WorldWideScience

Sample records for anaerobic respiration isolation

  1. Isolation, Growth, and Metabolism of an Obligately Anaerobic, Selenate-Respiring Bacterium, Strain SES-3

    OpenAIRE

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Blum, Jodi Switzer; Culbertson, Charles W.; Visscher, Pieter T.; Miller, Laurence G.; Dowdle, Phillip; Strohmaier, Frances E.

    1994-01-01

    A gram-negative, strictly anaerobic, motile vibrio was isolated from a selenate-respiring enrichment culture. The isolate, designated strain SES-3, grew by coupling the oxidation of lactate to acetate plus CO2 with the concomitant reduction of selenate to selenite or of nitrate to ammonium. No growth was observed on sulfate or selenite, but cell suspensions readily reduced selenite to elemental selenium (Se0). Hence, SES-3 can carry out a complete reduction of selenate to Se0. Washed cell sus...

  2. Isolation, growth, and metabolism of an obligately anaerobic, selenate- respiring bacterium, strain SES-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.; Blum, J.S.; Culbertson, C.W.; Visscher, P.T.; Miller, L.G.; Dowdle, P.; Strohmaier, F.E.

    1994-01-01

    A gram-negative, strictly anaerobic, motile vibrio was isolated from a selenate-respiring enrichment culture. The isolate, designated strain SES-3, grew by coupling the oxidation of lactate to acetate plus CO2 with the concomitant reduction of selenate to selenite or of nitrate to ammonium. No growth was observed on sulfate or selenite, but cell suspensions readily reduced selenite to elemental selenium (Se0). Hence, SES-3 can carry out a complete reduction of selenate to Se0. Washed cell suspensions of selenate- grown cells did not reduce nitrate, and nitrate-grown cells did not reduce selenate, indicating that these reductions are achieved by separate inducible enzyme systems. However, both nitrate-grown and selenate-grown cells have a constitutive ability to reduce selenite or nitrite. The oxidation of [14C]lactate to 14CO2 coupled to the reduction of selenate or nitrate by cell suspensions was inhibited by CCCP (carbonyl cyanide m- chlorophenylhydrazone), cyanide, and azide. High concentrations of selenite (5 mM) were readily reduced to Se0 by selenate-grown cells, but selenite appeared to block the synthesis of pyruvate dehydrogenase. Tracer experiments with [75Se]selenite indicated that cell suspensions could achieve a rapid and quantitative reduction of selenite to Se0. This reduction was totally inhibited by sulfite, partially inhibited by selenate or nitrite, but unaffected by sulfate or nitrate. Cell suspensions could reduce thiosulfate, but not sulfite, to sulfide. These results suggest that reduction of selenite to Se0 may proceed, in part, by some of the components of a dissimilatory system for sulfur oxyanions.

  3. Tellurite-, tellurate-, and selenite-based anaerobic respiration by strain CM-3 isolated from gold mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltman, Chris; Piercey-Normore, Michele D; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2015-09-01

    The newly discovered strain CM-3, a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium from gold mine tailings of the Central Mine in Nopiming Provincial Park, Canada, is capable of dissimilatory anaerobic reduction of tellurite, tellurate, and selenite. CM-3 possesses very high level resistance to these oxides, both aerobically and anaerobically. During aerobic growth, tellurite and tellurate resistance was up to 1500 and 1000 µg/ml, respectively. In the presence of selenite, growth occurred at the highest concentration tested, 7000 µg/ml. Under anaerobic conditions, resistance was decreased to 800 µg/ml for the Te oxides; however, much like under aerobic conditions, growth with selenite still took place at 7000 µg/ml. In the absence of oxygen, CM-3 couples oxide reduction to an increase in biomass. Following an initial drop in viable cells, due to switching from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, there was an increase in CFU/ml greater than one order of magnitude in the presence of tellurite (6.6 × 10(3)-8.6 × 10(4) CFU/ml), tellurate (4.6 × 10(3)-1.4 × 10(5) CFU/ml), and selenite (2.7 × 10(5)-5.6 × 10(6) CFU/ml). A control culture without metalloid oxides showed a steady decrease in CFU/ml with no recovery. ATP production was also increased in the presence of each oxide, further indicating anaerobic respiration. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed a 99.0 % similarity of CM-3 to Pseudomonas reactans. PMID:26254805

  4. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic...... consortia. Despite the potentially adverse effects, only few inorganic electron acceptors potentially utilizable for anaerobic respiration have been investigated with respect to negative interactions in anaerobic digesters. In this chapter we review competitive and inhibitory interactions between anaerobic...... respiring populations and methanogenic consortia in bioreactors. Due to the few studies in anaerobic digesters, many of our discussions are based upon studies of defined cultures or natural ecosystems...

  5. Enumeration of Organohalide Respirers in Municipal Wastewater Anaerobic Digesters

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan J.K. Smith; Boothe, Melissa A; Brice A. Fiddler; Tania M. Lozano; Russel K. Rahi; Krzmarzick, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Organohalide contaminants such as triclosan and triclocarban have been well documented in municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), but the degradation of these contaminants is not well understood. One possible removal mechanism is organohalide respiration by which bacteria reduce the halogenated compound. The purpose of this study was to determine the abundance of organohalide-respiring bacteria in eight WWTP anaerobic digesters. The obligate organohalide respiring Dehalococcoides mccar...

  6. Fermentation and Anaerobic Respiration by Rhodospirillum rubrum and Rhodopseudomonas capsulata

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz, J E; Weaver, P. F.

    1982-01-01

    Rhodospirillum rubrum and Rhodopseudomonas capsulata were able to grow anaerobically in the dark either by a strict mixed-acid fermentation of sugars or, in the presence of an appropriate electron acceptor, by an energy-linked anaerobic respiration. Both species fermented fructose without the addition of accessory oxidants, but required the initial presence of bicarbonate before fermentative growth could begin. Major products of R. rubrum fermentation were succinate, acetate, propionate, form...

  7. Anaerobic Respiration on Tellurate and Other Metalloids in Bacteria from Hydrothermal Vent Fields in the Eastern Pacific Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Csotonyi, Julius T.; Stackebrandt, Erko; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the discovery of anaerobic respiration on tellurate by bacteria isolated from deep ocean (1,543 to 1,791 m) hydrothermal vent worms. The first evidence for selenite- and vanadate-respiring bacteria from deep ocean hydrothermal vents is also presented. Enumeration of the anaerobic metal(loid)-resistant microbial community associated with hydrothermal vent animals indicates that a greater proportion of the bacterial community associated with certain vent fauna resists and red...

  8. Anaerobic respiration of Escherichia coli in the mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Shari A; Gibson, Terri; Maltby, Rosalie C; Chowdhury, Fatema Z; Stewart, Valley; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2011-10-01

    The intestine is inhabited by a large microbial community consisting primarily of anaerobes and, to a lesser extent, facultative anaerobes, such as Escherichia coli, which we have shown requires aerobic respiration to compete successfully in the mouse intestine (S. A. Jones et al., Infect. Immun. 75:4891-4899, 2007). If facultative anaerobes efficiently lower oxygen availability in the intestine, then their sustained growth must also depend on anaerobic metabolism. In support of this idea, mutants lacking nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase have extreme colonization defects. Here, we further explore the role of anaerobic respiration in colonization using the streptomycin-treated mouse model. We found that respiratory electron flow is primarily via the naphthoquinones, which pass electrons to cytochrome bd oxidase and the anaerobic terminal reductases. We found that E. coli uses nitrate and fumarate in the intestine, but not nitrite, dimethyl sulfoxide, or trimethylamine N-oxide. Competitive colonizations revealed that cytochrome bd oxidase is more advantageous than nitrate reductase or fumarate reductase. Strains lacking nitrate reductase outcompeted fumarate reductase mutants once the nitrate concentration in cecal mucus reached submillimolar levels, indicating that fumarate is the more important anaerobic electron acceptor in the intestine because nitrate is limiting. Since nitrate is highest in the absence of E. coli, we conclude that E. coli is the only bacterium in the streptomycin-treated mouse large intestine that respires nitrate. Lastly, we demonstrated that a mutant lacking the NarXL regulator (activator of the NarG system), but not a mutant lacking the NarP-NarQ regulator, has a colonization defect, consistent with the advantage provided by NarG. The emerging picture is one in which gene regulation is tuned to balance expression of the terminal reductases that E. coli uses to maximize its competitiveness and achieve the highest possible population in

  9. Enumeration of Organohalide Respirers in Municipal Wastewater Anaerobic Digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bryan Jk; Boothe, Melissa A; Fiddler, Brice A; Lozano, Tania M; Rahi, Russel K; Krzmarzick, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Organohalide contaminants such as triclosan and triclocarban have been well documented in municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), but the degradation of these contaminants is not well understood. One possible removal mechanism is organohalide respiration by which bacteria reduce the halogenated compound. The purpose of this study was to determine the abundance of organohalide-respiring bacteria in eight WWTP anaerobic digesters. The obligate organohalide respiring Dehalococcoides mccartyi was the most abundant and averaged 3.3 × 10(7) copies of 16S rRNA genes per gram, while the Dehalobacter was much lower at 2.6 × 10(4) copies of 16S rRNA genes per gram. The genus Sulfurospirillum spp. was also detected at 1.0 × 10(7) copies of 16S rRNA genes per gram. No other known or putatively organohalide-respiring strains in the Dehalococcoidaceae family were found to be present nor were the genera Desulfitobacterium or Desulfomonile. PMID:26508873

  10. Anaerobic respiration on tellurate and other metalloids in bacteria from hydrothermal vent fields in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csotonyi, Julius T; Stackebrandt, Erko; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2006-07-01

    This paper reports the discovery of anaerobic respiration on tellurate by bacteria isolated from deep ocean (1,543 to 1,791 m) hydrothermal vent worms. The first evidence for selenite- and vanadate-respiring bacteria from deep ocean hydrothermal vents is also presented. Enumeration of the anaerobic metal(loid)-resistant microbial community associated with hydrothermal vent animals indicates that a greater proportion of the bacterial community associated with certain vent fauna resists and reduces metal(loid)s anaerobically than aerobically, suggesting that anaerobic metal(loid) respiration might be an important process in bacteria that are symbiotic with vent fauna. Isolates from Axial Volcano and Explorer Ridge were tested for their ability to reduce tellurate, selenite, metavanadate, or orthovanadate in the absence of alternate electron acceptors. In the presence of metal(loid)s, strains showed an ability to grow and produce ATP, whereas in the absence of metal(loid)s, no growth or ATP production was observed. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone depressed metal(loid) reduction. Anaerobic tellurate respiration will be a significant component in describing biogeochemical cycling of Te at hydrothermal vents. PMID:16820492

  11. The respiration pattern as an indicator of the anaerobic threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmohamadsadeghi, Leila; Vesin, Jean-Marc; Lemay, Mathieu; Deriaz, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    The anaerobic threshold (AT) is a good index of personal endurance but needs a laboratory setting to be determined. It is important to develop easy AT field measurements techniques in order to rapidly adapt training programs. In the present study, it is postulated that the variability of the respiratory parameters decreases with exercise intensity (especially at the AT level). The aim of this work was to assess, on healthy trained subjects, the putative relationships between the variability of some respiration parameters and the AT. The heart rate and respiratory variables (volume, rate) were measured during an incremental exercise performed on a treadmill by healthy moderately trained subjects. Results show a decrease in the variance of 1/tidal volume with the intensity of exercise. Consequently, the cumulated variance (sum of the variance measured at each level of the exercise) follows an exponential relationship with respect to the intensity to reach eventually a plateau. The amplitude of this plateau is closely related to the AT (r=-0.8). It is concluded that the AT is related to the variability of the respiration. PMID:26736320

  12. FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in the light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri

    OpenAIRE

    Septer, Alecia N.; Bose, Jeffrey L.; Dunn, Anne K.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri induces both anaerobic respiration and bioluminescence during symbiotic infection. In many bacteria, the oxygen-sensitive regulator FNR activates anaerobic respiration, and a preliminary study using the light-generating lux genes from V. fischeri MJ1 cloned in Escherichia coli suggested that FNR stimulates bioluminescence. To test for FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in V. fischeri, we generated fnr mutants of V. fischeri strains MJ1 and ES1...

  13. Anaerobic respiration: In vitro efficacy of Nitazoxanide against mitochondriate Acanthamoeba castellanii of the T4 genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Farooq, Maria; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic protist pathogen that is responsible for serious human and animal infection. Being one of the most frequently isolated protists from the environment, it is likely that it readily encounters microaerophilic environments. For respiration under anaerobic or low oxygen conditions in several amitochondriate protists, decarboxylation of pyruvate is catalyzed by pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase instead of pyruvate dehydrogenase. In support, Nitazoxanide, an inhibitor of pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase, is effective and non-mutagenic clinically against a range of amitochondriate protists, Giardia intestinalis, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichomonas vaginalis. The overall aim of the present study was to determine in vitro efficacy of Nitazoxanide against Acanthamoeba castellanii. At micromolar concentrations, the findings revealed that Nitazoxanide neither affected A. castellanii growth or viability nor amoeba-mediated host cell monolayer damage in vitro or extracellular proteolytic activities. Similarly, microaerophilic conditions alone had no significant effects. In contrast, microaerophilic conditions together with Nitazoxanide showed amoebicidal effects and inhibited A. castellanii-mediated host cell monolayer damage as well as extracellular proteases. Using encystation assays, it was observed that Nitazoxanide inhibited trophozoite transformation into cysts both under aerophilic and microaerophilic conditions. Furthermore, pre-treatment of cysts with Nitazoxanide inhibited A. castellanii excystation. These findings are important in the identification of potential targets that could be useful against parasite-specific respiration as well as to understand the basic biology of the life cycle of Acanthamoeba. PMID:26297676

  14. ISOLATION OF ANAEROBES IN DEEP SEATED PRESSURE ULCERS USING A NOVEL INNOVATIVE TECHNIQUE OF ANAEROBE ISOLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalbiaktluangi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Isolation of an anaerobe is usually neglected in hospitals with limited resources due to the expensive and complicated technique of anaerobic isolation methods, which is difficult to arrange in such resource poor settings. Conventionally adopted anaerobic culture methods such as Anaerobic jar, Gas-Pak, Anoxomat or Automated glove-box systems are extremely costly and cumbersome for single unit testing, but not suitable for small scale laboratories. However, anaerobic bacteria are not to be overlooked as they have made a comeback in clinical settings and are even showing resistance to Metronidazole, once thought to be the gold standard bullet against anaerobes. Deep seated pressure ulcers are usually the site where anaerobe causes an infection in synergy with aerobes. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES Isolation of anaerobes in deep seated pressure ulcers using a novel innovative technique and to study their antibiogram profile. MATERIALS AND METHODS Swabs taken from depth of deep seated pressure ulcers were immediately inoculated in Brucella blood agar at bedside and placed in polycarbonate airtight jar for anaerobic incubation using a novel innovative Modified Candle Jar technique. In this technique five grams of grease-free grade zero steel wool were dipped in 50ml freshly prepared acidified copper sulphate solution until the copper colour appeared. Excess solution was drained and the steel wool was moulded into a loose pad to fit on an open Petri plate placed on top of the inoculated Brucella blood agar plates. A white-wax candle was placed at the centre of this plate. A small test tube containing mixture of 0.5g sodium-bicarbonate and 0.5g magnesium carbonate was kept ready to be placed inside the jar, just after placing the inoculated plate and incubated for 48 hours. RESULTS Peptostreptococcus anaerobius and Bacteroides fragilis were successfully isolated from deep seated pressure ulcers by this method. Antibiogram studies were done using the

  15. NarK is a nitrite-extrusion system involved in anaerobic nitrate respiration by Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rowe, John J.; Ubbink-Kok, Trees; Molenaar, Douwe; Konings, Wilhelmus; Driessen, Arnold J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli can use nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration. A polytopic membrane protein, termed NarK, has been implicated in nitrate uptake and nitrite excretion and is thought to function as a nitrate/nitrite antiporter. The longest-lived radioactive isotope of nitr

  16. The role of anaerobic respiration in the immobilization of uranium through biomineralization of phosphate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salome, Kathleen R.; Green, Stefan J.; Beazley, Melanie J.; Webb, Samuel M.; Kostka, Joel E.; Taillefert, Martial

    2013-04-01

    Although bioreduction of uranyl ions (U(VI)) and biomineralization of U(VI)-phosphate minerals are both able to immobilize uranium in contaminated sediments, the competition between these processes and the role of anaerobic respiration in the biomineralization of U(VI)-phosphate minerals has yet to be investigated. In this study, contaminated sediments incubated anaerobically in static microcosms at pH 5.5 and 7.0 were amended with the organophosphate glycerol-2-phosphate (G2P) as sole phosphorus and external carbon source and iron oxides, sulfate, or nitrate as terminal electron acceptors to determine the most favorable geochemical conditions to these two processes. While sulfate reduction was not observed even in the presence of G2P at both pHs, iron reduction was more significant at circumneutral pH irrespective of the addition of G2P. In turn, nitrate reduction was stimulated by G2P at both pH 5.5 and 7.0, suggesting nitrate-reducing bacteria provided the main source of inorganic phosphate in these sediments. U(VI) was rapidly removed from solution in all treatments but was not reduced as determined by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Simultaneously, wet chemical extractions and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy of these sediments indicated the presence of U-P species in reactors amended with G2P at both pHs. The rapid removal of dissolved U(VI), the simultaneous production of inorganic phosphate, and the existence of U-P species in the solid phase indicate that uranium was precipitated as U(VI)-phosphate minerals in sediments amended with G2P. Thus, under reducing conditions and in the presence of G2P, bioreduction of U(VI) was outcompeted by the biomineralization of U(VI)-phosphate minerals and U(VI) sorption at both pHs.

  17. Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

  18. Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, D.; Tu, Q.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

  19. Diversity and ubiquity of bacteria capable of utilizing humic substances as electron donors for anaerobic respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, John D; Cole, Kimberly A; Chakraborty, Romy; O'Connor, Susan M; Achenbach, Laurie A

    2002-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that reduced humic substances (HS) can be reoxidized by anaerobic bacteria such as Geobacter, Geothrix, and Wolinella species with a suitable electron acceptor; however, little is known of the importance of this metabolism in the environment. Recently we investigated this metabolism in a diversity of environments including marine and aquatic sediments, forest soils, and drainage ditch soils. Most-probable-number enumeration studies were performed using 2,6-anthrahydroquinone disulfonate (AHDS), an analog for reduced HS, as the electron donor with nitrate as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic organisms capable of utilizing reduced HS as an electron donor were found in all environments tested and ranged from a low of 2.31 x 10(1) in aquifer sediments to a high of 9.33 x 10(6) in lake sediments. As part of this study we isolated six novel organisms capable of anaerobic AHDS oxidation. All of the isolates coupled the oxidation of AHDS to the reduction of nitrate with acetate (0.1 mM) as the carbon source. In the absence of cells, no AHDS oxidation was apparent, and in the absence of AHDS, no cell density increase was observed. Generally, nitrate was reduced to N(2). Analysis of the AHDS and its oxidized form, 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS), in the medium during growth revealed that the anthraquinone was not being biodegraded as a carbon source and was simply being oxidized as an energy source. Determination of the AHDS oxidized and nitrate reduced accounted for 109% of the theoretical electron transfer. In addition to AHDS, all of these isolates could also couple the oxidation of reduced humic substances to the reduction of nitrate. No HS oxidation occurred in the absence of cells and in the absence of a suitable electron acceptor, demonstrating that these organisms were capable of utilizing natural HS as an energy source and that AHDS serves as a suitable analog for studying this metabolism. Alternative electron donors included

  20. Metabolic potential of fatty acid oxidation and anaerobic respiration by abundant members of Thaumarchaeota and Thermoplasmata in deep anoxic peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Xueju [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Handley, Kim M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gilbert, Jack A. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Marine Biological Lab., Woods Hole, MA (United States); Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China); Kostka, Joel E. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-05-22

    To probe the metabolic potential of abundant Archaea in boreal peats, we reconstructed two near-complete archaeal genomes, affiliated with Thaumarchaeota group 1.1c (bin Fn1, 8% abundance), which was a genomically unrepresented group, and Thermoplasmata (bin Bg1, 26% abundance), from metagenomic data acquired from deep anoxic peat layers. Each of the near-complete genomes encodes the potential to degrade long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) via β-oxidation. Fn1 has the potential to oxidize LCFA either by syntrophic interaction with methanogens or by coupling oxidation with anaerobic respiration using fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Fn1 is the first Thaumarchaeota genome without an identifiable carbon fixation pathway, indicating that this mesophilic phylum encompasses more diverse metabolisms than previously thought. Furthermore, we report genetic evidence suggestive of sulfite and/or organosulfonate reduction by Thermoplasmata Bg1. In deep peat, inorganic TEAs are often depleted to extremely low levels, yet the anaerobic respiration predicted for two abundant archaeal members suggests organic electron acceptors such as fumarate and organosulfonate (enriched in humic substances) may be important for respiration and C mineralization in peatlands.

  1. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. Materials and Methods: One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. Results: A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Conclusions: Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics. PMID:26421133

  2. Diversity and Ubiquity of Bacteria Capable of Utilizing Humic Substances as Electron Donors for Anaerobic Respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Coates, John D.; Cole, Kimberly A.; Chakraborty, Romy; O'Connor, Susan M.; Achenbach, Laurie A.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that reduced humic substances (HS) can be reoxidized by anaerobic bacteria such as Geobacter, Geothrix, and Wolinella species with a suitable electron acceptor; however, little is known of the importance of this metabolism in the environment. Recently we investigated this metabolism in a diversity of environments including marine and aquatic sediments, forest soils, and drainage ditch soils. Most-probable-number enumeration studies were performed using 2,6-a...

  3. Nitrilotriacetate Stimulation of Anaerobic Fe(III) Respiration by Mobilization of Humic Materials in Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Luu, Y.; Ramsay, B. A.; Ramsay, J A

    2003-01-01

    An enrichment culture capable of naphthalene mineralization reduced Fe(III) oxides without direct contact in anaerobic soil microcosms when the Fe(III) was placed in dialysis membranes or entrapped within alginate beads. Both techniques demonstrated that a component in soil, possibly humic materials, facilitated Fe(III) reduction when direct contact between cells and Fe(III) was not possible. The addition of the synthetic Fe(III) chelator, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), to soil enhanced Fe(III)...

  4. Comparison of different medium bases for the semiquantitative isolation of anaerobes from vaginal secretions.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheppard, A.; Cammarata, C; Martin, D. H.

    1990-01-01

    Two studies were performed to determine the best medium for the isolation of anaerobes from vaginal secretions. In the first, three different medium bases (brucella, Centers for Disease Control [CDC], and Schaedler) were compared semiquantitatively for ability to support the growth of gram-negative anaerobes from vaginal fluid. Media were supplemented with laked sheep blood, kanamycin, and vancomycin. The brucella base agar formulation supported the growth of anaerobic gram-negative bacilli b...

  5. Reductive Dechlorination of Carbon Tetrachloride by Tetrachloroethene and Trichloroethene Respiring Anaerobic Mixed Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickstrom, K. E.; Azizian, M.; Semprini, L.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CT) is a toxic and recalcitrant groundwater contaminant with the potential to form a broad range of transformation products. Of the possible biochemical pathways through which CT can be degraded, reductive dehalogenation to less chlorinated compounds and mineralization to carbon dioxide (CO2) appear to be the most frequently utilized pathways by anaerobic organisms. Results will be presented from batch experiments of CT degradation by the Evanite (EV), Victoria Strain (VS) and Point Mugu (PM) anaerobic dechlorinating cultures. The cultures are grown in chemostats and are capable of transforming tetrachloroethene (PCE) or trichloroethene (TCE) to ethene by halorespiration via reductive dehalogenase enzymes. For the batch CT transformation tests, the cells along with supernatant were harvested from chemostats fed PCE or TCE, but never CT. The batch reactors were initially fed 0.0085 mM CT and an excess of formate (EV and VS) or lactate (PM) as electron donor. Transformation of CT was 100% with about 20% converted to chloroform (CF) and undetected products. Multiple additions of CT showed a slowing of pseudo first-order CT transformation rates across all cultures. Batch reactors were then established and fed 0.085 mM CT with an excess of electron donor in order to better quantify the reductive pathway. CT was transformed to CF and dichloromethane (DCM), with trace amounts of chloromethane (CM) detected. Between 60-90% of the mass added to the system was accounted for, showing that the majority of the carbon tetrachloride present is being reductively dehalogenated. Results from batch reactors that were poisoned using sodium azide, and from reactors not provided electron donor will be presented to distinguish between biotic and abiotic reactions. Furthermore, results from reactors prepared with acetylene (a potent, reversible inhibitor of reductive dehalogenases (1)) will be presented as a means of identifying the enzymes involved in the

  6. Genomic Analysis of Anaerobic Respiration in the Archaeon Halobacterium sp. Strain NRC-1: Dimethyl Sulfoxide and Trimethylamine N-Oxide as Terminal Electron Acceptors†

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Jochen A.; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated anaerobic respiration of the archaeal model organism Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1 by using phenotypic and genetic analysis, bioinformatics, and transcriptome analysis. NRC-1 was found to grow on either dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as the sole terminal electron acceptor, with a doubling time of 1 day. An operon, dmsREABCD, encoding a putative regulatory protein, DmsR, a molybdopterin oxidoreductase of the DMSO reductase family (DmsEABC), and...

  7. Isolation of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria from suspected enterotoxaemia cases in lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Mechael

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ninety cases of clinically diagnosed enterotoxemia infection in lambs at AL-Hamdaniya region where studied for isolation of aerobic and anaerobic bacterial causes, faecal samples were collected from all suspected cases during January- June 2008, the results show that 41.6% of the isolates were Cl. perfringens as pure single isolates, while mixed infection of Cl. perfringens with each of Enterococci and staphylococcus in percentage of 26.04%, 20.83% respectively, also mixed infection of Cl. septicum with each of Staphylococcus and E.coli were isolated at the percentage of 5.2%, 6.25% respectively. Highest bacterial isolation was from the faecal samples collected during April. McIntosh jar method show isolation of pure culture of anaerobic bacteria (Cl. perfringens, while Candle jar method show detection of 56 isolates in mixed cultures of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

  8. Photodynamic effects of haematoporphyrin on respiration and calcium uptake in isolated mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been demonstrated that haematoporphyrin photosensitized reactions produced in isolated mitochondria affect essential cellular functions such as respiration, oxidative phosphorylation and Ca2+ membrane transport. The results indicated that, at the wavelength of 365 nm, a dose of 150 mJ/cm2 was sufficient to modify the integrity of the electron transport chain in the presence of only 3 x 10-6 M HP in the respiratory medium. It seemed likely that isolated mitochondria began to be damaged at a lower dose than the dose required to be lethal in intact cells. (U.K.)

  9. What iron minerals contribute to anaerobic respiration in peats differing in maturity on the Arctic Coastal Plain ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masue-Slowey, Y.; Wagner, F. E.; Lipson, D.; Raab, T. K.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial Fe-reduction accounts for 30-60% of ecosystem respiration in drained thaw-lake tundra of the Arctic Coastal Plain. Near Barrow, we collected diffraction, Fe-XANES, Moessbauer spectra (RT and liqHe), and wet-chemical data on the Fe mineralogy of DTLB over an age gradient from 0 - 5500 y BP to delineate the important phases involved in microbial cycling of Fe. Soils were cored frozen in early June of 2010/ 2011, wrapped/ transported to CA by overnight express. Cores varying in age since formation were further sectioned, and transferred to an anaerobic hood for size-fractionation based on settling velocity, and subjected to bulk XRD at SSRL. Fe-XANES of both clay-separates and bulk soil were collected at BL 4-1. Subsamples were packed into anaerobic vials and sent for Moessbauer spectroscopy. Present in bulk soils of all ages by XRD were quartz, albite and vermiculite. Additional smectitic minerals, goethite and Fe-phosphates were evident in some basin classes, esp. Young and Medium. XANES confirmed wet-chem results of a highly-reduced state for Fe in bulk soils, and fits of XAFS indicated goethite as 20% of the reactive Fe-pool among basin-age classes. The most abundant Fe-containing minerals in clay fractions (Old and Young soils) were a ferrosmectite, or hornblende-derived mineral. (Fig.1) MB spectra from various depths of an Old Basin (300-2000 yrs BP) - the DTLB class of greatest areal extent -- revealed largely reduced Fe pools (50-60%), with goethite and a Fhd-like component visible (~23%). LHe spectra indicated the presence of goethite as ~ 20% of the MB-visible pool (Fig 2). Two prominent quadrupole doublets had QS=3.24 mm/s; IS = 1.10 mm/s and QS = 2.84; IS=1.05 mm/s, respectively, and upon oxidation, demonstrated divergent kinetics. We attribute the doublet with lower splitting to the ferrosmectite component visible by XAFS. Although previous sequential extractions of Barrow soil minerals suggested a sizeable component of siderites (indeed geochem

  10. Isolation and characterization of an anaerobic ruminal bacterium capable of degrading hydrolyzable tannins.

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, K E; A. N. Pell; Schofield, P; Zinder, S

    1995-01-01

    An anaerobic diplococcoid bacterium able to degrade hydrolyzable tannins was isolated from the ruminal fluid of a goat fed desmodium (Desmodium ovalifolium), a tropical legume which contains levels as high as 17% condensed tannins. This strain grew under anaerobic conditions in the presence of up to 30 g of tannic acid per liter and tolerated a range of phenolic monomers, including gallic, ferulic, and p-coumaric acids. The predominant fermentation product from tannic acid breakdown was pyrog...

  11. Fermentative characteristics and fibrolytic activities of anaerobic gut fungi isolated from wild and domestic ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Shyam S; Kamra, Devki N; Sastry, Vadali R B

    2010-08-01

    Fermentative characteristics and fibrolytic enzyme activities of anaerobic gut fungi from wild (17 isolates) and domestic ruminants (15 isolates) were examined. In a medium containing 0.5% wheat straw and 0.02% cellobiose as energy source, activities of carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase), avicelase, xylanase, acetyl esterase and protease produced by the fungal isolates were investigated. Average activity of CMCase (17.4 vs. 8.25 mIU ml(-1)), acetyl esterase (134 vs. 57 mIU ml(-1)) and protease (4400 vs. 1683 mIU ml(-1)) were significantly higher in isolates from wild ruminants than those from domestic ruminants. Xylanase and avicelase activities were comparable. When compared irrespective of source, fungal isolates having monocentric growth pattern produced more fibrolytic enzymes than isolates having polycentric growth pattern. CMCase, xylanase, avicelase activities were highest in Neocallimastix isolates. Acetyl esterase activity was highest in Piromyces and Neocallimastix isolates. Protease activity was highest in Piromyces isolates followed closely by Neocallimastix isolates. Between isolates from wild and domestic ruminants few differences were observed in pattern of carbohydrate utilisation and end products of fermentation. Inter-strain differences in the end product formation were apparent. All of the isolates produced acetate, lactate and formate; only a few isolates produced succinate. For isolation of superior fibrolytic isolates of anaerobic fungi, greater emphasis should be given to the screening of enzyme activities of isolates of genera Neocallimastix and Piromyces. PMID:20722299

  12. Isolation of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria from suspected enterotoxaemia cases in lambs

    OpenAIRE

    N. S. Mechael

    2012-01-01

    Ninety cases of clinically diagnosed enterotoxemia infection in lambs at AL-Hamdaniya region where studied for isolation of aerobic and anaerobic bacterial causes, faecal samples were collected from all suspected cases during January- June 2008, the results show that 41.6% of the isolates were Cl. perfringens as pure single isolates, while mixed infection of Cl. perfringens with each of Enterococci and staphylococcus in percentage of 26.04%, 20.83% respectively, also mixed infection of Cl. se...

  13. Biological conversion of biogas to methanol using methanotrophs isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Johnathon P; Ge, Xumeng; Li, Yueh-Fen; Yu, Zhongtang; Li, Yebo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate methanotrophs (methane oxidizing bacteria) that can directly convert biogas produced at a commercial anaerobic digestion (AD) facility to methanol. A methanotrophic bacterium was isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate. The isolate had characteristics comparable to obligate methanotrophs from the genus Methylocaldum. This newly isolated methanotroph grew on biogas or purified CH4 and successfully converted biogas from AD to methanol. Methanol production was achieved using several methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) inhibitors and formate as an electron donor. The isolate also produced methanol using phosphate with no electron donor or using formate with no MDH inhibitor. The maximum methanol concentration (0.43±0.00gL(-1)) and 48-h CH4 to methanol conversion (25.5±1.1%) were achieved using biogas as substrate and a growth medium containing 50mM phosphate and 80mM formate. PMID:26630583

  14. Properties of anaerobic fungi isolated from several habitats: complexity of phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelená, Viera; Birošová, Lucia; Olejníková, Petra; Polák, Martin; Lakatoš, Boris; Varečka, Ľudovít

    2016-01-01

    Isolates of anaerobic fungi from rumen, animal faeces and compost displayed morphological similarity with known anaerobic fungi. According to their ITS sequences, species were related to Neocallimastix and Piromyces. Rumen fungi tolerated exposure to an aerobic atmosphere for at least four days. Under anaerobic conditions, they could grow on both, defined or complex substrates. Growth in liquid media was monitored by the continuous measurement of metabolic gases (O2, CO2, H2, CO, H2S, CH4). Monitored metabolism was complex, showed that both CO2 and H2 were produced and subsequently consumed by yet unknown metabolic pathway(s). CO and H2S were evolved similarly, but not identically with the generation of CO2 and H2 suggesting their connection with energetic metabolism. Anaerobic fungi from snail faeces and compost produced concentrations of H2S, H2, CO near the lower limit of detection. The rumen isolates produced cellulases and xylanases with similar pH and temperature optima. Proteolytic enzymes were secreted as well. Activities of some enzymes of the main catabolic pathways were found in cell-free homogenates of mycelia. The results indicate the presence of the pentose cycle, the glyoxylate cycle and an incomplete citrate cycle in these fungi. Differences between isolates indicate phenotypic variability between anaerobic fungi. PMID:26612922

  15. In vitro activities of 10 antimicrobial agents against bacterial vaginosis-associated anaerobic isolates from pregnant Japanese and Thai women.

    OpenAIRE

    Puapermpoonsiri, S; Watanabe, K; Kato, N; K. Ueno

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro activities of 10 antimicrobial agents against 159 bacterial vaginosis-associated anaerobic isolates from pregnant Japanese and Thai women were determined. Clindamycin, imipenem, cefmetazole, amoxicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, and metronidazole were highly active against all anaerobic isolates except Prevotella bivia and Mobiluncus species, which were resistant to amoxicillin and metronidazole, respectively. Cefotiam, ceftazidime, and ofloxacin were variably effective, while ce...

  16. Buwchfawromyces eastonii gen. nov., sp. nov.: a new anaerobic fungus (Neocallimastigomycota isolated from buffalo faeces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Martin Callaghan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The novel anaerobic fungus Buwchfawromyces eastonii gen. nov., sp. nov., belonging to order Neocallimastigales (phylum Neocallimastigomycota is described. Morphologically similar to Piromyces but genetically quite distinct, this fungus (isolate GE09 was first isolated from buffalo faeces in west Wales and then subsequently isolated from sheep, cattle and horse in the same area. Phylogenetic analysis of LSU and ITS sequence confirmed that B. eastonii isolates formed a distinct clade close to the polycentric Anaeromyces spp. The morphology of GE09 is monocentric with monoflagellate zoospores. However, the sporangial stalk (sporangiophore is often distinctly swollen and the proximal regions of the rhizoidal system twisted in appearance.

  17. Dehalobacter restrictus gen. nov. and sp. nov., a strictly anaerobic bacterium that reductively dechlorinates tetra- and trichloroethene in an anaerobic respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holliger, C; Hahn, D; Harmsen, H; Ludwig, W; Schumacher, W; Tindall, B; Vazquez, F; Weiss, N; Zehnder, AJB

    1998-01-01

    The highly enriched anaerobic bacterium that couples the reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene to growth, previously referred to as PER-K23, was obtained in pure culture and characterized. The bacterium, which does not form spores, is a small, gram-negative rod with one lateral flagellum. It

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. Strain PSR-1, an Arsenate-Respiring Bacterium Isolated from Arsenic-Contaminated Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Tonomura, Mimori; Ehara, Ayaka; Suzuki, Haruo; Amachi, Seigo

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of Anaeromyxobacter sp. strain PSR-1, an arsenate-respiring bacterium isolated from arsenic-contaminated soil. It contained three distinct arsenic resistance gene clusters (ars operons), while no respiratory arsenate reductase gene (arr) was identified.

  19. Isolation and identification of bacteria responsible for simultaneous anaerobic ammonium and sulfate removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation is a novel biological reaction,in which ammonium is oxidized with sulfate as the electron acceptor under anoxic conditions.Ammonium and sulfate are cosmopolitan chemical species which are an integral part of the global nitrogen and sulfur cycles.A detailed exploration of sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation is quite practical.In this work,a bacterial strain named ASR has been isolated from an anaerobic ammonia and sulfate removing reactor working under steady-state.On the basis of electron microscopy,physiological tests and 16S rDNA phylogenetic sequence analysis,the strain ASR is found to be related to Bacillus benzoevorans.According to the biological carbon source utilization test,the strain ASR could use many carbon sources.Its optimum pH value and temperature were 8.5 and 30 °C,respectively.The test proves that the strain ASR is able to use sulfate to oxidize ammonia anaerobically.The maximum ammonia and sulfate removal rates were 44.4% and 40.0%,respectively.The present study provided biological evidence for the confirmation and development of sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation and brought new insights into the global nitrogen and sulfur cycles.

  20. Helicobacter ganmani sp nov., a urease-negative anaerobe isolated from the intestines of laboratory mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, B.R.; O'Rourke, J.L.; Vandamme, P.;

    2001-01-01

    Spiral bacteria were isolated from the intestines of laboratory mice during a study examining the presence of Helicobacter species and other spiral organisms naturally infecting mice maintained at four different animal facilities in Sydney, Australia. One group of 17 isolates, cultured from mice...... from three of the four facilities, were found to be helicobacters but did not fall within any of the 18 currently recognized species. These isolates were unusual in that they only grew anaerobically at 37 degreesC and were incapable of growth under microaerobic conditions. Like Helicobacter rodentium...

  1. TELLURITE RESISTANCE AND REDUCTION DURING AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC GROWTH OF BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM SARCHESHME COPPER MINE

    OpenAIRE

    A. Akhavan Sepahei ، V. Rashetnia

    2009-01-01

    Tellurium compounds can be found in high concentrations in land and water near sites of waste discharge of industrial manufacturing processes and anodic sludge of copper mine. Potassium tellurite (K2TeO3) is toxic to many microorganisms at concentrations >1mg/mL. In this research, some species of facultative anaerobic bacteria (Bacillus sp.) were isolated from Sarcheshme copper mine(Kerman, Iran) which demonstrated high-level-resistance to tellurite and accumulation of metallic tellurium crys...

  2. Isolation of a tannic acid-degrading Streptococcus sp. from an anaerobic shea cake digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitiema, L W; Dianou, D; Simpore, J; Karou, S D; Savadogo, P W; Traore, A S

    2010-01-01

    An anaerobic digester fed with shea cake rich in tannins and phenolic compounds rich-shea cake and previously inoculated with anaerobic sludge from the pit of a slaughterhouse, enabled six months acclimatization of the bacteria to aromatic compounds. Afterwards, digester waste water samples were subject to successive culture on media with 1 g L(-1) tannic acid allowing the isolation of a bacterial strain coded AB. Strain AB was facultatively anaerobic, mesophilic, non-motile, non-sporulating, catalase and oxidase negative bacterium, namely strain AB, was isolated from an anaerobic digester fed with shea cake rich in tannins and phenolic compounds, after inoculation with anaerobic sludge from the pit of a slaughterhouse and enrichment on tannic acid. The coccoid cells occurred in pair, short or long chains and stained Gram-positive. Strain AB fermented a wide range of carbohydrates including glucose, fructose, galactose, raffinose, arabinose, sucrose, maltose, lactose, starch and cellulose. Optimum growth occurred with glucose and tannic acid at 37 degrees C and pH 8. The pH, temperature and salt concentration for growth ranged from 5 to 9, 20 to 45 degrees C and 0 to 15 g L(-1), respectively. Strain AB converted tannic acid to gallic acid. These features were similar to those of the Streptococcus genus. The determination of tannic acid hydrolysis end products, ability to utilize various organic acids, alcohols and peptides, GC% of the DNA, the sequencing of 16S rRNA gene and DNA-DNA hybridization will permit to confirm this affiliation and to determine the species. PMID:20415153

  3. Molecular and Stable Isotope Investigation of Nitrite Respiring Bacterial Communities Capable of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (ANAMMOX) and Denitrifying Anaerobic Methane Oxidation (DAMO) in Nitrogen Contaminated Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, B.; Hirsch, M.; Taylor, J.; Smith, R. L.; Repert, D.; Tobias, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) and denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) are two recently discovered N2 production pathways in the microbial nitrogen cycle. ANAMMOX has been relatively well investigated in various aquatic ecosystems, while DAMO has been examined only in freshwater wetlands. However, neither ANAMMOX nor DAMO have been studied in groundwater ecosystems as microbial N removal processes where they could compliment or compete with denitrification to remediate N contaminated aquifers. Thus, we conducted molecular and stable isotope analyses to detect and measure ANAMMOX and DAMO in a nitrogen contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The study site has a plume of nitrogen contaminated groundwater as a result of continuous discharge of treated wastewater over 60 years. Groundwater was collected from multiport sampling devices installed at two sites, near the waste-water disposal location (A) and more than 3 km down gradient (B) along the contamination plume. Biomass was collected from water samples for DNA extraction and 15N tracer incubation experiments. PCR with specific 16S rRNA gene primers detected the presence of ANAMMOX and DAMO bacteria at both sites. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes revealed that the ANAMMOX community at site A was most associated with Kuenenia spp. while site B had a community more closely related to Brocadia spp. The DAMO communities at the two sites were quite different based on 16S rRNA gene analysis. The communities at site B are closely associated with Candidatus “Methylomirabilis oxyfera”, which is the first enriched DAMO culture. Most of the 16S rRNA sequences detected in site A were related to those found in other DAMO enrichment cultures established from a eutrophic ditch sediment. In order to determine active members of ANAMMOX communities, the transcriptional expression of hydrazine oxidase (hzo) and hydrazine hydrolase (hh) genes was examined at both sites. In addition, 15N tracer

  4. A novel denitrifying bacterial isolate that degrades trimethylamine both aerobically and anaerobically via two different pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S G; Bae, H S; Lee, S T

    2001-10-01

    The aerobic and anaerobic degradation of trimethylamine by a newly isolated denitrifying bacterium from an enrichment culture with trimethylamine inoculated with activated sludge was studied. Based on 16S rDNA analysis, this strain was identified as a Paracoccus sp. The isolate, strain T231, aerobically degraded trimethylamine, dimethylamine and methylamine and released a stoichiometric amount of ammonium ion into the culture fluid as a metabolic product, indicating that these methylated amines were completely degraded to formaldehyde and ammonia. The strain degraded trimethylamine also under denitrifying conditions and consumed a stoichiometric amount of nitrate, demonstrating that complete degradation of trimethylamine was coupled with nitrate reduction. Cell-free extract prepared from cells grown aerobically on trimethylamine exhibited activities of trimethylamine mono-oxygenase, trimethylamine N-oxide demethylase, dimethylamine mono-oxygenase, and methylamine mono-oxygenase. Cell-free extract from cells grown anaerobically on trimethylamine and nitrate exhibited activities of trimethylamine dehydrogenase and dimethylamine dehydrogenase. These results indicate that strain T231 had two different pathways for aerobic and anaerobic degradation of trimethylamine. This is a new feature for trimethylamine metabolism in denitrifying bacteria. PMID:11685371

  5. Desulfurella amilsii sp. nov., a novel acidotolerant sulfur-respiring bacterium isolated from acidic river sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentino, Anna P; Brienza, Claudio; Stams, Alfons J M; Sánchez-Andrea, Irene

    2016-03-01

    A novel acidotolerant and moderately thermophilic sulfur-reducing bacterium was isolated from sediments of the Tinto River (Spain), an extremely acidic environment. Strain TR1T stained Gram-negative, and was obligately anaerobic, non-spore-forming and motile. Cells were short rods (1.5-2 × 0.5-0.7 μm), appearing singly or in pairs. Strain TR1T was catalase-negative and slightly oxidase-positive. Urease activity and indole formation were absent, but gelatin hydrolysis was present. Growth was observed at 20-52 °C with an optimum close to 50 °C, and a pH range of 3-7 with optimum between pH 6 and 6.5. Yeast extract was essential for growth, but extra vitamins were not required. In the presence of sulfur, strain TR1T grew with acetate, formate, lactate, pyruvate, stearate, arginine and H2/CO2. All substrates were completely oxidized and H2S and CO2 were the only metabolic products detected. Besides elemental sulfur, thiosulfate was used as an electron acceptor. The isolate also grew by disproportionation of elemental sulfur. The predominant cellular fatty acids were saturated components: C16 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0 and C18 : 0. The only quinone component detected was menaquinone MK-7(H2). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 34 mol%. The isolate is affiliated to the genus Desulfurella of the class Deltaproteobacteria, sharing 97 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with the four species described in the genus Desulfurella. Considering the distinct physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, strain TR1T represents a novel species within the genus Desulfurella, for which the name Desulfurella amilsii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TR1T ( = DSM 29984T = JCM 30680T). PMID:26704766

  6. A Diverse Community of Metal(loid) Oxide Respiring Bacteria Is Associated with Tube Worms in the Vicinity of the Juan de Fuca Ridge Black Smoker Field

    OpenAIRE

    Maltman, Chris; Walter, Graham; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Epibiotic bacteria associated with tube worms living in the vicinity of deep sea hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean were investigated for the ability to respire anaerobically on tellurite, tellurate, selenite, selenate, metavanadate and orthovanadate as terminal electron acceptors. Out of 107 isolates tested, 106 were capable of respiration on one or more of these oxides, indicating that metal(loid) oxide based respiration is not only much more prevalent in natu...

  7. Distribution of secretory inhibitor of platelet microbiddal protein among anaerobic bacteria isolated from stool of children with diarrhea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Iuri B Ivanov; Viktor A Gritsenko

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the secretory inhibitor of platelet microbicidal protein (SIPHP) phenotypes of faecal anaerobic isolates from patients with diarrhea.METHODS: Faecal isolates of anaerobic bacteria(B.fragiliS,n=42; B.longum,n=70;A.israelii,n=21;E.lentum,n=12) from children with diarrhea were tested.SlPHP production was tested by inhibition of platelet microbicidal protein (PHP) bioactivity against B.subtilis and was expressed as percentage of inhibition of PMP bactericidal activity.RESULTS: Among anaerobic isolates 80% of B.Iongum strains,85.7% of A.israelii strains,50%of E.lentum strains and 92.86% of B.fragilis strains were SIPMP-positive.The isolated anaerobic organisms demonstrated SIPHP production at a mean level of 13.8%±0.7%,14.7%±1.8%,3.9%±0.9% (P<0.05) and 26.8%±7.5% (P<0.05) for bifidobacteria,A.israelii,E.lentum and B.fragilis,respectively.CONCLUSION: Data from the present study may have significant implications in understanding the pathogenesis of microecological disorders in the intestine,as well as for future improvement in the prevention and therapy of anaerobe-associated infections.

  8. Sequence and Genetic Characterization of etrA, an fnr Analog that Regulates Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffarini, Daad A.; Nelson, Kenneth H.

    1993-01-01

    An electron transport regulatory gene, etrA, has been isolated and characterized from the obligate respiratory bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens MR-l. The deduced amino acid sequence of etrA (EtrA) shows a high degree of identity to both the Fnr of Escherichia coli (73.6%) and the analogous protein (ANR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (50.8%). The four active cysteine residues of Fnr are conserved in EtrA, and the amino acid sequence of the DNA-binding domains of the two proteins are identical. Further, S.putrefaciens etrA is able to complement an fnr mutant of E.coli. In contrast to fnr, there is no recognizable Fnr box upstream of the etrA sequence. Gene replacement etr.A mutants of MR-1 were deficient in growth on nitrite, thiosulfate, sulfite, trimethylamine-N-oxide, dimethyl sulfoxide, Fe(III), and fumarate, suggesting that EtrA is involved in the regulation of the corresponding reductase genes. However, the mutants were all positive for reduction of and growth on nitrate and Mn(IV), indicating that EtrA is not involved in the regulation of these two systems. Southern blots of S.putrefaciens DNA with use of etrA as a probe revealed the expected etrA bands and a second set of hybridization signals whose genetic and functional properties remain to be determined.

  9. Asiatic acid uncouples respiration in isolated mouse liver mitochondria and induces HepG2 cells death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yapeng; Liu, Siyuan; Wang, Ying; Wang, Dang; Gao, Jing; Zhu, Li

    2016-09-01

    Asiatic acid, one of the triterpenoid components isolated from Centella asiatica, has received increasing attention due to a wide variety of biological activities. To date, little is known about its mechanisms of action. Here we examined the cytotoxic effect of asiatic acid on HepG2 cells and elucidated some of the underlying mechanisms. Asiatic acid induced rapid cell death, as well as mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) dissipation, ATP depletion and cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytosol in HepG2 cells. In mitochondria isolated from mouse liver, asiatic acid treatment significantly stimulated the succinate-supported state 4 respiration rate, dissipated the MMP, increased Ca(2+) release from Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria, decreased ATP content and promoted cytochrome c release, indicating the uncoupling effect of asiatic acid. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by succinate-supported mitochondrial respiration was also significantly inhibited by asiatic acid. In addition, asiatic acid inhibited Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial swelling but did not induce mitochondrial swelling in hyposmotic potassium acetate medium which suggested that asiatic acid may not act as a protonophoric uncoupler. Inhibition of uncoupling proteins (UCPs) or blockade of adenine nucleotide transporter (ANT) attenuated the effect of asiatic acid on MMP dissipation, Ca(2+) release, mitochondrial respiration and HepG2 cell death. When combined inhibition of UCPs and ANT, asiatic acid-mediated uncoupling effect was noticeably alleviated. These results suggested that both UCPs and ANT partially contribute to the uncoupling properties of asiatic acid. In conclusion, asiatic acid is a novel mitochondrial uncoupler and this property is potentially involved in its toxicity on HepG2 cells. PMID:27288117

  10. Uranium Biominerals Precipitated by an Environmental Isolate of Serratia under Anaerobic Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Newsome

    Full Text Available Stimulating the microbially-mediated precipitation of uranium biominerals may be used to treat groundwater contamination at nuclear sites. The majority of studies to date have focussed on the reductive precipitation of uranium as U(IV by U(VI- and Fe(III-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter and Shewanella species, although other mechanisms of uranium removal from solution can occur, including the precipitation of uranyl phosphates via bacterial phosphatase activity. Here we present the results of uranium biomineralisation experiments using an isolate of Serratia obtained from a sediment sample representative of the Sellafield nuclear site, UK. When supplied with glycerol phosphate, this Serratia strain was able to precipitate 1 mM of soluble U(VI as uranyl phosphate minerals from the autunite group, under anaerobic and fermentative conditions. Under phosphate-limited anaerobic conditions and with glycerol as the electron donor, non-growing Serratia cells could precipitate 0.5 mM of uranium supplied as soluble U(VI, via reduction to nano-crystalline U(IV uraninite. Some evidence for the reduction of solid phase uranyl(VI phosphate was also observed. This study highlights the potential for Serratia and related species to play a role in the bioremediation of uranium contamination, via a range of different metabolic pathways, dependent on culturing or in situ conditions.

  11. Characteristics of fermentative hydrogen production with Klebsiella pneumoniae ECU-15 isolated from anaerobic sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Kun; Zhang, Xu; Tan, Wen-Song; Zhu, Ming-Long [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2010-01-15

    Klebsiella pneumoniae ECU-15 (EU360791), which was isolated from anaerobic sewage sludge, was investigated in this paper for its characteristics of fermentative hydrogen production. It was found that the anaerobic condition favored hydrogen production than that of the micro-aerobic condition. Culture temperature and pH of 37 C and 6.0 were the most favorable for the hydrogen production. The strain could grow in several kinds of monosaccharide and disaccharide, as well as the complicated corn stalk hydrolysate, with the best results exhibited in glucose. The maximum hydrogen production rate and yield of 482 ml/l/h and 2.07 mol/mol glucose were obtained at initial glucose concentration of 30 g/L and 5 g/L, respectively. Fermentation results in the diluent corn stalk hydrolysate showed that cell growth was not inhibited. However, the hydrogen production of 0.65 V/V was relatively lower than that of the glucose (1.11 V/V), which was mainly due to the interaction between xylose and glucose. (author)

  12. Isolation and characterization of Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus sp. nov., an extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic, anaerobic bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mladenovska, Zuzana; Mathrani, Indra M.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    1995-01-01

    An anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic, non-spore-forming bacterium, strain 6A, was isolated from an alkaline hot spring in Hverageroi, Iceland. The bacterium was non-motile, rod-shaped (1.5-3.5 x 0.7 mu m) and occurred singly, in pairs or in chains and stained gram-negative. The growth...... temperature was between 50 and 78 degrees C with a temperature optimum near 68 degrees C. Growth occurred between pH 5.8 and 8.2 with an optimum mum near 7.0. The bacterium fermented microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) and produced lactate, acetate and H-2 as the major fermentation products, and CO2...... and ethanol occurred as minor fermentation products. Only a restricted number of carbon sources (cellulose, xylan, starch, pectin, cellobiose, xylose, maltose and lactose) were used as substrates. During growth on Avicel, the bacterium produced free cellulases with carboxymethylcellulase and avicelase...

  13. Thermoanaerobacter pentosaceus sp. nov., an anaerobic, extreme thermophilic, high ethanol-yielding bacterium isolated from household waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás, Ana Faria; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    An extremely thermophilic, xylanolytic, spore-forming and strict anaerobic bacterium DTU01(T) was isolated from a continuously stirred tank reactor fed with xylose and household waste. Cells stained Gram-negative and were rod-shaped (0.5-2 µm in length). Spores were terminal with a diameter...

  14. 16S rRNA gene sequencing in routine identification of anaerobic bacteria isolated from blood cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Knudsen, Elisa;

    2010-01-01

    A comparison between conventional identification and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of anaerobic bacteria isolated from blood cultures in a routine setting was performed (n = 127). With sequencing, 89% were identified to the species level, versus 52% with conventional identification. The times for...... identification were 1.5 days and 2.8 days, respectively....

  15. Rapid isolation of a facultative anaerobic electrochemically active bacterium capable of oxidizing acetate for electrogenesis and azo dyes reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Nan; Yuan, Shi-Jie; Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Xiang-Ning; Li, Wen-Wei; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-05-01

    In this study, 27 strains of electrochemically active bacteria (EAB) were rapidly isolated and their capabilities of extracellular electron transfer were identified using a photometric method based on WO3 nanoclusters. These strains caused color change of WO3 from white to blue in a 24-well agar plate within 40 h. Most of the isolated EAB strains belonged to the genera of Aeromonas and Shewanella. One isolate, Pantoea agglomerans S5-44, was identified as an EAB that can utilize acetate as the carbon source to produce electricity and reduce azo dyes under anaerobic conditions. The results confirmed the capability of P. agglomerans S5-44 for extracellular electron transfer. The isolation of this acetate-utilizing, facultative EBA reveals the metabolic diversity of environmental bacteria. Such strains have great potential for environmental applications, especially at interfaces of aerobic and anaerobic environments, where acetate is the main available carbon source. PMID:24648142

  16. Roseimarinus sediminis gen. nov., sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic bacterium isolated from coastal sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Jie; Liu, Qian-Qian; Chen, Guan-Jun; Du, Zong-Jun

    2015-07-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, non-motile and pink-pigmented bacterium, designated strain HF08(T), was isolated from marine sediment of the coast of Weihai, China. Cells were rod-shaped, and oxidase- and catalase-positive. The isolate grew optimally at 33 °C, at pH 7.5-8.0 and with 2-3% (w/v) NaCl. The dominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C14 : 0. Menaquinone 7 (MK-7) was the major respiratory quinone and the DNA G+C content was 44.8 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the isolate was a member of the class Bacteroidia, and shared 88-90% sequence similarity with the closest genera Sunxiuqinia, Prolixibacter, Draconibacterium, Mariniphaga and Meniscus. Based on the phylogenetic and phenotypic evidence presented, a novel species in a new genus of the family Prolixibacteraceae is proposed, with the name Roseimarinus sediminis gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Roseimarinus sediminis is HF08(T) ( = KCTC 42261(T) = CICC 10901(T)). PMID:25866024

  17. TELLURITE RESISTANCE AND REDUCTION DURING AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC GROWTH OF BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM SARCHESHME COPPER MINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Akhavan Sepahei ، V. Rashetnia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Tellurium compounds can be found in high concentrations in land and water near sites of waste discharge of industrial manufacturing processes and anodic sludge of copper mine. Potassium tellurite (K2TeO3 is toxic to many microorganisms at concentrations >1mg/mL. In this research, some species of facultative anaerobic bacteria (Bacillus sp. were isolated from Sarcheshme copper mine(Kerman, Iran which demonstrated high-level-resistance to tellurite and accumulation of metallic tellurium crystals. High-level-resistance was observed for Bacilli and cocci grown with certain organic carbon sources, implying that tellurite reduction is not essential to confer tellurite resistance. Level of adsorption was determined by inductively coupled plasma and spectrophotometer (Diethyldithiocarbamate method. The level of tellurite concentration in the bacteria cell and the formation of tellurium nanocrystals were illuminated by transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope. The Te(0 crystals occur internally and each microorganism forms a distinctly different structure (for example Bacillus selenitreducens make tellurium nano rod. In this study it was found that microorganism can grow 3.in 1500mg/L-2000mg/L and higher tellurite concentrations. The use of microorganisms to generate Te nanomaterials may be an alternative for bench-scale syntheses. Additionally, they may also generate products with unique properties unattainable by conventional physical/chemical methods. This study is important because native bacteria from Sarcheshme (Kerman, Iran that may show high-level-resistance to tellurite, were isolated.

