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Sample records for anaerobic respiration isolation

  1. Halanaeroarchaeum sulfurireducens gen. nov., sp. nov., the first obligately anaerobic sulfur-respiring haloarchaeon, isolated from a hypersaline lake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Kublanov, Ilya V.; Yakimov, Mikhail M.; Rijpstra, W. Irene C; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic enrichments with acetate as electron donor and carbon source, and elemental sulfur as electron acceptor at 4 M NaCl using anaerobic sediments and brines from several hypersaline lakes in Kulunda Steppe (Altai, Russia) resulted in isolation in pure culture of four strains of obligately

  2. Tellurite-, tellurate-, and selenite-based anaerobic respiration by strain CM-3 isolated from gold mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltman, Chris; Piercey-Normore, Michele D; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2015-09-01

    The newly discovered strain CM-3, a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium from gold mine tailings of the Central Mine in Nopiming Provincial Park, Canada, is capable of dissimilatory anaerobic reduction of tellurite, tellurate, and selenite. CM-3 possesses very high level resistance to these oxides, both aerobically and anaerobically. During aerobic growth, tellurite and tellurate resistance was up to 1500 and 1000 µg/ml, respectively. In the presence of selenite, growth occurred at the highest concentration tested, 7000 µg/ml. Under anaerobic conditions, resistance was decreased to 800 µg/ml for the Te oxides; however, much like under aerobic conditions, growth with selenite still took place at 7000 µg/ml. In the absence of oxygen, CM-3 couples oxide reduction to an increase in biomass. Following an initial drop in viable cells, due to switching from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, there was an increase in CFU/ml greater than one order of magnitude in the presence of tellurite (6.6 × 10(3)-8.6 × 10(4) CFU/ml), tellurate (4.6 × 10(3)-1.4 × 10(5) CFU/ml), and selenite (2.7 × 10(5)-5.6 × 10(6) CFU/ml). A control culture without metalloid oxides showed a steady decrease in CFU/ml with no recovery. ATP production was also increased in the presence of each oxide, further indicating anaerobic respiration. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed a 99.0 % similarity of CM-3 to Pseudomonas reactans.

  3. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic...

  4. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic ...

  5. Isolation and Cultivation of Anaerobes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aragao Börner, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms play important roles in different biotechnological processes. Their complex metabolism and special cultivation requirements have led to less isolated representatives in comparison to their aerobic counterparts.In view of that, the isolation and cultivation of anaerobic...... microorganisms is still a promising venture, and conventional methodologies as well as considerations and modifications are presented here. An insight into new methodologies and devices as well as a discussion on future perspectives for the cultivation of anaerobes may open the prospects of the exploitation...... of these microorganisms as a source for biotechnology....

  6. Enrichment and isolation of Bacillus beveridgei sp. nov., a facultative anaerobic haloalkaliphile from Mono Lake, California, that respires oxyanions of tellurium, selenium, and arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baesman, S.M.; Stolz, J.F.; Kulp, T.R.; Oremland, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Mono Lake sediment slurries incubated with lactate and tellurite [Te(IV)] turned progressively black with time because of the precipitation of elemental tellurium [Te(0)]. An enrichment culture was established from these slurries that demonstrated Te(IV)-dependent growth. The enrichment was purified by picking isolated black colonies from lactate/Te(IV) agar plates, followed by repeated streaking and picking. The isolate, strain MLTeJB, grew in aqueous Te(IV)-medium if provided with a small amount of sterile solid phase material (e.g., agar plug; glass beads). Strain MLTeJB grew at high concentrations of Te(IV) (~8 mM) by oxidizing lactate to acetate plus formate, while reducing Te(IV) to Te(0). Other electron acceptors that were found to sustain growth were tellurate, selenate, selenite, arsenate, nitrate, nitrite, fumarate and oxygen. Notably, growth on arsenate, nitrate, nitrite and fumarate did not result in the accumulation of formate, implying that in these cases lactate was oxidized to acetate plus CO2. Strain MLTeJB is a low G + C Gram positive motile rod with pH, sodium, and temperature growth optima at 8.5-9.0, 0.5-1.5 M, and 40??C, respectively. The epithet Bacillus beveridgei strain MLTeJBT is proposed. ?? 2009 Springer.

  7. The effect of metabolic inhibitors on the development of respiration in anaerobically grown yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, W.; Tustanoff, E. R.

    1966-01-01

    1. Iodoacetate and fluoride did not prevent the development of respiration in aerobically grown yeast. 2. The effect of dinitrophenol suggested that phosphorylation developed simultaneously with respiration in anaerobically grown yeast, but the effect of oligomycin suggested that the phosphorylation and oxidation were not tightly coupled. 3. Inhibitors of electron transport showed that both the respiratory peak and the subsequent respiration were cyanide-sensitive, but the peak respiration was insensitive to antimycin. 4. Of the inhibitors of protein or RNA synthesis tested, only p-fluorophenylalanine inhibited the development of respiration. The results are not consistent with a new synthesis of mitochondria. 5. 2-Phenylethanol inhibited the development of respiration in anaerobically grown yeast and also yeast growth. Other inhibitors of DNA synthesis had no effect on the development of respiration. 6. The relevance of the results to mitochondrial morphogenesis is discussed. PMID:4290405

  8. ISOLATION OF OBLIGATELY ANAEROBIC PSYCHROPHILIC BACTERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SINCLAIR, N A; STOKES, J L

    1964-03-01

    Sinclair, N. A. (Washington State University, Pullman), and J. L. Stokes. Isolation of obligately anaerobic psychrophilic bacteria. J. Bacteriol. 87:562-565. 1964.-A total of 11 strains of strictly anaerobic psychrophilic bacteria have been isolated from soil, mud, and sewage. The organisms grow well at 0 C in liquid and on solid media, and grow only in the complete absence of oxygen. On the basis of shape, sporulation, flagellation, and strictly anaerobic growth, all of the organisms were classified as strains of Clostridium. Some of the biochemical properties of the strains and the effect of temperature on growth are described.

  9. Phenotypic characteristics of nitrate and 3-nitro-1-propionate-respiring enzymes of the obligate respiratory anaerobe Denitrobacterium detoxificans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic respiration consumes reducing equivalents generated during fermentation thereby contributing to the maintenance of hydrogen homoeostasis in gut ecosystems. Nitrate and 3-nitro-1-propionate (NPA) are acceptors used by the nonfermentative, rumen anaerobe, Denitrobacterium detoxificans, whic...

  10. Anaerobic respiration: In vitro efficacy of Nitazoxanide against mitochondriate Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Farooq, Maria; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic protist pathogen that is responsible for serious human and animal infection. Being one of the most frequently isolated protists from the environment, it is likely that it readily encounters microaerophilic environments. For respiration under anaerobic or low oxygen conditions in several amitochondriate protists, decarboxylation of pyruvate is catalyzed by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase instead of pyruvate dehydrogenase. In support, Nitazoxanide, an inhibitor of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, is effective and non-mutagenic clinically against a range of amitochondriate protists, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis. The overall aim of the present study was to determine in vitro efficacy of Nitazoxanide against Acanthamoeba castellanii. At micromolar concentrations, the findings revealed that Nitazoxanide neither affected A. castellanii growth or viability nor amoeba-mediated host cell monolayer damage in vitro or extracellular proteolytic activities. Similarly, microaerophilic conditions alone had no significant effects. In contrast, microaerophilic conditions together with Nitazoxanide showed amoebicidal effects and inhibited A. castellanii-mediated host cell monolayer damage as well as extracellular proteases. Using encystation assays, it was observed that Nitazoxanide inhibited trophozoite transformation into cysts both under aerophilic and microaerophilic conditions. Furthermore, pre-treatment of cysts with Nitazoxanide inhibited A. castellanii excystation. These findings are important in the identification of potential targets that could be useful against parasite-specific respiration as well as to understand the basic biology of the life cycle of Acanthamoeba. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cholera Toxin Production Induced upon Anaerobic Respiration is Suppressed by Glucose Fermentation in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Kang-Mu; Bari, Wasimul; Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, Hye Jin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2016-03-01

    The causative agent of pandemic cholera, Vibrio cholerae, infects the anaerobic environment of the human intestine. Production of cholera toxin (CT), a major virulence factor of V. cholerae, is highly induced during anaerobic respiration with trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as an alternative electron acceptor. However, the molecular mechanism of TMAO-stimulated CT production is not fully understood. Herein, we reveal that CT production during anaerobic TMAO respiration is affected by glucose fermentation. When the seventh pandemic V. cholerae O1 strain N16961 was grown with TMAO and additional glucose, CT production was markedly reduced. Furthermore, an N16961 Δcrp mutant, devoid of cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), was defective in CT production during growth by anaerobic TMAO respiration, further suggesting a role of glucose metabolism in regulating TMAO-mediated CT production. TMAO reductase activity was noticeably decreased when grown together with glucose or by mutation of the crp gene. A CRP binding region was identified in the promoter region of the torD gene, which encodes a structural subunit of the TMAO reductase. Gel shift assays further confirmed the binding of purified CRP to the torD promoter sequence. Together, our results suggest that the bacterial ability to respire using TMAO is controlled by CRP, whose activity is dependent on glucose availability. Our results reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of major virulence factor production by V. cholerae under anaerobic growth conditions.

  12. Contribution of Cell Elongation to the Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during Anaerobic Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yongjin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative bacterium of clinical importance, forms more robust biofilm during anaerobic respiration, a mode of growth presumed to occur in abnormally thickened mucus layer lining the cystic fibrosis (CF) patient airway. However, molecular basis behind this anaerobiosis-triggered robust biofilm formation is not clearly defined yet. Here, we identified a morphological change naturally accompanied by anaerobic respiration in P. aeruginosa and investigated its effect on the biofilm formation in vitro. A standard laboratory strain, PAO1 was highly elongated during anaerobic respiration compared with bacteria grown aerobically. Microscopic analysis demonstrated that cell elongation likely occurred as a consequence of defective cell division. Cell elongation was dependent on the presence of nitrite reductase (NIR) that reduces nitrite (NO2 −) to nitric oxide (NO) and was repressed in PAO1 in the presence of carboxy-PTIO, a NO antagonist, demonstrating that cell elongation involves a process to respond to NO, a spontaneous byproduct of the anaerobic respiration. Importantly, the non-elongated NIR-deficient mutant failed to form biofilm, while a mutant of nitrate reductase (NAR) and wild type PAO1, both of which were highly elongated, formed robust biofilm. Taken together, our data reveal a role of previously undescribed cell biological event in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and suggest NIR as a key player involved in such process. PMID:21267455

  13. Rethinking anaerobic As(III) oxidation in filters: Effect of indigenous nitrate respirers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jinli; Du, Jingjing; Tian, Haixia; Chan, Tingshan; Jing, Chuanyong

    2018-04-01

    Microorganisms play a key role in the redox transformation of arsenic (As) in aquifers. In this study, the impact of indigenous bacteria, especially the prevailing nitrate respirers, on arsenite (As(III)) oxidation was explored during groundwater filtration using granular TiO 2 and subsequent spent TiO 2 anaerobic landfill. X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy analysis showed As(III) oxidation (46% in 10 days) in the presence of nitrate in the simulated anaerobic landfills. Meanwhile, iron (Fe) species on the spent TiO 2 were dominated by amorphous ferric arsenate, ferrihydrite and goethite. The Fe phase showed no change during the anaerobic landfill incubation. Batch incubation experiments implied that the indigenous bacteria completely oxidized As(III) to arsenate (As(V)) in 10 days using nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. The bacterial community analysis indicated that various kinds of microbial species exist in groundwater matrix. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum, with Hydrogenophaga (34%), Limnohabitans (16%), and Simplicispira (7%) as the major bacterial genera. The nitrate respirers especially from the Hydrogenophaga genus anaerobically oxidized As(III) using nitrate as an electron acceptor instead of oxygen. Our study implied that microbes can facilitate the groundwater As oxidation using nitrate on the adsorptive media. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Distinct and diverse anaerobic respiration of methanogenic community in response to MnO2nanoparticles in anaerobic digester sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Qiao, Sen; Yu, Cong; Tian, Yihui; Yang, Yue; Zhou, Jiti

    2017-10-15

    Recently, the influence of metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) on methanogenesis in anaerobic digestion has drawn much attention, however, the changes in NPs and functioning consortia within the methanogenic community are usually not investigated. Therefore, the methanogenesis performance, NPs transformation and methanogenic community development in anaerobic digester sludge under MnO 2 NP supplementation were demonstrated in this study. MnO 2 NPs (400 mg/gVSS) stimulated the methane (CH 4 ) yield by 42% for a final CH 4 proportion of 81.8% of the total gas production. Meanwhile, the coenzyme F 420 and INT-electron transport system activities showed positive correlation with MnO 2 concentration. Microbial Mn reduction and oxidation occurred in conjunction with methanogenesis, resulting in transformation of the shape of the MnO 2 NPs from wire-like to globular particles. Microbial community analysis indicated that the relative abundances of genera Methanobacterium, Methanosaeta, and Methanosarcina were higher in the presence of MnO 2 NPs. Moreover, a new and different crucial synergy within the methanogenic community was formed with low-abundance consortia driving Mn respiration coupled to methanogenesis in anaerobic digestion. To our knowledge, this is the first report on transformation of metal oxides NPs combined with syntrophic community development in studies focusing on methanogenesis in response to NPs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Anaerobic Respiration Using a Complete Oxidative TCA Cycle Drives Multicellular Swarming in Proteus mirabilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alteri, Christopher J.; Himpsl, Stephanie D.; Engstrom, Michael D.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteus mirabilis rapidly migrates across surfaces using a periodic developmental process of differentiation alternating between short swimmer cells and elongated hyperflagellated swarmer cells. To undergo this vigorous flagellum-mediated motility, bacteria must generate a substantial proton gradient across their cytoplasmic membranes by using available energy pathways. We sought to identify the link between energy pathways and swarming differentiation by examining the behavior of defined central metabolism mutants. Mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (fumC and sdhB mutants) caused altered patterns of swarming periodicity, suggesting an aerobic pathway. Surprisingly, the wild-type strain swarmed on agar containing sodium azide, which poisons aerobic respiration; the fumC TCA cycle mutant, however, was unable to swarm on azide. To identify other contributing energy pathways, we screened transposon mutants for loss of swarming on sodium azide and found insertions in the following genes that involved fumarate metabolism or respiration: hybB, encoding hydrogenase; fumC, encoding fumarase; argH, encoding argininosuccinate lyase (generates fumarate); and a quinone hydroxylase gene. These findings validated the screen and suggested involvement of anaerobic electron transport chain components. Abnormal swarming periodicity of fumC and sdhB mutants was associated with the excretion of reduced acidic fermentation end products. Bacteria lacking SdhB were rescued to wild-type pH and periodicity by providing fumarate, independent of carbon source but dependent on oxygen, while fumC mutants were rescued by glycerol, independent of fumarate only under anaerobic conditions. These findings link multicellular swarming patterns with fumarate metabolism and membrane electron transport using a previously unappreciated configuration of both aerobic and anaerobic respiratory chain components. PMID:23111869

  16. Microbial metal reduction by members of the genus Shewanella: novel strategies for anaerobic respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dichristina, Thomas; Bates, David J.; Burns, Justin L.; Dale, Jason R.; Payne, Amanda N.

    2006-01-01

    Metal-reducing members of the genus Shewanella are important components of the microbial community residing in redox-stratified freshwater and marine environments. Metal-reducing gram-negative bacteria such as Shewanella, however, are presented with a unique physiological challenge: they are required to respire anaerobically on terminal electron acceptors which are either highly insoluble (Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides) and reduced to soluble end-products or highly soluble (U(VI) and Tc(VII)) and reduced to insoluble end-products. To overcome physiological problems associated with metal solubility, metal-respiring Shewanella are postulated to employ a variety of novel respiratory strategies not found in other gram-negative bacteria which respire on soluble electron acceptors such as O2, NO3 and SO4. The following chapter highlights the latest findings on the molecular mechanism of Fe(III), U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction by Shewanella, with particular emphasis on electron transport chain physiology.

  17. NarK is a nitrite-extrusion system involved in anaerobic nitrate respiration by Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rowe, John J.; Ubbink-Kok, Trees; Molenaar, Douwe; Konings, Wilhelmus; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    Escherichia coli can use nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration. A polytopic membrane protein, termed NarK, has been implicated in nitrate uptake and nitrite excretion and is thought to function as a nitrate/nitrite antiporter. The longest-lived radioactive isotope of

  18. ANAEROBIC GLYCOLYSIS AND POSTANOXIC RECOVERY OF RESPIRATION OF RAT CORTICAL SYNAPTOSOMES ARE REDUCED BY SYNAPTOSOMAL SODIUM LOAD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GLEITZ, J; BEILE, A; KHAN, S; WILFFERT, B; TEGTMEIER, F

    1993-01-01

    Synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex were used to study the effect of veratridine-induced Na+ load on postanoxic recovery of respiration and on aerobic and anaerobic ATP turnover, calculated from rates of oxygen consumption and lactate production. Non-stimulated synaptosomes: after onset of anoxia

  19. Systems-level analysis of Escherichia coli response to silver nanoparticles: the roles of anaerobic respiration in microbial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huamao; Lo, Tat-Ming; Sitompul, Johnner; Chang, Matthew Wook

    2012-08-10

    Despite extensive use of silver nanoparticles for antimicrobial applications, cellular mechanisms underlying microbial response to silver nanoparticles remain to be further elucidated at the systems level. Here, we report systems-level response of Escherichia coli to silver nanoparticles using transcriptome-based biochemical and phenotype assays. Notably, we provided the evidence that anaerobic respiration is induced upon exposure to silver nanoparticles. Further we showed that anaerobic respiration-related regulators and enzymes play an important role in E. coli resistance to silver nanoparticles. In particular, our results suggest that arcA is essential for resistance against silver NPs and the deletion of fnr, fdnH and narH significantly increases the resistance. We envision that this study offers novel insights into modes of antimicrobial action of silver nanoparticles, and cellular mechanisms contributing to the development of microbial resistance to silver nanoparticles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, D.; Tu, Q.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

  1. Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, D.; Tu, Q.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

  2. Isolation of Clostridium tetani from anaerobic empyema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayall, B C; Snashall, E A; Peel, M M

    1998-11-01

    We report the isolation of Clostridium tetani (along with Fusobacterium mortiferum) from empyema pus. The patient, a 68 year old retired farmer from rural NSW, had recently undergone cholecystectomy, had heart failure and developed an empyema. He improved after drainage of the empyema and penicillin therapy, but died suddenly during convalescence.

  3. Isolation and characterization of respiration-deficient mutants from the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatab, M A; Whittaker, P A

    1992-04-01

    The isolation of several respiration deficient mutants of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans is described. These show greatly reduced respiration rates, loss of cytochromes aa3 and b, and reduced growth rates. All of the mutants had lost the ability to assimilate a wide range of carbon sources. Ultrastructural studies showed reduced development of mitochondrial cristae in the mutants. The mutants can be divided into three classes depending on their respiration responses to the addition of cyanide.

  4. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-07-01

    Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics.

  5. Iron and manganese in anaerobic respiration: environmental significance, physiology, and regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealson, K. H.; Saffarini, D.

    1994-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron and/or manganese reduction is known to occur in several organisms, including anaerobic sulfur-reducing organisms such as Geobacter metallireducens or Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, and facultative aerobes such as Shewanella putrefaciens. These bacteria couple both carbon oxidation and growth to the reduction of these metals, and inhibitor and competition experiments suggest that Mn(IV) and Fe(III) are efficient electron acceptors similar to nitrate in redox abilities and capable of out-competing electron acceptors of lower potential, such as sulfate (sulfate reduction) or CO2 (methanogenesis). Field studies of iron and/or manganese reduction suggest that organisms with such metabolic abilities play important roles in coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to metal reduction under anaerobic conditions. Because both iron and manganese oxides are solids or colloids, they tend to settle downward in aquatic environments, providing a physical mechanism for the movement of oxidizing potential into anoxic zones. The resulting biogeochemical metal cycles have a strong impact on many other elements including carbon, sulfur, phosphorous, and trace metals.

  6. Moorella stamsii sp. nov., a new anaerobic thermophilic hydrogenogenic carboxydotroph isolated from digester sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves, J.I.; Gelder, van A.H.; Alves, M.M.; Sousa, D.Z.; Plugge, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    A novel anaerobic, thermophilic, carbon monoxide-utilizing bacterium, strain E3-O, was isolated from anaerobic sludge of a municipal solid waste digester. Cells were straight rods, 0.6 to 1µm in diameter and 2 to 3 µm in length, growing as single cells or in pairs. Cells formed round terminal

  7. Frequency of resistance in obligate anaerobic bacteria isolated from dogs, cats, and horses to antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawhon, S D; Taylor, A; Fajt, V R

    2013-11-01

    Clinical specimens from dogs, cats, and horses were examined for the presence of obligate anaerobic bacteria. Of 4,018 specimens cultured, 368 yielded 606 isolates of obligate anaerobic bacteria (248 from dogs, 50 from cats, and 308 from horses). There were 100 specimens from 94 animals from which only anaerobes were isolated (25 dogs, 8 cats, and 61 horses). The most common sites tested were abdominal fluid (dogs and cats) and intestinal contents (horses). The most common microorganism isolated from dogs, cats, and horses was Clostridium perfringens (75, 13, and101 isolates, respectively). The MICs of amoxicillin with clavulanate, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, metronidazole, and penicillin were determined using a gradient endpoint method for anaerobes. Isolates collected at necropsy were not tested for antimicrobial susceptibility unless so requested by the clinician. There were 1/145 isolates tested that were resistant to amoxicillin-clavulanate (resistance breakpoint ≥ 16/8 μg/ml), 7/77 isolates tested were resistant to ampicillin (resistance breakpoint ≥ 2 μg/ml), 4/242 isolates tested were resistant to chloramphenicol (resistance breakpoint ≥ 32 μg/ml), 12/158 isolates tested were resistant to clindamycin (resistance breakpoint ≥ 8 μg/ml), 10/247 isolates tested were resistant to metronidazole (resistance breakpoint ≥ 32 μg/ml), and 54/243 isolates tested were resistant to penicillin (resistance breakpoint ≥ 2 μg/ml). These data suggest that anaerobes are generally susceptible to antimicrobial drugs in vitro.

  8. Antimicrobial resistance determinants among anaerobic bacteria isolated from footrot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, María; García, Nuria; Ayala, Juan Alfonso; Vadillo, Santiago; Píriz, Segundo; Quesada, Alberto

    2012-05-25

    Antibiotic resistance has been evaluated among 36 Gram negative and anaerobic bacilli (10 Bacteroides, 11 Prevotella, 7 Porphyromonas and 8 Fusobacterium strains) isolated from clinical cases of caprine and ovine footrot (necrotic pododermatitis). The initial analysis on this bacterial consortium evaluates the relationships existing among antimicrobial resistance determinants, phenotype expression and mobilization potential. The Bacteroides strains were generally resistant to penicillins, first-generation cephalosporins, tetracycline and erythromycin, and expressed low level of β-lactamase activity. The main determinants found among the Bacteroides strains were cepA and tetQ genes, conferring resistance to β-lactams and tetracycline, respectively. A general susceptibility to β-lactams was shown for most Prevotella, Porphyromonas and Fusobacterium strains, where none of the β-lactamase genes described in Bacteroides was detected. Resistance to tetracycline and/or erythromycin was found among the three bacterial groups. Although tetQ genes were detected for several Prevotella and Porphyromonas strains, a unique ermF positive was revealed among Prevotella strains. The expression of resistance markers was not related with the polymorphism of their coding sequences. However, the finding of sequence signatures for conjugative transposons in the vicinities of tetQ and ermF suggests a mobilization potential that might have contributed to the spread of antimicrobial resistance genes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Genomic Analysis of Anaerobic Respiration in the Archaeon Halobacterium sp. Strain NRC-1: Dimethyl Sulfoxide and Trimethylamine N-Oxide as Terminal Electron Acceptors†

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Jochen A.; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated anaerobic respiration of the archaeal model organism Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1 by using phenotypic and genetic analysis, bioinformatics, and transcriptome analysis. NRC-1 was found to grow on either dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as the sole terminal electron acceptor, with a doubling time of 1 day. An operon, dmsREABCD, encoding a putative regulatory protein, DmsR, a molybdopterin oxidoreductase of the DMSO reductase family (DmsEABC), and...

  10. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria in Ontario, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand-Austin, Alex; Rawte, Prasad; Toye, Baldwin; Jamieson, Frances B; Farrell, David J; Patel, Samir N

    2014-08-01

    The local epidemiology of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in anaerobic bacteria is important in guiding the empiric treatment of infections. However, susceptibility data are very limited on anaerobic organisms, particularly among non-Bacteroides organisms. To determine susceptibility profiles of clinically-significant anaerobic bacteria in Ontario Canada, anaerobic isolates from sterile sites submitted to Public Health Ontario Laboratory (PHOL) for identification and susceptibility testing were included in this study. Using the E-test method, isolates were tested for various antimicrobials including, penicillin, cefoxitin, clindamycin, meropenem, piperacillin-tazobactam and metronidazole. The MIC results were interpreted based on guidelines published by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Of 2527 anaerobic isolates submitted to PHOL, 1412 were either from sterile sites or bronchial lavage, and underwent susceptibility testing. Among Bacteroides fragilis, 98.2%, 24.7%, 1.6%, and 1.2% were resistant to penicillin, clindamycin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and metronidazole, respectively. Clostridium perfringens was universally susceptible to penicillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, and meropenem, whereas 14.2% of other Clostridium spp. were resistant to penicillin. Among Gram-positive anaerobes, Actinomyces spp., Parvimonas micra and Propionibacterium spp. were universally susceptible to β-lactams. Eggerthella spp., Collinsella spp., and Eubacterium spp. showed variable resistance to penicillin. Among Gram-negative anaerobes, Fusobacterium spp., Prevotella spp., and Veillonella spp. showed high resistance to penicillin but were universally susceptible to meropenem and piperacillin-tazobactam. The detection of metronidazole resistant B. fragilis is concerning as occurrence of these isolates is extremely rare. These data highlight the importance of ongoing surveillance to provide clinically relevant information to clinicians for empiric management of

  11. Epidemiology and Antimicrobial Susceptibilities of Wound Isolates of Obligate Anaerobes from Combat Casualties

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Brian K.; Mende, Katrin; Weintrob, Amy C.; Beckius, Miriam L.; Zera, Wendy C.; Lu, Dan; Bradley, William; Tribble, David R.; Schnaubelt, Elizabeth R.; Murray, Clinton K.

    2015-01-01

    Data from recent conflicts related to war wounds and obligate anaerobes are limited. We define the epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of obligate anaerobes from Iraq and Afghanistan casualties (6/2009–12/2013), as well as their association with clinical outcomes. Susceptibility against eleven antibiotics (7 classes) was tested. Overall, 59 patients had 119 obligate anaerobes identified (83 were first isolates). Obligate anaerobes were isolated 7–13 days post-injury, primarily from lower extremity wounds (43%), and were largely Bacteroides spp. (42%) and Clostridium spp. (19%). Patients with pelvic wounds were more likely to have Bacteroides spp. and concomitant resistant gram-negative aerobes. Seventy-three percent of isolates were resistant to ≥1 antimicrobials. Bacteroides spp. demonstrated the most resistance (16% of first isolates). Patients with resistant isolates had similar outcomes to those with susceptible strains. Serial recovery of isolates occurred in 15% of patients and was significantly associated with isolation of Bacteroides spp., along with resistant gram-negative aerobes. PMID:26607420

  12. PCR-based detection of resistance genes in anaerobic bacteria isolated from intra-abdominal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Chau Minh; Tanaka, Kaori; Watanabe, Kunitomo

    2013-04-01

    Little information is available on the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes in anaerobes in Japan. To understand the background of antimicrobial resistance in anaerobes involved in intra-abdominal infections, we investigated the distribution of eight antimicrobial resistance genes (cepA, cfiA, cfxA, ermF, ermB, mefA, tetQ, and nim) and a mutation in the gyrA gene in a total of 152 organisms (Bacteroides spp., Prevotella spp., Fusobacterium spp., Porphyromonas spp., Bilophila wadsworthia, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Veillonella spp., gram-positive cocci, and non-spore-forming gram-positive bacilli) isolated between 2003 and 2004 in Japan. The cepA gene was distributed primarily in Bacteroides fragilis. Gene cfxA was detected in about 9 % of the Bacteroides isolates and 75 % of the Prevotella spp. isolates and did not appear to contribute to cephamycin resistance. Two strains of B. fragilis contained the metallo-β-lactamase gene cfiA, but they did not produce the protein product. Gene tetQ was detected in about 81, 44, and 63 % of B. fragilis isolates, other Bacteroides spp., and Prevotella spp. isolates, respectively. The ermF gene was detected in 25, 13, 56, 64, and 16 % of Bacteroides spp., Prevotella spp., Fusobacterium spp., B. wadsworthia, and anaerobic cocci, respectively. Gene mefA was found in only 10 % of the B. fragilis strains and 3 % of the non-B. fragilis strains. Genes nim and ermB were not detected in any isolate. Substitution at position 82 (Ser to Phe) in gyrA was detected in B. fragilis isolates that were less susceptible or resistant to moxifloxacin. This study is the first report on the distribution of resistance genes in anaerobes isolated from intra-abdominal infections in Japan. We expect that the results might help in understanding the resistance mechanisms of specific anaerobes.

  13. Biological conversion of biogas to methanol using methanotrophs isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Johnathon P; Ge, Xumeng; Li, Yueh-Fen; Yu, Zhongtang; Li, Yebo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate methanotrophs (methane oxidizing bacteria) that can directly convert biogas produced at a commercial anaerobic digestion (AD) facility to methanol. A methanotrophic bacterium was isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate. The isolate had characteristics comparable to obligate methanotrophs from the genus Methylocaldum. This newly isolated methanotroph grew on biogas or purified CH4 and successfully converted biogas from AD to methanol. Methanol production was achieved using several methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) inhibitors and formate as an electron donor. The isolate also produced methanol using phosphate with no electron donor or using formate with no MDH inhibitor. The maximum methanol concentration (0.43±0.00gL(-1)) and 48-h CH4 to methanol conversion (25.5±1.1%) were achieved using biogas as substrate and a growth medium containing 50mM phosphate and 80mM formate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Engineering a synthetic anaerobic respiration for reduction of xylose to xylitol using NADH output of glucose catabolism by Escherichia coli AI21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Andrew; Garza, Erin; Manow, Ryan; Wang, Jinhua; Gao, Yuanyuan; Grayburn, Scott; Zhou, Shengde

    2016-04-16

    Anaerobic rather than aerobic fermentation is preferred for conversion of biomass derived sugars to high value redox-neutral and reduced commodities. This will likely result in a higher yield of substrate to product conversion and decrease production cost since substrate often accounts for a significant portion of the overall cost. To this goal, metabolic pathway engineering has been used to optimize substrate carbon flow to target products. This approach works well for the production of redox neutral products such as lactic acid from redox neutral sugars using the reducing power NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced) generated from glycolysis (2 NADH per glucose equivalent). Nevertheless, greater than two NADH per glucose catabolized is needed for the production of reduced products (such as xylitol) from redox neutral sugars by anaerobic fermentation. The Escherichia coli strain AI05 (ΔfrdBC ΔldhA ΔackA Δ(focA-pflB) ΔadhE ΔptsG ΔpdhR::pflBp 6-(aceEF-lpd)), previously engineered for reduction of xylose to xylitol using reducing power (NADH equivalent) of glucose catabolism, was further engineered by 1) deleting xylAB operon (encoding for xylose isomerase and xylulokinase) to prevent xylose from entering the pentose phosphate pathway; 2) anaerobically expressing the sdhCDAB-sucABCD operon (encoding for succinate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA synthetase) to enable an anaerobically functional tricarboxcylic acid cycle with a theoretical 10 NAD(P)H equivalent per glucose catabolized. These reducing equivalents can be oxidized by synthetic respiration via xylose reduction, producing xylitol. The resulting strain, AI21 (pAI02), achieved a 96 % xylose to xylitol conversion, with a yield of 6 xylitol per glucose catabolized (molar yield of xylitol per glucose consumed (YRPG) = 6). This represents a 33 % improvement in xylose to xylitol conversion, and a 63 % increase in xylitol yield per glucose catabolized over

  15. Transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways, alternative respiration and enterotoxin genes in anaerobic growth of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, van der M.; Abee, T.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To assess genes specifically activated during anaerobic growth that are involved in metabolism and pathogenesis of the foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus. Methods and Results: Growth under anaerobic conditions in Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth revealed a reduced growth rate and lower yield

  16. Isolation and characterization of acetate-utilizing anaerobes from a freshwater sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, J.C.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Acetate-degrading anaerobic microorganisms in freshwater sediment were quantified by the most probable number technique. From the highest dilutions a methanogenic, a sulfate-reducing, and a nitrate-reducing microorganism were isolated with acetate as substrate. The methanogen (culture AMPB-Zg) was

  17. Isolation, characterization, and ecology of sulfur-respiring crenarchaea inhabiting acid-sulfate-chloride-containing geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Eric S; Jackson, Robert A; Encarnacion, Gem; Zahn, James A; Beard, Trevor; Leavitt, William D; Pi, Yundan; Zhang, Chuanlun L; Pearson, Ann; Geesey, Gill G

    2007-10-01

    Elemental sulfur (S(0)) is associated with many geochemically diverse hot springs, yet little is known about the phylogeny, physiology, and ecology of the organisms involved in its cycling. Here we report the isolation, characterization, and ecology of two novel, S(0)-reducing Crenarchaea from an acid geothermal spring referred to as Dragon Spring. Isolate 18U65 grows optimally at 70 to 72 degrees C and at pH 2.5 to 3.0, while isolate 18D70 grows optimally at 81 degrees C and pH 3.0. Both isolates are chemoorganotrophs, dependent on complex peptide-containing carbon sources, S(0), and anaerobic conditions for respiration-dependent growth. Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) containing four to six cyclopentyl rings were present in the lipid fraction of isolates 18U65 and 18D70. Physiological characterization suggests that the isolates are adapted to the physicochemical conditions of Dragon Spring and can utilize the natural organic matter in the spring as a carbon and energy source. Quantitative PCR analysis of 16S rRNA genes associated with the S(0) flocs recovered from several acid geothermal springs using isolate-specific primers indicates that these two populations together represent 17 to 37% of the floc-associated DNA. The physiological characteristics of isolates 18U65 and 18D70 are consistent with their potential widespread distribution and putative role in the cycling of sulfur in acid geothermal springs throughout the Yellowstone National Park geothermal complex. Based on phenotypic and genetic characterization, the designations Caldisphaera draconis sp. nov. and Acidilobus sulfurireducens sp. nov. are proposed for isolates 18U65 and 18D70, respectively.

  18. Buwchfawromyces eastonii gen. nov., sp. nov.: a new anaerobic fungus (Neocallimastigomycota isolated from buffalo faeces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Martin Callaghan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The novel anaerobic fungus Buwchfawromyces eastonii gen. nov., sp. nov., belonging to order Neocallimastigales (phylum Neocallimastigomycota is described. Morphologically similar to Piromyces but genetically quite distinct, this fungus (isolate GE09 was first isolated from buffalo faeces in west Wales and then subsequently isolated from sheep, cattle and horse in the same area. Phylogenetic analysis of LSU and ITS sequence confirmed that B. eastonii isolates formed a distinct clade close to the polycentric Anaeromyces spp. The morphology of GE09 is monocentric with monoflagellate zoospores. However, the sporangial stalk (sporangiophore is often distinctly swollen and the proximal regions of the rhizoidal system twisted in appearance.

  19. Transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways, alternative respiration and enterotoxin genes in anaerobic growth of Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, M; Abee, T

    2009-09-01

    To assess genes specifically activated during anaerobic growth that are involved in metabolism and pathogenesis of the foodborne pathogen Bacillus cereus. Growth under anaerobic conditions in Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth revealed a reduced growth rate and lower yield as compared to growth under aerobic conditions. Subsequently, comparative transcriptome analysis showed specific genes induced under anaerobic conditions. These included novel genes identified for anaerobic growth of B. cereus, encoding metabolic pathways, such as the arginine deiminase pathway (ArcABDC), formate dehydrogenase (FdhF) and pyruvate formate lyase (Pfl), and alternative respiratory proteins, such as arsenate reductases. Notably, haemolytic enzyme encoding genes were induced during anaerobic growth, and enterotoxin genes were induced in high cell density transition and stationary phases of aerobic cultures. These data point to induction of stress adaptation and pathogenicity factors and rearrangements of expression of metabolic pathways in response to oxygen limitations in B. cereus. The reported changes in gene expression show that the foodborne pathogen B. cereus can adjust to anaerobic conditions, such as encountered in the human GI-tract.

  20. Isolation and identification of anaerobic organisms from the male and female urogenital tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, S

    1983-06-01

    Since Bacteroides spp may play an important role together with Gardnerella vaginalis in the pathogenesis of non-specific vaginitis and balanoposthitis, anaerobic organisms were isolated and identified from 34 female and 20 male patients attending a department of genitourinary medicine, and the results compared with the clinical findings and the presence of other routinely isolated pathogens. Twenty-three different organisms were recovered from 13 of the 20 men; of these organisms, 20 were of the Bacteroides spp. Most isolates were of the B melaninogenicus/oralis group, which forms part of the commensal vaginal flora in women. A definite association between the presence of anaerobes and other pathogens needs to be firmly established, as this obviously causes important complications in treating these conditions.

  1. The effect of 2,4-D and ABA on respiration of isolated mitochondria from maize coleoptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Raczek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility of isolated maize mitochondria to the growth regulators: 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D and abscisic acid (ABA was studied. It was found that 2,4-D (a herbicide inhibits respiration in mitochondria, as do other herbicides or phenoxy-acids. In the entire range of concentrations used (10-3-10-9 M, 2,4-D introduced into the medium before the respiration reaction was begun, or during it, limited the intensity of succinate oxidation. It did not, however, markedly change phosphorylation properties. Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation took place only after preincubation of mitochondria with 2,4-D and was the result of the destruction of mitochondrial membranes. ABA (a growth inhibitor of plants caused a similar response in maize mitochondria. Preincubation of mitochondria with ABA lead to the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. Whereas ABA introduced during respiration (state 4 respiration or before its onset, lowered the oxidative potential of mitochondria, it also changed the pattern of state 4-3-4 transition after addition of ADP (it was especially visible at high concentrations, which indicates that the coupling of oxidative phosphorylation with the respiratory chain has faltered. It seems that this negative effect of 2,4-D and ABA on respiration of isolated maize mitochondria is connected with the inhibitory effect of these growth regulators on the growth of maize coleoptiles. Interference in the organization mitochondrial membranes results in a lowered supply of ATP - a source of energy needed in elongation processes.

  2. Chitinolytic enzymes from bacterium inhabiting human gastrointestinal tract - critical parameters of protein isolation from anaerobic culture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dušková, Jarmila; Tishchenko, Galina; Ponomareva, E.; Šimůnek, Jiří; Koppová, Ingrid; Skálová, Tereza; Štěpánková, Andrea; Hašek, Jindřich; Dohnálek, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2011), s. 261-263 ISSN 0001-527X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/09/1407; GA ČR GA305/07/1073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : chitinolytic enzymes * anaerobic cultivation * protein isolation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.491, year: 2011 http://www.actabp.pl/pdf/2_2011/261.pdf

  3. Isolation of a tannic acid-degrading Streptococcus sp. from an anaerobic shea cake digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitiema, L W; Dianou, D; Simpore, J; Karou, S D; Savadogo, P W; Traore, A S

    2010-01-01

    An anaerobic digester fed with shea cake rich in tannins and phenolic compounds rich-shea cake and previously inoculated with anaerobic sludge from the pit of a slaughterhouse, enabled six months acclimatization of the bacteria to aromatic compounds. Afterwards, digester waste water samples were subject to successive culture on media with 1 g L(-1) tannic acid allowing the isolation of a bacterial strain coded AB. Strain AB was facultatively anaerobic, mesophilic, non-motile, non-sporulating, catalase and oxidase negative bacterium, namely strain AB, was isolated from an anaerobic digester fed with shea cake rich in tannins and phenolic compounds, after inoculation with anaerobic sludge from the pit of a slaughterhouse and enrichment on tannic acid. The coccoid cells occurred in pair, short or long chains and stained Gram-positive. Strain AB fermented a wide range of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, galactose, raffinose, arabinose, sucrose, maltose, lactose, starch and cellulose. Optimum growth occurred with glucose and tannic acid at 37 degrees C and pH 8. The pH, temperature and salt concentration for growth ranged from 5 to 9, 20 to 45 degrees C and 0 to 15 g L(-1), respectively. Strain AB converted tannic acid to gallic acid. These features were similar to those of the Streptococcus genus. The determination of tannic acid hydrolysis end products, ability to utilize various organic acids, alcohols and peptides, GC% of the DNA, the sequencing of 16S rRNA gene and DNA-DNA hybridization will permit to confirm this affiliation and to determine the species.

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria in a University Hospital Centre Split, Croatia in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Anita; Rubic, Zana; Dogas, Varja; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Radic, Marina; Tonkic, Marija

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic bacteria play a significant role in many endogenous polymicrobial infections. Since antimicrobial resistance among anaerobes has increased worldwide, it is useful to provide local susceptibility data to guide empirical therapy. The present study reports recent data on the susceptibility of clinically relevant anaerobes in a University Hospital Centre (UHC) Split, Croatia. A total of 63 Gram-negative and 59 Gram-positive anaerobic clinical isolates from various body sites were consecutively collected from January to December 2013. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using standardized methods and interpreted using EUCAST criteria. Patient's clinical and demographic data were recorded by clinical microbiologist. Among 35 isolates of Bacteroides spp., 97.1% were resistant to penicillin (PCN), 5.7% to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), 8.6% to piperacillin/tazobactam (TZP), 29.0% to clindamycin (CLI) and 2.9% to metronidazole (MZ). Percentages of susceptible strains to imipenem (IPM), meropenem (MEM) and ertapenem (ETP) were 94.3. Resistance of other Gram-negative bacilli was 76.0% to PCN, 8.0% to AMC, 12.0% to TZP, 28.0% to CLI and 8% to MZ. All other Gram-negative strains were fully susceptible to MEM and ETP, while 96.0% were susceptible to IPM. Clostridium spp. isolates were 100% susceptible to all tested antibiotics except to CLI (two of four tested isolates were resistant). Propionibacterium spp. showed resistance to CLI in 4.3%, while 100% were resistant to MZ. Among other Gram-positive bacilli, 18.2% were resistant to PCN, 9.1% to CLI and 54.5% to MZ, while 81.8% of isolates were susceptible to carbapenems. Gram-positive cocci were 100% susceptible to all tested antimicrobials except to MZ, where 28.6% of resistant strains were recorded. Abdomen was the most common source of isolates (82.5%). The most prevalent types of infection were abscess (22.1%), sepsis (14.8%), appendicitis (13.9%) and peritonitis (6.6%). Twenty four patients (19

  5. Anaerobic gut fungi: Advances in isolation, culture, and cellulolytic enzyme discovery for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haitjema, Charles H; Solomon, Kevin V; Henske, John K; Theodorou, Michael K; O'Malley, Michelle A

    2014-08-01

    Anaerobic gut fungi are an early branching family of fungi that are commonly found in the digestive tract of ruminants and monogastric herbivores. It is becoming increasingly clear that they are the primary colonizers of ingested plant biomass, and that they significantly contribute to the decomposition of plant biomass into fermentable sugars. As such, anaerobic fungi harbor a rich reservoir of undiscovered cellulolytic enzymes and enzyme complexes that can potentially transform the conversion of lignocellulose into bioenergy products. Despite their unique evolutionary history and cellulolytic activity, few species have been isolated and studied in great detail. As a result, their life cycle, cellular physiology, genetics, and cellulolytic metabolism remain poorly understood compared to aerobic fungi. To help address this limitation, this review briefly summarizes the current body of knowledge pertaining to anaerobic fungal biology, and describes progress made in the isolation, cultivation, molecular characterization, and long-term preservation of these microbes. We also discuss recent cellulase- and cellulosome-discovery efforts from gut fungi, and how these interesting, non-model microbes could be further adapted for biotechnology applications. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Biofilm growth kinetics of a monomethylamine producing Alphaproteobacteria strain isolated from an anaerobic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jopia, Paz; Ruiz-Tagle, Nathaly; Villagrán, Marcelo; Sossa, Katherine; Pantoja, Silvio; Rueda, Luis; Urrutia-Briones, Homero

    2010-02-01

    Industrial fishing effluents are characterized by high loads of protein and sulfate that stimulate the activity of proteolytic and sulfate reducing bacteria during anaerobic digestion. Their metabolic products (NH3 and H2S respectively) have a well-known detrimental effect on the activity of methanogens. Since methylamine is a carbon source used by methylaminotrophic methane producing archaea (mMPA) but not by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), enriched mMPA anaerobic biofilms have been developed on ceramics. We propose that methylated amines could be produced in the biofilm by using betaine, a known precursor of methylamine, as a carbon and energy source. We isolated an anaerobic betainotrophic methylaminogenic bacterial strain (bMB) from an anaerobic bioreactor, using betaine as the only carbon and energy source. This strain was identified by a standard biochemical test (API 20NE), cloning, and 16S rDNA sequencing. bMB biofilm structure and biofilm growth kinetic parameters were determined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the Gompertz growth model, respectively. Monomethylamine production was determined by infrared spectroscopy and by high pressure liquid chromatography. The isolated bMB strain was determined as Stappia stellulata (Proteobacteria phylum). It was able to form biofilm on ceramics and its kinetic growth parameters resulted in: maximum biofilm bacterial count (A) of 6.25 x 10(8) UFC/cm(2) and maximum specific growth rate (mu(m)) of 0.0221/h. Production of monomethylamine was about 4.027 atogram/cell/day (at/cell/day) after 15 days of incubation in biofilms. This study confirms the adhesion capacity of this bMB strain on ceramic supports, assuring that monomethylamine production in biofilms could be enriched with mMPA that use monomethylamine. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacterial Isolates on the Surface and Core of Tonsils from Patients with Chronic Tonsillitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Niranjan Khadilkar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Controversy regarding treatment of tonsillitis based on throat culture report still persists. If surface culture is a determinant of bacteriology of the core, then rational therapy could be aimed at organisms cultured by surface swab. Materials and Methods A Cross-sectional study was conducted on 100 patients of chronic tonsillitis who underwent tonsillectomy. Tonsil surface and core swabs were studied for aerobic and anaerobic growth. Result Eighty seven percent patients had aerobic growth on tonsil surface and ninety percent in tonsil core. Staphylococcus aureus was the commonest aerobic bacteria isolated. Anaerobic growth was present in 47% patients on tonsil surface, and 48% in core. Porphyromonas sp. was the commonest anaerobic bacterium isolated. Discussion There was no statistically significant difference between aerobic and anaerobic bacteria found in tonsil surface and core.  Conclusion Throat swabs adequately represent core pathogen, and are dependable in detecting bacteriology of chronic tonsillitis.

  8. [Isolation, Identification and Characteristic Analysis of an Oil-producing Chlorella sp. Tolerant to High-strength Anaerobic Digestion Effluent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuang; Wang, Wen-guo; Ma, Dan-wei; Tang, Xiao-yu; Hu, Qi-chun

    2015-07-01

    A Chlorella strain tolerant to high-strength anaerobic digestion effluent was isolated from the anaerobic digestion effluent with a long-term exposure to air. The strain was identified as a Chlorella by morphological and molecular biological methods, and named Chlorella sp. BWY-1, The anaerobic digestion effluent used in this study was from a biogas plant with the raw materials of swine wastewater after solid-liquid separation. The Chlorella regularis (FACHB-729) was used as the control strain. The comparative study showed that Chlorella sp, BWY-Ihad relatively higher growth rate, biomass accumulation capacity and pollutants removal rate in BG11. and different concentrations of anaerobic digestion effluent. Chlorella sp. BWY-1 had the highest growth rate and biomass productivity (324.40 mg.L-1) in BG11, but its lipid productivity and lipid content increased with the increase of anaerobic digestion effluent concentration, In undiluted anaerobic digestion effluent, the lipid productivity and lipid content of Chlorella sp. BWY-1 were up to 44. 43% and 108. 70 mg.L-1, respectively. Those results showed that the isolated algal strain bad some potential applications in livestock wastewater treatment and bioenergy production, it could be combined with a solid-liquid separation, anaerobic fermentation and other techniques for processing livestock wastewater and producing biodiesel.

  9. Dehalogenimonas formicexedens sp. nov., a chlorinated alkane-respiring bacterium isolated from contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Trent A; Bowman, Kimberly S; Lee, Imchang; Chun, Jongsik; Albuquerque, Luciana; da Costa, Milton S; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2017-05-01

    A strictly anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming bacterium designated NSZ-14T, isolated from contaminated groundwater in Louisiana (USA), was characterized using a polyphasic approach. Strain NSZ-14T reductively dehalogenated a variety of polychlorinated aliphatic alkanes, producing ethene from 1,2-dichloroethane, propene from 1,2-dichloropropane, a mixture of cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethene from 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, vinyl chloride from 1,1,2-trichloroethane and allyl chloride (3-chloro-1-propene) from 1,2,3-trichloropropane. Formate or hydrogen could both serve as electron donors. Dechlorination occurred between pH 5.5 and 7.5 and over a temperature range of 20-37 °C. Major cellular fatty acids included C18 : 1ω9c, C14 : 0 and C16 : 0. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogenetic analysis indicated that the strain clusters within the class Dehalococcoidia of the phylum Chloroflexi, most closely related to but distinct from type strains of the species Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens (97.63 % similarity) and Dehalogenimonas lykanthroporepellens (95.05 %). A complete genome sequence determined for strain NSZ-14T revealed a DNA G+C content of 53.96 mol%, which was corroborated by HPLC (54.1±0.2 mol% G+C). Genome-wide comparisons based on average nucleotide identity by orthology and estimated DNA-DNA hybridization values combined with phenotypic and chemotaxonomic traits and phylogenetic analysis indicate that strain NSZ-14T represents a novel species within the genus Dehalogenimonas, for which the name Dehalogenimonas formicexedens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NSZ-14T (=HAMBI 3672T=JCM 19277T=VKM B-3058T). An emended description of Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens is also provided.

  10. ANAEROBIC RESISTANCE TO HIGH LEVELS OF CADMIUM AND OTHER TOXIC METALS IN A FACULTATIVE ANAEROBE ISOLATED FROM PRISTINE SALT MARSH SEDIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHARMA,P.K.; VAIRAVAMURTHY,A.; KIELECZAWA,J.

    1999-06-20

    The authors have isolated many Cd (II) resistant bacterial strains from relatively pristine sediments collected from salt marshes in Shelter Island, New York. Detailed studies are being performed on one isolate, strain Cd-1. Strain Cd-1 is metabolically diverse, halotolerant, Gram-negative, facultative anaerobe. It can resist high amounts of Cd (II), Cr (VI), As (V), Se (IV), Co (II), Pb (II), or Zn (II) under defined anaerobic conditions. With pyruvate as the energy source, Cd-1 can grow well at examined Cd (II) concentrations ranging up to 15 mM. It can resist Cd (II) with or without marine level NaCl concentration, under acidic or neutral conditions. It can resist Cd (II) under aerobic conditions as well. These features are novel for a heavy metal resistant bacterium.

  11. Genetic identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of clinically isolated anaerobic bacteria: A prospective multicenter surveillance study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunoki, Tomoyuki; Matsumura, Yasufumi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Tanaka, Michio; Hamano, Kyoko; Nakano, Satoshi; Noguchi, Taro; Nagao, Miki; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    This prospective multicenter surveillance study was designed to provide antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of clinical anaerobic bacteria with genetic species identification in Japan. In 2014, a total of 526 non-duplicate clinical anaerobic isolates were collected from 11 acute-care hospitals in the Kyoto and Shiga regions of Japan. Genetic identification was performed using 16S rRNA sequencing. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined in the central laboratory and were interpreted using the CLSI criteria. Genetic analysis provided species-level identification for 496 isolates (83 species in 40 genera) and genus-level identification for 21 isolates (13 genera). Among these 517 isolates, the most frequent anaerobes were Bacteroides spp. (n = 207), Prevotella spp. (n = 43), Clostridium spp. (n = 40), and Peptoniphilus spp. (n = 40). B. fragilis was the most common species (n = 107) and showed 91.6%-97.2% susceptibility to β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations (BLBLIs; ampicillin-sulbactam, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and piperacillin-tazobactam) and carbapenems (imipenem and meropenem) as well as 100% susceptibility to metronidazole. Gram-negative anaerobes were highly susceptible to metronidazole (99.0%) followed by BLBLIs and carbapenems (>90% each). BLBLIs or carbapenems also retained activity against Gram-positive anaerobes (99.5%-100%) except Clostridioides difficile. All isolates were susceptible to combinations of metronidazole with BLBLIs or carbapenems. Thus, BLBLIs or carbapenems are first choices for empirical therapy of anaerobic infections in Japan, and these antimicrobials in combination with metronidazole should be reserved for very severe infections and targeted therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Isolation and identification of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria in the oral cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenxin; Wu, Fanzi; Zhou, Xinxuan; Wu, Lan; Li, Mingyun; Ren, Biao; Guo, Qiang; Huang, Ruijie; Li, Jiyao; Xiao, Liying; Li, Yan

    2015-12-01

    To establish a systematic method for isolation and identification of aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria in the oral cavity. Samples of the saliva, dental plaque and periapical granulation tissue were collected from 20 subjects with healthy oral condition and from 8 patients with different oral diseases. The bacteria in the samples were identified by morphological identification, VITEK automatic microorganism identification and 16s rRNA gene sequencing. VITEK automatic microorganism identification and 16s rRNA gene sequencing showed an agreement rate of 22.39% in identifying the bacteria in the samples. We identified altogether 63 bacterial genus (175 species), among which Streptococcus, Actinomyces and Staphylococcus were the most common bacterial genus, and Streptococcus anginosus, Actinomyces oris, Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus mitis were the most common species. Streptococcus anginosus was commonly found in patients with chronic periapical periodontitis. Streptococcus intermedius and Staphylococcus aureus were common in patients with radiation caries, and in patients with rampant caries, Streptococcus mutans was found at considerably higher rate than other species. Aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria are commonly found in the oral cavity, and most of them are gram-positive. 16s rRNA gene sequencing is more accurate than VITEK automatic microorganism identification in identifying the bacteria.

  13. Caldicoprobacter guelmensis sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic, xylanolytic bacterium isolated from a hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Hacene, Hocine; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2013-06-01

    A hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacterium, designated D2C22(T), was isolated from the hydrothermal hot spring of Guelma in north-east Algeria. The isolate was a Gram-stain-positive, non-sporulating, non-motile rod, appearing singly or in pairs (0.3-0.4 × 8.0-9.0 µm). Strain D2C22(T) grew anaerobically at 45-85 °C (optimum 65 °C), at pH 5-9 (optimum pH 6.8) and with 0-20 g NaCl l(-1). Strain D2C22(T) used glucose, galactose, lactose, fructose, ribose, xylose, arabinose, maltose, cellobiose, mannose, melibiose, sucrose, xylan and pyruvate (only in the presence of yeast extract or biotrypticase) as electron donors. The end products from glucose fermentation were acetate, lactate, CO2 and H2. Nitrate, nitrite, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfate and sulfite were not used as electron acceptors. The predominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15:0 and iso-C17:0. The DNA G+C content was 41.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain D2C22(T) was most closely related to Caldicoprobacter oshimai JW/HY-331(T), Caldicoprobacter algeriensis TH7C1(T) and Acetomicrobium faecale DSM 20678(T) (95.5, 95.5 and 95.3% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain D2C22(T) is proposed to be a representative of a novel species of the genus Caldicoprobacter within the order Clostridiales, for which the name Caldicoprobacter guelmensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is D2C22(T) (=DSM 24605(T)=JCM 17646(T)).

  14. ‘Lactomassilus timonensis,’ a new anaerobic bacterial species isolated from the milk of a healthy African mother

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Togo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We here report the main characteristics of a new anaerobic bacterial genus and species ‘Lactomassilus timonensis,’ strain Marseille-P4641T (CSUR = P4641, isolated by microbial culturomics from the milk of a 35-year-old healthy lactating mother from Mali.

  15. Thermotoga lettingae sp. nov. : a novel thermophilic, methanol-degrading bacterium isolated from a thermophilic anaerobic reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balk, M.; Weijma, J.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    A novel, anaerobic, non-spore-forming, mobile, Gram-negative, thermophilic bacterium, strain TMO(T), was isolated from a thermophilic sulfate-reducing bioreactor operated at 65 degrees C with methanol as the sole substrate. The G C content of the DNA of strain TMO(T) was 39.2 molÐThe optimum pH,

  16. 16S rRNA gene sequencing in routine identification of anaerobic bacteria isolated from blood cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Knudsen, Elisa

    2010-01-01

    A comparison between conventional identification and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of anaerobic bacteria isolated from blood cultures in a routine setting was performed (n = 127). With sequencing, 89% were identified to the species level, versus 52% with conventional identification. The times...

  17. Isolation and identification of intestinal bacteria from Japanese tree frog (Hlya japonica) with the special reference to anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benno, Y; Izumi-Kurotani, A; Yamashita, M

    1992-08-01

    The bacteria in the large intestines of eight Japanese tree frogs (Hlya japonica) were enumerated by using an anaerobic culture system. The microorganisms at approximately 3.1 x 10(9) bacteria per g (wet weight) of intestinal contents were present in the intestine of all the frogs tested. No difference of the total bacteria in the frog intestine was observed between two different incubation-temperatures (room temperature and 37 degrees C). Eleven genera and 16 species were isolated from the frog intestine. In most frogs, Bacteroides (B.) caccae and B. vulgatus were detected as the predominant organisms. Escherichia coli was also present in greater numbers in the intestine. Other bacteria isolated at high dilutions were strict anaerobes, including Fusobacterium and Clostridium. Enterococcus faecalis was frequently isolated from the frog intestine. However, four genera of Bifidobacterium, Eubacterium, Peptostreptococcus, and Lactobacillus were not isolated from the frog intestine.

  18. Isolation and Characterization of a New KOR-1 from an Anaerobic Digester Using Pig Slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urantulkhuur Battumur

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A new methanogen was isolated from an anaerobic digester using pig slurry in South Korea. Only one strain, designated KOR-1, was characterized in detail. Cells of KOR-1 were straight or crooked rods, non-motile, 5 to 15 μm long and 0.7 μm wide. They stained Gram-positive and produced methane from H2+CO2 and formate. Strain KOR-1 grew optimally at 38°C. The optimum pH for growth was 7.0. The strain grew at 0.5% to 3.0% NaCl, with optimum growth at 2.5% NaCl. The G+C content of genomic DNA of strain KOR-1 was 41 mol%. The strain tolerated ampicillin, penicillin G, kanamycin and streptomycin but tetracycline inhibited cell growth. A large fragment of the 16S rRNA gene (~1,350 bp was obtained from the isolate and sequenced. Comparison of 16S rRNA genes revealed that strain KOR–1 is related to Methanobacterium formicicum (98%, sequence similarity, Methanobacterium bryantii (95% and Methanobacterium ivanovii (93%. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced mcrA gene sequences confirmed the closest relative as based on mcrA gene sequence analysis was Methanobacterium formicicum strain (97% nucleic acid sequence identity. On the basis of physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, strain KOR-1 is proposed as a new strain within the genus Methanobacterium, Methanobacterium formicicum KOR-1.

  19. Biochemical identification and determination of antimicrobial resistance in clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria obtained from the Hospital San Juan de Dios in the period 2009 to 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meza Pena, Maria Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Clinical isolates of 81 anaerobic bacteria isolated are identified to patients of the Hospital San Juan de Dios, between 2009 to 2011; by algorithms that have employed biochemical methods of reference chemical samples. Antimicrobial resistance is determined. The miniaturized methods and biochemical algorithms proposed were compared to identify differences between methods. The minimum inhibitory concentration of metronidazole, clindamycin, amoxicillin, tetracycline and cefotaxime are determined to 81 anaerobic bacteria isolated from the Hospital mentioned [es

  20. Glucose, Lactate and Glutamine but not Glutamate Support Depolarization-Induced Increased Respiration in Isolated Nerve Terminals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Andersen, Vibe H; Bak, Lasse K

    2017-01-01

    . Synaptosomal respiration using glutamate and glutamine as substrates was significantly higher compared to basal respiration, whereas oligomycin-dependent and FCCP-induced respiration was lower compared to the responses obtained in the presence of glucose as substrate. We provide evidence that synaptosomes...... are able to use besides glucose and pyruvate also the substrates lactate, glutamate and glutamine to support their basal respiration. Veratridine was found to increase respiration supported by glucose, pyruvate, lactate and glutamine and FCCP was found to increase respiration supported by glucose, pyruvate...

