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Sample records for anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea

  1. Growth and Methane Oxidation Rates of Anaerobic Methanotrophic Archaea in a Continuous-Flow Bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Peter R. Girguis; Orphan, Victoria J; Hallam, Steven J.; DeLong, Edward F

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic methanotrophic archaea have recently been identified in anoxic marine sediments, but have not yet been recovered in pure culture. Physiological studies on freshly collected samples containing archaea and their sulfate-reducing syntrophic partners have been conducted, but sample availability and viability can limit the scope of these experiments. To better study microbial anaerobic methane oxidation, we developed a novel continuous-flow anaerobic methane incubation system (AMIS) that...

  2. A genomic view of methane oxidation by aerobic bacteria and anaerobic archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Chistoserdova, Ludmila; Vorholt, Julia A.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2005-01-01

    Recent sequencing of the genome and proteomic analysis of a model aerobic methanotrophic bacterium, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) has revealed a highly versatile metabolic potential. In parallel, environmental genomics has provided glimpses into anaerobic methane oxidation by certain archaea, further supporting the hypothesis of reverse methanogenesis.

  3. Growth of anaerobic methane oxidizing archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria in a high pressure membrane-capsule bioreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, P.H.A.; Gieteling, J.; Widjaja-Greefkes, H.C.A.; Plugge, C.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P.N.L.; Meulepas, R.J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidizing communities of archaea (ANME) and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) grow slowly, which limits physiological studies. High methane partial pressure was previously successfully applied to stimulate growth, but it is not clear how different ANME subtypes and associated sulfate

  4. Environmental evaluation of coexistence of denitrifying anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in a paddy field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jing; Fu, Liang; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Lu, Yong-Ze; Cheng, Shuk H; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    The nitrate-dependent denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) process, which is metabolized together by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and NC10 phylum bacteria, is expected to be important for the global carbon and nitrogen cycles. However, there are little studies about the existence of this process and the functional microbes in environments. Therefore, the coexistence of DAMO archaea and bacteria in a paddy field was evaluated in this study. Next-generation sequencing showed that the two orders, Methanosarcinales and Nitrospirales, to which DAMO archaea and DAMO bacteria belong, were detected in the four soil samples. Then the in vitro experiments demonstrated both of nitrite- and nitrate-dependent DAMO activities, which confirmed the coexistence of DAMO archaea and DAMO bacteria. It was the first report about the coexistence of DAMO archaea and bacteria in a paddy field. Furthermore, anammox bacteria were detected in two of the four samples. The in vitro experiments did not show anammox activity in the initial period but showed low anammox activity after 20 days' enrichment. These results implicated that anammox bacteria may coexist with DAMO microorganisms in this field, but at a very low percentage. PMID:26394860

  5. Biomarker evidence for widespread anaerobic methane oxidation in Mediterranean sediments by a consortium of methanogenic archaea and bacteria : The Medinaut Shipboard Scientific Party

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pancost, Richard D.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; de Lint, Saskia; van der Maarel, Marc J.E.C.; Gottschal, JC

    2000-01-01

    Although abundant geochemical data indicate that anaerobic methane oxidation occurs in marine sediments, the linkage to specific microorganisms remains unclear, In order to examine processes of methane consumption and oxidation, sediment samples from mud volcanoes at two distinct sites on the Medite

  6. Growth and Population Dynamics of Anaerobic Methane-Oxidizing Archaea and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in a Continuous-Flow Bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Peter R. Girguis; Cozen, Aaron E.; DeLong, Edward F

    2005-01-01

    The consumption of methane in anoxic marine sediments is a biogeochemical phenomenon mediated by two archaeal groups (ANME-1 and ANME-2) that exist syntrophically with sulfate-reducing bacteria. These anaerobic methanotrophs have yet to be recovered in pure culture, and key aspects of their ecology and physiology remain poorly understood. To characterize the growth and physiology of these anaerobic methanotrophs and the syntrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria, we incubated marine sediments using...

  7. Aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation in terrestrial mud volcanoes in the Northern Apennines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrede, C.; Brady, S.; Rockstroh, S.; Dreier, A.; Kokoschka, S.; Heinzelmann, S. M.; Heller, C.; Reitner, J.; Taviani, M.; Daniel, R.; Hoppert, M.

    2012-07-01

    Methane oxidizing prokaryotes are ubiquitous in oxic and anoxic habitats wherever C1-compounds are present. Thus, methane saturated mud volcano fluids should be a preferred habitat of methane consuming prokaryotes, using the readily available electron donors. In order to understand the relevance of methane as a carbon and energy source in mud volcano communities, we investigate the diversity of prokaryotic organisms involved in oxidation of methane in fluid samples from the Salse di Nirano mud volcano field situated in the Northern Apennines. Cell counts were at approximately 0.7 × 106 microbial cells/ml. A fraction of the microbial biomass was identified as ANME (anaerobic methanotroph) archaea by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. They are associated in densely colonized flakes, of some tens of μm in diameter, embedded in a hyaline matrix. Diversity analysis based on the 16S rDNA genes, retrieved from amplified and cloned environmental DNA, revealed a high proportion of archaea, involved in anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Aerobic methane-oxidizing proteobacteria could be highly enriched from mud volcano fluids, indicating the presence of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria, which may contribute to methane oxidation, whenever oxygen is readily available. The results imply that biofilms, dominated by ANME archaea, colonize parts of the mud volcano venting system.

  8. Exploring the ecophysiology of anaerobic communities of methanotrophic archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, P.H.A.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) is a widespread occurring process in anoxic marine sediments. The process is performed by ANaerobic MEthane oxidizing archaea (ANME) and associated sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). The ANME presumably oxidize methane through reve

  9. Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification is the dominant methane sink in a deep lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deutzmann, Joerg S.; Stief, Peter; Brandes, Josephin;

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification, also known as “nitrate/nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation” (n-damo), was discovered in 2006. Since then, only a few studies have identified this process and the associated microorganisms in natural environments. In aquatic sediments......, the close proximity of oxygen- and nitrate-consumption zones can mask n-damo as aerobic methane oxidation. We therefore investigated the vertical distribution and the abundance of denitrifying methanotrophs related to Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera with cultivation-independent molecular...... techniques in the sediments of Lake Constance. Additionally, the vertical distribution of methane oxidation and nitrate consumption zones was inferred from high-resolution microsensor profiles in undisturbed sediment cores. M. oxyfera-like bacteria were virtually absent at shallow-water sites (littoral...

  10. The role of paraffin oil on the interaction between denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation and Anammox processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Ding, Jing; Zhang, Fang; Zeng, Raymond J

    2015-10-01

    Methane is sparingly soluble in water, resulting in a slow reaction rate in the denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) process. The slow rate limits the feasibility of research to examine the interaction between the DAMO and the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process. In this study, optimized 5 % (v/v) paraffin oil was added as a second liquid phase to improve methane solubility in a reactor containing DAMO and Anammox microbes. After just addition, methane solubility was found to increase by 25 % and DAMO activity was enhanced. After a 100-day cultivation, the paraffin reactor showed almost two times higher consumption rates of NO3 (-) (0.2268 mmol/day) and NH4 (+) (0.1403 mmol/day), compared to the control reactor without paraffin oil. The microbes tended to distribute in the oil-water interface. The quantitative (q) PCR result showed the abundance of gene copies of DAMO archaea, DAMO bacteria, and Anammox bacteria in the paraffin reactor were higher than those in the control reactor after 1 month. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that the percentages of the three microbes were 55.5 and 77.6 % in the control and paraffin reactors after 100 days, respectively. A simple model of mass balance was developed to describe the interactions between DAMO and Anammox microbes and validate the activity results. A mechanism was proposed to describe the possible way that paraffin oil enhanced DAMO activity. It is quite clear that paraffin oil enhances not only DAMO activity but also Anammox activity via the interaction between them; both NO3 (-) and NH4 (+) consumption rates were about two times those of the control.

  11. Diversity and enrichment of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidizing bacteria from wastewater sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Luesken, Francisca A.; van Alen, Theo A.; van der Biezen, Erwin; Frijters, Carla; Toonen, Ger; Kampman, Christel; Hendrickx, Tim L. G.; Zeeman, Grietje; Temmink, Hardy; Strous, Marc; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Jetten, Mike S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Recently discovered microorganisms affiliated to the bacterial phylum NC10, named “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera”, perform nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation. These microorganisms could be important players in a novel way of anaerobic wastewater treatment where ammonium and residual dissolved methane might be removed at the expense of nitrate or nitrite. To find suitable inocula for reactor startup, ten selected wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located in The Netherlands w...

  12. A microbial consortium couples anaerobic methane oxidation to denitrification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebarsing, A.A.; Pol, A.; Pas-Schoonen, K.T. van de; Smolders, A.J.P.; Ettwig, K.F.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Camp, H.J.M. op den; Jetten, M.S.M.; Strous, M.

    2006-01-01

    Modern agriculture has accelerated biological methane and nitrogen cycling on a global scale. Freshwater sediments often receive increased downward fluxes of nitrate from agricultural runoff and upward fluxes of methane generated by anaerobic decomposition. In theory, prokaryotes should be capable o

  13. Biomarker evidence for widespread anaerobic methane oxidation in Mediterranean sediments by a consortium of methanogenic archae and bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Pancost, R.D.; Lint, S. de; Maarel, M.J.E.C. van der; Gottschal, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Although abundant geochemical data indicate that anaerobic methane oxidation occurs in marine sediments, the linkage to specific microorganisms remains unclear. In order to examine processes of methane consumption and oxidation, sediment samples from mud volcanoes at two distinct sites on the Medite

  14. ANME-2D Archaea Catalyze Methane Oxidation in Deep Subsurface Sediments Independent of Nitrate Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernsdorf, A. W.; Amano, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Ise, K.; Thomas, B. C.; Banfield, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    -reducing/oxidizing archaeon Ferroglobus placidus. Thus, we suggest that ANME2-D may couple methane oxidation to reduction of ferric iron minerals in the sediment and may be generally important as a link between the iron and methane cycles in deep subsurface environments. Such information has important implications for modeling the global carbon cycle.

  15. Archaea in biogeochemical cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offre, Pierre; Spang, Anja; Schleper, Christa

    2013-01-01

    Archaea constitute a considerable fraction of the microbial biomass on Earth. Like Bacteria they have evolved a variety of energy metabolisms using organic and/or inorganic electron donors and acceptors, and many of them are able to fix carbon from inorganic sources. Archaea thus play crucial roles in the Earth's global geochemical cycles and influence greenhouse gas emissions. Methanogenesis and anaerobic methane oxidation are important steps in the carbon cycle; both are performed exclusively by anaerobic archaea. Oxidation of ammonia to nitrite is performed by Thaumarchaeota. They represent the only archaeal group that resides in large numbers in the global aerobic terrestrial and marine environments on Earth. Sulfur-dependent archaea are confined mostly to hot environments, but metal leaching by acidophiles and reduction of sulfate by anaerobic, nonthermophilic methane oxidizers have a potential impact on the environment. The metabolisms of a large number of archaea, in particular those dominating the subsurface, remain to be explored.

  16. Vertical profiles of community abundance and diversity of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and bacteria in a simple waste landfill in north China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Ding, Linjie; Wang, Xu; Chi, Zifang; Lei, Jiansen

    2015-03-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) is considered to be an important sink of CH4 in habitats as marine sediments. But, few studies focused on AMO in landfills which may be an important sink of CH4 derived from waste fermentation. To show evidence of AMO and to uncover function anaerobic methanotroph (ANME) community in landfill, different age waste samples were collected in Jinqianpu landfill located in north China. Through high-throughput sequencing, Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales archaea associated with ANME and reverse methanogenic archaea of Methanosarcina and Methanobacterium were detected. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) (Desulfobulbus and Desulfococcus) which could couple with ANME-conducting AMO were also found. But, the community structure of ANME had no significant difference with depths. From the results of investigation, we can come to a conclusion that sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (SR-DAMO) would be the dominant AMO process in the landfill, while iron-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (M/IR-DAMO) process was weak though concentration of ferric iron was large in the landfill. Denitrification-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (NR-DAMO) was negative because of lack of nitrate and relevant function microorganisms in the landfill. Results also indicate that CH4 mitigation would have higher potential by increasing electron acceptor contents and promoting the growth of relevant function microorganisms. PMID:25561057

  17. Vertical profiles of community abundance and diversity of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and bacteria in a simple waste landfill in north China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Ding, Linjie; Wang, Xu; Chi, Zifang; Lei, Jiansen

    2015-03-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) is considered to be an important sink of CH4 in habitats as marine sediments. But, few studies focused on AMO in landfills which may be an important sink of CH4 derived from waste fermentation. To show evidence of AMO and to uncover function anaerobic methanotroph (ANME) community in landfill, different age waste samples were collected in Jinqianpu landfill located in north China. Through high-throughput sequencing, Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales archaea associated with ANME and reverse methanogenic archaea of Methanosarcina and Methanobacterium were detected. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) (Desulfobulbus and Desulfococcus) which could couple with ANME-conducting AMO were also found. But, the community structure of ANME had no significant difference with depths. From the results of investigation, we can come to a conclusion that sulfate-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (SR-DAMO) would be the dominant AMO process in the landfill, while iron-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (M/IR-DAMO) process was weak though concentration of ferric iron was large in the landfill. Denitrification-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (NR-DAMO) was negative because of lack of nitrate and relevant function microorganisms in the landfill. Results also indicate that CH4 mitigation would have higher potential by increasing electron acceptor contents and promoting the growth of relevant function microorganisms.

  18. Cultivation of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria: impact of reactor configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Baolan; He, Zhanfei; Geng, Sha; Cai, Chen; Lou, Liping; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xinhua

    2014-09-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) is mediated by bacteria that anaerobically oxidize methane coupled with nitrite reduction and is a potential bioprocess for wastewater treatment. In this work, the effect of reactor configuration on n-damo bacterial cultivation was investigated. A magnetically stirred gas lift reactor (MSGLR), a sequencing batch reactor (SBR), and a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were selected to cultivate the bacteria. Microbial community was monitored by using quantitative PCR, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, pmoA gene sequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The effects of substrate inhibition, methane mass transfer, and biomass washout in the three reactors were focused on. The results indicated that the MSGLR had the best performance among the three reactor systems, with the highest total and specific n-damo activities. Its maximum volumetric nitrogen removal rate was up to 76.9 mg N L(-1) day(-1), which was higher than previously reported values (5.1-37.8 mg N L(-1) d(-1)).

  19. Microbiology, ecology and application of the nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Dong eShen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo, which couples the anaerobic oxidation of methane to denitrification, is a recently discovered process observed in Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera. M. oxyfera is affiliated with the NC10 phylum, a phylum having no members in pure culture. Based on the isotopic labeling experiments, it is hypothesized that M. oxyfera has an unusual intra-aerobic pathway for the production of oxygen via the dismutation of nitric oxide into dinitrogen gas and oxygen. In addition, the bacterial species has a unique ultrastructure that is distinct from that of other previously described bacterial shapes. M. oxyfera-like sequences have been recovered from different natural habitats, suggesting that the n-damo process potentially contributes to global carbon and nitrogen cycles. The n-damo process is an ecological process that can reduce the greenhouse effect, as methane is more effective in heat-trapping than carbon dioxide. The n-damo process, which uses methane instead of organic matter to drive denitrification, is also an economical nitrogen removal process because methane is a relatively inexpensive electron donor. This mini-review summarizes the peculiar microbiology of M. oxyfera and discusses the potential ecological importance and engineering application of the n-damo process.

  20. Regulation of anaerobic methane oxidation in sediments of the Black Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Knab

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM and sulfate reduction (SRR were investigated in sediments of the western Black Sea, where upward methane transport is controlled by diffusion. To understand the regulation and dynamics of methane production and oxidation in the Black Sea, rates of methanogenesis, AOM, and SRR were determined using radiotracers in combination with pore water chemistry and stable isotopes. In the Danube Canyon and the Dnjepr palaeo-delta AOM did not consume methane effectively and upwards diffusing methane created an extended sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ that spread over more than 2.5 m and was located in brackish and limnic sediment. Measurable AOM rates occurred mainly in the lower part of the SMTZ, sometimes even at depths where sulfate seemed to be unavailable. The inefficiency of methane oxidation appears to be linked to the paleoceanographic history of the sediment, since in all cores methane was completely oxidized at the transition from the formerly oxic brackish clays to marine anoxic sediments. The upward tailing of methane was less pronounced in a core from the deep sea in the area of the Dnjepr Canyon, the only station with a SMTZ close to the marine deposits. Sub-surface sulfate reduction rates were mostly extremely low, and in the SMTZ were even lower than AOM rates. Rates of bicarbonate-based methanogenesis were below detection limit in two of the cores, but δ13C values of methane indicate a biogenic origin. The most δ13C- depleted isotopic signal of methane was found in the SMTZ of the core from the deep sea, most likely as a result of carbon recycling between AOM and methanogenesis.

  1. Regulation of anaerobic methane oxidation in sediments of the Black Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Knab

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM and sulfate reduction (SRR were investigated in sediments of the western Black Sea, where methane transport is controlled by diffusion. To understand the regulation and dynamics of methane production and oxidation in the Black Sea, rates of methanogenesis, AOM, and SRR were determined using radiotracers in combination with pore water chemistry and stable isotopes. On the shelf of the Danube paleo-delta and the Dnjepr Canyon, AOM did not consume methane effectively and upwards diffusing methane created an extended sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ that spread over more than 2.5 m and was located in formerly limnic sediment. Measurable AOM rates occurred mainly in the lower part of the SMTZ, sometimes even at depths where sulfate seemed to be unavailable. The inefficiency of methane oxidation appears to be linked to the limnic history of the sediment, since in all cores methane was completely oxidized at the limnic-marine transition. The upward tailing of methane was less pronounced in a core from the deep sea in the area of the Dnjepr Canyon, the only station with a SMTZ close to the marine deposits. Sulfate reduction rates were mostly extremely low, and in the SMTZ were even lower than AOM rates. Rates of bicarbonate-based methanogenesis were below detection limit in two of the cores, but δ13C values of methane indicate a biogenic origin. The most depleted δ13C-signal was found in the SMTZ of the core from the deep sea, most likely as a result of carbon recycling between AOM and methanogenesis.

  2. Immunological detection of enzymes for sulfate reduction in anaerobic methane-oxidizing consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milucka, Jana; Widdel, Friedrich; Shima, Seigo

    2013-05-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) at marine gas seeps is performed by archaeal-bacterial consortia that have so far not been cultivated in axenic binary or pure cultures. Knowledge about possible biochemical reactions in AOM consortia is based on metagenomic retrieval of genes related to those in archaeal methanogenesis and bacterial sulfate reduction, and identification of a few catabolic enzymes in protein extracts. Whereas the possible enzyme for methane activation (a variant of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, Mcr) was shown to be harboured by the archaea, enzymes for sulfate activation and reduction have not been localized so far. We adopted a novel approach of fluorescent immunolabelling on semi-thin (0.3-0.5 μm) cryosections to localize two enzymes of the SR pathway, adenylyl : sulfate transferase (Sat; ATP sulfurylase) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr) in microbial consortia from Black Sea methane seeps. Both Sat and Dsr were exclusively found in an abundant microbial morphotype (c. 50% of all cells), which was tentatively identified as Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus-related bacteria. These results show that ANME-2 archaea in the Black Sea AOM consortia did not express bacterial enzymes of the canonical sulfate reduction pathway and thus, in contrast to previous suggestions, most likely cannot perform canonical sulfate reduction. Moreover, our results show that fluorescent immunolabelling on semi-thin cryosections which to our knowledge has been so far only applied on cell tissues, is a powerful tool for intracellular protein detection in natural microbial associations.

  3. Anaerobic methane oxidation may be more prevalent in surface soils than was originally thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Mathieu; Bradley, Robert L.; Šimek, Miloslav

    2013-04-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (CH4) (AOM) is a process that was first reported to occur in deep anoxic marine sediments. In this environment, CH4 is oxidized with sulphate (SO42-) as the terminal electron acceptor. It is mediated by a syntrophic consortium formed by SO42- reducing bacteria and anaerobic CH4 oxidizing Archaea, or by the latter alone. Since this landmark discovery, AOM was found to occur in other environments including freshwater lake sediments and water columns, mud volcanoes, landfill leachate, deep buried Holocene sediments and hydrocarbon contaminated aquifers. All of these situations are very specific and point to AOM as being primarily occurring in highly reducing conditions. Thus, observations of AOM in surface soils with fluctuating REDOX conditions are relatively scarce, although a few independent studies have reported AOM in surface peatlands as well as in a forest soil. Furthermore, AOM may follow different pathways, such as via the coupled oxidation of CH4 and reduction of manganese (Mn(IV)) or iron (Fe(III)), or by a lone denitrifying species that converts nitrite to nitric oxide in order to generate O2 that is then used internally to oxidize CH4. Thus, the goal of our study was to determine whether AOM is more prevalent than was thought in hydromorphic surface soils across different environments, and whether the addition of NO3- or SO4= as alternative electron acceptors may stimulate the process. We collected samples from 3 peatland soils in Scotland, 2 acid-sulphate soils in Finland, and shore sediments of 15 drained fish ponds in the Czech Republic. Subsamples were incubated in the absence of O2 and amended with either NO3-, SO42-, or left unamended (control). The net flux of CH4 and CO2 were assessed by gas chromatography after 2, 20, 40 and 60 days. We also used a 13C-CH4 isotope dilution technique to determine gross production and consumption rates of CH4. We detected AOM in all of our soils, with oxidation rates ranging between 0

  4. Archaeal and anaerobic methane oxidizer communities in the Sonora Margin cold seeps, Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, Adrien; Cruaud, Perrine; Pignet, Patricia; Caprais, Jean-Claude; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Godfroy, Anne; Toffin, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    Cold seeps, located along the Sonora Margin transform fault in the Guaymas Basin, were extensively explored during the 'BIG' cruise in June 2010. They present a seafloor mosaic pattern consisting of different faunal assemblages and microbial mats. To investigate this mostly unknown cold and hydrocarbon-rich environment, geochemical and microbiological surveys of the sediments underlying two microbial mats and a surrounding macrofaunal habitat were analyzed in detail. The geochemical measurements suggest biogenic methane production and local advective sulfate-rich fluxes in the sediments. The distributions of archaeal communities, particularly those involved in the methane cycle, were investigated at different depths (surface to 18 cm below the sea floor (cmbsf)) using complementary molecular approaches, such as Automated method of Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA), 16S rRNA libraries, fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction with new specific primer sets targeting methanogenic and anaerobic methanotrophic lineages. Molecular results indicate that metabolically active archaeal communities were dominated by known clades of anaerobic methane oxidizers (archaeal anaerobic methanotroph (ANME)-1, -2 and -3), including a novel 'ANME-2c Sonora' lineage. ANME-2c were found to be dominant, metabolically active and physically associated with syntrophic Bacteria in sulfate-rich shallow sediment layers. In contrast, ANME-1 were more prevalent in the deepest sediment samples and presented a versatile behavior in terms of syntrophic association, depending on the sulfate concentration. ANME-3 were concentrated in small aggregates without bacterial partners in a restricted sediment horizon below the first centimetres. These niche specificities and syntrophic behaviors, depending on biological surface assemblages and environmental availability of electron donors, acceptors and carbon substrates, suggest that ANME could support

  5. New primers for detecting and quantifying denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation archaea in different ecological niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jing; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Fu, Liang; Lu, Yong-Ze; Cheng, Shuk H; Zeng, Raymond J

    2015-11-01

    The significance of ANME-2d in methane sink in the environment has been overlooked, and there was no any study evaluating the distribution of ANME-2d in the environment. New primers were thus needed to be designed for following research. In this paper, a pair of primers (DP397F and DP569R) was designed to quantify ANME-2d. The specificity and amplification efficiency of this primer pair were acceptable. PCR amplification of another pair of primers (DP142F and DP779R) generated a single, bright targeted band from the enrichment sample, but yielded faint, multiple bands from the environmental samples. Nested PCR was conducted using the primers DP142F/DP779R in the first round and DP142F/DP569R in the second round, which generated a bright targeted band. Further phylogenetic analysis showed that these targeted bands were ANME-2d-related sequences. Real-time PCR showed that the copies of the 16s ribosomal RNA gene of ANME-2d in these samples ranged from 3.72 × 10(4) to 2.30 × 10(5) copies μg(-1) DNA, indicating that the percentage of ANME-2d was greatest in a polluted river sample and least in a rice paddy sample. These results demonstrate that the newly developed real-time PCR primers could sufficiently quantify ANME-2d and that nested PCR with an appropriate combination of the new primers could successfully detect ANME-2d in environmental samples; the latter finding suggests that ANME-2d may spread in environments. PMID:26300291

  6. Atmospheric oxygen levels, anaerobic methane oxidation, and the coupling of the global COS cycles by sulfate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, U. G.; Chernyavsky, B. M.

    2007-12-01

    Changes in the partitioning between the reduced and oxidized reservoirs of carbon and sulfur are the dominant control on atmospheric oxygen levels, and the partitioning itself depends to a large degree on microbial redox processes remineralizing organic matter (OM). However, the controls of organic matter preservation in marine sediments are one of the most complex and controversial issues in contemporary biochemistry. Knowledge how the transition from one electron acceptor to another affects OM remineralization rates is scant even for the transition from aerobic to anaerobic respiration. Much less is known about the transition from anaerobic respiration to fermentation. Although the individual pathways of methane generation are known, our understanding of the complex interactions between different bacterial groups remains limited, resulting in considerable difficulties to resolve these questions in microcosm experiments. Here we show that a dramatic drop in seawater sulfate concentrations during the Early Cretaceous (Wortmann & Chernyavsky, Nature 2007) resulted in a global breakdown of microbial sulfate reduction in the marine subsurface biosphere. This event resulted in a positive excursion of the global δ13C-value, suggesting that organic matter remineralization rates dropped by more than 50%. This implies that the methanogenic microbial community was unable to increase their metabolic rates, despite the increased supply of organic matter. the reduced availability of sulfate for anaerobic methane oxidation did not increase the flux of isotopically light carbon into the ocean/atmosphere system. We therefore speculate that the capacity of marine methanogenic ecosystems to synthesize extracellular enzymes to hydrolyze organic matter is specific to the prevailing type of organic matter. This results in a positive coupling of the metabolic activity of both ecosystems, which in turn is a necessary prerequisite to decouple reduced carbon and sulfur burial, a key

  7. Anaerobic nitrite-dependent methane-oxidizing bacteria - novel participants in methane cycling of drained peatlands ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Menko, Ekaterina; Sirin, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    Northern peatlands are one of the key sources of atmospheric methane. Process-based studies of methane dynamic are based on the hypothesis of the balance between microbial methane production and oxidation, but this doesn't explain all variations in and constraints on peatland CH4 emissions. One of the reasons for this discrepancy could be anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) - the process which is still poorly studied and remained controversial. Very little is known about AOM in peatlands, where it could work as an important 'internal' sink for CH4. This lack of knowledge primarily originated from researchers who generally consider AOM quantitatively insignificant or even non-existent in northern peatland ecosystems. But not far ago, Smemo and Yavitt (2007) presented evidence for AOM in freshwater peatlands used indirect techniques including isotope dilution assays and selective methanogenic inhibitors. Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation NC10 group bacteria (n-damo) were detected in a minerotrophic peatland in the Netherlands that is infiltrated by nitrate-rich ground water (Zhu et al., 2012). Present study represents the first, to our knowledge, characterization of AOM in human disturbed peatlands, including hydrological elements of artificial drainage network. The experiments were conducted with samples of peat from drained peatlands, as well as of water and bottom sediments of ditches from drained Dubnensky mire massif, Moscow region (Chistotin et al., 2006; Sirin et al., 2012). This is the key testing area of our research group in European part of Russia for the long-term greenhouse gases fluxes measurements supported by testing physicochemical parameters, intensity and genomic diversity of CH4-cycling microbial communities. Only in sediments of drainage ditches the transition anaerobic zone was found, where methane and nitrate occurred, suggested the possible ecological niche for n-damo bacteria. The NC10 group methanotrophs were analyzed by PCR

  8. Evidence for nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation as a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bao-lan; Shen, Li-dong; Lian, Xu; Zhu, Qun; Liu, Shuai; Huang, Qian; He, Zhan-fei; Geng, Sha; Cheng, Dong-qing; Lou, Li-ping; Xu, Xiang-yang; Zheng, Ping; He, Yun-feng

    2014-03-25

    The process of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) was recently discovered and shown to be mediated by "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" (M. oxyfera). Here, evidence for n-damo in three different freshwater wetlands located in southeastern China was obtained using stable isotope measurements, quantitative PCR assays, and 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase gene clone library analyses. Stable isotope experiments confirmed the occurrence of n-damo in the examined wetlands, and the potential n-damo rates ranged from 0.31 to 5.43 nmol CO2 per gram of dry soil per day at different depths of soil cores. A combined analysis of 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase genes demonstrated that M. oxyfera-like bacteria were mainly present in the deep soil with a maximum abundance of 3.2 × 10(7) gene copies per gram of dry soil. It is estimated that ∼0.51 g of CH4 m(-2) per year could be linked to the n-damo process in the examined wetlands based on the measured potential n-damo rates. This study presents previously unidentified confirmation that the n-damo process is a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands, and n-damo has the potential to be a globally important methane sink due to increasing nitrogen pollution. PMID:24616523

  9. Co-occurrence of nitrite-dependent anaerobic ammonium and methane oxidation processes in subtropical acidic forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Han; Wang, Yong-Feng; Chan, Ho-Wang; Wu, Ruo-Nan; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) are two new processes of recent discoveries linking the microbial nitrogen and carbon cycles. In this study, 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of anammox bacteria and pmoA gene of n-damo bacteria were used to investigate their distribution and diversity in natural acidic and re-vegetated forest soils. The 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved featured at least three species in two genera known anammox bacteria, namely Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans, Candidatus Brocadia fulgida, and Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis while the pmoA gene amplified was affiliated with two species of known n-damo bacteria Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera and a newly established Candidatus Methylomirabilis sp. According to the results, the diversity of anammox bacteria in natural forests was lower than in re-vegetated forests, but no significant difference was observed in n-damo community between them. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that both anammox and n-damo bacteria were more abundant in the lower layer (10-20 cm) than the surface layer (0-5 cm). The abundance of anammox bacteria varied from 2.21 × 10(5) to 3.90 × 10(6) gene copies per gram dry soil, and n-damo bacteria quantities were between 1.69 × 10(5) and 5.07 × 10(6) gene copies per gram dry soil in the two different layers. Both anammox and n-damo bacteria are reported for the first time to co-occur in acidic forest soil in this study, providing a more comprehensive information on more defined microbial processes contributing to C and N cycles in the ecosystems. PMID:27178181

  10. Biogeochemical modelling of anaerobic vs. aerobic methane oxidation in a meromictic crater lake (Lake Pavin, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and its concentration in the atmosphere has increased over the past decades. Methane produced by methanogenic Archae can be consumed through aerobic and anaerobic oxidation pathways. In anoxic conditions found in freshwater environments such as meromictic lakes, CH4 oxidation pathways involving different terminal electron acceptors such as NO3-, SO42-, and oxides of Fe and Mn are thermodynamically possible. In this study, a reactive transport model was developed to assess the relative significance of the different pathways of CH4 consumption in the water column of Lake Pavin. In most cases, the model reproduced experimental data collected from the field from June 2006 to June 2007. Although the model and the field measurements suggest that anaerobic CH4 oxidation may contribute to CH4 consumption in the water column of Lake Pavin, aerobic oxidation remains the major sink of CH4 in this lake.

  11. The Potential for Biologically Catalyzed Anaerobic Methane Oxidation on Ancient Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Marlow, Jeffrey J.; LaRowe, Douglas E.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Amend, Jan P.; Orphan, Victoria J

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the potential for the biologically mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction on ancient Mars. Seven distinct fluids representative of putative martian groundwater were used to calculate Gibbs energy values in the presence of dissolved methane under a range of atmospheric CO_2 partial pressures. In all scenarios, AOM is exergonic, ranging from −31 to −135 kJ/mol CH_4. A reaction transport model was constructed to examine how environmentally ...

  12. Trace methane oxidation and the methane dependency of sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J.W.

    2010-05-01

    This study investigates the oxidation of labeled methane (CH4) and the CH4 dependence of sulfate reduction in three types of anaerobic granular sludge. In all samples, 13C-labeled CH4 was anaerobically oxidized to 13C-labeled CO2, while net endogenous CH4 production was observed. Labeled-CH4 oxidation rates followed CH4 production rates, and the presence of sulfate hampered both labeled-CH4 oxidation and methanogenesis. Labeled-CH4 oxidation was therefore linked to methanogenesis. This process is referred to as trace CH4 oxidation and has been demonstrated in methanogenic pure cultures. This study shows that the ratio between labeled-CH4 oxidation and methanogenesis is positively affected by the CH4 partial pressure and that this ratio is in methanogenic granular sludge more than 40 times higher than that in pure cultures of methanogens. The CH4 partial pressure also positively affected sulfate reduction and negatively affected methanogenesis: a repression of methanogenesis at elevated CH4 partial pressures confers an advantage to sulfate reducers that compete with methanogens for common substrates, formed from endogenous material. The oxidation of labeled CH 4 and the CH4 dependence of sulfate reduction are thus not necessarily evidence of anaerobic oxidation of CH4 coupled to sulfate reduction. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  13. The potential for biologically catalyzed anaerobic methane oxidation on ancient Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Jeffrey J; Larowe, Douglas E; Ehlmann, Bethany L; Amend, Jan P; Orphan, Victoria J

    2014-04-01

    This study examines the potential for the biologically mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction on ancient Mars. Seven distinct fluids representative of putative martian groundwater were used to calculate Gibbs energy values in the presence of dissolved methane under a range of atmospheric CO2 partial pressures. In all scenarios, AOM is exergonic, ranging from -31 to -135 kJ/mol CH4. A reaction transport model was constructed to examine how environmentally relevant parameters such as advection velocity, reactant concentrations, and biomass production rate affect the spatial and temporal dependences of AOM reaction rates. Two geologically supported models for ancient martian AOM are presented: a sulfate-rich groundwater with methane produced from serpentinization by-products, and acid-sulfate fluids with methane from basalt alteration. The simulations presented in this study indicate that AOM could have been a feasible metabolism on ancient Mars, and fossil or isotopic evidence of this metabolic pathway may persist beneath the surface and in surface exposures of eroded ancient terrains.

  14. Constraints on mechanisms and rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane by microbial consortia: process-based modeling of ANME-2 archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Orcutt

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM is the main process responsible for the removal of methane generated in Earth's marine subsurface environments. However, the biochemical mechanism of AOM remains elusive. By explicitly resolving the observed spatial arrangement of methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria found in consortia mediating AOM, potential intermediates involved in the electron transfer between the methane oxidizing and sulfate reducing partners were investigated via a consortium-scale reaction transport model that integrates the effect of diffusional transport with thermodynamic and kinetic controls on microbial activity. Model simulations were used to assess the impact of poorly constrained microbial characteristics such as minimum energy requirements to sustain metabolism and cell specific rates. The role of environmental conditions such as the influence of methane levels on the feasibility of H2, formate and acetate as intermediate species, and the impact of the abundance of intermediate species on pathway reversal were examined. The results show that higher production rates of intermediates via AOM lead to increased diffusive fluxes from the methane oxidizing archaea to sulfate reducing bacteria, but the build-up of the exchangeable species can cause the energy yield of AOM to drop below that required for ATP production. Comparison to data from laboratory experiments shows that under the experimental conditions of Nauhaus et al. (2007, none of the potential intermediates considered here is able to support metabolic activity matching the measured rates.

  15. Temporal resilience and dynamics of anaerobic methane-oxidizing microbial communities to short-term changes in methane partial pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasek, S.; Tiantian, Y.; Torres, M. E.; Colwell, F. S.; Wang, F.; Liang, L.

    2015-12-01

    Marine sediments produce tens to hundreds of teragrams of methane annually, which is released from the seabed at thousands of cold seeps distributed globally along continental margins. Around 80-90% of this methane is consumed in shallower sediment layers before reaching the hydrosphere, in a microbially-mediated process known as anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) However, cold seeps appear to exhibit temporal variation in gas flux intensity, and AOM filter efficiency at cold seeps generally decreases with fluid flow rate. To our knowledge, the degree to which temporal heterogeneity in subsurface methane flux stimulates AOM community growth and adaptation to increased methane concentrations has not been investigated. Static high-pressure bioreactors were used to incubate sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) and methanogenic zone sediments underlying a Mediterranean mud volcano gas flare under in situ temperature and pressure at 8 MPa methane. Sulfide production rates of 0.4 μmol/cm3/day in both sediment regimes after 4 months of incubation suggested the resilience of the marine subsurface methane filter may extend well below the SMTZ (40 cm). Similar incubations of SMTZ samples from below a gas flare off Svalbard at saturating (3.8 MPa) and 0.2 MPa methane are being sampled after 1 week, 4 weeks, and 4 months; sulfide production rates of 8-18 nmol/cm3/day were first observed after 4 weeks of incubation. Sediment samples at all specified time points for both sets of incubations were collected for nucleic acid extraction and cell fixation. Anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are expected dominant taxa in enriched and non-enriched communities. 16S rDNA community analysis is expected to reveal additional microbial players involved in the short-term adaptation to higher methane partial pressures in the marine subsurface. Increased AOM community activity (RNA/DNA ratio) and copy numbers of methane cycling transcripts (mcr

  16. Light-Dependent Aerobic Methane Oxidation Reduces Methane Emissions from Seasonally Stratified Lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Oswald

    Full Text Available Lakes are a natural source of methane to the atmosphere and contribute significantly to total emissions compared to the oceans. Controls on methane emissions from lake surfaces, particularly biotic processes within anoxic hypolimnia, are only partially understood. Here we investigated biological methane oxidation in the water column of the seasonally stratified Lake Rotsee. A zone of methane oxidation extending from the oxic/anoxic interface into anoxic waters was identified by chemical profiling of oxygen, methane and δ13C of methane. Incubation experiments with 13C-methane yielded highest oxidation rates within the oxycline, and comparable rates were measured in anoxic waters. Despite predominantly anoxic conditions within the zone of methane oxidation, known groups of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea were conspicuously absent. Instead, aerobic gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs were identified as the active methane oxidizers. In addition, continuous oxidation and maximum rates always occurred under light conditions. These findings, along with the detection of chlorophyll a, suggest that aerobic methane oxidation is tightly coupled to light-dependent photosynthetic oxygen production both at the oxycline and in the anoxic bottom layer. It is likely that this interaction between oxygenic phototrophs and aerobic methanotrophs represents a widespread mechanism by which methane is oxidized in lake water, thus diminishing its release into the atmosphere.

  17. Syntrophic interactions and mechanisms underpinning anaerobic methane oxidation: targeted metaproteogenomics, single-cell protein detection and quantitative isotope imaging of microbial consortia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orphan, Victoria Jeanne [California Institute of Technology

    2014-11-26

    Syntrophy and mutualism play a central role in carbon and nutrient cycling by microorganisms. Yet, our ability to effectively study symbionts in culture has been hindered by the inherent interdependence of syntrophic associations, their dynamic behavior, and their frequent existence at thermodynamic limits. Now solutions to these challenges are emerging in the form of new methodologies. Developing strategies that establish links between the identity of microorganisms and their metabolic potential, as well as techniques that can probe metabolic networks on a scale that captures individual molecule exchange and processing, is at the forefront of microbial ecology. Understanding the interactions between microorganisms on this level, at a resolution previously intractable, will lead to our greater understanding of carbon turnover and microbial community resilience to environmental perturbations. In this project, we studied an enigmatic syntrophic association between uncultured methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria. This environmental archaeal-bacterial partnership represents a globally important sink for methane in anoxic environments. The specific goals of this project were organized into 3 major tasks designed to address questions relating to the ecophysiology of these syntrophic organisms under changing environmental conditions (e.g. different electron acceptors and nutrients), primarily through the development of microanalytical imaging methods which enable the visualization of the spatial distribution of the partners within aggregates, consumption and exchange of isotopically labeled substrates, and expression of targeted proteins identified via metaproteomics. The advanced tool set developed here to collect, correlate, and analyze these high resolution image and isotope-based datasets from methane-oxidizing consortia has the potential to be widely applicable for studying and modeling patterns of activity and interactions across a broad range of

  18. Artificial electron acceptors decouple archaeal methane oxidation from sulfate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Silvan; Yu, Hang; Chadwick, Grayson L; McGlynn, Shawn E; Orphan, Victoria J

    2016-02-12

    The oxidation of methane with sulfate is an important microbial metabolism in the global carbon cycle. In marine methane seeps, this process is mediated by consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) that live in syntrophy with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The underlying interdependencies within this uncultured symbiotic partnership are poorly understood. We used a combination of rate measurements and single-cell stable isotope probing to demonstrate that ANME in deep-sea sediments can be catabolically and anabolically decoupled from their syntrophic SRB partners using soluble artificial oxidants. The ANME still sustain high rates of methane oxidation in the absence of sulfate as the terminal oxidant, lending support to the hypothesis that interspecies extracellular electron transfer is the syntrophic mechanism for the anaerobic oxidation of methane. PMID:26912857

  19. Constraints on mechanisms and rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane by microbial consortia: process-based modeling of ANME-2 archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Orcutt

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM is the main process responsible for the removal of methane generated in Earth's marine subsurface environments. However, the biochemical mechanism of AOM remains elusive. By explicitly resolving the observed spatial arrangement of methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria found in consortia mediating AOM, potential intermediates involved in the electron transfer between the methane oxidizing and sulfate reducing partners were investigated via a consortium-scale reaction transport model that integrates the effect of diffusional transport with thermodynamic and kinetic controls on microbial activity. Model simulations were used to assess the impact of poorly constrained microbial characteristics such as minimum energy requirements to sustain metabolism, substrate affinity and cell specific rates. The role of environmental conditions such as the influence of methane levels on the feasibility of H2, formate and acetate as intermediate species, and the impact of the abundance of intermediate species on pathway reversal was examined. The results show that higher production rates of intermediates via AOM lead to increased diffusive fluxes from the methane oxidizing archaea to sulfate reducing bacteria, but the build-up of the exchangeable species causes the energy yield of AOM to drop below that required for ATP production. Comparison to data from laboratory experiments shows that under the experimental conditions of Nauhaus et al. (2007, neither hydrogen nor formate is exchanged fast enough between the consortia partners to achieve measured rates of metabolic activity, but that acetate exchange might support rates that approach those observed.

  20. 硫酸盐还原型甲烷厌氧氧化菌群驯化及其群落特征%Acclimatization and Characteristics of Microbial Community in Sulphate-Dependent Anaerobic Methane Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    席婧茹; 刘素琴; 李琳; 刘俊新

    2014-01-01

    The greenhouse effect of methane is 26 times worse than that of carbon dioxide, and wastewater containing high concentrations of sulfate is harmful to water, soil and plants. Therefore, anaerobic oxidation of methane driven by sulfate is one of the effective ways for methane reduction. In this paper, with sulfate as the electron accepter, a microbial consortium capable of oxidating methane under anaerobic condition was cultured. The diversity and characteristics of bacterial and archaeal community were investigated by PCR-DGGE, and phylogenetic analysis of the dominant microorganisms was also carried out. The DGGE fingerprints showed that microbial community structure changed distinctly, and the abundance of methane-oxidizing archea and sulfate-reducing bacteria increased in the acclimatization system added sulfate. After acclimatization, the bacterial diversity increased, while archaea diversity decreased slightly. The representative bands in the DGGE profiles were excised and sequenced. Results indicated that the dominant species in the acclimatization system were Spirochaetes, Desulfuromonadales, Methanosarcinales, Methanosaeta. Methane converted into carbon dioxide while sulfate transformed into hydrogen sulfide and sulfur in the process of anaerobic methane oxidation accompanied by sulphate reduction.%甲烷的温室效应是二氧化碳的26倍,高浓度硫酸盐废水对水体、土壤和植物均有危害。硫酸盐为氧化剂的甲烷厌氧氧化是减少甲烷的主要途径之一。本研究以硫酸盐作为电子受体,驯化培养硫酸盐还原型甲烷厌氧氧化菌群,采用 PCR-DGGE技术分析细菌和古菌菌群多样性和群落结构特征,并对其中的优势菌进行系统发育分析。 DGGE 指纹图谱结果表明,硫酸盐的加入使微生物群落结构和优势种群数量发生了明显的改变,其增强了甲烷氧化古菌和硫酸盐还原细菌的丰度,加入硫酸盐驯化的菌群,其细菌

  1. Molecular Fingerprint and Dominant Environmental Factors of Nitrite-Dependent Anaerobic Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria in Sediments from the Yellow River Estuary, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Pengze; Li, Mingcong; Wei, Guangshan; Li, Han; Gao, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) is performed by “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera” (M. oxyfera), which connects the carbon and nitrogen global nutrient cycles. In the present study, M. oxyfera-like bacteria sequences were successfully recovered from Yellow River Estuary sediments using specific primers for 16S rRNA and pmoA genes. A M. oxyfera-like sequences analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene revealed greater diversity compared with the pmoA gene; the 16S rRNA gene sequences retrieved from the Yellow River Estuary sediments belong to groups A as well as B and were mainly found in freshwater habitats. Quantitative PCR showed that 16S rRNA gene abundance varied from 9.28±0.11×103 to 2.10±0.13×105 copies g-1 (dry weight), and the pmoA gene abundance ranged from 8.63±0.50×103 to 1.83±0.18×105 copies g-1 (dry weight). A correlation analysis showed that the total organic carbon (TOC) and ammonium (NH4+) as well as the ratio of total phosphorus to total nitrogen (TP/TN) influenced the M. oxyfera-like bacteria distribution in the Yellow River Estuary sediments. These findings will aid in understanding the n-damo bacterial distribution pattern as well as their correlation with surrounding environmental factors in temperate estuarine ecosystems. PMID:26368535

  2. 中空纤维膜生物反应器富集反硝化厌氧甲烷氧化菌群的研究%Enrichment of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation microbes in a hollow fiber membrane bioreactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱祝胜; 付亮; 丁静; 丁兆威; 曾建雄

    2014-01-01

    反硝化厌氧甲烷氧化(DAMO)过程可以由一种称为Methylomirabilis oxy f era的DAMO细菌在有或者没有DAMO古菌下完成.已经报道的DAMO过程的菌群富集时间长(一般需要7~18月),且DAMO体系反硝化速率低.利用中空纤维膜生物反应器(HFMB)提高甲烷的传质来试图实现快速启动DAMO反应,结果发现HFMB在不到3个月时间内就表现出DAMO反应,其反硝化速率达到50 mg · L -1· d-1硝酸盐氮.二代测序显示,HFMB中微生物以 A naerolineaceae , A zospira ,CL500‐3占绝对优势,分别为39.08%,13.68%和11.54%,而 DAMO 细菌(Methylomirabilis)和与厌氧甲烷氧化有关的古菌 Methanosarcina分别占0.02%和0.13%,因此推测在HFMB中DAMO过程是由一群新的菌群主导完成.%The process of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) can be catalyzed by DAMO bacteria called Methylomirabilis oxyfera with or without the involvement of DAMO archaea .Enrichment of DAMO microbes often takes a long time (7 ~ 18 months) to show a faint denitrification function in reported DAMO process .This study aimed to fast enrich DAMO microbes in a hollow fiber membrane bioreactor (HFMB) as the special structure of hollow fiber can increase the mass transfer of methane .It is found that HFMB shows DAMO activity in a shorter period of time (<3 months) and the denitrification rate reaches 50 mg · L -1 · d-1 NO3 -‐N .The next‐generation DNA sequencing on the microbes in HFMB shows that Anaerolineaceae ,Azospira,CL500‐3 are dominant with 39.08% ,13.68% and 11.54% of the total microbes , respectively . Meanwhile , Methylomirabilis (DAMO bacteria ) and Methanosarcina (DAMO archaea) are only 0.02% and 0.13% ,respectively .It is speculated therefore that the DAMO process in HFMB may have been catalyzed by other microbes that are different from the known DAMO microbes .

  3. Methane-Oxidizing Enzymes: An Upstream Problem in Biological Gas-to-Liquids Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Thomas J; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2016-08-01

    Biological conversion of natural gas to liquids (Bio-GTL) represents an immense economic opportunity. In nature, aerobic methanotrophic bacteria and anaerobic archaea are able to selectively oxidize methane using methane monooxygenase (MMO) and methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR) enzymes. Although significant progress has been made toward genetically manipulating these organisms for biotechnological applications, the enzymes themselves are slow, complex, and not recombinantly tractable in traditional industrial hosts. With turnover numbers of 0.16-13 s(-1), these enzymes pose a considerable upstream problem in the biological production of fuels or chemicals from methane. Methane oxidation enzymes will need to be engineered to be faster to enable high volumetric productivities; however, efforts to do so and to engineer simpler enzymes have been minimally successful. Moreover, known methane-oxidizing enzymes have different expression levels, carbon and energy efficiencies, require auxiliary systems for biosynthesis and function, and vary considerably in terms of complexity and reductant requirements. The pros and cons of using each methane-oxidizing enzyme for Bio-GTL are considered in detail. The future for these enzymes is bright, but a renewed focus on studying them will be critical to the successful development of biological processes that utilize methane as a feedstock. PMID:27366961

  4. [Research progress in microbial methane oxidation coupled to denitrification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Yuan, Meng-Dong; Liu, Jing-Jing; Huang, Xiao-Xiao; Wu, Wei-Xiang

    2013-12-01

    Methane oxidation coupled to denitrification is an essential bond to connect carbon- and nitrogen cycling. To deeply research this process will improve our understanding on the biochemical cycling of global carbon and nitrogen. As an exogenous gaseous carbon source of denitrification, methane can both regulate the balance of atmospheric methane to effectively mitigate the greenhouse effect caused by methane, and reduce the cost of exogenous carbon source input in traditional wastewater denitrification treatment process. As a result, great attention has being paid to the mechanical study of the process. This paper mainly discussed the two types of methane oxidation coupled to denitrification, i. e., aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) and anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (ANME-D), with the focus on the microbiological coupling mechanisms and related affecting factors. The existing problems in the engineering application of methane oxidation coupled to denitrification were pointed out, and the application prospects were approached. PMID:24697087

  5. Genomic expansion of Domain Archaea highlights roles for organisms from new phyla in anaerobic carbon cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelle, Cindy; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Thomas, Brian C.; Hug, Laura A.; Brown, Christopher T.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Frischkorn, Kyle R.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Singh, Andrea; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-03-01

    cultivated representatives, the biogeochemical impacts of this major radiation of archaea are primarily through anaerobic carbon and hydrogen cycling.