  18. Anaerobic bioremediation of RDX by ovine whole rumen fluid and pure culture isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, H L; Duringer, J M; Murty, L D; Craig, A M

    2013-04-01

    The ability of ruminal microbes to degrade the explosive compound hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in ovine whole rumen fluid (WRF) and as 24 bacterial isolates was examined under anaerobic conditions. Compound degradation was monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identification of metabolites. Organisms in WRF microcosms degraded 180 μM RDX within 4 h. Nitroso-intermediates hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX), hexahydro-1,3-dinitroso-5-nitro-1,3,5-triazine (DNX), and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitroso-1,3,5-triazine (TNX) were present as early as 0.25 h and were detected throughout the 24-h incubation period, representing one reductive pathway of ring cleavage. Following reduction to MNX, peaks consistent with m/z 193 and 174 were also produced, which were unstable and resulted in rapid ring cleavage to a common metabolite consistent with an m/z of 149. These represent two additional reductive pathways for RDX degradation in ovine WRF, which have not been previously reported. The 24 ruminal isolates degraded RDX with varying efficiencies (0-96 %) over 120 h. Of the most efficient degraders identified, Clostridium polysaccharolyticum and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans subsp. desulfuricans degraded RDX when medium was supplemented with both nitrogen and carbon, while Anaerovibrio lipolyticus, Prevotella ruminicola, and Streptococcus bovis IFO utilized RDX as a sole source of nitrogen. This study showed that organisms in whole rumen fluid, as well as several ruminal isolates, have the ability to degrade RDX in vitro and, for the first time, delineated the metabolic pathway for its biodegradation. PMID:22688904

  19. Increased in vitro activity of ceftriaxone by addition of tazobactam against clinical isolates of anaerobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, K E; Morice, N; Schiro, D D

    1994-08-01

    A total of 461 clinical strains of anaerobes were tested using a broth microdilution test to determine the activity of the combination of ceftriaxone and tazobactam and other antimicrobials against these isolates. Ceftriaxone was combined with tazobactam in ratios of 1:1, 2:1, 4:1, and 8:1 and twofold dilutions of ceftriaxone in constant concentrations to tazobactam of 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 micrograms/ml. Against beta-lactamase-producing strains of the Bacteroides fragilis group, B. capillosus, and Prevotella species all combinations of ceftriaxone and tazobactam showed enhanced in vitro activity and were eight- to 2048-fold more active than ceftriaxone alone. By comparison ceftriaxone and tazobactam showed superior or equal activity to ampicillin and sulbactam, piperacillin and tazobactam, amoxicillin and clavulanate, ticarcillin and clavulanate, and metronidazole against these same strains. Against beta-lactamase nonproducing strains of Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, Clostridium, Eubacterium, Peptostreptococcus, and Veillonella parvula the addition of tazobactam produced no appreciable enhanced ceftriaxone activity. Fixed concentrations of tazobactam at 2 and 4 micrograms/ml appear to be most suitable for susceptibility testing and are within the pharmacologic profile of this inhibitor. Pharmacologic and toxicity studies will be needed to define the role of ceftriaxone and tazobactam in infectious diseases. PMID:7851086

  20. [Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of aerobic Gram-positive cocci and anaerobic bacteria in 2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Yoshida, Isamu; Itoh, Yoshihisa; Tachibana, Mineji; Takahashi, Choichiro; Kaku, Mitsuo; Kanemitsu, Keiji; Okada, Masahiko; Horikawa, Yoshinori; Shiotani, Joji; Kino, Hiroyoshi; Ono, Yuka; Baba, Hisashi; Matsuo, Shuji; Asari, Seishi; Toyokawa, Masahiro; Matsuoka, Kimiko; Kusano, Nobuchika; Nose, Motoko; Murase, Mitsuharu; Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Saikawa, Tetsunori; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Kohno, Shigeru; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Nakasone, Isamu; Maki, Hideki; Yamano, Yoshinori

    2010-12-01

    The activity of antibacterial agents against aerobic Gram-positive cocci (26 species, 1022 strains) and anaerobic bacteria (23 species, 184 strains) isolated from clinical specimens in 2006 at 16 clinical facilities in Japan were studied using either broth microdilution or agar dilution method. The ratio of methicillin-resistant strains among Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis was 53.0% and 65.8%, suggesting that resistant strains were isolated at high frequency. Vancomycin (VCM) and quinupristin/dalfopristin (QPR/DPR) had good antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis, with MIC90s of < or = 2 micrcog/mL. The ratio of penicillin (PC) intermediate and resistant strains classified by mutations of PC-binding proteins among Streptococcus pneumoniae was 87.6%. Ceftriaxone, cefpirome, cefepime, carbapenem antibiotics, VCM, teicoplanin, linezolid(LZD) and QPR/DPR had MIC90s of < or = 1 microg/mL against PC-intermediate and resistant S. pneumoniae strains. Against all strains of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, the MICs of VCM and TEIC were under 2 microg/mL, and no resistant strain was detected, suggesting that these agents had excellent activities against these species. 10.9% of E. faecalis strains or 3.5% of E. faecium strains showed intermediate or resistant to LZD. 24.4% of E. faecium strains showed intermediate or resistant to QPR/DPR. Against all strains of Clostridium difficile, the MIC of VCM were under 1 microg/mL, suggesting that VCM had excellent activity against C. difficile. Carbapenems showed good activity against Peptococcaceae, Bacteroides spp., and Prevotella spp. However since several strains of Bacteroides fragilis showed resistant to carbapenems and the susceptibility of this species should be well-focused in the future. PMID:21425596

  1. [Antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates of aerobic gram-positive cocci and anaerobic bacteria in 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Isamu; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kudo, Reiko; Fuji, Rieko; Takahashi, Choichiro; Oota, Reiko; Kaku, Mitsuo; Kunishima, Hiroyuki; Okada, Masahiko; Horikawa, Yoshinori; Shiotani, Joji; Kino, Hiroyoshi; Ono, Yuka; Fujita, Shinichi; Matsuo, Shuji; Kono, Hisashi; Asari, Seishi; Toyokawa, Masahiro; Kusano, Nobuchika; Nose, Motoko; Horii, Toshinobu; Tanimoto, Ayako; Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Saikawa, Tetsunori; Hiramatsu, Kazufumi; Kohno, Shigeru; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Nakasone, Isamu; Maki, Hideki; Yamano, Yoshinori

    2012-02-01

    The activity of antibacterial agents against aerobic Gram-positive cocci (25 genus or species, 1029 strains) and anaerobic bacteria (21 genus or species, 187 strains) isolated from clinical specimens in 2008 at 16 clinical facilities in Japan were studied using either broth microdilution or agar dilution method. The ratio of methicillin-resistant strains among Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis was 59.6% and 81.2%, suggesting that resistant strains were isolated at high frequency. Vancomycin (VCM), linezolid (LZD) and quinupristin/dalfopristin (QPR/DPR) had good antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis, with MIC90s of < or = 2 microg/mL. The ratio of penicillin (PC) intermediate and resistant strains classified by mutations of PC-binding proteins among Streptococcus pneumoniae was 92.0% that was highest among our previous reports. Cefpirome, carbapenems, VCM, teicoplanin (TEIC), LZD and QPR/DPR had MIC90s of < or = 1 microg/mL against PC-intermediate and resistant S. pneumoniae strains. Against all strains of Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, the MICs of VCM and TEIC were under 2 microg/mL, and no resistant strain was detected, suggesting that these agents had excellent activities against these species. 15.9% of E. faecalis strains and 1.2% of E. faecium strains showed intermediate to LZD. 17.1% of E. faecium strains showed intermediate or resistant to QPR/DPR. Against all strains of Clostridium difficile, the MIC of VCM was under 1 microg/mL, suggesting that VCM had excellent activity. Carbapenems showed good activity against Clostridiales, Bacteroides spp., and Prevotella spp., but one strain of Bacteroides fragilis showed resistant to carbapenems. And so, the susceptibility of this species should be well-focused in the future at detecting continuously. PMID:22808693

  2. Desulfatirhabdium butyrativorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a butyrate-oxidizing, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from an anaerobic bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balk, M.; Altinbas, M.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Sinninghe Damste, J.S.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    A novel sulfate-reducing bacterium, strain HB1T, was isolated from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating paper-mill wastewater operated at 37 °C. Cells of strain HB1T were oval to rod-shaped, 1¿1.3 µm wide and 2.6¿3.5 µm long and Gram-negative. The optimum temperature for growth

  3. Proteocatella sphenisci gen. nov., sp. nov., a psychrotolerant, spore-forming anaerobe isolated from penguin guano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V; Hoover, Richard B; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B; Lupa, Boguslaw; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2009-09-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, psychrotolerant bacterium, designated strain PPP2T, was isolated from guano of the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) in Chilean Patagonia. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, spore-forming, straight rods (0.7-0.8x3.0-5.0 microm) that were motile by means of peritrichous flagella. Growth was observed at pH 6.7-9.7 (optimum pH 8.3) and 2-37 degrees C (optimum 29 degrees C). Growth was observed between 0 and 4% (w/v) NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5% (w/v). Strain PPP2T was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that was capable of fermentative metabolism. Peptone, bacto-tryptone, Casamino acids, oxalate, starch, chitin and yeast extract were utilized as substrates. The major metabolic products were acetate, butyrate and ethanol. Strain PPP2T was resistant to ampicillin, but sensitive to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin, vancomycin and gentamicin. The DNA G+C content of strain PPP2T was 39.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain PPP2T was related most closely to Clostridium sticklandii SR (approximately 90% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and phenotypic characteristics, strain PPP2T is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Proteocatella sphenisci gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Proteocatella sphenisci is PPP2T (=ATCC BAA-755T=JCM 12175T=CIP 108034T). PMID:19620379

  4. Isolation and characterization of a Klebsiella oxytoca strain for simultaneous azo-dye anaerobic reduction and bio-hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Yu, Han-Qing; Wu, Chao

    2012-07-01

    A facultative anaerobic bacteria strain GS-4-08, isolated from an anaerobic sequence batch reactor for synthetic dye wastewater treatment, was investigated for azo-dye decolorization. This bacterium was identified as a member of Klebsiella oxytoca based on Gram staining, morphology characterization and 16S rRNA gene analysis. It exhibited a good capacity of simultaneous decolorization and hydrogen production in the presence of electron donor. The hydrogen production was less affected even at a high Methyl Orange (MO) concentration of 0.5 mM, indicating a superior tolerability of this strain to MO. This efficient bio-hydrogen production from electron donor can not only avoid bacterial inhibition due to accumulation of volatile fatty acids during MO decolorization, but also can recover considerable energy from dye wastewater. PMID:22086069

  5. Caloramator quimbayensis sp. nov., an anaerobic, moderately thermophilic bacterium isolated from a terrestrial hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubiano-Labrador, Carolina; Baena, Sandra; Díaz-Cárdenas, Carolina; Patel, Bharat K C

    2013-04-01

    An anaerobic, moderately thermophilic, terminal-spore-forming bacterium, designated strain USBA A(T), was isolated from a terrestrial hot spring located at an altitude of 2683 m in the Andean region of Colombia (04° 50' 14.0″ N 75° 32' 53.4″ W). Cells of strain USBA A(T) were Gram-stain-positive, straight to slightly curved rods (0.9×2.5 µm), that were arranged singly or in pairs, and were motile by means of flagella. Growth occurred at 37-55 °C and pH 6.0-8.0, with a doubling time of 2 h under the optimal conditions (50 °C and pH 7.0). Glucose fermentation in strain USBA A(T) required yeast extract or peptone (each at 0.2 %, w/v). The novel strain fermented sugars, amino acids, Casamino acids, propanol, propionate, starch and dextrin, but no growth was observed on galactose, lactose, xylose, histidine, serine, threonine, benzoate, butyrate, lactate, pyruvate, succinate, methanol, ethanol, glycerol, casein, gelatin or xylan. The end products of glucose fermentation were formate, acetate, ethanol and lactate. Strain USBA A(T) did not grow autotrophically (with CO2 as carbon source and H2 as electron donor) and did not reduce thiosulfate, sulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite, vanadium (V) or Fe (III) citrate. Growth of strain USBA A(T) was inhibited by ampicillin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, penicillin and streptomycin (each at 10 µg ml(-1)). The predominant fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, C16 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0 and the genomic DNA G+C content was 32.6 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strain USBA A(T) belonged in the phylum Firmicutes and that its closest relative was Caloramator viterbiensis JW/MS-VS5(T) (95.0 % sequence similarity). A DNA-DNA relatedness value of only 30 % was recorded in hybridization experiments between strain USBA A(T) and Caloramator viterbiensis DSM 13723(T). Based on the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic evidence and the results of the DNA-DNA hybridization experiments, strain USBA A

  6. Acetoanaerobium pronyense sp. nov., an anaerobic alkaliphilic bacterium isolated from a carbonate chimney of the Prony Hydrothermal Field (New Caledonia)

    OpenAIRE

    Bes, M. (Marta); Merrouch, M.; Joseph, Manon; Quéméneur, Marianne; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Erausol, G.; A. Postec

    2015-01-01

    A novel anaerobic bacterial strain, ST07-YET, was isolated from a carbonate chimney of the Prony Hydrothermal Field (PHF) in New Caledonia. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, straight rods (0.7-0.8 x 3.0-5.0 mu m) and motile by means of lateral flagella. Strain ST07-YET was mesophilic (optimum 35 degrees C), moderately alkaliphilic and halotolerant (optimum pH 8.7 and 5 gr l(-1) NaCl). Elemental sulfur, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite were not used as terminal electron accepto...

  7. Engineering a synthetic anaerobic respiration for reduction of xylose to xylitol using NADH output of glucose catabolism by Escherichia coli AI21

    OpenAIRE

    Iverson, Andrew; Garza, Erin; Manow, Ryan; Wang, Jinhua; Gao, Yuanyuan; Grayburn, Scott; Zhou, Shengde

    2016-01-01

    Background Anaerobic rather than aerobic fermentation is preferred for conversion of biomass derived sugars to high value redox-neutral and reduced commodities. This will likely result in a higher yield of substrate to product conversion and decrease production cost since substrate often accounts for a significant portion of the overall cost. To this goal, metabolic pathway engineering has been used to optimize substrate carbon flow to target products. This approach works well for the product...

  8. Evaluation of some Mannich bases derived from substituted acetophenones against P-388 lymphocytic leukemia and on respiration in isolated rat liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmock, J R; Shyam, K; Hamon, N W; Logan, B M; Raghavan, S K; Harwood, D J; Smith, P J

    1983-08-01

    Series of 3-dimethylamino-1-aryl-1-propanone hydrobromides (IV) and 3-dimethylamino-2-dimethylaminomethyl-1-aryl-1-propanone dihydrobromides (V) were synthesized. Evaluation of these derivatives against P-388 lymphocytic leukemia growth revealed that two compounds show promise as antineoplastic agents. Compounds of the V series were unstable in phosphate buffer (in contrast to series IV), and when the same nuclear substituent was present in both series of compounds, V was approximately 100 times more active than IV in both the stimulation and inhibition of respiration of mitochondria isolated from rat liver cells. Representatives from both series showed that respiration in mitochondria was affected by changing the pH of the aqueous buffer from 7.4 to 6.9 or 6.4 and by reducing the temperature from 37 degrees to 20 degrees. The compounds showed reactivity toward a biomimetic thiol. PMID:6620142

  9. Exercise at anaerobic threshold intensity and insulin secretion by isolated pancreatic islets of rats

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira, Camila Aparecida Machado; Paiva, Mauricio Ferreira; Mota, Clécia Alencar Soares; Ribeiro, Carla; de Almeida Leme, José Alexandre Curiacos; Luciano, Eliete; de Mello, Maria Alice Rostom

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of acute exercise and exercise training at the anaerobic threshold (AT) intensity on aerobic conditioning and insulin secretion by pancreatic islets, adult male Wistar rats were submitted to the lactate minimum test (LMT) for AT determination. Half of the animals were submitted to swimming exercise training (trained), 1 h/day, 5 days/week during 8 weeks, with an overload equivalent to the AT. The other half was kept sedentary. At the end of the experimental period, the ...

  10. Calculibacillus koreensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic Fe(III)-reducing bacterium isolated from sediment of mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Ui-Gi; Kim, So-Jeong; Hong, Heeji; Kim, Song-Gun; Gwak, Joo-Han; Jung, Man-Young; Kim, Jong-Geol; Na, Jeong-Geol; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2016-06-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterium, strain B5(T), was isolated from sediment of an abandoned coal mine in Taebaek, Republic of Korea. Cells of strain B5(T) were non-spore-forming, straight, Gram-positive rods. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.0 and 30°C, respectively, while the strain was able to grow within pH and temperature ranges of 5.5-7.5 and 25-45°C, respectively. Growth of strain B5(T) was observed at NaCl concentrations of 0 to 6.0% (w/v) with an optimum at 3.0-4.0% (w/v). The polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, an unknown phospholipid and three unknown polar lipids. Strain B5(T) grew anaerobically by reducing nitrate, nitrite, ferric-citrate, ferric-nitrilotriacetate, elemental sulfur, thiosulfate, and anthraquinone-2-sulfonate in the presence of proteinaceous compounds, organic acids, and carbohydrates as electron donors. The isolate was not able to grow by fermentation. Strain B5(T) did not grow under aerobic or microaerobic conditions. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain B5(T) is most closely related to the genus Tepidibacillus (T. fermentans STGH(T); 96.3%) and Vulcanibacillus (V. modesticaldus BR(T); 94.6%). The genomic DNA G+C content (36.9 mol%) of strain B5(T) was higher than those of T. fermentans STGH(T) (34.8 mol%) and V. modesticaldus BR(T) (34.5 mol%). Based on its phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and phylogenetic properties, we describe a new species of a novel genus Calculibacillus, represented by strain B5(T) (=KCTC 15397(T) =JCM 19989(T)), for which we propose the name Calculibacillus koreensis gen. nov., sp. nov. PMID:27225457

  11. In Vitro Activities of Moxifloxacin against 900 Aerobic and Anaerobic Surgical Isolates from Patients with Intra-Abdominal and Diabetic Foot Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Edmiston, Charles E.; Krepel, Candace J.; Seabrook, Gary R.; Somberg, Lewis R.; Nakeeb, Atilla; Cambria, Robert A.; Towne, Jonathan B.

    2004-01-01

    The in vitro activities of moxifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, imipenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, clindamycin, and metronidazole against 900 surgical isolates were determined using NCCLS testing methods. Moxifloxacin exhibited good to excellent antimicrobial activity against most aerobic (90.8%) and anaerobic (97.1%) microorganisms, suggesting that it may be effective for the treatment of polymicrobial surgical infections.

  12. Genome sequence of Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548, an anaerobic bacterium from the phylum Lentisphaerae, isolated from the human gastro-intestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Passel, Mark W.J. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Kant, Ravi [University of Helsinki; Palva, Airi [University of Helsinki; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Sims, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; De Vos, Willem M. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Smidt, Hauke [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands; Zoetendal, Erwin G. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands

    2011-01-01

    Victivallis vadensis ATCC BAA-548 represents the first cultured representative from the novel phylum Lentisphaerae, a deep-branching bacterial lineage. Few cultured bacteria from this phylum are known, and V. vadensis therefore represents an important organism for evolutionary studies. V. vadensis is a strictly anaerobic sugar-fermenting isolate from the human gastro-intestinal tract.

  13. Gelidivirgula Patagoniensis Gen. Nov., Sp. Nov., A Novel Psychrotolerant, Sporeforming Anaerobe Isolated from Magellanic Penguin Guano in Patagonia, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Tang, Jane; Krader, Paul

    2003-01-01

    A novel obligately anaerobic, psychrotrophic bacterium, strain PPP2(sup T), was isolated from guano of the Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) in Patagonia, Chile. The Gram-positive, sporeforming, straight rods with sizes 0.6-0.9 x 3.0-5.0 microns, are motile by peritrichous flagella. Growth was observed to occur within the pH range 6.0-9.5 (optimum pH x), and temperature range 2-28 C (optimum 20 C). The novel isolate does not require NaCl for growth, but is halotolerant and growth was observed between 0 and 7 % NaCl (w/v) with optimum at 0.5 % (w/v). The new isolate is a catalase negative chemoorganohetherotroph with fermentative metabolism and uses as substrates: peptone, Bacto-tryptone, Casamino acids, and yeast extract. The major metabolic products are: acetate, butyrate, ethanol, and hydrogen is a minor gas product.. Strain PPP2 was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampin, kanamycin, and gentamycin. The G+C content of the DNA is 43.6 mol%. On the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequences and phenotypic characteristics, it is proposed that the strain PPP2(sup T) (= ATCC BAA-755(sup T) = JSM ...(sup T)) is assigned to the new genus Gelidivirgula gen. nov., as a representative of the new species, Gelidivirgula patagonensis sp. nov.

  14. Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov., an anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Elkins, James G [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL; Keller, Martin [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Allman, Steve L [ORNL; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    A novel, obligately anaerobic, extremely thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, designated OB47T, was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park, WY, USA. The isolate was a non-motile, non-spore forming, Gram-positive rod approximately 2 m long by 0.2 m wide and grew at temperatures between 55-85oC with the optimum at 78oC. The pH range for growth was 6.0-8.0 with values of near 7.0 being optimal. Growth on cellobiose produced the fastest specific growth rates at 0.75 hr-1. The organism also displayed fermentative growth on glucose, maltose, arabinose, fructose, starch, lactose, mannose, sucrose, galactose, xylose, arabinogalactan, Avicel, xylan, filter paper, processed cardboard, pectin, dilute acid-pretreated switchgrass and Populus. OB47T was unable to grow on mannitol, fucose, lignin, Gelrite, acetate, glycerol, ribose, sorbital, carboxymethylcellulose and casein. Yeast extract stimulated growth and thiosulfate, sulfate, nitrate, and sulfur were not reduced. Fermentation end products were mainly acetate, H2, and CO2 although lactate and ethanol were produced in 5 l batch fermentations. The G+C content of the DNA was 35 mol% and sequence analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene placed OB47T within the genus Caldicellulosiruptor. Based on its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, the isolate is proposed to be designated Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis sp. nov. and OB47T is the type stain (ATCC = ____, JCM = ____).

  15. Isolation and Characterization of a New Methanobacterium formicicum KOR-1 from an Anaerobic Digester Using Pig Slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battumur, Urantulkhuur; Yoon, Young-Man; Kim, Chang-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A new methanogen was isolated from an anaerobic digester using pig slurry in South Korea. Only one strain, designated KOR-1, was characterized in detail. Cells of KOR-1 were straight or crooked rods, non-motile, 5 to 15 μm long and 0.7 μm wide. They stained Gram-positive and produced methane from H2+CO2 and formate. Strain KOR-1 grew optimally at 38°C. The optimum pH for growth was 7.0. The strain grew at 0.5% to 3.0% NaCl, with optimum growth at 2.5% NaCl. The G+C content of genomic DNA of strain KOR-1 was 41 mol%. The strain tolerated ampicillin, penicillin G, kanamycin and streptomycin but tetracycline inhibited cell growth. A large fragment of the 16S rRNA gene (~1,350 bp) was obtained from the isolate and sequenced. Comparison of 16S rRNA genes revealed that strain KOR–1 is related to Methanobacterium formicicum (98%, sequence similarity), Methanobacterium bryantii (95%) and Methanobacterium ivanovii (93%). Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced mcrA gene sequences confirmed the closest relative as based on mcrA gene sequence analysis was Methanobacterium formicicum strain (97% nucleic acid sequence identity). On the basis of physiological and phylogenetic characteristics, strain KOR-1 is proposed as a new strain within the genus Methanobacterium, Methanobacterium formicicum KOR-1. PMID:26949961

  16. Anaerobes beyond anaerobic digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, D. Z.; Pereira, M A; Alves, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms are widespread in nature. Sediments, gastrointestinal tracks, volcanic vents, geothermal sources are examples of habitats where anaerobic metabolism prevail, in some cases at extreme temperature, pH and pressure conditions. In such microbial ecosystems waste of some is food for others in a true integrated structure. Anaerobic microorganisms are able to use a wide variety of organic and inorganic compounds. Recalcitrant compounds, such as hydrocarbons, a...

  17. Helicobacter ganmani sp nov., a urease-negative anaerobe isolated from the intestines of laboratory mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, B.R.; O'Rourke, J.L.; Vandamme, P.; On, Stephen L.W.; Lee, A.

    2001-01-01

    and found to be identical to one another. H. rodentium was the most closely related species in terms of 16S rDNA sequence similarity (98.2%). Numerical analysis of whole-cell proteins by SDS-PAGE for nine isolates was carried out with a comparison to all known Helicobacter species, including newly...

  18. Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., a new anaerobic, haloalkaliphilic, spore-forming acetogen isolated from Mono Lake in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, E. V.; Hoover, R. B.; Bej, A. K.; Marsic, D.; Detkova, E. N.; Whitman, W. B.; Krader, P.

    2003-01-01

    A novel extremely haloalkaliphilic, strictly anaerobic, acetogenic bacterium strain APO was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, alkaline Mono Lake in California. The Gram-positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.55- 0.7x1.7-3.0 microns were motile by a single laterally attached flagellum. Strain APO was mesophilic (range 10-48 C, optimum of 37 C); halophilic (NaCl range 1-20% (w/v) with optimum of 3-5% (w/v), and alkaliphilic (pH range 8.0-10.5, optimum 9.5). The novel isolate required sodium ions in the medium. Strain APO was an organotroph with a fermentative type of metabolism and used the substrates peptone, bacto-tryptone, casamino acid, yeast extract, L-serine, L-lysine, L-histidine, L-arginine, and pyruvate. The new isolate performed the Stickland reaction with the following amino acid pairs: proline + alanine, glycine + alanine, and tryptophan + valine. The main end product of growth was acetate. High activity of CO dehydrogenase and hydrogenase indicated the presence of a homoacetogenic, non-cycling acetyl-coA pathway. Strain APO was resistant to kanamycin but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). The sequence of the 16s rRNA gene of strain APO possessed 98.2% similarity with the sequence from Tindullia magadiensis Z-7934, but the DNA-DNA hybridization value between these organisms was only 55%. On the basis of these physiological and molecular properties, strain APO is proposed to be a novel species of the genus Tindallia with the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., (type strain APO = ATCC BAA-393 - DSM 14871).

  19. Light-enhanced dark respiration in leaves, isolated cells and protoplasts of various types of C4 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parys, Eugeniusz; Jastrzebski, Hubert

    2006-04-01

    The rate of respiratory CO2 evolution from the leaves of Zea mays, Panicum miliaceum, and Panicum maximum, representing NADP-ME, NAD-ME, and PEP-CK types of C4 plants, respectively, was increased by approximately two to four times after a period of photosynthesis. This light-enhanced dark respiration (LEDR) was a function of net photosynthetic rate specific to plant species, and was depressed by 1% O2. When malate, aspartate, oxaloacetate or glycine solution at 50 mM concentration was introduced into the leaves instead of water, the rate of LEDR was enhanced, far less in Z. mays (by 10-25%) than in P. miliaceum (by 25-35%) or P. maximum (by 40-75%). The enhancement of LEDR under glycine was relatively stable over a period of 1 h, whereas the remaining metabolites caused its decrease following a transient increase. The metabolites reduced the net photosynthesis rate in the two Panicum species, but not in Z. mays, where this process was stimulated by glycine. The bundle sheath cells from P. miliaceum exhibited a higher rate of LEDR than those of Z. mays and P. maximum. Glycine had no effect on the respiration rate of the cells, but malate increased in cells of Z. mays and P. miliaceum by about 50% and 30%, respectively. With the exception of aspartate, which stimulated both the O2 evolution and O2 uptake in P. maximum, the remaining metabolites reduced photosynthetic O2 evolution from bundle sheath cells in Panicun species. The net O2 exchange in illuminated cells of Z. mays did not respond to CO2 or metabolites. Leaf mesophyll protoplasts of Z. mays and P. miliaceum, and bundle sheath protoplasts of Z. mays, which are unable to fix CO2 photosynthetically, also produced LEDR, but the mesophyll protoplasts, compared with bundle sheath protoplasts, required twice the time of illumination to obtain the maximal rate. The results suggest that the substrates for LEDR in C4 plants are generated during a period of illumination not only via the Calvin cycle reactions, but

  20. Bacterial respiration of arsenic and selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichment culture suggest that they are widespread and metabolically active in nature. Although the bacterial species that have been isolated and characterized are still few in number, they are scattered throughout the bacterial domain and include Gram- positive bacteria, beta, gamma and epsilon Proteobacteria and the sole member of a deeply branching lineage of the bacteria, Chrysiogenes arsenatus. The oxidation of a number of organic substrates (i.e. acetate, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, ethanol) or hydrogen can be coupled to the reduction of arsenate and selenate, but the actual donor used varies from species to species. Both periplasmic and membrane-associated arsenate and selenate reductases have been characterized. Although the number of subunits and molecular masses differs, they all contain molybdenum. The extent of the environmental impact on the transformation and mobilization of arsenic and selenium by microbial dissimilatory processes is only now being fully appreciated.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of a Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium That Anaerobically Degrades Alkanes

    OpenAIRE

    So, Chi Ming; Young, L. Y.

    1999-01-01

    An alkane-degrading, sulfate-reducing bacterial strain, AK-01, was isolated from an estuarine sediment with a history of chronic petroleum contamination. The bacterium is a short, nonmotile, non-spore-forming, gram-negative rod. It is mesophilic and grows optimally at pH 6.9 to 7.0 and at an NaCl concentration of 1%. Formate, fatty acids (C4 to C16) and hydrogen were readily utilized as electron donors. Sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate were used as electron acceptors, but sulfur, nitrite, an...

  2. Anaerobic degradation of 3-aminobenzoate by a newly isolated sulfate reducer and a methanogenic enrichment culture

    OpenAIRE

    Schnell, Sylvia; Schink, Bernhard

    1992-01-01

    A new rod-shaped, gram-negative, non-sporing sulfate reducer, strain mAB1, was enriched and isolated from marine sediment samples with 3-aminobenzoate as sole electron and carbon source. Strain mAB1 degraded 3-aminobenzoate completely to CO 2 and NH 3 with stoichiometric reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Ceils contained carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, cytochromes, and sulfite reductase P582. Strain mAB1 degraded also benzoate, 4-aminobenzoate, hydroxybenzoates, and some aliphatic compounds. Bes...

  3. Trichococcus patagoniensis sp. nov., a facultative anaerobe that grows at -5 degrees C, isolated from penguin guano in Chilean Patagonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V; Hoover, Richard B; Bej, Asim K; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B; Krader, Paul E; Tang, Jane

    2006-09-01

    A novel, extremely psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain PmagG1(T), was isolated from guano of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) collected in Chilean Patagonia. Gram-variable, motile cocci with a diameter of 1.3-2.0 mum were observed singularly or in pairs, short chains and irregular conglomerates. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.0-10.0, with optimum growth at pH 8.5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was from -5 to 35 degrees C, with optimum growth at 28-30 degrees C. Strain PmagG1(T) did not require NaCl, as growth was observed in the presence of 0-6.5 % NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5 % (w/v). Strain PmagG1(T) was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that used sugars and some organic acids as substrates. The metabolic end products were lactate, formate, acetate, ethanol and CO(2). Strain PmagG1(T) was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The G+C content of its genomic DNA was 45.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 100 % similarity of strain PmagG1(T) with Trichococcus collinsii ATCC BAA-296(T), but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated relatedness values of <45+/-1 %. Another phylogenetically closely related species, Trichococcus pasteurii, showed 99.85 % similarity by 16S rRNA sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization showed relatedness values of 47+/-1.5 %. Based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the novel species Trichococcus patagoniensis sp. nov. is proposed, with strain PmagG1(T) (=ATCC BAA-756(T)=JCM 12176(T)=CIP 108035(T)) as the type strain. PMID:16957099

  4. Trichococcus Patagoniensis sp. nov., a Facultative Anaerobe that grows at -5 C, Isolated from Penguin Guano in Chilean Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Bej, Asim K.; Marsic, Damien; Whitman, William B.; Krader, Paul E.; Tang, Jane

    2006-01-01

    A novel, extremely psychrotolerant, facultative anaerobe, strain PmagGl(sup T), was isolated from guano of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) collected in Chilean Patagonia. Gram-variable, motile cocci with a diameter of 1.3-2.0 micrometers were observed singularly or in pairs, short chains and irregular conglomerates. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.0-10.0, with optimum growth at pH 8.5. The temperature range for growth of the novel isolate was from -5 to 35 C, with optimum growth at 28-30 C. Strain PmagG1(sup T) did not require NaCl, as growth was observed in the presence of 0-6.5% NaCl with optimum growth at 0.5% (w/v). Strain PmagGl(sup T) was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that used sugars and some organic acids as substrates. The metabolic end products were lactate, formate, acetate, ethanol and Con. Strain PmagG1(sup T) was sensitive to ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, kanamycin and gentamicin. The G+C content of its genomic DNA was 45.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed 100 % similarity of strain PmagG1(sup T) with Trichococcus collinsii ATCC BAA-296(sup T), but DNA-DNA hybridization between them demonstrated relatedness values of less than 45 plus or minus 1%. Another phylogenetically closely related species, Trichococcus pasteurii, showed 99.85 % similarity by 16s rRNA sequencing and DNA-DNA hybridization showed relatedness values of 47 plus or minus 1.5%. Based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the novel species Trichococcus patagoniensis sp. nov. is proposed, with strain PmagG1(sup T) (=ATCC BAA-756(sup T)=JCM 12176(sup T)=CIP 108035(sup T)) as the type strain.

  5. Comparison of growth characteristics of anaerobic fungi isolated from ruminant and non-ruminant herbivores during cultivation in a defined medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunissen, M J; Op den Camp, H J; Orpin, C G; Huis in 't Veld, J H; Vogels, G D

    1991-06-01

    Anaerobic fungi were isolated from rumen fluid of a domestic sheep (Ovis aries; a ruminant) and from faeces of five non-ruminants: African elephant (Loxodonta africana), black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis), Indian rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis), Indian elephant (Elephas maximus) and mara (Dolichotis patagonum). The anaerobic fungus isolated from the sheep was a Neocallimastix species and the isolates from non-ruminants were all species similar to Piromyces spp. A defined medium is described which supported growth of all the isolates, and was used to examine growth characteristics of the different strains. For each fungus the lipid phosphate content was determined after growth on cellobiose and the resulting values were used to estimate fungal biomass after growth on solid substrates. The ability of isolates from ruminants and non-ruminants to digest both wheat straw and cellulose was comparable. More than 90% and 60%, respectively, of filter paper cellulose and wheat straw were digested by most strains within 60-78 h. Growth of two fungi, isolated from rumen fluid of a sheep (Neocallimastix strain N1) and from faeces of an Indian rhinoceros (Piromyces strain R1), on cellobiose was studied in detail. Fungal growth yields on cellobiose were 64.1 g (mol substrate)-1 for N1 and 34.2 g mol-1 for R1. The major fermentation products of both strains were formate, lactate, acetate, ethanol and hydrogen. PMID:1919514

  6. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of the gene (aniA) encoding the major anaerobically induced outer membrane protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, G T; Clark, V L

    1992-11-01

    When grown under anaerobic conditions, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea, expresses several novel outer membrane proteins. One of these, Pan 1, has an apparent molecular mass of 54 kDa in electrophoresis and is recognized by serum samples from patients with gonococcal infection. The presence of antibodies to this protein in patient sera suggests that Pan 1 is expressed during gonococcal infection and, more importantly, that N. gonorrhoeae grows anaerobically in vivo. We have cloned the Pan 1 structural gene, aniA, by screening a gonococcal lambda gt11 expression library with monospecific, polyclonal anti-Pan 1 antiserum. Three distinct immunoreactive recombinants, containing overlapping fragments of DNA, were isolated and confirmed to be coding for Pan 1 protein sequences. Northern (RNA blot) hybridization of an insert from an aniA recombinant to total gonococcal cellular RNA revealed the presence of a 1.5-kb transcript that was specific to RNA from anaerobically grown gonococci, indicating that the aniA gene is regulated at the transcriptional level and is monocistronic. To characterize the aniA gene, we have sequenced the entire 2-kb region spanned by the overlapping recombinants. We have also performed primer extension analysis on RNA isolated from aerobically and anaerobically grown gonococci in order to define the aniA promoter region. Two putative primer extension products specific to organisms grown anaerobically were identified by homology to known Escherichia coli promoter sequences, suggesting that the regulation of aniA expression involves multiple promoter regions. PMID:1383156

  7. The isolation and characterization of new C. thermocellum strains and the evaluation of multiple anaerobic digestion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wen

    The overall objective of my research was to improve the efficiencies of bioconversions that produce renewable energy from lignocellulosic biomass. To this end, my studies addressed issues important to two promising strategies: consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) and anaerobic digestion (AD). CBP achieves saccharolytic enzyme production, hydrolysis, and fermentation in a single step and is considered to be the most cost-effective model. Anaerobic bacteria that can be used in CBP are highly desirable. To that end, two thermophilic and cellulolytic bacterial strains were isolated and characterized (Chapter 3). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, both strains CS7 and CS8 are closely related to Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405. However, they had significantly higher specific cellulase activities and ethanol/acetate ratios than C. thermocellum ATCC 27405. As a result, CS7 and CS8 are two new highly cellulolytic and ethanologenic C. thermocellum strains, with application potentials in research and development of CBP. As some of the most promising AD processes, two temperature-phased AD (TPAD) systems, in comparison with a thermophilic single-stage AD (TSAD) system and a mesophilic two-stage AD (MTAD) system, were studied in treating high-strength dairy cattle manure. The TPAD systems, with the thermophilic digesters acidified (AT-TPAD, Chapter 4) or operated at neutral pH (NT-TPAD, Chapter 5), were optimized at the thermophilic temperature of 50°C and a volume ratio between the thermophilic and the mesophilic digesters of 1:2. Despite similar methane productions, the NT-TPAD system achieved significantly higher volatile solid (VS) removal than the AT-TPAD system and needed no external pH adjustments (Chapter 6). At the same overall OLR, the TSAD system achieved the highest performance, followed by the NT-TPAD and the MTAD systems (Chapter 7). Each digester harbored distinct yet dynamic microbial populations, some of which were significantly correlated or associated

  8. Thermotoga lettingae sp. nov., a novel thermophilic, methanol-degrading bacterium isolated from a thermophilic anaerobic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balk, Melike; Weijma, Jan; Stams, Alfons J M

    2002-07-01

    A novel, anaerobic, non-spore-forming, mobile, Gram-negative, thermophilic bacterium, strain TMOT, was isolated from a thermophilic sulfate-reducing bioreactor operated at 65 C with methanol as the sole substrate. The G+C content of the DNA of strain TMOT was 39.2 mol%. The optimum pH, NaCl concentration, and temperature for growth were 7.0, 1.0%, and 65 degrees C, respectively. Strain TMOT was able to degrade methanol to CO2 and H2 in syntrophic culture with Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus AH or Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii. Thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, Fe(III) and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate were able to serve as electron acceptors during methanol degradation. In the presence of thiosulfate or elemental sulfur, methanol was converted to CO2 and partly to alanine. In pure culture, strain TMOT was also able to ferment methanol to acetate, CO2 and H2. However, this degradation occurred slower than in syntrophic cultures or in the presence of electron acceptors. Yeast extract was required for growth. Besides growing on methanol, strain TMOT grew by fermentation on a variety of carbohydrates including monomeric and oligomeric sugars, starch and xylan. Acetate, alanine, CO2, H2, and traces of ethanol, lactate and alpha-aminobutyrate were produced during glucose fermentation. Comparison of 16S rDNA genes revealed that strain TMOT is related to Thermotoga subterranea (98%) and Thermotoga elfii (98%). The type strain is TMOT (= DSM 14385T = ATCC BAA-301T). On the basis of the fact that these organisms differ physiologically from strain TMOT, it is proposed that strain TMOT be classified as a new species, within the genus Thermotoga, as Thermotoga lettingae. PMID:12148651

  9. Acetoanaerobium pronyense sp. nov., an anaerobic alkaliphilic bacterium isolated from a carbonate chimney of the Prony Hydrothermal Field (New Caledonia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bes, Méline; Merrouch, Mériem; Joseph, Manon; Quéméneur, Marianne; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Erauso, Gaël; Postec, Anne

    2015-08-01

    A novel anaerobic bacterial strain, ST07-YET, was isolated from a carbonate chimney of the Prony Hydrothermal Field (PHF) in New Caledonia. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, straight rods (0.7-0.8 × 3.0-5.0 μm) and motile by means of lateral flagella. Strain ST07-YET was mesophilic (optimum 35 °C), moderately alkaliphilic and halotolerant (optimum pH 8.7 and 5 g l- 1 NaCl). Elemental sulfur, sulfate, thiosulfate, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite were not used as terminal electron acceptors. Yeast extract, peptone, tryptone, Casamino acids, crotonate, pyruvate, galactose, maltose, sucrose, ribose, trehalose and glucose were used as carbon sources. Glucose fermentation led to acetate, H2 and CO2 formation. Arginine, serine, histidine, lysine, methionine and cysteine improved growth, but the Stickland reaction was negative for the combinations of amino acids tested. The major metabolic products from yeast extract fermentation were H2, CO2, acetate, butyrate, isobutyrate, isovalerate and propionate. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C16  :  0, C16  :  1cis9, C14  :  0 and C16  :  1cis7 (>5 % of total fatty acids). The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 32.9 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain ST07-YET was most closely related to Clostridium sticklandii DSM 519T and Acetoanaerobium noterae NOT-3T (96.7 % and 96.8 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). On the basis of phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and physiological properties, strain ST07-YET is proposed to represent a novel species of the genus Acetoanaerobium (order Clostridiales, phylum Firmicutes) with the name Acetoanaerobium pronyense sp. nov. The type strain is ST07-YET ( = DSM 27512T = JCM 19400T). PMID:25948619

  10. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and of Pu-EDTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enhanced mobility of radionuclides by co-disposed chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), is likely to occur only under anaerobic conditions. Our extensive effort to enrich and isolate anaerobic EDTA-degrading bacteria has failed. Others has tried and also failed. To explain the lack of anaerobic biodegradation of EDTA, we proposed that EDTA has to be transported into the cells for metabolism. A failure of uptake may contribute to the lack of EDTA degradation under anaerobic conditions. We demonstrated that an aerobic EDTA-degrading bacterium strain BNC1 uses an ABC-type transporter system to uptake EDTA. The system has a periplasmic binding protein that bind EDTA and then interacts with membrane proteins to transport EDTA into the cell at the expense of ATP. The bind protein EppA binds only free EDTA with a Kd of 25 nM. The low Kd value indicates high affinity. However, the Kd value of Ni-EDTA is 2.4 x 10-10 nM, indicating much stronger stability. Since Ni and other trace metals are essential for anaerobic respiration, we conclude that the added EDTA sequestrates all trace metals and making anaerobic respiration impossible. Thus, the data explain the lack of anaerobic enrichment cultures for EDTA degradation. Although we did not obtain an EDTA degrading culture under anaerobic conditions, our finding may promote the use of certain metals that forms more stable metal-EDTA complexes than Pu(III)-EDTA to prevent the enhanced mobility. Further, our data explain why EDTA is the most dominant organic pollutant in surface waters, due to the lack of degradation of certain metal-EDTA complexes.

  11. Characterization of Alkaliphilus hydrothermalis sp nov., a novel alkaliphilic anaerobic bacterium, isolated from a carbonaceous chimney of the Prony hydrothermal field, New Caledonia

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Aissa, F.; Postec, A.; Erauso, G.; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Hamdi, M.; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Ollivier, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A novel anaerobic, alkaliphilic, Gram-positive staining bacterium was isolated from a hydrothermal chimney in the Prony Bay, New Caledonia. This strain designated FatMR1(T) grew at temperatures from 20 to 55 A degrees C (optimum 37 A degrees C) and at pH between 7.5 and 10.5 (optimum 8.8-9). NaCl is not required for growth (optimum 0.2-0.5 %), but is tolerated up to 3 %. Sulfate, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite are not used as terminal electron acceptors. Strain Fa...

  12. Elemental sulfur and thiosulfate disproportionation by Desulfocapsa sulfoexigens sp. nov., a new anaerobic bacterium isolated from marine surface sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finster, Kai; Liesack, Werner; Thamdrup, Bo

    1998-01-01

    A mesophilic, anaerobic, gram-negative bacterium, strain SB164P1, was enriched and isolated from oxidized marine surface sediment with elemental sulfur as the sole energy substrate in the presence of ferrihydrite. Elemental sulfur was disproportionated to hydrogen sulfide and sulfate. Growth was...... chemolithoautotrophically exclusively by the disproportionation of inorganic sulfur compounds. Comparative 16S rDNA sequencing analysis placed strain SB164P1 into the delta subclass of the class Proteobacteria. Its closest relative is Desulfocapsa thiozymogenes, and slightly more distantly related are Desulfofustis...

  13. In Vitro Activities of Telithromycin and 10 Oral Agents against Aerobic and Anaerobic Pathogens Isolated from Antral Puncture Specimens from Patients with Sinusitis

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Warren, Yumi; Tyrrel, Kerin L.; Fernandez, Helen

    2003-01-01

    A study of the comparative in vitro activity of telithromycin, a new ketolide, against 155 aerobic and 171 anaerobic antral sinus puncture isolates showed it to be active against a broad range of sinus pathogens. All pneumococci, including erythromycin-resistant strains, were susceptible to telithromycin at ≤0.5 μg/ml; all Haemophilus influenzae and Eikenella corrodens strains were inhibited by ≤4 μg of telithromycin/ml; all Moraxella spp. and beta-lactamase-producing Prevotella species strai...

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfotomaculum copahuensis Strain CINDEFI1 Isolated from the Geothermal Copahue System, Neuquén, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaakop, Amira Suriaty; Chan, Chia Sing; Urbieta, M. Sofía; Ee, Robson; Tan-Guan-Sheng, Adrian; Donati, Edgardo R.

    2016-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum copahuensis strain CINDEFI1 is a novel spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from the Copahue volcano area, Argentina. Here, we present its draft genome in which we found genes related with the anaerobic respiration of sulfur compounds similar to those present in the Copahue environment. PMID:27540078

  15. Anaerobic denitrification in fungi from the coastal marine sediments off Goa, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathrine, Sumathi J; Raghukumar, Chandralata

    2009-01-01

    Denitrification is a microbial process during which nitrate or nitrite is reduced under anaerobic condition to gaseous nitrogen. The Arabian Sea contains one of the major pelagic denitrification zones and in addition to this, denitrification also takes places along the continental shelf. Prokaryotic microorganisms were considered to be the only players in this process. However recent studies have shown that higher microeukaryotes such as fungi can also adapt to anaerobic mode of respiration and reduce nitrate to harmful green house gases such as NO and N2O. In this study we examined the distribution and biomass of fungi in the sediments of the seasonal anoxic region off Goa from two stations. The sampling was carried out in five different periods from October 2005, when dissolved oxygen levels were near zero in bottom waters to March 2006. We isolated mycelial fungi, thraustochytrids and yeasts. Species of Aspergillus and thraustochytrids were dominant. Fungi were isolated under aerobic, as well as anaerobic conditions from different seasons. Four isolates were examined for their denitrification activity. Two cultures obtained from the anoxic sediments showed better growth under anaerobic condition than the other two cultures that were isolated from oxic sediments. Our preliminary results suggest that several species of fungi can grow under oxygen deficient conditions and participate in denitrification processes. PMID:18834939

  16. Biodegradation of Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine and Its Mononitroso Derivative Hexahydro-1-Nitroso-3,5-Dinitro-1,3,5-Triazine by Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain SCZ-1 Isolated from an Anaerobic Sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jian-Shen; Halasz, Annamaria; Paquet, Louise; Beaulieu, Chantale; Hawari, Jalal

    2002-01-01

    In previous work, we found that an anaerobic sludge efficiently degraded hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), but the role of isolates in the degradation process was unknown. Recently, we isolated a facultatively anaerobic bacterium, identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae strain SCZ-1, using MIDI and the 16S rRNA method from this sludge and employed it to degrade RDX. Strain SCZ-1 degraded RDX to formaldehyde (HCHO), methanol (CH3OH) (12% of total C), carbon dioxide (CO2) (72% of total...

  17. Medium factors on anaerobic production of rhamnolipids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG and a simplifying medium for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng; Zhou, Jidong; Han, Siqin; Ma, Fang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Aerobic production of rhamnolipid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was extensively studied. But effect of medium composition on anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa was unknown. A simplifying medium facilitating anaerobic production of rhamnolipid is urgently needed for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). Medium factors affecting anaerobic production of rhamnolipid were investigated using P. aeruginosa SG (Genbank accession number KJ995745). Medium composition for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa is different from that for aerobic production of rhamnolipid. Both hydrophobic substrate and organic nitrogen inhibited rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions. Glycerol and nitrate were the best carbon and nitrogen source. The commonly used N limitation under aerobic conditions was not conducive to rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions because the initial cell growth demanded enough nitrate for anaerobic respiration. But rhamnolipid was also fast accumulated under nitrogen starvation conditions. Sufficient phosphate was needed for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. SO4(2-) and Mg(2+) are required for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Results will contribute to isolation bacteria strains which can anaerobically produce rhamnolipid and medium optimization for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Based on medium optimization by response surface methodology and ions composition of reservoir formation water, a simplifying medium containing 70.3 g/l glycerol, 5.25 g/l NaNO3, 5.49 g/l KH2PO4, 6.9 g/l K2HPO4·3H2O and 0.40 g/l MgSO4 was designed. Using the simplifying medium, 630 mg/l of rhamnolipid was produced by SG, and the anaerobic culture emulsified crude oil to EI24 = 82.5 %. The simplifying medium was promising for in situ MEOR applications. PMID:26925616

  18. A fast and reliable procedure for spore collection from anaerobic fungi: Application for RNA uptake and long-term storage of isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Shelby; Elledge, Nicole C; Hanafy, Radwa A; Elshahed, Mostafa S; Youssef, Noha

    2016-08-01

    Anaerobic gut fungi (AGF) represent a basal fungal lineage (phylum Neocallimastigomycota) that resides in the rumen and alimentary tracts of herbivores. The AGF reproduce asexually, with a life cycle that involves flagellated zoospores released from zoosporangia followed by encystment, germination and the subsequent development of rhizomycelia. A fast and reliable approach for AGF spore collection is critical not only for developmental biology studies, but also for molecular biological (e.g. AMT-transformation and RNAi) approaches. Here, we developed and optimized a simple and reliable procedure for the collection of viable, competent, and developmentally synchronized AGF spores under strict anaerobic conditions. The approach involves growing AGF on agar medium in serum bottles under anaerobic conditions, and flooding the observed aerial growth to promote spore release from sporangia into the flooding suspension. The released spores are gently collected using a wide bore sterile needle. Process optimization resulted in the recovery of up to 7×10(9) spores per serum bottle. Further, the released spores exhibited synchronized development from flagellated spores to encysted spores and finally to germinating spores within 90min from the onset of flooding. At the germinating spore stage, the obtained spores were competent, and readily uptook small interfering RNA (siRNA) oligonucleotides. Finally, using multiple monocentric and polycentric AGF isolates, we demonstrate that AGF grown on agar surface could retain viability for up to 16weeks at 39°C, and hence this solid surface growth procedure represents a simple, cryopreservative- and freezing temperature-free approach for AGF storage. PMID:27288952

  19. Respiration in spiders (Araneae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Anke

    2016-05-01

    Spiders (Araneae) are unique regarding their respiratory system: they are the only animal group that breathe simultaneously with lungs and tracheae. Looking at the physiology of respiration the existence of tracheae plays an important role in spiders with a well-developed tracheal system. Other factors as sex, life time, type of prey capture and the high ability to gain energy anaerobically influence the resting and the active metabolic rate intensely. Most spiders have metabolic rates that are much lower than expected from body mass; but especially those with two pairs of lungs. Males normally have higher resting rates than females; spiders that are less evolved and possess a cribellum have lower metabolic rates than higher evolved species. Freely hunting spiders show a higher energy turnover than spiders hunting with a web. Spiders that live longer than 1 year will have lower metabolic rates than those species that die after 1 year in which development and reproduction must be completed. Lower temperatures and starvation, which most spiders can cope with, will decrease the metabolic rate as well. PMID:26820263

  20. RESPONSE OF RICE ROOT IN RESPIRATION AT JOINTING STAGE TO OZONE POLLUTION AND ALTERNATION OF ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC CONDITIONS%水稻拔节期根系呼吸对臭氧污染和厌氧—有氧环境变化的响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    寇太记; 朱建国

    2013-01-01

    Effects of elevated atmospheric ozone (pO3) (50% higher than the ambient pO3 in concentration) on root respiration and biomass accumulation and distribution of rice (Oryza sativa L.cv.Xiandao 63) at the jointing stage were investigated in fully open-air field conditions,and effect of alternation of anaerobic and aerobic conditions on root respiration was analyzed using special gas-collecting installations.Results show that under elevated pO3canopy and total biomass of the crop decreased slightly,while its root dry matter weight and ratio of root/canopy dropped significantly by 14.7% and 10.4%,respectively.The mixture of N2 and O2at a ratio of 9∶1 or 9.5∶0.5 was the most propitious for root respiration,whereas in pure N2,natural air and CO2-saturated distilled water root respiration rate was lowered to a varying degree.The treatment of elevated pO3 coupled with measurement inn CO2-saturated distilled water and the treatment of ambient air coupled with measurement in pure N2 was the least in root respiration rate,indicating that although the condition in which root respiration was measured affected root respiration rate,the impact was restricted in degree by the atmospheric environment in which the plant grew.The root respiration rate of rice growing under elevated ozone was 23.6% ~52.7% higher than that under natural atmosphere when measured in pure gas condition,and the difference between the two was insignificant when the measurement was done in CO2-saturated distilled water,showing that the influence of ozone pollution on root respiration obviously decreased.Under elevated and ambient pO3 environments,root respiration of the rice displayed a curve of convex quadratic function with increasing oxygen supply in the gaseous environment for measurement.The oxygen concentration of 5%~ 10% in the environment promoted rice root respiration,while stronge anaerobic condition (i.e.,pure N2) and aerobic conditions (i.e.,air) both affected root

  1. The antimicrobial action of low molecular weight chitosan and chitooligosaccharides on growth of anaerobic bacteria isolated from human feces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimůnek, Jiří; Koppová, Ingrid; Tishchenko, Galina

    Aberdeen : Rowett Institute-INRA, 2010. s. 103-103. [7th joint symposium of Rowett-INRA:Gut Microbiology: new insight into gut microbial ecosystems. 23.06.2010-25.06.2010, Aberdeen] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA525/08/0803 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : chitosan * anaerobic bacteria * human faces Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology http://www.rowett.ac.uk/Rowett-INRA2010/scientific-prog.html

  2. Short inhalation exposures of the isolated and perfused rat lung to respirable dry particle aerosols; the detailed pharmacokinetics of budesonide, formoterol, and terbutaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Per; Eirefelt, Stefan J; Andersson, Paul; Blomgren, Anders; Ryrfeldt, Ake; Gerde, Per

    2008-06-01

    There is an increasing interest in using the lung as a route of entry for both local and systemic administration of drugs. However, because adequate technologies have been missing in the preclinical setting, few investigators have addressed the detailed disposition of drugs in the lung following short inhalation exposures to highly concentrated dry powder aerosols. New methods are needed to explore the disposition of drugs after short inhalation exposures, thus mimicking a future clinical use. Our aim was to study the pulmonary disposition of budesonide, formoterol, and terbutaline, which are clinically used for the treatment of bronchial asthma. Using the recently developed DustGun aerosol technology, we exposed by inhalation for approximately 1 min the isolated and perfused rat lung (IPL) to respirable dry particle aerosols of the three drugs at high concentrations. The typical aerosol concentration was 1 mug/mL, and the particle size distribution of the tested substances varied with a MMAD ranging from 2.3 to 5.3 mum. The IPL was perfused in single pass mode and repeated samples of the perfusate were taken for up to 80 min postexposure. The concentration of drug in perfusate and in lung extracts was measured using LC-MS/MS. The deposited dose was determined by adding the amounts of drug collected in perfusate to the amount extracted from the tissues at 80 min. Deposited amounts of budesonide, formoterol fumarate, and terbutaline sulphate were 23 +/- 17, 36 +/- 8, and 60 +/- 3.2 mug (mean +/- SD, n = 3), respectively. Retention in lung tissues at the end of the perfusion period expressed as fraction of deposited dose was 0.19 +/- 0.05, 0.19 +/- 0.06, and 0.04 +/- 0.01 (mean +/- SD, n = 3) for budesonide, formoterol, and terbutaline, respectively. Each short inhalation exposure to the highly concentrated aerosols consumed 1-3 mg powder. Hence, this system can be particularly useful for obtaining a detailed pharmacokinetic characterization of inhaled compounds in

  3. Microbial Iron Respiration Can Protect Steel from Corrosion

    OpenAIRE

    Dubiel, M.; Hsu, C H; Chien, C. C.; Mansfeld, F.; Newman, D. K.

    2002-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MC) of steel has been attributed to the activity of biofilms that include anaerobic microorganisms such as iron-respiring bacteria, yet the mechanisms by which these organisms influence corrosion have been unclear. To study this process, we generated mutants of the iron-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 that were defective in biofilm formation and/or iron reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to determine changes...

  4. Pectinase Activity of Anaerobic and Facultatively Anaerobic Bacteria Associated with Soft Rot of Yam (Diascorea rotundata)

    OpenAIRE

    Obi, Samuel K. C.

    1981-01-01

    Anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria associated with soft rot of yam (Diascorea rotundata) were isolated by the looping-out method and found to consist of Clostridium (three isolates), Corynebacterium (three isolates), Vibrio (one isolate), and Bacillus lentus (one isolate). Enzyme assay for hydrolase, lyase, and pectinesterase activities by the cup-plate method showed that except for Vibrio sp., B. lentus, and two isolates of Corynebacterium no pectinase activity could be detected ...