  1. Veillonella rogosae sp. nov., an anaerobic, Gram-negative coccus isolated from dental plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Nausheen; Do, Thuy; Byun, Roy; Sheehy, Evelyn; Clark, Douglas; Gilbert, Steven C.; Beighton, David

    2008-01-01

    Strains of a novel anaerobic, Gram-negative coccus were isolated from the supra-gingival plaque of children. Independent strains from each of six subjects were shown, at a phenotypic level and based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, to be members of the genus Veillonella. Analysis revealed that the six strains shared 99.7 % similarity in their 16S rRNA gene sequences and 99.0 % similarity in their rpoB gene sequences. The six novel strains formed a distinct group and could be clearly separated from recognized species of the genus Veillonella of human or animal origin. The novel strains exhibited 98 and 91 % similarity to partial 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequences of Veillonella parvula ATCC 10790T, the most closely related member of the genus. The six novel strains could be differentiated from recognized species of the genus Veillonella based on partial 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequencing. The six novel strains are thus considered to represent a single novel species of the genus Veillonella, for which the name Veillonella rogosae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CF100T (=CCUG 54233T=DSM 18960T). PMID:18319459

  2. Mobilisporobacter senegalensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterium isolated from tropical shea cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbengue, Malick; Thioye, Abdoulaye; Labat, Marc; Casalot, Laurence; Joseph, Manon; Samb, Abdoulaye; Ben Ali Gam, Zouhaier

    2016-03-01

    A Gram-stain positive, endospore-forming, strictly anaerobic bacterium, designated strain Gal1 T , was isolated from shea cake, a waste material from the production of shea butter, originating from Saraya, Senegal. The cells were rod-shaped, slightly curved, and motile with peritrichous flagella. The strain was oxidase-negative and catalase-negative. Growth was observed at temperatures ranging from 15 to 45 °C (optimum 30 °C) and at pH 6.5-9.3 (optimum pH 7.8). The salinity range for growth was 0-3.5 % NaCl (optimum 1 %). Yeast extract was required for growth. Strain Gal1 T fermented various carbohydrates such as mannose, mannitol, arabinose, cellobiose, fructose, glucose, maltose, sucrose, trehalose and lactose and the major end-products were ethanol and acetate. The only major cellular fatty acid was C16 : 0 (19.6 %). The DNA base G+C content of strain Gal1 T was 33.8 mol%. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate indicated that this strain was related to Mobilitalea sibirica DSM 26468 T with 94.27 % similarity, Clostridium populeti ATTC 35295 T with 93.94 % similarity, and Clostridium aminovalericum DSM 1283 T and Anaerosporobacter mobilis DSM 15930 T with 93.63 % similarity. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and the results of biochemical and physiological tests, strain Gal1 T was clearly distinguished from closely related genera, and strain Gal1 T can be assigned to a novel species of a new genus for which the name Mobilisporobacter senegalensis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Gal1 T ( = DSM 26537 T  = JCM 18753 T ).

  3. Intra-Genomic Heterogeneity in 16S rRNA Genes in Strictly Anaerobic Clinical Isolates from Periodontal Abscesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiazhen; Miao, Xinyu; Xu, Meng; He, Junlin; Xie, Yi; Wu, Xingwen; Chen, Gang; Yu, Liying; Zhang, Wenhong

    2015-01-01

    Background Members of the genera Prevotella, Veillonella and Fusobacterium are the predominant culturable obligate anaerobic bacteria isolated from periodontal abscesses. When determining the cumulative number of clinical anaerobic isolates from periodontal abscesses, ambiguous or overlapping signals were frequently encountered in 16S rRNA gene sequencing chromatograms, resulting in ambiguous identifications. With the exception of the genus Veillonella, the high intra-chromosomal heterogeneity of rrs genes has not been reported. Methods The 16S rRNA genes of 138 clinical, strictly anaerobic isolates and one reference strain were directly sequenced, and the chromatograms were carefully examined. Gene cloning was performed for 22 typical isolates with doublet sequencing signals for the 16S rRNA genes, and four copies of the rrs-ITS genes of 9 Prevotella intermedia isolates were separately amplified by PCR, sequenced and compared. Five conserved housekeeping genes, hsp60, recA, dnaJ, gyrB1 and rpoB from 89 clinical isolates of Prevotella were also amplified by PCR and sequenced for identification and phylogenetic analysis along with 18 Prevotella reference strains. Results Heterogeneity of 16S rRNA genes was apparent in clinical, strictly anaerobic oral bacteria, particularly in the genera Prevotella and Veillonella. One hundred out of 138 anaerobic strains (72%) had intragenomic nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in multiple locations, and 13 strains (9.4%) had intragenomic insertions or deletions in the 16S rRNA gene. In the genera Prevotella and Veillonella, 75% (67/89) and 100% (19/19) of the strains had SNPs in the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. Gene cloning and separate amplifications of four copies of the rrs-ITS genes confirmed that 2 to 4 heterogeneous 16S rRNA copies existed. Conclusion Sequence alignment of five housekeeping genes revealed that intra-species nucleotide similarities were very high in the genera Prevotella, ranging from 94.3–100%. However, the

  4. Megasphaera indica sp. nov., an obligate anaerobic bacteria isolated from human faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanjekar, V B; Marathe, N P; Ramana, V Venkata; Shouche, Y S; Ranade, D R

    2014-07-01

    Two coccoid, non-motile, obligately anaerobic, Gram-stain-negative bacteria, occurring singly or in pairs, or as short chains, with a mean size of 1.4-2.5 µm were isolated from the faeces of two healthy human volunteers, aged 26 and 56 years, and were designated NMBHI-10(T) and BLPYG-7, respectively. Both the strains were affiliated to the sub-branch Sporomusa of the class Clostridia as revealed by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The isolates NMBHI-10(T) and BLPYG-7 showed 99.1 and 99.2% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively, with Megasphaera elsdenii JCM 1772(T). DNA-DNA hybridization and phenotypic analysis showed that both the strains were distinct from their closest relative, M. elsdenii JCM 1772(T) (42 and 53% DNA-DNA relatedness with NMBHI-10(T) and BLPYG-7, respectively), but belong to the same species (DNA-DNA relatedness of 80.9 % between the isolates). According to DNA-DNA hybridization results, the coccoid strains belong to the same genospecies, and neither is related to any of the recognized species of the genus Megasphaera. Strains NMBHI-10(T) and BLPYG-7 grew in PYG broth at temperatures of between 15 and 40 °C (optimum 37 °C), but not at 45 °C. The strains utilized a range of carbohydrates as sources of carbon and energy including glucose, lactose, cellobiose, rhamnose, galactose and sucrose. Glucose fermentation resulted in the formation of volatile fatty acids, mainly caproic acid and organic acids such as succinic acid. Phylogenetic analysis, specific phenotypic characteristics and/or DNA G+C content also differentiated the strains from each other and from their closest relatives. The DNA G+C contents of strains NMBHI-10(T) and BLPYG-7 are 57.7 and 54.9 mol%, respectively. The major fatty acids were 12 : 0 FAME and 17 : 0 CYC FAME. On the basis of these data, we conclude that strains NMBHI-10(T) and BLPYG-7 should be classified as representing a novel species of the genus Megasphaera, for which the name Megsphaera indica sp. nov

  5. Caldicoprobacter algeriensis sp. nov. a new thermophilic anaerobic, xylanolytic bacterium isolated from an Algerian hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Grégoire, Patrick; Joseph, Manon; Kebbouche-Gana, Salima; Benayad, Tahar; Hacene, Hocine; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Ollivier, Bernard

    2011-03-01

    A thermophilic anaerobic bacterium (strain TH7C1(T)) was isolated from the hydrothermal hot spring of Guelma in the northeast of Algeria. Strain TH7C1(T) stained Gram-positive, was a non-motile rod appearing singly, in pairs, or as long chains (0.7-1 × 2-6 μm(2)). Spores were never observed. It grew at temperatures between 55 and 75°C (optimum 65°C) and at pH between 6.2 and 8.3 (optimum 6.9). It did not require NaCl for growth, but tolerated it up to 5 g l(-1). Strain TH7C1(T) is an obligatory heterotroph fermenting sugars including glucose, galactose, lactose, raffinose, fructose, ribose, xylose, arabinose, maltose, mannitol, cellobiose, mannose, melibiose, saccharose, but also xylan, and pyruvate. Fermentation of sugars only occurred in the presence of yeast extract (0.1%). The end-products from glucose fermentation were acetate, lactate, ethanol, CO(2), and H(2). Nitrate, nitrite, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfate, and sulfite were not used as electron acceptors. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 44.7 mol% (HPLC techniques). Phylogenetic analysis of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequence indicated that strain TH7C1(T) was affiliated to Firmicutes, order Clostridiales, family Caldicoprobacteraceae, with Caldicoprobacter oshimai (98.5%) being its closest relative. Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic, and genetic characteristics, strain TH7C1(T) is proposed as a novel species of genus Caldicoprobacter, Caldicoprobacter algeriensis, sp. nov. (strain TH7C1(T) = DSM 22661(T) = JCM 16184(T)).

  6. Akkermansia glycaniphila sp. nov., an anaerobic mucin-degrading bacterium isolated from reticulated python faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwerkerk, Janneke P; Aalvink, Steven; Belzer, Clara; de Vos, Willem M

    2016-11-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, strictly anaerobic, oval-shaped, non-spore-forming bacterium (strain PytT) was isolated from reticulated python faeces. Strain PytT was capable of using mucin as sole carbon, energy and nitrogen source. Cells could grow singly, in pairs, and were also found to aggregate. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of filamentous structures connecting individual bacterial cells. Strain PytT could grow on a limited number of single sugars, including N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, glucose, lactose and galactose, but only when a plentiful protein source was provided. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed strain PytT to belong to the Verrucomicrobiae class I, family Akkermansiaceae, genus Akkermansia, with Akkermansia muciniphila MucT as the closest relative (94.4 % sequence similarity). DNA-DNA hybridization revealed low relatedness of 28.3 % with A. muciniphila MucT. The G+C content of DNA from strain PytT was 58.2 mol%. The average nucleotide identity (ANI) of the genome of strain PytT compared to the genome of strain MucT was 79.7 %. Chemotaxonomic data supported the affiliation of strain PytT to the genus Akkermansia. Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and genetic characteristics, strain PytT represents a novel species of the genus Akkermansia, for which the name Akkermansia glycaniphila sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PytT (=DSM 100705T=CIP 110913T).

  7. Data on effects of rotenone on calcium retention capacity, respiration and activities of respiratory chain complexes I and II in isolated rat brain mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekuviene, Evelina; Ivanoviene, Laima; Borutaite, Vilmante; Morkuniene, Ramune

    2017-08-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Rotenone decreases ischemia-induced injury by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition in mature brains" (Rekuviene et al., 2017) [1]. Data in this article present the direct effects of rotenone on calcium retention capacity (CRC) in isolated normal cortex and cerebellum mitochondria, effects of rotenone intravenous infusion on leak and phosphorylating respiration rates of isolated cortex and cerebellum mitochondria, on activities of respiratory chain complexes I and II in freezed-thawed/sonicated cortex and cerebellum mitochondria after brain ischemia. In addition, detailed experimental procedures of isolation of brain mitochondria, measurements of CRC, respiration, activities of respiratory chain complexes and H 2 O 2 generation in cortex and cerebellum mitochondria are described.

  8. Data on effects of rotenone on calcium retention capacity, respiration and activities of respiratory chain complexes I and II in isolated rat brain mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelina Rekuviene

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “Rotenone decreases ischemia-induced injury by inhibiting mitochondrial permeability transition in mature brains” (Rekuviene et al., 2017 [1]. Data in this article present the direct effects of rotenone on calcium retention capacity (CRC in isolated normal cortex and cerebellum mitochondria, effects of rotenone intravenous infusion on leak and phosphorylating respiration rates of isolated cortex and cerebellum mitochondria, on activities of respiratory chain complexes I and II in freezed-thawed/sonicated cortex and cerebellum mitochondria after brain ischemia. In addition, detailed experimental procedures of isolation of brain mitochondria, measurements of CRC, respiration, activities of respiratory chain complexes and H2O2 generation in cortex and cerebellum mitochondria are described.

  9. [Identification of anaerobic gram-negative bacilli isolated from various clinical specimens and determination of antibiotic resistance profiles with E-test methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Cengiz; Keşli, Recep

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify gram-negative anaerobic bacilli isolated from various clinical specimens that were obtained from patients with suspected anaerobic infections and to determine the antibiotic resistance profiles by using the antibiotic concentration gradient method. The study was performed in Afyon Kocatepe University Ahmet Necdet Sezer Research and Practice Hospital, Medical Microbiology Laboratory between 1 November 2014 and 30 October 2015. Two hundred and seventyeight clinical specimens accepted for anaerobic culture were enrolled in the study. All the samples were cultivated anaerobically by using Schaedler agar with 5% defibrinated sheep blood and Schaedler broth. The isolated anaerobic gram-negative bacilli were identified by using both the conventional methods and automated identification system (VITEK 2, bioMerieux, France). Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed with antibiotic concentration gradient method (E-test, bioMerieux, France); against penicillin G, clindamycin, cefoxitin, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, imipenem, meropenem, ertapenem and doripenem for each isolate. Of the 28 isolated anaerobic gram-negative bacilli; 14 were identified as Bacteroides fragilis group, 9 were Prevotella spp., and 5 were Fusobacterium spp. The highest resistance rate was found against penicillin (78.5%) and resistance rates against clindamycin and cefoxitin were found as 17.8% and 21.4%, respectively. No resistance was found against metronidazole, moxifloxacin, imipenem, meropenem, ertapenem and doripenem. As a result, isolation and identification of anaerobic bacteria are difficult, time-consuming and more expensive when compared with the cost of aerobic culture. The rate of anaerobic bacteria isolation may be increased by obtaining the appropriate clinical specimen and appropriate transportation of these specimens. We believe that the data obtained from the study in our center may offer benefits for the follow up and treatment of infections

  10. Clostridium punense sp. nov., an obligate anaerobe isolated from healthy human faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanjekar, Vikram Bholanath; Marathe, Nachiket Prakash; Shouche, Yogesh Shreepad; Ranade, Dilip Ramchandra

    2015-12-01

    An obligately anaerobic, rod-shaped (0.5-1.0 × 2.0-10.0 μm), Gram-stain-positive bacterium, occurring mainly singly or in pairs, and designated BLPYG-8T, was isolated from faeces of a healthy human volunteer aged 56 years. Cells were non-motile. Oval, terminal spores were formed that swell the cells. The strain was affiliated with the genus Clostridium sensu stricto (Clostridium rRNA cluster I) as revealed by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Strain BLPYG-8T showed 97.3 to 97.4 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Clostridium sulfidigenes DSM 18982T, Clostridium subterminale DSM 6970T and Clostridium thiosulfatireducens DSM 13105T. DNA-DNA hybridization and phenotypic analysis showed that the strain was distinct from its closest relatives, C. sulfidigenes DSM 18982T, C. subterminale DSM 6970T, C. thiosulfatireducens DSM 13105T with 54.2, 53.9 and 53.3 % DNA-DNA relatedness, respectively. Strain BLPYG-8T grew in PYG broth at temperatures between 20 and 40 °C (optimum 37 °C). The strain utilized a range of amino acids as well as carbohydrates as a source of carbon and energy. Glucose fermentation resulted in the formation of volatile fatty acids mainly acetic acid, n-butyric acid and organic acids such as succinic and lactic acid. The DNA G+C content of strain BLPYG-8T was 44.1 mol%. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were C14 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, C16 : 1ω7c and C16 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis and specific phenotypic characteristics and/or DNA G+C content differentiated the strain from its closest relatives. On the basis of these data, strain BLPYG-8T represents a novel species of the genus Clostridium, for which the name Clostridium punense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BLPYG-8T ( = DSM 28650T = CCUG 64195T = MCC 2737T).

  11. Anaerosporomusa subterranea gen. nov., sp. nov., a spore-forming anaerobe belonging to the class Negativicutes isolated from saprolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jessica K; Shah, Madhavi; Yee, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, spore-forming, anaerobic bacterium designated strain RU4T was isolated from a saprolite core collected from Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. Cells were slightly curved rods and exhibited an outer membrane exterior to a thin cell wall. Strain RU4T formed heat-resistant endospores in late-log phase and stationary phase cultures. Under anaerobic conditions, strain RU4T grew by fermenting fumarate and maleate, but did not grow on glucose, glycerol, pyruvate, lactate, succinate, citrate, formate, acetate, propionate, butyrate or valerate. Strain RU4T did not reduce sulfate or ferric iron. The main cellular fatty acids were C17 : 0 cyclo, C16 : 0 and C15 : 0. The DNA G+C content was 52 mol%. Analysis of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, recA, infB, gyrB and atpD gene sequences indicated that the isolate is related to members of the family Sporomusaceae. Based on 92 % sequence similarity of the 16S rRNA gene to its closest relatives in the family Sporomusaceae and divergent physiological traits, the newly-cultivated isolate was assigned to a novel species of a new genus, Anaerosporomusa subterranea gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Anaerosporomusa subterranea is RU4T (=DSM 29728T=ATCC BAA-2723T).

  12. Thioarsenate Formation Coupled with Anaerobic Arsenite Oxidation by a Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Hot Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Wu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Thioarsenates are common arsenic species in sulfidic geothermal waters, yet little is known about their biogeochemical traits. In the present study, a novel sulfate-reducing bacterial strain Desulfotomaculum TC-1 was isolated from a sulfidic hot spring in Tengchong geothermal area, Yunnan Province, China. The arxA gene, encoding anaerobic arsenite oxidase, was successfully amplified from the genome of strain TC-1, indicating it has a potential ability to oxidize arsenite under anaerobic condition. In anaerobic arsenite oxidation experiments inoculated with strain TC-1, a small amount of arsenate was detected in the beginning but became undetectable over longer time. Thioarsenates (AsO4-xSx2- with x = 1–4 formed with mono-, di- and tri-thioarsenates being dominant forms. Tetrathioarsenate was only detectable at the end of the experiment. These results suggest that thermophilic microbes might be involved in the formation of thioarsenates and provide a possible explanation for the widespread distribution of thioarsenates in terrestrial geothermal environments.

  13. Butyricimonas phoceensis sp. nov., a new anaerobic species isolated from the human gut microbiota of a French morbidly obese patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togo, A H; Diop, A; Dubourg, G; Nguyen, T T; Andrieu, C; Caputo, A; Couderc, C; Fournier, P-E; Maraninchi, M; Valero, R; Raoult, D; Million, M

    2016-11-01

    Butyricimonas phoceensis strain AT9 (= CSUR 1981 = DSM 100664) was isolated from a stool sample from a morbidly obese French patient living in Marseille using the culturomics approach. The genome of this Gram-negative-staining, anaerobic and non-spore forming rod bacillus is 4 736 949 bp long and contains 3947 protein-coding genes. Genomic analysis identified 173 genes as ORFans (4.5%) and 1650 orthologous proteins (42%) not shared with the closest phylogenetic species, Butyricimonas virosa. Its major fatty acid was the branched acid iso-C15:0 (62.3%).

  14. Butyricimonas phoceensis sp. nov., a new anaerobic species isolated from the human gut microbiota of a French morbidly obese patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Togo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Butyricimonas phoceensis strain AT9 (= CSUR 2478 = DSM 100838 was isolated from a stool sample from a morbidly obese French patient living in Marseille using the culturomics approach. The genome of this Gram-negative-staining, anaerobic and non–spore forming rod bacillus is 4 736 949 bp long and contains 3947 protein-coding genes. Genomic analysis identified 173 genes as ORFans (4.5% and 1650 orthologous proteins (42% not shared with the closest phylogenetic species, Butyricimonas virosa. Its major fatty acid was the branched acid iso-C15:0 (62.3%.

  15. Culturable prokaryotic diversity of deep, gas hydrate sediments: first use of a continuous high-pressure, anaerobic, enrichment and isolation system for subseafloor sediments (DeepIsoBUG)

    OpenAIRE

    Parkes, R John; Sellek, Gerard; Webster, Gordon; Martin, Derek; Anders, Erik; Weightman, Andrew J; Sass, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Deep subseafloor sediments may contain depressurization-sensitive, anaerobic, piezophilic prokaryotes. To test this we developed the DeepIsoBUG system, which when coupled with the HYACINTH pressure-retaining drilling and core storage system and the PRESS core cutting and processing system, enables deep sediments to be handled without depressurization (up to 25 MPa) and anaerobic prokaryotic enrichments and isolation to be conducted up to 100 MPa. Here, we describe the system and its first use...

  16. High rate of non-susceptibility to metronidazole and clindamycin in anaerobic isolates: Data from a clinical laboratory from Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Sadia Omer; Jabeen, Kauser; Qaiser, Saba; Ahsan, Syed Tanwir; Khan, Erum; Zafar, Afia

    2015-06-01

    Due to increasing resistance amongst anaerobic pathogens periodic surveillance of resistance has been recommended in regional/local settings. Anaerobic antimicrobial susceptibility testing is not routinely performed in many laboratories in Pakistan, hence absence of local data may lead to inappropriate empirical therapy in serious cases. 121 clinically significant anaerobic strains (26/121; 21% bacteremic isolates) were isolated and saved from 2010 to 2011. Susceptibility testing against metronidazole, clindamycin, co-amoxiclav, meropenem, piperacillin/tazobactam, linezolid and gatifloxacin was performed by determining minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). A high proportion of non-susceptible strains to metronidazole (10% of 121 isolates) and clindamycin (12% of 121 isolates) was seen, most noticeable in Bacteroides fragilis. Three Bacteroides species strains were non-susceptible to both metronidazole and clindamycin. One strain of Clostridium species was fully resistant to metronidazole and had intermediate resistance to clindamycin. No resistance to any of the other tested antibiotics was seen. Resistance to metronidazole was higher in bacteremic vs. non bacteremic isolates (p = value 0.07). In our setting where there is a high usage of empirical metronidazole and clindamycin for the treatment of serious anaerobic infections clinicians should be aware of increased resistance to these agents. Periodic surveillance of resistance to anti-anaerobic drugs especially metronidazole and clindamycin should be performed to generate antibiogram and guide appropriate empiric therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibilities of anaerobic bacteria isolated from perforated corneal ulcers by culture and multiplex PCR: an evaluation in cases with keratitis and endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokman, Hrisi Bahar; İskeleli, Güzin; Dalar, Zeynep Güngördü; Kangaba, Achille Aime; Demirci, Mehmet; Akay, Hatice K; Borsa, Bariş Ata; Algingil, Reyhan Çalişkan; Kocazeybek, Bekir S; Torun, Müzeyyen Mamal; Kiraz, Nuri

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria play an important role in eye infections; however, there is limited epidemiologic data based on the the role of these bacteria in the etiology of keratitis and endophthalmitis. The aim of this re- search is to determine the prevalence of anaerobic bacteria in perforated corneal ulcers of patients with keratitis and endophthalmitis and to evaluate their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Corneal scrapings were taken by the ophthalmologist using sterile needles. For the isolation of anaerobic bacteria, samples were inoculated on specific media and were incubated under anaerobic conditions obtained with Anaero-Gen (Oxoid & Mitsubishi Gas Company) in anaerobic jars (Oxoid USA, Inc. Columbia, MD, USA). The molecular identification of anaerobic bacteria was performed by multiplex PCR and the susceptibilities of an- aerobic bacteria to penicillin, chloramphenicol, and clindamycin were determined with the E test (bioMerieux). 51 strains of anaerobic bacteria belonging to four different genuses were detected by multiplex PCR and only 46 strains were isolated by culture. All of them were found susceptible to chloramphenicol whereas penicillin resistance was found in 13.3% of P.anaerobius strains, clindamycin resistance was found in 34.8% of P.acnes and 13.3% of P. anaerobius strains. Additionnaly, one strain of P. granulosum was found resistant to clindamycin, one strain of B. fragilis and one strain of P.melaninogenica were found resistant to penicillin and clindamycin. Routine analyses of anaerobes in perforated corneal ulcers is inevitable and usage of appropriate molecular methods, for the detection of bacteria responsible from severe infections which might not be deter- mined by cultivation, may serve for the early decision of the appropriate treatment. Taking into account the in- creasing antimicrobial resistance of anaerobic bacteria, alternative eye specific antibiotics effective against anaer- obes are needed to achieve a successful treatment.

  18. Transcriptomic analysis of lignocellulosic biomass degradation by the anaerobic fungal isolate Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couger, M B; Youssef, Noha H; Struchtemeyer, Christopher G; Liggenstoffer, Audra S; Elshahed, Mostafa S

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic fungi reside in the rumen and alimentary tract of herbivores where they play an important role in the digestion of ingested plant biomass. The anaerobic fungal isolate Orpinomyces sp. strain C1A is an efficient biomass degrader, capable of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of the cellulosic and hemicellulosic fractions in multiple types of lignocellulosic biomass. To understand the mechanistic and regulatory basis of biomass deconstruction in anaerobic fungi, we analyzed the transcriptomic profiles of C1A when grown on four different types of lignocellulosic biomass (alfalfa, energy cane, corn stover, and sorghum) versus a soluble sugar monomer (glucose). A total of 468.2 million reads (70.2 Gb) were generated and assembled into 27,506 distinct transcripts. CAZyme transcripts identified included 385, 246, and 44 transcripts belonging to 44, 13, and 8 different glycoside hydrolases (GH), carbohydrate esterases, and polysaccharide lyases families, respectively. Examination of CAZyme transcriptional patterns indicates that strain C1A constitutively transcribes a high baseline level of CAZyme transcripts on glucose. Although growth on lignocellulosic biomass substrates was associated with a significant increase in transcriptional levels in few GH families, including the highly transcribed GH1 β-glucosidase, GH6 cellobiohydrolase, and GH9 endoglucanase, the transcriptional levels of the majority of CAZyme families and transcripts were not significantly altered in glucose-grown versus lignocellulosic biomass-grown cultures. Further, strain C1A co-transcribes multiple functionally redundant enzymes for cellulose and hemicellulose saccharification that are mechanistically and structurally distinct. Analysis of fungal dockerin domain-containing transcripts strongly suggests that anaerobic fungal cellulosomes represent distinct catalytic units capable of independently attacking and converting intact plant fibers to sugar monomers. Collectively, these

  19. Alternative anaerobic enrichments to the bacteriological analytical manual culture method for isolation of Shigella sonnei from selected types of fresh produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Andrew P; Thunberg, Richard L; Johnson, Mildred L; Hammack, Thomas S; Andrews, Wallace H

    2004-01-01

    Alternative methods of reducing oxygen during anaerobic enrichment in the Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) Shigella culture method were evaluated and compared to the current and less practical GasPak method. The alternative anaerobic methods included the use of reducing agents in Shigella broth and reducing culture container headspace volume to minimize atmospheric effects on oxygen concentration in Shigella broth during enrichment. The reducing agents evaluated were sodium thioglycollate, L-cystine, L-cysteine, titanium(III) citrate, and dithiothreitol, each at concentrations of 0.1, 0.05, and 0.01%. The use of Oxyrase for Broth with the enrichment medium (Shigella broth) was evaluated at concentrations of 10, 20 and 30 microL/mL. Recoveries of chill- and freeze-stressed S. sonnei strains 357 and 20143 were determined with each anaerobic method, including the GasPak method, using inoculation levels ranging from 10(0)to 10(3) cells. For each anaerobic method, strain, inoculation level, and stress type, 5 replicate enrichments were evaluated by streaking to MacConkey agar for isolation. The numbers of cultures with each method from which S. sonnei was isolated were used to compare the alternative anaerobic methods to the GasPak method. The alternative anaerobic method with which chill- and freeze-stressed S. sonnei strains 357 and 20143 were isolated most consistently was the use of Oxyrase for Broth in Shigella broth at a concentration of 20 microL/mL. This method was compared to the GasPak anaerobic method in evaluations on the recovery of S. sonnei strains 357 and 20143 from artificially contaminated test portions of parsley, cilantro, green onions, strawberries, carrots, and celery. A third anaerobic method included the use of 0.5 cm mineral oil overlay on cultures containing Oxyrase for Broth at concentrations of 20 microL/mL. Recovery rates of strain 357 were significantly greater (p cultures. The use of mineral oil overlay with Oxyrase for Broth also

  20. Microbial reduction of uranium(VI) by anaerobic microorganisms isolated from a former uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Ulrike; Krawczyk-Baersch, Evelyn [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry; Arnold, Thuro [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures

    2017-06-01

    The former uranium mine Koenigstein (Germany) is currently in the process of controlled flooding by reason of remediation purposes. However, the flooding water still contains high concentrations of uranium and other heavy metals. For that reason the water has to be cleaned up by a conventional waste water treatment plant. The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between anaerobic microorganisms and uranium for possible bioremediation approaches, which could be an great alternative for the intensive and expensive waste water treatment. EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) and XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) measurements were performed and revealed a complete reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) only by adding 10 mM glycerol.

  1. Microbial reduction of uranium(VI) by anaerobic microorganisms isolated from a former uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, Ulrike; Krawczyk-Baersch, Evelyn; Arnold, Thuro; Scheinost, Andreas C.

    2017-01-01

    The former uranium mine Koenigstein (Germany) is currently in the process of controlled flooding by reason of remediation purposes. However, the flooding water still contains high concentrations of uranium and other heavy metals. For that reason the water has to be cleaned up by a conventional waste water treatment plant. The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between anaerobic microorganisms and uranium for possible bioremediation approaches, which could be an great alternative for the intensive and expensive waste water treatment. EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) and XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) measurements were performed and revealed a complete reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) only by adding 10 mM glycerol.

  2. Isolation and Characterization of a New Methanobacterium formicicum KOR-1 from an Anaerobic Digester Using Pig Slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battumur, Urantulkhuur; Yoon, Young-Man; Kim, Chang-Hyun

    2016-04-01

    A new methanogen was isolated from an anaerobic digester using pig slurry in South Korea. Only one strain, designated KOR-1, was characterized in detail. Cells of KOR-1 were straight or crooked rods, non-motile, 5 to 15 μm long and 0.7 μm wide. They stained Gram-positive and produced methane from H2+CO2 and formate. Strain KOR-1 grew optimally at 38°C. The optimum pH for growth was 7.0. The strain grew at 0.5% to 3.0% NaCl, with optimum growth at 2.5% NaCl. The G+C content of genomic DNA of strain KOR-1 was 41 mol%. The strain tolerated ampicillin, penicillin G, kanamycin and streptomycin but tetracycline inhibited cell growth. A large fragment of the 16S rRNA gene (~1,350 bp) was obtained from the isolate and sequenced. Comparison of 16S rRNA genes revealed that strain KOR-1 is related to Methanobacterium formicicum (98%, sequence similarity), Methanobacterium bryantii (95%) and Methanobacterium ivanovii (93%). Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced mcrA gene sequences confirmed the closest relative as based on mcrA gene sequence analysis was Methanobacterium formicicum strain (97% nucleic acid sequence identity). On the basis of physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, strain KOR-1 is proposed as a new strain within the genus Methanobacterium, Methanobacterium formicicum KOR-1.

  3. Catenisphaera adipataccumulans gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of the family Erysipelotrichaceae isolated from an anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Manabu; Katayama, Taiki; Morita, Naoki; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-03-01

    An obligately anaerobic bacterium, designated strain GK12(T), was isolated from an anaerobic digester in Fukagawa, Hokkaido Prefecture, Japan. The cells of strain GK12(T) were non-motile, non-spore-forming cocci that commonly occurred in chains. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain GK12(T) was affiliated with the family Erysipelotrichaceae in the phylum Firmicutes and showed 91.8 % sequence similarity to the most closely related species, Faecalicoccus acidiformans. The strain grew at 30-50 °C (optimally at 40 °C) and at pH 5.5-8.5 (optimally at pH 7.5). The main end product of glucose fermentation was lactate. Yeast extract was required for growth. The strain contained C14 : 0, C14 : 0 1,1-dimethoxyalkane (DMA), C16 : 0 DMA and C18 : 0 DMA as the major cellular fatty acids (>10 % of the total). The polar lipid profile was composed of phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol and an unidentified phospholipid. The whole-cell sugars were galactose, rhamnose and ribose. The cell-wall murein contained alanine, glutamic acid, lysine, serine and threonine, but not diaminopimelic acid. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 47.7 mol%. Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic properties, a novel genus and species, Catenisphaera adipataccumulans gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate strain GK12(T) ( = NBRC 108915(T) = DSM 25799(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  4. Regulation of mitochondrial respiration by inorganic phosphate; comparing permeabilized muscle fibers and isolated mitochondria prepared from type-1 and type-2 rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Quistorff, Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    -II muscle from male Wistar rats were prepared. Respiration was measured while the medium P(i) concentration was gradually increased. The apparent K(m) values for P(i) were 607 +/- 17 microM and 405 +/- 15 microM (P ...ADP is generally accepted as a key regulator of oxygen consumption both in isolated mitochondria and in permeabilized fibers from skeletal muscle. The present study explored inorganic phosphate in a similar regulatory role. Saponin permeabilized fibers and isolated mitochondria from type-I and type...... were significantly lower than type-1 permeabilized fibers, 338 +/- 130 microM and 235 +/- 30 microM (P muscle is unknown, but a similar pattern has been observed for K(m) of ADP...

  5. Regulation of mitochondrial respiration by inorganic phosphate; comparing permeabilized muscle fibers and isolated mitochondria prepared from type-1 and type-2 rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Quistorff, Bjørn

    2009-01-01

    ADP is generally accepted as a key regulator of oxygen consumption both in isolated mitochondria and in permeabilized fibers from skeletal muscle. The present study explored inorganic phosphate in a similar regulatory role. Saponin permeabilized fibers and isolated mitochondria from type-I and type-II muscle from male Wistar rats were prepared. Respiration was measured while the medium P(i) concentration was gradually increased. The apparent K(m) values for P(i) were 607 +/- 17 microM and 405 +/- 15 microM (P muscle is unknown, but a similar pattern has been observed for K(m) of ADP. Our data indicate that phosphate may play a role in regulation of oxygen consumption in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Helicobacter ganmani sp nov., a urease-negative anaerobe isolated from the intestines of laboratory mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, B.R.; O'Rourke, J.L.; Vandamme, P.

    2001-01-01

    and found to be identical to one another. H. rodentium was the most closely related species in terms of 16S rDNA sequence similarity (98.2%). Numerical analysis of whole-cell proteins by SDS-PAGE for nine isolates was carried out with a comparison to all known Helicobacter species, including newly...

  7. Antibiotic resistance genes in anaerobic bacteria isolated from primary dental root canal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F

    2012-12-01

    Fourty-one bacterial strains isolated from infected dental root canals and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence were screened for the presence of 14 genes encoding resistance to beta-lactams, tetracycline and macrolides. Thirteen isolates (32%) were positive for at least one of the target antibiotic resistance genes. These strains carrying at least one antibiotic resistance gene belonged to 11 of the 26 (42%) infected root canals sampled. Two of these positive cases had two strains carrying resistance genes. Six out of 7 Fusobacterium strains harbored at least one of the target resistance genes. One Dialister invisus strain was positive for 3 resistance genes, and 4 other strains carried two of the target genes. Of the 6 antibiotic resistance genes detected in root canal strains, the most prevalent were blaTEM (17% of the strains), tetW (10%), and ermC (10%). Some as-yet-uncharacterized Fusobacterium and Prevotella isolates were positive for blaTEM, cfxA and tetM. Findings demonstrated that an unexpectedly large proportion of dental root canal isolates, including as-yet-uncharacterized strains previously regarded as uncultivated phylotypes, can carry antibiotic resistance genes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., a new anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic, spore-forming acetogen isolated from Mono Lake in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, E. V.; Hoover, R. B.; Bej, A. K.; Marsic, D.; Detkova, E. N.; Whitman, W. B.; Krader, P.

    2003-01-01

    A novel extremely haloalkaliphilic, strictly anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium strain APO was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, alkaline Mono Lake in California. The Gram-positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.55- 0.7x1.7-3.0 microns were motile by a single laterally attached flagellum. Strain APO was mesophilic (range 10-48 C, optimum of 37 C); halophilic (NaCl range 1-20% (w/v) with optimum of 3-5% (w/v), and alkaliphilic (pH range 8.0-10.5, optimum 9.5). The novel isolate required sodium ions in the medium. Strain APO was an organotroph with a fermentative type of metabolism and used the substrates peptone, bacto-tryptone, casamino acid, yeast extract, L-serine, L-lysine, L-histidine, L-arginine, and pyruvate. The new isolate performed the Stickland reaction with the following amino acid pairs: proline + alanine, glycine + alanine, and tryptophan + valine. The main end product of growth was acetate. High activity of CO dehydrogenase and hydrogenase indicated the presence of a homoacetogenic, non-cycling acetyl-coA pathway. Strain APO was resistant to kanamycin but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). The sequence of the 16s rRNA gene of strain APO possessed 98.2% similarity with the sequence from Tindullia magadiensis Z-7934, but the DNA-DNA hybridization value between these organisms was only 55%. On the basis of these physiological and molecular properties, strain APO is proposed to be a novel species of the genus Tindallia with the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., (type strain APO = ATCC BAA-393 - DSM 14871).

  9. Chitinolytic enzymes from bacterium inhabiting human gastrointestinal tract -- critical parameters of protein isolation from anaerobic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dušková, Jarmila; Tishchenko, Galina; Ponomareva, Evgenia; Šimůnek, Jiří; Koppová, Ingrid; Skálová, Tereza; Štěpánková, Andrea; Hašek, Jindřich; Dohnálek, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The object of this study are chitinolytic enzymes produced by bacterium Clostridium paraputrificum J4 isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of a healthy human. In particular, we focus on the development of purification protocols, determination of properties of the enzymes and their activity profiles. The process of bacteria cultivation and isolation of chitinolytic complex of enzymes showing specific activities of endo-, exo-chitinase and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase was optimized. A range of various purification procedures were used such as ultrafiltration, precipitation, chromatographic separations (ion-exchange, size exclusion, chromatofocusing) in altered combinations. The optimal purification protocol comprises two or three steps. Individual samples were analyzed by SDS/PAGE electrophoresis and after renaturation their activity could be detected using zymograms. Mass spectroscopy peptide fragment analysis and MALDI analysis of the purest samples indicate presence of endochitinase B (molecular mass about 85 kDa) and of 60-kDa endo- and exochitinases.

  10. Methylomusa anaerophila gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic methanol-utilizing bacterium isolated from a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Nanako; Yamamuro, Ayaka; Miyahara, Morio; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Abe, Takashi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2018-04-01

    Abacterial strain, designated MMFC1 T , was isolated from a methanol-fed microbial fuel cell that had been inoculated with sludge obtained from a wastewater-treatmentfacility in a chemical plant. The strain grows by fermenting methanol to produce acetate under anaerobic conditions, while homoacetogenic growth is not observed. MMFC1 T also grows on pyruvate and lactate but not on sugars and other organic acids. Cells are curved rods and motile, have peritrichous flagella, and form endospores. The genome sequence of strain MMFC1 T supports the physiological data. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence shows that strain MMFC1 T is affiliated with the family Sporomusaceae, while the closest relative is Sporomusa ovata with nucleotide-sequencesimilarity of 93.5 %. Major fatty acids are iso-C13 : 0 3-OH, C16 : 1ω9 and iso-C17 : 0. On the basis of its physiological, genomic and phylogenetic features, a novel genus and species are proposed to accommodate strain MMFC1 T , with the name Methylomusa anaerophila gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Methylomusa anaerophila is MMFC1 T (=JCM 31821 T = KCTC 15592 T ).

  11. Isolation and characterization of Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterium which reductively dechlorinates chlorophenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, I; Woese, C; Wiegel, J

    1994-10-01

    An organism that is able to reductively ortho-dechlorinate 2,4-dichlorophenol and 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetate (3-Cl-4-OHPA) was isolated from a methanogenic lake sediment. This organism, an anaerobic, motile, Gram-type-positive, rod-shaped bacterium, grew in the presence of 0.1% yeast extract when pyruvate, lactate, formate, or hydrogen was used as the electron donor for reductive dehalogenation of 3-Cl-4-OHPA. Sulfite, thiosulfate, and sulfur were reduced to sulfide, nitrate was reduced to nitrite, and fumarate was reduced to succinate. Dissimilatory reduction of sulfate could not be demonstrated, and no adenylylsulfate reductase was detected with an immunoassay. The organism fermented two pyruvate molecules to one lactate molecule, one acetate molecule, and one carbon dioxide molecule. The pH and temperature optima for both growth and dechlorination of 3-Cl-4-OHPA were 7.5 and 38 degrees C, respectively. The doubling time under these conditions was approximately 3.5 h. On the basis of the results of a 16S rRNA analysis and the inability of the organism to use sulfate as an electron acceptor, strain JW/IU-DC1 is described as the type strain of the new taxon Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans gen. nov., sp. nov.

  12. Partial characterization of xylanase produced by Caldicoprobacter algeriensis, a new thermophilic anaerobic bacterium isolated from an Algerian hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouacem, Khelifa; Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Boucherba, Nawel; Joseph, Manon; Gagaoua, Mohammed; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Kecha, Mouloud; Benallaoua, Said; Hacène, Hocine; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2014-11-01

    To date, xylanases have expanded their use in many processing industries, such as pulp, paper, food, and textile. This study aimed the production and partial characterization of a thermostable xylanase from a novel thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Caldicoprobacter algeriensis strain TH7C1(T) isolated from a northeast hot spring in Algeria. The obtained results showed that C. algeriensis xylanase seems not to be correlated with the biomass growth profile whereas the maximum enzyme production (140.0 U/ml) was recorded in stationary phase (18 h). The temperature and pH for optimal activities were 70 °C and 11.0, respectively. The enzyme was found to be stable at 50, 60, 70, and 80 °C, with a half-life of 10, 9, 8, and 4 h, respectively. Influence of metal ions on enzyme activity revealed that Ca(+2) enhances greatly the relative activity to 151.3 %; whereas Hg(2+) inhibited significantly the enzyme. At the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the production of xylanase by the thermophilic bacterium C. algeriensis. This thermo- and alkaline-tolerant xylanase could be used in pulp bleaching process.

  13. Ruthenibacterium lactatiformans gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, lactate-producing member of the family Ruminococcaceae isolated from human faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkoporov, Andrei N; Chaplin, Andrei V; Shcherbakova, Victoria A; Suzina, Natalia E; Kafarskaia, Lyudmila I; Bozhenko, Vladimir K; Efimov, Boris A

    2016-08-01

    Two novel strains of Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, obligately anaerobic, non-spore-forming, non-motile bacteria were isolated from the faeces of healthy human subjects. The strains, designated as 585-1T and 668, were characterized by mesophilic fermentative metabolism, production of d-lactic acid, succinic acid and acetic acid as end products of d-glucose fermentation, prevalence of C18 : 1ω9, C18 : 1ω9 aldehyde, C16 : 0 and C16 : 1ω7c fatty acids, presence of glycine, glutamic acid, lysine, alanine and aspartic acid in the petidoglycan peptide moiety and lack of respiratory quinones. Whole genome sequencing revealed the DNA G+C content was 56.4-56.6 mol%. The complete 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains shared 91.7/91.6 % similarity with Anaerofilum pentosovorans FaeT, 91.3/91.2 % with Gemmiger formicilis ATCC 27749T and 88.9/88.8 % with Faecalibacterium prausnitzii ATCC 27768T. On the basis of chemotaxonomic and genomic properties it was concluded that the strains represent a novel species in a new genus within the family Ruminococcaceae, for which the name Ruthenibacterium lactatiformans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Ruthenibacterium lactatiformans is 585-1T (=DSM 100348T=VKM B-2901T).

  14. Isolation and characterization of Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus sp. nov., an extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic, anaerobic bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mladenovska, Zuzana; Mathrani, Indra M.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1995-01-01

    and ethanol occurred as minor fermentation products. Only a restricted number of carbon sources (cellulose, xylan, starch, pectin, cellobiose, xylose, maltose and lactose) were used as substrates. During growth on Avicel, the bacterium produced free cellulases with carboxymethylcellulase and avicelase...... activity. The G + C content of the cellular DNA of strain 6A was 35.2 +/- 0.8 mol%. Complete 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that strain 6A was phylogenetically related to Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus. It is proposed that the isolated bacterium be named Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus sp. nov....

  15. Tepidibacillus infernus sp. nov., a moderately thermophilic, selenate- and arsenate-respiring hydrolytic bacterium isolated from a gold mine, and emended description of the genus Tepidibacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podosokorskaya, Olga A; Merkel, Alexander Y; Gavrilov, Sergey N; Fedoseev, Igor; Heerden, Esta van; Cason, Errol D; Novikov, Andrey A; Kolganova, Tatyana V; Korzhenkov, Aleksei A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Kublanov, Ilya V

    2016-08-01

    A novel aerotolerant anaerobic, moderately thermophilic, organotrophic bacterium, strain MBL-TLPT, was isolated from a sample of microbial mat, developed under the flow of subsurface water in TauTona gold mine, South Africa. Cells of the new isolate were flagellated, spore-forming rods, 0.25-0.5 µm in width and 3-15 µm in length. Strain MBL-TLPT grew in the temperature range from 25 to 58 °C, pH range from 5.6 to 8.8 and at NaCl concentration from 0 to 85 g l-1. The isolate was able to ferment yeast extract and mono-, oligo- and polysaccharides, including starch and xanthan gum. The G+C content of the DNA was 35 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences of strain MBL-TLPT and relatives showed its affiliation to the genus Tepidibacillus. Tepidibacillus fermentans STGHT was its closest relative (97.1 % identity of 16S rRNA gene sequences). Based on phylogenetic analysis and the physiological properties of the novel isolate, we propose a novel species, Tepidibacillus infernus sp. nov., with MBL-TLPT(=DSM 28123T=VKM В-2949T) as the type strain.

  16. Fermentative hydrogen production from hydrolyzed cellulosic feedstock prepared with a thermophilic anaerobic bacterial isolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Yung Chung [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1 University Road, Tainan 701 (China); Huang, Chi-Yu.; Fu, Tzu-Ning [Department of Environmental Engineering and Science, Tunghai University, Taichung 407 (China); Chen, Chun-Yen; Chang, Jo-Shu [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1 University Road, Tainan 701 (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan (China)

    2009-08-15

    Hydrogen gas was produced via dark fermentation from natural cellulosic materials and {alpha}-cellulose via a two-step process, in which the cellulosic substrates were first hydrolyzed by an isolated cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium strain TCW1, and the resulting hydrolysates were then used as substrate for fermentative H{sub 2} production. The TCW1 strain was able to hydrolyze all the cellulosic materials examined to produce reducing sugars (RS), attaining the best reducing sugar production yield of 0.65 g reducing sugar/g substrate from hydrolysis of {alpha}-cellulose. The hydrolysates of those cellulosic materials were successfully converted to H{sub 2} via dark fermentation using seven H{sub 2}-producing bacterial isolates. The bioH{sub 2} production performance was highly dependent on the type of cellulosic feedstock used, the initial reducing sugar concentration (C{sub RS,o}) (ranging from 0.7 to 4.5 mg/l), as well as the composition of sugar and soluble metabolites present in the cellulosic hydrolysates. It was found that Clostridium butyricum CGS5 displayed the highest H{sub 2}-producing efficiency with a cumulative H{sub 2} production of 270 ml/l from {alpha}-cellulose hydrolysate (C{sub RS,o} = 4.52 mg/l) and a H{sub 2} yield of 7.40 mmol/g RS (or 6.66 mmol/g substrate) from napier grass hydrolysate (C{sub RS,o} = 1.22 g/l). (author)

  17. The potential of bacteria isolated from ruminal contents of seaweed-eating North Ronaldsay sheep to hydrolyse seaweed components and produce methane by anaerobic digestion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allan G; Withers, Susan; Sutherland, Alastair D

    2013-01-01

    The production of methane biofuel from seaweeds is limited by the hydrolysis of polysaccharides. The rumen microbiota of seaweed-eating North Ronaldsay sheep was studied for polysaccharidic bacterial isolates degrading brown-seaweed polysaccharides. Only nine isolates out of 65 utilized >90% of the polysaccharide they were isolated on. The nine isolates (eight Prevotella spp. and one Clostridium butyricum) utilized whole Laminaria hyperborea extract and a range of seaweed polysaccharides, including alginate (seven out of nine isolates), laminarin and carboxymethylcellulose (eight out of nine isolates); while two out of nine isolates additionally hydrolysed fucoidan to some extent. Crude enzyme extracts from three of the isolates studied further had diverse glycosidases and polysaccharidase activities; particularly against laminarin and alginate (two isolates were shown to have alginate lyase activity) and notably fucoidan and carageenan (one isolate). In serial culture rumen microbiota hydrolysed a range of seaweed polysaccharides (fucoidan to a notably lesser degree) and homogenates of L. hyperborea, mixed Fucus spp. and Ascophyllum nodosum to produce methane and acetate. The rumen microbiota and isolates represent potential adjunct organisms or enzymes which may improve hydrolysis of seaweed components and thus improve the efficiency of seaweed anaerobic digestion for methane biofuel production. © 2012 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. In vitro efficacy of cefovecin against anaerobic bacteria isolated from subgingival plaque of dogs and cats with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazandi, Manouchehr; Bird, Philip S; Owens, Jane; Wilson, Gary; Meyer, James N; Trott, Darren J

    2014-08-01

    Periodontal disease is a common disease of dogs and cats often requiring antimicrobial treatment as an adjunct to mechanical debridement. However, correct compliance with oral antimicrobial therapy in companion animals is often difficult. Cefovecin is a recently introduced veterinary cephalosporin that has demonstrated prolonged concentrations in extracellular fluid, allowing for dosing intervals of up to 14 days. Subgingival samples were collected from the oral cavity of 29 dogs and eight cats exhibiting grade 2 or grade 3 periodontal disease. Samples were cultivated on Wilkin Chalgrens agar and incubated in an anaerobic chamber for seven days. Selected anaerobic bacteria were isolated and identified to species level using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for cefovecin and six additional antimicrobials using the agar dilution methodology recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The 65 clinical isolates were identified as Porphyromonas gulae (n = 45), Porphyromonas crevioricanis (n = 12), Porphyromonas macacae (n = 1), Porphyromonas cangingivalis (n = 1) Fusobacterium nucleatum (n = 2), Fusobacterium russii (n = 1) and Solobacterium moorei (n = 3). This is the first report of S. moorei being isolated from companion animals with periodontal disease. All isolates were highly susceptible to cefovecin, with a MIC90 of ≤0.125 μg/ml. Conversely, different resistance rates to ampicillin, amoxicillin and erythromycin between isolates were detected. Cefovecin is thus shown to be effective in vitro against anaerobic bacteria isolated from dogs and cats with periodontal disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The isolation and characterization of new C. thermocellum strains and the evaluation of multiple anaerobic digestion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wen

    The overall objective of my research was to improve the efficiencies of bioconversions that produce renewable energy from lignocellulosic biomass. To this end, my studies addressed issues important to two promising strategies: consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) and anaerobic digestion (AD). CBP achieves saccharolytic enzyme production, hydrolysis, and fermentation in a single step and is considered to be the most cost-effective model. Anaerobic bacteria that can be used in CBP are highly desirable. To that end, two thermophilic and cellulolytic bacterial strains were isolated and characterized (Chapter 3). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, both strains CS7 and CS8 are closely related to Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405. However, they had significantly higher specific cellulase activities and ethanol/acetate ratios than C. thermocellum ATCC 27405. As a result, CS7 and CS8 are two new highly cellulolytic and ethanologenic C. thermocellum strains, with application potentials in research and development of CBP. As some of the most promising AD processes, two temperature-phased AD (TPAD) systems, in comparison with a thermophilic single-stage AD (TSAD) system and a mesophilic two-stage AD (MTAD) system, were studied in treating high-strength dairy cattle manure. The TPAD systems, with the thermophilic digesters acidified (AT-TPAD, Chapter 4) or operated at neutral pH (NT-TPAD, Chapter 5), were optimized at the thermophilic temperature of 50°C and a volume ratio between the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters of 1:2. Despite similar methane productions, the NT-TPAD system achieved significantly higher volatile solid (VS) removal than the AT-TPAD system and needed no external pH adjustments (Chapter 6). At the same overall OLR, the TSAD system achieved the highest performance, followed by the NT-TPAD and the MTAD systems (Chapter 7). Each digester harbored distinct yet dynamic microbial populations, some of which were significantly correlated or associated

  20. Acetoanaerobium pronyense sp. nov., an anaerobic alkaliphilic bacterium isolated from a carbonate chimney of the Prony Hydrothermal Field (New Caledonia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bes, Méline; Merrouch, Mériem; Joseph, Manon; Quéméneur, Marianne; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Erauso, Gaël; Postec, Anne

    2015-08-01

    A novel anaerobic bacterial strain, ST07-YET, was isolated from a carbonate chimney of the Prony Hydrothermal Field (PHF) in New Caledonia. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, straight rods (0.7-0.8 × 3.0-5.0 μm) and motile by means of lateral flagella. Strain ST07-YET was mesophilic (optimum 35 °C), moderately alkaliphilic and halotolerant (optimum pH 8.7 and 5 g l- 1 NaCl). Elemental sulfur, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite were not used as terminal electron acceptors. Yeast extract, peptone, tryptone, Casamino acids, crotonate, pyruvate, galactose, maltose, sucrose, ribose, trehalose and glucose were used as carbon sources. Glucose fermentation led to acetate, H2 and CO2 formation. Arginine, serine, histidine, lysine, methionine and cysteine improved growth, but the Stickland reaction was negative for the combinations of amino acids tested. The major metabolic products from yeast extract fermentation were H2, CO2, acetate, butyrate, isobutyrate, isovalerate and propionate. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C16  :  0, C16  :  1cis9, C14  :  0 and C16  :  1cis7 (>5 % of total fatty acids). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 32.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain ST07-YET was most closely related to Clostridium sticklandii DSM 519T and Acetoanaerobium noterae NOT-3T (96.7 % and 96.8 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). On the basis of phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and physiological properties, strain ST07-YET is proposed to represent a novel species of the genus Acetoanaerobium (order Clostridiales, phylum Firmicutes) with the name Acetoanaerobium pronyense sp. nov. The type strain is ST07-YET ( = DSM 27512T = JCM 19400T).

  1. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and of Pu-EDTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xun, Luying

    2009-11-20

    The enhanced mobility of radionuclides by co-disposed chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), is likely to occur only under anaerobic conditions. Our extensive effort to enrich and isolate anaerobic EDTA-degrading bacteria has failed. Others has tried and also failed. To explain the lack of anaerobic biodegradation of EDTA, we proposed that EDTA has to be transported into the cells for metabolism. A failure of uptake may contribute to the lack of EDTA degradation under anaerobic conditions. We demonstrated that an aerobic EDTA-degrading bacterium strain BNC1 uses an ABC-type transporter system to uptake EDTA. The system has a periplasmic binding protein that bind EDTA and then interacts with membrane proteins to transport EDTA into the cell at the expense of ATP. The bind protein EppA binds only free EDTA with a Kd of 25 nM. The low Kd value indicates high affinity. However, the Kd value of Ni-EDTA is 2.4 x 10^(-10) nM, indicating much stronger stability. Since Ni and other trace metals are essential for anaerobic respiration, we conclude that the added EDTA sequestrates all trace metals and making anaerobic respiration impossible. Thus, the data explain the lack of anaerobic enrichment cultures for EDTA degradation. Although we did not obtain an EDTA degrading culture under anaerobic conditions, our finding may promote the use of certain metals that forms more stable metal-EDTA complexes than Pu(III)-EDTA to prevent the enhanced mobility. Further, our data explain why EDTA is the most dominant organic pollutant in surface waters, due to the lack of degradation of certain metal-EDTA complexes.

  2. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and of Pu-EDTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xun, Luying

    2009-01-01

    The enhanced mobility of radionuclides by co-disposed chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), is likely to occur only under anaerobic conditions. Our extensive effort to enrich and isolate anaerobic EDTA-degrading bacteria has failed. Others has tried and also failed. To explain the lack of anaerobic biodegradation of EDTA, we proposed that EDTA has to be transported into the cells for metabolism. A failure of uptake may contribute to the lack of EDTA degradation under anaerobic conditions. We demonstrated that an aerobic EDTA-degrading bacterium strain BNC1 uses an ABC-type transporter system to uptake EDTA. The system has a periplasmic binding protein that bind EDTA and then interacts with membrane proteins to transport EDTA into the cell at the expense of ATP. The bind protein EppA binds only free EDTA with a Kd of 25 nM. The low Kd value indicates high affinity. However, the Kd value of Ni-EDTA is 2.4 x 10 -10 nM, indicating much stronger stability. Since Ni and other trace metals are essential for anaerobic respiration, we conclude that the added EDTA sequestrates all trace metals and making anaerobic respiration impossible. Thus, the data explain the lack of anaerobic enrichment cultures for EDTA degradation. Although we did not obtain an EDTA degrading culture under anaerobic conditions, our finding may promote the use of certain metals that forms more stable metal-EDTA complexes than Pu(III)-EDTA to prevent the enhanced mobility. Further, our data explain why EDTA is the most dominant organic pollutant in surface waters, due to the lack of degradation of certain metal-EDTA complexes.

  3. Mitochondrial Respiration and Oxygen Tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Daniel S; Meitha, Karlia; Considine, Michael J; Foyer, Christine H

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of respiration and oxygen tension in plant organs allow a precise understanding of mitochondrial capacity and function within the context of cellular oxygen metabolism. Here we describe methods that can be routinely used for the isolation of intact mitochondria, and the determination of respiratory electron transport, together with techniques for in vivo determination of oxygen tension and measurement of respiration by both CO 2 production and O 2 consumption that enables calculation of the respiratory quotient [CO 2 ]/[O 2 ].

  4. Defluviitalea raffinosedens sp. nov., a thermophilic, anaerobic, saccharolytic bacterium isolated from an anaerobic batch digester treating animal manure and rice straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shichun; Huang, Yan; Wang, Cong; Fan, Hui; Dai, Lirong; Zhou, Zheng; Liu, Xing; Deng, Yu

    2017-05-01

    A thermophilic, anaerobic, fermentative bacterium, strain A6T, was obtained from an anaerobic batch digester treating animal manure and rice straw. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, slightly curved rods with a size of 0.6-1×2.5-8.2 µm, non-motile and produced terminal spores. The temperature, pH and NaCl concentration ranges for growth were 40-60 °C, 6.5-8.0 and 0-15.0 g l-1, with optimum growth noted at 50-55 °C, pH 7.5 and in the absence of NaCl, respectively. Yeast extract was required for growth. d-Glucose, maltose, d-xylose, d-galactose, d-fructose, d-ribose, lactose, raffinose, sucrose, d-arabinose, cellobiose, d-mannose and yeast extract were used as carbon and energy sources. The fermentation products from glucose were ethanol, lactate, acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, iso-butyrate, iso-valerate, H2 and CO2. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 36.6 mol%. The predominant fatty acids were C16 : 0, iso-C17 : 1, C14 : 0, C16 : 1ω7c, C16 : 0 N-alcohol and C13 : 0 3-OH. Respiratory quinones were not detected. The polar lipid profile comprised phosphoglycolipids, phospholipids, glycolipids, a diphosphatidylglycerol, a phosphatidylglycerol and an unidentified lipid. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the strain was closely related to Defluviitalea saccharophila DSM 22681T with a similarity of 96.0 %. Based on the morphological, physiological and taxonomic characterization, strain A6T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Defluviitalea, for which the name Defluviitalea raffinosedens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is A6T (=DSM 28090T=ACCC 19951T).

  5. Isolation and characterization of Magnetospirillum sp. strain 15-1 as a representative anaerobic toluene-degrader from a constructed wetland model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Meyer-Cifuentes

    Full Text Available Previously, Planted Fixed-Bed Reactors (PFRs have been used to investigate microbial toluene removal in the rhizosphere of constructed wetlands. Aerobic toluene degradation was predominant in these model systems although bulk redox conditions were hypoxic to anoxic. However, culture-independent approaches indicated also that microbes capable of anaerobic toluene degradation were abundant. Therefore, we aimed at isolating anaerobic-toluene degraders from one of these PFRs. From the obtained colonies which consisted of spirilli-shaped bacteria, a strain designated 15-1 was selected for further investigations. Analysis of its 16S rRNA gene revealed greatest similarity (99% with toluene-degrading Magnetospirillum sp. TS-6. Isolate 15-1 grew with up to 0.5 mM of toluene under nitrate-reducing conditions. Cells reacted to higher concentrations of toluene by an increase in the degree of saturation of their membrane fatty acids. Strain 15-1 contained key genes for the anaerobic degradation of toluene via benzylsuccinate and subsequently the benzoyl-CoA pathway, namely bssA, encoding for the alpha subunit of benzylsuccinate synthase, bcrC for subunit C of benzoyl-CoA reductase and bamA for 6-oxocyclohex-1-ene-1-carbonyl-CoA hydrolase. Finally, most members of a clone library of bssA generated from the PFR had highest similarity to bssA from strain 15-1. Our study provides insights about the physiological capacities of a strain of Magnetospirillum isolated from a planted system where active rhizoremediation of toluene is taking place.

  6. Isolation and characterization of newMethanosarcina mazeistrains KOR-3, -4, -5, and -6 from an anaerobic digester using pig slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battumur, Urantulkhuur; Yoon, Youngman; Bae, Gui Sek; Kim, Chang-Hyun

    2017-08-01

    An experiment was conducted to isolate and identify new methanogens in Korea from an anaerobic digester that uses pig slurry. An anaerobic digestate sample was collected from an anaerobic digester using pig slurry. Pre-reduced media were used for the growth and isolation of methanogens. Growth temperature range, pH range, NaCl concentration range, substrate utilization, and antibiotic tolerance were investigated to determine the physiological characteristics of isolated methanogens. The isolates were also examined microscopically for their morphology and Gram-stained. Polymerase chain reaction of 16S rRNA and mcrA gene-based amplicons was used for identification purpose. Four strains, designated KOR-3, -4, -5, and -6, were isolated and were non-motile, irregular coccoid, and 0.5 to 1.5 μm in diameter. Moreover, the cell walls of isolated strains were Gram-negative. KOR-3 and KOR-4 strains used acetate for methane production but did not use H 2 +CO 2 , formate, or methanol as a growth substrate KOR-5 and KOR-6 strains utilized acetate, methanol, and trimethylamine for methanogenesis but did not use H 2 +CO 2 or formate as a growth substrate. The optimum temperature and pH for growth of four strains were 39°C and 6.8 to 7.2, respectively. The optimum concentration of NaCl for growth of KOR-3, KOR-5, and KOR-6 were 1.0% (w/v). The optimum NaCl concentration for KOR-4 was 0.5% (w/v). All of the strains tolerated ampicillin, penicillin G, kanamycin, streptomycin, and tetracycline; however, chloramphenicol inhibited cell growth. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and mcrA genes demonstrated that strains KOR-3, -4, -5, and -6 are related to Methanosarcina mazei ( M. mazei , 99% sequence similarity). On the basis of physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, strains KOR-3, -4, -5, and -6 are proposed to be new strains within the genus Methanosarcina , named M. mazei KOR-3, -4, -5, and -6.