  6. The contribution of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea to azo dye reduction by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos A.B.; Cervantes, F.J.; Madrid, de M.P.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lier, van J.B.

    2006-01-01

    The contribution of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea to azo dye reduction by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium was studied. Additionally, the effects of different electron-donating substrates and the redox mediator riboflavin on dye reduction were assessed by using either a methanoge

  7. Metabolic Capabilities of Microorganisms Involved in and Associated with the Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane

    OpenAIRE

    Wegener, Gunter; Krukenberg, Viola; Ruff, S. Emil; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Knittel, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    In marine sediments the anaerobic oxidation of methane with sulfate as electron acceptor (AOM) is responsible for the removal of a major part of the greenhouse gas methane. AOM is performed by consortia of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and their specific partner bacteria. The physiology of these organisms is poorly understood, which is due to their slow growth with doubling times in the order of months and the phylogenetic diversity in natural and in vitro AOM enrichments. Here w...

  8. The Apparent Involvement of ANMEs in Mineral Dependent Methane Oxidation, as an Analog for Possible Martian Methanotrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Christopher H.; Beal, Emily J.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2011-11-01

    On Earth, marine anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) can be driven by the microbial reduction of sulfate, iron, and manganese. Here, we have further characterized marine sediment incubations to determine if the mineral dependent methane oxidation involves similar microorganisms to those found for sulfate-dependent methane oxidation. Through FISH and FISH-SIMS analyses using 13C and 15N labeled substrates, we find that the most active cells during manganese dependent AOM are primarily mixed and mixed-cluster aggregates of archaea and bacteria. Overall, our control experiment using sulfate showed two active bacterial clusters, two active shell aggregates, one active mixed aggregate, and an active archaeal sarcina, the last of which appeared to take up methane in the absence of a closely-associated bacterial partner. A single example of a shell aggregate appeared to be active in the manganese incubation, along with three mixed aggregates and an archaeal sarcina. These results suggest that the microorganisms (e.g., ANME-2) found active in the manganese-dependent incubations are likely capable of sulfate-dependent AOM. Similar metabolic flexibility for Martian methanotrophs would mean that the same microbial groups could inhabit a diverse set of Martian mineralogical crustal environments. The recently discovered seasonal Martian plumes of methane outgassing could be coupled to the reduction of abundant surface sulfates and extensive metal oxides, providing a feasible metabolism for present and past Mars. In an optimistic scenario Martian methanotrophy consumes much of the periodic methane released supporting on the order of 10,000 microbial cells per cm2 of Martian surface. Alternatively, most of the methane released each year could be oxidized through an abiotic process requiring biological methane oxidation to be more limited. If under this scenario, 1% of this methane flux were oxidized by biology in surface soils or in subsurface aquifers (prior to release), a total

  9. The Apparent Involvement of ANMEs in Mineral Dependent Methane Oxidation, as an Analog for Possible Martian Methanotrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria J. Orphan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available On Earth, marine anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM can be driven by the microbial reduction of sulfate, iron, and manganese. Here, we have further characterized marine sediment incubations to determine if the mineral dependent methane oxidation involves similar microorganisms to those found for sulfate-dependent methane oxidation. Through FISH and FISH-SIMS analyses using 13C and 15N labeled substrates, we find that the most active cells during manganese dependent AOM are primarily mixed and mixed-cluster aggregates of archaea and bacteria. Overall, our control experiment using sulfate showed two active bacterial clusters, two active shell aggregates, one active mixed aggregate, and an active archaeal sarcina, the last of which appeared to take up methane in the absence of a closely-associated bacterial partner. A single example of a shell aggregate appeared to be active in the manganese incubation, along with three mixed aggregates and an archaeal sarcina. These results suggest that the microorganisms (e.g., ANME-2 found active in the manganese-dependent incubations are likely capable of sulfate-dependent AOM. Similar metabolic flexibility for Martian methanotrophs would mean that the same microbial groups could inhabit a diverse set of Martian mineralogical crustal environments. The recently discovered seasonal Martian plumes of methane outgassing could be coupled to the reduction of abundant surface sulfates and extensive metal oxides, providing a feasible metabolism for present and past Mars. In an optimistic scenario Martian methanotrophy consumes much of the periodic methane released supporting on the order of 10,000 microbial cells per cm2 of Martian surface. Alternatively, most of the methane released each year could be oxidized through an abiotic process requiring biological methane oxidation to be more limited. If under this scenario, 1% of this methane flux were oxidized by biology in surface soils or in subsurface aquifers (prior to

  10. Patterns of ^(15)N assimilation and growth of methanotrophic ANME-2 archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria within structured syntrophic consortia revealed by FISH-SIMS

    OpenAIRE

    Orphan, Victoria J; Turk, Kendra A.; Green, Abigail M.; House, Christopher H.

    2009-01-01

    Methane release from the oceans is controlled in large part by syntrophic interactions between anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (DSS), frequently found as organized consortia. An understanding of the specifics of this symbiotic relationship and the metabolic heterogeneity existing between and within individual methane-oxidizing aggregates is currently lacking. Here, we use the microanalytical method FISH-SIMS (fluorescence in situ hybridization-secondary i...

  11. Trace methane oxidation studied in several Euryarchaeota under diverse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Moran

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We used 13C-labeled methane to document the extent of trace methane oxidation by Archaeoglobus fulgidus, Archaeoglobus lithotrophicus, Archaeoglobus profundus, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanosarcina acetivorans. The results indicate trace methane oxidation during growth varied among different species and among methanogen cultures grown on different substrates. The extent of trace methane oxidation by Mb. thermoautotrophicum (0.05 ± 0.04%, ± 2 standard deviations of the methane produced during growth was less than that by M. barkeri (0.15 ± 0.04%, grown under similar conditions with H2 and CO2. Methanosarcina acetivorans oxidized more methane during growth on trimethylamine (0.36 ± 0.05% than during growth on methanol (0.07 ± 0.03%. This may indicate that, in M. acetivorans, either a methyltransferase related to growth on trimethylamine plays a role in methane oxidation, or that methanol is an intermediate of methane oxidation. Addition of possible electron acceptors (O2, NO3–, SO22–, SO32– or H2 to the headspace did not substantially enhance or diminish methane oxidation in M. acetivorans cultures. Separate growth experiments with FAD and NAD+ showed that inclusion of these electron carriers also did not enhance methane oxidation. Our results suggest trace methane oxidized during methanogenesis cannot be coupled to the reduction of these electron acceptors in pure cultures, and that the mechanism by which methane is oxidized in methanogens is independent of H2 concentration. In contrast to the methanogens, species of the sulfate-reducing genus Archaeoglobus did not significantly oxidize methane during growth (oxidizing 0.003 ± 0.01% of the methane provided to A. fulgidus, 0.002 ± 0.009% to A. lithotrophicus and 0.003 ± 0.02% to A. profundus. Lack of observable methane oxidation in the three Archaeoglobus species examined may indicate that methyl-coenzyme M reductase, which is not present in

  12. Environental assessment of methane oxidizers nitrite driven bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    VAELLO LÓPEZ, MARIA TERESA

    2013-01-01

    The nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (N-DAMO) bacteria has been discovered in the last decade and there is little known about its environmental distribution and contribution to the oxidation of methane (CH4). Because CH4 is of environmental concern due to its contribution to global warming, it has become very important to look for ways to reduce it. The purpose of this thesis is the acquisition of established molecular tools and their application in microbial ecology investiga...

  13. Field and laboratory studies of methane oxidation in an anoxic marine sediment: Evidence for a methanogen-sulfate reducer consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Alperin, Marc J.; Albert, Daniel B.; Martens, Christopher S.

    1994-12-01

    Field and laboratory studies of anoxic sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, suggest that anaerobic methane oxidation is mediated by a consortium of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. A seasonal survey of methane oxidation and CO2 reduction rates indicates that methane production was confined to sulfate-depleted sediments at all times of year, while methane oxidation occurred in two modes. In the summer, methane oxidation was confined to sulfate-depleted sediments and occurred at rates lower than those of CO2 reduction. In the winter, net methane oxidation occurred in an interval at the base of the sulfate-containing zone. Sediment incubation experiments suggest both methanogens and sulfate reducers were responsible for the observed methane oxidation. In one incubation experiment both modes of oxidation were partially inhibited by 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (a specific inhibitor of methanogens). This evidence, along with the apparent confinement of methane oxidation to sulfate-depleted sediments in the summer, indicates that methanogenic bacteria are involved in methane oxidation. In a second incubation experiment, net methane oxidation was induced by adding sulfate to homogenized methanogenic sediments, suggesting that sulfate reducers also play a role in the process. We hypothesize that methanogens oxidize methane and produce hydrogen via a reversal of CO2 reduction. The hydrogen is efficiently removed and maintained at low concentrations by sulfate reducers. Pore water H2 concentrations in the sediment incubation experiments (while net methane oxidation was occurring) were low enough that methanogenic bacteria could derive sufficient energy for growth from the oxidation of methane. The methanogen-sulfate reducer consortium is consistent not only with the results of this study, but may also be a feasible mechanism for previously documented anaerobic methane oxidation in both freshwater and marine environments.

  14. Archaea in Symbioses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Wrede

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years, the analysis of microbial diversity in various habitats greatly increased our knowledge on the kingdom Archaea. At the same time, we became aware of the multiple ways in which Archaea may interact with each other and with organisms of other kingdoms. The large group of euryarchaeal methanogens and their methane oxidizing relatives, in particular, take part in essential steps of the global methane cycle. Both of these processes, which are in reverse to each other, are partially conducted in a symbiotic interaction with different partners, either ciliates and xylophagous animals or sulfate reducing bacteria. Other symbiotic interactions are mostly of unknown ecological significance but depend on highly specific mechanisms. This paper will give an overview on interactions between Archaea and other organisms and will point out the ecological relevance of these symbiotic processes, as long as these have been already recognized.

  15. Methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis in anoxic waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milucka, Jana; Kirf, Mathias; Lu, Lu; Krupke, Andreas; Lam, Phyllis; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Schubert, Carsten J

    2015-09-01

    Freshwater lakes represent large methane sources that, in contrast to the Ocean, significantly contribute to non-anthropogenic methane emissions to the atmosphere. Particularly mixed lakes are major methane emitters, while permanently and seasonally stratified lakes with anoxic bottom waters are often characterized by strongly reduced methane emissions. The causes for this reduced methane flux from anoxic lake waters are not fully understood. Here we identified the microorganisms and processes responsible for the near complete consumption of methane in the anoxic waters of a permanently stratified lake, Lago di Cadagno. Interestingly, known anaerobic methanotrophs could not be detected in these waters. Instead, we found abundant gamma-proteobacterial aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria active in the anoxic waters. In vitro incubations revealed that, among all the tested potential electron acceptors, only the addition of oxygen enhanced the rates of methane oxidation. An equally pronounced stimulation was also observed when the anoxic water samples were incubated in the light. Our combined results from molecular, biogeochemical and single-cell analyses indicate that methane removal at the anoxic chemocline of Lago di Cadagno is due to true aerobic oxidation of methane fuelled by in situ oxygen production by photosynthetic algae. A similar mechanism could be active in seasonally stratified lakes and marine basins such as the Black Sea, where light penetrates to the anoxic chemocline. Given the widespread occurrence of seasonally stratified anoxic lakes, aerobic methane oxidation coupled to oxygenic photosynthesis might have an important but so far neglected role in methane emissions from lakes. PMID:25679533

  16. Methane oxidation linked to chlorite dismutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurence G.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Carlström, Charlotte I.; Coates, John D.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the potential for CH4 oxidation to be coupled with oxygen derived from the dissimilatory reduction of perchlorate, chlorate, or via chlorite (ClO−2) dismutation. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO−4 and ClO−3 could be inferred from the accumulation of chloride ions either in spent media or in soil slurries prepared from exposed freshwater lake sediment, neither of these oxyanions evoked methane oxidation when added to either anaerobic mixed cultures or soil enriched in methanotrophs. In contrast, ClO−2 amendment elicited such activity. Methane (0.2 kPa) was completely removed within several days from the headspace of cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata CKB incubated with either Methylococcus capsulatus Bath or Methylomicrobium album BG8 in the presence of 5 mM ClO−2. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing soil enriched in methanotrophs when co-incubated with D. agitata CKB and 10 mM ClO−2. However, to be effective these experiments required physical separation of soil from D. agitata CKB to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although a link between ClO−2 and CH4 consumption was established in soils and cultures, no upstream connection with either ClO−4 or ClO−3 was discerned. This result suggests that the release of O2 during enzymatic perchlorate reduction was negligible, and that the oxygen produced was unavailable to the aerobic methanotrophs.

  17. Methane oxidation linked to chlorite dismutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence G. Miller

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We examined the potential for CH4 oxidation to be coupled with oxygen derived from the dissimilatory reduction of perchlorate, chlorate or via chlorite (ClO2- dismutation. Although dissimilatory reduction of ClO4- and ClO3- could be inferred from the accumulation of chloride ions either in spent media or in soil slurries prepared from exposed freshwater lake sediment, neither of these oxyanions evoked methane oxidation when added to either anaerobic mixed cultures or soil enriched in methanotrophs. In contrast, ClO2- amendment elicited such activity. Methane (0.2 kPa was completely removed within several days from the headspace of cell suspensions of Dechloromonas agitata CKB incubated with either Methylococcus capsulatus Bath or Methylomicrobium album BG8 in the presence of 5 mM ClO2-. We also observed complete removal of 0.2 kPa CH4 in bottles containing soil enriched in methanotrophs when co-incubated with D. agitata CKB and 10 mM ClO2-. However, to be effective these experiments required physical separation of soil from D. agitata CKB to allow for the partitioning of O2 liberated from chlorite dismutation into the shared headspace. Although a link between ClO2- and CH4 consumption was established in soils and cultures, no upstream connection with either ClO4- or ClO3- was discerned. This result suggests that the release of O2 during enzymatic perchlorate reduction was negligible, and that the oxygen produced was unavailable to the aerobic methanotrophs.

  18. Methane oxidation and degradation of organic compounds in landfill soil covers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2002-01-01

    High rates of methane oxidation and degradation of the lowed halogenated methanes (TCM and DCM) and HCFCs (HCFC-21 and HCFC-22) were found in an investigation of the oxidation of methane and halogenated organic compunds (HOCs) in landfill gas affected soil. The degradation followed zero-order kin......High rates of methane oxidation and degradation of the lowed halogenated methanes (TCM and DCM) and HCFCs (HCFC-21 and HCFC-22) were found in an investigation of the oxidation of methane and halogenated organic compunds (HOCs) in landfill gas affected soil. The degradation followed zero...... in the anaerobic zone in the lower part of soil columns permeated with artificial landfill gas. The lesser-chlorinated compounds were degraded in the upper oxic zone with overlapping gradients of methane and oxygen. Methane oxidation and degradation of HOCs in the top-soils may play a very important role...

  19. 厌氧氨氧化细菌和反硝化厌氧甲烷氧化细菌在岸边带土壤中的分布规律%Distribution of anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria and nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidizing bacteria in soil profile in the riparian zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏超; 祝贵兵; 邹雨璇; 周蓉; 赵思研

    2015-01-01

    厌氧氨氧化(anaerobic ammonium oxidation,anammox)和反硝化厌氧甲烷氧化(nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation,n-damo)的发现打破了人们长久以来对生物氮、碳循环的传统认识.厌氧氨氧化细菌(anammox bacteria)和反硝化厌氧甲烷氧化细菌(n-damo bacteria)在水生态系统均有分布,并且在全球氮、碳循环中发挥重要作用.但它们在岸边带土壤中的存在和分布还不甚清楚.因此,本文对湖泊岸边带土壤中厌氧氨氧化细菌和反硝化厌氧甲烷氧化细菌的存在和分布进行了研究.基于厌氧氨氧化细菌hzsB基因(联氨合成酶关键基因)和M.oxyfera-like细菌16S rRNA基因的序列分析,分别证明了厌氧氨氧化细菌和M.oxffera-like细菌在白洋淀湖泊岸边带深层土壤中的共同存在.厌氧氨氧化细菌hzsB基因定量PCR结果显示,其主要分布在地下水位附近及以下部分(40~100 cm),而在表层(0~40 cm)土壤中未被检测到.M.oxyfera-like 细菌16S rRNA基因定量PCR结果显示,不同深度的土壤均有M.oxyfera-like细菌分布,并且其丰度随着土壤深度的增加而递增.这些结果说明厌氧氨氧化细菌和M.oxyfera-like细菌在湖泊岸边带深层土壤中共同存在,并且有不同的分布规律.

  20. Microbial Methane Oxidation Rates in Guandu Wetland of northern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zih-Huei; Wang, Pei-Ling; Lin, Li-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Wetland is one of the major sources of atmospheric methane. The exact magnitude of methane emission is essentially controlled by microbial processes. Besides of methanogenesis, methanotrophy oxidizes methane with the reduction of various electron acceptors under oxic or anoxic conditions. The interplay of these microbial activities determines the final methane flux under different circumstances. In a tidal wetland, the cyclic flooding and recession of tide render oxygen and sulfate the dominant electron acceptors for methane oxidation. However, the details have not been fully examined, especially for the linkage between potential methane oxidation rates and in situ condition. In this study, a sub-tropical wetland in northern Taiwan, Guandu, was chosen to examine the tidal effect on microbial methane regulation. Several sediment cores were retrieved during high tide and low tide period and their geochemical profiles were characterized to demonstrate in situ microbial activities. Incubation experiments were conducted to estimate potential aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation rates in surface and core sediments. Sediment cores collected in high tide and low tide period showed different geochemical characteristics, owning to tidal inundation. Chloride and sulfate concentration were lower during low tide period. A spike of enhanced sulfate at middle depth intervals was sandwiched by two sulfate depleted zones above and underneath. Methane was accumulated significantly with two methane depletion zones nearly mirroring the sulfate spike zone identified. During the high tide period, sulfate decreased slightly with depth with methane production inhibited at shallow depths. However, a methane consumption zone still occurred near the surface. Potential aerobic methane oxidation rates were estimated between 0.7 to 1.1 μmole/g/d, showing no difference between the samples collected at high tide or low tide period. However, a lag phase was widely observed and the lag phase

  1. Methanogenic archaea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter outlines procedures for enumerating, isolating, culturing and storing methanogens from ruminal digesta. The methanogens, a large and diverse group of Archaea, have unique features that separate them from the bacteria and the eukaryotes. They are the only recognized ruminal microbes belonging to the Archaea and are an integral part of the rumen microbial ecosystem. By scavenging hydrogen gas, methanogens play a key ecological role in keeping the partial pressure of hydrogen low so that fermentation can proceed efficiently. Although about 70 methanogenic species belonging to 2 1 genera have been identified from anaerobic environments, and a range of different methanogens co-exist in the rumen, to date only seven ruminal species have been isolated and purified. The population densities of methanogens in the rumen appear to be influenced by diet, and in particular by the fibre content of the diet. Sheep and cattle fed diets rich in concentrates contained 107-108 and 108- 109 ruminal methanogens/g, respectively, whereas sheep and dairy cows grazing pasture contained 109-1010 ruminal methanogens/g (G.N. Jarvis and K.N. Joblin, unpublished data). With careful application, methanogen population densities can readily be determined using culture methods. These appear to be similar to the population densities determined by culture-independent methods (P. Evans and K.N. Joblin, unpublished data)

  2. Archaea in metazoan diets: implications for food webs and biogeochemical cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Andrew R; Levin, Lisa A; Orphan, Victoria J; Marlow, Jeffrey J

    2012-01-01

    Although the importance of trophic linkages, including ‘top-down forcing', on energy flow and ecosystem productivity is recognized, the influence of metazoan grazing on Archaea and the biogeochemical processes that they mediate is unknown. Here, we test if: (1) Archaea provide a food source sufficient to allow metazoan fauna to complete their life cycle; (2) neutral lipid biomarkers (including crocetane) can be used to identify Archaea consumers; and (3) archaeal aggregates are a dietary source for methane seep metazoans. In the laboratory, we demonstrated that a dorvilleid polychaete, Ophryotrocha labronica, can complete its life cycle on two strains of Euryarchaeota with the same growth rate as when fed bacterial and eukaryotic food. Archaea were therefore confirmed as a digestible and nutritious food source sufficient to sustain metazoan populations. Both strains of Euryarchaeota used as food sources had unique lipids that were not incorporated into O. labronica tissues. At methane seeps, sulfate-reducing bacteria that form aggregations and live syntrophically with anaerobic-methane oxidizing Archaea contain isotopically and structurally unique fatty acids (FAs). These biomarkers were incorporated into tissues of an endolithofaunal dorvilleid polychaete species from Costa Rica (mean bulk δ13C=−92±4‰ polar lipids −116‰) documenting consumption of archaeal-bacterial aggregates. FA composition of additional soft-sediment methane seep species from Oregon and California provided evidence that consumption of archaeal-bacterial aggregates is widespread at methane seeps. This work is the first to show that Archaea are consumed by heterotrophic metazoans, a trophic process we coin as ‘archivory'. PMID:22402398

  3. Enzymes involved in the anaerobic oxidation of n-alkanes: from methane to long-chain paraffins

    OpenAIRE

    Amy V. Callaghan

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of methane and non-methane alkanes. To date, there appear to be at least three proposed mechanisms of anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM). The first pathway is mediated by consortia of archaeal anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-reducing bacteria via ‘reverse methanogenesis’ and is catalyzed by a homologue of methyl-coenzyme M reductase. The second pathway is also mediated by anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-red...

  4. Intercellular wiring enables electron transfer between methanotrophic archaea and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Gunter; Krukenberg, Viola; Riedel, Dietmar; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Boetius, Antje

    2015-10-22

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate controls the emission of the greenhouse gas methane from the ocean floor. In marine sediments, AOM is performed by dual-species consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) inhabiting the methane-sulfate transition zone. The biochemical pathways and biological adaptations enabling this globally relevant process are not fully understood. Here we study the syntrophic interaction in thermophilic AOM (TAOM) between ANME-1 archaea and their consortium partner SRB HotSeep-1 (ref. 6) at 60 °C to test the hypothesis of a direct interspecies exchange of electrons. The activity of TAOM consortia was compared to the first ANME-free culture of an AOM partner bacterium that grows using hydrogen as the sole electron donor. The thermophilic ANME-1 do not produce sufficient hydrogen to sustain the observed growth of the HotSeep-1 partner. Enhancing the growth of the HotSeep-1 partner by hydrogen addition represses methane oxidation and the metabolic activity of ANME-1. Further supporting the hypothesis of direct electron transfer between the partners, we observe that under TAOM conditions, both ANME and the HotSeep-1 bacteria overexpress genes for extracellular cytochrome production and form cell-to-cell connections that resemble the nanowire structures responsible for interspecies electron transfer between syntrophic consortia of Geobacter. HotSeep-1 highly expresses genes for pili production only during consortial growth using methane, and the nanowire-like structures are absent in HotSeep-1 cells isolated with hydrogen. These observations suggest that direct electron transfer is a principal mechanism in TAOM, which may also explain the enigmatic functioning and specificity of other methanotrophic ANME-SRB consortia. PMID:26490622

  5. Assessing the role of spatial structure on cell-specific activity and interactions within uncultured methane-oxidizing syntrophic consortia (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orphan, V. J.; McGlynn, S.; Chadwick, G.; Dekas, A.; Green-Saxena, A.

    2013-12-01

    Sulfate-coupled anaerobic oxidation of methane is catalysed through symbiotic associations between archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria and represents the dominant sink for methane in the oceans. These methane-oxidizing symbiotic consortia form well-structured multi-celled aggregations in marine methane seeps, where close spatial proximity is believed to be essential for efficient exchange of substrates between syntrophic partners. The nature of this interspecies metabolic relationship is still unknown however there are a number of hypotheses regarding the electron carrying intermediate and ecophysiology of the partners, each of which should be affected by, and influence, the spatial arrangement of archaeal and bacterial cells within aggregates. To advance our understanding of the role of spatial structure within naturally occurring environmental consortia, we are using spatial statistical methods combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization and high-resolution nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (FISH-nanoSIMS) to quantify the effect of spatial organization and intra- and inter-species interactions on cell-specific microbial activity within these diverse archaeal-bacterial partnerships.

  6. Associative patterns among anaerobic fungi, methanogenic archaea and bacterial communities in response to changes in diet and age in the rumen of dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay eKumar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The rumen microbiome represents a complex microbial genetic web where bacteria, anaerobic rumen fungi (ARF, protozoa and archaea work in harmony contributing to the health and productivity of ruminants. We hypothesized that the rumen microbiome shifts as the dairy cow advances in lactations and these microbial changes may contribute to differences in productivity between primiparous (first lactation and multiparous (≥ second lactation cows. To this end, we investigated shifts in the ruminal ARF and methanogenic communities in both primiparous (n=5 and multiparous (n=5 cows as they transitioned from a high forage to a high grain diet upon initiation of lactation. A total of 20 rumen samples were extracted for genomic DNA, amplified using archaeal and fungal specific primers, sequenced on a 454 platform and analyzed using QIIME. Community comparisons (Bray-Curtis index revealed the effect of diet (P < 0.01 on ARF composition, while archaeal communities differed between primiparous and multiparous cows (P < 0.05. Among ARF, several lineages were unclassified, however, phylum Neocallimastigomycota showed the presence of three known genera. Abundance of Cyllamyces and Caecomyces shifted with diet whereas, Orpinomyces was influenced by both diet and age. Methanobrevibacter constituted the most dominant archaeal genus across all samples. Co-occurrence analysis incorporating taxa from bacteria, ARF and archaea revealed syntrophic interactions both within and between microbial domains in response to change in diet as well as age of dairy cows. Notably, these interactions were numerous and complex in multiparous cows supporting our hypothesis that the rumen microbiome also matures with age to sustain the growing metabolic needs of the host. This study provides a broader picture of the ARF and methanogenic populations in the rumen of dairy cows and their co-occurrence implicates specific relationships between different microbial domains in response to

  7. Effects of trace volatile organic compounds on methane oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiemchaisri Wilai

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs on methane oxidation in landfill cover soils were examined. The batch experiments were conducted using single and mixed VOCs, such as, dichloromethane (DCM, trichloroethylene (TCE, tetrachloroethylene (PCE, and benzene. The results from all combinations showed a decrease in methane oxidation rate with increase in VOC concentrations. Moreover, inhibition effects of TCE and DCM were found higher than benzene and PCE. The reduction of methane oxidation by benzene and PCE could be attributed to the toxicity effect, whereas TCE and DCM were found to exhibit the competitive-inhibition effect. When the soil was mixed with DCM, no methane oxidation was found. Damage to the cell's internal membrane was found in a methanotrophic culture exposed to VOC gases which is the attachment site of a key enzyme needed for methane oxidation

  8. Anaerobic oxidation of methane associated with sulfate reduction in a natural freshwater gas source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Peer Ha; Suarez-Zuluaga, Diego A; van Rossem, Minke; Diender, Martijn; Stams, Alfons Jm; Plugge, Caroline M

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and trace methane oxidation (TMO) was investigated in a freshwater natural gas source. Sediment samples were taken and analyzed for potential electron acceptors coupled to AOM. Long-term incubations with (13)C-labeled CH4 ((13)CH4) and different electron acceptors showed that both AOM and TMO occurred. In most conditions, (13)C-labeled CO2 ((13)CO2) simultaneously increased with methane formation, which is typical for TMO. In the presence of nitrate, neither methane formation nor methane oxidation occurred. Net AOM was measured only with sulfate as electron acceptor. Here, sulfide production occurred simultaneously with (13)CO2 production and no methanogenesis occurred, excluding TMO as a possible source for (13)CO2 production from (13)CH4. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the highest presence of ANME-2a/b (ANaerobic MEthane oxidizing archaea) and AAA (AOM Associated Archaea) sequences in the incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only methane addition. Higher abundance of ANME-2a/b in incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only sulfate addition was shown by qPCR analysis. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria belonging to SEEP-SRB1. This is the first report that explicitly shows that AOM is associated with sulfate reduction in an enrichment culture of ANME-2a/b and AAA methanotrophs and SEEP-SRB1 sulfate reducers from a low-saline environment. PMID:26636551

  9. Anaerobic oxidation of methane associated with sulfate reduction in a natural freshwater gas source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Peer HA; Suarez-Zuluaga, Diego A; van Rossem, Minke; Diender, Martijn; Stams, Alfons JM; Plugge, Caroline M

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and trace methane oxidation (TMO) was investigated in a freshwater natural gas source. Sediment samples were taken and analyzed for potential electron acceptors coupled to AOM. Long-term incubations with 13C-labeled CH4 (13CH4) and different electron acceptors showed that both AOM and TMO occurred. In most conditions, 13C-labeled CO2 (13CO2) simultaneously increased with methane formation, which is typical for TMO. In the presence of nitrate, neither methane formation nor methane oxidation occurred. Net AOM was measured only with sulfate as electron acceptor. Here, sulfide production occurred simultaneously with 13CO2 production and no methanogenesis occurred, excluding TMO as a possible source for 13CO2 production from 13CH4. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the highest presence of ANME-2a/b (ANaerobic MEthane oxidizing archaea) and AAA (AOM Associated Archaea) sequences in the incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only methane addition. Higher abundance of ANME-2a/b in incubations with methane and sulfate as compared with only sulfate addition was shown by qPCR analysis. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis showed the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria belonging to SEEP-SRB1. This is the first report that explicitly shows that AOM is associated with sulfate reduction in an enrichment culture of ANME-2a/b and AAA methanotrophs and SEEP-SRB1 sulfate reducers from a low-saline environment. PMID:26636551

  10. Sulfate reduction and anaerobic methane oxidation in Black Sea sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, BB; Weber, A.; Zopfi, J.

    2001-01-01

    Beyond the shelf break at ca. 150 m water depth, sulfate reduction is the only important process of organic matter oxidation in Black Sea sediments from the surface down to the sulfate-methane transition at 2-4 m depth. Sulfate reduction rates were measured experimentally with (SO42-)-S-35...... the process was very sluggish with turnover times of methane within the sulfate-methane transition zone of 20 yr or more. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.Beyond the shelf break at ca. 150 m water depth, sulfate reduction is the only important process of organic matter oxidation in Black Sea...... sediments from the surface down to the sulfate-methane transition at 2-4 m depth. Sulfate reduction rates were measured experimentally with (SO42-)-S-35, and the rates were compared with results of two diffusion-reaction models. The results showed that, even in these non-bioirrigated sediments without...

  11. Termites Facilitate Methane Oxidation and Shape the Methanotrophic Community

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Adrian; Erens, Hans; Mujinya, Basile Bazirake; Boeckx, Pascal; Baert, Geert; Schneider, Bellinda; Frenzel, Peter; Boon, Nico; Van Ranst, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Termite-derived methane contributes 3 to 4% to the total methane budget globally. Termites are not known to harbor methane-oxidizing microorganisms (methanotrophs). However, a considerable fraction of the methane produced can be consumed by methanotrophs that inhabit the mound material, yet the methanotroph ecology in these environments is virtually unknown. The potential for methane oxidation was determined using slurry incubations under conditions with high (12%) and in situ (∼0.004%) metha...

  12. [Activity of methane-oxidizing bacteria in the adsorbed state].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov, A I; Nazarenko, A V

    1975-01-01

    Adsorption of pure cultures of methane oxidizing bacteria, Methylosinus trichosporium 20 and Methylococcus ucrainicus 21, on glass and coal was studied; the former strain was sorbed on both sorbents, the latter strain was sorbed on coal but not on glass. The rate of methane oxidation by the cells of adsorbed microorganisms was higher than in the case of free cells, and increased with a decrease in dimensions of the sorbent particles. PMID:1207502

  13. Candidatus Desulfofervidus auxilii, a hydrogenotrophic sulfate-reducing bacterium involved in the thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukenberg, Viola; Harding, Katie; Richter, Michael; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Gruber-Vodicka, Harald R; Adam, Birgit; Berg, Jasmine S; Knittel, Katrin; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Boetius, Antje; Wegener, Gunter

    2016-09-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is mediated by consortia of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and their specific partner bacteria. In thermophilic AOM consortia enriched from Guaymas Basin, members of the ANME-1 clade are associated with bacteria of the HotSeep-1 cluster, which likely perform direct electron exchange via nanowires. The partner bacterium was enriched with hydrogen as sole electron donor and sulfate as electron acceptor. Based on phylogenetic, genomic and metabolic characteristics we propose to name this chemolithoautotrophic sulfate reducer Candidatus Desulfofervidus auxilii. Ca. D. auxilii grows on hydrogen at temperatures between 50°C and 70°C with an activity optimum at 60°C and doubling time of 4-6 days. Its genome draft encodes for canonical sulfate reduction, periplasmic and soluble hydrogenases and autotrophic carbon fixation via the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. The presence of genes for pili formation and cytochromes, and their similarity to genes of Geobacter spp., indicate a potential for syntrophic growth via direct interspecies electron transfer when the organism grows in consortia with ANME. This first ANME-free enrichment of an AOM partner bacterium and its characterization opens the perspective for a deeper understanding of syntrophy in anaerobic methane oxidation. PMID:26971539

  14. Kinetics of methane oxidation in selected mineral soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkiewicz, A.; Bulak, P.; Brzeziñska, M.; Włodarczyk, T.; Polakowski, C.

    2012-10-01

    The kinetic parameters of methane oxidation in three mineral soils were measured under laboratory conditions. Incubationswere preceded by a 24-day preincubationwith 10%vol. of methane. All soils showed potential to the consumption of added methane. None of the soils, however, consumed atmospheric CH4. Methane oxidation followed the Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with relatively low values of parameters for Eutric Cambisol, while high values for Haplic Podzol, and especially for Mollic Gleysol which showed the highest methanotrophic activity and much lower affinity to methane. The high values of parameters for methane oxidation are typical for organic soils and mineral soils from landfill cover. The possibility of the involvement of nitrifying microorganisms, which inhabit the ammonia-fertilized agricultural soils should be verified.

  15. Enrichment of denitrifying methane-oxidizing microorganisms using up-flow continuous reactors and batch cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Hatamoto

    Full Text Available Denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidizing (DAMO microorganisms were enriched from paddy field soils using continuous-flow and batch cultures fed with nitrate or nitrite as a sole electron acceptor. After several months of cultivation, the continuous-flow cultures using nitrite showed remarkable simultaneous methane oxidation and nitrite reduction and DAMO bacteria belonging to phylum NC10 were enriched. A maximum volumetric nitrite consumption rate of 70.4±3.4 mg-N·L(-1·day(-1 was achieved with very short hydraulic retention time of 2.1 hour. In the culture, about 68% of total microbial cells were bacteria and no archaeal cells were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization. In the nitrate-fed continuous-flow cultures, 58% of total microbial cells were bacteria while archaeal cells accounted for 7% of total cell numbers. Phylogenetic analysis of pmoA gene sequence showed that enriched DAMO bacteria in the continuous-flow cultivation had over 98% sequence similarity to DAMO bacteria in the inoculum. In contrast, for batch culture, the enriched pmoA gene sequences had 89-91% sequence similarity to DAMO bacteria in the inoculum. These results indicate that electron acceptor and cultivation method strongly affect the microbial community structures of DAMO consortia.

  16. A four-helix bundle stores copper for methane oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Vita, Nicholas; Platsaki, Semeli; Baslé, Arnaud; Allen, Stephen J; Paterson, Neil G.; Crombie, Andrew T.; Murrell, J Colin; Waldron, Kevin J.; Dennison, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Methane-oxidising bacteria (methanotrophs) require large quantities of copper for the membrane-bound (particulate) methane monooxygenase (pMMO) 1,2 . Certain methanotrophs are also able to switch to using the iron-containing soluble MMO (sMMO) to catalyse methane oxidation, with this switchover regulated by copper 3,4 . MMOs are Nature’s primary biological mechanism for suppressing atmospheric levels of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Furthermore, methanotrophs and MMOs have enormous potent...

  17. Aerobic Methane Oxidation in Alaskan Lakes Along a Latitudinal Transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Cruz, K. C.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Anthony, P.; Thalasso, F.

    2013-12-01

    Karla Martinez-Cruz* **, Armando Sepulveda-Jauregui*, Katey M. Walter Anthony*, Peter Anthony*, and Frederic Thalasso**. * Water and Environmental Research Center, Institute of Northern Engineering, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska. ** Biotechnology and Bioengineering Department, Cinvestav, Mexico city, D. F., Mexico. Methane (CH4) is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, after carbon dioxide and water vapor. Boreal lakes play an important role in the current global warming by contributing as much as 6% of global atmospheric CH4 sources annually. On the other hand, aerobic methane oxidation (methanotrophy) in lake water is a fundamental process in global methane cycling that reduces the amount of CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. Several environmental factors affect aerobic methane oxidation in the water column both directly and indirectly, including concentration of CH4 and O2, temperature and carbon budgets of lakes. We analyzed the potential of aerobic methane oxidation (PMO) rates in incubations of water collected from 30 Alaskan lakes along a north-south transect during winter and summer 2011. Our findings showed an effect of CH4 and O2 concentrations, temperature and yedoma thawing permafrost on PMO activity in the lake water. The highest PMO rates were observed in summer by lakes situated on thawing yedoma permafrost, most of them located in the interior of Alaska. We also estimated that 60-80% of all CH4 produced in Alaskan lakes could be taken up by methanotrophs in the lake water column, showing the significant influence of aerobic methane oxidation of boreal lakes to the global CH4 budget.

  18. Trichloroethylene Biodegradation by a Methane-Oxidizing Bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Little, C. Deane; Palumbo, Anthony V; Herbes, Stephen E.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Tyndall, Richard L.; Gilmer, Penny J.

    1988-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), a common groundwater contaminant, is a suspected carcinogen that is highly resistant to aerobic biodegradation. An aerobic, methane-oxidizing bacterium was isolated that degrades TCE in pure culture at concentrations commonly observed in contaminated groundwater. Strain 46-1, a type I methanotrophic bacterium, degraded TCE if grown on methane or methanol, producing CO2 and water-soluble products. Gas chromatography and 14C radiotracer techniques were used to determine...

  19. Selective methane oxidation on zeolite stabilized copper oxide clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Grundner, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Copper oxide clusters stabilized in the micropores of zeolites have been found to selectively oxidize methane to methanol. The synthesis of a catalyst with homotopic trinuclear copper oxide clusters was achieved via ion exchange and oxidation. The steric and chemical environments of these clusters characterized by combinations of physicochemical measurement were critical to activate and convert methane. While the absence of water was critical for methane oxidation, the presence of water was r...

  20. 甲烷氧化菌分类及代谢途径研究进展%Progresses in the classification and mechanism of methane-oxidizing bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡朝阳; 何崭飞; 胡宝兰

    2016-01-01

    Summary Methane (CH4) as a colorless,odorless organic gas,is one of the most simple hydrocarbons and is widely distributed in environment.As the second most important greenhouse gas,only following carbon dioxide, methane contributes a lot to the global warming. Methane-oxidizing bacteria are a kind of microorganisms which directly use methane as carbon and energy source.Because they can convert methane into carbon dioxide and mitigate the global greenhouse effect,methane-oxidizing bacteria are attracting more and more attention.Methane-oxidizing bacteria not only reduce methane emissions in the soil,but also uptake the methane in the gas phase of the unsaturated soil.They are important to mitigate the global greenhouse effect. According to whether can uptake oxygen in environment as the electron acceptor or not,methane-oxidizing bacteria can be divided into aerobic and anaerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria.Aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria are gram-negative bacteria,which use methane as carbon and energy source,have been discovered as early as 1906. Because of the potential value of aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria in practice production,scientists have made extensive research about them in the past 40 years.At the same time,aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria can reduce soil methane emissions and uptake methane in the atmosphere,playing an important role in global carbon cycle. Because anaerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria”s doubling time is long,research progress about them is slow. Cellular components of different kinds of methane-oxidizing bacteria are different,and they have different enzymes and C1 metabolic pathways.The center metabolic mechanism of C1 component determines the competition ability of different bacteria in different environments.The main center metabolic mechanism can be divided into three categories:ribulose monophosphate cycle,serine cycle,and the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle.%甲烷作为仅次于二氧化碳的第2号温室气体,是

  1. Oxidation and Assimilation of Atmospheric Methane by Soil Methane Oxidizers

    OpenAIRE

    Roslev, P.; Iversen, N.; Henriksen, K.

    1997-01-01

    The metabolism of atmospheric methane in a forest soil was studied by radiotracer techniques. Maximum (sup14)CH(inf4) oxidation (163.5 pmol of C cm(sup-3) h(sup-1)) and (sup14)C assimilation (50.3 pmol of C cm(sup-3) h(sup-1)) occurred at the A(inf2) horizon located 15 to 18 cm below the soil surface. At this depth, 31 to 43% of the atmospheric methane oxidized was assimilated into microbial biomass; the remaining methane was recovered as (sup14)CO(inf2). Methane-derived carbon was incorporat...

  2. Regulation of Methane Oxidation in a Freshwater Wetland by Water Table Changes and Anoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslev, Peter; King, Gary M.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of water table fluctuations and anoxia on methane emission and methane oxidation were studied in a freshwater marsh. Seasonal aerobic methane oxidation rates varied between 15% and 76% of the potential diffusive methane flux (diffusive flux in the absence of aerobic oxidation). On an annual basis, approximately 43% of the methane diffusing into the oxic zone was oxidized before reaching the atmosphere. The highest methane oxidation was observed when the water table was below the peat surface. This was confirmed in laboratory experiments where short-term decreases in water table levels increased methane oxidation but also net methane emission. Although methane emission was generally not observed during the winter, stems of soft rush (Juncus effusus) emitted methane when the marsh was ice covered. Indigenous methanotrophic bacteria from the wetiand studied were relatively anoxia tolerant. Surface peat incubated under anoxic conditions maintained 30% of the initial methane oxidation capacity after 32 days of anoxia. Methanotrophs from anoxic peat initiated aerobic methane oxidation relatively quickly after oxygen addition (1-7 hours). These results were supported by culture experiments with the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. This organism maintained a greater capacity for aerobic methane oxidation when starved under anoxic compared to oxic conditions. Anoxic incubation of M. trichosporium OB3b in the presence of sulfide (2 mM) and a low redox potential (-110 mV) did not decrease the capacity for methane oxidation relative to anoxic cultures incubated without sulfide. The results suggest that aerobic methane oxidation was a major regulator of seasonal methane emission front the investigated wetland. The observed water table fluctuations affected net methane oxidation presumably due to associated changes in oxygen gradients. However, changes from oxic to anoxic conditions in situ had relatively little effect on survival of the methanotrophic

  3. A four-helix bundle stores copper for methane oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Nicolas; Platsaki, Semeli; Baslé, Arnaud; Allen, Stephen J; Paterson, Neil G; Crombie, Andrew T; Murrell, J Colin; Waldron, Kevin J; Dennison, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) require large quantities of copper for the membrane-bound (particulate) methane monooxygenase. Certain methanotrophs are also able to switch to using the iron-containing soluble methane monooxygenase to catalyse methane oxidation, with this switchover regulated by copper. Methane monooxygenases are nature's primary biological mechanism for suppressing atmospheric levels of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Furthermore, methanotrophs and methane monooxygenases have enormous potential in bioremediation and for biotransformations producing bulk and fine chemicals, and in bioenergy, particularly considering increased methane availability from renewable sources and hydraulic fracturing of shale rock. Here we discover and characterize a novel copper storage protein (Csp1) from the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b that is exported from the cytosol, and stores copper for particulate methane monooxygenase. Csp1 is a tetramer of four-helix bundles with each monomer binding up to 13 Cu(I) ions in a previously unseen manner via mainly Cys residues that point into the core of the bundle. Csp1 is the first example of a protein that stores a metal within an established protein-folding motif. This work provides a detailed insight into how methanotrophs accumulate copper for the oxidation of methane. Understanding this process is essential if the wide-ranging biotechnological applications of methanotrophs are to be realized. Cytosolic homologues of Csp1 are present in diverse bacteria, thus challenging the dogma that such organisms do not use copper in this location. PMID:26308900

  4. Exploring methane-oxidizing communities for the co-metabolic degradation of organic micropollutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benner, Jessica; De Smet, Delfien; Ho, Adrian; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Heylen, Kim; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Methane-oxidizing cultures from five different inocula were enriched to be used for co-metabolic degradation of micropollutants. In a first screening, 18 different compounds were tested for degradation with the cultures as well as with four pure methane-oxidizing bacterial (MOB) strains. The tested

  5. Activity and diversity of methane-oxidizing bacteria in glacier forefields on siliceous and calcareous bedrock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauer, P. A.; Dam, B.; Liesack, W.; Zeyer, J.; Schroth, M. H.

    2012-06-01

    The global methane (CH4) cycle is largely driven by methanogenic archaea and methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB), but little is known about their activity and diversity in pioneer ecosystems. We conducted a field survey in forefields of 13 receding Swiss glaciers on both siliceous and calcareous bedrock to investigate and quantify CH4 turnover based on soil-gas CH4 concentration profiles, and to characterize the MOB community by sequencing and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of pmoA. Methane turnover was fundamentally different in the two bedrock categories. Of the 36 CH4 concentration profiles from siliceous locations, 11 showed atmospheric CH4 consumption at concentrations of ~1-2 μL L-1 with soil-atmosphere CH4 fluxes of -0.14 to -1.1 mg m-2 d-1. Another 11 profiles showed no apparent activity, while the remaining 14 exhibited slightly increased CH4 concentrations of ~2-10 μL L-1 , most likely due to microsite methanogenesis. In contrast, all profiles from calcareous sites suggested a substantial, yet unknown CH4 source below our sampling zone, with soil-gas CH4 concentrations reaching up to 1400 μL L-1. Remarkably, most soils oxidized ~90 % of the deep-soil CH4, resulting in soil-atmosphere fluxes of 0.12 to 31 mg m-2 d-1. MOB showed limited diversity in both siliceous and calcareous forefields: all identified pmoA sequences formed only 5 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at the species level and, with one exception, could be assigned to either Methylocystis or the as-yet-uncultivated Upland Soil Cluster γ (USCγ). The latter dominated T-RFLP patterns of all siliceous and most calcareous samples, while Methylocystis dominated in 4 calcareous samples. Members of Upland Soil Cluster α (USCα) were not detected. Apparently, USCγ adapted best to the oligotrophic cold climate conditions at the investigated pioneer sites.

  6. Deposition of Biogenic Iron Minerals in a Methane Oxidizing Microbial Mat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Wrede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The syntrophic community between anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria forms thick, black layers within multi-layered microbial mats in chimney-like carbonate concretions of methane seeps located in the Black Sea Crimean shelf. The microbial consortium conducts anaerobic oxidation of methane, which leads to the formation of mainly two biomineral by-products, calcium carbonates and iron sulfides, building up these chimneys. Iron sulfides are generated by the microbial reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds in the microbial mats. Here we show that sulfate reducing bacteria deposit biogenic iron sulfides extra- and intracellularly, the latter in magnetosome-like chains. These chains appear to be stable after cell lysis and tend to attach to cell debris within the microbial mat. The particles may be important nuclei for larger iron sulfide mineral aggregates.

  7. Intensive Ammonia and Methane Oxidation in Organic Liquid Manure Crusts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Daniel Aagren; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Schramm, Andreas;

    methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and are known to accumulate nitrite and nitrate, indicating the presence of ammonia oxidizers (AOB). We have surveyed six manure tanks with organic covers to investigate the prevalence of MOB and AOB and to link the potential activity with physical and chemical aspects of...... characterized with respect to O2 availability by in situ profiling with electrochemical microsensors. Results show that oxygen penetration increased from few micrometers up to several centimetres with crust age. AOB and ammonium oxidation are ubiquitously present in well-developed manure crusts whereas MOB were...... also CH4 emission mitigation, an organic surface crust can be effective if populations of MOB and AOB are allowed to build up....