  5. In vitro susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, J A

    1979-01-01

    In vitro susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria should be limited to isolates from persistent or recurrent infections that have been treated adequately and appropriately with antimicrobial agents and, in reference centers, to collections of isolates in order to monitor alterations in susceptibility of species to various antimicrobial agents. An agar dilution reference method is being evaluated currently; however, practicality limits sporadic testing of single isolates to disk elution or broth dilution techniques. No single disk diffusion method has yet been found to be acceptable for testing anaerobic bacteria, and the results obtained with standardized procedures for aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria are not applicable to anaerobic bacteria. PMID:288163

  6. Tindallia Californiensis sp. nov.: A New Halo-Alkaliphilic Primary Anaerobe, Isolated from Meromictic soda Mono Lake in California and the Correction of Diagnosis for Genus Tindallia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena; Marsic, Damien; Hoover, Richard B.; Kevbrin, Vadim; Whitman, William B.; Krader, Paul; Cleland, Dave; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A novel extremely halo-alkaliphilic, bacterium strain APO (sup T) was isolated from sediments of the athalassic, meromictic, soda Mono Lake in California. Gram positive, spore-forming, slightly curved rods with sizes 0.6-0.7x 2.5-4.0 micrometers which occur singly, in pairs or short curved chains. Cells, are motile by singular subcentral flagellum. Strain APO (sup T) is mesophilic: growth was observed over the temperature range of +10 C to +48 C (optimum +37 C), NaCl concentration range 1-20 %, wt/vol (optimum 3-5%, wt/vol) and pH range 8.0-11.0 (optimum pH 9.5). The novel isolate is strictly halo-alkaliphilic, requires sodium chloride in medium, obligately anaerobic and catalase-negative. Strain APO (sup T) is organo-heterotroph with fermentative type of metabolism, and uses as substrates: peptone, badotryptone, casamino acids, yeast extract, L-serine, L-lysine, L-histidine, L-arginine, and pyruvate. The main end products of growth on peptone medium were: lactate, acetate, propionate, and ethanol. Strain APO (sup T) is resistant to kanamycin, but sensitive to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and gentamycin. The sum of G+C in DNA is 44.4 mol% (by HPLC method). On the bait of physiological and molecular properties, the isolate was considered as novel species of genus Tindallia; and the name Tindallia californiensis sp. nov., is proposed for new isolate (type strain APO (sup T) - ATCC BAA_393(sup T) = DSMZ 14871 (sup T)).

  7. Flow-FISH analysis and isolation of clostridial strains in an anaerobic semi-solid bio-hydrogen producing system by hydrogenase gene target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Chang Jui; Chou, Chia-Hung; Hsu, Ping-Chi; Yu, Sian-Jhong; Chen, Wei-En; Lay, Jiunn-Jyi; Huang, Chieh-Chen; Wen, Fu-Shyan

    2007-04-01

    By using hydrogenase gene-targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), the predominant clostridial hydrogenase that may have contributed to biohydrogen production in an anaerobic semi-solid fermentation system has been monitored. The results revealed that a Clostridium pasteurianum-like hydrogenase gene sequence can be detected by both PCR and RT-PCR and suggested that the bacterial strain possessing this specific hydrogenase gene was dominant in hydrogenase activity and population. Whereas another Clostridium saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase gene can be detected only by RT-PCR and suggest that the bacterial strain possessing this specific hydrogenase gene may be less dominant in population. In this study, hydrogenase gene-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that only 6.6% of the total eubacterial cells in a hydrogen-producing culture were detected to express the C. saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase, whereas the eubacteria that expressed the C. pasteurianum-like hydrogenase was 25.6%. A clostridial strain M1 possessing the identical nucleotide sequences of the C. saccharobutylicum-like hydrogenase gene was then isolated and identified as Clostridium butyricum based on 16S rRNA sequence. Comparing to the original inoculum with mixed microflora, either using C. butyricum M1 as the only inoculum or co-culturing with a Bacillus thermoamylovorans isolate will guarantee an effective and even better production of hydrogen from brewery yeast waste. PMID:17277963

  8. Methanospirillum stamsii sp. nov., a psychrotolerant, hydrogenotrophic, methanogenic archaeon isolated from an anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed bioreactor operated at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshina, Sofiya N; Ermakova, Anna V; Bomberg, Malin; Detkova, Ekaterina N

    2014-01-01

    A psychrotolerant hydrogenotrophic methanogen, strain Pt1, was isolated from a syntrophic propionate-oxidizing methanogenic consortium obtained from granulated biomass of a two-stage low-temperature (3-8 °C) anaerobic expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) bioreactor, fed with a mixture of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) (acetate, propionate and butyrate). The strain was strictly anaerobic, and cells were curved rods, 0.4-0.5×7.5-25 µm, that sometimes formed wavy filaments from 25 to several hundred micrometres in length. Cells stained Gram-negative and were non-sporulating. They were gently motile by means of tufted flagella. The strain grew at 5-37 °C (optimum at 20-30 °C), at pH 6.0-10 (optimum 7.0-7.5) and with 0-0.3 M NaCl (optimum 0 M NaCl). Growth and methane production was found with H2/CO2 and very weak growth with formate. Acetate and yeast extract stimulated growth, but were not essential. The G+C content of the DNA of strain Pt1 was 40 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain Pt1 was a member of the genus Methanospirillum and showed 97.5 % sequence similarity to Methanospirillum hungatei JF1(T) and 94 % sequence similarity to Methanospirillum lacunae Ki8-1(T). DNA-DNA hybridization of strain Pt1 with Methanospirillum hungatei JF1(T) revealed 39 % relatedness. On the basis of its phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic position, strain Pt1 is a representative of a novel species of the genus Methanospirillum, for which the name Methanospirillum stamsii sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Pt1(T) ( = DSM 26304(T) = VKM B-2808(T)). PMID:24048867

  9. Respirator field performance factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Industrial Hygiene Group assisted OSHA and the NRC in measurements of respirator performance under field conditions. They reviewed problems associated with sampling aerosols within the respirator in order to determine fit factors (FFs) or field performance factor (FPF). In addition, they designed an environmental chamber study to determine the effects of temperature and humidity on a respirator wearer

  10. Anaerobic thermophilic bacteria isolated from a Venezuelan oil field and its potential use in microbial improved oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trebbau, G.; Fernandez, B.; Marin, A. [INTEVEP S.A., Caracas (Venezuela)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this work is to determine the ability of indigenous bacteria from a Venezuelan oil field to grow under reservoir conditions inside a porous media, and to produce metabolites capable of recovering residual crude oil. For this purpose, samples of formation waters from a central-eastern Venezuelan oil reservoir were enriched with different carbon sources and a mineral basal media. Formation water was used as a source of trace metals. The enrichments obtained were incubated at reservoir temperature (71{degrees}C), reservoir pressure (1,200 psi), and under anaerobic conditions for both outside and inside porous media (Berea core). Growth and metabolic activity was followed outside porous media by measuring absorbance at 660 nm, increases in pressure, and decreases in pH. Inside porous media bacterial activity was determined by visual examination of the produced waters (gas bubbles and bacterial cells). All the carbohydrates tested outside porous media showed good growth at reservoir conditions. The pH was lowered, gases such as CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} were identified by GC. Surface tension was lowered in some enrichments by 30% when compared to controls. Growth was decreased inside porous media, but gases were produced and helped displace oil. In addition, 10% residual oil was recovered from the Berea core. Mathematical modeling was applied to the laboratory coreflood experiment to evaluate the reproducibility of the results obtained.

  11. Specific neural substrate linking respiration to locomotion

    OpenAIRE

    Gariépy, Jean-François; Missaghi, Kianoush; Chevallier, Stéphanie; Chartré, Shannon; Robert, Maxime; Auclair, François; Lund, James P; DUBUC, RÉJEAN

    2011-01-01

    When animals move, respiration increases to adapt for increased energy demands; the underlying mechanisms are still not understood. We investigated the neural substrates underlying the respiratory changes in relation to movement in lampreys. We showed that respiration increases following stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) in an in vitro isolated preparation, an effect that persists in the absence of the spinal cord and caudal brainstem. By using electrophysiological and a...

  12. The Arx Anaerobic Arsenite-Oxidization Pathway Is Conserved In Halomonas And Ectothiorhodospira Strains Isolated From Big Soda Lake, Nevada

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Alison Tory

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms play a significant role in environmental arsenic cycling. The most recent discovery to the ever growing collection of known arsenic metabolisms is photosynthesis-linked arsenite oxidation (photoarsenotrophy). However, it is poorly understood and has only been identified in thermal springs on Paoha Island of Mono Lake, CA. The arsenite oxidase ArxA is thought to be responsible for the oxidation of arsenite in photoarsenotrophy. However, the first and only isolated photoarsenotro...

  13. Anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook I, Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 297. Stedman's Online ...

  14. Characterization of Alkaliphilus hydrothermalis sp. nov., a novel alkaliphilic anaerobic bacterium, isolated from a carbonaceous chimney of the Prony hydrothermal field, New Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Aissa, Fatma; Postec, Anne; Erauso, Gaël; Payri, Claude; Pelletier, Bernard; Hamdi, Moktar; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Ollivier, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    A novel anaerobic, alkaliphilic, Gram-positive staining bacterium was isolated from a hydrothermal chimney in the Prony Bay, New Caledonia. This strain designated FatMR1(T) grew at temperatures from 20 to 55 °C (optimum 37 °C) and at pH between 7.5 and 10.5 (optimum 8.8-9). NaCl is not required for growth (optimum 0.2-0.5%), but is tolerated up to 3%. Sulfate, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, sulfite, nitrate and nitrite are not used as terminal electron acceptors. Strain FatMR1(T) fermented pyruvate, yeast extract, peptone and biotrypcase and used fructose as the only sugar. The main fermentation products from fructose and proteinaceous compounds (e.g. peptone and biotrypcase) were acetate, H2 and CO2. Crotonate was disproportionated to acetate and butyrate. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C14:0 and C16:0. The G + C content of the genomic DNA was 37.1 mol%. On the basis of phylogenetic, genetic, and physiological properties, strain FatMR1(T) (=DSM 25890(T), =JCM 18390(T)) belonging to the phylum Firmicutes, class Clostridia, order Clostridiales, is proposed as a novel species of the genus Alkaliphilus, A. hydrothermalis sp. nov. PMID:25319677

  15. Regulation of mitochondrial respiration by inorganic phosphate; comparing permeabilized muscle fibers and isolated mitochondria prepared from type-1 and type-2 rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Quistorff, Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    ADP is generally accepted as a key regulator of oxygen consumption both in isolated mitochondria and in permeabilized fibers from skeletal muscle. The present study explored inorganic phosphate in a similar regulatory role. Saponin permeabilized fibers and isolated mitochondria from type-I and type...

  16. Choosing the right respirator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selecting respirators to help protect workers from airborne contaminants can be a confusing process. The consequences of selecting the incorrect respirator can be intimidating, and worker safety and health may be dramatically and irreparably affected if an inappropriate respirator is chosen. When used in the workplace, a formal respiratory protection program must be established covering the basic requirements outlined in the OSHA Respiratory Protection Standard (29 CFR 1910.134). Education and training must be properly emphasized and conducted periodically. Maintenance, cleaning, and storage programs must be established and routinely followed for reusable respirators. The process of establishing a respiratory protection program can be broken down into four basic steps: Identify respiratory hazards and concentrations; understand the contaminants effects on workers' health; select appropriate respiratory protection; and train in proper respirator use and maintenance. These four steps are the foundation for establishing a basic respirator protection program. Be sure to consult state and federal OSHA requirements to ensure that the program complies. Leading industrial respirator manufacturers should be able to assist with on-site training and education in this four-step process, in addition to helping employers train their workers and conduct respirator fit testing

  17. Parotitis due to anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlow, A; Korentager, R; Keystone, E; Bohnen, J

    1988-01-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus remains the pathogen most commonly implicated in acute suppurative parotitis, the pathogenic role of gram-negative facultative anaerobic bacteria and strict anaerobic organisms in this disease is becoming increasingly recognized. This report describes a case of parotitis due to Bacteroides disiens in an elderly woman with Sjögren's syndrome. Literature reports on seven additional cases of suppurative parotitis due to anaerobic bacteria are reviewed. Initial therapy of acute suppurative parotitis should include coverage for S. aureus and, in a very ill patient, coverage of gram-negative facultative organisms with antibiotics such as cloxacillin and an aminoglycoside. A failure to respond clinically to such a regimen or isolation of anaerobic bacteria should lead to the consideration of the addition of clindamycin or penicillin. PMID:3287567

  18. Microbial iron respiration can protect steel from corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubiel, M; Hsu, C H; Chien, C C; Mansfeld, F; Newman, D K

    2002-03-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MC) of steel has been attributed to the activity of biofilms that include anaerobic microorganisms such as iron-respiring bacteria, yet the mechanisms by which these organisms influence corrosion have been unclear. To study this process, we generated mutants of the iron-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 that were defective in biofilm formation and/or iron reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in the corrosion rate and corrosion potential as a function of time for these mutants in comparison to the wild type. Counter to prevailing theories of MC, our results indicate that biofilms comprising iron-respiring bacteria may reduce rather than accelerate the corrosion rate of steel. Corrosion inhibition appears to be due to reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions and increased consumption of oxygen, both of which are direct consequences of microbial respiration. PMID:11872499

  19. In Vitro Activities of Daptomycin, Vancomycin, Quinupristin- Dalfopristin, Linezolid, and Five Other Antimicrobials against 307 Gram-Positive Anaerobic and 31 Corynebacterium Clinical Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Warren, Yumi A.; Tyrrell, Kerrin L.; Fernandez, Helen T.

    2003-01-01

    The activities of daptomycin, a cyclic lipopeptide, and eight other agents were determined against 338 strains of gram-positive anaerobic bacteria and corynebacteria by the NCCLS reference agar dilution method with supplemented brucella agar for the anaerobes and Mueller-Hinton agar for the corynebacteria. The daptomycin MICs determined on Ca2+-supplemented (50 mg/liter) brucella agar plates were one- to fourfold lower than those determined in unsupplemented media. Daptomycin was highly activ...

  20. Porphyromonas pogonae sp. nov., an anaerobic but low concentration oxygen adapted coccobacillus isolated from lizards (Pogona vitticeps) or human clinical specimens, and emended description of the genus Porphyromonas Shah and Collins 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Kuwabara, Saki; Kania, Stephen A; Kato, Hisayuki; Hamagishi, Manami; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Sato, Takuichi; Tomida, Junko; Tanaka, Kaori; Bemis, David A

    2015-03-01

    During the process of identifying a Gram-negative coccobacillus isolated from a human clinical specimen, we found that the isolate's 16S rRNA gene had very close sequence identity with that of a variant Porphyromonas isolated from polymicrobial infections in the central bearded dragon, a species of lizard [2]. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the human isolate and of six isolates from lizards were nearly identical (99.9-100%). Phylogenetic analysis placed all of these isolates in a single phylogenetic cluster well separated from other species in the genus Porphyromonas. The closest species was Porphyromonas catoniae with 90.7-90.9% sequence identity, although there was less than 6% DNA similarity between the P. catoniae type strain and our representative isolates from lizards (PAGU 1787(T)) and human (PAGU 1776). These isolates could grow under anaerobic or microaerobic conditions (6% O2 atmosphere). The isolates were positive for catalase and very strong β-hemolytic activity, but did not show black or brown pigmentation. Biochemically, the isolates could be differentiated from closely related species by pyroglutamic acid arylamidase and glycine arylamidase activity, and some others. The fermentation products mainly included succinic acid and propionic acid. The major fatty acids detected in cells of the isolates were iso-C15:0, anteiso-C15:0, and 3OH-iso-C17:0. The G+C content was 43.0 ± 0.62 mol%. The species name Porphyromonas pogonae sp. nov. is proposed for these isolates with the type strain of PAGU 1787(T) (=MI 10-1288(T)=JCM 19732(T)=ATCC BAA-2643(T)). PMID:25481042

  1. Anaerobic workout

    OpenAIRE

    McAdam, Ewan J.

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic technology cannot directly replace current wastewater treatment processes exclusively. The UASB reactor configuration removes slightly less organic carbon by comparison as the process relies on lamella separation for passive clarification rather than using fine pores like anMBR. By contrast, whilst anMBR can operate as a single unit process for organic carbon removal, the membrane surface has to be cleaned using gas sparging to limit surface deposition, which requires extra energy. ...

  2. Respirator Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Products NIOSH-Issued Publications Publication Types Alerts Current Intelligence Bulletins Criteria Documents Fact Sheets Health Hazard Evaluations ( ... using gas mask and escape respirators. At the end of this Fact Sheet, you will find a ...

  3. Fate of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in anaerobic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degradation of 14C labelled 2,5,2; 2,5,2',5' PCBs was studied in Hagerstown silty clay loam with and without sludge amendments under anaerobic conditions for 42 days. Soil respiration was enhanced by PCBs in soil. PCBs reduced the soil respiration in soil with sludge. Volatilization of PCBs was decreased by sludge in soil. Most of the radioactivity was found in hexane extracts of soils. No further degradation products were observed. (author)

  4. Teaching Cellular Respiration & Alternate Energy Sources with a Laboratory Exercise Developed by a Scientist-Teacher Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Brandon; Mitton, Teri; Smith, Rosemary; Magnuson, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells are a current research area that harvests electricity from bacteria capable of anaerobic respiration. Graphite is an electrically conductive material that bacteria can respire on, thus it can be used to capture electrons from bacteria. When bacteria transfer electrons to graphite, an electrical potential is created that can…

  5. Species identification of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria: a comparison of two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Holm, Anette; Knudsen, Elisa;

    2011-01-01

    We compared two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) systems (Shimadzu/SARAMIS and Bruker) on a collection of consecutive clinically important anaerobic bacteria (n = 290). The Bruker system had more correct identifications to the species level...... (67.2% versus 49.0%), but also more incorrect identifications (7.9% versus 1.4%). The system databases need to be optimized to increase identification levels. However, MALDI-TOF MS in its present version seems to be a fast and inexpensive method for identification of most clinically important...... anaerobic bacteria....

  6. Plant Respiration and Climate Change Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant respiration is one of the key processes in terms of an understanding of plant growth and functioning in a future climate. Short- and long-term effects of temperature and CO2 on plant respiration were investigated in a number of plant species. The experiments tested effects of either temperature and/or CO2 from the level of individual respiratory enzymes, isolated mitochondria, whole-tissue, and up to the whole canopy level. The short-term effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on plant respiration appeared to be less than suggested so far in the literature. This was true both at the tissue level and for intact mitochondria. Respiratory enzymes can, however, be affected already at low CO2. These effects did not manifest itself at the tissue level, though, due to low degrees of control on the whole respiratory process exerted by the particular enzymes. Plant respiration on the other hand was affected by long-term growth at elevated atmospheric CO2. The findings of the reduced plant respiration at the leaf level were consistent with the literature and potential causes are discussed. Short-term effects of temperature on plant respiration were demonstrated to be dependent on the actual measurement temperature. Further, it is shown that mitochondrial leaf respiration in darkness and light differ substantially in the temperature sensitivity with the former being the far most sensitive. This has implications for modelling CO2 exchange between vegetation and atmosphere as demonstrated here, since this has so far been neglected. Long-term effects of temperature resulted in respiratory acclimation in a number of species. Respiratory acclimation appeared not to occur to any one single type of growth temperature. The implications of this finding in combination with the timing of acclimation are discussed for modelling respiratory CO2 release. (au)

  7. Plant Respiration and Climate Change Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, D.

    2002-04-01

    Plant respiration is one of the key processes in terms of an understanding of plant growth and functioning in a future climate. Short- and long-term effects of temperature and CO{sub 2} on plant respiration were investigated in a number of plant species. The experiments tested effects of either temperature and/or CO{sub 2} from the level of individual respiratory enzymes, isolated mitochondria, whole-tissue, and up to the whole canopy level. The short-term effects of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on plant respiration appeared to be less than suggested so far in the literature. This was true both at the tissue level and for intact mitochondria. Respiratory enzymes can, however, be affected already at low CO{sub 2}. These effects did not manifest itself at the tissue level, though, due to low degrees of control on the whole respiratory process exerted by the particular enzymes. Plant respiration on the other hand was affected by long-term growth at elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The findings of the reduced plant respiration at the leaf level were consistent with the literature and potential causes are discussed. Short-term effects of temperature on plant respiration were demonstrated to be dependent on the actual measurement temperature. Further, it is shown that mitochondrial leaf respiration in darkness and light differ substantially in the temperature sensitivity with the former being the far most sensitive. This has implications for modelling CO{sub 2} exchange between vegetation and atmosphere as demonstrated here, since this has so far been neglected. Long-term effects of temperature resulted in respiratory acclimation in a number of species. Respiratory acclimation appeared not to occur to any one single type of growth temperature. The implications of this finding in combination with the timing of acclimation are discussed for modelling respiratory CO{sub 2} release. (au)

  8. Thermodynamic and kinetic control on anaerobic oxidation of methane in marine sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knab, Nina J.; Dale, Andrew W.; Lettmann, Karsten;

    2008-01-01

    The free energy yield of microbial respiration reactions in anaerobic marine sediments must be sufficient to be conserved as biologically usable energy in the form of ATP. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SRR) has a very low standard free energy yield of ΔG  = -3...

  9. Cultivable Anaerobic Microbiota of Infected Root Canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuichi Sato

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Periapical periodontitis is an infectious and inflammatory disease of the periapical tissues caused by oral bacteria invading the root canal. In the present study, profiling of the microbiota in infected root canals was performed using anaerobic culture and molecular biological techniques for bacterial identification. Methods. Informed consent was obtained from all subjects (age ranges, 34–71 years. Nine infected root canals with periapical lesions from 7 subjects were included. Samples from infected root canals were collected, followed by anaerobic culture on CDC blood agar plates. After 7 days, colony forming units (CFU were counted and isolated bacteria were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results. The mean bacterial count (CFU in root canals was (0.5±1.1×106 (range 8.0×101–3.1×106, and anaerobic bacteria were predominant (89.8%. The predominant isolates were Olsenella (25.4%, Mogibacterium (17.7%, Pseudoramibacter (17.7%, Propionibacterium (11.9% and Parvimonas (5.9%. Conclusion. The combination of anaerobic culture and molecular biological techniques makes it possible to analyze rapidly the microbiota in infected root canals. The overwhelming majority of the isolates from infected root canals were found to be anaerobic bacteria, suggesting that the environment in root canals is anaerobic and therefore support the growth of anaerobes.

  10. Perspectives of the microbial carbon pump with special references to microbial respiration and ecological efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Dang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although respiration consumes fixed carbon and produce CO2, it provides energy for essential biological processes of an ecosystem, including the microbial carbon pump (MCP. In MCP-driving biotransformation of labile DOC to recalcitrant DOC (RDOC, microbial respiration provides the metabolic energy for environmental organic substrate sensing, cellular enzyme syntheses and catalytic processes such as uptake, secretion, modification, fixation and storage of carbon compounds. The MCP efficiency of a heterotrophic microorganism is thus related to its energy production efficiency and hence to its respiration efficiency. Anaerobically respiring microbes usually have lower energy production efficiency and lower energy-dependent carbon transformation efficiency, and consequently lower MCP efficiency at per cell level. This effect is masked by the phenomena that anoxic environments often store more organic matter. Here we point out that organic carbon preservation and RDOC production is different in mechanisms, and anaerobically respiring ecosystems could also have lower MCP ecological efficiency. Typical cases can be found in large river estuarine ecosystems. Due to strong terrigenous input of nutrients and organic matter, estuarine ecosystems usually experience intense heterotrophic respiration processes that rapidly consume dissolved oxygen, potentially producing hypoxic and anoxic zones in the water column. The lowered availability of dissolved oxygen and the excessive supply of nutrients such as nitrate from river input prompt enhanced anaerobic respiration processes. Thus, some nutrients may be consumed by anaerobically respiring heterotrophic microorganisms, instead of being utilized by phytoplankton for carbon fixation and primary production. In this situation, the ecological functioning of the estuarine ecosystem is altered and the ecological efficiency is lowered, as less carbon is fixed and less energy is produced. Ultimately this would have

  11. Anaerobic thermophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term "extremophile" was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of "extreme" environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally "hot environments" on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has definitely

  12. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Canganella

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong

  13. In Vitro Activities of Doripenem and Six Comparator Drugs against 423 Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacterial Isolates from Infected Diabetic Foot Wounds▿

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, Ellie J. C.; Citron, Diane M.; Merriam, C. Vreni; Warren, Yumi A.; Tyrrell, Kerin L.; Fernandez, Helen T.

    2007-01-01

    Against 182 anaerobe and 241 aerobe strains obtained from diabetic foot infections, doripenem was the most active carbapenem against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MIC90, 2 μg/ml), more active than imipenem against Proteus mirabilis, and ertapenem was more active against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. The MIC50 and MIC90 values were ≤0.125 μg/ml for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and all streptococci and 0.25/1 for Bacteroides fragilis.

  14. Taurine reduction in anaerobic respiration of Bilophila wadsworthia RZATAU.

    OpenAIRE

    Laue, Heike; Denger, Karin; Cook, Alasdair M.

    1997-01-01

    Organosulfonates are important natural and man-made compounds, but until recently (T. J. Lie, T. Pitta, E. R. Leadbetter, W. Godchaux III, and J. R. Leadbetter. Arch. Microbiol. 166:204-210, 1996), they were not believed to be dissimilated under anoxic conditions. We also chose to test whether alkane- and arenesulfonates could serve as electron sinks in respiratory metabolism. We generated 60 anoxic enrichment cultures in mineral salts medium which included several potential electron donors a...

  15. Anaerobic fungal populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of molecular techniques has greatly broadened our view of microbial diversity and enabled a more complete detection and description of microbial communities. The application of these techniques provides a simple means of following community changes, for example, Ishii et al. described transient and more stable inhabitants in another dynamic microbial system, compost. Our present knowledge of anaerobic gut fungal population diversity within the gastrointestinal tract is based upon isolation, cultivation and observations in vivo. It is likely that there are many species yet to be described, some of which may be non-culturable. We have observed a distinct difference in the ease of cultivation between the different genera, for example, Caecomyes isolates are especially difficult to isolate and maintain in vitro, a feature that is likely to result in the under representation of this genera in culture-based enumerations. The anaerobic gut fungi are the only known obligately anaerobic fungi. For the majority of their life cycles, they are found tightly associated with solid digesta in the rumen and/or hindgut. They produce potent fibrolytic enzymes and grow invasively on and into the plant material they are digesting making them important contributors to fibre digestion. This close association with intestinal digesta has made it difficult to accurately determine the amount of fungal biomass present in the rumen, with Orpin suggesting 8% contribution to the total microbial biomass, whereas Rezaeian et al. more recently gave a value of approximately 20%. It is clear that the rumen microbial complement is affected by dietary changes, and that the fungi are more important in digestion in the rumens of animals fed with high-fibre diets. It seems likely that the gut fungi play an important role within the rumen as primary colonizers of plant fibre, and so we are particularly interested in being able to measure the appearance and diversity of fungi on the plant

  16. Anaerobic Digestion: Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Batstone, Damien J.

    2011-01-01

    Organic waste may degrade anaerobically in nature as well as in engineered systems. The latter is called anaerobic digestion or biogasification. Anaerobic digestion produces two main outputs: An energy-rich gas called biogas and an effluent. The effluent, which may be a solid as well as liquid with...... very little dry matter may also be called a digest. The digest should not be termed compost unless it specifically has been composted in an aerated step. This chapter describes the basic processes of anaerobic digestion. Chapter 9.5 describes the anaerobic treatment technologies, and Chapter 9.......6 addresses the mass balances and environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion....

  17. A Diverse Community of Metal(loid) Oxide Respiring Bacteria Is Associated with Tube Worms in the Vicinity of the Juan de Fuca Ridge Black Smoker Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltman, Chris; Walter, Graham; Yurkov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Epibiotic bacteria associated with tube worms living in the vicinity of deep sea hydrothermal vents of the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the Pacific Ocean were investigated for the ability to respire anaerobically on tellurite, tellurate, selenite, selenate, metavanadate and orthovanadate as terminal electron acceptors. Out of 107 isolates tested, 106 were capable of respiration on one or more of these oxides, indicating that metal(loid) oxide based respiration is not only much more prevalent in nature than is generally believed, but also is an important mode of energy generation in the habitat. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed the bacterial community to be rich and highly diverse, containing many potentially new species. Furthermore, it appears that the worms not only possess a close symbiotic relationship with chemolithotrophic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, but also with the metal(loid) oxide transformers. Possibly they protect the worms through reduction of the toxic compounds that would otherwise be harmful to the host. PMID:26914590

  18. Differential production of slime under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, L P; Simpson, W A; Christensen, G D

    1990-01-01

    A series of 37 clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci previously identified as negative for slime production by the tube test were reexamined by the tissue culture plate test under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. None of the strains produced slime under anaerobic conditions; however, five strains (13%) produced slime under aerobic conditions.

  19. Proteomic dataset of the organohalide-respiring bacterium Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain CBDB1 grown on hexachlorobenzene as electron acceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffmann, Christian L; Otto, Wolfgang; Hansen, Rasmus; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Adrian, Lorenz; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Jehmlich, Nico

    2016-06-01

    The proteome of the anaerobic organohalide-respiring bacterium Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain CBDB1 was analyzed by nano liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Two different preparation methods, (i) in-solution and (ii) in-gel proteolytic digestion were assessed to elucidate the core and the functional proteome of bacterial cultures grown in synthetic anaerobic medium with hexachlorobenzene as sole electron acceptor. A detailed analysis of the data presented is available (Schiffmann et al., 2014) [1]. PMID:26958645

  20. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene Mark;

    2015-01-01

    denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off...... and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our......Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic...

  1. The VirS/VirR two-component system regulates the anaerobic cytotoxicity, intestinal pathogenicity, and enterotoxemic lethality of Clostridium perfringens type C isolate CN3685.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Menglin; Vidal, Jorge; Saputo, Juliann; McClane, Bruce A; Uzal, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens vegetative cells cause both histotoxic infections (e.g., gas gangrene) and diseases originating in the intestines (e.g., hemorrhagic necrotizing enteritis or lethal enterotoxemia). Despite their medical and veterinary importance, the molecular pathogenicity of C. perfringens vegetative cells causing diseases of intestinal origin remains poorly understood. However, C. perfringens beta toxin (CPB) was recently shown to be important when vegetative cells of C. perfringens type C strain CN3685 induce hemorrhagic necrotizing enteritis and lethal enterotoxemia. Additionally, the VirS/VirR two-component regulatory system was found to control CPB production by CN3685 vegetative cells during aerobic infection of cultured enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. Using an isogenic virR null mutant, the current study now reports that the VirS/VirR system also regulates CN3685 cytotoxicity during infection of Caco-2 cells under anaerobic conditions, as found in the intestines. More importantly, the virR mutant lost the ability to cause hemorrhagic necrotic enteritis in rabbit small intestinal loops. Western blot analyses demonstrated that the VirS/VirR system mediates necrotizing enteritis, at least in part, by controlling in vivo CPB production. In addition, vegetative cells of the isogenic virR null mutant were, relative to wild-type vegetative cells, strongly attenuated in their lethality in a mouse enterotoxemia model. Collectively, these results identify the first regulator of in vivo pathogenicity for C. perfringens vegetative cells causing disease originating in the complex intestinal environment. Since VirS/VirR also mediates histotoxic infections, this two-component regulatory system now assumes a global role in regulating a spectrum of infections caused by C. perfringens vegetative cells. PMID:21264065

  2. Anaerobic decomposition of humic substances by Clostridium from the deep subsurface

    OpenAIRE

    Akio Ueno; Satoru Shimizu; Shuji Tamamura; Hidetoshi Okuyama; Takeshi Naganuma; Katsuhiko Kaneko

    2016-01-01

    Decomposition of humic substances (HSs) is a slow and cryptic but non-negligible component of carbon cycling in sediments. Aerobic decomposition of HSs by microorganisms in the surface environment has been well documented; however, the mechanism of anaerobic microbial decomposition of HSs is not completely understood. Moreover, no microorganisms capable of anaerobic decomposition of HSs have been isolated. Here, we report the anaerobic decomposition of humic acids (HAs) by the anaerobic bacte...

  3. Gender comparisons in anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity tests.

    OpenAIRE

    Maud, P. J.; Shultz, B B

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity test scores between young active men and women. Three performance measures of anaerobic power and two of anaerobic capacity were administered to a sample comprising 52 male and 50 female college students (means age = 21.4 yrs). Results indicated significant differences between men and women in body height, weight and per cent fat, in fat free mass (FFM), anaerobic power, and anaerobic capacity when recorded as gros...

  4. A Novel Electrophototrophic Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris Strain RP2, Exhibits Hydrocarbonoclastic Potential in Anaerobic Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkidusamy, Krishnaveni; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2016-01-01

    An electrophototrophic, hydrocarbonoclastic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris stain RP2 was isolated from the anodic biofilms of hydrocarbon fed microbial electrochemical remediation systems (MERS). Salient properties of the strain RP2 were direct electrode respiration, dissimilatory metal oxide reduction, spore formation, anaerobic nitrate reduction, free living diazotrophy and the ability to degrade n-alkane components of petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) in anoxic, photic environments. In acetate fed microbial electrochemical cells, a maximum current density of 305 ± 10 mA/m(2) (1000Ω) was generated (power density 131.65 ± 10 mW/m(2)) by strain RP2 with a coulombic efficiency of 46.7 ± 1.3%. Cyclic voltammetry studies showed that anaerobically grown cells of strain RP2 is electrochemically active and likely to transfer electrons extracellularly to solid electron acceptors through membrane bound compounds, however, aerobically grown cells lacked the electrochemical activity. The ability of strain RP2 to produce current (maximum current density 21 ± 3 mA/m(2); power density 720 ± 7 μW/m(2), 1000 Ω) using PH as a sole energy source was also examined using an initial concentration of 800 mg l(-1) of diesel range hydrocarbons (C9-C36) with a concomitant removal of 47.4 ± 2.7% hydrocarbons in MERS. Here, we also report the first study that shows an initial evidence for the existence of a hydrocarbonoclastic behavior in the strain RP2 when grown in different electron accepting and illuminated conditions (anaerobic and MERS degradation). Such observations reveal the importance of photoorganotrophic growth in the utilization of hydrocarbons from contaminated environments. Identification of such novel petrochemical hydrocarbon degrading electricigens, not only expands the knowledge on the range of bacteria known for the hydrocarbon bioremediation but also shows a biotechnological potential that goes well beyond its applications to MERS. PMID:27462307

  5. Isolation, characterization, and U(VI)-reducing potential of a facultatively anaerobic, acid-resistant Bacterium from Low-pH, nitrate- and U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediment and description of Salmonella subterranea sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S; Sullivan, Sara A; O'Neill, Kathleen R; Nevin, Kelly P; Lovley, Derek R

    2004-05-01

    A facultatively anaerobic, acid-resistant bacterium, designated strain FRCl, was isolated from a low-pH, nitrate- and U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediment at site FW-024 at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, Tenn. Strain FRCl was enriched at pH 4.5 in minimal medium with nitrate as the electron acceptor, hydrogen as the electron donor, and acetate as the carbon source. Clones with 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences identical to the sequence of strain FRCl were also detected in a U(VI)-reducing enrichment culture derived from the same sediment. Cells of strain FRCl were gram-negative motile regular rods 2.0 to 3.4 micro m long and 0.7 to 0.9 microm in diameter. Strain FRCl was positive for indole production, by the methyl red test, and for ornithine decarboxylase; it was negative by the Voges-Proskauer test (for acetylmethylcarbinol production), for urea hydrolysis, for arginine dihydrolase, for lysine decarboxylase, for phenylalanine deaminase, for H(2)S production, and for gelatin hydrolysis. Strain FRCl was capable of using O(2), NO(3)(-), S(2)O(3)(2-), fumarate, and malate as terminal electron acceptors and of reducing U(VI) in the cell suspension. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence of the isolate indicated that this strain was 96.4% similar to Salmonella bongori and 96.3% similar to Enterobacter cloacae. Physiological and phylogenetic analyses suggested that strain FRCl belongs to the genus Salmonella and represents a new species, Salmonella subterranea sp. nov. PMID:15128557

  6. Perspectives for anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    to the soil. Anaerobic digestion (AD) is one way of achieving this goal and it will furthermore, reduce energy consumption or may even be net energy producing. This chapter aims at provide a basic understanding of the world in which anaerobic digestion is operating today. The newest process developments...

  7. Anaerobic sludge granulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Castro Lopes, de S.I.; Lettinga, G.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews different theories on anaerobic sludge granulation in UASB-reactors that have been proposed during the past two decades
    This paper reviews different theories on anaerobic sludge granulation in UASB-reactors that have been proposed during the past two decades. The initial stage

  8. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Kalvelage

    Full Text Available Oxygen minimum zones are major sites of fixed nitrogen loss in the ocean. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox, in pelagic nitrogen removal. Sources of ammonium for the anammox reaction, however, remain controversial, as heterotrophic denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our results suggest that microaerobic respiration is a major mode of organic matter remineralization and source of ammonium (~45-100% in the upper oxygen minimum zones, and reconcile hitherto observed mismatches between ammonium producing and consuming processes therein.

  9. Molecular characterization and fermentative hydrogen production of a wild anaerobe in clostridium genus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yongfeng; REN Nanqi; YANG Chuanping; LI Jianzheng; LI Peng

    2007-01-01

    Anaerobic process of biohydrogen production is developed in this paper.The isolation and identification of high efficient biohydrogen production anaerobic bacteria are the important foundations for the fermented biohydrogen production process by anaerobic digesting organic wastewater.Taking the physiological and biochemical traits,the morphological characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence into consideration,the isolate Rennanqilyf33 is a new species.

  10. The molecular biological characterization of a strain of biohydrogen-producing anaerobe in Clostridium Genus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-feng; REN Nan-qi; ZHENG Guo-xiang; LIU Min; HU Li-jie; CHEN Ying; WANG Xiang-jing

    2005-01-01

    The anaerobic process of biohydrogen production was developed recently. The isolation and identification of biohydrogen producing anaerobic bacteria with high evolution rate and yield is an important foundation of the fermented biohydrogen production process through which anaerobic bacteria digest organic wastewater. By considering physiological and biochemical traits, morphological characteristics and a 16S rDNA sequence, the isolated Rennanqilyf33 is shown to be a new species.

  11. Chemical characteristic of respirable particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respirable particulates are particulates which having diameter size at 2-5 µm, due to aerodynamically may be inhaled through respiratory tract and having ability to deposit into lungs, causing damage of the alveolar tissues and inducing health problems. Health Department of Bandung have reported that prevalency of acute respiratory tract infection disease having increasing tendency every year. Measurement of PM10 in period of 2002-2005 have done by BPLH Bandung city which pointed that in some places the concentration of PM10 was higher than daily threshold limit values. This research having intend to understand of respirable particulates exposure in society with characterization of chemical materials contained as hazard identification. Location of research have done in four regions of Bandung City. Personal sampler has used for collection of respirable particulates from human breathing zone. Chemical characteristic were done using neutron activation analysis, atomic absorption spectrometer and reflectance methods. The useful of this procedure as the baseline to calculate IEC (Inhalation Exposure Concentration) values for estimate the exposure of respirable particulates which inhaled during period of time. Calculating of IEC is the earlier step from epidemiological study or risk assessment which connecting prevalency of tract respiratory disease with characteristic of respirable particulates. Elements Br, Mn, Al, I, V, Cl, Ti, Na, Hg, Pb, and black carbon (BC), are the elements which identified. The results showed that respirable particulates which inhaled by citizen as receptor at Tegalega, Aria Graha, Dago Pakar, and Cisaranten Wetan are relatively higher than PM2,5 ambient air at the same places. Almost whole of such elements which contained in respirable particulates was found in highest concentration at Cisaranten Wetan. (author)

  12. [Anaerobic-aerobic infection in acute appendicitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamchich, V I; Ulitovskiĭ, I V; Savich, E I; Znamenskiĭ, V A; Beliaeva, O A

    1998-01-01

    362 patients with acute appendicitis (AA) were examined. For microbiological diagnosis of aerobic and anaerobic nonclostridial microflora we used complex accelerated methods (including evaluation of gram-negative microorganisms in comparison with tinctorial-fermentative method of differential staining according to oxygen sensitivity of catalasopositive together with aerobic and cathalasonegative anaerobic microorganisms) as well as complete bacteriologic examination with determination of sensitivity of the above microorganism to antimicrobial remedies. High rate of aerobic-anaerobic microbial associations and substantial identity of microflora from appendicis and exudate from abdominal cavity was revealed, which evidenced the leading role of endogenous microorganisms in etiology and pathogenesis of AA and peritonitis i. e. autoinfection. In patients with destructive forms of AA, complicated by peritonitis it is recommended to use the accelerated method of examination of pathologic material as well as the complete scheme of examination with the identification of the isolated microorganisms and the correction of antibiotic treatment. PMID:9511291

  13. Life in the absence of oxygen: alterative electron acceptors for anaerobic microorganisms in a petroleum environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balk, M.

    2007-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms derive energy by transferring electrons from an external source or donor to an external electron sink or terminal acceptor and often have the capacity to reduce 2 or more terminal electron acceptors. The well-known type of microbial respiration, in which oxygen serves as an

  14. Contribution of anaerobic energy expenditure to whole body thermogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Christopher B

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Heat production serves as the standard measurement for the determination of energy expenditure and efficiency in animals. Estimations of metabolic heat production have traditionally focused on gas exchange (oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production although direct heat measurements may include an anaerobic component particularly when carbohydrate is oxidized. Stoichiometric interpretations of the ratio of carbon dioxide production to oxygen uptake suggest that both anaerobic and aerobic heat production and, by inference, all energy expenditure – can be accounted for with a measurement of oxygen uptake as 21.1 kJ per liter of oxygen. This manuscript incorporates contemporary bioenergetic interpretations of anaerobic and aerobic ATP turnover to promote the independence of these disparate types of metabolic energy transfer: each has different reactants and products, uses dissimilar enzymes, involves different types of biochemical reactions, takes place in separate cellular compartments, exploits different types of gradients and ultimately each operates with distinct efficiency. The 21.1 kJ per liter of oxygen for carbohydrate oxidation includes a small anaerobic heat component as part of anaerobic energy transfer. Faster rates of ATP turnover that exceed mitochondrial respiration and that are supported by rapid glycolytic phosphorylation with lactate production result in heat production that is independent of oxygen uptake. Simultaneous direct and indirect calorimetry has revealed that this anaerobic heat does not disappear when lactate is later oxidized and so oxygen uptake does not adequately measure anaerobic efficiency or energy expenditure (as was suggested by the "oxygen debt" hypothesis. An estimate of anaerobic energy transfer supplements the measurement of oxygen uptake and may improve the interpretation of whole-body energy expenditure.

  15. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  16. [Sensitivity of anaerobic bacteria to therapeutic agents (Zurich 1984)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüst, J; Hardegger, U

    1985-12-28

    There are several reports in the literature on resistance of anaerobic bacteria against antimicrobial agents. Therefore, 231 anaerobic strains of various bacterial genera, isolated from clinical specimens during fall 1984, were tested for susceptibility to antimicrobial agents active against anaerobic bacteria. Whereas 23% of the Bacteroides species not belonging to the B. fragilis group were resistant to penicillin, the anaerobic bacteria were still susceptible to chloramphenicol, clindamycin and the nitroimidazoles. The resistance rate against the various new beta-lactam antibiotics was comparable to results of other studies. Due to the increasing resistance it is recommended that the susceptibility of clinically important anaerobes be tested by appropriate techniques. The agar diffusion test must not be used due to unreliable results. Instead, the minimal inhibitory concentration should be determined or the "broth-disk" test performed. PMID:4089587

  17. Phenotypic and Genotypic Description of Sedimenticola selenatireducens Strain CUZ, a Marine (Per)Chlorate-Respiring Gammaproteobacterium, and Its Close Relative the Chlorate-Respiring Sedimenticola Strain NSS

    OpenAIRE

    Carlström, Charlotte I.; Loutey, Dana E.; Wang, Ouwei; Engelbrektson, Anna; Clark, Iain; Lucas, Lauren N.; Somasekhar, Pranav Y.; Coates, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Two (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria, strains CUZ and NSS, were isolated from marine sediments in Berkeley and San Diego, CA, respectively. Strain CUZ respired both perchlorate and chlorate [collectively designated (per)chlorate], while strain NSS respired only chlorate. Phylogenetic analysis classified both strains as close relatives of the gammaproteobacterium Sedimenticola selenatireducens. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) preparations showed the...

  18. Evaluation of a metronidazole disk test for the presumptive identification of anaerobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senne, J E; McCarthy, L R

    1982-07-01

    A total of 632 bacterial strains recovered under anaerobic conditions from clinical specimens were tested from their susceptibility to metronidazole by a disk diffusion test using 5 micrograms metronidazole disks. Three-hundred-fifty-five of the 632 bacterial strains exhibited susceptibility the metronidazole, and each was determined to be an obligate anaerobe. The remaining 277 isolates showed resistance to the 5 micrograms disk. Of these resistant strains, 257 were determined to be facultative anaerobes, while 20 (18 Propionibacterium acnes, one Peptostreptococcus sp., and one Peptococcus magnus) were identified as obligate anaerobes. Potential use of this disk diffusion test for identifying the anaerobic status of bacteria is discussed. PMID:7124785

  19. Specific neural substrate linking respiration to locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariépy, Jean-François; Missaghi, Kianoush; Chevallier, Stéphanie; Chartré, Shannon; Robert, Maxime; Auclair, François; Lund, James P; Dubuc, Réjean

    2012-01-10

    When animals move, respiration increases to adapt for increased energy demands; the underlying mechanisms are still not understood. We investigated the neural substrates underlying the respiratory changes in relation to movement in lampreys. We showed that respiration increases following stimulation of the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) in an in vitro isolated preparation, an effect that persists in the absence of the spinal cord and caudal brainstem. By using electrophysiological and anatomical techniques, including whole-cell patch recordings, we identified a subset of neurons located in the dorsal MLR that send direct inputs to neurons in the respiratory generator. In semi-intact preparations, blockade of this region with 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione and (2R)-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid greatly reduced the respiratory increases without affecting the locomotor movements. These results show that neurons in the respiratory generator receive direct glutamatergic connections from the MLR and that a subpopulation of MLR neurons plays a key role in the respiratory changes linked to movement. PMID:22160700

  20. Facepiece leakage and fitting of respirators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ways in which airborne contaminants can penetrate respirators and the factors which affect the fit of respirators are discussed. The fit of the respirator to the face is shown to be the most critical factor affecting the protection achieved by the user. Qualitative and quantitative fit testing techniques are described and their application to industrial respirator programs is examined. Quantitative measurement of the leakage of a respirator while worn can be used to numerically indicate the protection achieved. These numbers, often referred to as protection factors, are sometimes used as the basis for selecting suitable respirators and this practice is reviewed. (author)

  1. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-07-31

    reactor. Batch tests were conducted to examine naphthenic acid biodegradability under several conditions. The conditions used were seed from the anaerobic reactor, wetland sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and a sterile control. The naphthenic acid was from a commercial source isolated from Gulf Coast petroleum as was dosed at 2 mg/mL. The incubations were for 30 days at 30 C. The results showed that the naphthenic acids were not biodegraded under anaerobic conditions, but were degraded under aerobic conditions. Despite poor performance of the anaerobic reactor, it remains likely that anaerobic treatment of acetate, toluene, and, potentially, other produced-water components is feasible.

  2. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    reactor. Batch tests were conducted to examine naphthenic acid biodegradability under several conditions. The conditions used were seed from the anaerobic reactor, wetland sediments under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and a sterile control. The naphthenic acid was from a commercial source isolated from Gulf Coast petroleum as was dosed at 2 mg/mL. The incubations were for 30 days at 30 C. The results showed that the naphthenic acids were not biodegraded under anaerobic conditions, but were degraded under aerobic conditions. Despite poor performance of the anaerobic reactor, it remains likely that anaerobic treatment of acetate, toluene, and, potentially, other produced-water components is feasible

  3. A novel screening protocol for the isolation of hydrogen producing Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Happe Thomas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sealed Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cultures evolve significant amounts of hydrogen gas under conditions of sulfur depletion. However, the eukaryotic green alga goes through drastic metabolic changes during this nutritional stress resulting in cell growth inhibition and eventually cell death. This study aimed at isolating C. reinhardtii transformants which produce hydrogen under normal growth conditions to allow a continuous hydrogen metabolism without the stressful impact of nutrient deprivation. Results To achieve a steady photobiological hydrogen production, a screening protocol was designed to identify C. reinhardtii DNA insertional mutagenesis transformants with an attenuated photosynthesis to respiration capacity ratio (P/R ratio. The screening protocol entails a new and fast method for mutant strain selection altered in their oxygen production/consumption balance. Out of 9000 transformants, four strains with P/R ratios varying from virtually zero to three were isolated. Strain apr1 was found to have a slightly higher respiration rate and a significantly lower photosynthesis rate than the wild type. Sealed cultures of apr1 became anaerobic in normal growth medium (TAP under moderate light conditions and induced [FeFe]-hydrogenase activity, yet without significant hydrogen gas evolution. However, Calvin-Benson cycle inactivation of anaerobically adapted apr1 cells in the light led to a 2-3-fold higher in vivo hydrogen production than previously reported for the sulfur-deprived C. reinhardtii wild type. Conclusion Attenuated P/R capacity ratio in microalgal mutants constitutes a platform for achieving steady state photobiological hydrogen production. Using this platform, algal hydrogen metabolism can be analyzed without applying nutritional stress. Furthermore, these strains promise to be useful for biotechnological hydrogen generation, since high in vivo hydrogen production rates are achievable under normal growth

  4. Use of Facemasks and Respirators

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-05-15

    This program demonstrates the differences of facemasks and respirators that are to be used in public settings during an influenza pandemic.  Created: 5/15/2007 by CDC, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 5/25/2007.

  5. General Instructions for Disposable Respirators

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-09

    This podcast, intended for the general public, demonstrates how to put on and take off disposable respirators that are to be used in areas affected by the influenza outbreak.  Created: 4/9/2009 by CDC, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 4/29/2009.

  6. Soil Respiration: Concept and Measurement Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANDOR M.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil respiration is the main element in the carbon cycle that makes possible for plants carbon plants to return inthe atmosphere. The objective of this work was to present and discuss some aspects of the soil CO2 efflux. We definedherein, some terms associated to the soil respiration concept, we tackled some aspects regarding the influence oftemperature, humidity and soil pH on soil respiration and we presented the principle of soil respiration measurement byusing dynamic closed chamber system.

  7. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic bacteria were isolated from deep subsurface sediment samples taken at study sites in Idaho (INEL) and Washington (HR) by culturing on dilute and concentrated medium. Morphologically distinct colonies were purified, and their responses to 21 selected physiological tests were determined. Although the number of isolates was small (18 INEL, 27 HR) some general patterns could be determined. Most strains could utilize all the carbon sources, however the glycerol and melizitose utilization was positive for 50% or less of the HR isolates. Catalase activity (27.78% at INEL, 74.07% at HR) and tryptophan metabolism (11.12% at INEL, 40.74% at HR) were significantly different between the two study sites. MPN and viable counts indicate that sediments near the water table yield the greatest numbers of anaerobes. Deeper sediments also appear to be more selective with the greatest number of viable counts on low-nutrient mediums. Likewise, only strictly obligate anaerobes were found in the deepest sediment samples. Selective media indicated the presence of methanogens, acetogens, and sulfate reducers at only the HR site

  8. Soil Respiration in Response to Landscape Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variations in soil type, due to landscape position, may influence soil respiration. This study was conducted to determine how landscape position (summit, side-slope, and depression) influences heterotrophic and autotrophic soil respiration. Soil respiration was determined at three landscape positio...

  9. Mitochondrial respiration is decreased in skeletal muscle of patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Sahlin, Kent; Fernström, Maria;

    2007-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis of a lower respiratory capacity per mitochondrion in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic patients compared with obese subjects. Muscle biopsies obtained from 10 obese type 2 diabetic and 8 obese nondiabetic male subjects were used for assessment of 3-hydroxy......-Acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase (HAD) and citrate synthase activity, uncoupling protein (UCP)3 content, oxidative stress measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), fiber type distribution, and respiration in isolated mitochondria. Respiration was normalized to citrate synthase activity (mitochondrial content) in isolated mitochondria....... Maximal ADP-stimulated respiration (state 3) with pyruvate plus malate and respiration through the electron transport chain (ETC) were reduced in type 2 diabetic patients, and the proportion of type 2X fibers were higher in type 2 diabetic patients compared with obese subjects (all P < 0.05). There were...

  10. Coupled anaerobic/aerobic biodegradation of 2,4,6 trichlorophenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Degradation of 2, 4, 6-trichlorophenol(TCP) with co-immobilizing anaerobic granular sludge and isolated aerobic bacterial specieswas studied in coupled anaerobic/aerobic integrated reactors. The synergism of aerobes and anaerobes within co-immobilized granule mightfacilitate degrading the TCP and exchange of anaerobic metabolites 4-CP, which promoted system organic removal efficiency and recovered fromorganic shock-loads more quickly. The biomass specific activities experiment further confirmed that strict anaerobes be not affected over thecourse of this experiment by the presence of an oxic environment, aerobic activity predominated in the outer co-immobilized granule layers,while the interior was characterized by anaerobic activity. The co-immobilized granule could thus enable both aerobic and anaerobic microbesfunction in the same reactor and thereby integrate the oxidative and reductive catabolism.

  11. Aerobic Microbial Respiration In Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalvelage, Tim; Lavik, Gaute; Jensen, Marlene Mark;

    2015-01-01

    Namibia and Peru. Experiments with additions of double-labelled oxygen revealed high aerobic activity in the upper OMZs, likely controlled by surface organic matter export. Consistently observed oxygen consumption in samples retrieved throughout the lower OMZs hints at efficient exploitation of vertically...... denitrification and alternative anaerobic pathways of organic matter remineralization cannot account for the ammonium requirements of reported anammox rates. Here, we explore the significance of microaerobic respiration as a source of ammonium during organic matter degradation in the oxygen-deficient waters off...... and laterally advected, oxygenated waters in this zone by aerobic microorganisms. In accordance, metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses identified genes encoding for aerobic terminal oxidases and demonstrated their expression by diverse microbial communities, even in virtually anoxic waters. Our...

  12. Biodegradability of leathers through anaerobic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhayalan, K; Fathima, N Nishad; Gnanamani, A; Rao, J Raghava; Nair, B Unni; Ramasami, T

    2007-01-01

    Leather processing generates huge amounts of both solid and liquid wastes. The management of solid wastes, especially tanned leather waste, is a challenging problem faced by tanners. Hence, studies on biodegradability of leather become imperative. In this present work, biodegradability of untanned, chrome tanned and vegetable tanned leather under anaerobic conditions has been addressed. Two different sources of anaerobes have been used for this purpose. The effect of detanning as a pretreatment method before subjecting the leather to biodegradation has also been studied. It has been found that vegetable tanned leather leads to more gas production than chrome tanned leather. Mixed anaerobic isolates when employed as an inoculum are able to degrade the soluble organics of vegetable tanned material and thus exhibit an increased level of gas production during the initial days, compared to the results of the treatments that received the anaerobic sludge. With chrome tanned materials, there was not much change in the volume of the gas produced from the two different sources. It has been found that detanning tends to improve the biodegradability of both types of leathers. PMID:16740383

  13. Dehalorespiration with Polychlorinated Biphenyls by an Anaerobic Ultramicrobacterium▿

    OpenAIRE

    May, Harold D.; Miller, Greg S.; Birthe V. Kjellerup; Sowers, Kevin R.

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic microbial dechlorination is an important step in the detoxification and elimination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), but a microorganism capable of coupling its growth to PCB dechlorination has not been isolated. Here we describe the isolation from sediment of an ultramicrobacterium, strain DF-1, which is capable of dechlorinating PCBs containing double-flanked chlorines added as single congeners or as Aroclor 1260 in contaminated soil. The isolate requires Desulfovibrio spp. in...

  14. Respiration in Neonate Sea Turtles

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Edwin R.; Paladino, Frank V.; Strohl, Kingman P.; Pilar Santidrián, T.; Klann, Kenneth; Spotila, James R.

    2006-01-01

    The pattern and control of respiration is virtually unknown in hatchling sea turtles. Using incubator-raised turtles, we measured oxygen consumption, frequency, tidal volume, and minute volume for leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) and olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) turtle hatchlings for the first six days after pipping. In addition, we tested the hatchlings’ response to hypercapnic, hyperoxic, and hypoxic challenges over this time period. Hatchling sea turtles generally showed resting ...

  15. Plastron Respiration Using Commercial Fabrics

    OpenAIRE

    Shaun Atherton; Brennan, Joseph C; Morris, Robert H.; Joshua D.E. Smith; Christopher A.E. Hamlett; Glen McHale; Neil J Shirtcliffe; Newton, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of insect and arachnid species are able to remain submerged in water indefinitely using plastron respiration. A plastron is a surface-retained film of air produced by surface morphology that acts as an oxygen-carbon dioxide exchange surface. Many highly water repellent and hydrophobic surfaces when placed in water exhibit a silvery sheen which is characteristic of a plastron. In this article, the hydrophobicity of a range of commercially available water repellent fabrics and polymer...