  7. A comparative evaluation of antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, Curcuma longa, and Camellia sinensis as irrigating solutions on isolated anaerobic bacteria from infected primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhariwal, Neha Shashikant; Hugar, Shivayogi M; Harakuni, Sheetal; Sogi, Suma; Assudani, Harsha G; Mistry, Laresh Naresh

    2016-01-01

    In endodontics, most of the commercial intra-canal medicaments have cytotoxic reactions and because of their inability to eliminate bacteria from dentinal tubules, recent medicine has turned its attention to the usage of biologic medication prepared from natural plants. The literature to testify the efficacy of natural alternatives in primary teeth is meagre and its effects as irrigating solutions need to be evaluated. To evaluate the antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, ethanolic extracts of Curcuma longa (turmeric) and Camellia sinensis (green tea) as irrigating solutions against the anaerobic bacteria isolated from the root canals of infected primary teeth. Thirty patients were selected based on the selected inclusion and exclusion criteria. Preoperative radiographs were taken. Rubber dam isolation and working length estimation were done, following which thirty samples were taken from the root canals of infected primary teeth using sterile absorbent paper points and transferred to tubes containing thioglycolate transport medium. The bacteria were then isolated using standard microbiological protocols and were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity testing using the three test irrigants. SPSS 18 software using Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. The most commonly isolated bacteria included Porphyromonas sp., Bacteroides fragilis, Peptostreptococcus, and Staphylococcus aureus. Sodium hypochlorite and C. longa (turmeric) showed good antibacterial effect and were effective against most of the isolated bacteria. There was statistically significant difference in the antibacterial effect among the three tested groups (P < 0.001). The least effective was C. sinensis (green tea). The infected primary teeth almost always present with a polymicrobial structure with a wide variety of anaerobic bacteria. The chemo-mechanical preparation plays an important role in eradicating the population of predominant micro-organisms in treating these teeth with

  8. A comparative evaluation of antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, Curcuma longa, and Camellia sinensis as irrigating solutions on isolated anaerobic bacteria from infected primary teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Shashikant Dhariwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In endodontics, most of the commercial intra-canal medicaments have cytotoxic reactions and because of their inability to eliminate bacteria from dentinal tubules, recent medicine has turned its attention to the usage of biologic medication prepared from natural plants. The literature to testify the efficacy of natural alternatives in primary teeth is meagre and its effects as irrigating solutions need to be evaluated. Aim: To evaluate the antibacterial effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite, ethanolic extracts of Curcuma longa (turmeric and Camellia sinensis (green tea as irrigating solutions against the anaerobic bacteria isolated from the root canals of infected primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients were selected based on the selected inclusion and exclusion criteria. Preoperative radiographs were taken. Rubber dam isolation and working length estimation were done, following which thirty samples were taken from the root canals of infected primary teeth using sterile absorbent paper points and transferred to tubes containing thioglycolate transport medium. The bacteria were then isolated using standard microbiological protocols and were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity testing using the three test irrigants. Statistical Analysis: SPSS 18 software using Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Results: The most commonly isolated bacteria included Porphyromonas sp., Bacteroides fragilis, Peptostreptococcus, and Staphylococcus aureus. Sodium hypochlorite and C. longa (turmeric showed good antibacterial effect and were effective against most of the isolated bacteria. There was statistically significant difference in the antibacterial effect among the three tested groups (P < 0.001. The least effective was C. sinensis (green tea. Conclusion: The infected primary teeth almost always present with a polymicrobial structure with a wide variety of anaerobic bacteria. The chemo-mechanical preparation plays an important

  9. Anaerobic metabolism of pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, N.B.K.

    1980-01-01

    A manifold assembly system was used to study the metabolism of 14 C labelled PCNB in flooded and moist anaerobic soils. Soil respiration was generally enhanced by PCNB. More CO 2 was produced in moist anaerobic than in flooded anaerobic soil. Flooding reduced the volatilization of pesticide. The extractable radioactivity from the soil was same (70%) in the treatments. Nevertheless, differences were observed in distribution of PCNB and its degradation products. Pentachloroaniline (PCA) was the principal degradation product. Pentachlorothioanisole (PCTA) was more abundant in moist anaerobic than in flooded anaerobic soil. Pentachlorophenol (PCP) was formed from PCNB in anaerobic soil. Degradation of PCA, PCTA and PCP were further studied in soil and a possible pathway for anaerobic degradation of PCNB was proposed. (author)

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Alkaliphilus metalliredigens Strain QYMF, an Alkaliphilic and Metal-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Borax-Contaminated Leachate Ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, C; Copeland, A; Lucas, S; Lapidus, A; Barry, K; Detter, J C; Glavina Del Rio, T; Hammon, N; Israni, S; Dalin, E; Tice, H; Pitluck, S; Chertkov, O; Brettin, T; Bruce, D; Han, C; Schmutz, J; Larimer, F; Land, M L; Hauser, L; Kyrpides, N; Mikhailova, N; Ye, Q; Zhou, J; Richardson, P; Fields, M W

    2016-11-03

    Alkaliphilus metalliredigens strain QYMF is an anaerobic, alkaliphilic, and metal-reducing bacterium associated with phylum Firmicutes QYMF was isolated from alkaline borax leachate ponds. The genome sequence will help elucidate the role of metal-reducing microorganisms under alkaline environments, a capability that is not commonly observed in metal respiring-microorganisms. Copyright © 2016 Hwang et al.

  11. Elemental sulfur and thiosulfate disproportionation by Desulfocapsa sulfoexigens sp. nov., a new anaerobic bacterium isolated from marine surface sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finster, Kai; Liesack, Werner; Thamdrup, Bo

    1998-01-01

    A mesophilic, anaerobic, gram-negative bacterium, strain SB164P1, was enriched and isolated from oxidized marine surface sediment with elemental sulfur as the sole energy substrate in the presence of ferrihydrite. Elemental sulfur was disproportionated to hydrogen sulfide and sulfate. Growth...... was observed exclusively in the presence of a hydrogen sulfide scavenger, e.g., ferrihydrite. In the absence of a scavenger, sulfide and sulfate production were observed but no growth occurred. Strain SB164P1 grew also by disproportionation of thiosulfate and sulfite. With thiosulfate, the growth efficiency...... was higher in ferrihydrite-supplemented media than in media without ferrihydrite. Growth coupled to sulfate reduction was not observed. However, a slight sulfide production occurred in cultures incubated with formate and sulfate. Strain SB164P1 is the first bacterium described that grows...

  12. FERMENTATION OF INULIN BY CLOSTRIDIUM-THERMOSUCCINOGENES SP-NOV, A THERMOPHILIC ANAEROBIC BACTERIUM ISOLATED FROM VARIOUS HABITATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DRENT, WJ; LAHPOR, GA; WIEGANT, WM; GOTTSCHAL, JC

    Four closely related strains of thermophilic bacteria were isolated via enrichment in batch and continuous culture with inulin as the sole source of carbon and energy by using inoculations from various sources. These new strains were isolated from beet pulp from a sugar refinery, soil around a

  13. Nitric oxide and mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G C

    1999-05-05

    Nitric oxide (NO) and its derivative peroxynitrite (ONOO-) inhibit mitochondrial respiration by distinct mechanisms. Low (nanomolar) concentrations of NO specifically inhibit cytochrome oxidase in competition with oxygen, and this inhibition is fully reversible when NO is removed. Higher concentrations of NO can inhibit the other respiratory chain complexes, probably by nitrosylating or oxidising protein thiols and removing iron from the iron-sulphur centres. Peroxynitrite causes irreversible inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and damage to a variety of mitochondrial components via oxidising reactions. Thus peroxynitrite inhibits or damages mitochondrial complexes I, II, IV and V, aconitase, creatine kinase, the mitochondrial membrane, mitochondrial DNA, superoxide dismutase, and induces mitochondrial swelling, depolarisation, calcium release and permeability transition. The NO inhibition of cytochrome oxidase may be involved in the physiological regulation of respiration rate, as indicated by the finding that isolated cells producing NO can regulate cellular respiration by this means, and the finding that inhibition of NO synthase in vivo causes a stimulation of tissue and whole body oxygen consumption. The recent finding that mitochondria may contain a NO synthase and can produce significant amounts of NO to regulate their own respiration also suggests this regulation may be important for physiological regulation of energy metabolism. However, definitive evidence that NO regulation of mitochondrial respiration occurs in vivo is still missing, and interpretation is complicated by the fact that NO appears to affect tissue respiration by cGMP-dependent mechanisms. The NO inhibition of cytochrome oxidase may also be involved in the cytotoxicity of NO, and may cause increased oxygen radical production by mitochondria, which may in turn lead to the generation of peroxynitrite. Mitochondrial damage by peroxynitrite may mediate the cytotoxicity of NO, and may be

  14. Anaerobic microsites have an unaccounted role in soil carbon stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiluweit, Marco; Wanzek, Tom; Kleber, Markus; Nico, Peter; Fendorf, Scott

    2017-11-24

    Soils represent the largest carbon reservoir within terrestrial ecosystems. The mechanisms controlling the amount of carbon stored and its feedback to the climate system, however, remain poorly resolved. Global carbon models assume that carbon cycling in upland soils is entirely driven by aerobic respiration; the impact of anaerobic microsites prevalent even within well-drained soils is missed within this conception. Here, we show that anaerobic microsites are important regulators of soil carbon persistence, shifting microbial metabolism to less efficient anaerobic respiration, and selectively protecting otherwise bioavailable, reduced organic compounds such as lipids and waxes from decomposition. Further, shifting from anaerobic to aerobic conditions leads to a 10-fold increase in volume-specific mineralization rate, illustrating the sensitivity of anaerobically protected carbon to disturbance. The vulnerability of anaerobically protected carbon to future climate or land use change thus constitutes a yet unrecognized soil carbon-climate feedback that should be incorporated into terrestrial ecosystem models.

  15. Tindallia Californiensis sp. nov.: A New Halo-Alkaliphilic Primary Anaerobe, Isolated from Meromictic soda Mono Lake in California and the Correction of Diagnosis for Genus Tindallia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena; Marsic, Damien; Hoover, Richard B.; Kevbrin, Vadim; Whitman, William B.; Krader, Paul; Cleland, Dave; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel extremely halo-alkaliphilic, bacterium strain APO (sup T) was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, soda Mono Lake in California. Gram positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.6-0.7x 2.5-4.0 micrometers which occur singly, in pairs or short curved chains. Cells, are motile by singular subcentral flagellum. Strain APO (sup T) is mesophilic: growth was observed over the temperature range of +10 C to +48 C (optimum +37 C), NaCl concentration range 1-20 %, wt/vol (optimum 3-5%, wt/vol) and pH range 8.0-11.0 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly halo-alkaliphilic, requires sodium chloride in medium, obligately anaerobic and catalase-negative. Strain APO (sup T) is organo-heterotroph with fermentative type of metabolism, and uses as substrates: peptone, badotryptone, casamino acids, yeast extract, L-serine, L-lysine, L-histidine, L-arginine, and pyruvate. The main end products of growth on peptone medium were: lactate, acetate, propionate, and ethanol. Strain APO (sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The sum of G+C in DNA is 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). On the bait of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered as novel species of genus Tindallia; and the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., is proposed for new isolate (type strain APO (sup T) - ATCC BAA_393(sup T) = DSMZ 14871 (sup T)).

  16. Denitrobacterium detoxificans gen. nov., sp. nov., a ruminal bacterium that respires on nitrocompounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R C; Rasmussen, M A; Jensen, N S; Allison, M J

    2000-03-01

    A new group of anaerobic, Gram-positive, high G + C (56-60 mol%) bacteria was isolated from the bovine rumen. Of four strains characterized, all were non-motile and none produced spores. The isolates did not produce indole or H2S and did not hydrolyse gelatin. Cells of each strain exhibited similar rod-shaped morphology (0.5-1.0 x 1.0-1.5 microns) although bulbous ends were sometimes present. None of the four strains were able to grow via oxidation of a variety of potentially fermentable substrates but rather obtained energy for growth via anaerobic respiration processes, oxidizing hydrogen, formate or lactate for reduction of various oxidized nitrogen compounds. Trimethylamine oxide and DMSO were also used as electron acceptor. All four strains shared greater than 99% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity. The closest match found between the 16S rRNA gene sequence of all four strains, NPOH1T, NPOH2, NPOH3 and MAJ1, to sequences available in GenBank was that of Coriobacterium glomerans (86% sequence similarity), a phenotypically dissimilar anaerobe within the class Actinobacteria. To accommodate these bacteria the creation of a new genus and species, Denitrobacterium detoxificans, for placement within the family Coriobacteriaceae is proposed. The type strain, NPOH1T (ATCC 700546T), grew equally well over a narrow range of incubation temperatures tested (32-39 degrees C).

  17. Isolation and characterization of 14 additional genes specifying the anaerobic biosynthesis of cobalamin (vitamin B12) in Propionibacterium freudenreichii (P. shermanii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessner, Charles A; Huang, Ke-Xue; Warren, Martin J; Raux, Evelyne; Scott, A Ian

    2002-06-01

    A search for genes encoding enzymes involved in cobalamin (vitamin B12) production in the commercially important organism Propionibacterium freudenreichii (P. shermanii) has resulted in the isolation of an additional 14 genes encoding enzymes responsible for 17 steps of the anaerobic B12 pathway in this organism. All of the genes believed to be necessary for the biosynthesis of adenosylcobinamide from uroporphyrinogen III have now been isolated except two (cbiA and an as yet unidentified gene encoding cobalt reductase). Most of the genes are contained in two divergent operons, one of which, in turn, is closely linked to the operon encoding the B12-dependent enzyme methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. The close linkage of the three genes encoding the subunits of transcarboxylase to the hemYHBXRL gene cluster is reported. The functions of the P. freudenreichii B12 pathway genes are discussed, and a mechanism for the regulation of cobalamin and propionic acid production by oxygen in this organism is proposed.

  18. Aminobacterium thunnarium sp. nov., a mesophilic, amino acid-degrading bacterium isolated from an anaerobic sludge digester, pertaining to the phylum Synergistetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Olfa; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Postec, Anne; Bouallagui, Hassib; Hamdi, Moktar; Bonin, Patricia; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2015-02-01

    A new Gram-staining-positive, non-sporulating, mesophilic, amino acid-degrading anaerobic bacterium, designated strain OTA 102(T), was isolated from an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor treating wastewater from cooking tuna. The cells were curved rods (0.6-2.5×0.5 µm) and occurred singly or in pairs. The strain was motile by means of one lateral flagellum. Strain OTA 102(T) grew at temperatures between 30 and 45 °C (optimum 40 °C), between pH 6.0 and 8.4 (optimum pH 7.2) and NaCl concentrations between 1 and 5 % (optimum 2 %, w/v). Strain OTA 102(T) required yeast extract for growth. Serine, threonine, glycine, cysteine, citrate, fumarate, α-ketoglutarate and pyruvate were fermented. When co-cultured with Methanobacterium formicicum as the hydrogen scavenger, strain OTA 102(T) oxidized alanine, valine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartate, tyrosine, methionine, histidine and asparagine. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain OTA 102(T) was 41.7 mol%. The main fatty acid was iso-C15 : 0. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain OTA 102(T) was related to Aminobacterium colombiense and Aminobacterium mobile (95.5 and 95.2 % similarity, respectively), of the phylum Synergistetes. On the basis of phylogenetic, genetic and physiological characteristics, strain OTA 102(T) is proposed to represent a novel species of the genus Aminobacterium, Aminobacterium thunnarium sp. nov. The type strain is OTA 102(T) ( = DSM 27500(T) = JCM 19320(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  19. Isolation of a star-shaped uranium(V/VI) cluster from the anaerobic photochemical reduction of uranyl(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelain, Lucile; White, Sarah; Scopelliti, Rosario; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2016-01-01

    Actinide oxo clusters are an important class of compounds due to their impact on actinide migration in the environment. The photolytic reduction of uranyl(VI) has potential application in catalysis and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, but the intermediate species involved in this reduction have not yet been elucidated. Here we show that the photolysis of partially hydrated uranyl(VI) in anaerobic conditions leads to the reduction of uranyl(VI), and to the incorporation of the resulting U V species into the stable mixed-valent star-shaped U VI /U V oxo cluster [U(UO 2 ) 5 (μ 3 -O) 5 (PhCOO) 5 (Py) 7 ]. This cluster is only the second example of a U VI /U V cluster and the first one associating uranyl groups to a non-uranyl(V) center. The U V center in 1 is stable, while the reaction of uranyl(V) iodide with potassium benzoate leads to immediate disproportionation and formation of the U 12 IV U 4 V O 24 cluster {[K(Py) 2 ] 2 [K(Py)] 2 [U 16 O 24 (PhCOO) 24 (Py) 2 ]}.

  20. Isolation of a star-shaped uranium(V/VI) cluster from the anaerobic photochemical reduction of uranyl(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatelain, Lucile; White, Sarah; Scopelliti, Rosario; Mazzanti, Marinella [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) (Switzerland). Inst. de Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques

    2016-11-07

    Actinide oxo clusters are an important class of compounds due to their impact on actinide migration in the environment. The photolytic reduction of uranyl(VI) has potential application in catalysis and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, but the intermediate species involved in this reduction have not yet been elucidated. Here we show that the photolysis of partially hydrated uranyl(VI) in anaerobic conditions leads to the reduction of uranyl(VI), and to the incorporation of the resulting U{sup V} species into the stable mixed-valent star-shaped U{sup VI}/U{sup V} oxo cluster [U(UO{sub 2}){sub 5}(μ{sub 3}-O){sub 5}(PhCOO){sub 5}(Py){sub 7}]. This cluster is only the second example of a U{sup VI}/U{sup V} cluster and the first one associating uranyl groups to a non-uranyl(V) center. The U{sup V} center in 1 is stable, while the reaction of uranyl(V) iodide with potassium benzoate leads to immediate disproportionation and formation of the U{sub 12}{sup IV}U{sub 4}{sup V}O{sub 24} cluster {[K(Py)_2]_2[K(Py)]_2[U_1_6O_2_4(PhCOO)_2_4(Py)_2]}.

  1. Oxygen sensitivity of various anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesche, W J

    1969-11-01

    Anaerobes differ in their sensitivity to oxygen, as two patterns were recognizable in the organisms included in this study. Strict anaerobes were species incapable of agar surface growth at pO(2) levels greater than 0.5%. Species that were found to be strict anaerobes were Treponema macrodentium, Treponema denticola, Treponema oralis n. sp., Clostridium haemolyticum, Selenomonas ruminatium, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens, and Lachnospira multiparus. Moderate anaerobes would include those species capable of growth in the presence of oxygen levels as high as 2 to 8%. The moderate anaerobes could be exposed to room atmosphere for 60 to 90 min without appreciable loss of viability. Species considered as moderate anaerobes were Bacteroides fragilis, B. melaninogenicus, B. oralis, Fusobacteria nucleatum, Clostridium novyi type A, and Peptostreptococcus elsdenii. The recognition of at least two general types of anaerobes would seem to have practical import in regard to the primary isolation of anaerobes from source material.

  2. Anaerobic microbial associations degrading aminoaromatic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotova, I.; Savelieva, O.; Dyakonova, A.T.; Sklyar, V.; Kalyushnyi, S.V.; Stams, A.J.M.; Netrusov, A.

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic microbial associations have been isolated that degrade aminoaromatic acids to methane and carbon dioxide at high rates. Significant differences between the morphological, cytological, and physiological traits of cultures isolated from samples of adapted and unadapted sludge are shown. The

  3. Partitioning of ecosystem respiration in a beech forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brændholt, Andreas; Ibrom, Andreas; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg

    2018-01-01

    of Reco in a temperate beech forest at diel, seasonal and annual time scales. Reco was measured by eddy covariance while respiration rates from soil, tree stems and isolated coarse tree roots were measured bi-hourly by an automated closed-chamber system. Soil respiration (Rsoil) was measured in intact...... with the highest respiration rates around 13:00-15:00 CET for Rstem, and the highest respiration seen from 9:00–15:00 for Rroot. In contrast, Rsoil showed the lowest respiration during daytime with no clear difference in the diel pattern between the intact and trenched soil plots. Finally, we calculated annual......Terrestrial ecosystem respiration (Reco) represents a major component of the global carbon cycle. It consists of many sub-components, such as aboveground plant respiration and belowground root and microbial respiration, each of which may respond differently to abiotic factors, and thus to global...

  4. Respirator Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to protect myself, my family, and/or my employees? If available and used correctly, a respirator can ... Respirator Fact Sheet [PDF - 706 KB] Follow NIOSH Facebook Flickr Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A- ...

  5. Competition for L-lactate betweenDesulfovibrio, Veillonella, andAcetobacterium species isolated from anaerobic intertidal sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laanbroek, H J; Geerligs, H J; Peijnenburg, A A; Siesling, J

    1983-12-01

    Almost equal numbers ofDesulfovibrio, Veillonella, andAcetobacterium species were found in agar shake dilutions of anaerobic intertidal brackish sediments applying L-lactate as the only energy source and sulfate as electron acceptor. Pure cultures of these bacteria were studied in more detail in batch cultures as well as in L-lactate-limited chemostats. The maximal specific growth rates on L-lactate were determined in washout experiments and amounted to 0.16, 0.30, and 0.06 h(-1) forDesulfovibrio baculatus H.L21,Veillonella alcalescens NS.L49, andAcetobacterium NS.L40, respectively. Competition for L-lactate was studied in energy-limited chemostats at a dilution rate of 0.02 h(-1).D. baculatus H.L21 turned out to be the best competitor at low L-lactate concentrations provided that sufficient sulfate and iron were present.V. alcalescens NS.L49 was favored by the absence of sulfate and iron. Coexistence ofD. baculatus H.L21 andV. alcalescens NS.L49 was observed in a L-lactate-limited chemostat with additional sulfate and citrate. Syntrophic growth ofV. alcalescens NS.L49 andAcetobacterium NS.L40 occurred in a L-lactate-limited chemostat in the absence of sulfate. No coexistence betweenD. baculatus H.L21 andAcetobacterium NS.L40 was observed in a L-lactate-limited chemostat without sulfate. Addition of calcium-saturated illite to an energy-limited mixed culture ofV. alcalescens NS.L49 andAcetobacterium NS.L40 induced iron limitation and subsequent washout of theAcetobacterium species. Finally, the ecological niches of the 3 species in relation to the consumption of lactate were discussed.

  6. Respirator field performance factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, B.J.; DeField, J.D.; Strandberg, S.W.; Sutcliffe, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Industrial Hygiene Group assisted OSHA and the NRC in measurements of respirator performance under field conditions. They reviewed problems associated with sampling aerosols within the respirator in order to determine fit factors (FFs) or field performance factor (FPF). In addition, they designed an environmental chamber study to determine the effects of temperature and humidity on a respirator wearer

  7. Identification of electrode respiring, hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial strain Stenotrophomonas maltophilia MK2 highlights the untapped potential for environmental bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnaveni Venkidusamy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrode respiring bacteria (ERB possess a great potential for many biotechnological applications such as microbial electrochemical remediation systems (MERS because of their exoelectrogenic capabilities to degrade xenobiotic pollutants. Very few ERB have been isolated from MERS, those exhibited a bioremediation potential towards organic contaminants. Here we report once such bacterial strain, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia MK2, a facultative anaerobic bacterium isolated from a hydrocarbon fed MERS, showed a potent hydrocarbonoclastic behavior under aerobic and anaerobic environments. Distinct properties of the strain MK2 were anaerobic fermentation of the amino acids, electrode respiration, anaerobic nitrate reduction and the ability to metabolize n-alkane components (C8-C36 of petroleum hydrocarbons including the biomarkers, pristine and phytane. The characteristic of diazoic dye decolorization was used as a criterion for pre-screening the possible electrochemically active microbial candidates. Bioelectricity generation with concomitant dye decolorization in MERS showed that the strain is electrochemically active. In acetate fed microbial fuel cells, maximum current density of 273±8 mA/m2 (1000Ω was produced (power density 113±7 mW/m2 by strain MK2 with a coulombic efficiency of 34.8 %. Further, the presence of possible alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB and rubA in the strain MK2 indicated that the genes involved in hydrocarbon degradation are of diverse origin. Such observations demonstrated the potential of facultative hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated environments. Identification of such a novel petrochemical hydrocarbon degrading ERB is likely to offer a new route to the sustainable bioremedial process of source zone contamination with simultaneous energy generation through MERS.

  8. Survival of Anaerobic Fe2+ Stress Requires the ClpXP Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Brittany D; Redford, Kaitlyn E; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2018-04-15

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a versatile bacterium capable of respiring extracellular, insoluble ferric oxide minerals under anaerobic conditions. The respiration of iron minerals results in the production of soluble ferrous ions, which at high concentrations are toxic to living organisms. It is not fully understood how Fe 2+ is toxic to cells anaerobically, nor is it fully understood how S. oneidensis is able to resist high levels of Fe 2+ Here we describe the results of a transposon mutant screen and subsequent deletion of the genes clpX and clpP in S. oneidensis , which demonstrate that the protease ClpXP is required for anaerobic Fe 2+ resistance. Many cellular processes are known to be regulated by ClpXP, including entry into stationary phase, envelope stress response, and turnover of stalled ribosomes. However, none of these processes appears to be responsible for mediating anaerobic Fe 2+ resistance in S. oneidensis Protein trapping studies were performed to identify ClpXP targets in S. oneidensis under Fe 2+ stress, implicating a wide variety of protein targets. Escherichia coli strains lacking clpX or clpP also display increased sensitivity to Fe 2+ anaerobically, indicating Fe 2+ resistance may be a conserved role for the ClpXP protease system. Hypotheses regarding the potential role(s) of ClpXP during periods of high Fe 2+ are discussed. We speculate that metal-containing proteins are misfolded under conditions of high Fe 2+ and that the ClpXP protease system is necessary for their turnover. IMPORTANCE Prior to the evolution of cyanobacteria and oxygenic photosynthesis, life arose and flourished in iron-rich oceans. Today, aqueous iron-rich environments are less common, constrained to low-pH conditions and anaerobic systems such as stratified lakes and seas, digestive tracts, subsurface environments, and sediments. The latter two ecosystems often favor dissimilatory metal reduction, a process that produces soluble Fe 2+ from iron oxide minerals

  9. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1991-06-01

    This study seeks to determine numbers, diversity, and morphology of anaerobic microorganisms in 15 samples of subsurface material from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in 18 samples from the Hanford Reservation and in 1 rock sample from the Nevada Test Site; set up long term experiments on the chemical activities of anaerobic microorganisms based on these same samples; work to improve methods for the micro-scale determination of in situ anaerobic microbial activity;and to begin to isolate anaerobes from these samples into axenic culture with identification of the axenic isolates.

  10. Thermoanaerobacter pentosaceus sp. nov., an anaerobic, extreme thermophilic, high ethanol-yielding bacterium isolated from household waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás, Ana Faria; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    of approximately 0.5 µm. Optimal growth occurred at 70 °C and pH(25°C) 7, with a maximum growth rate of 0.1 h-1. DNA G+C content was 34.2 mol %. Strain DTU01(T) could ferment arabinose, cellobiose, fructose, galactose, glucose, inulin, lactose, mannose, melibiose, pectin, starch, sucrose, xylan, yeast extract...... and xylose, but not cellulose, Avicel®, mannitol, inositol, glycerol, acetate, lactate, ethanol, butanol or peptone. Ethanol was the major fermentation product and a maximum yield of 1.39 mol of ethanol per mol xylose was achieved when sulphite was added to the cultivation medium. Thiosulphite......, the physiological and phylogenetic differences (DNA G+C content, substrate utilization, electron acceptors, phylogenetic distance, isolation site) allow for the proposal of strain DTU01(T) as a new species within the genus Thermoanaerobacter, for which the name Thermoanaerobacter pentosaceus sp. nov. is proposed...

  11. Progesterone impairs cell respiration and suppresses a compensatory increase in glucose transport in isolated rat skeletal muscle: a non-genomic mechanism contributing to metabolic adaptation to late pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, F; Brunmair, B; Quarré, L; Szöcs, Z; Waldhäusl, W; Fürnsinn, C

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to gain better insight into the mechanisms responsible for impaired glucose metabolism during late pregnancy. We explored the direct effects of progesterone on glucose metabolism of skeletal muscle. Specimens of skeletal muscle from untreated rats were incubated with progesterone and rates of substrate fluxes through the various pathways of glucose metabolism were analysed. Progesterone dose-dependently reduced the rates of glucose and pyruvate oxidation (insulin-stimulated rates after 5 h of exposure to 1 and 10 mumol/l progesterone: glucose oxidation, -6 +/- 4%, NS, and -39 +/- 4%, p respiration, e.g. by the specific inhibitor rotenone, is known to trigger a compensatory increase in glucose transport, but this response was blunted in the case of progesterone (change of glucose transport in response to 10 mumol/l progesterone vs 60 nmol/l rotenone, both causing a reduction in glucose oxidation by -39%: progesterone, +14 +/- 8% vs rotenone, +84 +/- 23%, p respiration and at the same time suppresses a compensatory increase in glucose transport, causing cellular carbohydrate deficiency in isolated rat skeletal muscle. This effect is mediated by a direct, rapid and non-genomic mechanism and could contribute to pregnancy-associated changes in glucose homeostasis.

  12. Lebetimonas natsushimae sp. nov., a novel strictly anaerobic, moderately thermophilic chemoautotroph isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent polychaete nest in the Mid-Okinawa Trough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Ryousuke; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Tame, Akihiro; Nunoura, Takuro; Muto, Hisashi; Mino, Sayaka; Sawayama, Shigeki; Takai, Ken; Nakagawa, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    A moderately thermophilic, strictly anaerobic, chemoautotrophic bacterium, designated strain HS1857 T , was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent at the Noho site in the Mid-Okinawa Trough. Strain HS1857 T grew between 35 and 63°C (optimum 55°C), in the presence of 10-55gl -1 NaCl (optimum 25gl -1 ), and pH 5.5-7.1 (optimum 6.4). Growth occurred with molecular hydrogen as the electron donor and elemental sulfur, nitrate, or selenate as the electron acceptors. Formate could serve as an alternative electron donor with nitrate as an electron acceptor. During growth with nitrate as the electron acceptor, strain HS1857 T produced ammonium and formed a biofilm. CO 2 was utilized as the sole carbon source. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 33.2mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain HS1857 T is a member of the order Nautiliales, showing a sequence similarity of 95.0% with Lebetimonas acidiphila Pd55 T . The fatty acid composition was similar to that of L. acidiphila, which was dominated by C 18:0 (47.0%) and C 18:1 (23.7%). Based on the genomic, chemotaxonomic, phenotypic characteristics, the name Lebetimonas natsushimae sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain is HS1857 T (=NBRC 112478 T =DSM 104102 T ). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Choosing the right respirator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bidwell, J.

    1997-01-01

    Selecting respirators to help protect workers from airborne contaminants can be a confusing process. The consequences of selecting the incorrect respirator can be intimidating, and worker safety and health may be dramatically and irreparably affected if an inappropriate respirator is chosen. When used in the workplace, a formal respiratory protection program must be established covering the basic requirements outlined in the OSHA Respiratory Protection Standard (29 CFR 1910.134). Education and training must be properly emphasized and conducted periodically. Maintenance, cleaning, and storage programs must be established and routinely followed for reusable respirators. The process of establishing a respiratory protection program can be broken down into four basic steps: Identify respiratory hazards and concentrations; understand the contaminants effects on workers' health; select appropriate respiratory protection; and train in proper respirator use and maintenance. These four steps are the foundation for establishing a basic respirator protection program. Be sure to consult state and federal OSHA requirements to ensure that the program complies. Leading industrial respirator manufacturers should be able to assist with on-site training and education in this four-step process, in addition to helping employers train their workers and conduct respirator fit testing

  14. Fate of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in anaerobic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, N.B.K.

    1980-01-01

    Degradation of 14 C labelled 2,5,2; 2,5,2',5' PCBs was studied in Hagerstown silty clay loam with and without sludge amendments under anaerobic conditions for 42 days. Soil respiration was enhanced by PCBs in soil. PCBs reduced the soil respiration in soil with sludge. Volatilization of PCBs was decreased by sludge in soil. Most of the radioactivity was found in hexane extracts of soils. No further degradation products were observed. (author)

  15. Porphyromonas pogonae sp. nov., an anaerobic but low concentration oxygen adapted coccobacillus isolated from lizards (Pogona vitticeps) or human clinical specimens, and emended description of the genus Porphyromonas Shah and Collins 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Kuwabara, Saki; Kania, Stephen A; Kato, Hisayuki; Hamagishi, Manami; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Sato, Takuichi; Tomida, Junko; Tanaka, Kaori; Bemis, David A

    2015-03-01

    During the process of identifying a Gram-negative coccobacillus isolated from a human clinical specimen, we found that the isolate's 16S rRNA gene had very close sequence identity with that of a variant Porphyromonas isolated from polymicrobial infections in the central bearded dragon, a species of lizard [2]. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the human isolate and of six isolates from lizards were nearly identical (99.9-100%). Phylogenetic analysis placed all of these isolates in a single phylogenetic cluster well separated from other species in the genus Porphyromonas. The closest species was Porphyromonas catoniae with 90.7-90.9% sequence identity, although there was less than 6% DNA similarity between the P. catoniae type strain and our representative isolates from lizards (PAGU 1787(T)) and human (PAGU 1776). These isolates could grow under anaerobic or microaerobic conditions (6% O2 atmosphere). The isolates were positive for catalase and very strong β-hemolytic activity, but did not show black or brown pigmentation. Biochemically, the isolates could be differentiated from closely related species by pyroglutamic acid arylamidase and glycine arylamidase activity, and some others. The fermentation products mainly included succinic acid and propionic acid. The major fatty acids detected in cells of the isolates were iso-C15:0, anteiso-C15:0, and 3OH-iso-C17:0. The G+C content was 43.0 ± 0.62 mol%. The species name Porphyromonas pogonae sp. nov. is proposed for these isolates with the type strain of PAGU 1787(T) (=MI 10-1288(T)=JCM 19732(T)=ATCC BAA-2643(T)). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. In vitro activity of mecillinam against anaerobic bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Steinkraus, G E; McCarthy, L R

    1980-01-01

    A microtiter broth dilution method was employed to determine the in vitro activity of mecillinam against 201 recent clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria. Both the anerobic gram-positive and anaerobic gram-negative bacilli displayed a wide range of minimal inhibitory concentrations of mecillinam; most strains were resistant to the antibiotic. The anaerobic cocci exhibited a narrower range of minimal inhibitory concentrations than were observed with other anaerobes, but also exhibited mecill...

  17. Anaerobic biodegradability of macropollutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini

    2002-01-01

    A variety of test procedures for determination of anaerobic biodegradability has been reported. This paper reviews the methods developed for determination of anaerobic biodegradability of macro-pollutants. Anaerobic biodegradability of micro-pollutants is not included. Furthermore, factors...

  18. Plant Respiration and Climate Change Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn, D.

    2002-04-01

    Plant respiration is one of the key processes in terms of an understanding of plant growth and functioning in a future climate. Short- and long-term effects of temperature and CO 2 on plant respiration were investigated in a number of plant species. The experiments tested effects of either temperature and/or CO 2 from the level of individual respiratory enzymes, isolated mitochondria, whole-tissue, and up to the whole canopy level. The short-term effects of elevated atmospheric CO 2 on plant respiration appeared to be less than suggested so far in the literature. This was true both at the tissue level and for intact mitochondria. Respiratory enzymes can, however, be affected already at low CO 2 . These effects did not manifest itself at the tissue level, though, due to low degrees of control on the whole respiratory process exerted by the particular enzymes. Plant respiration on the other hand was affected by long-term growth at elevated atmospheric CO 2 . The findings of the reduced plant respiration at the leaf level were consistent with the literature and potential causes are discussed. Short-term effects of temperature on plant respiration were demonstrated to be dependent on the actual measurement temperature. Further, it is shown that mitochondrial leaf respiration in darkness and light differ substantially in the temperature sensitivity with the former being the far most sensitive. This has implications for modelling CO 2 exchange between vegetation and atmosphere as demonstrated here, since this has so far been neglected. Long-term effects of temperature resulted in respiratory acclimation in a number of species. Respiratory acclimation appeared not to occur to any one single type of growth temperature. The implications of this finding in combination with the timing of acclimation are discussed for modelling respiratory CO 2 release. (au)

  19. Plant Respiration and Climate Change Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, D.

    2002-04-01

    Plant respiration is one of the key processes in terms of an understanding of plant growth and functioning in a future climate. Short- and long-term effects of temperature and CO{sub 2} on plant respiration were investigated in a number of plant species. The experiments tested effects of either temperature and/or CO{sub 2} from the level of individual respiratory enzymes, isolated mitochondria, whole-tissue, and up to the whole canopy level. The short-term effects of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on plant respiration appeared to be less than suggested so far in the literature. This was true both at the tissue level and for intact mitochondria. Respiratory enzymes can, however, be affected already at low CO{sub 2}. These effects did not manifest itself at the tissue level, though, due to low degrees of control on the whole respiratory process exerted by the particular enzymes. Plant respiration on the other hand was affected by long-term growth at elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The findings of the reduced plant respiration at the leaf level were consistent with the literature and potential causes are discussed. Short-term effects of temperature on plant respiration were demonstrated to be dependent on the actual measurement temperature. Further, it is shown that mitochondrial leaf respiration in darkness and light differ substantially in the temperature sensitivity with the former being the far most sensitive. This has implications for modelling CO{sub 2} exchange between vegetation and atmosphere as demonstrated here, since this has so far been neglected. Long-term effects of temperature resulted in respiratory acclimation in a number of species. Respiratory acclimation appeared not to occur to any one single type of growth temperature. The implications of this finding in combination with the timing of acclimation are discussed for modelling respiratory CO{sub 2} release. (au)

  20. Anaerobic Bacteria in Clinical Specimens – Frequent, But a Neglected Lot: A Five Year Experience at a Tertiary Care Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Padmaja Ananth; Gawda, Ashwini; Shetty, Seema; Anegundi, Renuka; Varma, Muralidhar; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay; Chawla, Kiran

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Anaerobic bacteria which constitute a significant proportion of the normal microbiota also cause variety of infections involving various anatomic sites. Considering the tedious culture techniques with longer turnaround time, anaerobic cultures are usually neglected by clinicians and microbiologists. Aim To study the frequency of isolation of different anaerobic bacteria from various clinical specimens. Materials and Methods A retrospective study to analyse the frequency of isolation of different anaerobic bacteria, was conducted over a period of five years from 2011 to 2015 including various clinical specimens submitted to anaerobic division of Microbiology laboratory. Anaerobic bacteria were isolated and identified following standard bacteriological techniques. Results Pathogenic anaerobes (n=336) were isolated from 278 (12.48%) of overall 2227 specimens processed with an average yield of 1.2 isolates. Anaerobes were isolated as polymicrobial flora with or without aerobic bacterial pathogens in 159 (57.2%) patients. Anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli (140, 41.7%) were the predominant isolates. B. fragilis group (67, 19.9%) were the most commonly isolated anaerobic pathogens. Anaerobes were predominantly isolated from deep seated abscess (23.9%). Conclusion Pathogenic anaerobes were isolated from various infection sites. Unless culture and susceptibility tests are performed as a routine, true magnitude of antimicrobial resistance among anaerobic pathogens will not be known. Knowledge of the distribution of these organisms may assist in the selection of appropriate empirical therapy for anaerobic infections. PMID:28892897

  1. Anaerobic Bacteria in Clinical Specimens - Frequent, But a Neglected Lot: A Five Year Experience at a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Padmaja Ananth; Vishwanath, Shashidhar; Gawda, Ashwini; Shetty, Seema; Anegundi, Renuka; Varma, Muralidhar; Mukhopadhyay, Chiranjay; Chawla, Kiran

    2017-07-01

    Anaerobic bacteria which constitute a significant proportion of the normal microbiota also cause variety of infections involving various anatomic sites. Considering the tedious culture techniques with longer turnaround time, anaerobic cultures are usually neglected by clinicians and microbiologists. To study the frequency of isolation of different anaerobic bacteria from various clinical specimens. A retrospective study to analyse the frequency of isolation of different anaerobic bacteria, was conducted over a period of five years from 2011 to 2015 including various clinical specimens submitted to anaerobic division of Microbiology laboratory. Anaerobic bacteria were isolated and identified following standard bacteriological techniques. Pathogenic anaerobes (n=336) were isolated from 278 (12.48%) of overall 2227 specimens processed with an average yield of 1.2 isolates. Anaerobes were isolated as polymicrobial flora with or without aerobic bacterial pathogens in 159 (57.2%) patients. Anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli (140, 41.7%) were the predominant isolates. B. fragilis group (67, 19.9%) were the most commonly isolated anaerobic pathogens. Anaerobes were predominantly isolated from deep seated abscess (23.9%). Pathogenic anaerobes were isolated from various infection sites. Unless culture and susceptibility tests are performed as a routine, true magnitude of antimicrobial resistance among anaerobic pathogens will not be known. Knowledge of the distribution of these organisms may assist in the selection of appropriate empirical therapy for anaerobic infections.

  2. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1992-06-01

    A variety of different media were used to isolate facultatively (FAB) and obligately anaerobic bacteria (OAB). These bacteria were isolated from core subsamples obtained from boreholes at the Idaho National Engineering Lab. (INEL) or at the Hanford Lab. (Yakima). Core material was sampled at various depths to 600 feet below the surface. All core samples with culturable bacteria contained at least FAB making thisthe most common physiological type of anaerobic bacteria present in the deep subsurface at these two sites. INEL core samples are characterized by isolates of both FAB and OAB. No isolates of acetogenic, methanogenic, or sulfate reducing bacteria were obtained. Yakima core samples are characterized by a marked predominance of FAB in comparison to OAB. In addition, isolates of acetogenic, methanogenic, and sulfate reducing bacteria were obtained. The Yakima site has the potential for complete anaerobic mineralization of organic compounds whereas this potential appears to be lacking at INEL.

  3. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Canganella

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong

  4. Anaerobic benzene degradation by bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Carsten; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2011-11-01

    Benzene is a widespread and toxic contaminant. The fate of benzene in contaminated aquifers seems to be primarily controlled by the abundance of oxygen: benzene is aerobically degraded at high rates by ubiquitous microorganisms, and the oxygen-dependent pathways for its breakdown were elucidated more than 50 years ago. In contrast, benzene was thought to be persistent under anoxic conditions until 25 years ago. Nevertheless, within the last 15 years, several benzene-degrading cultures have been enriched under varying electron acceptor conditions in laboratories around the world, and organisms involved in anaerobic benzene degradation have been identified, indicating that anaerobic benzene degradation is a relevant environmental process. However, only a few benzene degraders have been isolated in pure culture so far, and they all use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In some highly enriched strictly anaerobic cultures, benzene has been described to be mineralized cooperatively by two or more different organisms. Despite great efforts, the biochemical mechanism by which the aromatic ring of benzene is activated in the absence of oxygen is still not fully elucidated; methylation, hydroxylation and carboxylation are discussed as likely reactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the 'key players' of anaerobic benzene degradation under different electron acceptor conditions and the possible pathway(s) of anaerobic benzene degradation. © 2011 The Authors; Journal compilation © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Anaerobic benzene degradation by bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Carsten; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Richnow, Hans‐Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Summary Benzene is a widespread and toxic contaminant. The fate of benzene in contaminated aquifers seems to be primarily controlled by the abundance of oxygen: benzene is aerobically degraded at high rates by ubiquitous microorganisms, and the oxygen‐dependent pathways for its breakdown were elucidated more than 50 years ago. In contrast, benzene was thought to be persistent under anoxic conditions until 25 years ago. Nevertheless, within the last 15 years, several benzene‐degrading cultures have been enriched under varying electron acceptor conditions in laboratories around the world, and organisms involved in anaerobic benzene degradation have been identified, indicating that anaerobic benzene degradation is a relevant environmental process. However, only a few benzene degraders have been isolated in pure culture so far, and they all use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In some highly enriched strictly anaerobic cultures, benzene has been described to be mineralized cooperatively by two or more different organisms. Despite great efforts, the biochemical mechanism by which the aromatic ring of benzene is activated in the absence of oxygen is still not fully elucidated; methylation, hydroxylation and carboxylation are discussed as likely reactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the ‘key players’ of anaerobic benzene degradation under different electron acceptor conditions and the possible pathway(s) of anaerobic benzene degradation. PMID:21450012

  6. Anaerobic fungal populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookman, J.L.; Nicholson, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    The development of molecular techniques has greatly broadened our view of microbial diversity and enabled a more complete detection and description of microbial communities. The application of these techniques provides a simple means of following community changes, for example, Ishii et al. described transient and more stable inhabitants in another dynamic microbial system, compost. Our present knowledge of anaerobic gut fungal population diversity within the gastrointestinal tract is based upon isolation, cultivation and observations in vivo. It is likely that there are many species yet to be described, some of which may be non-culturable. We have observed a distinct difference in the ease of cultivation between the different genera, for example, Caecomyes isolates are especially difficult to isolate and maintain in vitro, a feature that is likely to result in the under representation of this genera in culture-based enumerations. The anaerobic gut fungi are the only known obligately anaerobic fungi. For the majority of their life cycles, they are found tightly associated with solid digesta in the rumen and/or hindgut. They produce potent fibrolytic enzymes and grow invasively on and into the plant material they are digesting making them important contributors to fibre digestion. This close association with intestinal digesta has made it difficult to accurately determine the amount of fungal biomass present in the rumen, with Orpin suggesting 8% contribution to the total microbial biomass, whereas Rezaeian et al. more recently gave a value of approximately 20%. It is clear that the rumen microbial complement is affected by dietary changes, and that the fungi are more important in digestion in the rumens of animals fed with high-fibre diets. It seems likely that the gut fungi play an important role within the rumen as primary colonizers of plant fibre, and so we are particularly interested in being able to measure the appearance and diversity of fungi on the plant

  7. Species identification of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria: a comparison of two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Holm, Anette; Knudsen, Elisa

    2011-01-01

    We compared two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) systems (Shimadzu/SARAMIS and Bruker) on a collection of consecutive clinically important anaerobic bacteria (n = 290). The Bruker system had more correct identifications to the species level...... (67.2% versus 49.0%), but also more incorrect identifications (7.9% versus 1.4%). The system databases need to be optimized to increase identification levels. However, MALDI-TOF MS in its present version seems to be a fast and inexpensive method for identification of most clinically important...

  8. Anaerobic bacterial meningitis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Jun; Lien, Chia-Yi; Chien, Chun-Chih; Huang, Chi-Ren; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chang, Wen-Neng

    2018-01-22

    Anaerobic infection is a very uncommon condition in adult bacterial meningitis (ABM), and its clinical characteristics have yet to be clarified. We enrolled 540 patients with culture-proven bacterial meningitis during a study period of 30 years (1986-2015), of whom 13 (2.4%) had anaerobic infections. These 13 patients were eight men and five women, aged 22-77 years. Among them, 53.8% (7/13) had a postneurosurgical state as the preceding event, and 79.6% (10/13) had underlying medical conditions including diabetes mellitus, malignancy, liver cirrhosis, cerebral infarct and alcoholism. Nosocomial and mixed infections were found in 15.5% (2/13) and 46.1% (6/13) of the patients, respectively. A total of 14 anaerobic strains were isolated from cerebrospinal fluid specimens, including nine Gram-negative (G(-)) strains: Fusobacterium nucleatum (3), Prevotella species (3) and Bacteroides fragilis (3), and five Gram-positive (G(+)) strains: Propionibacterium acnes (3) and Peptostreptococcus micros (also known as Parvimonas micra) (2). All of the implicated G(+) anaerobic bacteria were susceptible to penicillin, and no multiple drug-resistant strains were found among the implicated G(-) anaerobic bacteria. Despite treatment, 30.8% (4/13) of the patients died. Of the nine survivors, 22.2% (2/9) had a full recovery, while the other 77.8% (7/9) had varying degrees of neurological deficits. Compared with the good outcome group (n = 6, modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores: 0-2), the poor outcome group (n = 7, mRS scores ≧3) had higher incidence of seizure. These results may offer a preliminary view of the clinical characteristics of anaerobic ABM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Anaerobic Digestion: Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Batstone, Damien J.

    2011-01-01

    Organic waste may degrade anaerobically in nature as well as in engineered systems. The latter is called anaerobic digestion or biogasification. Anaerobic digestion produces two main outputs: An energy-rich gas called biogas and an effluent. The effluent, which may be a solid as well as liquid...... with very little dry matter may also be called a digest. The digest should not be termed compost unless it specifically has been composted in an aerated step. This chapter describes the basic processes of anaerobic digestion. Chapter 9.5 describes the anaerobic treatment technologies, and Chapter 9.......6 addresses the mass balances and environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion....

  10. [Anaerobes analysis in 80 cases with ora maxillofacial infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y F

    1999-12-01

    OBJECTIVE:To define the infection types of 80 cases of ora-maxillofacial infection and investigate its anaerobes' distribution and the role of the anaerobes' metabolic products in their identification.METHODS:We isolated and cultured anaerobes from the purulent specimen and applied the gasliquid chromatograph (GLC) technique to analyze the anaerobes' metabolic products to define their genera and species in the meantime.RESULTS:Bacteria were isolated from all of the purulent specimen.Isolation rate of bacteria was 100.00% and isolation rate of anaerobes,which distributed in 8 genera,29 species,was 95.00%. The higher detectable rate of them were respectively peptostreptococcus,petococcus,bacteroides,fusobacterium,verillonella,eubacterium. The rate of mixed infection was 80.00%. The proportion ratio of aerobes and anaerobes was 1:1.08.CONCLUSION:Oral-maxillofacial infection mostly belongs to endogenous mixed infection in which anaerobes are preponderant bacteria. GLC technique is a effective,sensitive,selective and specific method for defining anaerobes' genera and species through analyzing their metabolic products. It is a promising and recommendable rapid anaerobes' identification method comparatively at present.

  11. Livestock Anaerobic Digester Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Anaerobic Digester Database provides basic information about anaerobic digesters on livestock farms in the United States, organized in Excel spreadsheets. It includes projects that are under construction, operating, or shut down.

  12. [Application of anaerobic bacteria detection in oral and maxillofacial infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhen-ying; Lin, Qin; Meng, Yan-hong; He, Chun; Su, Jia-zeng; Peng, Xin

    2016-02-18

    To investigate the distribution and drug resistance of anaerobic bacteria in the patients with oral and maxillofacial infection. Aerobic and anaerobic bacteria cultures from 61 specimens of pus from the patients with oral and maxillofacial infection in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School of Stomatology were identified. The culture type was evaluated by API 20A kit and drug resistance test was performed by Etest method. The clinical data and antibacterial agents for the treatment of the 61 cases were collected, and the final outcomes were recorded. The bacteria cultures were isolated from all the specimens, with aerobic bacteria only in 6 cases (9.8%), anaerobic bacteria only in 7 cases (11.5%), and both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in 48 cases (78.7%). There were 55 infected cases (90.2%) with anaerobic bacteria, and 81 anaerobic bacteria stains were isolated. The highest bacteria isolation rate of Gram positive anaerobic bacteria could be found in Peptostreptococcus, Bifidobacterium and Pemphigus propionibacterium. No cefoxitin, amoxicillin/carat acid resistant strain was detected in the above three Gram positive anaerobic bacteria. The highest bacteria isolation rate of Gram negative anaerobic bacteria could be detected in Porphyromonas and Prevotella. No metronidazole, cefoxitin, amoxicillin/carat acid resistant strain was found in the two Gram negative anaerobic bacteria. In the study, 48 patients with oral and maxillofacial infection were treated according to the results of drug resistance testing, and the clinical cure rate was 81.3%. Mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria cultures are very common in most oral and maxillofacial infection patients. Anaerobic bacteria culture and drug resistance testing play an important role in clinical treatment.

  13. Effect of respiration and manganese on oxidative stress resistance of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watanabe, M.; Veen, van der S.; Nakajima, H.; Abee, T.

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a facultatively anaerobic bacterium that can perform respiration under aerobic conditions in the presence of haem, with vitamin K2 acting as a source of menaquinone. We investigated growth performance and oxidative stress resistance of Lb. plantarum WCFS1 cultures grown in

  14. Respirable dust and respirable silica exposure in Ontario gold mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Dave K; Rajhans, Gyan S; Malik, Om P; des Tombe, Karen

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of respirable dust and respirable silica in Ontario gold mines was conducted by the Ontario Ministry of Labor during 1978-1979. The aim was to assess the feasibility of introducing gravimetric sampling to replace the assessment method which used konimeters, a device which gave results in terms of number of particles per cubic centimeter (ppcc) of air. The study involved both laboratory and field assessments. The field assessment involved measurement of airborne respirable dust and respirable silica at all eight operating gold mines of the time. This article describes the details of the field assessment. A total of 288 long-term (7-8 hr) personal respirable dust air samples were collected from seven occupational categories in eight gold mines. The respirable silica (α-quartz) was determined by x-ray diffraction method. The results show that during 1978-1979, the industry wide mean respirable dust was about 1 mg/m(3), and the mean respirable silica was 0.08 mg/m(3.)The mean% silica in respirable dust was 7.5%. The data set would be useful in future epidemiological and health studies, as well as in assessment of workers' compensation claims for occupational diseases such as silicosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and autoimmune diseases such as renal disease and rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stams, Alfons J M; de Bok, Frank A M; Plugge, Caroline M; van Eekert, Miriam H A; Dolfing, Jan; Schraa, Gosse

    2006-03-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory syntrophic consortia of proton-reducing acetogenic bacteria and hydrogen-consuming methanogenic archaea. Anaerobic microorganisms that use insoluble electron acceptors for growth, such as iron- and manganese-oxide as well as inert graphite electrodes in microbial fuel cells, also transfer electrons exocellularly. Soluble compounds, like humic substances, quinones, phenazines and riboflavin, can function as exocellular electron mediators enhancing this type of anaerobic respiration. However, direct electron transfer by cell-cell contact is important as well. This review addresses the mechanisms of exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities. There are fundamental differences but also similarities between electron transfer to another microorganism or to an insoluble electron acceptor. The physical separation of the electron donor and electron acceptor metabolism allows energy conservation in compounds as methane and hydrogen or as electricity. Furthermore, this separation is essential in the donation or acceptance of electrons in some environmental technological processes, e.g. soil remediation, wastewater purification and corrosion.

  16. Aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria from gut of red palm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pure cultures were obtained after incubating the plates at different atmospheric conditions (aerobic, and strictly anaerobic). The majority of isolated microbiota observed were aerobes and facultative anaerobes (Bacillus sp., Salmonella sp., Enterococcus sp., and Xanthomonas sp.). These qualitative differences of bacteria, ...

  17. Genome analysis of Chitinivibrio alkaliphilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel extremely haloalkaliphilic anaerobic chitinolytic bacterium from the candidate phylum Termite Group 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Gumerov, Vadim M; Rakitin, Andrey L; Beletsky, Alexey V; Damsté, J S Sinninghe; Muyzer, Gerard; Mardanov, Andrey V; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2014-06-01

    Anaerobic enrichments from hypersaline soda lakes with chitin as substrate yielded five closely related anaerobic haloalkaliphilic isolates growing on insoluble chitin by fermentation at pH 10 and salinities up to 3.5 M. The chitinolytic activity was exclusively cell associated. To better understand the biology and evolutionary history of this novel bacterial lineage, the genome of the type strain ACht1 was sequenced. Analysis of the 2.6 Mb draft genome revealed enzymes of chitin-degradation pathways, including secreted cell-bound chitinases. The reconstructed central metabolism revealed pathways enabling the fermentation of polysaccharides, while it lacks the genes needed for aerobic or anaerobic respiration. The Rnf-type complex, oxaloacetate decarboxylase and sodium-transporting V-type adenosine triphosphatase were identified among putative membrane-bound ion pumps. According to 16S ribosomal RNA analysis, the isolates belong to the candidate phylum Termite Group 3, representing its first culturable members. Phylogenetic analysis using ribosomal proteins and taxonomic distribution analysis of the whole proteome supported a class-level classification of ACht1 most probably affiliated to the phylum Fibribacteres. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and genomic analyses, the novel bacteria are proposed to be classified as Chitinivibrio alkaliphilus gen. nov., sp. nov., within a novel class Chitinivibrione. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Cattle respiration facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl; Lund, Peter; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis

    2012-01-01

    In Denmark, the emission rate of methane from dairy cows has been calculated using the IPCC standard values for dairy cows in Western countries, due to the lack of national data. Therefore, four respiration chambers for dairy cows were built with the main purpose of measuring methane, but also...... for dairy cows is between 800 to 1500 L/min depending on the milk production and liveweight. This gives an average concentration of 5000−6000 ppm of carbon dioxide and 500−600 ppm of methane in the chambers....

  19. Cell yields and fermentation responses of a Salmonella Typhimurium poultry isolate at different dilution rates in an anaerobic steady state continuous culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of these studies were to determine cell yield and fermentation responses of a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium poultry isolate using various dilution rates in steady state continuous culture incubations. S. enterica Typhimurium cells were propagated in continuous cultures with ...

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Cellulolytic Strain Clostridium sp. Bc-iso-3 Isolated from an Industrial-Scale Anaerobic Digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Schnürer, Anna

    2016-10-27

    Clostridium sp. Bc-iso-3 is a cellulolytic strain isolated from a Swedish industrial-scale biogas digester. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of this strain, which consists of four contigs with a total length of 4,327,139 bp and an average coverage of 312.97×. Copyright © 2016 Sun and Schnürer.

  1. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene Mark

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrifica......Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic...... and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results...... suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100%) in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein....

  2. Anaerobe Reinigung von Abwasser

    OpenAIRE

    Sternad, W.; Mohr, M.; Spork, C.; Troesch, W.; Trick, I.; Krischke, W.

    2007-01-01

    WO 2007076953 A1 UPAB: 20070822 NOVELTY - The municipal wastewater purification comprises anaerobic biological purification of the wastewater by using a biomass (15-100 g/l) from psychrophilic microorganisms, concentrating the sludge by separating the wastewater and feeding back the sludge into the anaerobic biological purification. The psychrophilic microorganisms exhibit an optimum temperature of less than 25degreesC. The anaerobic purification takes place as single- or two-step methanizati...

  3. Streptomycin-induced inflammation enhances Escherichia coli gut colonization through nitrate respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spees, Alanna M; Wangdi, Tamding; Lopez, Christopher A; Kingsbury, Dawn D; Xavier, Mariana N; Winter, Sebastian E; Tsolis, Renée M; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2013-07-02

    Treatment with streptomycin enhances the growth of human commensal Escherichia coli isolates in the mouse intestine, suggesting that the resident microbial community (microbiota) can inhibit the growth of invading microbes, a phenomenon known as "colonization resistance." However, the precise mechanisms by which streptomycin treatment lowers colonization resistance remain obscure. Here we show that streptomycin treatment rendered mice more susceptible to the development of chemically induced colitis, raising the possibility that the antibiotic might lower colonization resistance by changing mucosal immune responses rather than by preventing microbe-microbe interactions. Investigation of the underlying mechanism revealed a mild inflammatory infiltrate in the cecal mucosa of streptomycin-treated mice, which was accompanied by elevated expression of Nos2, the gene that encodes inducible nitric oxide synthase. In turn, this inflammatory response enhanced the luminal growth of E. coli by nitrate respiration in a Nos2-dependent fashion. These data identify low-level intestinal inflammation as one of the factors responsible for the loss of resistance to E. coli colonization after streptomycin treatment. Our intestine is host to a complex microbial community that confers benefits by educating the immune system and providing niche protection. Perturbation of intestinal communities by streptomycin treatment lowers "colonization resistance" through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that streptomycin increases the inflammatory tone of the intestinal mucosa, thereby making the bowel more susceptible to dextran sulfate sodium treatment and boosting the Nos2-dependent growth of commensal Escherichia coli by nitrate respiration. These data point to the generation of alternative electron acceptors as a by-product of the inflammatory host response as an important factor responsible for lowering resistance to colonization by facultative anaerobic bacteria such as E. coli.

  4. A novel electrophototrophic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain RP2, exhibits hydrocarbonoclastic potential in anaerobic environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnaveni Venkidusamy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An electrophototrophic, hydrocarbonoclastic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris stain RP2 was isolated from the anodic biofilms of hydrocarbon fed microbial electrochemical remediation systems (MERS. Salient properties of the strain RP2 were direct electrode respiration, dissimilatory metal oxide reduction, spore formation, anaerobic nitrate reduction, free living diazotrophy and the ability to degrade n-alkane components of petroleum hydrocarbons in anoxic, photic environments. In acetate fed microbial electrochemical cells, a maximum current density of 305±10 mA/m2 (1000Ω was generated (power density 131.65±10 mW/m2 by strain RP2 with a coulombic efficiency of 46.7 ± 1.3%. Cyclic voltammetry studies showed that anaerobically grown cells of strain RP2 is electrochemically active and likely to transfer electrons extracellularly to solid electron acceptors through membrane bound compounds, however, aerobically grown cells lacked the electrochemical activity. The ability of strain RP2 to produce current (maximum current density 21±3 mA/m2; power density 720±7 µW/m2, 1000Ω using petroleum hydrocarbon (PH as a sole energy source was also examined using an initial concentration of 800 mg l-1 of diesel range hydrocarbons (C9- C36 with a concomitant removal of 47.4 ± 2.7% hydrocarbons in MERS. Here, we also report the first study that shows an initial evidence for the existence of a hydrocarbonoclastic behavior in the strain RP2 when grown in different electron accepting and illuminated conditions (anaerobic and MERS degradation. Such observations reveal the importance of photoorganotrophic growth in the utilization of hydrocarbons from contaminated environments. Identification of such novel petrochemical hydrocarbon degrading electricigens, not only expands the knowledge on the range of bacteria known for the hydrocarbon bioremediation but also shows a biotechnological potential that goes well beyond its applications to MERS.