  8. Microbial methane oxidation in the Arctic Ocean offshore Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinle, Lea I.; Graves, Carolyn; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Treude, Tina; Niemann, Helge

    2013-04-01

    Large amounts of methane are released from ocean sediments, most importantly at cold seep environments. Aerobic methanotrophic bacteria in the ocean water column consume a significant fraction of this biogenic methane, preventing its emission to the atmosphere. The understanding of key environmental factors controlling the efficiency of this biological methane-filter is still incomplete. In order to elucidate possible environmental constraints on methane turnover in the ocean, we investigated the temporal and spatial variation of aerobic methane oxidation (MOx) rates at active cold seeps at water depths between 150 and 400 m, located off the coast of Svalbard. In the study area, methane concentrations were consistently elevated in bottom waters (up to 825 nM) and decreased towards the sea surface. Highest MOx rates of up to 3.1 nM/day were typically observed at ~30 m above the sea floor. Despite the constant supply of methane substrate, MOx rates displayed a high temporal variability. Comparison of the distribution of MOx rates and water temperature revealed consistent spatio-temporal patterns suggesting an oceanographic control on the magnitude of MOx: Cool Arctic bottom waters containing a comparably large standing stock of methanotrophic bacteria are episodically displaced by the warmer W-Spitsbergen current, which meanders along the Svalbard continental margin and is depleted in methanotrophic biomass. As a consequence, methane is injected into warmer water masses containing fewer methanotrophs, and overall methane oxidation is reduced. While the primary cause for the observed discrepancy in methanotrophic activity between the different water masses is still uncertain, our preliminary data indicate that MOx fluctuations in the ocean water column above the Svalbard cold seeps are modulated by ocean circulation patterns and the associated differential supply of bacterial stock.

  9. Methane oxidation and methanotrophs: resistance and resilience against model perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, A.; Frenzel, P.

    2009-04-01

    Biodiversity is claimed to be essential for ecosystem functioning. However, most experiments on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF) have been made on higher plants, while only few studies have dealt with microbial communities. Overall microbial diversity may be very high, and general functions like aerobic carbon mineralization are assumed to be supported by highly redundant communities. Therefore, we focused on methane oxidation, a microbial process of global importance mitigating methane emissions from wetland, rice fields, and landfills. We used a rice paddy as our model system, where >90% of potentially emitted methane may be oxidized in the oxic surface layer. This community is presumed to consist of 10-20 taxa more or less equivalent to species. We focused on the ability of methanotrophs to recover from a disturbance causing a significant die-off of all microbial populations. This was simulated by mixing native with sterile soil in two ratios (1:4 and 1:40). Microcosms were incubated and the temporal shift of the methanotrophic communities was followed by pmoA-based Terminal Restriction Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP), qPCR, and a pmoA-based diagnostic microarray. We consistently observed distinctive temporal shifts between Methylocystaceaea and Methylococcacea, a rapid population growth leading to the same or even higher cell numbers as in microcosms made from native soil alone, but no effect on the amount of methane oxidized. The ratio of different methanotrophs changed with treatment, while the number of taxa stayed nearly the same. Overall, methanotrophs showed a remarkable resilience compensating for die-offs. It has to be noted, however, that our experiment focused on methanotrophs adapted to and living at high methane fluxes. Quite different, methanotrophs living in upland soils do not mitigate methane emissions, but are the only biological sink to atmospheric methane. These microbes are severely substrate limited, and will be much more

  10. Susceptibility of archaea to antimicrobial agents: applications to clinical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khelaifia, S; Drancourt, M

    2012-09-01

    We herein review the state of knowledge regarding the in vitro and in vivo susceptibility of archaea to antimicrobial agents, including some new molecules. Indeed, some archaea colonizing the human microbiota have been implicated in diseases such as periodontopathy. Archaea are characterized by their broad-spectrum resistance to antimicrobial agents. In particular, their cell wall lacks peptidoglycan, making them resistant to antimicrobial agents interfering with peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Archaea are, however, susceptible to the protein synthesis inhibitor fusidic acid and imidazole derivatives. Also, squalamine, an antimicrobial agent acting on the cell wall, proved effective against human methanogenic archaea. In vitro susceptibility data could be used to design protocols for the decontamination of complex microbiota and the selective isolation of archaea in anaerobic culture. PMID:22748132

  11. Effects of Nitrogen Fertilizer,Soil Moisture and Temperature on Methane Oxidation in Paddy Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANXIAOYUAN; CAIZUCONG

    1996-01-01

    Effects of nitrogen fertilizer,soil mosture and temperature and temperature on methane oxidation in paddy soil were investigated under laboratory conditions.Addition of 0.05 g N kg-1 soil as NH4Cl strongly inhibited methane oxidation and addition of the same rate of KCl also inhibited the oxidation but with more slight effect,suggesting that the inhibitory effect was partly caused by increase in osmotic potential in microorganism cell,Not only NH4+ but also NO3- greatly affected methane oxidation.Urea did not affect methane oxidation in paddy soil in the first two days of incubation,but strong inhibitory effect was observed afterwards.Methane was oxidized in the treated soil with an optimum moisture of 280 g kg-1 ,and air-drying inhibited methane oxidation entirely.The optimum temperature of methane oxidation was about 30℃ in paddy soil.while no methane oxidation was observed at 5℃or 50℃。

  12. Site variation in methane oxidation as affected by atmospheric deposition and type of temperate forest ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumme, Rainer; Borken, Werner

    1999-06-01

    Factors controlling methane oxidation were analyzed along a soil acidity gradient (pH(H2O) 3.9 to 5.2) under beech and spruce forests in Germany. Mean annual methane oxidation ranged from 0.1 to 2.5 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 and was correlated with base saturation (r2 = 0.88), soil pH (r2 = 0.77), total nitrogen (r2 = 0.71), amount of the organic surface horizon (r2 = 0.49) and bulk density of the mineral soil (r2 = 0.43). At lower pHs the formation of an organic surface horizon was promoted. This horizon did not have any methane oxidation capacity and acted like a gas diffusion barrier, which decreased the methane oxidation capacity of the soil. In contrast, on sites at the higher end of the pH range, higher burrowing activity of earthworms increased macroporosity and thereby gas diffusivity and methane oxidation. Gas diffusivity was also affected by litter shape: broad beech leaves reduced methane oxidation more than spruce needles. An increase in methane oxidation of most soil samples following sieving indicates that diffusion is the main limiting factor for methane oxidation. However, this "sieving effect" was less in soils with a pH below 5 than in soils with a pH above 5, which we attribute to a direct effect of soil acidity. We discuss our results using a hierarchical concept for the "short-term" and "long-term" controls on methane oxidation in forest ecosystems.

  13. Inhibition of methane oxidation by nitrogenous fertilizers in a paddy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saiful Alam

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogenous fertilizers are generally thought to have an important role in regulating methane oxidation. In this study, the effect of ammonium on methane oxidation activity was investigated in a paddy soil using urea at concentrations of 0, 50, 100, 200 and 400 μg N per gram dry weight soil (N/g.d.w.s and ammonium sulfate at concentrations of 0, 50 and 200 μg N/g.d.w.s. The results of this study demonstrate that urea concentrations of 200 μg N/g.d.w.s. and above significantly inhibit methane oxidation activity, whereas no statistically significant difference was observed in methane oxidation activity among soil microcosms with urea concentrations of less than 200 μg N/g.d.w.s after incubation for 27 days. Similar results were obtained in a sense that methane oxidation activity was inhibited only when the ammonium sulfate concentration was 200 μg N/g.d.w.s in soil microcosms in this study. Phylogenetic analysis of pmoA genes showed that nitrogen fertilization resulted in apparent changes in the community composition of methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB. Type I MOB displayed an increased abundance in soil microcosms amended with nitrogenous fertilizers, whereas type II MOB dominated the native soil. Furthermore, although no statistically significant relationship was observed between pmoA gene and amoA gene abundances, methane oxidation activity was significantly negatively correlated with nitrification activity in the presence of urea or ammonium sulfate. Our results indicate that the methane oxidation activity in paddy soils might be inhibited when the concentration of ammonium fertilizers is high and that the interactions between ammonia and methane oxidizers need to be further investigated.

  14. Environmental control on aerobic methane oxidation in coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinle, Lea; Maltby, Johanna; Engbersen, Nadine; Zopfi, Jakob; Bange, Hermann; Elvert, Marcus; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Kock, Annette; Lehmann, Moritz; Treude, Tina; Niemann, Helge

    2016-04-01

    Large quantities of methane are produced in anoxic sediments of continental margins and may be liberated to the overlying water column, where some of it is consumed by aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB). Aerobic methane oxidation (MOx) in the water column is consequently the final sink for methane before its release to the atmosphere, where it acts as a potent greenhouse gas. In the context of the ocean's contribution to atmospheric methane, coastal seas are particularly important accounting >75% of global methane emission from marine systems. Coastal oceans are highly dynamic, in particular with regard to the variability of methane and oxygen concentrations as well as temperature and salinity, all of which are potential key environmental factors controlling MOx. To determine important environmental controls on the activity of MOBs in coastal seas, we conducted a two-year time-series study with measurements of physicochemical water column parameters, MOx activity and the composition of the MOB community in a coastal inlet in the Baltic Sea (Boknis Eck Time Series Station, Eckernförde Bay - E-Bay). In addition, we investigated the influence of temperature and oxygen on MOx during controlled laboratory experiments. In E-Bay, hypoxia developed in bottom waters towards the end of the stratification period. Constant methane liberation from sediments resulted in bottom water methane accumulations and supersaturation (with respect to the atmospheric equilibrium) in surface waters. Here, we will discuss the factors impacting MOx the most, which were (i) perturbations of the water column (ii) temperature and (iii) oxygen concentration. (i) Perturbations of the water column caused by storm events or seasonal mixing led to a decrease in MOx, probably caused by replacement of stagnant water with a high standing stock of MOB by 'new' waters with a lower abundance of methanotrophs. b) An increase in temperature generally led to higher MOx rates. c) Even though methane was

  15. Archaea on human skin

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander J Probst; Auerbach, Anna K.; Christine Moissl-Eichinger

    2013-01-01

    The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin mi...

  16. Methane Oxidation in Termite Hindguts: Absence of Evidence and Evidence of Absence▿

    OpenAIRE

    Pester, Michael; Tholen, Anne; Friedrich, Michael W.; Brune, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    A steep oxygen gradient and the presence of methane render the hindgut internal periphery of termites a potential habitat for aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria. However, methane emissions of various termites increased, if at all, only slightly when termites were exposed to an anoxic (nitrogen) atmosphere, and 14CH4 added to the air headspace over live termites was not converted to 14CO2. Evidence for the absence of methane oxidation in living termites was corroborated by the failure to detec...

  17. Exploring methane-oxidizing communities for the co-metabolic degradation of organic micropollutants

    OpenAIRE

    Benner, Jessica; De Smet, Delfien; Ho, Adrian; Kerckhof, Frederiek-Maarten; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Heylen, Kim; Boon, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Methane-oxidizing cultures from five different inocula were enriched to be used for co-metabolic degradation of micropollutants. In a first screening, 18 different compounds were tested for degradation with the cultures as well as with four pure methane-oxidizing bacterial (MOB) strains. The tested compounds included pharmaceuticals, chemical additives, pesticides, and their degradation products. All enriched cultures were successful in the degradation of at least four different pollutants, b...

  18. Distribution and Rate of Methane Oxidation in Sediments of the Florida Everglades †

    OpenAIRE

    King, Gary M.; Roslev, Peter; Skovgaard, Henrik

    1990-01-01

    Rates of methane emission from intact cores were measured during anoxic dark and oxic light and dark incubations. Rates of methane oxidation were calculated on the basis of oxic incubations by using the anoxic emissions as an estimate of the maximum potential flux. This technique indicated that methane oxidation consumed up to 91% of the maximum potential flux in peat sediments but that oxidation was negligible in marl sediments. Oxygen microprofiles determined for intact cores were comparabl...

  19. Use of stable isotopes to determine methane oxidation in landfill cover soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptay, K.; Chanton, J.; Czepiel, P.; Mosher, B.

    1998-04-01

    The mean isotopic composition of CH4 emitted from six New England (United States) landfills was 13C and D enriched (-48.1 to -50.4‰ and -273 to -281‰) relative to anoxic zone landfill CH4 (mean values of -55.9 to -56.2‰ and -296 to -300‰) owing to the oxidation of methane as it was transported from the landfill to the atmosphere through the soil cap. The fraction of methane oxidized f0 during its passage through the soil cap was calculated from the degree of 13C enrichment in emitted CH4 relative to anoxic zone CH4 in conjunction with values determined for the preference of soil methane oxidizing bacteria for 12CH4 over 13CH4 (α = 1.022 ± 0.008). Mean values for methane oxidation in six landfills were from 24 to 35% of the total flux through the soil during the warm season, depending upon how the data were grouped. Our results bracket recent estimates of methane oxidation of about 30% in the warm summer period produced using a model with the input terms of soil temperature, moisture, depth, and oxygen concentration. Because of variations in the response of methane oxidation to temperature at these New England sites, our study is consistent with the modeling results of Czepiel et al. [1996b] that the best estimate for the annual value for methane oxidation in the landfills considered is about 10%.

  20. Activity and diversity of methane-oxidizing bacteria in glacier forefields on siliceous and calcareous bedrock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Nauer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The global methane (CH4 cycle is largely driven by methanogenic archaea and methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB, but little is known about their activity and diversity in pioneer ecosystems. We conducted a field survey in forefields of 13 receding Swiss glaciers on both siliceous and calcareous bedrock to investigate and quantify CH4 turnover based on soil-gas CH4 concentration profiles, and to characterize the MOB community by sequencing and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP analysis of pmoA. Methane turnover was fundamentally different in the two bedrock categories. Of the 36 CH4 concentration profiles from siliceous locations, 11 showed atmospheric CH4 consumption at concentrations of ~1–2 μL L−1 with soil-atmosphere CH4 fluxes of –0.14 to –1.1 mg m−2 d−1. Another 11 profiles showed no apparent activity, while the remaining 14 exhibited slightly increased CH4 concentrations of ~2–10 μL L−1 , most likely due to microsite methanogenesis. In contrast, all profiles from calcareous sites suggested a substantial, yet unknown CH4 source below our sampling zone, with soil-gas CH4 concentrations reaching up to 1400 μL L−1. Remarkably, most soils oxidized ~90 % of the deep-soil CH4, resulting in soil-atmosphere fluxes of 0.12 to 31 mg m−2 d−1. MOB showed limited diversity in both siliceous and calcareous forefields: all identified pmoA sequences formed only 5 operational taxonomic units (OTUs at the species level and, with one exception, could be assigned to either Methylocystis or the as-yet-uncultivated Upland Soil Cluster γ (USCγ. The latter dominated T-RFLP patterns of all siliceous and most calcareous samples, while Methylocystis dominated in 4 calcareous samples. Members of Upland Soil

  1. Activity and diversity of methane-oxidizing bacteria in glacier forefields on siliceous and calcareous bedrock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Nauer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The global methane (CH4 cycle is largely driven by methanogenic archaea and methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB, but little is known about their activity and diversity in pioneer ecosystems. We conducted a field survey in forefields of 13 receding Swiss glaciers on both siliceous and calcareous bedrock to investigate and quantify CH4 turnover based on soil-gas CH4 concentration profiles, and to characterize MOB communities using pmoA sequencing and T-RFLP. Methane turnover was fundamentally different in the two bedrock categories. Of the 36 CH4 concentration profiles from siliceous locations, 11 showed atmospheric CH4 consumption at concentrations of ∼1–2 μl l−1 with soil-atmosphere CH4 fluxes of −0.14 to −1.1 mg m−2 d−1. Another 11 profiles showed no apparent activity, while the remaining 14 exhibited slightly increased CH4 concentrations of ∼2–10 μl l−1, most likely due to microsite methanogenesis. In contrast, all profiles from calcareous sites suggested a substantial, yet unknown CH4 source below our sampling zone, with soil-gas CH4 concentrations reaching up to 1400 μl l−1. Remarkably, most soils oxidized ∼90% of the deep-soil CH4, resulting in soil-atmosphere fluxes of 0.12 to 31 mg m−2 d−1. MOB showed limited diversity in both siliceous and calcareous forefields: all identified pmoA sequences formed only 5 OTUs and, with one exception, could be assigned to either Methylocystis or the as-yet-uncultivated Upland Soil Cluster γ (USCγ. The latter dominated T-RFLP patterns of all siliceous and most calcareous samples, while Methylocystis dominated in 4 calcareous samples. As Type I MOB are widespread in cold climate habitats with elevated CH4 concentrations, USCγ might be the corresponding

  2. Archaea on human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Probst

    Full Text Available The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin.

  3. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in grassland soils used for cattle husbandry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bannert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available While the importance of anaerobic methane oxidation has been reported for marine ecosystems, the role of this process in soils is still questionable. Grasslands used as pastures for cattle-overwintering show an increase in anaerobic soil micro-sites caused by animal treading and excrement deposition. Therefore anaerobic potential methane oxidation activity of severely impacted soil from a cattle winter pasture was investigated in an incubation experiment under anaerobic conditions using 13C-labeled methane. We were able to detect a high microbial activity utilizing CH4 as nutrient source shown by the respiration of 13CO2. Measurements of possible terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic oxidation of methane were carried out. Soil sulfate concentrations were too low to explain the oxidation of the amount of methane added, but enough nitrate and iron(III were detected. However, only nitrate was consumed during the experiment. 13C-PLFA analyses clearly showed the utilization of CH4 as nutrient source mainly by organisms harbouring 16:1ω7 PLFAs. These lipids were found in Gram-negative microorganisms and anaerobes. The fact that these lipids are also typical for type I methanotrophs, known as aerobic methane oxidizers, might indicate a link between aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation.

  4. Metabolic capabilities of microorganisms involved in and associated with the anaerobic oxidation of methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunter eWegener

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In marine sediments the anaerobic oxidation of methane with sulfate as electron acceptor (AOM is responsible for the removal of a major part of the greenhouse gas methane. AOM is performed by consortia of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME and their specific partner bacteria. The physiology of these organisms is poorly understood, which is due to their slow growth with doubling times in the order of months and the phylogenetic diversity in natural and in vitro AOM enrichments. Here we study sediment-free long-term AOM enrichments that were cultivated from seep sediments sampled off the Italian Island Elba (20°C; hereon called E20 and from hot vents of the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, cultivated at 37°C (G37 or at 50°C (G50. These enrichments were dominated by consortia of ANME-2 archaea and Seep-SRB2 partner bacteria (E20 or by ANME-1, forming consortia with Seep-SRB2 bacteria (G37 or with bacteria of the HotSeep-1 cluster (G50. We investigate lipid membrane compositions as possible factors for the different temperature affinities of the different ANME clades and show autotrophy as characteristic feature for both ANME clades and their partner bacteria. Although in the absence of additional substrates methane formation was not observed, methanogenesis from methylated substrates (methanol and methylamine could be quickly stimulated in the E20 and the G37 enrichment. Responsible for methanogenesis are archaea from the genus Methanohalophilus and Methanococcoides, which are minor community members during AOM (1 to 7‰ of archaeal 16S rRNA gene amplicons. In the same two cultures also sulfur disproportionation could be quickly stimulated by addition of zero-valent colloidal sulfur. The isolated partner bacteria are likewise minor community members (1 to 9‰ of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons, whereas the dominant partner bacteria (Seep-SRB1a, Seep-SRB2 or HotSeep-1 did not grow on elemental sulfur. Our results support a

  5. Metabolic Capabilities of Microorganisms Involved in and Associated with the Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Gunter; Krukenberg, Viola; Ruff, S Emil; Kellermann, Matthias Y; Knittel, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    In marine sediments the anaerobic oxidation of methane with sulfate as electron acceptor (AOM) is responsible for the removal of a major part of the greenhouse gas methane. AOM is performed by consortia of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and their specific partner bacteria. The physiology of these organisms is poorly understood, which is due to their slow growth with doubling times in the order of months and the phylogenetic diversity in natural and in vitro AOM enrichments. Here we study sediment-free long-term AOM enrichments that were cultivated from seep sediments sampled off the Italian Island Elba (20°C; hereon called E20) and from hot vents of the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, cultivated at 37°C (G37) or at 50°C (G50). These enrichments were dominated by consortia of ANME-2 archaea and Seep-SRB2 partner bacteria (E20) or by ANME-1, forming consortia with Seep-SRB2 bacteria (G37) or with bacteria of the HotSeep-1 cluster (G50). We investigate lipid membrane compositions as possible factors for the different temperature affinities of the different ANME clades and show autotrophy as characteristic feature for both ANME clades and their partner bacteria. Although in the absence of additional substrates methane formation was not observed, methanogenesis from methylated substrates (methanol and methylamine) could be quickly stimulated in the E20 and the G37 enrichment. Responsible for methanogenesis are archaea from the genus Methanohalophilus and Methanococcoides, which are minor community members during AOM (1-7‰ of archaeal 16S rRNA gene amplicons). In the same two cultures also sulfur disproportionation could be quickly stimulated by addition of zero-valent colloidal sulfur. The isolated partner bacteria are likewise minor community members (1-9‰ of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons), whereas the dominant partner bacteria (Seep-SRB1a, Seep-SRB2, or HotSeep-1) did not grow on elemental sulfur. Our results support a functioning of AOM as

  6. Archaea in Yellowstone Lake

    OpenAIRE

    Kan, Jinjun; Clingenpeel, Scott; Macur, Richard E.; Inskeep, William P.; Lovalvo, Dave; Varley, John; Gorby, Yuri; McDermott, Timothy R.; Nealson, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Yellowstone geothermal complex has yielded foundational discoveries that have significantly enhanced our understanding of the Archaea. This study continues on this theme, examining Yellowstone Lake and its lake floor hydrothermal vents. Significant Archaea novelty and diversity were found associated with two near-surface photic zone environments and two vents that varied in their depth, temperature and geochemical profile. Phylogenetic diversity was assessed using 454-FLX sequencing (∼51 ...

  7. Bioenergetics of the Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Schäfer, Günter; Engelhard, Martin; Müller, Volker

    1999-01-01

    In the late 1970s, on the basis of rRNA phylogeny, Archaea (archaebacteria) was identified as a distinct domain of life besides Bacteria (eubacteria) and Eucarya. Though forming a separate domain, archaea display an enormous diversity of lifestyles and metabolic capabilities. Many archaeal species are adapted to extreme environments with respect to salinity, temperatures around the boiling point of water, and/or extremely alkaline or acidic pH. This has posed the challenge of studying the mol...

  8. Different Abilities of Eight Mixed Cultures of Methane-oxidizing Bacteria to Degrade TCE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Kim; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Jensen, Bjørn K.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of eight mixed cultures of methane-oxidizing bacteria to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE) was examined in laboratory batch experiments. This is one of the first reported works studying TCE degradation by mixed cultures of methane-oxidizing bacteria at 10°C, a common temperature for soils...... and groundwaters. Only three of the eight mixed cultures were able to degrade TCE, or to degrade TCE fast enough to result in a significant removal of TCE within the experimental time, when the cultures used methane as growth substrate. The same three mixed cultures were able to degrade TCE when they oxidized...... methanol, but only for a limited time period of about 5 days. Several explanations for the discontinued degradation of TCE are given. An experiment carried out to re-activate the methane-oxidizing bacteria after 8 days of growth on methanol by adding methane did not immediately result in degradation...

  9. Ecophysiological Characteristics of Obligate Methanotrophic Bacteria and Methane Oxidation In Situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gary M.

    1993-01-01

    Most of the obligate methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) described to date are neutrophilic mesophiles that grow optimally in dilute media. Kinetic analyses generally indicate that bacterial methane uptake occurs by transport systems with a K(sub m) greater than l micronM. These and other properties of MOB are inconsistent with characteristics of methane oxidation in situ. The inconsistencies indicate a need for greater attention to the ecophysiological characteristics of isolates and the design of enrichment and isolation schemes which emphasize ecologically relevant parameters (e.g., low temperature, limited and diverse substrate availability, low water potential).

  10. Tropical Archaea: Diversity associated with the surface microlayer of corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent 16S rDNA studies have focused on detecting uncultivated bacteria associated with Caribbean reef corals in an effort to address the ecological roles of coral-associated microbes. Reports of Archaea associated with fishes and marine invertebrates raised the question of whether Archaea might also be part of the coral-associated microbial community. DNA analysis of mucus from 3 reef-building species of Caribbean corals, Montastraea annularis complex, Diploria strigosa and D. labyrinthiformis in the US Virgin Islands yielded 34 groups of archaeal 16S ribotypes (defined at the level of 97% similarity). The majority (75%) was most closely matched by BLAST searches to sequences derived from marine water column samples, whereas the remaining ribotypes were most similar to sequences isolated from anoxic environments (15%) and hydrothermal vents (9%). Unlike previous 16S studies of coral-associated Bacteria, the results do not suggest specific associations between particular archaeal sequences and individual coral species. Marine Archaea (Groups I, II and III) in addition to Thermoplasma-like, methanogen, and marine benthic crenarchaeote phylotypes, were detected in the mucus of tropical corals. The finding of sequences from coral-associated Archaea that are closely related to strict and facultative anaerobes, as well as to uncultivated Archaea from other types of anoxic environments, suggests that anaerobic micro-niches may exist in coral mucus layers. Archaea, with their unique biogeochemical capabilities, broaden the scope of possible interactions between corals and their associated microbial communities.

  11. Global Change Simulations Affect Potential Methane Oxidation in Upland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankinship, J. C.; Hungate, B. A.

    2004-12-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of methane (CH4) are higher now than they have ever been during the past 420,000 years. However, concentrations have remained stable since 1999. Emissions associated with livestock husbandry are unlikely to have changed, so some combination of reduced production in wetlands, more efficient capture by landfills, or increased consumption by biological CH4 oxidation in upland soils may be responsible. Methane oxidizing bacteria are ubiquitous in upland soils and little is known about how these bacteria respond to anthropogenic global change, and how they will influence - or already are influencing - the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Might ongoing and future global changes increase biological CH4 oxidation? Soils were sampled from two field experiments to assess changes in rates of CH4 oxidation in response to global change simulations. Potential activities of CH4 oxidizing bacterial communities were measured through laboratory incubations under optimal temperature, soil moisture, and atmospheric CH4 concentrations (~18 ppm, or 10x ambient). The ongoing 6-year multifactorial Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment (JRGCE) simulates warming, elevated precipitation, elevated atmospheric CO2, elevated atmospheric N deposition, and increased wildfire frequency in an annual grassland in a Mediterranean-type climate in central California. The ongoing 1-year multifactorial Merriam Climate Change Experiment (MCCE) simulates warming, elevated precipitation, and reduced precipitation in four different types of ecosystems along an elevational gradient in a semi-arid climate in northern Arizona. The high desert grassland, pinyon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine forest, and mixed conifer forest ecosystems range in annual precipitation from 100 to 1000 mm yr-1, and from productivity being strongly water limited to strongly temperature limited. Among JRGCE soils, elevated atmospheric CO2 increased potential CH4 oxidation rates (p=0.052) and wildfire

  12. Archaea were widespread in sediments of the Messinian Salinity Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgel, Daniel; Peckmann, Jörn

    2015-04-01

    sulfate reduction. One of the important processes fuelling authigenesis was microbial oxidation of methane. Lipid biomarker patterns reveal that a consortium of methanotrophic archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria consumed methane in anoxic and hypersaline environments. Halophilic archaea other than those archaea involved in methane oxidation have been present in the depositional environment as well. This as to yet still somewhat random selection of examples provides evidence for the great diversity of environmental settings created during the MSC and the abundance of archaea in these environments, calling for more work on the geomicrobiology of the unrivaled archive of dramatic paleooceanographic change during the MSC.

  13. Gene decay in archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. J. van Passel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene-dense chromosomes of archaea and bacteria were long thought to be devoid of pseudogenes, but with the massive increase in available genome sequences, whole genome comparisons between closely related species have identified mutations that have rendered numerous genes inactive. Comparative analyses of sequenced archaeal genomes revealed numerous pseudogenes, which can constitute up to 8.6% of the annotated coding sequences in some genomes. The largest proportion of pseudogenes is created by gene truncations, followed by frameshift mutations. Within archaeal genomes, large numbers of pseudogenes contain more than one inactivating mutation, suggesting that pseudogenes are deleted from the genome more slowly in archaea than in bacteria. Although archaea seem to retain pseudogenes longer than do bacteria, most archaeal genomes have unique repertoires of pseudogenes.

  14. Dissimilatory perchlorate reduction linked to aerobic methane oxidation via chlorite dismutase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R. S.; Baesman, S. M.; Miller, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    accumulation of chloride ions either in spent media or in slurries prepared from Searsville Lake soil, neither of these oxyanions evoked methane oxidation when added to either anaerobic mixed cultures or soils enriched in methanotrophs. This result leads us to surmise that the release of O2 during enzymatic perchlorate reduction was low, and that the oxygen produced was unavailable to the aerobic methanotrophs. This was borne out by patterns of O2 and CO2 production during experiments with lake soil, growth media, and pure cultures of dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria. We observed that O2 release during incubation of D. agitata CKB with 10 mM ClO4- or ClO3- was decoupled from metabolism. More O2 was released during incubations without added acetate than with 10 mM acetate and an even greater amount of O2 was released during incubation with heat-killed cells. This suggests a chemical mechanism of O2 production during reaction with ClO4- and ClO3-. Hence, perchlorate reducing bacteria need not be present to facilitate O2 release from the surface of Mars, in support of recent interpretations of Viking LR and GEx experiments.

  15. Effect of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene on methane oxidation and community structure of methanotrophic consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun-Ah; Lee, Eun-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-01-01

    The methane oxidation rate and community structure of a methanotrophic consortium were analyzed to determine the effects of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) on methane oxidation. The maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax ) of the consortium was 326.8 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1), and it had a half-saturation constant (Km ) of 143.8 μM. The addition of TCE or PCE resulted in decreased methane oxidation rates, which were decreased from 101.73 to 5.47-24.64 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1) with an increase in the TCE-to-methane ratio, and to 61.95-67.43 μmol·g-dry biomass(-1)·h(-1) with an increase in the PCE-to-methane ratio. TCE and PCE were non-competitive inhibitors for methane oxidation, and their inhibition constants (Ki ) were 33.4 and 132.0 μM, respectively. When the methanotrophic community was analyzed based on pmoA using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), the pmoA gene copy numbers were shown to decrease from 7.3 ± 0.7 × 10(8) to 2.1-5.0 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number · g-dry biomass(-1) with an increase in the TCE-to-methane ratio and to 2.5-7.0 × 10(7) pmoA gene copy number · g-dry biomass(-1) with an increase in the PCE-to-methane ratio. Community analysis by microarray demonstrated that Methylocystis (type II methanotrophs) were the most abundant in the methanotrophic community composition in the presence of TCE. These results suggest that toxic effects caused by TCE and PCE change not only methane oxidation rates but also the community structure of the methanotrophic consortium.

  16. Inhibition of methane oxidation in slurry surface crust by inorganic nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Yun-Feng; Elsgaard, Lars; Petersen, Søren O

    2013-01-01

    Livestock slurry is an important source of methane (CH4). Depending on dry matter content, a floating crust may form where methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and CH4 oxidation activity have been found, suggesting that surface crusts may reduce CH4 emissions from slurry. However, it is not known how...... MOB in this environment interact with inorganic nitrogen (N). We studied inhibitory effects of ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3–) and nitrite (NO2–) on potential CH4 oxidation in a cattle slurry surface crust. Methane oxidation was assayed at salt concentrations up to 500 mM at 100 and 10,000 ppmv...... without any decline in activity. The inhibition by NH4+ increased progressively, and no range of tolerance was observed. Methane concentrations of 10,000 ppmv resulted in 50- to 100-fold higher specific CH4 uptake rates than 100 ppmv CH4, but did not change the inhibition patterns of N salts. MOB...

  17. Linking activity, composition and seasonal dynamics of atmospheric methane oxidizers in a meadow soil

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; KAMMANN, Claudia; Lenhart, Katharina; Dam, Bomba; Liesack, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Microbial oxidation is the only biological sink for atmospheric methane. We assessed seasonal changes in atmospheric methane oxidation and the underlying methanotrophic communities in grassland near Giessen (Germany), along a soil moisture gradient. Soil samples were taken from the surface layer (0–10 cm) of three sites in August 2007, November 2007, February 2008 and May 2008. The sites showed seasonal differences in hydrological parameters. Net uptake rates varied seasonally between 0 and 7...

  18. Degradation kinetics of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons by methane oxidizers naturally-associated with wetland plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C L; Goltz, M N; Agrawal, A

    2014-12-01

    Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) are common groundwater contaminants that can be removed from the environment by natural attenuation processes. CAH biodegradation can occur in wetland environments by reductive dechlorination as well as oxidation pathways. In particular, CAH oxidation may occur in vegetated wetlands, by microorganisms that are naturally associated with the roots of wetland plants. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the cometabolic degradation kinetics of the CAHs, cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cisDCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1TCA), by methane-oxidizing bacteria associated with the roots of a typical wetland plant in soil-free system. Laboratory microcosms with washed live roots investigated aerobic, cometabolic degradation of CAHs by the root-associated methane-oxidizing bacteria at initial aqueous [CH4] ~1.9mgL(-1), and initial aqueous [CAH] ~150μgL(-1); cisDCE and TCE (in the presence of 1,1,1TCA) degraded significantly, with a removal efficiency of approximately 90% and 46%, respectively. 1,1,1TCA degradation was not observed in the presence of active methane oxidizers. The pseudo first-order degradation rate-constants of TCE and cisDCE were 0.12±0.01 and 0.59±0.07d(-1), respectively, which are comparable to published values. However, their biomass-normalized degradation rate constants obtained in this study were significantly smaller than pure-culture studies, yet they were comparable to values reported for biofilm systems. The study suggests that CAH removal in wetland plant roots may be comparable to processes within biofilms. This has led us to speculate that the active biomass may be on the root surface as a biofilm. The cisDCE and TCE mass losses due to methane oxidizers in this study offer insight into the role of shallow, vegetated wetlands as an environmental sink for such xenobiotic compounds.

  19. Effects of inorganic electron acceptors on methanogenesis and methanotrophy and on the community structure of bacteria and archaea in sediments of a boreal lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Antti J.; Karvinen, Anu; Nykänen, Hannu; Peura, Sari; Tiirola, Marja; Mäki, Anita; Kankaala, Paula

    2016-04-01

    bacterial community occurred. Besides decreasing the availability of methanogenic substrates, the Mn4+/Fe3+ - induced changes in the bacterial community also probably decreased the H2:acetate - ratio in the substrate pool. This led to increase in the relative activity (mRNA level) of some operational taxonomic units assigned to aceticlastic Methanosaetaceae and decrease in the relative activity of hydrogenotrophic Methanoregulaceae in the sediment. CH4 oxidation (0.02 - 0.30 nmol gdw‑1d‑1 in anaerobic and 18 - 73 nmol gdw‑1d‑1in aerobic treatments) took place without EA additions and was enhanced only by O2. This suggests decoupling of the process from the reduction of other inorganic EAs. The results also indicate that Fe3+/Mn4+ - reduction did not increase CH4 oxidation via increased availability of SO42‑ by cryptic sulfur cycle or via increased availability of organic EAs. Furthermore, ANME - archaea were only ≤ 3% of sediment archaeal community and their relative activity was decreased during incubations. Thus, EA driving CH4 oxidation in the anoxic sediments of the lake remains unknown or the process was methanogen-driven via trace methane oxidation.

  20. Methane oxidation and formation of EPS in compost: effect of oxygen concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen concentration plays an important role in the regulation of methane oxidation and the microbial ecology of methanotrophs. However, this effect is still poorly quantified in soil and compost ecosystems. The effect of oxygen on the formation of exopolymeric substances (EPS) is as yet unknown. We studied the effect of oxygen on the evolution of methanotrophic activity. At both high and low oxygen concentrations, peak activity was observed twice within a period of 6 months. Phospholipid fatty acid analysis showed that there was a shift from type I to type II methanotrophs during this period. At high oxygen concentration, EPS production was about 250% of the amount at low oxygen concentration. It is hypothesized that EPS serves as a carbon cycling mechanism for type I methanotrophs when inorganic nitrogen is limiting. Simultaneously, EPS stimulates nitrogenase activity in type II methanotrophs by creating oxygen-depleted zones. The kinetic results were incorporated in a simulation model for gas transport and methane oxidation in a passively aerated biofilter. Comparison between the model and experimental data showed that, besides acting as a micro-scale diffusion barrier, EPS can act as a barrier to macro-scale diffusion, reducing the performance of such biofilters. - 1.5% oxygen resulted in a slightly higher and more stable methane oxidation activity

  1. Methane oxidation and formation of EPS in compost: effect of oxygen concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilshusen, J.H.; Hettiaratchi, J.P.A.; Visscher, A. de; Saint-Fort, R

    2004-05-01

    Oxygen concentration plays an important role in the regulation of methane oxidation and the microbial ecology of methanotrophs. However, this effect is still poorly quantified in soil and compost ecosystems. The effect of oxygen on the formation of exopolymeric substances (EPS) is as yet unknown. We studied the effect of oxygen on the evolution of methanotrophic activity. At both high and low oxygen concentrations, peak activity was observed twice within a period of 6 months. Phospholipid fatty acid analysis showed that there was a shift from type I to type II methanotrophs during this period. At high oxygen concentration, EPS production was about 250% of the amount at low oxygen concentration. It is hypothesized that EPS serves as a carbon cycling mechanism for type I methanotrophs when inorganic nitrogen is limiting. Simultaneously, EPS stimulates nitrogenase activity in type II methanotrophs by creating oxygen-depleted zones. The kinetic results were incorporated in a simulation model for gas transport and methane oxidation in a passively aerated biofilter. Comparison between the model and experimental data showed that, besides acting as a micro-scale diffusion barrier, EPS can act as a barrier to macro-scale diffusion, reducing the performance of such biofilters. - 1.5% oxygen resulted in a slightly higher and more stable methane oxidation activity.

  2. Conventional methanotrophs are responsible for atmospheric methane oxidation in paddy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuanfeng; Zheng, Yan; Bodelier, Paul L. E.; Conrad, Ralf; Jia, Zhongjun

    2016-06-01

    Soils serve as the biological sink of the potent greenhouse gas methane with exceptionally low concentrations of ~1.84 p.p.m.v. in the atmosphere. The as-yet-uncultivated methane-consuming bacteria have long been proposed to be responsible for this `high-affinity' methane oxidation (HAMO). Here we show an emerging HAMO activity arising from conventional methanotrophs in paddy soil. HAMO activity was quickly induced during the low-affinity oxidation of high-concentration methane. Activity was lost gradually over 2 weeks, but could be repeatedly regained by flush-feeding the soil with elevated methane. The induction of HAMO activity occurred only after the rapid growth of methanotrophic populations, and a metatranscriptome-wide association study suggests that the concurrent high- and low-affinity methane oxidation was catalysed by known methanotrophs rather than by the proposed novel atmospheric methane oxidizers. These results provide evidence of atmospheric methane uptake in periodically drained ecosystems that are typically considered to be a source of atmospheric methane.

  3. 2 D patterns of soil gas diffusivity , soil respiration, and methane oxidation in a soil profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Martin; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer; Lang, Friederike

    2015-04-01

    The apparent gas diffusion coefficient in soil (DS) is an important parameter describing soil aeration, which makes it a key parameter for root growth and gas production and consumption. Horizontal homogeneity in soil profiles is assumed in most studies for soil properties - including DS. This assumption, however, is not valid, even in apparently homogeneous soils, as we know from studies using destructive sampling methods. Using destructive methods may allow catching a glimpse, but a large uncertainty remains, since locations between the sampling positions cannot be analyzed, and measurements cannot be repeated. We developed a new method to determine in situ the apparent soil gas diffusion coefficient in order to examine 2 D pattern of DS and methane oxidation in a soil profile. Different tracer gases (SF6, CF4, C2H6) were injected continuously into the subsoil and measured at several locations in the soil profile. These data allow for modelling inversely the 2 D patterns of DS using Finite Element Modeling. The 2D DS patterns were then combined with naturally occurring CH4 and CO2 concentrations sampled at the same locations to derive the 2D pattern of soil respiration and methane oxidation in the soil profile. We show that methane oxidation and soil respiration zones shift within the soil profile while the gas fluxes at the surface remain rather stable during a the 3 week campaign.

  4. Microbial reefs in the Black Sea fueled by anaerobic oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelis, W.; Seifert, R.; Nauhaus, K.;

    2002-01-01

    of densely aggregated archaea ( phylogenetic ANME-1 cluster) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus group). If incubated in vitro, these mats perform anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulfate reduction. Obviously, anaerobic microbial consortia can generate both carbonate...

  5. Enzymes involved in the anaerobic oxidation of n-alkanes: from methane to long-chain paraffins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy V. Callaghan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic microorganisms play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of methane and non-methane alkanes. To date, there appear to be at least three proposed mechanisms of anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM. The first pathway is mediated by consortia of archaeal anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-reducing bacteria via ‘reverse methanogenesis’ and is catalyzed by a homologue of methyl-coenzyme M reductase. The second pathway is also mediated by anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-reducing bacteria, wherein the archaeal members catalyze both methane oxidation and sulfate reduction and zero-valent sulfur is a key intermediate. The third AOM mechanism is a nitrite-dependent, intra-aerobic pathway described for the denitrifying bacterium, ‘Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera.’ It is hypothesized that AOM proceeds via reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, followed by the conversion of two nitric oxide molecules to dinitrogen and molecular oxygen. The latter can be used to functionalize the methane via a particulate methane monooxygenase. With respect to non-methane alkanes, there also appears to be novel mechanisms of activation. The most well-described pathway is the addition of non-methane alkanes across the double bond of fumarate to form alkyl-substituted succinates via the putative glycyl radical enzyme, alkylsuccinate synthase (also known as methylalkylsuccinate synthase. Other proposed mechanisms include anaerobic hydroxylation via ethylbenzene dehydrogenase-like enzymes and an ‘intra-aerobic’ denitrification pathway similar to that described for ‘M. oxyfera.’

  6. pmoA Primers for Detection of Anaerobic Methanotrophs▿

    OpenAIRE

    Luesken, F.A.; Zhu, B.; Alen, T.A. van; Butler, M.K.; Diaz, M. R.; Song, B.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.; M. S. M. Jetten; Ettwig, K.F.

    2011-01-01

    Published pmoA primers do not match the pmoA sequence of “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera,” a bacterium that performs nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation. Therefore, new pmoA primers for the detection of “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera”-like methanotrophs were developed and successfully tested on freshwater samples from different habitats. These primers expand existing molecular tools for the study of methanotrophs in the environment.

  7. Biosignatures of methanogenic archaea by Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy (CRM)

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano, P.; Hermelink, A.; Lasch, P.; de Vera, J.P.; Böttger, U.; Wagner, D

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea are anaerobic chemotrophic microorganisms that meet many of the metabolic and physiological requirements for survival on the martian subsurface. In particular, methanogens from Siberian permafrost are extremely resistant against different types of environmental stresses as well as simulated martian thermo-physical and subsurface conditions, making them promising model organisms for potential life on Mars. Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational spectroscopic technique that ha...

  8. Modelling the growth of methane-oxidizing bacteria in a fixed biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilbo, Carl Morten; Arvin, Erik; Holst, Helle;

    1992-01-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria were grown in a fixed biofilm reactor in order to study their ability to degrade chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons. Focus is on the growth behaviour of the mixed culture. The growth is described by a model that includes methanotrophic bacteria in the active biomass....... The study forms the basis for setting up a future meauring programme. This work indicates a yield coefficient for methanotrophs of 0.36 mg biomass COD per mg CH$-4$/. In weight units this corresponds to approx. 1.44 mg biomass per mg CH$-4$/. This is close to the theoretical maximum growth yield...

  9. Conventional methanotrophs are responsible for atmospheric methane oxidation in paddy soils

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Yuanfeng; Yan, Zheng; Bodelier, P. L. E.; Conrad, R.; Jia, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Soils serve as the biological sink of the potent greenhouse gas methane with exceptionally low concentrations of ~1.84 p.p.m.v. in the atmosphere. The as-yet-uncultivated methane-consuming bacteria have long been proposed to be responsible for this ‘high-affinity’ methane oxidation (HAMO). Here we show an emerging HAMO activity arising from conventional methanotrophs in paddy soil. HAMO activity was quickly induced during the low-affinity oxidation of high-concentration methane. Activity was ...

  10. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulphidic marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, DR. Jennifer [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Yu, DR. Hang [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Steele, Joshua [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Dawson, Katherine [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Sun, S [University of California, San Diego; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Orphan, V [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

    2013-01-01

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyse important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulphiderich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization because of decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulphide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulphidic (> 1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5 270 nM), cobalt (0.5 6 nM), molybdenum (10 5600 nM) and tungsten (0.3 8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalysing anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulphate-reducing bacteria. Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrophilic microorganisms. Overall, our data suggest that AOM consortia use specialized biochemical strategies to overcome the challenges of metal availability in sulphidic environments.

  11. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulfidic marine sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, DR. Jennifer [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Yu, DR. Hang [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Steele, Joshua [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Dawson, Katherine [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Sun, S [University of California, San Diego; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Orphan, V [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

    2014-01-01

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyze important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulfide-rich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization due to decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulfide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulfidic (>1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5-270 nM), cobalt (0.5-6 nM), molybdenum (10-5,600 nM) and tungsten (0.3-8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalyzing anaerobic oxidation of methane utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrotolerant microorganisms. Finally, our data suggest that chemical speciation of metals in highly sulfidic porewaters may exert a stronger influence on microbial bioavailability than total concentration

  12. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulphidic marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Jennifer B; Yu, Hang; Steele, Joshua A; Dawson, Katherine S; Sun, Shulei; Chourey, Karuna; Pan, Chongle; Hettich, Robert L; Orphan, Victoria J

    2014-06-01

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyse important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulphide-rich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization because of decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulphide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold (≤ 10°C) and sulphidic (> 1 mM ΣH(2)S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5-270 nM), cobalt (0.5-6 nM), molybdenum (10-5600 nM) and tungsten (0.3-8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalysing anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulphate-reducing bacteria. Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrophilic microorganisms. Overall, our data suggest that AOM consortia use specialized biochemical strategies to overcome the challenges of metal availability in sulphidic environments.

  13. [Depth Profiles of Methane Oxidation Kinetics and the Related Methanotrophic Community in a Simulated Landfill Cover].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhi-lin; Zhao, Tian-tao; Gao, Yan-hui; He, Zhi; Yang, Xu; Peng, Xu-ya

    2015-11-01

    Simulated landfill cover with real time online monitoring system was developed using cover soils. Then the system started and the concentrations of bio-gas in various depths were continuously monitored, and it was found that the system ran continually and stably after 2-3 h when methane flux changed. After that, the relationship between regularity of methane oxidation and methane flux in landfill cover was analyzed. The results indicated that concentration of oxygen decreased with increasing methane flux when the depth was deeper than 20 cm, and no obvious correlation between oxygen concentration in landfill cover surface and methane flux, however, methane oxidation rate showed positive correlation with methane flux in various depths (range of R2 was 0.851-0.999). Kinetics of CH4 oxidation in landfill cover was fitted by CH4 -O2 dual-substrate model (range of R2 was 0.902-0.955), the half-saturation constant K(m) increasing with depth was 0.157-0.729 in dynamic condition. Finally, methanotrophs community structure in original cover soil sample and that in simulated landfill cover were investigated by high-throughout sequencing technology, and the statistics indicated that the abundance and species of methanotrophs in simulated landfill cover significantly increased compared with those in original cover soil sample, and type I methanotrophs including Methylobacter and Methylophilaceae and type II methanotrophs Methylocystis were dominant species. PMID:26911022

  14. Fractionation of carbon and hydrogen isotopes by methane-oxidizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, D.D.; Risatti, J.B.; Schoell, M.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon isotopic analysis of methane has become a popular technique in the exploration for oil and gas because it can be used to differentiate between thermogenic and microbial gas and can sometimes be used for gas-source rock correlations. Methane-oxidizing bacteria, however, can significantly change the carbon isotopic composition of methane; the origin of gas that has been partially oxidized by these bacteria could therefore be misinterpreted. We cultured methane-oxidizing bacteria at two different temperatures and monitored the carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of the residual methane. The residual methane was enriched in both 13C and D. For both isotopic species, the enrichment at equivalent levels of conversion was greater at 26??C than at 11.5??C. The change in ??D relative to the change in ??13C was independent of temperature within the range studied. One culture exhibited a change in the fractionation pattern for carbon (but not for hydrogen) midway through the experiment, suggesting that bacterial oxidation of methane may occur via more than one pathway. The change in the ??D value for the residual methane was from 8 to 14 times greater than the change in the ??13C value, indicating that combined carbon and hydrogen isotopic analysis may be an effective way of identifying methane which has been subjected to partial oxidation by bacteria. ?? 1981.

  15. Methane oxidation and molecular characterization of methanotrophs from a former mercury mine impoundment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baesman, Shaun; Miller, Laurence G.; Wei, Jeremy H.; Cho, Yirang; Matys, Emily D.; Summons, Roger E.; Welander, Paula V.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    The Herman Pit, once a mercury mine, is an impoundment located in an active geothermal area. Its acidic waters are permeated by hundreds of gas seeps. One seep was sampled and found to be composed of mostly CO2 with some CH4 present. The δ13CH4 value suggested a complex origin for the methane: i.e., a thermogenic component plus a biological methanogenic portion. The relatively 12C-enriched CO2 suggested a reworking of the ebullitive methane by methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we tested bottom sediments for their ability to consume methane by conducting aerobic incubations of slurried materials. Methane was removed from the headspace of live slurries, and subsequent additions of methane resulted in faster removal rates. This activity could be transferred to an artificial, acidic medium, indicating the presence of acidophilic or acid-tolerant methanotrophs, the latter reinforced by the observation of maximum activity at pH = 4.5 with incubated slurries. A successful extraction of sterol and hopanoid lipids characteristic of methanotrophs was achieved, and their abundances greatly increased with increased sediment methane consumption. DNA extracted from methane-oxidizing enrichment cultures was amplified and sequenced for pmoA genes that aligned with methanotrophic members of the Gammaproteobacteria. An enrichment culture was established that grew in an acidic (pH 4.5) medium via methane oxidation.