  16. Impact of Anodic Respiration on Biopolymer Production and Consequent Membrane Fouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, So; Terada, Kotaro; Miyake, Hiroshi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2016-09-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have recently been integrated with membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for wastewater treatment and energy recovery. However, the impact of integration of the two reactors on membrane fouling of MBR has not been reported yet. In this study, MFCs equipped with different external resistances (1-10 000 ohm) were operated, and membrane-fouling potentials of the MFC anode effluents were directly measured to study the impact of anodic respiration by exoelectrogens on membrane fouling. It was found that although the COD removal efficiency was comparable, the fouling potential was significantly reduced due to less production of biopolymer (a major foulant) in MFCs equipped with lower external resistance (i.e., with higher current generation) as compared with aerobic respiration. Furthermore, it was confirmed that Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA, a dominant exoelectrogen in anode biofilms of MFCs in this study, produced less biopolymer under anodic respiration condition than fumarate (anaerobic) respiration condition, resulting in lower membrane-fouling potential. Taken together, anodic respiration can mitigate membrane fouling of MBR due to lower biopolymer production, suggesting that development of an electrode-assisted MBR (e-MBR) without aeration is feasible. PMID:27427998

  17. Anaerobic bacteria colonizing the lower airways in lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Malm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobes comprise most of the endogenous oropharyngeal microflora, and can cause infections of airways in lung cancer patients who are at high risk for respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and species diversity of anaerobes in specimens from the lower airways of lung cancer patients. Sensitivity of the isolates to conventional antimicrobial agents used in anaerobe therapy was assessed. Respiratory secretions obtained by bronchoscopy from 30 lung cancer patients were cultured onto Wilkins- -Chalgren agar in anaerobic conditions at 37°C for 72–96 hours. The isolates were identified using microtest Api 20A. The minimal inhibitory concentrations for penicillin G, amoxicillin/clavulanate, piperacillin/tazobactam, cefoxitin, imipenem, clindamycin, and metronidazole were determined by E-test. A total of 47 isolates of anaerobic bacteria were detected in 22 (73.3% specimens. More than one species of anaerobe was found in 16 (53.3% samples. The most frequently isolated were Actinomyces spp. and Peptostreptococcus spp., followed by Eubacterium lentum, Veillonella parvula, Prevotella spp., Bacteroides spp., Lactobacillus jensenii. Among antibiotics used in the study amoxicillin/clavulanate and imipenem were the most active in vitro (0% and 2% resistant strains, respectively. The highest resistance rate was found for penicillin G and metronidazole (36% and 38% resistant strains, respectively. The results obtained confirm the need to conduct analyses of anaerobic microflora colonizing the lower respiratory tract in patients with lung cancer to monitor potential etiologic factors of airways infections, as well as to propose efficient, empirical therapy. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 2, pp. 263–266

  18. Comparative investigation on microbial community and electricity generation in aerobic and anaerobic enriched MFCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiang-chun; Quan, Yan-ping; Tao, Kun; Jiang, Xiao-man

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the difference in microbial community and power generation capacity of air-cathode MFCs enriched under anode aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Results showed that MFCs successfully started with continuous air inputting to anode chamber. The aerobic enriched MFC produced comparable and even more electricity with the fuels of acetate, glucose and ethanol compared to the anaerobic MFC when returning to anaerobic condition. The two MFCs showed a slightly different microbial community for anode biofilms (a similarity of 77%), but a highly similar microbial community (a similarity of 97%) for anolyte microbes. The anode biofilm of aerobic enriched MFC showed the presence of some specific bacteria closely related to Clostridium sticklandii, Leucobacter komagatae and Microbacterium laevaniformans. The anaerobic enriched MFC found the presence of a large number of yeast Trichosporon sp. This research demonstrates that it is possible to enrich oxygen-tolerant anode respiring bacteria through purposely aeration in anode chamber. PMID:23196248

  19. Lymphocyte respiration in children with Trisomy 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aburawi Elhadi H

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study measured lymphocyte mitochondrial O2 consumption (cellular respiration in children with trisomy 21. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from whole blood of trisomy 21 and control children and these cells were immediately used to measure cellular respiration rate. [O2] was determined as a function of time from the phosphorescence decay rates (1/τ of Pd (II-meso-tetra-(4-sulfonatophenyl-tetrabenzoporphyrin. In sealed vials containing lymphocytes and glucose as a respiratory substrate, [O2] declined linearly with time, confirming the zero-order kinetics of O2 conversion to H2O by cytochrome oxidase. The rate of respiration (k, in μM O2 min-1, thus, was the negative of the slope of [O2] vs. time. Cyanide inhibited O2 consumption, confirming that oxidation occurred in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Results For control children (age = 8.8 ± 5.6 years, n = 26, the mean (± SD value of kc (in μM O2 per min per 107 cells was 1.36 ± 0.79 (coefficient of variation, Cv = 58%; median = 1.17; range = 0.60 to 3.12; -2SD = 0.61. For children with trisomy 21 (age = 7.2 ± 4.6 years, n = 26, the values of kc were 0.82 ± 0.62 (Cv = 76%; median = 0.60; range = 0.20 to 2.80, pp6.1 mU/L. Fourteen of 26 (54% children with trisomy 21 had kc values of 0.20 to 0.60 (i.e., kc positively correlated with body-mass index (BMI, R >0.302, serum creatinine (R >0.507, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, R >0.535 and albumin (R >0.446. Conclusions Children with trisomy 21 in this study have reduced lymphocyte bioenergetics. The clinical importance of this finding requires further studies.

  20. Anaerobic biotransformation of estrogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czajka, Cynthia P. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Londry, Kathleen L. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada)]. E-mail: londryk@cc.umanitoba.ca

    2006-08-31

    Estrogens are important environmental contaminants that disrupt endocrine systems and feminize male fish. We investigated the potential for anaerobic biodegradation of the estrogens 17-{alpha}-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) in order to understand their fate in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Cultures were established using lake water and sediment under methanogenic, sulfate-, iron-, and nitrate-reducing conditions. Anaerobic degradation of EE2 (added at 5 mg/L) was not observed in multiple trials over long incubation periods (over three years). E2 (added at 5 mg/L) was transformed to estrone (E1) under all four anaerobic conditions (99-176 {mu}g L{sup -1} day{sup -1}), but the extent of conversion was different for each electron acceptor. The oxidation of E2 to E1 was not inhibited by E1. Under some conditions, reversible inter-conversion of E2 and E1 was observed, and the final steady state concentration of E2 depended on the electron-accepting condition but was independent of the total amount of estrogens added. In addition, racemization occurred and E1 was also transformed to 17-{alpha}-estradiol under all but nitrate-reducing conditions. Although E2 could be readily transformed to E1 and in many cases 17-{alpha}-estradiol under anaerobic conditions, the complete degradation of estrogens under these conditions was minimal, suggesting that they would accumulate in anoxic environments.

  1. The anaerobic digestion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, C.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Boone, D.R. [Oregon Graduate Inst., Portland, OR (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  2. Anaerobic biological treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Enso-Fenox process has been very successfully used to remove chlorinated phenolic compounds from pulp bleaching effluents. It is a two-stage anaerobic/aerobic process consisting of a nonmethanogenic anaerobic fluidized bed followed by a trickling filter. Studies have been conducted on reductive dechlorination of chlorinated aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions with chlorinated phenols as the sole carbon and energy source. Approximately 40% of the added chlorophenols was converted to CH4 and CO2. Substrate loading rates were 20 mg/L/d at hydraulic detention times of 2-4 days with 90% substrate conversion efficiency. Reductive dechlorination of mono, di-, tri-, and pentachlorophenols has been demonstrated in anaerobic sewage sludge. The following constituents were tested in the laboratory at their approximate concentrations in coal conversion wastewater (CCWW) and were anaerobically degraded in serum bottles: 1,000 mg/L phenol; 500 mg/L resorcinol; 1,000 mg/L benzoic acid; 500 mg/L p-cresol; 200 mg/L pyridine; 2,000 mg/L benzoic acid; 250 mg/L 40 methylcatechol; 500 mg/L 4-ethylpyridine; and 2,000 mg/L hexanoic acid. A petrochemical may initially exhibit toxicity to an unacclimated population of methane-fermenting bacteria, but with acclimation the toxicity may be greatly reduced or disappear. In addition, the microorganisms may develop the capacity to actually degrade compounds which showed initial toxicity. Since biomass digestion requires a complete consortium of bacteria, it is relevant to study the effect of a given process as well as to individual steps within the process. A toxicant can inhibit the rate-limiting step and/or change the step that is rate-limiting. Both manifestations of toxicity can severely affect the overall process

  3. Electricity generation by anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from hypersaline soda lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L.G.; Oremland, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria and anoxic sediments from soda lakes produced electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). No electricity was generated in the absence of bacterial metabolism. Arsenate respiring bacteria isolated from moderately hypersaline Mono Lake (Bacillus selenitireducens), and salt-saturated Searles Lake, CA (strain SLAS-1) oxidized lactate using arsenate as the electron acceptor. However, these cultures grew equally well without added arsenate using the MFC anode as their electron acceptor, and in the process oxidized lactate more efficiently. The decrease in electricity generation by consumption of added alternative electron acceptors (i.e. arsenate) which competed with the anode for available electrons proved to be a useful indicator of microbial activity and hence life in the fuel cells. Shaken sediment slurries from these two lakes also generated electricity, with or without added lactate. Hydrogen added to sediment slurries was consumed but did not stimulate electricity production. Finally, electricity was generated in statically incubated "intact" sediment cores from these lakes. More power was produced in sediment from Mono Lake than from Searles Lake, however microbial fuel cells could detect low levels of metabolism operating under moderate and extreme conditions of salt stress. ?? 2008 US Government.

  4. Effect of Rocking Movements on Respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena Omlin

    Full Text Available For centuries, rocking has been used to promote sleep in babies or toddlers. Recent research suggested that relaxation could play a role in facilitating the transition from waking to sleep during rocking. Breathing techniques are often used to promote relaxation. However, studies investigating head motions and body rotations showed that vestibular stimulation might elicit a vestibulo-respiratory response, leading to an increase in respiration frequency. An increase in respiration frequency would not be considered to promote relaxation in the first place. On the other hand, a coordination of respiration to rhythmic vestibular stimulation has been observed. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of different movement frequencies and amplitudes on respiration frequency. Furthermore, we tested whether subjects adapt their respiration to movement frequencies below their spontaneous respiration frequency at rest, which could be beneficial for relaxation. Twenty-one healthy subjects (24-42 years, 12 males were investigated using an actuated bed, moving along a lateral translation. Following movement frequencies were applied: +30%, +15%, -15%, and -30% of subjects' rest respiration frequency during baseline (no movement. Furthermore, two different movement amplitudes were tested (Amplitudes: 15 cm, 7.5 cm; movement frequency: 0.3 Hz. In addition, five subjects (25-28 years, 2 males were stimulated with their individual rest respiration frequency. Rocking movements along a lateral translation caused a vestibulo-respiratory adaptation leading to an increase in respiration frequency. The increase was independent of the applied movement frequencies or amplitudes but did not occur when stimulating with subjects' rest respiration frequency. Furthermore, no synchronization of the respiration frequency to the movement frequency was observed. In particular, subjects did not lower their respiration frequency below their resting frequency. Hence, it

  5. H2-dependent anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli on L-malate: succinate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, J; Kulla, H; Gottschalk, G

    1976-02-01

    Escherichia coli grew anaerobically on L-malate only in the presence of H2; 91% of the L-malate utilized was converted to succinate. Anaerobically isolated membrane vesicles catalyzed the reduction of fumarate with H2 and contained a b-type cytochrome. Cytochrome c552 was present in the "periplasmic space." PMID:1107323

  6. A Respiration Rate Body Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Viktor Avbelj; Aleksandra Rashkovska; Roman Trobec

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new body sensor for extracting the respiration rate based on the amplitude changes in the body surface potential differences between two proximal body electrodes. The sensor could be designed as a plaster-like reusable unit that can be easily fixed onto the surface of the body. It could be equipped either with a sufficiently large memory for storing the measured data or with a low-power radio system that can transmit the measured data to a gateway for further processing. We explo...

  7. Isolation, identification and metabolic characterization of an anaerobic thermophilic bacterium%一嗜热厌氧杆菌的分离、鉴定及其代谢特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰贵红; 葛菊; 刘海昌; 唐全武; 张辉; 乔代容; 曹毅

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] To isolate, protect thermophilic microbial resources from petroleum reservoirs and analyze these main metabolic characterization. [Methods] The strain BF1 was isolated by Hungte anaerobic technique from Chenghai 1 Unit of Dagang oil field in China. Its taxonomic status determined by physiological, biochemical and 16S Rrna gene sequence analysis. Its effect of sulfur metabolism on the corrosion current was measured by electrochemical analysis. [Results] The strain BF1 was Gram-negative, strictly thermophilic anaerobic, top-sporulating, non-motile, rods, 0.42 μmx(l.6-5.4) μm, grew solitary, in pairs or in chains. Growth occurred at 45 °C-75 °C (optimum 60 °C), at Ph 4.5-8.5 (optimum 6.5). Specific growth rate (μm) was 0.99 h-1 and doubling time was 42 min. Substrates included glucose, melizitose, raffinose, mannose, lactose, fructose and ribose. The main products of glucose fermentation were CO2, H2, acetate and ethanol. The strain could reduce thiosulfate and sulfite to sulfide, and its tolerance limits were 75 mmol/L and 50 mmol/L, respectively. The electrochemical impedance reduced from 2 099 Ω/cm2 to 776 Ω/cm2 and the corrosion current increased from 9.936e-006 A to 3.25e-005 A after thiosulfate (50 mmol/L) was reduced. The fatty acids were mainly composed of saturated long chain fatty acids, with C15:0 the most, accounting for 70.6%. The G+C content of DNA was 34.0 mol%. The 16S Rrna gene sequence analysis indicated that the closest phylogenetic relatives were Thermoanaerobacter pseudethanolicus DSM2355T and T. Brockii subsp. Brockii DSM1457T, 98.3% and 98.0%, respectively. However, the strain BF1 was different with T. Pseudethanolicus DSM2355T and T. Brockii subsp. Brockii DSM1457T in doubling time, optimum temperature and substrates utilized, and different with T. Pseudethanolicus DSM 2355T in fatty acid profile. [Conclusion] The strain BF1 may be a new species of Thermoanaerobacter genus, the exact taxonomic status of it requires DNA

  8. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in grassland soils used for cattle husbandry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bannert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available While the importance of anaerobic methane oxidation has been reported for marine ecosystems, the role of this process in soils is still questionable. Grasslands used as pastures for cattle-overwintering show an increase in anaerobic soil micro-sites caused by animal treading and excrement deposition. Therefore anaerobic potential methane oxidation activity of severely impacted soil from a cattle winter pasture was investigated in an incubation experiment under anaerobic conditions using 13C-labeled methane. We were able to detect a high microbial activity utilizing CH4 as nutrient source shown by the respiration of 13CO2. Measurements of possible terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic oxidation of methane were carried out. Soil sulfate concentrations were too low to explain the oxidation of the amount of methane added, but enough nitrate and iron(III were detected. However, only nitrate was consumed during the experiment. 13C-PLFA analyses clearly showed the utilization of CH4 as nutrient source mainly by organisms harbouring 16:1ω7 PLFAs. These lipids were found in Gram-negative microorganisms and anaerobes. The fact that these lipids are also typical for type I methanotrophs, known as aerobic methane oxidizers, might indicate a link between aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation.

  9. Dynamic characteristics of Paracoccus denitrificans in alternate aerobic-anaerobic continuous cultivations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waki, T.; Kawato, Y.; Shimatani, Y.; Ichikawa, K.

    1980-06-01

    The alternate aerobic-anaerobic continuous culture system was used to analyze the adaptation phenomena of Paracoccus denitrificans quantitatively, which will be observed in a single sludge nitrification-denitrification system. After the initial rapid reduction of nitrate in the anaerobic period, a rather high rate of nitrate reduction was maintained. The lag of adaptation to each condition was short and this was explained by the presence of large amounts of the cytochromes and enzymes required for both aerobic and nitrate/nitrite respirations. When the alternation cycle of aerobic and anaerobic conditions was short, the nitrate concentration was lower than that in anaerobic continuous cultures at the same dilution rate. The apparent specific rate of nitrate reduction was almost the same as that in anaerobic continuous cultures when the alternation cycle was short. On the other hand, the nitrite accumulated at high concentrations and the apparent specific rate of nitrite reduction was very low. The actual reduction rate of nitrate in the anaerobic periods was found to be unaffected by the length of the aerobic periods, however, the actual reduction rate of nitrite was highly affected by the aerobic periods. By considering the initial rapid reduction of nitrate in the alternate aerobic-anaerobic system, it was suggested that the higher recycling ratio which corresponds to the shorter alternation cycle, was effective in increasing the efficiency of nitrogen removal in the single sludge nitrification-denitrification system.

  10. Two genetically distinct pathways for transcriptional regulation of anaerobic gene expression in Salmonella typhimurium.

    OpenAIRE

    Jamieson, D J; Higgins, C F

    1986-01-01

    Expression of the tripeptide permease gene tppB is anaerobically induced. This induction is independent of the fnr (oxrA) gene product, which is known to be required for the anaerobic induction of several respiratory enzymes. We isolated, characterized, and mapped mutations in two genes, oxrC and tppR, which prevent the anaerobic induction of tppB expression. Mutations in oxrC were highly pleiotropic, preventing the anaerobic expression of the formate dehydrogenase component of formate hydrog...

  11. Hydrolysis of particulate substrate by activated sludge under aerobic, anoxic and anaerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henze, Mogens; Mladenovski, C.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation of hydrolysis of particulate organic substrate by activated sludge has been made. Raw municipal wastewater was used as substrate. It was mixed with activated sludge from a high loaded activated sludge plant with pure oxygen aeration. During 4 days batch experiments under aerobic......, anoxic and anaerobic conditions, the hydrolysis was following through the production of ammonia. The hydrolysis rate of nitrogeneous compounds is significantly affected by the electron donor available. The rate is high under aerobic conditions, medium under anaerobic conditions and low under anoxic...... conditions. The ratio between the hydrolysis rates under aerobic and under anoxic conditions are very similar to the respiration rates measured as electron equivalents....

  12. Respirators: Supervisors Self-Study #43442

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-20

    This course, Respirators: Supervisors Self-Study (#43442), addresses training requirements for supervisors of respirator wearers as specified by the American National Standard Institute (ANSI) Standard for Respiratory Protection, ANSI Z88.2, and as incorporated by reference in the Department of Energy (DOE) Worker Health and Safety Rule, 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 851. This course also presents the responsibilities of supervisors of respirator wearers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  13. [Effects of Tillage on Soil Respiration and Root Respiration Under Rain-Fed Summer Corn Field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xing-li; Liao, Yun-cheng

    2015-06-01

    To explore the effects of different tillage systems on soil respiration and root respiration under rain-fed condition. Based on a short-term experiment, this paper investigated soil respiration in summer corn growth season under four tillage treatments including subsoiling tillage (ST), no tillage (NT), rotary tillage (RT) and moldboard plow tillage (CT). The contribution of root respiration using root exclusion method was also discussed. The results showed that soil respiration rate presented a single peak trend under four tillage methods during the summer corn growing season, and the maximum value was recorded at the heading stage. The trends of soil respiration were as follows: heading stage > flowering stage > grain filling stage > maturity stage > jointing stage > seedling stage. The trends of soil respiration under different tillage systems were as follows: CT > ST > RT > NT. There was a significant correlation between soil respiration rate and soil temperatures (P decomposition of soil carbon. PMID:26387335

  14. Respirator selection for clandestine methamphetamine laboratory investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gary O; Bronder, Gregory D; Larson, Scott A; Parker, Jay A; Metzler, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    First responders to illicit drug labs may not always have SCBA protection available. Air-purifying respirators using organic vapor cartridges with P-100 filters may not be sufficient. It would be better to use a NIOSH-approved CBRN respirator with its required multi-purpose cartridge system, which includes a P-100 filter. This would remove all the primary drug lab contaminants—organic vapors, acid gases, ammonia, phosphine, iodine, and airborne meth particulates. To assure the proper selection and use of a respirator, it is recommended that the contaminants present be identified and quantified and the OSHA 29 CFR 1910.134 respirator protection program requirements followed. PMID:22571884

  15. Uncoupling Mitochondrial Respiration for Diabesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrick, James W; Larrick, Jasmine W; Mendelsohn, Andrew R

    2016-08-01

    Until recently, the mechanism of adaptive thermogenesis was ascribed to the expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown and beige adipocytes. UCP1 is known to catalyze a proton leak of the inner mitochondrial membrane, resulting in uncoupled oxidative metabolism with no production of adenosine triphosphate and increased energy expenditure. Thus increasing brown and beige adipose tissue with augmented UCP1 expression is a viable target for obesity-related disorders. Recent work demonstrates an UCP1-independent pathway to uncouple mitochondrial respiration. A secreted enzyme, PM20D1, enriched in UCP1+ adipocytes, exhibits catalytic and hydrolytic activity to reversibly form N-acyl amino acids. N-acyl amino acids act as endogenous uncouplers of mitochondrial respiration at physiological concentrations. Administration of PM20D1 or its products, N-acyl amino acids, to diet-induced obese mice improves glucose tolerance by increasing energy expenditure. In short-term studies, treated animals exhibit no toxicity while experiencing 10% weight loss primarily of adipose tissue. Further study of this metabolic pathway may identify novel therapies for diabesity, the disease state associated with diabetes and obesity. PMID:27378359

  16. Plastron Respiration Using Commercial Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Atherton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of insect and arachnid species are able to remain submerged in water indefinitely using plastron respiration. A plastron is a surface-retained film of air produced by surface morphology that acts as an oxygen-carbon dioxide exchange surface. Many highly water repellent and hydrophobic surfaces when placed in water exhibit a silvery sheen which is characteristic of a plastron. In this article, the hydrophobicity of a range of commercially available water repellent fabrics and polymer membranes is investigated, and how the surface of the materials mimics this mechanism of underwater respiration is demonstrated allowing direct extraction of oxygen from oxygenated water. The coverage of the surface with the plastron air layer was measured using confocal microscopy. A zinc/oxygen cell is used to consume oxygen within containers constructed from the different membranes, and the oxygen consumed by the cell is compared to the change in oxygen concentration as measured by an oxygen probe. By comparing the membranes to an air-tight reference sample, it was found that the membranes facilitated oxygen transfer from the water into the container, with the most successful membrane showing a 1.90:1 ratio between the cell oxygen consumption and the change in concentration within the container.

  17. Anaerobic azo dye reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Zee, van der, KG Kristoffer

    2002-01-01

    Azo dyes, aromatic moieties linked together by azo (-N=N-) chromophores, represent the largest class of dyes used in textile-processing and other industries. The release of these compounds into the environment is undesirable, not only because of their colour, but also because many azo dyes and their breakdown products are toxic and/or mutagenic to life. To remove azo dyes from wastewater, a biological treatment strategy based on anaerobic reduction of the azo dyes, followed by aerobic transfo...

  18. Anaerobic biodegradation of fluoranthene under methanogenic conditions in presence of surface-active compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchedzhieva, Nadezhda; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Angelidaki, Irini

    Bacillus cereus isolated from municipal wastewater treatment plant was used as a model strain to assess the efficiency of two anionic surfactants, a chemical surfactant and a biosurfactant during fluoranthene biodegradation under anaerobic methanogenic conditions. The surfactants selected for the...

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ANAEROBIC FUNGUS FROM LLAMA FECES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MARVINSIKKEMA, FD; LAHPOR, GA; KRAAK, MN; GOTTSCHAL, JC; PRINS, RA

    1992-01-01

    An anaerobic fungus was isolated from Hama faeces. Based on its morphological characteristics, polyflagellated zoospores, extensive rhizoid system and the formation of monocentric colonies, the fungus is assigned to the genus Neocallimastix. Neocallimastix sp. L2 is able to grow on several poly-, ol

  20. Characterizing the anaerobic response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashima, Mia; Specht, Michael; Naumann, Bianca; Hippler, Michael

    2010-07-01

    The versatile metabolism of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is reflected in its complex response to anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic response is also remarkable in the context of renewable energy because C. reinhardtii is able to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. To identify proteins involved during anaerobic acclimation as well as to localize proteins and pathways to the powerhouses of the cell, chloroplasts and mitochondria from C. reinhardtii in aerobic and anaerobic (induced by 8 h of argon bubbling) conditions were isolated and analyzed using comparative proteomics. A total of 2315 proteins were identified. Further analysis based on spectral counting clearly localized 606 of these proteins to the chloroplast, including many proteins of the fermentative metabolism. Comparative quantitative analyses were performed with the chloroplast-localized proteins using stable isotopic labeling of amino acids ([(13)C(6)]arginine/[(12)C(6)]arginine in an arginine auxotrophic strain). The quantitative data confirmed proteins previously characterized as induced at the transcript level as well as identified several new proteins of unknown function induced under anaerobic conditions. These proteins of unknown function provide new candidates for further investigation, which could bring insights for the engineering of hydrogen-producing alga strains. PMID:20190198

  1. How switches and lags in biophysical regulators affect spatial-temporal variation of soil respiration in an oak-grass savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Tang, Jianwu; Xu, Liukang

    2006-06-01

    Complex behavior, associated with soil respiration of an oak-grass savanna ecosystem in California, was quantified with continuous measurements of CO2 exchange at two scales (soil and canopy) and with three methods (overstory and understory eddy covariance systems, soil respiration chambers, and a below-ground CO2 flux gradient system). To partition soil respiration into its autotrophic and heterotrophic components, we exploited spatial gradients in the landscape and seasonal variations in rainfall. During the dry summer, heterotrophic respiration was dominant in the senesced grassland area, whereas autotrophic respiration by roots and the feeding of microbes by root exudates was dominant under the trees. A temporal switch in soil respiration occurred in the spring. But the stimulation of root respiration lagged the timing of leaf-out by the trees. Another temporal switch in soil respiration occurred at the start of autumn rains. This switch was induced by the rapid germination of grass seed and new grass growth. Isolated summer rain storms caused a pulse in soil respiration. Such rain events stimulated microbial respiration only; the rain was not sufficient to replenish soil moisture in the root zone or to germinate grass seed. Soil respiration lagged photosynthetic activity on hourly scales. The likely mechanism is the slow translocation of photosynthate to the roots and associated microbes. Another lag occurred on daily scales because of modulations in photosynthesis and stomatal conductance by the passage of dry and humid air masses.

  2. New perspectives in anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lier, J.B.; Tilche, A.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær;

    2001-01-01

    requirements. In fact, most advances were achieved during the last three decades, when high-rate reactor systems were developed and a profound insight was obtained in the microbiology of the anaerobic communities. This insight led to a better understanding of anaerobic treatment and, subsequently, to a broader......The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern...

  3. Photosynthesis and Respiration in a Jar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttner, Joseph K.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity that reduces the biosphere to a water-filled jar to simulate the relationship between cellular respiration, photosynthesis, and energy. Allows students in high school biology and related courses to explore quantitatively cellular respiration and photosynthesis in almost any laboratory setting. (ASK)

  4. Respirators: APR Issuer Self Study 33461

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-07-13

    Respirators: APR Issuer Self-Study (course 33461) is designed to introduce and familiarize employees selected as air-purifying respirator (APR) issuers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with the responsibilities, limitations, procedures, and resources for issuing APRs at LANL. The goal is to enable these issuers to consistently provide proper, functioning APRs to authorized users

  5. Depressive Symptoms and Impaired Respiration in Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliwise, Donald L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Associations between depression and impaired respiration in sleep are frequently noted clinically. This relationship was documented psychometrically with the Geriatric Depression Scale, a self-report measure of nonsomatic depressive symptoms. Mean values and effect size suggest that impaired respiration in sleep was associated with only relatively…

  6. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, I. C.; Levine, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of the atmospheric chemical and photochemical effects of biogenic nitric and nitrous oxide emissions. The magnitude of the biogenic emission of NO is noted to remain uncertain. Possible soil sources of NO and N2O encompass nitrification by autotropic and heterotropic nitrifiers, denitrification by nitrifiers and denitrifiers, nitrate respiration by fermenters, and chemodenitrification. Oxygen availability is the primary determinant of these organisms' relative rates of activity. The characteristics of this major influence are presently investigated in light of the effect of oxygen partial pressure on NO and N2O production by a wide variety of common soil-nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The results obtained indicate that aerobic soils are primary sources only when there is sufficient moisture to furnish anaerobic microsites for denitrification.

  7. Low-potential respirators support electricity production in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüning, André; Beecroft, Nelli J; Avignone-Rossa, Claudio

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we analyse how electric power production in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) depends on the composition of the anodic biofilm in terms of metabolic capabilities of identified sets of species. MFCs are a promising technology for organic waste treatment and sustainable bioelectricity production. Inoculated with natural communities, they present a complex microbial ecosystem with syntrophic interactions between microbes with different metabolic capabilities. Our results demonstrate that low-potential anaerobic respirators--that is those that are able to use terminal electron acceptors with a low redox potential--are important for good power production. Our results also confirm that community metabolism in MFCs with natural inoculum and fermentable feedstock is a two-stage system with fermentation followed by anode respiration. PMID:25388758

  8. δ18O measurements of dissolved O2 undergoing respiration in contaminated ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolved oxygen (O2) is an important constituent in ground water, as it controls the geochemistry and microbiology of aquifers. Microbial respiration consumes O2 and alters the O2 concentration, which controls ground-water redox conditions. In contaminated environments, O2 demand and aerobic versus anaerobic pathways of degradation largely determine whether remediation of a particular set of contaminants occurs and what kind of additional in situ reclamation approaches might be possible. Microbial processes fractionate isotopes of O2 because molecules containing lighter isotopes react faster than those containing heavier isotopes; therefore the fractionation of O2 isotopes can be used to identify O2 respiration in aquatic systems. Two methods were used to analyze isotopes of dissolved O2 in ground water; the major differences between the two methods are sample size and handling in the field and laboratory

  9. Contribution of root respiration to soil respiration in a C3/C4 mixed grassland

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wei Wang; Kenji Ohse; Jianjun Liu; Wenhong Mo; Takehisa Oikawa

    2005-09-01

    The spatial and temporal variations of soil respiration were studied from May 2004 to June 2005 in a C3/C4 mixed grassland of Japan. The linear regression relationship between soil respiration and root biomass was used to determine the contribution of root respiration to soil respiration. The highest soil respiration rate of 11.54 mol m–2 s–1 was found in August 2004 and the lowest soil respiration rate of 4.99 mol m–2 s–1 was found in April 2005. Within-site variation was smaller than seasonal change in soil respiration. Root biomass varied from 0.71 kg m–2 in August 2004 to 1.02 in May 2005. Within-site variation in root biomass was larger than seasonal variation. Root respiration rate was highest in August 2004 (5.7 mol m–2 s–1) and lowest in October 2004 (1.7 mol m–2 s–1). Microbial respiration rate was highest in August 2004 (5.8 mol m–2 s–1) and lowest in April 2005 (2.59 mol m–2 s–1). We estimated that the contribution of root respiration to soil respiration ranged from 31% in October to 51% in August of 2004, and from 45% to 49% from April to June 2005.

  10. Anaerobic wastewater treatment using anaerobic baffled bioreactor: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Siti; Dahlan, Irvan

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is receiving renewed interest because it offers a means to treat wastewater with lower energy investment. Because the microorganisms involved grow more slowly, such systems require clever design so that the microbes have sufficient time with the substrate to complete treatment without requiring enormous reactor volumes. The anaerobic baffled reactor has inherent advantages over single compartment reactors due to its circulation pattern that approaches a plug flow reactor. The physical configuration of the anaerobic baffled reactor enables significant modifications to be made; resulting in a reactor which is proficient of treating complex wastewaters which presently require only one unit, ultimately significant reducing capital costs. This paper also concerns about mechanism, kinetic and hydrodynamic studies of anaerobic digestion for future application of the anaerobic baffled reactor for wastewater treatment.

  11. Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Respiration on Minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, Robert C.

    2013-04-26

    anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing; 4. An acid-stable red cytochrome with a novel absorbance peak at 579 nm was purified from cell-free extracts of L. ferriphilum. Functional studies demonstrated that this cytochrome was an important component of the aerobic iron respiratory chain in this organism; 5. The specific adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to pyrite is mediated by an extracellular protein that was identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to minerals was characterized by high affinity binding that exhibited a high specificity for pyrite over other sulfide minerals. The principal biopolymer involved in this high-affinity adhesion to pyrite was isolated by mineral affinity chromatography and identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of purified aporusticyanin to minerals was observed to adhere to different mineral with a pattern of reactivity identical to that observed with the intact bacterium. Further, preincubation of pyrite with excess exogenous aporusticyanin served to inhibit the adherence of intact cells to the surface of the mineral, indicating that the protein and the cells adhered to the pyrite in a mutually exclusive manner. Taken together, these observations support a model where aporusticyanin located on the surface of the bacterial cell acts as a mineral-specific receptor for the initial adherence of At. ferrooxidans to solid pyrite; 6. The specific adhesion of L. ferriphilum to pyrite was mediated by a different acid-stable extracellular protein than aporusticyanin; and 7. A prototype integrating cavity absorption meter (ICAM) was assembled to determine whether this novel spectrophotometer could be used to study cellular respiration in situ.

  12. Anaerobic Metabolism: Linkages to Trace Gases and Aerobic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megonigal, J. P.; Hines, M. E.; Visscher, P. T.

    2003-12-01

    Life evolved and flourished in the absence of molecular oxygen (O2). As the O2 content of the atmosphere rose to the present level of 21% beginning about two billion years ago, anaerobic metabolism was gradually supplanted by aerobic metabolism. Anaerobic environments have persisted on Earth despite the transformation to an oxidized state because of the combined influence of water and organic matter. Molecular oxygen diffuses about 104 times more slowly through water than air, and organic matter supports a large biotic O2 demand that consumes the supply faster than it is replaced by diffusion. Such conditions exist in wetlands, rivers, estuaries, coastal marine sediments, aquifers, anoxic water columns, sewage digesters, landfills, the intestinal tracts of animals, and the rumen of herbivores. Anaerobic microsites are also embedded in oxic environments such as upland soils and marine water columns. Appreciable rates of aerobic respiration are restricted to areas that are in direct contact with air or those inhabited by organisms that produce O2.Rising atmospheric O2 reduced the global area of anaerobic habitat, but enhanced the overall rate of anaerobic metabolism (at least on an area basis) by increasing the supply of electron donors and acceptors. Organic carbon production increased dramatically, as did oxidized forms of nitrogen, manganese, iron, sulfur, and many other elements. In contemporary anaerobic ecosystems, nearly all of the reducing power is derived from photosynthesis, and most of it eventually returns to O2, the most electronegative electron acceptor that is abundant. This photosynthetically driven redox gradient has been thoroughly exploited by aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms for metabolism. The same is true of hydrothermal vents (Tunnicliffe, 1992) and some deep subsurface environments ( Chapelle et al., 2002), where thermal energy is the ultimate source of the reducing power.Although anaerobic habitats are currently a small fraction of Earth

  13. Anaerobic changes in the energy metabolism of mouse brain during the recovery from acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There months after whole-body irradiation of mice with a sublethal dose of 5 Gy a study was made of some indices of energy metabolism like tissue respiration, oxidative phosphorylation, and formation of lactic acid in the survived brain homogenate. Revealed were (a) the diminution of coupling of tissue respiration to oxidative phosphorylation, the rate of oxygen consumption and the level of cyanoresistant respiration being constant, (b) the increase in the rate of glycolysis in anaerobic and particularly, in aerobic conditions, and (c) reduction of the Pasteur and Crabtree effects. The above mentioned changes in the brain energy metabolism seem to be a manifestation of the process of the reduced metabolism formation in the nervous tissue at the remote tims after irradiation

  14. Techniques for anaerobic susceptibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornsberry, C

    1977-03-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of antimicrobial agents for anaerobic bacteria can be determined by agar dilution and broth dilution (including microdilution) techniques. If MICs are not determined routinely, the disk broth or category methods are recommended for routine use. The Bauer-Kirby disk diffusion method and its interpretative standards should not be used for anaerobes. PMID:850089

  15. Anaerobic Digestion of Piggery Waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velsen, van A.F.M.

    1981-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological process by which organic matter is converted to methane and carbon dioxide by microbes in the absence of air (oxygen). In nature, anaerobic conversions occur at all places where organic material accumulates and the supply of oxygen is deficient, e.g. in marshes an

  16. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellinger, A. [INFOENERGIE, Ettenhausen (Switzerland)

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  17. Anaerobically functioning mitochondria: evolutionary perspective on modulation of energy metabolism in Mytilus edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GB Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrion represents a compelling biological model of complex organelle development driven by evolutionary modification of permanently enslaved primordial purple non-sulphur bacteria. As an evolutionary modification, the dynamic nature of the mitochondrion has been observed to exhibit biochemical and functional variation, including the capacity for energy production driven by anaerobic respiratory mechanisms. In invertebrates, mitochondrial anaerobic respiration allows the organism to survive at a lower energy state while yielding more ATP than can be achieved by glycolysis alone. Furthermore, a preferred physiological state of lower energy production operationally yields diminished free radical generation, thereby offering a protective existential advantage. It has been established that energy production by the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, is functionally dependent on anaerobic respiratory mechanisms within the mitochondrion. Importantly, under hypoxic conditions metabolic pathways in M. edulis have been demonstrated to synthesize and utilize amino acid adducts termed opines as chemically defined energy reserves. In addition to the utilization of opines as anaerobic metabolic intermediates by invertebrate organisms, opines were also discovered and characterized as metabolic intermediates in plant parasites, specifically crown gall tumors. A careful review of the biomedical literature indicates mechanistic similarities between anaerobically functioning mitochondria in M. edulis and crown gall tissues and metabolic processes in human tumors. The anaerobically functioning mitochondrion in M. edulis tissues is a potentially valuable high resolution model system for development of novel anticancer therapeutic agents.

  18. Mitochondrial impairment by PPAR agonists and statins identified via immunocaptured OXPHOS complex activities and respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondrial impairment is increasingly implicated in the etiology of toxicity caused by some thiazolidinediones, fibrates, and statins. We examined the effects of members of these drug classes on respiration of isolated rat liver mitochondria using a phosphorescent oxygen sensitive probe and on the activity of individual oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes using a recently developed immunocapture technique. Of the six thiazolidinediones examined, ciglitazone, troglitazone, and darglitazone potently disrupted mitochondrial respiration. In accord with these data, ciglitazone and troglitazone were also potent inhibitors of Complexes II + III, IV, and V, while darglitazone predominantly inhibited Complex IV. Of the six statins evaluated, lovastatin, simvastatin, and cerivastatin impaired mitochondrial respiration the most, with simvastatin and lovastatin impairing multiple OXPHOS Complexes. Within the class of fibrates, gemfibrozil more potently impaired respiration than fenofibrate, clofibrate, or ciprofibrate. Gemfibrozil only modestly inhibited Complex I, fenofibrate inhibited Complexes I, II + III, and V, and clofibrate inhibited Complex V. Our findings with the two complementary methods indicate that (1) some members of each class impair mitochondrial respiration, whereas others have little or no effect, and (2) the rank order of mitochondrial impairment accords with clinical adverse events observed with these drugs. Since the statins are frequently co-prescribed with the fibrates or thiazolidinediones, various combinations of these three drug classes were also analyzed for their mitochondrial effects. In several cases, the combination additively uncoupled or inhibited respiration, suggesting that some combinations are more likely to yield clinically relevant drug-induced mitochondrial side effects than others

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the Respiration-Competent Strain Lactobacillus casei N87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Annamaria; Parente, Eugenio; Reale, Anna; Ianniello, Rocco G.

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei is used as a starter, adjunct, and/or probiotic culture in the production of fermented and functional foods. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the respiration-competent strain L. casei N87, isolated from infant feces. This genome information may be useful for the study of respiratory metabolism in lactic acid bacteria. PMID:27151805

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Respiration-Competent Strain Lactobacillus casei N87

    OpenAIRE

    Zotta, Teresa; Ricciardi, Annamaria; Parente, Eugenio; Reale, Anna; Ianniello, Rocco G.; Bassi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei is used as a starter, adjunct, and/or probiotic culture in the production of fermented and functional foods. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the respiration-competent strain L. casei N87, isolated from infant feces. This genome information may be useful for the study of respiratory metabolism in lactic acid bacteria.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Respiration-Competent Strain Lactobacillus casei N87.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotta, Teresa; Ricciardi, Annamaria; Parente, Eugenio; Reale, Anna; Ianniello, Rocco G; Bassi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei is used as a starter, adjunct, and/or probiotic culture in the production of fermented and functional foods. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of the respiration-competent strain L. casei N87, isolated from infant feces. This genome information may be useful for the study of respiratory metabolism in lactic acid bacteria. PMID:27151805

  2. Effects of thyroid state on respiration of perfused rat and guinea pig hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of thyroid state on the respiration of the isolated heart were investigated using retrograde perfused rat and guinea pig hearts. In both species, hypothyroidism caused a marked depression in circulating thyroid hormone concentrations and in the respiration of the isolated, retrograde perfused heart. Hypothyroidism was caused by injecting animals with Na131I. The effects on myocardial respiration could be attributed to changes in the contraction frequency and in the oxygen consumption per beat, with little contribution from basal respiration. Treatment of animals with thyroxine elevated plasma thyroid hormones to a similar extent in rats and guinea pigs. In the latter, thyroxine treatment was associated with substantial increases in the contraction frequency and the oxygen consumption per beat of the isolated heart. In contrast, only small changes were apparent in the retrograde perfused rat heart, observations that were confirmed in rat hearts perfused at near physiological work loads. It was concluded that rat hearts isolated from normal animals function at near maximal thyroid state, in contrast to the guinea pig heart, which requires higher circulating concentrations of thyroid hormones to attain maximal responses

  3. Dissimilatory Sb(V) reduction by microorganisms isolated from Sb-contaminated sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovick, M. A.; Kulp, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    Mining and smelting are major sources of trace metal contamination in freshwater systems. Arsenic (As) is a common contaminant derived from certain mining operations and is a known toxic metalloid and carcinogen. Antimony (Sb) is listed as a pollutant of priority interest by the EPA and is presumed to share similar geochemical and toxicological properties with arsenic. Both elements can occur in four different oxidation states (V, III, 0, and -III) under naturally occurring conditions. In aqueous solutions As(V) and Sb(V) predominate in oxygenated surface waters whereas As(III) and Sb(III) are stable in anoxic settings. Numerous studies have examined microbiological redox pathways that utilize As(V) as a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration, however there have been few studies on microbial mechanisms that may affect the biogeochemical cycling of Sb in the environment. Here we report bacterial reduction of Sb(V) to Sb(III) in anoxic enrichment cultures and bacterial isolates grown from sediment collected from an Sb contaminated pond at a mine tailings site in Idaho (total pond water Sb concentration = 235.2 +/- 136.3 ug/L). Anaerobic sediment microcosms (40 mL) were established in artificial freshwater mineral salt medium, amended with millimolar concentrations of Sb(V), acetate or lactate, and incubated at 27°C for several days. Antimony(V), lactate, and acetate concentrations were monitored during incubation by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and Ion Chromatography (IC). Live sediment microcosms reduced millimolar amendments of Sb(V) to Sb(III) coupled to the oxidation of acetate and lactate, while no activity occurred in killed controls. Enrichment cultures were established by serially diluting Sb(V)-reducing microcosms in mineral salt medium with Sb(V) and acetate, and a Sb(V)-reducing bacterial strain was isolated by plating on anaerobic agar plates amended with millimolar Sb(V) and acetate. Direct cell counting demonstrated that

  4. Development of washing apparatus for respirators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc. Ikata Nuclear Power Station has a regulation that workers must wear a half-face respirator (referred to in figure 1) to avoid internal exposure at the work place through coming into contact with radioactive substances. The washing of these respirators, currently performed in the Station, is done by manually rubbing them with a cloth penetrated with ethyl alcohol. The workers are therefore often required to lobar for a long time under rigorous conditions. Under these circumstances, experimental work has been conducted with the aim of developing washing apparatus suitable for the most commonly used type to respirator in the Station. (author)

  5. Re-interpreting anaerobic metabolism: an argument for the application of both anaerobic glycolysis and excess post-exercise oxygen comsumption (EPOC) as independent sources of energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C B

    1998-02-01

    Due to current technical difficulties and changing cellular conditions, the measurement of anaerobic and recovery energy expenditure remains elusive. During rest and low-intensity steady-state exercise, indirect calorimetric measurements successfully represent energy expenditure. The same steady-state O2 uptake methods are often used to describe the O2 deficit and excess post-oxygen consumption (EPOC): 1 l O2 = 5 kcal = 20.9 kJ. However, an O2 deficit plus exercise O2 uptake measurement ignores energy expenditure during recovery, and an exercise O2 uptake plus EPOC measurement misrepresents anaerobic energy expenditure. An alternative solution has not yet been proposed. Anaerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration are construed here as a symbiotic union of metabolic pathways, each contributing independently to energy expenditure and heat production. Care must be taken when using O2 uptake alone to quantify energy expenditure because various high-intensity exercise models reveal that O2 uptake can lag behind estimated energy demands or exceed them. The independent bioenergetics behind anaerobic glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration can acknowledge these discrepancies. Anaerobic glycolysis is an additive component to an exercise O2 uptake measurement. Moreover, it is the assumptions behind steady-state O2 uptake that do not permit proper interpretation of energy expenditure during EPOC; 1 l O2 not = 20.9 kJ. Using both the O2 deficit and a modified EPOC for interpretation, rather than one or the other, leads to a better method of quantifying energy expenditure for higher intensity exercise and recovery. PMID:9535579

  6. Photosynthesis and Respiration in Leaf Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Simon

    1998-01-01

    Demonstrates how leaf slices provide an inexpensive material for illustrating several fundamental points about the biochemistry of photosynthesis and respiration. Presents experiments that illustrate the effects of photon flux density and herbicides and carbon dioxide concentration. (DDR)

  7. Probing soil respiration process of grasslands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Soil respiration, which is primarily the only output approach for CO2 exchanges in soils between the global terrestrial ecosystem and the atmosphere,exerts a direct influence on the speed of carbon turnover rate of the soil.

  8. The Low Energy-Coupling Respiration in Zymomonas mobilis Accelerates Flux in the Entner-Doudoroff Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkis, Reinis; Strazdina, Inese; Balodite, Elina; Lasa, Zane; Galinina, Nina; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2016-01-01

    Performing oxidative phosphorylation is the primary role of respiratory chain both in bacteria and eukaryotes. Yet, the branched respiratory chains of prokaryotes contain alternative, low energy-coupling electron pathways, which serve for functions other than oxidative ATP generation (like those of respiratory protection, adaptation to low-oxygen media, redox balancing, etc.), some of which are still poorly understood. We here demonstrate that withdrawal of reducing equivalents by the energetically uncoupled respiratory chain of the bacterium Zymomonas mobilis accelerates its fermentative catabolism, increasing the glucose consumption rate. This is in contrast to what has been observed in other respiring bacteria and yeast. This effect takes place after air is introduced to glucose-consuming anaerobic cell suspension, and can be simulated using a kinetic model of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway in combination with a simple net reaction of NADH oxidation that does not involve oxidative phosphorylation. Although aeration hampers batch growth of respiring Z. mobilis culture due to accumulation of toxic byproducts, nevertheless under non-growing conditions respiration is shown to confer an adaptive advantage for the wild type over the non-respiring Ndh knock-out mutant. If cells get occasional access to limited amount of glucose for short periods of time, the elevated glucose uptake rate selectively improves survival of the respiring Z. mobilis phenotype. PMID:27100889

  9. A New Rate Law Describing Microbial Respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Qusheng; Bethke, Craig M

    2003-01-01

    The rate of microbial respiration can be described by a rate law that gives the respiration rate as the product of a rate constant, biomass concentration, and three terms: one describing the kinetics of the electron-donating reaction, one for the kinetics of the electron-accepting reaction, and a thermodynamic term accounting for the energy available in the microbe's environment. The rate law, derived on the basis of chemiosmotic theory and nonlinear thermodynamics, is unique in that it accou...

  10. Effect of Music on Emotions and Respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi Kengo; Masaoka Yuri; Satoh Kanako; Katoh Nobumasa; Homma Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    In the present study we investigated whether the emotional state induced by music can change respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (VT), minute ventilation (VE), and end-tidal CO2concentration (ETCO2). In a pioneering study investigating the effect of music on respiration, the music of Stockhausen and Chopin was used. In the present study, we examined the effects of the same musical stimuli used in that study on respiration. Each stimulus (Stockhausen, Chopin, and silence) was delivered for 30 ...

  11. 42 CFR 84.174 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.174... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.174 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except..., durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type of respirator it...

  12. 42 CFR 84.197 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.197... Cartridge Respirators § 84.197 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type...

  13. 42 CFR 84.134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84.134... Respirators § 84.134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. Supplied-air respirators shall be equipped with a substantial, durable container bearing markings which show the applicant's name, the type...

  14. Mitochondrial respiration without ubiquinone biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Hekimi, Siegfried

    2013-12-01

    Ubiquinone (UQ), a.k.a. coenzyme Q, is a redox-active lipid that participates in several cellular processes, in particular mitochondrial electron transport. Primary UQ deficiency is a rare but severely debilitating condition. Mclk1 (a.k.a. Coq7) encodes a conserved mitochondrial enzyme that is necessary for UQ biosynthesis. We engineered conditional Mclk1 knockout models to study pathogenic effects of UQ deficiency and to assess potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of UQ deficiencies. We found that Mclk1 knockout cells are viable in the total absence of UQ. The UQ biosynthetic precursor DMQ9 accumulates in these cells and can sustain mitochondrial respiration, albeit inefficiently. We demonstrated that efficient rescue of the respiratory deficiency in UQ-deficient cells by UQ analogues is side chain length dependent, and that classical UQ analogues with alkyl side chains such as idebenone and decylUQ are inefficient in comparison with analogues with isoprenoid side chains. Furthermore, Vitamin K2, which has an isoprenoid side chain, and has been proposed to be a mitochondrial electron carrier, had no efficacy on UQ-deficient mouse cells. In our model with liver-specific loss of Mclk1, a large depletion of UQ in hepatocytes caused only a mild impairment of respiratory chain function and no gross abnormalities. In conjunction with previous findings, this surprisingly small effect of UQ depletion indicates a nonlinear dependence of mitochondrial respiratory capacity on UQ content. With this model, we also showed that diet-derived UQ10 is able to functionally rescue the electron transport deficit due to severe endogenous UQ deficiency in the liver, an organ capable of absorbing exogenous UQ. PMID:23847050

  15. EMERGING METRONIDAZOLE RESISTANCE IN ANAEROBES AND MAPPING THEIR SUSCEPTIBILITY BEHAVIOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, anaerobic clinical isolates of Bacteroides fragilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Yersinia enterocolitica were obtained from different clinical specimens and were subjected to molecular typing to detect the gene encoding metronidazole resistance in these isolates. Subsequently, antibacterial activity of drugs was tested against the selected clinical isolates. A total of 53 clinical isolates involving 18 obligate and 35 facultative anaerobic bacteria were recovered from clinical samples of 67 patients who were suspected to have anaerobic infection. A disk diffusion method was employed to screen for metronidazole-resistance among these isolates. PCR assay was used to detect the metronidazole resistant gene (nim. Susceptibility studies in metronidazole resistant clinical isolates as well as positive controls were performed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. According to disc diffusion method, of 53 isolates, 21 isolates (39.6% were found to be metronidazole resistant. Further screening of these isolates with PCR revealed only 13 isolates (24.5% carry nim gene. Out of which 7 were of B. fragilis, 3 were of Y. enterocolitica, 2 were of E. coli and 1 was of S. aureus. The highest number of metronidazole resistant isolates were found in abscess (7 followed by intra-abdominal infection (5 and bone and joint infection (1. When metronidazole resistant isolates were subjected to screen for the presence of nim gene, all isolates were found to carry nim gene. According to minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC data, among the tested antibacterial agents, Mebatic emerged as the most active antibacterial against metronidazole resistant isolates of B. fragilis, E. coli, S. aureus and Y. enterocolitica with MIC values 0.125 to 1.0 µg mL-1. Similarly, Antimicrobial Susceptibility

  16. European surveillance study on antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-positive anaerobic cocci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazier, J; Chmelar, D; Dubreuil, L;

    2008-01-01

    Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) are a heterogeneous group of microorganisms frequently isolated from local and systemic infections. In this study, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of clinical strains isolated in 10 European countries were investigated. After identification of 299 GPAC to...... Parvimonas micra (formerly Peptostreptococcus micros), isolated from skin and soft tissue infections. All isolates were susceptible to imipenem, metronidazole, vancomycin and linezolid. Twenty-one isolates (7%) were resistant to penicillin (n=13) and/or to clindamycin (n=12). Four isolates were resistant to...... both agents. The majority of resistant isolates were identified as F. magna and originated from blood, abscesses and soft tissue infections....

  17. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC6(3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC6(3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC6(3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC6(3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics

  18. Large scale study on measurement of respiration activity (AT(4)) by Sapromat and OxiTop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binner, Erwin; Böhm, Katharina; Lechner, Peter

    2012-10-01

    In the run-up for amending the Austrian landfill ordinance, parameters were developed to assess the stability/reactivity of mechanically-biologically pretreated residual wastes. The Landfill Ordinance 2008 regulates limit values for Respiration Activity (="Atmungsaktivität") RA(4) (AT(4))wastes (sewage sludge, commercial waste, material from abandoned sites, biowaste compost). For measurement of respiration activity in Austria mainly two methods are used: the Sapromat®-method and the OxiTop®-method. Whether respectively to what extent these two methods give same results, is discussed in this paper. Since 2009 at ABF-BOKU 169 respiration activity tests of samples taken from different stages of MBT - as well as biowaste composting processes, materials from landfills as well as abandoned sites and residues from anaerobic treatment plants were analysed parallel by Sapromat® and OxiTop®. The results manifest very strong correlation between the Sapromat® and OxiTop® method. The correlation coefficient is 0.993. As a very clear tendency OxiTop® gives lower amounts than Sapromat®. In average the lower values of OxiTop® are around 88%. PMID:22704002

  19. Hydroxylation and Carboxylation—Two Crucial Steps of Anaerobic Benzene Degradation by Dechloromonas Strain RCB

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Romy; Coates, John D.

    2005-01-01

    Benzene is a highly toxic industrial compound that is essential to the production of various chemicals, drugs, and fuel oils. Due to its toxicity and carcinogenicity, much recent attention has been focused on benzene biodegradation, especially in the absence of molecular oxygen. However, the mechanism by which anaerobic benzene biodegradation occurs is still unclear. This is because until the recent isolation of Dechloromonas strains JJ and RCB no organism that anaerobically degraded benzene ...

  20. Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by the Facultative Anaerobe Pantoea agglomerans SP1

    OpenAIRE

    Francis, Chris A.; Obraztsova, Anna Y.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2000-01-01

    Anaerobic enrichments with acetate as the electron donor and Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor were obtained from sediments of Salt Pond, a coastal marine basin near Woods Hole, Mass. A pure culture of a facultatively anaerobic Fe(III) reducer was isolated, and 16S rRNA analysis demonstrated that this organism was most closely related to Pantoea (formerly Enterobacter) agglomerans, a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria. This organ...

  1. The anaerobic community of an estuarine environment: an analogue for life on Mars.

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis-Harper, E.; Pearson, V. K.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Olsson-Francis, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used microbiological techniques in combination with several analytical geochemical techniques to identify potential biomarkers for life on Mars. A community of anaerobic microorganisms containing chemolithoautotrophs was isolated from below the redox potential discontinuity (RPD) layer. The anaerobic conditions, the 11-15 ˚C temperature and high salinity (37 g l-1 NaCl) make the sub-RPD zone an ideal environment to sample a biological analogue for the martian subsurface. Sam...

  2. Anaerobic Cultures from Preserved Tissues of Baby Mammoth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.; Fisher, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Microbiological analysis of several cold-preserved tissue samples from the Siberian baby mammoth known as Lyuba revealed a number of culturable bacterial strains that were grown on anaerobic media at 4 C. Lactic acid produced by LAB (lactic acid bacteria) group, usually by members of the genera Carnobacterium and Lactosphera, appears to be a wonderful preservative that prevents other bacteria from over-dominating a system. Permafrost and lactic acid preserved the body of this one-month old baby mammoth and kept it in exceptionally good condition, resulting in this mammoth being the most complete such specimen ever recovered. The diversity of novel anaerobic isolates was expressed on morphological, physiological and phylogenetic levels. Here we discuss the specifics of the isolation of new strains, differentiation from trivial contamination, and preliminary results for the characterization of cultures.

  3. Anaerobic cultures from preserved tissues of baby mammoth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Fisher, Daniel; Hoover, Richard B.

    2011-10-01

    Microbiological analysis of several cold-preserved tissue samples from the Siberian baby mammoth known as Lyuba revealed a number of culturable bacterial strains that were grown on anaerobic media at 3 oC. Lactic acid produced by LAB (lactic acid bacteria) group, usually by members of the genera Carnobacterium and Lactosphera, appears to be a wonderful preservative that keeps other bacteria from colonizing a system. Permafrost and lactic acid preserved the body of this one month-old baby mammoth and kept it in exceptionally good condition, resulting in this mammoth being the most complete sample of the species ever recovered. The diversity of novel psychrophilic anaerobic isolates was expressed on morphological, physiological and phylogenetic levels. Here, we discuss the specifics of the isolation of new psychrophilic strains, differentiation from trivial contamination, and preliminary results for characterization of the cultures.

  4. Carbon dioxide fixation and respiration relationships observed during closure experiments in Biosphere 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mark; Dempster, William; Allen, John P.

    Biosphere 2 enclosed several ecosystems - ones analogous to rainforest, tropical savannah, thornscrub, desert, marsh and coral reef - and a diverse agro-ecology, with dozens of food crops, in virtual material isolation from Earth's environment. This permits a detailed examination of fixation and respiration from the continuous record of carbon dioxide concentration from sensors inside the facility. Unlike the Earth, all the ecosystems were active during sunlight hours, while phyto and soil respiration dominated nighttime hours. This resulted in fluctuations of as much as 600-700 ppm CO2 daily during days of high sunlight input. We examine the relationships between daytime fixation as driven by photosynthesis to nighttime respiration and also fixation and respiration as related to carbon dioxide concentration. Since carbon dioxide concentrations varied from near Earth ambient levels to over 3000 ppm (during low-light winter months), the response of the plant communities and impact on phytorespiration and soil respiration may be of relevance to the global climate change research community. An investigation of these dynamics will also allow the testing of models predicting the response of community metabolism to variations in sunlight and degree of previous net carbon fixation.

  5. Ammonium excretion and oxygen respiration of tropical copepods and euphausiids exposed to oxygen minimum zone conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiko, Rainer; Hauss, Helena; Buchholz, Friedrich; Melzner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Calanoid copepods and euphausiids are key components of marine zooplankton communities worldwide. Most euphausiids and several copepod species perform diel vertical migrations (DVMs) that contribute to the export of particulate and dissolved matter to midwater depths. In vast areas of the global ocean, and in particular in the eastern tropical Atlantic and Pacific, the daytime distribution depth of many migrating organisms corresponds to the core of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). At depth, the animals experience reduced temperature and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) and an increased carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) compared to their near-surface nighttime habitat. Although it is well known that low oxygen levels can inhibit respiratory activity, the respiration response of tropical copepods and euphausiids to relevant pCO2, pO2, and temperature conditions remains poorly parameterized. Further, the regulation of ammonium excretion at OMZ conditions is generally not well understood. It was recently estimated that DVM-mediated ammonium supply could fuel bacterial anaerobic ammonium oxidation - a major loss process for fixed nitrogen in the ocean considerably. These estimates were based on the implicit assumption that hypoxia or anoxia in combination with hypercapnia (elevated pCO2) does not result in a down-regulation of ammonium excretion. We exposed calanoid copepods from the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic (ETNA; Undinula vulgaris and Pleuromamma abdominalis) and euphausiids from the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP; Euphausia mucronata) and the ETNA (Euphausia gibboides) to different temperatures, carbon dioxide and oxygen levels to study their survival, respiration and excretion rates at these conditions. An increase in temperature by 10 °C led to an approximately 2-fold increase of the respiration and excretion rates of U. vulgaris (Q10, respiration = 1.4; Q10, NH4-excretion = 1.6), P. abdominalis (Q10, respiration = 2.0; Q10, NH4-excretion = 2.4) and

  6. Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteriology of Hidradenitis Suppurativa: A Study of 22 Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoulis, Alexandros C.; Koumaki, Dimitra; Liakou, Aikaterini I.; Vrioni, Georgia; Koumaki, Vasiliki; Kontogiorgi, Dimitra; Tzima, Korina; Tsakris, Athanasios; Rigopoulos, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease of unclear etiology. The role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of disease remains controversial. Materials and Methods Specimens were obtained from 22 HS patients by direct percutaneous needle aspiration. The collected material was cultured in aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and sensitivity tests were performed. Results Of the 22 patients, 32% were culture negative and 68% were culture positive. A total of 16 isolates was obtained, 14 aerobic and 2 anaerobic. Aerobic bacteria were present in 86% of the specimens, whereas only anaerobic bacteria were isolated in 7%. The predominant aerobic species were Proteus mirabilis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus lugdunensis. The isolated anaerobic bacteria were Dermacoccus nishinomiyaensis and Propionibacterium granulosum. Conclusion A variety of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was isolated from the HS lesions of our patients. In contrast to previous studies, fewer patients were found to be culture positive, and Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in only 1 of them. More studies are necessary to elucidate the controversial role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of HS. PMID:27170935

  7. Solubilization of lignin by the ruminal anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix patriciarum.

    OpenAIRE

    McSweeney, C S; Dulieu, A; Katayama, Y; Lowry, J B

    1994-01-01

    The ability of the ruminal anaerobic phycomycete Neocallimastix patriciarum to digest model lignin compounds and lignified structures in plant material was studied in batch culture. The fungus did not degrade or transform model lignin compounds that were representative of the predominant intermonomer linkages in lignin, nor did it solubilize acid detergent lignin that had been isolated from spear grass. In a stem fraction of sorghum, 33.6% of lignin was apparently solubilized by the fungus. S...