  5. Agathobaculum butyriciproducens gen. nov.  sp. nov., a strict anaerobic, butyrate-producing gut bacterium isolated from human faeces and reclassification of Eubacterium desmolans as Agathobaculum desmolans comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sharon; Jin, Tae-Eun; Chang, Dong-Ho; Rhee, Moon-Soo; Kim, Hyun Ju; Lee, Sang Jun; Park, Doo-Sang; Kim, Byoung-Chan

    2016-09-01

    A novel bacterial strain, SR79T, was isolated from a Korean faecal sample and characterized using a polyphasic approach. SR79T was found to be a strictly anaerobic, Gram-stain-positive, non-spore-forming, non-motile, catalase- and oxidase-negative short rod with no flagella. SR79T grew optimally at 37 °C in the presence of 0.5 % (w/v) NaCl at pH 7. The NaCl range for growth was 0-1 % (w/v). The isolate produced butyric acid (>18  mM) as a major end product. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the most closely related type strains were Eubacteriumdesmolans ATCC 43058T and Butyricicoccus pullicaecorum 25-3T (96.4 and 96.0 % similarity, respectively). The DNA G+C content was determined to be 52.9 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids (>10 %) were C16 : 0, C18 : 1cis-9, C19 : 1 cyc 9,10 and C14 : 0. Meso-diaminopimelic acid was present in the cell wall peptidoglycan and the cell wall hydrolysates contained ribose, glucose and galactose. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, phylogenetic analysis, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic characteristics allowed differentiation of SR79T, which represents a novel species of a new genus within the family Ruminococcaceae, for which the name Agathobaculum butyriciproducens gen. nov. sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SR79T (=KCTC 15532T=DSM 100391T). Based on the results of this study, it is also proposed to transfer Eubacteriumdesmolans to this new genus, as Agathobaculum desmolans comb. nov. The type strain of Agathobaculum desmolans is ATCC 43058T (=CCUG 27818T).

  6. Isolation, characterization, and U(VI)-reducing potential of a facultatively anaerobic, acid-resistant Bacterium from Low-pH, nitrate- and U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediment and description of Salmonella subterranea sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S; Sullivan, Sara A; O'Neill, Kathleen R; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2004-05-01

    A facultatively anaerobic, acid-resistant bacterium, designated strain FRCl, was isolated from a low-pH, nitrate- and U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediment at site FW-024 at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, Tenn. Strain FRCl was enriched at pH 4.5 in minimal medium with nitrate as the electron acceptor, hydrogen as the electron donor, and acetate as the carbon source. Clones with 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences identical to the sequence of strain FRCl were also detected in a U(VI)-reducing enrichment culture derived from the same sediment. Cells of strain FRCl were gram-negative motile regular rods 2.0 to 3.4 micro m long and 0.7 to 0.9 microm in diameter. Strain FRCl was positive for indole production, by the methyl red test, and for ornithine decarboxylase; it was negative by the Voges-Proskauer test (for acetylmethylcarbinol production), for urea hydrolysis, for arginine dihydrolase, for lysine decarboxylase, for phenylalanine deaminase, for H(2)S production, and for gelatin hydrolysis. Strain FRCl was capable of using O(2), NO(3)(-), S(2)O(3)(2-), fumarate, and malate as terminal electron acceptors and of reducing U(VI) in the cell suspension. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of the isolate indicated that this strain was 96.4% similar to Salmonella bongori and 96.3% similar to Enterobacter cloacae. Physiological and phylogenetic analyses suggested that strain FRCl belongs to the genus Salmonella and represents a new species, Salmonella subterranea sp. nov.

  7. Anaerobic sludge granulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Castro Lopes, de S.I.; Lettinga, G.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews different theories on anaerobic sludge granulation in UASB-reactors that have been proposed during the past two decades
    This paper reviews different theories on anaerobic sludge granulation in UASB-reactors that have been proposed during the past two decades. The initial

  8. Molecular ecology of anaerobic reactor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H. Jacob Peider; Zheng, D.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    for these processes. Only a few percent of Bacteria and Archaea have so far been isolated, and almost nothing is known about the dynamics and interactions between these and other microorganisms. This lack of knowledge is most clearly exemplified by the sometimes unpredictable and unexplainable failures...... to the abundance of each microbe in anaerobic reactor systems by rRNA probing. This chapter focuses on various molecular techniques employed and problems encountered when elucidating the microbial ecology of anaerobic reactor systems. Methods such as quantitative dot blot/fluorescence in-situ probing using various...

  9. Enhanced Biotransformation of Triclocarban by Ochrobactrum sp. TCC-1 Under Anoxic Nitrate Respiration Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hui; Liang, Bin; Kong, Deyong; Li, Zhiling; Qi, Guoshu; Wang, Aijie

    2017-04-01

    Antimicrobial triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide, TCC) is frequently detected in soils and sediments for the widely reclaim of sewage sludge or biosolid in recent decades. This resulted from a weak removal of TCC during wastewater treatment, and most of it adsorbed onto sewage sludge. As the toxicity and persistence of TCC in the environment, the elimination of TCC from the source of output is of great importance, particularly in anoxic process. In this study, the biotransformation of TCC by a newly isolated TCC-degrading strain Ochrobactrum sp. TCC-1 under anoxic conditions was investigated. By testing different carbon nitrogen ratios (C/N), it showed that nitrate could support the growth of strain TCC-1 and enhance the hydrolysis of TCC to more biodegradable chloroanilines, especially with a higher C/N of 10 and under anaerobic conditions. In wastewater sewage sludge, strain TCC-1 colonized and maintained the TCC-hydrolyzing activity under the nitrate respiration mode. These results would lay a basic foundation for the potential bioremediation of TCC-contaminated anoxic sites with TCC-degrading strain.

  10. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Enteric Gram Negative Facultative Anaerobe Bacilli in Aerobic versus Anaerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amachawadi, Raghavendra G.; Renter, David G.; Volkova, Victoriya V.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatments result in the host’s enteric bacteria being exposed to the antimicrobials. Pharmacodynamic models can describe how this exposure affects the enteric bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance. The models utilize measurements of bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility traditionally obtained in vitro in aerobic conditions. However, in vivo enteric bacteria are exposed to antimicrobials in anaerobic conditions of the lower intestine. Some of enteric bacteria of food animals are potential foodborne pathogens, e.g., Gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica. These are facultative anaerobes; their physiology and growth rates change in anaerobic conditions. We hypothesized that their antimicrobial susceptibility also changes, and evaluated differences in the susceptibility in aerobic vs. anaerobic conditions of generic E. coli and Salmonella enterica of diverse serovars isolated from cattle feces. Susceptibility of an isolate was evaluated as its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) measured by E-Test® following 24 hours of adaptation to the conditions on Mueller-Hinton agar, and on a more complex tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood (BAP) media. We considered all major antimicrobial drug classes used in the U.S. to treat cattle: β-lactams (specifically, ampicillin and ceftriaxone E-Test®), aminoglycosides (gentamicin and kanamycin), fluoroquinolones (enrofloxacin), classical macrolides (erythromycin), azalides (azithromycin), sulfanomides (sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim), and tetracyclines (tetracycline). Statistical analyses were conducted for the isolates (n≥30) interpreted as susceptible to the antimicrobials based on the clinical breakpoint interpretation for human infection. Bacterial susceptibility to every antimicrobial tested was statistically significantly different in anaerobic vs. aerobic conditions on both media, except for no difference in susceptibility to ceftriaxone on BAP agar. A satellite experiment

  11. From breathing to respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitting, Jean-William

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of breathing remained an enigma for a long time. The Hippocratic school described breathing patterns but did not associate breathing with the lungs. Empedocles and Plato postulated that breathing was linked to the passage of air through pores of the skin. This was refuted by Aristotle who believed that the role of breathing was to cool the heart. In Alexandria, breakthroughs were accomplished in the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Later, Galen proposed an accurate description of the respiratory muscles and the mechanics of breathing. However, his heart-lung model was hampered by the traditional view of two non-communicating vascular systems - veins and arteries. After a period of stagnation in the Middle Ages, knowledge progressed with the discovery of pulmonary circulation. The comprehension of the purpose of breathing progressed by steps thanks to Boyle and Mayow among others, and culminated with the contribution of Priestley and the discovery of oxygen by Lavoisier. Only then was breathing recognized as fulfilling the purpose of respiration, or gas exchange. A century later, a controversy emerged concerning the active or passive transfer of oxygen from alveoli to the blood. August and Marie Krogh settled the dispute, showing that passive diffusion was sufficient to meet the oxygen needs. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Plant respiration under low oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Toro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Respiration is an oxidative process controlled by three pathways: glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. Respiratory metabolism is ubiquitous in all organisms, but with differences among each other. For example in plants, because their high plasticity, respiration involves metabolic pathways with unique characteristics. In this way, in order to avoid states of low energy availability, plants exhibit great flexibility to bypass conventional steps of glycolysis, TCA cycle, and OXPHOS. To understand the energetic link between these alternative pathways, it is important to know the growth, maintenance, and ion uptake components of the respiration in plants. Changes in these components have been reported when plants are subjected to stress, such as oxygen deficiency. This review analyzes the current knowledge on the metabolic and functional aspects of plant respiration, its components and its response to environmental changes.

  13. Inhibition experiments on anaerobic methane oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alperin, M.J.; Reeburgh, W.S.

    1985-10-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation is a general process important in controlling fluxes of methane from anoxic marine sediments. The responsible organism has not been isolated, and little is known about the electron acceptors and substrates involved in the process. Laboratory evidence indicates that sulfate reducers and methanogens are able to oxidize small quantities of methane. Field evidence suggests anaerobic methane oxidation may be linked to sulfate reduction. Experiments with specific inhibitors for sulfate reduction (molybdate), methanogenesis (2-bromoethanesulfonic acid), and acetate utilization (fluoroacetate) were performed on marine sediments from the zone of methane oxidation to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria or methanogenic bacteria are responsible for methane oxidation. The inhibition experiment results suggest that methane oxidation in anoxic marine sediments is not directly mediated by sulfate-reducing bacteria or methanogenic bacteria. Our results are consistent with two possibilities: anaerobic methane oxidation may be mediated by an unknown organism or a consortium involving an unknown methane oxidizer and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  14. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene M; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Löscher, Carolin; Schunck, Harald; Desai, Dhwani K; Hauss, Helena; Kiko, Rainer; Holtappels, Moritz; LaRoche, Julie; Schmitz, Ruth A; Graco, Michelle I; Kuypers, Marcel M M

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100%) in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein.

  15. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Kalvelage

    Full Text Available Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100% in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein.

  16. Respiration of bivalves from three different deep-sea areas: Cold seeps, hydrothermal vents and organic carbon-rich sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khripounoff, A.; Caprais, J. C.; Decker, C.; Le Bruchec, J.; Noel, P.; Husson, B.

    2017-08-01

    We studied bivalves (vesicomyids and mytilids) inhabiting four different areas of high sulfide and methane production: (1) in the Gulf of Guinea, two pockmarks (650 m and 3150 m depth) and one site rich in organic sediments in the deepest zone (4950 m average depth), (2) at the Azores Triple Junction on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, one hydrothermal site (Lucky Strike vent field, 1700 m depth). Two types of Calmar benthic chambers were deployed, either directly set into the sediment (standard Calmar chamber) or fitted with a tank to isolate organisms from the sediment (modified Calmar chamber), to assess gas and solute exchanges in relation to bivalve bed metabolism. Fluxes of oxygen, total carbon dioxide, ammonium and methane were measured. At the site with organic-rich sediments, oxygen consumption by clams measured in situ with the standard benthic chamber was variable (1.3-6.7 mmol m-2 h-1) as was total carbon dioxide production (1-9.6 mmol m-2 h-1). The observed gas and solute fluxes were attributed primarily to bivalve respiration (vesicomyids or mytilids), but microbial and geochemical processes in the sediment may be also responsible for some of variations in the deepest stations. The respiration rate of isolated vesicomyids (16.1-0.25.7 μmol g-1 dry weight h-1) was always lower than that of mytilids (33 μmol g-1 dry weight h-1). This difference was attributed to the presence of a commensal scaleworm in the mytilids. The respiratory coefficient (QR) ≥1 indicated high levels of anaerobic metabolism. The O:N index ranged from 5 to 25, confirming that vesicomyids and mytilids, living in symbiosis with bacteria, have a protein-based food diet.

  17. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  18. Contribution of anaerobic energy expenditure to whole body thermogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Christopher B

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Heat production serves as the standard measurement for the determination of energy expenditure and efficiency in animals. Estimations of metabolic heat production have traditionally focused on gas exchange (oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production although direct heat measurements may include an anaerobic component particularly when carbohydrate is oxidized. Stoichiometric interpretations of the ratio of carbon dioxide production to oxygen uptake suggest that both anaerobic and aerobic heat production and, by inference, all energy expenditure – can be accounted for with a measurement of oxygen uptake as 21.1 kJ per liter of oxygen. This manuscript incorporates contemporary bioenergetic interpretations of anaerobic and aerobic ATP turnover to promote the independence of these disparate types of metabolic energy transfer: each has different reactants and products, uses dissimilar enzymes, involves different types of biochemical reactions, takes place in separate cellular compartments, exploits different types of gradients and ultimately each operates with distinct efficiency. The 21.1 kJ per liter of oxygen for carbohydrate oxidation includes a small anaerobic heat component as part of anaerobic energy transfer. Faster rates of ATP turnover that exceed mitochondrial respiration and that are supported by rapid glycolytic phosphorylation with lactate production result in heat production that is independent of oxygen uptake. Simultaneous direct and indirect calorimetry has revealed that this anaerobic heat does not disappear when lactate is later oxidized and so oxygen uptake does not adequately measure anaerobic efficiency or energy expenditure (as was suggested by the "oxygen debt" hypothesis. An estimate of anaerobic energy transfer supplements the measurement of oxygen uptake and may improve the interpretation of whole-body energy expenditure.

  19. Contribution of root respiration to soil respiration in a C3/C4 mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spatial and temporal variations of soil respiration were studied from May 2004 to June 2005 in a C3/C4 mixed grassland of Japan. The linear regression relationship between soil respiration and root biomass was used to determine the contribution of root respiration to soil respiration. The highest soil respiration rate of ...

  20. Contribution of root respiration to soil respiration in a C3/C4 mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The spatial and temporal variations of soil respiration were studied from May 2004 to June 2005 in a C3/C4 mixed grassland of Japan. The linear regression relationship between soil respiration and root biomass was used to determine the contribution of root respiration to soil respiration. The highest soil respiration rate of.

  1. Characterization of Halanaerocella petrolearia gen. nov., sp. nov., a new anaerobic moderately halophilic fermentative bacterium isolated from a deep subsurface hypersaline oil reservoir : New taxa: Firmicutes (Class Clostridia, Order Halanaerobiales, Halobacteroidaceae, Halobacteroides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, G; Chehider, N; Joulian, C; Battaglia-Brunet, F; Cayol, J-L; Postec, A; Borgomano, J; Neria-Gonzalez, I; Lomans, B P; Ollivier, B; Alazard, D

    2011-09-01

    An anaerobic, halophilic, and fermentative bacterium, strain S200(T), was isolated from a core sample of a deep hypersaline oil reservoir. Cells were rod-shaped, non-motile, and stained Gram-positive. It grew at NaCl concentrations ranging from 6 to 26% (w/v), with optimal growth at 15% (w/v) NaCl, and at temperatures between 25 and 47°C with an optimum at 40-45°C. The optimum pH was 7.3 (range 6.2-8.8; no growth at pH 5.8 and pH 9). The doubling time in optimized growth conditions was 3.5 h. Strain S200(T) used exclusively carbohydrates as carbon and energy sources. The end products of glucose degradation were lactate, formate, ethanol, acetate, H(2), and CO(2). The predominant cellular fatty acids were non-branched fatty acids C(16:1), C(16:0), and C(14:0). The G + C mole% of the DNA was 32.7%. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain S200(T) formed a distinct lineage within the family Halobacteroidaceae, order Halanaerobiales, and was most closely related to Halanaerobaculum tunisiense DSM 19997(T) and Halobacteroides halobius DSM 5150(T), with sequence similarity of 92.3 and 91.9%, respectively. On the basis of its physiological and genotypic properties, strain S200(T) is proposed to be assigned to a novel species of a novel genus, for which the name Halanaerocella petrolearia is proposed. The type strain of Halanaerocella petrolearia is strain S200(T) (=DSM 22693(T) = JCM 16358(T)).

  2. Effect of organic synthetic food colours on mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, F G; Valim, M F; Vercesi, A E

    1996-01-01

    Eleven organic synthetic dyes, currently or formerly used as food colours in Brazil, were tested to determine their effect on mitochondrial respiration in mitochondria isolated from rat liver and kidney. The compounds tested were: Erythrosine, Ponceau 4R, Allura Red, Sunset yellow, Tartrazine, Amaranth, Brilliant Blue, Blue, Fast Red E, Orange GGN and Scarlet GN. All food colours tested inhibited mitochondrial respiration (State III respiration, uncoupled) supported either by alpha-ketoglutarate or succinate. This inhibition varied largely, e.g. from 100% to 16% for Erythrosine and Tartrazine respectively, at a concentration of 0.1 mg food colour per mitochondrial protein. Both rat liver and kidney mitochondria showed similar patterns of inhibition among the food colours tested. This effect was dose related and the concentration to give 50% inhibition was determined for some of the dyes. The xanthene dye Erythrosine, which showed the strongest effect, was selected for further investigation on mitochondria in vivo.

  3. Membrane controlled anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omstead, D. R.

    In response to general shortages of energy, examination of the anaerboic digestion process as a potential source of a combustible, methane-rich fuel has intensified in recent years. It has been suggested that orgaic intermediates (such as fatty acids), produced during digestion, might also be recovered for use as chemical feedstocks. This investigation has been concerned with combining ultrafiltration separation techniques with anaerobic digestion for the development of a process in which the total production of acetic acid (the most valuable intermediate in anaerobic digestion) and methane are optimized. Enrichment cultures, able to utilize glucose as a sole carbon source, were adapted from sewage digesting cultures using conventional techniques. An ultrafiltration system was constructed and coupled to an anaerobic digester culture vessel which contained the glucose enrichment. The membrane controlled anaerobic digester appears to show promise as a means of producing high rates of both methane gas and acetic acid.

  4. Anaerobic Digestion Foaming Causes

    OpenAIRE

    Ganidi, Nafsika

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion foaming has been encountered in several sewage treatment plants in the UK. Foaming has raised major concerns for the water utilities due to significant impacts on process efficiency and operational costs. Several foaming causes have been suggested over the past few years by researchers. However, the supporting experimental information is limited and in some cases site specific. The present report aimed to provide a better understanding of the anaerobic di...

  5. Peritoneal dialysis peritonitis by anaerobic pathogens: a retrospective case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial infections account for most peritoneal dialysis (PD)-associated peritonitis episodes. However, anaerobic PD peritonitis is extremely rare and intuitively associated with intra-abdominal lesions. In this study, we examined the clinical characteristics of PD patients who developed anaerobic peritonitis. Methods We retrospectively identified all anaerobic PD peritonitis episodes from a prospectively collected PD registry at a single center between 1990 and 2010. Only patients receiving more than 3 months of PD were enrolled. We analyzed clinical features as well as outcomes of anaerobic PD peritonitis patients. Results Among 6 patients, 10 episodes of PD-associated peritonitis were caused by anaerobic pathogens (1.59% of all peritonitis episodes during study the period), in which the cultures from 5 episodes had mixed growth. Bacteroides fragilis was the most common species identified (4 isolates). Only 3 episodes were associated with gastrointestinal lesions, and 4 episodes were related to a break in sterility during exchange procedures. All anaerobic pathogens were susceptible to clindamycin and metronidazole, but penicillin resistance was noted in 4 isolates. Ampicillin/sulbactam resistance was found in 2 isolates. In 5 episodes, a primary response was achieved using the first-generation cephalosporin and ceftazidime or aminoglycoside. In 3 episodes, the first-generation cephalosporin was replaced with aminoglycosides. Tenckhoff catheter removal was necessary in 2 episodes. Only one episode ended with mortality (due to a perforated bowel). Conclusion Anaerobic PD-associated peritonitis might be predominantly caused by contamination, rather than intra-abdominal events. Half of anaerobic PD-associated peritonitis episodes had polymicrobial growth. The overall outcome of anaerobic peritonitis is fair, with a high catheter survival rate. PMID:23705895

  6. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-07-31

    reactor. Batch tests were conducted to examine naphthenic acid biodegradability under several conditions. The conditions used were seed from the anaerobic reactor, wetland sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and a sterile control. The naphthenic acid was from a commercial source isolated from Gulf Coast petroleum as was dosed at 2 mg/mL. The incubations were for 30 days at 30 C. The results showed that the naphthenic acids were not biodegraded under anaerobic conditions, but were degraded under aerobic conditions. Despite poor performance of the anaerobic reactor, it remains likely that anaerobic treatment of acetate, toluene, and, potentially, other produced-water components is feasible.

  7. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-01-01

    reactor. Batch tests were conducted to examine naphthenic acid biodegradability under several conditions. The conditions used were seed from the anaerobic reactor, wetland sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and a sterile control. The naphthenic acid was from a commercial source isolated from Gulf Coast petroleum as was dosed at 2 mg/mL. The incubations were for 30 days at 30 C. The results showed that the naphthenic acids were not biodegraded under anaerobic conditions, but were degraded under aerobic conditions. Despite poor performance of the anaerobic reactor, it remains likely that anaerobic treatment of acetate, toluene, and, potentially, other produced-water components is feasible

  8. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface. Progress report, June 1, 1990--May 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1991-06-01

    This study seeks to determine numbers, diversity, and morphology of anaerobic microorganisms in 15 samples of subsurface material from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in 18 samples from the Hanford Reservation and in 1 rock sample from the Nevada Test Site; set up long term experiments on the chemical activities of anaerobic microorganisms based on these same samples; work to improve methods for the micro-scale determination of in situ anaerobic microbial activity;and to begin to isolate anaerobes from these samples into axenic culture with identification of the axenic isolates.

  9. A novel screening protocol for the isolation of hydrogen producing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Happe Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sealed Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultures evolve significant amounts of hydrogen gas under conditions of sulfur depletion. However, the eukaryotic green alga goes through drastic metabolic changes during this nutritional stress resulting in cell growth inhibition and eventually cell death. This study aimed at isolating C. reinhardtii transformants which produce hydrogen under normal growth conditions to allow a continuous hydrogen metabolism without the stressful impact of nutrient deprivation. Results To achieve a steady photobiological hydrogen production, a screening protocol was designed to identify C. reinhardtii DNA insertional mutagenesis transformants with an attenuated photosynthesis to respiration capacity ratio (P/R ratio. The screening protocol entails a new and fast method for mutant strain selection altered in their oxygen production/consumption balance. Out of 9000 transformants, four strains with P/R ratios varying from virtually zero to three were isolated. Strain apr1 was found to have a slightly higher respiration rate and a significantly lower photosynthesis rate than the wild type. Sealed cultures of apr1 became anaerobic in normal growth medium (TAP under moderate light conditions and induced [FeFe]-hydrogenase activity, yet without significant hydrogen gas evolution. However, Calvin-Benson cycle inactivation of anaerobically adapted apr1 cells in the light led to a 2-3-fold higher in vivo hydrogen production than previously reported for the sulfur-deprived C. reinhardtii wild type. Conclusion Attenuated P/R capacity ratio in microalgal mutants constitutes a platform for achieving steady state photobiological hydrogen production. Using this platform, algal hydrogen metabolism can be analyzed without applying nutritional stress. Furthermore, these strains promise to be useful for biotechnological hydrogen generation, since high in vivo hydrogen production rates are achievable under normal growth

  10. Phenotypic and Genomic Properties of Chitinispirillum alkaliphilum gen. nov., sp. nov., A Haloalkaliphilic Anaerobic Chitinolytic Bacterium Representing a Novel Class in the Phylum Fibrobacteres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y; Rakitin, Andrey L; Gumerov, Vadim M; Beletsky, Alexey V; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Mardanov, Andrey V; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic enrichment from sediments of hypersaline alkaline lakes in Wadi el Natrun (Egypt) with chitin resulted in the isolation of a fermentative haloalkaliphilic bacterium, strain ACht6-1, growing exclusively with insoluble chitin as the substrate in a sodium carbonate-based medium at pH 8.5-10.5 and total Na(+) concentrations from 0.4 to 1.75 M. The isolate had a Gram-negative cell wall and formed lipid cysts in old cultures. The chitinolytic activity was associated with cells. Analysis of the 4.4 Mb draft genome identified pathways for chitin utilization, particularly, secreted chitinases linked to the cell surface, as well as genes for the hydrolysis of other polysaccharides and fermentation of sugars, while the genes needed for aerobic and anaerobic respiration were absent. Adaptation to a haloalkaliphilic lifestyle was reflected by the gene repertoire encoding sodium rather than proton-dependent membrane-bound ion pumps, including the Rnf-type complex, oxaloacetate decarboxylase, V-type ATPase, and pyrophosphatase. The phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene and ribosomal proteins indicated that ACht6-1 forms a novel deep lineage at the class level within the bacterial candidate division TG3. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and genomic analyses, the novel chitinolytic bacterium is described as Chitinispirillum alkaliphilum gen. nov., sp. nov., within a novel class Chitinispirillia that could be included into the phylum Fibrobacteres.

  11. Phenotypic and genomic properties of Chitinispirillum alkaliphilum gen. nov., sp. nov., a haloalkaliphilic anaerobic chitinolytic bacterium representing a novel class in the phylum Fibrobacteres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitry eSorokin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic enrichment from sediments of hypersaline alkaline lakes in Wadi el Natrun (Egypt with chitin resulted in the isolation of a fermentative haloalkaliphilic bacterium, strain ACht6-1, growing exclusively with insoluble chitin as the substrate in a sodium carbonate-based medium at pH 8.5-10.5 and total Na+ concentrations from 0.4 to 1.75 M. The isolate had a Gram-negative cell wall and formed lipid cysts in old cultures. The chitinolytic activity was associated with cells. Analysis of the 4.4 Mb draft genome identified pathways for chitin utilization, particularly, secreted chitinases linked to the cell surface, as well as genes for the hydrolysis of other polysaccharides and fermentation of sugars, while the genes needed for aerobic and anaerobic respiration were absent. Adaptation to a haloalkaliphilic lifestyle was reflected by the gene repertoire encoding sodium rather than proton-dependent membrane-bound ion pumps, including the Rnf-type complex, oxaloacetate decarboxylase, V-type ATPase and pyrophosphatase. The phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene and ribosomal proteins indicated that ACht6-1 forms a novel deep lineage at the class level within the bacterial candidate division TG3. Based on phylogenetic, phenotypic and genomic analyses, the novel chitinolytic bacterium is described as Chitinispirillum alkaliphilum gen. nov., sp. nov., within a novel class Chitinispirillia that could be included into the phylum Fibrobacteres.

  12. Predicting soil respiration from peatlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowson, J G; Worrall, F; Evans, M G; Dixon, S D

    2013-01-01

    This study considers the relative performance of six different models to predict soil respiration from upland peat. Predicting soil respiration is important for global carbon budgets and gap filling measured data from eddy covariance and closed chamber measurements. Further to models previously published new models are presented using two sub-soil zones and season. Models are tested using data from the Bleaklow plateau, southern Pennines, UK. Presented literature models include ANOVA using logged environmental data, the Arrhenius equation, modified versions of the Arrhenius equation to include soil respiration activation energy and water table depth. New models are proposed including the introduction of two soil zones in the peat profile, and season. The first new model proposes a zone of high CO(2) productivity related to increased soil microbial CO(2) production due to the supply of labile carbon from plant root exudates and root respiration. The second zone is a deeper zone where CO(2) production is lower with less labile carbon. A final model allows the zone of high CO(2) production to become dormant during winter months when plants will senesce and will vary depending upon vegetation type within a fixed location. The final model accounted for, on average, 31.9% of variance in net ecosystem respiration within 11 different restoration sites whilst, using the same data set, the best fitting literature equation only accounted for 18.7% of the total variance. Our results demonstrate that soil respiration models can be improved by explicitly accounting for seasonality and the vertically stratified nature of soil processes. These improved models provide an enhanced basis for calculating the peatland carbon budgets which are essential in understanding the role of peatlands in the global C cycle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Enumeração e isolamento de bactérias anaeróbias facultativas num reator de fluxo ascendente e manta de lodo tratando efluente de uma indústria de gelatina - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v25i2.1977 Enumeration and isolation of facultative anaerobic bacteria in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating wastewater from a gelatine industry- DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v25i2.1977

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Vataru Nakamura

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foram determinados os níveis de bactérias anaeróbias facultativas em Reator de Fluxo Ascendente e Manta de Lodo (UASB utilizado no tratamento de efluente de industria de gelatina. A quantificação dos microrganismos apresentou similar valor na manta de lodo granular e na zona de fluidização. No compartimento de sedimentação do reator as bactérias foram dois logs menores. Estas comunidades são compostas principalmente de bacilos Gram-negativos. Os mais abundantes gêneros foram Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Citrobacter, Escherichia, Klebsiella e Stenotrophomonas. O significado para a saúde pública das bactérias isoladas no reator UASB é desconhecido. Algumas espécies são residentes permanentes, outras são encontradas em somente uma parte da população, e ainda outras espécies são patógenos oportunistas que causam infecção humana. No presente estudo, nenhuma das bactérias predominantes pertence ao grupo dos patógenos estritosThis experiment measured levels of facultative anaerobic bacteria in an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB reactor treating wastewater from a gelatin industry. The microorganism quantification showed similar values in granular sludge bed and fluidized zone. In the settling compartment of reactor, the bacteria were two logs lower. These communities are composed mainly of Gram-negative rods. The most abundant genera isolated were Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Citrobacter, Escherichia, Klebsiella and Stenotrophomonas. The significance of the bacteria isolated from UASB reactor for public health is unknown. Some species are permanent residents; other are found only in a fraction of the population, and still other species are opportunistic pathogens that cause human infections. In the present study, none of the predominant bacteria belonged to the group of strict pathogens

  14. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1993-10-01

    Anaerobic bacteria were isolated from deep subsurface sediment samples taken at study sites in Idaho (INEL) and Washington (HR) by culturing on dilute and concentrated medium. Morphologically distinct colonies were purified, and their responses to 21 selected physiological tests were determined. Although the number of isolates was small (18 INEL, 27 HR) some general patterns could be determined. Most strains could utilize all the carbon sources, however the glycerol and melizitose utilization was positive for 50% or less of the HR isolates. Catalase activity (27.78% at INEL, 74.07% at HR) and tryptophan metabolism (11.12% at INEL, 40.74% at HR) were significantly different between the two study sites. MPN and viable counts indicate that sediments near the water table yield the greatest numbers of anaerobes. Deeper sediments also appear to be more selective with the greatest number of viable counts on low-nutrient mediums. Likewise, only strictly obligate anaerobes were found in the deepest sediment samples. Selective media indicated the presence of methanogens, acetogens, and sulfate reducers at only the HR site

  15. General Instructions for Disposable Respirators

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-09

    This podcast, intended for the general public, demonstrates how to put on and take off disposable respirators that are to be used in areas affected by the influenza outbreak.  Created: 4/9/2009 by CDC, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 4/29/2009.

  16. Use of Facemasks and Respirators

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-05-15

    This program demonstrates the differences of facemasks and respirators that are to be used in public settings during an influenza pandemic.  Created: 5/15/2007 by CDC, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 5/25/2007.

  17. Anaerobic and aerobic acetylene hydratase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Acetaldehyde is the first metabolite produced during acetylene degradation by bacteria either aerobically or anaerobically. Conversion of acetylene into acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetate, and biomass occurs in anaerobic cultures of Palobacter acetylinicus or aerobically with Mycobacterium lacticola, Nocardia rhodochrous, ...

  18. Hemicellulases from anaerobic thermophiles. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegel, J.

    1994-05-01

    The longterm goal of this research effort is to obtain an anaerobic thermophilic bacterium that efficiently converts various hemicellulose-containing biomass to ethanol over a broad pH range. The strategy is to modify the outfit and regulation of the rate-limiting xylanases, glycosidases and xylan esterases in the ethanologenic, anaerobic thermophile Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus, which grows between pH 4.5 and 9.5. Although it utilizes xylans, the xylanase, acetyl(xylan) esterase and O-methylglucuronidase activities in T. ethanolicus are barely measurable and regarded as the rate limiting steps in its xylan utilization. Thus, and also due to the presently limited knowledge of hemicellulases in anaerobic thermophiles, we characterize the hemicellulolytic enzymes from this and other anaerobic thermophiles as enzyme donors. Beside the active xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus, exhibiting the two different activities, we characterized 2 xylosidases, two acetyl(xylan) esterases, and an O-methylglucuronidase from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. We will continue with the characterization of xylanases from novel isolated slightly acidophilic, neutrophilic and slightly alkalophilic thermophiles. We have cloned, subcloned and partially sequenced the 165,000 Da (2 x 85,000) xylosidase/arabinosidase from T. ethanolicus and started with the cloning of the esterases from Thermoanaerobacterium spec. Consequently, we will develop a shuttle vector and continue to apply electroporation of autoplasts as a method for cloning into T. ethanolicus.

  19. Contribution of root respiration to soil respiration in a C3/C4 mixed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Root respiration can be estimated by the differences between soil respiration and microbial respiration. 2.5 Statistical analysis. Coefficient of variation (CV) was calculated to provide a measure of within-site variation of soil respiration, soil temperature, soil moisture content, root biomass, micro- bial biomass carbon, and total ...

  20. Anaerobic bacteria colonizing the lower airways in lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Malm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobes comprise most of the endogenous oropharyngeal microflora, and can cause infections of airways in lung cancer patients who are at high risk for respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and species diversity of anaerobes in specimens from the lower airways of lung cancer patients. Sensitivity of the isolates to conventional antimicrobial agents used in anaerobe therapy was assessed. Respiratory secretions obtained by bronchoscopy from 30 lung cancer patients were cultured onto Wilkins- -Chalgren agar in anaerobic conditions at 37°C for 72–96 hours. The isolates were identified using microtest Api 20A. The minimal inhibitory concentrations for penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanate, piperacillin/tazobactam, cefoxitin, imipenem, clindamycin, and metronidazole were determined by E-test. A total of 47 isolates of anaerobic bacteria were detected in 22 (73.3% specimens. More than one species of anaerobe was found in 16 (53.3% samples. The most frequently isolated were Actinomyces spp. and Peptostreptococcus spp., followed by Eubacterium lentum, Veillonella parvula, Prevotella spp., Bacteroides spp., Lactobacillus jensenii. Among antibiotics used in the study amoxicillin/clavulanate and imipenem were the most active in vitro (0% and 2% resistant strains, respectively. The highest resistance rate was found for penicillin G and metronidazole (36% and 38% resistant strains, respectively. The results obtained confirm the need to conduct analyses of anaerobic microflora colonizing the lower respiratory tract in patients with lung cancer to monitor potential etiologic factors of airways infections, as well as to propose efficient, empirical therapy. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 2, pp. 263–266

  1. Anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation in deep subsurface oil reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Carolyn M; Jones, D M; Larter, S R

    2004-09-16

    Biodegradation of crude oil in subsurface petroleum reservoirs is an important alteration process with major economic consequences. Aerobic degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons at the surface is well documented and it has long been thought that the flow of oxygen- and nutrient-bearing meteoric waters into reservoirs was necessary for in-reservoir petroleum biodegradation. The occurrence of biodegraded oils in reservoirs where aerobic conditions are unlikely, together with the identification of several anaerobic microorganisms in oil fields and the discovery of anaerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation mechanisms, suggests that anaerobic degradation processes could also be responsible. The extent of anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation processes in the world's deep petroleum reservoirs, however, remains strongly contested. Moreover, no organism has yet been isolated that has been shown to degrade hydrocarbons under the conditions found in deep petroleum reservoirs. Here we report the isolation of metabolites indicative of anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation from a large fraction of 77 degraded oil samples from both marine and lacustrine sources from around the world, including the volumetrically important Canadian tar sands. Our results therefore suggest that anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation is a common process in biodegraded subsurface oil reservoirs.

  2. Anaerobic biotransformation of estrogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajka, Cynthia P.; Londry, Kathleen L.

    2006-01-01

    Estrogens are important environmental contaminants that disrupt endocrine systems and feminize male fish. We investigated the potential for anaerobic biodegradation of the estrogens 17-α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17-β-estradiol (E2) in order to understand their fate in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Cultures were established using lake water and sediment under methanogenic, sulfate-, iron-, and nitrate-reducing conditions. Anaerobic degradation of EE2 (added at 5 mg/L) was not observed in multiple trials over long incubation periods (over three years). E2 (added at 5 mg/L) was transformed to estrone (E1) under all four anaerobic conditions (99-176 μg L -1 day -1 ), but the extent of conversion was different for each electron acceptor. The oxidation of E2 to E1 was not inhibited by E1. Under some conditions, reversible inter-conversion of E2 and E1 was observed, and the final steady state concentration of E2 depended on the electron-accepting condition but was independent of the total amount of estrogens added. In addition, racemization occurred and E1 was also transformed to 17-α-estradiol under all but nitrate-reducing conditions. Although E2 could be readily transformed to E1 and in many cases 17-α-estradiol under anaerobic conditions, the complete degradation of estrogens under these conditions was minimal, suggesting that they would accumulate in anoxic environments

  3. Anaerobic biotransformation of estrogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czajka, Cynthia P. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Londry, Kathleen L. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada)]. E-mail: londryk@cc.umanitoba.ca

    2006-08-31

    Estrogens are important environmental contaminants that disrupt endocrine systems and feminize male fish. We investigated the potential for anaerobic biodegradation of the estrogens 17-{alpha}-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) in order to understand their fate in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Cultures were established using lake water and sediment under methanogenic, sulfate-, iron-, and nitrate-reducing conditions. Anaerobic degradation of EE2 (added at 5 mg/L) was not observed in multiple trials over long incubation periods (over three years). E2 (added at 5 mg/L) was transformed to estrone (E1) under all four anaerobic conditions (99-176 {mu}g L{sup -1} day{sup -1}), but the extent of conversion was different for each electron acceptor. The oxidation of E2 to E1 was not inhibited by E1. Under some conditions, reversible inter-conversion of E2 and E1 was observed, and the final steady state concentration of E2 depended on the electron-accepting condition but was independent of the total amount of estrogens added. In addition, racemization occurred and E1 was also transformed to 17-{alpha}-estradiol under all but nitrate-reducing conditions. Although E2 could be readily transformed to E1 and in many cases 17-{alpha}-estradiol under anaerobic conditions, the complete degradation of estrogens under these conditions was minimal, suggesting that they would accumulate in anoxic environments.

  4. The anaerobic digestion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, C.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Boone, D.R. [Oregon Graduate Inst., Portland, OR (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  5. Bacterial ecology of abattoir wastewater treated by an anaerobic digestor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabari, Linda; Gannoun, Hana; Khelifi, Eltaief; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Hamdi, Moktar; Fardeau, Marie-Laure

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater from an anaerobic treatment plant at a slaughterhouse was analysed to determine the bacterial biodiversity present. Molecular analysis of the anaerobic sludge obtained from the treatment plant showed significant diversity, as 27 different phyla were identified. Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Thermotogae, Euryarchaeota (methanogens), and msbl6 (candidate division) were the dominant phyla of the anaerobic treatment plant and represented 21.7%, 18.5%, 11.5%, 9.4%, 8.9%, and 8.8% of the total bacteria identified, respectively. The dominant bacteria isolated were Clostridium, Bacteroides, Desulfobulbus, Desulfomicrobium, Desulfovibrio and Desulfotomaculum. Our results revealed the presence of new species, genera and families of microorganisms. The most interesting strains were characterised. Three new bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion of abattoir wastewater were published. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Bacterial ecology of abattoir wastewater treated by an anaerobic digestor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Jabari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Wastewater from an anaerobic treatment plant at a slaughterhouse was analysed to determine the bacterial biodiversity present. Molecular analysis of the anaerobic sludge obtained from the treatment plant showed significant diversity, as 27 different phyla were identified. Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Thermotogae, Euryarchaeota (methanogens, and msbl6 (candidate division were the dominant phyla of the anaerobic treatment plant and represented 21.7%, 18.5%, 11.5%, 9.4%, 8.9%, and 8.8% of the total bacteria identified, respectively. The dominant bacteria isolated were Clostridium, Bacteroides, Desulfobulbus, Desulfomicrobium, Desulfovibrio and Desulfotomaculum. Our results revealed the presence of new species, genera and families of microorganisms. The most interesting strains were characterised. Three new bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion of abattoir wastewater were published.

  7. Controls on Methanogenesis in Organic-Rich Anaerobic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R.; Tfaily, M.; Chanton, J.; Rich, V. I.; Saleska, S. R.; Holmes, B.; Langford, L.; Hanson, P. J.; Bridgham, S. D.; Hopple, A.; Keller, J.; Cory, A.; Kostka, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    Peatlands contain an amount of C equal to half the CO2 in the atmosphere. That C is stored as organic C (OC) in peat deposits which form when plant productivity exceeds heterotrophic respiration. This balance has been attributed to cold, anaerobic, low pH conditions which slow microbial respiration rates, high aromatic content which may inhibit microbial decomposition, and recalcitrance of OC under terminal electron-acceptor (TEA) depleted conditions. Peat has been described as a potential C bomb which could release Gt of C into the atmosphere if rising global temperatures shifted this balance in favor of increased microbial respiration. At the Spruce and Peatlands Responses Under Changing Environments (SPRUCE) experimental site in Minnesota, U.S.A., peat up to 2 m deep was heated (+2.25°C to +9°C above ambient) both in situ and in laboratory incubations to test the response of microbial respiration to increasing temperatures. Our results demonstrated (1) that temperature did not influence CO2 or CH4 production rates in deep anaerobic peat, (2) that microbial decomposition was dominated by dissolved OC rather than the solid phase peat, and (3) that microbial decomposition in surface peat may become more methanogenic with warming. This shift towards higher CH4 production relative to CO2 has significant climate change implications since CH4 is a much stronger greenhouse gas than CO2. Under TEA-poor, anaerobic conditions, such as peat deposits, thermodynamic principles dictate that cellulose, the dominant OC form in Sphagnum peat, should be mineralized into equimolar CO2 and CH­4. However, deviations from this predicted ratio abound. The literature of rumen, a system similar to peat in many ways, revealed a potential mechanism for sustaining elevated CO2 production without accumulating inhibitory H2. Using FTICRMS, we found ubiquitous hydrogenation of unsaturated OC which could be acting as TEAs in peat deposits. This mechanism has the further advantages of

  8. Anaerobic biological treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speece, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Enso-Fenox process has been very successfully used to remove chlorinated phenolic compounds from pulp bleaching effluents. It is a two-stage anaerobic/aerobic process consisting of a nonmethanogenic anaerobic fluidized bed followed by a trickling filter. Studies have been conducted on reductive dechlorination of chlorinated aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions with chlorinated phenols as the sole carbon and energy source. Approximately 40% of the added chlorophenols was converted to CH 4 and CO 2 . Substrate loading rates were 20 mg/L/d at hydraulic detention times of 2-4 days with 90% substrate conversion efficiency. Reductive dechlorination of mono, di-, tri-, and pentachlorophenols has been demonstrated in anaerobic sewage sludge. The following constituents were tested in the laboratory at their approximate concentrations in coal conversion wastewater (CCWW) and were anaerobically degraded in serum bottles: 1,000 mg/L phenol; 500 mg/L resorcinol; 1,000 mg/L benzoic acid; 500 mg/L p-cresol; 200 mg/L pyridine; 2,000 mg/L benzoic acid; 250 mg/L 40 methylcatechol; 500 mg/L 4-ethylpyridine; and 2,000 mg/L hexanoic acid. A petrochemical may initially exhibit toxicity to an unacclimated population of methane-fermenting bacteria, but with acclimation the toxicity may be greatly reduced or disappear. In addition, the microorganisms may develop the capacity to actually degrade compounds which showed initial toxicity. Since biomass digestion requires a complete consortium of bacteria, it is relevant to study the effect of a given process as well as to individual steps within the process. A toxicant can inhibit the rate-limiting step and/or change the step that is rate-limiting. Both manifestations of toxicity can severely affect the overall process

  9. Adaptation and Antibiotic Tolerance of Anaerobic Burkholderia pseudomallei ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Mohamad A.; Austin, Chad R.; Stewart, Amanda L.; Higgins, Mike; Vázquez-Torres, Andrés; Voskuil, Martin I.

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiological agent of melioidosis and is remarkably resistant to most classes of antibacterials. Even after months of treatment with antibacterials that are relatively effective in vitro, there is a high rate of treatment failure, indicating that this pathogen alters its patterns of antibacterial susceptibility in response to cues encountered in the host. The pathology of melioidosis indicates that B. pseudomallei encounters host microenvironments that limit aerobic respiration, including the lack of oxygen found in abscesses and in the presence of nitric oxide produced by macrophages. We investigated whether B. pseudomallei could survive in a nonreplicating, oxygen-deprived state and determined if this physiological state was tolerant of conventional antibacterials. B. pseudomallei survived initial anaerobiosis, especially under moderately acidic conditions similar to those found in abscesses. Microarray expression profiling indicated a major shift in the physiological state of hypoxic B. pseudomallei, including induction of a variety of typical anaerobic-environment-responsive genes and genes that appear specific to anaerobic B. pseudomallei. Interestingly, anaerobic B. pseudomallei was unaffected by antibacterials typically used in therapy. However, it was exquisitely sensitive to drugs used against anaerobic pathogens. After several weeks of anaerobic culture, a significant loss of viability was observed. However, a stable subpopulation that maintained complete viability for at least 1 year was established. Thus, during the course of human infection, if a minor subpopulation of bacteria inhabited an oxygen-restricted environment, it might be indifferent to traditional therapy but susceptible to antibiotics frequently used to treat anaerobic infections. PMID:21537012

  10. Anaerobic Benzene Oxidation by Geobacter Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Timothy S.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Barlett, Melissa A.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    The abundance of Geobacter species in contaminated aquifers in which benzene is anaerobically degraded has led to the suggestion that some Geobacter species might be capable of anaerobic benzene degradation, but this has never been documented. A strain of Geobacter, designated strain Ben, was isolated from sediments from the Fe(III)-reducing zone of a petroleum-contaminated aquifer in which there was significant capacity for anaerobic benzene oxidation. Strain Ben grew in a medium with benzene as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the sole electron acceptor. Furthermore, additional evaluation of Geobacter metallireducens demonstrated that it could also grow in benzene-Fe(III) medium. In both strain Ben and G. metallireducens the stoichiometry of benzene metabolism and Fe(III) reduction was consistent with the oxidation of benzene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) serving as the sole electron acceptor. With benzene as the electron donor, and Fe(III) oxide (strain Ben) or Fe(III) citrate (G. metallireducens) as the electron acceptor, the cell yields of strain Ben and G. metallireducens were 3.2 × 109 and 8.4 × 109 cells/mmol of Fe(III) reduced, respectively. Strain Ben also oxidized benzene with anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as the sole electron acceptor with cell yields of 5.9 × 109 cells/mmol of AQDS reduced. Strain Ben serves as model organism for the study of anaerobic benzene metabolism in petroleum-contaminated aquifers, and G. metallireducens is the first anaerobic benzene-degrading organism that can be genetically manipulated. PMID:23001648

  11. Clostridium acetireducens sp nov, a novel amino acid-oxidizing, acetate-reducing anaerobic bacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlygsson, J; Krooneman, J; Collins, Matthew D.; Pascual, C; Gottschall, JC

    Strain 30A(T) (T = type strain), which was isolated from an anaerobic bioreactor fed on waste from a potato starch factory in De Krim, The Netherlands, is a nonmotile, gram-positive, anaerobic, rod-shaped organism that is able to degrade various amino acids, including alanine, leucine, isoleucine,

  12. Diatoms respire nitrate to survive dark and anoxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Anja; de Beer, Dirk; Nitsch, Jana L.; Lavik, Gaute; Stief, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms survive in dark, anoxic sediment layers for months to decades. Our investigation reveals a correlation between the dark survival potential of marine diatoms and their ability to accumulate NO3− intracellularly. Axenic strains of benthic and pelagic diatoms that stored 11–274 mM NO3− in their cells survived for 6–28 wk. After sudden shifts to dark, anoxic conditions, the benthic diatom Amphora coffeaeformis consumed 84–87% of its intracellular NO3− pool within 1 d. A stable-isotope labeling experiment proved that 15NO3− consumption was accompanied by the production and release of 15NH4+, indicating dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). DNRA is an anaerobic respiration process that is known mainly from prokaryotic organisms, and here shown as dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathway used by a eukaryotic phototroph. Similar to large sulfur bacteria and benthic foraminifera, diatoms may respire intracellular NO3− in sediment layers without O2 and NO3−. The rapid depletion of the intracellular NO3− storage, however, implies that diatoms use DNRA to enter a resting stage for long-term survival. Assuming that pelagic diatoms are also capable of DNRA, senescing diatoms that sink through oxygen-deficient water layers may be a significant NH4+ source for anammox, the prevalent nitrogen loss pathway of oceanic oxygen minimum zones. PMID:21402908

  13. Anaerobic Metabolism in T4 Acanthamoeba Genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Daniella de Sousa Mendes Moreira; Alves, Luciano Moreira; da Costa, Tatiane Luiza; de Castro, Ana Maria; Vinaud, Marina Clare

    2017-06-01

    Members of the genus Acanthamoeba are of the most common protozoa that has been isolated from a variety of environment and affect immunocompromised individuals, causing granulomatous amoebic encephalitis and skin lesions. Acanthamoeba, in immunocompetent patients, may cause a keratitis related to corneal microtrauma. These free-living amoebas easily adapt to the host environment and wield metabolic pathways such as the energetic and respiratory ones in order to maintain viability for long periods. The energetic metabolism of cysts and trophozoites remains mostly unknown. There are a few reports on the energetic metabolism of these organisms as they are mitochondriate eukaryotes and some studies under aerobic conditions showing that Acanthamoeba hydrolyzes glucose into pyruvate via glycolysis. The aim of this study was to detect the energetic metabolic pathways with emphasis on anaerobic metabolism in trophozoites of three isolates of Acanthamoeba sp belonging to the T4 genotype. Two samples were collected in the environment and one was a clinical sample. The evaluation of these microorganisms proceeded as follows: rupture of trophozoites (7.5 × 10 3 parasites/ml) and biochemical analysis with high performance liquid chromatography and spectrophotometry. The anaerobic glycolysis was identified through the detection of glucose, pyruvate, and lactate. The protein catabolism was identified through the detection of fumarate, urea, and creatinine. The fatty acid oxidation was identified through the detection of acetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and propionate. The detected substances are the result of the consumption of energy reserves such as glycogen and lipids. The anaerobic glycolysis and protein catabolism pathways were observed in all three isolates: one clinical and two environmental. This study represents the first report of energetic pathways used by trophozoites from different isolates of the T4 genotype Acanthamoeba.

  14. Hydrolysis of particulate substrate by activated sludge under aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henze, Mogens; Mladenovski, C.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of hydrolysis of particulate organic substrate by activated sludge has been made. Raw municipal wastewater was used as substrate. It was mixed with activated sludge from a high loaded activated sludge plant with pure oxygen aeration. During 4 days batch experiments under aerobic......, anoxic and anaerobic conditions, the hydrolysis was following through the production of ammonia. The hydrolysis rate of nitrogeneous compounds is significantly affected by the electron donor available. The rate is high under aerobic conditions, medium under anaerobic conditions and low under anoxic...... conditions. The ratio between the hydrolysis rates under aerobic and under anoxic conditions are very similar to the respiration rates measured as electron equivalents....

  15. Growth of silicone-immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters, a technique to study microcolony formation under anaerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højberg, Ole; Binnerup, S. J.; Sørensen, Jan

    1997-01-01

    A technique was developed to study microcolony formation by silicone- immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters under anaerobic conditions. A sudden shift to anaerobiosis was obtained by submerging the filters in medium which was depleted for oxygen by a pure culture of bacteria....... The technique was used to demonstrate that preinduction of nitrate reductase under low-oxygen conditions was necessary for nonfermenting, nitrate-respiring bacteria, e.g., Pseudomonas spp., to cope with a sudden lack of oxygen. In contrast, nitrate-respiring, fermenting bacteria, e.g., Bacillus and Escherichia...... spp, formed microcolonies under anaerobic conditions with or without the presence of nitrate and irrespective of aerobic or anaerobic preculture conditions....

  16. Early anaerobic metabolisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Rosing, Minik T; Bjerrum, Christian

    2006-01-01

    probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity......Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were...... of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent...

  17. Early anaerobic metabolisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Don E; Rosing, Minik T; Bjerrum, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8 Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent with the carbon isotope record and other considerations of the carbon cycle, that marine rates of primary production at this time were probably an order of magnitude (or more) less than today. We conclude that the flux of reduced species to the Earth surface at this time may have been sufficient to drive anaerobic ecosystems of sufficient activity to be consistent with the carbon isotope record. Conversely, an ecosystem based on oxygenic photosynthesis was also possible with complete removal of the oxygen by reaction with reduced species from the mantle. PMID:17008221

  18. Effects of respirator use on worker performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardarelli, R. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In 1993, EPRI funded Yankee Atomic Electric Company to examine the effects of respirator use on worker efficiency. Phase I of Yankee`s effort was to develop a study design to determine respirator effects. Given success in Phase I, a larger population will be tested to determine if a stasitically significant respirator effect on performance can be measured. This paper summarizes the 1993 EPRI/Yankee Respirator Effects of Pilot Study, and describes the study design for the 1994 EPRI/Yankee Respirator Study to be conducted at the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant. Also described is a summary of respirator effect studies that have been conducted during the last ten (10) years.

  19. Isolation of Capsulate Bacteria from Acute Dentoalveolar Abscesses

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, M. A. O.; Milligan, S. G.; MacFarlane, T. W.; Carmichael, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of a capsule was determined for 198 bacterial strains (57 facultative anaerobes, 141 strict anaerobes) isobdted from pus samples aspirated from 40 acute dentoalveolar abscesses. A total of 133 (67 per cent) of the isolates (42 facultative anaerobes, 91 strict anaerobes) were found to have a capsule. Possession ofa capsule may in part explain the apparent pathogenicity of the bacterial species encountered in acute dentoalveolar abscess.Keywords - Bacterial capsule; Acute dentoalve...

  20. Respirators: Supervisors Self-Study #43442

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-20

    This course, Respirators: Supervisors Self-Study (#43442), addresses training requirements for supervisors of respirator wearers as specified by the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) Standard for Respiratory Protection, ANSI Z88.2, and as incorporated by reference in the Department of Energy (DOE) Worker Health and Safety Rule, 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 851. This course also presents the responsibilities of supervisors of respirator wearers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  1. Hydrogenosomes of the anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix sp. L2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema, Femke Dieuwke

    1993-01-01

    Anaerobic fungi are normal inhabitants of the digestive tract of many herbivores, where they play a role in the digestion of plant material. All strains which have been isolated so far produce H2 as one of the fermentation products and contain hydrogenosomes, organelles in which the H2-production is

  2. New perspectives in anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lier, J.B.; Tilche, A.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2001-01-01

    The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern...... requirements. In fact, most advances were achieved during the last three decades, when high-rate reactor systems were developed and a profound insight was obtained in the microbiology of the anaerobic communities. This insight led to a better understanding of anaerobic treatment and, subsequently, to a broader...

  3. New perspectives in anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lier, J.B.; Tilche, A.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2001-01-01

    The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern requireme......The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern...

  4. The heat generated by yeast cultures with a mixed metabolism in the transition between respiration and fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Stockar, U; Birou, B

    1989-06-05

    The heat generated by both batch and continuous cultures of the yeast K. fragilis was studied using a modified Bench Scale Calorimeter. Batch cultures were used to measure the heat dissipation rates and the heat yields during fully aerobic and completely anaerobic growth, whereas continuous cultures enabled, in addition, a quantitative study of heat dissipation rates during growth on mixed metabolism. In this case, the extent of fermentation versus respiration could be specified and controlled by varying the degree of oxygen limitation. The heat dissipated per unit biomass formed was highest for fully respirative catabolism and fell continuously to a much lower value typical of anaerobic cultures as the catabolism was shifted increasingly to the fermentative mode. The heat generated per mole of oxygen taken up stayed quite close to the fully aerobic value of 506 kJ mol(-1) even when a sizable fraction of the substrate available to catabolism was fermented. If the fraction of respiration in the metabolism is lowered beyond a certain threshold, the ratio of the heat generation to oxygen consumption starts to increase dramatically and finally tends to infinity for fully anaerobic growth. All experimental results were quantitatively analyzed and explained on the basis of a simple model which formally describes the cultures in terms of two parallel "chemical" reactions. In simple cases such as the one presented here, the model enables calculation of the whole stoichiometry of the culture from a single measured heat yield.

  5. Plastron Respiration Using Commercial Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Atherton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of insect and arachnid species are able to remain submerged in water indefinitely using plastron respiration. A plastron is a surface-retained film of air produced by surface morphology that acts as an oxygen-carbon dioxide exchange surface. Many highly water repellent and hydrophobic surfaces when placed in water exhibit a silvery sheen which is characteristic of a plastron. In this article, the hydrophobicity of a range of commercially available water repellent fabrics and polymer membranes is investigated, and how the surface of the materials mimics this mechanism of underwater respiration is demonstrated allowing direct extraction of oxygen from oxygenated water. The coverage of the surface with the plastron air layer was measured using confocal microscopy. A zinc/oxygen cell is used to consume oxygen within containers constructed from the different membranes, and the oxygen consumed by the cell is compared to the change in oxygen concentration as measured by an oxygen probe. By comparing the membranes to an air-tight reference sample, it was found that the membranes facilitated oxygen transfer from the water into the container, with the most successful membrane showing a 1.90:1 ratio between the cell oxygen consumption and the change in concentration within the container.

  6. Multicenter study of antimicrobial susceptibility of anaerobic bacteria in Korea in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yangsoon; Park, Yeon Joon; Kim, Mi Na; Uh, Young; Kim, Myung Sook; Lee, Kyungwon

    2015-09-01

    Periodic monitoring of regional or institutional resistance trends of clinically important anaerobic bacteria is recommended, because the resistance of anaerobic pathogens to antimicrobial drugs and inappropriate therapy are associated with poor clinical outcomes. There has been no multicenter study of clinical anaerobic isolates in Korea. We aimed to determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns of clinically important anaerobes at multiple centers in Korea. A total of 268 non-duplicated clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria were collected from four large medical centers in Korea in 2012. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by the agar dilution method according to the CLSI guidelines. The following antimicrobials were tested: piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, cefoxitin, cefotetan, imipenem, meropenem, clindamycin, moxifloxacin, chloramphenicol, metronidazole, and tigecycline. Organisms of the Bacteroides fragilis group were highly susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, and meropenem, as their resistance rates to these three antimicrobials were lower than 6%. For B. fragilis group isolates and anaerobic gram-positive cocci, the resistance rates to moxifloxacin were 12-25% and 11-13%, respectively. Among B. fragilis group organisms, the resistance rates to tigecycline were 16-17%. Two isolates of Finegoldia magna were non-susceptible to chloramphenicol (minimum inhibitory concentrations of 16-32 mg/L). Resistance patterns were different among the different hospitals. Piperacillin-tazobactam, cefoxitin, and carbapemems are highly active beta-lactam agents against most of the anaerobes. The resistance rates to moxifloxacin and tigecycline are slightly higher than those in the previous study.

  7. New perspectives in anaerobic digestion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lier, van J.B.; Tilche, A.; Ahring, B.K.; Macarie, H.; Moletta, R.; Dohanyos, M.; Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Lens, P.N.L.; Verstraete, W.

    2001-01-01

    The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern

  8. Anaerobic digestion of piggery waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velsen, van A.F.M.

    1981-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological process by which organic matter is converted to methane and carbon dioxide by microbes in the absence of air (oxygen). In nature, anaerobic conversions occur at all places where organic material accumulates and the supply of oxygen is deficient, e.g. in marshes

  9. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellinger, A. [INFOENERGIE, Ettenhausen (Switzerland)

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  10. Respirators: APR Issuer Self Study 33461

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-07-13

    Respirators: APR Issuer Self-Study (course 33461) is designed to introduce and familiarize employees selected as air-purifying respirator (APR) issuers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with the responsibilities, limitations, procedures, and resources for issuing APRs at LANL. The goal is to enable these issuers to consistently provide proper, functioning APRs to authorized users

  11. Students' Chemical Knowledge in Photosynthesis and Respiration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Students' Chemical Knowledge in Photosynthesis and Respiration in Port Harcourt Metropolis of Rivers State of Nigeria. ... African Journal of Chemical Education ... Photosynthesis-Respiration Chemical Reaction Test (P-RCRT) and PLDRT-essay test on light and dark reactions of photosynthesis and fate of glucose in ...

  12. Management effects on European cropland respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eugster, W.; Moffat, A.M.; Ceschia, E.; Jacobs, C.M.J.; Moors, E.J.; Jans, W.W.P.

    2010-01-01

    Increases in respiration rates following management activities in croplands are considered a relevant anthropogenic source of CO2. In this paper, we quantify the impact of management events on cropland respiration fluxes of CO2 as they occur under current climate and management conditions. Our

  13. 42 CFR 84.1131 - Respirators; required components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1131 Respirators; required components. (a) Each respirator described in § 84.1130 shall...

  14. Respiration in neonate sea turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Edwin R; Paladino, Frank V; Strohl, Kingman P; Santidrián T, Pilar; Klann, Kenneth; Spotila, James R

    2007-03-01

    The pattern and control of respiration is virtually unknown in hatchling sea turtles. Using incubator-raised turtles, we measured oxygen consumption, frequency, tidal volume, and minute volume for leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) and olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) turtle hatchlings for the first six days after pipping. In addition, we tested the hatchlings' response to hypercapnic, hyperoxic, and hypoxic challenges over this time period. Hatchling sea turtles generally showed resting ventilation characteristics that are similar to those of adults: a single breath followed by a long respiratory pause, slow frequency, and high metabolic rate. With hypercapnic challenge, both species responded primarily by elevating respiratory frequency via a decrease in the non-ventilatory period. Leatherback resting tidal volume increased with age but otherwise, neither species' resting respiratory pattern nor response to gas challenge changed significantly over the first few days after hatching. At the time of nest emergence, sea turtles have achieved a respiratory pattern that is similar to that of actively diving adults.