  16. Methane Oxidation and Molecular Characterization of Methanotrophs from a Former Mercury Mine Impoundment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun M. Baesman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Herman Pit, once a mercury mine, is an impoundment located in an active geothermal area. Its acidic waters are permeated by hundreds of gas seeps. One seep was sampled and found to be composed of mostly CO2 with some CH4 present. The δ13CH4 value suggested a complex origin for the methane: i.e., a thermogenic component plus a biological methanogenic portion. The relatively 12C-enriched CO2 suggested a reworking of the ebullitive methane by methanotrophic bacteria. Therefore, we tested bottom sediments for their ability to consume methane by conducting aerobic incubations of slurried materials. Methane was removed from the headspace of live slurries, and subsequent additions of methane resulted in faster removal rates. This activity could be transferred to an artificial, acidic medium, indicating the presence of acidophilic or acid-tolerant methanotrophs, the latter reinforced by the observation of maximum activity at pH = 4.5 with incubated slurries. A successful extraction of sterol and hopanoid lipids characteristic of methanotrophs was achieved, and their abundances greatly increased with increased sediment methane consumption. DNA extracted from methane-oxidizing enrichment cultures was amplified and sequenced for pmoA genes that aligned with methanotrophic members of the Gammaproteobacteria. An enrichment culture was established that grew in an acidic (pH 4.5 medium via methane oxidation.

  17. Characterization of microbial associations with methanotrophic archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria through statistical comparison of nested Magneto-FISH enrichments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Methane seep systems along continental margins host diverse and dynamic microbial assemblages, sustained in large part through the microbially mediated process of sulfate-coupled Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM). This methanotrophic metabolism has been linked to consortia of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). These two groups are the focus of numerous studies; however, less is known about the wide diversity of other seep associated microorganisms. We selected a hierarchical set of FISH probes targeting a range of Deltaproteobacteria diversity. Using the Magneto-FISH enrichment technique, we then magnetically captured CARD-FISH hybridized cells and their physically associated microorganisms from a methane seep sediment incubation. DNA from nested Magneto-FISH experiments was analyzed using Illumina tag 16S rRNA gene sequencing (iTag). Enrichment success and potential bias with iTag was evaluated in the context of full-length 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, CARD-FISH, functional gene clone libraries, and iTag mock communities. We determined commonly used Earth Microbiome Project (EMP) iTAG primers introduced bias in some common methane seep microbial taxa that reduced the ability to directly compare OTU relative abundances within a sample, but comparison of relative abundances between samples (in nearly all cases) and whole community-based analyses were robust. The iTag dataset was subjected to statistical co-occurrence measures of the most abundant OTUs to determine which taxa in this dataset were most correlated across all samples. Many non-canonical microbial partnerships were statistically significant in our co-occurrence network analysis, most of which were not recovered with conventional clone library sequencing, demonstrating the utility of combining Magneto-FISH and iTag sequencing methods for hypothesis generation of associations within complex microbial communities. Network analysis pointed to many co

  18. Characterization of microbial associations with methanotrophic archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria through statistical comparison of nested Magneto-FISH enrichments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembath-Reichert, Elizabeth; Case, David H; Orphan, Victoria J

    2016-01-01

    Methane seep systems along continental margins host diverse and dynamic microbial assemblages, sustained in large part through the microbially mediated process of sulfate-coupled Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM). This methanotrophic metabolism has been linked to consortia of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). These two groups are the focus of numerous studies; however, less is known about the wide diversity of other seep associated microorganisms. We selected a hierarchical set of FISH probes targeting a range of Deltaproteobacteria diversity. Using the Magneto-FISH enrichment technique, we then magnetically captured CARD-FISH hybridized cells and their physically associated microorganisms from a methane seep sediment incubation. DNA from nested Magneto-FISH experiments was analyzed using Illumina tag 16S rRNA gene sequencing (iTag). Enrichment success and potential bias with iTag was evaluated in the context of full-length 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, CARD-FISH, functional gene clone libraries, and iTag mock communities. We determined commonly used Earth Microbiome Project (EMP) iTAG primers introduced bias in some common methane seep microbial taxa that reduced the ability to directly compare OTU relative abundances within a sample, but comparison of relative abundances between samples (in nearly all cases) and whole community-based analyses were robust. The iTag dataset was subjected to statistical co-occurrence measures of the most abundant OTUs to determine which taxa in this dataset were most correlated across all samples. Many non-canonical microbial partnerships were statistically significant in our co-occurrence network analysis, most of which were not recovered with conventional clone library sequencing, demonstrating the utility of combining Magneto-FISH and iTag sequencing methods for hypothesis generation of associations within complex microbial communities. Network analysis pointed to many co

  19. Potential environmental functions of widespread, abundant, uncultured marine archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, K. G.; Schreiber, L.; Petersen, D. G.; Schramm, A.; Jorgensen, B.

    2012-12-01

    The vast majority of marine subsurface microorganisms are uncultivated, and therefore have unknown metabolisms. Much of the prokaryotes present in the marine subsurface are archaea, and, in turn, much of the archaea fall into the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group. These organisms are widely distributed globally and are phylogenetically diverse, comprising 17 distinct subgroups, defined by 16S rRNA genes (Kubo et al. 2012). The subgroups do not seem to have any well-defined environmental distribution (i.e., they are all present in different types of marine and terrestrial environments). However, the abundance of sequences from a certain environment type differs among subgroups, and may provide clues to their role in these environments. We sequenced the genome of a single cell of MCG extracted directly from marine sediments. Although coverage was low (~30%), the data quality was high. Conserved genes show that MCG is deeply branching within the newly named "Thaumarchaeota", and contains a complete pathway for the degradation or extracellular proteins. A further search through metagenomic data shows that this process may be widespread in marine sediments. We hypothesize that MCG archaea may be important in anaerobic protein decomposition in marine sediments. Reference Kubo et al., 2012. Archaea of the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group (MCG) are abundant, diverse, and widespread in marine sediments. ISME Journal, in press, doi:10.1038/ismej.2012.37.

  20. The indirect global warming potential and global temperature change potential due to methane oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methane is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas in the atmosphere next to carbon dioxide. Its global warming potential (GWP) for a time horizon of 100 years is 25, which makes it an attractive target for climate mitigation policies. Although the methane GWP traditionally includes the methane indirect effects on the concentrations of ozone and stratospheric water vapour, it does not take into account the production of carbon dioxide from methane oxidation. We argue here that this CO2-induced effect should be included for fossil sources of methane, which results in slightly larger GWP values for all time horizons. If the global temperature change potential is used as an alternative climate metric, then the impact of the CO2-induced effect is proportionally much larger. We also discuss what the correction term should be for methane from anthropogenic biogenic sources.

  1. Methane oxidation over noble metal catalysts as related to controlling natural gas vehicle exhaust emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural gas has considerable potential as an alternative automotive fuel. This paper reports on methane, the principal hydrocarbon species in natural-gas engine exhaust, which has extremely low photochemical reactivity but is a powerful greenhouse gas. Therefore, exhaust emissions of unburned methane from natural-gas vehicles are of particular concern. This laboratory reactor study evaluates noble metal catalysts for their potential in the catalytic removal of methane from natural-gas vehicle exhaust. Temperature run-up experiments show that the methane oxidation activity decreases in the order Pd/Al2O3 > Rh/Al2O3 > Pt/Al2O3. Also, for all the noble metal catalysts studied, methane conversion can be maximized by controlling the O2 concentration of the feedstream at a point somewhat rich (reducing) of stoichiometry

  2. Changes in methane oxidation activity and methanotrophic community composition in saline alkaline soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Silva, Nancy; Valenzuela-Encinas, César; Marsch, Rodolfo; Dendooven, Luc; Alcántara-Hernández, Rocio J

    2014-05-01

    The soil of the former Lake Texcoco is a saline alkaline environment where anthropogenic drainage in some areas has reduced salt content and pH. Potential methane (CH4) consumption rates were measured in three soils of the former Lake Texcoco with different electrolytic conductivity (EC) and pH, i.e. Tex-S1 a >18 years drained soil (EC 0.7 dS m(-1), pH 8.5), Tex-S2 drained for ~10 years (EC 9.0 dS m(-1), pH 10.3) and the undrained Tex-S3 (EC 84.8 dS m(-1), pH 10.3). An arable soil from Alcholoya (EC 0.7 dS m(-1), pH 6.7), located nearby Lake Texcoco was used as control. Methane oxidation in the soil Tex-S1 (lowest EC and pH) was similar to that in the arable soil from Alcholoya (32.5 and 34.7 mg CH4 kg(-1) dry soil day(-1), respectively). Meanwhile, in soils Tex-S2 and Tex-S3, the potential CH4 oxidation rates were only 15.0 and 12.8 mg CH4 kg(-1) dry soil day(-1), respectively. Differences in CH4 oxidation were also related to changes in the methane-oxidizing communities in these soils. Sequence analysis of pmoA gene showed that soils differed in the identity and number of methanotrophic phylotypes. The Alcholoya soil and Tex-S1 contained phylotypes grouped within the upland soil cluster gamma and the Jasper Ridge, California JR-2 clade. In soil Tex-S3, a phylotype related to Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum was detected.

  3. Temperature response of methane oxidation and production potentials in peatland ecosystems across Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welti, Nina; Korrensalo, Aino; Kerttula, Johanna; Maljanen, Marja; Uljas, Salli; Lohila, Annalea; Laine, Anna; Vesala, Timo; Elliott, David; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that the ecosystems located in the high latitudes are especially sensitive to warming. Therefore, we compared 14 peatland systems throughout Finland along a latitudinal gradient from 69°N to 61°N to examine the response of methane production and methane oxidation with warming climate. Peat samples were taken at the height of the growing season in 2015 from 0 - 10cm below the water table depth. The plant communities in sampling locations were described by estimating cover of each plant species and pH of water was measured. Upon return to the lab, we made two parallel treatments, under anoxic and oxic conditions in order to calculate the CH4 production and consumption potentials of the peat and used three temperatures, 4°C, 17.5°C, and 30°C to examine the temperature effect on the potentials. We hypothesized that there will be an observable response curve in CH4 production and oxidation relative to temperature with a greater response with increasing latitude. In general, increasing temperature increased the potential for CH4 production and oxidation, at some sites, the potential was highest at 17.5°C, indicating that there is an optimum temperature threshold for the in situ methane producing and oxidizing microbial communities. Above this threshold, the peat microbial communities are not able to cope with increasing temperature. This is especially noticeable for methane oxidation at sites above 62°N. As countries are being expected to adequately account for their greenhouse gas budgets with increasing temperature models, knowing where the temperature threshold exists is of critical importance.

  4. Permafrost Thaw Induces Methane Oxidation in Transitional Thaw Stages in a Subarctic Peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perryman, C. R.; Kashi, N. N.; Malhotra, A.; McCalley, C. K.; Varner, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Rising temperatures in the subarctic are accelerating permafrost thaw and increasing methane (CH4) emissions from subarctic peatlands. Methanotrophs in these peatlands can consume/oxidize CH4, potentially mitigating CH4 emissions in these peatlands. Oxidation rates can exceed 90% of CH4 production in some settings, depending on O2 and CH4 availability and environmental conditions. Malhotra and Roulet identified 10 thaw stages in Stordalen Mire near Abisko, Sweden (68°21'N,18°49'E ) with variable vegetation, environmental conditions, and associated CH4 emissions. We investigated potential methane oxidation rates across these thaw stages. Peat cores were extracted from two depths at each stage and incubated in 350ml glass jars at in situ temperatures and CH4 concentrations. Headspace samples were collected from each incubation jar over a 48-hour period and analyzed for CH4 concentration using flame ionization detection gas chromatography (GC-FID). Oxidation rates ranged from <0.1 to 17 μg of CH4 per gram of dry biomass per day. Water table depth and pore water pH were the strongest environmental correlates of oxidation (sample size = 56, p < 0.001). The highest potential oxidation rates were observed in collapsing palsa sites and recently collapsed sedge-dominated open water sites near palsa mounds. Our results suggest that permafrost thaw induces high CH4 oxidation rates by creating conditions ideal for both methanogenic and methanotrophic microbial communities. Our results also reinforce the importance of incorporating transitional thaw stages in landscape level carbon budgets of thawing peatlands emphasized by Malhotra and Roulet. Forthcoming microbial analysis and stable isotope analysis will further elucidate the factors controlling methane oxidation rates at Stordalen Mire.

  5. Depth-related coupling relation between methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOBs) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) in a marine sediment core from the Dongsha region, the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Fu, Shao-Ying; Zhu, Qing; Xiao, Xi; Yuan, Jian-Ping; Peng, Juan; Wu, Chou-Fei; Wang, Jiang-Hai

    2014-12-01

    The vertical distributions of methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOBs) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) in the marine sediment core of DH-CL14 from the Dongsha region, the South China Sea, were investigated. To enumerate MOBs and SRBs, their specific genes of pmoA and apsA were quantified by a culture-independent molecular biological technique, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The result shows that the pmoA gene copies per gram of sediments reached the maximum of 1,118,679 at the depth of 140-160 cm. Overall considering the detection precision, sample amount, measurement cost, and sensitivity to the seepage of methane from the oil/gas reservoirs or gas hydrates, we suggest that the depth of 140-160 cm may be the optimal sampling position for the marine microbial exploration of oils, gases, and gas hydrates in the Dongsha region. The data of the pmoA and apsA gene copies exhibit an evident coupling relation between MOBs and SRBs as illustrated in their vertical distributions in this sediment core, which may well be interpreted by a high sulfate concentration inhibiting methane production and further leading to the reduction of MOBs. In comparison with the numbers of the pmoA and apsA copies at the same sediment depth, we find out that there were two methane-oxidizing mechanisms of aerobic and anaerobic oxidation in this sediment core, i.e., the aerobic oxidation with free oxygen dominantly occurred above the depth of 210-230 cm, while the anaerobic oxidation with the other electron acceptors such as sulfates and manganese-iron oxides happened below the depth of 210-230 cm. PMID:25064353

  6. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane in a French meromictic lake (Lake Pavin): Who is responsible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, V.; Attard, E.; Birgel, D.; Schaeffer, P.; Jézéquel, D.; Lehours, A.

    2012-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and its biogeochemical cycle is of primary significance to the global carbon cycle. The Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM) has been estimated to be responsible for >90% of methane consumption. This biogeochemical process has been increasingly documented during the last two decades but the underlying microbial processes and their key agents remain incompletely understood. Freshwater lakes account for 2-10% of the total emissions of methane and are therefore an important part of the global methane cycle. Lake Pavin is a French meromictic crater lake with unusual hydrological characteristics: its morphology (depth >92m, mean diameter 750m) induce that waters below 60m are never mixed with overlying waters and remain permanently anoxic. The deep anoxic waters of Lake Pavin contain high concentrations (i.e. 4 mM) of methane but, contrary to other aquatic systems, almost no methane escapes from the lake. Previous biogeochemical and modeling studies suggest that methane is preferentially consumed within the oxic-anoxic transition zone (ca. 55-60 m depth) but that ca. 30% of methane oxidation occurs in the anoxic part of the lake. Phylogenetic (16S rRNA) analyses showed that ANME generally involved in AOM (ANME-1, -2 and -3) are not present in Lake Pavin. Other archaeal groups that do not have any cultured representatives so far appear well represented in the anoxic parts of the lake but their implication in AOM is not demonstrated. The analysis of lipid biomarkers using GC-MS and LC-MS revealed the presence of a low diversity of archaeal-specific biomarkers in the superficial sediments and in the anoxic waters of the lake. Archaeol and caldarcheaol (GDGT-0) are the two main archaeal core lipids detected; other biomarkers generally present in ANME such as pentamethylicosane or hydroxyarchaeol are not present. However, the stable carbon isotopic composition of archaeol (δ13C = -18‰) and of the biphytane chain of GDGT-0 (δ13C

  7. Eubacteria and Archaea community of simultaneous methanogenesis and denitrification granular sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yujiao; ZUO Jiane; CHEN Lili; WANG Yong

    2008-01-01

    Based on the successful performance of a lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor with the capacity of simultaneous methanogenesis and denitrification (SMD), the specific phylogenetic groups and community structure of microbes in the SMD granule in the UASB reactor were investigated by the construction of the Eubacteria and Archaea 16S rDNA clone libraries, fragment length polymorphism, and sequence blast. Real time quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (RTQ-PCR) technique was used to quantify the contents of Eubacteria and Archaea in the SMD granule. The contents of some special predominant methanogens were also investigated. The results indicated that the Methanosaeta and Methanobacteria were the predominant methanogens in all Archaea in the SMD granule, with contents of 71. 59% and 22. 73% in all 88 random Archaea clones, respectively. The diversity of Eubacteria was much more complex than that of Archaea. The low GC positive gram bacteria and Б-Protebacteria were the main predominant Eubacteria species in SMD granule, their contents were 49. 62% and 12. 03% in all 133 random Eubacteria clones respectively. The results of RTQ-PCR indicated that the content of Archaea was less than Eubacteria, the Archaea content in total microorganisms in SMD granule was about 27. 6%.

  8. Anaerobes beyond anaerobic digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, D. Z.; Pereira, M A; Alves, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms are widespread in nature. Sediments, gastrointestinal tracks, volcanic vents, geothermal sources are examples of habitats where anaerobic metabolism prevail, in some cases at extreme temperature, pH and pressure conditions. In such microbial ecosystems waste of some is food for others in a true integrated structure. Anaerobic microorganisms are able to use a wide variety of organic and inorganic compounds. Recalcitrant compounds, such as hydrocarbons, a...

  9. Anaerobic thermophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term "extremophile" was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of "extreme" environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally "hot environments" on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has definitely

  10. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Canganella

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong

  11. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy reveals a convergence of the chemical composition in methanogenic archaea from a Siberian permafrost-affected soil

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano, P; Hermelink, A.; Lasch, P.; de Vera, J.-P.; König, N.; Burckhardt, O.; Wagner, D.

    2015-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea are widespread anaerobic microorganisms responsible for the 25 production of biogenic methane. Several new species of psychrotolerant methanogenic archaea were recently isolated from a permafrost-affected soil in the Lena delta (Siberia, Russia), showing an exceptional resistance against desiccation, osmotic stress, low temperatures, starvation, UV and ionizing radiation when compared to methanogens from non-permafrost environments. To gain a deeper insight into the diffe...

  12. Anaerobic methane oxidation and a deep H2S sink generate isotopically heavy sulfides in Black Sea sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, BB; Bottcher, ME; Luschen, H.;

    2004-01-01

    and underlying sapropel, below which sea water ions penetrate deep down into the limnic Pleistocene deposits from >9000 years BP. Sulfate reduction rates have a subsurface maximum at the SO42--CH4 transition where H2S reaches 4 maximum concentration. Because of an excess of reactive iron in the deep limnic...... deposits, most of the methane-derived H2S is drawn downward to a sulfidization front where it reacts with Fe(III) and with Fe 21 diffusing up from below. The H2S-Fe2+ transition is marked by a black band of amorphous iron sulfide above which distinct horizons of greigite and pyrite formation occur....... The pore water gradients respond dynamically to environmental changes in the Black Sea with relatively short time constants of ca. 500 yr for SO42- and 10 yr for H2S, whereas the FeS in the black band has taken ca. 3000 yr to accumulate. The dual diffusion interfaces of SO42--CH4 and H2S-Fe2+ cause...

  13. Anaerobic methane oxidation and a deep H 2S sink generate isotopically heavy sulfides in Black Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Böttcher, Michael E.; Lüschen, Holger; Neretin, Lev N.; Volkov, Igor I.

    2004-05-01

    The main terminal processes of organic matter mineralization in anoxic Black Sea sediments underlying the sulfidic water column are sulfate reduction in the upper 2-4 m and methanogenesis below the sulfate zone. The modern marine deposits comprise a ca. 1-m-deep layer of coccolith ooze and underlying sapropel, below which sea water ions penetrate deep down into the limnic Pleistocene deposits from >9000 years BP. Sulfate reduction rates have a subsurface maximum at the SO 42--CH 4 transition where H 2S reaches maximum concentration. Because of an excess of reactive iron in the deep limnic deposits, most of the methane-derived H 2S is drawn downward to a sulfidization front where it reacts with Fe(III) and with Fe 2+ diffusing up from below. The H 2S-Fe 2+ transition is marked by a black band of amorphous iron sulfide above which distinct horizons of greigite and pyrite formation occur. The pore water gradients respond dynamically to environmental changes in the Black Sea with relatively short time constants of ca. 500 yr for SO 42- and 10 yr for H 2S, whereas the FeS in the black band has taken ca. 3000 yr to accumulate. The dual diffusion interfaces of SO 42--CH 4 and H 2S-Fe 2+ cause the trapping of isotopically heavy iron sulfide with δ 34S = +15 to +33‰ at the sulfidization front. A diffusion model for sulfur isotopes shows that the SO 42- diffusing downward into the SO 42--CH 4 transition has an isotopic composition of +19‰, close to the +23‰ of H 2S diffusing upward. These isotopic compositions are, however, very different from the porewater SO 42- (+43‰) and H 2S (-15‰) at the same depth. The model explains how methane-driven sulfate reduction combined with a deep H 2S sink leads to isotopically heavy pyrite in a sediment open to diffusion. These results have general implications for the marine sulfur cycle and for the interpretation of sulfur isotopic data in modern sediments and in sedimentary rocks throughout earth's history.

  14. XoxF-Type Methanol Dehydrogenase from the Anaerobic Methanotroph “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera”

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ming L.; Wessels, Hans J. C. T.; Pol, Arjan; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Mike S.M. Jetten; van Niftrik, Laura; Keltjens, Jan T.

    2014-01-01

    “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera” is a newly discovered anaerobic methanotroph that, surprisingly, oxidizes methane through an aerobic methane oxidation pathway. The second step in this aerobic pathway is the oxidation of methanol. In Gram-negative bacteria, the reaction is catalyzed by pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (MDH). The genome of “Ca. Methylomirabilis oxyfera” putatively encodes three different MDHs that are localized in one large gene cluster: one...

  15. Two isozymes of particulate methane monooxygenase with different methane oxidation kinetics are found in Methylocystis sp. strain SC2

    OpenAIRE

    Baani, Mohamed; Liesack, Werner

    2008-01-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) attenuate methane emission from major sources, such as wetlands, rice paddies, and landfills, and constitute the only biological sink for atmospheric methane in upland soils. Their key enzyme is particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), which converts methane to methanol. It has long been believed that methane at the trace atmospheric mixing ratio of 1.75 parts per million by volume (ppmv) is not oxidized by the methanotrophs cultured to date, but ra...

  16. Molecular characterization of a microbial consortium involved in methane oxidation coupled to denitrification under micro-aerobic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jingjing; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Liang; Ju, Xi; Wu, Weixiang; Chen, Yingxu

    2013-01-01

    Methane can be used as an alternative carbon source in biological denitrification because it is nontoxic, widely available and relatively inexpensive. A microbial consortium involved in methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (MOD) was enriched with nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors under micro-aerobic conditions. The 16S rRNA gene combined with pmoA phylogeny of methanotrophs and nirK phylogeny of denitrifiers were analysed to reveal the dominant microbial populations and functi...

  17. Methane oxidation in soil profiles of Dutch and Finnish coniferous forests with different soil texture and atmospheric nitrogen deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saari, A.; Martikainen, P.J.; Ferm, A.; Ruuskanen, J.; Boer, W. de; Troelstra, S.R.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    We studied methane oxidation capacity in soil profiles of Dutch and Finnish coniferous forests. The Finnish sites (n = 9) had nitrogen depositions from 3 to 36 kg N ha⁻¹ a⁻¹. The deposition of N on the Dutch sites (n = 13) was higher ranging from 50 to 92 kg N ha⁻¹ a⁻¹. The Dutch sites had also lime

  18. Operando XAS study of the influence of CO and NO on methane oxidation by Pd/Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionni, V.; Nachtegaal, M.; Petrov, A.; Kröcher, O.; Ferri, D.

    2016-05-01

    Methane oxidation on Pd/Al2O3 has been investigated using operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Pd K-edge. The influence of CO and NO on methane abatement has been addressed performing temperature programmed reaction runs while recording simultaneously XANES spectra. During CO oxidation Pd is reduced while methane conversion is shifted to higher temperature. NO strongly inhibits both CO and CH4 oxidation, despite the higher fraction of oxidized palladium.

  19. In Situ Analyses of Methane Oxidation Associated with the Roots and Rhizomes of a Bur Reed, Sparganium eurycarpum, in a Maine Wetland

    OpenAIRE

    King, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Methane oxidation associated with the belowground tissues of a common aquatic macrophyte, the burweed Sparganium eurycarpum, was assayed in situ by a chamber technique with acetylene or methyl fluoride as a methanotrophic inhibitor at a headspace concentration of 3 to 4%. Acetylene and methyl fluoride inhibited both methane oxidation and peat methanogenesis. However, inhibition of methanogenesis resulted in no obvious short-term effect on methane fluxes. Since neither inhibitor adversely affe...

  20. Early Microbial Evolution: The Age of Anaerobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William F; Sousa, Filipa L

    2016-02-01

    In this article, the term "early microbial evolution" refers to the phase of biological history from the emergence of life to the diversification of the first microbial lineages. In the modern era (since we knew about archaea), three debates have emerged on the subject that deserve discussion: (1) thermophilic origins versus mesophilic origins, (2) autotrophic origins versus heterotrophic origins, and (3) how do eukaryotes figure into early evolution. Here, we revisit those debates from the standpoint of newer data. We also consider the perhaps more pressing issue that molecular phylogenies need to recover anaerobic lineages at the base of prokaryotic trees, because O2 is a product of biological evolution; hence, the first microbes had to be anaerobes. If molecular phylogenies do not recover anaerobes basal, something is wrong. Among the anaerobes, hydrogen-dependent autotrophs--acetogens and methanogens--look like good candidates for the ancestral state of physiology in the bacteria and archaea, respectively. New trees tend to indicate that eukaryote cytosolic ribosomes branch within their archaeal homologs, not as sisters to them and, furthermore tend to root archaea within the methanogens. These are major changes in the tree of life, and open up new avenues of thought. Geochemical methane synthesis occurs as a spontaneous, abiotic exergonic reaction at hydrothermal vents. The overall similarity between that reaction and biological methanogenesis fits well with the concept of a methanogenic root for archaea and an autotrophic origin of microbial physiology. PMID:26684184

  1. Remarkable recovery and colonization behaviour of methane oxidizing bacteria in soil after disturbance is controlled by methane source only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yao; Abell, Guy C J; Bodelier, Paul L E; Meima-Franke, Marion; Sessitsch, Angela; Bodrossy, Levente

    2014-08-01

    Little is understood about the relationship between microbial assemblage history, the composition and function of specific functional guilds and the ecosystem functions they provide. To learn more about this relationship we used methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB) as model organisms and performed soil microcosm experiments comprised of identical soil substrates, hosting distinct overall microbial diversities(i.e., full, reduced and zero total microbial and MOB diversities). After inoculation with undisturbed soil, the recovery of MOB activity, MOB diversity and total bacterial diversity were followed over 3 months by methane oxidation potential measurements and analyses targeting pmoA and 16S rRNA genes. Measurement of methane oxidation potential demonstrated different recovery rates across the different treatments. Despite different starting microbial diversities, the recovery and succession of the MOB communities followed a similar pattern across the different treatment microcosms. In this study we found that edaphic parameters were the dominant factor shaping microbial communities over time and that the starting microbial community played only a minor role in shaping MOB microbial community.

  2. Atmospheric methane removal by methane-oxidizing bacteria immobilized on porous building materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganendra, Giovanni; De Muynck, Willem; Ho, Adrian; Hoefman, Sven; De Vos, Paul; Boeckx, Pascal; Boon, Nico

    2014-04-01

    Biological treatment using methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) immobilized on six porous carrier materials have been used to mitigate methane emission. Experiments were performed with different MOB inoculated in building materials at high (~20 % (v/v)) and low (~100 ppmv) methane mixing ratios. Methylocystis parvus in autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) exhibited the highest methane removal rate at high (28.5 ± 3.8 μg CH₄ g⁻¹ building material h⁻¹) and low (1.7 ± 0.4 μg CH₄ g⁻¹ building material h⁻¹) methane mixing ratio. Due to the higher volume of pores with diameter >5 μm compared to other materials tested, AAC was able to adsorb more bacteria which might explain for the higher methane removal observed. The total methane and carbon dioxide-carbon in the headspace was decreased for 65.2 ± 10.9 % when M. parvus in Ytong was incubated for 100 h. This study showed that immobilized MOB on building materials could be used to remove methane from the air and also act as carbon sink. PMID:24337222

  3. Effects of preconditioning the rhizosphere of different plant species on biotic methane oxidation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndanga, Éliane M; Lopera, Carolina B; Bradley, Robert L; Cabral, Alexandre R

    2016-09-01

    The rhizosphere is known as the most active biogeochemical layer of the soil. Therefore, it could be a beneficial environment for biotic methane oxidation. The aim of this study was to document - by means of batch incubation tests - the kinetics of CH4 oxidation in rhizosphere soils that were previously exposed to methane. Soils from three pre-exposure to CH4 zones were sampled: the never-before pre-exposed (NEX), the moderately pre-exposed (MEX) and the very pre-exposed (VEX). For each pre-exposure zone, the rhizosphere of several plant species was collected, pre-incubated, placed in glass vials and submitted to CH4 concentrations varying from 0.5% to 10%. The time to the beginning of CH4 consumption and the CH4 oxidation rate were recorded. The results showed that the fastest CH4 consumption occurred for the very pre-exposed rhizosphere. Specifically, a statistically significant difference in CH4 oxidation half-life was found between the rhizosphere of the VEX vegetated with a mixture of different plants and the NEX vegetated with ryegrass. This difference was attributed to the combined effect of the preconditioning level and plant species as well as to the organic matter content. Regardless of the preconditioning level, the oxidation rate values obtained in this study were comparable to those reported in the reviewed literature for mature compost. PMID:27177464

  4. Anaerobic methanotrophy in tidal wetland: Effects of electron acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Hung; Yu, Zih-Huei; Wang, Pei-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands have been considered to represent the largest natural source of methane emission, contributing substantially to intensify greenhouse effect. Despite in situ methanogenesis fueled by organic degradation, methanotrophy also plays a vital role in controlling the exact quantity of methane release across the air-sediment interface. As wetlands constantly experience various disturbances of anthropogenic activities, biological burrowing, tidal inundation, and plant development, rapid elemental turnover would enable various electron acceptors available for anaerobic methanotrophy. The effects of electron acceptors on stimulating anaerobic methanotrophy and the population compositions involved in carbon transformation in wetland sediments are poorly explored. In this study, sediments recovered from tidally influenced, mangrove covered wetland in northern Taiwan were incubated under the static conditions to investigate whether anaerobic methanotrophy could be stimulated by the presence of individual electron acceptors. Our results demonstrated that anaerobic methanotrophy was clearly stimulated in incubations amended with no electron acceptor, sulfate, or Fe-oxyhydroxide. No apparent methane consumption was observed in incubations with nitrate, citrate, fumarate or Mn-oxides. Anaerobic methanotrophy in incubations with no exogenous electron acceptor appears to proceed at the greatest rates, being sequentially followed by incubations with sulfate and Fe-oxyhydroxide. The presence of basal salt solution stimulated methane oxidation by a factor of 2 to 3. In addition to the direct impact of electron acceptor and basal salts, incubations with sediments retrieved from low tide period yielded a lower rate of methane oxidation than from high tide period. Overall, this study demonstrates that anaerobic methanotrophy in wetland sediments could proceed under various treatments of electron acceptors. Low sulfate content is not a critical factor in inhibiting methane

  5. Multiple archaeal groups mediate methane oxidation in anoxic cold seep sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria J Orphan; House, Christopher H.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; McKeegan, Kevin D.; DeLong, Edward F.

    2002-01-01

    No microorganism capable of anaerobic growth on methane as the sole carbon source has yet been cultivated. Consequently, information about these microbes has been inferred from geochemical and microbiological observations of field samples. Stable isotope analysis of lipid biomarkers and rRNA gene surveys have implicated specific microbes in the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Here we use combined fluorescent in situ hybridization and secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses, to identify...

  6. Low-level 14C methane oxidation rate measurements modified for remote field settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, M. A.; Pohlman, J.; Ruppel, C. D.; Xu, X.

    2012-12-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation limits atmospheric methane emissions from degraded subsea permafrost and dissociated methane hydrates in high latitude oceans. Methane oxidation rate measurements are a crucial tool for investigating the efficacy of this process, but are logistically challenging when working on small research vessels in remote settings. We modified a low-level 14C-CH4 oxidation rate measurement for use in the Beaufort Sea above hydrate bearing sediments during August 2012. Application of the more common 3H-CH4 rate measurement that uses 106 times more radioactivity was not practical because the R/V Ukpik cannot accommodate a radiation van. The low-level 14C measurement does not require a radiation van, but careful isolation of the 14C-label is essential to avoid contaminating natural abundance 14C measurements. We used 14C-CH4 with a total activity of 1.1 μCi, which is far below the 100 μCi permitting level. In addition, we modified field procedures to simplify and shorten sample processing. The original low-level 14C-CH4 method requires 6 steps in the field: (1) collect water samples in glass serum bottles, (2) inject 14C-CH4 into bottles, (3) incubate for 24 hours, (4) filter to separate the methanotrophic bacterial cells from the aqueous sample, (5) kill the filtrate with sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and (6) purge with nitrogen to remove unused 14C-CH4. Onshore, the 14C-CH4 respired to carbon dioxide or incorporated into cell material by methanotrophic bacteria during incubation is quantified by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). We conducted an experiment to test the possibility of storing samples for purging and filtering back onshore (steps 4 and 6). We subjected a series of water samples to steps 1-3 & 5, and preserved with mercuric chloride (HgCl2) instead of NaOH because HgCl2 is less likely to break down cell material during storage. The 14C-content of the carbon dioxide in samples preserved with HgCl2 and stored for up to 2 weeks was stable

  7. Nitrification and methane oxidation at the sediment surface in Hamilton Harbour (Lake Ontario)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrification and methane oxidation in profundal and littoral sediment surfaces of a polluted system were investigated by means of pore water analyses, enumeration of methanotrophic and nitrifying bacteria, and slurry experiments. Sediment CH4 concentrations (0.38-3.4 mM) were generally higher than NH4+ concentrations (0.35-1.4 mM) at the profundal site but not at the littoral site where CH4 and NH4+ concentrations were 0.10-0.93 and 0.12-0.46 mM, respectively. Methanotroph counts (105 cfu·mL-1) were at least an order of magnitude higher than those of NH4+ -oxidizing bacteria (103-104 MPN·mL-1). Dissolved O2 profiles indicated a penetration of 0.5-2.0 mm (profundal) and 2.5-6.0 mm (littoral) which suggests that actual oxidation of CH4 and NH4+ was restricted to this oxic layer. Calculated fluxes of CH4 (0-23 mmol·M-2·d-1), NH4+ (0-2.5 mmol·-2·d-1), and O2 (-14 mmol·-2·d-1) through the surface sediment suggested that CH4 consumption could account for a more important fraction of the estimated O2 consumption than could nitrification. We conclude that: CH4 metabolism may be more important than nitrification as a sink of hypolimnetic O2 in Hamilton Harbour; and CH4 may suppress nitrification by competition for O2 and NH4+ between methanotrophs and nitrifiers. (author). 29 refs., 5 figs

  8. Microbial methane oxidation at the redoxcline of the Gotland Deep (Central Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Schmale

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane concentrations in the stratified water column of the Gotland Deep (Central Baltic Sea show a strong gradient from high values in the saline deep water (max. 504nM to low concentrations in the less dense, brackish surface water (about 4 nM. The steepest gradient is present within the redoxcline (between 115 and 135 m water depth that separates the anoxic deep part from the oxygenated surface water, implying a methane consumption rate of 0.28 nM d−1. The process of microbial methane oxidation within the redoxcline is mirrored by a shift of the stable carbon isotope ratio of methane between the bottom water (δ13C CH4 = −82.4‰ and the suboxic depth interval (δ13C CH4 = −38.7‰. A water column sample from 100 m water depth was studied to identify the microorganisms responsible for the methane turnover at the redoxcline. Notably, methane monoxygenase gene expression analyses for the specific water depth demonstrated that accordant methanotrophic activity was due to only one microbial phylotype. An imprint of these organisms on the particular organic matter was revealed by distinctive lipid biomarkers showing bacteriohopanepolyols and lipid fatty acids characteristic for aerobic type I methanotrophic bacteria (e.g. 35-aminobacteriohopane-30,31,32,33,34-pentol. In conjunction with earlier findings, our results support the idea that biogeochemical cycles in Central Baltic Sea redoxclines are mainly driven by only a few microbial key species.

  9. Surface composition and catalytic activity of La-Fe mixed oxides for methane oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fengxiang [School of Chemistry, Beijing Institute of Technology, Liangxiang East Road, Beijing 102488 (China); Li, Zhanping [Analysis Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ma, Hongwei [School of Chemistry, Beijing Institute of Technology, Liangxiang East Road, Beijing 102488 (China); Gao, Zhiming, E-mail: zgao@bit.edu.cn [School of Chemistry, Beijing Institute of Technology, Liangxiang East Road, Beijing 102488 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The sample with La/Fe atomic ratio of 0.94 is single phase perovskite La{sub 0.94}FeO{sub 3−d}. • The excess ironic oxide exists on the surface of the perovskite crystallites. • La{sup 3+} ions are enriched on surface of the oxides even for the La{sub 0.68}Fe sample. - Abstract: Four La-Fe oxide samples with La/Fe atomic ratio y = 1.02 ∼ 0.68 (denoted as LayFe) were prepared by the citrate method. The samples had a decreased specific surface area with the La/Fe atomic ratio decreasing. XRD pattern proved that the sample La{sub 0.94}Fe is single phase perovskite La{sub 0.94}FeO{sub 3−d}. Phase composition of the samples was estimated by the Rietveld refinement method. XPS analyses indicate that La{sup 3+} ions are enriched on surface of crystallites for all the samples, and surface carbonate ions are relatively abundant on the samples La{sub 1.02}Fe and La{sub 0.94}Fe. Catalytic activity for methane oxidation per unit surface area of the samples is in the order of La{sub 0.68}Fe > La{sub 0.76}Fe > La{sub 0.94}Fe > La{sub 1.02}Fe both in the presence and in the absence of gaseous oxygen. A reason for this order would be the higher concentration of Fe{sup 3+} ion on the surface of the samples La{sub 0.68}Fe and La{sub 0.76}Fe.

  10. Niche segregation of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and anammox bacteria in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitcher, A.; Villanueva, L.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; Reichart, G.J.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria have emerged as significant factors in the marine nitrogen cycle and are responsible for the oxidation of ammonium to nitrite and dinitrogen gas, respectively. Potential for an interaction between these groups exists;

  11. Differential methane oxidation activity and microbial community composition at cold seeps in the Arctic off western Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gründger, Friederike; Svenning, Mette M.; Niemann, Helge; Silyakova, Anna; Serov, Pavel; Li Hong, Wei; Wegener, Gunter; Panieri, Giuliana; Carroll, JoLynn

    2016-04-01

    Most models considering climate change related bottom water warming suggest that gas hydrates may become destabilized, leading to the mobilization of methane into seabed and water column ecosystems, and, eventually, into the atmosphere. However, the capacity of methanotrophic microbes retaining methane in sediments and the hydrosphere is not well constrained. Here, we investigate the microbial utilization of methane in sediments and the water column, focusing on cold seeps discovered at the arctic continental margin of western Svalbard. We measured ex situ rates of methane oxidation and sulfate reduction in two active gas flare sites with different geological settings at the Vestnesa Ridge (1204 m water depth) and within a pingolike feature area southwest off Svalbard (PLF; 380 m water depth). Our results show contrarily situations at our two sampling sites: At Vestnesa Ridge we find high methane oxidation rates with values up to 2055 nmol cm‑3 d‑1 at the sediment surface where the sediments are oversaturated with methane. Whereas, methane concentration and oxidation rates are low in the overlying water column (2 pmol cm‑3 d‑1). In contrast, at the sediment surface at PLF methane concentration and oxidation rates are considerably lower (up to 1.8 nmol cm‑3 d‑1). While the overlying bottom water contains high concentration of methane and shows oxidation rates with values of up to 3.8 nmol cm‑3 d‑1. The data on methane oxidation and sulfate reduction activity are compared to the sediment geochemistry and to data from metagenomic analysis identifying the methanotrophic community composition. These results provide unique insight into the dynamic responses of the seabed biological filter at cold seeps in the Arctic off western Svalbard. This study is part of the Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate and was supported by the Research Council of Norway through its Centres of Excellence funding scheme grant No. 223259.

  12. Oxygen availability is a major factor in determining the composition of microbial communities involved in methane oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Hernandez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We have previously observed that methane supplied to lake sediment microbial communities as a substrate not only causes a response by bona fide methanotrophic bacteria, but also by non-methane-oxidizing bacteria, especially by members of the family Methylophilaceae. This result suggested that methane oxidation in this environment likely involves communities composed of different functional guilds, rather than a single type of microbe. To obtain further support for this concept and to obtain further insights into the factors that may define such partnerships, we carried out microcosm incubations with sediment samples from Lake Washington at five different oxygen tensions, while methane was supplied at the same concentration in each. Community composition was determined through 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing after 10 and 16 weeks of incubation. We demonstrate that, in support of our prior observations, the methane-consuming communities were represented by two major types: the methanotrophs of the family Methylococcaceae and by non-methanotrophic methylotrophs of the family Methylophilaceae. However, different species persisted under different oxygen tensions. At high initial oxygen tensions (150 to 225 µM the major players were, respectively, species of the genera Methylosarcina and Methylophilus, while at low initial oxygen tensions (15 to 75 µM the major players were Methylobacter and Methylotenera. These data suggest that oxygen availability is at least one major factor determining specific partnerships in methane oxidation. The data also suggest that speciation within Methylococcaceae and Methylophilaceae may be driven by niche adaptation tailored toward specific placements within the oxygen gradient.

  13. Methane oxidation at 55 degrees C and pH 2 by a thermoacidophilic bacterium belonging to the Verrucomicrobia phylum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Tajul; Jensen, Sigmund; Reigstad, Laila Johanne; Larsen, Oivind; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2008-01-01

    Methanotrophic bacteria constitute a ubiquitous group of microorganisms playing an important role in the biogeochemical carbon cycle and in control of global warming through natural reduction of methane emission. These bacteria share the unique ability of using methane as a sole carbon and energy source and have been found in a great variety of habitats. Phylogenetically, known methanotrophs constitute a rather limited group and have so far only been affiliated with the Proteobacteria. Here, we report the isolation and initial characterization of a nonproteobacterial obligately methanotrophic bacterium. The isolate, designated Kam1, was recovered from an acidic hot spring in Kamchatka, Russia, and is more thermoacidophilic than any other known methanotroph, with optimal growth at approximately 55 degrees C and pH 3.5. Kam1 is only distantly related to all previously known methanotrophs and belongs to the Verrucomicrobia lineage of evolution. Genes for methane monooxygenases, essential for initiation of methane oxidation, could not be detected by using standard primers in PCR amplification and Southern blot analysis, suggesting the presence of a different methane oxidation enzyme. Kam1 also lacks the well developed intracellular membrane systems typical for other methanotrophs. The isolate represents a previously unrecognized biological methane sink, and, due to its unusual phylogenetic affiliation, it will shed important light on the origin, evolution, and diversity of biological methane oxidation and on the adaptation of this process to extreme habitats. Furthermore, Kam1 will add to our knowledge of the metabolic traits and biogeochemical roles of the widespread but poorly understood Verrucomicrobia phylum.

  14. Microbiology and potential applications of aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) process: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Qian; Yuan, Mengdong; Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Sun, Faqian; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Weixiang; Lee, Po-Heng

    2016-03-01

    Aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (AME-D) is an important link between the global methane and nitrogen cycles. This mini-review updates discoveries regarding aerobic methanotrophs and denitrifiers, as a prelude to spotlight the microbial mechanism and the potential applications of AME-D. Until recently, AME-D was thought to be accomplished by a microbial consortium where denitrifying bacteria utilize carbon intermediates, which are excreted by aerobic methanotrophs, as energy and carbon sources. Potential carbon intermediates include methanol, citrate and acetate. This mini-review presents microbial thermodynamic estimations and postulates that methanol is the ideal electron donor for denitrification, and may serve as a trophic link between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. More excitingly, new discoveries have revealed that AME-D is not only confined to the conventional synergism between methanotrophic bacteria and denitrifiers. Specifically, an obligate aerobic methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomonas denitrificans FJG1, has been demonstrated to couple partial denitrification with methane oxidation, under hypoxia conditions, releasing nitrous oxide as a terminal product. This finding not only substantially advances the understanding of AME-D mechanism, but also implies an important but unknown role of aerobic methanotrophs in global climate change through their influence on both the methane and nitrogen cycles in ecosystems. Hence, further investigation on AME-D microbiology and mechanism is essential to better understand global climate issues and to develop niche biotechnological solutions. This mini-review also presents traditional microbial techniques, such as pure cultivation and stable isotope probing, and powerful microbial techniques, such as (meta-) genomics and (meta-) transcriptomics, for deciphering linked methane oxidation and denitrification. Although AME-D has immense potential for nitrogen removal from wastewater, drinking

  15. Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria in a California Upland Grassland Soil: Diversity and Response to Simulated Global Change

    OpenAIRE

    Horz, Hans-Peter; Rich, Virginia; Avrahami, Sharon; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the diversity of methane-oxidizing bacteria (i.e., methanotrophs) in an annual upland grassland in northern California, using comparative sequence analysis of the pmoA gene. In addition to identifying type II methanotrophs commonly found in soils, we discovered three novel pmoA lineages for which no cultivated members have been previously reported. These novel pmoA clades clustered together either with clone sequences related to “RA 14” or “WB5FH-A,” which both represent clust...

  16. Toxicity of 1,1,1-Trichloroethane and Trichloroethene on a Mixed Culture of Methane-Oxidizing Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Broholm, Kim; Jensen, Bjørn K.; Christensen, Thomas H.; Olsen, Lajla

    1990-01-01

    The influence of trichloroethene (TCE; 0 to 65 mg/liter) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA; 0 to 103 mg/liter) on methane consumption of a mixed culture of methane-oxidizing bacteria was studied in laboratory batch experiments. Increasing concentrations of TCE or 1,1,1-TCA resulted in decreasing methane consumption. Methane consumption was totally inhibited at a concentration of 13 mg of TCE per liter, while methane consumption was still observed at the upper studied concentration of 103 m...

  17. Identifying active methane-oxidizers in thawed Arctic permafrost by proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C. M.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Chourey, K.; Hettich, R. L.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Layton, A. C.; Mykytczuk, N. C.; Whyte, L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    characterization identified ~350 proteins, confirmed enhanced microbial activities and significant shift in community structure within the microcosms. Although the activity of Shewanella sp. was suppressed by the incubation conditions, other bacteria were activated. This was shown by at least 3-fold increase in the number of identified proteins, which were primarily players in cellular energy metabolism. Among them, Geobacter sp. and methane-oxidizers, Bradyrhizobium sp., Methylosinus sp. and Methylocystis sp. appear dominant. In order to advance the protein database for better biodiversity and functional identification, we are currently using duo extraction protocols and consolidating metagenome data obtained from the same soil samples. A depth profile (from active to permafrost layer) for methanotrophs is being determined by examining pristine cores, thawed cryosols as well as enrichment cultures. The proteome information from these samples will be presented, which will be complemented by molecular studies.

  18. Genetic techniques for the archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Joel A; Picking, Jonathan W; Santangelo, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    Genetic techniques for the Archaea have undergone a rapid expansion in complexity, resulting in increased exploration of the role of Archaea in the environment and detailed analyses of the molecular physiology and information-processing systems in the third domain of life. Complementary gains in describing the ever-increasing diversity of archaeal organisms have allowed these techniques to be leveraged in new and imaginative ways to elucidate shared and unique aspects of archaeal diversity and metabolism. In this review, we introduce the four archaeal clades for which advanced genetic techniques are available--the methanogens, halophiles, Sulfolobales, and Thermococcales--with the aim of providing an overall profile of the advantages and disadvantages of working within each clade, as essentially all of the genetically accessible archaeal organisms require unique culturing techniques that present real challenges. We discuss the full repertoire of techniques possible within these clades while highlighting the recent advances that have been made by taking advantage of the most prominent techniques and approaches.

  19. Microbial methane oxidation processes and technologies for mitigation of landfill gas emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter; Bogner, J.E.;

    2009-01-01

    Landfill gas containing methane is produced by anaerobic degradation of organic waste. Methane is a strong greenhouse gas and landfills are one of the major anthropogenic sources of atmospheric methane. Landfill methane may be oxidized by methanotrophic microorganisms in soils or waste materials ...