  8. Aerobic and Anaerobic Starvation Metabolism in Methanotrophic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Roslev, P.; King, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    The capacity for anaerobic metabolism of endogenous and selected exogenous substrates in carbon- and energy-starved methanotrophic bacteria was examined. The methanotrophic isolate strain WP 12 survived extended starvation under anoxic conditions while metabolizing 10-fold less endogenous substrate than did parallel cultures starved under oxic conditions. During aerobic starvation, the cell biomass decreased by 25% and protein and lipids were the preferred endogenous substrates. Aerobic prote...

  9. Anaerobic oxidation of p-cresol by a denitrifying bacterium.

    OpenAIRE

    Bossert, I D; Young, L Y

    1986-01-01

    Metabolism of p-cresol (pCr) under nitrate-reducing conditions is mediated by the denitrifying bacterial isolate PC-07. The methyl substituent of the substrate is oxidized anaerobically by whole-cell suspensions of PC-07 through a series of dehydrogenation and hydration reactions to yield p-hydroxybenzoate (pOHB) in stoichiometric proportions. The partially oxidized intermediates in the pathway p-hydroxybenzyl alcohol and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde can also serve as substrates for pOHB formation. ...

  10. Soil Respiration During a Soybean-Growing Season

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Soil respiration induced by soybean cultivation over its entire growing season and the factors influencing soil respiration were investigated to examine the seasonal pattern of soil respiration induced by soybean cultivation, explore soybean growth and photosynthesis on soil respiration, and determine the temperature dependence on soil respiration. Soil respiration in a pot experiment with and without soybean plants was sampled using the static chamber method and measured using gas chromatograph. Air temperature was a dominant factor controlling soil respiration rate in unplanted soil. Additionally,rhizosphere respiration comprised 62% to 98% of the soil respiration rate in the soybean-planted soil varying with the soybean growth stages. Harvesting aerial parts of soybean plant caused an immediate drop in the soil respiration rate at that stage. After harvesting the aerial parts of the soybean plant, a highly significant correlation between soil respiration rate and air temperature was found at the flowering stage (P < 0.01), the pod stage (P < 0.01), and the seed-filling stage(P < 0.05). Thus, rhizosphere respiration during the soybean-growing period not only made a great contribution to soil respiration, but also determined the seasonal variation pattern of the soil respiration rate.

  11. Soil respiration partition and its components in the total agro-ecosystem respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delogu, Emilie; LeDantec, Valerie; Mordelet, Patrick; Buysse, Pauline; Aubinet, Marc; Pattey, Elizabeth; Mary, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Close to 15% of the Earth's terrestrial surface is used for cropland. In the context of global warming, and acknowledged by the Kyoto Protocol, agricultural soils could be a significant sink for atmospheric CO2. Understanding the factors influencing carbon fluxes of agricultural soils is essential for implementing efficient mitigation practices. Most of the soil respiration modeling studies was carried out in forest ecosystems, but only a few was carried out in agricultural ecosystems. In the study, we evaluated simple formalisms to model soil respiration using wheat data from four contrasting geographical mi-latitude regions. Soil respiration were measured in three winter wheat fields at Lamasquère (43°49'N, 01°23'E, 2007) and Auradé (43°54'N, 01°10'E, 2008), South-West France and Lonzée (50°33'N, 4°44'E, 2007), Belgium, and in a spring wheat field at Ottawa (45°22'N, 75°43'W, 2007, 2011), Ontario, Canada. Manual closed chambers were used in the French sites. The Belgium and Canadian sites were equipped with automated closed chamber systems, which continuously collected 30-min soil respiration exchanges. All the sites were also equipped with eddy flux towers. When eddy flux data were collected over bare soil, the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was equal to soil respiration exchange. These NEE data were used to validate the model. Different biotic and abiotic descriptors were used to model daily soil respiration and its heterotrophic and autotrophic components: soil temperature, soil relative humidity, Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), shoot biomass, crop height, with different formalisms. It was interesting to conclude that using biotic descriptors did not improve the performances of the model. In fact, a combination of abiotic descriptors (soil humidity and soil temperature) allowed significant model formalism to model soil respiration. The simple soil respiration model was used to calculate the heterotrophic and autotrophic source contributions to

  12. Maintenance, endogeneous, respiration, lysis, decay and predation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    loosdrecht, Marc C. M. Van; Henze, Mogens

    1999-01-01

    In activated sludge processes an increased sludge age is associated with a decreased sludge production. This phenomenon is generally interpreted as a result of endogenous respiration processes. In the activated sludge models cell lysis (or decay) is incorporated. The lysis is modelled such that it...... mechanism is microbiologically correct. The lysis/decay model mechanism is a strongly simplified representation of reality. This paper tries to review the processes grouped under endogenous respiration in activated sludge models. Mechanisms and processes such as maintenance, lysis, internal and external...... maintenance processes. This conversion will in general be denoted as endogenous respiration. Based on the literature review the phenomena are discussed and organised, in order to create a working platform for discussing more detailed activated sludge models, one of which is being sketched. (C) 1999 IAWQ...

  13. Ecotechnological water quality control in acidic mining lakes. Part 2. Primary production and respiration; Oekotechnologische Steuerung der Gewaesserguete in sauren Tagebauseen. Teil 2. Primaerproduktion und Respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlmann, W. [Inst. fuer Wasser und Boden, Dresden (Germany); Nixdorf, B. [Brandenburgisch-Technische Univ., Fakultaet fuer Umweltwissenschaften, Lehrstuhl fuer Gewaesserschutz, Bad Saarow (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    The necessity of neutralizing acidic mining lakes is obvious if the water is to be used in reservoirs (Lohsa II) or for other purposes such as balancing the water budget, fishing or recreation or to be discharged into river systems. Flushing of mining lakes with alkaline surface water from rivers is the moist common method to stabilize the lake structures and to neutralize acidic water. This method is limited in lakes without river coupling or with a high re-acidification potential. The present contribution demonstrates the possibility of biogenic alkalinity production in acidic mining lakes focusing on the main biological processes of primary production and respiration. The influence of biogenic matter transformation on water chemistry in acidic mining lakes is analyzed. Calculation of the extent of aerobic and anaerobic decay of organic matter will be a necessary prerequisite for sustainable sulfate reduction. (orig.)

  14. Microbial network for waste activated sludge cascade utilization in an integrated system of microbial electrolysis and anaerobic fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wenzong; He, Zhangwei; Yang, Chunxue;

    2016-01-01

    integrated system of microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) and anaerobic digestion (AD) for waste activated sludge (WAS). Microbial communities in integrated system would build a thorough energetic and metabolic interaction network regarding fermentation communities and electrode respiring communities. The...... Parabacteroides, which showed a delayed contribution to the extracellular electron transport leading to a slow cascade utilization of WAS. Conclusions: Efficient pretreatment could supply more short-chain fatty acids and higher conductivities in the fermentative liquid, which facilitated mass transfer in anodic...

  15. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in grassland soils used for cattle husbandry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bannert

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available While the importance of anaerobic methane oxidation has been reported for marine ecosystems, the role of this process in soils is still questionable. Grasslands used as pastures for cattle overwintering show an increase in anaerobic soil micro-sites caused by animal treading and excrement deposition. Therefore, anaerobic potential methane oxidation activity of severely impacted soil from a cattle winter pasture was investigated in an incubation experiment under anaerobic conditions using 13C-labelled methane. We were able to detect a high microbial activity utilizing CH4 as nutrient source shown by the respiration of 13CO2. Measurements of possible terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic oxidation of methane were carried out. Soil sulfate concentrations were too low to explain the oxidation of the amount of methane added, but enough nitrate and iron(III were detected. However, only nitrate was consumed during the experiment. 13C-PLFA analyses clearly showed the utilization of CH4 as nutrient source mainly by organisms harbouring 16:1ω7 PLFAs. These lipids were also found as most 13C-enriched fatty acids by Raghoebarsing et al. (2006 after addition of 13CH4 to an enrichment culture coupling denitrification of nitrate to anaerobic oxidation of methane. This might be an indication for anaerobic oxidation of methane by relatives of "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" in the investigated grassland soil under the conditions of the incubation experiment.

  16. [Anaerobic bacteria 150 years after their discovery by Pasteur].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, José Elías; García-Sánchez, Enrique; Martín-Del-Rey, Ángel; García-Merino, Enrique

    2015-02-01

    In 2011 we celebrated the 150th anniversary of the discovery of anaerobic bacteria by Louis Pasteur. The interest of the biomedical community on such bacteria is still maintained, and is particularly focused on Clostridium difficile. In the past few years important advances in taxonomy have been made due to the genetic, technological and computing developments. Thus, a significant number of new species related to human infections have been characterised, and some already known have been reclassified. At pathogenic level some specimens of anaerobic microflora, that had not been isolated from human infections, have been now isolated in some clinical conditions. There was emergence (or re-emergence) of some species and clinical conditions. Certain anaerobic bacteria have been associated with established infectious syndromes. The virulence of certain strains has increased, and some hypotheses on their participation in certain diseases have been given. In terms of diagnosis, the routine use of MALDI-TOF has led to a shortening of time and a cost reduction in the identification, with an improvement directly related to the improvement of data bases. The application of real-time PCR has been another major progress, and the sequencing of 16srRNA gene and others is currently a reality for several laboratories. Anaerobes have increased their resistance to antimicrobial agents, and the emergence of resistance to carbapenems and metronidazole, and multi-resistance is a current reality. In this situation, linezolid could be an effective alternative for Bacteroides. Fidaxomicin is the only anti-anaerobic agent introduced in the recent years, specifically for the diarrhoea caused by C.difficile. Moreover, some mathematical models have also been proposed in relation with this species. PMID:23648369

  17. Investigation of mitochondrial dysfunction by sequential microplate-based respiration measurements from intact and permeabilized neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascaline Clerc

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is a component of many neurodegenerative conditions. Measurement of oxygen consumption from intact neurons enables evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics under conditions that are more physiologically realistic compared to isolated mitochondria. However, mechanistic analysis of mitochondrial function in cells is complicated by changing energy demands and lack of substrate control. Here we describe a technique for sequentially measuring respiration from intact and saponin-permeabilized cortical neurons on single microplates. This technique allows control of substrates to individual electron transport chain complexes following permeabilization, as well as side-by-side comparisons to intact cells. To illustrate the utility of the technique, we demonstrate that inhibition of respiration by the drug KB-R7943 in intact neurons is relieved by delivery of the complex II substrate succinate, but not by complex I substrates, via acute saponin permeabilization. In contrast, methyl succinate, a putative cell permeable complex II substrate, failed to rescue respiration in intact neurons and was a poor complex II substrate in permeabilized cells. Sequential measurements of intact and permeabilized cell respiration should be particularly useful for evaluating indirect mitochondrial toxicity due to drugs or cellular signaling events which cannot be readily studied using isolated mitochondria.

  18. Maintenance, endogeneous, respiration, lysis, decay and predation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    loosdrecht, Marc C. M. Van; Henze, Mogens

    1999-01-01

    mechanism is microbiologically correct. The lysis/decay model mechanism is a strongly simplified representation of reality. This paper tries to review the processes grouped under endogenous respiration in activated sludge models. Mechanisms and processes such as maintenance, lysis, internal and external...... maintenance processes. This conversion will in general be denoted as endogenous respiration. Based on the literature review the phenomena are discussed and organised, in order to create a working platform for discussing more detailed activated sludge models, one of which is being sketched. (C) 1999 IAWQ...

  19. [Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, José E; García-Sánchez, Enrique; García-García, María Inmaculada

    2014-02-01

    The anaerobic bacteria resistance to antibiotics is increasing, and even has appeared against the most active of those, like metronidazol and carbapenems. This fact forces to make and periodical sensibility tests -at least in the most aggressive and virulent species, in cases that they are isolated from life locations and in the absence of therapeutic response- to check the local sensibility and to establish suitable empiric therapies, all based on multicentric studies carried out in order to this or well to check the activity of new antibiotics. For the laboratory routine, the easiest sensibility method is the E-test/MIC evaluator. Another alternative is microdilution, that's only normalized for Bacteroides. There are preliminary facts that allow the use of disc diffusion method in some species of Bacteroides and Clostridium. For the temporal and multicentric studies, the procedure is dilution in agar plate, the reference method. PMID:24630580

  20. Anaerobic digestion of solid material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavilin, V.A.; Lokshina, L.Y.; Flotats, X.;

    2007-01-01

    A new multidimensional (3 and 2D) anaerobic digestion model for cylindrical reactor with non-uniform influent concentration distributions was developed to study the way in which mixing intensity affects the efficiency of continuous-flow anaerobic digestion. Batch experiments reported and simulated...... improve the continuous flow reactor performance at the relatively low influent methanogenic biomass concentration. In the continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) there are two steady states with and without methane production at slightly different values of initial methanogenic biomass concentration....... In the system, the threshold methanogenic biomass concentration existed because of inhibition by high VFA concentration. High methanogenic biomass concentration is required for efficient anaerobic digestion of MSW in order to avoid possible inhibition due to high VFA build-up. Thus, CSTR configuration might...

  1. RISK FACTORS IN NEONATAL ANAEROBIC INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Tabib

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic bacteria are well known causes of sepsis in adults but there are few studies regarding their role in neonatal sepsis. In an attempt to define the incidence of neonatal anaerobic infections a prospective study was performed during one year period. A total number of 400 neonates under sepsis study were entered this investigation. Anaerobic as well as aerobic cultures were sent. The patients were subjected to comparison in two groups: anaerobic culture positive and anaerobic culture negative and this comparison were analyzed statistically. There were 7 neonates with positive anaerobic culture and 35 neonates with positive aerobic culture. A significant statistical relationship was found between anaerobic infections and abdominal distention and pneumonia. It is recommended for those neonates with abdominal distention and pneumonia refractory to antibiotic treatment to be started on antibiotics with anaerobic coverage.

  2. Enhanced biogas yield from energy crops with rumen anaerobic fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prochazka, Jindrich; Zabranska, Jana; Dohanyos, Michal [Department of Water Technology and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Environmental Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Mrazek, Jakub; Strosova, Lenka; Fliegerova, Katerina [Laboratory of Anaerobic Microbiology, Institute of Animal Physiology and Genetics, CAS, v.v.i., Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-06-15

    Anaerobic fungi (AF) are able to degrade crop substrates with higher efficiency than commonly used anaerobic bacteria. The aim of this study was to investigate ways of use of rumen AF to improve biogas production from energy crops under laboratory conditions. In this study, strains of AF isolated from feces or rumen fluid of cows and deer were tested for their ability to integrate into the anaerobic bacterial ecosystem used for biogas production, in order to improve degradation of substrate polysaccharides and consequently the biogas yield. Batch culture, fed batch culture, and semicontinuous experiments have been performed using anaerobic sludge from pig slurry fermentation and different kinds of substrates (celluloses, maize, and grass silage) inoculated by different genera of AF. All experiments showed a positive effect of AF on the biogas yield and quality. AF improved the biogas production by 4-22%, depending on the substrate and AF species used. However, all the cultivation experiments indicated that rumen fungi do not show long-term survival in fermenters with digestate from pig slurry. The best results were achieved during fed batch experiment with fungal culture Anaeromyces (KF8), in which biogas production was enhanced during the whole experimental period of 140 days. This result has not been achieved in semicontinuous experiment, where increment in biogas production in fungal enriched reactor was only 4% after 42 days. (copyright 2012 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Respiration-induced weathering patterns of two endolithically growing lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bettina; Scherr, Claudia; Bicker, Fritz; Friedl, Thomas; Büdel, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    The two endolithic lichen species Hymenelia prevostii and Hymenelia coerulea were investigated with regard to their thallus morphology and their effects on the surrounding substrate. The physiological processes responsible for the observed alterations of the rock were identified. Whereas the thallus surface of H. coerulea was level, H. prevostii formed small depressions that were deepest in the thallus center. In a cross-section, both species revealed an algal zone consisting of algal cavities parallel to the substrate surface and a fungal zone below. However, H. prevostii revealed significantly larger cavities with more than twice the cell number and a denser pattern of cavities than H. coerulea, resulting in a biomass per surface area being more than twice as large. Below H. prevostii the layer of macroscopically visibly altered rock material was about twice as deep and within this layer, the depletion of calcium and manganese was considerably higher. In simultaneous measurements of the oxygen uptake/oxygen release and pH shift, the isolated algal strains of both lichens revealed respiration-induced acidification of the medium in the dark. At higher light intensities, H. coerulea and to a lesser extent also H. prevostii alkalized the medium which may lessen the acidification effect somewhat under natural conditions. In a long-term growth experiment, the isolated algal strains of both lichens revealed acidification of the medium to a similar extent. Neither acidic lichen substances nor oxalic acid was identified. The significant differences between the weathering patterns of both species are based on the same respiration-induced acidification mechanism, with H. prevostii having a greater effect due to its higher biomass per area. PMID:20735487

  4. 78 FR 18535 - Respirator Certification Fees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 84 RIN 0920-AA42 Respirator Certification Fees AGENCY: Centers for Disease... and Human Services (HHS) proposes to revise the fee structure currently used by the National Institute... number). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This proposed rule is designed to establish fees for the...

  5. Microbial iron respiration: impacts on corrosion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A K; Newman, D K

    2003-08-01

    In this review, we focus on how biofilms comprising iron-respiring bacteria influence steel corrosion. Specifically, we discuss how biofilm growth can affect the chemistry of the environment around the steel at different stages of biofilm development, under static or dynamic fluid regimes. We suggest that a mechanistic understanding of the role of biofilm metabolic activity may facilitate corrosion control. PMID:12734693

  6. Respirators, internal dose, and Oyster Creek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article looks at the experience of Oyster Creek in relaxing the requirements for the use of respirators in all facets of plant maintenance, on the overall dose received by plant maintenance personnel. For Roger Shaw, director of radiological controls for three years at GPU Nuclear Corporation's Oyster Creek nuclear plant the correct dose balance is determined on a job-by-job basis: Does the job require a respirator, which is an effective means of decreasing worker inhalation of airborne radioactive particles? Will wearing a respirator slow down a worker, consequently increasing whole body radiation exposure by prolonging the time spent in fields of high external radiation? How does respiratory protection affect worker safety and to what degree? While changes to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's 10CFR20 have updated the radiation protection requirements for the nuclear industry, certain of the revisions have been directed specifically at reducing worker dose, Shaw said. open-quotes It basically delineates that dose is dose,close quotes Shaw said, open-quotes regardless of whether it is acquired externally or internally.close quotes The revision of Part 20 changed the industry's attitude toward internal dose, which had always been viewed negatively. open-quotes Internal dose was always seen as preventable by wearing respirators and by using engineering techniques such as ventilation control and decontamination,close quotes Shaw said, open-quotes whereas external dose, although reduced where practical, was seen as a fact of the job.close quotes

  7. 42 CFR 84.1130 - Respirators; description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirators; description. 84.1130 Section 84.1130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND... respective vapors, or from the chemical reaction between their respective vapors and gases. (3)...

  8. Anaerobic Digestion of Piggery Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Velsen, van, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological process by which organic matter is converted to methane and carbon dioxide by microbes in the absence of air (oxygen). In nature, anaerobic conversions occur at all places where organic material accumulates and the supply of oxygen is deficient, e.g. in marshes and lake sediments. Microbial formation of methane also plays a role in the ruminant digestion.In digestion units, the external conditions acting upon the process can be regulated to speed it up as c...

  9. Research in anti- anaerobe mechanism of nanometer materials%纳米材料抗厌氧菌机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊德鑫; 梁明

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the antimicrobial spectrum of nanometer materials to 33 strains of ordinary anaerobic pathogenic bacteria isolated from 11 genera. METHODS:The anti anaerobic effects of nanometer materials were examined and measured by test tube dilution method.RESULTS:In most tubes, there were no bacteria growth in nanometer suspension.CONCLUSION: there is a wide antimicrobial spectrum of nanometer materials and it can effectively inhibit the growth of the anaerobic bacteria.

  10. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors for municipal wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Fawehinmi, Folasade

    2006-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment has historically been considered unsuitable for the treatment of domestic wastewaters. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the incorporation of membranes into the anaerobic bioreactor to uncouple solid retention time and hydraulic retention time. This in turn prevents biomass washout and allows sufficient acclimatisation periods for anaerobes. However, the exposure of membranes to anaerobic biomass comes with its own inherent problems namely fouling. Fouling w...

  11. Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria have lagged behind similar studies in aerobes. However, the current interest in biotechnology, the involvement of anaerobes in disease and the emergence of antibioticresistant strains have focused attention on the genetics of anaerobes. This article reviews molecular genetic studies in Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and methanogens. Certain genetic systems in some anaerobes differ from those in aerobes and illustrate the genetic diversity among bacteria

  12. Toward a general evaluation model for soil respiration (GEMSR)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Soil respiration is an important component of terrestrial carbon budget. Its accurate evaluation is es- sential to the study of terrestrial carbon source/sink. Studies on soil respiration at present mostly focus on the temporal variations and the controlling factors of soil respiration, but its spatial variations and controlling factors draw less attention. Moreover, the evaluation models for soil respiration at present include only the effects of water and heat factors, while the biological and soil factors controlling soil respiration and their interactions with water and heat factors have not been considered yet. These models are not able to accurately evaluate soil respiration in different vegetation/terrestrial ecosystems at different temporal and spatial scales. Thus, a general evaluation model for soil respiration (GEMSR) including the interacting meteorological (water and heat factors), soil nutrient and biological factors is suggested in this paper, and the basic procedure developing GEMSR and the research tasks of soil respiration in the future are also discussed.

  13. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, I C; Levine, J S

    1986-05-01

    Biogenic emissions of nitric and nitrous oxides have important impacts on the photochemistry and chemistry of the atmosphere. Although biogenic production appears to be the overwhelming source of N(2)O, the magnitude of the biogenic emission of NO is very uncertain. In soils, possible sources of NO and N(2)O include nitrification by autotrophic and heterotrophic nitrifiers, denitrification by nitrifiers and denitrifiers, nitrate respiration by fermenters, and chemodenitrification. The availability of oxygen determines to a large extent the relative activities of these various groups of organisms. To better understand this influence, we investigated the effect of the partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2)) on the production of NO and N(2)O by a wide variety of common soil nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The production of NO per cell was highest by autotrophic nitrifiers and was independent of pO(2) in the range tested (0.5 to 10%), whereas N(2)O production was inversely proportional to pO(2). Nitrous oxide production was highest in the denitrifier Pseudomonas fluorescens, but only under anaerobic conditions. The molar ratio of NO/N(2)O produced was usually greater than unity for nitrifiers and much less than unity for denitrifiers. Chemodenitrification was the major source of both the NO and N(2)O produced by the nitrate respirer Serratia marcescens. Chemodenitrification was also a possible source of NO and N(2)O in nitrifier cultures but only when high concentrations of nitrite had accumulated or were added to the medium. Although most of the denitrifiers produced NO and N(2)O only under anaerobic conditions, chemostat cultures of Alcaligenes faecalis continued to emit these gases even when the cultures were sparged with air. Based upon these results, we predict that aerobic soils are primary sources of NO and that N(2)O is produced only when there is sufficient soil moisture to provide the anaerobic microsites

  14. Factors Controlling Respiration Rates and Respired Carbon Dioxide Signatures in Riverine Ecosystems of the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, E. E.; Richey, J. E.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Quay, P. D.; Krusche, A. V.; Alin, S. R.

    2006-12-01

    This study examined the processes controlling respiration rates observed in streams and rivers throughout the Amazon basin during the dry season by substituting spatial coverage for experimental manipulation. Throughout the Brazilian states of Amazonas and Acre, respiration rates ranged from 0.066 to 1.45 μM/hr of O2 consumed. In situ respiration was positively correlated with pH (r2=0.60), with pH values ranging from 3.95 to 8.57. Although the concentration of bulk size fractions of organic matter(dissolved organic carbon (DOC), fine particulate organic carbon, and coarse particulate organic carbon) were uncorrelated with both pH and respiration, respiration was positively correlated with the percentage of DOC that was less than 5 kDa as determined by centrifuge ultrafiltration (r2=0.52). No correlation was observed for the less than 100 kDa fraction. Further, pH was also correlated with the percentage of DOC in the <5 kDa fraction (r2=0.86), as the <5 kDa fraction increased from 34% in acidic blackwater streams to 91% in more basic whitewater rivers. These results suggest that low molecular weight organic matter (LMWOM, <5 kDa) is labile and supports higher respiration rates as compared to high molecular weight organic matter, and that pH may control the size distribution of dissolved organic matter. Further, at high pH sites with high respiration rates, net primary production ranged from 3.54 to 13.5 μM/hr of O2 produced. These rates suggest that higher pH sites are dominated by in situ production, resulting in high yields of LMWOM, which is rapidly consumed during the dry season. The 13C of respired CO2 was monitored during bottle incubations to characterize the source of organic matter being respired. Values ranged from -15.2 to -27.0‰, similar to the 13C of DIC at each site, indicating that respiration is a key process controlling the δ13C of the DIC. Furthermore, there is a positive correlation between the δ13C of respired CO2 and respiration rate (r2

  15. Viscosity evolution of anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pevere, A.; Guibaud, G.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.; Baudu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the apparent viscosity at steady shear rate of sieved anaerobic granular sludge (20¿315 ¿m diameter) sampled from different full-scale anaerobic reactors was recorded using rotation tests. The ¿limit viscosity¿ of sieved anaerobic granular sludge was determined from the apparent vis

  16. Kinetics and modeling of anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion modeling started in the early 1970s when the need for design and efficient operation of anaerobic systems became evident. At that time not only was the knowledge about the complex process of anaerobic digestion inadequate but also there were computational limitations. Thus...

  17. Respiration hastens maturation and lowers yield in rice

    OpenAIRE

    Sitaramam, V.; Bhate, R.; Kamalraj, P.; Pachapurkar, S.

    2008-01-01

    Role of respiration in plant growth remains an enigma. Growth of meristematic cells, which are not photosynthetic, is entirely driven by endogenous respiration. Does respiration determine growth and size or does it merely burn off the carbon depleting the biomass? We show here that respiration of the germinating rice seed, which is contributed largely by the meristematic cells of the embryo, quantitatively correlates with the dynamics of much of plant growth, starting with the time for germin...

  18. [Stem respiration of Pinus koraiensis in Changbai Mountains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miao; Ji, Lanzhu; Li, Qiurong; Xiao, Dongmei; Liu, Hailiang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, soil respiration chamber, a simple and precise method, was used to measure the stem respiration of trees. LI-6400-09 respiration chamber serving as a system is usually used in soil respiration, but we made polyvinyl chloride (PVC) collar and fixed it on the stem surface to measure the stem respiration. From May to October 2003, the stem respiration of Pinus koraiensis, the dominant tree species in Changbai Mountain, was measured in different time and different places using this technique. Meanwhile, the temperatures in the stems and in the forests were measured. The results showed that the stem respiration rate had a remarkably seasonal tendency with a single peak, the maximum was in August and the minimum was in February. The stem respiration rate had an exponential relationship with stem temperature, and the curve exponential regressions for stem respiration rate and temperature factor of trees with big DBH were better than those with small DBH. The stem respiration in different DBH trees was higher in the south stem face than that in the north stem face, and the variance of respiration rate between south and north decreased with a decrease of DBH trees. During the growing season from May to October, the average maintenance respiration accounted for 63.63% in different DBH trees, and the maintenance respiration contribution to total respiratory consumption increased with increasing DBH, which was 66.76, 73.29% and 50.84%, respectively. The stem respiration Q10 values ranged from 2.56-3.32 in different DBH of trees, and the seasonal tendency for stem R, and Rm in different DBH of trees was obtained by using respiration Q10. Therefore, the differences between different parts of stem and different DBH of trees should be considered in estimating the respiration model in ecosystem. PMID:15852948

  19. Acceptable respiratory protection program and LASL respirator research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short history is presented on the LASL Respiratory Protection Training Programs. Then a discussion is given on the major points of an acceptable respiratory protection program utilizing the points required by the Occupational, Safety, and Health Administration (OSHA) Regulation 29 CFR 1910.134. Contributions to respirator research are reviewed. Discussion is presented under the following section headings: program administration; respirator selection; respirator use; fitting and training; respirator maintenance; medical clearance and surveillance; special problems; program evaluation; and documentation

  20. Lack of activity of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim against anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, J E; Stewart, P R

    1974-07-01

    The activity of sulfamethoxazole (SMX), trimethoprim (TMP), and the combination of the two was determined against a variety of anaerobic bacteria. Brucella agar was somewhat inhibitory for SMX and TMP but activity was good and equivalent in Diagnostic Sensitivity Test Agar (Oxoid) and Mueller-Hinton agar and the latter was selected for use in these studies. Agar dilution susceptibility tests showed that 95 of 98 anaerobic isolates were resistant to >/=100 mug of SMX per ml and 85 were resistant to >/=6.25 mug of TMP per ml. "Checkerboard" agar dilution studies of combined activity showed that 66 of 72 isolates were resistant to >/= (100 mug of SMX per ml + 6.25 mug of TMP per ml) and only six isolates were susceptible to the synergistic activity of the combination. The majority of 32 isolates tested by the disk diffusion method were also resistant to SMX and TMP individually and to the combination 25-mug disk. Correlation between agar dilution minimal inhibitory concentration and disk zone size results was in general good for individual agents. Four Bacteroides fragilis isolates were inhibited by the combination 25-mug disk but were resistant to SMX + TMP by agar dilution "checkerboard." This discrepancy may have been due to different incubation periods since disk results also showed resistance when read after 48 h (as is done with agar dilution) rather than the standard 24 h for disk tests. These studies suggest that SMX and TMP, either individually or in combination, are not active against the great majority of anaerobic bacteria. PMID:15828176

  1. Purification and Characterization of (Per)Chlorate Reductase from the Chlorate-Respiring Strain GR-1

    OpenAIRE

    Kengen, Servé W. M.; Rikken, Geoffrey B.; Hagen, Wilfred R.; van Ginkel, Cees G.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    1999-01-01

    Strain GR-1 is one of several recently isolated bacterial species that are able to respire by using chlorate or perchlorate as the terminal electron acceptor. The organism performs a complete reduction of chlorate or perchlorate to chloride and oxygen, with the intermediate formation of chlorite. This study describes the purification and characterization of the key enzyme of the reductive pathway, the chlorate and perchlorate reductase. A single enzyme was found to catalyze both the chlorate-...

  2. Fatty acid nitroalkenes induce resistance to ischemic cardiac injury by modulating mitochondrial respiration at complex II

    OpenAIRE

    Koenitzer, Jeffrey R; Gustavo Bonacci; Woodcock, Steven R.; Chen-Shan Chen; Nadiezhda Cantu-Medellin; Kelley, Eric E.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA) are metabolic and inflammatory-derived electrophiles that mediate pleiotropic signaling actions. It was hypothesized that NO2-FA would impact mitochondrial redox reactions to induce tissue-protective metabolic shifts in cells. Nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) reversibly inhibited complex II-linked respiration in isolated rat heart mitochondria in a pH-dependent manner and suppressed superoxide formation. Nitroalkylation of Fp subunit was determined by BME capture and the s...

  3. Age-Dependent Reductions in Mitochondrial Respiration are Exacerbated by Calcium in the Female Rat Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, J. Craig; Machikas, Alexandra M.; Korzick, Donna H.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease mortality increases rapidly following menopause by poorly defined mechanisms. Since mitochondrial function and Ca2+ sensitivity are important regulators of cell death following myocardial ischemia, we sought to determine if aging and/or estrogen deficiency (ovx) increased mitochondrial Ca2+ sensitivity. Mitochondrial respiration was measured in ventricular mitochondria isolated from adult (6mo; n=26) and aged (24mo; n=25), intact or ovariectomized female rats using the ...

  4. 20 CFR 718.303 - Death from a respirable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Death from a respirable disease. 718.303... from a respirable disease. (a)(1) If a deceased miner was employed for ten or more years in one or more coal mines and died from a respirable disease, there shall be a rebuttable presumption that his or...

  5. 20 CFR 410.462 - Presumption relating to respirable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Presumption relating to respirable disease... Pneumoconiosis § 410.462 Presumption relating to respirable disease. (a) Even though the existence of... was employed for 10 years or more in the Nation's coal mines and died from a respirable disease,...

  6. 21 CFR 892.1970 - Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. 892.1970... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1970 Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. (a) Identification. A radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer is a device intended to be used...

  7. 30 CFR 70.300 - Respiratory equipment; respirable dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Respiratory equipment; respirable dust. Respiratory equipment approved by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84 shall be made available to all persons whenever exposed to concentrations of respirable dust in excess of the... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respiratory equipment; respirable dust....

  8. 42 CFR 84.1134 - Respirator containers; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Respirator containers; minimum requirements. 84... Combination Gas Masks § 84.1134 Respirator containers; minimum requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section each respirator shall be equipped with a substantial, durable...

  9. 42 CFR 84.1156 - Pesticide respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pesticide respirators; performance requirements... DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1156 Pesticide respirators; performance requirements;...

  10. The role of alternative cyanide-insensitive respiration in plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raskin, Ilya

    1997-09-29

    This DOE funded research concentrated on the investigation of the role of respiration and oxidative stress in plant biology. Initially the authors concentrated on the possible role of cyanide-insensitive respiration in counteracting the deleterious effects of chilling stress. Although plants are considered to be poikilotherms, there are a few examples of thermogenesis, in which the tissue temperature increases well above ambient. They suggested that differences between thermogenic and non-thermogenic plants may be quantitative rather than qualitative, and that heat from increased respiration may have a local protective effect on the mitochondria, slowing or reducing the effects of chilling. They proposed that this is accomplished by a large increase in respiration, predominantly via the alternative pathway. They measured the increases in respiration, particularly via the alternative pathway, in response to chilling. They have also quantified the associated increases in heat evolution in response to chilling in a number of plant species using a microcalorimeter. For example, after 8 h exposure to 8 C, heat evolution in chilling-sensitive species increased 47--98%, compared to 7--22% for the chilling-resistant species. No increase in heat evolution was observed in the extremely chilling-sensitive ornamental Episcka cupreata (Hook). Increases in heat evolution were observed when plants were chilled in constant light or in the dark, but not when plants were chilled at high humidity. Heat evolution by mitochondria isolated from potato tuber slices were also measured. These values, together with measurements of the heat capacity of isolated mitochondria and counting of the mitochondria by flow cytometry, allow calculation of theoretical maximal rates of heating and the heat produced per mitochondrion. The obtained data was consistent with the protective role of respiratory heat production in cold-stressed plants.

  11. Oxygen Effects in Anaerobic Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshai Botheju

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of free oxygen in bio-gasification is a sparsely studied area, apart from the common argument of oxygen being toxic and inhibitory for anaerobic micro-cultures. Some studies have, however, revealed increased solubilisation of organic matter in the presence of some free oxygen in anaerobic digestion. This article analyses these counterbalancing phenomena with a mathematical modelling approach using the widely accepted biochemical model ADM 1. Aerobic oxidation of soluble carbon and inhibition of obligatory anaerobic organisms are modelled using standard saturation type kinetics. Biomass dependent first order hydrolysis kinetics is used to relate the increased hydrolysis rate with oxygen induced increase in biomass growth. The amended model, ADM 1-Ox (oxygen, has 25 state variables and 22 biochemical processes, presented in matrix form. The computer aided simulation tool AQUASIM 2.1 is used to simulate the developed model. Simulation predictions are evaluated against experimental data obtained using a laboratory batch test array comprising miniature anaerobic bio-reactors of 100 ml total volume each, operated under different initial air headspaces giving rise to the different oxygen loading conditions. The reactors were initially fed with a glucose solution and incubated at 35 Celsius, for 563 hours. Under the oxygen load conditions of 22, 44 and 88 mg/L, the ADM1-Ox model simulations predicted the experimental methane potentials quite adequately. Both the experimental data and the simulations suggest a linear reduction of methane potential with respect to the increase in oxygen load within this range.

  12. Anaerobic Treatment of Methanolic Wastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettinga, G.; Geest, van der A.Th.; Hobma, S.W.; Laan, van der J.B.R.

    1979-01-01

    Although it is well known that methanol can be fermented directly by a specific species of methane bacteria, viz. Methanosarcina barkeri, until now little information was available about the effect of important environmental factors on the anaerobic fermentation of methanol. As methanol can be the m

  13. Rhizobial and bradyrhizobial symbionts of mesquite from the Sonoran Desert: Salt tolerance, facultative halophily, and nitrate respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizobial symbionts from surface and phreatic absorbing root environments of a mature mesquite woodland in the Sonoran Desert of Southern California were tested for their ability to tolerate high salinity, and respire nitrate as mechanisms of free-living survival. Isolates were grown in yeast-extra...

  14. Anaerobic microbial dehalogenation of organohalides-state of the art and remediation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijenhuis, Ivonne; Kuntze, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    Contamination and remediation of groundwater with halogenated organics and understanding of involved microbial reactions still poses a challenge. Over the last years, research in anaerobic microbial dehalogenation has advanced in many aspects providing information about the reaction, physiology of microorganisms as well as approaches to investigate the activity of microorganisms in situ. Recently published crystal structures of reductive dehalogenases (Rdh), heterologous expression systems and advanced analytical, proteomic and stable isotope approaches allow addressing the overall reaction and specific enzymes as well as co-factors involved during anaerobic microbial dehalogenation. In addition to Dehalococcoides spp., Dehalobacter and Dehalogenimonas strains have been recognized as important and versatile organohalide respirers. Together, these provide perspectives for integrated concepts allowing to improve and monitor in situ biodegradation. PMID:26773757

  15. In vitro activity of pipecolic acid amide of clindamycin (U-57930E) on anaerobic bacteria compared with those of clindamycin, cefoxitin, and chloramphenicol.

    OpenAIRE

    Dhawan, V K; Bansal, M B; Thadepalli, H

    1982-01-01

    In vitro activity of pipecolic acid amide of clindamycin (U-57930E) against 265 isolates of anaerobic bacteria, including 66 strains of Bacteroides fragilis, was compared with those of clindamycin, chloramphenicol, and cefoxitin. At therapeutically achievable concentrations, the activities of all four antibiotics against anaerobic bacteria were similar.

  16. Detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections by fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odontogenic infections are a potential risk for patients who receive cervicofacial radiotherapy and should be treated before irradiation. Anaerobic microbial infections are the most common causes. This study assessed the value of the hypoxic imaging agent fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) in detecting anaerobic odontogenic infections. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed at 2 h after injection of 370 MBq (10 mCi) of FMISO in 26 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients and six controls with healthy teeth. Tomograms were interpreted visually to identify hypoxic foci in the jaw. All patients received thorough dental examinations as a pre-radiotherapy work-up. Fifty-one sites of periodonititis, 15 periodontal abscesses, 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, 23 sites of dental caries without root canal infection, and seven necrotic pulps were found by dental examination. Anaerobic pathogens were isolated from 12 patients. Increased uptake of FMISO was found at 45 out of 51 sites of periodontitis, all 15 sites of periodontal abscess, all 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, all seven sites of necrotic pulp and 15 sites of dental carries without obvious evidence of active root canal infection. No abnormal uptake was seen in the healthy teeth of patients or in the six controls. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of FMISO PET scan in detecting odontogenic infections were 93%, 97%, 84%, 99% and 96%, respectively. 18F-fluoride ion bone scan done in three patients showed that 18F-fluoride ion plays no role in the demonstration of anaerobic odontogenic infection. FMISO PET scan is a sensitive method for the detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections, and may play a complementary role in the evaluation of the dental condition of patients with head and neck tumours prior to radiation therapy. (orig.)

  17. Detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections by fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Renshyan [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chu Leeshing [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan); Yen Sanhui [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan); Chang Chenpei [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chou Kuoliang [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Wu Liangchi [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Chang Chiwei [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Lui Muntain [Dept. of Dentistry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China); Chen Kuangy [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan); Yeh Shinhwa [National PET/Cyclotron Center and Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, National Yang-Ming Univ. Medical School, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-10-01

    Odontogenic infections are a potential risk for patients who receive cervicofacial radiotherapy and should be treated before irradiation. Anaerobic microbial infections are the most common causes. This study assessed the value of the hypoxic imaging agent fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) in detecting anaerobic odontogenic infections. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was performed at 2 h after injection of 370 MBq (10 mCi) of FMISO in 26 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients and six controls with healthy teeth. Tomograms were interpreted visually to identify hypoxic foci in the jaw. All patients received thorough dental examinations as a pre-radiotherapy work-up. Fifty-one sites of periodonititis, 15 periodontal abscesses, 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, 23 sites of dental caries without root canal infection, and seven necrotic pulps were found by dental examination. Anaerobic pathogens were isolated from 12 patients. Increased uptake of FMISO was found at 45 out of 51 sites of periodontitis, all 15 sites of periodontal abscess, all 14 sites of dental caries with root canal infection, all seven sites of necrotic pulp and 15 sites of dental carries without obvious evidence of active root canal infection. No abnormal uptake was seen in the healthy teeth of patients or in the six controls. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of FMISO PET scan in detecting odontogenic infections were 93%, 97%, 84%, 99% and 96%, respectively. {sup 18}F-fluoride ion bone scan done in three patients showed that {sup 18}F-fluoride ion plays no role in the demonstration of anaerobic odontogenic infection. FMISO PET scan is a sensitive method for the detection of anaerobic odontogenic infections, and may play a complementary role in the evaluation of the dental condition of patients with head and neck tumours prior to radiation therapy. (orig.)

  18. Anaerobic Mineralization of Toluene by Enriched Sediments with Quinones and Humus as Terminal Electron Acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Francisco J.; Dijksma, Wouter; Duong-Dac, Tuan; Ivanova, Anna; Lettinga, Gatze; Field, Jim A.

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic microbial oxidation of toluene to CO2 coupled to humus respiration was demonstrated by use of enriched anaerobic sediments from the Amsterdam petroleum harbor (APH) and the Rhine River. Both highly purified soil humic acids (HPSHA) and the humic quinone moiety model compound anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) were utilized as terminal electron acceptors. After 2 weeks of incubation, 50 and 85% of added uniformly labeled [13C]toluene were recovered as 13CO2 in HPSHA- and AQDS-supplemented APH sediment enrichment cultures, respectively; negligible recovery occurred in unsupplemented cultures. The conversion of [13C]toluene agreed with the high level of recovery of electrons as reduced humus or as anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate. APH sediment was also able to use nitrate and amorphous manganese dioxide as terminal electron acceptors to support the anaerobic biodegradation of toluene. The addition of substoichiometric amounts of humic acids to bioassay reaction mixtures containing amorphous ferric oxyhydroxide as a terminal electron acceptor led to more than 65% conversion of toluene (1 mM) after 11 weeks of incubation, a result which paralleled the partial recovery of electron equivalents as acid-extractable Fe(II). Negligible conversion of toluene and reduction of Fe(III) occurred in these bioassay reaction mixtures when humic acids were omitted. The present study provides clear quantitative evidence for the mineralization of an aromatic hydrocarbon by humus-respiring microorganisms. The results indicate that humic substances may significantly contribute to the intrinsic bioremediation of anaerobic sites contaminated with priority pollutants by serving as terminal electron acceptors. PMID:11571145

  19. Paper-Based Electrical Respiration Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güder, Firat; Ainla, Alar; Redston, Julia; Mosadegh, Bobak; Glavan, Ana; Martin, T J; Whitesides, George M

    2016-05-01

    Current methods of monitoring breathing require cumbersome, inconvenient, and often expensive devices; this requirement sets practical limitations on the frequency and duration of measurements. This article describes a paper-based moisture sensor that uses the hygroscopic character of paper (i.e. the ability of paper to adsorb water reversibly from the surrounding environment) to measure patterns and rate of respiration by converting the changes in humidity caused by cycles of inhalation and exhalation to electrical signals. The changing level of humidity that occurs in a cycle causes a corresponding change in the ionic conductivity of the sensor, which can be measured electrically. By combining the paper sensor with conventional electronics, data concerning respiration can be transmitted to a nearby smartphone or tablet computer for post-processing, and subsequently to a cloud server. This means of sensing provides a new, practical method of recording and analyzing patterns of breathing. PMID:27059088

  20. A MEMS turbine prototype for respiration harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goreke, U.; Habibiabad, S.; Azgin, K.; Beyaz, M. I.

    2015-12-01

    The design, manufacturing, and performance characterization of a MEMS-scale turbine prototype is reported. The turbine is designed for integration into a respiration harvester that can convert normal human breathing into electrical power through electromagnetic induction. The device measures 10 mm in radius, and employs 12 blades located around the turbine periphery along with ball bearings around the center. Finite element simulations showed that an average torque of 3.07 μNm is induced at 12 lpm airflow rate, which lies in normal breathing levels. The turbine and a test package were manufactured using CNC milling on PMMA. Tests were performed at respiration flow rates between 5-25 lpm. The highest rotational speed was measured to be 9.84 krpm at 25 lpm, resulting in 8.96 mbar pressure drop across the device and 370 mW actuation power.

  1. Nrf2 impacts cellular bioenergetics by controlling substrate availability for mitochondrial respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira M. Holmström

    2013-06-01

    Transcription factor Nrf2 and its repressor Keap1 regulate a network of cytoprotective genes involving more than 1% of the genome, their best known targets being drug-metabolizing and antioxidant genes. Here we demonstrate a novel role for this pathway in directly regulating mitochondrial bioenergetics in murine neurons and embryonic fibroblasts. Loss of Nrf2 leads to mitochondrial depolarisation, decreased ATP levels and impaired respiration, whereas genetic activation of Nrf2 increases the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels, the rate of respiration and the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation. We further show that Nrf2-deficient cells have increased production of ATP in glycolysis, which is then used by the F1Fo-ATPase for maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential. While the levels and in vitro activities of the respiratory complexes are unaffected by Nrf2 deletion, their activities in isolated mitochondria and intact live cells are substantially impaired. In addition, the rate of regeneration of NADH after inhibition of respiration is much slower in Nrf2-knockout cells than in their wild-type counterparts. Taken together, these results show that Nrf2 directly regulates cellular energy metabolism through modulating the availability of substrates for mitochondrial respiration. Our findings highlight the importance of efficient energy metabolism in Nrf2-mediated cytoprotection.

  2. Impact of human activities on soil respiration:A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Soil respiration is one of the primary fluxes of carbon between soils and the atmosphere.It is produced by rhizosphere respiration and soil microbial respiration.Soil respiration is not only affected by environmental factors,but also changes with the hu-man-induced disturbances of ecosystems.Land-use,the measures of land management,the pollution of soil,and so on can affect soil respiration and change the soil efflux.According to some research,the authors summed up their impacts on soil respiration by human activities through land-use changes and land-management measures among agroecosystem,grassland ecosystem,and for-est ecosystem.The results showed that (1) when adding fertilization to farmland,the soil respiration will increase;(2) fenced land can decrease soil respiration,while soil respiration in the grazed land at a grassland ecosystem will decline with the increasing of grazing intensity;(3) with grassland fertilization;farmland cultivation;fire,fertilization,and cutting of forest,conflicting results were found in the changes of soil respiration.Perhaps plant species,site condition,and measurement season can lead to different results on soil respiration.

  3. DIFFUSION IN BIOFILMS RESPIRING ON ELECTRODES

    OpenAIRE

    Renslow, RS; Babauta, JT; Majors, PD; Beyenal, H

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed noninvasive, nondestr...

  4. Electron transport in microbial chlorate respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Smedja Bäcklund, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Several bacterial species are capable to use perchlorate and/or chlorate as an alternative electron acceptor in absence of oxygen. Microbial respiration of oxochlorates is important for biotreatment of effluent from industries where oxochlorates are produced or handled. One of these species, the Gram-negative Ideonella dechloratans, is able to reduce chlorate but not perchlorate. Two soluble enzymes, chlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase, participate in the conversion of chlorate into chl...

  5. Prevalence of Anaerobic and Aerobic Bacteria in Early Onset Neonatal Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Nili

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: To determine prospectively the prevalence of anaerobic and aerobic infection in early onset (during 72 hours of age neonatal sepsis, in Tehran Vali-e-Asr Hospital."nMethods: Among all the live birth, neonates suspecting of having septicemia were investigated for isolation of micro­organisms. Culture bottle containing enriched tryptic soy broth was used for standard blood culture system to detect aerobes and an ANAEROBIC/F bottle was inoculated using BACTEC 9120 continuous monitoring blood culture system to deter­mine the growth of anaerobic bacteria. Among 1724 live births, 402 consecutive neonates suspecting of having septicemia were investigated for isolation of micro organism."nResults: A total of 27 episodes of early onset neonatal sepsis occurred with an incidence of 15.66 (11.6 aerobe + 4.0 anaer­obe per 1000 live births. Aerobic bacteria were the major etiological agents, accounting for 20 cases. 7 (26% cases had posi­tive blood cultures with anaerobic bacteria. Propionibacterium and Peptostreptococccus (amongst anaerobic and coagu­lase-negative staphylococci and staphylococcus aureus (amongst aerobic were the most commonly isolated organisms. Compari­son of clinical findings and demographic characteristics between aerobic and anaerobic infection did not have a signifi­cant statistical difference."nConclusion: Our impression is that while anaerobic bacteremia in the newborn infants can occasionally cause severe morbid­ity and mortality, majority of cases experience a self limited illness with transient bacteremia.

  6. Effect of incubation conditions on anaerobic susceptibility testing results.

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, P R; Niles, A C

    1982-01-01

    We determined the effect of performing antimicrobial susceptibility tests in five different anaerobic incubation systems: GasPak jar, large GasPak jar, evacuated-gassed anaerobic jar, anaerobic chamber, and Bio-Bag. Growth of the anaerobes was equivalent in all five incubation systems. The results of testing 38 anaerobes against 11 antimicrobial agents were comparable for the anaerobic jars and anaerobic chamber. However, discordant results were observed for metronidazole and cefamandole test...

  7. How Ecosystems Breathe: Measuring Respiration of Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTammany, M. E.

    2005-05-01

    Curriculum for general ecology labs often uses in-lab exercises and computer simulations to demonstrate ecological principles rather than experimental field projects. In addition, ecosystem processes can be difficult to incorporate into general ecology labs because the techniques require sophisticated equipment or complex field designs. As an alternative to in-lab projects, I have integrated field measurement of soil respiration into my general ecology lab to teach students aspects of experimental design (sampling, replication, error, etc.) and to demonstrate how organism-level processes operate beyond single organisms in nature and are influenced by environmental conditions. In a program laden with biomedical interests, analogies between organisms and ecosystems are quite appealing to students. Students in my general ecology course complete a 2-week field project in which they measure soil respiration inside a dark microcosm chamber. We use 10% KOH to trap evolved CO2 and titrate unreacted KOH in lab using 1N HCl. The protocol is simple, only requires some chemicals, and can be used in many different habitats (including flower beds on campus) quite easily. Potential experiments could involve varying environmental conditions, such as soil moisture, nutrient availability, gaseous environment, carbon supply, or temperature, to affect soil respiration rate.

  8. Diffusion in biofilms respiring on electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renslow, Ryan S. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Babauta, Jerome T. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Majors, Paul D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Beyenal, Haluk [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2012-11-15

    The goal of this study was to measure spatially and temporally resolved effective diffusion coefficients (De) in biofilms respiring on electrodes. Two model electrochemically active biofilms, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, were investigated. A novel nuclear magnetic resonance microimaging perfusion probe capable of simultaneous electrochemical and pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) techniques was used. PFG-NMR allowed for noninvasive, nondestructive, high spatial resolution in situ De measurements in living biofilms respiring on electrodes. The electrodes were polarized so that they would act as the sole terminal electron acceptor for microbial metabolism. We present our results as both two-dimensional De heat maps and surface-averaged relative effective diffusion coefficient (Drs) depth profiles. We found that (1) Drs decreases with depth in G. sulfurreducens biofilms, following a sigmoid shape; (2) Drs at a given location decreases with G. sulfurreducens biofilm age; (3) average De and Drs profiles in G. sulfurreducens biofilms are lower than those in S. oneidensis biofilms—the G. sulfurreducens biofilms studied here were on average 10 times denser than the S. oneidensis biofilms; and (4) halting the respiration of a G. sulfurreducens biofilm decreases the De values. Density, reflected by De, plays a major role in the extracellular electron transfer strategies of electrochemically active biofilms.

  9. Continuous respirable mine dust monitor development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, B.K.; Williams, K.L.; Stein, S.W. [and others

    1996-12-31

    In June 1992, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) published the Report of the Coal Mine Respirable Dust Task Group, Review of the Program to Control Respirable Coal Mine Dust in the United States. As one of its recommendations, the report called for the accelerated development of two mine dust monitors: (1) a fixed-site monitor capable of providing continuous information on dust levels to the miner, mine operator, and to MSHA, if necessary, and (2) a personal sampling device capable of providing both a short-term personal exposure measurement as well as a full-shift measurement. In response to this recommendation, the U.S. Bureau of Mines initiated the development of a fixed-site machine-mounted continuous respirable dust monitor. The technology chosen for monitor development is the Rupprecht and Patashnick Co., Inc. tapered element oscillating microbalance. Laboratory and in-mine tests have indicated that, with modification, this sensor can meet the humidity and vibration requirements for underground coal mine use. The U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Research Center (DOE-PRC) is continuing that effort by developing prototypes of a continuous dust monitor based on this technology. These prototypes are being evaluated in underground coal mines as they become available. This effort, conducted as a joint venture with MSHA, is nearing completion with every promise of success.

  10. Fermentation products and plant cell wall-degrading enzymes produced by monocentric and polycentric anaerobic ruminal fungi.

    OpenAIRE

    Borneman, W. S.; Akin, D. E.; Ljungdahl, L G

    1989-01-01

    Five anaerobic fungal isolates from the bovine rumen were grown on Coastal Bermuda grass (CBG) leaf blades and monitored over a 9-day period for substrate utilization, fermentation products, cellulase, and xylanase activities. Two of the fungal isolates showed monocentric growth patterns; one (isolate MC-1) had monoflagellated zoospores and morphologically resembled members of the genus Piromyces; the other (isolate MC-2) had multiflagellated zoospores and resembled members of the genus Neoca...

  11. Effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on soil microbial respiration and root/rhizosphere respiration in-forest soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The two main components of soil respiration,i.e.,root/rhizosphere and microbial respiration,respond differently to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations both in mechanism and sensitivity because they have different substrates derived from plant and soil organic matter,respectively.To model the carbon cycle and predict the carbon source/sink of forest ecosystems,we must first understand the relative contributions of root/rhizosphere and microbial respiration to total soil respiration under elevated CO2 concentrations.Root/rhizosphere and soil microbial respiration have been shown to increase,decrease and remain unchanged under elevated CO2 concentrations.A significantly positive relationship between root biomass and root/rhizosphere respiration has been found.Fine roots respond more strongly to elevated CO2 concentrations than coarse roots.Evidence suggests that soil microbial respiration is highly variable and uncertain under elevated CO2 concentrations.Microbial biomass and activity are related or unrelated to rates of microbial respiration.Because substrate availability drives microbial metabolism in soils,it is likely that much of the variability in microbial respiration results from differences in the response of root growth to elevated CO2 concentrations and subsequent changes in substrate production.Biotic and abiotic factors affecting soil respiration were found to affect both root/rhizosphere and microbial respiration.

  12. Using O2 to study the relationships between soil CO2 efflux and soil respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Angert

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil respiration, is the sum of respiration processes in the soil, and is a major flux in the global carbon cycle. It is usually assumed that the CO2 efflux is equal to the soil respiration rate. Here we challenge this assumption by combining measurements of CO2 with high-precision measurements of O2. These measurements were conducted on different ecosystems and soil types, and included measurements of air-samples taken from the soil profile of three Mediterranean sites, a temperate forest, and two alpine forests. Root-free soils from the alpine sites were also incubated at the lab. We found that the ratio between the CO2 efflux to the O2 influx (which we defined as apparent respiratory quotient, ARQ was in the range of 0.14 to 1.23, which strongly deviates from 0.9 ± 0.1, which is the ratio expected from the elemental composition of average plants and soil organic matter. At the Mediterranean sites these deviations were explained as a result of CO2 dissolution in the soil water and transformation to bi-carbonate in these high pH soils, and by carbonates dissolution and precipitation processes. Thus, correct estimate of the short-term, chamber-based biological respiratory flux in such soils can only be made by dividing the measured CO2 efflux by the average (efflux weighted soil profile ARQ. We demonstrated that applying this approach to a semiarid pine forest resulted in estimated short-term respiration rate 3.8 times higher than the chamber-measured surface CO2 efflux (8.8 μmol CO2 m−2 s−1 instead of 2.3 μmol CO2 m−2 s−1, at the time of measurement. The ARQ values that were often found for the more acidic soils were lower than 0.7, and hence surprising. These values might be the result of the oxidation of reduced iron, which could previously form during times of high soil moisture and local anaerobic conditions inside aggregates. Further research is needed to confirm that low ARQ found in non-calcareous soils, is the result of this

  13. Anaerobic digestion of solid material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavilin, V.A.; Lokshina, L.Y.; Flotats, X.; Angelidaki, Irini

    2007-01-01

    A new multidimensional (3 and 2D) anaerobic digestion model for cylindrical reactor with non-uniform influent concentration distributions was developed to study the way in which mixing intensity affects the efficiency of continuous-flow anaerobic digestion. Batch experiments reported and simulated...... improve the continuous flow reactor performance at the relatively low influent methanogenic biomass concentration. In the continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) there are two steady states with and without methane production at slightly different values of initial methanogenic biomass concentration. In...... failure. According to the distributed models a plug-flow reactor with non-uniform influent concentration distributions where methanogenic and hydrolytic microorganisms are separated has significant methane production and solids removal at the relatively low influent methanogenic biomass concentration...