  15. Ability for anaerobic growth is not sufficient for development of the petite phenotype in Saccharomyces kluyveri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kasper; Olsson, Lisbeth; Piskur, Jure

    2001-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a petite-phenotype-positive ("petite-positive") yeast, which can successfully grow in the absence of oxygen. On the other hand, Kluyveromyces lactis as well as many other yeasts are petite negative and cannot grow anaerobically. In this paper, we show that Saccharomyces...... kluyveri can grow under anaerobic conditions, but while it can generate respiration-deficient mutants, it cannot generate true petite mutants. From a phylogenetic point of view, S. kluyveri is apparently more closely related to S. cerevisiae than to K. lactis. These observations suggest that the progenitor...... of the modern Saccharomyces and Kluyveromyces yeasts, as well as other related genera, was a petite-negative and aerobic yeast. Upon separation of the K. lactis and S. kluyveri-S. cerevisiae lineages, the latter developed the ability to grow anaerobically. However, while the S. kluyveri lineage has remained...

  16. Sleep and Respiration in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Prisk, G. Kim; Paiva, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Sleep is often reported to be of poor quality in microgravity, and studies on the ground have shown a strong relationship between sleep-disordered breathing and sleep disruption. During the 16-day Neurolab mission, we studied the influence of possible changes in respiratory function on sleep by performing comprehensive sleep recordings on the payload crew on four nights during the mission. In addition, we measured the changes in the ventilatory response to low oxygen and high carbon dioxide in the same subjects during the day, hypothesizing that changes in ventilatory control might affect respiration during sleep. Microgravity caused a large reduction in the ventilatory response to reduced oxygen. This is likely the result of an increase in blood pressure at the peripheral chemoreceptors in the neck that occurs when the normally present hydrostatic pressure gradient between the heart and upper body is abolished. This reduction was similar to that seen when the subjects were placed acutely in the supine position in one-G. In sharp contrast to low oxygen, the ventilatory response to elevated carbon dioxide was unaltered by microgravity or the supine position. Because of the similarities of the findings in microgravity and the supine position, it is unlikely that changes in ventilatory control alter respiration during sleep in microgravity. During sleep on the ground, there were a small number of apneas (cessation of breathing) and hypopneas (reduced breathing) in these normal subjects. During sleep in microgravity, there was a reduction in the number of apneas and hypopneas per hour compared to preflight. Obstructive apneas virtually disappeared in microgravity, suggesting that the removal of gravity prevents the collapse of upper airways during sleep. Arousals from sleep were reduced in microgravity compared to preflight, and virtually all of this reduction was as a result of a reduction in the number of arousals from apneas and hypopneas. We conclude that any sleep

  17. Reverse Methanogenesis and Respiration in Methanotrophic Archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, Peer H.A.; Welte, Cornelia U.; Koehorst, Jasper J.; Plugge, Caroline M.; Jetten, Mike S.M.; Stams, Alfons J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is catalyzed by anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) via a reverse and modified methanogenesis pathway. Methanogens can also reverse the methanogenesis pathway to oxidize methane, but only during net methane production (i.e., "trace methane oxidation"). In

  18. Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Respiration on Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, Robert C.

    2013-04-26

    anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing; 4. An acid-stable red cytochrome with a novel absorbance peak at 579 nm was purified from cell-free extracts of L. ferriphilum. Functional studies demonstrated that this cytochrome was an important component of the aerobic iron respiratory chain in this organism; 5. The specific adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to pyrite is mediated by an extracellular protein that was identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to minerals was characterized by high affinity binding that exhibited a high specificity for pyrite over other sulfide minerals. The principal biopolymer involved in this high-affinity adhesion to pyrite was isolated by mineral affinity chromatography and identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of purified aporusticyanin to minerals was observed to adhere to different mineral with a pattern of reactivity identical to that observed with the intact bacterium. Further, preincubation of pyrite with excess exogenous aporusticyanin served to inhibit the adherence of intact cells to the surface of the mineral, indicating that the protein and the cells adhered to the pyrite in a mutually exclusive manner. Taken together, these observations support a model where aporusticyanin located on the surface of the bacterial cell acts as a mineral-specific receptor for the initial adherence of At. ferrooxidans to solid pyrite; 6. The specific adhesion of L. ferriphilum to pyrite was mediated by a different acid-stable extracellular protein than aporusticyanin; and 7. A prototype integrating cavity absorption meter (ICAM) was assembled to determine whether this novel spectrophotometer could be used to study cellular respiration in situ.

  19. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface. Progress report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1992-06-01

    A variety of different media were used to isolate facultatively (FAB) and obligately anaerobic bacteria (OAB). These bacteria were isolated from core subsamples obtained from boreholes at the Idaho National Engineering Lab. (INEL) or at the Hanford Lab. (Yakima). Core material was sampled at various depths to 600 feet below the surface. All core samples with culturable bacteria contained at least FAB making thisthe most common physiological type of anaerobic bacteria present in the deep subsurface at these two sites. INEL core samples are characterized by isolates of both FAB and OAB. No isolates of acetogenic, methanogenic, or sulfate reducing bacteria were obtained. Yakima core samples are characterized by a marked predominance of FAB in comparison to OAB. In addition, isolates of acetogenic, methanogenic, and sulfate reducing bacteria were obtained. The Yakima site has the potential for complete anaerobic mineralization of organic compounds whereas this potential appears to be lacking at INEL.

  20. Re-interpreting anaerobic metabolism: an argument for the application of both anaerobic glycolysis and excess post-exercise oxygen comsumption (EPOC) as independent sources of energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C B

    1998-02-01

    Due to current technical difficulties and changing cellular conditions, the measurement of anaerobic and recovery energy expenditure remains elusive. During rest and low-intensity steady-state exercise, indirect calorimetric measurements successfully represent energy expenditure. The same steady-state O2 uptake methods are often used to describe the O2 deficit and excess post-oxygen consumption (EPOC): 1 l O2 = 5 kcal = 20.9 kJ. However, an O2 deficit plus exercise O2 uptake measurement ignores energy expenditure during recovery, and an exercise O2 uptake plus EPOC measurement misrepresents anaerobic energy expenditure. An alternative solution has not yet been proposed. Anaerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration are construed here as a symbiotic union of metabolic pathways, each contributing independently to energy expenditure and heat production. Care must be taken when using O2 uptake alone to quantify energy expenditure because various high-intensity exercise models reveal that O2 uptake can lag behind estimated energy demands or exceed them. The independent bioenergetics behind anaerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration can acknowledge these discrepancies. Anaerobic glycolysis is an additive component to an exercise O2 uptake measurement. Moreover, it is the assumptions behind steady-state O2 uptake that do not permit proper interpretation of energy expenditure during EPOC; 1 l O2 not = 20.9 kJ. Using both the O2 deficit and a modified EPOC for interpretation, rather than one or the other, leads to a better method of quantifying energy expenditure for higher intensity exercise and recovery.

  1. Effects of thyroid state on respiration of perfused rat and guinea pig hearts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, L.C.; Wallace, P.G.; Berry, M.N. (Flinders Univ. School of Medicine, Bedford Park (Australia))

    1987-09-01

    The effects of thyroid state on the respiration of the isolated heart were investigated using retrograde perfused rat and guinea pig hearts. In both species, hypothyroidism caused a marked depression in circulating thyroid hormone concentrations and in the respiration of the isolated, retrograde perfused heart. Hypothyroidism was caused by injecting animals with Na{sup 131}I. The effects on myocardial respiration could be attributed to changes in the contraction frequency and in the oxygen consumption per beat, with little contribution from basal respiration. Treatment of animals with thyroxine elevated plasma thyroid hormones to a similar extent in rats and guinea pigs. In the latter, thyroxine treatment was associated with substantial increases in the contraction frequency and the oxygen consumption per beat of the isolated heart. In contrast, only small changes were apparent in the retrograde perfused rat heart, observations that were confirmed in rat hearts perfused at near physiological work loads. It was concluded that rat hearts isolated from normal animals function at near maximal thyroid state, in contrast to the guinea pig heart, which requires higher circulating concentrations of thyroid hormones to attain maximal responses.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Desulfuromonas acetexigens Strain 2873, a Novel Anode-Respiring Bacterium

    KAUST Repository

    Katuri, Krishna

    2017-03-03

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Desulfuromonas acetexigens strain 2873, which was originally isolated from digester sludge from a sewage treatment plant in Germany. This bacterium is capable of anode respiration with high electrochemical activity in microbial electrochemical systems. The draft genome contains 3,376 predicted protein-coding genes and putative multiheme c-type cytochromes.

  3. Effects of thyroid state on respiration of perfused rat and guinea pig hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, L.C.; Wallace, P.G.; Berry, M.N.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of thyroid state on the respiration of the isolated heart were investigated using retrograde perfused rat and guinea pig hearts. In both species, hypothyroidism caused a marked depression in circulating thyroid hormone concentrations and in the respiration of the isolated, retrograde perfused heart. Hypothyroidism was caused by injecting animals with Na 131 I. The effects on myocardial respiration could be attributed to changes in the contraction frequency and in the oxygen consumption per beat, with little contribution from basal respiration. Treatment of animals with thyroxine elevated plasma thyroid hormones to a similar extent in rats and guinea pigs. In the latter, thyroxine treatment was associated with substantial increases in the contraction frequency and the oxygen consumption per beat of the isolated heart. In contrast, only small changes were apparent in the retrograde perfused rat heart, observations that were confirmed in rat hearts perfused at near physiological work loads. It was concluded that rat hearts isolated from normal animals function at near maximal thyroid state, in contrast to the guinea pig heart, which requires higher circulating concentrations of thyroid hormones to attain maximal responses

  4. Clinical pulmonary function and industrial respirator wear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raven, P.B. (Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth); Moss, R.F.; Page, K.; Garmon, R.; Skaggs, B.

    1981-12-01

    This investigation was the initial step in determining a clinical pulmonary test which could be used to evaluate workers as to their suitability to industrial respirator wear. Sixty subjects, 12 superior, 37 normal, and 11 moderately impaired with respect to lung function tests were evaluated with a battery of clinical pulmonary tests while wearing an industrial respirator. The respirator was a full-face mask (MSA-Ultravue) demand breathing type equipped with an inspiratory resistance of 85mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow and an expiratory resistance of 25mm H/sub 2/O at 85 L/min air flow. Comparisons of these tests were made between the three groups of subjects both with and without a respirator. It appears that those lung tests which measure the flow characteristics of the lung especially those that are effort dependant are more susceptible to change as a result of respirator wear. Hence, the respirator affects the person with superior lung function to a greater degree than the moderately impaired person. It was suggested that the clinical test of 15 second maximum voluntary ventilations (MVV./sub 25/) may be the test of choice for determining worker capability in wearing an industrial respirator.

  5. Anaerobes as Sources of Bioactive Compounds and Health Promoting Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Gashaw

    Aerobic microorganisms have been sources of medicinal agents for several decades and an impressive variety of drugs have been isolated from their cultures, studied and formulated to treat or prevent diseases. On the other hand, anaerobes, which are believed to be the oldest life forms on earth and evolved remarkably diverse physiological functions, have largely been neglected as sources of bioactive compounds. However, results obtained from the limited research done so far show that anaerobes are capable of producing a range of interesting bioactive compounds that can promote human health. In fact, some of these bioactive compounds are found to be novel in their structure and/or mode of action.Anaerobes play health-promoting roles through their bioactive products as well as application of whole cells. The bioactive compounds produced by these microorganisms include antimicrobial agents and substances such as immunomodulators and vitamins. Bacteriocins produced by anaerobes have been in use as preservatives for about 40 years. Because these substances are effective at low concentrations, encounter relatively less resistance from bacteria and are safe to use, there is a growing interest in these antimicrobial agents. Moreover, several antibiotics have been reported from the cultures of anaerobes. Closthioamide and andrimid produced by Clostridium cellulolyticum and Pantoea agglomerans, respectively, are examples of novel antibiotics of anaerobe origin. The discovery of such novel bioactive compounds is expected to encourage further studies which can potentially lead to tapping of the antibiotic production potential of this fascinating group of microorganisms.Anaerobes are widely used in preparation of fermented foods and beverages. During the fermentation processes, these organisms produce a number of bioactive compounds including anticancer, antihypertensive and antioxidant substances. The well-known health promoting effect of fermented food is mostly due to these

  6. Anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2003-01-01

    -rate anaerobic treatment systems based on anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm are described in this chapter. Emphasis is given to a) the Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) systems, b) the main characteristics of the anaerobic granular sludge, and c) the factors that control the granulation process...

  7. Age-associated decline in mitochondrial respiration and electron transport in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Melissa; Mockett, Robin J; Shen, Yi; Orr, William C; Sohal, Rajindar S

    2005-09-01

    The principal objective of the present study was to identify specific alterations in mitochondrial respiratory functions during the aging process. Respiration rates and the activities of electron transport chain complexes were measured at various ages in mitochondria isolated from thoraces of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, which consist primarily of flight muscles. The rates of state 3 respiration (ADP-stimulated), RCRs (respiratory control ratios) and uncoupled respiration rates decreased significantly as a function of age, using either NAD+- or FAD-linked substrates; however, there were no differences in state 4 respiration (ADP-depleted) rates. There was also a significant age-related decline in the activity of cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV), but not of the other mitochondrial oxidoreductases examined. Exposure of mitochondria isolated from young flies to low doses of KCN or NaAz (sodium azide), complex IV inhibitors, decreased cytochrome c oxidase activity and increased the production of H2O2. Collectively, these results support the hypothesis that impairment of mitochondrial respiration may be a causal factor in the aging process, and that such impairment may result from and contribute to increased H2O2 production in vivo.

  8. Light respiration by subtropical seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Matheus C; Eyre, Bradley D

    2017-06-01

    Here, we report the first-ever measurements of light CO 2 respiration rate (CRR) by seaweeds. We measured the influence of temperature (15-25°C) and light (irradiance from 60 to 670 μmol · m -2  · s -1 ) on the light CCR of two subtropical seaweed species, and measured the CRR of seven different seaweed species under the same light (150 μmol · m -2  · s -1 ) and temperature (25°C). There was little effect of irradiance on light CRR, but there was an effect of temperature. Across the seven species light CRR was similar to OCR (oxygen consumption rate in the dark), with the exception of a single species. The outlier species was a coralline alga, and the higher light CRR was probably driven by calcification. CRR could be estimated from OCR, as well as carbon photosynthetic rates from oxygen photosynthetic rates, which suggests that previous studies have probably provided good estimations of gross photosynthesis for seaweeds. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  9. A quasi-2-dimensional model for respiration of the cornea with soft contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatori, Sho C; Radke, Clayton J

    2012-04-01

    Because neither the human cornea nor a soft contact lens (SCL) is of constant thickness, corneal oxygenation varies locally. To quantify the importance of cornea/SCL thickness variations on oxygen demand, we develop a quasi-2-dimensional (2D) respiration model that accounts for aerobic and anaerobic metabolism and bicarbonate buffering. Because metabolism is critical to oxygen demand, we extend the 1-dimensional (1D), 6-layer oxygen metabolic model of Chhabra et al. Lateral diffusion is shown to be negligible. Accordingly, we adopt the 1D reactive-diffusion metabolic model but apply it locally along the cornea/lens extent. This "quasi-2D" approximation permits 2D assessment of oxygen consumption, including the effects of carbon dioxide, glucose, and lactate, bicarbonate, and hydrogen ions. We use both an oxygen deficiency factor and an excess lactate factor to gauge corneal health after accounting for both cornea and contact lens thickness variations. The quasi-2D respiration model provides quantitative spatial resolution of corneal oxygenation with minimal expenditure of computation time. When only aerobic oxygen loss is included, our quasi-2D approach is in excellent agreement with the fully 2D results of Alvord et al. However, the quasi-2D model predicts 2D concentration profiles of glucose, lactate ions, bicarbonate ions, hydrogen ions, and carbon dioxide, as well as oxygen. Neglect of metabolic reactions and/or thickness variations leads to inaccurate prediction of oxygen demand, especially near the lens periphery. The quasi-2D respiration model indicates that lateral thickness variations and respiration kinetics are critical for assessing on-eye physiologic performance of an SCL. We find that oxygen deficiency factor and excess lactate factor are useful indices to gauge corneal hypoxia. A user-friendly computer program of the quasi-2D respiration model is available for lens design.

  10. Implementing Livestock Anaerobic Digestion Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page provides information to help make an informed decision about installing an anaerobic digester. Is it a good match for a farm’s organic waste, project financing, development guidelines and permit requirements?

  11. Quantitative Respirator Fit, Face Sizes, and Determinants of Fit in South African Diagnostic Laboratory Respirator Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganyi, Jeanneth; Wilson, Kerry S; Rees, David

    2017-11-10

    Respirators are widely used in health care settings but there is scant information on adequacy of fit and its determinants, particularly in resource-constrained settings. The aim of the study is to describe the proportion of South African diagnostic laboratory respirator users with adequate quantitative respirator fit while wearing their currently selected respirators which were generally supplied without regard to face size, and to identify determinants of fit test pass and fail. This was a cross-sectional study with 562 participants. Quantitative respirator fit testing was conducted using a PortaCount fit testing machine. Four facial dimensions were taken using callipers and a tape measure. STATA 14 was used to perform descriptive and inferential statistics. The effect of the independent variables including face dimensions, race, smoking, respirator make and size, and age group was explored using multiple logistic regression stratified by sex. Ninety one percent of the respirators supplied were medium-sized. Seventy eight percent of respirator users failed fit testing and were thus probably not protected by their currently supplied respirator. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that face length in mm (odds ratio [OR] = 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.00-1.09), nasal root breadth in mm (OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.06-1.28), and respirator shape (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.39-0.78) were significant predictors of overall fit for all subjects and for women alone, but these factors explained only a small percentage of fit test outcomes. A large proportion of diagnostic laboratory employees were using poorly fitting respirators. This creates a false impression of protection. Fit testing of respirators is therefore important and recommended. The determinants evaluated described only a small portion of the variability in fit; important determinants were absent from the models. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British

  12. Cardiac, Skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I

    2014-01-01

    in cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle suggest all mitochondria are created equal, the contrasting RCR and non-phosphorylating respiration highlight the existence of intrinsic functional differences between these muscle mitochondria. This likely influences the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation...

  13. Effect of Music on Emotions and Respiration

    OpenAIRE

    NOGUCHI Kengo:筆頭著者; MASAOKA Yuri; SATOH Kanako; KATO Nobumasa; HOMMA Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    In the present study we investigated whether the emotional state induced by music can change respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (VT), minute ventilation (VE), and end-tidal CO2concentration (ETCO2). In a pioneering study investigating the effect of music on respiration, the music of Stockhausen and Chopin was used. In the present study, we examined the effects of the same musical stimuli used in that study on respiration. Each stimulus (Stockhausen, Chopin, and silence) was delivered for 30 ...

  14. 42 CFR 84.134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.134... Respirators § 84.134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Supplied-air respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type and...

  15. 42 CFR 84.197 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.197... Cartridge Respirators § 84.197 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type and...

  16. 42 CFR 84.174 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.174... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.174 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except..., durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type of respirator it contains...

  17. European surveillance study on antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-positive anaerobic cocci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazier, J; Chmelar, D; Dubreuil, L

    2008-01-01

    Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) are a heterogeneous group of microorganisms frequently isolated from local and systemic infections. In this study, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of clinical strains isolated in 10 European countries were investigated. After identification of 299 GPAC...... and Parvimonas micra (formerly Peptostreptococcus micros), isolated from skin and soft tissue infections. All isolates were susceptible to imipenem, metronidazole, vancomycin and linezolid. Twenty-one isolates (7%) were resistant to penicillin (n=13) and/or to clindamycin (n=12). Four isolates were resistant...... to both agents. The majority of resistant isolates were identified as F. magna and originated from blood, abscesses and soft tissue infections....

  18. Respiration rate and ethylene production of fresh cut lettuce as affected by cutting grade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. MARTÍNEZ

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available For designing optimal polymeric films for modified atmosphere packaging of whole heads as well as for minimally fresh processed (fresh-cut Iceberg lettuce ‘Coolguard’, the effect of several cutting grades on respiration rate (RR and ethylene production at 5ºC was studied. According to common industrial practices cutting grades less than 0.5 cm, between 0.5 and 1 cm, and 2 cm length were selected. Results from four experiments were compared to those obtained for whole heads in which a homogenous range of 6 to 8 ml CO2 kg-1 h-1 in RR was found. Compared to whole heads, in fresh-cut lettuce the RR was 2-fold higher. The lowest cutting grade showed the highest respiration rate, and no significant differences in RR among lettuce pieces of intermediate and the highest grades were found. No ethylene production was detected in whole heads, while in minimally processed lettuce pieces only traces were found. For avoiding risks of anaerobic respiration and excessive CO2 levels within packages containing fresh-cut lettuce pieces lower than 0.5 cm length, films with relatively high O2 permeability like standard polypropylene or low-density polyethylene must be selected.;

  19. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC6(3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC6(3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC6(3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC6(3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics.

  20. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC 6 (3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC 6 (3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC 6 (3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC 6 (3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics

  1. Growth of silicone-immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters, a technique to study microcolony formation under anaerobic conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Højberg, O; Binnerup, S J; Sørensen, J

    1997-01-01

    A technique was developed to study microcolony formation by silicone-immobilized bacteria on polycarbonate membrane filters under anaerobic conditions. A sudden shift to anaerobiosis was obtained by submerging the filters in medium which was depleted for oxygen by a pure culture of bacteria. The technique was used to demonstrate that preinduction of nitrate reductase under low-oxygen conditions was necessary for nonfermenting, nitrate-respiring bacteria, e.g., Pseudomonas spp., to cope with a...

  2. Effect of rotenone on gill-respiring and plastron-respiring insects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rotenone, a commonly-used piscicide, interferes with the cellular respiration of aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates by preventing the uptake of oxygen. While dose-response relationships have been developed for fish, there are limited comparative data available on aquatic insects that respire either with tracheal gills or ...

  3. Characterization of the respiration-induced yeast mitochondrial permeability transition pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Patrick C; Pfeiffer, Douglas R

    2013-12-01

    When isolated mitochondria from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae oxidize respiratory substrates in the absence of phosphate and ADP, the yeast mitochondrial unselective channel, also called the yeast permeability transition pore (yPTP), opens in the inner membrane, dissipating the electrochemical gradient. ATP also induces yPTP opening. yPTP opening allows mannitol transport into isolated mitochondria of laboratory yeast strains, but mannitol is not readily permeable through the yPTP in an industrial yeast strain, Yeast Foam. The presence of oligomycin, an inhibitor of ATP synthase, allowed for respiration-induced mannitol permeability in mitochondria from this strain. Potassium (K+) had varied effects on the respiration-induced yPTP, depending on the concentration of the respiratory substrate added. At low respiratory substrate concentrations K+ inhibited respiration-induced yPTP opening, while at high substrate concentrations this effect diminished. However, at the high respiratory substrate concentrations, the presence of K+ partially prevented phosphate inhibition of yPTP opening. Phosphate was found to inhibit respiration-induced yPTP opening by binding a site on the matrix space side of the inner membrane in addition to its known inhibitory effect of donating protons to the matrix space to prevent the pH change necessary for yPTP opening. The respiration-induced yPTP was also inhibited by NAD, Mg2+, NH4 + or the oxyanion vanadate polymerized to decavanadate. The results demonstrate similar effectors of the respiration-induced yPTP as those previously described for the ATP-induced yPTP and reconcile previous strain-dependent differences in yPTP solute selectivity. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. [Anaerobic bacteria 150 years after their discovery by Pasteur].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, José Elías; García-Sánchez, Enrique; Martín-Del-Rey, Ángel; García-Merino, Enrique

    2015-02-01

    In 2011 we celebrated the 150th anniversary of the discovery of anaerobic bacteria by Louis Pasteur. The interest of the biomedical community on such bacteria is still maintained, and is particularly focused on Clostridium difficile. In the past few years important advances in taxonomy have been made due to the genetic, technological and computing developments. Thus, a significant number of new species related to human infections have been characterised, and some already known have been reclassified. At pathogenic level some specimens of anaerobic microflora, that had not been isolated from human infections, have been now isolated in some clinical conditions. There was emergence (or re-emergence) of some species and clinical conditions. Certain anaerobic bacteria have been associated with established infectious syndromes. The virulence of certain strains has increased, and some hypotheses on their participation in certain diseases have been given. In terms of diagnosis, the routine use of MALDI-TOF has led to a shortening of time and a cost reduction in the identification, with an improvement directly related to the improvement of data bases. The application of real-time PCR has been another major progress, and the sequencing of 16srRNA gene and others is currently a reality for several laboratories. Anaerobes have increased their resistance to antimicrobial agents, and the emergence of resistance to carbapenems and metronidazole, and multi-resistance is a current reality. In this situation, linezolid could be an effective alternative for Bacteroides. Fidaxomicin is the only anti-anaerobic agent introduced in the recent years, specifically for the diarrhoea caused by C.difficile. Moreover, some mathematical models have also been proposed in relation with this species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. [Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, José E; García-Sánchez, Enrique; García-García, María Inmaculada

    2014-02-01

    The anaerobic bacteria resistance to antibiotics is increasing, and even has appeared against the most active of those, like metronidazol and carbapenems. This fact forces to make and periodical sensibility tests -at least in the most aggressive and virulent species, in cases that they are isolated from life locations and in the absence of therapeutic response- to check the local sensibility and to establish suitable empiric therapies, all based on multicentric studies carried out in order to this or well to check the activity of new antibiotics. For the laboratory routine, the easiest sensibility method is the E-test/MIC evaluator. Another alternative is microdilution, that's only normalized for Bacteroides. There are preliminary facts that allow the use of disc diffusion method in some species of Bacteroides and Clostridium. For the temporal and multicentric studies, the procedure is dilution in agar plate, the reference method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Carbon dioxide fixation and respiration relationships observed during closure experiments in Biosphere 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mark; Dempster, William; Allen, John P.

    Biosphere 2 enclosed several ecosystems - ones analogous to rainforest, tropical savannah, thornscrub, desert, marsh and coral reef - and a diverse agro-ecology, with dozens of food crops, in virtual material isolation from Earth's environment. This permits a detailed examination of fixation and respiration from the continuous record of carbon dioxide concentration from sensors inside the facility. Unlike the Earth, all the ecosystems were active during sunlight hours, while phyto and soil respiration dominated nighttime hours. This resulted in fluctuations of as much as 600-700 ppm CO2 daily during days of high sunlight input. We examine the relationships between daytime fixation as driven by photosynthesis to nighttime respiration and also fixation and respiration as related to carbon dioxide concentration. Since carbon dioxide concentrations varied from near Earth ambient levels to over 3000 ppm (during low-light winter months), the response of the plant communities and impact on phytorespiration and soil respiration may be of relevance to the global climate change research community. An investigation of these dynamics will also allow the testing of models predicting the response of community metabolism to variations in sunlight and degree of previous net carbon fixation.

  7. Plasma Amino Acids Stimulate Uncoupled Respiration of Muscle Subsarcolemmal Mitochondria in Lean but Not Obese Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kras, Katon A; Hoffman, Nyssa; Roust, Lori R; Patel, Shivam H; Carroll, Chad C; Katsanos, Christos S

    2017-12-01

    Obesity is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle. Increasing the plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations stimulates mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in lean individuals. To determine whether acute elevation in plasma AAs enhances muscle mitochondrial respiration and ATP production in subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria in obese adults. Assessment of SS and IMF mitochondrial function during saline (i.e., control) and AA infusions. Eligible participants were healthy lean (body mass index, 30 kg/m2; age 35 ± 3 years; n = 11) subjects. Single trial of saline infusion followed by AA infusion. SS and IMF mitochondria were isolated from muscle biopsies collected at the end of the saline and AA infusions. Mitochondrial respiration and ATP production. AA infusion increased adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-stimulated respiration and ATP production rates of SS mitochondria in the lean (P lean subjects only (P lean or obese subjects (P > 0.05). Increasing the plasma AA concentrations enhances the capacity for respiration and ATP production of muscle SS, but not IMF, mitochondria in lean individuals, in parallel with increases in uncoupled respiration. However, neither of these parameters increases in muscle SS or IMF mitochondria in obese individuals. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  8. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of obligate anaerobic bacteria from clinical samples of animal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga, Melissa; Rodríguez-Cavallini, Evelyn; López-Ureña, Diana; Barquero-Calvo, Elías; Quesada-Gómez, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    The etiology of veterinary infectious diseases has been the focus of considerable research, yet relatively little is known about the causative agents of anaerobic infections. Susceptibility studies have documented the emergence of antimicrobial resistance and indicate distinct differences in resistance patterns related to veterinary hospitals, geographic regions, and antibiotic-prescribing regimens. The aim of the present study was to identify the obligate anaerobic bacteria from veterinary clinical samples and to determinate the in vitro susceptibility to eight antimicrobials and their resistance-associated genes. 81 clinical specimens obtained from food-producing animals, pets and wild animals were examined to determine the relative prevalence of obligate anaerobic bacteria, and the species represented. Bacteroides spp, Prevotella spp and Clostridium spp represented approximately 80% of all anaerobic isolates. Resistance to metronidazole, clindamycin, tetracycline and fluoroquinolones was found in strains isolated from food-producing animals. Ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and cephalotin showed the highest resistance in all isolates. In 17%, 4% and 14% of tetracycline-resistant isolates, the resistance genes tetL, tetM and tetW were respectively amplified by PCR whereas in 4% of clindamycin-resistant strains the ermG gene was detected. 26% of the isolates were positive for cepA, while only 6% harbored the cfxA (resistance-conferring genes to beta-lactams). In this study, the obligate anaerobic bacteria from Costa Rica showed a high degree of resistance to most antimicrobials tested. Nevertheless, in the majority of cases this resistance was not related to the resistance acquired genes usually described in anaerobes. It is important to address and regulate the use of antimicrobials in the agricultural industry and the empirical therapy in anaerobic bacterial infections in veterinary medicine, especially since antibiotics and resistant bacteria can persist in the

  9. Simplified pressure method for respirator fit testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, D; Xu, M; Foo, S; Pilacinski, W; Willeke, K

    1991-08-01

    A simplified pressure method has been developed for fit testing air-purifying respirators. In this method, the air-purifying cartridges are replaced by a pressure-sensing attachment and a valve. While wearers hold their breath, a small pump extracts air from the respirator cavity until a steady-state pressure is reached in 1 to 2 sec. The flow rate through the face seal leak is a unique function of this pressure, which is determined once for all respirators, regardless of the respirator's cavity volume or deformation because of pliability. The contaminant concentration inside the respirator depends on the degree of dilution by the flow through the cartridges. The cartridge flow varies among different brands and is measured once for each brand. The ratio of cartridge to leakflow is a measure of fit. This flow ratio has been measured on human subjects and has been compared to fit factors determined on the same subjects by means of photometric and particle count tests. The aerosol tests gave higher values of fit.

  10. Anaerobic digestion of solid material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavilin, V.A.; Lokshina, L.Y.; Flotats, X.

    2007-01-01

    A new multidimensional (3 and 2D) anaerobic digestion model for cylindrical reactor with non-uniform influent concentration distributions was developed to study the way in which mixing intensity affects the efficiency of continuous-flow anaerobic digestion. Batch experiments reported and simulated....... In the system, the threshold methanogenic biomass concentration existed because of inhibition by high VFA concentration. High methanogenic biomass concentration is required for efficient anaerobic digestion of MSW in order to avoid possible inhibition due to high VFA build-up. Thus, CSTR configuration might...... have unstable dynamics at high organic loading as shown in earlier experiments carried out by Stroot et al. (2001). A gradual increase of organic loading during the start up of a completely mixed digester causing an accumulation of methanogenic biomass is a solution to prevent a probable digester...

  11. Instrumentation in anaerobic treatment - research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjers, H.; Lier, van J.B.

    2006-01-01

    High rate anaerobic treatment reactors are able to uncouple solids and liquid retention time, resulting in high biomass concentrations. Principal advantages of anaerobic treatment include: energy efficiency, low biomass yield, low nutrient requirement and high volumetric organic loadings. In order

  12. RISK FACTORS IN NEONATAL ANAEROBIC INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Tabib

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic bacteria are well known causes of sepsis in adults but there are few studies regarding their role in neonatal sepsis. In an attempt to define the incidence of neonatal anaerobic infections a prospective study was performed during one year period. A total number of 400 neonates under sepsis study were entered this investigation. Anaerobic as well as aerobic cultures were sent. The patients were subjected to comparison in two groups: anaerobic culture positive and anaerobic culture negative and this comparison were analyzed statistically. There were 7 neonates with positive anaerobic culture and 35 neonates with positive aerobic culture. A significant statistical relationship was found between anaerobic infections and abdominal distention and pneumonia. It is recommended for those neonates with abdominal distention and pneumonia refractory to antibiotic treatment to be started on antibiotics with anaerobic coverage.

  13. Soil respiration partition and its components in the total agro-ecosystem respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delogu, Emilie; LeDantec, Valerie; Mordelet, Patrick; Buysse, Pauline; Aubinet, Marc; Pattey, Elizabeth; Mary, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Close to 15% of the Earth's terrestrial surface is used for cropland. In the context of global warming, and acknowledged by the Kyoto Protocol, agricultural soils could be a significant sink for atmospheric CO2. Understanding the factors influencing carbon fluxes of agricultural soils is essential for implementing efficient mitigation practices. Most of the soil respiration modeling studies was carried out in forest ecosystems, but only a few was carried out in agricultural ecosystems. In the study, we evaluated simple formalisms to model soil respiration using wheat data from four contrasting geographical mi-latitude regions. Soil respiration were measured in three winter wheat fields at Lamasquère (43°49'N, 01°23'E, 2007) and Auradé (43°54'N, 01°10'E, 2008), South-West France and Lonzée (50°33'N, 4°44'E, 2007), Belgium, and in a spring wheat field at Ottawa (45°22'N, 75°43'W, 2007, 2011), Ontario, Canada. Manual closed chambers were used in the French sites. The Belgium and Canadian sites were equipped with automated closed chamber systems, which continuously collected 30-min soil respiration exchanges. All the sites were also equipped with eddy flux towers. When eddy flux data were collected over bare soil, the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was equal to soil respiration exchange. These NEE data were used to validate the model. Different biotic and abiotic descriptors were used to model daily soil respiration and its heterotrophic and autotrophic components: soil temperature, soil relative humidity, Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), shoot biomass, crop height, with different formalisms. It was interesting to conclude that using biotic descriptors did not improve the performances of the model. In fact, a combination of abiotic descriptors (soil humidity and soil temperature) allowed significant model formalism to model soil respiration. The simple soil respiration model was used to calculate the heterotrophic and autotrophic source contributions to

  14. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  15. Anaerobic culture by Total Air Barrier: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Sarkar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFor study with obligate anaerobes, inoculated platescontaining suitable reduced media need handling andincubation under strict anaerobic condition. Instead ofensuring a confined oxygen free chamber for placing seededplates, same purpose may be achieved by creating total airbarrier to the surface.MethodUpper moist surface of freshly prepared anaerobic media inPetri plates were intimately covered with very thintransparent bacteriological inert sterile polyester sheets.Stock culture of Bacteroides fragilis, ATCC 23745 andClostridium sporogenes, ATCC 11437 were grown in cookedmeat broth and then sub-cultured on respective plates, afterlifting the cover sheets. Sheets were again covered andincubated at 37oC ordinary incubator. To performantimicrobial susceptibility test, similarly covered seededplates with well inoculums were inverted en-block afterstripping sides with the help of a spatula. Now antibiotic diskswere placed on upper bare surfaces. After short pre-diffusion,plates were incubated keeping inoculated surface below.Same study was performed by conventional method usingGaspak.ResultsGood growths were noted in both sets of the study;however discrete colonies appeared more flat in nature intest set. Almost identical zones of inhibition were noted inboth sets of sensitivity study. Seven days old growths incovered blood agar plates were found viable when subculturedin cooked meat broths.ConclusionIsolation, identification and susceptibility study for mostclinically important obligate anaerobes may be performedby simple barrier method after appropriatestandardization.

  16. Anaerobic bioprocessing of organic wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, W; de Beer, D; Pena, M; Lettinga, G; Lens, P

    1996-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of dissolved, suspended and solid organics has rapidly evolved in the last decades but nevertheless still faces several scientific unknowns. In this review, some fundamentals of bacterial conversions and adhesion are addressed initially. It is argued in the light of ΔG-values of reactions, and in view of the minimum energy quantum per mol, that anaerobic syntrophs must have special survival strategies in order to support their existence: redistributing the available energy between the partners, reduced end-product fermentation reactions and special cell-to-cell physiological interactions. In terms of kinetics, it appears that both reaction rates and residual substrate thresholds are strongly related to minimum ΔG-values. These new fundamental insights open perspectives for efficient design and operation of anaerobic bioprocesses. Subsequently, an overview is given of the current anaerobic biotechnology. For treating wastewaters, a novel and high performance new system has been introduced during the last decade; the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket system (UASB). This reactor concept requires anaerobic consortia to grow in a dense and eco-physiologically well-organized way. The microbial principles of such granular sludge growth are presented. Using a thermodynamic approach, the formation of different types of aggregates is explained. The application of this bioprocess in worldwide wastewater treatment is indicated. Due to the long retention times of the active biomass, the UASB is also suitable for the development of bacterial consortia capable of degrading xenobiotics. Operating granular sludge reactors at high upflow velocities (5-6 m/h) in expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) systems enlarges the application field to very low strength wastewaters (chemical oxygen demand system to the thermophilic configuration, as the latter permits higher conversion rates and easier sanitation. Integration of ultrafiltration in anaerobic slurry digestion

  17. Mitochondrial cytochrome redox states and respiration in acute pulmonary oxygen sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, N; Pak, O; Schörner, S; Derfuss, T; Krug, A; Gnaiger, E; Ghofrani, H A; Schermuly, R T; Huckstorf, C; Seeger, W; Grimminger, F; Weissmann, N

    2010-11-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an essential mechanism to optimise lung gas exchange. We aimed to decipher the proposed oxygen sensing mechanism of mitochondria in HPV. Cytochrome redox state was assessed by remission spectrophotometry in intact lungs and isolated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). Mitochondrial respiration was quantified by high-resolution respirometry. Alterations were compared with HPV and hypoxia-induced functional and molecular readouts on the cellular level. Aortic and renal arterial smooth muscle cells (ASMC and RASMC, respectively) served as controls. The hypoxia-induced decrease of mitochondrial respiration paralleled HPV in isolated lungs. In PASMC, reduction of respiration and mitochondrial cytochrome c and aa3 (complex IV), but not of cytochrome b (complex III) matched an increase in matrix superoxide levels as well as mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarisation with subsequent cytosolic calcium increase. In contrast to PASMC, RASMC displayed a lower decrease in respiration and no rise in superoxide, membrane potential or intracellular calcium. Pharmacological inhibition of mitochondria revealed analogous kinetics of cytochrome redox state and strength of HPV. Our data suggest inhibition of complex IV as an essential step in mitochondrial oxygen sensing of HPV. Concomitantly, increased superoxide release from complex III and mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarisation may initiate the cytosolic calcium increase underlying HPV.

  18. Investigation of mitochondrial dysfunction by sequential microplate-based respiration measurements from intact and permeabilized neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascaline Clerc

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is a component of many neurodegenerative conditions. Measurement of oxygen consumption from intact neurons enables evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics under conditions that are more physiologically realistic compared to isolated mitochondria. However, mechanistic analysis of mitochondrial function in cells is complicated by changing energy demands and lack of substrate control. Here we describe a technique for sequentially measuring respiration from intact and saponin-permeabilized cortical neurons on single microplates. This technique allows control of substrates to individual electron transport chain complexes following permeabilization, as well as side-by-side comparisons to intact cells. To illustrate the utility of the technique, we demonstrate that inhibition of respiration by the drug KB-R7943 in intact neurons is relieved by delivery of the complex II substrate succinate, but not by complex I substrates, via acute saponin permeabilization. In contrast, methyl succinate, a putative cell permeable complex II substrate, failed to rescue respiration in intact neurons and was a poor complex II substrate in permeabilized cells. Sequential measurements of intact and permeabilized cell respiration should be particularly useful for evaluating indirect mitochondrial toxicity due to drugs or cellular signaling events which cannot be readily studied using isolated mitochondria.

  19. Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria have lagged behind similar studies in aerobes. However, the current interest in biotechnology, the involvement of anaerobes in disease and the emergence of antibioticresistant strains have focused attention on the genetics of anaerobes. This article reviews molecular genetic studies in Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and methanogens. Certain genetic systems in some anaerobes differ from those in aerobes and illustrate the genetic diversity among bacteria

  20. Viscosity evolution of anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pevere, A.; Guibaud, G.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.; Baudu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the apparent viscosity at steady shear rate of sieved anaerobic granular sludge (20¿315 ¿m diameter) sampled from different full-scale anaerobic reactors was recorded using rotation tests. The ¿limit viscosity¿ of sieved anaerobic granular sludge was determined from the apparent

  1. Kinetics and modeling of anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion modeling started in the early 1970s when the need for design and efficient operation of anaerobic systems became evident. At that time not only was the knowledge about the complex process of anaerobic digestion inadequate but also there were computational limitations. Thus...

  2. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber. (a) Identification. An anaerobic chamber is a device intended for medical purposes to maintain an anaerobic (oxygen...

  3. Biochemical Mechanisms and Microorganisms Involved in Anaerobic Testosterone Metabolism in Estuarine Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chao-Jen; Chen, Yi-Lung; Wang, Chia-Hsiang; Wei, Sean T-S; Lin, I-Ting; Ismail, Wael A; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Current knowledge on the biochemical mechanisms underlying microbial steroid metabolism in anaerobic ecosystems is extremely limited. Sulfate, nitrate, and iron [Fe (III)] are common electron acceptors for anaerobes in estuarine sediments. Here, we investigated anaerobic testosterone metabolism in anaerobic sediments collected from the estuary of Tamsui River, Taiwan. The anaerobic sediment samples were spiked with testosterone (1 mM) and individual electron acceptors (10 mM), including nitrate, Fe 3+ , and sulfate. The analysis of androgen metabolites indicated that testosterone biodegradation under denitrifying conditions proceeds through the 2,3- seco pathway, whereas testosterone biodegradation under iron-reducing conditions may proceed through an unidentified alternative pathway. Metagenomic analysis and PCR-based functional assays suggested that Thauera spp. were the major testosterone degraders in estuarine sediment samples incubated with testosterone and nitrate. Thauera sp. strain GDN1, a testosterone-degrading betaproteobacterium, was isolated from the denitrifying sediment sample. This strain tolerates a broad range of salinity (0-30 ppt). Although testosterone biodegradation did not occur under sulfate-reducing conditions, we observed the anaerobic biotransformation of testosterone to estrogens in some testosterone-spiked sediment samples. This is unprecedented since biotransformation of androgens to estrogens is known to occur only under oxic conditions. Our metagenomic analysis suggested that Clostridium spp. might play a role in this anaerobic biotransformation. These results expand our understanding of microbial metabolism of steroids under strictly anoxic conditions.

  4. Biochemical Mechanisms and Microorganisms Involved in Anaerobic Testosterone Metabolism in Estuarine Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Jen Shih

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Current knowledge on the biochemical mechanisms underlying microbial steroid metabolism in anaerobic ecosystems is extremely limited. Sulfate, nitrate, and iron [Fe (III] are common electron acceptors for anaerobes in estuarine sediments. Here, we investigated anaerobic testosterone metabolism in anaerobic sediments collected from the estuary of Tamsui River, Taiwan. The anaerobic sediment samples were spiked with testosterone (1 mM and individual electron acceptors (10 mM, including nitrate, Fe3+, and sulfate. The analysis of androgen metabolites indicated that testosterone biodegradation under denitrifying conditions proceeds through the 2,3-seco pathway, whereas testosterone biodegradation under iron-reducing conditions may proceed through an unidentified alternative pathway. Metagenomic analysis and PCR-based functional assays suggested that Thauera spp. were the major testosterone degraders in estuarine sediment samples incubated with testosterone and nitrate. Thauera sp. strain GDN1, a testosterone-degrading betaproteobacterium, was isolated from the denitrifying sediment sample. This strain tolerates a broad range of salinity (0–30 ppt. Although testosterone biodegradation did not occur under sulfate-reducing conditions, we observed the anaerobic biotransformation of testosterone to estrogens in some testosterone-spiked sediment samples. This is unprecedented since biotransformation of androgens to estrogens is known to occur only under oxic conditions. Our metagenomic analysis suggested that Clostridium spp. might play a role in this anaerobic biotransformation. These results expand our understanding of microbial metabolism of steroids under strictly anoxic conditions.

  5. Characterization of aerobic and anaerobic vegetative growth of the food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus F4430/73 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Eric; Duport, Catherine; Zigha, Assia; Schmitt, Philippe

    2005-02-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus cereus is a facultative anaerobe that is still poorly characterized metabolically. In this study, the aerobic vegetative growth and anaerobic vegetative growth of the food-borne pathogen B. cereus F4430/73 strain were compared with those of the genome-sequenced ATCC14579 strain using glucose and glycerol as fermentative and nonfermentative carbon sources, respectively. Uncontrolled batch cultures on several defined media showed that B. cereus strains had high amino acid or pyruvate requirements for anaerobic fermentative growth. In addition, growth performance was considerably improved by maintaining the pH of the culture medium near neutrality. Spectra of fermentation by-products were typically (per mole of glucose) 0.2-0.4 acetate, 1.1-1.4 L-lactate, 0.3-0.4 formate, and 0.05-0.2 ethanol with only traces of succinate, pyruvate, and 2,3-butanediol. These spectra were drastically changed in the presence of 20 mmol nitrate x L(-1), which stimulated anaerobic growth. During anaerobic and aerobic respiration, the persistent production of acetate and other by-products indicated overflow metabolisms. This was especially true in glucose-grown cells for which respiratory complex III made only a minor contribution to growth. Surprisingly, oxygen uptake rates linked to the cytochrome c and quinol branches of the respiratory chain were maintained at high levels in anaerobic, respiring, or fermenting cells. Growth and metabolic features of B. cereus F4430/73 are discussed using biochemical and genomic data.

  6. Anaerobic Treatment of Methanolic Wastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettinga, G.; Geest, van der A.Th.; Hobma, S.W.; Laan, van der J.B.R.

    1979-01-01

    Although it is well known that methanol can be fermented directly by a specific species of methane bacteria, viz. Methanosarcina barkeri, until now little information was available about the effect of important environmental factors on the anaerobic fermentation of methanol. As methanol can be the

  7. Perspectives of Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, J.G.; Runia, W.T.; Molendijk, L.P.G.; Bleeker, P.O.

    2010-01-01

    Biological soil disinfestation is an environmentally friendly method to disinfest soil. From now on we refer to it as anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD). With ASD a green manure crop (40 t/ha) is homogeneously incorporated into the topsoil (0-30 cm) after which the field is lightly compacted and

  8. Inhibition of Anaerobic Biological Treatment: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li; Ji, Dandan; Zang, Lihua

    2018-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a method for treating living and industrial wastewater by anaerobic degradation of organic compounds, which can produce biogas (carbon dioxide and methane mixture) and microbial biomass. And biogas as a renewable resource, can replace the use of ore fuel. In the process of anaerobic digestion, the problems of low methane yield and unstable reaction process are often encountered, which limits the widespread use of this technology. Various inhibitors are the main limiting factors for anaerobic digestion. In this paper, the main factors limiting anaerobic digestion are reviewed, and the latest research progress is introduced.

  9. LIMITATION OF SOIL RESPIRATION DURING DRY PERIOD

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Marian; Janouš, Dalibor; Acosta, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 16, - (2003), s. 47-52. ISBN 80-7157-297-7 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA AV ČR IBS6087005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : moisture * Norway spruce * precipitation * respiration * soil CO2 efflux Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  10. Respiration during sleep in Huntington's chorea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollen, E. L.; den Heijer, J. C.; Ponsioen, C.; Kramer, C.; van der Velde, E. A.; van Dijk, J. G.; Roos, R. A.; Kamphuisen, H. A.; Buruma, O. J.

    1988-01-01

    In view of recent reports on lower brainstem dysfunction in Huntington's chorea, we studied respiration during sleep in 12 patients with Huntington's chorea (HC) and in controls. There were no statistically significant differences between patients and controls with respect to apnea periods,

  11. THE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL DAMAGE ON RESPIRATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The drops were meant to simulate handling, road and vehicle conditions that the tomatoes are subjected to from the areas of production to market outlets. Respiration, compositional ... The level of ripeness followed the reverse trend to that of chlorophyll as it was measured in terms of the attainment of red color. Decay was ...

  12. The Nucleus Retroambiguus Control of Respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subramanian, Hari H.; Holstege, Gert

    2009-01-01

    The role of the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) in the context of respiration control has been subject of debate for considerable time. To solve this problem, we chemically (using D, L-homocysteic acid) stimulated the NRA in unanesthetized precollicularly decerebrated cats and studied the respiratory

  13. Development of conformal respirator monitoring technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shonka, J.J.; Weismann, J.J.; Logan, R.J.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a Small Business Innovative Research Phase II project to develop a modular, surface conforming respirator monitor to improve upon the manual survey techniques presently used by the nuclear industry. Research was performed with plastic scintillator and gas proportional modules in an effort to find the most conducive geometry for a surface conformal, position sensitive monitor. The respirator monitor prototype developed is a computer controlled, position-sensitive detection system employing 56 modular proportional counters mounted in molds conforming to the inner and outer surfaces of a commonly used respirator (Scott Model 801450-40). The molds are housed in separate enclosures and hinged to create a open-quotes waffle-ironclose quotes effect so that the closed monitor will simultaneously survey both surfaces of the respirator. The proportional counter prototype was also designed to incorporate Shonka Research Associates previously developed charge-division electronics. This research provided valuable experience into pixellated position sensitive detection systems. The technology developed can be adapted to other monitoring applications where there is a need for deployment of many traditional radiation detectors

  14. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3) Air-purifying...) Front-mounted or back-mounted gas masks; (2) Chin-style gas mask; (3) Chemical cartridge; (4) Air...

  15. Differences in Cold Adaptation of Bacillus subtilis under Anaerobic and Aerobic Conditions▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beranová, Jana; Mansilla, María C.; de Mendoza, Diego; Elhottová, Dana; Konopásek, Ivo

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis, which grows under aerobic conditions, employs fatty acid desaturase (Des) to fluidize its membrane when subjected to temperature downshift. Des requires molecular oxygen for its activity, and its expression is regulated by DesK-DesR, a two-component system. Transcription of des is induced by the temperature downshift and is decreased when membrane fluidity is restored. B. subtilis is also capable of anaerobic growth by nitrate or nitrite respiration. We studied the mechanism of cold adaptation in B. subtilis under anaerobic conditions that were predicted to inhibit Des activity. We found that in anaerobiosis, in contrast to aerobic growth, the induction of des expression after temperature downshift (from 37°C to 25°C) was not downregulated. However, the transfer from anaerobic to aerobic conditions rapidly restored the downregulation. Under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, the induction of des expression was substantially reduced by the addition of external fluidizing oleic acid and was fully dependent on the DesK-DesR two-component regulatory system. Fatty acid analysis proved that there was no desaturation after des induction under anaerobic conditions despite the presence of high levels of the des protein product, which was shown by immunoblot analysis. The cold adaptation of B. subtilis in anaerobiosis is therefore mediated exclusively by the increased anteiso/iso ratio of branched-chain fatty acids and not by the temporarily increased level of unsaturated fatty acids that is typical under aerobic conditions. The degrees of membrane fluidization, as measured by diphenylhexatriene fluorescence anisotropy, were found to be similar under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. PMID:20581210

  16. Mitochondrial efficiency in rat skeletal muscle: influence of respiration rate, substrate and muscle type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogensen, M; Sahlin, K

    2005-11-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that mitochondrial efficiency (i.e. P/O ratio) is higher in type I than in type II fibres during submaximal rates of respiration. Mitochondria were isolated from rat soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, representing type I and type II fibres, respectively. Mitochondrial efficiency (P/O ratio) was determined with pyruvate (Pyr) or palmitoyl-l-carnitine (PC) during submaximal (constant rate of adenosine diphosphate infusion) and maximal (V(max), state 3) rates of respiration and fitted to monoexponential functions. There was no difference in V(max) between PC and Pyr in soleus but in EDL V(max) with PC was only 58% of that with Pyr. The activity of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase was threefold higher in soleus than in EDL. P/O ratio at V(max) was 8-9% lower with PC [2.33 +/- 0.02 (soleus) and 2.30 +/- 0.02 (EDL)] than with Pyr [2.52 +/- 0.03 (soleus) and 2.54 +/- 0.03 (EDL)] but not different between the two muscles (P > 0.05). P/O ratio was low at low rates of respiration and increased exponentially when the rate of respiration increased. The asymptotes of the curves were similar to P/O ratio at V(max). P/O ratio at submaximal respirations was not different between soleus and EDL neither with Pyr nor with PC. Mitochondrial efficiency, as determined in vitro, was not significantly different in the two fibre types neither at V(max) nor at submaximal rates of respiration. The low V(max) for PC oxidation in EDL may relate to low activity of beta-oxidation.

  17. Respiring cellular nano-magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, Ayesha; Khan, Zanib; Bokhari, Habib; Hidayathula, Syed; Jilani, Ghulam; Khan, Abid Ali

    2017-11-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria provide an interesting example for the biosynthesis of magnetic (Fe 3 O 4 or Fe 3 S 4 ) nanoparticles, synthesized through a process known as biologically controlled mineralization, resulting in complex monodispersed, and nanostructures with unique magnetic properties. In this work, we report a novel aerobic bacterial strain isolated from sludge of an oil refinery. Microscopic and staining analysis revealed that it was a gram positive rod with the capability to thrive in a medium (9K) supplemented, with Fe 2+ ions at an acidic pH (~3.2). The magnetic behaviour of these cells was tested by their alignment towards a permanent magnet, and later on confirmed by magnetometry analysis. The X-ray diffraction studies proved the cellular biosynthesis of magnetite nanoparticles inside the bacteria. This novel, bio-nano-magnet, could pave the way for green synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles to be used in industrial and medical applications such as MRI, magnetic hyperthermia and ferrofluids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections by fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Renshyan; Chu Leeshing; Yen Sanhui; Chang Chenpei; Chou Kuoliang; Wu Liangchi; Chang Chiwei; Lui Muntain; Chen Kuangy; Yeh Shinhwa

    1996-01-01

    Odontogenic infections are a potential risk for patients who receive cervicofacial radiotherapy and should be treated before irradiation. Anaerobic microbial infections are the most common causes. This study assessed the value of the hypoxic imaging agent fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) in detecting anaerobic odontogenic infections. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed at 2 h after injection of 370 MBq (10 mCi) of FMISO in 26 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients and six controls with healthy teeth. Tomograms were interpreted visually to identify hypoxic foci in the jaw. All patients received thorough dental examinations as a pre-radiotherapy work-up. Fifty-one sites of periodonititis, 15 periodontal abscesses, 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, 23 sites of dental caries without root canal infection, and seven necrotic pulps were found by dental examination. Anaerobic pathogens were isolated from 12 patients. Increased uptake of FMISO was found at 45 out of 51 sites of periodontitis, all 15 sites of periodontal abscess, all 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, all seven sites of necrotic pulp and 15 sites of dental carries without obvious evidence of active root canal infection. No abnormal uptake was seen in the healthy teeth of patients or in the six controls. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of FMISO PET scan in detecting odontogenic infections were 93%, 97%, 84%, 99% and 96%, respectively. 18 F-fluoride ion bone scan done in three patients showed that 18 F-fluoride ion plays no role in the demonstration of anaerobic odontogenic infection. FMISO PET scan is a sensitive method for the detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections, and may play a complementary role in the evaluation of the dental condition of patients with head and neck tumours prior to radiation therapy. (orig.)

  19. Potential application of anaerobic extremophiles for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2004-11-01

    In processes of the substrate fermentation most anaerobes produce molecular hydrogen as a waste end product, which often controls the culture growth as an inhibitor. Usually in nature the hydrogen is easily removed from an ecosystem, due to its physical features, and an immediate consumption by the secondary anaerobes that sometimes behave as competitors for electron donors; a classical example of this kind of substrate competition in anaerobic microbial communities is the interaction between methanogens and sulfate- or sulfur-reducers. Previously, on the mixed cultures of anaerobes at neutral pH, it was demonstrated that bacterial hydrogen production could provide a good alternative energy source. At neutral pH the original cultures could easily contaminated by methanogens, and the most unpleasant side effect of these conditions is the development of pathogenic bacteria. In both cases the rate of hydrogen production was dramatically decreased since some part of the hydrogen was transformed to methane, and furthermore, the cultivation with pathogenic contaminants on an industrial scale would create an unsafe situation. In our laboratory the experiments with obligately alkaliphilic bacteria producing hydrogen as an end metabolic product were performed at different conditions. The mesophilic, haloalkaliphilic and obligately anaerobic bacterium Spirochaeta americana ASpG1T was studied and various cultivation regimes were compared for the most effective hydrogen production. In a highly mineralized media with pH 9.5-10.0 not many known methanogens are capable of growth, and the probability of developing pathogenic contaminants is theoretically is close to zero (in medicine carbonate- saturated solutions are applied as antiseptics). Therefore the cultivation of alkaliphilic hydrogen producing bacteria could be considered as a safe and economical process for large-scale industrial bio-hydrogen production in the future. Here we present and discuss the experimental data

  20. Detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections by fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Renshyan [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chu Leeshing [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan); Yen Sanhui [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan); Chang Chenpei [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chou Kuoliang [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Wu Liangchi [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chang Chiwei [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Lui Muntain [Dept. of Dentistry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China); Chen Kuangy [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan); Yeh Shinhwa [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-10-01

    Odontogenic infections are a potential risk for patients who receive cervicofacial radiotherapy and should be treated before irradiation. Anaerobic microbial infections are the most common causes. This study assessed the value of the hypoxic imaging agent fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) in detecting anaerobic odontogenic infections. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed at 2 h after injection of 370 MBq (10 mCi) of FMISO in 26 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients and six controls with healthy teeth. Tomograms were interpreted visually to identify hypoxic foci in the jaw. All patients received thorough dental examinations as a pre-radiotherapy work-up. Fifty-one sites of periodonititis, 15 periodontal abscesses, 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, 23 sites of dental caries without root canal infection, and seven necrotic pulps were found by dental examination. Anaerobic pathogens were isolated from 12 patients. Increased uptake of FMISO was found at 45 out of 51 sites of periodontitis, all 15 sites of periodontal abscess, all 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, all seven sites of necrotic pulp and 15 sites of dental carries without obvious evidence of active root canal infection. No abnormal uptake was seen in the healthy teeth of patients or in the six controls. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of FMISO PET scan in detecting odontogenic infections were 93%, 97%, 84%, 99% and 96%, respectively. {sup 18}F-fluoride ion bone scan done in three patients showed that {sup 18}F-fluoride ion plays no role in the demonstration of anaerobic odontogenic infection. FMISO PET scan is a sensitive method for the detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections, and may play a complementary role in the evaluation of the dental condition of patients with head and neck tumours prior to radiation therapy. (orig.)

  1. Acceptable respiratory protection program and LASL respirator research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaggs, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    A short history is presented on the LASL Respiratory Protection Training Programs. Then a discussion is given on the major points of an acceptable respiratory protection program utilizing the points required by the Occupational, Safety, and Health Administration (OSHA) Regulation 29 CFR 1910.134. Contributions to respirator research are reviewed. Discussion is presented under the following section headings: program administration; respirator selection; respirator use; fitting and training; respirator maintenance; medical clearance and surveillance; special problems; program evaluation; and documentation (records).

  2. Contribution of root to soil respiration and carbon balance in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soil respiration varied from 2.5 to 11.9 g CO2 m-2 d-1 and from 1.5 to 9.3 g CO2 m-2 d-1, and the contribution of root respiration to total soil respiration from 38% to 76% and from 25% to 72% in Communities 1 and 2, respectively. During the growing season (May–September), soil respiration, shoot biomass, live root ...

  3. Acceptable respiratory protection program and LASL respirator research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, B.J.

    1979-01-01

    A short history is presented on the LASL Respiratory Protection Training Programs. Then a discussion is given on the major points of an acceptable respiratory protection program utilizing the points required by the Occupational, Safety, and Health Administration (OSHA) Regulation 29 CFR 1910.134. Contributions to respirator research are reviewed. Discussion is presented under the following section headings: program administration; respirator selection; respirator use; fitting and training; respirator maintenance; medical clearance and surveillance; special problems; program evaluation; and documentation

  4. Effects of Nasal or Oral Breathing on Anaerobic Power Output and Metabolic Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recinto, Christine; Efthemeou, Theodore; Boffelli, P Tony; Navalta, James W

    2017-01-01

    Nasal and oral exclusive breathing modes have benefits and drawbacks during submaximal exercise. It is unknown whether these responses would extend to anaerobic work performed at high intensity. Nine individuals (males N = 7, females N = 2) performed a standard Wingate Anaerobic cycle test on a cycle ergometer under nose (N) and mouth (M) only respiratory conditions, performed in a counterbalanced order. A 2 (condition: nose, mouth) × 6 (time: 0-5 sec, 5-10 sec, 10-15 sec, 15-20 sec, 20-25 sec, 25-30 sec) repeated measures ANOVA was used to analyze the data with significance accepted at the pbreathing mode were observed for any power output or performance measures associated with the Wingate Anaerobic cycle test. Respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was significantly higher in the oral respiration condition from 10 seconds to 25 seconds during the test (pbreathing was effective in reducing hyperventilation as RER remained below 1.0. However, elevated HR with nasal breathing indicates increased cardiovascular stress associated with this mode. As breathing mode does not affect power output or performance measures during completion of a high-intensity anaerobic test, preference of the participant should be the determining factor if a choice is available.

  5. Determining anaerobic capacity in sporting activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordhof, Dionne A; Skiba, Philip F; de Koning, Jos J

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic capacity/anaerobically attributable power is an important parameter for athletic performance, not only for short high-intensity activities but also for breakaway efforts and end spurts during endurance events. Unlike aerobic capacity, anaerobic capacity cannot be easily quantified. The 3 most commonly used methodologies to quantify anaerobic capacity are the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit method, the critical power concept, and the gross efficiency method. This review describes these methods, evaluates if they result in similar estimates of anaerobic capacity, and highlights how anaerobic capacity is used during sporting activities. All 3 methods have their own strengths and weaknesses and result in more or less similar estimates of anaerobic capacity but cannot be used interchangeably. The method of choice depends on the research question or practical goal.