  20. Methane oxidation associated to submerged brown-mosses buffers methane emissions from Siberian polygonal peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebner, Susanne; Zeyer, Josef; Knoblauch, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Circumpolar peatlands store roughly 18 % of the globally stored carbon in soils [based on 1, 2]. Also, northern wetlands and tundra are a net source of methane (CH4), an effective greenhouse gas (GHG), with an estimated annual CH4 release of 7.2% [3] or 8.1% [4] of the global total CH4 emission. Although it is definite that Arctic tundra significantly contributes to the global methane emissions in general, regional variations in GHG fluxes are enormous. CH4 fluxes of polygonal tundra within the Siberian Lena Delta, for example, were reported to be low [5, 6], particularly at open water polygonal ponds and small lakes [7] which make up around 10 % of the delta's surface. Low methane emissions from polygonal ponds oppose that Arctic permafrost thaw ponds are generally known to emit large amounts of CH4 [8]. Combining tools of biogeochemistry and molecular microbiology, we identified sinks of CH4 in polygonal ponds from the Lena Delta that were not considered so far in GHG studies from Arctic wetlands. Pore water CH4 profiling in polygonal ponds on Samoylov, a small island in the central part of the Lena Delta, revealed a pronounced zone of CH4 oxidation near the vegetation surface in submerged layers of brown-mosses. Here, potential CH4 oxidation was an order of magnitude higher than in non-submerged mosses and in adjacent bulk soil. We could additionally show that this moss associated methane oxidation (MAMO) is hampered when exposure of light is prevented. Shading of plots with submerged Scorpidium scorpioides inhibited MAMO leading to higher CH4 concentrations and an increase in CH4 fluxes by a factor of ~13. Compared to non-submerged mosses, the submerged mosses also showed significantly lower δ13C values indicating that they use carbon dioxide derived from methane oxidation for photosynthesis. Applying stable isotope probing of DNA, type II methanotrophs were identified to be responsible for the oxidation of CH4 in the submerged Scorpidium scorpioides. Our

  1. The role of endophytic methane-oxidizing bacteria in submerged Sphagnum in determining methane emissions of Northeastern Siberian tundra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. Maximov

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of the microbial processes governing methane emissions from tundra ecosystems is receiving increasing attention. Recently, cooperation between methanotrophic bacteria and submerged Sphagnum was shown to reduce methane emissions but also to supply CO2 for photosynthesis for the plant. Although this process was shown to be important in the laboratory, the differences that exist in methane emissions from inundated vegetation types with or without Sphagnum in the field have not been linked to these bacteria before. In this study, chamber flux measurements, an incubation study and a process model were used to investigate the drivers and controls on the relative difference in methane emissions between a submerged Sphagnum/sedge vegetation type and an inundated sedge vegetation type without Sphagnum. It was found that methane emissions in the Sphagnum-dominated vegetation type were 50 % lower than in the vegetation type without Sphagnum. A model sensitivity analysis showed that these differences could not sufficiently be explained by differences in methane production and plant transport. The model, combined with an incubation study, indicated that methane oxidation by endophytic bacteria, living in cooperation with submerged Sphagnum, plays a significant role in methane cycling at this site. This result is important for spatial upscaling as oxidation by these bacteria is likely involved in 15 % of the net methane emissions at this tundra site. Our findings support the notion that methane-oxidizing bacteria are an important factor in understanding the processes behind methane emissions in tundra.

  2. Methane oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction under hypoxia by the Gammaproteobacterium Methylomonas denitrificans, sp. nov. type strain FJG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kits, K Dimitri; Klotz, Martin G; Stein, Lisa Y

    2015-09-01

    Obligate methanotrophs belonging to the Phyla Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia require oxygen for respiration and methane oxidation; nevertheless, aerobic methanotrophs are abundant and active in low oxygen environments. While genomes of some aerobic methanotrophs encode putative nitrogen oxide reductases, it is not understood whether these metabolic modules are used for NOx detoxification, denitrification or other purposes. Here we demonstrate using microsensor measurements that a gammaproteobacterial methanotroph Methylomonas denitrificans sp. nov. strain FJG1(T) couples methane oxidation to nitrate reduction under oxygen limitation, releasing nitrous oxide as a terminal product. Illumina RNA-Seq data revealed differential expression of genes encoding a denitrification pathway previously unknown to methanotrophs as well as the pxmABC operon in M. denitrificans sp. nov. strain FJG1(T) in response to hypoxia. Physiological and transcriptome data indicate that genetic inventory encoding the denitrification pathway is upregulated only upon availability of nitrate under oxygen limitation. In addition, quantitation of ATP levels demonstrates that the denitrification pathway employs inventory such as nitrate reductase NarGH serving M. denitrificans sp. nov. strain FJG1(T) to conserve energy during oxygen limitation. This study unravelled an unexpected metabolic flexibility of aerobic methanotrophs, thereby assigning these bacteria a new role at the metabolic intersection of the carbon and nitrogen cycles. PMID:25580993

  3. Methane Seep in Shallow-Water Permeable Sediment Harbors High Diversity of Anaerobic Methanotrophic Communities, Elba, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, S. Emil; Kuhfuss, Hanna; Wegener, Gunter; Lott, Christian; Ramette, Alban; Wiedling, Johanna; Knittel, Katrin; Weber, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is a key biogeochemical process regulating methane emission from marine sediments into the hydrosphere. AOM is largely mediated by consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), and has mainly been investigated in deep-sea sediments. Here we studied methane seepage at four spots located at 12 m water depth in coastal, organic carbon depleted permeable sands off the Island of Elba (Italy). We combined biogeochemical measurements, sequencing-based community analyses and in situ hybridization to investigate the microbial communities of this environment. Increased alkalinity, formation of free sulfide and nearly stoichiometric methane oxidation and sulfate reduction rates up to 200 nmol g-1 day-1 indicated the predominance of sulfate-coupled AOM. With up to 40 cm thickness the zones of AOM activity were unusually large and occurred in deeper sediment horizons (20–50 cm below seafloor) as compared to diffusion-dominated deep-sea seeps, which is likely caused by advective flow of pore water due to the shallow water depth and permeability of the sands. Hydrodynamic forces also may be responsible for the substantial phylogenetic and unprecedented morphological diversity of AOM consortia inhabiting these sands, including the clades ANME-1a/b, ANME-2a/b/c, ANME-3, and their partner bacteria SEEP-SRB1a and SEEP-SRB2. High microbial dispersal, the availability of diverse energy sources and high habitat heterogeneity might explain that the emission spots shared few microbial taxa, despite their physical proximity. Although the biogeochemistry of this shallow methane seep was very different to that of deep-sea seeps, their key functional taxa were very closely related, which supports the global dispersal of key taxa and underlines strong selection by methane as the predominant energy source. Mesophilic, methane-fueled ecosystems in shallow-water permeable sediments may comprise distinct

  4. Methane seep in shallow-water permeable sediment harbors high diversity of anaerobic methanotrophic communities, Elba, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Emil Ruff

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM is a key biogeochemical process regulating methane emission from marine sediments into the hydrosphere. AOM is largely mediated by consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB, and has mainly been investigated in deep-sea sediments. Here we studied methane seepage at four spots located at 12 m water depth in coastal, organic-carbon depleted permeable sands off the Island of Elba (Italy. We combined biogeochemical measurements, sequencing-based community analyses and in situ hybridization to investigate the microbial communities of this environment. Increased alkalinity, formation of free sulfide and nearly stoichiometric methane oxidation and sulfate reduction rates up to 200 nmol g-1 day-1 indicated the predominance of sulfate-coupled AOM. With up to 40 cm thickness the zones of AOM activity were unusually large and occurred in deeper sediment horizons (20–50 cm below seafloor as compared to diffusion-dominated deep-sea seeps, which is likely caused by advective flow of pore water due to the shallow water depth and permeability of the sands. Hydrodynamic forces also may be responsible for the substantial phylogenetic and unprecedented morphological diversity of AOM consortia inhabiting these sands, including the clades ANME-1a/b, ANME-2a/b/c, ANME-3 and their partner bacteria SEEP-SRB1a and SEEP-SRB2. High microbial dispersal, the availability of diverse energy sources and high habitat heterogeneity might explain that the emission spots shared few microbial taxa, despite their physical proximity. Although the biogeochemistry of this shallow methane seep was very different to that of deep-sea seeps, their key functional taxa were very closely related, which supports the global dispersal of key taxa and underlines strong selection by methane as the predominant energy source. Mesophilic, methane-fueled ecosystems in shallow-water permeable sediments may comprise

  5. Methane Seep in Shallow-Water Permeable Sediment Harbors High Diversity of Anaerobic Methanotrophic Communities, Elba, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, S Emil; Kuhfuss, Hanna; Wegener, Gunter; Lott, Christian; Ramette, Alban; Wiedling, Johanna; Knittel, Katrin; Weber, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is a key biogeochemical process regulating methane emission from marine sediments into the hydrosphere. AOM is largely mediated by consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), and has mainly been investigated in deep-sea sediments. Here we studied methane seepage at four spots located at 12 m water depth in coastal, organic carbon depleted permeable sands off the Island of Elba (Italy). We combined biogeochemical measurements, sequencing-based community analyses and in situ hybridization to investigate the microbial communities of this environment. Increased alkalinity, formation of free sulfide and nearly stoichiometric methane oxidation and sulfate reduction rates up to 200 nmol g(-1) day(-1) indicated the predominance of sulfate-coupled AOM. With up to 40 cm thickness the zones of AOM activity were unusually large and occurred in deeper sediment horizons (20-50 cm below seafloor) as compared to diffusion-dominated deep-sea seeps, which is likely caused by advective flow of pore water due to the shallow water depth and permeability of the sands. Hydrodynamic forces also may be responsible for the substantial phylogenetic and unprecedented morphological diversity of AOM consortia inhabiting these sands, including the clades ANME-1a/b, ANME-2a/b/c, ANME-3, and their partner bacteria SEEP-SRB1a and SEEP-SRB2. High microbial dispersal, the availability of diverse energy sources and high habitat heterogeneity might explain that the emission spots shared few microbial taxa, despite their physical proximity. Although the biogeochemistry of this shallow methane seep was very different to that of deep-sea seeps, their key functional taxa were very closely related, which supports the global dispersal of key taxa and underlines strong selection by methane as the predominant energy source. Mesophilic, methane-fueled ecosystems in shallow-water permeable sediments may comprise distinct

  6. The Leeuwenhoek Lecture 2000 The natural and unnatural history of methane-oxidizing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton, Howard

    2005-01-01

    Methane gas is produced from many natural and anthropogenic sources. As such, methane gas plays a significant role in the Earth's climate, being 25 times more effective as a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. As with nearly all other naturally produced organic molecules on Earth, there are also micro-organisms capable of using methane as their sole source of carbon and energy. The microbes responsible (methanotrophs) are ubiquitous and, for the most part, aerobic. Although anaerobic methanot...

  7. Regulated polyploidy in halophilic archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Breuert

    Full Text Available Polyploidy is common in higher eukaryotes, especially in plants, but it is generally assumed that most prokaryotes contain a single copy of a circular chromosome and are therefore monoploid. We have used two independent methods to determine the genome copy number in halophilic archaea, 1 cell lysis in agarose blocks and Southern blot analysis, and 2 Real-Time quantitative PCR. Fast growing H. salinarum cells contain on average about 25 copies of the chromosome in exponential phase, and their ploidy is downregulated to 15 copies in early stationary phase. The chromosome copy number is identical in cultures with a twofold lower growth rate, in contrast to the results reported for several other prokaryotic species. Of three additional replicons of H. salinarum, two have a low copy number that is not growth-phase regulated, while one replicon even shows a higher degree of growth phase-dependent regulation than the main replicon. The genome copy number of H. volcanii is similarly high during exponential phase (on average 18 copies/cell, and it is also downregulated (to 10 copies as the cells enter stationary phase. The variation of genome copy numbers in the population was addressed by fluorescence microscopy and by FACS analysis. These methods allowed us to verify the growth phase-dependent regulation of ploidy in H. salinarum, and they revealed that there is a wide variation in genome copy numbers in individual cells that is much larger in exponential than in stationary phase. Our results indicate that polyploidy might be more widespread in archaea (or even prokaryotes in general than previously assumed. Moreover, the presence of so many genome copies in a prokaryote raises questions about the evolutionary significance of this strategy.

  8. Molecular analysis of the biomass of a fluidized bed reactor treating synthetic vinasse at anaerobic and micro-aerobic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, E.; Lopes, A.; Fdz-Polanco, M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Garcia Encina, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    The microbial communities (Bacteria and Archaea) established in an anaerobic fluidized bed reactor used to treat synthetic vinasse (betaine, glucose, acetate, propionate, and butyrate) were characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and phylogenetic analysis. This study was focu

  9. Novel Cardiolipins from Uncultured Methane-Metabolizing Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Y. Yoshinaga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel cardiolipins from Archaea were detected by screening the intact polar lipid (IPL composition of microbial communities associated with methane seepage in deep-sea sediments from the Pakistan margin by high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. A series of tentatively identified cardiolipin analogues (dimeric phospholipids or bisphosphatidylglycerol, BPG represented 0.5% to 5% of total archaeal IPLs. These molecules are similar to the recently described cardiolipin analogues with four phytanyl chains from extreme halophilic archaea. It is worth noting that cardiolipin analogues from the seep archaeal communities are composed of four isoprenoidal chains, which may contain differences in chain length (20 and 25 carbon atoms and degrees of unsaturation and the presence of a hydroxyl group. Two novel diether lipids, structurally related to the BPGs, are described and interpreted as degradation products of archaeal cardiolipin analogues. Since archaeal communities in seep sediments are dominated by anaerobic methanotrophs, our observations have implications for characterizing structural components of archaeal membranes, in which BPGs are presumed to contribute to modulation of cell permeability properties. Whether BPGs facilitate interspecies interaction in syntrophic methanotrophic consortia remains to be tested.

  10. Seawater methane flux, methane oxidation rates, and methane sources on the Central US Beaufort Sea Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, J.; Pack-Woo, M.; Xu, X.; Ruppel, C. D.; Casso, M.; Worley, C.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that some shallow-water circum-Arctic Ocean continental shelves (e.g., the Laptev Sea) are releasing substantial methane to the atmosphere. A number of processes -- including microbial degradation of organic matter in shallow sediments or in deeper sediments that were only recently thawed from permafrost, the dissociation of gas hydrates that formed in association with permafrost, and leakage from deeper thermogenic reservoirs -- may contribute to these methane fluxes. In August 2012, the USGS Gas Hydrates Project, with sponsorship from the DOE Methane Hydrates R&D Program, conducted a cross-shelf survey of greenhouse gas fluxes, carbon isotopic signatures of methane and CO2, and methane oxidation rates on the Central US Beaufort Sea continental shelf. IODP drilling has been proposed for a shelf-to-upper continental slope transect on this part of the Alaskan Beaufort passive margin to unravel the history of late Pleistocene to contemporary climate warming and sea level rise. The work presented here complements a 2012 USGS multichannel seismic program intended as IODP site survey. The flux, isotopic, and oxidation rate surveys sampled nearshore areas still underlain by subsea permafrost, a location where relict gas hydrate previously associated with permafrost may still exist and extend across the shelf to where present-day methane release is likely dominated by microbial methane generated in situ. The new geochemical data were acquired using dedicated cavity ringdown spectrometers (CRDS) for the atmospheric and sea surface measurements. The seawater CRDS also characterized the carbon isotopic signature of the CO2 and CH4 in real-time. Oxidation rate measurements were carried out using the low level 14C-CH4 (LL 14C) tracer method. Continuous measurements of surface air and surface seawater methane and carbon dioxide concentration, in conjunction with relevant meteorological and water chemistry data, permit us to calculate sea

  11. Microbiological Hydrogen Production by Anaerobic Fermentation and Photosynthetic Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asada, Y.; Ohsawa, M.; Nagai, Y.; Fukatsu, M.; Ishimi, K.; Ichi-ishi, S.

    2009-07-01

    Hydrogen gas is a clean and renewable energy carrier. Microbiological hydrogen production from glucose or starch by combination used of an anaerobic fermenter and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter spheroides RV was studied. In 1984, the co-culture of Clostridium butyricum and RV strain to convert glucose to hydrogen was demonstrated by Miyake et al. Recently, we studied anaerobic fermentation of starch by a thermophilic archaea. (Author)

  12. Field-scale tracking of active methane-oxidizing communities in a landfill-cover soil reveals spatial and seasonal variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henneberger, R.; Chiri, E.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Frenzel, P.; Luke, C.; Schroth, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) in soils mitigate methane (CH4) emissions. We assessed spatial and seasonal differences in active MOB communities in a landfill cover soil characterized by highly variable environmental conditions. Field-based measurements of CH4 oxidation activity and stable

  13. Effect of methanogenic substrates on anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    Meulepas, R.J.W.; Jagersma, C.G.; Khadem, A.F.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P. N. L.

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) is assumed to be a syntrophic process, in which methanotrophic archaea produce an interspecies electron carrier (IEC), which is subsequently utilized by sulfate-reducing bacteria. In this paper, six methanogenic substrates are tested as candidate-IECs by assessing their effect on AOM and SR by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment. The presence of acetate, formate or hydrogen enhanced SR, but did not inhibit AOM, nor did ...

  14. Serpins in unicellular Eukarya, Archaea, and Bacteria:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, T.H.; Hejgaard, Jørn; Saunders, N.F.W;

    2004-01-01

    in unicellular eukaryotes: the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense, and the human pathogens Entamoeba spp., Eimera tenella, Toxoplasma gondii, and Giardia lamblia. We compare these sequences to others, particularly those in the complete genome sequences of Archaea...

  15. Where does DNA replication start in archaea?

    OpenAIRE

    Vas, Amit; Leatherwood, Janet

    2000-01-01

    Genome-wide measures of DNA strand composition have been used to find archaeal DNA replication origins. Archaea seem to replicate using a single origin (as do eubacteria) even though archaeal replication factors are more like those of eukaryotes.

  16. Viruses of the Archaea: a unifying view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, David; Forterre, Patrick; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2006-01-01

    DNA viruses of the Archaea have highly diverse and often exceptionally complex morphotypes. Many have been isolated from geothermally heated hot environments, raising intriguing questions about their origins, and contradicting the widespread notion of limited biodiversity in extreme environments...

  17. Methane oxidation in pig and cattle slurry storages, and effects of surface crust moisture and methane availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, S.O.; Ambus, P.

    2006-01-01

    Storages with liquid manure (slurry) may develop a surface crust of particulate organic matter, or an artificial crust can be established. Slurry storages are net sources of atmospheric methane (CH4), but a potential for bacterial oxidation of CH4 in surface crusts was recently suggested in a study......2 during incubation, while intact subsamples were used to characterize CH4 oxidation as a function of CH4 availability and moisture content. Methane oxidation was observed in all materials except for an expanded clay product (Leca) sampled from a pig slurry storage. Despite significant variation...... content, each time followed by determination of CH4 fluxes. Only one surface crust material showed a relationship between CH4 fluxes and moisture content that would implicate gas diffusivity in the regulation of CH4 oxidation. The occurrence of inducible CH4 oxidation activity in slurry storage surface...

  18. Modeling the effects of vegetation on methane oxidation and emissions through soil landfill final covers across different climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abichou, Tarek; Kormi, Tarek; Yuan, Lei; Johnson, Terry; Francisco, Escobar

    2015-02-01

    Plant roots are reported to enhance the aeration of soil by creating secondary macropores which improve the diffusion of oxygen into soil as well as the supply of methane to bacteria. Therefore, methane oxidation can be improved considerably by the soil structuring processes of vegetation, along with the increase of organic biomass in the soil associated with plant roots. This study consisted of using a numerical model that combines flow of water and heat with gas transport and oxidation in soils, to simulate methane emission and oxidation through simulated vegetated and non-vegetated landfill covers under different climatic conditions. Different simulations were performed using different methane loading flux (5-200 g m(-2) d(-1)) as the bottom boundary. The lowest modeled surface emissions were always obtained with vegetated soil covers for all simulated climates. The largest differences in simulated surface emissions between the vegetated and non-vegetated scenarios occur during the growing season. Higher average yearly percent oxidation was obtained in simulations with vegetated soil covers as compared to non-vegetated scenario. The modeled effects of vegetation on methane surface emissions and percent oxidation were attributed to two separate mechanisms: (1) increase in methane oxidation associated with the change of the physical properties of the upper vegetative layer and (2) increase in organic matter associated with vegetated soil layers. Finally, correlations between percent oxidation and methane loading into simulated vegetated and non-vegetated covers were proposed to allow decision makers to compare vegetated versus non-vegetated soil landfill covers. These results were obtained using a modeling study with several simplifying assumptions that do not capture the complexities of vegetated soils under field conditions.

  19. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in grassland soils used for cattle husbandry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bannert

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available While the importance of anaerobic methane oxidation has been reported for marine ecosystems, the role of this process in soils is still questionable. Grasslands used as pastures for cattle overwintering show an increase in anaerobic soil micro-sites caused by animal treading and excrement deposition. Therefore, anaerobic potential methane oxidation activity of severely impacted soil from a cattle winter pasture was investigated in an incubation experiment under anaerobic conditions using 13C-labelled methane. We were able to detect a high microbial activity utilizing CH4 as nutrient source shown by the respiration of 13CO2. Measurements of possible terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic oxidation of methane were carried out. Soil sulfate concentrations were too low to explain the oxidation of the amount of methane added, but enough nitrate and iron(III were detected. However, only nitrate was consumed during the experiment. 13C-PLFA analyses clearly showed the utilization of CH4 as nutrient source mainly by organisms harbouring 16:1ω7 PLFAs. These lipids were also found as most 13C-enriched fatty acids by Raghoebarsing et al. (2006 after addition of 13CH4 to an enrichment culture coupling denitrification of nitrate to anaerobic oxidation of methane. This might be an indication for anaerobic oxidation of methane by relatives of "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera" in the investigated grassland soil under the conditions of the incubation experiment.

  20. Diversity and distribution of methane-oxidizing microbial communities associated with different faunal assemblages in a giant pockmark of the Gabon continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambon-Bonavita, M. A.; Nadalig, T.; Roussel, E.; Delage, E.; Duperron, S.; Caprais, J. C.; Boetius, A.; Sibuet, M.

    2009-12-01

    A giant 800-m-diameter pockmark named REGAB was discovered on the Gabon continental margin actively emitting methane at a water depth of 3200 m. The microbial diversity in sediments from four different assemblages of chemosynthetic organisms, Mytilidae, Vesicomyidae, Siboglinidae and a bacterial mat, was investigated using comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Aggregates of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME-2) and bacteria of the Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus cluster were found in all four chemosynthetic habitats. Fluorescence in situ hybridization targeting the ANME-2/ Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus aggregates showed their presence few centimeters (3-5 cm) below the surface of sediment. 16S rRNA gene sequences from all known marine ANME groups were detected in the pockmark sediments, as well as from both known bacterial partners. The archaeal diversity was limited to the ANME cluster for all investigated samples. The bacterial diversity included members of the Proteobacteria, Bacilliales, Cytophaga/Flavobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, JS1 and Actinobacteria clusters. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences related to those of known sulphide-oxidizing symbionts were recovered from tissues of several invertebrates including vesicomyid clams and siboglinid tubeworms of REGAB.

  1. Diversity and seasonal dynamics of airborne archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Ruzene Nespoli, C.; Pickersgill, D. A.; Galand, P. E.; Müller-Germann, I.; Nunes, T.; Gomes Cardoso, J.; Almeida, S. M.; Pio, C.; Andreae, M. O.; Conrad, R.; Pöschl, U.; Després, V. R.

    2014-11-01

    Archaea are widespread and abundant in many terrestrial and aquatic environments, and are thus outside extreme environments, accounting for up to ~10% of the prokaryotes. Compared to bacteria and other microorganisms, however, very little is known about the abundance, diversity, and dispersal of archaea in the atmosphere. By means of DNA analysis and Sanger sequencing targeting the 16S rRNA (435 sequences) and amoA genes in samples of air particulate matter collected over 1 year at a continental sampling site in Germany, we obtained first insights into the seasonal dynamics of airborne archaea. The detected archaea were identified as Thaumarchaeota or Euryarchaeota, with soil Thaumarchaeota (group I.1b) being present in all samples. The normalized species richness of Thaumarchaeota correlated positively with relative humidity and negatively with temperature. This together with an increase in bare agricultural soil surfaces may explain the diversity peaks observed in fall and winter. The detected Euryarchaeota were mainly predicted methanogens with a low relative frequency of occurrence. A slight increase in their frequency during spring may be linked to fertilization processes in the surrounding agricultural fields. Comparison with samples from the Cape Verde islands (72 sequences) and from other coastal and continental sites indicates that the proportions of Euryarchaeota are enhanced in coastal air, which is consistent with their suggested abundance in marine surface waters. We conclude that air transport may play an important role in the dispersal of archaea, including assumed ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota and methanogens.

  2. Methane oxidation in a crude oil contaminated aquifer: Delineation of aerobic reactions at the plume fringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, R.T.; Bekins, B.A.; Delin, G.N.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Blowes, D.W.; Kirshtein, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    High resolution direct-push profiling over short vertical distances was used to investigate CH4 attenuation in a petroleum contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. The contaminant plume was delineated using dissolved gases, redox sensitive components, major ions, carbon isotope ratios in CH4 and CO2, and the presence of methanotrophic bacteria. Sharp redox gradients were observed near the water table. Shifts in ??13CCH4 from an average of - 57.6??? (?? 1.7???) in the methanogenic zone to - 39.6??? (?? 8.7???) at 105 m downgradient, strongly suggest CH4 attenuation through microbially mediated degradation. In the downgradient zone the aerobic/anaerobic transition is up to 0.5 m below the water table suggesting that transport of O2 across the water table is leading to aerobic degradation of CH4 at this interface. Dissolved N2 concentrations that exceeded those expected for water in equilibrium with the atmosphere indicated bubble entrapment followed by preferential stripping of O2 through aerobic degradation of CH4 or other hydrocarbons. Multivariate and cluster analysis were used to distinguish between areas of significant bubble entrapment and areas where other processes such as the infiltration of O 2 rich recharge water were important O2 transport mechanisms. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Field-scale treatment of landfill gas with a passive methane oxidizing biofilter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philopoulos, A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Felske, C. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada); McCartney, D. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Natural Resources Engineering Facility

    2008-09-15

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills produce methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as a result of the anaerobic biodegradation of organic fractions of waste. This paper provided details of field tests conducted to test 2 approaches that addressed the issue of gases produced at a landfill in Alberta. A CH{sub 4} oxidation layer was applied to replace intermediate and final landfill covers. Landfill gas (LFG) was then trapped using 3 biogenic CH{sub 4} oxidizing biofilters. Mature yard waste was used as a biofilter medium. The LFG was trapped by the liner, accumulated in a collection system, and then passed through the biofilter medium. The study was conducted over a period of 10 months. Results of the study showed that the integration of the biofilter into the landfill cover showed promising results. Low surface emissions were observed in 6 out of 8 monitoring events at 2 of the sites. Low influent LFG fluxes at the third site did not allow for full air sampling analyses to be conducted. 22 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  4. Methane oxidation in permeable sediments at hydrocarbon seeps in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treude, T.; Ziebis, W.

    2010-03-01

    A shallow-water area in the Santa Barbara Channel (California), known collectively as the Coal Oil Point seep field, is one the largest natural submarine oil and gas emission areas in the world. Both gas and oil are seeping constantly through a predominantly sandy seabed into the ocean. This study focused on the methanotrophic activity within the surface sediments (0-15 cm) of the permeable seabed in the so-called Brian Seep area at a water depth ~10 m. Detailed investigations of biogeochemical parameters in the sediment surrounding active gas vents indicated that methane seepage through the permeable seabed induces a convective transport of fluids within the surface sediment layer, which results in a deeper penetration of oxidants (oxygen, sulfate) into the sediment, as well as in a faster removal of potentially inhibiting reduced end products (e.g. hydrogen sulfide). Methanotrophic activity was often found close to the sediment-water interface, indicating the involvement of aerobic bacteria. However, biogeochemical data suggests that the majority of methane is consumed by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction below the surface layer (>15 cm), where sulfate is still available in high concentrations. This subsurface maximum of AOM activity in permeable sands is in contrast to known deep-sea seep habitats, where upward fluid advection through more fine-grained sediments leads to an accumulation of AOM activity within the top 10 cm of the sediments, because sulfate is rapidly depleted.

  5. Methane oxidation in a crude oil contaminated aquifer: Delineation of aerobic reactions at the plume fringes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Richard T.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Delin, Geoffrey N.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Blowes, David W.; Kirshtein, Julie D.

    2011-07-01

    High resolution direct-push profiling over short vertical distances was used to investigate CH 4 attenuation in a petroleum contaminated aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota. The contaminant plume was delineated using dissolved gases, redox sensitive components, major ions, carbon isotope ratios in CH 4 and CO 2, and the presence of methanotrophic bacteria. Sharp redox gradients were observed near the water table. Shifts in δ 13C CH4 from an average of - 57.6‰ (± 1.7‰) in the methanogenic zone to - 39.6‰ (± 8.7‰) at 105 m downgradient, strongly suggest CH 4 attenuation through microbially mediated degradation. In the downgradient zone the aerobic/anaerobic transition is up to 0.5 m below the water table suggesting that transport of O 2 across the water table is leading to aerobic degradation of CH 4 at this interface. Dissolved N 2 concentrations that exceeded those expected for water in equilibrium with the atmosphere indicated bubble entrapment followed by preferential stripping of O 2 through aerobic degradation of CH 4 or other hydrocarbons. Multivariate and cluster analysis were used to distinguish between areas of significant bubble entrapment and areas where other processes such as the infiltration of O 2 rich recharge water were important O 2 transport mechanisms.

  6. 2009 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism & Molecular Biology GRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Julie Maupin- Furlow

    2009-07-26

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses; and industrial applications. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  7. 2011 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism, & Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keneth Stedman

    2011-08-05

    Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  8. The use of novel packing material for improving methane oxidation in biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Emanuel Manfred F; Duarte, Felipe V; Vieira, João Paulo R; Melo, Vinícius M; Souza, Cláudio L; Araújo, Juliana C; Chernicharo, Carlos Augusto L

    2016-11-01

    The use of biofilters (working bed volume of 7.85 L) for the oxidation of CH4 at low concentrations (from 0.17%v/v to 3.63%v/v, typically in waste gas from anaerobic sewage treatment) was investigated and four empty bed residence times were tested (in min): 42.8, 29.5, 19.6, and 7.4. Mixtures of organic (composted leaves) and three non-organic materials (sponge-based material - SBM, blast furnace slag - BFS, and expanded vermiculite - ExpV) were used as packing media. Along 188 operational days after the steady state was reached (95 days for start-up), the CH4 mineralization decreased while the inlet loads gradually increased from 3.0 ± 0.8 gCH4 m(-3) h(-1) to 148.8 ± 4.4 gCH4 m(-3) h(-1). The biofilter packed with ExpV showed the best results, since the CH4 conversions decreased from 95.0 ± 5.0% to 12.7 ± 3.7% as a function of inlet concentration, compared to the other two biofilters (SBM and BFS) which showed CH4 conversions decreasing from 56.0 ± 5.4% to 3.5 ± 1.2% as a function of inlet concentration. The methanotrophic activity of biomass taken from ExpV biofilter was three times higher than the activity of biomass from the other two biofilters. Taken together, these results suggested that ExpV provides an attractive environment for microbial growth, besides the mechanical resistance provided to the whole packing media, showing the potential to its use in biofiltration of diffuse CH4 emissions.

  9. The use of novel packing material for improving methane oxidation in biofilters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Emanuel Manfred F; Duarte, Felipe V; Vieira, João Paulo R; Melo, Vinícius M; Souza, Cláudio L; Araújo, Juliana C; Chernicharo, Carlos Augusto L

    2016-11-01

    The use of biofilters (working bed volume of 7.85 L) for the oxidation of CH4 at low concentrations (from 0.17%v/v to 3.63%v/v, typically in waste gas from anaerobic sewage treatment) was investigated and four empty bed residence times were tested (in min): 42.8, 29.5, 19.6, and 7.4. Mixtures of organic (composted leaves) and three non-organic materials (sponge-based material - SBM, blast furnace slag - BFS, and expanded vermiculite - ExpV) were used as packing media. Along 188 operational days after the steady state was reached (95 days for start-up), the CH4 mineralization decreased while the inlet loads gradually increased from 3.0 ± 0.8 gCH4 m(-3) h(-1) to 148.8 ± 4.4 gCH4 m(-3) h(-1). The biofilter packed with ExpV showed the best results, since the CH4 conversions decreased from 95.0 ± 5.0% to 12.7 ± 3.7% as a function of inlet concentration, compared to the other two biofilters (SBM and BFS) which showed CH4 conversions decreasing from 56.0 ± 5.4% to 3.5 ± 1.2% as a function of inlet concentration. The methanotrophic activity of biomass taken from ExpV biofilter was three times higher than the activity of biomass from the other two biofilters. Taken together, these results suggested that ExpV provides an attractive environment for microbial growth, besides the mechanical resistance provided to the whole packing media, showing the potential to its use in biofiltration of diffuse CH4 emissions. PMID:27505166

  10. Niche segregation of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and anammox bacteria in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    OpenAIRE

    Pitcher, A.; Villanueva, L; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; G. J. Reichart; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria have emerged as significant factors in the marine nitrogen cycle and are responsible for the oxidation of ammonium to nitrite and dinitrogen gas, respectively. Potential for an interaction between these groups exists; however, their distributions are rarely determined in tandem. Here we have examined the vertical distribution of AOA and anammox bacteria through the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), one of ...

  11. Distinct Responses in Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria after Addition of Biosolids to an Agricultural Soil▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, John J.; Policht, Katherine; Grancharova, Tanya; Hundal, Lakhwinder S.

    2011-01-01

    The recently discovered ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) have been suggested as contributors to the first step of nitrification in terrestrial ecosystems, a role that was previously assigned exclusively to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The current study assessed the effects of agricultural management, specifically amendment of soil with biosolids or synthetic fertilizer, on nitrification rates and copy numbers of archaeal and bacterial ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes. Anaerobically dige...

  12. 2007 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism and Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imke Schroeder

    2008-09-18

    The Archaea are a fascinating and diverse group of prokaryotic organisms with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of this GRC conference, 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology', expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting the evolution and composition of microbial communities and novel archaeal species, their impact on the environment, archaeal metabolism, and research that stems from sequence analysis of archaeal genomes. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple reputable areas with new scientific topics in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

  13. Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blow, M. J.; Deutschbauer, A. M.; Hoover, C. A.; Lamson, J.; Lamson, J.; Price, M. N.; Waters, J.; Wetmore, K. M.; Bristow, J.; Arkin, A. P.

    2013-03-20

    Bacteria and Archaea exhibit a huge diversity of metabolic capabilities with fundamental importance in the environment, and potential applications in biotechnology. However, the genetic bases of these capabilities remain unclear due largely to an absence of technologies that link DNA sequence to molecular function. To address this challenge, we are developing a pipeline for high throughput annotation of gene function using mutagenesis, growth assays and DNA sequencing. By applying this pipeline to annotate gene function in 50 diverse microbes we hope to discover thousands of new gene functions and produce a proof of principle `Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea?.

  14. Biochemistry and physiology of anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-18

    We welcome you to The Power of Anaerobes. This conference serves two purposes. One is to celebrate the life of Harry D. Peck, Jr.,who was born May 18, 1927 and would have celebrated his 73rd birthday at this conference. He died November 20, 1998. The second is to gather investigators to exchange views within the realm of anaerobic microbiology, an area in which tremendous progress has been seen during recent years. It is sufficient to mention discoveries of a new form of life (the archaea), hyper or extreme thermophiles, thermophilic alkaliphiles and anaerobic fungi. With these discoveries has come a new realization about physiological and metabolic properties of microorganisms, and this in turn has demonstrated their importance for the development, maintenance and sustenance of life on Earth.

  15. Anaerobic Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Ju, Mei-Ting; Li, Wei-Zun; Liu, Le; Wang, Yan-Nan; Chang, Chein-Chi

    2016-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2015 on the focus of Anaerobic Process. It is divided into the following sections. Pretreatment Organic waste Multiple-stage co-digestion Process Methodology and Technology. PMID:27620085

  16. Anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook I, Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 297. Stedman's Online ...

  17. Alpha- and Gammaproteobacterial Methanotrophs Codominate the Active Methane-Oxidizing Communities in an Acidic Boreal Peat Bog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esson, Kaitlin C; Lin, Xueju; Kumaresan, Deepak; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Murrell, J Colin; Kostka, Joel E

    2016-04-15

    The objective of this study was to characterize metabolically active, aerobic methanotrophs in an ombrotrophic peatland in the Marcell Experimental Forest, in Minnesota. Methanotrophs were investigated in the field and in laboratory incubations using DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP), expression studies on particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) genes, and amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Potential rates of oxidation ranged from 14 to 17 μmol of CH4g dry weight soil(-1)day(-1) Within DNA-SIP incubations, the relative abundance of methanotrophs increased from 4%in situto 25 to 36% after 8 to 14 days. Phylogenetic analysis of the(13)C-enriched DNA fractions revealed that the active methanotrophs were dominated by the generaMethylocystis(type II;Alphaproteobacteria),Methylomonas, andMethylovulum(both, type I;Gammaproteobacteria). In field samples, a transcript-to-gene ratio of 1 to 2 was observed forpmoAin surface peat layers, which attenuated rapidly with depth, indicating that the highest methane consumption was associated with a depth of 0 to 10 cm. Metagenomes and sequencing of cDNApmoAamplicons from field samples confirmed that the dominant active methanotrophs wereMethylocystisandMethylomonas Although type II methanotrophs have long been shown to mediate methane consumption in peatlands, our results indicate that members of the generaMethylomonasandMethylovulum(type I) can significantly contribute to aerobic methane oxidation in these ecosystems. PMID:26873322

  18. A laboratory-scale comparison of compost and sand--compost--perlite as methane-oxidizing biofilter media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philopoulos, Andrew; Ruck, Juliane; McCartney, Daryl; Felske, Christian

    2009-03-01

    Municipal solid waste landfills produce methane, a potent greenhouse gas. A treatment approach is to passively vent landfill gas through a methane-oxidizing biofilter medium, a porous substrate that facilitates the growth of methanotrophic bacteria. Two substrates, compost and a sand-compost-perlite (SCP) mixture, were evaluated in a laboratory-scale experiment for their suitability as biofilter media. The SCP mixture was investigated to minimize settlement and was based on a particle size distribution specification used for turf grass. The long-term (218 days) methane removal rates showed that both compost and SCP were capable of removing 100% of the methane influent flux (134 g CH(4) m( -2) day(-1)). The post-experiment analysis showed that compost had compacted more than SCP. This did not affect the results; however, in a field installation, traffic on the biofilter surface (e.g. maintenance) could cause further compaction and negatively affect performance. Exopolymeric substance produced by the methanotrophic bacteria, attributed by others for declining removal rates due to bio-clogging, was not observed to affect the results. The maximum exopolymeric substance values measured were 23.9 and 7.8 mg D-glucose g(-1) (dry basis) for compost and SCP, respectively.

  19. Importance of methane-oxidizing bacteria in the methane budget as revealed by the use of a specific inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.; Culbertson, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    METHANE is a greenhouse gas whose concentration in the atmosphere is increasing1-3 Much of this methane is derived from the metabolism of methane-generating (methanogenic) bacteria4,5, and over the past two decades much has been learned about the ecology of methanogens; specific inhibitors of methanogenesis, such as 2-bromoethanesulphonic acid, have proved useful in this regard6. In contrast, although much is known about the biochemistry of methane-oxidizing (methanotrophic) bacteria7, ecological investigations have been hampered by the lack of an analogous specific inhibitor6. Methanotrophs limit the flux of methane to the atmosphere from sediments8,9 and consume atmospheric methane10, but the quantitative importance of methanotrophy in the global methane budget is not well known5. Methylfluoride (CH3F) is known to inhibit oxygen consumption by Methylococcus capsulatus11, and to inhibit the oxidation of 14CH4 to 14CO2 by endosymbionts in mussel gill tissues12. Here we report that methylfluoride (MF) inhibits the oxidation of methane by methane monooxygenase, and by using methylfluoride in field investigations, we find that methanotrophic bacteria can consume more than 90% of the methane potentially available.

  20. Field-scale tracking of active methane-oxidizing communities in a landfill cover soil reveals spatial and seasonal variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneberger, Ruth; Chiri, Eleonora; Bodelier, Paul E L; Frenzel, Peter; Lüke, Claudia; Schroth, Martin H

    2015-05-01

    Aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) in soils mitigate methane (CH4 ) emissions. We assessed spatial and seasonal differences in active MOB communities in a landfill cover soil characterized by highly variable environmental conditions. Field-based measurements of CH4 oxidation activity and stable-isotope probing of polar lipid-derived fatty acids (PLFA-SIP) were complemented by microarray analysis of pmoA genes and transcripts, linking diversity and function at the field scale. In situ CH4 oxidation rates varied between sites and were generally one order of magnitude lower in winter compared with summer. Results from PLFA-SIP and pmoA transcripts were largely congruent, revealing distinct spatial and seasonal clustering. Overall, active MOB communities were highly diverse. Type Ia MOB, specifically Methylomonas and Methylobacter, were key drivers for CH4 oxidation, particularly at a high-activity site. Type II MOB were mainly active at a site showing substantial fluctuations in CH4 loading and soil moisture content. Notably, Upland Soil Cluster-gamma-related pmoA transcripts were also detected, indicating concurrent oxidation of atmospheric CH4 . Spatial separation was less distinct in winter, with Methylobacter and uncultured MOB mediating CH4 oxidation. We propose that high diversity of active MOB communities in this soil is promoted by high variability in environmental conditions, facilitating substantial removal of CH4 generated in the waste body.

  1. Protein Acetylation in Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Soppa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins can be acetylated at the alpha-amino group of the N-terminal amino acid (methionine or the penultimate amino acid after methionine removal or at the epsilon-amino group of internal lysines. In eukaryotes the majority of proteins are N-terminally acetylated, while this is extremely rare in bacteria. A variety of studies about N-terminal acetylation in archaea have been reported recently, and it was revealed that a considerable fraction of proteins is N-terminally acetylated in haloarchaea and Sulfolobus, while this does not seem to apply for methanogenic archaea. Many eukaryotic proteins are modified by differential internal acetylation, which is important for a variety of processes. Until very recently, only two bacterial proteins were known to be acetylation targets, but now 125 acetylation sites are known for E. coli. Knowledge about internal acetylation in archaea is extremely limited; only two target proteins are known, only one of which—Alba—was used to study differential acetylation. However, indications accumulate that the degree of internal acetylation of archaeal proteins might be underestimated, and differential acetylation has been shown to be essential for the viability of haloarchaea. Focused proteomic approaches are needed to get an overview of the extent of internal protein acetylation in archaea.

  2. Enrichment of denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria for application after direct low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampman, Christel, E-mail: christel.kampman@wur.nl [Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands); Hendrickx, Tim L.G. [Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands); Luesken, Francisca A.; Alen, Theo A. van; Op den Camp, Huub J.M.; Jetten, Mike S.M. [Department of Microbiology, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Zeeman, Grietje; Buisman, Cees J.N.; Temmink, Hardy [Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new concept for low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this concept, denitrification and methane oxidation are performed by Methylomirabilis oxyfera. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The bacteria were enriched from fresh water sediment using sequencing fed-batch reactors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The volumetric consumption rate has to be increased by an order of magnitude for practical application. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Further research should focus on systems with improved biomass retention. - Abstract: Despite many advantages of anaerobic sewage treatment over conventional activated sludge treatment, it has not yet been applied in temperate zones. This is especially because effluent from low-temperature anaerobic treatment contains nitrogen and dissolved methane. The presence of nitrogen and methane offers the opportunity to develop a reactor in which methane is used as electron donor for denitrification. Such a reactor could be used in a new concept for low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment, consisting of a UASB-digester system, a reactor for denitrification coupled to anaerobic methane oxidation, and a nitritation reactor. In the present study denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria similar to 'Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera' were enriched. Maximum volumetric nitrite consumption rates were 33.5 mg NO{sub 2}{sup -}-N/L d (using synthetic medium) and 37.8 mg NO{sub 2}{sup -}-N/L d (using medium containing effluent from a sewage treatment plant), which are similar to the maximum rate reported so far. Though the goal was to increase the rates, in both reactors, after reaching these maximum rates, volumetric nitrite consumption rates decreased in time. Results indicate biomass washout may have significantly decelerated enrichment. Therefore, to obtain higher volumetric consumption rates, further research should focus on systems with complete biomass

  3. Enrichment of denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria for application after direct low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A new concept for low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment is proposed. ► In this concept, denitrification and methane oxidation are performed by Methylomirabilis oxyfera. ► The bacteria were enriched from fresh water sediment using sequencing fed-batch reactors. ► The volumetric consumption rate has to be increased by an order of magnitude for practical application. ► Further research should focus on systems with improved biomass retention. - Abstract: Despite many advantages of anaerobic sewage treatment over conventional activated sludge treatment, it has not yet been applied in temperate zones. This is especially because effluent from low-temperature anaerobic treatment contains nitrogen and dissolved methane. The presence of nitrogen and methane offers the opportunity to develop a reactor in which methane is used as electron donor for denitrification. Such a reactor could be used in a new concept for low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment, consisting of a UASB-digester system, a reactor for denitrification coupled to anaerobic methane oxidation, and a nitritation reactor. In the present study denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria similar to ‘Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera’ were enriched. Maximum volumetric nitrite consumption rates were 33.5 mg NO2−-N/L d (using synthetic medium) and 37.8 mg NO2−-N/L d (using medium containing effluent from a sewage treatment plant), which are similar to the maximum rate reported so far. Though the goal was to increase the rates, in both reactors, after reaching these maximum rates, volumetric nitrite consumption rates decreased in time. Results indicate biomass washout may have significantly decelerated enrichment. Therefore, to obtain higher volumetric consumption rates, further research should focus on systems with complete biomass retention.

  4. A First Analysis of Metallome Biosignatures of Hyperthermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyllinniskii Cameron

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, no experimental data has been reported for the metallome of hyperthermophilic microorganisms although their metal requirements for growth are known to be unique. Here, experiments were conducted to determine (i cellular trace metal concentrations of the hyperthermophilic Archaea Methanococcus jannaschii and Pyrococcus furiosus, and (ii a first estimate of the metallome for these hyperthermophilic species via ICP-MS. The metal contents of these cells were compared to parallel experiments using the mesophilic bacterium Escherichia coli grown under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Fe and Zn were typically the most abundant metals in cells. Metal concentrations for E. coli grown aerobically decreased in the order Fe > Zn > Cu > Mo > Ni > W > Co. In contrast, M. jannaschii and P. furiosus show almost the reverse pattern with elevated Ni, Co, and W concentrations. Of the three organisms, a biosignature is potentially demonstrated for the methanogen M. jannaschii that may, in part, be related to the metallome requirements of methanogenesis. The bioavailability of trace metals more than likely has varied through time. If hyperthermophiles are very ancient, then the trace metal patterns observed here may begin to provide some insights regarding Earth's earliest cells and in turn, early Earth chemistry.

  5. Bioenergetic and physiological studies of hyperthermophilic archaea. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, R.M.

    1999-03-01

    This project focuses on physiological and bioenergetic characteristics of two representative hyperthermophilic archaea: Thermococcus litoralis (T{sub opt} 88 C) and Pyrococcus furiosus (T{sub opt} 98 C). Both are obligately anaerobic heterotrophs which grow in the presence or absence of reducible sulfur compounds. T. litoralis was studied in relation to information previously developed for P. furiosus: effect of sulfur reduction on bioenergetics, preferred fermentation patterns, tungsten requirement, etc. A defined medium was developed for T. litoralis consisting of amino acids, vitamins and nucleotides. This serves as the basis for continuous culture studies probing metabolic response to media changes. P. furiosus and T. litoralis have also been found to produce a polysaccharide in the presence of maltose and yeast extract. The composition and chemical structure of this polysaccharide was investigated as well as the metabolic motivation for its production. A novel and, perhaps, primitive intracellular proteolytic complex (previously designated as protease S66) in P. furiosus was isolated and the gene encoding the subunit of the complex was cloned, sequenced and the protease expressed in active form in Eschericia coli. Among other issues, the role of this complex in protein turnover and stress response was examined in the context of this organism in addition to comparing it to other complexes in eubacterial and eukaryotic cells. Biochemical characteristics of the protease have been measured in addition to examining other proteolytic species in P. furiosus.