  14. Simultaneous removal of perchlorate and energetic compounds in munitions wastewater by zero-valent iron and perchlorate-respiring bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Se Chang; Hubbard, Brian; Cha, Daniel K; Kim, Byung J

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium perchlorate is one of the main constituents in Army's insensitive melt-pour explosive, PAX-21 in addition to RDX and 2,4-dinitroanisole (DNAN). The objective of this study is to develop an innovative treatment process to remove both perchlorate and energetic compounds simultaneously from PAX-21 production wastewater. It was hypothesized that the pretreatment of PAX-21 wastewater with zero-valent iron (ZVI) would convert energetic compounds to products that are more amenable for biological oxidation and that these products serve as electron donors for perchlorate-reducing bacteria. Results of batch ZVI reduction experiments showed that DNAN was completely reduced to 2,4-diaminoanisole and RDX was completely reduced to formaldehyde. Anaerobic batch biodegradation experiments showed that perchlorate (30 mg L(-1)) in ZVI-treated PAX-21 wastewater was decreased to an undetectable level after 5 days. Batch biodegradation experiments also confirmed that formaldehyde in ZVI-treated wastewater was the primary electron donor for perchlorate-respiring bacteria. The integrated iron-anaerobic bioreactor system was effective in completely removing energetic compounds and perchlorate from the PAX-21 wastewater without adding an exogenous electron donor. This study demonstrated that ZVI pretreatment not only removed energetic compounds, but also transformed energetic compounds to products that can serve as the source of electrons for perchlorate-respiring bacteria. PMID:24410688

  15. Anaerobic procedures of wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Zupančič, Tadeja

    2013-01-01

    Highly polluted wastewater is formed in dairies, pig farms and slaughterhouses. Before released into watercourses, wastewater should be properly processed with different treatment procedures in wastewater treatment plants. The thesis deals with the descriptions of mechanical, physical and chemical, and biological wastewater treatment procedures and the description of the factors which affect the reactions in wastewater treatment plants. I give special emphasis on anaerobic wastewater treatmen...

  16. Phenotypic and genotypic description of Sedimenticola selenatireducens strain CUZ, a marine (per)chlorate-respiring gammaproteobacterium, and its close relative the chlorate-respiring Sedimenticola strain NSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlström, Charlotte I; Loutey, Dana E; Wang, Ouwei; Engelbrektson, Anna; Clark, Iain; Lucas, Lauren N; Somasekhar, Pranav Y; Coates, John D

    2015-04-01

    Two (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria, strains CUZ and NSS, were isolated from marine sediments in Berkeley and San Diego, CA, respectively. Strain CUZ respired both perchlorate and chlorate [collectively designated (per)chlorate], while strain NSS respired only chlorate. Phylogenetic analysis classified both strains as close relatives of the gammaproteobacterium Sedimenticola selenatireducens. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) preparations showed the presence of rod-shaped, motile cells containing one polar flagellum. Optimum growth for strain CUZ was observed at 25 to 30 °C, pH 7, and 4% NaCl, while strain NSS grew optimally at 37 to 42 °C, pH 7.5 to 8, and 1.5 to 2.5% NaCl. Both strains oxidized hydrogen, sulfide, various organic acids, and aromatics, such as benzoate and phenylacetate, as electron donors coupled to oxygen, nitrate, and (per)chlorate or chlorate as electron acceptors. The draft genome of strain CUZ carried the requisite (per)chlorate reduction island (PRI) for (per)chlorate respiration, while that of strain NSS carried the composite chlorate reduction transposon responsible for chlorate metabolism. The PRI of strain CUZ encoded a perchlorate reductase (Pcr), which reduced both perchlorate and chlorate, while the genome of strain NSS included a gene for a distinct chlorate reductase (Clr) that reduced only chlorate. When both (per)chlorate and nitrate were present, (per)chlorate was preferentially utilized if the inoculum was pregrown on (per)chlorate. Historically, (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB) and chlorate-reducing bacteria (CRB) have been isolated primarily from freshwater, mesophilic environments. This study describes the isolation and characterization of two highly related marine halophiles, one a PRB and the other a CRB, and thus broadens the known phylogenetic and physiological diversity of these unusual metabolisms. PMID:25662971

  17. Anaerobic digestion of aliphatic polyesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmejkalová, Pavla; Kužníková, Veronika; Merna, Jan; Hermanová, Soňa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic processes for the treatment of plastic materials waste represent versatile and effective approach in environmental protection and solid waste management. In this work, anaerobic biodegradability of model aliphatic polyesters, poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), in the form of powder and melt-pressed films with varying molar mass, was studied. Biogas production was explored in batch laboratory trials at 55 ± 1°C under a nitrogen atmosphere. The inoculum used was thermophilic digested sludge (total solids concentration of 2.9%) from operating digesters at the Central Waste Water Treatment Plant in Prague, Czech Republic. Methanogenic biodegradation of PCLs typically yielded from 54 to 60% of the theoretical biogas yield. The biodegradability of PLAs achieved from 56 to 84% of the theoretical value. High biogas yield (up to 677 mL/g TS) with high methane content (more than 60%), comparable with conventionally processed materials, confirmed the potential of polyester samples for anaerobic treatment in the case of their exploitation in agriculture or as a packaging material in the food industry. PMID:27191559

  18. Adjustment of Forest Ecosystem Root Respiration as Temperature Warms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew J. Burton; Jerry M. Melillo; Serita D. Frey

    2008-01-01

    Adjustment of ecosystem root respiration to warmer climatic conditions can alter the autotrophic portion of soil respiration and influence the amount of carbon available for biomass production. We examined 44 published values of annual forest root respiration and found an increase in ecosystem root respiration with increasing mean annual temperature (MAT),but the rate of this cross-ecosystem increase (Q10 = 1.6) is less than published values for short-term responses of root respiration to temperature within ecosystems (Q10 = 2-3). When specific root respiration rates and root biomass values were examined, there was a clear trend for decreasing root metabolic capacity (respiration rate at a standard temperature) with increasing MAT. There also were tradeoffs between root metabolic capacity and root system biomass, such that there were no instances of high growing season respiration rates and high root biomass occurring together. We also examined specific root respiration rates at three soil warming experiments at Harvard Forest, USA, and found decreases in metabolic capacity for roots from the heated plots. This decline could be due to either physiological acclimation or to the effects of co-occurring drier soils on the measurement date. Regardless of the cause, these findings clearly suggest that modeling efforts that allow root respiration to increase exponentially with temperature, with Qt0 values of 2 or more, may over-predict root contributions to ecosystem CO2 efflux for future climates and underestimate the amount of C available for other uses,including net primary productivity.

  19. Combustion, respiration and intermittent exercise: a theoretical perspective on oxygen uptake and energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Christopher B

    2014-01-01

    While no doubt thought about for thousands of years, it was Antoine Lavoisier in the late 18th century who is largely credited with the first "modern" investigations of biological energy exchanges. From Lavoisier's work with combustion and respiration a scientific trend emerges that extends to the present day: the world gains a credible working hypothesis but validity goes missing, often for some time, until later confirmed using proper measures. This theme is applied to glucose/glycogen metabolism where energy exchanges are depicted as conversion from one form to another and, transfer from one place to another made by both the anaerobic and aerobic biochemical pathways within working skeletal muscle, and the hypothetical quantification of these components as part of an oxygen (O2) uptake measurement. The anaerobic and aerobic energy exchange components of metabolism are represented by two different interpretations of O2 uptake: one that contains a glycolytic component (1 L O2 = 21.1 kJ) and one that does not (1 L O2 = 19.6 kJ). When energy exchange transfer and oxygen-related expenditures are applied separately to exercise and recovery periods, an increased energy cost for intermittent as compared to continuous exercise is hypothesized to be a direct result. PMID:24833508

  20. Combustion, Respiration and Intermittent Exercise: A Theoretical Perspective on Oxygen Uptake and Energy Expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B. Scott

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available While no doubt thought about for thousands of years, it was Antoine Lavoisier in the late 18th century who is largely credited with the first “modern” investigations of biological energy exchanges. From Lavoisier’s work with combustion and respiration a scientific trend emerges that extends to the present day: the world gains a credible working hypothesis but validity goes missing, often for some time, until later confirmed using proper measures. This theme is applied to glucose/glycogen metabolism where energy exchanges are depicted as conversion from one form to another and, transfer from one place to another made by both the anaerobic and aerobic biochemical pathways within working skeletal muscle, and the hypothetical quantification of these components as part of an oxygen (O2 uptake measurement. The anaerobic and aerobic energy exchange components of metabolism are represented by two different interpretations of O2 uptake: one that contains a glycolytic component (1 L O2 = 21.1 kJ and one that does not (1 L O2 = 19.6 kJ. When energy exchange transfer and oxygen-related expenditures are applied separately to exercise and recovery periods, an increased energy cost for intermittent as compared to continuous exercise is hypothesized to be a direct result.

  1. Fatty acid nitroalkenes induce resistance to ischemic cardiac injury by modulating mitochondrial respiration at complex II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R. Koenitzer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA are metabolic and inflammatory-derived electrophiles that mediate pleiotropic signaling actions. It was hypothesized that NO2-FA would impact mitochondrial redox reactions to induce tissue-protective metabolic shifts in cells. Nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2 reversibly inhibited complex II-linked respiration in isolated rat heart mitochondria in a pH-dependent manner and suppressed superoxide formation. Nitroalkylation of Fp subunit was determined by BME capture and the site of modification by OA-NO2 defined by mass spectrometric analysis. These effects translated into reduced basal and maximal respiration and favored glycolytic metabolism in H9C2 cardiomyoblasts as assessed by extracellular H+ and O2 flux analysis. The perfusion of NO2-FA induced acute cardioprotection in an isolated perfused heart ischemia/reperfusion (IR model as evidenced by significantly higher rate-pressure products. Together these findings indicate that NO2-FA can promote cardioprotection by inducing a shift from respiration to glycolysis and suppressing reactive species formation in the post-ischemic interval.

  2. Fatty acid nitroalkenes induce resistance to ischemic cardiac injury by modulating mitochondrial respiration at complex II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenitzer, Jeffrey R; Bonacci, Gustavo; Woodcock, Steven R; Chen, Chen-Shan; Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Kelley, Eric E; Schopfer, Francisco J

    2016-08-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FA) are metabolic and inflammatory-derived electrophiles that mediate pleiotropic signaling actions. It was hypothesized that NO2-FA would impact mitochondrial redox reactions to induce tissue-protective metabolic shifts in cells. Nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) reversibly inhibited complex II-linked respiration in isolated rat heart mitochondria in a pH-dependent manner and suppressed superoxide formation. Nitroalkylation of Fp subunit was determined by BME capture and the site of modification by OA-NO2 defined by mass spectrometric analysis. These effects translated into reduced basal and maximal respiration and favored glycolytic metabolism in H9C2 cardiomyoblasts as assessed by extracellular H(+) and O2 flux analysis. The perfusion of NO2-FA induced acute cardioprotection in an isolated perfused heart ischemia/reperfusion (IR) model as evidenced by significantly higher rate-pressure products. Together these findings indicate that NO2-FA can promote cardioprotection by inducing a shift from respiration to glycolysis and suppressing reactive species formation in the post-ischemic interval. PMID:26722838

  3. Molecular ecology of anaerobic reactor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H. Jacob Peider; Zheng, D.; Westermann, Peter; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Raskin, L.

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic reactor systems are essential for the treatment of solid and liquid wastes and constitute a core facility in many waste treatment plants. Although much is known about the basic metabolism in different types of anaerobic reactors, little is known about the microbes responsible for these ...... specific nucleic acid probes are discussed and exemplified by studies of anaerobic granular sludge, biofilm and digester systems...... malfunctions of anaerobic digesters occasionally experienced, leading to sub-optimal methane production and wastewater treatment. Using a variety of molecular techniques, we are able to determine which microorganisms are active, where they are active, and when they are active, but we still need to determine...... abundance of each microbe in anaerobic reactor systems by rRNA probing. This chapter focuses on various molecular techniques employed and problems encountered when elucidating the microbial ecology of anaerobic reactor systems. Methods such as quantitative dot blot/fluorescence in-situ probing using various...

  4. Cloning, sequencing, and sequence analysis of two novel plasmids from the thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Anaerocellum thermophilum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Mikkelsen, Marie Just; Schrøder, I.;

    2004-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of two novel plasmids isolated from the extreme thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Anaerocellum thermophilum DSM6725 (A. thermophilum), growing optimally at 70degreesC, has been determined. pBAS2 was found to be a 3653 bp plasmid with a GC content of 43%, and the sequence...

  5. Underground Corrosion by Microorganisms Part II : Role of Anaerobic Sulphate Reducing Bacteria-Desulfotomaculum SP

    OpenAIRE

    H. M. Dayal; K. C. Tiwari; Kamlesh Mehta; Chandrashekhar,

    1988-01-01

    During the course of studies on the corrosion causing soil microflora from different geoclimatic regions of India, several strains of anaerobic sulphate reducing bacteria belonging to genus Desulfotomaculum were isolated and characterised. Their corrosive action on mild steel, galvanised iron and structural aluminium, the three main metals of construction of underground structures, have been studied under laboratory conditions.

  6. Underground Corrosion by Microorganisms Part II : Role of Anaerobic Sulphate Reducing Bacteria-Desulfotomaculum SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Dayal

    1988-04-01

    Full Text Available During the course of studies on the corrosion causing soil microflora from different geoclimatic regions of India, several strains of anaerobic sulphate reducing bacteria belonging to genus Desulfotomaculum were isolated and characterised. Their corrosive action on mild steel, galvanised iron and structural aluminium, the three main metals of construction of underground structures, have been studied under laboratory conditions.

  7. Noncatalytic docking domains of cellulosomes of anaerobic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenbakkers, P J; Li, X L; Ximenes, E A; Arts, J G; Chen, H; Ljungdahl, L G; Op Den Camp, H J

    2001-09-01

    A method is presented for the specific isolation of genes encoding cellulosome components from anaerobic fungi. The catalytic components of the cellulosome of anaerobic fungi typically contain, besides the catalytic domain, mostly two copies of a 40-amino-acid cysteine-rich, noncatalytic docking domain (NCDD) interspaced by short linkers. Degenerate primers were designed to anneal to the highly conserved region within the NCDDs of the monocentric fungus Piromyces sp. strain E2 and the polycentric fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2. Through PCR using cDNA from Orpinomyces sp. and genomic DNA from Piromyces sp. as templates, respectively, 9 and 19 PCR products were isolated encoding novel NCDD linker sequences. Screening of an Orpinomyces sp. cDNA library with four of these PCR products resulted in the isolation of new genes encoding cellulosome components. An alignment of the partial NCDD sequence information obtained and an alignment of database-accessible NCDD sequences, focusing on the number and position of cysteine residues, indicated the presence of three structural subfamilies within fungal NCDDs. Furthermore, evidence is presented that the NCDDs in CelC from the polycentric fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2 specifically recognize four proteins in a cellulosome preparation, indicating the presence of multiple scaffoldins. PMID:11514516

  8. Polyethylenimine-mediated impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration and membrane integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Karina; Malinska, Dominika; Koszela-Piotrowska, Izabela;

    2012-01-01

    The 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine (PEI) is a highly efficient synthetic polycation used in transfection protocols, but also triggers mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic cell death processes where the mechanistic issues are poorly understood. We now demonstrate that PEI in a concentration- and time......-dependent manner can affect functions (membrane potential, swelling and respiration) and ultrastructural integrity of freshly isolated rat liver mitochondria. The threshold concentration for detection of PEI-mediated impairment of rat liver mitochondrial functions is 3 µg/mL, however, lower PEI levels still exert...... some effects on mitochondrial morphology and respiration, and these may be related to the inherent membrane perturbing properties of this polycation. The PEI-mediated mitochondrial swelling phase is biphasic, with a fast decaying initial period (most prominent from 4 µg/mL PEI) followed by a slower...

  9. Can soil respiration estimate neglect the contribution of abiotic exchange?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi CHEN; WenFeng WANG; GePing LUO; Hui YE

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the hypothesis that soil respiration can always be interpreted purely in terms of biotic processes, neglecting the contribution of abiotic exchange to CO2 fluxes in alkaline soils of arid areas that characterize 5%of the Earth’s total land surface. Analyses on flux data collected from previous studies suggested reconciling soil respiration as organic (root/microbial respiration) and inorganic (abiotic CO2 exchange) respiration, whose contributions in the total CO2 flux were determined by soil alkaline content. On the basis of utilizing mete-orological and soil data collected from the Xinjiang and Central Asia Scientific Data Sharing Platform, an incorpo-rated model indicated that inorganic respiration represents almost half of the total CO2 flux. Neglecting the abiotic module may result in overestimates of soil respiration in arid alkaline lands, which partly explains the long-sought“missing carbon sink”.

  10. Tillage Effects on Soil Properties & Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Teodor; Bogdan, Ileana; Moraru, Paula; Pop, Adrian; Duda, Bogdan; Cacovean, Horea; Coste, Camelia

    2015-04-01

    Soil tillage systems can be able to influence soil compaction, water dynamics, soil temperature and soil structural condition. These processes can be expressed as changes of soil microbiological activity, soil respiration and sustainability of agriculture. Objectives of this study were: 1) to assess the effects of tillage systems (Conventional System-CS, Minimum Tillage-MT, No-Tillage-NT) on soil compaction, soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration and 2) to establish the relationship that exists in changing soil properties. Three treatments were installed: CS-plough + disc; MT-paraplow + rotary grape; NT-direct sowing. The study was conducted on an Argic-Stagnic Faeoziom. The MT and NT applications reduce or completely eliminate the soil mobilization, due to this, soil is compacted in the first year of application. The degree of compaction is directly related to soil type and its state of degradation. The state of soil compaction diminished over time, tending toward a specific type of soil density. Soil moisture was higher in NT and MT at the time of sowing and in the early stages of vegetation and differences diminished over time. Moisture determinations showed statistically significant differences. The MT and NT applications reduced the thermal amplitude in the first 15 cm of soil depth and increased the soil temperature by 0.5-2.20C. The determinations confirm the effect of soil tillage system on soil respiration; the daily average was lower at NT (315-1914 mmoli m-2s-1) and followed by MT (318-2395 mmoli m-2s-1) and is higher in the CS (321-2480 mmol m-2s-1). Comparing with CS, all the two conservation tillage measures decreased soil respiration, with the best effects of no-tillage. An exceeding amount of CO2 produced in the soil and released into the atmosphere, resulting from aerobic processes of mineralization of organic matter (excessive loosening) is considered to be not only a way of increasing the CO2 in the atmosphere, but also a loss of

  11. Degradation of TCE using sequential anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapatwala, Kirit D.; Babu, G. R. V.; Baresi, Larry; Trunzo, Richard M.

    1995-01-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) were isolated from contaminated wastewaters and soil sites. The aerobic cultures were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (four species) and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The optimal conditions for the growth of aerobic cultures were determined. The minimal inhibitory concentration values of TCE for Pseudomonas sps. were also determined. The aerobic cells were immobilized in calcium alginate in the form of beads. Degradation of TCE by the anaerobic and dichloroethylene (DCE) by aerobic cultures was studied using dual reactors - anaerobic biofilm and aerobic immobilized bed reactor. The minimal mineral salt (MMS) medium saturated with TCE was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the anaerobic reactor. The MMS medium saturated with DCE and supplemented with xylenes and toluene (3 ppm each) was pumped at the rate of 1 ml per hour into the fluidized air-uplift-type reactor containing the immobilized aerobic cells. The concentrations of TCE and DCE and the metabolites formed during their degradation by the anaerobic and aerobic cultures were monitored by GC. The preliminary study suggests that the anaerobic and aerobic cultures of our isolates can degrade TCE and DCE.

  12. Soil Respiration in Semiarid Temperate Grasslands under Various Land Management

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen WANG; Ji, Lei; Hou, Xiangyang; Schellenberg, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration, a major component of the global carbon cycle, is significantly influenced by land management practices. Grasslands are potentially a major sink for carbon, but can also be a source. Here, we investigated the potential effect of land management (grazing, clipping, and ungrazed enclosures) on soil respiration in the semiarid grassland of northern China. Our results showed the mean soil respiration was significantly higher under enclosures (2.17μmol.m−2.s−1) and clipping (2.06μ...

  13. Contributions of ectomycorrhizal fungal mats to forest soil respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, C. L.; L. A. Kluber; Martin, J. P.; B. A. Caldwell; B. J. Bond

    2012-01-01

    Distinct aggregations of fungal hyphae and rhizomorphs, or "mats", formed by some genera of ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fungi are common features of soils in coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest. We measured in situ respiration rates of Piloderma mats and neighboring non-mat soils in an old-growth Douglas-fir forest in western Oregon to investigate whether there was higher respiration from mats, and to estimate mat contributions to total soil respiration. We found that are...

  14. Cadmium removal by Euglena gracilis is enhanced under anaerobic growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago-Martínez, M. Geovanni; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Encalada, Rusely; Pineda, Erika; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología (Mexico); Zepeda-Rodriguez, Armando [Facultad de Medicina, UNAM, Mexico City (Mexico); Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología (Mexico); Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo, E-mail: rjass_cardiol@yahoo.com.mx [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología (Mexico)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • The protist Euglena gracilis had the ability to grow and remove large amounts of Cd{sup 2+} under anaerobic conditions. • High biomass was attained by combination of glycolytic and mitochondrial carbon sources. • Routes of degradation of glucose, glutamate and malate under anaerobic conditions in E. gracilis are described. • Biosorption was the main mechanism of Cd{sup 2+} removal in anaerobiosis, whereas the Cd{sup 2+} intracellularly accumulated was inactivated by thiol-molecules and polyphosphate. - Abstract: The facultative protist Euglena gracilis, a heavy metal hyper-accumulator, was grown under photo-heterotrophic and extreme conditions (acidic pH, anaerobiosis and with Cd{sup 2+}) and biochemically characterized. High biomass (8.5 × 10{sup 6} cells mL{sup −1}) was reached after 10 days of culture. Under anaerobiosis, photosynthetic activity built up a microaerophilic environment of 0.7% O{sub 2}, which was sufficient to allow mitochondrial respiratory activity: glutamate and malate were fully consumed, whereas 25–33% of the added glucose was consumed. In anaerobic cells, photosynthesis but not respiration was activated by Cd{sup 2+} which induced higher oxidative stress. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were 20 times lower in control cells under anaerobiosis than in aerobiosis, although Cd{sup 2+} induced a higher MDA production. Cd{sup 2+} stress induced increased contents of chelating thiols (cysteine, glutathione and phytochelatins) and polyphosphate. Biosorption (90%) and intracellular accumulation (30%) were the mechanisms by which anaerobic cells removed Cd{sup 2+} from medium, which was 36% higher versus aerobic cells. The present study indicated that E. gracilis has the ability to remove Cd{sup 2+} under anaerobic conditions, which might be advantageous for metal removal in sediments from polluted water bodies or bioreactors, where the O{sub 2} concentration is particularly low.

  15. ESTIMATING ROOT RESPIRATION IN SPRUCE AND BEECH: DECREASES IN SOIL RESPIRATION FOLLOWING GIRDLING

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was undertaken to follow seasonal fluxes of CO2 from soil and to estimate the contribution of autotrophic (root + mycorrhizal) to total soil respiration (SR) in a mixed stand of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) near Freising, Germany. Matu...

  16. Decomposition of Alternative Chirality Amino Acids by Alkaliphilic Anaerobe from Owens Lake, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alisa; Pikuta, Elena V.; Guisler, Melissa; Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    The study of alkaliphilic microbial communities from anaerobic sediments of Owens and Mono Lakes in California led to the isolation of a bacterial strain capable of metabolizing amino acids with alternative chirality. According to the phylogenetic analysis, the anaerobic strain BK1 belongs to the genus Tindallia; however, despite the characteristics of other described species of this genus, the strain BK1 was able to grow on D-arginine and Dlysine. Cell morphology of this strain showed straight, motile, non-spore-forming rods with sizes 0.45 x 1.2-3 microns. Physiological characteristics of the strain showed that it is catalase negative, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, and obligately alkaliphilic. This isolate is unable to grow at pH 7 and requires CO3 (2-) ions for growth. The strain has chemo-heterotrophic metabolism and is able to ferment various proteolysis products and some sugars. It plays the role of a primary anaerobe within the trophic chain of an anaerobic microbial community by the degradation of complex protein molecules to smaller and less energetic molecules. The new isolate requires NaCl for growth, and can grow within the range of 0.5-13 %, with the optimum at 1 % NaCl (w/v). The temperature range for the growth of the new isolate is 12-40 C with optimum at 35 C. The pH range for the growth of strain BK1 occurs between 7.8 and 11.0 with optimum at 9.5. This paper presents detailed physiological characteristics of the novel isolate from Owens Lake, a unique relic ecosystem of Astrobiological significance, and makes an accent on the ability of this strain to utilize L-amino acids.

  17. Anaerobic degradation of landfill leachate using an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor with microbial sulfate reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the anaerobic degradation of landfill leachate and sulfate reduction as a function of COD/(SO42-) ratio in an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor. The reactor, which was inoculated with a mixed consortium, was operated under a constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 5 days. We investigated the effect of COD/(SO42-) ratio variation on the sulfate reduction efficiency, hydrogen sulfide production, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, conductivity, and pH variation. The best reactor performance, with significant sulfate reduction efficiency and COD removal efficiency of 91% and 87%, respectively, was reached under a COD/(SO42-) ratio of 1.17. Under these conditions, microscopic analysis showed the abundance of vibrios and rod-shaped bacterial cells. Two anaerobic bacteria were isolated from the reactor sludge. Phylogenetic studies performed on these strains identified strain A1 as affiliated to Clostridium genus and strain H1 as a new species of sulfate-reducing bacteria affiliated to the Desulfovibrio genus. The closest phylogenetic relative of strain H1 was Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, at 96% similarity for partial 16S RNA gene sequence data. Physiological and metabolic characterization was performed for this strain.

  18. Variations of the Respiration Signals for Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy Using the Video Coached Respiration Guiding System

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hyun Jeong; Yea, Ji Woon; Oh, Se An

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) has been used to minimize the dose to normal tissue in lung-cancer radiotherapy. The present research aims to improve the regularity of respiration in RGRT using a video coached respiration guiding system. In the study, 16 patients with lung cancer were evaluated. The respiration signals of the patients were measured by a real-time position management (RPM) Respiratory Gating System (Varian, USA) and the patients were trained using the video coached ...

  19. Can we distinguish autotrophic respiration from heterotrophic respiration in a field site using high temporal resolution CO2 flux measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, Beatrice; Berger, Sina; Praetzel, Leandra; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The processes behind C-cycling in peatlands are important to understand for assessing the vulnerability of peatlands as carbon sinks under changing climate conditions. Especially boreal peatlands are likely to underlie strong alterations in the future. It is expected that C-pools that are directly influenced by vegetation and water table fluctuations can be easily destabilized. The CO2 efflux through respiration underlies autotrophic and heterotrophic processes that show different feedbacks on changing environmental conditions. In order to understand the respiration fluxes better for more accurate modelling and prognoses, the determination of the relative importance of different respiration sources is necessary. Earlier studies used e.g. exfoliation experiments, incubation experiments or modelling approaches to estimate the different respiration sources for the total ecosystem respiration (Reco). To further the understanding in this topic, I want to distinguish autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration using high temporal resolution measurements. The study site was selected along a hydrological gradient in a peatland in southern Ontario (Canada) and measurements were conducted from May to September 2015 once per month. Environmental controls (water table, soil temperature and soil moisture) that effect the respiration sources were recorded. In my study I used a Li-COR 6400XT and a Los Gatos greenhouse gas analyzer (GGA). Reco was determined by chamber flux measurements with the GGA, while simultaneously CO2 respiration measurements on different vegetation compartments like roots, leaves and mosses were conducted using the Li-COR 6400XT. The difference between Reco and autotrophic respiration equals heterotrophic respiration. After the measurements, the vegetation plots were harvested and separated for all compartments (leaves, roots, mosses, soil organic matter), dried and weighed. The weighted respiration rates from all vegetation compartments sum up to

  20. Respirator studies for the ERDA Division of Safety, Standards, and Compliance. Progress report, July 1, 1974--June 30, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major accomplishments during FY 1975 were the initiation of a respirator research program to investigate the physiological effects of wearing a respirator under stress, assisting ERDA contractors by providing information and training concerning respirator programs, quality assurance of respirators, and respirator applications. A newsletter of respirator developments for ERDA contractor personnel was published, and a Respirator Symposium was conducted

  1. Anaerobic Capacities of Leaf Litter

    OpenAIRE

    Kusel, K.; Drake, H L

    1996-01-01

    Leaf litter displayed a capacity to spontaneously form organic acids, alcohols, phenolic compounds, H(inf2), and CO(inf2) when incubated anaerobically at 20(deg)C either as buffered suspensions or in a moistened condition in microcosms. Acetate was the predominant organic product formed regardless of the degree of litter decomposition. Initial rates of acetate formation in litter suspensions and microcosms approximated 2.6 and 0.53 (mu)mol of acetate per g (dry weight) of litter per h, respec...

  2. Anaerobic digestion of coffee waste

    OpenAIRE

    L. Neves; Ribeiro, R.; Oliveira, Rosário; Alves, M. M.

    2005-01-01

    The anaerobic co-digestion of five different by-products from instant coffee substitutes production was studied in mesophilic conditions. The co-substrate was the excess of sewage sludge from the wastewater treatment plant located in the same coffee factory. Four of the tested wastes produced methane in the range of 0.24-0.28 m³CH4(STP)/kgVSinitial . Reduction of 50-73% in total solids and 75-80% in volatile solids were obtained and the hydrolysis rate constants were in the ran...

  3. Aminomonas paucivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a mesophilic, anaerobic, amino-acid-utilizing bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Baena, S.; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Ollivier, Bernard; Labat, Marc; Thomas, P; Garcia, Jean-Louis; Patel, B.K.C.

    1999-01-01

    A novel, asaccharolytic, amino-acid-degrading bacterium, designated strain GLU-3T, was isolated from an anaerobic lagoon of a dairy wastewater treatment plant. Strain GLU-3T stained Gram-negative and was an obligately anaerobic, non-spore-forming, slightly curved, rod-shaped bacterium (0.3 x 4.0-6.0 micrometers) which existed singly or in pairs. The DNA G+C content was 43 mol%. Optimum growth occurred at 35°C and pH 7.5 on arginine, histidine, threonine and glycine. Acetate was the end-produc...

  4. Anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    role of the anaerobic digestion in the wastewater treatment plants from a pre-treatment method to the main biological treatment method. The application of staged high-rate anaerobic digesters has shown the larger potential among the recent developments in this direction. The most common high...

  5. Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Itzhak

    1995-01-01

    Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of…

  6. Instrumentation in anaerobic treatment - research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjers, H.; Lier, van J.B.

    2006-01-01

    High rate anaerobic treatment reactors are able to uncouple solids and liquid retention time, resulting in high biomass concentrations. Principal advantages of anaerobic treatment include: energy efficiency, low biomass yield, low nutrient requirement and high volumetric organic loadings. In order t

  7. Atrazine removal in Danish anaerobic aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Philip Grinder; Arildskov, N.P.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    The pesticide atrazine (6-chloro-N-2-ethyl-N-4-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine -2,4-diamine) was removed from the water phase in anaerobic laboratory batch incubations with sediment and groundwater from a number of Danish anaerobic aquifers, but not in incubations from aerobic aquifers. The removal...

  8. Anaerobic degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Haagensen, Frank; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    increases during anaerobic stabilization due to transformation of easily degradable organic matter. Hence, LAS is regarded as resistant to biodegradation under anaerobic conditions. We present data from a lab-scale semi-continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) spiked with linear dodecylbenzene sulfonate (C...

  9. On the metabolic interactions of (photo)respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Toshihiro; Florian, Alexandra; Timm, Stefan; Bauwe, Hermann; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2016-05-01

    Given that photorespiration is inextricably linked to the process of photosynthesis by virtue of sharing the common first enzyme Rubisco, the photorespiratory pathway has been less subject to study in isolation than many other metabolic pathways. That said, despite often being described to be linked to reactions of ammonia assimilation, C1 metabolism and respiratory metabolism, the precise molecular mechanisms governing these linkages in land plants remain partially obscure. The application of broad metabolite profiling on mutants with altered levels of metabolic enzymes has facilitated the identification of common and distinct metabolic responses among them. Here we provide an update of the recent findings from such studies, focusing particularly on the interplay between photorespiration and the metabolic reactions of mitochondrial respiration. In order to do so we evaluated (i) changes in organic acids following environmental perturbation of metabolism, (ii) changes in organic acid levels in a wide range of photorespiratory mutants, (iii) changes in levels of photorespiratory metabolites in transgenic tomato lines deficient in the expression of enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In addition, we estimated the rates of photorespiration in a complete set of tricarboxylic acid cycle transgenic tomato lines. Finally, we discuss insight concerning the interaction between photorespiration and other pathways that has been attained following the development of (13)CO2-based flux profiling methods. PMID:27029352

  10. Prospects of Anaerobic Digestion Technology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As the world's largest developing country, China must face the problem of managing municipal solid waste, and the challenge of organic waste disposal is even more serious. Considering the characteristics of traditional waste disposal technologies and the subsequent secondary pollution, anaerobic digestion has various advantages such as reduction in the land needed for disposal and preservation of environmental quality. In light of the energy crisis, this paper focuses on the potential production of biogas from biowaste through anaerobic digestion processes, the problems incurred by the waste collection system, and the efficiency of the anaerobic digestion process. Use of biogas in a combined heat and power cogeneration system is also discussed. Finally, the advantages of anaerobic digestion technology for the Chinese market are summarized. The anaerobic digestion is suggested to be a promising treating technology for the organic wastes in China.

  11. Anaerobic biorefinery: Current status, challenges, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatdeenarunat, Chayanon; Nguyen, Duc; Surendra, K C; Shrestha, Shilva; Rajendran, Karthik; Oechsner, Hans; Xie, Li; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) has been in use for many decades. To date, it has been primarily aimed at treating organic wastes, mainly manures and wastewater sludge, and industrial wastewaters. However, with the current advancements, a more open mind is required to look beyond these somewhat restricted original applications of AD. Biorefineries are such concepts, where multiple products including chemicals, fuels, polymers etc. are produced from organic feedstocks. The anaerobic biorefinery concept is now gaining increased attention, utilizing AD as the final disposal step. This review aims at evaluating the potential significance of anaerobic biorefineries, including types of feedstocks, uses for the produced energy, as well as sustainable applications of the generated residual digestate. A comprehensive analysis of various types of anaerobic biorefineries has been developed, including both large-scale and household level applications. Finally, future directives are highlighted showing how anaerobic biorefinery concept could impact the bioeconomy in the near future. PMID:27005786

  12. Anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye;

    2003-01-01

    The long retention time of the active biomass in the high-rate anaerobic digesters is the key factor for the successful application of the high rate anaerobic wastewater treatment. The long solids retention time is achieved due to the specific reactor configuration and it is enhanced...... by the immobilization of the biomass, which forms static biofilms, particle-supported biofilms, or granules depending on the reactor's operational conditions. The advantages of the high-rate anaerobic digestion over the conventional aerobic wastewater treatment methods has created a clear trend for the change...... of the role of the anaerobic digestion in the wastewater treatment plants from a pre-treatment method to the main biological treatment method. The application of staged high-rate anaerobic digesters has shown the larger potential among the recent developments in this direction. The most common high...

  13. Molecular ecology of anaerobic reactor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H. Jacob Peider; Zheng, D.; Westermann, Peter;

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic reactor systems are essential for the treatment of solid and liquid wastes and constitute a core facility in many waste treatment plants. Although much is known about the basic metabolism in different types of anaerobic reactors, little is known about the microbes responsible...... to the abundance of each microbe in anaerobic reactor systems by rRNA probing. This chapter focuses on various molecular techniques employed and problems encountered when elucidating the microbial ecology of anaerobic reactor systems. Methods such as quantitative dot blot/fluorescence in-situ probing using various...... and malfunctions of anaerobic digesters occasionally experienced, leading to sub-optimal methane production and wastewater treatment. Using a variety of molecular techniques, we are able to determine which microorganisms are active, where they are active, and when they are active, but we still need to determine...

  14. Towards a Mechanistic Understanding of Anaerobic Nitrate Dependent Iron Oxidation: Balancing Electron Uptake and Detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JohnDCoates

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic oxidation of Fe(II by subsurface microorganisms is an important part of biogeochemical cycling in the environment, but the biochemical mechanisms used to couple iron oxidation to nitrate respiration are not well understood. Based on our own work and the evidence available in the literature, we propose a mechanistic model for anaerobic nitrate dependent iron oxidation. We suggest that anaerobic iron oxidizing microorganisms likely exist along a continuum including: 1 bacteria that inadvertently oxidize Fe(II by abiotic or biotic reactions with enzymes or chemical intermediates in their metabolic pathways (e.g. denitrification and suffer from toxicity or energetic penalty, 2 Fe(II tolerant bacteria that gain little or no growth benefit from iron oxidation but can manage the toxic reactions, and 3 bacteria that efficiently accept electrons from Fe(II to gain a growth advantage while preventing or mitigating the toxic reactions. Predictions of the proposed model are highlighted and experimental approaches are discussed.

  15. Cadmium removal by Euglena gracilis is enhanced under anaerobic growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Martínez, M Geovanni; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Encalada, Rusely; Pineda, Erika; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Zepeda-Rodriguez, Armando; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo

    2015-05-15

    The facultative protist Euglena gracilis, a heavy metal hyper-accumulator, was grown under photo-heterotrophic and extreme conditions (acidic pH, anaerobiosis and with Cd(2+)) and biochemically characterized. High biomass (8.5×10(6)cellsmL(-1)) was reached after 10 days of culture. Under anaerobiosis, photosynthetic activity built up a microaerophilic environment of 0.7% O₂, which was sufficient to allow mitochondrial respiratory activity: glutamate and malate were fully consumed, whereas 25-33% of the added glucose was consumed. In anaerobic cells, photosynthesis but not respiration was activated by Cd(2+) which induced higher oxidative stress. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were 20 times lower in control cells under anaerobiosis than in aerobiosis, although Cd(2+) induced a higher MDA production. Cd(2+) stress induced increased contents of chelating thiols (cysteine, glutathione and phytochelatins) and polyphosphate. Biosorption (90%) and intracellular accumulation (30%) were the mechanisms by which anaerobic cells removed Cd(2+) from medium, which was 36% higher versus aerobic cells. The present study indicated that E. gracilis has the ability to remove Cd(2+) under anaerobic conditions, which might be advantageous for metal removal in sediments from polluted water bodies or bioreactors, where the O₂ concentration is particularly low. PMID:25698571

  16. Plasmodesmal-mediated cell-to-cell transport in wheat roots is modulated by anaerobic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, R. E.; Fujiwara, T.; Lucas, W. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cell-to-cell transport of small molecules and ions occurs in plants through plasmodesmata. Plant roots are frequently subjected to localized anaerobic stress, with a resultant decrease in ATP. In order to determine the effect of this stress on plasmodesmal transport, fluorescent dyes of increasing molecular weight (0.46 to 1OkDa) were injected into epidermal and cortical cells of 3-day-old wheat roots, and their movement into neighboring cells was determined by fluorescence microscopy. Anaerobiosis was generated by N2 gas or simulated by the presence of sodium azide, both of which reduced the ATP levels in the tissue by over 80%. In the absence of such stress, the upper limit for movement, or size exclusion limit (SEL), of cortical plasmodesmata was cells. Upon imposition of stress, the SEL rose to between 5 and 10 kDa. This response of plasmodesmata to a decrease in the level of ATP suggests that they are constricted by an ATP-dependent process so as to maintain a restricted SEL. When roots are subjected to anaerobic stress, an increase in SEL may permit enhanced delivery of sugars to the affected cells of the root where anaerobic respiration could regenerate the needed ATP.

  17. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Alternative Fuels and Associated Biocorrosion of Carbon Steel in Marine Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Renxing; Aktas, Deniz F; Aydin, Egemen; Bonifay, Vincent; Sunner, Jan; Suflita, Joseph M

    2016-05-01

    Fuels that biodegrade too easily can exacerbate through-wall pitting corrosion of pipelines and tanks and result in unintentional environmental releases. We tested the biological stability of two emerging naval biofuels (camelina-JP5 and Fischer-Tropsch-F76) and their potential to exacerbate carbon steel corrosion in seawater incubations with and without a hydrocarbon-degrading sulfate-reducing bacterium. The inclusion of sediment or the positive control bacterium in the incubations stimulated a similar pattern of sulfate reduction with different inocula. However, the highest rates of sulfate reduction were found in incubations amended with camelina-JP5 [(57.2 ± 2.2)-(80.8 ± 8.1) μM/day] or its blend with petroleum-JP5 (76.7 ± 2.4 μM/day). The detection of a suite of metabolites only in the fuel-amended incubations confirmed that alkylated benzene hydrocarbons were metabolized via known anaerobic mechanisms. Most importantly, general (r(2) = 0.73) and pitting (r(2) = 0.69) corrosion were positively correlated with sulfate loss in the incubations. Thus, the anaerobic biodegradation of labile fuel components coupled with sulfate respiration greatly contributed to the biocorrosion of carbon steel. While all fuels were susceptible to anaerobic metabolism, special attention should be given to camelina-JP5 biofuel due to its relatively rapid biodegradation. We recommend that this biofuel be used with caution and that whenever possible extended storage periods should be avoided. PMID:27058258

  18. New and fast method to quantify respiration rates of bacterial and plankton communities in freshwater ecosystems by using optical oxygen sensor spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkentin, Mareike; Freese, Heike M; Karsten, Ulf; Schumann, Rhena

    2007-11-01

    A new method of respiration rate measurement based on oxygen luminescence quenching in sensor spots was evaluated for the first time for aquatic bacterial communities. The commonly used Winkler and Clark electrode methods to quantify oxygen concentration both require long incubation times, and the latter additionally causes signal drift due to oxygen consumption at the cathode. The sensor spots proved to be advantageous over those methods in terms of precise and quick oxygen measurements in natural bacterial communities, guaranteeing a respiration rate estimate during a time interval short enough to neglect variations in organism composition, abundance, and activity. Furthermore, no signal drift occurs during measurements, and respiration rate measurements are reliable even at low temperatures and low oxygen consumption rates. Both a natural bacterioplankton sample and a bacterial isolate from a eutrophic river were evaluated in order to optimize the new method for aquatic microorganisms. A minimum abundance of 2.2 x 10(6) respiring cells ml(-1) of a bacterial isolate was sufficient to obtain a distinct oxygen depletion signal within 20 min at 20 degrees C with the new oxygen sensor spot method. Thus, a culture of a bacterial isolate from a eutrophic river (OW 144; 20 x 10(6) respiring bacteria ml(-1)) decreased the oxygen saturation about 8% within 20 min. The natural bacterioplankton sample respired 2.8% from initially 94% oxygen-saturated water in 30 min. During the growth season in 2005, the planktonic community of a eutrophic river consumed between 0.7 and 15.6 micromol O(2) liter(-1) h(-1). The contribution of bacterial respiration to the total plankton community oxygen consumption varied seasonally between 11 and 100%. PMID:17766446

  19. Response of anaerobic carbon cycling to water table manipulation in an Alaskan rich fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, E.S.; Chivers, M.R.; Turetsky, M.R.; Treat, C.C.; Petersen, D.G.; Waldrop, M.; Harden, J.W.; McGuire, A.D.

    2013-01-01

    To test the effects of altered hydrology on organic soil decomposition, we investigated CO2 and CH4 production potential of rich-fen peat (mean surface pH = 6.3) collected from a field water table manipulation experiment including control, raised and lowered water table treatments. Mean anaerobic CO2 production potential at 10 cm depth (14.1 ± 0.9 μmol C g−1 d−1) was as high as aerobic CO2 production potential (10.6 ± 1.5 μmol C g−1 d−1), while CH4 production was low (mean of 7.8 ± 1.5 nmol C g−1 d−1). Denitrification enzyme activity indicated a very high denitrification potential (197 ± 23 μg N g−1 d−1), but net NO-3 reduction suggested this was a relatively minor pathway for anaerobic CO2 production. Abundances of denitrifier genes (nirK and nosZ) did not change across water table treatments. SO2-4 reduction also did not appear to be an important pathway for anaerobic CO2 production. The net accumulation of acetate and formate as decomposition end products in the raised water table treatment suggested that fermentation was a significant pathway for carbon mineralization, even in the presence of NO-3. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations were the strongest predictors of potential anaerobic and aerobic CO2 production. Across all water table treatments, the CO2:CH4 ratio increased with initial DOC leachate concentrations. While the field water table treatment did not have a significant effect on mean CO2 or CH4 production potential, the CO2:CH4 ratio was highest in shallow peat incubations from the drained treatment. These data suggest that with continued drying or with a more variable water table, anaerobic CO2 production may be favored over CH4 production in this rich fen. Future research examining the potential for dissolved organic substances to facilitate anaerobic respiration, or alternative redox processes that limit the effectiveness of organic acids as substrates in anaerobic metabolism, would help explain additional

  20. Soil Respiration and Student Inquiry: A Perfect Match

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Catherine Marie; Wallenstein, Matthew David

    2011-01-01

    This activity explores the cycling of carbon between the atmosphere (primarily as CO[subscript 2]) and biomass in plants, animals, and microscopic organisms. Students design soil respiration experiments using a protocol that resembles current practice in soil ecology. Three methods for measuring soil respiration are presented. Student-derived…

  1. Simulation of Human Respiration with Breathing Thermal Manikin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Erik

    The human respiration contains carbon dioxide, bioeffluents, and perhaps virus or bacteria. People may also indulge in activities that produce contaminants, as for example tobacco smoking. For these reasons, the human respiration remains one of the main contributors to contamination of the indoor...

  2. Measurements of photosynthesis and respiration in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Stephen

    2003-03-01

    Methods for measuring the rates of photosynthesis and respiration in plants are reviewed. Closed systems that involve manometric techniques, 14CO2 fixation, O2 electrodes and other methods for measuring dissolved and gas phase O2 are described. These methods typically provide time-integrated rate measurements, and limitations to their use are discussed. Open gas exchange systems that use infra-red CO2 gas analysers and differential O2 analysers for measuring instantaneous rates of CO2 and O2 exchange are described. Important features of the analysers, design features of gas exchange systems, and sources of potential error are considered. The analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters for estimating the quantum yield for O2 evolution and CO2 fixation is described in relation to new fluorescence imaging systems for large scale screening of photosynthetic phenotypes, and the microimaging of individual chloroplasts. PMID:12654031

  3. Respiration in Heterotrophic Unicellular Eukaryotic Organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenchel, Tom

    2014-01-01

    -tensions. Available data do not contradict this and some evidence supports this interpretation. Cell size is ultimately limited because an increasing fraction of the mitochondria becomes exposed to near anoxic conditions with increasing cell size. The fact that mitochondria cluster close to the cell......Surface:volume quotient, mitochondrial volume fraction, and their distribution within cells were investigated and oxygen gradients within and outside cells were modelled. Cell surface increases allometrically with cell size. Mitochondrial volume fraction is invariant with cell size and constitutes...... about 10% and mitochondria are predominantly found close to the outer membrane. The results predict that for small and medium sized protozoa maximum respiration rates should be proportional to cell volume (scaling exponent ≈1) and access to intracellular O2 is not limiting except at very low ambient O2...

  4. Light-enhanced oxygen respiration in benthic phototrophic communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epping, EHG; Jørgensen, BB

    Two microelectrode studies demonstrate the effect of Light intensity and photosynthesis on areal oxygen respiration in a hypersaline mat at Guerrero Negro, Mexico, and in an intertidal sediment at Texel, The Netherlands. The hypersaline mat was studied in the laboratory at light intensities of 0...... light intensities. Areal respiration, calculated from the difference between areal gross and areal net photosynthesis, increased from 3.9 to 14.4 nmol O-2 cm(2) min(-1) with increasing surface irradiance. This light-enhanced areal respiration was related to an increase in oxygen penetration depth from 0.......2 to 2.0 mm, thus expanding the volume of sediment involved in oxygen respiration beneath the mat surface. The mean rate of oxygen respiration per volume of mat remained constant at a rate of similar to 100 nmol O-2 cm(-3) min(-1). Oxygen profiles for the intertidal sediment were recorded in situ...

  5. The PI3Kδ inhibitor idelalisib suppresses liver and lung cellular respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammadi, Suleiman Al; Almarzooqi, Saeeda; Abdul-Kader, Hidaya Mohammed; Saraswathiamma, Dhanya; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2015-01-01

    Idelalisib (an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-delta) is approved for treatment of B-cell malignancies, with a Boxed Warning concerning potentially fatal hepatic, lung, and intestinal toxicities. The mechanisms of these tissue-specific adverse events have yet to be elucidated. This in vitro study investigated whether these effects could be attributed, at least in part, to altered cellular bioenergetics. A phosphorescence analyzer was used to measure cellular mitochondrial O2 consumption (kc, µM O2 min-1 mg-1) in C57BL/6 mouse organs in the presence of 10 µM idelalisib or dimethyl-sulfoxide. Idelalisib significantly reduced the rate of cellular respiration in liver and lung fragments by 20% and 27%, respectively. Respiration in intestinal, thymic, and kidney fragments was unaffected. Idelalisib did not alter respiratory chain activities in mitochondria isolated from the liver and did not induce hepatocyte death. Thus, the drug mildly lowers liver and lung cellular respiration, an effect that may contribute to toxicities observed in these organs. PMID:26823960

  6. Direct effects of (-)-epicatechin and procyanidin B2 on the respiration of rat heart mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopustinskiene, Dalia M; Savickas, Arunas; Vetchý, David; Masteikova, Ruta; Kasauskas, Arturas; Bernatoniene, Jurga

    2015-01-01

    Flavonol (-)-epicatechin and its derived dimer procyanidin B2, present in high amounts in cocoa products, have been shown to exert beneficial effects on the heart and cardiovascular system; however, their mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated. We studied effects of (-)-epicatechin and procyanidin B2 on the oxidative phosphorylation of isolated rat heart mitochondria. (-)-Epicatechin and procyanidin B2 had stimulating effect (up to 30% compared to control) on substrate-driven (State 2) mitochondrial respiration. Their effect was dependent on the respiratory substrates used. (-)-Epicatechin at higher concentrations (from 0.27 µg/mL) significantly decreased (up to 15%) substrate- and ADP-driven (State 3) mitochondrial respiration in case of pyruvate and malate oxidation only. Procyanidin B2 (0.7-17.9 ng/mL) inhibited State 3 respiration rate up to 19%, the most profound effect being expressed with succinate as the substrate. (-)-Epicatechin at concentrations of 0.23 µg/mL and 0.46 µg/mL prevented loss of the cytochrome c from mitochondria when substrate was succinate, supporting the evidence of membrane stabilizing properties of this flavonol. Thus, both (-)-epicatechin and procyanidin B2 directly influenced mitochondrial functions and the observed effects could help to explain cardiometabolic risk reduction ascribed to the consumption of modest amounts of cocoa products. PMID:25811024

  7. Transcriptional regulation of the outer membrane porin gene ompW reveals its physiological role during the transition from the aerobic to the anaerobic lifestyle of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minfeng eXiao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding bacterial physiology relies on elucidating the regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions of those differentially expressed genes in response to environmental changes. A widespread Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane protein OmpW has been implicated in the adaptation to stresses in various species. It is recently found to be present in the regulon of the global anaerobic transcription factor FNR and ArcA in E. coli. However, little is known about the physiological implications of this regulatory disposition. In this study, we demonstrate that transcription of ompW is indeed mediated by a series of global regulators involved in the anaerobiosis of E. coli. We show that FNR can both activate and repress the expression of ompW through its direct binding to two distinctive sites, -81.5 and -126.5 bp respectively, on ompW promoter. ArcA also participates in repression of ompW under anaerobic condition, but in an FNR dependent manner. Additionally, ompW is also subject to the regulation by CRP and NarL which senses the availability and types of carbon sources and respiration electron acceptors in the environment respectively, implying a role of OmpW in the carbon and energy metabolism of E. coli during its anaerobic adaptation. Molecular docking reveals that OmpW can bind fumarate, an alternative electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration, with sufficient affinity. Moreover, supplement of fumarate or succinate which belongs to the C4-dicarboxylates family of metabolite, to E. coli culture rescues OmpW-mediated colicin S4 killing. Taken together, we propose that OmpW is involved in anaerobic carbon and energy metabolism to mediate the transition from aerobic to anaerobic lifestyle in E. coli.

  8. Multi-Scale Modeling of Respiration: Linking External to Cellular Respiration during Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Haiying; Lai, Nicola; Saidel, Gerald M.; Cabrera, Marco E.

    2009-01-01

    In human studies investigating factors that control cellular respiration in working skeletal muscle, pulmonary VO2 dynamics (VO2p) measured at the mouth by indirect calorimetry is typically used to represent muscle O2 consumption (UO2m). Furthermore, measurement of muscle oxygenation using near-infrared spectroscopy has provided information on the dynamic balance between oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption at the microvascular level. To relate these measurements and gain quantitative under...

  9. Respirator Performance against Nanoparticles under Simulated Workplace Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Evanly; Zhuang, Ziqing; Horvatin, Matthew; Liu, Yuewei; He, Xinjian; Rengasamy, Samy

    2015-10-01

    Filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) and elastomeric half-mask respirators (EHRs) are commonly used by workers for protection against potentially hazardous particles, including engineered nanoparticles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of these types of respirators against 10-400 nm particles using human subjects exposed to NaCl aerosols under simulated workplace activities. Simulated workplace protection factors (SWPFs) were measured for eight combinations of respirator models (2 N95 FFRs, 2 P100 FFRs, 2 N95 EHRs, and 2 P100 EHRs) worn by 25 healthy test subjects (13 females and 12 males) with varying face sizes. Before beginning a SWPF test for a given respirator model, each subject had to pass a quantitative fit test. Each SWPF test was performed using a protocol of six exercises for 3 min each: (i) normal breathing, (ii) deep breathing, (iii) moving head side to side, (iv) moving head up and down, (v) bending at the waist, and (vi) a simulated laboratory-vessel cleaning motion. Two scanning mobility particle sizers were used simultaneously to measure the upstream (outside the respirator) and downstream (inside the respirator) test aerosol; SWPF was then calculated as a ratio of the upstream and downstream particle concentrations. In general, geometric mean SWPF (GM-SWPF) was highest for the P100 EHRs, followed by P100 FFRs, N95 EHRs, and N95 FFRs. This trend holds true for nanoparticles (10-100 nm), larger size particles (100-400 nm), and the 'all size' range (10-400 nm). All respirators provided better or similar performance levels for 10-100 nm particles as compared to larger 100-400 nm particles. This study found that class P100 respirators provided higher SWPFs compared to class N95 respirators (P 10) against all particle size ranges tested. PMID:26180261

  10. Respiration triggers heme transfer from cytochrome c peroxidase to catalase in yeast mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiresan, Meena; Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M

    2014-12-01

    In exponentially growing yeast, the heme enzyme, cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. When the fermentable source (glucose) is depleted, cells switch to respiration and mitochondrial H2O2 levels rise. It has long been assumed that CCP activity detoxifies mitochondrial H2O2 because of the efficiency of this activity in vitro. However, we find that a large pool of Ccp1 exits the mitochondria of respiring cells. We detect no extramitochondrial CCP activity because Ccp1 crosses the outer mitochondrial membrane as the heme-free protein. In parallel with apoCcp1 export, cells exhibit increased activity of catalase A (Cta1), the mitochondrial and peroxisomal catalase isoform in yeast. This identifies Cta1 as a likely recipient of Ccp1 heme, which is supported by low Cta1 activity in ccp1Δ cells and the accumulation of holoCcp1 in cta1Δ mitochondria. We hypothesized that Ccp1's heme is labilized by hyperoxidation of the protein during the burst in H2O2 production as cells begin to respire. To test this hypothesis, recombinant Ccp1 was hyperoxidized with excess H2O2 in vitro, which accelerated heme transfer to apomyoglobin added as a surrogate heme acceptor. Furthermore, the proximal heme Fe ligand, His175, was found to be ∼ 85% oxidized to oxo-histidine in extramitochondrial Ccp1 isolated from 7-d cells, indicating that heme labilization results from oxidation of this ligand. We conclude that Ccp1 responds to respiration-derived H2O2 via a previously unidentified mechanism involving H2O2-activated heme transfer to apoCta1. Subsequently, the catalase activity of Cta1, not CCP activity, contributes to mitochondrial H2O2 detoxification. PMID:25422453

  11. Y-12 Respirator Flow Cycle Time Reduction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, C.T.; Rogers, P.E.

    2000-12-01

    In mid-July 2000, a Cycle Time Reduction (CTR) project was initiated by senior management to improve the flow and overall efficiency of the respirator distribution process at Y-12. A cross-functional team was formed to evaluate the current process and to propose necessary changes for improvement. Specifically, the team was challenged to make improvements that would eliminate production work stoppages due to the unavailability of respirators in Y-12 Stores. Prior to the team initiation, plant back orders for a specific model respirator were averaging above 600 and have been as high as 750+. The Cycle Time Reduction team segmented the respirator flow into detailed steps, with the focus and emphasis primarily being on the movement of dirty respirators out of work areas, transportation to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laundry, and return back to Y-12 Stores inventory. The team selected a popular model respirator, size large, to track improvements. Despite a 30 percent increase in respirator usage for the same period of time in the previous year, the team has reduced the back orders by 89% with a steady trend downward. Summary of accomplishments: A 47 percent reduction in the average cycle time for dirty respirators to be laundered and stocked for reuse at the Y-12 Complex; A 73 percent reduction in the average cycle time for dirty respirators to be laundered and stocked for reuse specifically for major users: Enriched Uranium Operations (EUO) and Facilities Maintenance Organization (FMO); Development of a performance measure for tracking back orders; An 89 percent reduction in the number of laundered respirators on back order; Implementation of a tracking method to account for respirator loss; Achievement of an annual cost savings/avoidance of $800K with a one-time cost of $20K; Implementation of a routine pick-up schedule for EUO (major user of respirators); Elimination of activities no longer determined to be needed; Elimination of routine complaint calls to

  12. Y-12 Respirator Flow Cycle Time Reduction Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In mid-July 2000, a Cycle Time Reduction (CTR) project was initiated by senior management to improve the flow and overall efficiency of the respirator distribution process at Y-12. A cross-functional team was formed to evaluate the current process and to propose necessary changes for improvement. Specifically, the team was challenged to make improvements that would eliminate production work stoppages due to the unavailability of respirators in Y-12 Stores. Prior to the team initiation, plant back orders for a specific model respirator were averaging above 600 and have been as high as 750+. The Cycle Time Reduction team segmented the respirator flow into detailed steps, with the focus and emphasis primarily being on the movement of dirty respirators out of work areas, transportation to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laundry, and return back to Y-12 Stores inventory. The team selected a popular model respirator, size large, to track improvements. Despite a 30 percent increase in respirator usage for the same period of time in the previous year, the team has reduced the back orders by 89% with a steady trend downward. Summary of accomplishments: A 47 percent reduction in the average cycle time for dirty respirators to be laundered and stocked for reuse at the Y-12 Complex; A 73 percent reduction in the average cycle time for dirty respirators to be laundered and stocked for reuse specifically for major users: Enriched Uranium Operations (EUO) and Facilities Maintenance Organization (FMO); Development of a performance measure for tracking back orders; An 89 percent reduction in the number of laundered respirators on back order; Implementation of a tracking method to account for respirator loss; Achievement of an annual cost savings/avoidance of $800K with a one-time cost of $20K; Implementation of a routine pick-up schedule for EUO (major user of respirators); Elimination of activities no longer determined to be needed; Elimination of routine complaint calls to

  13. Evaluation of Port-A-Cul transport system for protection of anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, E; Thompson, F S; Armfield, A Y; Dowell, V R; Reinhardt, D J

    1978-07-01

    The protection of anaerobes in Port-A-Cul (PAC) transport system (Bioquest, Div. of Becton, Dickinson &Co., Cockeysville, Md.) tubes and vials was studied. Ten species of obligately anaerobic bacteria commonly isolated from clinical specimens were used to prepare simulated swab and fluid specimens in high and low concentrations. Samples in PAC tubes and vials were held for 2, 24, and 48 h at ambient temperature and in a refrigerator. In addition, samples of the simulated specimens were exposed to controlled anaerobic and aerobic conditions in vented tubes and vials, with and without PAC medium, at ambient and refrigerator temperatures. Viable bacterial colony counts from specimens in PAC tubes and vials used as recommended by the manufacturer were consistently greater than those from specimens exposed to the different controlled conditions. The protection in PAC was about equal for specimens with either high or low concentrations of bacteria. Protection of the anaerobes in PAC was more obvious with swab than with fluid specimens. Quantitative recovery of anaerobes from refrigerated PAC samples, with few exceptions, was comparable to that from PAC samples held at ambient temperature. PMID:353071

  14. Anaerobic xylose fermentation by Spathaspora passalidarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaoru

    2012-01-01

    reductase (XR) and NAD+-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH). Thus, the capacity of S. passalidarum to utilize xylose under anaerobic conditions is possibly due to the balance between the cofactor’s supply and demand through this XR–XDH pathway. Only few XRs with NADH preference have been reported so far....... 2-Deoxy glucose completely inhibited the conversion of xylose by S. passalidarum under anaerobic conditions, but only partially did that under aerobic conditions. Thus, xylose uptake by S. passalidarum may be carried out by different xylose transport systems under anaerobic and aerobic conditions...