  6. Effect of chlorate, molybdate, and shikimic acid on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in aerobic and anaerobic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Christy E; Beier, Ross C; Hume, Michael E; Horrocks, Shane M; Casey, Thomas A; Caton, Joel S; Nisbet, David J; Smith, David J; Krueger, Nathan A; Anderson, Robin C

    2010-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine factors that affect sensitivity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to sodium chlorate (5mM). In our first experiment, cultures grown without chlorate grew more rapidly than those with chlorate. An extended lag before logarithmic growth was observed in anaerobic but not aerobic cultures containing chlorate. Chlorate inhibition of growth during aerobic culture began later than that observed in anaerobic cultures but persisted once inhibition was apparent. Conversely, anaerobic cultures appeared to adapt to chlorate after approximately 10h of incubation, exhibiting rapid compensatory growth. In anaerobic chlorate-containing cultures, 20% of total viable counts were resistant to chlorate by 6h and had propagated to 100% resistance (>10(9)CFU mL(-1)) by 24h. In the aerobic chlorate-containing cultures, 12.9% of colonies had detectable resistance to chlorate by 6h, but only 1% retained detectable resistance at 24h, likely because these cultures had opportunity to respire on oxygen and were thus not enriched via the selective pressure of chlorate. In another study, treatment with shikimic acid (0.34 mM), molybdate (1mM) or their combination had little effect on aerobic or anaerobic growth of Salmonella in the absence of added chlorate. As observed in our earlier study, chlorate resistance was not detected in any cultures without added chlorate. Chlorate resistant Salmonella were recovered at equivalent numbers regardless of treatment after 8h of aerobic or anaerobic culture with added chlorate; however, by 24h incubation chlorate sensitivity was completely restored to aerobic but not anaerobic cultures treated with shikimic acid or molybdate but not their combination. Results indicate that anaerobic adaptation of S. Typhimurium to sodium chlorate during pure culture is likely due to the selective propagation of low numbers of cells exhibiting spontaneous resistance to chlorate and this resistance is not reversible by

  7. Genome analysis of Chitinivibrio alkaliphilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel extremely haloalkaliphilic anaerobic chitinolytic bacterium from the candidate phylum Termite Group 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Gumerov, V.M.; Rakitin, A.L.; Beletsky, A.V.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Muyzer, G.; Mardanov, A.V.; Ravin, N.V.

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic enrichments from hypersaline soda lakes with chitin as substrate yielded five closely related anaerobic haloalkaliphilic isolates growing on insoluble chitin by fermentation at pH10 and salinities up to 3.5M. The chitinolytic activity was exclusively cell associated. To better understand

  8. Genome analysis of Chitinivibrio alkaliphilus gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel extremely haloalkaliphilic anaerobic chitinolytic bacterium from the candidate phylum Termite Group 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, D.Y.; Gumerov, V.M.; Rakitin, A.L.; Beletsky, A.V.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Muyzer, G.; Mardanov, A.V.; Ravin, N.V.

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic enrichments from hypersaline soda lakes with chitin as substrate yielded five closely related anaerobic haloalkaliphilic isolates growing on insoluble chitin by fermentation at pH 10 and salinities up to 3.5 M. The chitinolytic activity was exclusively cell associated. To better understand

  9. The optimization and validation of the Biotyper MALDI-TOF MS database for the identification of Gram-positive anaerobic cocci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veloo, A. C. M.; de Vries, E D; Jean-Pierre, H.; Justesen, U. S.; Morris, T.; Urban, E.; Wybo, I.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    OBJECTIVES: Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) account for 24-31% of the anaerobic bacteria isolated from human clinical specimens. At present GPAC are underrepresented in the Biotyper MALDI-TOF MS database. Profiles of new species have yet to be added. We present the optimization of the MALDI-TOF

  10. A marine microbial consortium apparently mediating anaerobic oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boetius, A.; Ravenschlag, K.; Schubert, CJ

    2000-01-01

    microorganisms mediating this reaction have not yet been isolated, and the pathway of anaerobic oxidation of methane is insufficiently understood. Recent data suggest that certain archaea reverse the process of methanogenesis by interaction with sulphate-reducing bacteria(5-7). Here we provide microscopic...... evidence for a structured consortium of archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria, which we identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization using specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. In this example of a structured archaeal-bacterial symbiosis, the archaea grow in dense aggregates of about 100...... cells and are surrounded by sulphate-reducing bacteria. These aggregates were abundant in gas-hydrate-rich sediments with extremely high rates of methane-based sulphate reduction, and apparently mediate anaerobic oxidation of methane....

  11. Separating autotrophic respiration due to roots from soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil respiration is the largest component of ecosystem respiration but little is known about it and its components in parkland systems. We therefore conducted an experiment to estimate the amount of CO2 respired and to partition it into soil, tree root and crop root contributions in parkland systems in Burkina Faso.

  12. 21 CFR 892.1970 - Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. 892.1970... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1970 Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. (a) Identification. A radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer is a device intended to be used to...

  13. 20 CFR 718.303 - Death from a respirable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Death from a respirable disease. 718.303... from a respirable disease. (a)(1) If a deceased miner was employed for ten or more years in one or more coal mines and died from a respirable disease, there shall be a rebuttable presumption that his or her...

  14. 20 CFR 410.462 - Presumption relating to respirable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Presumption relating to respirable disease... Pneumoconiosis § 410.462 Presumption relating to respirable disease. (a) Even though the existence of... was employed for 10 years or more in the Nation's coal mines and died from a respirable disease, it...

  15. Redefinition and global estimation of basal ecosystem respiration rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, C.M.J.; Yuan, W.

    2011-01-01

    Basal ecosystem respiration rate (BR), the ecosystem respiration rate at a given temperature, is a common and important parameter in empirical models for quantifying ecosystem respiration (ER) globally. Numerous studies have indicated that BR varies in space. However, many empirical ER models still

  16. Induction by ethylene of cyanide-resistant respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomos, T.; Laties, G.G.

    1976-05-17

    Ethylene and cyanide induce an increase in respiration in a variety of plant tissues, whereas ethylene has no effect on tissues whose respiration is strongly inhibited by cyanide. It is suggested that the existence of a cyanide-insensitive electron transport path is a prerequisite for stimulation of respiration by ethylene.

  17. The axon-protective WLD(S) protein partially rescues mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis after axonal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godzik, Katharina; Coleman, Michael P

    2015-04-01

    The axon-protective Wallerian degeneration slow (WLD(S)) protein can ameliorate the decline in axonal ATP levels after neurite transection. Here, we tested the hypothesis that this effect is associated with maintenance of mitochondrial respiration and/or glycolysis. We used isolated neurites of superior cervical ganglion (SCG) cultures in the Seahorse XF-24 Metabolic Flux Analyser to determine mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis under different conditions. We observed that both mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis declined significantly during the latent phase of Wallerian degeneration. WLD(S) partially reduced the decline both in glycolysis and in mitochondrial respiration. In addition, we found that depleting NAD levels in uncut cultures led to changes in mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis similar to those rescued by WLD(S) after cut, suggesting that the maintenance of NAD levels in Wld(S) neurites after axonal injury at least partially underlies the maintenance of ATP levels. However, by using another axon-protective mutation (Sarm1(-/-)), we could demonstrate that rescue of basal ECAR (and hence probably glycolysis) rather than basal OCR (mitochondrial respiration) may be part of the protective phenotype to delay Wallerian degeneration. These findings open new routes to study glycolysis and the connection between NAD and ATP levels in axon degeneration, which may help to eventually develop therapeutic strategies to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. The role of alternative cyanide-insensitive respiration in plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raskin, Ilya

    1997-09-29

    This DOE funded research concentrated on the investigation of the role of respiration and oxidative stress in plant biology. Initially the authors concentrated on the possible role of cyanide-insensitive respiration in counteracting the deleterious effects of chilling stress. Although plants are considered to be poikilotherms, there are a few examples of thermogenesis, in which the tissue temperature increases well above ambient. They suggested that differences between thermogenic and non-thermogenic plants may be quantitative rather than qualitative, and that heat from increased respiration may have a local protective effect on the mitochondria, slowing or reducing the effects of chilling. They proposed that this is accomplished by a large increase in respiration, predominantly via the alternative pathway. They measured the increases in respiration, particularly via the alternative pathway, in response to chilling. They have also quantified the associated increases in heat evolution in response to chilling in a number of plant species using a microcalorimeter. For example, after 8 h exposure to 8 C, heat evolution in chilling-sensitive species increased 47--98%, compared to 7--22% for the chilling-resistant species. No increase in heat evolution was observed in the extremely chilling-sensitive ornamental Episcka cupreata (Hook). Increases in heat evolution were observed when plants were chilled in constant light or in the dark, but not when plants were chilled at high humidity. Heat evolution by mitochondria isolated from potato tuber slices were also measured. These values, together with measurements of the heat capacity of isolated mitochondria and counting of the mitochondria by flow cytometry, allow calculation of theoretical maximal rates of heating and the heat produced per mitochondrion. The obtained data was consistent with the protective role of respiratory heat production in cold-stressed plants.

  19. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation mediated by Mn-oxides: from sediment to strain level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanaud, Cedric; Michotey, Valerie; Guasco, Sophie; Garcia, Nicole; Anschutz, Pierre; Canton, Mathieu; Bonin, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    Nitrite and (29)N(2) productions in slurry incubations of anaerobically sediment after (15)NO(3) or (15)NH(4) labelling in the presence of Mn-oxides suggested that anaerobic Mn-oxides mediated nitrification coupled with denitrification in muddy intertidal sediments of Arcachon Bay (SW Atlantic French coast). From this sediment, bacterial strains were isolated and physiologically characterized in terms of Mn-oxides and nitrate reduction as well as potential anaerobic nitrification. One of the isolated strain, identified as Marinobacter daepoensis strain M4AY14, was a denitrifier. Nitrous oxide production by this strain was demonstrated in the absence of nitrate and with Mn-oxides and NH(4) amendment, giving indirect proof of anaerobic nitrate or nitrite production. Anaerobic Mn-oxide-mediated nitrification was confirmed by (29)N(2) production in the presence of (15)NO(3) and (14)NH(4) under denitrifying conditions. Anaerobic nitrification by M4AY14 seemed to occur only in the absence of nitrate, or at nitrate levels lower than that of Mn-oxides. Most of the other isolates were affiliated with the Shewanella genus and were able to use both nitrate and Mn-oxides as electron acceptors. When both electron acceptors were present, whatever their concentrations, nitrate and Mn-oxide reduction co-occurred. These data indicate that bacterial Mn-oxide reduction could be an important process in marine sediments with low oxygen concentrations, and demonstrate for the first time the role of bacteria in anaerobic Mn-mediated nitrification. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Genome sequence of the organohalide-respiring Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens type strain (IP3-3(T)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Trent A; Richmond, Dray P; Bowman, Kimberly S; Cho, Yong-Joon; Chun, Jongsik; da Costa, Milton S; Rainey, Fred A; Moe, William M

    2016-01-01

    Dehalogenimonas alkenigignens IP3-3(T) is a strictly anaerobic, mesophilic, Gram negative staining bacterium that grows by organohalide respiration, coupling the oxidation of H2 to the reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated alkanes. Growth has not been observed with any non-polyhalogenated alkane electron acceptors. Here we describe the features of strain IP3-3(T) together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 1,849,792 bp high-quality-draft genome contains 1936 predicted protein coding genes, 47 tRNA genes, a single large subunit rRNA (23S-5S) locus, and a single, orphan, small unit rRNA (16S) locus. The genome contains 29 predicted reductive dehalogenase genes, a large majority of which lack cognate genes encoding membrane anchoring proteins.

  1. Endogenous nitric oxide formation in cardiac myocytes does not control respiration during β-adrenergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhaas, Michael; Nickel, Alexander G; Bergem, Stefanie; Casadei, Barbara; Laufs, Ulrich; Maack, Christoph

    2017-06-15

    In the heart, endothelial nitric oxide (NO) controls oxygen consumption in the working heart through paracrine mechanisms. While cardiac myocytes contain several isoforms of NO synthases, it is unclear whether these can control respiration in an intracrine fashion. A long-standing controversy is whether a NOS exists within mitochondria. By combining fluorescence technologies with electrical field stimulation or the patch-clamp technique in beating cardiac myocytes, we identified a neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) as the most relevant source of intracellular NO during β-adrenergic stimulation, while no evidence for a mitochondria-located NOS was obtained. The amounts of NO produced by non-mitochondrial nNOS were insufficient to regulate respiration during β-adrenergic stimulation, arguing against intracrine control of respiration by NO within cardiac myocytes. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) controls cardiac oxygen (O 2 ) consumption in a paracrine way by slowing respiration at the mitochondrial electron transport chain. While NO synthases (NOSs) are also expressed in cardiac myocytes, it is unclear whether they control respiration in an intracrine way. Furthermore, the existence of a mitochondrial NOS is controversial. Here, by combining fluorescence imaging with electrical field stimulation, the patch-clamp method and knock-out technology, we determined the sources and consequences of intracellular NO formation during workload transitions in isolated murine and guinea pig cardiac myocytes and mitochondria. Using 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF) as a fluorescent NO-sensor that locates to the cytosol and mitochondria, we observed that NO increased by ∼12% within 3 min of β-adrenergic stimulation in beating cardiac myocytes. This NO stems from neuronal NOS (nNOS), but not endothelial (eNOS). After patch clamp-mediated dialysis of cytosolic DAF, the remaining NO signals (mostly mitochondrial) were blocked by nNOS deletion, but not by

  2. Does high-sucrose diet alter skeletal muscle and liver mitochondrial respiration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, K; Py, G; Robert, E; Mercier, J

    2003-09-01

    A diet high in sucrose or fructose progressively impairs glucose and lipid metabolism, which leads to insulin resistance. As mitochondria are the sites of the oxidation and utilization of these substrates, we hypothesized that a high sucrose diet would alter mitochondrial respiration. Male Wistar rats were fed high-sucrose (SU) or control (CTL) diet for one week; mitochondrial respiration was investigated in mitochondria isolated from liver and both glycolytic and oxidative muscles, with pyruvate and palmitate as substrates. To test for metabolic disturbances, we measured not only glycogen content in muscles and liver, but also lactate, glucose and triglyceride blood concentrations. After one week of high-sucrose intake, we found no change in blood concentration of these variables, but glycogen content was significantly increased in liver (17.28 +/- 2.98 mg/g tissue SU vs 6.47 +/- 1.67 mg/g tissue CTL), oxidative muscle (1.59 +/- 0.21 mg/g tissue SU vs 0.70 +/- 0.24 mg/g tissue CTL) though not in glycolytic muscle (1.72 +/- 0.44 mg/g tissue SU vs 1.52 +/- 0.20 mg/g tissue CTL). State 3 mitochondrial respiration was significantly decreased in SU rats compared with CTL (p respiration could contributed to the development of insulin resistance.

  3. Nrf2 impacts cellular bioenergetics by controlling substrate availability for mitochondrial respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira M. Holmström

    2013-06-01

    Transcription factor Nrf2 and its repressor Keap1 regulate a network of cytoprotective genes involving more than 1% of the genome, their best known targets being drug-metabolizing and antioxidant genes. Here we demonstrate a novel role for this pathway in directly regulating mitochondrial bioenergetics in murine neurons and embryonic fibroblasts. Loss of Nrf2 leads to mitochondrial depolarisation, decreased ATP levels and impaired respiration, whereas genetic activation of Nrf2 increases the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels, the rate of respiration and the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation. We further show that Nrf2-deficient cells have increased production of ATP in glycolysis, which is then used by the F1Fo-ATPase for maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential. While the levels and in vitro activities of the respiratory complexes are unaffected by Nrf2 deletion, their activities in isolated mitochondria and intact live cells are substantially impaired. In addition, the rate of regeneration of NADH after inhibition of respiration is much slower in Nrf2-knockout cells than in their wild-type counterparts. Taken together, these results show that Nrf2 directly regulates cellular energy metabolism through modulating the availability of substrates for mitochondrial respiration. Our findings highlight the importance of efficient energy metabolism in Nrf2-mediated cytoprotection.

  4. Frost Induces Respiration and Accelerates Carbon Depletion in Trees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Or Sperling

    Full Text Available Cellular respiration depletes stored carbohydrates during extended periods of limited photosynthesis, e.g. winter dormancy or drought. As respiration rate is largely a function of temperature, the thermal conditions during such periods may affect non-structural carbohydrate (NSC availability and, ultimately, recovery. Here, we surveyed stem responses to temperature changes in 15 woody species. For two species with divergent respirational response to frost, P. integerrima and P. trichocarpa, we also examined corresponding changes in NSC levels. Finally, we simulated respiration-induced NSC depletion using historical temperature data for the western US. We report a novel finding that tree stems significantly increase respiration in response to near freezing temperatures. We observed this excess respiration in 13 of 15 species, deviating 10% to 170% over values predicted by the Arrhenius equation. Excess respiration persisted at temperatures above 0 °C during warming and reoccurred over multiple frost-warming cycles. A large adjustment of NSCs accompanied excess respiration in P. integerrima, whereas P. trichocarpa neither excessively respired nor adjusted NSCs. Over the course of the years included in our model, frost-induced respiration accelerated stem NSC consumption by 8.4 mg (glucose eq. cm(-3 yr(-1 on average in the western US, a level of depletion that may continue to significantly affect spring NSC availability. This novel finding revises the current paradigm of low temperature respiration kinetics.

  5. Catalase (KatA) plays a role in protection against anaerobic nitric oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Wilson, Jeffrey J; Mahtani, Harry K; Li, Qian; Vanderwielen, Bradley D; Makris, Thomas M; Rogers, Melanie; McDaniel, Cameron; Lipscomb, John D; Irvin, Randall T; Schurr, Michael J; Lancaster, Jack R; Kovall, Rhett A; Hassett, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a common bacterial pathogen, responsible for a high incidence of nosocomial and respiratory infections. KatA is the major catalase of PA that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a reactive oxygen intermediate generated during aerobic respiration. Paradoxically, PA displays elevated KatA activity under anaerobic growth conditions where the substrate of KatA, H2O2, is not produced. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the mechanism underlying this phenomenon and define the role of KatA in PA during anaerobiosis using genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches. We demonstrated that anaerobic wild-type PAO1 cells yielded higher levels of katA transcription and expression than aerobic cells, whereas a nitrite reductase mutant ΔnirS produced ∼50% the KatA activity of PAO1, suggesting that a basal NO level was required for the increased KatA activity. We also found that transcription of the katA gene was controlled, in part, by the master anaerobic regulator, ANR. A ΔkatA mutant and a mucoid mucA22 ΔkatA bacteria demonstrated increased sensitivity to acidified nitrite (an NO generator) in anaerobic planktonic and biofilm cultures. EPR spectra of anaerobic bacteria showed that levels of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC), indicators of NO stress, were increased significantly in the ΔkatA mutant, and dramatically in a ΔnorCB mutant compared to basal levels of DNIC in PAO1 and ΔnirS mutant. Expression of KatA dramatically reduced the DNIC levels in ΔnorCB mutant. We further revealed direct NO-KatA interactions in vitro using EPR, optical spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. KatA has a 5-coordinate high spin ferric heme that binds NO without prior reduction of the heme iron (Kd ∼6 μM). Collectively, we conclude that KatA is expressed to protect PA against NO generated during anaerobic respiration. We proposed that such protective effects of KatA may involve buffering of free NO when potentially toxic concentrations of

  6. Catalase (KatA) Plays a Role in Protection against Anaerobic Nitric Oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Wilson, Jeffrey J.; Mahtani, Harry K.; Li, Qian; VanderWielen, Bradley D.; Makris, Thomas M.; Rogers, Melanie; McDaniel, Cameron; Lipscomb, John D.; Irvin, Randall T.; Schurr, Michael J.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Kovall, Rhett A.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a common bacterial pathogen, responsible for a high incidence of nosocomial and respiratory infections. KatA is the major catalase of PA that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a reactive oxygen intermediate generated during aerobic respiration. Paradoxically, PA displays elevated KatA activity under anaerobic growth conditions where the substrate of KatA, H2O2, is not produced. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the mechanism underlying this phenomenon and define the role of KatA in PA during anaerobiosis using genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches. We demonstrated that anaerobic wild-type PAO1 cells yielded higher levels of katA transcription and expression than aerobic cells, whereas a nitrite reductase mutant ΔnirS produced ∼50% the KatA activity of PAO1, suggesting that a basal NO level was required for the increased KatA activity. We also found that transcription of the katA gene was controlled, in part, by the master anaerobic regulator, ANR. A ΔkatA mutant and a mucoid mucA22 ΔkatA bacteria demonstrated increased sensitivity to acidified nitrite (an NO generator) in anaerobic planktonic and biofilm cultures. EPR spectra of anaerobic bacteria showed that levels of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC), indicators of NO stress, were increased significantly in the ΔkatA mutant, and dramatically in a ΔnorCB mutant compared to basal levels of DNIC in PAO1 and ΔnirS mutant. Expression of KatA dramatically reduced the DNIC levels in ΔnorCB mutant. We further revealed direct NO-KatA interactions in vitro using EPR, optical spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. KatA has a 5-coordinate high spin ferric heme that binds NO without prior reduction of the heme iron (K d ∼6 μM). Collectively, we conclude that KatA is expressed to protect PA against NO generated during anaerobic respiration. We proposed that such protective effects of KatA may involve buffering of free NO when potentially toxic concentrations of

  7. Catalase (KatA plays a role in protection against anaerobic nitric oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengchang Su

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA is a common bacterial pathogen, responsible for a high incidence of nosocomial and respiratory infections. KatA is the major catalase of PA that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, a reactive oxygen intermediate generated during aerobic respiration. Paradoxically, PA displays elevated KatA activity under anaerobic growth conditions where the substrate of KatA, H2O2, is not produced. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the mechanism underlying this phenomenon and define the role of KatA in PA during anaerobiosis using genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches. We demonstrated that anaerobic wild-type PAO1 cells yielded higher levels of katA transcription and expression than aerobic cells, whereas a nitrite reductase mutant ΔnirS produced ∼50% the KatA activity of PAO1, suggesting that a basal NO level was required for the increased KatA activity. We also found that transcription of the katA gene was controlled, in part, by the master anaerobic regulator, ANR. A ΔkatA mutant and a mucoid mucA22 ΔkatA bacteria demonstrated increased sensitivity to acidified nitrite (an NO generator in anaerobic planktonic and biofilm cultures. EPR spectra of anaerobic bacteria showed that levels of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC, indicators of NO stress, were increased significantly in the ΔkatA mutant, and dramatically in a ΔnorCB mutant compared to basal levels of DNIC in PAO1 and ΔnirS mutant. Expression of KatA dramatically reduced the DNIC levels in ΔnorCB mutant. We further revealed direct NO-KatA interactions in vitro using EPR, optical spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. KatA has a 5-coordinate high spin ferric heme that binds NO without prior reduction of the heme iron (Kd ∼6 μM. Collectively, we conclude that KatA is expressed to protect PA against NO generated during anaerobic respiration. We proposed that such protective effects of KatA may involve buffering of free NO when potentially toxic

  8. Did Respiration or Photosynthesis Come First

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, E.

    1979-01-01

    The similarity of the mechanisms in photosynthetic and in oxidative phosphorylation suggests a common origin ( convers ion hypothesis). It is proposed that an early form of electron flow with oxidative phosphorylation ( p rerespiration ) , to terminal electron acceptors available in a reducing biosphere, was supplemented by a photocatalyst capable of a redox reaction. In this way, cyclic photophosphorylation arose. Further stages in evolution were reverse electron flow powered by ATP, to make NADH as a reductant for CO2 , and subsequently noncyclic electron flow. These processes concomitantly provided the oxidants indispensable for full development of oxidative phosphorylation, i.e. for normal respiration: sulphate, O2 and with participation of the nitrificants, nitrite and nitrate. Thus, prerespiration preceded photosynthesis, and this preceded respiration. It is also suggested that nonredox photoprocesses of the Halobacterium type are not part of the mainstream of bioenergetic evolution. They do not lead to photoprocesses with electron flow. (author)

  9. Metatranscriptome of an Anaerobic Benzene-Degrading, Nitrate-Reducing Enrichment Culture Reveals Involvement of Carboxylation in Benzene Ring Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fei; Gitiafroz, Roya; Devine, Cheryl E.; Gong, Yunchen; Hug, Laura A.; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2014-01-01

    The enzymes involved in the initial steps of anaerobic benzene catabolism are not known. To try to elucidate this critical step, a metatranscriptomic analysis was conducted to compare the genes transcribed during the metabolism of benzene and benzoate by an anaerobic benzene-degrading, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture. RNA was extracted from the mixed culture and sequenced without prior mRNA enrichment, allowing simultaneous examination of the active community composition and the differential gene expression between the two treatments. Ribosomal and mRNA sequences attributed to a member of the family Peptococcaceae from the order Clostridiales were essentially only detected in the benzene-amended culture samples, implicating this group in the initial catabolism of benzene. Genes similar to each of two subunits of a proposed benzene-carboxylating enzyme were transcribed when the culture was amended with benzene. Anaerobic benzoate degradation genes from strict anaerobes were transcribed only when the culture was amended with benzene. Genes for other benzoate catabolic enzymes and for nitrate respiration were transcribed in both samples, with those attributed to an Azoarcus species being most abundant. These findings indicate that the mineralization of benzene starts with its activation by a strict anaerobe belonging to the Peptococcaceae, involving a carboxylation step to form benzoate. These data confirm the previously hypothesized syntrophic association between a benzene-degrading Peptococcaceae strain and a benzoate-degrading denitrifying Azoarcus strain for the complete catabolism of benzene with nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor. PMID:24795366

  10. Mitochondrial respiration in hummingbird flight muscles.

    OpenAIRE

    Suarez, R K; Lighton, J R; Brown, G S; Mathieu-Costello, O

    1991-01-01

    Respiration rates of muscle mitochondria in flying hummingbirds range from 7 to 10 ml of O2 per cm3 of mitochondria per min, which is about 2 times higher than the range obtained in the locomotory muscles of mammals running at their maximum aerobic capacities (VO2max). Capillary volume density is higher in hummingbird flight muscles than in mammalian skeletal muscles. Mitochondria occupy approximately 35% of fiber volume in hummingbird flight muscles and cluster beneath the sarcolemmal membra...

  11. Effects of electron acceptors on removal of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, resistance genes and class 1 integrons under anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Heyang; Miller, Jennifer H; Abu-Reesh, Ibrahim M; Pruden, Amy; He, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Anaerobic biotechnologies can effectively remove antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), but there is a need to better understand the mechanisms. Here we employ bioelectrochemical systems (BES) as a platform to investigate the fate of a native tetracycline and sulfonamide-resistant Escherichia coli strain and its ARGs. The E. coli strain carrying intI1, sulI and tet(E) was isolated from domestic wastewater and dosed into a tubular BES. The BES was first operated as a microbial fuel cell (MFC), with aeration in the cathode, which resulted in enhanced removal of E. coli and ARGs by ~2 log (i.e., order of magnitude) when switched from high current to open circuit operation mode. The BES was then operated as a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to exclude the effects of oxygen diffusion, and the removal of E. coli and ARGs during the open circuit configuration was again 1-2 log higher than that at high current mode. Significant correlations of E. coli vs. current (R(2)=0.73) and ARGs vs. E. coli (R(2) ranged from 0.54 to 0.87), and the fact that the BES substrate contained no electron acceptors, implied that the persistence of the E. coli and its ARGs was determined by the availability of indigenous electron acceptors in the BES, i.e., the anode electrode or the electron shuttles generated by the exoelectrogens. Subsequent experiments with pure-culture tetracycline and sulfonamide-resistant E. coli being incubated in a two-chamber MEC and serum bottles demonstrated that the E. coli could survive by respiring anode electrode and/or electron shuttles released by exoelectrogens, and ARGs persisted with their host E. coli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become

  13. Thermophilic anaerobic acetate-utilizing methanogens and their metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mladenovska, Zuzana

    Six strains of thermophilic anaerobic acetate-utilizing methanogens were isolated from different full-scale thermophilic biogas plants in China and Denmark. The strain isolated from the Chinese biogas plant was designated KN-6P and the isolates from the Danish full-scale biogas plants were......, utilizing the substrates acetate, methanol and methylamines but not hydrogen/carbon dioxide. Strain Methanosarcina sp. SO-2P was able to grow mixotrophically on methanol and hydrogen/carbon dioxide with methane formation from hydrogen and carbon dioxide occurring after methanol depletion. All six...... that the similarity level between strains from the Danish biogas plants and Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1 was higher than 70%, and thus these strains should be considered as organisms belonging to the species Methanosarcina thermophila. DNA of strain KN-6P was only distantly related to the DNA of Methanosarcina...

  14. Potential for anaerobic conversion of xenobiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Dolfing, J.; Haagensen, Frank

    2003-01-01

    This review covers the latest research on the anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic xenobiotic compounds, with emphasis on surfactants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalate esters, polychlorinated biphenyls, halogenated phenols, and pesticides. The versatility of anaerobic reactor systems...... regarding the treatment of xenobiotics is shown with the focus on the UASB reactor, but the applicability of other reactor designs for treatment of hazardous waste is also included. Bioaugmentation has proved to be a viable technique to enhance a specific activity in anaerobic reactors and recent research...

  15. Understanding and Predicting Foam in Anaerobic Digester

    OpenAIRE

    I. R. Kanu; T. J. Aspray; A. J. Adeloye

    2015-01-01

    As a result of the ambiguity and complexity surrounding anaerobic digester foaming, efforts have been made by various researchers to understand the process of anaerobic digester foaming so as to proffer a solution that can be universally applied rather than site specific. All attempts ranging from experimental analysis to comparative review of other process has not fully explained the conditions and process of foaming in anaerobic digester. Studying the current available ...

  16. The contributions of respiration and glycolysis to extracellular acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookerjee, Shona A; Goncalves, Renata L S; Gerencser, Akos A; Nicholls, David G; Brand, Martin D

    2015-02-01

    The rate at which cells acidify the extracellular medium is frequently used to report glycolytic rate, with the implicit assumption that conversion of uncharged glucose or glycogen to lactate(-)+H(+) is the only significant source of acidification. However, another potential source of extracellular protons is the production of CO2 during substrate oxidation: CO2 is hydrated to H2CO3, which then dissociates to HCO3(-)+H(+). O2 consumption and pH were monitored in a popular platform for measuring extracellular acidification (the Seahorse XF Analyzer). We found that CO2 produced during respiration caused almost stoichiometric release of H(+) into the medium. With C2C12 myoblasts given glucose, respiration-derived CO2 contributed 34% of the total extracellular acidification. When glucose was omitted or replaced by palmitate or pyruvate, this value was 67-100%. Analysis of primary cells, cancer cell lines, stem cell lines, and isolated synaptosomes revealed contributions of CO2-produced acidification that were usually substantial, ranging from 3% to 100% of the total acidification rate. Measurement of glycolytic rate using extracellular acidification requires differentiation between respiratory and glycolytic acid production. The data presented here demonstrate the importance of this correction when extracellular acidification is used for quantitative measurement of glycolytic flux to lactate. We describe a simple way to correct the measured extracellular acidification rate for respiratory acid production, using simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption rate. Extracellular acidification is often assumed to result solely from glycolytic lactate production, but respiratory CO2 also contributes. We demonstrate that extracellular acidification by myoblasts given glucose is 66% glycolytic and 34% respiratory and describe a method to differentiate these sources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Potential for using thermophilic anaerobic bacteria for bioethanol production from hemicellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, P.; Georgieva, Tania I.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2004-01-01

    anaerobic bacterial strains growing optimally at 70-80degreesC for their ethanol production from D-Xylose. The new isolates came from different natural and man-made systems such as hot springs, paper pulp mills and brewery waste water. The test was composed of three different steps; (i) test for conversion...

  18. Underground Corrosion by Microorganisms Part II : Role of Anaerobic Sulphate Reducing Bacteria-Desulfotomaculum SP

    OpenAIRE

    H. M. Dayal; K. C. Tiwari; Kamlesh Mehta; Mr. Chandrashekhar

    1988-01-01

    During the course of studies on the corrosion causing soil microflora from different geoclimatic regions of India, several strains of anaerobic sulphate reducing bacteria belonging to genus Desulfotomaculum were isolated and characterised. Their corrosive action on mild steel, galvanised iron and structural aluminium, the three main metals of construction of underground structures, have been studied under laboratory conditions.

  19. Methanogenic degradation of (amino)aromatic compounds by anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linkova, Y.V.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of a range of aromatic substrates by anaerobic microbial communities was studied. Active methanogenic microbial communities decomposing aminoaromatic acids and azo dyes into CH4 and CO2 were isolated. Products of primary conversion were found to be 2-hydroxybenzyl and benzyl alcohols

  20. Aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria from gut of red palm weevil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... in the intestinal termite gut play key physiological functions. These functions are: cellulose and ... facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from termite's intestine including Burkholderia sp. and Citrobacter sp. .... The diversity of intestinal microbiota signifies the need for special requirements for cultivation.

  1. Methanomethylovorans thermophila sp. nov., a thermophilic, methylotrophic methanogen form an anaerobic reactor fed with methanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, B.; Parshina, S.N.; Doesburg, van W.C.J.; Lomans, B.P.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    A novel thermophilic, obligately methylotrophic, methanogenic archaeon, strain L2FAWT, was isolated from a thermophilic laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor fed with methanol as the carbon and energy source. Cells of strain L2FAWT were non-motile, irregular cocci, 0·7¿1·5 µm in

  2. Antimony Redox Biotransformation in the Subsurface: Effect of Indigenous Sb(V) Respiring Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liying; Ye, Li; Yu, Yaqin; Jing, Chuanyong

    2018-02-06

    Anaerobic microbiological antimonate [Sb(V)] respiration is a newly discovered process regulating the Sb redox transformation in soils. However, little is known about the role microbiological Sb(V) respiration plays in the fate of Sb in the subsurface, especially in the presence of sulfate and electron shuttles. Herein, we successfully enriched a Sb(V) reducing microbiota (SbRM) from the subsurface near an active Sb mine. SbRM was dominated by genus Alkaliphilus (18-36%), Clostridiaceae (17-18%), Tissierella (24-27%), and Lysinibacillus (16-37%). The incubation results showed that SbRM reduced 88% of dissolved Sb(V) to Sb(III), but the total Sb mobility remained the same as in the abiotic control, indicating that SbRM alone did not increase the total Sb release but regulated the Sb speciation in the subsurface. Micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) analysis suggested the association of Sb and Fe, and electron shuttles such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic disodium salt (AQDS) markedly enhanced the Sb release due to its ability to facilitate Fe mineral dissolution. Sb L-edge and S K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) results demonstrated that indigenous SbRM immobilized Sb via Sb 2 S 3 formation, especially in a sulfur-rich environment. The insights gained from this study shed new light on Sb mobilization and its risk assessment in the subsurface environment.

  3. Combustion, Respiration and Intermittent Exercise: A Theoretical Perspective on Oxygen Uptake and Energy Expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B. Scott

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available While no doubt thought about for thousands of years, it was Antoine Lavoisier in the late 18th century who is largely credited with the first “modern” investigations of biological energy exchanges. From Lavoisier’s work with combustion and respiration a scientific trend emerges that extends to the present day: the world gains a credible working hypothesis but validity goes missing, often for some time, until later confirmed using proper measures. This theme is applied to glucose/glycogen metabolism where energy exchanges are depicted as conversion from one form to another and, transfer from one place to another made by both the anaerobic and aerobic biochemical pathways within working skeletal muscle, and the hypothetical quantification of these components as part of an oxygen (O2 uptake measurement. The anaerobic and aerobic energy exchange components of metabolism are represented by two different interpretations of O2 uptake: one that contains a glycolytic component (1 L O2 = 21.1 kJ and one that does not (1 L O2 = 19.6 kJ. When energy exchange transfer and oxygen-related expenditures are applied separately to exercise and recovery periods, an increased energy cost for intermittent as compared to continuous exercise is hypothesized to be a direct result.

  4. Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Anaerobic Bacteria: Rubik’s Cube of Clinical Microbiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdács, Márió; Spengler, Gabriella; Urbán, Edit

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria have pivotal roles in the microbiota of humans and they are significant infectious agents involved in many pathological processes, both in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. Their isolation, cultivation and correct identification differs significantly from the workup of aerobic species, although the use of new technologies (e.g., matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, whole genome sequencing) changed anaerobic diagnostics dramatically. In the past, antimicrobial susceptibility of these microorganisms showed predictable patterns and empirical therapy could be safely administered but recently a steady and clear increase in the resistance for several important drugs (β-lactams, clindamycin) has been observed worldwide. For this reason, antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic isolates for surveillance purposes or otherwise is of paramount importance but the availability of these testing methods is usually limited. In this present review, our aim was to give an overview of the methods currently available for the identification (using phenotypic characteristics, biochemical testing, gas-liquid chromatography, MALDI-TOF MS and WGS) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (agar dilution, broth microdilution, disk diffusion, gradient tests, automated systems, phenotypic and molecular resistance detection techniques) of anaerobes, when should these methods be used and what are the recent developments in resistance patterns of anaerobic bacteria. PMID:29112122

  5. Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Anaerobic Bacteria: Rubik's Cube of Clinical Microbiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdács, Márió; Spengler, Gabriella; Urbán, Edit

    2017-11-07

    Anaerobic bacteria have pivotal roles in the microbiota of humans and they are significant infectious agents involved in many pathological processes, both in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. Their isolation, cultivation and correct identification differs significantly from the workup of aerobic species, although the use of new technologies (e.g., matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, whole genome sequencing) changed anaerobic diagnostics dramatically. In the past, antimicrobial susceptibility of these microorganisms showed predictable patterns and empirical therapy could be safely administered but recently a steady and clear increase in the resistance for several important drugs (β-lactams, clindamycin) has been observed worldwide. For this reason, antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic isolates for surveillance purposes or otherwise is of paramount importance but the availability of these testing methods is usually limited. In this present review, our aim was to give an overview of the methods currently available for the identification (using phenotypic characteristics, biochemical testing, gas-liquid chromatography, MALDI-TOF MS and WGS) and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (agar dilution, broth microdilution, disk diffusion, gradient tests, automated systems, phenotypic and molecular resistance detection techniques) of anaerobes, when should these methods be used and what are the recent developments in resistance patterns of anaerobic bacteria.

  6. Anaerobic transformation of carbon monoxide by microbial communities of Kamchatka hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetkova, Tatiana V; Rusanov, Igor I; Pimenov, Nikolay V; Kolganova, Tatyana V; Lebedinsky, Alexander V; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Sokolova, Tatyana G

    2011-05-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is one of the common gaseous compounds found in hot volcanic environments. It is known to serve as the growth substrate for a number of thermophilic prokaryotes, both aerobic and anaerobic. The goal of this work was to study the process of anaerobic transformation of CO by microbial communities inhabiting natural thermal environments: hot springs of Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka. The anaerobic microbial community of Treshchinny Spring (80°C, pH 6.5) was found to exhibit two peaks of affinity for CO (K (S1) = 54 nM and K (S2) = 1 μM). The actual rate of anaerobic CO transformation by the microbial community of this spring, calculated after obtaining the concentration dependence curve and extrapolated to the natural concentration of CO dissolved in the hot spring water (20 nM), was found to be 120 μmol l(-1) of sediment day(-1). In all the hot springs studied, more than 90% of the carbon of (14)CO upon anaerobic incubation was recovered as (14)CO(2). From 1 to 5% of (14)CO was transformed to volatile fatty acids (VFA). The number of microorganisms capable of anaerobic CO oxidation determined by dilution-to-extinction method reached 10(6) cells ml(-1) of sediment. CO-transforming anaerobic thermophilic microorganisms isolated from the springs under study exhibited hydrogenogenic type of CO oxidation and belonged to the bacterial genera Carboxydocella and Dictyoglomus. These data suggest a significant role of hydrogenogenic carboxydotrophic prokaryotes in anaerobic CO transformation in Uzon Caldera hot springs.

  7. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolton, H., Jr.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

    2005-04-18

    The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and {sup 60}Co) by codisposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Our previous NABIR research investigated the aerobic biodegradation and biogeochemistry of Pu(IV)-EDTA. Plutonium(IV) forms stable complexes with EDTA under aerobic conditions and an aerobic EDTA degrading bacterium can degrade EDTA in the presence of Pu and decrease Pu mobility. However, our recent studies indicate that while Pu(IV)-EDTA is stable in simple aqueous systems, it is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds (i.e., Fe(OH){sub 3}(s)--2-line ferrihydrite). Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) in likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA in groundwater. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed in this brand new project to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV) as PuO2(am) by metal reducing bacteria, the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA complex, how the Pu(III)-EDTA complex competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, the formation of a stable soluble Pu(III)-EDTA complex under anaerobic conditions would require degradation of the EDTA complex to limit Pu(III) transport in geologic environments. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have not been isolated. These knowledge gaps preclude the development of a mechanistic understanding of how anaerobic conditions will influence Pu and Pu-EDTA fate and transport to assess, model, and design approaches to stop

  8. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, H. Jr.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

    2005-01-01

    The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and 60 Co) by codisposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Our previous NABIR research investigated the aerobic biodegradation and biogeochemistry of Pu(IV)-EDTA. Plutonium(IV) forms stable complexes with EDTA under aerobic conditions and an aerobic EDTA degrading bacterium can degrade EDTA in the presence of Pu and decrease Pu mobility. However, our recent studies indicate that while Pu(IV)-EDTA is stable in simple aqueous systems, it is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds (i.e., Fe(OH) 3 (s)--2-line ferrihydrite). Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) in likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA in groundwater. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed in this brand new project to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV) as PuO2(am) by metal reducing bacteria, the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA complex, how the Pu(III)-EDTA complex competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, the formation of a stable soluble Pu(III)-EDTA complex under anaerobic conditions would require degradation of the EDTA complex to limit Pu(III) transport in geologic environments. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have not been isolated. These knowledge gaps preclude the development of a mechanistic understanding of how anaerobic conditions will influence Pu and Pu-EDTA fate and transport to assess, model, and design approaches to stop Pu

  9. Cadmium removal by Euglena gracilis is enhanced under anaerobic growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago-Martínez, M. Geovanni; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Encalada, Rusely; Pineda, Erika; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología (Mexico); Zepeda-Rodriguez, Armando [Facultad de Medicina, UNAM, Mexico City (Mexico); Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología (Mexico); Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo, E-mail: rjass_cardiol@yahoo.com.mx [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología (Mexico)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • The protist Euglena gracilis had the ability to grow and remove large amounts of Cd{sup 2+} under anaerobic conditions. • High biomass was attained by combination of glycolytic and mitochondrial carbon sources. • Routes of degradation of glucose, glutamate and malate under anaerobic conditions in E. gracilis are described. • Biosorption was the main mechanism of Cd{sup 2+} removal in anaerobiosis, whereas the Cd{sup 2+} intracellularly accumulated was inactivated by thiol-molecules and polyphosphate. - Abstract: The facultative protist Euglena gracilis, a heavy metal hyper-accumulator, was grown under photo-heterotrophic and extreme conditions (acidic pH, anaerobiosis and with Cd{sup 2+}) and biochemically characterized. High biomass (8.5 × 10{sup 6} cells mL{sup −1}) was reached after 10 days of culture. Under anaerobiosis, photosynthetic activity built up a microaerophilic environment of 0.7% O{sub 2}, which was sufficient to allow mitochondrial respiratory activity: glutamate and malate were fully consumed, whereas 25–33% of the added glucose was consumed. In anaerobic cells, photosynthesis but not respiration was activated by Cd{sup 2+} which induced higher oxidative stress. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were 20 times lower in control cells under anaerobiosis than in aerobiosis, although Cd{sup 2+} induced a higher MDA production. Cd{sup 2+} stress induced increased contents of chelating thiols (cysteine, glutathione and phytochelatins) and polyphosphate. Biosorption (90%) and intracellular accumulation (30%) were the mechanisms by which anaerobic cells removed Cd{sup 2+} from medium, which was 36% higher versus aerobic cells. The present study indicated that E. gracilis has the ability to remove Cd{sup 2+} under anaerobic conditions, which might be advantageous for metal removal in sediments from polluted water bodies or bioreactors, where the O{sub 2} concentration is particularly low.

  10. ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF A BIODEGRADABLE MATERIAL UNDER ANAEROBIC - THERMOPHILIC DIGESTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RICARDO CAMACHO-MUÑOZ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper dertermined the anaerobic biodegradation of a polymer obtained by extrusion process of native cassava starch, polylactic acid and polycaprolactone. Initially a thermophilic - methanogenic inoculum was prepared from urban solid waste. The gas final methane concentration and medium’s pH reached values of 59,6% and 7,89 respectively. The assay assembly was carried out according ASTM D5511 standard. The biodegradation percent of used materials after 15 day of digestion were: 77,49%, 61,27%, 0,31% for cellulose, sample and polyethylene respectively. Due cellulose showed biodegradation levels higher than 70% it’s deduced that the inoculum conditions were appropriate. A biodegradation level of 61,27%, 59,35% of methane concentration in sample’s evolved gas and a medium’s finale pH of 7,71 in sample’s vessels, reveal the extruded polymer´s capacity to be anaerobically degraded under thermophilic- high solid concentration conditions.

  11. Processing anaerobic sludge for extended storage as anaerobic digester inoculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiajia; Zicari, Steven M; Cui, Zongjun; Zhang, Ruihong

    2014-08-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic sludge was processed to reduce the volume and moisture content in order to reduce costs for storing and transporting the sludge as microbial inoculum for anaerobic digester startup. The moisture content of the sludge was reduced from 98.7% to 82.0% via centrifugation and further to 71.5% via vacuum evaporation. The processed sludge was stored for 2 and 4 months and compared with the fresh sludge for the biogas and methane production using food waste and non-fat dry milk as substrates. It was found that fresh unprocessed sludge had the highest methane yield and the yields of both unprocessed and processed sludges decreased during storage by 1-34%, however processed sludges seemed to regain some activity after 4 months of storage as compared to samples stored for only 2 months. Maximum methane production rates obtained from modified Gompertz model application also increased between the 2-month and 4-month processed samples. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Anaerobic co-culture of mesenchymal stem cells and anaerobic pathogens - a new in vitro model system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Kriebel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs are multipotent by nature and are originally isolated from bone marrow. In light of a future application of hMSCs in the oral cavity, a body compartment with varying oxygen partial pressures and an omnipresence of different bacterial species i.e. periodontitis pathogens, we performed this study to gain information about the behavior of hMSC in an anaerobic system and the response in interaction with oral bacterial pathogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established a model system with oral pathogenic bacterial species and eukaryotic cells cultured in anaerobic conditions. The facultative anaerobe bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were studied. Their effects on hMSCs and primary as well as permanent gingival epithelial cells (Ca9-22, HGPEC were comparatively analyzed. We show that hMSCs cope with anoxic conditions, since 40% vital cells remain after 72 h of anaerobic culture. The Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells are significantly more sensitive to lack of oxygen. All bacterial species reveal a comparatively low adherence to and internalization into hMSCs (0.2% and 0.01% of the initial inoculum, respectively. In comparison, the Ca9-22 and HGPEC cells present better targets for bacterial adherence and internalization. The production of the pro-inflammatory chemokine IL-8 is higher in both gingival epithelial cell lines compared to hMSCs and Fusobacterium nucleatum induce a time-dependent cytokine secretion in both cell lines. Porphyromonas gingivalis is less effective in stimulating secretion of IL-8 in the co-cultivation experiments. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HMSCs are suitable for use in anoxic regions of the oral cavity. The interaction with local pathogenic bacteria does not result in massive pro-inflammatory cytokine responses. The test system established in this study allowed further investigation of parameters prior to set up of

  13. Method for anaerobic fermentation and biogas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for biomass processing, anaerobic fermentation of the processed biomass, and the production biogas. In particular, the invention relates to a system and method for generating biogas from anaerobic fermentation of processed organic material that comprises...

  14. Anaerobic exercise - Induced changes in serum mineral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaerobic exercise, a non 02 – dependent energy metabolism leads to transient metabolic changes, which are corrected gradually by homestatic mechanism. We investigated in eight male subjects, the effects of anaerobic exercise after a day sedentary activity on serum mineral concentration. There was significant ...

  15. Integrated anaerobic and aerobic treatment of sewage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, K.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis describes results of investigations dealing with sequential concept of anaerobic-aerobic treatment of municipal wastewater. The main purposes of the study were 1) to develop a proper anaerobic hydrolytic pretreatment unit, consisting of a Hydrolysis Upflow Sludge Bed (HUSB-)

  16. Anaerobic induction in B. cereus ATCC 14579

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, van der M.; Abee, Tjakko

    2008-01-01

    A comparative transcriptome approach was used to assess genes involved in metabolism and pathogenesis that are specifically activated during anaerobic growth of the spore-forming food-borne human pathogen Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579. Growth under anaerobic conditions in Brain Heart Infusion broth

  17. Tillage Effects on Soil Properties & Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Teodor; Bogdan, Ileana; Moraru, Paula; Pop, Adrian; Duda, Bogdan; Cacovean, Horea; Coste, Camelia

    2015-04-01

    Soil tillage systems can be able to influence soil compaction, water dynamics, soil temperature and soil structural condition. These processes can be expressed as changes of soil microbiological activity, soil respiration and sustainability of agriculture. Objectives of this study were: 1) to assess the effects of tillage systems (Conventional System-CS, Minimum Tillage-MT, No-Tillage-NT) on soil compaction, soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration and 2) to establish the relationship that exists in changing soil properties. Three treatments were installed: CS-plough + disc; MT-paraplow + rotary grape; NT-direct sowing. The study was conducted on an Argic-Stagnic Faeoziom. The MT and NT applications reduce or completely eliminate the soil mobilization, due to this, soil is compacted in the first year of application. The degree of compaction is directly related to soil type and its state of degradation. The state of soil compaction diminished over time, tending toward a specific type of soil density. Soil moisture was higher in NT and MT at the time of sowing and in the early stages of vegetation and differences diminished over time. Moisture determinations showed statistically significant differences. The MT and NT applications reduced the thermal amplitude in the first 15 cm of soil depth and increased the soil temperature by 0.5-2.20C. The determinations confirm the effect of soil tillage system on soil respiration; the daily average was lower at NT (315-1914 mmoli m-2s-1) and followed by MT (318-2395 mmoli m-2s-1) and is higher in the CS (321-2480 mmol m-2s-1). Comparing with CS, all the two conservation tillage measures decreased soil respiration, with the best effects of no-tillage. An exceeding amount of CO2 produced in the soil and released into the atmosphere, resulting from aerobic processes of mineralization of organic matter (excessive loosening) is considered to be not only a way of increasing the CO2 in the atmosphere, but also a loss of

  18. Real-time Modification of Music with Dancer's Respiration Pattern

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jeong-seob; Yeo, Woon Seung

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to improve the correspondence between music and dance, and explores the use of human respiration pattern for musical applications with focus on the motional aspect of breathing. While respiration is frequently considered as an indicator of the metabolic state of human body that contains meaningful information for medicine or psychology, motional aspect of respiration has been relatively unnoticed in spite of its strong correlation with muscles and the brain. This paper intr...

  19. Anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2003-01-01

    The long retention time of the active biomass in the high-rate anaerobic digesters is the key factor for the successful application of the high rate anaerobic wastewater treatment. The long solids retention time is achieved due to the specific reactor configuration and it is enhanced by the immob......The long retention time of the active biomass in the high-rate anaerobic digesters is the key factor for the successful application of the high rate anaerobic wastewater treatment. The long solids retention time is achieved due to the specific reactor configuration and it is enhanced...... by the immobilization of the biomass, which forms static biofilms, particle-supported biofilms, or granules depending on the reactor's operational conditions. The advantages of the high-rate anaerobic digestion over the conventional aerobic wastewater treatment methods has created a clear trend for the change...

  20. [The development of a respiration and temperature monitor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X; Wu, B; Liu, Y; He, Q; Xiao, J

    2001-12-01

    This paper introduces the design of a monitoring system to measure the respiration and temperature of a body with an 8Xc196 single-chip microcomputer. This system can measure and display the respiration wave, respiration frequency and the body temperature in real-time with a liquid crystal display (LCD) and give an alarm when the parameters are beyond the normal scope. In addition, this device can provide a 24 hours trend graph of the respiration frequency and the body temperature parameters measured. Data can also be exchanged through serial communication interfaces (RS232) between the PC and the monitor.

  1. Respirator studies for the ERDA Division of Safety, Standards, and Compliance. Progress report, July 1, 1974--June 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, D.D.; Hack, A.L.; Davis, T.O.; Shafer, C.; Moore, T.O.; Richards, C.P.; Revoir, W.H.

    1976-08-01

    Major accomplishments during FY 1975 were the initiation of a respirator research program to investigate the physiological effects of wearing a respirator under stress, assisting ERDA contractors by providing information and training concerning respirator programs, quality assurance of respirators, and respirator applications. A newsletter of respirator developments for ERDA contractor personnel was published, and a Respirator Symposium was conducted

  2. Cadmium removal by Euglena gracilis is enhanced under anaerobic growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Martínez, M Geovanni; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Encalada, Rusely; Pineda, Erika; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Zepeda-Rodriguez, Armando; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo

    2015-05-15

    The facultative protist Euglena gracilis, a heavy metal hyper-accumulator, was grown under photo-heterotrophic and extreme conditions (acidic pH, anaerobiosis and with Cd(2+)) and biochemically characterized. High biomass (8.5×10(6)cellsmL(-1)) was reached after 10 days of culture. Under anaerobiosis, photosynthetic activity built up a microaerophilic environment of 0.7% O₂, which was sufficient to allow mitochondrial respiratory activity: glutamate and malate were fully consumed, whereas 25-33% of the added glucose was consumed. In anaerobic cells, photosynthesis but not respiration was activated by Cd(2+) which induced higher oxidative stress. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were 20 times lower in control cells under anaerobiosis than in aerobiosis, although Cd(2+) induced a higher MDA production. Cd(2+) stress induced increased contents of chelating thiols (cysteine, glutathione and phytochelatins) and polyphosphate. Biosorption (90%) and intracellular accumulation (30%) were the mechanisms by which anaerobic cells removed Cd(2+) from medium, which was 36% higher versus aerobic cells. The present study indicated that E. gracilis has the ability to remove Cd(2+) under anaerobic conditions, which might be advantageous for metal removal in sediments from polluted water bodies or bioreactors, where the O₂ concentration is particularly low. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Response of anaerobic carbon cycling to water table manipulation in an Alaskan rich fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, E.S.; Chivers, M.R.; Turetsky, M.R.; Treat, C.C.; Petersen, D.G.; Waldrop, M.; Harden, J.W.; McGuire, A.D.

    2013-01-01

    To test the effects of altered hydrology on organic soil decomposition, we investigated CO2 and CH4 production potential of rich-fen peat (mean surface pH = 6.3) collected from a field water table manipulation experiment including control, raised and lowered water table treatments. Mean anaerobic CO2 production potential at 10 cm depth (14.1 ± 0.9 μmol C g−1 d−1) was as high as aerobic CO2 production potential (10.6 ± 1.5 μmol C g−1 d−1), while CH4 production was low (mean of 7.8 ± 1.5 nmol C g−1 d−1). Denitrification enzyme activity indicated a very high denitrification potential (197 ± 23 μg N g−1 d−1), but net NO-3 reduction suggested this was a relatively minor pathway for anaerobic CO2 production. Abundances of denitrifier genes (nirK and nosZ) did not change across water table treatments. SO2-4 reduction also did not appear to be an important pathway for anaerobic CO2 production. The net accumulation of acetate and formate as decomposition end products in the raised water table treatment suggested that fermentation was a significant pathway for carbon mineralization, even in the presence of NO-3. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations were the strongest predictors of potential anaerobic and aerobic CO2 production. Across all water table treatments, the CO2:CH4 ratio increased with initial DOC leachate concentrations. While the field water table treatment did not have a significant effect on mean CO2 or CH4 production potential, the CO2:CH4 ratio was highest in shallow peat incubations from the drained treatment. These data suggest that with continued drying or with a more variable water table, anaerobic CO2 production may be favored over CH4 production in this rich fen. Future research examining the potential for dissolved organic substances to facilitate anaerobic respiration, or alternative redox processes that limit the effectiveness of organic acids as substrates in anaerobic metabolism, would help explain additional

  4. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles of anaerobic pathogens in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloo, A C M; van Winkelhoff, A J

    2015-02-01

    The antibiotic susceptibility profile of the Bacteroides fragilis group, Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC), Fusobacterium spp., Prevotella spp., Veillonella spp. and Bilophila wadsworthia for amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, clindamycin and metronidazole was determined. Human clinical isolates were isolated between 2011 and 2013 at the Microbiological Diagnostic Laboratory of the University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands and subjected to MALDI-TOF MS identification and susceptibility testing using E-test for MIC determination. Differences in clindamycin susceptibility between species of the B. fragilis group and GPAC were observed, with Bacteroides ovatus and Peptoniphilus harei having the highest resistance rates. Compared to other European countries, in The Netherlands the MIC90 for clindamycin of fusobacteria is low. Metronidazole resistance was first encountered in the genus Prevotella in 2013, but not in species of GPAC as reported in Belgium and Bulgaria. The differences in clindamycin resistance between the different European countries and reports of metronidazole resistance within the genera Prevotella and GPAC warrant more extensive susceptibility studies on anaerobic pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Isolation of cyanobacterial mutants exhibiting growth defects under microoxic conditions by transposon tagging mutagenesis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Kazuki; Sobue, Riho; Furutani, Yuho; Aoki, Rina; Fujita, Yuichi

    2017-05-12

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis by extracting electrons from water, with the generation of oxygen as a byproduct. Cyanobacteria use oxygen not only for respiration to produce energy in the dark but also for biosynthesis of various metabolites, such as heme and chlorophyll. Oxygen levels dynamically fluctuate in the field environments, from hyperoxic at daytime to almost anaerobic at night. Thus, adaptation to anaerobiosis should be important for cyanobacteria to survive in low-oxygen and anaerobic environments. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of cyanobacterial anaerobiosis because cyanobacteria have been regarded as aerobic organisms. As a first step to elucidate cyanobacterial adaptation mechanisms to low-oxygen environments, we isolated five mutants, T-1-T-5, exhibiting growth defects under microoxic conditions. The mutants were obtained from a transposon-tagged mutant library of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, which was produced by in vitro transposon tagging of cyanobacterial genomic DNA. Southern blot analysis indicated that a kanamycin resistance gene was inserted in the genome as a single copy. We identified the chromosomal transposon-tagged locus in T-5. Two open reading frames (sll0577 and sll0578) were partially deleted by the insertion of the kanamycin resistance gene in T-5. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction suggested that these co-transcribed genes are constitutively expressed under both aerobic and microoxic conditions. Then, we isolated two mutants in which one of the two genes was individually disrupted. Only the mutants partially lacking an intact sll0578 gene showed growth defects under microoxic conditions, whereas it grew normally under aerobic conditions. sll0578 is annotated as purK encoding N 5 -carboxy-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide synthetase involved in purine metabolism. This result implies the unexpected physiological importance of Pur

  6. Transcriptional regulation of the outer membrane porin gene ompW reveals its physiological role during the transition from the aerobic to the anaerobic lifestyle of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minfeng eXiao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding bacterial physiology relies on elucidating the regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions of those differentially expressed genes in response to environmental changes. A widespread Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein OmpW has been implicated in the adaptation to stresses in various species. It is recently found to be present in the regulon of the global anaerobic transcription factor FNR and ArcA in E. coli. However, little is known about the physiological implications of this regulatory disposition. In this study, we demonstrate that transcription of ompW is indeed mediated by a series of global regulators involved in the anaerobiosis of E. coli. We show that FNR can both activate and repress the expression of ompW through its direct binding to two distinctive sites, -81.5 and -126.5 bp respectively, on ompW promoter. ArcA also participates in repression of ompW under anaerobic condition, but in an FNR dependent manner. Additionally, ompW is also subject to the regulation by CRP and NarL which senses the availability and types of carbon sources and respiration electron acceptors in the environment respectively, implying a role of OmpW in the carbon and energy metabolism of E. coli during its anaerobic adaptation. Molecular docking reveals that OmpW can bind fumarate, an alternative electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration, with sufficient affinity. Moreover, supplement of fumarate or succinate which belongs to the C4-dicarboxylates family of metabolite, to E. coli culture rescues OmpW-mediated colicin S4 killing. Taken together, we propose that OmpW is involved in anaerobic carbon and energy metabolism to mediate the transition from aerobic to anaerobic lifestyle in E. coli.

  7. Validation of a for anaerobic bacteria optimized MALDI-TOF MS biotyper database: The ENRIA project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloo, A C M; Jean-Pierre, H; Justesen, U S; Morris, T; Urban, E; Wybo, I; Kostrzewa, M; Friedrich, A W

    2018-03-12

    Within the ENRIA project, several 'expertise laboratories' collaborated in order to optimize the identification of clinical anaerobic isolates by using a widely available platform, the Biotyper Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Main Spectral Profiles (MSPs) of well characterized anaerobic strains were added to one of the latest updates of the Biotyper database db6903; (V6 database) for common use. MSPs of anaerobic strains nominated for addition to the Biotyper database are included in this validation. In this study, we validated the optimized database (db5989 [V5 database] + ENRIA MSPs) using 6309 anaerobic isolates. Using the V5 database 71.1% of the isolates could be identified with high confidence, 16.9% with low confidence and 12.0% could not be identified. Including the MSPs added to the V6 database and all MSPs created within the ENRIA project, the amount of strains identified with high confidence increased to 74.8% and 79.2%, respectively. Strains that could not be identified using MALDI-TOF MS decreased to 10.4% and 7.3%, respectively. The observed increase in high confidence identifications differed per genus. For Bilophila wadsworthia, Prevotella spp., gram-positive anaerobic cocci and other less commonly encountered species more strains were identified with higher confidence. A subset of the non-identified strains (42.1%) were identified using 16S rDNA gene sequencing. The obtained identities demonstrated that strains could not be identified either due to the generation of spectra of insufficient quality or due to the fact that no MSP of the encountered species was present in the database. Undoubtedly, the ENRIA project has successfully increased the number of anaerobic isolates that can be identified with high confidence. We therefore recommend further expansion of the database to include less frequently isolated species as this would also allow us to gain valuable insight into the clinical

  8. Effects of light on respiration and development of photosynthetic cells. Renewal application and progress report, March 1-November 1, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, M.