  6. Halophilic archaea on Earth and in space: growth and survival under extreme conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Aharon

    2014-12-13

    Salts are abundant on Mars, and any liquid water that is present or may have been present on the planet is expected to be hypersaline. Halophilic archaea (family Halobacteriaceae) are the microorganisms best adapted to life at extremes of salinity on Earth. This paper reviews the properties of the Halobacteriaceae that may make the group good candidates for life also on Mars. Many species resist high UV and gamma radiation levels; one species has survived exposure to vacuum and radiation during a space flight; and there is at least one psychrotolerant species. Halophilic archaea may survive for millions of years within brine inclusions in salt crystals. Many species have different modes of anaerobic metabolism, and some can use light as an energy source using the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. They are also highly tolerant to perchlorate, recently shown to be present in Martian soils, and some species can even use perchlorate as an electron acceptor to support anaerobic growth. The presence of characteristic carotenoid pigments (α-bacterioruberin and derivatives) makes the Halobacteriaceae easy to identify by Raman spectroscopy. Thus, if present on Mars, such organisms may be detected by Raman instrumentation planned to explore Mars during the upcoming ExoMars mission. PMID:25368347

  7. The Function of Gas Vesicles in Halophilic Archaea and Bacteria: Theories and Experimental Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aharon Oren

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A few extremely halophilic Archaea (Halobacterium salinarum, Haloquadratum walsbyi, Haloferax mediterranei, Halorubrum vacuolatum, Halogeometricum borinquense, Haloplanus spp. possess gas vesicles that bestow buoyancy on the cells. Gas vesicles are also produced by the anaerobic endospore-forming halophilic Bacteria Sporohalobacter lortetii and Orenia sivashensis. We have extensive information on the properties of gas vesicles in Hbt. salinarum and Hfx. mediterranei and the regulation of their formation. Different functions were suggested for gas vesicle synthesis: buoying cells towards oxygen-rich surface layers in hypersaline water bodies to prevent oxygen limitation, reaching higher light intensities for the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, positioning the cells optimally for light absorption, light shielding, reducing the cytoplasmic volume leading to a higher surface-area-to-volume ratio (for the Archaea and dispersal of endospores (for the anaerobic spore-forming Bacteria. Except for Hqr. walsbyi which abounds in saltern crystallizer brines, gas-vacuolate halophiles are not among the dominant life forms in hypersaline environments. There only has been little research on gas vesicles in natural communities of halophilic microorganisms, and the few existing studies failed to provide clear evidence for their possible function. This paper summarizes the current status of the different theories why gas vesicles may provide a selective advantage to some halophilic microorganisms.

  8. Archaea: Evolution, Physiology, and Molecular Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    to honor the archaea pioneers Wolfram Zillig and Karl O. Stetter, the book provides a thorough survey of the field from its controversial beginnings to its ongoing expansion to include aspects of eukaryotic biology. The editors have assembled articles from the premier researchers in this rapidly burgeoning...... and technological context, and include accounts of cutting-edge research developments. The book spans archaeal evolution, physiology, and molecular and cellular biology and will be an essential reference for both graduate students and researchers....

  9. Comparative genomic analysis reveals 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complex lipoylation correlation with aerobiosis in archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill Borziak

    Full Text Available Metagenomic analyses have advanced our understanding of ecological microbial diversity, but to what extent can metagenomic data be used to predict the metabolic capacity of difficult-to-study organisms and their abiotic environmental interactions? We tackle this question, using a comparative genomic approach, by considering the molecular basis of aerobiosis within archaea. Lipoylation, the covalent attachment of lipoic acid to 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes (OADHCs, is essential for metabolism in aerobic bacteria and eukarya. Lipoylation is catalysed either by lipoate protein ligase (LplA, which in archaea is typically encoded by two genes (LplA-N and LplA-C, or by a lipoyl(octanoyl transferase (LipB or LipM plus a lipoic acid synthetase (LipA. Does the genomic presence of lipoylation and OADHC genes across archaea from diverse habitats correlate with aerobiosis? First, analyses of 11,826 biotin protein ligase (BPL-LplA-LipB transferase family members and 147 archaeal genomes identified 85 species with lipoylation capabilities and provided support for multiple ancestral acquisitions of lipoylation pathways during archaeal evolution. Second, with the exception of the Sulfolobales order, the majority of species possessing lipoylation systems exclusively retain LplA, or either LipB or LipM, consistent with archaeal genome streamlining. Third, obligate anaerobic archaea display widespread loss of lipoylation and OADHC genes. Conversely, a high level of correspondence is observed between aerobiosis and the presence of LplA/LipB/LipM, LipA and OADHC E2, consistent with the role of lipoylation in aerobic metabolism. This correspondence between OADHC lipoylation capacity and aerobiosis indicates that genomic pathway profiling in archaea is informative and that well characterized pathways may be predictive in relation to abiotic conditions in difficult-to-study extremophiles. Given the highly variable retention of gene repertoires across

  10. Biological conversion of biogas to methanol using methanotrophs isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Johnathon P; Ge, Xumeng; Li, Yueh-Fen; Yu, Zhongtang; Li, Yebo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate methanotrophs (methane oxidizing bacteria) that can directly convert biogas produced at a commercial anaerobic digestion (AD) facility to methanol. A methanotrophic bacterium was isolated from solid-state anaerobic digestate. The isolate had characteristics comparable to obligate methanotrophs from the genus Methylocaldum. This newly isolated methanotroph grew on biogas or purified CH4 and successfully converted biogas from AD to methanol. Methanol production was achieved using several methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) inhibitors and formate as an electron donor. The isolate also produced methanol using phosphate with no electron donor or using formate with no MDH inhibitor. The maximum methanol concentration (0.43±0.00gL(-1)) and 48-h CH4 to methanol conversion (25.5±1.1%) were achieved using biogas as substrate and a growth medium containing 50mM phosphate and 80mM formate. PMID:26630583

  11. Density-dependent enhancement of methane oxidation activity and growth of Methylocystis sp. by a non-methanotrophic bacterium Sphingopyxis sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Yeon Jeong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Methanotrophs are a biological resource as they degrade the greenhouse gas methane and various organic contaminants. Several non-methanotrophic bacteria have shown potential to stimulate growth of methanotrophs when co-cultured, and however, the ecology is largely unknown. Effects of Sphingopyxis sp. NM1 on methanotrophic activity and growth of Methylocystis sp. M6 were investigated in this study. M6 and NM1 were mixed at mixing ratios of 9:1, 1:1, and 1:9 (v/v, using cell suspensions of 7.5 × 1011 cells L−1. Methane oxidation of M6 was monitored, and M6 population was estimated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. Real-time PCR was applied to quantify rRNA and expression of transcripts for three enzymes involved in the methane oxidation pathway. NM1 had a positive effect on M6 growth at a 1:9 ratio (p < 0.05, while no significant effects were observed at 9:1 and 1:1 ratios. NM1 enhanced the methane oxidation 1.34-fold at the 1:9 ratio. NM1 increased the population density and relative rRNA level of M6 by 2.4-fold and 5.4-fold at the 1:9 ratio, indicating that NM1 stimulated the population growth of M6. NM1 increased the relative transcriptional expression of all mRNA targets only at the 1:9 ratio. These results demonstrated that NM1 enhanced the methanotrophic activity and growth of M6, which was dependent on the proportion of NM1 present in the culture. This stimulation can be used as management and enhancement strategies for methanotrophic biotechnological processes.

  12. Model-Based Feasibility Assessment of Membrane Biofilm Reactor to Achieve Simultaneous Ammonium, Dissolved Methane, and Sulfide Removal from Anaerobic Digestion Liquor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueming; Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) is proposed to achieve simultaneous removal of ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide from main-stream and side-stream anaerobic digestion liquors. To avoid dissolved methane stripping, oxygen is introduced through gas-permeable membranes, which also from the substratum for the growth of a biofilm likely comprising ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB), anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) bacteria, denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) microorganisms, aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB), and sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB). A mathematical model is developed and applied to assess the feasibility of such a system and the associated microbial community structure under different operational conditions. The simulation studies demonstrate the feasibility of achieving high-level (>97.0%), simultaneous removal of ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide in the MBfRs from both main-stream and side-stream anaerobic digestion liquors through adjusting the influent surface loading (or hydraulic retention time (HRT)) and the oxygen surface loading. The optimal HRT was found to be inversely proportional to the corresponding oxygen surface loading. Under the optimal operational conditions, AOB, DAMO bacteria, MOB, and SOB dominate the biofilm of the main-stream MBfR, while AOB, Anammox bacteria, DAMO bacteria, and SOB coexist in the side-stream MBfR to remove ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide simultaneously.

  13. Are termite mounds biofilters for methane? - Challenges and new approaches to quantify methane oxidation in termite mounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauer, Philipp A.; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Bristow, Mila; Arndt, Stefan K.

    2015-04-01

    Methane emissions from termites contribute around 3% to global methane in the atmosphere, although the total source estimate for termites is the most uncertain among all sources. In tropical regions, the relative source contribution of termites can be far higher due to the high biomass and relative importance of termites in plant decomposition. Past research focused on net emission measurements and their variability, but little is known about underlying processes governing these emissions. In particular, microbial oxidation of methane (MOX) within termite mounds has rarely been investigated. In well-studied ecosystems featuring an oxic matrix above an anoxic methane-producing habitat (e.g. landfills or sediments), the fraction of oxidized methane (fox) can reach up to 90% of gross production. However, conventional mass-balance approaches to apportion production and consumption processes can be challenging to apply in the complex-structured and almost inaccessible environment of a termite mound. In effect, all field-based data on termite-mound MOX is based on one study that measured isotopic shifts in produced and emitted methane. In this study a closed-system isotope fractionation model was applied and estimated fox ranged from 10% to almost 100%. However, it is shown here that by applying an open-system isotope-pool model, the measured isotopic shifts can also be explained by physical transport of methane alone. Different field-based methods to quantify MOX in termite mounds are proposed which do not rely on assumptions of physical gas transport. A simple approach is the use of specific inhibitors for MOX, e.g. difluoromethane (CH2F2), combined with chamber-based flux measurements before and after their application. Data is presented on the suitability of different inhibitors and first results of their application in the field. Alternatively, gas-tracer methods allow the quantification of methane oxidation and reaction kinetics without knowledge of physical gas

  14. Isotopic partitioning of net ecosystem CO2 exchange reveals the importance of methane oxidation in a boreal peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselquist, Niles; Peichl, Matthias; Öquist, Mats; Crill, Patrick; Nilsson, Mats

    2016-04-01

    the 13CO2 signature derives from a combination of SOM and pore water CH4 and applying a two-source mixing model, we found that roughly one-third of Rh was the result of methane oxidation whereas the remaining two-thirds came from the mineralization of SOM. Given that Rh represented ca. 50% of total Reco during the measurement period, we provide some of the first in situ measurements that highlight the important role methanotrophic bacteria may play in CO2 fluxes in a northern boreal peatland.

  15. Different methanotrophic potentials in stratified polar fjord waters (Storfjorden, Spitsbergen identified by using a combination of methane oxidation techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mau

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterially mediated aerobic methane oxidation (MOx is a key mechanism in controlling methane (CH4 emissions from the world's oceans to the atmosphere. In this study, we investigated MOx in the Arctic fjord Storfjorden (Spitsbergen by applying a combination of radio-tracer based incubation assays (3H-CH4 and 14H-CH4, stable C-CH4 isotope measurements, and molecular tools (16S rRNA DGGE-fingerprinting, pmoA- and mxaF gene analyses. Strofjorden is stratified in the summertime with melt water (MW in the upper 60 m of the water column, Arctic water (ArW between 60–100 m and brine-enriched shelf water (BSW down to 140 m. CH4 concentrations were supersaturated with respect to the atmospheric equilibrium (∼3 nM throughout the water column, increasing from ∼20 nM at the surface to a maximum of 72 nM at 60 m and decreasing below. MOx rate measurements at near in situ CH4 concentrations (here measured with 3H-CH4 raising the ambient CH4 pool by −1 at 60 m followed by a decrease in the deeper ArW/BSW. In contrast, rate measurements with 14H-CH4 at elevated CH4 concentrations (incubations were spiked with ∼450 nM of 14H-CH4, providing an estimate of the CH4 oxidation potential showed comparably low turnover rates (−1 at 60 m, but peaked in ArW/BSW at ∼100 m water depth, concomitant with increasing 14C-values in the residual CH4 pool. Our results indicate that the MOx community in the surface MW is adapted to relatively low CH4 concentrations. In contrast, the activity of the deep water MOx community is relatively low at the ambient, summertime CH4 concentrations but has the potential to increase rapidly in response to CH4 availability. A similar distinction between surface and deep water MOx is also suggested by our molecular analyses. Although, we found pmoA and maxF gene sequences throughout the water column attesting the ubiquitous presence of MOx communities in Storfjorden, deep water amplicons of pmoA and maxF were unusually long

  16. Anaerobic workout

    OpenAIRE

    McAdam, Ewan J.

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic technology cannot directly replace current wastewater treatment processes exclusively. The UASB reactor configuration removes slightly less organic carbon by comparison as the process relies on lamella separation for passive clarification rather than using fine pores like anMBR. By contrast, whilst anMBR can operate as a single unit process for organic carbon removal, the membrane surface has to be cleaned using gas sparging to limit surface deposition, which requires extra energy. ...

  17. Are There Rab GTPases in Archaea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surkont, Jaroslaw; Pereira-Leal, Jose B

    2016-07-01

    A complex endomembrane system is one of the hallmarks of Eukaryotes. Vesicle trafficking between compartments is controlled by a diverse protein repertoire, including Rab GTPases. These small GTP-binding proteins contribute identity and specificity to the system, and by working as molecular switches, trigger multiple events in vesicle budding, transport, and fusion. A diverse collection of Rab GTPases already existed in the ancestral Eukaryote, yet, it is unclear how such elaborate repertoire emerged. A novel archaeal phylum, the Lokiarchaeota, revealed that several eukaryotic-like protein systems, including small GTPases, are present in Archaea. Here, we test the hypothesis that the Rab family of small GTPases predates the origin of Eukaryotes. Our bioinformatic pipeline detected multiple putative Rab-like proteins in several archaeal species. Our analyses revealed the presence and strict conservation of sequence features that distinguish eukaryotic Rabs from other small GTPases (Rab family motifs), mapping to the same regions in the structure as in eukaryotic Rabs. These mediate Rab-specific interactions with regulators of the REP/GDI (Rab Escort Protein/GDP dissociation Inhibitor) family. Sensitive structure-based methods further revealed the existence of REP/GDI-like genes in Archaea, involved in isoprenyl metabolism. Our analysis supports a scenario where Rabs differentiated into an independent family in Archaea, interacting with proteins involved in membrane biogenesis. These results further support the archaeal nature of the eukaryotic ancestor and provide a new insight into the intermediate stages and the evolutionary path toward the complex membrane-associated signaling circuits that characterize the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, and specifically Rab proteins. PMID:27034425

  18. Contribution by the methanogenic endosymbionts of anaerobic ciliates to methane production in Dutch freshwater sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Alen, T.A.; Vogels, G.D.; Hackstein, J.H.P.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic methane contributes substantially to the atmospheric methane concentration and thus to global warming. This trace gas is predominantly produced by strictly anaerobic methanogenic archaea, which thrive in the most divergent ecological niches, e. g. paddy fields, sediments, landfills, and the

  19. Anaerobic biodegradability of macropollutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini

    2002-01-01

    A variety of test procedures for determination of anaerobic biodegradability has been reported. This paper reviews the methods developed for determination of anaerobic biodegradability of macro-pollutants. Anaerobic biodegradability of micro-pollutants is not included. Furthermore, factors import...

  20. Archaea: The First Domain of Diversified Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Caetano-Anollés

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the origin of diversified life has been plagued by technical and conceptual difficulties, controversy, and apriorism. It is now popularly accepted that the universal tree of life is rooted in the akaryotes and that Archaea and Eukarya are sister groups to each other. However, evolutionary studies have overwhelmingly focused on nucleic acid and protein sequences, which partially fulfill only two of the three main steps of phylogenetic analysis, formulation of realistic evolutionary models, and optimization of tree reconstruction. In the absence of character polarization, that is, the ability to identify ancestral and derived character states, any statement about the rooting of the tree of life should be considered suspect. Here we show that macromolecular structure and a new phylogenetic framework of analysis that focuses on the parts of biological systems instead of the whole provide both deep and reliable phylogenetic signal and enable us to put forth hypotheses of origin. We review over a decade of phylogenomic studies, which mine information in a genomic census of millions of encoded proteins and RNAs. We show how the use of process models of molecular accumulation that comply with Weston’s generality criterion supports a consistent phylogenomic scenario in which the origin of diversified life can be traced back to the early history of Archaea.

  1. Diurnally entrained anticipatory behavior in archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenia Whitehead

    Full Text Available By sensing changes in one or few environmental factors biological systems can anticipate future changes in multiple factors over a wide range of time scales (daily to seasonal. This anticipatory behavior is important to the fitness of diverse species, and in context of the diurnal cycle it is overall typical of eukaryotes and some photoautotrophic bacteria but is yet to be observed in archaea. Here, we report the first observation of light-dark (LD-entrained diurnal oscillatory transcription in up to 12% of all genes of a halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1. Significantly, the diurnally entrained transcription was observed under constant darkness after removal of the LD stimulus (free-running rhythms. The memory of diurnal entrainment was also associated with the synchronization of oxic and anoxic physiologies to the LD cycle. Our results suggest that under nutrient limited conditions halophilic archaea take advantage of the causal influence of sunlight (via temperature on O(2 diffusivity in a closed hypersaline environment to streamline their physiology and operate oxically during nighttime and anoxically during daytime.

  2. Swimming behavior of selected species of Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Bastian; Wirth, Reinhard

    2012-03-01

    The swimming behavior of Bacteria has been studied extensively, at least for some species like Escherichia coli. In contrast, almost no data have been published for Archaea on this topic. In a systematic study we asked how the archaeal model organisms Halobacterium salinarum, Methanococcus voltae, Methanococcus maripaludis, Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Methanocaldococcus villosus, Pyrococcus furiosus, and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius swim and which swimming behavior they exhibit. The two Euryarchaeota M. jannaschii and M. villosus were found to be, by far, the fastest organisms reported up to now, if speed is measured in bodies per second (bps). Their swimming speeds, at close to 400 and 500 bps, are much higher than the speed of the bacterium E. coli or of a very fast animal, like the cheetah, each with a speed of ca. 20 bps. In addition, we observed that two different swimming modes are used by some Archaea. They either swim very rapidly, in a more or less straight line, or they exhibit a slower kind of zigzag swimming behavior if cells are in close proximity to the surface of the glass capillary used for observation. We argue that such a "relocate-and-seek" behavior enables the organisms to stay in their natural habitat.

  3. Influence of Martian regolith analogs on the activity and growth of methanogenic archaea, with special regard to long-term desiccation

    OpenAIRE

    Schirmack, Janosch; Alawi, Mashal; Wagner, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea have been studied as model organisms for possible life on Mars for several reasons: they can grow lithoautotrophically by using hydrogen and carbon dioxide as energy and carbon sources, respectively; they are anaerobes; and they evolved at a time when conditions on early Earth are believed to have looked similar to those of early Mars. As Mars is currently dry and cold and as water might be available only at certain time intervals, any organism living on this planet would...

  4. Role of Mn2+ and Compatible Solutes in the Radiation Resistance of Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M. Webb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-myo-inositol phosphate in the radiation resistance of aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles. We found that the IR resistance of the thermophilic bacteria Rubrobacter xylanophilus and Rubrobacter radiotolerans was highly correlated to the accumulation of high intracellular concentration of trehalose in association with Mn, supporting the model of Mn2+-dependent ROS scavenging in the aerobes. In contrast, the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus gammatolerans and Pyrococcus furiosus did not contain significant amounts of intracellular Mn, and we found no significant antioxidant activity from mannosylglycerate and di-myo-inositol phosphate in vitro. We therefore propose that the low levels of IR-generated ROS under anaerobic conditions combined with highly constitutively expressed detoxification systems in these anaerobes are key to their radiation resistance and circumvent the need for the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes in the cell.

  5. Astrobiological studies with extremely halophilic Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendrihan, S.; Lotter, H. Stan

    2007-08-01

    Extremely halophilic Archaea were isolated and characterized by both classical and modern molecular biological methods from hypersaline and haloalkaline lakes, salted soils, solar salterns and rock salt deposits (1). The survival of these micro-organisms after embedding in laboratory-made halite was investigated. Their presence in fluid inclusions was demonstrated by staining with the BacLight LIVE/DEAD kit and observation of their fluorescence by microscopy. Following resuspension of cells from halite crystals, a survival of about 0.5 - 4% according to colony forming units was obtained. In previous studies which focussed on the resistance of halophilic archaea to UV radiation or the space environment, survival of a dose of 110 J/m2 (using liquid cultures) and up to 10 000 J/m2 at a range of 200 - 400 nm was reported, when dried Haloarcula sp. in a single layer were exposed on the Biopan facility (2). We exposed a few haloarchaeal strains to a Martian UV simulator lamp with a range of 200 - 400 nm and an intensity of 41.2 W/m2, obtaining a viability of about 51- 67% of cells following different exposure times. Other studies focus on the detection of haloarchaea in halite by Raman microspectroscopy and by NIR-FT-Raman spectroscopy, which are considered to be important future tools for Mars exploration (3). Using the Dilor XY Raman spectrometer with laser excitation at 514.5 nm, equipped with a confocal microscope BX40 (Olympus Corp., Japan) and a Bruker IFS 66 + FRA106 with laser excitation at 1064 nm (Bruker, Germany), instruments, we obtained characteristic carotenoid peaks contained by these microorganisms. 1. Fendrihan S., Legat A., Pfaffenhuemer M., Gruber C., Weidler G., Gerbl F. Stan Lotter H. (2006) Extremely halophilic archaea and the issue of long-term microbial survival. Review. Environ. Sci. Biotechnol. 5: 203-218. 2. Mancinelli R. L., White M. R., Rothschild L. J. (1998) Biopan survival I : exposure of the osmophiles Synechococcus sp. (Nägeli) and

  6. Non-linear dynamics of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures based on a biological kinetic model of aerobic enzymatic methane oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilin, Vasily A; Rytov, Sergey V; Shim, Natalia; Vogt, Carsten

    2016-06-01

    The non-linear dynamics of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures during methane oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria Methylosinus sporium strain 5 (NCIMB 11126) and Methylocaldum gracile strain 14 L (NCIMB 11912) under copper-rich (8.9 µM Cu(2+)), copper-limited (0.3 µM Cu(2+)) or copper-regular (1.1 µM Cu(2+)) conditions has been described mathematically. The model was calibrated by experimental data of methane quantities and carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures of methane measured previously in laboratory microcosms reported by Feisthauer et al. [ 1 ] M. gracile initially oxidizes methane by a particulate methane monooxygenase and assimilates formaldehyde via the ribulose monophosphate pathway, whereas M. sporium expresses a soluble methane monooxygenase under copper-limited conditions and uses the serine pathway for carbon assimilation. The model shows that during methane solubilization dominant carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation occurs. An increase of biomass due to growth of methanotrophs causes an increase of particulate or soluble monooxygenase that, in turn, decreases soluble methane concentration intensifying methane solubilization. The specific maximum rate of methane oxidation υm was proved to be equal to 4.0 and 1.3 mM mM(-1) h(-1) for M. sporium under copper-rich and copper-limited conditions, respectively, and 0.5 mM mM(-1) h(-1) for M. gracile. The model shows that methane oxidation cannot be described by traditional first-order kinetics. The kinetic isotope fractionation ceases when methane concentrations decrease close to the threshold value. Applicability of the non-linear model was confirmed by dynamics of carbon isotope signature for carbon dioxide that was depleted and later enriched in (13)C. Contrasting to the common Rayleigh linear graph, the dynamic curves allow identifying inappropriate isotope data due to inaccurate substrate concentration analyses. The non-linear model pretty adequately described experimental

  7. Assessment of hydrogen metabolism in commercial anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Tobias; Theiss, Juliane; Röske, Kerstin; Rother, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Degradation of biomass in the absence of exogenous electron acceptors via anaerobic digestion involves a syntrophic association of a plethora of anaerobic microorganisms. The commercial application of this process is the large-scale production of biogas from renewable feedstock as an alternative to fossil fuels. After hydrolysis of polymers, monomers are fermented to short-chain fatty acids and alcohols, which are further oxidized to acetate. Carbon dioxide, molecular hydrogen (H2), and acetate generated during the process are converted to methane by methanogenic archaea. Since many of the metabolic pathways as well as the syntrophic interactions and dependencies during anaerobic digestion involve formation, utilization, or transfer of H2, its metabolism and the methanogenic population were assessed in various samples from three commercial biogas plants. Addition of H2 significantly increased the rate of methane formation, which suggested that hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis is not a rate-limiting step during biogas formation. Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina appeared to numerically dominate the archaeal population of the three digesters, but their proportion and the Bacteria-to-Archaea ratio did not correlate with the methane productivity. Instead, hydrogenase activity in cell-free extracts from digester sludge correlated with methane productivity in a positive fashion. Since most microorganisms involved in biogas formation contain this activity, it approximates the overall anaerobic metabolic activity and may, thus, be suitable for monitoring biogas reactor performance. PMID:26995607

  8. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane Coupled to Nitrite Reduction by Halophilic Marine NC10 Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhanfei; Geng, Sha; Cai, Chaoyang; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Yan; Pan, Yawei; Lou, Liping; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xinhua; Hu, Baolan

    2015-08-15

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to nitrite reduction is a novel AOM process that is mediated by denitrifying methanotrophs. To date, enrichments of these denitrifying methanotrophs have been confined to freshwater systems; however, the recent findings of 16S rRNA and pmoA gene sequences in marine sediments suggest a possible occurrence of AOM coupled to nitrite reduction in marine systems. In this research, a marine denitrifying methanotrophic culture was obtained after 20 months of enrichment. Activity testing and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis were then conducted and showed that the methane oxidation activity and the number of NC10 bacteria increased correlatively during the enrichment period. 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that only bacteria in group A of the NC10 phylum were enriched and responsible for the resulting methane oxidation activity, although a diverse community of NC10 bacteria was harbored in the inoculum. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that NC10 bacteria were dominant in the enrichment culture after 20 months. The effect of salinity on the marine denitrifying methanotrophic culture was investigated, and the apparent optimal salinity was 20.5‰, which suggested that halophilic bacterial AOM coupled to nitrite reduction was obtained. Moreover, the apparent substrate affinity coefficients of the halophilic denitrifying methanotrophs were determined to be 9.8 ± 2.2 μM for methane and 8.7 ± 1.5 μM for nitrite. PMID:26048927

  9. Comparative studies of pelagic microbial methane oxidation within two anoxic basins of the central Baltic Sea (Gotland Deep and Landsort Deep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Jakobs

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pelagic methane oxidation was investigated in dependence on differing environmental conditions within the redox zone of the Gotland Deep (GD and Landsort Deep (LD, central Baltic Sea. The redox zone of both deeps, which indicates the transition between oxic and anoxic conditions, was characterized by a pronounced methane concentration gradient between the deep water (GD: 1233 nM, LD: 2935 nM and the surface water (GD and LD 13C CH4 enrichment (δ13C CH4 deep water: GD −84‰, LD −71‰ ; redox zone: GD −60‰, LD −20‰ ; δ13C CH4 vs. Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite standard, clearly indicating microbial methane consumption in that specific depth interval. Expression analysis of the methane monooxygenase identified one active type I methanotrophic bacterium in both redox zones. In contrast, the turnover of methane within the redox zones showed strong differences between the two basins (GD: max. 0.12 nM d–1 and LD: max. 0.61 nM d–1, with a four times higher turnover rate constant (k in the LD (GD: 0.0022 d–1, LD: 0.0079 d–1. Vertical mixing rates for both deeps were calculated on the base of the methane concentration profile and the consumption of methane in the redox zone (GD: 2.5 × 10–6 m2 s–1 LD: 1.6 × 10–5 m2 s–1. Our study identified vertical transport of methane from the deep water body towards the redox zone as well as differing hydrographic conditions within the oxic/anoxic transition zone of these deeps as major factors that determine the pelagic methane oxidation.

  10. Advances in the research of methane oxidation in forest soils%森林土壤氧化(吸收)甲烷研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓湘雯; 杨晶晶; 陈槐; 黄志宏; 项文化; 彭长辉

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is an important greenhouse gas, which is second only to carbon dioxide and about 25% contribution to global warming. Atmospheric methane can be oxidized by methanotrophic bacteria under aerobic condition. There are numerous reports of atmospheric CH4 oxidation and absorption in forest soils. Methanotrophic bacteria are a group of bacteria physiologically defined by their ability to use methane as sole source of carbon and energy for growth. However, it remains considerable uncertainty about the amounts of CH4 released from forest soils to the atmosphere, which depended on the abundance and relative activity of methanogenus and methanotrophic bacteria in forest ecosystems. Most studies have been focused on the environmental effects on the oxidizability and the biochemical properties of methanotrophic bacteria. The oxidation processes were a kind of high capacity and low affinity oxidation, affected by lots of factors, such as soil temperature, soil aeration, soil pH and nitrogen fertilizer. Generally, soil aeration was influenced by soil texture and soil moisture. And soil bulk density, soil structure and moisture were also influenced by land use types, and thereby affecting soil methane oxidation. Soil methane oxidation capacity also could be influenced by plants through changes in habitat or allelopathy. Few studies on soil animals, only termites in the emissions inventory is included in the global methane accounting. Starting from the classification of the methane-oxidizing bacteria, the methanotrophs on methane oxidation mechanism, the ecological distribution of the bacteria and methane oxidation factors, spatial and temporal heterogeneity, observation methods are reviewed. So, this review could provide a theoretical basis to correctly understand and accurately predict forest soil methane oxidation under the conditions of a certain type of climate and land use intensity.%甲烷是一种重要的温室气体,对全球气

  11. Bacterial community composition and abundance in leachate of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfills

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Bo Yue; Qi Wang; Zechun Huang; Qifei Huang; Zengqiang Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The abundance and phylogenetic composition of bacterial community in leachate of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfill were compared through real-time polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.In semi-aerobic landfill scenario,the bacterial 16S rRNA copy numbers in leachate had no significant reduction from initial stage to stable period.In the scenario of anaerobic landfill,the largest bacterial 16S rRNA gene copy number was found in leachate at initial stage,but it reduced significantly at stable period.Moreover,methane-oxidizing bacteria population in stable period was lower than that in initial period in both two landfill processes.However,semi-aerobic landfill leachate had more methanotrophic bacteria populations than that in the anaerobic one.Furthermore,according to the sequences and phylogenetic analysis,obvious difference could be detected in bacterial community composition in different scenarios.Proteobacteria and bacteroidetes took up a dominantly higher proportion in semi-aerobic landfill leachate.To summarize up,different landfill methods and its landfill ages had crucial impacts on bacterial abundance and composition in leachate of semi-aerobic and anaerobic landfills.

  12. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  13. Archaeal lipids and anaerobic oxidation of methane : A comparative study of the euxinic Black Sea and Cariaco Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Wakeham, S.G.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Black Sea and the Cariaco Basin are both large, euxinic marine basins in which methane concentrations are high and where anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is an important part of the carbon cycle. AOM can be recognized by lipid biomarkers that are specific to methanotrophic archaea involved a

  14. Experimental fossilisation of viruses from extremophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Orange

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of viruses at different stages of the origin of life has recently been reconsidered. It appears that viruses may have accompanied the earliest forms of life, allowing the transition from an RNA to a DNA world and possibly being involved in the shaping of tree of life in the three domains that we know presently. In addition, a large variety of viruses has been recently identified in extreme environments, hosted by extremophilic microorganisms, in ecosystems considered as analogues to those of the early Earth. Traces of life on the early Earth were preserved by the precipitation of silica on the organic structures. We present the results of the first experimental fossilisation by silica of viruses from extremophilic Archaea (SIRV2 – Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2, TPV1 – Thermococcus prieurii virus 1, and PAV1 – Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1. Our results confirm that viruses can be fossilised, with silica precipitating on the different viral structures (proteins, envelope over several months in a manner similar to that of other experimentally and naturally fossilised microorganisms. This study thus suggests that viral remains or traces could be preserved in the rock record although their identification may be challenging due to the small size of the viral particles.

  15. 2003 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism and Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard F. Shand

    2004-09-21

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2003 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism and Molecular Biology was held at Proctor Academy, Andover, NH from August 3-8, 2003. The Conference was well-attended with 150 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, ''free time'' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field. I want to personally thank you for your support of this Conference. As you know, in the interest of promoting the presentation of unpublished and frontier-breaking research, Gordon Research Conferences does not permit publication of meeting proceedings. If you wish any further details, please feel free to contact me. Thank you, Dr. Richard F. Shand, 2003 Conference Chair.

  16. A metagenomic study of methanotrophic microorganisms in Coal Oil Point seep sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Haverkamp Thomas HA; Håvelsrud Othilde; Kristensen Tom; Jakobsen Kjetill S; Rike Anne

    2011-01-01

    Background Methane oxidizing prokaryotes in marine sediments are believed to function as a methane filter reducing the oceanic contribution to the global methane emission. In the anoxic parts of the sediments, oxidation of methane is accomplished by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) living in syntrophy with sulphate reducing bacteria. This anaerobic oxidation of methane is assumed to be a coupling of reversed methanogenesis and dissimilatory sulphate reduction. Where ...

  17. Variability in aerobic methane oxidation over the past 1.2 Myrs recorded in microbial biomarker signatures from Congo fan sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Helen M.; Handley, Luke; Spencer-Jones, Charlotte L.; Dinga, Bienvenu Jean; Schefuß, Enno; Mann, Paul J.; Poulsen, John R.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; Wabakanghanzi, Jose N.; Wagner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Methane (CH4) is a strong greenhouse gas known to have perturbed global climate in the past, especially when released in large quantities over short time periods from continental or marine sources. It is therefore crucial to understand and, if possible, quantify the individual and combined response of these variable methane sources to natural climate variability. However, past changes in the stability of greenhouse gas reservoirs remain uncertain and poorly constrained by geological evidence. Here, we present a record from the Congo fan of a highly specific bacteriohopanepolyol (BHP) biomarker for aerobic methane oxidation (AMO), 35-aminobacteriohopane-30,31,32,33,34-pentol (aminopentol), that identifies discrete periods of increased AMO as far back as 1.2 Ma. Fluctuations in the concentration of aminopentol, and other 35-aminoBHPs, follow a pattern that correlates with late Quaternary glacial-interglacial climate cycles, with highest concentrations during warm periods. We discuss possible sources of aminopentol, and the methane consumed by the precursor methanotrophs, within the context of the Congo River setting, including supply of methane oxidation markers from terrestrial watersheds and/or marine sources (gas hydrate and/or deep subsurface gas reservoir). Compound-specific carbon isotope values of -30‰ to -40‰ for BHPs in ODP 1075 and strong similarities between the BHP signature of the core and surface sediments from the Congo estuary and floodplain wetlands from the interior of the Congo River Basin, support a methanotrophic and likely terrigenous origin of the 35-aminoBHPs found in the fan sediments. This new evidence supports a causal connection between marine sediment BHP records of tropical deep sea fans and wetland settings in the feeding river catchments, and thus tropical continental hydrology. Further research is needed to better constrain the different sources and pathways of methane emission. However, this study identifies the large potential

  18. A bioreactor approach to investigate the linkage between methane oxidation and nitrate/nitrite reduction in the pelagic oxic-anoxic transition zone of the central Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Jakobs

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of aerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification has been provided for different freshwater environments, whereas the significance of this process for the marine realm has not been adequately investigated. The goal of this study was to investigate the methane-related reduction of nitrate/nitrite in a marine environment (salinity 8.5. A water sample was collected from the oxic-anoxic transition zone of the Gotland Deep (central Baltic Sea and the microorganisms contained therein were cultivated in a bioreactor under hypoxic conditions (0.5 µM O2. To enrich the microorganisms involved in the coupled process the bioreactor was continuously sparged with methane as the sole energy and carbon source and simultaneously supplied with a nutrient solution rich in nitrate and nitrite. The bioreactor experiment showed a relationship between the turnover of methane and the concomitant concentration decrease of nitrite and nitrate at the early stage of the experiment. This relationship indicates the role of methanotrophs, which may support heterotrophic denitrifiers by the release of organic compounds as an energy source. Besides, a mixture of uncultured microorganisms, aerobic methanotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria were identified in the enrichment culture. Microbial incorporation of nitrite and methane was proven on the cellular and gene levels via 15NO2- / 13CH4 incubation experiments and subsequent analyses with nano secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS and stable isotope probing (SIP. The NanoSIMS showed the incorporation of 15N in almost all the bacteria and in 9% of those there was a concomitant enrichment in 13C. The relatively low abundance of methane-consuming bacteria in the bioreactor was further reflected in specific fatty acids indicative for type I methanotrophic bacteria. Based on pmoA gene analyses, this bacterium is different from the one that was identified as the only key player of methane oxidation in

  19. Environmental evidence for net methane production and oxidation in putative ANaerobic MEthanotrophic (ANME) archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lloyd, Karen; Teske, Andreas; Alperin, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    versus methane production in sediments from the White Oak River estuary, North Carolina. ANME-1 consistently transcribe 16S rRNA and mRNA of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA), the key gene for methanogenesis, up to 45 cm into methanogenic sediments. CARD-FISH shows that ANME-1 exist as single rod...

  20. Survival or revival: long-term preservation induces a reversible viable but non-culturable state in methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Hoefman

    Full Text Available Knowledge on long-term preservation of micro-organisms is limited and research in the field is scarce despite its importance for microbial biodiversity and biotechnological innovation. Preservation of fastidious organisms such as methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB has proven difficult. Most MOB do not survive lyophilization and only some can be cryopreserved successfully for short periods. A large-scale study was designed for a diverse set of MOB applying fifteen cryopreservation or lyophilization conditions. After three, six and twelve months of preservation, the viability (via live-dead flow cytometry and culturability (via most-probable number analysis and plating of the cells were assessed. All strains could be cryopreserved without a significant loss in culturability using 1% trehalose in 10-fold diluted TSB (TT as preservation medium and 5% DMSO as cryoprotectant. Several other cryopreservation and lyophilization conditions, all of which involved the use of TT medium, also allowed successful preservation but showed a considerable loss in culturability. We demonstrate here that most of these non-culturables survived preservation according to viability assessment indicating that preservation induces a viable but non-culturable (VBNC state in a significant fraction of cells. Since this state is reversible, these findings have major implications shifting the emphasis from survival to revival of cells in a preservation protocol. We showed that MOB cells could be significantly resuscitated from the VBNC state using the TT preservation medium.

  1. Proteorhodopsin lateral gene transfer between marine planktonic Bacteria and Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Martinez, Asuncion; Mincer, Tracy J;

    2006-01-01

    Planktonic Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya reside and compete in the ocean's photic zone under the pervasive influence of light. Bacteria in this environment were recently shown to contain photoproteins called proteorhodopsins, thought to contribute to cellular energy metabolism by catalysing light......-driven proton translocation across the cell membrane. So far, proteorhodopsin genes have been well documented only in proteobacteria and a few other bacterial groups. Here we report the presence and distribution of proteorhodopsin genes in Archaea affiliated with the order Thermoplasmatales, in the ocean......'s upper water column. The genomic context and phylogenetic relationships of the archaeal and proteobacterial proteorhodopsins indicate its probable lateral transfer between planktonic Bacteria and Archaea. About 10% of the euryarchaeotes in the photic zone contained the proteorhodopsin gene adjacent...

  2. Anaerobic oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Boetius, A.; Knittel, K.;

    2003-01-01

    At Hydrate Ridge (HR), Cascadia convergent margin, surface sediments contain massive gas hydrates formed from methane that ascends together with fluids along faults from deeper reservoirs. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by a microbial consortium of archaea and sulfate-reducing...... bacteria, generates high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in the surface sediments. The production of sulfide supports chemosynthetic communities that gain energy from sulfide oxidation. Depending on fluid flow, the surface communities are dominated either by the filamentous sulfur bacteria Beggiatoa...

  3. Laboratory-scale bioaugmentation relieves acetate accumulation and stimulates methane production in stalled anaerobic digesters

    OpenAIRE

    Town, Jennifer R.; Dumonceaux, Tim J.

    2015-01-01

    An imbalance between acidogenic and methanogenic organisms during anaerobic digestion can result in increased accumulation of volatile fatty acids, decreased reactor pH, and inhibition of methane-producing Archaea. Most commonly the result of organic input overload or poor inoculum selection, these microbiological and biochemical changes severely hamper reactor performance, and there are a few tools available to facilitate reactor recovery. A small, stable consortium capable of catabolizing a...

  4. Anaerobic digestion for simultaneous sewage sludge treatment and CO biomethanation: process performance and microbial ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Wang, Wen; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    in an anaerobic reactor was presented. Batch experiments showed that CO was inhibitory to methanogens, but not to bacteria, at CO partial pressure between 0.25 and 1 atm under thermophilic conditions. During anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge supplemented with CO added through a hollow fiber membrane (HFM....... However, the two species were distributed differently in the liquid phase and in the biofilm. Although carboxidotrophic activities test showed that CO was converted by both archaea and bacteria, the bacterial species responsible for CO conversion are unknown....

  5. Methane oxidation kinetics of bio-cover sewage sludge modified by coal ash for landfill%垃圾填埋场覆盖材料改性污泥的甲烷氧化动力学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹; 赵玲; 尹平河; 肖娟宜; 黄思明

    2012-01-01

    在实验室模拟条件下,以粉煤灰改性污泥为垃圾填埋场生物覆盖材料,分析了初始甲烷浓度、初始氧气浓度对甲烷氧化效率的影响,并测定了甲烷氧化动力学方程及动力学参数,旨在为材料实际工程应用提供理论依据.结果表明:初始CH4、O2浓度制约生物覆盖材料的甲烷氧化效率,初始CH4、O2浓度越高,材料甲烷氧化能力越强;甲烷氧化过程符合2级动力学方程-dV(CH4)/dt=kV(CH4)V(O2);利用Michaelis-Menten模型得出覆盖层材料的最大氧化速率Vmax为2.54 μmol g-1h-1,半速常数Km为0.49 μmol.%In this study, laboratory-scale experiments were carried out to examine the effects of initial methane and oxygen contents on methane oxidation efficiency in landfill bio-cover sewage sludge, and the kinetic equation and corresponding parameters were also determined, aiming to provide scientific basis for the practical engineering application. The results showed that the methane and oxygen contents strongly affected the methane oxidation efficiency. The higher methane and oxygen contents resulted in stronger methane oxidation efficiency. The kinetics of methane oxidation was - dV( CH4)/di = kV{ CH4 ) V( 02) , which fit the second-order reaction. As calculated from Michaelis-Menten equation, the largest methane oxidation rate ( Kmax ) was 2. 54 μmol g ‐ 1h‐ 1, and the half saturation constant ( Km ) was found at 0. 49 μmol.

  6. Hydrogen production by hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea: mechanisms for reductant disposal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaart, M.R.A.; Bielen, A.A.M.; Oost, van der J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Kengen, S.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen produced from biomass by bacteria and archaea is an attractive renewable energy source. However, to make its application more feasible, microorganisms are needed with high hydrogen productivities. For several reasons, hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea are pro

  7. Gender comparisons in anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity tests.

    OpenAIRE

    Maud, P. J.; Shultz, B B

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity test scores between young active men and women. Three performance measures of anaerobic power and two of anaerobic capacity were administered to a sample comprising 52 male and 50 female college students (means age = 21.4 yrs). Results indicated significant differences between men and women in body height, weight and per cent fat, in fat free mass (FFM), anaerobic power, and anaerobic capacity when recorded as gros...

  8. Microbial ecology of the stratified water column of the Black Sea as revealed by a comprehensive biomarker study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakeham, Stuart G.; Amann, Rudi; Freemann, Katherine H.;

    2007-01-01

    ) and sulfate reducing bacteria. We also measured a wide range of bacterial and archaeal lipid biomarkers. Depth distributions of diagnostic biomarkers are matched with zonation of microbial processes, including aerobic bacterial oxidation of methane, oxidation of ammonium by bacteria and archaea, metal...... reduction, and sulfide oxidation at the chemocline, and bacterial sulfate reduction and anaerobic oxidation of methane by archaea in the anoxic zone. Cell densities for archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria are estimated based on water column biomarker concentrations and compared with CARD-FISH results....

  9. In-Vitro Archaeacidal Activity of Biocides against Human-Associated Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Saber Khelaifia; Jean Michel Brunel; Michel Drancourt

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several methanogenic archaea have been detected in the human intestinal microbiota. These intestinal archaea may contaminate medical devices such as colonoscopes. However, no biocide activity has been reported among these human-associated archaea. METHODOLOGY: The minimal archaeacidal concentration (MAC) of peracetic acid, chlorhexidine, squalamine and twelve parent synthetic derivatives reported in this study was determined against five human-associated methanogenic archaea inclu...

  10. Hyperthermophilic archaea produce membrane vesicles that can transfer DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaudin, M.; Gauliard, E.; Schouten, S.; Houel-Renault, L.; Lenormand, P.; Marguet, E.; Forterre, P.

    2013-01-01

    Thermococcales are hyperthermophilic archaea found in deep-sea hydrothermal vents. They have been recently reported to produce membrane vesicles (MVs) into their culture medium. Here, we have characterized the mode of production and determined the biochemical composition of MVs from two species of T

  11. Molecular characterization of hydrolytic enzymes from hyperthermophilic archaea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorhorst, W.G.B.

    1998-01-01

    Hyperthermophiles are recently discovered microorganisms which are able to grow optimally above 85 °C. Most hyperthermophiles belong to the Archaea, the third domain of life. One of the main interests in hyperthermophiles to deepen the insight in the way their proteins are stabilized and how to appl

  12. Engineering of ß-glycosidases from hyperthermophilic Archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaper, T.

    2001-01-01

    Hyperthermophilic Archaea are microorganisms that grow optimally above 80°C. To be able to live at these temperature extremes their cell components display extreme resistance towards thermal degradation. This characteristic is an attractive feature for use of their

  13. On the Response of Halophilic Archaea to Space Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Leuko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are ubiquitous and can be found in almost every habitat and ecological niche on Earth. They thrive and survive in a broad spectrum of environments and adapt to rapidly changing external conditions. It is of great interest to investigate how microbes adapt to different extreme environments and with modern human space travel, we added a new extreme environment: outer space. Within the last 50 years, technology has provided tools for transporting microbial life beyond Earth’s protective shield in order to study in situ responses to selected conditions of space. This review will focus on halophilic archaea, as, due to their ability to survive in extremes, they are often considered a model group of organisms to study responses to the harsh conditions associated with space. We discuss ground-based simulations, as well as space experiments, utilizing archaea, examining responses and/or resistance to the effects of microgravity and UV in particular. Several halophilic archaea (e.g., Halorubrum chaoviator have been exposed to simulated and actual space conditions and their survival has been determined as well as the protective effects of halite shown. Finally, the intriguing potential of archaea to survive on other planets or embedded in a meteorite is postulated.

  14. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy reveals a convergence of the chemical composition in methanogenic archaea from a Siberian permafrost-affected soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Paloma; Hermelink, Antje; Lasch, Peter; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; König, Nicole; Burckhardt, Oliver; Wagner, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Methanogenic archaea are widespread anaerobic microorganisms responsible for the production of biogenic methane. Several new species of psychrotolerant methanogenic archaea were recently isolated from a permafrost-affected soil in the Lena Delta (Siberia, Russia), showing an exceptional resistance against desiccation, osmotic stress, low temperatures, starvation, UV and ionizing radiation when compared to methanogens from non-permafrost environments. To gain a deeper insight into the differences observed in their resistance, we described the chemical composition of methanogenic strains from permafrost and non-permafrost environments using confocal Raman microspectroscopy (CRM). CRM is a powerful tool for microbial identification and provides fingerprint-like information about the chemical composition of the cells. Our results show that the chemical composition of methanogens from permafrost-affected soils presents a high homology and is remarkably different from strains inhabiting non-permafrost environments. In addition, we performed a phylogenetic reconstruction of the studied strains based on the functional gene mcrA to prove the different evolutionary relationship of the permafrost strains. We conclude that the permafrost methanogenic strains show a convergent chemical composition regardless of their genotype. This fact is likely to be the consequence of a complex adaptive process to the Siberian permafrost environment and might be the reason underlying their resistant nature. PMID:26499486

  15. Anaerobic Digestion: Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Batstone, Damien J.

    2011-01-01

    with very little dry matter may also be called a digest. The digest should not be termed compost unless it specifically has been composted in an aerated step. This chapter describes the basic processes of anaerobic digestion. Chapter 9.5 describes the anaerobic treatment technologies, and Chapter 9...