  15. Potential for anaerobic conversion of xenobiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Dolfing, J.; Haagensen, Frank;

    2003-01-01

    This review covers the latest research on the anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic xenobiotic compounds, with emphasis on surfactants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalate esters, polychlorinated biphenyls, halogenated phenols, and pesticides. The versatility of anaerobic reactor systems...... regarding the treatment of xenobiotics is shown with the focus on the UASB reactor, but the applicability of other reactor designs for treatment of hazardous waste is also included. Bioaugmentation has proved to be a viable technique to enhance a specific activity in anaerobic reactors and recent research...... on reactor and in situ bioaugmentation is reported....

  16. Syntrophic co-culture of aerobic Bacillus and anaerobic Clostridium for bio-fuels and bio-hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jui-Jen; Ho, Cheng-Yu.; Chen, Wei-En; Huang, Chieh-Chen [Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung (China); Chou, Chia-Hung; Lay, Jiunn-Jyi [Department of Science and Technology, National Kaohsiung First University, Kaohsiung (China)

    2008-10-15

    By using brewery yeast waste and microflora from rice straw compost, an anaerobic semi-solid bio-hydrogen-producing system has been established. For the purpose of industrialization, the major players of both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial strains in the system were isolated and their combination for an effective production of bio-hydrogen and other bio-fuels was examined in this study. The phylogenetic analysis found that four anaerobic isolates (Clostridium beijerinckii L9, Clostridium diolis Z2, Clostridium roseum Z5-1, and C. roseum W8) were highly related with each other and belongs to the cluster I clostridia family, the family that many of solvent-producing strains included. On the other hand, one of the aerobic isolates, the Bacillus thermoamylovorans strain I, shown multiple extracellular enzyme activities including lipase, protease, {alpha}-amylase, pectinase and cellulase, was suggested as a good partner for creating an anaerobic environment and pre-saccharification of substrate for those co-cultured solventogenic clostridial strain. Among these clostridial strains, though C. beijerinckii L9 do not show as many extracellular enzyme activities as Bacillus, but it performs the highest hydrogen-producing ability. The original microflora can be updated to a syntrophic bacterial co-culture system contended only with B. thermoamylovorans I and C. beijerinckii L9. The combination of aerobic Bacillus and anaerobic Clostridium may play the key role for developing the industrialized bio-fuels and bio-hydrogen-producing system from biomass. (author)

  17. [Spectral characteristics of soluble metabolites during endogenous respiration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-hua; Zhang, Qin; Bai, Xu-li; Liu, Yi

    2014-09-01

    Endogenous respiration phase plays an important role in the sewage treatment process. In order to clearly understand the endogenous respiration process of the activated sludge process, three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy and respirogram were employed for the analysis of endogenous respiration process. Results showed that the three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy and UV spectroscopy could identify all stages significantly. The following conclusions could be drawn: (1) Rapid decline phase of endogenous respiration:the excitation wavelength (EX) and emission wavelength (Em) of humic peak showed blue shift of 5 nm and 6 nm, respectively, the fluorescence index f450/500 and HIX (humification index) were reduced by 9. 3% and 0.2%, respectively, UV253/203 and UV254 increased by 37.5% and 200%, respectively. These results indicated the presence of bioavailable organics; (2)Slow decline phase of endogenous respiration: f450/500 was increased by 0. 5% , HIX was reduced by 0. 2% , UV253/203 was reduced by 20% , UV254 was increased by 16. 7%. These results indicated that hydrolysis or autolysis of cells might occur; (3)Stable phase of endogenous respiration: humic acid peak remained unchanged, indicating the adaption of microorganisms to starving environment. The analysis of the endogenous respiration process from the perspective of metabolites provides a new way for control of microbial wastewater treatment process. PMID:25518670

  18. Root Zone Respiration on Hydroponically Grown Wheat Plant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-Crespo, R. A.; Monje, O. A.

    2010-01-01

    Root respiration is a biological phenomenon that controls plant growth and physiological development during a plant's lifespan. This process is dependent on the availability of oxygen in the system where the plant is located. In hydroponic systems, where plants are submerged in a solution containing vital nutrients but no type of soil, the availability of oxygen arises from the dissolved oxygen concentration in the solution. This oxygen concentration is dependent on the , gas-liquid interface formed on the upper surface of the liquid, as given by Henry's Law, depending on pressure and temperature conditions. Respiration rates of the plants rise as biomass and root zone increase with age. The respiration rate of Apogee wheat plants (Triticum aestivum) was measured as a function of light intensity (catalytic for photosynthesis) and CO2 concentration to determine their effect on respiration rates. To determine their effects on respiration rate and plant growth microbial communities were introduced into the system, by Innoculum. Surfactants were introduced, simulating gray-water usage in space, as another factor to determine their effect on chemical oxygen demand of microbials and on respiration rates of the plants. It is expected to see small effects from changes in CO2 concentration or light levels, and to see root respiration decrease in an exponential manner with plant age and microbial activity.

  19. Evaluation of dust respirators for elimination of mouse aeroallergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, M; Inouye, S; Miyazawa, H; Kamimura, H; Kimura, M; Yamazaki, S

    1989-01-01

    The efficiency of various dust respirators for eliminating mouse allergens [mouse urine proteins (MUP), pelts proteins (MPP) and serum albumin (MSA)] were evaluated with use of low-volume air samplers and immunochemical methods. Three kinds of dust respirators from one manufacturer which have different efficacy in the exclusion of dust particles were put on the fiber glass filter in each air sampler. Then the air in a mouse housing room was sampled. The allergens passed through the respirators, were trapped in the fiber glass filters, and then extracted from the filters. The allergens of MUP and MPP in the extract were measured by an inhibition method of fluorometric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for IgE antibody and those of MSA measured by a fluorometric sandwich ELISA. The respirator with the lowest capability of exclusion was found to eliminate 65-86% of respective allergens. The other two respirators with higher powers eliminated 98% of MUP. MPP and MSA were eliminated to undetectable levels through these respirators. This study provided a means for the evaluation of dust respirators for animal aeroallergens. PMID:2918688

  20. Soil Respiration in Semiarid Temperate Grasslands under Various Land Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiangyang; Schellenberg, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration, a major component of the global carbon cycle, is significantly influenced by land management practices. Grasslands are potentially a major sink for carbon, but can also be a source. Here, we investigated the potential effect of land management (grazing, clipping, and ungrazed enclosures) on soil respiration in the semiarid grassland of northern China. Our results showed the mean soil respiration was significantly higher under enclosures (2.17μmol.m−2.s−1) and clipping (2.06μmol.m−2.s−1) than under grazing (1.65μmol.m−2.s−1) over the three growing seasons. The high rates of soil respiration under enclosure and clipping were associated with the higher belowground net primary productivity (BNPP). Our analyses indicated that soil respiration was primarily related to BNPP under grazing, to soil water content under clipping. Using structural equation models, we found that soil water content, aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and BNPP regulated soil respiration, with soil water content as the predominant factor. Our findings highlight that management-induced changes in abiotic (soil temperature and soil water content) and biotic (ANPP and BNPP) factors regulate soil respiration in the semiarid temperate grassland of northern China. PMID:26808376

  1. Soil Respiration in Semiarid Temperate Grasslands under Various Land Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Wang

    Full Text Available Soil respiration, a major component of the global carbon cycle, is significantly influenced by land management practices. Grasslands are potentially a major sink for carbon, but can also be a source. Here, we investigated the potential effect of land management (grazing, clipping, and ungrazed enclosures on soil respiration in the semiarid grassland of northern China. Our results showed the mean soil respiration was significantly higher under enclosures (2.17 μmol.m(-2.s(-1 and clipping (2.06 μmol.m(-2.s(-1 than under grazing (1.65 μmol.m-(2.s(-1 over the three growing seasons. The high rates of soil respiration under enclosure and clipping were associated with the higher belowground net primary productivity (BNPP. Our analyses indicated that soil respiration was primarily related to BNPP under grazing, to soil water content under clipping. Using structural equation models, we found that soil water content, aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP and BNPP regulated soil respiration, with soil water content as the predominant factor. Our findings highlight that management-induced changes in abiotic (soil temperature and soil water content and biotic (ANPP and BNPP factors regulate soil respiration in the semiarid temperate grassland of northern China.

  2. Soil Respiration in Semiarid Temperate Grasslands under Various Land Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Ji, Lei; Hou, Xiangyang; Schellenberg, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Soil respiration, a major component of the global carbon cycle, is significantly influenced by land management practices. Grasslands are potentially a major sink for carbon, but can also be a source. Here, we investigated the potential effect of land management (grazing, clipping, and ungrazed enclosures) on soil respiration in the semiarid grassland of northern China. Our results showed the mean soil respiration was significantly higher under enclosures (2.17 μmol.m(-2).s(-1)) and clipping (2.06 μmol.m(-2).s(-1)) than under grazing (1.65 μmol.m-(2).s(-1)) over the three growing seasons. The high rates of soil respiration under enclosure and clipping were associated with the higher belowground net primary productivity (BNPP). Our analyses indicated that soil respiration was primarily related to BNPP under grazing, to soil water content under clipping. Using structural equation models, we found that soil water content, aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and BNPP regulated soil respiration, with soil water content as the predominant factor. Our findings highlight that management-induced changes in abiotic (soil temperature and soil water content) and biotic (ANPP and BNPP) factors regulate soil respiration in the semiarid temperate grassland of northern China. PMID:26808376

  3. Anaerobic respirometry as a tool for substrate characterisation aiming at modelling of manures anaerobic modelling of manures anaerobic digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Girault, R.; Sadowski, A.G.; Béline, F.

    2010-01-01

    Modelling of anaerobic digestion is more and more used as a tool for process optimization or interpreting observed phenomena within research projects. The most used model is the Anaerobic Digestion Model n°1 (ADM1) but some other models are also available (either simpler or more complex). Whatever the model, one of the major key issue is the fractionation and characterisation of the influent. For substrates like activated sludge from wastewater treatment plants, detailed influent characterisa...

  4. Anaerobe Tolerance to Oxygen and the Potentials of Anaerobic and Aerobic Cocultures for Wastewater Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    The anaerobic treatment processes are considered to be well-established methods for the elimination of easily biodegradable organic matter from wastewaters. Some difficulties concerning certain wastewaters are related to the possible presence of dissolved oxygen. The common belief is that anaerobes are oxygen intolerant. Therefore, the common practice is to use sequencing anaerobic and aerobic steps in separate tanks. Enhanced treatment by polishing off the residual biodegradable oxygen deman...

  5. Support for an anaerobic sulfur cycle in two Canadian peatland soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodau, Christian; Mayer, Bernhard; Peiffer, Stefan; Moore, Tim R.

    2007-06-01

    Sulfur cycling in peatlands may affect global CH4 emissions by suppression of methanogenesis through bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR). We sought evidence for anaerobic sulfur cycling in four peat mesocosms irrigated with sulfate at a loading of 0.8 and 3.3 g S m-2 yr-1. To this end we obtained concentration profiles of dissolved O2, C, S, and Fe, and determined 34S/32S ratios of sulfate, reduced inorganic sulfur (TRIS), and total sulfur. To estimate the importance of BSR for anaerobic respiration, peat was incubated with molybdate as inhibitor of BSR. In the mesocosms, pore water concentrations of dissolved sulfate and H2S adjusted to 5-20 μmol L-1 and 0-9 μmol L-1, respectively, whereas concentrations of CO2, CH4, and DOC reached millimolar levels. CO2 production was not explained by methanogenesis and net reduction of inorganic electron acceptors. In the shallow peat, H2S was produced and 34S in sulfate enriched by 3.6 to 6‰, indicating occurrence of BSR. Sulfate reducers also accounted for much of the metabolic activity. Addition of molybdate suppressed CO2 production by 20 to 50%. Deeper into the peat, the sulfate pool was apparently replenished from the peat matrix as sulfate became enriched in 32S, likely stemming from TRIS or organic sulfur in the peat. Sulfur was thus anaerobically cycled between oxidized and reduced pools. An electron acceptor capable of driving this cycle could not be conclusively identified. Regardless of this uncertainty, the results suggest that anaerobic S cycling can maintain BSR and potentially contribute to low methane production in soils of ombrotrophic bogs.

  6. Respirator Use in a Hospital Setting: Establishing Surveillance Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, Mary I.; Ficken, Meredith E.; Lehmann, Christoph U.; Talbot, Thomas R.; Swift, Melanie D.; McGown, Paula W.; Wheaton, Robert F.; Bruer, Michele; Little, Steven W.; Oke, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Information that details use and supply of respirators in acute care hospitals is vital to prevent disease transmission, assure the safety of health care personnel, and inform national guidelines and regulations. Objective To develop measures of respirator use and supply in the acute care hospital setting to aid evaluation of respirator programs, allow benchmarking among hospitals, and serve as a foundation for national surveillance to enhance effective Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) use and management. Methods We identified existing regulations and guidelines that govern respirator use and supply at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC). Related routine and emergency hospital practices were documented through an investigation of hospital administrative policies, protocols, and programs. Respirator dependent practices were categorized based on hospital workflow: Prevention (preparation), patient care (response), and infection surveillance (outcomes). Associated data in information systems were extracted and their quality evaluated. Finally, measures representing major factors and components of respirator use and supply were developed. Results Various directives affecting multiple stakeholders govern respirator use and supply in hospitals. Forty-seven primary and secondary measures representing factors of respirator use and supply in the acute care hospital setting were derived from existing information systems associated with the implementation of these directives. Conclusion Adequate PPE supply and effective use that limit disease transmission and protect health care personnel are dependent on multiple factors associated with routine and emergency hospital practices. We developed forty-seven measures that may serve as the basis for a national PPE surveillance system, beginning with standardized measures of respirator use and supply for collection across different hospital types, sizes, and locations to inform hospitals, government agencies

  7. Influence of soil moisture on soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fer, Miroslav; Kodesova, Radka; Nikodem, Antonin; Klement, Ales; Jelenova, Klara

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work was to describe an impact of soil moisture on soil respiration. Study was performed on soil samples from morphologically diverse study site in loess region of Southern Moravia, Czech Republic. The original soil type is Haplic Chernozem, which was due to erosion changed into Regosol (steep parts) and Colluvial soil (base slope and the tributary valley). Soil samples were collected from topsoils at 5 points of the selected elevation transect and also from the parent material (loess). Grab soil samples, undisturbed soil samples (small - 100 cm3, and large - 713 cm3) and undisturbed soil blocks were taken. Basic soil properties were determined on grab soil samples. Small undisturbed soil samples were used to determine the soil water retention curves and the hydraulic conductivity functions using the multiple outflow tests in Tempe cells and a numerical inversion with HYDRUS 1-D. During experiments performed in greenhouse dry large undisturbed soil samples were wetted from below using a kaolin tank and cumulative water inflow due to capillary rise was measured. Simultaneously net CO2 exchange rate and net H2O exchange rate were measured using LCi-SD portable photosynthesis system with Soil Respiration Chamber. Numerical inversion of the measured cumulative capillary rise data using the HYDRUS-1D program was applied to modify selected soil hydraulic parameters for particular conditions and to simulate actual soil water distribution within each soil column in selected times. Undisturbed soil blocks were used to prepare thin soil sections to study soil-pore structure. Results for all soil samples showed that at the beginning of soil samples wetting the CO2 emission increased because of improving condition for microbes' activity. The maximum values were reached for soil column average soil water content between 0.10 and 0.15 cm3/cm3. Next CO2 emission decreased since the pore system starts filling by water (i.e. aggravated conditions for microbes

  8. Characterizing the Anaerobic Response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by Quantitative Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Terashima, Mia; Specht, Michael; Naumann, Bianca; Hippler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The versatile metabolism of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is reflected in its complex response to anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic response is also remarkable in the context of renewable energy because C. reinhardtii is able to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. To identify proteins involved during anaerobic acclimation as well as to localize proteins and pathways to the powerhouses of the cell, chloroplasts and mitochondria from C. reinhardtii in aerobic and anaerobic...

  9. Anaerobe Tolerance to Oxygen and the Potentials of Anaerobic and Aerobic Cocultures for Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Kato

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic treatment processes are considered to be well-established methods for the elimination of easily biodegradable organic matter from wastewaters. Some difficulties concerning certain wastewaters are related to the possible presence of dissolved oxygen. The common belief is that anaerobes are oxygen intolerant. Therefore, the common practice is to use sequencing anaerobic and aerobic steps in separate tanks. Enhanced treatment by polishing off the residual biodegradable oxygen demand from effluents of anaerobic reactors, or the biodegradation of recalcitrant wastewater pollutants, usually requires sequenced anaerobic and aerobic bacteria activities. However, the combined activity of both bacteria can also be obtained in a single reactor. Previous experiments with either pure or mixed cultures showed that anaerobes can tolerate oxygen to a certain extent. The oxygen toxicity to methanogens in anaerobic sludges was quantified in batch experiments, as well as in anaerobic reactors. The results showed that methanogens have a high tolerance to oxygen. In practice, it was confirmed that dissolved oxygen does not constitute any detrimental effect on reactor treatment performance. This means that the coexistence of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria in one single reactor is feasible and increases the potentials of new applications in wastewater treatment

  10. Removal of anaerobic soluble microbial products in a biological activated carbon reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaojing; Zhou, Weili; He, Shengbing

    2013-09-01

    The soluble microbial products (SMP) in the biological treatment effluent are generally of great amount and are poorly biodegradable. Focusing on the biodegradation of anaerobic SMP, the biological activated carbon (BAC) was introduced into the anaerobic system. The experiments were conducted in two identical lab-scale up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. The high strength organics were degraded in the first UASB reactor (UASB1) and the second UASB (UASB2, i.e., BAC) functioned as a polishing step to remove SMP produced in UASB1. The results showed that 90% of the SMP could be removed before granular activated carbon was saturated. After the saturation, the SMP removal decreased to 60% on the average. Analysis of granular activated carbon adsorption revealed that the main role of SMP removal in BAC reactor was biodegradation. A strain of SMP-degrading bacteria, which was found highly similar to Klebsiella sp., was isolated, enriched and inoculated back to the BAC reactor. When the influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) was 10,000 mg/L and the organic loading rate achieved 10 kg COD/(m3 x day), the effluent from the BAC reactor could meet the discharge standard without further treatment. Anaerobic BAC reactor inoculated with the isolated Klebsiella was proved to be an effective, cheap and easy technical treatment approach for the removal of SMP in the treatment of easily-degradable wastewater with COD lower than 10,000 mg/L. PMID:24520716

  11. [Sensitivity of clinical strains of facultatively anaerobic bacteria to antimicrobial drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhenov, L G; Iskhakova, Kh I

    1988-02-01

    Six hundred and sixty five samples of clinical materials from patients with various pyoinflammatory diseases were tested for obligatory anaerobes. Anaerobes were detected in 148 samples which amounted to 22.3 per cent of the total number of the samples and to 33.2 per cent of the samples with microbial growth. A total of 171 strains of obligatory anaerobes were isolated. Among them 58.5, 24.5, 16.4 and 0.6 per cent were nonsporulating gramnegative bacilli, grampositive cocci, grampositive bacilli and gramnegative cocci respectively. Sensitivity of the isolated anaerobes was tested with the disk diffusion method. The most active drugs against the tested strains were: nitroxoline, rifampicin, metronidasole, erythromycin, carbenicillin and cefotaxim (4.2, 4.5, 9.3, 10.6, 11.5 and 11.7 per cent of the resistant strains respectively). Gentamicin, polymyxin M, novobiocin and cefazoline were the least active drugs (94.6, 78.9, 65.4 and 50.0 per cent of the resistant strains respectively). Metronidasole, levomycetin, nitroxolin, rifampicin and furazolidone showed the highest activity against bacteroids of the fragilis group (0, 0, 0, 8 and 12.5 per cent of the resistant strains respectively) while gentamicin, polymyxin M, cefazolin, oxacillin, novobiocin and penicillin showed the lowest activity (100, 100, 100, 100, 87.0 and 66.7 per cent of the resistant strains respectively). PMID:3377601

  12. In vitro activities of clinafloxacin against contemporary clinical bacterial isolates from 10 North American centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, P C; Barry, A L; Brown, S D

    1998-05-01

    Clinafloxacin was more active than ciprofloxacin against 4,213 aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacterial isolates from 10 medical centers, as tested by broth microdilution and disk diffusion methods. The percentage of 201 anaerobes susceptible to clinafloxacin by broth microdilution was comparable to cefoxitin. Our data support the proposed disk diffusion interpretive criteria for aerobic bacteria with 5-microg clinafloxacin disks. PMID:9593166

  13. Oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of gases respired by humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen-isotope fractionation associated with respiration in human individuals at rest is linearly related to the fraction of the O2 utilized in the respiration process. The slope of this relationship is affected by a history of smoking, by vigorous exercise, and by the N2/O2 ratio of the inhaled gas. For patients who suffer anemia-related diseases, the slope of this relationship is directly proportional to their level of hemoglobin. These results introduce a new approach for studying the mechanisms of O2 consumption in human respiration and how they are affected by related diseases

  14. Estimating daytime ecosystem respiration from eddy-flux data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Herbst, Mathias;

    2011-01-01

    To understand what governs the patterns of net ecosystem exchange of CO2, an understanding of factors influencing the component fluxes, ecosystem respiration and gross primary production is needed. In the present paper, we introduce an alternative method for estimating daytime ecosystem respiration...... based on whole ecosystem fluxes from a linear regression of photosynthetic photon flux density data vs. daytime net ecosystem exchange data at forest ecosystem level. This method is based on the principles of the Kok-method applied at leaf level for estimating daytime respiration. We demonstrate the...

  15. Respirator studies for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A project of the Health, Safety and Environment Division is described. The project provides the NRC with information of respiratory protective devices and programs for their licensee personnel. The following activities were performed during FY 1983: selection of alternate test aerosols for quality assurance testing of high-efficiency particulate air respirator filters; evaluation of MAG-1 spectacles for use with positive and negative-pressure respirators; development of a Manual of Respiratory Protection in Emergencies Involving Airborne Radioactive Materials, and technical assistance to NRC licensees regarding respirator applications. 2 references, 1 figure

  16. Ammonium excretion and oxygen respiration of tropical copepods and euphausiids exposed to oxygen minimum zone conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiko, R.; Hauss, H.; Buchholz, F.; Melzner, F.

    2015-10-01

    Calanoid copepods and euphausiids are key components of marine zooplankton communities worldwide. Most euphausiids and several copepod species perform diel vertical migrations (DVMs) that contribute to the export of particulate and dissolved matter to midwater depths. In vast areas of the global ocean, and in particular in the eastern tropical Atlantic and Pacific, the daytime distribution depth of many migrating organisms corresponds to the core of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). At depth, the animals experience reduced temperature and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) and an increased carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) compared to their near-surface nighttime habitat. Although it is well known that low oxygen levels can inhibit respiratory activity, the respiration response of tropical copepods and euphausiids to relevant pCO2, pO2 and temperature conditions remains poorly parameterized. Further, the regulation of ammonium excretion at OMZ conditions is generally not well understood. It was recently estimated that DVM-mediated ammonium supply considerably fuels bacterial anaerobic ammonium oxidation - a major loss process for fixed nitrogen in the ocean. These estimates were based on the implicit assumption that hypoxia or anoxia in combination with hypercapnia (elevated pCO2) does not result in a downregulation of ammonium excretion. Here we show that exposure to OMZ conditions can result in strong depression of respiration and ammonium excretion in calanoid copepods and euphausiids from the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic and the Eastern Tropical South Pacific. These physiological responses need to be taken into account when estimating DVM-mediated fluxes of carbon and nitrogen into OMZs.

  17. Anaerobic degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Haagensen, Frank; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    increases during anaerobic stabilization due to transformation of easily degradable organic matter. Hence, LAS is regarded as resistant to biodegradation under anaerobic conditions. We present data from a lab-scale semi-continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) spiked with linear dodecylbenzene sulfonate (C......% of the added C-12 LAS was bioavailable and 20% was biotransformed when spiking with 100 mg/L of C-12 LAS and a TS concentration of 14.2 mg/L. Enhanced bioavailability of C-12 LAS was obtained in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor inoculated with granular sludge and sewage sludge. Biodegradation......Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) found in wastewater is removed in the wastewater treatment facilities by sorption and aerobic biodegradation. The anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge has not been shown to contribute to the removal. The concentration of LAS based on dry matter typically...

  18. Occupational Exposure to Respirable Dust, Respirable Crystalline Silica and Diesel Engine Exhaust Emissions in the London Tunnelling Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Karen S; Mair, Craig; Alexander, Carla; de Vocht, Frank; van Tongeren, Martie

    2016-03-01

    Personal 8-h shift exposure to respirable dust, diesel engine exhaust emissions (DEEE) (as respirable elemental carbon), and respirable crystalline silica of workers involved in constructing an underground metro railway tunnel was assessed. Black carbon (BC) concentrations were also assessed using a MicroAeth AE51. During sprayed concrete lining (SCL) activities in the tunnel, the geometric mean (GM) respirable dust exposure level was 0.91mg m(-3), with the highest exposure measured on a back-up sprayer (3.20mg m(-3)). The GM respirable crystalline silica concentration for SCL workers was 0.03mg m(-3), with the highest measurement also for the back-up sprayer (0.24mg m(-3)). During tunnel boring machine (TBM) activities, the GM respirable dust concentration was 0.54mg m(-3). The GM respirable elemental carbon concentration for all the TBM operators was 18 µg m(-3); with the highest concentration measured on a segment lifter. The BC concentrations were higher in the SCL environment in comparison to the TBM environment (daily GM 18-54 µg m(-3) versus 3-6 µg m(-3)). This small-scale monitoring campaign provides additional personal data on exposures experienced by underground tunnel construction workers. PMID:26403363

  19. Anaerobic membrane bioreactor under extreme conditions (poster)

    OpenAIRE

    Munoz Sierra, J.D.; De Kreuk, M.K.; Spanjers, H.; van Lier, J B

    2013-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors ensure biomass retention by the application of micro or ultrafiltration processes. This allows operation at high sludge concentrations. Previous studies have shown that anaerobic membrane bioreactors is an efficient way to retain specialist microorganisms for treating wastewaters from different industries such as coke, textile, food, and chemical. However, few research has been found into the use of membrane bioreactors for anaerobic treatment of wastewater under extreme ...

  20. Anaerobic Biodegradability of Agricultural Renewable Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Bo; Lortscher, Peter; Palfery, Doris

    2013-01-01

    Natural fiber-based paper and paperboard products are likely disposed of in municipal wastewater, composting, or landfill after an intended usage. However, there are few studies reporting anaerobic sludge digestion and biodegradability of agricultural fibers although the soiled sanitary products, containing agricultural fibers, are increasingly disposed of in municipal wastewater or conventional landfill treatment systems, in which one or more unit operations are anaerobic digestion. We condu...

  1. Psychrophilic anaerobic treatment of low strength wastewaters.

    OpenAIRE

    Rebac, S.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to design a high-rate anaerobic system for the treatment low strength wastewaters under psychrophilic conditions.Psychrophilic (3 to 20 °C) anaerobic treatment of low strength synthetic and malting wastewater was investigated using a single and two stage expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor system. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies found in the experiments with synthetic wastewater exceeded 90 % in the single stage reactor at im...

  2. Anaerober Abbau von Kresolen und Monohydroxybenzoaten

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Jochen A.

    2000-01-01

    All aromatic compounds are potential substrates for microorganisms. Hence, microorganisms play an eminent role in the global carbon cycle. The present work describes the anaerobic degradation of cresols and toluene, both bulk chemicals of the petroleum industry, and the anaerobic degradation of 3-hydroxybenzoate, a model compound for degradation of lignin-monomers. Degradation pathways for these aromatic substrates are postulated on the basis of in vitro measurements of key enzymes in various...

  3. Anaerobic digester for treatment of organic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, V. K. [Indian Insitute of Technology, Delhi (India)]|[ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Matera (Italy); Fortuna, F.; Canditelli, M.; Cornacchia, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Matera (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; Farina, R. [ENEA, centro Ricerche ``Ezio Clementel``, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1997-09-01

    The essential features of both new and more efficient reactor systems and their appropriate applications for various organic waste management situations, description of several working plants are discussed in the present communication. It is hoped that significant development reported here would be useful in opening a new vista to the application of anaerobic biotechnology for the waste treatment of both low/high organic strength and specialized treatment for toxic substances, using appropriate anaerobic methods.

  4. Anaerobic Digestion of Paper Mill Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Shreeshivadasan Chelliapan; Siti Baizura Mahat; Md. Fadjil Md. Din; A. Yuzir; Othman, N.

    2012-01-01

    In general, paper mill wastewater contains complex organic substances which could not be treated completely using conventional treatment processes, e.g. aerobic processes. As a result, anaerobic technology is a promising alternative for paper mill wastewater treatment due to its ability to degrade hard organic compounds. In the present study, treatment of paper mill wastewater using a stage anaerobic reactor was investigated. The more specific objectives of this study were to confirm whether ...

  5. Sleep Deprivation Induced Anxiety and Anaerobic Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Selma Arzu Vardar; Levent Öztürk; Cem Kurt; Erdogan Bulut; Necdet Sut; Erdal Vardar

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation induced anxiety on anaerobic performance. Thirteen volunteer male physical education students completed the Turkish version of State Anxiety Inventory and performed Wingate anaerobic test for three times: (1) following a full-night of habitual sleep (baseline measurements), (2) following 30 hours of sleep deprivation, and (3) following partial-night sleep deprivation. Baseline measurements were performed the day before ...

  6. EFFECT OF MUSIC ON ANAEROBIC EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Atan, T.

    2013-01-01

    For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-...

  7. Comparative Studies of Alternative Anaerobic Digestion Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Inman, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Washington D.C. Water and Sewage Authority is planning to construct a new anaerobic digestion facility at its Blue Plains WWTP by 2008. The research conducted in this study is to aid the designers of this facility by evaluating alternative digestion technologies. Alternative anaerobic digestion technologies include thermophilic, acid/gas phased, and temperature phased digestion. In order to evaluate the relative merits of each, a year long study evaluated the performance of bench scale dig...

  8. SLEEP DEPRIVATION INDUCED ANXIETY AND ANAEROBIC PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Arzu Vardar

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation induced anxiety on anaerobic performance. Thirteen volunteer male physical education students completed the Turkish version of State Anxiety Inventory and performed Wingate anaerobic test for three times: (1 following a full-night of habitual sleep (baseline measurements, (2 following 30 hours of sleep deprivation, and (3 following partial-night sleep deprivation. Baseline measurements were performed the day before total sleep deprivation. Measurements following partial sleep deprivation were made 2 weeks later than total sleep deprivation measurements. State anxiety was measured prior to each Wingate test. The mean state anxiety following total sleep deprivation was higher than the baseline measurement (44.9 ± 12.9 vs. 27.6 ± 4.2, respectively, p = 0.02 whereas anaerobic performance parameters remained unchanged. Neither anaerobic parameters nor state anxiety levels were affected by one night partial sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that 30 hours continuous wakefulness may increase anxiety level without impairing anaerobic performance, whereas one night of partial sleep deprivation was ineffective on both state anxiety and anaerobic performance

  9. Succession of lignocellulolytic bacterial consortia bred anaerobically from lake sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenblum, Elisa; Jiménez, Diego Javier; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2016-03-01

    Anaerobic bacteria degrade lignocellulose in various anoxic and organically rich environments, often in a syntrophic process. Anaerobic enrichments of bacterial communities on a recalcitrant lignocellulose source were studied combining polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and culturing. Three consortia were constructed using the microbiota of lake sediment as the starting inoculum and untreated switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) (acid or heat) or treated (with either acid or heat) as the sole source of carbonaceous compounds. Additionally, nitrate was used in order to limit sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. Bacterial growth took place, as evidenced from 3 to 4 log unit increases in the 16S rRNA gene copy numbers as well as direct cell counts through three transfers on cleaned and reused substrate placed in fresh mineral medium. After 2 days, Aeromonas bestiarum-like organisms dominated the enrichments, irrespective of the substrate type. One month later, each substrate revealed major enrichments of organisms affiliated with different species of Clostridium. Moreover, only the heat-treated substrate selected Dysgonomonas capnocytophagoides-affiliated bacteria (Bacteroidetes). Towards the end of the experiment, members of the Proteobacteria (Aeromonas, Rhizobium and/or Serratia) became dominant in all three types of substrates. A total of 160 strains was isolated from the enrichments. Most of the strains tested (78%) were able to grow anaerobically on carboxymethyl cellulose and xylan. The final consortia yield attractive biological tools for the depolymerization of recalcitrant lignocellulosic materials and are proposed for the production of precursors of biofuels. PMID:26875750

  10. Quantifying rhizosphere respiration for two cool-season perennial forages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the regulation of ecosystem carbon dioxide flux from forage production systems requires knowledge of component fluxes, including photosynthetic uptake and respiratory loss. Experimental separation of soil respiration into its heterotrophic (free-living soil organisms) and rhizosphere c...

  11. Anaerobic psychrophiles from Lake Zub and Lake Untersee, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alisa; Pikuta, Elena V.; Guisler, Melissa; Stahl, Sarah; Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-08-01

    The study of samples from Antarctica 2008 and 2009 expeditions organized and successfully conducted by Richard Hoover led to the isolation of diverse anaerobic strains with psychrotolerant and psychrophilic physiology. Due to the fact that Lake Untersee has never been subject to microbiological study, this work with the samples has significant and pioneering impact to the knowledge about the biology of this unique ecosystem. Also, the astrobiological significance for the study of these ecosystems is based on new findings of ice covered water systems on other bodies of our solar system. Anaerobic psychrotolerant strain LZ-22 was isolated from a frozen sample of green moss with soils around the rhizosphere collected near Lake Zub in Antarctica. Morphology of strain LZ-22 was observed to be motile, rod shaped and spore-forming cells with sizes 1 x 5-10 μm. This new isolate is a mesophile with the maximum temperature of growth at 40°C. Strain LZ-22 is able to live on media without NaCl and in media with up to 7 % (w/v) NaCl. It is catalase negative and grows only on sugars with the best growth rate being on lactose. The strain is a neutrophile and grows between pH 5 and 9.0 with the optimum at 7.8. Another two strains UL7-96mG and LU-96m7P were isolated from deep water samples of Lake Untersee. Proteolytic strain LU-96m7P had a truly psychrophilic nature and refused to grow at room temperature. Sugarlytic strain UL7-96mG was found to be psychrotolerant, but its rate of growth at 3°C was very high compared with other mesophiles. Two homoacetogenic psychrophilic strains A7AC-96m and AC-DS7 were isolated and purified from samples of Lake Untersee; both of them are able to grow chemolithotrophically on H2+CO2. In the presence of lactate, these strains are able to grow only at 0-18 °C, and growth at 22 °C was observed only with yeast extract stimulation. In this paper, physiological and morphological characteristics of novel psychrophilic and psychrotolerant isolates

  12. Anaerobic Psychrophiles from Lake Zub and Lake Untersee, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alisa; Pikuta, Elena V.; Guisler, Melissa; Stahl, Sarah; Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    The study of samples from Antarctica 2008 and 2009 expeditions organized and successfully conducted by Richard Hoover led to the isolation of diverse anaerobic strains with psychrotolerant and psychrophilic physiology. Due to the fact that Lake Untersee has never been subject to microbiological study, this work with the samples has significant and pioneering impact to the knowledge about the biology of this unique ecosystem. Also, the astrobiological significance for the study of these ecosystems is based on new findings of ice covered water systems on other bodies of our solar system. Anaerobic psychrotolerant strain LZ-22 was isolated from a frozen sample of green moss with soils around the rhizosphere collected near Lake Zub in Antarctica. Morphology of strain LZ-22 was observed to be motile, rod shaped and spore-forming cells with sizes 1 x 5-10 micron. This new isolate is a mesophile with the maximum temperature of growth at 40C. Strain LZ-22 is able to live on media without NaCl and in media with up to 7% (w/v) NaCl. It is catalase negative and grows only on sugars with the best growth rate being on lactose. The strain is a neutrophile and grows between pH 5 and 9.0 with the optimum at 7.8. Another two strains UL7-96mG and LU-96m7P were isolated from deep water samples of Lake Untersee. Proteolytic strain LU-96m7P had a truly psychrophilic nature and refused to grow at room temperature. Sugarlytic strain UL7-96mG was found to be psychrotolerant, but its rate of growth at 3C was very high compared with other mesophiles. Two homoacetogenic psychrophilic strains A7AC-96m and AC-DS7 were isolated and purified from samples of Lake Untersee; both of them are able to grow chemolithotrophically on H2+CO2. In the presence of lactate, these strains are able to grow only at 0-18C, and growth at 22C was observed only with yeast extract stimulation. In this paper, physiological and morphological characteristics of novel psychrophilic and psychrotolerant isolates from

  13. Anaerobic culture on growth efficient bi-layered culture plate in a modified candle jar using a rapid and slow combustion system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P K Maiti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Success for maximum isolation of anaerobes depends on maintaining critically low oxygen levels throughout and growth in a reduced medium with exclusion of inhibitory substances. Hence a dual system was used equipped with candle combustion for instant exhaustion of major part of oxygen from a sealed jar, along with acidified steel wool for residual oxygen purging. For inhibitory substances removal, test anaerobes were grown on anaerobic medium layered on buffer charcoal agar bed. After 48 hours incubation average colony sizes were compared with that of growths in conventional Gas-Pak system. Better growths were noted in the innovative system.

  14. Fuzzy Control of Tidal volume, Respiration number and Pressure value

    OpenAIRE

    Hasan Guler; Fikret Ata

    2010-01-01

    In this study, control of tidal volume, respiration number and pressure value which are arrived to patient at mechanical ventilator device which is used in intensive care units were performed with fuzzy logic controller. The aim of this system is to reduce workload of aneshesiologist. By calculating tidal volume, respiration number and pressure value, the error Pe(k) between reference pressure value (Pref) and pressure of gas given ill person (Phasta) and error change rate ;#948;Pe(k) were co...

  15. Fuzzy Control of Tidal volume, Respiration number and Pressure value

    OpenAIRE

    Guler, Hasan; ATA, Fikret

    2000-01-01

    In this study, control of tidal volume, respiration number and pressure value which are arrived to patient at mechanical ventilator device which is used in intensive care units were performed with fuzzy logic controller. The aim of this system is to reduce workload of aneshesiologist. By calculating tidal volume, respiration number and pressure value, the error Pe(k) between reference pressure value (Pref) and pressure of gas given ill person (Phasta) and error change rate δPe(k) wer...

  16. Contributions of ectomycorrhizal fungal mats to forest soil respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Phillips

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Distinct aggregations of fungal hyphae and rhizomorphs, or "mats", formed by some genera of ectomycorrhizal (EcM fungi are common features of soils in coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest. We measured in situ respiration rates of Piloderma mats and neighboring non-mat soils in an old-growth Douglas-fir forest in western Oregon to investigate whether there was higher respiration from mats, and to estimate mat contributions to total soil respiration. We found that areas where Piloderma mats colonized the organic horizon often had higher soil surface flux than non-mats, with the relative increase in respiration averaging 16% across two growing seasons. Both soil physical factors and biochemistry were related to the higher surface flux of mat soils. When soil moisture was high, soil CO2 production was concentrated into near-surface soil horizons where mats tend to colonize, resulting in greater apparent differences in respiration between mat and non-mat soils. Respiration rates were also correlated with the activity of chitin-degrading soil enzymes. This finding supports the notion that the abundance of fungal biomass in EcM mats is an important driver of C and N cycling. We found Piloderma mats present across 57% of the exposed soil, and use this value to estimate a respiratory contribution from mats at the stand-scale of about 9% of total soil respiration. The activity of EcM mats, which includes both EcM fungi and microbial associates, appeared to constitute a substantial portion of total soil respiration in this old-growth Douglas-fir forest.

  17. Contributions of ectomycorrhizal fungal mats to forest soil respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Phillips

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Distinct aggregations of fungal hyphae and rhizomorphs, or "mats" formed by some genera of ectomycorrhizal (EcM fungi are common features of soils in coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest. We measured in situ respiration rates of Piloderma mats and neighboring non-mat soils in an old-growth Douglas-fir forest in Western Oregon to investigate whether there was an incremental increase in respiration from mat soils, and to estimate mat contributions to total soil respiration. We found that areas where Piloderma mats colonized the organic horizon often had higher soil surface flux than non-mats, with the incremental increase in respiration averaging 16 % across two growing seasons. Both soil physical factors and biochemistry were related to the higher surface flux of mat soils. When air-filled pore space was low (high soil moisture, soil CO2 production was concentrated into near-surface soil horizons where mats tend to colonize, resulting in greater apparent differences in respiration between mat and non-mat soils. Respiration rates were also correlated with the activity of chitin-degrading soil enzymes. This suggests that the elevated activity of fungal mats may be related to consumption or turnover of chitinous fungal cell-wall materials. We found Piloderma mats present across 57 % of the soil surface in the study area, and use this value to estimate a respiratory contribution from mats at the stand-scale of about 9 % of total soil respiration. The activity of EcM mats, which includes both EcM fungi and microbial associates, was estimated to constitute a substantial portion of total soil respiration in this old-growth Douglas-fir forest.

  18. Small ecosystem engineers as important regulators of lake's sediment respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, Victor; Lewandowski, Joerg; Krause, Stefan; Romeijn, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Although shallow lakes are covering only about 1.5% of the land surface of the Earth, they are responsible for sequestration of carbon amounts similar or even larger than those sequestered in all marine sediments. One of the most important drivers of the carbon sequestration in lakes is sediment respiration. Especially in shallow lakes, bioturbation, i.e. the biogenic reworking of the sediment matrix and the transport of fluids within the sediment, severely impacts on sediment respiration. Widespread freshwater bioturbators such as chironomid larvae (Diptera, Chironomidae) are building tubes in the sediment and actively pump water through their burrows (ventilation). In the present work we study how different organism densities and temperatures (5-30°C) impact on respiration rates. In a microcosm experiment the bioreactive resazurin/resorufin smart tracer system was applied for quantifying the impacts of different densities of Chironomidae (Diptera) larvae (0, 1000, 2000 larvae/m2) on sediment respiration. Tracer transformation rates (and sediment respiration) were correlated with larval densities with highest transformation rates occurring in microcosms with highest larval densities. Respiration differences between defaunated sediment and sediment with 1000 and 2000 larvae per m2 was insignificant at 5 °C, and was progressively increasing with rising temperatures. At 30 °C respiration rates of sediment with 2000 larvae per m2 was 4.8 times higher than those of defaunated sediment. We interpret this as an effect of temperature on larval metabolic and locomotory activity. Furthermore, bacterial communities are benefiting from the combination of the high water temperatures and bioirrigation as bacterial community are able to maintain high metabolic rates due to oxygen supplied by bioirrigation. In the context of global climate change that means that chironomid ecosystem engineering activity will have a profound and increasing impact on lake sediment respiration

  19. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of low-level radioactive cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work has been completed using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale. Start-up and operating procedures have been developed, and effluent was generated for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and fed-batch conditions were made lasting 36, 90, and 423 d. Solids solubilization rates and gas production rates averaged approximately 1.8 g cellulose per L of reactor per d and 1.2 L of off-gas per L reactor per d. Greater than 80% destruction of the volatile suspended solids was obtained. A simple dynamic process model was constructed to aid in process design and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester

  20. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work is underway using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale, to develop start-up and operating procedures, and to generate effluent for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and batch-fed conditions have been made lasting 36, 90, and over 200 days. Solids solubilization and gas production rates and total solids destruction have met or exceeded the target values of 0.6 g cellulose per L of reactor per day, 0.5 L off-gas per L of reactor per day, and 80% destruction of solids, respectively. Successful start-up procedures have been developed, and preliminary effluent characterization and disposal studies have been done. A simple dynamic process model has been constructed to aid in further process development and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester. 7 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  1. Anaerobic Nitrogen Fixers on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. G.

    2000-07-01

    The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen gas to the protein of living systems is an amazing process of nature. The first step in the process is biological nitrogen fixation, the transformation of N2 to NH3. The phenomenon is crucial for feeding the billions of our species on Earth. On Mars, the same process may allow us to discover how life can adapt to a hostile environment, and render it habitable. Hostile environments also exist on Earth. For example, nothing grows in coal refuse piles due to the oxidation of pyrite and marcasite to sulfuric acid. Yet, when the acidity is neutralized, alfalfa and soybean plants develop root nodules typical of symbiotic nitrogen fixation with Rhizobium species possibly living in the pyritic material. When split open, these nodules exhibited the pinkish color of leghemoglobin, a protein in the nodule protecting the active nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase against the toxic effects of oxygen. Although we have not yet obtained direct evidence of nitrogenase activity in these nodules (reduction of acetylene to ethylene, for example), these findings suggested the possibility that nitrogen fixation was taking place in this hostile, non-soil material. This immediately raises the possibility that freeliving anaerobic bacteria which fix atmospheric nitrogen on Earth, could do the same on Mars.

  2. Two proximal skin electrodes--a respiration rate body sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trobec, Roman; Rashkovska, Aleksandra; Avbelj, Viktor

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new body sensor for extracting the respiration rate based on the amplitude changes in the body surface potential differences between two proximal body electrodes. The sensor could be designed as a plaster-like reusable unit that can be easily fixed onto the surface of the body. It could be equipped either with a sufficiently large memory for storing the measured data or with a low-power radio system that can transmit the measured data to a gateway for further processing. We explore the influence of the sensor’s position on the quality of the extracted results using multi-channel ECG measurements and considering all the pairs of two neighboring electrodes as potential respiration-rate sensors. The analysis of the clinical measurements, which also include reference thermistor-based respiration signals, shows that the proposed approach is a viable option for monitoring the respiration frequency and for a rough classification of breathing types. The obtained results were evaluated on a wireless prototype of a respiration body sensor. We indicate the best positions for the respiration body sensor and prove that a single sensor for body surface potential difference on proximal skin electrodes can be used for combined measurements of respiratory and cardiac activities. PMID:23202022

  3. Improvement of ballistocardiogram processing by inclusion of respiration information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a novel methodology for processing of a ballistocardiogram (BCG) is proposed in which the respiration signal is utilized to improve the averaging of the BCG signal and ultimately the annotation and interpretation of the signal. Previous research works filtered out the respiration signal while the novelty of the current research is that, rather than removing the respiration effect from the signal, we utilize the respiration information to improve the averaging and thus analysis and interpretation of the BCG signal in diagnosis of cardiac malfunctions. This methodology is based on our investigation that BCG cycles corresponding to the inspiration and expiration phases of the respiration cycle are different in morphology. BCG cycles corresponding to the expiration phase of respiration have been proved to be more closely related to each other when compared to cycles corresponding to inspiration, and therefore expiration cycles are better candidates to be selected for the calculation of the averaged BCG signal. The new BCG average calculated based on this methodology is then considered as the representative and a template of the BCG signal for further processing. This template can be considered as the output of a clinical BCG instrument with higher reliability and accuracy compared to the previous processing methods

  4. Quantitative evaluation of the protective effect of respirators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status and related problems of the quantitative evaluation method for respirator efficiency are generally reviewed. As the introduction, the special features of various types of respirators are summarized, and the basic concept of leakage and the protection factor are explained. As for the quantitative measurement of the protective efficiency, the features of various existing man-test methods such as NaCl aerosol man-test, DOP (dioctyl phthalate) man-test, and SF6 gas man-test are reviewed and discussed. As the important problems associated with those man-tests, the following aspects are discussed. The measurement of the aerosol concentration within masks; the calculation method for the protection factor; the effect of beards. The examples of measuring the protection factor are also explained for the following respirator systems: half mask respirator with a high efficiency filter; full face mask respirator with a high efficiency filter; demand mode and pressure-demand mode respirators; and mound suit with suspenders. Finally, the outline of the manual of respiratory protection published by NRC in 1976 is briefly reviewed. (Aoki, K.)

  5. Two Proximal Skin Electrodes — A Respiration Rate Body Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Avbelj

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new body sensor for extracting the respiration rate based on the amplitude changes in the body surface potential differences between two proximal body electrodes. The sensor could be designed as a plaster-like reusable unit that can be easily fixed onto the surface of the body. It could be equipped either with a sufficiently large memory for storing the measured data or with a low-power radio system that can transmit the measured data to a gateway for further processing. We explore the influence of the sensor’s position on the quality of the extracted results using multi-channel ECG measurements and considering all the pairs of two neighboring electrodes as potential respiration-rate sensors. The analysis of the clinical measurements, which also include reference thermistor-based respiration signals, shows that the proposed approach is a viable option for monitoring the respiration frequency and for a rough classification of breathing types. The obtained results were evaluated on a wireless prototype of a respiration body sensor. We indicate the best positions for the respiration body sensor and prove that a single sensor for body surface potential difference on proximal skin electrodes can be used for combined measurements of respiratory and cardiac activities.

  6. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Pristane by Nitrate Reducing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, K. S.; Freeman, K. H.; Macalady, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    In recent sediments, microbial biodegradation provides a control on the long-term preservation of organic matter, through the preferential loss of certain biomolecules and the alteration and concentration of other more recalcitrant molecules. Biodegradation of hydrocarbons derived from membrane lipids, has been demonstrated by both aerobic and strictly anaerobic culturing experiments. The isoprenoid pristane, once considered stable under anaerobic conditions, is in fact degraded by a denitrifying microcosm (BREGNARD et al., 1997) and a methanogenic, sulphate-reducing enrichment culture (GROSSI, 2000). We recently demonstrated pristane biodegradation and accompanying loss of nitrate by an activated sludge isolate. The measured nitrate consumption accounts for a 7.1 +/- 0.4 mg loss of pristane, 4.74% of the initial substrate, in 181 days, assuming pristane conversion to CO2. We have characterized the microorganisms active in the biodegradation process, through the creation of a 16S rDNA clone library, as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Experiments are in progress to enrich cultures of sulfate reducing bacteria that utilize pristane as a sole carbon source and to characterize reaction mechanisms in pristane-oxidizing pathways.

  7. Plankton community respiration during a coccolithophore bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Carol; Widdicombe, Claire E.; Zubkov, Mikhail V.; Tarran, Glen A.; Miller, Axel E. J.; Rees, Andrew P.

    Plankton dark community respiration (DCR), gross production (GP), bacterial production, protozoan herbivory, and phytoplankton, microzooplankton and heterotrophic bacterial abundance were measured during a bloom of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. The study, which was conducted in the northern North Sea during June 1999, included a spatial survey and a 6-day Lagrangian time series informed by a sulphur hexafluoride (SF 6) tracer-release experiment. E. huxleyi abundance in surface waters ranged from 380 to 3000 cells ml -1, while DCR varied between 2 and 4 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 and GP between 2 and 5 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1. Euphotic zone integrated DCR and GP were in approximate balance, with a mean (±SD) P:R ratio of 0.9±0.4 ( n=9). However, highest GP occurred at the surface alongside maxima of E. huxleyi, whereas highest rates of DCR occurred at depths of 25-30 m associated with maxima in chlorophyll a and bacterial biomass. DCR was positively correlated with bacterial biomass, microzooplankton biomass, attenuance, particulate organic carbon, and chlorophyll a concentration; and negatively correlated with apparent oxygen utilisation. DCR was not correlated with in situ temperature, dissolved organic carbon concentration or E. huxleyi abundance. A˜100 h incubation of 0.8 μm filtered seawater enabled the estimation of a bacterial respiratory quotient (RQ) and growth efficiency (BGE) from the slopes of the linear regressions of the decrease in dissolved oxygen and increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and bacterial carbon with time. During this experiment the bacterial RQ was 0.69 and the growth efficiency was 18%. This measured BGE was used in comparison with literature values to apportion DCR to that associated with bacterial (13-71%), microzooplankton (10-50%), and algal (11-28%) activity. This accounting exercise compared well with measured DCR (to within ±50%), the exact calculation being highly dependent on the BGE used.

  8. Degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye using anaerobic/aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) and photochemical membrane reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different types of advance treatment methods were evaluated for the degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5). The performance of two stage anaerobic SBR-aerobic MBR, anaerobic MBR with immobilized and suspended biocells and an integrated membrane photocatalytic reactor (MPR) using slurry UV/TiO2 system were investigated. The results suggest that, nearly 99.9% color removal and 80-95% organic COD and TOC removal can be achieved using different reactor systems. Considering the Taiwan EPA effluent standard discharge criteria for COD/TOC, the degree of treatment achieved by combining the anaerobic-aerobic system was found to be acceptable. Anew, Bacilluscereus, high color removal bacterium was isolated from Anaerobic SBR. Furthermore, when this immobilized into PVA-calcium alginate pellets, and suspended in the anaerobic MBR was able to achieve high removal efficiencies, similar to the suspended biocells system. However, the immobilized cell Anaerobic MBR was found to be more advantageous, due to lower fouling rates in the membrane unit. Results from slurry type MPR system showed that this system was capable of mineralizing RB5 dyes with faster degradation rate as compared to other systems. The reactor was also able to separate the catalyst effectively and perform efficiently without much loss of catalyst activity.

  9. Influences of Quinclorac on Culturable Microorganisms and Soil Respiration in Flooded Paddy Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHEN-MEI LU; HANG MIN; YANG-FANG YE

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential effects of herbicide quinclorac (3,7-dichloro-8-quinoline-carboxylic) on the culturable microorganisms in flooded paddy soil. Methods Total soil aerobic bacteria, actinomycetes and fungi were counted by a 10-fold serial dilution plate technique. Numbers of anaerobic fermentative bacteria (AFB), denitrifying bacteria (DNB) and hydrogen-producing acetogenic bacteria (HPAB) were numerated by three-tube anaerobic most-probable-number (MPN)methods with anaerobic liquid enrichment media. The number of methanogenic bacteria (MB) and nitrogen-fixing bacteria (NFB) was determined by the rolling tube method in triplicate. Soil respiration was monitored by a 102G-type gas chromatography with a stainless steel column filled with GDX-104 and a thermal conductivity detector. Results Quinclorac concentration was an important factor affecting the populations of various culturable microorganisms. There were some significant differences in the aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. AFB and DNB between soils were supplemented with quinclorac and non-quinclorac at the early stage of incubation, but none of them was persistent. The number of fungi and DNB was increased in soil samples treated by lower than1.33 μg·g-1 dried soil, while the CFU of fungi and HPAB was inhibited in soil samples treated by higher than 1.33 μg·g-1 dried soil. The population of actinomycete declined in negative proportion to the concentrations of quinclorac applied after 4 days. However, application of quinclorac greatly stimulated the growth of AFB and NFB. MB was more sensitive to quinclorac than the others, and the three soil samples with concentrations higher than 1 μg·g-1 dried soil declined significantly to less than 40% of that in the control, but the number of samples with lower concentrations of quinclorac was nearly equal to that in the control at the end of experiments. Conclusion Quinclorac is safe to the soil microorganisms when applied at normal

  10. Effect of vegetation of transgenic Bt rice lines and their straw amendment on soil enzymes, respiration, functional diversity and community structure of soil microorganisms under field conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Fang; Bin Dong; Hu Yan; Feifan Tang; Baichuan Wang; Yunlong Yu

    2012-01-01

    With the development of transgenic crops,there is an increasing concern about the possible adverse effects of their vegetation and residues on soil environmental quality.This study was carried out to evaluate the possible effects of the vegetation of transgenic Bt rice lines Huachi B6 (HC) and TT51 (TT) followed by the return of their straw to the soil on soil enzymes (catalase,arease,neutral phosphatase and invertase),anaerobic respiration activity,microbial utilization of carbon substrates and community structure,under field conditions.The results indicated that the vegetation of the two transgenic rice lines (HC and TT) and return of their straw had few adverse effects on soil enzymes and anaerobic respiration activity compared to their parent and distant parent,although some transient differences were observed.The vegetation and subsequent straw amendment of Bt rice HC and TT did not appear to have a harmful effect on the richness,evenness and community structure of soil microorganisms.No different pattern of impact due to plant species was found between HC and TT.It could be concluded that the vegetation of transgenic Bt rice lines and the return of their straw as organic fertilizer may not alter soil microbe-mediated functions.