    1980-11-20

    The oxyhydrogen reaction in the presence and absence of CO/sub 2/ was studied in H/sub 2/- adapted Scenedesmus obliquus by monitoring the initial rates of H/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, and /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ uptake and the effect of inhibitors on these rates. Glucose and acetate respiration was competitive with H/sub 2/ uptake. KCN inhibited equally respiration and the oxyhydrogen reaction in the presence and absence of CO/sub 2/. It was concluded that the oxyhydrogen reaction both in the absence and presence of CO/sub 2/ has properties in common with components of respiration and photosynthesis. Participation of these two processes in the oxyhydrogen reaction would require a closely linked shuttle between mitochondrion and chloroplast. Protoplasts and chloroplasts will be isolated from a H/sub 2/-adapted alga in order to elucidate the cooperation between the two organelles. Acetate was shown to stimulate H/sub 2/ photoproduction in H/sub 2/-adapted algae even more so than an uncoupler of electron transport. The role of these compounds will be evaluated either in terms of the glyoxylate cycle or electron acceptors resulting in formation of alcohols. The term chloroplast respiration was proposed to account for the breakdown of polyglucan within the chloroplast. A means of reoxidizing reduced pyridine nucleotide was required to complete the cycle. A new enzyme ascorbic acid reduced pyridine nucleotide peroxidase was isolated from the chloroplast. The characterization of this enzyme will continue.

  9. Reverse Methanogenesis and Respiration in Methanotrophic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peer H. A. Timmers

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM is catalyzed by anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME via a reverse and modified methanogenesis pathway. Methanogens can also reverse the methanogenesis pathway to oxidize methane, but only during net methane production (i.e., “trace methane oxidation”. In turn, ANME can produce methane, but only during net methane oxidation (i.e., enzymatic back flux. Net AOM is exergonic when coupled to an external electron acceptor such as sulfate (ANME-1, ANME-2abc, and ANME-3, nitrate (ANME-2d, or metal (oxides. In this review, the reversibility of the methanogenesis pathway and essential differences between ANME and methanogens are described by combining published information with domain based (metagenome comparison of archaeal methanotrophs and selected archaea. These differences include abundances and special structure of methyl coenzyme M reductase and of multiheme cytochromes and the presence of menaquinones or methanophenazines. ANME-2a and ANME-2d can use electron acceptors other than sulfate or nitrate for AOM, respectively. Environmental studies suggest that ANME-2d are also involved in sulfate-dependent AOM. ANME-1 seem to use a different mechanism for disposal of electrons and possibly are less versatile in electron acceptors use than ANME-2. Future research will shed light on the molecular basis of reversal of the methanogenic pathway and electron transfer in different ANME types.

  10. Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by the Facultative Anaerobe Pantoea agglomerans SP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Chris A.; Obraztsova, Anna Y.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2000-01-01

    Anaerobic enrichments with acetate as the electron donor and Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor were obtained from sediments of Salt Pond, a coastal marine basin near Woods Hole, Mass. A pure culture of a facultatively anaerobic Fe(III) reducer was isolated, and 16S rRNA analysis demonstrated that this organism was most closely related to Pantoea (formerly Enterobacter) agglomerans, a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria. This organism, designated strain SP1, can grow by coupling the oxidation of acetate or H2 to the reduction of a variety of electron acceptors, including Fe(III), Mn(IV), Cr(VI), and the humic substance analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate, but not sulfate. To our knowledge, this is the first mesophilic facultative anaerobe reported to couple acetate oxidation to dissimilatory metal reduction. PMID:10653716

  11. Tributyltin (TBT) and mitochondrial respiration in mussel digestive gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesci, Salvatore; Ventrella, Vittoria; Trombetti, Fabiana; Pirini, Maurizio; Pagliarani, Alessandra

    2011-06-01

    The toxicity of organotins and especially tri-n-butyltin (TBT) on mitochondria is well known. However as far as we are aware, effects on mitochondrial respiration are unexplored in mollusks. In this work mitochondria isolated from the digestive gland of Mytilus galloprovincialis and susceptive to the classical respiratory chain inhibitors, were assayed in the presence of micromolar TBT concentrations to investigate mitochondrial respiratory activities. Intact and freeze-thawed mitochondria were used. TBT significantly inhibited oxygen consumption in the presence of glutamate/malate or succinate as substrates. Conversely cytochrome c oxidase activity (complex IV), assayed both polarographically and spectrophotometrically, was unaffected. The addition of 1,4-dithioerythritol (DTE) decreased the TBT-driven inhibition of complexes I and III. The TBT capability of covalent binding to thiol groups of mitochondrial proteins in a dose-dependent manner was confirmed by the aid of Ellman's reagent. Data strongly suggests that TBT may prevent the electron transfer from complexes I and III to downhill respiratory chain complexes by binding to critical SH residues. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. EFFECT OF MUSIC ON ANAEROBIC EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST) under 3 conditions on separate days: while listening to “slow rhythm music”, “fast rhythm music” or “no music”. 48 hours after the subjects completed RAST under 3 conditions, Wingate Anaerobic Power (WAN) tests were performed under 3 music conditions. The order of the 3 conditions (slow music, fast music and no music) was selected randomly to prevent an order effect. Results showed no significant differences between 3 conditions in anaerobic power assessments, heart rate or blood lactate (p > 0.05). On the basis of these results it can be said that music cannot improve anaerobic performance. The type of music had no impact on power outputs during RAST and WAN exercise. As a conclusion, listening to music and its rhythm cannot enhance anaerobic performance and cannot change the physiological response to supramaximal exercise. PMID:24744463

  13. EFFECT OF MUSIC ON ANAEROBIC EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülin Atan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST under 3 conditions on separate days: while listening to “slow rhythm music”, “fast rhythm music” or “no music”. 48 hours after the subjects completed RAST under 3 conditions, Wingate Anaerobic Power (WAN tests were performed under 3 music conditions. The order of the 3 conditions (slow music, fast music and no music was selected randomly to prevent an order effect. Results showed no significant differences between 3 conditions in anaerobic power assessments, heart rate or blood lactate (p>0.05. On the basis of these results it can be said that music cannot improve anaerobic performance. The type of music had no impact on power outputs during RAST and WAN exercise. As a conclusion, listening to music and its rhythm cannot enhance anaerobic performance and cannot change the physiological response to supramaximal exercise.

  14. Molecular ecology of anaerobic reactor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H. Jacob Peider; Zheng, D.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic reactor systems are essential for the treatment of solid and liquid wastes and constitute a core facility in many waste treatment plants. Although much is known about the basic metabolism in different types of anaerobic reactors, little is known about the microbes responsible for these ......Anaerobic reactor systems are essential for the treatment of solid and liquid wastes and constitute a core facility in many waste treatment plants. Although much is known about the basic metabolism in different types of anaerobic reactors, little is known about the microbes responsible...... and malfunctions of anaerobic digesters occasionally experienced, leading to sub-optimal methane production and wastewater treatment. Using a variety of molecular techniques, we are able to determine which microorganisms are active, where they are active, and when they are active, but we still need to determine...... to the abundance of each microbe in anaerobic reactor systems by rRNA probing. This chapter focuses on various molecular techniques employed and problems encountered when elucidating the microbial ecology of anaerobic reactor systems. Methods such as quantitative dot blot/fluorescence in-situ probing using various...

  15. Increased expression of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and gluconeogenesis in anaerobically growing xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fermentation of xylose to ethanol has been achieved in S. cerevisiae by genetic engineering. Xylose utilization is however slow compared to glucose, and during anaerobic conditions addition of glucose has been necessary for cellular growth. In the current study, the xylose-utilizing strain TMB 3415 was employed to investigate differences between anaerobic utilization of glucose and xylose. This strain carried a xylose reductase (XYL1 K270R engineered for increased NADH utilization and was capable of sustained anaerobic growth on xylose as sole carbon source. Metabolic and transcriptional characterization could thus for the first time be performed without addition of a co-substrate or oxygen. Results Analysis of metabolic fluxes showed that although the specific ethanol productivity was an order of magnitude lower on xylose than on glucose, product yields were similar for the two substrates. In addition, transcription analysis identified clear regulatory differences between glucose and xylose. Respiro-fermentative metabolism on glucose during aerobic conditions caused repression of cellular respiration, while metabolism on xylose under the same conditions was fully respiratory. During anaerobic conditions, xylose repressed respiratory pathways, although notably more weakly than glucose. It was also observed that anaerobic xylose growth caused up-regulation of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and gluconeogenesis, which may be driven by an increased demand for NADPH during anaerobic xylose catabolism. Conclusion Co-factor imbalance in the initial twp steps of xylose utilization may reduce ethanol productivity by increasing the need for NADP+ reduction and consequently increase reverse flux in glycolysis.

  16. Cultivable anaerobic and aerobic bacterial communities in the fermentation chambers of Holotrichia parallela (coleoptera: scarabaeidae) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Yuan, Yimin; Ali, Muhammad Waqar; Peng, Tao; Peng, Wei; Raza, Muhammad Fahim; Zhao, Yongshun; Zhang, Hongyu

    2018-01-01

    As important pests, scarab beetle larvae survive on plant biomass and the microbiota of the fermentation chamber play an important role in the digestion of lignocellulose-rich diets. However, the cultivable microbes, especially the anaerobic cultivable microbes, are still largely unknown. Here, both cultivable anaerobic and aerobic bacterial communities associated with the fermentation chamber of Holotrichia parallela larvae were investigated. In total bacteria cells directly enumerated by the 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining method, the viable plate counts of cultivable bacteria in the fermentation chamber accounted for 0.92% of proportion. These cultivable bacteria were prone to attach to the fermentation chamber wall (88.41%) compared to the chamber contents. Anaerobic bacteria were dominant in the cultivable bacteria attaching to the fermentation chamber wall (70.20%), while the quantities of anaerobes and aerobes were similar in the chamber contents. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), fingerprinting and sequence analysis of isolated colonies revealed that the cultivable bacteria are affiliated with class γ-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidia, Actinobacteria, Clostridia and β-Proteobacteria. γ-Proteobacteria was the major type of anaerobic cultivable bacteria and even the only one type of aerobic cultivable bacteria. Taken together, our results suggest, for the first time, that anaerobic microbiota are dominant in cultivable bacteria in the special anoxia niche of the fermentation chamber from H. parallela larvae. These bacterial isolates could be a treasure trove for screening lignocellulytic microbes which are essential for the plant biomass digestion of this scarab species.

  17. Cultivable anaerobic and aerobic bacterial communities in the fermentation chambers of Holotrichia parallela (coleoptera: scarabaeidae) larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad Waqar; Peng, Tao; Peng, Wei; Raza, Muhammad Fahim; Zhao, Yongshun; Zhang, Hongyu

    2018-01-01

    As important pests, scarab beetle larvae survive on plant biomass and the microbiota of the fermentation chamber play an important role in the digestion of lignocellulose-rich diets. However, the cultivable microbes, especially the anaerobic cultivable microbes, are still largely unknown. Here, both cultivable anaerobic and aerobic bacterial communities associated with the fermentation chamber of Holotrichia parallela larvae were investigated. In total bacteria cells directly enumerated by the 4’, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining method, the viable plate counts of cultivable bacteria in the fermentation chamber accounted for 0.92% of proportion. These cultivable bacteria were prone to attach to the fermentation chamber wall (88.41%) compared to the chamber contents. Anaerobic bacteria were dominant in the cultivable bacteria attaching to the fermentation chamber wall (70.20%), while the quantities of anaerobes and aerobes were similar in the chamber contents. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), fingerprinting and sequence analysis of isolated colonies revealed that the cultivable bacteria are affiliated with class γ-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidia, Actinobacteria, Clostridia and β-Proteobacteria. γ-Proteobacteria was the major type of anaerobic cultivable bacteria and even the only one type of aerobic cultivable bacteria. Taken together, our results suggest, for the first time, that anaerobic microbiota are dominant in cultivable bacteria in the special anoxia niche of the fermentation chamber from H. parallela larvae. These bacterial isolates could be a treasure trove for screening lignocellulytic microbes which are essential for the plant biomass digestion of this scarab species. PMID:29304141

  18. Identification of metabolically active methanogens in anaerobic digester by DNA Stable-Isotope Probing using 13C-acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gowdaman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion is gaining enormous attention due to the ability to covert organic wastes into biogas, an alternative sustainable energy. Methanogenic community plays a significant role in biogas production and also for proficient functioning of the anaerobic digester. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the methanogen diversity of a food waste anaerobic digester. After endogenous respiration, the digester samples were supplemented with isotopes of acetate to enrich methanogen population, and were analyzed using DNA-SIP (Stable-Isotope Probing. Following separation and fractionation of heavy (13C and light (12C DNA, PCR amplification was carried out using archaeal 16S rRNA gene followed by DGGE analysis. Sequencing of the prominent DGGE bands revealed the dominance of Methanocorpusculum labreanum species belonging to hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiales, which can produce methane in the presence of H2/CO2 and requires acetate for its growth. This is the first instance where Methanocorpusculum labreanum is being reported as a dominant species in an anaerobic digester operative on food waste.

  19. Optimization of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimization of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for treatment of composite fermentation and distillation wastewater. ... Keywords: Composite wastewater, up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic biological treatment, biogas, granulated anaerobic sludge, industrial wastewater. African Journal of ...

  20. A simple anaerobic system for onsite treatment of domestic wastewater

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among several anaerobic treatment processes, high rate anaerobic digesters receive great attention due to its high loading capacity and chemical oxygen demand removal rate. Up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) is getting wide acceptance among several anaerobic processes. However, its application is still ...

  1. The agony of agonal respiration: is the last gasp necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkin, R M; Resnik, D B

    2002-06-01

    Gasping respiration in the dying patient is the last respiratory pattern prior to terminal apnoea. The duration of the gasping respiration phase varies; it may be as brief as one or two breaths to a prolonged period of gasping lasting minutes or even hours. Gasping respiration is very abnormal, easy to recognise and distinguish from other respiratory patterns and, in the dying patient who has elected to not be resuscitated, will always result in terminal apnoea. Gasping respiration is also referred to as agonal respiration and the name is appropriate because the gasping breaths appear uncomfortable and raise concern that the patient is suffering and in agony. Enough uncertainty exists about the influence of gasping respiration on patient wellbeing, that it is appropriate to assume that the gasping breaths are burdensome to patients. Therefore, gasping respiration at the end of life should be treated. We propose that there is an ethical basis, in rare circumstances, for the use of neuromuscular blockade to suppress prolonged episodes of agonal respiration in the well-sedated patient in order to allow a peaceful and comfortable death.

  2. Contribution of root to soil respiration and carbon balance in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH

    Global soil respiration is estimated to be 76.5 Pg C yr-1, which is 30–60 Pg C yr-1 greater than the net primary productivity. (NPP) (Raich and Potter 1995). Therefore, soil respiration is a major pathway for carbon to move from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere and even small changes can strongly influence net ...

  3. Soil Respiration and Student Inquiry: A Perfect Match

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Catherine Marie; Wallenstein, Matthew David

    2011-01-01

    This activity explores the cycling of carbon between the atmosphere (primarily as CO[subscript 2]) and biomass in plants, animals, and microscopic organisms. Students design soil respiration experiments using a protocol that resembles current practice in soil ecology. Three methods for measuring soil respiration are presented. Student-derived…

  4. Simulation of Human Respiration with Breathing Thermal Manikin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Erik

    The human respiration contains carbon dioxide, bioeffluents, and perhaps virus or bacteria. People may also indulge in activities that produce contaminants, as for example tobacco smoking. For these reasons, the human respiration remains one of the main contributors to contamination of the indoor...

  5. respiration and transpiration characteristics of selected fresh fruits

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    Respiration and transpiration characteristics of mushrooms, strawberries, broccoli and tomatoes were determined under different temperature, atmospheric and humidity conditions in order to get information for modified humidity atmosphere conception. The respiration rate was determined using a static method. (scanning ...

  6. Interpreting diel hysteresis between soil respiration and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Phillips; N. Nickerson; D. Risk; B.J. Bond

    2011-01-01

    Increasing use of automated soil respiration chambers in recent years has demonstrated complex diel relationships between soil respiration and temperature that are not apparent from less frequent measurements. Soil surface flux is often lagged from soil temperature by several hours, which results in semielliptical hysteresis loops when surface flux is plotted as a...

  7. Respiration and transpiration characteristics of selected fresh fruits ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Respiration and transpiration characteristics of mushrooms, strawberries, broccoli and tomatoes were determined under different temperature, atmospheric and humidity conditions in order to get information for modified humidity atmosphere conception. The respiration rate was determined using a static method (scanning ...

  8. Determination of radon gas and respirable ore dust concentrations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study has estimated the concentrations of radon gas and respirable ore dust in the Merelani underground tanzanite mines. Two different portable monitors were used to measure the radon gas and respirable ore dust concentrations respectively. The mean radon gas concentration (disintegrations per second per cubic ...

  9. Respirators: Air Purifying, Self-Study, Course 40723

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-21

    Respirators: Air Purifying Self-Study (COURSE 40723) is designed for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) workers, support services subcontractors, and other LANL subcontractors who work under the LANL Respiratory Protection Program (RPP). This course also meets the air-purifying respirators (APRs) retraining requirement.

  10. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except as provided in...) Containers for gas masks combinations shall be designed and constructed to permit easy removal of the mask. ...

  11. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general... gas mask 70 85 20 Chin-style gas mask 65 80 20 Powered air-purifying 2 2 50 2 70 20 Chemical Cartridge...

  12. Diversity of Cultured Thermophilic Anaerobes in Hot Springs of Yunnan Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L.; Lu, Y.; Dong, X.; Liu, X.; Wei, Y.; Ji, X.; Zhang, C.

    2010-12-01

    Thermophilic anaerobes including Archaea and Bacteria refer to those growing optimally at temperatures above 50°C and do not use oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor for growth. Study on thermophilic anaerobes will help to understand how life thrives under extreme conditions. Meanwhile thermophilic anaerobes are of importance in potential application and development of thermophilic biotechnology. We have surveyed culturable thermophilic anaerobes in hot springs (pH6.5-7.5; 70 - 94°C) in Rehai of Tengchong, Bangnazhang of Longlin, Eryuan of Dali,Yunnan, China. 50 strains in total were cultured from the hot springs water using Hungate anaerobic technique, and 30 strains were selected based on phenotypic diversity for analysis of 16S rDNA sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 28 strains belonged to the members of five genera: Caldanaerobacter, Calaramator, Thermoanaerobacter, Dictyoglomus and Fervidobacterium, which formed five branches on the phylogenetic tree. Besides, 2 strains of methanogenic archaea were obtained. The majority of the isolates were the known species, however, seven strains were identified as novel species affiliated to the five genera based on the lower 16S rDNA sequence similarities (less than 93 - 97%) with the described species. This work would provide the future study on their diversity, distribution among different regions and the potential application of thermophilic enzyme. Supported by State Key Laboratory of Microbial Resources, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences(SKLMR-080605)and the Foundation of State Natural Science (30660009, 30960022, 31081220175).

  13. Intraspecific variation in aerobic and anaerobic locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jon Christian; Tirsgård, Bjørn; Cordero, Gerardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and trade-off in aerobic and anaerobic traits remain poorly understood in aquatic locomotion. Using gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), both axial swimmers, this study tested four hypotheses: (1) gait transition from steady...... to unsteady (i.e., burst-assisted) swimming is associated with anaerobic metabolism evidenced as excess post exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC); (2) variation in swimming performance (critical swimming speed; U crit) correlates with metabolic scope (MS) or anaerobic capacity (i.e., maximum EPOC); (3...

  14. Anaerobic degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Haagensen, Frank; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) found in wastewater is removed in the wastewater treatment facilities by sorption and aerobic biodegradation. The anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge has not been shown to contribute to the removal. The concentration of LAS based on dry matter typically...... increases during anaerobic stabilization due to transformation of easily degradable organic matter. Hence, LAS is regarded as resistant to biodegradation under anaerobic conditions. We present data from a lab-scale semi-continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) spiked with linear dodecylbenzene sulfonate (C...

  15. Accelerated anaerobic hydrolysis rates under a combination of intermittent aeration and anaerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T. R.; Lastra Milone, T.; Petersen, G.

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic hydrolysis in activated return sludge was investigated in laboratory scale experiments to find if intermittent aeration would accelerate anaerobic hydrolysis rates compared to anaerobic hydrolysis rates under strict anaerobic conditions. The intermittent reactors were set up in a 240 h...... for calculating hydrolysis rates based on soluble COD were compared. Two-way ANOVA with the Bonferroni post-test was performed in order to register any significant difference between reactors with intermittent aeration and strictly anaerobic conditions respectively. The experiment demonstrated a statistically...... significant difference in favor of the reactors with intermittent aeration showing a tendency towards accelerated anaerobic hydrolysis rates due to application of intermittent aeration. The conclusion of the work is thus that intermittent aeration applied in the activated return sludge process (ARP) can...

  16. Respirable dust measured downwind during rock dust application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M L; Organiscak, J; Klima, S; Perera, I E

    2017-05-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted underground evaluations in an attempt to quantify respirable rock dust generation when using untreated rock dust and rock dust treated with an anticaking additive. Using personal dust monitors, these evaluations measured respirable rock dust levels arising from a flinger-type application of rock dust on rib and roof surfaces. Rock dust with a majority of the respirable component removed was also applied in NIOSH's Bruceton Experimental Mine using a bantam duster. The respirable dust measurements obtained downwind from both of these tests are presented and discussed. This testing did not measure miners' exposure to respirable coal mine dust under acceptable mining practices, but indicates the need for effective continuous administrative controls to be exercised when rock dusting to minimize the measured amount of rock dust in the sampling device.

  17. Light-enhanced oxygen respiration in benthic phototrophic communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epping, EHG; Jørgensen, BB

    1996-01-01

    Two microelectrode studies demonstrate the effect of Light intensity and photosynthesis on areal oxygen respiration in a hypersaline mat at Guerrero Negro, Mexico, and in an intertidal sediment at Texel, The Netherlands. The hypersaline mat was studied in the laboratory at light intensities of 0...... light intensities. Areal respiration, calculated from the difference between areal gross and areal net photosynthesis, increased from 3.9 to 14.4 nmol O-2 cm(2) min(-1) with increasing surface irradiance. This light-enhanced areal respiration was related to an increase in oxygen penetration depth from 0.......2 to 2.0 mm, thus expanding the volume of sediment involved in oxygen respiration beneath the mat surface. The mean rate of oxygen respiration per volume of mat remained constant at a rate of similar to 100 nmol O-2 cm(-3) min(-1). Oxygen profiles for the intertidal sediment were recorded in situ during...

  18. CO(2) Inhibits Respiration in Leaves of Rumex crispus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amthor, J S; Koch, G W; Bloom, A J

    1992-02-01

    Curly dock (Rumex crispus L.) was grown from seed in a glasshouse at an ambient CO(2) partial pressure of about 35 pascals. Apparent respiration rate (CO(2) efflux in the dark) of expanded leaves was then measured at ambient CO(2) partial pressure of 5 to 95 pascals. Calculated intercellular CO(2) partial pressure was proportional to ambient CO(2) partial pressure in these short-term experiments. The CO(2) level strongly affected apparent respiration rate: a doubling of the partial pressure of CO(2) typically inhibited respiration by 25 to 30%, whereas a decrease in CO(2) elicited a corresponding increase in respiration. These responses were readily reversible. A flexible, sensitive regulatory interaction between CO(2) (a byproduct of respiration) and some component(s) of heterotrophic metabolism is indicated.

  19. A Global Database of Soil Respiration Data, Version 2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides an updated soil respiration database (SRDB), a near-universal compendium of published soil respiration (RS) data. Soil respiration,...

  20. A Global Database of Soil Respiration Data, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides a soil respiration data database (SRDB), a near-universal compendium of published soil respiration (RS) data. Soil respiration, the...

  1. Effects of prolonged mechanical ventilation on respiratory muscle ultrastructure and mitochondrial respiration in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Nathalie; Matecki, Stefan; Py, Guillaume; Lopez, Sandrine; Mercier, Jacques; Capdevila, Xavier

    2003-01-01

    To investigate in rabbits whether prolonged mechanical ventilation (PMV) leads to ultrastructural changes in respiratory muscles and alters diaphragm mitochondrial respiration. Experimental prospective study in a university laboratory. We studied respiratory muscles of seven rabbits after 49+/-1 h of controlled mechanical ventilation. Ten nonventilated rabbits were used as a control group. After mechanical ventilation electron-microscopic observations of the diaphragm and the external intercostal muscles revealed disrupted myofibrils, increased number of lipid vacuoles in the sarcoplasm, and smaller mitochondria with focal membrane disruptions. Volumetric and numerical densities of the mitochondria were significantly lower in the PMV group than the control group. Mitochondrial respiration was quantified in isolated diaphragm muscle-cell mitochondria using two respiratory substrates. There was no difference in oxygen consumption values in the three states of mitochondrial respiration between the two groups except for state 2 (basal state) with pyruvate/malate parameter (53.5+/-20 for the ventilated group vs. 33.8+/-10.2 nmol atom O/mg per minute for the control group). There was no significant difference between groups in ADP/O ratio or respiratory control ratio. PMV leads to respiratory muscle cell degeneration and minor changes in oxidative phosphorylation coupling in diaphragmatic mitochondria. These phenomena may mediate part of damage of respiratory muscles after inactivity related to PMV.

  2. Measurements of photosynthesis and respiration in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Stephen

    2003-03-01

    Methods for measuring the rates of photosynthesis and respiration in plants are reviewed. Closed systems that involve manometric techniques, 14CO2 fixation, O2 electrodes and other methods for measuring dissolved and gas phase O2 are described. These methods typically provide time-integrated rate measurements, and limitations to their use are discussed. Open gas exchange systems that use infra-red CO2 gas analysers and differential O2 analysers for measuring instantaneous rates of CO2 and O2 exchange are described. Important features of the analysers, design features of gas exchange systems, and sources of potential error are considered. The analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters for estimating the quantum yield for O2 evolution and CO2 fixation is described in relation to new fluorescence imaging systems for large scale screening of photosynthetic phenotypes, and the microimaging of individual chloroplasts.

  3. Management effects on European cropland respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugster, Werner; Moffat, Antje M.; Ceschia, Eric

    2010-01-01

    findings are based on all available CarboEurope IP eddy covariance flux measurements during a 4-year period (2004–2007). Detailed management information was available for 15 out of the 22 sites that contributed flux data, from which we compiled 30 types of management for European-scale comparison...... +83% (early season tillage) to -50% (rice paddy flooding and burning of rice residues) on the 28 days time scale,whenonlymanagementtypes with aminimumof 7 replications are considered. Most management types showed a large variationamongevents and between sites, indicating that additional factors other...... management types with adequate statistical coverage of at least 5 events during the years 2004–2007. In this comparison, late-season moldboard ploughing (30–45 cm) led to highest median increase in respiration on the 7 days timescale (+43%), which was still +15% in the 28 days comparison. On average, however...

  4. Syntrophic co-culture of aerobic Bacillus and anaerobic Clostridium for bio-fuels and bio-hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jui-Jen; Ho, Cheng-Yu.; Chen, Wei-En; Huang, Chieh-Chen [Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung (China); Chou, Chia-Hung; Lay, Jiunn-Jyi [Department of Science and Technology, National Kaohsiung First University, Kaohsiung (China)

    2008-10-15

    By using brewery yeast waste and microflora from rice straw compost, an anaerobic semi-solid bio-hydrogen-producing system has been established. For the purpose of industrialization, the major players of both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial strains in the system were isolated and their combination for an effective production of bio-hydrogen and other bio-fuels was examined in this study. The phylogenetic analysis found that four anaerobic isolates (Clostridium beijerinckii L9, Clostridium diolis Z2, Clostridium roseum Z5-1, and C. roseum W8) were highly related with each other and belongs to the cluster I clostridia family, the family that many of solvent-producing strains included. On the other hand, one of the aerobic isolates, the Bacillus thermoamylovorans strain I, shown multiple extracellular enzyme activities including lipase, protease, {alpha}-amylase, pectinase and cellulase, was suggested as a good partner for creating an anaerobic environment and pre-saccharification of substrate for those co-cultured solventogenic clostridial strain. Among these clostridial strains, though C. beijerinckii L9 do not show as many extracellular enzyme activities as Bacillus, but it performs the highest hydrogen-producing ability. The original microflora can be updated to a syntrophic bacterial co-culture system contended only with B. thermoamylovorans I and C. beijerinckii L9. The combination of aerobic Bacillus and anaerobic Clostridium may play the key role for developing the industrialized bio-fuels and bio-hydrogen-producing system from biomass. (author)

  5. Anaerobes in men with urethritis

    OpenAIRE

    Fontaine, E A; Taylor-Robinson, D; Hanna, N F; Coufalik, E D

    1982-01-01

    Sixty-four men with non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU), seven with gonococcal urethritis (GU), and 30 who had no symptoms or signs of urethritis were studied. Chlamydia trachomatis was isolated from urethral specimens taken from 22% of the men with NGU, and 18% with GU, but not from those who did not have urethritis even though 20 (67%) of them had a history of NGU, GU, or both. The chlamydial isolation rate for men having NGU for the first time was 30%. Ureaplasma urealyticum was isolated from ...

  6. Clinical characteristics and antimicrobial susceptibilities of anaerobic bacteremia in an acute care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Thean Yen; Ng, Lily Siew Yong; Kwang, Lee Ling; Rao, Suma; Eng, Li Ching

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the clinical features of anaerobic bacteraemia in an acute-care hospital, and evaluated the antimicrobial susceptibility of these isolates to commonly available antibiotics. Microbiological and epidemiological data from 2009 to 2011were extracted from the laboratory information system and electronic medical records. One hundred and eleven unique patient episodes consisting of 116 anaerobic isolates were selected for clinical review and antibiotic susceptibility testing. Susceptibilities to amoxicillin-clavulanate, clindamycin, imipenem, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, penicillin and piperacillin-tazobactam were performed using Etest strips with categorical interpretations according to current CLSI breakpoints. Metronidazole-resistant and carbapenem-resistant anaerobic Gram-negative bacilli were screened for the nim and cfiA genes. Clinical data was obtained retrospectively from electronic medical records. During the 3 year period, Bacteroides fragilis group (41%), Clostridium species (14%), Propionibacterium species (9%) and Fusobacterium species (6%) were the most commonly isolated anaerobes. Patients with anaerobic bacteraemia that were included in the study were predominantly above 60 years of age, with community-acquired infections. The most commonly used empiric antibiotic therapies were beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations (44%) and metronidazole (10%). The crude mortality was 25%, and appropriate initial antibiotic therapy was not significantly associated with improved survival. Intra-abdominal infections (39%) and soft-tissue infections (33%) accounted for nearly three-quarters of all bacteraemia. Antibiotics with the best anaerobic activity were imipenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, amoxicillin-clavulanate and metronidazole, with in-vitro susceptibility rates of 95%, 95%, 94% and 92% respectively. Susceptibilities to penicillin (31%), clindamycin (60%) and moxifloxacin (84%) were more variable. Two multidrug

  7. Negative Regulation of STAT3 Protein-mediated Cellular Respiration by SIRT1 Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernier, Michel; Paul, Rajib K; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    significantly in Sirt1-KO cells as compared with wild-type MEFs. Various mitochondrial bioenergetic parameters, such as the oxygen consumption rate in cell cultures, enzyme activities of the electron transport chain complexes in isolated mitochondria, and production of ATP and lactate, indicated that Sirt1-KO...... cells exhibited higher mitochondrial respiration as compared with wild-type MEFs. Two independent approaches, including ectopic expression of SIRT1 and siRNA-mediated knockdown of STAT3, led to reduction in intracellular ATP levels and increased lactate production in Sirt1-KO cells that were approaching...

  8. The respiration of cells and mitochondria of porin deficient yeast mutants is coupled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michejda, J; Guo, X J; Lauquin, G J

    1990-08-31

    Several mutants of yeast lacking the porin gene have been found stable and viable on glucose or glycerol media. Ethanol-supported respiration of porin-free mutant and wild cells appeared equally coupled in vivo being similarly depressed by inhibitors of ADP/ATP translocase or of ATP synthase and stimulated by the uncoupler FCCP. The absence of porin in isolated mutant mitochondria hardly impaired the electron flux but increased the requirement for Mg2+ (or Ca2+) and for ADP and carboxyatractylate concentrations necessary to drive effectively state 3 - state 4 and state 4 - state 3 transitions, respectively. The existence of another porin species, possibly controlled by bivalent cations, is postulated.

  9. Anaerobe Tolerance to Oxygen and the Potentials of Anaerobic and Aerobic Cocultures for Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Kato

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic treatment processes are considered to be well-established methods for the elimination of easily biodegradable organic matter from wastewaters. Some difficulties concerning certain wastewaters are related to the possible presence of dissolved oxygen. The common belief is that anaerobes are oxygen intolerant. Therefore, the common practice is to use sequencing anaerobic and aerobic steps in separate tanks. Enhanced treatment by polishing off the residual biodegradable oxygen demand from effluents of anaerobic reactors, or the biodegradation of recalcitrant wastewater pollutants, usually requires sequenced anaerobic and aerobic bacteria activities. However, the combined activity of both bacteria can also be obtained in a single reactor. Previous experiments with either pure or mixed cultures showed that anaerobes can tolerate oxygen to a certain extent. The oxygen toxicity to methanogens in anaerobic sludges was quantified in batch experiments, as well as in anaerobic reactors. The results showed that methanogens have a high tolerance to oxygen. In practice, it was confirmed that dissolved oxygen does not constitute any detrimental effect on reactor treatment performance. This means that the coexistence of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria in one single reactor is feasible and increases the potentials of new applications in wastewater treatment

  10. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Plugge, C.M.; Eekert, van M.H.A.; Dolfing, J.; Schraa, G.

    2006-01-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory

  11. Anaerobic Toxicity of Cationic Silver Nanoparticles

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Toxicity data for the impact of nano-silver on anaerobic degradation. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Gitipour, A., S. Thiel, K. Scheckel,...

  12. Solar pond for heating anaerobic digesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Kehui; Li Shensheng

    1991-10-01

    A theoretical analysis and numerical results calculated for solar pond heating anaerobic digesters in Beijing area in China are presented. The effect of temperature rise is evident and rather steady. 3 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  13. Mitochondrial respiration deficits driven by reactive oxygen species in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Shane; Liang, Li-Ping; Fulton, Ruth; Shimizu, Takahiko; Day, Brian; Patel, Manisha

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic alterations have been implicated in the etiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but whether or not they have a functional impact on cellular energy producing pathways (glycolysis and/or oxidative phosphorylation) is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine if alterations in cellular bioenergetics occur using real-time analysis of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates in an animal model of TLE. We hypothesized that increased steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) initiated by epileptogenic injury result in impaired mitochondrial respiration. We established methodology for assessment of bioenergetic parameters in isolated synaptosomes from the hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats at various times in the kainate (KA) model of TLE. Deficits in indices of mitochondrial respiration were observed at time points corresponding with the acute and chronic phases of epileptogenesis. We asked if mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction occurred as a result of increased mitochondrial ROS and if it could be attenuated in the KA model by pharmacologically scavenging ROS. Increased steady-state ROS in mice with forebrain-specific conditional deletion of manganese superoxide dismutase (Sod2(fl/fl)NEX(Cre/Cre)) in mice resulted in profound deficits in mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Pharmacological scavenging of ROS with a catalytic antioxidant restored mitochondrial respiration deficits in the KA model of TLE. Together, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial respiration deficits occur in experimental TLE and ROS mechanistically contribute to these deficits. Furthermore, this study provides novel methodology for assessing cellular metabolism during the entire time course of disease development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Respiration triggers heme transfer from cytochrome c peroxidase to catalase in yeast mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiresan, Meena; Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M

    2014-12-09

    In exponentially growing yeast, the heme enzyme, cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. When the fermentable source (glucose) is depleted, cells switch to respiration and mitochondrial H2O2 levels rise. It has long been assumed that CCP activity detoxifies mitochondrial H2O2 because of the efficiency of this activity in vitro. However, we find that a large pool of Ccp1 exits the mitochondria of respiring cells. We detect no extramitochondrial CCP activity because Ccp1 crosses the outer mitochondrial membrane as the heme-free protein. In parallel with apoCcp1 export, cells exhibit increased activity of catalase A (Cta1), the mitochondrial and peroxisomal catalase isoform in yeast. This identifies Cta1 as a likely recipient of Ccp1 heme, which is supported by low Cta1 activity in ccp1Δ cells and the accumulation of holoCcp1 in cta1Δ mitochondria. We hypothesized that Ccp1's heme is labilized by hyperoxidation of the protein during the burst in H2O2 production as cells begin to respire. To test this hypothesis, recombinant Ccp1 was hyperoxidized with excess H2O2 in vitro, which accelerated heme transfer to apomyoglobin added as a surrogate heme acceptor. Furthermore, the proximal heme Fe ligand, His175, was found to be ∼ 85% oxidized to oxo-histidine in extramitochondrial Ccp1 isolated from 7-d cells, indicating that heme labilization results from oxidation of this ligand. We conclude that Ccp1 responds to respiration-derived H2O2 via a previously unidentified mechanism involving H2O2-activated heme transfer to apoCta1. Subsequently, the catalase activity of Cta1, not CCP activity, contributes to mitochondrial H2O2 detoxification.

  15. Workplace Breathing Rates: Defining Anticipated Values and Ranges for Respirator Certification Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caretti, David M; Gardner, Paul D; Coyne, Karen M

    2004-01-01

    .... For air-purifying respirators (APRs), the primary performance tests most affected by airflow rate are filter gas-life capacity, particulate filter efficiency, and respirator breathing resistances...

  16. Biogas plasticization coupled anaerobic digestion: the anaerobic pump stoichiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimel, Keith A

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents the stoichiometry section of a bioenergetics investigation into the biogas plasticization of wastewater sludge using the Anaerobic Pump (TAP). Three residue samples, an input substrate and two residual products, were collected from two side by side operated AD systems, a conventional continuous flow and stirred reactor, and TAP, and submitted for elemental and calorimetric analyses. The elemental compositions of the residues were fitted to a heterotrophic metabolism model [1] for both systems. To facilitate balanced stoichiometric models, a simple "cell" correction computation separates measured residual composites into "real" residual composition and cell growth (C5H7NO2) components. The elemental data and model results show that the TAP stage II residual composition (C1H0.065O0.0027N0.036) was nearly devoid of hydrogen and oxygen, leaving only fixed carbon and cells grown as the composition of the remaining mass. This quantitative evidence supports prior measurements of very high methane yields from TAP stage II reactor during steady-state experiments [2]. All performance parameters derived from the stoichiometric model(s) showed good agreement with measured steady-state averaged values. These findings are strong evidence that plasticization-disruption (TAP) cycle is the mechanism responsible for the observed increases in methane yield. The accuracy achieved by the stoichiometry models qualifies them for thermodynamic analysis to obtain potentials and bioconversion efficiencies. How applied pressure causes matrix conformation changes triggered by a functional consequence (plasticization and disruption) is this study's essential focus.

  17. EFFECT OF MUSIC ON ANAEROBIC EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Atan, T.

    2013-01-01

    For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-...

  18. Anaerobic critical velocity in four swimming techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, H P; Fernandes, R J; Vilas-Boas, J P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess critical velocity in order to control and evaluate anaerobic swimming training. 51 highly trained male swimmers performed maximal 15, 25, 37.5 and 50 m in the 4 swimming techniques to determine critical velocity from the distance-time relationship. Anaerobic critical velocity was compared with 100 m swimming performance and corresponding partials. Complementarily, 9 swimmers performed a 6×50 m (4 min interval) training series at front crawl individual anaerobic critical velocity, capillary blood lactate concentrations being assessed after each repetition. The mean±SD values of anaerobic critical velocity and its relationship with the 100 m event were: 1.61±0.07 (r=0.60, p=0.037), 1.53±0.05 (r=0.81, p=0.015), 1.33±0.05 (r=0.83, p=0.002), and 1.75±0.05 (r=0.74, p=0.001), for butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and front crawl, respectively. However, differences between anaerobic critical velocity and performance were observed (with exception of the second half of the 100 m swimming events in breaststroke and butterfly). Lactate concentration values at the end of the series were 14.52±1.06 mmol.l (-1), which suggests that it was indeed an anaerobic training set. In this sense, anaerobic critical velocity can be used to prescribe anaerobic training intensities. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Covering Materials for Anaerobic Digesters Producing Biogas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itodo, I. N.; Philips, T. K.

    2002-01-01

    The suitability of foam, concrete and clay soil as covering material on anaerobic digesters producing biogas was investigated using four batch-type digesters of 20 litres volume. The methane yield from the digesters was of the order: foam >control> concrete > clay soil. The digester covered with foam had the highest methane yield, best temperature control and most favourable pH conditions. It is most suitable as cover material on anaerobic digesters

  20. SLEEP DEPRIVATION INDUCED ANXIETY AND ANAEROBIC PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Arzu Vardar

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation induced anxiety on anaerobic performance. Thirteen volunteer male physical education students completed the Turkish version of State Anxiety Inventory and performed Wingate anaerobic test for three times: (1 following a full-night of habitual sleep (baseline measurements, (2 following 30 hours of sleep deprivation, and (3 following partial-night sleep deprivation. Baseline measurements were performed the day before total sleep deprivation. Measurements following partial sleep deprivation were made 2 weeks later than total sleep deprivation measurements. State anxiety was measured prior to each Wingate test. The mean state anxiety following total sleep deprivation was higher than the baseline measurement (44.9 ± 12.9 vs. 27.6 ± 4.2, respectively, p = 0.02 whereas anaerobic performance parameters remained unchanged. Neither anaerobic parameters nor state anxiety levels were affected by one night partial sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that 30 hours continuous wakefulness may increase anxiety level without impairing anaerobic performance, whereas one night of partial sleep deprivation was ineffective on both state anxiety and anaerobic performance

  1. Soil Respiration in Semiarid Temperate Grasslands under Various Land Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Ji, Lei; Hou, Xiangyang; Schellenberg, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration, a major component of the global carbon cycle, is significantly influenced by land management practices. Grasslands are potentially a major sink for carbon, but can also be a source. Here, we investigated the potential effect of land management (grazing, clipping, and ungrazed enclosures) on soil respiration in the semiarid grassland of northern China. Our results showed the mean soil respiration was significantly higher under enclosures (2.17 μmol.m(-2).s(-1)) and clipping (2.06 μmol.m(-2).s(-1)) than under grazing (1.65 μmol.m-(2).s(-1)) over the three growing seasons. The high rates of soil respiration under enclosure and clipping were associated with the higher belowground net primary productivity (BNPP). Our analyses indicated that soil respiration was primarily related to BNPP under grazing, to soil water content under clipping. Using structural equation models, we found that soil water content, aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and BNPP regulated soil respiration, with soil water content as the predominant factor. Our findings highlight that management-induced changes in abiotic (soil temperature and soil water content) and biotic (ANPP and BNPP) factors regulate soil respiration in the semiarid temperate grassland of northern China.

  2. Plankton Respiration from the Cellular to the Basin Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C.; Garcia-Martin, E. E.; Hull, T.; Kitidis, V. A.; Ostle, C.; Serret, P.; Tilstone, G.

    2016-02-01

    Estimates of marine plankton respiration provide an important constraint on the magnitude of the biological carbon pump and global elemental nutrient cycles, yet respiration remains one of the least constrained terms in models of metabolism, gas exchange and carbon mass balance. This is due in part to the difficulty in measuring both total oceanic respiration and that attributable to specific plankton groups or size classes and the resulting lack of earth observation algorithms. Respiration in the surface layer of the ocean is usually estimated from either the consumption of dissolved oxygen in a contained sample volume or from enzymatic proxies such as INT, and is less frequently determined from mixed layer oxygen utilisation, allometric equations or biomass / abundance spectra.As part of a tracer release (SF6) experiment in the Mauritanian upwelling and a seasonal study of UK shelf sea biogeochemistry, we measured plankton respiration using a range of methods which span time and space scales from cells to the mixed layer and hours to years. This presentation will compare and contrast these concurrent measurements with a view to assessing the range of variability in respiration relative to that in primary production alongside measures of parameters such as plankton community structure and organic carbon availability which may lead to this variability. In addition, by comparing between systems and between seasons in the same system, and utilising the available global dataset, we aim to test predictive empirical models of respiration in an attempt to extrapolate to the basin scale.

  3. Soil Respiration in Semiarid Temperate Grasslands under Various Land Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    Full Text Available Soil respiration, a major component of the global carbon cycle, is significantly influenced by land management practices. Grasslands are potentially a major sink for carbon, but can also be a source. Here, we investigated the potential effect of land management (grazing, clipping, and ungrazed enclosures on soil respiration in the semiarid grassland of northern China. Our results showed the mean soil respiration was significantly higher under enclosures (2.17 μmol.m(-2.s(-1 and clipping (2.06 μmol.m(-2.s(-1 than under grazing (1.65 μmol.m-(2.s(-1 over the three growing seasons. The high rates of soil respiration under enclosure and clipping were associated with the higher belowground net primary productivity (BNPP. Our analyses indicated that soil respiration was primarily related to BNPP under grazing, to soil water content under clipping. Using structural equation models, we found that soil water content, aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP and BNPP regulated soil respiration, with soil water content as the predominant factor. Our findings highlight that management-induced changes in abiotic (soil temperature and soil water content and biotic (ANPP and BNPP factors regulate soil respiration in the semiarid temperate grassland of northern China.

  4. Alternative respiration and fumaric acid production of Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuai; Xu, Qing; Huang, He; Li, Shuang

    2014-06-01

    Under the conditions of fumaric acid fermentation, Rhizopus oryzae ME-F14 possessed at least two respiratory systems. The respiration of mycelia was partially inhibited by the cytochrome respiration inhibitor antimycin A or the alternative respiration inhibitor salicylhydroxamic acid and was completely inhibited in the presence of both antimycin A and salicylhydroxamic acid. During fumaric acid fermentation process, the activity of alternative respiration had a great correlation with fumaric acid productivity; both of them reached peak at the same time. The alternative oxidase gene, which encoded the mitochondrial alternative oxidase responsible for alternative respiration in R. oryzae ME-F14, was cloned and characterized in Escherichia coli. The activity of alternative respiration, the alternative oxidase gene transcription level, as well as the fumaric acid titer were measured under different carbon sources and different carbon-nitrogen ratios. The activity of alternative respiration was found to be comparable to the transcription level of the alternative oxidase gene and the fumaric acid titer. These results indicated that the activity of the alternative oxidase was regulated at the transcription stage under the conditions tested for R. oryzae ME-F14.

  5. Temperature response of soil respiration largely unaltered with experimental warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Joanna C.; Tang, Jianwu; Templer, Pamela H.; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Crowther, Thomas W.; Burton, Andrew J.; Dukes, Jeffrey S.; Emmett, Bridget; Frey, Serita D.; Heskel, Mary A.; Jiang, Lifen; Machmuller, Megan B.; Mohan, Jacqueline; Panetta, Anne Marie; Reich, Peter B.; Reinsch, Sabine; Wang, Xin; Allison, Steven D.; Bamminger, Chris; Bridgham, Scott; Collins, Scott L.; de Dato, Giovanbattista; Eddy, William C.; Enquist, Brian J.; Estiarte, Marc; Harte, John; Henderson, Amanda; Johnson, Bart R.; Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Luo, Yiqi; Marhan, Sven; Melillo, Jerry M.; Penuelas, Josep; Pfeifer-Meister, Laurel; Poll, Christian; Rastetter, Edward B.; Reinmann, Andrew B.; Reynolds, Lorien L.; Schmidt, Inger K.; Shaver, Gaius R.; Strong, Aaron L.; Suseela, Vidya; Tietema, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory release of carbon dioxide (CO2) from soil is a major yet poorly understood flux in the global carbon cycle. Climatic warming is hypothesized to increase rates of soil respiration, potentially fueling further increases in global temperatures. However, despite considerable scientific attention in recent decades, the overall response of soil respiration to anticipated climatic warming remains unclear. We synthesize the largest global dataset to date of soil respiration, moisture, and temperature measurements, totaling >3,800 observations representing 27 temperature manipulation studies, spanning nine biomes and over 2 decades of warming. Our analysis reveals no significant differences in the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration between control and warmed plots in all biomes, with the exception of deserts and boreal forests. Thus, our data provide limited evidence of acclimation of soil respiration to experimental warming in several major biome types, contrary to the results from multiple single-site studies. Moreover, across all nondesert biomes, respiration rates with and without experimental warming follow a Gaussian response, increasing with soil temperature up to a threshold of ∼25 °C, above which respiration rates decrease with further increases in temperature. This consistent decrease in temperature sensitivity at higher temperatures demonstrates that rising global temperatures may result in regionally variable responses in soil respiration, with colder climates being considerably more responsive to increased ambient temperatures compared with warmer regions. Our analysis adds a unique cross-biome perspective on the temperature response of soil respiration, information critical to improving our mechanistic understanding of how soil carbon dynamics change with climatic warming.

  6. Changes in the antibiotic susceptibility of anaerobic bacteria from 2007-2009 to 2010-2012 based on the CLSI methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastey, Christine J; Boyd, Halsey; Schuetz, Audrey N; Anderson, Karen; Citron, Diane M; Dzink-Fox, Jody; Hackel, Meredith; Hecht, David W; Jacobus, Nilda V; Jenkins, Stephen G; Karlsson, Maria; Knapp, Cynthia C; Koeth, Laura M; Wexler, Hannah; Roe-Carpenter, Darcie E

    2016-12-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic isolates was conducted at four independent sites from 2010 to 2012 and compared to results from three sites during the period of 2007-2009. This data comparison shows significant changes in antimicrobial resistance in some anaerobic groups. Therefore, we continue to recommend institutions regularly perform susceptibility testing when anaerobes are cultured from pertinent sites. Annual generation of an institutional-specific antibiogram is recommended for tracking of resistance trends over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Microbial isolates in open fractures seen in the accident and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Routine microscopy, culture and sensitivities for aerobic and anaerobic organisms were carried out on these specimens. ... pattern of all the isolates shows that pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone were more effective compared to cefuroxime and amoxycillin which had substantial resistance to most of the isolates.

  8. [Factors influencing the variability in soil heterotrophic respiration from terrestrial ecosystem in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Chen, Shu-Tao; Hu, Zheng-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Soil heterotrophic respiration is one of the key factors for estimating ecosystem carbon balance. Measurement data of soil heterotrophic respiration from terrestrial ecosystem in China were collected. Climate data (annual precipitation and annual mean air temperature) and relevant environmental factors (e. g. tree age) were also collected. Results indicated that the relationship between heterotrophic respiration and soil respiration could be explained by a power function. Heterotrophic respiration increased with the increase of soil respiration. The power function explained 73% of the variability (R2 = 0.730, P power function could be used to explain the relationship between the ratio of heterotrophic respiration to soil respiration and tree age. Further investigation showed that the relationship between measured annual heterotrophic respiration and modeled heterotrophic respiration by using an empirical model could be described by a linear function, indicating that the empirical model well fitted the variability in heterotrophic respiration.

  9. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, T.L.; Lee, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work is underway using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale, to develop start-up and operating procedures, and to generate effluent for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and batch-fed conditions have been made lasting 36, 90, and over 200 days. Solids solubilization and gas production rates and total solids destruction have met or exceeded the target values of 0.6 g cellulose per L of reactor per day, 0.5 L off-gas per L of reactor per day, and 80% destruction of solids, respectively. Successful start-up procedures have been developed, and preliminary effluent characterization and disposal studies have been done. A simple dynamic process model has been constructed to aid in further process development and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester. 7 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  10. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.D.; Donaldson, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of low-level radioactive cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work has been completed using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale. Start-up and operating procedures have been developed, and effluent was generated for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and fed-batch conditions were made lasting 36, 90, and 423 d. Solids solubilization rates and gas production rates averaged approximately 1.8 g cellulose per L of reactor per d and 1.2 L of off-gas per L reactor per d. Greater than 80% destruction of the volatile suspended solids was obtained. A simple dynamic process model was constructed to aid in process design and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester

  11. Respirator studies for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, B.J.; Fairchild, C.I.; DeField, J.D.; Hack, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    A project of the Health, Safety and Environment Division is described. The project provides the NRC with information of respiratory protective devices and programs for their licensee personnel. The following activities were performed during FY 1983: selection of alternate test aerosols for quality assurance testing of high-efficiency particulate air respirator filters; evaluation of MAG-1 spectacles for use with positive and negative-pressure respirators; development of a Manual of Respiratory Protection in Emergencies Involving Airborne Radioactive Materials, and technical assistance to NRC licensees regarding respirator applications. 2 references, 1 figure

  12. Degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye using anaerobic/aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) and photochemical membrane reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Sheng-Jie; Damodar, Rahul A.; Hou, Sheng-Chon

    2010-01-01

    Three different types of advance treatment methods were evaluated for the degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5). The performance of two stage anaerobic SBR-aerobic MBR, anaerobic MBR with immobilized and suspended biocells and an integrated membrane photocatalytic reactor (MPR) using slurry UV/TiO 2 system were investigated. The results suggest that, nearly 99.9% color removal and 80-95% organic COD and TOC removal can be achieved using different reactor systems. Considering the Taiwan EPA effluent standard discharge criteria for COD/TOC, the degree of treatment achieved by combining the anaerobic-aerobic system was found to be acceptable. Anew, Bacilluscereus, high color removal bacterium was isolated from Anaerobic SBR. Furthermore, when this immobilized into PVA-calcium alginate pellets, and suspended in the anaerobic MBR was able to achieve high removal efficiencies, similar to the suspended biocells system. However, the immobilized cell Anaerobic MBR was found to be more advantageous, due to lower fouling rates in the membrane unit. Results from slurry type MPR system showed that this system was capable of mineralizing RB5 dyes with faster degradation rate as compared to other systems. The reactor was also able to separate the catalyst effectively and perform efficiently without much loss of catalyst activity.

  13. Fermentative degradation of polyethylene glycol by a strictly anaerobic, gram-negative, nonsporeforming bacterium, Pelobacter venetianus sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schink, B; Stieb, M

    1983-06-01

    The synthetic polyether polyethylene glycol (PEG) with a molecular weight of 20,000 was anaerobically degraded in enrichment cultures inoculated with mud of limnic and marine origins. Three strains (Gra PEG 1, Gra PEG 2, and Ko PEG 2) of rod-shaped, gram-negative, nonsporeforming, strictly anaerobic bacteria were isolated in mineral medium with PEG as the sole source of carbon and energy. All strains degraded dimers, oligomers, and polymers of PEG up to a molecular weight of 20,000 completely by fermentation to nearly equal amounts of acetate and ethanol. The monomer ethylene glycol was not degraded. An ethylene glycol-fermenting anaerobe (strain Gra EG 12) isolated from the same enrichments was identified as Acetobacterium woodii. The PEG-fermenting strains did not excrete extracellular depolymerizing enzymes and were inhibited by ethylene glycol, probably owing to a blocking of the cellular uptake system. PEG, some PEG-containing nonionic detergents, 1,2-propanediol, 1,2-butanediol, glycerol, and acetoin were the only growth substrates utilized of a broad variety of sugars, organic acids, and alcohols. The isolates did not reduce sulfate, sulfur, thiosulfate, or nitrate and were independent of growth factors. In coculture with A. woodii or Methanospirillum hungatei, PEGs and ethanol were completely fermented to acetate (and methane). A marine isolate is described as the type strain of a new species, Pelobacter venetianus sp. nov. Its physiology and ecological significance, as well as the importance and possible mechanism of anaerobic polyether degradation, are discussed.

  14. Substrate-specific changes in mitochondrial respiration in skeletal and cardiac muscle of hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jason C L; Staples, James F

    2014-04-01

    During torpor, the metabolic rate (MR) of thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) is considerably lower relative to euthermia, resulting in part from temperature-independent mitochondrial metabolic suppression in liver and skeletal muscle, which together account for ~40% of basal MR. Although heart accounts for very little (respiration rates were decreased up to 60% during torpor in both subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IM) mitochondria from cardiac muscle. We further demonstrated pronounced seasonal (summer vs. winter [i.e., interbout] euthermia) changes in respiration rates in both mitochondrial subpopulations in this tissue, consistent with a shift in fuel use away from carbohydrates and proteins and towards fatty acids and ketones. By contrast, these seasonal changes in respiration rates were not observed in either SS or IM mitochondria isolated from hind limb skeletal muscle. Both populations of skeletal muscle mitochondria, however, did exhibit metabolic suppression during torpor, and this suppression was 2- to 3-fold greater in IM mitochondria, which provide ATP for Ca(2+)- and myosin ATPases, the activities of which are likely quite low in skeletal muscle during torpor because animals are immobile. Finally, these changes in mitochondrial respiration rates were still evident when standardized to citrate synthase activity rather than to total mitochondrial protein.

  15. A techno-economic evaluation of anaerobic biogas producing systems in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Hervan Marion; Xie, Wei; Liang, Jianghui; Mao, Hanping; Lei, Hanwu; Ruan, Roger; Bu, Quan

    2017-12-08

    Biogas production has been the focus of many individuals in the developing world; there have been several investigations that focus on improving the production process and product quality. In the developing world the lack of advanced technology and capital has hindered the development of energy production. Renewable energy has the potential to improve the standard of living for most of the 196 countries which are classified as developing economies. One of the easiest renewable energy compounds that can be produced is biogas (bio-methane). Biogas can be produced from almost any source of biomass through the anaerobic respiration of micro-organisms. Low budget energy systems are reviewed in this article along with various feedstock sources. Adapted gas purification and storage systems are also reviewed, along with the possible economic, social, health and environmental benefits of its implementation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling de novo granulation of anaerobic sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doloman, Anna; Varghese, Honey; Miller, Charles D; Flann, Nicholas S

    2017-07-17

    A unique combination of mechanical, physiochemical and biological forces influences granulation during processes of anaerobic digestion. Understanding this process requires a systems biology approach due to the need to consider not just single-cell metabolic processes, but also the multicellular organization and development of the granule. In this computational experiment, we address the role that physiochemical and biological processes play in granulation and provide a literature-validated working model of anaerobic granule de novo formation. The agent-based model developed in a cDynoMiCs simulation environment successfully demonstrated a de novo granulation in a glucose fed system, with the average specific methanogenic activity of 1.11 ml C H 4 /g biomass and formation of a 0.5 mm mature granule in 33 days. The simulated granules exhibit experimental observations of radial stratification: a central dead core surrounded by methanogens then encased in acidogens. Practical application of the granulation model was assessed on the anaerobic digestion of low-strength wastewater by measuring the changes in methane yield as experimental configuration parameters were systematically searched. In the model, the emergence of multicellular organization of anaerobic granules from randomly mixed population of methanogens and acidogens was observed and validated. The model of anaerobic de novo granulation can be used to predict the morphology of the anaerobic granules in a alternative substrates of interest and to estimate methane potential of the resulting microbial consortia. The study demonstrates a successful integration of a systems biology approach to model multicellular systems with the engineering of an efficient anaerobic digestion system.

  17. Dicarbanonaborates in yeast respiration and membrane transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotyk, A; Lapathitis, G

    1997-04-01

    Two derivatives of carborates, sodium 5,6-dichloro-7,8-dicarbanonaborate (CB-Cl) and sodium 5-mercapto-7,8-dicarbanonaborate (CB-SH) were found to inhibit endogenous as well as glucose-induced respiration of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both substances slightly increased endogenous acid production, were neutral toward H(+)-ATPase-associated acidification but pronouncedly inhibited the K(+)-stimulated acidification. The same effects were observed also with an ATPase-deficient mutant of the yeast. The ATP-hydrolyzing activity of yeast plasma membranes in vitro was severely reduced. The membrane potential was substantially increased toward more negative values. The H(+)-symporting uptake of glutamic acid was considerably decreased, that of adenine was diminished much less. The effects of the dicarbanonaborates are obviously pleiotropic but their inhibition of ATP hydrolysis and of uptake of H(+)-symported substances, on the one hand, and absolute lack of effect on ATPase-catalyzed acidification, on the other, pose an unresolved problem.

  18. Evaluation of the routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing results of clinically significant anaerobic bacteria in a Slovenian tertiary-care hospital in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeverica, Samo; Kolenc, Urša; Mueller-Premru, Manica; Papst, Lea

    2017-10-01

    The aim of our study was to determined antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of 2673 clinically significant anaerobic bacteria belonging to the major genera, isolated in 2015 in a large tertiary-care hospital in Slovenia. The species identification was performed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined immediately at the isolation of the strains against: penicillin, co-amoxiclav, imipenem, clindamycin and metronidazole, using gradient diffusion methodology and EUCAST breakpoints. The most frequent anaerobes were Bacteroides fragilis group with 31% (n = 817), Gram positive anaerobic cocci (GPACs) with 22% (n = 589), Prevotella with 14% (n = 313) and Propionibacterium with 8% (n = 225). Metronidazole has retained full activity (100%) against all groups of anaerobic bacteria intrinsically susceptible to it. Co-amoxiclav and imipenem were active against most tested anaerobes with zero or low resistance rates. However, observed resistance to co-amoxiclav (8%) and imipenem (1%) is worrying especially among B. fragilis group isolates. High overall resistance (23%) to clindamycin was detected in our study and was highest among the genera Prevotella, Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, GPACs and Clostridium. Routine testing of antimicrobial susceptibility of clinically relevant anaerobic bacteria is feasible and provides good surveillance data. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. [Development and Evaluation of a New Selective Culture Medium, KBM Anaero RS-GNR, for Detection of Anaerobic Gram Negative Rods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Taeko; Kato, Kyohei; Hanaiwa, Hiroki; Harada, Tetsuhiro; Funashima, Yumiko; Akiwa, Makoto; Sekiguchi, Jun-Ichiro; Nagasawa, Zenzo; Umemura, Tsukuru

    2017-03-22

    The laboratory culture methods for isolating drug-resistant pathogens has been the gold standard in medical microbiology, and play pivotal roles in the overall management of infectious diseases. Recently, several reports have emphasized the development of antibiotics-resistance among anaerobic gram-negative rods, especially Genus Bacteroides and Prevotella . Therefore, a selective culture method to detect these pathogens is needed. We developed here the new selective culture medium, termed "KBM Anaero RS-GNR," for detecting anaerobic Gram-negative rods. Growth capability and selectivity of the agar medium were assessed by using the pure culture suspensions of more than 100 bacterial strains as well as the 13 samples experimentally contaminated with these bacterial strains. This new medium, "KBM Anaero RS-GNR," successfully showed the selective isolation of anaerobic Gram-negative rods. Compared with commercially available medium, "PV Brucella HK Agar, " which is also designed to detect anaerobic Gram-negative rods, there was no significant difference of the overall detection efficiency between two media. However, "KBM Anaero RS-GNR" showed superior to selectivity for anaerobic Gram-negative rods, especially from the samples contaminated with Candida species. Thus, the culture method using KBM Anaero RS-GNR is relevant for isolation of anaerobic Gram-negative rods especially from clinical specimens.