  11. The anaerobic degradation of gaseous, nonmethane alkanes — From in situ processes to microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Florin Musat

    2015-01-01

    The short chain, gaseous alkanes ethane, propane, n- and iso-butane are released in significant amounts into the atmosphere, where they contribute to tropospheric chemistry and ozone formation. Biodegradation of gaseous alkanes by aerobic microorganisms, mostly bacteria and fungi isolated from terrestrial environments, has been known for several decades. The first indications for short chain alkane anaerobic degradation were provided by geochemical studies of deep-sea environments around hydr...

  12. Global regulation of photosynthesis and respiration by FnrL: the first two targets in the tetrapyrrole pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchane, Soufian; Picaud, Martine; Therizols, Pierre; Reiss-Husson, Françoise; Astier, Chantal

    2007-03-01

    Fnr is a regulator that controls the expression of a variety of genes in response to oxygen limitation in bacteria. To assess the role of Fnr in photosynthesis in Rubrivivax gelatinosus, a strain carrying a null mutation in fnrL was constructed. It was unable to grow anaerobically in the light, but, intriguingly, it was able to produce photosynthetic complexes under high oxygenation conditions. The mutant lacked all c-type cytochromes normally detectable in microaerobically-grown wild type cells and accumulated coproporphyrin III. These data suggested that the pleiotropic phenotype observed in FNR is primarily due to the control at the level of the HemN oxygen-independent coproporphyrinogen III dehydrogenase. hemN expression in trans partially suppressed the FNR phenotype, as it rescued heme and cytochrome syntheses. Nevertheless, these cells were photosynthetically deficient, and pigment analyses showed that they were blocked at the level of Mg(2+)-protoporphyrin monomethyl ester. Expression of both hemN and bchE in the FNR mutant restored synthesis of Mg(2+)-protochlorophyllide. We, therefore, conclude that FnrL controls respiration by regulating hemN expression and controls photosynthesis by regulating both hemN and bchE expression. A comprehensive picture of the control points of microaerobic respiration and photosynthesis by FnrL is provided, and the prominent role of this factor in activating alternative gene programs after reduction of oxygen tension in facultative aerobes is discussed. PMID:17178720

  13. Anaerobic Nitrate-Dependent Metal Bio-Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, K.; Knox, T.; Achenbach, L. A.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Direct biological oxidation of reduced metals (Fe(II) and U(IV)) coupled to nitrate reduction at circumneutral pH under anaerobic conditions has been recognized in several environments as well as pure culture. Several phylogentically diverse mesophilic bacteria have been described as capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation (NFOx). Our recent identification of a freshwater mesophilic, lithoautotroph, Ferrutens nitratireducens strain 2002, capable of growth through NFOx presents an opportunity to further study metal bio- oxidation. Continuing physiological studies revealed that in addition to Fe(II) oxidation, strain 2002 is capable of oxidizing U(IV) (4 μM) in washed cell suspensions with nitrate serving as the electron acceptor. Pasteurized cultures exhibited abiotic oxidation of 2 μM U(IV). Under growth conditions, strain 2002 catalyzed the oxidation of 12 μM U(IV) within a two week period. Cultures amended with sodium azide, an electron transport inhibitor, demonstrated limited oxidation (7 μM) similar to pasteurized cultures, supporting the direct role of electron transport in U(IV) bio-oxidation. The oxidation of U(IV) coupled denitrification at circumneutral pH would yield enough energy to support anaerobic microbial growth (ΔG°'= -460.36 kJ/mole). It is currently unknown whether or not strain 2002 can couple this metabolism to growth. The growth of F. nitratireducens strain 2002 utilizing Fe(II) as the sole electron donor was previously demonstrated. The amount of U(IV) (~12 μM) that strain 2002 oxidized under similar autotrophic growth conditions yields 0.0019 kJ, enough energy for the generation of ATP (5.3 x 10-20 kJ ATP-1), but not enough energy for cell replication as calculated for nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidizing conditions (0.096 kJ) assuming a similar metabolism. In addition to F. nitratireducens strain 2002, a nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidizing bacterium isolated from U contaminated groundwater, Diaphorobacter sp. strain

  14. Characterization and Description of Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans gen. nov., sp. nov., an Aryl-Halorespiring Facultative Anaerobic Myxobacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Sanford, Robert A.; Cole, James R.; Tiedje, James M

    2002-01-01

    Five strains were isolated which form a physiologically and phylogenetically coherent group of chlororespiring microorganisms and represent the first taxon in the Myxobacteria capable of anaerobic growth. The strains were enriched and isolated from various soils and sediments based on their ability to grow using acetate as an electron donor and 2-chlorophenol (2-CPh) as an electron acceptor. They are slender gram-negative rods with a bright red pigmentation that exhibit gliding motility and f...

  15. Anaerobic metabolism in Brassica seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myoung-Ryoul; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    Germination typically depends on oxidative respiration. The lack of convection under space conditions may create hypoxic or conditions during seed germination. We investigated the effect of reduced oxygen on seed germination and metabolism to understand how metabolic constraints affect seed growth and responsiveness to reorientation. Germination was completely inhibited when seeds were imbibed in the absence of oxygen; germination occurred at 5% oxygen and higher levels. Adding oxygen after 72 h resulted in immediate germination (protrusion of the radicle). Hypoxia typically activates alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, EC 1.1.1.1) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27) which produce ethanol and/or L-lactate, respectively. We report on the expression of ADH1 and LDH1, and changes in total soluble sugars, starch, pH, and L-lactate in seedlings grown at 28°C in 0, 2.5, 5, 10% and ambient (21%) oxygen conditions as controls. The highest consumption (lowest level) of sugars was seen at 0% oxygen but the lowest level of starch occurred 24 h after imbibition under ambient condition. Expression levels of ADH1 in ambient oxygen condition increased within 24 h but increased threefold under hypoxic conditions; LDH1 increased up to 8-fold under hypoxia compared to controls but ADH1 and LDH1 were less expressed as the oxygen levels increased. The intracellular pH of seeds decreased as the content of L-lactate increased for all oxygen concentrations. These results indicate that germination of Brassica is sensitive to oxygen levels and that oxygen availability during germination is an important factor for metabolic activities. (Supported by NASA grant NNX10AP91G)

  16. The effect of outside conditions on anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Min; WANG Shu-bo

    2016-01-01

    Organic carbon, inorganic carbon, temperature, pH and ORP are all to have a certain influence on the anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction. We can draw some conclusions on the optimum conditions of anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction. The optimum temperature of the anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction is 30-35℃. And the optimum pH of the anaerobic ammonia reaction is 7.5-8.3. The presence of organic matters can affect the anaerobic ammonia reaction, and different organic matters have different influence on it. The concentration of the inorganic carbon also exist great influence on the reaction. High inorganic carbon concentration also can inhibit anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction.

  17. Parameters affecting the stability of the digestate from a two-stage anaerobic process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focused on the factors affecting the respiration rate of the digestate taken from a continuous anaerobic two-stage process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). The process involved a hydrolytic reactor (HR) that produced a leachate fed to a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). It was found that a volatile solids (VS) removal in the range 40-75% and an operating temperature in the HR between 21 and 35 oC resulted in digestates with similar respiration rates, with all digestates requiring 17 days of aeration before satisfying the British Standard Institution stability threshold of 16 mg CO2 g VS-1 day-1. Sanitization of the digestate at 65 oC for 7 days allowed a mature digestate to be obtained. At 4 g VS L-1 d-1 and Solid Retention Times (SRT) greater than 70 days, all the digestates emitted CO2 at a rate lower than 25 mg CO2 g VS-1 d-1 after 3 days of aeration, while at SRT lower than 20 days all the digestates displayed a respiration rate greater than 25 mg CO2 g VS-1 d-1. The compliance criteria for Class I digestate set by the European Commission (EC) and British Standard Institution (BSI) could not be met because of nickel and chromium contamination, which was probably due to attrition of the stainless steel stirrer in the HR.

  18. [Utility of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of anaerobic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, Mariela S; Romano, Vanesa; Nievas, Jimena; Smayevsky, Jorgelina

    2014-01-01

    The analysis by MALDI-TOF MS (Matrix-assited laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry) has become a reference method for the identification of microorganisms in Clinical Microbiology. However, data on some groups of microorganisms are still controversial. The aim of this study is to determine the utility of MALDI-TOF MS for the identification of clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria. One-hundred and six anaerobic bacteria isolates were analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS and by conventional biochemical tests. In those cases where identification by conventional methodology was not applicable or in the face of discordance between sequencing methodologies, 16 S rRNA gene sequence analysis was performed. The conventional method and MALDI-TOF MS agreed at genus and species level by 95.3 %. Concordance in gram-negative bacilli was 91.4% and 100% among gram-positive bacilli; there was also concordance both in the 8 isolates studied in gram-positive cocci and in the single gram-negative cocci included. The data obtained in this study demonstrate that MALDI-TOF MS offers the possibility of adequate identification of anaerobic bacteria. PMID:25011591

  19. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface. Final performance report, June 1, 1990--August 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1993-10-01

    Anaerobic bacteria were isolated from deep subsurface sediment samples taken at study sites in Idaho (INEL) and Washington (HR) by culturing on dilute and concentrated medium. Morphologically distinct colonies were purified, and their responses to 21 selected physiological tests were determined. Although the number of isolates was small (18 INEL, 27 HR) some general patterns could be determined. Most strains could utilize all the carbon sources, however the glycerol and melizitose utilization was positive for 50% or less of the HR isolates. Catalase activity (27.78% at INEL, 74.07% at HR) and tryptophan metabolism (11.12% at INEL, 40.74% at HR) were significantly different between the two study sites. MPN and viable counts indicate that sediments near the water table yield the greatest numbers of anaerobes. Deeper sediments also appear to be more selective with the greatest number of viable counts on low-nutrient mediums. Likewise, only strictly obligate anaerobes were found in the deepest sediment samples. Selective media indicated the presence of methanogens, acetogens, and sulfate reducers at only the HR site.

  20. Phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of Planctomycetes from anaerobic, sulfide- and sulfur-rich Zodletone Spring, Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshahed, Mostafa S; Youssef, Noha H; Luo, Qingwei; Najar, Fares Z; Roe, Bruce A; Sisk, Tracy M; Bühring, Solveig I; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Krumholz, Lee R

    2007-08-01

    We investigated the phylogenetic diversity and metabolic capabilities of members of the phylum Planctomycetes in the anaerobic, sulfide-saturated sediments of a mesophilic spring (Zodletone Spring) in southwestern Oklahoma. Culture-independent analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences generated using Planctomycetes-biased primer pairs suggested that an extremely diverse community of Planctomycetes is present at the spring. Although sequences that are phylogenetically affiliated with cultured heterotrophic Planctomycetes were identified, the majority of the sequences belonged to several globally distributed, as-yet-uncultured Planctomycetes lineages. Using complex organic media (aqueous extracts of the spring sediments and rumen fluid), we isolated two novel strains that belonged to the Pirellula-Rhodopirellula-Blastopirellula clade within the Planctomycetes. The two strains had identical 16S rRNA gene sequences, and their closest relatives were isolates from Kiel Fjord (Germany), Keauhou Beach (HI), a marine aquarium, and tissues of marine organisms (Aplysina sp. sponges and postlarvae of the giant tiger prawn Penaeus monodon). The closest recognized cultured relative of strain Zi62 was Blastopirellula marina (93.9% sequence similarity). Detailed characterization of strain Zi62 revealed its ability to reduce elemental sulfur to sulfide under anaerobic conditions, as well as its ability to produce acids from sugars; both characteristics may potentially allow strain Zi62 to survive and grow in the anaerobic, sulfide- and sulfur-rich environment at the spring source. Overall, this work indicates that anaerobic metabolic abilities are widely distributed among all major Planctomycetes lineages and suggests carbohydrate fermentation and sulfur reduction as possible mechanisms employed by heterotrophic Planctomycetes for growth and survival under anaerobic conditions. PMID:17545322

  1. Partitioning of Respiration in an Animal-Algal Symbiosis: Implications for Different Aerobic Capacity Between Symbiodinium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas David Hawkins

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cnidarian-dinoflagellate symbioses are ecologically important and the subject of much investigation. However, our understanding of critical aspects of symbiosis physiology, such as the partitioning of total respiration between the host and symbiont, remains incomplete. Specifically, we know little about how the relationship between host and symbiont respiration varies between different holobionts (host-symbiont combinations. We applied molecular and biochemical techniques to investigate aerobic respiratory capacity in naturally symbiotic Exaiptasia pallida sea anemones, alongside animals infected with either homologous ITS2-type A4 Symbiodinium or a heterologous isolate of Symbiodinium minutum (ITS2-type B1. In naturally symbiotic anemones, host, symbiont, and total holobiont mitochondrial citrate synthase (CS enzyme activity, but not host mitochondrial copy number, were reliable predictors of holobiont respiration. There was a positive association between symbiont density and host CS specific activity (mg protein-1, and a negative correlation between host- and symbiont CS specific activities. Notably, partitioning of total CS activity between host and symbiont in this natural E. pallida population was significantly different to the host/symbiont biomass ratio. In re-infected anemones, we found significant between-holobiont differences in the CS specific activity of the algal symbionts. Furthermore, the relationship between the partitioning of total CS activity and the host/symbiont biomass ratio differed between holobionts. These data have broad implications for our understanding of cnidarian-algal symbiosis. Specifically, the long-held assumption of equivalency between symbiont/host biomass and respiration ratios can result in significant overestimation of symbiont respiration and potentially erroneous conclusions regarding the percentage of carbon translocated to the host. The interspecific variability in symbiont aerobic capacity provides

  2. Measurement of mitochondrial respiration in trophoblast culture

    OpenAIRE

    Alina, Maloyan; Mele, James; Muralimanohara, Balasubashini; Myatt, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Pregnancy is a state of oxidative stress, which becomes exaggerated under pathological conditions, such as preeclampsia, IUGR, diabetes and obesity, where placental mitochondrial dysfunction is observed. The majority of investigations utilize isolated mitochondria when measuring mitochondrial activity in placenta. However, this does not provide a complete physiological readout of mitochondrial function. This technical note describes a method to measure respiratory function in intact primary s...

  3. Consequences of ccmR deletion on respiration, fermentation and H2 metabolism in cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Anagha; Zhang, Shuyi; Liu, Yang; Tadmori, Kinan A; Bryant, Donald A; Dismukes, Charles G

    2016-07-01

    CcmR, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, represses the genes encoding components of the high-affinity carbon concentration mechanism in cyanobacteria. Unexpectedly, deletion of the ccmR gene was found to alter the expression of the terminal oxidase and fermentative genes, especially the hydrogenase operon in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Consistent with the transcriptomic data, the deletion strain exhibits flux increases (30-50%) in both aerobic O2 respiration and anaerobic H2 evolution. To understand how CcmR influences anaerobic metabolism, the kinetics of autofermentation were investigated following photoautotrophic growth. The autofermentative H2 yield increased by 50% in the CcmR deletion strain compared to the wild-type strain, and increased to 160% (within 20 h) upon continuous removal of H2 from the medium ("milking") to suppress H2 uptake. Consistent with this greater reductant flux to H2 , the mutant excreted less lactate during autofermentation (NAD(P)H consuming pathway). To enhance the rate of NADH production during anaerobic metabolism, the ccmR mutant was engineered to introduce GAPDH overexpression (more NADH production) and LDH deletion (less NADH consumption). The triple mutant (ccmR deletion + GAPDH overexpression + LDH deletion) showed 6-8-fold greater H2 yield than the WT strain, achieving conversion rates of 17 nmol 10(8)  cells(-1)  h(-1) and yield of 0.87 H2 per glucose equivalent (8.9% theoretical maximum). Simultaneous monitoring of the intracellular NAD(P)H concentration and H2 production rate by these mutants reveals an inverse correspondence between these variables indicating hydrogenase-dependent H2 production as a major sink for consuming NAD(P)H in preference to excretion of reduced carbon as lactate during fermentation. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1448-1459. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26704377

  4. Neural Network Modeling of Respiration Rate of Litchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mangaraj, T. K. Goswami, MK Tripathi, SK Giri and RK Pajnoo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Litchi is one of the most environmentally sensitive tropical fruits crop. It is popular export cultivar due to its attractive red color and high fruits quality. Pericarp browning, desiccations, loss of quality and post harvest decay have been identified as major problems restricting expansion of the industries in litchi exporting countries. Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP has been considered to be beneficial to maintain high humidity essential for prevention of water loss and browning of litchi pericarp. Accurate measurement of respiration rate and its modeling is an important aspect to the success of design and operational features of techniques like modified atmosphere storage. The respiration data generated at temperatures 0-30 oC in the step of 5 for litchi using the closed system method was used for modeling respiration rate using neural network technique. Here O2, CO2, temperature and time are considered as independent parameters and respiration rate as the dependent parameters. To establish a specific relationship between these parameter using neural network modeling three layers are taken i.e. input layer, output layer and a hidden layer. In this method first of all the experimental values are coded in between -1 to +1. Then by use of mathematical formulations in MATLAB programming the out put response (respiration rate with respect to O2 and CO2 was found out at any specific temperature. This respiration rate provides the basis for modeling of modified atmospheric packaging system. In the MATLAB program using neural network the respiration rate can be obtained by giving the storage period and concentration of O2 and CO2 at specified temperature. The relative deviation at different storage temperature was found out and it is in good agreement with that of experimental values.

  5. Occurrence of trace elements in respirable coal dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhalation of fine particles of coal dust contributes significantly to the occurrence of the disease, pneumoconiosis, prevailing in coal mining community. It is not presently known whether only the coal dust or specific chemical compounds or synergistic effects of several compounds associated with respirable coal dust is responsible for the disease, pneumoconiosis. The present paper describes the quantitative determination of ten minor and trace elements in respirable coal dust particles by atomic absorption spectrophotometric methods. The respirable coal dust samples are collected at the mine atmosphere during drilling in coal scams by using Messrs. Casella's Hexlet apparatus specially designed and fitted with horizontal elutriator to collect the respirable coal dust fraction simulating as near as possible to the lung's retention of the coal miners. After destruction of organic matter by wet oxidation and filtering off clay and silica, Fe, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Mn, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Ni were determined directly in the resulting solution by atomic absorption spectrophotometric procedures. The results show that the trace metals are more acute in lower range of size spectrum. Correlation coefficient, enrichment factor and linear regression values and their inverse relationship between the slope and EF values suggest that, in general, the trace metals in respirable particulates are likely to be from coal derived source if their concentrations are likewise high in the coal. The trace metal analytical data of respirable particulates fitted well to the linear regressive equation. The results of the studies are of importance as it may throw some light on the respirable lung disease 'pneumoconiosis' which are predominant in coal mining community. (author). 13 refs., 6 tabs

  6. Temporal changes of soil respiration under different tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akburak, Serdar; Makineci, Ender

    2013-04-01

    Soil respiration rates were measured monthly (from April 2007 to March 2008) under four adjacent coniferous plantation sites [Oriental spruce (Picea orientalis L.), Austrian pine (Pinus nigra Arnold), Turkish fir (Abies bornmulleriana L.), and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.)] and adjacent natural Sessile oak forest (Quercus petraea L.) in Belgrad Forest-Istanbul/Turkey. Also, soil moisture, soil temperature, and fine root biomass were determined to identify the underlying environmental variables among sites which are most likely causing differences in soil respiration. Mean annual soil moisture was determined to be between 6.3 % and 8.1 %, and mean annual temperature ranged from 13.0°C to 14.2°C under all species. Mean annual fine root biomass changed between 368.09 g/m(2) and 883.71 g/m(2) indicating significant differences among species. Except May 2007, monthly soil respiration rates show significantly difference among species. However, focusing on tree species, differences of mean annual respiration rates did not differ significantly. Mean annual soil respiration ranged from 0.56 to 1.09 g C/m(2)/day. The highest rates of soil respiration reached on autumn months and the lowest rates were determined on summer season. Soil temperature, soil moisture, and fine root biomass explain mean annual soil respiration rates at the highest under Austrian pine (R (2) = 0.562) and the lowest (R (2) = 0.223) under Turkish fir. PMID:22828980

  7. Seasonality of temperate forest photosynthesis and daytime respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, R; Munger, J W; McManus, J B; Nelson, D D; Zahniser, M S; Davidson, E A; Wofsy, S C; Saleska, S R

    2016-06-30

    Terrestrial ecosystems currently offset one-quarter of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions because of a slight imbalance between global terrestrial photosynthesis and respiration. Understanding what controls these two biological fluxes is therefore crucial to predicting climate change. Yet there is no way of directly measuring the photosynthesis or daytime respiration of a whole ecosystem of interacting organisms; instead, these fluxes are generally inferred from measurements of net ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 exchange (NEE), in a way that is based on assumed ecosystem-scale responses to the environment. The consequent view of temperate deciduous forests (an important CO2 sink) is that, first, ecosystem respiration is greater during the day than at night; and second, ecosystem photosynthetic light-use efficiency peaks after leaf expansion in spring and then declines, presumably because of leaf ageing or water stress. This view has underlain the development of terrestrial biosphere models used in climate prediction and of remote sensing indices of global biosphere productivity. Here, we use new isotopic instrumentation to determine ecosystem photosynthesis and daytime respiration in a temperate deciduous forest over a three-year period. We find that ecosystem respiration is lower during the day than at night-the first robust evidence of the inhibition of leaf respiration by light at the ecosystem scale. Because they do not capture this effect, standard approaches overestimate ecosystem photosynthesis and daytime respiration in the first half of the growing season at our site, and inaccurately portray ecosystem photosynthetic light-use efficiency. These findings revise our understanding of forest-atmosphere carbon exchange, and provide a basis for investigating how leaf-level physiological dynamics manifest at the canopy scale in other ecosystems. PMID:27357794

  8. Seasonality of temperate forest photosynthesis and daytime respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, R.; Munger, J. W.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.; Zahniser, M. S.; Davidson, E. A.; Wofsy, S. C.; Saleska, S. R.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems currently offset one-quarter of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions because of a slight imbalance between global terrestrial photosynthesis and respiration. Understanding what controls these two biological fluxes is therefore crucial to predicting climate change. Yet there is no way of directly measuring the photosynthesis or daytime respiration of a whole ecosystem of interacting organisms; instead, these fluxes are generally inferred from measurements of net ecosystem–atmosphere CO2 exchange (NEE), in a way that is based on assumed ecosystem-scale responses to the environment. The consequent view of temperate deciduous forests (an important CO2 sink) is that, first, ecosystem respiration is greater during the day than at night; and second, ecosystem photosynthetic light-use efficiency peaks after leaf expansion in spring and then declines, presumably because of leaf ageing or water stress. This view has underlain the development of terrestrial biosphere models used in climate prediction and of remote sensing indices of global biosphere productivity. Here, we use new isotopic instrumentation to determine ecosystem photosynthesis and daytime respiration in a temperate deciduous forest over a three-year period. We find that ecosystem respiration is lower during the day than at night—the first robust evidence of the inhibition of leaf respiration by light at the ecosystem scale. Because they do not capture this effect, standard approaches overestimate ecosystem photosynthesis and daytime respiration in the first half of the growing season at our site, and inaccurately portray ecosystem photosynthetic light-use efficiency. These findings revise our understanding of forest–atmosphere carbon exchange, and provide a basis for investigating how leaf-level physiological dynamics manifest at the canopy scale in other ecosystems.

  9. A global database of soil respiration data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bond-Lamberty

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil respirationRS, the flux of autotropically- and heterotrophically-generated CO2 from the soil to the atmosphere – remains the least well-constrained component of the terrestrial C cycle. Here we introduce the SRDB database, a near-universal compendium of published RS data, and make it available to the scientific community both as a traditional static archive and as a dynamic community database that will be updated over time by interested users. The database encompasses all published studies that report one of the following data measured in the field (not laboratory: annual RS, mean seasonal RS, a seasonal or annual partitioning of RS into its sources fluxes, RS temperature response (Q10, or RS at 10 °C. Its orientation is thus to seasonal and annual fluxes, not shorter-term or chamber-specific measurements. To date, data from 818 studies have been entered into the database, constituting 3379 records. The data span the measurement years 1961–2007 and are dominated by temperate, well-drained forests. We briefly examine some aspects of the SRDB data – mean annual RS fluxes and their correlation with other carbon fluxes, RS variability, temperature sensitivities, and the partitioning of RS source flux – and suggest some potential lines of research that could be explored using these data. The SRDB database described here is available online in a permanent archive as well as via a project-hosting repository; the latter source leverages open-source software technologies to encourage wider participation in the database's future development. Ultimately, we hope that the updating of, and corrections to, the SRDB will become a shared project, managed by the users of these data in the scientific community.

  10. Pyrogenic effect of respirable road dust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayawardena, Umesh; Tollemark, Linda; Tagesson, Christer; Leanderson, Per, E-mail: per.leanderson@lio.s [Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, S-581 85 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2009-02-01

    Because pyrogenic (fever-inducing) compounds on ambient particles may play an important role for particle toxicity, simple methods to measure pyrogens on particles are needed. Here we have used a modified in vitro pyrogen test (IPT) to study the release of interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) in whole human blood exposed to respirable road-dust particles (RRDP). Road dusts were collected from the roadside at six different streets in three Swedish cities and particles with a diameter less than 10 mum (RRDP) were prepared by a water sedimentation procedure followed by lyophilisation. RRDP (200 mul of 1 - 10{sup 6} ng/ml) were mixed with 50 mul whole blood and incubated at 37 deg. C overnight before IL-1beta was analysed with chemiluminescence ELISA in 384-well plates. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide from Salmonella minnesota), zymosan B and Curdlan (P-1,3-glucan) were used as positive controls. All RRDP samples had a pyrogenic effect and the most active sample produced 1.6 times more IL-1beta than the least active. This formation was of the same magnitude as in samples with 10 ng LPS/ml and was larger than that evoked by zymosan B and Curdlan (by mass basis). The method was sensitive enough to determine formation of IL-1beta in mixtures with 10 ng RRDP/ml or 0.01 ng LPS/ml. The endotoxin inhibitor, polymyxin B (10 mug/ml), strongly reduced the RRDP-induced formation of IL-1beta at 1mug RRDP/ml (around 80 % inhibition), but had only marginal or no effects at higher RRDP-concentrations (10 and 100 mug /ml). In summary, all RRDP tested had a clear pyrogen effect in this in vitro model. Endotoxin on the particles but also other factors contributed to the pyrogenic effect. As opposed to the limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay (which measures endotoxin alone), IPT measures a broad range of pyrogens that may be present on particulate matter. The IPT method thus affords a simple, sensitive and quantitative determination of the total pyrogenic potential of ambient particles.

  11. VDAC electronics: 3. VDAC-Creatine kinase-dependent generation of the outer membrane potential in respiring mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial energy in cardiac cells has been reported to be channeled into the cytosol through the intermembrane contact sites formed by the adenine nucleotide translocator, creatine kinase and VDAC. Computational analysis performed in this study showed a high probability of the outer membrane potential (OMP) generation coupled to such a mechanism of energy channeling in respiring mitochondria. OMPs, positive inside, calculated at elevated concentrations of creatine are high enough to restrict ATP release from mitochondria, to significantly decrease the apparent Km,ADP for state 3 respiration and to maintain low concentrations of Ca(2+) in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. An inhibition by creatine of Ca(2+)-induced swelling of isolated mitochondria and other protective effects of creatine reported in the literature might be explained by generated positive OMP. We suggest that VDAC-creatine kinase-dependent generation of OMP represents a novel physiological factor controlling metabolic state of mitochondria, cell energy channeling and resistance to death. PMID:27085978

  12. Anaerobic, solvent-producing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Montoya Castaño, Dolly

    2005-01-01

    This work’s main goal was to study strategies for the molecular and enzymatic characterisation of new solvent-producing mesophylic Clostridium isolates from Colombia and ascertain their solvent producing biotechnological potential by using a cheap agro-industrial waste as carbon source. Molecular characterisation of the native strains using 16S rRNA, PFGE and DNA- DNA hybridisation shown that the native strains are closely related to each other and not belong to Clostridium butyricum and sugg...

  13. In vitro effect of X radiation on respiration and glycolysis of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells of the mouse - an experimental comparison with the mouse tumortetanus assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depending on the dose of X-rays, in vitro irradiation of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells of the mouse affected both respiration and glycolysis. 38.7 C/kg irradiation suppressed the aerobic and anaerobic energy metabolism rather strongly followed by a reduction of the 'take' and growth of the subcutaneously injected tumour cells, as opposed to the growth behavior of non-irradiated cells. In analogy, tetanus mortality rates were reduced in the mouse tumor-tetanus assay with 38.7 C/kg irradiated cells. On the other hand, irradiation with 5.16 C/kg of Ehrlich carcinoma cells resulted in unchanged rates of respiration and glycolysis, in spite of the strongly limited growth capacity of the tumor cells. The tumor-tetanus assay of the mouse showed good correlation with subcutaneous tumor growth; no such correlation was found in the tetanus assay and the manometric values of respiration and glycolysis with 5.16 C/kg irradiated tumor cells. After subcutaneous injection of mixed cell suspensions consisting of 1 x 105 viable and 1 x 106 38.7 C/kg irradiated Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells as well as of 3 x 102 tetanus spores per single dose, we observed similar rates of tumor growth and tetanus mortality, respectively, if 1 x 105 viable tumor cells alone were administered together with 3 x 102 tetanus spores, without addition of irradiated tumor cells. (author)

  14. Kinetics and modeling of anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    Anaerobic digestion modeling started in the early 1970s when the need for design and efficient operation of anaerobic systems became evident. At that time not only was the knowledge about the complex process of anaerobic digestion inadequate but also there were computational limitations. Thus, the...... first models were very simple and consisted of a limited number of equations. During the past thirty years much research has been conducted on the peculiarities of the process and on the factors that influence it on the one hand while an enormous progress took place in computer science on the other. The...... combination of both parameters resulted in the development of more and more concise and complex models. In this chapter the most important models found in the literature are described starting from the simplest and oldest to the more recent and complex ones....

  15. Anaerobic lipid degradation through acidification and methanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ijung; Kim, Sang-Hyoun; Shin, Hang-Sik; Jung, Jin-Young

    2010-01-01

    In biological wastewater treatment high lipid concentration is known to inhibit microorganisms and cause active biomass flotation. To reduce lipid inhibition, a two-phase anaerobic system, consisting of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) and an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, was applied to synthetic dairy wastewater. During 153 days of operation, the two-phase system showed stable performance in lipid degradation. In the ASBR, a 13% lipid removal efficiency and 10% double bond removal efficiency were maintained. In the UASB, the chemical oxygen demand (COD), lipid and volatile fatty acid (VFA) removal efficiencies were more than 80%, 70% and 95%, respectively, up to organic loading rate 6.5 g COD/L/day. There were no operational problems such as serious scum formation or sludge washout. Protein degradation occurred prior to degradation during acidogenesis. PMID:20134250

  16. Biochemistry and physiology of anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-18

    We welcome you to The Power of Anaerobes. This conference serves two purposes. One is to celebrate the life of Harry D. Peck, Jr.,who was born May 18, 1927 and would have celebrated his 73rd birthday at this conference. He died November 20, 1998. The second is to gather investigators to exchange views within the realm of anaerobic microbiology, an area in which tremendous progress has been seen during recent years. It is sufficient to mention discoveries of a new form of life (the archaea), hyper or extreme thermophiles, thermophilic alkaliphiles and anaerobic fungi. With these discoveries has come a new realization about physiological and metabolic properties of microorganisms, and this in turn has demonstrated their importance for the development, maintenance and sustenance of life on Earth.

  17. Biochar from anaerobically digested sugarcane bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyang, Mandu; Gao, Bin; Pullammanappallil, Pratap; Ding, Wenchuan; Zimmerman, Andrew R

    2010-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of anaerobic digestion on biochar produced from sugarcane bagasse. Sugarcane bagasse was anaerobically digested to produce methane. The digested residue and fresh bagasse was pyrolyzed separately into biochar at 600 degrees C in nitrogen environment. The digested bagasse biochar (DBC) and undigested bagasse biochar (BC) were characterized to determine their physicochemical properties. Although biochar was produced from the digested residue (18% by weight) and the raw bagasse (23%) at a similar rate, there were many physiochemical differences between them. Compared to BC, DBC had higher pH, surface area, cation exchange capacity (CEC), anion exchange capacity (AEC), hydrophobicity and more negative surface charge, all properties that are generally desirable for soil amelioration, contaminant remediation or wastewater treatment. Thus, these results suggest that the pyrolysis of anaerobic digestion residues to produce biochar may be an economically and environmentally beneficial use of agricultural wastes. PMID:20634061

  18. Automatic respiration tracking for radiotherapy using optical 3D camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tuotuo; Geng, Jason; Li, Shidong

    2013-03-01

    Rapid optical three-dimensional (O3D) imaging systems provide accurate digitized 3D surface data in real-time, with no patient contact nor radiation. The accurate 3D surface images offer crucial information in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) treatments for accurate patient repositioning and respiration management. However, applications of O3D imaging techniques to image-guided radiotherapy have been clinically challenged by body deformation, pathological and anatomical variations among individual patients, extremely high dimensionality of the 3D surface data, and irregular respiration motion. In existing clinical radiation therapy (RT) procedures target displacements are caused by (1) inter-fractional anatomy changes due to weight, swell, food/water intake; (2) intra-fractional variations from anatomy changes within any treatment session due to voluntary/involuntary physiologic processes (e.g. respiration, muscle relaxation); (3) patient setup misalignment in daily reposition due to user errors; and (4) changes of marker or positioning device, etc. Presently, viable solution is lacking for in-vivo tracking of target motion and anatomy changes during the beam-on time without exposing patient with additional ionized radiation or high magnet field. Current O3D-guided radiotherapy systems relay on selected points or areas in the 3D surface to track surface motion. The configuration of the marks or areas may change with time that makes it inconsistent in quantifying and interpreting the respiration patterns. To meet the challenge of performing real-time respiration tracking using O3D imaging technology in IGRT, we propose a new approach to automatic respiration motion analysis based on linear dimensionality reduction technique based on PCA (principle component analysis). Optical 3D image sequence is decomposed with principle component analysis into a limited number of independent (orthogonal) motion patterns (a low dimension eigen-space span by eigen-vectors). New

  19. The Arsenic Cycle in Searles Lake, California: An Arsenic-Rich, Salt-Saturated Soda Lake. II. Isolation of Arsenic-Metabolizing Microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Stolz, J. F.; Langley, S.; Beveridge, T. J.; Kulp, T. R.; Oremland, R. S.

    2004-12-01

    The motivation for isolating arsenic-metabolizing prokaryotes from Searles Lake was to characterize the physiology of microbes that can cope simultaneously with at least 3 environmental extremes: saturating salt concentration, high pH, and high dissolved inorganic arsenic. A secondary motivation was to find extremely halophilc Archaea that could respire As(V), as this has only been reported for the Crenarchaea. Enrichment cultures of arsenate [As(V)]-respirers were established by inoculating Searles Lake mud into an anaerobic, alkaline (pH = 9.8) artificial medium containing 346 g/L dissolved salts, with lactate as the electron donor and As(V) as the electron acceptor. After about 6 months of bi-weekly transfers, the enrichment was purified by serial dilution, with the highest growth-positive dilution tube exhibiting motile cells having uniform morphology (curved rods). This culture, strain SLAS-1, grew by oxidizing lactate to acetate plus carbon dioxide while reducing As(V) to arsenite [As(III)]. The doubling time was 48 hours at 346 g/L salinity, and nearly equivalent growth rates were observed over a salinity range of 200 to 346 g/l, with no growth evident below 200 g/L. The pH range was 8.5 to 10, with an optimum at 9.5. Strain SLAS-1 has an unusual motility that can be characterized as a "fish-like" swimming motion. Thin section electron micrographs revealed the presence of an internal cytoplasmic filament that runs the full length of the microorganism. We suggest that this filament may be involved in cellular motility. However, taxonomic classification of SLAS-1 made by 16S rRNA gene sequences aligned it in the order Haloanaerobacteriales of the Domain Bacteria. In a further effort to isolate haloalkaliphilic Archaea, a similar enrichment strategy was employed as above, but cell-wall antibiotics were added to the medium to discourage the growth of Bacteria. An enrichment culture, designated Serl-Ab, was established that oxidized lactate to acetate plus carbon

  20. The effect of tannic compounds on anaerobic wastewater treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Field, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is an alternative to the conventional aerobic treatment processes for the removal of easily biodegradable organic matter in medium to high strength industrial wastestreams. Anaerobic treatment has several advantages, however one important disadvantage is the high sensi

  1. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...

  2. Succession of lignocellulolytic bacterial consortia bred anaerobically from lake sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korenblum, Elisa; Jiménez Avella, Diego; van Elsas, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria degrade lignocellulose in various anoxic and organically rich environments, often in a syntrophic process. Anaerobic enrichments of bacterial communities on a recalcitrant lignocellulose source were studied combining polymerase chain reaction–denaturing gradient gel electrophoresi

  3. Bundvands respiration i Kattegat og Bælthavet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen L. S.; Bendtsen, Jørgen

    Der findes generelt meget få direkte målinger af den pelagiske respiration, og det har ikke været muligt at finde repræsentative målinger af den pelagiske respiration for de åbne danske farvande. Her præsenteres et sæsonstudie af bundvandets respiration fra 5 stationer i et transekt gående fra det....... Temperaturfølsomheden af respirationsraten udtrykt som en Q10 var 3,01 ± 1.07 for alle forsøg og uafhængigt af om prøverne blev kølet eller opvarmet under inkubationerne. Den labile pulje af organisk stof blev bestemt og de observerede respirations rater svarede til specifikke kulstof omsætningsrater på mellem 0...... målbar reduktion i det partikulære materiale under inkubationerne, tyder overraskende på,at opløst organisk materiale (DOM) er den vigtigste kulstofkilde for bundvandet respiration....

  4. Effect of Hyperglycemia on Mitochondrial Respiration in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Rasmus; Højberg, Patricia M V; Almdal, Thomas; Boushel, Robert; Haugaard, Steen B; Madsbad, Sten; Dela, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    DM. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eleven patients with T2DM [9 males, 2 females; age, 52.8 +/- 2.5 yr (mean +/- se); body mass index, 30.2 +/- 1.1 kg/m(2)] in poor glycemic control were treated with insulin aspart and NPH insulin for a median period of 46 d (range, 31-59). Mitochondrial respiration and...... glucose (12.7 +/- 1.1 to 6.5 +/- 0.3 mmol/liter; P < 0.001) were reduced after treatment. Mitochondrial respiration per milligram muscle was lower in T2DM compared to controls [substrates for complex I, 24% lower (P < 0.05); substrates for complex I+II, 17% lower (P < 0.05)]. Mitochondrial respiration and...... citrate synthase activity did not differ before and after improvements in glycemic control, but mitochondrial respiration correlated with fasting plasma glucose before (r(2) = 0.53; P < 0.05) but not after treatment [r(2) = 0.0024; not significant (NS)]. Mitochondrial respiration normalized to...

  5. Multivariate monitoring of anaerobic co-digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Michael; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo

    warming and environmental concerns. Anaerobic digestion applied in agriculture can simultaneously convert heterogeneous biomasses and wastes from the primary agricultural sector and from the bio processing industries, for instance food processing, pharma, and biofuel production, into valuable organic...... fertiliser and renewable energy. Meanwhile, in order for the biogas sector to become a significant player in the energy supply chain, the anaerobic digestion process has to be controlled to a greater extent than what is implemented as state-of-the-art today. Through application of the philosophy behind...

  6. Susceptibility of anaerobic bacteria to carbenicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazevic, D J; Matsen, J M

    1974-05-01

    One hundred and seventy-one strains of anaerobes were tested for susceptibility to carbenicillin by using agar dilution, broth dilution, and two disk diffusion methods. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for 67% of 51 strains of Bacteroides fragilis, 7 of 9 strains of Bacteroides melaninogenicus, and all of 8 strains of Eubacterium was 100 mug or less per ml. The MICs of the remaining anaerobes were 50 mug or less per ml. The broth dilution results were felt to be the most accurate of the four methods utilized. PMID:4462461

  7. Startup and stabilization of anaerobic membrane bioreactors at ambient temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Benito Peña, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest in wastewater treatment in last decades to reduce human footprint. Primarily, anaerobic technology focused on treatment and stabilization of sludge, but now the tendency is to give it a major role in low cost treatment of high/low strength wastewaters, since anaerobic digestion offers energy generation through gas production. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR) combine anaerobic digestion with membrane filtration. They are becoming a feasible opti...

  8. The Financial Feasibility of Anaerobic Digestion for Ontario's Livestock Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Weersink, Alfons; Mallon, Shawn

    2007-01-01

    This report is an investigation of the financial feasibility of farm based anaerobic digestion investments under Ontario's Standard Offer Contract electricity prices. Using Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) Agricultural Anaerobic Digestion Calculation Spreadsheet (AADCS) anaerobic digestion inputs, outputs, cost and revenues were estimated and used to conduct a financial analysis on the feasibility of four sized farm base anaerobic digestion investments. The res...

  9. The effect of tannic compounds on anaerobic wastewater treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Field, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is an alternative to the conventional aerobic treatment processes for the removal of easily biodegradable organic matter in medium to high strength industrial wastestreams. Anaerobic treatment has several advantages, however one important disadvantage is the high sensitivity of the anaerobic bacteria (ie. methanogenic bacteria) to toxic compounds. The anaerobic technologies were initially developed for the treatment of non-toxic organic wastewaters. As the techn...

  10. A novel acidophilic, thermophilic iron and sulfur-oxidizing archaeon isolated from a hot spring of tengchong, yunnan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiannan Ding

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel thermoacidophilic iron and sulfur-oxidizing archaeon, strain YN25, was isolated from an in situ enriched acid hot spring sample collected in Yunnan, China. Cells were irregular cocci, about 0.9-1.02 µm×1.0-1.31 µm in the medium containing elemental sulfur and 1.5-2.22 µm×1.8-2.54 µm in ferrous sulfate medium. The ranges of growth and pH were 50-85 (optimum 65 and pH 1.0-6.0 (optimum 1.5-2.5. The acidophile was able to grow heterotrophically on several organic substrates, including various monosaccharides, alcohols and amino acids, though the growth on single substrate required yeast extract as growth factor. Growth occurred under aerobic conditions or via anaerobic respiration using elemental sulfur as terminal electron acceptor. Results of morphology, physiology, fatty acid analysis and analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the strain YN25 should be grouped in the species Acidianus manzaensis. Bioleaching experiments indicated that this strain had excellent leaching capacity, with a copper yielding ratio up to 79.16% in 24 d. The type strain YN25 was deposited in China Center for Type Culture Collection (=CCTCCZNDX0050.

  11. Treatment of domestic sewage in a two-step system anaerobic filter/anaerobic hybrid reactor at low temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elmitwalli, T.A.; Zeeman, G.; Oahn, K.L.T.; Lettinga, G.

    2002-01-01

    The treatment of domestic sewage at low temperature of 13 degrees Celsius was investigated in a two-step system consisting of an anaerobic filter (AF) + an anaerobic hybrid (AH) reactor operated at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs)

  12. The IWA Anaerobic digestion model no 1. (ADM1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batstone, Damien J.; Keller, J.; Angelidaki, Irini;

    2002-01-01

    The IWA Anaerobic Digestion Modelling Task Group was established in 1997 at the 8th World Congress on Anaerobic Digestion (Sendai, Japan) with the goal of developing a generalised anaerobic digestion model. The structured model includes multiple steps describing biochemical as well...

  13. Stability of anaerobic reactors under micro-aeration conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidation of sulphide in anaerobic bioreactors by introducing limited amounts of oxygen provides a relatively simple strategy for reducing the levels of sulphite in anaerobic digesters (biogas and effluent). The introduction of limited amounts of air is a general practice in agricultural anaerobic digesters, it is estimated that worldwide over 3.000 units are operated under such conditions. (Author)

  14. Anaerobic Digestion. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie, John W., Ed.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a four-lesson unit on anaerobic digestion control. Areas addressed include: (1) anaerobic sludge digestion (considering the nature of raw sludge, purposes of anaerobic digestion, the results of digestion, types of equipment, and other topics); (2) digester process control (considering feeding…

  15. Anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that toluene and m-xylene were rapidly mineralized in a denitrifying laboratory aquifer column operated under continuous flow conditions in the complete absence of molecular oxygen. A bacterium, tentatively identified as a Pseudomonas sp., was isolated from this column. This organism mineralized toluene and m-xylene under pure culture conditions with nitrate or nitrous oxide as the sole electron acceptors. Carbon balance studies using 0.3mM [ring-UL-14C]toluene revealed that more than 50 percent of the radioactivity was evolved as 14CO2

  16. Nitrogen-induced reduction in soil respiration of European forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Callum; Fleischer, Katrin; Bistinas, Ioannis; Ekici, Altug; Dolman, Albertus

    2014-05-01

    Soil heterotrophic respiration is parameterized in vegetation models as a temperature-dependent decay function, and is usually spatially constant. We test this fundamental assumption with chamber-based observations of the soil carbon efflux along a >1,100km transect throughout European forests, where the latitude is kept constant to control for insolation. We find a modest, but significant, inter-site linear correlation between air temperature and carbon efflux (r2 = 0.32, p=0.02), but not at 5cm depth soil temperature (r2 = -0.02, p=0.4). Average midday respiration increased West-East and correlates well with distance from the coast (r2 = 0.55, pgrid-size scale than temperature. We explain the reduction in soil respiration as a result of nitrogen inhibition of decomposition.

  17. Soil microbial respiration from observations and Earth System Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil microbial respiration (Rh) is a large but uncertain component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Carbon–climate feedbacks associated with changes to Rh are likely, but Rh parameterization in Earth System Models (ESMs) has not been rigorously evaluated largely due to a lack of appropriate measurements. Here we assess, for the first time, Rh estimates from eight ESMs and their environmental drivers across several biomes against a comprehensive soil respiration database (SRDB-V2). Climatic, vegetation, and edaphic factors exert strong controls on annual Rh in ESMs, but these simple controls are not as apparent in the observations. This raises questions regarding the robustness of ESM projections of Rh in response to future climate change. Since there are many more soil respiration (Rs) observations than Rh data, two ‘reality checks’ for ESMs are also created using the Rs data. Guidance is also provided on the Rh improvement in ESMs. (letter)

  18. Evaluation of Respirable Crystalline Silica in High School Ceramics Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Fechser

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Air concentrations of respirable crystalline silica were measured in eleven (11 high school ceramics classrooms located in Salt Lake County, UT, USA. Respirable dust was collected on PVC filters using precision flow pumps and cyclone samplers (n = 44. Filters were subsequently analyzed for respirable dust and percent crystalline silica content. The geometric mean of the silica concentrations was 0.009 mg/m3 near the teacher’s work station and 0.008 mg/m3 near the kilns. The number of students in the classroom was correlated to the silica concentration in the ceramics classroom, but no correlation was found between the silica concentrations and either the size of the classroom or the age of the building. Results from this study indicate that ceramics teachers may be at an increased risk of exposure to crystalline silica based on the ACGIH TLV of 0.025 mg/m3, with an exceedance of 21%.

  19. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis VII. Respiration and Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, A. A.; Calvin, M.

    1949-07-21

    The relationship of respiration to photosynthesis in barley seedling leaves and the algae, Chlorella and Scenedesmus, has been investigated using radioactive carbon dioxide and the techniques of paper chromatography and radioautography. The plants are allowed to photosynthesize normally for thirty seconds in c{sup 14}O{sub 2} after which they are allowed to respire in air or helium in the light or dark. Respiration of photosynthetic intermediates as evidenced by the appearance of labeled glutomic, isocitric, fumaric and succinic acids is slower in the light than in the dark. Labeled glycolic acid is observed in barley and algae. It disappears rapidly in the dark and is maintained and increased in quantity in the light in C0{sub 2}-free air.

  20. Proceedings of the 10. world congress on anaerobic digestion 2004 : anaerobic bioconversion, answer for sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This conference reviewed the broad scope of anaerobic process-related activities taking place globally and confirmed the possibilities of using anaerobic processes to add value to industrial wastewaters, municipal solid wastes and organic wastes while minimizing pollution and greenhouse gases. It focused on biomolecular tools, instrumentation of anaerobic digestion processes, anaerobic bioremediation of chlorinated organics, and thermophilic and mesophilic digestion. Several papers focused on the feasibility of using waste products to produce hydrogen and methane for electricity generation. The sessions of the conference were entitled acidogenesis; microbial ecology; process control; sulfur content; technical development; domestic wastewater; agricultural waste; organic municipal solid wastes; instrumentation; molecular biology; sludges; agricultural feedstock; bioremediation; industrial wastewater; hydrogen production; pretreatments; sustainability; and integrated systems. The conference featured 387 posters and 192 oral presentations, of which 111 have been indexed separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  1. Environmental impacts of anaerobic digestion and the use of anaerobic residues as soil amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosey, F.E. [VFA Services Ltd., Herts (United Kingdom)

    1996-01-01

    This paper defines the environmental role of anaerobic digestion within the overall objective of recovering energy from renewable biomass resources. Examples and opportunities for incorporating anaerobic digestion into biomass-to-energy schemes are discussed, together with environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion plants. These include visual, public amenity, pathogens and public health, odor control, and gaseous emissions. Digestate disposal and the benefits of restrictions on recycling organic wastes and biomass residues back to the land are discussed, particularly as they relate to American and European codes of practice and environmental legislation. The paper concludes that anaerobic digestion, if performed in purpose-designed reactors that efficiently recover and use biogas, is an environmentally benign process that can enhance energy recovery and aid the beneficial land use of plant residues in many biomass-to-energy schemes.

  2. Antoine Lavoisier and the study of respiration: 200 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, M A

    1991-03-01

    Antoine Lavoisier has been called the father of modern chemistry. From a medical point of view, he introduced the study of respiration and metabolism and so founded biochemistry. With his experiments, our knowledge of how the body works made immense strides forward. Two hundred years ago, he wrote his last authentic and untouched account of his views on respiration, in a letter to Joseph Black in Edinburgh. This opportunity has been taken to briefly review this work and the life of a man who did much to improve our understanding of ourselves. PMID:2003841

  3. Fundamental Medical and Engineering Investigations on Protective Artificial Respiration

    CERN Document Server

    Klaas, Michael; Schroder, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    This volume contains a collection of papers from the research program 'Protective Artificial Respiration (PAR)'. In 2005 the German Research Association DFG launched the research program PAR which is a joint initiative of medicine and fluid mechanics. The main long-term objective of this program is the development of a more protective artificial respiratory system to reduce the physical stress of patients undergoing artificial respiration. To satisfy this goal 11 projects have been defined. In each of these projects scientists from medicine and fluid mechanics do collaborate in several experim

  4. Oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of gases respired by humans

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, S.; Zeiri, L.

    1988-01-01

    Oxygen-isotope fractionation associated with respiration in human individuals at rest is linearly related to the fraction of the O2 utilized in the respiration process. The slope of this relationship is affected by a history of smoking, by vigorous exercise, and by the N2/O2 ratio of the inhaled gas. For patients who suffer anemia-related diseases, the slope of this relationship is directly proportional to their level of hemoglobin. These results introduce a new approach for studying the mech...

  5. A simple and sensitive quality control method of the anaerobic atmosphere for identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Tage; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of a strict anaerobic atmosphere is essential for the culture of strict anaerobic bacteria. We describe a simple and sensitive quality control method of the anaerobic atmosphere, based on the measurement of the zone diameter around a 5-μg metronidazole disk when testing an...

  6. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Are membranes really necessary?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davila, M.; Kassab, G.; Klapwijk, A.; Lier, van J.B.

    2008-01-01

    Membranes themselves represent a significant cost for the full scale application of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR). The possibility of operating an AnMBR with a self-forming dynamic membrane generated by the substances present in the reactor liquor would translate into an important saving. A

  7. Applications of the anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Ellegaard, L.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    and resource/energy recovery have been developed. Treatment of biowastes by anaerobic digestion processes is in many cases the optimal way to convert organic waste into useful products such as energy (in the form of biogas) and a fertilizer product. Other waste management options, such as land filling...

  8. Analysis of denitrification in swine anaerobic lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic lagoons are a common management practice for the treatment of swine wastewater. Although these lagoons were once thought to be relatively simple; their physical, chemical, and biological processes are actually very sophisticated. To get a better understanding of the processes which occur i...

  9. Anaerobic work capacity in elite wheelchair athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, L H; Bakker, W H; Elkhuizen, J W; Veeger, DirkJan (H. E. J.); Gwinn, T

    1997-01-01

    To study the anaerobic work capacity in wheelchair athletes, 67 elite wheelchair athletes (50 male) were studied in a 30-second sprint test on a computer-controlled wheelchair ergometer during the World Championships and Games for the Disabled in Assen (1990). The experimental set-up (ergometer, pro

  10. Anaerobic effluent disinfection using ozone: Byproducts formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, G.H.R.; Daniel, L.A.; Bruning, H.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2010-01-01

    This research was aimed at studying oxidation processes, coliform inactivation effectiveness and disinfection byproducts (DBPs) associated with the disinfection of anaerobic sanitary wastewater effluent with ozone applied at doses of 5.0, 8.0 and 10.0mg O(3)L(-1) for contact times of 5, 10 and 15 mi

  11. Anaerobic hydrolysis during digestion of complex substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, W.T.M.

    2001-01-01

    Complex waste(water) such as, raw sewage, dairy wastewater, slaughterhouse wastewater, fish processing wastewater, primary sludge and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste have been proven to be degradable under anaerobic conditions. However, during the digestion process the conversion of th

  12. Sulfate-reducing bacteria in anaerobic bioreactors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of industrial wastewaters containing high amounts of easily degradable organic compounds in anaerobic bioreactors is a well-established process. Similarly, wastewaters which in addition to organic compounds also contain sulfate can be treated in this way. For a long time, the occurrenc

  13. Anaerobic digestion in sustainable biomass chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pabon Pereira, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the potential contribution of anaerobic digestion (AD) to the sustainability of biomass chains. Results provide insights in the technological potential to recover energy and valuable by-products from energy crops and residues, and evaluate biomass cascades involving AD technolo

  14. Anaerobic digestion of slaughterhouse by-products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejnfelt, Anette; Angelidaki, Irini

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of animal by-products was investigated in batch and semi-continuously fed, reactor experiments at 55 degrees C and for some experiments also at 37 degrees C. Separate or mixed by-products from pigs were tested. The methane potential measured by batch assays for meat- and bone...

  15. Can Anaerobic Fungi Improve Biogas Production?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fliegerová, Kateřina; Mrázek, Jakub; Štrosová, Lenka; Procházka, J.

    Edinburgh : Elsevier, 2010. s. 1-1. [IMC9 (9th International mycological congress): The biology of Fungi. 01.08.2010 - 06.08.2010, Edinburgh] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : anaerobic fungi * biogas production Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  16. Enrichment of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidizing microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihu; Zeng, Raymond J; Burow, Luke C; Lant, Paul; Keller, Jurg; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2009-10-01

    The microorganisms responsible for anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to denitrification have not been clearly elucidated. Three recent publications suggested it can be achieved by a denitrifying bacterium with or without the involvement of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea. A key factor limiting the progress in this research field is the shortage of enrichment cultures performing denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO). In this study, DAMO cultures were enriched from mixed inoculum including sediment from a freshwater lake, anaerobic digester sludge and return activated sludge from a sewage treatment plant. Two reactors, operated at 35°C and at 22°C, respectively, showed simultaneous methane oxidation and nitrate reduction after several months of operation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries from the 35°C enrichment showed the presence of an archaeon closely related to other DAMO archaea and a dominated bacterium belonging to the yet uncultivated NC10 phylum. This culture preferred nitrite to nitrate as the electron acceptor. The present study suggests that the archaea are rather methanotrophs than methanogens. The highest denitrification rate achieved was 2.35 mmol NO3 (-) -N gVSS(-1)  day(-1) . The culture enriched at 22°C contained the same NC10 bacterium observed in the culture enriched at 35°C but no archaea. PMID:23765890

  17. Anaerobic Toxicity of Cationic Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag+ under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged p...

  18. Anaerobic Digestion of Paper Mill Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreeshivadasan Chelliapan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In general, paper mill wastewater contains complex organic substances which could not be treated completely using conventional treatment processes, e.g. aerobic processes. As a result, anaerobic technology is a promising alternative for paper mill wastewater treatment due to its ability to degrade hard organic compounds. In the present study, treatment of paper mill wastewater using a stage anaerobic reactor was investigated. The more specific objectives of this study were to confirm whether paper mill wastewater can be tolerated by methanogenic sludge and to assess the stability of reactor for measured parameters (e.g. COD removal, and methane composition. Results showed up to 98% COD removal efficiency in the anaerobic reactor when the reactor was operated at an OLR of 1.560 kg COD/m3.d. Anaerobic digestion can provide high treatment efficiency for recalcitrant substrates, which generates robust microorganism (acidogenesis and methanogenesis, for the degradation of recalcitrant compounds such as in the paper mill wastewater.

  19. Anaerobic Digestion: Mass Balances and Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jacob; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Jansen, Jes la Cour

    2011-01-01

    While the basic processes involved in anaerobic digestion of waste are described in Chapter 9.4 and the main digestion technologies are presented in Chapter 9.5, this chapter focuses on mass balances, gas production and energy aspects, environmental emissions and unit process inventories...

  20. Anaerobic Digestion in a Flooded Densified Leachbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chynoweth, David P.; Teixeira, Arthur A.; Owens, John M.; Haley, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses the adaptation of a patented biomass-digesting process, denoted sequential batch anaerobic composting (SEBAC), to recycling of wastes aboard a spacecraft. In SEBAC, high-solids-content biomass wastes are converted into methane, carbon dioxide, and compost.