  20. Parameters affecting the stability of the digestate from a two-stage anaerobic process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trzcinski, Antoine P.; Stuckey, David C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focused on the factors affecting the respiration rate of the digestate taken from a continuous anaerobic two-stage process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). The process involved a hydrolytic reactor (HR) that produced a leachate fed to a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). It was found that a volatile solids (VS) removal in the range 40-75% and an operating temperature in the HR between 21 and 35 o C resulted in digestates with similar respiration rates, with all digestates requiring 17 days of aeration before satisfying the British Standard Institution stability threshold of 16 mg CO 2 g VS -1 day -1 . Sanitization of the digestate at 65 o C for 7 days allowed a mature digestate to be obtained. At 4 g VS L -1 d -1 and Solid Retention Times (SRT) greater than 70 days, all the digestates emitted CO 2 at a rate lower than 25 mg CO 2 g VS -1 d -1 after 3 days of aeration, while at SRT lower than 20 days all the digestates displayed a respiration rate greater than 25 mg CO 2 g VS -1 d -1 . The compliance criteria for Class I digestate set by the European Commission (EC) and British Standard Institution (BSI) could not be met because of nickel and chromium contamination, which was probably due to attrition of the stainless steel stirrer in the HR.

  1. Characterization of respirable mine dust and diesel particulate matter

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mahlangu, Vusi J

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the preliminary outcomes to develop and optimize methods to characterize DPM and respirable dust samples for the following: Crystalline compounds Common mineral analyses Particle size distribution Elemental Carbon (EC...

  2. Redefinition and global estimation of basal ecosystem respiration rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Wenping [College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China; Luo, Yiqi [Department of Botany and Microbiology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, USA; Li, Xianglan [College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China; Liu, Shuguang; Yu, Guirui [Key Laboratory of Ecosystem Network Observation and Modeling, Synthesis Research Center of Chinese Ecosystem Research Network, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; Zhou, Tao [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China; Bahn, Michael [Institute of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria; Black, Andy [Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B. C., Canada; Desai, Ankur R. [Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Department, Center for Climatic Research, Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; Cescatti, Alessandro [Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Ispra, Italy; Marcolla, Barbara [Sustainable Agro-ecosystems and Bioresources Department, Fondazione Edmund Mach-IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, San Michele all' Adige, Italy; Jacobs, Cor [Alterra, Earth System Science-Climate Change, Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands; Chen, Jiquan [Department of Earth, Ecological, and Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio, USA; Aurela, Mika [Climate and Global Change Research, Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, Finland; Bernhofer, Christian [Chair of Meteorology, Institute of Hydrology and Meteorology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; Gielen, Bert [Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk, Belgium; Bohrer, Gil [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Geodetic Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA; Cook, David R. [Climate Research Section, Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, USA; Dragoni, Danilo [Department of Geography, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA; Dunn, Allison L. [Department of Physical and Earth Sciences, Worcester State College, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA; Gianelle, Damiano [Sustainable Agro-ecosystems and Bioresources Department, Fondazione Edmund Mach-IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, San Michele all' Adige, Italy; Grünwald, Thomas [Chair of Meteorology, Institute of Hydrology and Meteorology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany; Ibrom, Andreas [Risø DTU National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Biosystems Division, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde, Denmark; Leclerc, Monique Y. [Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, University of Georgia, Griffin, Georgia, USA; Lindroth, Anders [Geobiosphere Science Centre, Physical Geography and Ecosystems Analysis, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Liu, Heping [Laboratory for Atmospheric Research, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA; Marchesini, Luca Belelli [Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-Food and Forest Systems, University of Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy; Montagnani, Leonardo; Pita, Gabriel [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon, Portugal; Rodeghiero, Mirco [Sustainable Agro-ecosystems and Bioresources Department, Fondazione Edmund Mach-IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, San Michele all' Adige, Italy; Rodrigues, Abel [Unidade de Silvicultura e Produtos Florestais, Instituto Nacional dos Recursos Biológicos, Oeiras, Portugal; Starr, Gregory [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA; Stoy, Paul C. [Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana, USA

    2011-10-13

    Basal ecosystem respiration rate (BR), the ecosystem respiration rate at a given temperature, is a common and important parameter in empirical models for quantifying ecosystem respiration (ER) globally. Numerous studies have indicated that BR varies in space. However, many empirical ER models still use a global constant BR largely due to the lack of a functional description for BR. In this study, we redefined BR to be ecosystem respiration rate at the mean annual temperature. To test the validity of this concept, we conducted a synthesis analysis using 276 site-years of eddy covariance data, from 79 research sites located at latitudes ranging from ~3°S to ~70°N. Results showed that mean annual ER rate closely matches ER rate at mean annual temperature. Incorporation of site-specific BR into global ER model substantially improved simulated ER compared to an invariant BR at all sites. These results confirm that ER at the mean annual

  3. Influence of vestibular activation on respiration in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Kevin D.; Sharpe, Melissa K.; Drury, Daniel; Ertl, Andrew C.; Ray, Chester A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the semicircular canals and otolith organs on respiration in humans. On the basis of animal studies, we hypothesized that vestibular activation would elicit a vestibulorespiratory reflex. To test this hypothesis, respiratory measures, arterial blood pressure, and heart rate were measured during engagement of semicircular canals and/or otolith organs. Dynamic upright pitch and roll (15 cycles/min), which activate the otolith organs and semicircular canals, increased respiratory rate (Delta2 +/- 1 and Delta3 +/- 1 breaths/min, respectively; P respiration similarly (Delta3 +/- 1 and Delta2 +/- 1, respectively; P muscle afferent, increased respiration (Delta3 +/- 1; P muscle afferents, mediate increased ventilation in humans and support the concept that vestibular activation alters respiration in humans.

  4. Global Annual Soil Respiration Data (Raich and Schlesinger 1992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set is a compilation of soil respiration rates (g C m-2 yr-1) from terrestrial and wetland ecosystems reported in the literature prior to 1992....

  5. Ecosystem respiration depends strongly on photosynthesis in a temperate heath

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Klaus Steenberg; Ibrom, A.; Beier, C.

    2007-01-01

    We measured net ecosystem CO2 flux (F-n) and ecosystem respiration (R-E), and estimated gross ecosystem photosynthesis (P-g) by difference, for two years in a temperate heath ecosystem using a chamber method. The exchange rates of carbon were high and of similar magnitude as for productive forest...... respiration from October to March was 22% and 30% of annual flux, respectively, suggesting that both cold-season carbon gain and loss were important in the annual carbon cycle of the ecosystem. Model fit of R-E of a classic, first-order exponential equation related to temperature ( second year; R-2 = 0......) of 2.5 by the modified model. The model introduces R-photo, which describes the part of respiration being tightly coupled to the photosynthetic rate. It makes up 5% of the assimilated carbon dioxide flux at 0 degrees C and 35% at 20 degrees C implying a high sensitivity of respiration to photosynthesis...

  6. Global Annual Soil Respiration Data (Raich and Schlesinger 1992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is a compilation of soil respiration rates (g C m-2 yr-1) from terrestrial and wetland ecosystems reported in the literature prior to 1992. These rates...

  7. Respiration in the yeast and mycelial phases of Histoplasma capsulatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, B; Lambowitz, A M; Kobayashi, G S; Medoff, G

    1979-05-01

    Respiration in the yeast and mycelial phases of Histoplasma capsulatum proceeds via a cytochrome system and an alternate oxidase, both present constitutively. The mycelial cytochrome system is distinguished by an additional partial shunt around the antimycin-sensitive site.

  8. A practical mechanical respirator, 1929: the "iron lung".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J A

    1990-09-01

    No satisfactory mechanical respirator existed before 1929, when Philip Drinker and Louis Shaw described an apparatus of their own design. This machine was in the form of a cylindrical tank enclosing the patient's body and chest, leaving the head outside the chamber under atmospheric pressure. Air pumps, later a bellows, raised and lowered pressure within the tank to assume the entire work of breathing. Popularly named the iron lung, the Drinker respirator supported thousands of patients afflicted with respiratory paralysis during the polio era. It was being superseded by positive-pressure airway ventilators just as the polio era came to a close. Today the Drinker respirator has disappeared virtually without a trace. Although its disadvantage was its cumbersome size, we must concede that it supported patients over the long term with fewer complications than do the respirators of today.

  9. SAFARI 2000 Annual Soil Respiration Data (Raich and Schlesinger 1992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is a compilation of soil respiration rates (g C m-2 yr-1) from terrestrial and wetland ecosystems reported in the literature prior to 1992 subset for...

  10. SAFARI 2000 Annual Soil Respiration Data (Raich and Schlesinger 1992)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set is a compilation of soil respiration rates (g C m-2 yr-1) from terrestrial and wetland ecosystems reported in the literature prior to 1992...

  11. [Utility of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of anaerobic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, Mariela S; Romano, Vanesa; Nievas, Jimena; Smayevsky, Jorgelina

    2014-01-01

    The analysis by MALDI-TOF MS (Matrix-assited laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry) has become a reference method for the identification of microorganisms in Clinical Microbiology. However, data on some groups of microorganisms are still controversial. The aim of this study is to determine the utility of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria. One-hundred and six anaerobic bacteria isolates were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and by conventional biochemical tests. In those cases where identification by conventional methodology was not applicable or in the face of discordance between sequencing methodologies, 16 S rRNA gene sequence analysis was performed. The conventional method and MALDI-TOF MS agreed at genus and species level by 95.3 %. Concordance in gram-negative bacilli was 91.4% and 100% among gram-positive bacilli; there was also concordance both in the 8 isolates studied in gram-positive cocci and in the single gram-negative cocci included. The data obtained in this study demonstrate that MALDI-TOF MS offers the possibility of adequate identification of anaerobic bacteria. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Carbon dioxide titration method for soil respiration measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Rubio, Luis

    2017-01-01

    This thesis was commissioned by Tampere University of Applied Sciences, which was interested in studying and developing a titration measurement method for soil respiration and biodegradability. Some experiments were carried out measuring soil respiration for testing the method and others adding some biodegradable material like polylactic acid compressed material and 100% biodegradable plastic bags to test its biodegradability and the possibility to measure it via titration. The thesi...

  13. The classic: The chemical constitution of respiration ferment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburg, Otto Heinrich

    2010-11-01

    This Classic Article is a reprint of the original work by Otto Heinrich Warburg, The Chemical Constitution of Respiration Ferment. An accompanying biographical sketch of Otto Heinrich Warburg, PhD, MD, is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-010-1533-z . The Classic Article is from Warburg O. The chemical constitution of respiration ferment. Science. 1928;68:437-443. Reprinted with permission from AAAS.

  14. The Classic: The Chemical Constitution of Respiration Ferment

    OpenAIRE

    Warburg, Otto Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    This Classic Article is a reprint of the original work by Otto Heinrich Warburg, The Chemical Constitution of Respiration Ferment. An accompanying biographical sketch of Otto Heinrich Warburg, PhD, MD, is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-010-1533-z. The Classic Article is from Warburg O. The chemical constitution of respiration ferment. Science. 1928;68:437–443. Reprinted with permission from AAAS.

  15. Use of respirators for protection of workers against airborne radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revoir, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    The various types of respirators and the requirements for an effective respirator program are outlined. The use of specific types of respirators to protect workers against inhalation of airborne radioactive materials is discussed. Problems encountered in using respirators in the nuclear industry which have resulted in worker injury and death are described

  16. Respiration during Postharvest Development of Soursop Fruit, Annona muricata L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, Johan; Paull, Robert E.

    1984-01-01

    Fruit of soursop, Annona muricata L., showed increased CO2 production 2 days after harvest, preceding the respiratory increase that coincided with autocatalytic ethylene evolution and other ripening phenomena. Experiments to alter gas exchange patterns of postharvest fruit parts and tissue cylinders had little success. The respiratory quotient of tissue discs was near unity throughout development. 2,4-Dinitrophenol uncoupled respiration more effectively than carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone; 0.4 millimolar KCN stimulated, 4 millimolar salicylhydroxamic acid slightly inhibited, and their combination strongly inhibited respiration, as did 10 millimolar NaN3. Tricarboxylic acid cycle members and ascorbate were more effective substrates than sugars, but acetate and glutarate strongly inhibited. Disc respiration showed the same early peak as whole fruit respiration; this peak is thus an inherent characteristic of postharvest development and cannot be ascribed to differences between ovaries of the aggregatetype fruit. The capacity of the respiratory apparatus did not change during this preclimacteric peak, but the contents of rate-limiting malate and citrate increased after harvest. It is concluded that the preclimacteric rise in CO2 evolution reflects increased mitochondrial respiration because of enhanced supply of carboxylates as a substrate, probably induced by detachment from the tree. The second rise corresponds with the respiration during ripening of other climacteric fruits. PMID:16663783

  17. Two Proximal Skin Electrodes — A Respiration Rate Body Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Avbelj

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new body sensor for extracting the respiration rate based on the amplitude changes in the body surface potential differences between two proximal body electrodes. The sensor could be designed as a plaster-like reusable unit that can be easily fixed onto the surface of the body. It could be equipped either with a sufficiently large memory for storing the measured data or with a low-power radio system that can transmit the measured data to a gateway for further processing. We explore the influence of the sensor’s position on the quality of the extracted results using multi-channel ECG measurements and considering all the pairs of two neighboring electrodes as potential respiration-rate sensors. The analysis of the clinical measurements, which also include reference thermistor-based respiration signals, shows that the proposed approach is a viable option for monitoring the respiration frequency and for a rough classification of breathing types. The obtained results were evaluated on a wireless prototype of a respiration body sensor. We indicate the best positions for the respiration body sensor and prove that a single sensor for body surface potential difference on proximal skin electrodes can be used for combined measurements of respiratory and cardiac activities.

  18. PCR and Omics Based Techniques to Study the Diversity, Ecology and Biology of Anaerobic Fungi: Insights, Challenges and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan E. Edwards

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic fungi (phylum Neocallimastigomycota are common inhabitants of the digestive tract of mammalian herbivores, and in the rumen, can account for up to 20% of the microbial biomass. Anaerobic fungi play a primary role in the degradation of lignocellulosic plant material. They also have a syntrophic interaction with methanogenic archaea, which increases their fiber degradation activity. To date, nine anaerobic fungal genera have been described, with further novel taxonomic groupings known to exist based on culture-independent molecular surveys. However, the true extent of their diversity may be even more extensively underestimated as anaerobic fungi continue being discovered in yet unexplored gut and non-gut environments. Additionally many studies are now known to have used primers that provide incomplete coverage of the Neocallimastigomycota. For ecological studies the internal transcribed spacer 1 region (ITS1 has been the taxonomic marker of choice, but due to various limitations the large subunit rRNA (LSU is now being increasingly used. How the continued expansion of our knowledge regarding anaerobic fungal diversity will impact on our understanding of their biology and ecological role remains unclear; particularly as it is becoming apparent that anaerobic fungi display niche differentiation. As a consequence, there is a need to move beyond the broad generalization of anaerobic fungi as fiber-degraders, and explore the fundamental differences that underpin their ability to exist in distinct ecological niches. Application of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics to their study in pure/mixed cultures and environmental samples will be invaluable in this process. To date the genomes and transcriptomes of several characterized anaerobic fungal isolates have been successfully generated. In contrast, the application of proteomics and metabolomics to anaerobic fungal analysis is still in its infancy. A central problem for all

  19. PCR and Omics Based Techniques to Study the Diversity, Ecology and Biology of Anaerobic Fungi: Insights, Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Joan E.; Forster, Robert J.; Callaghan, Tony M.; Dollhofer, Veronika; Dagar, Sumit S.; Cheng, Yanfen; Chang, Jongsoo; Kittelmann, Sandra; Fliegerova, Katerina; Puniya, Anil K.; Henske, John K.; Gilmore, Sean P.; O'Malley, Michelle A.; Griffith, Gareth W.; Smidt, Hauke

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic fungi (phylum Neocallimastigomycota) are common inhabitants of the digestive tract of mammalian herbivores, and in the rumen, can account for up to 20% of the microbial biomass. Anaerobic fungi play a primary role in the degradation of lignocellulosic plant material. They also have a syntrophic interaction with methanogenic archaea, which increases their fiber degradation activity. To date, nine anaerobic fungal genera have been described, with further novel taxonomic groupings known to exist based on culture-independent molecular surveys. However, the true extent of their diversity may be even more extensively underestimated as anaerobic fungi continue being discovered in yet unexplored gut and non-gut environments. Additionally many studies are now known to have used primers that provide incomplete coverage of the Neocallimastigomycota. For ecological studies the internal transcribed spacer 1 region (ITS1) has been the taxonomic marker of choice, but due to various limitations the large subunit rRNA (LSU) is now being increasingly used. How the continued expansion of our knowledge regarding anaerobic fungal diversity will impact on our understanding of their biology and ecological role remains unclear; particularly as it is becoming apparent that anaerobic fungi display niche differentiation. As a consequence, there is a need to move beyond the broad generalization of anaerobic fungi as fiber-degraders, and explore the fundamental differences that underpin their ability to exist in distinct ecological niches. Application of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics to their study in pure/mixed cultures and environmental samples will be invaluable in this process. To date the genomes and transcriptomes of several characterized anaerobic fungal isolates have been successfully generated. In contrast, the application of proteomics and metabolomics to anaerobic fungal analysis is still in its infancy. A central problem for all analyses, however

  20. Surfactants and the Mechanics of Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jbaily, Abdulrahman; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Alveoli are small sacs found at the end of terminal bronchioles in human lungs with a mean diameter of 200 μm. A thin layer of fluid (hypophase) coats the inner face of an alveolus and is in contact with the air in the lungs. The thickness of this layer varies among alveoli, but is in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 μm for many portions of the alveolar network. The interfacial tension σ at the air-hypophase interface tends to favor collapse of the alveolus, and resists its expansion during inhalation. Type II alveolar cells synthesize and secrete a mixture of phospholipids and proteins called pulmonary surfactant. These surfactant molecules adsorb to the interface causing σ of water at body temperature is 70 mN/m and falls to an equilibrium value of 25 mN/m when surfactants are present. Also, in a dynamic sense, it is known that σ is reduced to near 0 during exhalation when the surfactant film compresses. In this work, the authors develop a mechanical and transport model of the alveolus to study the effect of surfactants on various aspects of respiration. The model is composed of three principal parts: (i) air movement into and out of the alveolus; (ii) a balance of linear momentum across the two-layered membrane of the alveolus (hypophase and elastic wall); and (iii) a pulmonary surfactant transport problem in the hypophase. The goal is to evaluate the influence of pulmonary surfactant on respiratory mechanics.

  1. Biochemistry and physiology of anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-18

    We welcome you to The Power of Anaerobes. This conference serves two purposes. One is to celebrate the life of Harry D. Peck, Jr.,who was born May 18, 1927 and would have celebrated his 73rd birthday at this conference. He died November 20, 1998. The second is to gather investigators to exchange views within the realm of anaerobic microbiology, an area in which tremendous progress has been seen during recent years. It is sufficient to mention discoveries of a new form of life (the archaea), hyper or extreme thermophiles, thermophilic alkaliphiles and anaerobic fungi. With these discoveries has come a new realization about physiological and metabolic properties of microorganisms, and this in turn has demonstrated their importance for the development, maintenance and sustenance of life on Earth.

  2. Multivariate monitoring of anaerobic co-digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Michael; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo

    Anaerobic digestion processes for production of renewable energy in the form of biogas, and in the future hydrogen, are becoming increasingly important worldwide. Sustainable solutions for renewable energy production systems are given high political priority, amongst other things due to global...... warming and environmental concerns. Anaerobic digestion applied in agriculture can simultaneously convert heterogeneous biomasses and wastes from the primary agricultural sector and from the bio processing industries, for instance food processing, pharma, and biofuel production, into valuable organic...... fertiliser and renewable energy. Meanwhile, in order for the biogas sector to become a significant player in the energy supply chain, the anaerobic digestion process has to be controlled to a greater extent than what is implemented as state-of-the-art today. Through application of the philosophy behind...

  3. An integrative perspective of the anaerobic threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Marcelo Magalhães; Sousa, Caio Victor; da Silva Aguiar, Samuel; Knechtle, Beat; Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Alves, Polissandro Mortoza; Simões, Herbert Gustavo

    2017-12-14

    The concept of anaerobic threshold (AT) was introduced during the nineteen sixties. Since then, several methods to identify the anaerobic threshold (AT) have been studied and suggested as novel 'thresholds' based upon the variable used for its detection (i.e. lactate threshold, ventilatory threshold, glucose threshold). These different techniques have brought some confusion about how we should name this parameter, for instance, anaerobic threshold or the physiological measure used (i.e. lactate, ventilation). On the other hand, the modernization of scientific methods and apparatus to detect AT, as well as the body of literature formed in the past decades, could provide a more cohesive understanding over the AT and the multiple physiological systems involved. Thus, the purpose of this review was to provide an integrative perspective of the methods to determine AT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Glucose metabolism in anaerobic rice seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayne, R.G.; Kende, Hans

    1986-01-01

    More than 80% of the radioactivity from (U- 14 C)glucose metabolised by anaerobic rice seedlings or by excised roots or coleoptiles was recovered as ethanol plus CO 2 ; less than 5% was recovered as water-soluble acidic components. Rates of 14 CO 2 formation from (U- 14 C)glucose were similar in roots and coleoptiles in both N 2 and air atmospheres. More 14 C0 2 was formed from (U- 14 C)glucose than could be accounted for by ethanolic fermentation, and the specific yields of 14 CO 2 from (6- 14 C)glucose and (1- 14 C)glucose gave unusually high C-6/C-1 ratios (1.7) in the anaerobic coleoptile. The results may indicate that appreciable pentan synthesis occurs in the anaerobic coleoptile. (author)

  5. The role of anaerobes in patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia and aspiration pneumonia: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marik, P E; Careau, P

    1999-01-01

    Aspiration of oropharyngeal material, with its high concentration of anaerobic bacteria, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of both ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and aspiration pneumonitis (AP). Consequently, patients with these disorders are usually treated with antimicrobial agents with anaerobic activity. To determine the incidence of anaerobic bacteria in patients with VAP and AP. Prospective, nonrandomized, interventional study. University-affiliated community teaching hospital. We performed sequential blind protected specimen brush (PSB) sampling and mini-BAL in 143 patients with 185 episodes of suspected VAP and 25 patients with AP who required mechanical ventilation. Quantitative aerobic and anaerobic cultures were performed on all specimens. Pneumonia was considered to be present when either > 500 cfu/mL cultured from blind PSB sampling or > 5,000 cfu/mL cultured from mini-BAL were present. Using the predefined criteria, bacterial pneumonia was diagnosed in 63 of 185 suspected VAP episodes (34%) and 12 of 25 patients with AP (48%). At least one dose of an antibiotic was given in the 24 h prior to bacteriologic sampling in 106 suspected VAP episodes (57%) and in 12 patients with AP (48%). More than one pathogen was isolated from 11 VAP and four AP patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and enteric Gram-negative organisms were isolated most frequently from patients with VAP. In the patients with AP, enteric Gram-negative organisms were isolated in patients with GI disorders and Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae predominated in patients with "community-acquired" aspiration. Only one anaerobic organism was isolated from the entire group of patients; Veillonella paravula was isolated from a blind PSB specimen in a patient with suspected aspiration pneumonia. Despite painstaking effort, we were able to isolate only one anaerobic organism (nonpathogenic) from this group of patients. The spectrum of aerobes in

  6. Tillage-induced short-term soil organic matter turnover and respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Sebastian Rainer; Leinweber, Peter; Jurasinski, Gerald; Eckhardt, Kai-Uwe; Glatzel, Stephan

    2016-09-01

    Tillage induces decomposition and mineralisation of soil organic matter (SOM) by the disruption of macroaggregates and may increase soil CO2 efflux by respiration, but these processes are not well understood at the molecular level. We sampled three treatments (mineral fertiliser: MF; biogas digestate: BD; unfertilised control: CL) of a Stagnic Luvisol a few hours before and directly after tillage as well as 4 days later from a harvested maize field in northern Germany and investigated these samples by means of pyrolysis-field ionisation mass spectrometry (Py-FIMS) and hot-water extraction. Before tillage, the Py-FIMS mass spectra revealed differences in relative ion intensities of MF and CL compared to BD most likely attributable to the cattle manure used for the biogas feedstock and to relative enrichments during anaerobic fermentation. After tillage, the CO2 effluxes were increased in all treatments, but this increase was less pronounced in BD. We explain this by restricted availability of readily biodegradable carbon compounds and possibly an inhibitory effect of sterols from digestates. Significant changes in SOM composition were observed following tillage. In particular, lignin decomposition and increased proportions of N-containing compounds were detected in BD. In MF, lipid proportions increased at the expense of ammonia, ammonium, carbohydrates and peptides, indicating enhanced microbial activity. SOM composition in CL was unaffected by tillage. Our analyses provide strong evidence for significant short-term SOM changes due to tillage in fertilised soils.

  7. Characterization and Optimization of Dual Anaerobic/Aerobic Biofilm Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Togna, A

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this Phase I STTR effort was to develop and characterize a dual anaerobic/aerobic biofilm process that promotes anaerobic reductive dehalogenation and aerobic cometabolic biodegradation...

  8. A simple anaerobic system for onsite treatment of domestic wastewater

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    UASB), carbon footprint. INTRODUCTION. Domestic wastewater refers to the wastewater from toilet, bathroom and kitchen of household. Anaerobic treatment of organic material proceeds in the absence of oxygen and the presence of anaerobic ...

  9. The effect of tannic compounds on anaerobic wastewater treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Field, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is an alternative to the conventional aerobic treatment processes for the removal of easily biodegradable organic matter in medium to high strength industrial wastestreams. Anaerobic treatment has several advantages, however one important disadvantage is the

  10. Directed Evolution Reveals Unexpected Epistatic Interactions That Alter Metabolic Regulation and Enable Anaerobic Xylose Use by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Trey K; Tremaine, Mary; Parreiras, Lucas S; Hebert, Alexander S; Myers, Kevin S; Higbee, Alan J; Sardi, Maria; McIlwain, Sean J; Ong, Irene M; Breuer, Rebecca J; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; McGee, Mick A; Dickinson, Quinn; La Reau, Alex; Xie, Dan; Tian, Mingyuan; Reed, Jennifer L; Zhang, Yaoping; Coon, Joshua J; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gasch, Audrey P; Landick, Robert

    2016-10-01

    The inability of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert xylose from plant biomass into biofuels remains a major challenge for the production of renewable bioenergy. Despite extensive knowledge of the regulatory networks controlling carbon metabolism in yeast, little is known about how to reprogram S. cerevisiae to ferment xylose at rates comparable to glucose. Here we combined genome sequencing, proteomic profiling, and metabolomic analyses to identify and characterize the responsible mutations in a series of evolved strains capable of metabolizing xylose aerobically or anaerobically. We report that rapid xylose conversion by engineered and evolved S. cerevisiae strains depends upon epistatic interactions among genes encoding a xylose reductase (GRE3), a component of MAP Kinase (MAPK) signaling (HOG1), a regulator of Protein Kinase A (PKA) signaling (IRA2), and a scaffolding protein for mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis (ISU1). Interestingly, the mutation in IRA2 only impacted anaerobic xylose consumption and required the loss of ISU1 function, indicating a previously unknown connection between PKA signaling, Fe-S cluster biogenesis, and anaerobiosis. Proteomic and metabolomic comparisons revealed that the xylose-metabolizing mutant strains exhibit altered metabolic pathways relative to the parental strain when grown in xylose. Further analyses revealed that interacting mutations in HOG1 and ISU1 unexpectedly elevated mitochondrial respiratory proteins and enabled rapid aerobic respiration of xylose and other non-fermentable carbon substrates. Our findings suggest a surprising connection between Fe-S cluster biogenesis and signaling that facilitates aerobic respiration and anaerobic fermentation of xylose, underscoring how much remains unknown about the eukaryotic signaling systems that regulate carbon metabolism.

  11. Directed Evolution Reveals Unexpected Epistatic Interactions That Alter Metabolic Regulation and Enable Anaerobic Xylose Use by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trey K Sato

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The inability of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert xylose from plant biomass into biofuels remains a major challenge for the production of renewable bioenergy. Despite extensive knowledge of the regulatory networks controlling carbon metabolism in yeast, little is known about how to reprogram S. cerevisiae to ferment xylose at rates comparable to glucose. Here we combined genome sequencing, proteomic profiling, and metabolomic analyses to identify and characterize the responsible mutations in a series of evolved strains capable of metabolizing xylose aerobically or anaerobically. We report that rapid xylose conversion by engineered and evolved S. cerevisiae strains depends upon epistatic interactions among genes encoding a xylose reductase (GRE3, a component of MAP Kinase (MAPK signaling (HOG1, a regulator of Protein Kinase A (PKA signaling (IRA2, and a scaffolding protein for mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S cluster biogenesis (ISU1. Interestingly, the mutation in IRA2 only impacted anaerobic xylose consumption and required the loss of ISU1 function, indicating a previously unknown connection between PKA signaling, Fe-S cluster biogenesis, and anaerobiosis. Proteomic and metabolomic comparisons revealed that the xylose-metabolizing mutant strains exhibit altered metabolic pathways relative to the parental strain when grown in xylose. Further analyses revealed that interacting mutations in HOG1 and ISU1 unexpectedly elevated mitochondrial respiratory proteins and enabled rapid aerobic respiration of xylose and other non-fermentable carbon substrates. Our findings suggest a surprising connection between Fe-S cluster biogenesis and signaling that facilitates aerobic respiration and anaerobic fermentation of xylose, underscoring how much remains unknown about the eukaryotic signaling systems that regulate carbon metabolism.

  12. Respirator studies for the ERDA Division of Safety, Standards, and Compliance, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976. [Physiological effects of wearing respirators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, T.O.; Raven, P.B.; Shafer, C.L.; Linnebur, A.C.; Bustos, J.M.; Wheat, L.D.; Douglas, D.D.

    1977-03-01

    Results of a study to determine what effect wearing a respirator has on worker performance, and which physiological parameters an industrial physician should consider when examining an employee who will be wearing a respirator while working are presented. (TFD)

  13. Are there multiple mechanisms of anaerobic sulfur oxidation with ferric iron in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Jiri; Pakostova, Eva; Lochman, Jan; Janiczek, Oldrich; Mandl, Martin

    2016-06-01

    To clarify the pathway of anaerobic sulfur oxidation coupled with dissimilatory ferric iron reduction in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain CCM 4253 cells, we monitored their energy metabolism gene transcript profiles. Several genes encoding electron transporters involved in aerobic iron and sulfur respiration were induced during anaerobic growth of ferrous iron-grown cells. Most sulfur metabolism genes were either expressed at the basal level or their expression declined. However, transcript levels of genes assumed to be responsible for processing of elemental sulfur and other sulfur intermediates were elevated at the beginning of the growth period. In contrast, genes with predicted functions in formation of hydrogen sulfide and sulfate were significantly repressed. The main proposed mechanism involves: outer membrane protein Cyc2 (assumed to function as a terminal ferric iron reductase); periplasmic electron shuttle rusticyanin; c4-type cytochrome CycA1; the inner membrane cytochrome bc1 complex I; and the quinone pool providing connection to the sulfur metabolism machinery, consisting of heterodisulfide reductase, thiosulfate:quinone oxidoreductase and tetrathionate hydrolase. However, an alternative mechanism seems to involve a high potential iron-sulfur protein Hip, c4-type cytochrome CycA2 and inner membrane cytochrome bc1 complex II. Our results conflict with findings regarding the type strain, indicating strain- or phenotype-dependent pathway variation. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of electron acceptors on removal of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, resistance genes and class 1 integrons under anaerobic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Heyang; Miller, Jennifer H. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Abu-Reesh, Ibrahim M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713, Doha (Qatar); Pruden, Amy [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); He, Zhen, E-mail: zhenhe@vt.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Anaerobic biotechnologies can effectively remove antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), but there is a need to better understand the mechanisms. Here we employ bioelectrochemical systems (BES) as a platform to investigate the fate of a native tetracycline and sulfonamide-resistant Escherichia coli strain and its ARGs. The E. coli strain carrying intI1, sulI and tet(E) was isolated from domestic wastewater and dosed into a tubular BES. The BES was first operated as a microbial fuel cell (MFC), with aeration in the cathode, which resulted in enhanced removal of E. coli and ARGs by ~ 2 log (i.e., order of magnitude) when switched from high current to open circuit operation mode. The BES was then operated as a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to exclude the effects of oxygen diffusion, and the removal of E. coli and ARGs during the open circuit configuration was again 1–2 log higher than that at high current mode. Significant correlations of E. coli vs. current (R{sup 2} = 0.73) and ARGs vs. E. coli (R{sup 2} ranged from 0.54 to 0.87), and the fact that the BES substrate contained no electron acceptors, implied that the persistence of the E. coli and its ARGs was determined by the availability of indigenous electron acceptors in the BES, i.e., the anode electrode or the electron shuttles generated by the exoelectrogens. Subsequent experiments with pure-culture tetracycline and sulfonamide-resistant E. coli being incubated in a two-chamber MEC and serum bottles demonstrated that the E. coli could survive by respiring anode electrode and/or electron shuttles released by exoelectrogens, and ARGs persisted with their host E. coli. - Highlights: • The fate of an antibiotic resistant E. coli stain and its ARGs in BES is studied. • The removal of the E. coli and its ARGs is enhanced with decreased current. • The ARGs are removed when the host E. coli dies and persist when the host survives. • The survival of the E. coli depends

  15. Effects of electron acceptors on removal of antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, resistance genes and class 1 integrons under anaerobic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Heyang; Miller, Jennifer H.; Abu-Reesh, Ibrahim M.; Pruden, Amy; He, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic biotechnologies can effectively remove antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), but there is a need to better understand the mechanisms. Here we employ bioelectrochemical systems (BES) as a platform to investigate the fate of a native tetracycline and sulfonamide-resistant Escherichia coli strain and its ARGs. The E. coli strain carrying intI1, sulI and tet(E) was isolated from domestic wastewater and dosed into a tubular BES. The BES was first operated as a microbial fuel cell (MFC), with aeration in the cathode, which resulted in enhanced removal of E. coli and ARGs by ~ 2 log (i.e., order of magnitude) when switched from high current to open circuit operation mode. The BES was then operated as a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to exclude the effects of oxygen diffusion, and the removal of E. coli and ARGs during the open circuit configuration was again 1–2 log higher than that at high current mode. Significant correlations of E. coli vs. current (R 2 = 0.73) and ARGs vs. E. coli (R 2 ranged from 0.54 to 0.87), and the fact that the BES substrate contained no electron acceptors, implied that the persistence of the E. coli and its ARGs was determined by the availability of indigenous electron acceptors in the BES, i.e., the anode electrode or the electron shuttles generated by the exoelectrogens. Subsequent experiments with pure-culture tetracycline and sulfonamide-resistant E. coli being incubated in a two-chamber MEC and serum bottles demonstrated that the E. coli could survive by respiring anode electrode and/or electron shuttles released by exoelectrogens, and ARGs persisted with their host E. coli. - Highlights: • The fate of an antibiotic resistant E. coli stain and its ARGs in BES is studied. • The removal of the E. coli and its ARGs is enhanced with decreased current. • The ARGs are removed when the host E. coli dies and persist when the host survives. • The survival of the E. coli depends on the

  16. Susceptibility to simvastatin-induced toxicity is partly determined by mitochondrial respiration and phosphorylation state of Akt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Peter J; Zahno, Anja; Lindinger, Peter; Maseneni, Swarna; Felser, Andrea; Krähenbühl, Stephan; Brecht, Karin

    2011-12-01

    Statins are widely used to prevent cardiovascular diseases. They are well-tolerated, with side-effects mainly seen in skeletal muscle. How these side-effects are caused is unknown. We compared isolated primary mouse skeletal muscle myocytes, C2C12 myotubes and liver HepG2 cells to detect differences that could uncover why statins are toxic in skeletal muscle but less so in the liver. 10μM simvastatin caused a decrease in mitochondrial respiration in the primary mouse myocytes and C2C12 myotubes, but had no effect in the HepG2 cells. Mitochondrial integrity is maintained by multiple signaling pathways. One of these pathways, Igf-1/Akt signaling, is also heavily implicated in causing statin-induced toxicity by upregulating atrogin-1. We found that phosphorylated Akt was reduced in C2C12 myotubes but not in HepG2 cells. HepG2 mitochondrial respiration became susceptible to simvastatin-treatment after Akt inhibition, and mitochondrial respiration was rescued in Igf-1-treated C2C12 myotubes. These results suggest that disruption of Igf-1/Akt signaling is a causative factor in simvastatin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in C2C12 myotubes, whereas HepG2 cells are protected by maintaining Igf-1/Akt signaling. We conclude that phosphorylation of Akt is a key indicator of susceptibility to statin-induced toxicity. How statins can disrupt Igf-1/Akt signaling is unknown. Statins reduce geranylgeranylation of small GTPases, such as Rap1. Previous studies implicate Rap1 as a link between cAMP/Epac and Igf-1/Akt signaling. Transient transfection of constitutively active Rap1 into C2C12 myotubes led to a partial rescue of simvastatin-induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, providing a novel link between signaling and respiration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Partitioning of Respiration in an Animal-Algal Symbiosis: Implications for Different Aerobic Capacity Between Symbiodinium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas David Hawkins

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbioses are ecologically important and the subject of much investigation. However, our understanding of critical aspects of symbiosis physiology, such as the partitioning of total respiration between the host and symbiont, remains incomplete. Specifically, we know little about how the relationship between host and symbiont respiration varies between different holobionts (host-symbiont combinations. We applied molecular and biochemical techniques to investigate aerobic respiratory capacity in naturally symbiotic Exaiptasia pallida sea anemones, alongside animals infected with either homologous ITS2-type A4 Symbiodinium or a heterologous isolate of Symbiodinium minutum (ITS2-type B1. In naturally symbiotic anemones, host, symbiont, and total holobiont mitochondrial citrate synthase (CS enzyme activity, but not host mitochondrial copy number, were reliable predictors of holobiont respiration. There was a positive association between symbiont density and host CS specific activity (mg protein-1, and a negative correlation between host- and symbiont CS specific activities. Notably, partitioning of total CS activity between host and symbiont in this natural E. pallida population was significantly different to the host/symbiont biomass ratio. In re-infected anemones, we found significant between-holobiont differences in the CS specific activity of the algal symbionts. Furthermore, the relationship between the partitioning of total CS activity and the host/symbiont biomass ratio differed between holobionts. These data have broad implications for our understanding of cnidarian-algal symbiosis. Specifically, the long-held assumption of equivalency between symbiont/host biomass and respiration ratios can result in significant overestimation of symbiont respiration and potentially erroneous conclusions regarding the percentage of carbon translocated to the host. The interspecific variability in symbiont aerobic capacity provides

  18. Aerobic versus Anaerobic Microbial Degradation of Clothianidin under Simulated California Rice Field Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Rebecca A; Tomco, Patrick L; Howard, Megan W; Schempp, Tabitha T; Stewart, Davis J; Stacey, Phillip M; Ball, David B; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2016-09-28

    Microbial degradation of clothianidin was characterized under aerobic and anaerobic California rice field conditions. Rate constants (k) and half-lives (DT50) were determined for aerobic and anaerobic microcosms, and an enrichment experiment was performed at various nutrient conditions and pesticide concentrations. Temperature effects on anaerobic degradation rates were determined at 22 ± 2 and 35 ± 2 °C. Microbial growth was assessed in the presence of various pesticide concentrations, and distinct colonies were isolated and identified. Slow aerobic degradation was observed, but anaerobic degradation occurred rapidly at both 25 and 35 °C. Transformation rates and DT50 values in flooded soil at 35 ± 2 °C (k = -7.16 × 10(-2) ± 3.08 × 10(-3) day(-1), DT50 = 9.7 days) were significantly faster than in 25 ± 2 °C microcosms (k= -2.45 × 10(-2) ± 1.59 × 10(-3) day(-1), DT50 = 28.3 days). At the field scale, biodegradation of clothianidin will vary with extent of oxygenation.

  19. In-vitro activity of solithromycin against anaerobic bacteria from the normal intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Andrej; Rashid, Mamun-Ur; Nord, Carl Erik

    2016-12-01

    Solithromycin is a novel fluoroketolide with high activity against bacteria associated with community-acquired respiratory tract infections as well as gonorrhea. However, data on the activity of solithromycin against anaerobic bacteria from the normal intestinal microbiota are scarce. In this study, 1024 Gram-positive and Gram-negative anaerobic isolates from the normal intestinal microbiota were analyzed for in-vitro susceptibility against solithromycin and compared to azithromycin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftriaxone, metronidazole and levofloxacin by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Solithromycin was active against Bifidobacteria (MIC 50 , 0.008 mg/L) and Lactobacilli (MIC 50 , 0.008 mg/L). The MIC 50 for Clostridia, Bacteroides, Prevotella and Veillonella were 0.5, 0.5, 0.125 and 0.016 mg/L, respectively. Gram-positive anaerobes were more susceptible to solithromycin as compared to the other antimicrobials tested. The activity of solithromycin against Gram-negative anaerobes was equal or higher as compared to other tested agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fermentative Degradation of Polyethylene Glycol by a Strictly Anaerobic, Gram-Negative, Nonsporeforming Bacterium, Pelobacter venetianus sp. nov

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    The synthetic polyether polyethylene glycol (PEG) with a molecular weight of 20,000 was anaerobically degraded in enrichment cultures inoculated with mud of limnic and marine origins. Three strains (Gra PEG 1, Gra PEG 2, and Ko PEG 2) of rod-shaped, gram-negative, nonsporeforming, strictly anaerobic bacteria were isolated in mineral medium with PEG as the sole source of carbon and energy. All strains degraded dimers, oligomers, and polymers of PEG up to a molecular weight of 20,000 completely...

  1. Anaerobic digestion of cider apple residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras Lopez, A. (E.T.S.I.I., U.N.E.D., Madrid (Spain). Dept. Quimica Applicada a la Ingenieria); Lopez Bobo, R. (E.T.S. Ingeneiros Industriales, Asturias (Spain). Dept. de Energia)

    1992-12-01

    Apple residue from the cider industry is used here for anaerobic fermentation. The effect of retention time and volatile solids concentration on the production of biogas and methane was investigated by using continuously mixed anaerobic fermentors with a working volume of 1 1. The maximum proportions of biogas and methane obtained were 430 1 biogas/kg per day (12 days' retention time and 3% of volatile solids) and 281 1 of methane per day (a retention time of 30 days and 2% of volatile solids), respectively. (author)

  2. Anaerobic bacteria, the colon and colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, W E

    1980-02-01

    Anaerobic bacteria constitute more than 90% of the bacteria in the colon. An anaerobic environment is needed to maintain their growth and the production of short-chain fatty acids by these bacteria from carbohydrates. Short-chain fatty acids are rapidly absorbed and essential for metabolic as well as functional welfare of the colonic mucosa. The importance of these acids in water absorption and in the patogenesis of colitis is discussed in relation to the concept of "energy deficiency diseases" of the colonic mucosa.

  3. Methane from Syngas by Anaerobic Digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Sanjay; Bergland, Wenche Hennie; Bakke, Rune

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a prominent green technology used for methane production from organic waste. Previous studies have shown that the amount of CH4 produced during anaerobic digestion can be increased by adding inorganic electron donors such as H2 and CO, both which can be produced as syngas from wood. Syngas inflow is implemented in the ADM1 model and simulations are carried out with different syngas additions to a well-documented case of wastewater treatment plant sludge AD. Three d...

  4. Renewable methane from anaerobic digestion of biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chynoweth, D.P.; Owens, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Production of methane via anaerobic digestion of energy crops and organic wastes would benefit society by providing a clean fuel from renewable feedstocks. This would replace fossil fuel-derived energy and reduce environmental impacts including global warming and acid rain. Although biomass energy is more costly than fossil fuel-derived energy, trends to limit carbon dioxide and other emissions through emission regulations, carbon taxes, and subsidies of biomass energy would make it cost competitive. Methane derived from anaerobic digestion is competitive in efficiencies and costs to other biomass energy forms including heat, synthesis gases, and ethanol. (author)

  5. Anaerobic digestion of industrial activated aerobic sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodloe, J.G.; Roberts, R.S.

    1990-04-01

    The Tennessee Eastman Company manufactures a variety of organic chemicals, plastics and fibers at their Kingsport Tennessee Facility. The wastewater generated during the manufacture of these compounds is currently treated using an activated sludge process. The objective of the project is to evaluate the economic potential of an anaerobic digestion process to convert industrial sludge at the Tennessee Eastman Company into biogas. The evaluation will require collection and analysis of experimental data on the anaerobic digestion of industrial sludge obtained from Kingsport. Although the experiments will be conducted using Tennessee Eastman sludge, these results should be also generally applicable to similar industrial sludge

  6. Effect of Oxygen on Verbenone Conversion From cis-Verbenol by Gut Facultative Anaerobes of Dendroctonus valens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingjie Cao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction from North America, Dendroctonus valens LeConte has become a destructive forest pest in China. Although gut aerobic bacteria have been investigated and some are implicated in beetle pheromone production, little is known about the abundance and significance of facultative anaerobic bacteria in beetle gut, especially with regards to effects of oxygen on their role in pheromone production. In this study, we isolated and identified gut bacteria of D. valens adults in an anaerobic environment, and further compared their ability to convert cis-verbenol into verbenone (a multi-functional pheromone of D. valens under different O2 concentrations. Pantoea conspicua, Enterobacter xiangfangensis, Staphylococcus warneri were the most frequently isolated species among the total of 10 species identified from beetle gut in anaerobic conditions. Among all isolated species, nine were capable of cis-verbenol to verbenone conversion, and the conversion efficiency increased with increased oxygen concentration. This O2-mediated conversion of cis-verbenol to verbenone suggests that gut facultative anaerobes of D. valens might play an important role in the frass, where there is higher exposure to oxygen, hence the higher verbenone production. This claim is further supported by distinctly differential oxygen concentrations between gut and frass of D. valens females.

  7. Genomic analysis of Melioribacter roseus, facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep lineage within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly V Kadnikov

    Full Text Available Melioribacter roseus is a moderately thermophilic facultatively anaerobic organotrophic bacterium representing a novel deep branch within Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group. To better understand the metabolic capabilities and possible ecological functions of M. roseus and get insights into the evolutionary history of this bacterial lineage, we sequenced the genome of the type strain P3M-2(T. A total of 2838 open reading frames was predicted from its 3.30 Mb genome. The whole proteome analysis supported phylum-level classification of M. roseus since most of the predicted proteins had closest matches in Bacteriodetes, Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, Firmicutes and deeply-branching bacterium Caldithrix abyssi, rather than in one particular phylum. Consistent with the ability of the bacterium to grow on complex carbohydrates, the genome analysis revealed more than one hundred glycoside hydrolases, glycoside transferases, polysaccharide lyases and carbohydrate esterases. The reconstructed central metabolism revealed pathways enabling the fermentation of complex organic substrates, as well as their complete oxidation through aerobic and anaerobic respiration. Genes encoding the photosynthetic and nitrogen-fixation machinery of green sulfur bacteria, as well as key enzymes of autotrophic carbon fixation pathways, were not identified. The M. roseus genome supports its affiliation to a novel phylum Ignavibateriae, representing the first step on the evolutionary pathway from heterotrophic ancestors of Bacteriodetes/Chlorobi group towards anaerobic photoautotrophic Chlorobi.

  8. In vitro effect of X radiation on respiration and glycolysis of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells of the mouse - an experimental comparison with the mouse tumortetanus assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negelein, E.; Schneeweiss, U.; Fabricius, E.M.; Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Krebsforschung)

    1979-01-01

    Depending on the dose of X-rays, in vitro irradiation of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells of the mouse affected both respiration and glycolysis. 38.7 C/kg irradiation suppressed the aerobic and anaerobic energy metabolism rather strongly followed by a reduction of the 'take' and growth of the subcutaneously injected tumour cells, as opposed to the growth behavior of non-irradiated cells. In analogy, tetanus mortality rates were reduced in the mouse tumor-tetanus assay with 38.7 C/kg irradiated cells. On the other hand, irradiation with 5.16 C/kg of Ehrlich carcinoma cells resulted in unchanged rates of respiration and glycolysis, in spite of the strongly limited growth capacity of the tumor cells. The tumor-tetanus assay of the mouse showed good correlation with subcutaneous tumor growth; no such correlation was found in the tetanus assay and the manometric values of respiration and glycolysis with 5.16 C/kg irradiated tumor cells. After subcutaneous injection of mixed cell suspensions consisting of 1 x 10 5 viable and 1 x 10 6 38.7 C/kg irradiated Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells as well as of 3 x 10 2 tetanus spores per single dose, we observed similar rates of tumor growth and tetanus mortality, respectively, if 1 x 10 5 viable tumor cells alone were administered together with 3 x 10 2 tetanus spores, without addition of irradiated tumor cells. (author)

  9. Optimization of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aghomotsegin

    2013-06-05

    Jun 5, 2013 ... grown in the bottom part of UASB reactor were more compact and tense than those that occurred in the ... anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic biological treatment, biogas, granulated anaerobic sludge, industrial wastewater. INTRODUCTION ... structure of filaments of methanogenic bacteria,.

  10. The developments of anaerobic baffled reactor for wastewater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-15

    Mar 15, 2010 ... Key words: Anaerobic baffled reactor, anaerobic process, reactor development, performance, solids retention, full-scale. INTRODUCTION. With the ... erobic reactors for the treatment of wastewater. As one of the high-rate anaerobic reactors, the ABR was extensively used in treating wastewater. The ABR ...

  11. The IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model No 1 (ADM1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batstone, D.J.; Keller, J.; Angelidaki, I.; Kalyuzhnyi, S.V.; Pavalostathis, S.G.; Rozzi, A.; Sanders, W.T.M.; Siegrist, H.; Vavilin, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    The IWA Anaerobic Digestion Modelling Task Group was established in 1997 at the 8th World Congress on Anaerobic Digestion (Sendai, Japan) with the goal of developing a generalised anaerobic digestion model. The structured model includes multiple steps describing biochemical as well as

  12. Anaerobic Digestion. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie, John W., Ed.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a four-lesson unit on anaerobic digestion control. Areas addressed include: (1) anaerobic sludge digestion (considering the nature of raw sludge, purposes of anaerobic digestion, the results of digestion, types of equipment, and other topics); (2) digester process control (considering feeding…

  13. The IWA Anaerobic digestion model no 1. (ADM1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batstone, Damien J.; Keller, J.; Angelidaki, Irini

    2002-01-01

    The IWA Anaerobic Digestion Modelling Task Group was established in 1997 at the 8th World Congress on Anaerobic Digestion (Sendai, Japan) with the goal of developing a generalised anaerobic digestion model. The structured model includes multiple steps describing biochemical as well...

  14. Impact of Land Use on Soil Respiration in Southwestern Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodosio, B.; Daly, E.; Pauwels, V. R. N.

    2015-12-01

    Land use management is one of the key contributors to the global environmental change. Considerable changes in landscapes have been experienced in Southwestern Victoria, Australia in the past two decades. Eucalyptus globulus (blue gum) plantations have expanded, resulting in possible changes in the water and carbon balances of catchments. The shift from pastures to plantations could have a significant impact on the local carbon balance with possible effects on atmospheric CO2 concentration and vegetation productivity. We present preliminary measurements from a field study comparing soil respiration in a plantation and a pasture. Adjacent catchments in Southwestern Victoria, near Gatum, were used as study areas; the prominent difference between the two catchments is the land use, with one catchment being used as a pasture for livestock grazing and the other catchment being mainly planted with blue gums. The variability of soil respiration in the pasture is governed by differences in soil moisture and substrate content due to local features of the topography and livestock grazing. Soil respiration measurements in the plantation were taken on mounds, access tracks, and open spaces. Most observations on mounds had higher soil respiration possibly due to root and mycorrhizal respiration. The measurements in open spaces had comparable values with mound measurements; this might be due to a less limited radiation. The soil respiration between trees had lower values, possibly because of radiation limitation due to the canopy cover. These preliminary measurements allow us to compare soil respiration variability across catchments with different land uses. This is important to estimate CO2 fluxes from soil to the atmosphere in large areas and will be valuable in estimating gross primary production from measurements of net ecosystem exchange.

  15. Bariatric surgery rapidly improves mitochondrial respiration in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhawan, Sheetal; Richards, William; O'Hea, Martha F; Audia, Jonathon P; Alvarez, Diego F

    2013-12-01

    Obesity and its attendant comorbidities are an emerging epidemic. Chronic metabolic inflammation (metainflammation) is thought to precipitate obesity-associated morbidities; however, its mechanistic progression is poorly understood. Moreover, although interventions such as diet, exercise, and bariatric surgery can control body weight, their effects on metainflammation are also poorly understood. Recently, metainflammation and the pathobiology of obesity have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Herein we examined the effects of bariatric surgery on mitochondrial respiration as an index of resolving metainflammation in morbidly obese patients. This institutional review board-approved study involved morbidly obese patients (body mass index > 35 kg/m(2)) undergoing sleeve gastrectomy or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in peripheral blood monocytes and in skeletal muscle samples before surgery and at 12 weeks after surgery. Patient biometrics, homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) score, C-reactive protein, and lipid profile were analyzed. Twenty patients were enrolled and showed an average percent excess body weight loss of 30.3% weight loss at 12 weeks after surgery. Average HOMA-IR score decreased from 3.0 to 1.2 in insulin-resistant patients. C-reactive protein, an index of metainflammation, showed a modest decrease. Lipid profile remained stable. Intriguingly, mitochondrial basal and maximal respiration rates in peripheral blood monocytes increased after surgery. Basal rates of skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration were unchanged, but the maximal respiration rate trended toward an increase after surgery. Cellular and tissue mitochondrial respiration increased in a morbidly obese patient cohort after laparoscopic bariatric surgery. These changes were consistent in patients with postsurgical weight loss. Importantly, no significant changes or improvements occurred in canonical indices used to

  16. Mitochondrial respiration as a target for neuroprotection and cognitive enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Lima, F; Barksdale, Bryan R; Rojas, Julio C

    2014-04-15

    This paper focuses on brain mitochondrial respiration as a therapeutic target for neuroprotection and cognitive enhancement. We propose that improving brain mitochondrial respiration is an important future direction in research and treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other conditions associated with cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. The central thesis is that supporting and improving brain mitochondrial respiration constitutes a promising neurotherapeutic principle, with potential applications in AD as well as in a wide variety of neuropsychological conditions. We propose three different interventional approaches to improve brain mitochondrial respiration based on (a) pharmacology, (b) photobiomodulation and (c) nutrition interventions, and provide detailed examples for each type of intervention. First, low-dose USP methylene blue is described as a pharmacological intervention that can successfully increase mitochondrial respiration and result in memory enhancement and neuroprotection. Second, transcranial low-level light/laser therapy with near-infrared light is used to illustrate a photobiomodulation intervention with similar neurometabolic mechanisms of action as low-dose methylene blue. Finally, a nutrition intervention to improve mitochondrial respiration is proposed by increasing ketone bodies in the diet. The evidence discussed for each intervention supports a fundamental neurotherapeutic strategy based on improving oxidative energy metabolism while at the same time reducing the pro-oxidant tendencies of the nervous system. Targeting brain mitochondrial respiration with these three types of interventions is proposed as part of a holistic neurotherapeutic approach to improve brain energy metabolism and antioxidant defenses. This strategy represents a promising new bioenergetics direction for treatment of AD and other neuropsychological disorders featuring cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. Seasonality of temperate forest photosynthesis and daytime respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, R.; Munger, J. W.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.; Zahniser, M. S.; Davidson, E. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Saleska, S. R.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems currently offset one-quarter of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions because of a slight imbalance between global terrestrial photosynthesis and respiration. Understanding what controls these two biological fluxes is therefore crucial to predicting climate change. Yet there is no way of directly measuring the photosynthesis or daytime respiration of a whole ecosystem of interacting organisms; instead, these fluxes are generally inferred from measurements of net ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 exchange (NEE), in a way that is based on assumed ecosystem-scale responses to the environment. The consequent view of temperate deciduous forests (an important CO2 sink) is that, first, ecosystem respiration is greater during the day than at night; and second, ecosystem photosynthetic light-use efficiency peaks after leaf expansion in spring and then declines, presumably because of leaf ageing or water stress. This view has underlain the development of terrestrial biosphere models used in climate prediction and of remote sensing indices of global biosphere productivity. Here, we use new isotopic instrumentation to determine ecosystem photosynthesis and daytime respiration in a temperate deciduous forest over a three-year period. We find that ecosystem respiration is lower during the day than at night—the first robust evidence of the inhibition of leaf respiration by light at the ecosystem scale. Because they do not capture this effect, standard approaches overestimate ecosystem photosynthesis and daytime respiration in the first half of the growing season at our site, and inaccurately portray ecosystem photosynthetic light-use efficiency. These findings revise our understanding of forest-atmosphere carbon exchange, and provide a basis for investigating how leaf-level physiological dynamics manifest at the canopy scale in other ecosystems.

  18. [Baroreflexes originated in vertebral artery zones upon peripheral vein tonus, systemic arterial blood pressure, and external respiration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agadzhanian, N A; Kupriianov, S V

    2008-06-01

    The investigation was intended to study the role ofbaroreceptors ofhemodynamically isolated zone of vertebral arteries in regulation of peripheral veins tonus, arterial pressure and external respiration. Pressure decrease in this vascular reflexogenic zone led to reflex responses of increase in femoral vein tonus, elevation of blood pressure level and stimulation of external respiration. The opposite reflex responses of cardio-respiratory functional system to initial pressure activation of vertebral arteries baroreceptors are observed. Basing on generalization of our own findings and similar physiological and morphological researches of other authors, it is established that afferentation from the vertebral artery zone is a reflexogenic factor of somatic muscles' veins tonus regulation. These reflexes of capacity vessels tonic activity changes are part of cardio-respiratory responses of maintaining the tissue gaseous exchange.

  19. Anaerobic halo- alkaliphilic bacterial community of athalassic, hypersaline Mono lake and Owens Lake in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Detkova, Ekaterina N.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Hoover, Richard B.

    2003-02-01

    The bacterial diversity of microbial extremophiles from the meromictic, hypersaline Mono Lake and a small evaporite pool in Owens Lake of California was studied. In spite of these regions had differing mineral background and different concentrations of NaCl in water they contain the same halo- alkaliphiles anaerobic bacterial community. Three new species of bacteria were detected in this community: primary anaerobe, dissipotrophic saccharolytic spirochete Spirochaeta americana strain AspG1T, primary anaerobe which is proteolytic Tindallia californiensis strain APOT, and secondary anaerobe, hydrogen using Desulfonatronum thiodismutans strain MLF1T, which is sulfate- reducer with chemo-litho-autotrophic metabolism. All of these bacteria are obligate alkaliphiles and dependent upon Na+ ions and CO32- ions in growth mediums. It is interesting that closest relationships for two of these species were isolates from samples of equatorial African soda Magadi lake: Spirochaeta americana AspG1T has 99.4% similarity on 16S rDNA- analyses with Spirochaeta alkalica Z- 7491T, and Tindallia californiensis APOT has 99.1% similarity with Tindallia magadiensis Z-7934T. But result of DNA-DNA- hybridization demonstrated less then 50% similarity between Spirochaeta americana AspG1T and Spirochaeta alkalica Z-7491T. Percent of homology between Tindallia californiensis APOT and Tindallia magadiensis Z-7934T is only 55%. The sulfate-reducer from the alkalic anaerobic community of Magadi lake Desulfonatronovibrio hydrogenovorans Z-7935T was phylogenetically distant from this sulfate-reducer in Mono lake, but genetically closer (99.7% similarity) to the sulfate-reducer, isolated from Central Asian alkalic lake Khadyn in Siberia Desulfonatronum lacustre Z-7951T. The study of key enzymes (hydrogenase and CO- hydrogenase) in Tindallia californiensis APOT and Desulfonatronum thiodismutans MLF1T showed the presence of high activity of both the enzymes in first and only hydrogenase in second

  20. Common Mesophilic Anaerobes, Including Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium tetani, in 21 Soil Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Louis Ds.

    1975-01-01

    A relatively rich medium was markedly superior to a dilute medium for the isolation of anaerobic bacteria from soil. The obligate anaerobes isolated from 21 soil samples were all clostridia and the counts ranged from 2.7 × 102 to 3.3 × 106 per g. The organisms most frequently isolated were Clostridium subterminale, C. sordellii, C. sporogenes, C. indolis, C. bifermentans, C. mangenoti, and C. perfringens. Seventeen other species were also recognized but almost one-third of the isolates could not be identified with any known species of Clostridum. C. botulinum type A was demonstrated in six soil samples, and type B in one. These soils were neutral to alkaline in reaction (average pH 7.9) and low in organic matter content (1.4%). The association of C. botulinum types A and B with neutral to alkaline soils was statistically significant (P = 0.001) as was their association with soils low in organic matter (P = 0.005). C. botulinum types E and F were found in one soil sample, pH 4.5, with organic matter 13.7%. C. tetani was isolated from two soil samples, both of intermediate pH value and higher than average organic matter content. PMID:238468