  16. Anaerobic sludge granulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Castro Lopes, de S.I.; Lettinga, G.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews different theories on anaerobic sludge granulation in UASB-reactors that have been proposed during the past two decades
    This paper reviews different theories on anaerobic sludge granulation in UASB-reactors that have been proposed during the past two decades. The initial stage

  17. One step beyond a ribosome: The ancient anaerobic core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Filipa L; Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Martin, William F

    2016-08-01

    Life arose in a world without oxygen and the first organisms were anaerobes. Here we investigate the gene repertoire of the prokaryote common ancestor, estimating which genes it contained and to which lineages of modern prokaryotes it was most similar in terms of gene content. Using a phylogenetic approach we found that among trees for all 8779 protein families shared between 134 archaea and 1847 bacterial genomes, only 1045 have sequences from at least two bacterial and two archaeal groups and retain the ancestral archaeal-bacterial split. Among those, the genes shared by anaerobes were identified as candidate genes for the prokaryote common ancestor, which lived in anaerobic environments. We find that these anaerobic prokaryote common ancestor genes are today most frequently distributed among methanogens and clostridia, strict anaerobes that live from low free energy changes near the thermodynamic limit of life. The anaerobic families encompass genes for bifunctional acetyl-CoA-synthase/CO-dehydrogenase, heterodisulfide reductase subunits C and A, ferredoxins, and several subunits of the Mrp-antiporter/hydrogenase family, in addition to numerous S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) dependent methyltransferases. The data indicate a major role for methyl groups in the metabolism of the prokaryote common ancestor. The data furthermore indicate that the prokaryote ancestor possessed a rotor stator ATP synthase, but lacked cytochromes and quinones as well as identifiable redox-dependent ion pumping complexes. The prokaryote ancestor did possess, however, an Mrp-type H(+)/Na(+) antiporter complex, capable of transducing geochemical pH gradients into biologically more stable Na(+)-gradients. The findings implicate a hydrothermal, autotrophic, and methyl-dependent origin of life. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27150504

  18. Vertical stratification of bacteria and archaea in sediments of a boreal stratified humic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissanen, Antti J.; Mpamah, Promise; Peura, Sari; Taipale, Sami; Biasi, Christina; Nykänen, Hannu

    2015-04-01

    to 21 % of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons) and decreased gradually towards deeper layers while the relative abundances of Clostridiaceae and Peptostreptococcaceae started to increase at deeper depths, at 5 cm and 10 cm, respectively, both peaking at depth layer from 20 to 26 cm (Clostridiaceae up to 13 % and Peptostreptococcaceae up to 11 % of bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons). Methanogenic community was dominated by acetoclastic methanogens (genus Methanosaeta), which were most abundant at depth layer from sediment surface to 10 cm (up to 87 % of archaeal 16S rRNA gene amplicons) and decreased drastically until the depth of 18 cm having quite stable relative abundance from 18 to 26 cm (5 to 11 % of archaeal 16S rRNA gene amplicons). Hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanoregula, Methanolinea, Methanospirillum, Methanocella) (3 to 11 % of archaeal 16S rRNA gene amplicons) did not show any specific depth patterns. The proportion of methanotrophic microbes was very low and they consisted almost completely of type II methanotrophic bacteria (family Methylocystaceae), which had highest relative abundance at depth layer from 5 to 10 cm (up to 3 % of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons) and were almost absent below 15 cm. Anaerobic methanotrophic archaea were not detected. These findings will be discussed with results from PLFA and q-PCR analyses.

  19. Ammonia-oxidising archaea--physiology, ecology and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleper, Christa; Nicol, Graeme W

    2010-01-01

    Nitrification is a microbially mediated process that plays a central role in the global cycling of nitrogen and is also of economic importance in agriculture and wastewater treatment. The first step in nitrification is performed by ammonia-oxidising microorganisms, which convert ammonia into nitrite ions. Ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB) have been known for more than 100 years. However, metagenomic studies and subsequent cultivation efforts have recently demonstrated that microorganisms of the domain archaea are also capable of performing this process. Astonishingly, members of this group of ammonia-oxidising archaea (AOA), which was overlooked for so long, are present in almost every environment on Earth and typically outnumber the known bacterial ammonia oxidisers by orders of magnitudes in common environments such as the marine plankton, soils, sediments and estuaries. Molecular studies indicate that AOA are amongst the most abundant organisms on this planet, adapted to the most common environments, but are also present in those considered extreme, such as hot springs. The ecological distribution and community dynamics of these archaea are currently the subject of intensive study by many research groups who are attempting to understand the physiological diversity and the ecosystem function of these organisms. The cultivation of a single marine isolate and two enrichments from hot terrestrial environments has demonstrated a chemolithoautotrophic mode of growth. Both pure culture-based and environmental studies indicate that at least some AOA have a high substrate affinity for ammonia and are able to grow under extremely oligotrophic conditions. Information from the first available genomes of AOA indicate that their metabolism is fundamentally different from that of their bacterial counterparts, involving a highly copper-dependent system for ammonia oxidation and electron transport, as well as a novel carbon fixation pathway that has recently been discovered in

  20. Biodegradation of trichloroethylene and its anaerobic daughter products in freshwater wetland sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, M.M.; Olsen, L.D.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory microcosms were prepared under methanogenic, sulfate-reducing, and aerobic conditions using sediment and groundwater from a freshwater wetland that is a discharge area for a trichloroethylene (TCE) to evaluate potential biodegradation rates of TCE and its anaerobic daughter products (cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, trans-1,2-dichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride (VC)). Anaerobic degradation of TCE was about an order of magnitude faster under methanogenic conditions than under sulfate-reducing conditions. Both 12DCE and VC were found under sulfate-reducing conditions in the microcosms containing the wetland sediment, but their production, especially for VC, was substantially slower than under methanogenic conditions. Methane concentrations remained approximately constant (when losses in the formalin-amended controls are considered) in the microcosms amended with TCE and increased in the microcosms amended with the 12DCE isomers and VC during the first 18-25 days of incubation. The most rapid decrease in concentrations of TCE, cis-12DCE, trans-12DCE, and VC was found after aerobic methane-oxidizing conditions were definitely established.

  1. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  2. Widespread Disulfide Bonding in Proteins from Thermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Jorda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Disulfide bonds are generally not used to stabilize proteins in the cytosolic compartments of bacteria or eukaryotic cells, owing to the chemically reducing nature of those environments. In contrast, certain thermophilic archaea use disulfide bonding as a major mechanism for protein stabilization. Here, we provide a current survey of completely sequenced genomes, applying computational methods to estimate the use of disulfide bonding across the Archaea. Microbes belonging to the Crenarchaeal branch, which are essentially all hyperthermophilic, are universally rich in disulfide bonding while lesser degrees of disulfide bonding are found among the thermophilic Euryarchaea, excluding those that are methanogenic. The results help clarify which parts of the archaeal lineage are likely to yield more examples and additional specific data on protein disulfide bonding, as increasing genomic sequencing efforts are brought to bear.

  3. Microbial anaerobic methane cycling in the subseafloor at the Von Damm hydrothermal vent field, Mid-Cayman Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, J. A.; Reveillaud, J. C.; Stepanauskas, R.; McDermott, J. M.; Sylva, S. P.; Seewald, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Mid-Cayman Rise (MCR) is Earth's deepest and slowest spreading mid-ocean ridge located in the western Caribbean. With an axial rift valley floor at a depth of ~4200-6500 m, it represents one of the deepest sections of ridge crest worldwide. In 2009, the world's deepest hydrothermal vents (Piccard at 4960 m) and an ultramafic-influenced system only 20 km away on top of an oceanic core complex (Von Damm at 2350 m) were discovered along the MCR. Each site is hosted in a distinct geologic setting with different thermal and chemical regimes. The Von Damm site is a particularly interesting location to examine chemolithoautotrophic subseafloor microbial communities due to the abundant hydrogen, methane, and organic compounds in the venting fluids. Here, we used a combination of stable isotope tracing, next-generation sequencing, and single cell techniques to determine the identity, activity, and genomic repertoire of subseafloor anaerobic archaea involved in methane cycling in hydrothermal fluids venting at the Von Damm site. Molecular sequencing of phylogenetic marker genes revealed the presence of diverse archaea that both generate and consume methane across a geochemical and thermal spectrum of vents. Stable isotope tracing experiments were used to detect biological utilization of formate and dissolved inorganic carbon, and methane generation at 70 °C under anaerobic conditions. Results indicate that methanogenesis with formate as a substrate is occurring at 70 °C at two Von Damm sites, Ginger Castle and the Main Orifice. The results are consistent with thermodynamic predictions for carbon speciation at the temperatures encountered at the ultramafic-hosted Von Damm, where formate is predicted to be thermodynamically stable, and may thus serve as a an important source of carbon. Diverse thermophilic methanogenic archaea belonging to the genera Methanothermococcus were detected at all vent sites with both 16S rRNA tag sequencing and single cell sorting. Other

  4. Classification of Bacteria and Archaea: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleifer, Karl Heinz

    2009-12-01

    The late 19th century was the beginning of bacterial taxonomy and bacteria were classified on the basis of phenotypic markers. The distinction of prokaryotes and eukaryotes was introduced in the 1960s. Numerical taxonomy improved phenotypic identification but provided little information on the phylogenetic relationships of prokaryotes. Later on, chemotaxonomic and genotypic methods were widely used for a more satisfactory classification. Archaea were first classified as a separate group of prokaryotes in 1977. The current classification of Bacteria and Archaea is based on an operational-based model, the so-called polyphasic approach, comprised of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic data, as well as phylogenetic information. The provisional status Candidatus has been established for describing uncultured prokaryotic cells for which their phylogenetic relationship has been determined and their authenticity revealed by in situ probing. The ultimate goal is to achieve a theory-based classification system based on a phylogenetic/evolutionary concept. However, there are currently two contradictory opinions about the future classification of Bacteria and Archaea. A group of mostly molecular biologists posits that the yet-unclear effect of gene flow, in particular lateral gene transfer, makes the line of descent difficult, if not impossible, to describe. However, even in the face of genomic fluidity it seems that the typical geno- and phenotypic characteristics of a taxon are still maintained, and are sufficient for reliable classification and identification of Bacteria and Archaea. There are many well-defined genotypic clusters that are congruent with known species delineated by polyphasic approaches. Comparative sequence analysis of certain core genes, including rRNA genes, may be useful for the characterization of higher taxa, whereas various character genes may be suitable as phylogenetic markers for the delineation of lower taxa. Nevertheless, there may still be

  5. Diversity of Ammonia Oxidizing Archaea in Tropical Compost Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vidya eDe Gannes; Gaius eEudoxie; Dyer, David H.; William James Hickey

    2012-01-01

    Composting is widely used to transform waste materials into valuable agricultural products. In the tropics, large quantities of agricultural wastes could be potentially useful in agriculture after composting. However, while microbiological processes of composts in general are well established, relatively little is known about microbial communities that may be unique to these in tropical systems, particularly nitrifiers. The recent discovery of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) has changed the p...

  6. Global Ecological Pattern of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Huiluo Cao; Jean-Christophe Auguet; Ji-Dong Gu

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The global distribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), which play a pivotal role in the nitrification process, has been confirmed through numerous ecological studies. Though newly available amoA (ammonia monooxygenase subunit A) gene sequences from new environments are accumulating rapidly in public repositories, a lack of information on the ecological and evolutionary factors shaping community assembly of AOA on the global scale is apparent. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: We condu...

  7. Stable Carbon Isotope Fractionation by Methylotrophic Methanogenic Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Penger, Jörn; Conrad, Ralf; Blaser, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In natural environments methane is usually produced by aceticlastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaea. However, some methanogens can use C1 compounds such as methanol as the substrate. To determine the contributions of individual substrates to methane production, the stable-isotope values of the substrates and the released methane are often used. Additional information can be obtained by using selective inhibitors (e.g., methyl fluoride, a selective inhibitor of acetoclastic methanoge...

  8. Evolution of DNA replication protein complexes in eukaryotes and Archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Chia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The replication of DNA in Archaea and eukaryotes requires several ancillary complexes, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, replication factor C (RFC, and the minichromosome maintenance (MCM complex. Bacterial DNA replication utilizes comparable proteins, but these are distantly related phylogenetically to their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts at best. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While the structures of each of the complexes do not differ significantly between the archaeal and eukaryotic versions thereof, the evolutionary dynamic in the two cases does. The number of subunits in each complex is constant across all taxa. However, they vary subtly with regard to composition. In some taxa the subunits are all identical in sequence, while in others some are homologous rather than identical. In the case of eukaryotes, there is no phylogenetic variation in the makeup of each complex-all appear to derive from a common eukaryotic ancestor. This is not the case in Archaea, where the relationship between the subunits within each complex varies taxon-to-taxon. We have performed a detailed phylogenetic analysis of these relationships in order to better understand the gene duplications and divergences that gave rise to the homologous subunits in Archaea. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This domain level difference in evolution suggests that different forces have driven the evolution of DNA replication proteins in each of these two domains. In addition, the phylogenies of all three gene families support the distinctiveness of the proposed archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota.

  9. Expansion of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinke, Christian; Sczyrba, Alex; Malfatti, Stephanie; Lee, Janey; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Hallam, Steven; Inskeep, William P.; Hedlund, Brian P.; Sievert, Stefan M.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Tsiamis, George; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-06-02

    To date the vast majority of bacterial and archaeal genomes sequenced are of rather limited phylogenetic diversity as they were chosen based on their physiology and/ or medical importance. The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project (Wu et al. 2009) is aimed at systematically filling the gaps of the tree of life with phylogenetically diverse reference genomes. However more than 99 percent of microorganisms elude current culturing attempts, severely limiting the ability to recover complete or even partial genomes of these largely mysterious species. These limitations gave rise to the GEBA uncultured project. Here we propose to use single cell genomics to massively expand the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea by targeting 80 single cell representatives of uncultured candidate phyla which have no or very few cultured representatives. Generating these reference genomes of uncultured microbes will dramatically increase the discovery rate of novel protein families and biological functions, shed light on the numerous underrepresented phyla that likely play important roles in the environment, and will assist in improving the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of Bacteria and Archaea. Moreover, these data will improve our ability to interpret metagenomics sequence data from diverse environments, which will be of tremendous value for microbial ecology and evolutionary studies to come.

  10. Expansion of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinke, Christian; Sczyrba, Alex; Malfatti, Stephanie; Lee, Janye; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Hallam, Steven; Inskeep, William P.; Hedlund, Brian P.; Sievert, Stefan M.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Tsiamis, George; Hugenholtz, Philip; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-03-20

    To date the vast majority of bacterial and archaeal genomes sequenced are of rather limited phylogenetic diversity as they were chosen based on their physiology and/ or medical importance. The Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea (GEBA) project (Wu et al. 2009) is aimed to systematically filling the gaps of the tree of life with phylogenetically diverse reference genomes. However more than 99percent of microorganisms elude current culturing attempts, severely limiting the ability to recover complete or even partial genomes of these largely mysterious species. These limitations gave rise to the GEBA uncultured project. Here we propose to use single cell genomics to massively expand the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea by targeting 80 single cell representatives of uncultured candidate phyla which have no or very few cultured representatives. Generating these reference genomes of uncultured microbes will dramatically increase the discovery rate of novel protein families and biological functions, shed light on the numerous underrepresented phyla that likely play important roles in the environment, and will assist in improving the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of Bacteria and Archaea. Moreover, these data will improve our ability to interpret metagenomics sequence data from diverse environments, which will be of tremendous value for microbial ecology and evolutionary studies to come.

  11. Carotenoid Production by Halophilic Archaea Under Different Culture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegari-Santos, Rossana; Diogo, Ricardo Alexandre; Fontana, José Domingos; Bonfim, Tania Maria Bordin

    2016-05-01

    Carotenoids are pigments that may be used as colorants and antioxidants in food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. Since they also benefit human health, great efforts have been undertaken to search for natural sources of carotenoids, including microbial ones. The optimization of culture conditions to increase carotenoid yield is one of the strategies used to minimize the high cost of carotenoid production by microorganisms. Halophilic archaea are capable of producing carotenoids according to culture conditions. Their main carotenoid is bacterioruberin with 50 carbon atoms. In fact, the carotenoid has important biological functions since it acts as cell membrane reinforcement and it protects the microorganism against DNA damaging agents. Moreover, carotenoid extracts from halophilic archaea have shown high antioxidant capacity. Therefore, current review summarizes the effect of different culture conditions such as salt and carbon source concentrations in the medium, light incidence, and oxygen tension on carotenoid production by halophilic archaea and the strategies such as optimization methodology and two-stage cultivation already used to increase the carotenoid yield of these microorganisms. PMID:26750123

  12. Anaerobic Methyl tert-Butyl Ether-Degrading Microorganisms Identified in Wastewater Treatment Plant Samples by Stable Isotope Probing

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Weimin; Sun, Xiaoxu; Cupples, Alison M.

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) degradation potential was investigated in samples from a range of sources. From these 22 experimental variations, only one source (from wastewater treatment plant samples) exhibited MTBE degradation. These microcosms were methanogenic and were subjected to DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) targeted to both bacteria and archaea to identify the putative MTBE degraders. For this purpose, DNA was extracted at two time points, subjected to ultracentrif...

  13. Diverse electron sources support denitrification under hypoxia in the obligate methanotroph Methylomicrobium album strain BG8

    OpenAIRE

    Kits, K. Dimitri; Campbell, Dustin J.; Rosana, Albert R.; Stein, Lisa Y.

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) are a diverse group of microorganisms that are ubiquitous in natural environments. Along with anaerobic MOB and archaea, aerobic methanotrophs are critical for attenuating emission of methane to the atmosphere. Clearly, nitrogen availability in the form of ammonium and nitrite have strong effects on methanotrophic activity and their natural community structures. Previous findings show that nitrite amendment inhibits the activity of some cultivated meth...

  14. Simulation model for oxygen consumption flux and prediction of methane oxidation in landfill cover soil%覆盖层氧气消耗通量模型及甲烷氧化能力预测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢志林; 赵天涛; 陈新安; 车轮; 张丽杰; 全学军

    2015-01-01

    填埋场覆盖层生物气扩散规律和甲烷氧化能力的评估是甲烷减排研究的重要组成部分。以数值模拟方法分析了氧气在覆盖层中的扩散规律,得到了指数方程形式的氧气扩散模型(R2范围0.8941~0.9975);通过检测有机碳和甲烷浓度变化进一步考察了模拟覆盖层不同深度的甲烷氧化能力,证实了在0.05~0.25 m范围内甲烷氧化活性最高;以Fick定律和轴向扩散模型推导了模拟覆盖层中氧气消耗通量模型,该模型计算得到的氧气消耗通量与覆盖层中微生物甲烷氧化经验方程相比无显著差异;结合以上模型推演出覆盖层甲烷消耗通量模型,与实际检测值相比,预测结果理想(R2=0.9983)。该成果可为揭示填埋场覆盖层生物气扩散规律、强化甲烷氧化能力以及预测甲烷排放提供新的思路和理论依据。%Diffusion process of biogas and evaluation of methane oxidation in landfill cover soil are important parts of research on methane emission. Diffusion process of oxygen in landfill cover soil was analyzed by simulation, and an oxygen diffusion model fitted by exponential equation (0.8941methane oxidation in different landfill cover depths was also investigated by analyzing organic carbon and monitoring methane concentration. The most intensive methane oxidation occurred at the layer of 0.05—0.25 m. An oxygen consumption flux model in landfill cover was derived on the basis of Fick’s law and axial dispersion model. There was no significant difference between fitted values by oxygen consumption flux model and derived values by empirical equation of biological methane oxidation. Based on the above model, a methane consumption flux model was derived finally, and the prediction was consistent with detection. These results provided new ideas and theoretical basis for revealing biogas diffusion process in landfill cover soil

  15. Anaerobic Fungi: A Potential Source of Biological H2 in the Oceanic Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Schnürer, Anna; Bengtson, Stefan; Neubeck, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The recent recognition of fungi in the oceanic igneous crust challenges the understanding of this environment as being exclusively prokaryotic and forces reconsiderations of the ecology of the deep biosphere. Anoxic provinces in the igneous crust are abundant and increase with age and depth of the crust. The presence of anaerobic fungi in deep-sea sediments and on the seafloor introduces a type of organism with attributes of geobiological significance not previously accounted for. Anaerobic fungi are best known from the rumen of herbivores where they produce molecular hydrogen, which in turn stimulates the growth of methanogens. The symbiotic cooperation between anaerobic fungi and methanogens in the rumen enhance the metabolic rate and growth of both. Methanogens and other hydrogen-consuming anaerobic archaea are known from subseafloor basalt; however, the abiotic production of hydrogen is questioned to be sufficient to support such communities. Alternatively, biologically produced hydrogen could serve as a continuous source. Here, we propose anaerobic fungi as a source of bioavailable hydrogen in the oceanic crust, and a close interplay between anaerobic fungi and hydrogen-driven prokaryotes. PMID:27433154

  16. Anaerobic fungi: a potential source of biological H2 in the oceanic crust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus eIvarsson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent recognition of fungi in the oceanic igneous crust challenges the understanding of this environment as being exclusively prokaryotic and forces reconsiderations of the ecology of the deep biosphere. Anoxic provinces in the igneous crust are abundant and increase with age and depth of the crust. The presence of anaerobic fungi in deep-sea sediments and on the seafloor introduces a type of organism with attributes of geobiological significance not previously accounted for. Anaerobic fungi are best known from the rumen of herbivores where they produce molecular hydrogen, which in turn stimulates the growth of methanogens. The symbiotic cooperation between anaerobic fungi and methanogens in the rumen enhance the metabolic rate and growth of both. Methanogens and other hydrogen-consuming anaerobic archaea are known from subseafloor basalt; however, the abiotic production of hydrogen is questioned to be sufficient to support such communities. Alternatively, biologically produced hydrogen could serve as a continuous source. Here we propose anaerobic fungi as a source of bioavailable hydrogen in the oceanic crust, and a close interplay between anaerobic fungi and hydrogen-driven prokaryotes.

  17. Microbial community analysis of ambient temperature anaerobic digesters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciotola, R. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Food, Agriculture and Biological Engineering

    2010-07-01

    This paper reported on a study in which designs for Chinese and Indian fixed-dome anaerobic digesters were modified in an effort to produce smaller and more affordable digesters. While these types of systems are common in tropical regions of developing countries, they have not been used in colder climates because of the low biogas yield during the winter months. Although there is evidence that sufficient biogas production can be maintained in colder temperatures through design and operational changes, there is a lack of knowledge about the seasonal changes in the composition of the microbial communities in ambient temperature digesters. More knowledge is needed to design and operate systems for maximum biogas yield in temperate climates. The purpose of this study was to cultivate a microbial community that maximizes biogas production at psychrophilic temperatures. The study was conducted on a 300 gallon experimental anaerobic digester on the campus of Ohio State University. Culture-independent methods were used on weekly samples collected from the digester in order to examine microbial community response to changes in ambient temperature. Microbial community profiles were established using universal bacterial and archaeal primers that targeted the 16S rRNA gene. In addition to the methanogenic archaea, this analysis also targeted some of the other numerically and functionally important microbial taxa in anaerobic digesters, such as hydrolytic, fermentative, acetogenic and sulfate reducing bacteria. According to preliminary results, the composition of the microbial community shifts with changes in seasonal temperature.

  18. Archaea in metazoan diets: implications for food webs and biogeochemical cycling

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew R Thurber; Levin, Lisa A.; Orphan, Victoria J.; Marlow, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Although the importance of trophic linkages, including ‘top-down forcing’, on energy flow and ecosystem productivity is recognized, the influence of metazoan grazing on Archaea and the biogeochemical processes that they mediate is unknown. Here, we test if: (1) Archaea provide a food source sufficient to allow metazoan fauna to complete their life cycle; (2) neutral lipid biomarkers (including crocetane) can be used to identify Archaea consumers; and (3) archaeal aggregates are a dietary sour...

  19. Understanding DNA Repair in Hyperthermophilic Archaea: Persistent Gaps and Other Reasons to Focus on the Fork

    OpenAIRE

    Grogan, Dennis W.

    2015-01-01

    Although hyperthermophilic archaea arguably have a great need for efficient DNA repair, they lack members of several DNA repair protein families broadly conserved among bacteria and eukaryotes. Conversely, the putative DNA repair genes that do occur in these archaea often do not generate the expected phenotype when deleted. The prospect that hyperthermophilic archaea have some unique strategies for coping with DNA damage and replication errors has intellectual and technological appeal, but re...

  20. Exploring the diversity of extremely halophilic archaea in food-grade salts

    OpenAIRE

    Henriet, O.; Fourmentin, J.; Delincé, B.; Mahillon, J

    2014-01-01

    Salting is one of the oldest means of food preservation: adding salt decreases water activity and inhibits microbial development. However, salt is also a source of living bacteria and archaea. The occurrence and diversity of viable archaea in this extreme environment were assessed in 26 food-grade salts from worldwide origin by cultivation on four culture media. Additionally, metagenomic analysis of 16S rRNA gene was performed on nine salts. Viable archaea were observed in 14 salts and colony...

  1. Vertical distribution of methane oxidation and methanotrophic response to elevated methane concentrations in stratified waters of the Arctic fjord Storfjorden (Svalbard, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mau

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterially mediated aerobic methane oxidation (MOx is a key mechanism in controlling methane (CH4 emissions from the world's oceans to the atmosphere. In this study, we investigated MOx in the Arctic fjord Storfjorden (Svalbard by applying a combination of radio-tracer-based incubation assays (3H-CH4 and 14C-CH4, stable C-CH4 isotope measurements, and molecular tools (16S rRNA gene Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE fingerprinting, pmoA- and mxaF gene analyses. Storfjorden is stratified in the summertime with melt water (MW in the upper 60 m of the water column, Arctic water (ArW between 60 and 100 m, and brine-enriched shelf water (BSW down to 140 m. CH4 concentrations were supersaturated with respect to the atmospheric equilibrium (about 3–4 nM throughout the water column, increasing from ∼20 nM at the surface to a maximum of 72 nM at 60 m and decreasing below. MOx rate measurements at near in situ CH4 concentrations (here measured with 3H-CH4 raising the ambient CH4 pool by −1 at 60 m, followed by a decrease in the deeper ArW/BSW. In contrast, rate measurements with 14C-CH4 (incubations were spiked with ∼450 nM of 14C-CH4, providing an estimate of the CH4 oxidation at elevated concentration showed comparably low turnover rates (−1 at 60 m, and peak rates were found in ArW/BSW at ∼100 m water depth, concomitant with increasing 13C values in the residual CH4 pool. Our results indicate that the MOx community in the surface MW is adapted to relatively low CH4 concentrations. In contrast, the activity of the deep-water MOx community is relatively low at the ambient, summertime CH4 concentrations but has the potential to increase rapidly in response to CH4 availability. A similar distinction between surface and deep-water MOx is also suggested by our molecular analyses. The DGGE banding patterns of 16S rRNA gene fragments of the surface MW and deep water were clearly different. A DGGE band related to the known type I MOx

  2. Archaea: From Genomics to Physiology and the Origin of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vothknecht, Ute C.; Tumbula, Debra L.

    1999-01-01

    This document represents a report on a meeting about Archaea. The meeting had an unusually diversified mix of topics all related to Archaea highlighting their differences and similarities with other kingdoms of life. Thus, a large number of scientists from others areas of biology participated in this conference. One-third of the speakers (11 of 33) represented laboratories whose main interests have not been archaea and who have not previously participated in similar symposia or workshops. Thus, this symposium provided a unique opportunity for archaeal researchers to interact in a wider forum. Because of the broad range of topics covered, the conference also introduced many of the participants to new areas of archaeal research. The discussions of genomics, molecular mechanisms of transcription, metabolic pathways and evolution were at a very high level. Talks and posters provided detailed discussions of the state of the current knowledge in RNA processing, transcriptional initiation, chromatin structure, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, autotrophic CO2 fixation, Upid biosynthesis and a wide range of other topics. In addition to providing overviews, major areas of scientific argument were clearly delineated, particularly in the discussions of genomics and evolution. Some of the questions raised included: how representative are individual gene trees of organismal evolution, how prevalent is horizontal evolution, how reliable are functional assignments in genomics? On these topics, the different points of view were well represented. The future of any field depends on the enthusiasm and intellectual engagement of young scientists working in the area. Therefore, the participation of 29 graduate and postdoctoral students (out of about 135 participants) was a highlight of the meeting. This was the consequence of funding contributions by NSF and NASA.

  3. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löscher, C. R.; Kock, A.; Könneke, M.; LaRoche, J.; Bange, H. W.; Schmitz, R. A.

    2012-07-01

    The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA) over their bacterial counterparts (AOB) in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) that occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been reported to produce N2O. Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA) were detectable throughout the water column of the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) and eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) Oceans. Particularly in the ETNA, comparable patterns of abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes and N2O co-occurred in the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved oxygen in the ocean.

  4. Microbial Community Response to Seasonal Temperature Variation in a Small-Scale Anaerobic Digester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Michel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Bacterial and Archaeal communities in a 1.14 m3 ambient temperature anaerobic digester treating dairy cow manure were investigated using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP and direct sequencing of the cloned polymerase chain reaction (PCR products. Results indicate shifts in the structure of the both the Archaeal and Bacterial communities coincided with digester re-inoculation as well as temperature and loading rate changes. Following re-inoculation of the sour digester, the predominant Archaea shifted from Methanobrevibacter to Methanosarcina, which was the most abundant Archaea in the inoculum. Methonosarcina was replaced by Methanosaeta after the resumption of digester loading in the summer of 2010. Methanosaeta began to decline in abundance as the digester temperature cooled in the fall of 2010 while Methanobrevibacter increased in abundance. The microbial community rate of change was variable during the study period, with the most rapid changes occurring after re-inoculation.

  5. Influence of co-substrates in the anaerobic degradation of an anionic surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Y. Okada

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The removal of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS was evaluated in a UASB reactor using short-chain alcohols (ethanol and methanol and complex co-substrate (yeast extract. Using only methanol and ethanol as co-substrates resulted in removal of LAS between 30 and 41%. At the end, addition of a complex substrate (yeast extract increased the removal of LAS to 50%. During the assay, water supply aeration increased the volatile fatty acid of the effluent (70 mg HAc.L-1 and decreased the removal of LAS (from 40 to 30%. According to the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH results, the amount of Archaea decreased due to water supply aeration (from 64 to 48%. Furthermore, addition of complex co-substrate increased the total anaerobic bacteria and methanogenic archaea content (three and four log units, respectively, which were estimated using the most probable number technique.

  6. The effects of space relevant environmental factors on halophilic Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuko, Stefan; Moeller, Ralf; Rettberg, Petra

    Within the last 50 years, space technology has provided tools for transporting terrestrial (microbial) life beyond Earth's protective shield in order to study its responses to selected conditions of space. Microorganisms are ubiquitous and can be found in almost every environment on Earth. They thrive and survive in a broad spectrum of environments and are true masters in adapting to rapidly changing external conditions. Although microorganisms cannot actively grow under the harsh conditions of outer space or other known planets, some microorganisms might be able to survive for a time in space or other planets as dormant, inactive spores or in similar desiccation-resistant resting states, e.g., enclosed in halite crystals or biofilms. Halite crystals are the realm of halophilic Archaea as they have adapted to life at extreme salt concentrations. They can stay entrapped in such crystals for millions of years without losing viability and therefore the family Halobacteriaceae belongs to the group of microorganisms which may survive space travel or may even be found on other planets. Several members of this family have been utilized in space relevant experiments where they were exposed to detrimental environmental conditions such as UV-C radiation, vacuum, temperature cycles (+60(°) C and -25(°) C) and heavy iron bombardment (150 MeV He, 500 MeV Ar and 500 MeV Fe ions). The viability was evaluated by colony forming unit (cfu) counts as well as with the LIFE/DEAD kit. Results revealed that UV-C radiation (up to 1.000 J/m (2) ) has a considerable effect on the viability, whereas the other tested parameters inflict little damage onto the organisms. Repair of UV-C inflicted damage is efficient and several DNA damage repair genes are up-regulated following exposure. Halophilic archaea display a strong resistance against heavy iron bombardment, with dosages of up to 2.000 Gy 500 MeV Fe ions needed to establish a visible effect on the vitality. Genomic integrity after

  7. Purine biosynthesis in archaea: variations on a theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Anne M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to perform de novo biosynthesis of purines is present in organisms in all three domains of life, reflecting the essentiality of these molecules to life. Although the pathway is quite similar in eukaryotes and bacteria, the archaeal pathway is more variable. A careful manual curation of genes in this pathway demonstrates the value of manual curation in archaea, even in pathways that have been well-studied in other domains. Results We searched the Integrated Microbial Genome system (IMG for the 17 distinct genes involved in the 11 steps of de novo purine biosynthesis in 65 sequenced archaea, finding 738 predicted proteins with sequence similarity to known purine biosynthesis enzymes. Each sequence was manually inspected for the presence of active site residues and other residues known or suspected to be required for function. Many apparently purine-biosynthesizing archaea lack evidence for a single enzyme, either glycinamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase or inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase, suggesting that there are at least two more gene variants in the purine biosynthetic pathway to discover. Variations in domain arrangement of formylglycinamidine ribonucleotide synthetase and substantial problems in aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase and inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase assignments were also identified. Manual curation revealed some overly specific annotations in the IMG gene product name, with predicted proteins without essential active site residues assigned product names implying enzymatic activity (21 proteins, 2.8% of proteins inspected or Enzyme Commission (E. C. numbers (57 proteins, 7.7%. There were also 57 proteins (7.7% assigned overly generic names and 78 proteins (10.6% without E.C. numbers as part of the assigned name when a specific enzyme name and E. C. number were well-justified. Conclusions The patchy distribution of purine biosynthetic genes in archaea is

  8. Seasonal Variation on Microbial Community and Methane Production during Anaerobic Digestion of Cattle Manure in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Juliana Alves; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Bonnafous, Anaïs; Arcuri, Pedro Braga; Silva, Vânia Lúcia; Otenio, Marcelo Henrique; Diniz, Cláudio Galuppo

    2016-04-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an alternative method for the treatment of animal manure and wastewater. The anaerobic bioconversion of biomass requires a multi-step biological process, including microorganisms with distinct roles. The diversity and composition of microbial structure in pilot-scale anaerobic digestion operating at ambient temperature in Brazil were studied. Influence of the seasonal and temporal patterns on bacterial and archaeal communities were assessed by studying the variations in density, dynamic and diversity and structure. The average daily biogas produced in the summer and winter months was 18.7 and 16 L day(-1), respectively, and there was no difference in the average methane yield. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that no differences in abundances and dynamics were found for bacterial communities and the total number of Archaea in different seasons. Analysis of bacterial clone libraries revealed a predominance of Firmicutes (54.5 %/summer and 46.7 %/winter) and Bacteroidetes (31.4 %/summer and 44.4 %/winter). Within the Archaea, the phylum Euryarchaeota was predominant in both digesters. Phylogenetic distribution showed changes in percentage between the phyla identified, but no alterations were recorded in the quality and amount of produced methane or community dynamics. The results may suggest that redundancy of microbial groups may have occurred, pointing to a more complex microbial community in the ecosystem related to this ambient temperature system.

  9. Methane oxidation with in situ enhanced facultative bacteria from aged-refuse%矿化垃圾中兼性营养菌原位强化甲烷氧化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵天涛; 张云茹; 张丽杰; 全学军; 彭绪亚

    2012-01-01

    引言好氧甲烷氧化菌在新陈代谢上具有独一无二的特性:它们能够利用甲烷和其他一碳化合物作为唯一碳源和能源.这类微生物最典型的特点是利用甲烷单加氧酶( MMO,methane monooxygenase)催化甲烷氧化为甲醇[1].长时间来,所有的甲烷氧化菌都被认为是专一营养的,即它们无法利用含有碳碳键的化合物生长.%Facultative methanotrophs can utilize methane as well as multi-carbon compounds, including organic acids and carbohydrates. Facultative methanotrophs from aged-refuse were enhanced in situ to overcome the limitations of methane oxidation by existing landfill covers. Methanotrophs from oligotrophic aged-refuse had a better environmental tolerance by analysis of scanning electron microscope (SEM). These bacteria could enrich quickly in the presence of carbon source. However, the methane-oxidation capability could not be improved if only adding carbohydrates or nitrate mineral salts (NMS) medium alone. Compound acclimation of facultative methanotrophs were carried out by NMS medium and glucose/ starch. After a delay period of 7-9 d, methane consumption came into a logarithmic growth period, which indicated that facultative methanotrophs had strong biological activity and high substrate competitive advantage. Metabolic pathways of facultative methanotrophs were modified by adding NMS medium, and methane could be utilized despite the presence of other carbon sources. The activity of facultative methanotrophs was enhanced by low concentration of chloroform. Oxidation rate of methane reached 0. 114 ml·d-1·g-1 as the concentration of chloroform was 50 mg·L-1. The problems about the engineering application of obligate methanotrophs were overcome due to the discovery of the new method, and the results would have important implication for understanding the methane-oxidizing bacteria and the factors controlling methane fluxes in the environment.

  10. Complex community of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation bacteria in coastal sediments of the Mai Po wetland by PCR amplification of both 16S rRNA and pmoA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Zhou, Zhichao; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, both 16S rRNA and pmoA gene-based PCR primers were employed successfully to study the diversity and distribution of n-damo bacteria in the surface and lower layer sediments at the coastal Mai Po wetland. The occurrence of n-damo bacteria in both the surface and subsurface sediments with high diversity was confirmed in this study. Unlike the two other known n-damo communities from coastal areas, the pmoA gene-amplified sequences in the present work clustered not only with some freshwater subclusters but also within three newly erected marine subclusters mostly, indicating the unique niche specificity of n-damo bacteria in this wetland. Results suggested vegetation affected the distribution and community structures of n-damo bacteria in the sediments and n-damo could coexist with sulfate-reducing methanotrophs in the coastal ecosystem. Community structures of the Mai Po n-damo bacteria based on 16S rRNA gene were different from those of either the freshwater or the marine. In contrast, structures of the Mai Po n-damo communities based on pmoA gene grouped with the marine ones and were clearly distinguished from the freshwater ones. The abundance of n-damo bacteria at this wetland was quantified using 16S rRNA gene PCR primers to be 2.65-6.71 × 10(5) copies/g dry sediment. Ammonium and nitrite strongly affected the community structures and distribution of n-damo bacteria in the coastal Mai Po wetland sediments.

  11. Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchman, David L. [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States)

    2012-03-29

    The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (Methane in the Arctic Shelf or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (metagenomes ). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in

  12. A comparative genomic analysis of energy metabolism in sulfate reducing bacteria and archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês A. C. ePereira

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The number of sequenced genomes of sulfate-reducing organisms (SRO has increased significantly in the recent years, providing an opportunity for a broader perspective into the energy metabolism of such organisms. In this work we carried out a comparative survey of energy metabolism genes found in twenty-five available genomes of SRO. This analysis revealed a higher diversity of possible energy conserving pathways than classically considered to be present in these organisms, and permitted the identification of new proteins not known to be present in this group. The Deltaproteobacteria (and Thermodesulfovibrio yellowstonii are characterized by a large number of cytochromes c and cytochrome c-associated membrane redox complexes, indicating that periplasmic electron transfer pathways are important in these bacteria. The Archaea and Clostridia groups contain practically no cytochromes c or associated membrane complexes. However, despite the absence of a periplasmic space, a few extracytoplasmic membrane redox proteins were detected in the Gram-positive bacteria. Several ion-translocating complexes were detected in SRO including H+-pyrophosphatases, complex I homologues, Rnf and Ech/Coo hydrogenases. Furthermore, we found evidence that cytoplasmic electron bifurcating mechanisms, recently described for other anaerobes, are also likely to play an important role in energy metabolism of SRO. A number of cytoplasmic [NiFe] and [FeFe] hydrogenases, formate dehydrogenases and heterodisulfide reductase-related proteins are likely candidates to be involved in energy coupling through electron bifurcation, from diverse electron donors such as H2, formate, pyruvate, NAD(PH, β-oxidation and others. In conclusion, this analysis indicates that energy metabolism of SRO is far more versatile than previously considered, and that both chemiosmotic and flavin-based electron bifurcating mechanisms provide alternative strategies for energy conservation.

  13. Anaerobic bacteria in otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulghum, R S; Daniel, H J; Yarborough, J G

    1977-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria, Peptostrepotococcus intermedius and Propionibacterium acnes, were found in mixed culture specimens from four to ten tested cases of chronic secretory otitis media. These anaerobic bacteria were in a mixed infection flora with aerobic bacteria most often Staphylococcus epidermidis and Cornybacterium sp. which do not fit any established species. The findings of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media is consistent with the sporadic report of the involvement of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media in the literature since 1898.

  14. CRISPR loci reveal networks of gene exchange in archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodt Avital

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CRISPR (Clustered, Regularly, Interspaced, Short, Palindromic Repeats loci provide prokaryotes with an adaptive immunity against viruses and other mobile genetic elements. CRISPR arrays can be transcribed and processed into small crRNA molecules, which are then used by the cell to target the foreign nucleic acid. Since spacers are accumulated by active CRISPR/Cas systems, the sequences of these spacers provide a record of the past "infection history" of the organism. Results Here we analyzed all currently known spacers present in archaeal genomes and identified their source by DNA similarity. While nearly 50% of archaeal spacers matched mobile genetic elements, such as plasmids or viruses, several others matched chromosomal genes of other organisms, primarily other archaea. Thus, networks of gene exchange between archaeal species were revealed by the spacer analysis, including many cases of inter-genus and inter-species gene transfer events. Spacers that recognize viral sequences tend to be located further away from the leader sequence, implying that there exists a selective pressure for their retention. Conclusions CRISPR spacers provide direct evidence for extensive gene exchange in archaea, especially within genera, and support the current dogma where the primary role of the CRISPR/Cas system is anti-viral and anti-plasmid defense. Open peer review This article was reviewed by: Profs. W. Ford Doolittle, John van der Oost, Christa Schleper (nominated by board member Prof. J Peter Gogarten

  15. Assessing methane oxidation under landfill covers and its contribution to the above atmospheric CO2 levels: The added value of the isotope (δ13C and δ18O CO2; δ13C and δD CH4) approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Comparison of the isotope and mass balance approaches to evaluate the level of methane oxidation within a landfill. ► The level of methane oxidation is not homogenous under the landfill cover and is strongly correlated to the methane flux. ► Isotope tracking of the contribution of the methane oxidation to the CO2 concentrations in the ambient air. - Abstract: We are presenting here a multi-isotope approach (δ13C and δ18O of CO2; δ13C and δD of CH4) to assess (i) the level(s) of methane oxidation during waste biodegradation and its migration through a landfill cover in Sonzay (France), and (ii) its contribution to the atmospheric CO2 levels above the surface. The isotope approach is compared to the more conventional mass balance approach. Results from the two techniques are comparable and show that the CH4 oxidation under the landfill cover is heterogenous, with low oxidation percentages in samples showing high biogas fluxes, which was expected in clay covers presenting fissures, through which CH4 is rapidly transported. At shallow depth, more immobile biogas pockets show a higher level of CH4 oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria. δ13C of CO2 samples taken at different heights (from below the cover up to 8 m above the ground level) were also used to identify and assess the relative contributions of its main sources both under the landfill cover and in the surrounding atmosphere.

  16. The anaerobic digestion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, C.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Boone, D.R. [Oregon Graduate Inst., Portland, OR (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  17. Anaerobic biotransformation of estrogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czajka, Cynthia P. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Londry, Kathleen L. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada)]. E-mail: londryk@cc.umanitoba.ca

    2006-08-31

    Estrogens are important environmental contaminants that disrupt endocrine systems and feminize male fish. We investigated the potential for anaerobic biodegradation of the estrogens 17-{alpha}-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) in order to understand their fate in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Cultures were established using lake water and sediment under methanogenic, sulfate-, iron-, and nitrate-reducing conditions. Anaerobic degradation of EE2 (added at 5 mg/L) was not observed in multiple trials over long incubation periods (over three years). E2 (added at 5 mg/L) was transformed to estrone (E1) under all four anaerobic conditions (99-176 {mu}g L{sup -1} day{sup -1}), but the extent of conversion was different for each electron acceptor. The oxidation of E2 to E1 was not inhibited by E1. Under some conditions, reversible inter-conversion of E2 and E1 was observed, and the final steady state concentration of E2 depended on the electron-accepting condition but was independent of the total amount of estrogens added. In addition, racemization occurred and E1 was also transformed to 17-{alpha}-estradiol under all but nitrate-reducing conditions. Although E2 could be readily transformed to E1 and in many cases 17-{alpha}-estradiol under anaerobic conditions, the complete degradation of estrogens under these conditions was minimal, suggesting that they would accumulate in anoxic environments.

  18. A comprehensive study into the molecular methodology and molecular biology of methanogenic Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, M.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2001-01-01

    Methanogens belong to the kingdom of Euryarchaeota in the domain of Archaea. The Archaea differ from Bacteria in many aspects important to molecular work. Among these are cell wall composition, their sensitivity to antibiotics, their translation and transcription machinery, and their very strict ...

  19. Linking carbon and nitrogen cycling: Environmental transcription of mmoX, pmoA, and nifH by methane oxidizing Proteobacteria in a Sub-Arctic palsa peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebner, Susanne; Svenning, Mette M.

    2013-04-01

    Sub-Arctic terrestrial ecosystems are currently affected by climate change which causes degradation of stored organic carbon and emissions of greenhouse gases from microbial processes. Methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB) mitigate methane emissions and perform an important function in the soil-atmosphere interaction. In this study we investigated presence and environmental transcription of functional genes of MOB along the degradation of permafrost in a Sub-Arctic palsa peatland using molecular approaches. The acidic and oligotrophic peatland hosts a small number of active MOB among a seemingly specialized community. The methanotrophic community displayed a broad functional potential by transcribing genes for key enzymes involved in both carbon and nitrogen metabolisms including particulate and soluble methane monoogygenase (pMMO and sMMO) as well as nitrogenase. Transcription of mmoX that encodes for a subunit of the sMMO suggests an ecological importance of sMMO with a broad substrate range in this peatland. In situ transcripts of mmoX were tracked mainly to Methylocella related Beijerinckiaceae, and to relatives of Methylomonas while Methylocystis constituting the dominant group which utilizes pMMO. These results address interesting questions concerning in-situ substrate preferences of MOB, and the general importance of species that lack a pMMO for mitigating methane emissions. The importance of MOB for the nitrogen budget in this low pH, nitrogen limited habitat was identified by nifH transcripts of native methanotrophs. Hence, methane oxidizing Proteobacteria show an extended functional repertoire and importance for the biogeochemical cycling in this dynamic ecosystem of degrading permafrost.

  20. Anaerobic biological treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Enso-Fenox process has been very successfully used to remove chlorinated phenolic compounds from pulp bleaching effluents. It is a two-stage anaerobic/aerobic process consisting of a nonmethanogenic anaerobic fluidized bed followed by a trickling filter. Studies have been conducted on reductive dechlorination of chlorinated aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions with chlorinated phenols as the sole carbon and energy source. Approximately 40% of the added chlorophenols was converted to CH4 and CO2. Substrate loading rates were 20 mg/L/d at hydraulic detention times of 2-4 days with 90% substrate conversion efficiency. Reductive dechlorination of mono, di-, tri-, and pentachlorophenols has been demonstrated in anaerobic sewage sludge. The following constituents were tested in the laboratory at their approximate concentrations in coal conversion wastewater (CCWW) and were anaerobically degraded in serum bottles: 1,000 mg/L phenol; 500 mg/L resorcinol; 1,000 mg/L benzoic acid; 500 mg/L p-cresol; 200 mg/L pyridine; 2,000 mg/L benzoic acid; 250 mg/L 40 methylcatechol; 500 mg/L 4-ethylpyridine; and 2,000 mg/L hexanoic acid. A petrochemical may initially exhibit toxicity to an unacclimated population of methane-fermenting bacteria, but with acclimation the toxicity may be greatly reduced or disappear. In addition, the microorganisms may develop the capacity to actually degrade compounds which showed initial toxicity. Since biomass digestion requires a complete consortium of bacteria, it is relevant to study the effect of a given process as well as to individual steps within the process. A toxicant can inhibit the rate-limiting step and/or change the step that is rate-limiting. Both manifestations of toxicity can severely affect the overall process

  1. Enhancing anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by pretreatment: effect of volatile to total solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Duan, Xu; Chen, Jianguang; Fang, Kuo; Feng, Leiyu; Yan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Qi

    2016-06-01

    In this study the effect of volatile to total solids (VS/TS) on anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) pretreated by alkaline, thermal and thermal-alkaline strategies was studied. Experimental results showed that the production of methane from sludge was increased with VS/TS. When anaerobic digesters were fed with sludge pretreated by the thermal-alkaline method, the average methane yield was improved from 2.8 L/d at VS/TS 0.35 to 4.7 L/d at VS/TS 0.56. Also, the efficiency of VS reduction during sludge anaerobic digestion varied between 18.9% and 45.6%, and increased gradually with VS/TS. Mechanism investigation of VS/TS on WAS anaerobic digestion suggested that the general activities of anaerobic microorganisms, activities of key enzymes related to sludge hydrolysis, acidification and methanogenesis, and the ratio of Archaea to Bacteria were all increased with VS/TS, showing good agreement with methane production. PMID:26698921

  2. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Löscher

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA over their bacterial counterparts (AOB in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O that occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been reported to produce N2O.

    Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA were detectable throughout the water column of the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA and eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP Oceans. Particularly in the ETNA, comparable patterns of abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes and N2O co-occurred in the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved

  3. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Loescher

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA over their bacterial counterparts (AOB in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O which occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been described to produce N2O. Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA were detectable throughout the water column of the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic (ETNA and Eastern Tropical South Pacific Oceans (ETSP. Particularly in the ETNA, maxima in abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes correlated with the N2O maximum and the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved oxygen

  4. Global ecological pattern of ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiluo Cao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The global distribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA, which play a pivotal role in the nitrification process, has been confirmed through numerous ecological studies. Though newly available amoA (ammonia monooxygenase subunit A gene sequences from new environments are accumulating rapidly in public repositories, a lack of information on the ecological and evolutionary factors shaping community assembly of AOA on the global scale is apparent. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: We conducted a meta-analysis on uncultured AOA using over ca. 6,200 archaeal amoA gene sequences, so as to reveal their community distribution patterns along a wide spectrum of physicochemical conditions and habitat types. The sequences were dereplicated at 95% identity level resulting in a dataset containing 1,476 archaeal amoA gene sequences from eight habitat types: namely soil, freshwater, freshwater sediment, estuarine sediment, marine water, marine sediment, geothermal system, and symbiosis. The updated comprehensive amoA phylogeny was composed of three major monophyletic clusters (i.e. Nitrosopumilus, Nitrosotalea, Nitrosocaldus and a non-monophyletic cluster constituted mostly by soil and sediment sequences that we named Nitrososphaera. Diversity measurements indicated that marine and estuarine sediments as well as symbionts might be the largest reservoirs of AOA diversity. Phylogenetic analyses were further carried out using macroevolutionary analyses to explore the diversification pattern and rates of nitrifying archaea. In contrast to other habitats that displayed constant diversification rates, marine planktonic AOA interestingly exhibit a very recent and accelerating diversification rate congruent with the lowest phylogenetic diversity observed in their habitats. This result suggested the existence of AOA communities with different evolutionary history in the different habitats. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Based on an up-to-date amoA phylogeny, this

  5. An intertwined evolutionary history of methanogenic archaea and sulfate reduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Susanti

    Full Text Available Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and dissimilatory sulfate reduction, two of the oldest energy conserving respiratory systems on Earth, apparently could not have evolved in the same host, as sulfite, an intermediate of sulfate reduction, inhibits methanogenesis. However, certain methanogenic archaea metabolize sulfite employing a deazaflavin cofactor (F(420-dependent sulfite reductase (Fsr where N- and C-terminal halves (Fsr-N and Fsr-C are homologs of F(420H(2 dehydrogenase and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr, respectively. From genome analysis we found that Fsr was likely assembled from freestanding Fsr-N homologs and Dsr-like proteins (Dsr-LP, both being abundant in methanogens. Dsr-LPs fell into two groups defined by following sequence features: Group I (simplest, carrying a coupled siroheme-[Fe(4-S(4] cluster and sulfite-binding Arg/Lys residues; Group III (most complex, with group I features, a Dsr-type peripheral [Fe(4-S(4] cluster and an additional [Fe(4-S(4] cluster. Group II Dsr-LPs with group I features and a Dsr-type peripheral [Fe(4-S(4] cluster were proposed as evolutionary intermediates. Group III is the precursor of Fsr-C. The freestanding Fsr-N homologs serve as F(420H(2 dehydrogenase unit of a putative novel glutamate synthase, previously described membrane-bound electron transport system in methanogens and of assimilatory type sulfite reductases in certain haloarchaea. Among archaea, only methanogens carried Dsr-LPs. They also possessed homologs of sulfate activation and reduction enzymes. This suggested a shared evolutionary history for methanogenesis and sulfate reduction, and Dsr-LPs could have been the source of the oldest (3.47-Gyr ago biologically produced sulfide deposit.

  6. Influence of Martian regolith analogs on the activity and growth of methanogenic archaea, with special regard to long-term desiccation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janosch eSchirmack

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Methanogenic archaea have been studied as model organisms for possible life on Mars for several reasons: they can grow lithoautotrophically by using hydrogen and carbon dioxide as energy and carbon sources, respectively; they are anaerobes; and they evolved at a time when conditions on early Earth are believed to have looked similar to those of early Mars. As Mars is currently dry and cold and as water might be available only at certain time intervals, any organism living on this planet would need to cope with desiccation. On Earth there are several regions with low water availability as well, e.g. permafrost environments, desert soils and salt pans. Here, we present the results of a set of experiments investigating the influence of different Martian regolith analogs on the metabolic activity and growth of three methanogenic strains exposed to culture conditions as well as long-term desiccation. In most cases, concentrations below 1 %wt of regolith in the media resulted in an increase of methane production rates, whereas higher concentrations decreased the rates, thus prolonging the lag phase. Further experiments showed that methanogenic archaea are capable of producing methane when incubated on a water-saturated sedimentary matrix of regolith lacking nutrients. Survival of methanogens under these conditions was analyzed with a 400 day desiccation experiment in the presence of regolith analogs. All tested strains of methanogens survived the desiccation period as it was determined through reincubation on fresh medium and via qPCR following propidium monoazide treatment to identify viable cells. The survival of long-term desiccation and the ability of active metabolism on water-saturated MRAs strengthens the possibility of methanogenic archaea or physiologically similar organisms to exist in environmental niches on Mars. The best results were achieved in presence of a phyllosilicate, which provides insights of possible positive effects in habitats

  7. Influence of Martian regolith analogs on the activity and growth of methanogenic archaea, with special regard to long-term desiccation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmack, Janosch; Alawi, Mashal; Wagner, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Methanogenic archaea have been studied as model organisms for possible life on Mars for several reasons: they can grow lithoautotrophically by using hydrogen and carbon dioxide as energy and carbon sources, respectively; they are anaerobes; and they evolved at a time when conditions on early Earth are believed to have looked similar to those of early Mars. As Mars is currently dry and cold and as water might be available only at certain time intervals, any organism living on this planet would need to cope with desiccation. On Earth there are several regions with low water availability as well, e.g., permafrost environments, desert soils, and salt pans. Here, we present the results of a set of experiments investigating the influence of different Martian regolith analogs (MRAs) on the metabolic activity and growth of three methanogenic strains exposed to culture conditions as well as long-term desiccation. In most cases, concentrations below 1 wt% of regolith in the media resulted in an increase of methane production rates, whereas higher concentrations decreased the rates, thus prolonging the lag phase. Further experiments showed that methanogenic archaea are capable of producing methane when incubated on a water-saturated sedimentary matrix of regolith lacking nutrients. Survival of methanogens under these conditions was analyzed with a 400 day desiccation experiment in the presence of regolith analogs. All tested strains of methanogens survived the desiccation period as it was determined through reincubation on fresh medium and via qPCR following propidium monoazide treatment to identify viable cells. The survival of long-term desiccation and the ability of active metabolism on water-saturated MRAs strengthens the possibility of methanogenic archaea or physiologically similar organisms to exist in environmental niches on Mars. The best results were achieved in presence of a phyllosilicate, which provides insights of possible positive effects in habitats on Earth

  8. The key microorganisms for anaerobic degradation of pentachlorophenol in paddy soil as revealed by stable isotope probing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Hui [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Chengshuai [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550009 (China); Li, Fangbai, E-mail: cefbli@soil.gd.cn [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Luo, Chunling [Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Chen, Manjia; Hu, Min [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • SIP suggested that Dechloromonas can mineralize PCP in soil. • Methanosaeta and Methanocella acquired PCP-derived carbon. • Lactate enhanced microbial degradation of PCP in soil. - Abstract: Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a common residual persistent pesticide in paddy soil and has resulted in harmful effect on soil ecosystem. The anaerobic microbial transformation of PCP, therefore, has been received much attentions, especially the functional microbial communities for the reductive transformation. However, the key functional microorganisms for PCP mineralization in the paddy soil still remain unknown. In this work, DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) was applied to explore the key microorganisms responsible for PCP mineralization in paddy soil. The SIP results indicated that the dominant bacteria responsible for PCP biodegradation belonged to the genus Dechloromonas of the class β-Proteobacteria. In addition, the increased production of {sup 13}CH{sub 4} and {sup 13}CO{sub 2} indicated that the addition of lactate enhanced the rate of biodegradation and mineralization of PCP. Two archaea classified as the genera of Methanosaeta and Methanocella of class Methanobacteria were enriched in the heavy fraction when with lactate, whereas no archaea was detected in the absence of lactate. These findings provide direct evidence for the species of bacteria and archaea responsible for anaerobic PCP or its breakdown products mineralization and reveal a new insight into the microorganisms linked with PCP degradation in paddy soil.

  9. Anaerobic azo dye reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Zee, van der, KG Kristoffer

    2002-01-01

    Azo dyes, aromatic moieties linked together by azo (-N=N-) chromophores, represent the largest class of dyes used in textile-processing and other industries. The release of these compounds into the environment is undesirable, not only because of their colour, but also because many azo dyes and their breakdown products are toxic and/or mutagenic to life. To remove azo dyes from wastewater, a biological treatment strategy based on anaerobic reduction of the azo dyes, followed by aerobic transfo...

  10. Microbial community structure and performance of an anaerobic reactor digesting cassava pulp and pig manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichnumsin, P; Ahring, B; Nopharatana, A; Chaiprasert, P

    2012-01-01

    Microbial community dynamics in response to changes in substrate types (i.e. pig manure (PM), cassava pulp (CP) and mixtures of PM and CP) were investigated in an anaerobic continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Molecular identification of bacterial and archaeal domains were performed, using a 16S rDNA clone library with polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) screening and phylogenetic analysis. Analysis of bacterial clone libraries revealed that the differences in the community structure corresponded to the substrate types. However, the Bacteroidetes were the most abundant group in all substrates, followed by the Clostridia. With pure PM, the dominant bacterial groups were Bacteroidales, Clostridia and Paludibacter. With a co-substrate, at CP to PM (CP:PM) ratio of 50:50, the sequences analysis revealed the greatest diversity of bacterial communities at class level, and the sequences affiliated with Cytophaga sp. became an exclusive predominant. With CP alone, Bacteroides sp. was the dominant species and this reactor had the lowest diversity of bacteria. Archaea observed in the CSTR fed with all substrate types were Methanosaeta sp., Methanosaeta concilii and Methanospirillum hungatei. Among the Archaea, Methanosaeta sp. was the exclusive predominant. The relative distribution of Archaea also changed regarding to the substrate types.

  11. New perspectives in anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lier, J.B.; Tilche, A.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær;

    2001-01-01

    requirements. In fact, most advances were achieved during the last three decades, when high-rate reactor systems were developed and a profound insight was obtained in the microbiology of the anaerobic communities. This insight led to a better understanding of anaerobic treatment and, subsequently, to a broader......The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern...

  12. Impact of sulfate pollution on anaerobic biogeochemical cycles in a wetland sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Darren S; Mitchell, Alison

    2012-03-15

    The impact of sulfate pollution is increasingly being seen as an issue in the management of inland aquatic ecosystems. In this study we use sediment slurry experiments to explore the addition of sulfate, with or without added carbon, on the anaerobic biogeochemical cycles in a wetland sediment that previously had not been exposed to high levels of sulfate. Specifically we looked at the cycling of S (sulfate, dissolved and particulate sulfide--the latter measured as acid volatile sulfide; AVS), C (carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, methane and the short chain volatile fatty acids formate, acetate, butyrate and propionate), N (dinitrogen, ammonium, nitrate and nitrite) and redox active metals (Fe(II) and Mn(II)). Sulfate had the largest effects on the cycling of S and C. All the added S at lower loadings were converted to AVS over the course of the experiment (30 days). At the highest loading (8 mmol) less than 50% of consumed S was converted to AVS, however this is believed to be a kinetic effect. Although sulfate reduction was occurring in sediments with added sulfate, dissolved sulfide concentrations remained low throughout the study. Sulfate addition affected methanogenesis. In the absence of added carbon, addition of sulfate, even at a loading of 1 mmol, resulted in a halving of methane formation. The initial rate of formation of methane was not affected by sulfate if additional carbon was added to the sediment. However, there was evidence for anaerobic methane oxidation in those sediments with added sulfate and carbon, but not in those sediments treated only with carbon. Surprisingly, sulfate addition had little apparent impact on N dynamics; previous studies have shown that sulfide can inhibit denitrification and stimulate dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia. We propose that because most of the reduced sulfur was in particulate form, levels of dissolved sulfide were too low to interfere with the N cycle.

  13. Effect of methanogenic substrates on anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment.

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J W

    2010-05-06

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) is assumed to be a syntrophic process, in which methanotrophic archaea produce an interspecies electron carrier (IEC), which is subsequently utilized by sulfate-reducing bacteria. In this paper, six methanogenic substrates are tested as candidate-IECs by assessing their effect on AOM and SR by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment. The presence of acetate, formate or hydrogen enhanced SR, but did not inhibit AOM, nor did these substrates trigger methanogenesis. Carbon monoxide also enhanced SR but slightly inhibited AOM. Methanol did not enhance SR nor did it inhibit AOM, and methanethiol inhibited both SR and AOM completely. Subsequently, it was calculated at which candidate-IEC concentrations no more Gibbs free energy can be conserved from their production from methane at the applied conditions. These concentrations were at least 1,000 times lower can the final candidate-IEC concentration in the bulk liquid. Therefore, the tested candidate-IECs could not have been produced from methane during the incubations. Hence, acetate, formate, methanol, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen can be excluded as sole IEC in AOM coupled to SR. Methanethiol did inhibit AOM and can therefore not be excluded as IEC by this study.

  14. Biochemistry of methyl-coenzyme M reductase: the nickel metalloenzyme that catalyzes the final step in synthesis and the first step in anaerobic oxidation of the greenhouse gas methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    Methane, the major component of natural gas, has been in use in human civilization since ancient times as a source of fuel and light. Methanogens are responsible for synthesis of most of the methane found on Earth. The enzyme responsible for catalyzing the chemical step of methanogenesis is methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR), a nickel enzyme that contains a tetrapyrrole cofactor called coenzyme F430, which can traverse the Ni(I), (II), and (III) oxidation states. MCR and methanogens are also involved in anaerobic methane oxidation. This review describes structural, kinetic, and computational studies aimed at elucidating the mechanism of MCR. Such studies are expected to impact the many ramifications of methane in our society and environment, including energy production and greenhouse gas warming.

  15. Distribution and Abundance of Archaea in South China Sea Sponge Holoxea sp. and the Presence of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Sponge Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with bacterial symbionts, little is known about archaea in sponges especially about their spatial distribution and abundance. Understanding the distribution and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea will help greatly in elucidating the potential function of symbionts in nitrogen cycling in sponges. In this study, gene libraries of 16S rRNA gene and ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA genes and quantitative real-time PCR were used to study the spatial distribution and abundance of archaea in the South China Sea sponge Holoxea sp. As a result, Holoxea sp. specific AOA, mainly group C1a (marine group I: Crenarchaeota were identified. The presence of ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaea was observed for the first time within sponge cells. This study suggested a close relationship between sponge host and its archaeal symbionts as well as the archaeal potential contribution to sponge host in the ammonia-oxidizing process of nitrification.

  16. Anaerobic wastewater treatment using anaerobic baffled bioreactor: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Siti; Dahlan, Irvan

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is receiving renewed interest because it offers a means to treat wastewater with lower energy investment. Because the microorganisms involved grow more slowly, such systems require clever design so that the microbes have sufficient time with the substrate to complete treatment without requiring enormous reactor volumes. The anaerobic baffled reactor has inherent advantages over single compartment reactors due to its circulation pattern that approaches a plug flow reactor. The physical configuration of the anaerobic baffled reactor enables significant modifications to be made; resulting in a reactor which is proficient of treating complex wastewaters which presently require only one unit, ultimately significant reducing capital costs. This paper also concerns about mechanism, kinetic and hydrodynamic studies of anaerobic digestion for future application of the anaerobic baffled reactor for wastewater treatment.

  17. Identification of a glycolytic regulon in the Archaea Pyrococcus and Thermococcus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werken, van de H.J.G.; Verhees, C.H.; Akerboom, A.P.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2006-01-01

    The glycolytic pathway of the hyperthermophilic archaea that belong to the order Thermococcales (Pyrococcus, Thermococcus and Palaeococcus) differs significantly from the canonical Embden-Meyerhof pathway in bacteria and eukarya. This archaeal glycolysis variant consists of several novel enzymes, so

  18. Picoheterotroph (Bacteria and Archaea biomass distribution in the global ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Landry

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We compiled a database of 39 766 data points consisting of flow cytometric and microscopical measurements of picoheterotroph abundance, including both Bacteria and Archaea. After gridding with 1° spacing, the database covers 1.3% of the ocean surface. There are data covering all ocean basins and depths except the Southern Hemisphere below 350 m or from April until June. The average picoheterotroph biomass is 3.9 ± 3.6 μg C l−1 with a 20-fold decrease between the surface and the deep sea. We estimate a total ocean inventory of about 1.3 × 1029 picoheterotroph cells. Surprisingly, the abundance in the coastal regions is the same as at the same depths in the open ocean. Using an average of published open ocean measurements for the conversion from abundance to carbon biomass of 9.1 fg cell−1, we calculate a picoheterotroph carbon inventory of about 1.2 Pg C. The main source of uncertainty in this inventory is the conversion factor from abundance to biomass. Picoheterotroph biomass is ~2 times higher in the tropics than in the polar oceans. doi:10.1594/PANGAEA.779142

  19. Chaperonin Polymers in Archaea: The Cytoskeleton of Prokaryotes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, J. D.; Kagawa, H. K.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1997-07-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that play a critical role in folding nascent polypeptides under normal conditions and refolding damaged proteins under stress conditions. In all organisms these complexes are composed of evolutionarily conserved 60-kDa proteins arranged in double-ring structures with between 7 and 9 protein subunits per ring. These double ring structures are assumed to be the functional units in vivo, although they have never been observed inside cells. Here the authors show that the purified chaperonin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, which is closely related to chaperonins in eukaryotes, has a double ring structure at low concentrations (0.1 mg/ml), but at more physiological concentrations, the rings stack end to end to form polymers. The polymers are stable at physiological temperatures (75 C) and closely resemble structures observed inside unfixed S. shibatae cells. The authors suggest that in vivo chaperonin activity may be regulated by polymerization and that chaperonin polymers may act as a cytoskeleton-like structure in archaea and bacteria.

  20. Involvement of thermophilic archaea in the biocorrosion of oil pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidova, Irene A; Duncan, Kathleen E; Perez-Ibarra, B Monica; Suflita, Joseph M

    2012-07-01

    Two thermophilic archaea, strain PK and strain MG, were isolated from a culture enriched at 80°C from the inner surface material of a hot oil pipeline. Strain PK could ferment complex organic nitrogen sources (e.g. yeast extract, peptone, tryptone) and was able to reduce elemental sulfur (S°), Fe(3+) and Mn(4+) . Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the organism belonged to the order Thermococcales. Incubations of this strain with elemental iron (Fe°) resulted in the abiotic formation of ferrous iron and the accumulation of volatile fatty acids during yeast extract fermentation. The other isolate, strain MG, was a H(2) :CO(2) -utilizing methanogen, phylogenetically affiliated with the genus Methanothermobacter family. Co-cultures of the strains grew as aggregates that produced CH(4) without exogenous H(2) amendment. The co-culture produced the same suite but greater concentrations of fatty acids from yeast extract than did strain PK alone. Thus, the physiological characteristics of organisms both alone and in combination could conceivably contribute to pipeline corrosion. The Thermococcus strain PK could reduce elemental sulfur to sulfide, produce fatty acids and reduce ferric iron. The hydrogenotrophic methanogen strain MG enhanced fatty acid production by fermentative organisms but could not couple the dissolution Fe° with the consumption of water-derived H(2) like other methanogens.

  1. Bridging domains : a comparison between information processing in Archaea and Eukarya

    OpenAIRE

    Koning, de, H.

    2015-01-01

    Bridging Domains A Comparison between Information Processing in Archaea and Eukarya Studying Information Processing Living cells evolved complex systems to handle the flow of information both accurately and efficiently. These systems are highly comparable between the three domains of life: eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea. The central components of replication, transcription, aminoacylation, and translation are found in every living cell known today, with only relatively small deviations, des...

  2. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellinger, A. [INFOENERGIE, Ettenhausen (Switzerland)

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  3. Anaerobic Digestion of Piggery Waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velsen, van A.F.M.

    1981-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological process by which organic matter is converted to methane and carbon dioxide by microbes in the absence of air (oxygen). In nature, anaerobic conversions occur at all places where organic material accumulates and the supply of oxygen is deficient, e.g. in marshes an

  4. Genome sequencing of methanogenic Archaea Methanosarcina mazei TUC01 strain isolated from an Amazonian Flooded Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraúna, R. A.; Graças, D. A.; Ramos, R. T.; Carneiro, A. R.; Lopes, T. S.; Lima, A. R.; Zahlouth, R. L.; Pellizari, V. H.; Silva, A.

    2013-05-01

    Methanosarcina mazei is a strictly anaerobic methanogen from the Methanosarcinales order. This species is known for its broad catabolic range among methanogens and is widespread throughout diverse environments. The draft genome of a strain cultivated from the sediment of the Tucuruí hydroelectric power station, the fourth largest hydroelectric dam in the world, is described here. Approximately 80% of methane is produced by biogenic sources, such as methanogenic archaea from M. mazei species. Although the methanogenesis pathway is well known, some aspects of the core genome, genome evolution and shared genes are still unclear. A sediment sample from the Tucuruí hydropower station reservoir was inoculated in mineral media supplemented with acetate and methanol. This media was maintained in an H2:CO2 (80:20) atmosphere to enrich and cultivate M. mazei. The enrichment was conducted at 30°C under standard anaerobic conditions. After several molecular and cellular analyses, total DNA was extracted from a non-pure culture of M. mazei, amplified using phi29 DNA polymerase (BioLabs) and finally used as a source template for genome sequencing. The draft genome was obtained after two rounds of sequencing. First, the genome was sequenced using a SOLiD System V3 with a mate-paired library, which yielded 24,405,103 and 24,399,268 reads (50 bp) for the R3 and F3 tags, respectively. The second round of sequencing was performed using the SOLiD 5500 XL platform with a mate-paired library, resulting in a total of 113,588,848 reads (60 bp) for each tag (F3 and R3). All reads obtained by this procedure were filtered using Quality Assessment software, whereby reads with an average quality score below Phred 20 were removed. Velvet and Edena were used to assemble the reads, and Simplifier was used to remove the redundant sequences. After this, a total of 16,811 contigs were obtained. M. mazei GO1 (AE008384) genome was used to map the contigs and generate the scaffolds. We used the

  5. Assessing methane oxidation under landfill covers and its contribution to the above atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels: The added value of the isotope ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O CO{sub 2}; {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D CH{sub 4}) approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widory, D., E-mail: d.widory@brgm.fr [BRGM, 3 ave Claude Guillemin, 45000 Orleans (France); Proust, E.; Bellenfant, G. [BRGM, 3 ave Claude Guillemin, 45000 Orleans (France); Bour, O. [INERIS, Parc Technologique ALATA, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of the isotope and mass balance approaches to evaluate the level of methane oxidation within a landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The level of methane oxidation is not homogenous under the landfill cover and is strongly correlated to the methane flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotope tracking of the contribution of the methane oxidation to the CO{sub 2} concentrations in the ambient air. - Abstract: We are presenting here a multi-isotope approach ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O of CO{sub 2}; {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}D of CH{sub 4}) to assess (i) the level(s) of methane oxidation during waste biodegradation and its migration through a landfill cover in Sonzay (France), and (ii) its contribution to the atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels above the surface. The isotope approach is compared to the more conventional mass balance approach. Results from the two techniques are comparable and show that the CH{sub 4} oxidation under the landfill cover is heterogenous, with low oxidation percentages in samples showing high biogas fluxes, which was expected in clay covers presenting fissures, through which CH{sub 4} is rapidly transported. At shallow depth, more immobile biogas pockets show a higher level of CH{sub 4} oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria. {delta}{sup 13}C of CO{sub 2} samples taken at different heights (from below the cover up to 8 m above the ground level) were also used to identify and assess the relative contributions of its main sources both under the landfill cover and in the surrounding atmosphere.

  6. Distance-decay and taxa-area relationships for bacteria, archaea and methanogenic archaea in a tropical lake sediment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi Pedroni Barreto

    Full Text Available The study of of the distribution of microorganisms through space (and time allows evaluation of biogeographic patterns, like the species-area index (z. Due to their high dispersal ability, high reproduction rates and low rates of extinction microorganisms tend to be widely distributed, and they are thought to be virtually cosmopolitan and selected primarily by environmental factors. Recent studies have shown that, despite these characteristics, microorganisms may behave like larger organisms and exhibit geographical distribution. In this study, we searched patterns of spatial diversity distribution of bacteria and archaea in a contiguous environment. We collected 26 samples of a lake sediment, distributed in a nested grid, with distances between samples ranging from 0.01 m to 1000 m. The samples were analyzed using T-RFLP (Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism targeting mcrA (coding for a subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase and the genes of Archaeal and Bacterial 16S rRNA. From the qualitative and quantitative results (relative abundance of operational taxonomic units we calculated the similarity index for each pair to evaluate the taxa-area and distance decay relationship slopes by linear regression. All results were significant, with mcrA genes showing the highest slope, followed by Archaeal and Bacterial 16S rRNA genes. We showed that the microorganisms of a methanogenic community, that is active in a contiguous environment, display spatial distribution and a taxa-area relationship.

  7. The implementation of artificial neural networks to model methane oxidation in landfill soil covers[Includes the CSCE forum on professional practice and career development : 1. international engineering mechanics and materials specialty conference : 1. international/3. coastal, estuarine and offshore engineering specialty conference : 2. international/8. construction specialty conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeto, A.; Albanna, M.; Warith, M. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The disposal of solid waste significantly contributes to the total anthropogenic emissions of methane (CH{sub 4}), a greenhouse gas that negatively affects climate change. The oxidation of methane in landfill bio-covers takes place through the use of methanotrophic bacteria which provides a sink for methane. The rate at which methane is biologically oxidized depends on several parameters. This study provided a better understanding of the oxidation of methane in landfill soil covers through modeling methane oxidation with artificial neural networks (ANNs). An ANN was trained and tested to model methane oxidation in various batch scale systems for 3 types of soils. Input data consisted of temperature, moisture content, soil composition and the nutrient content added to the system. Model results were in good agreement with experimental results reported by other researchers. It was concluded that the use of ANNs to model methane oxidation in batch scale bio-covers can address the large number of complicated physical and biochemical processes that occur within the landfill bio-cover. 10 refs., 7 tabs., 5 figs.

  8. Anaerobic fungal populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of molecular techniques has greatly broadened our view of microbial diversity and enabled a more complete detection and description of microbial communities. The application of these techniques provides a simple means of following community changes, for example, Ishii et al. described transient and more stable inhabitants in another dynamic microbial system, compost. Our present knowledge of anaerobic gut fungal population diversity within the gastrointestinal tract is based upon isolation, cultivation and observations in vivo. It is likely that there are many species yet to be described, some of which may be non-culturable. We have observed a distinct difference in the ease of cultivation between the different genera, for example, Caecomyes isolates are especially difficult to isolate and maintain in vitro, a feature that is likely to result in the under representation of this genera in culture-based enumerations. The anaerobic gut fungi are the only known obligately anaerobic fungi. For the majority of their life cycles, they are found tightly associated with solid digesta in the rumen and/or hindgut. They produce potent fibrolytic enzymes and grow invasively on and into the plant material they are digesting making them important contributors to fibre digestion. This close association with intestinal digesta has made it difficult to accurately determine the amount of fungal biomass present in the rumen, with Orpin suggesting 8% contribution to the total microbial biomass, whereas Rezaeian et al. more recently gave a value of approximately 20%. It is clear that the rumen microbial complement is affected by dietary changes, and that the fungi are more important in digestion in the rumens of animals fed with high-fibre diets. It seems likely that the gut fungi play an important role within the rumen as primary colonizers of plant fibre, and so we are particularly interested in being able to measure the appearance and diversity of fungi on the plant

  9. Diversity of Ammonia Oxidizing Archaea in Tropical Compost Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya eDe Gannes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Composting is widely used to transform waste materials into valuable agricultural products. In the tropics, large quantities of agricultural wastes could be potentially useful in agriculture after composting. However, while microbiological processes of composts in general are well established, relatively little is known about microbial communities that may be unique to these in tropical systems, particularly nitrifiers. The recent discovery of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA has changed the paradigm of nitrification being initiated solely by ammonia oxidizing bacteria. In the present study, AOA abundance and diversity was examined in composts produced from combinations of plant waste materials common in tropical agriculture (rice straw, sugar cane bagasse, coffee hulls, which were mixed with either cow- or sheep-manure. The objective was to determine how AOA abundance and diversity varied as a function of compost system and time, the latter being a contrast between the start of the compost process (mesophilic phase and the finished product (mature phase. The results showed that AOA were relatively abundant in composts of tropical agricultural wastes, and significantly more so than were the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Furthermore, while the AOA communities in the composts were predominatly group I.1b, the communities were diverse and exhibited structures that diverged between compost types and phases. These patterns could be taken as indicators of the ecophysiological diversity in the soil AOA (groub I.1b, in that significantly different AOA communties developed when exposed to varying physico-chemical environments. Nitrification patterns and levels differed in the composts which, for the mature material, could have signifcant effects on its performanc as a plant growth medium. Thus, it will also be important to determine the association of AOA (and diversity in their communities with nitrification in these systems.

  10. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Chadwick, Grayson L.; Kempes, Christopher P.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer.

  11. In-vitro archaeacidal activity of biocides against human-associated archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Khelaifia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several methanogenic archaea have been detected in the human intestinal microbiota. These intestinal archaea may contaminate medical devices such as colonoscopes. However, no biocide activity has been reported among these human-associated archaea. METHODOLOGY: The minimal archaeacidal concentration (MAC of peracetic acid, chlorhexidine, squalamine and twelve parent synthetic derivatives reported in this study was determined against five human-associated methanogenic archaea including Methanobrevibacter smithii, Methanobrevibacter oralis, Methanobrevibacter arboriphilicus, Methanosphaera stadtmanae, Methanomassiliicoccus luminyensis and two environmental methanogens Methanobacterium beijingense and Methanosaeta concilii by using a serial dilution technique in Hungates tubes. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MAC of squalamine derivative S1 was 0.05 mg/L against M. smithii strains, M. oralis, M. arboriphilicus, M. concilii and M. beijingense whereas MAC of squalamine and derivatives S2-S12 varied from 0.5 to 5 mg/L. For M. stadtmanae and M. luminyensis, MAC of derivative S1 was 0.1 mg/L and varied from 1 to ≥ 10 mg/L for squalamine and its parent derivatives S2-S12. Under the same experimental conditions, chlorhexidine and peracetic acid lead to a MAC of 0.2 and 1.5 mg/L, respectively against all tested archaea. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Squalamine derivative S1 exhibited a 10-200 higher archaeacidal activity than other tested squalamine derivatives, on the majority of human-associated archaea. As previously reported and due to their week corrosivity and their wide spectrum of antibacterial and antifungal properties, squalamine and more precisely derivative S1 appear as promising compounds to be further tested for the decontamination of medical devices contaminated by human-associated archaea.

  12. Presence of Archaea in the Indoor Environment and Their Relationships with Housing Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakpour, Sepideh; Scott, James A; Turvey, Stuart E; Brook, Jeffrey R; Takaro, Timothy K; Sears, Malcolm R; Klironomos, John

    2016-08-01

    Archaea are widespread and abundant in soils, oceans, or human and animal gastrointestinal (GI) tracts. However, very little is known about the presence of Archaea in indoor environments and factors that can regulate their abundances. Using a quantitative PCR approach, and targeting the archaeal and bacterial 16S rRNA genes in floor dust samples, we found that Archaea are a common part of the indoor microbiota, 5.01 ± 0.14 (log 16S rRNA gene copies/g dust, mean ± SE) in bedrooms and 5.58 ± 0.13 in common rooms, such as living rooms. Their abundance, however, was lower than bacteria: 9.20 ± 0.32 and 9.17 ± 0.32 in bedrooms and common rooms, respectively. In addition, by measuring a broad array of environmental factors, we obtained preliminary insights into how the abundance of total archaeal 16S rRNA gene copies in indoor environment would be associated with building characteristics and occupants' activities. Based on the results, Archaea are not equally distributed within houses, and the areas with greater input of outdoor microbiome and higher traffic and material heterogeneity tend to have a higher abundance of Archaea. Nevertheless, more research is needed to better understand causes and consequences of this microbial group in indoor environments. PMID:27098176

  13. Exploring the diversity of extremely halophilic archaea in food-grade salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, Olivier; Fourmentin, Jeanne; Delincé, Bruno; Mahillon, Jacques

    2014-11-17

    Salting is one of the oldest means of food preservation: adding salt decreases water activity and inhibits microbial development. However, salt is also a source of living bacteria and archaea. The occurrence and diversity of viable archaea in this extreme environment were assessed in 26 food-grade salts from worldwide origin by cultivation on four culture media. Additionally, metagenomic analysis of 16S rRNA gene was performed on nine salts. Viable archaea were observed in 14 salts and colony counts reached more than 10(5)CFU per gram in three salts. All archaeal isolates identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing belonged to the Halobacteriaceae family and were related to 17 distinct genera among which Haloarcula, Halobacterium and Halorubrum were the most represented. High-throughput sequencing generated extremely different profiles for each salt. Four of them contained a single major genus (Halorubrum, Halonotius or Haloarcula) while the others had three or more genera of similar occurrence. The number of distinct genera per salt ranged from 21 to 27. Halorubrum had a significant contribution to the archaeal diversity in seven salts; this correlates with its frequent occurrence in crystallization ponds. On the contrary, Haloquadratum walsbyi, the halophilic archaea most commonly found in solar salterns, was a minor actor of the food-grade salt diversity. Our results indicate that the occurrence and diversity of viable halophilic archaea in salt can be important, while their fate in the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion remains largely unknown. PMID:25217724

  14. Understanding DNA Repair in Hyperthermophilic Archaea: Persistent Gaps and Other Reasons to Focus on the Fork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis W. Grogan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although hyperthermophilic archaea arguably have a great need for efficient DNA repair, they lack members of several DNA repair protein families broadly conserved among bacteria and eukaryotes. Conversely, the putative DNA repair genes that do occur in these archaea often do not generate the expected phenotype when deleted. The prospect that hyperthermophilic archaea have some unique strategies for coping with DNA damage and replication errors has intellectual and technological appeal, but resolving this question will require alternative coping mechanisms to be proposed and tested experimentally. This review evaluates a combination of four enigmatic properties that distinguishes the hyperthermophilic archaea from all other organisms: DNA polymerase stalling at dU, apparent lack of conventional NER, lack of MutSL homologs, and apparent essentiality of homologous recombination proteins. Hypothetical damage-coping strategies that could explain this set of properties may provide new starting points for efforts to define how archaea differ from conventional models of DNA repair and replication fidelity.

  15. Exploring the diversity of extremely halophilic archaea in food-grade salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriet, Olivier; Fourmentin, Jeanne; Delincé, Bruno; Mahillon, Jacques

    2014-11-17

    Salting is one of the oldest means of food preservation: adding salt decreases water activity and inhibits microbial development. However, salt is also a source of living bacteria and archaea. The occurrence and diversity of viable archaea in this extreme environment were assessed in 26 food-grade salts from worldwide origin by cultivation on four culture media. Additionally, metagenomic analysis of 16S rRNA gene was performed on nine salts. Viable archaea were observed in 14 salts and colony counts reached more than 10(5)CFU per gram in three salts. All archaeal isolates identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing belonged to the Halobacteriaceae family and were related to 17 distinct genera among which Haloarcula, Halobacterium and Halorubrum were the most represented. High-throughput sequencing generated extremely different profiles for each salt. Four of them contained a single major genus (Halorubrum, Halonotius or Haloarcula) while the others had three or more genera of similar occurrence. The number of distinct genera per salt ranged from 21 to 27. Halorubrum had a significant contribution to the archaeal diversity in seven salts; this correlates with its frequent occurrence in crystallization ponds. On the contrary, Haloquadratum walsbyi, the halophilic archaea most commonly found in solar salterns, was a minor actor of the food-grade salt diversity. Our results indicate that the occurrence and diversity of viable halophilic archaea in salt can be important, while their fate in the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion remains largely unknown.

  16. Optimisation of 16S rDNA amplicon sequencing protocols for microbial community profiling of anaerobic digesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; McIlroy, Simon Jon; Larsen, Poul;

    of the community composition. As such sample specific optimisation and standardisation of DNA extraction, as well PCR primer selection, are essential to minimising the potential for such biases. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for optimized community profiling of anaerobic digesters. The FastDNA......RNA gene amplicon sequencing is rapid, cheap, high throughput, and has high taxonomic resolution. However, biases are introduced in multiple steps of this approach, including non-representative DNA extraction and uneven taxonomic coverage of selected PCR primers, potentially giving a skewed view...... SPIN kit was selected and the mechanical lysis parameters optimised for extraction of genomic DNA from mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digester samples. Different primer sets were compared for targeting the archaea and bacteria, both together and individually. Shotgun sequencing of a TruSeq PCR...

  17. Obtaining representative community profiles of anaerobic digesters through optimisation of 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; McIlroy, Simon Jon; Karst, Søren Michael;

    of the community composition . As such sample specific optimisation and standardisation of DNA extraction, as well PCR primer selection, are essential to minimising the potential for such biases. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for optimized community profiling of anaerobic digesters. The FastDNA......RNA gene amplicon sequencing is rapid, cheap, high throughput, and has high taxonomic resolution. However, biases are introduced in multiple steps of this approach, including non-representative DNA extraction and uneven taxonomic coverage of selected PCR primers, potentially giving a skewed view...... SPIN kit was selected and the mechanical lysis parameters optimised for extraction of genomic DNA from mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digester samples. Different primer sets were compared for targeting the archaea and bacteria, both together and individually . Shotgun sequencing...

  18. Production of volatile derivatives of metal(loid)s by microflora involved in anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalke, K; Wickenheiser, E B; Mehring, M; Hirner, A V; Hensel, R

    2000-07-01

    Gases released from anaerobic wastewater treatment facilities contain considerable amounts of volatile methyl and hydride derivatives of metals and metalloids, such as arsine (AsH(3)), monomethylarsine, dimethylarsine, trimethylarsine, trimethylbismuth (TMBi), elemental mercury (Hg(0)), trimethylstibine, dimethyltellurium, and tetramethyltin. Most of these compounds could be shown to be produced by pure cultures of microorganisms which are representatives of the anaerobic sewage sludge microflora, i.e., methanogenic archaea (Methanobacterium formicicum, Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum), sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio vulgaris, D. gigas), and a peptolytic bacterium (Clostridium collagenovorans). Additionally, dimethylselenium and dimethyldiselenium could be detected in the headspace of most of the pure cultures. This is the first report of the production of TMBi, stibine, monomethylstibine, and dimethylstibine by a pure culture of M. formicicum. PMID:10877769

  19. Soil methane oxidation in a long-term no-tillage system in Southern BrazilOxidação de metano em solo a longo prazo sob plantio direto no Sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cimélio Bayer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Conservation management systems are usually suggested as alternative to restore the soil methane (CH4 oxidation capacity of degraded soils; however, little information is available on tropical and subtropical soils. Our objective was to evaluate the long-term (19 years effect of no-tillage (NT versus conventional tillage (CT management systems on CH4 fluxes in a formerly degraded Acrisol in Southern Brazil. Annual CH4 fluxes of two cropping systems [O/M-black oat (Avena strigosa/maize and V/M-vetch (Vigna sativa/maize] were measured in NT and CT soils. Static chambers were used for air sampling, while chromatography was used for CH4 analysis. Analysis of the historical dataset at this experimental site indicated improvements in soil quality under the NT system, especially in legume-based cropping system (V/M that exhibited the highest annual biomass input. CH4 fluxes ranged from −42 ± 2 to 38 ± 16 μg C m-2 h-1, and annual CH4 emissions ranged from −825 ± 117 (CT V/M to 453 ± 185 g C ha-1 (NT O/M. Thus, the annual CH4 oxidation capacity of the soil was not related to the soil quality produced by the soil management systems. On the basis of our results and published literature, we postulate that conservation management systems improve the methane oxidation and soil quality in distinct soil layers, which result in a slow effect of these management systems on the methane oxidation capacity. Sistemas conservacionistas de manejo de solo são considerados usualmente uma alternativa para restaurar a capacidade de solos agrícolas degradados em oxidar metano (CH4, mas escassa informação é disponível para solos tropicais e subtropicais. O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar o efeito de longo prazo (19 anos do plantio direto (PD nos fluxos de CH4 em um Argissolo Vermelho (Classificação Brasileira degradado da região Sul do Brasil, em comparação ao preparo convencional (PC. Fluxos anuais de CH4 do solo foram avaliados nos sistemas PD e

  20. The role of microbial diversity in the dynamics and stability of global methane consumption: microbial methane oxidation as a model-system for microbial ecology (ESF EuroDiversity METHECO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, P.; Metheco-Team

    2009-04-01

    therefore cannot be ignored in nature conservation and management issues. Investigating this hypothesis is equivalent to assessing the Biodiversity-Ecosystem Functioning relationship (BEF) which has been intensively studied in classical ecology has largely been ignored investigating microbial communities. METHECO is focusing on methane oxidizing bacteria, a well-defined yet sufficiently diverse group of bacteria catalyzing an important ecosystem service: next to carbon dioxide, methane is the most important greenhouse gas adding about 30% to the radiative forcing exerted by carbon dioxide. The emission of methane would be even much higher without the activity of methane-oxidizing bacteria which on a global basis mitigate about 50% of the biologically produced methane. In contrast, methanotrophs in aerated upland soils form the only biological sink for atmospheric methane playing a vital role in the global climate. METHECO is studying diversity and functioning of methanotrophs over a wide range of European ecosystems from the Mediterranean to the Arctic, and from landfills to pristine environments. Our objectives are (i) the definition of meaningful taxonomic units which describe microbial diversity in the habitats studied, (ii) assessing the effects of perturbations on diversity and functioning, (iii) identifying controls of methanotrophic activity and diversity, and (iv) developing a standardized methodology and framework for environmental microbial ecology.

  1. Succession of microbial community and enhanced mechanism of a ZVI-based anaerobic granular sludge process treating chloronitrobenzenes wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Liang, E-mail: felix79cn@hotmail.com [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory for Water Pollution Control and Environmental Safety, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Jin, Jie [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Lin, Haizhuan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Wenzhou Environmental Protection Design Scientific Institute, Wenzhou 325000 (China); Gao, Kaituo [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Xu, Xiangyang, E-mail: xuxy@zju.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory for Water Pollution Control and Environmental Safety, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • The combined ZVI–UASB process was established for the degradation of chloronitrobenzenes. • There were the better shock resistance and buffering capacity for anaerobic acidification in the combined process. • Novel ZVI-based anaerobic granular sludge (ZVI–AGS) was successfully developed. • Adaptive shift of microbial community was significant in ZVI-based anaerobic granular sludge system. - Abstract: The combined zero-valent iron (ZVI) and upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) process is established for the treatment of chloronitrobenzenes (ClNBs) wastewater, and the succession of microbial community and its enhanced mechanism are investigated in the study. Results showed that compared with the control UASB (R1), the stable COD removal, ClNBs transformation, and dechlorination occurred in the combined system (R2) when operated at influent COD and 3,4-Dichloronitrobenzene (3,4-DClNB) loading rates of 4200–7700 g m{sup −3} d{sup −1} and 6.0–70.0 g m{sup −3} d{sup −1}, and R2 had the better shock resistance and buffering capacity for the anaerobic acidification. The dechlorination for the intermediate products of p-chloroanaline (p-ClAn) to analine (AN) occurred in R2 reactor after 45 days, whereas it did not occur in R1 after a long-term operation. The novel ZVI-based anaerobic granular sludge (ZVI–AGS) was successfully developed in the combined system, and higher microbial activities including ClNB transformation and H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} production were achieved simultaneously. The dominant bacteria were closely related to the groups of Megasphaera, Chloroflexi, and Clostridium, and the majority of archaea were correlated with the groups of Methanosarcinalesarchaeon, Methanosaetaconcilii, and Methanothrixsoehngenii, which are capable of reductively dechlorinating PCB, HCB, and TCE in anaerobic niche and EPS secretion.

  2. 杜儿坪矿中部风井风排瓦斯氧化处理项目设计%The Design of Ventilation Air Methane Oxidation Treatment Project of

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗申国

    2013-01-01

    我国煤矿风排瓦斯量巨大,直接排放造成环境污染和能源浪费,利用乏风氧化机组将其销毁,同时产生热能,不仅改善大气环境,还为矿井风排瓦斯处理开辟了一条新途径。以杜儿坪矿中部风井风排瓦斯氧化处理项目设计为例,介绍了工程概况、机组选型、装机规模及工艺系统设计方案,并论述了避免对矿井通风安全造成影响的措施。%There is a huge number of coal mine ventilation air methane in China,emptying directly lead to envi-ronmental pollution and energy waste,using oxidation unit will be destroyed,and generate heat,not only improve the atmospheric environment,also for mine ventilation air methane treatment has opened up a new way.Takes the ventila-tion air methane oxidation treatment project design in Du'erping coal mine central ventilation shaft as an example,in-troduces the engineering general situation,the unit type selection,installed capacity and design scheme of process system,and discusses the measures to avoid affecting the safety of mine ventilation.

  3. The TrmB family: a versatile group of transcriptional regulators in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindner, Antonia; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Microbes are organisms which are well adapted to their habitat. Their survival depends on the regulation of gene expression levels in response to environmental signals. The most important step in regulation of gene expression takes place at the transcriptional level. This regulation is intriguing in Archaea because the eu-karyotic-like transcription apparatus is modulated by bacterial-like transcription regulators. The transcriptional regulator of mal operon (TrmB) family is well known as a very large group of regulators in Archaea with more than 250 members to date. One special feature of these regulators is that some of them can act as repressor, some as activator and others as both repressor and activator. This review gives a short updated overview of the TrmB family and their regulatory patterns in different Archaea as a lot of new data have been published on this topic since the last review from 2008.

  4. Untapped Resources: Biotechnological Potential of Peptides and Secondary Metabolites in Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, James C.; Burns, Brendan P.

    2015-01-01

    Archaea are an understudied domain of life often found in “extreme” environments in terms of temperature, salinity, and a range of other factors. Archaeal proteins, such as a wide range of enzymes, have adapted to function under these extreme conditions, providing biotechnology with interesting activities to exploit. In addition to producing structural and enzymatic proteins, archaea also produce a range of small peptide molecules (such as archaeocins) and other novel secondary metabolites such as those putatively involved in cell communication (acyl homoserine lactones), which can be exploited for biotechnological purposes. Due to the wide array of metabolites produced there is a great deal of biotechnological potential from antimicrobials such as diketopiperazines and archaeocins, as well as roles in the cosmetics and food industry. In this review we will discuss the diversity of small molecules, both peptide and nonpeptide, produced by archaea and their potential biotechnological applications. PMID:26504428

  5. Archaeal and bacterial community dynamics and bioprocess performance of a bench-scale two-stage anaerobic digester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Alejandro; Garcia-Ruiz, Maria Jesus; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Alejandro; Osorio, Francisco; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jesus

    2016-07-01

    Two-stage technologies have been developed for anaerobic digestion of waste-activated sludge. In this study, the archaeal and bacterial community structure dynamics and bioprocess performance of a bench-scale two-stage anaerobic digester treating urban sewage sludge have been studied by the means of high-throughput sequencing techniques and physicochemical parameters such as pH, dried sludge, volatile dried sludge, acid concentration, alkalinity, and biogas generation. The coupled analyses of archaeal and bacterial communities and physicochemical parameters showed a direct relationship between archaeal and bacterial populations and bioprocess performance during start-up and working operation of a two-stage anaerobic digester. Moreover, results demonstrated that archaeal and bacterial community structure was affected by changes in the acid/alkalinity ratio in the bioprocess. Thus, a predominance of the acetoclastic methanogen Methanosaeta was observed in the methanogenic bioreactor at high-value acid/alkaline ratio, while a predominance of Methanomassilicoccaeceae archaea and Methanoculleus genus was observed in the methanogenic bioreactor at low-value acid/alkaline ratio. Biodiversity tag-iTag sequencing studies showed that methanogenic archaea can be also detected in the acidogenic bioreactor, although its biological activity was decreased after 4 months of operation as supported by physicochemical analyses. Also, studies of the VFA producers and VFA consumers microbial populations showed as these microbiota were directly affected by the physicochemical parameters generated in the bioreactors. We suggest that the results obtained in our study could be useful for future implementations of two-stage anaerobic digestion processes at both bench- and full-scale. PMID:26940050

  6. Stress response of methanogenic archaea from Siberian permafrost compared to methanogens from non-permafrost habitats

    OpenAIRE

    Daria Morozova; Dirk Wagner;  

    2007-01-01

    We examined the survival potential of methanogenic archaea exposed to different environmental stress conditions such as low temperature (down to 78.5 °C), high salinity (up to 6 M NaCl), starvation (up to 3 months), long-term freezing (up to 2 years), desiccation (up to 25 days) and oxygen exposure (up to 72 hours). The experiments were conducted with microbial populations of methanogenic archaea from Siberian permafrost and were complemented by experiments on well-studied methanogens from no...

  7. Pyrosequencing reveals microbial community profile in anaerobic bio-entrapped membrane reactor for pharmaceutical wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kok Kwang; Shi, Xueqing; Ong, Say Leong; Ng, How Yong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, pharmaceutical wastewater with high salinity and total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) was treated by an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) and an anaerobic bio-entrapped membrane reactor (AnBEMR). The microbial populations and communities were analyzed using the 454 pyrosequencing method. The hydraulic retention time (HRT), membrane flux and mean cell residence time (MCRT) were controlled at 30.6h, 6L/m(2)h and 100d, respectively. The results showed that the AnBEMR achieved higher TCOD removal efficiency and greater biogas production compared to the AnMBR. Through DNA pyrosequencing analysis, both the anaerobic MBRs showed similar dominant groups of bacteria and archaea. However, phylum Elusimicrobia of bacteria was only detected in the AnBEMR; the higher abundance of dominant archaeal genus Methanimicrococcus found in the AnBEMR could play an important role in degradation of the major organic pollutant (i.e., trimethylamine) present in the pharmaceutical wastewater. PMID:26577579

  8. Performance and methanogenic community of rotating disk reactor packed with polyurethane during thermophilic anaerobic digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A newly developed anaerobic rotating disk reactor (ARDR) packed with polyurethane was used in continuous mode for organic waste removal under thermophilic (55 oC) anaerobic conditions. This paper reports the effects of the rotational speed on the methanogenic performance and community in an ARDR supplied with acetic acid synthetic wastewater as the organic substrate. The best performance was obtained from the ARDR with the rotational speed (ω) of 30 rpm. The average removal of dissolved organic carbon was 98.5%, and the methane production rate was 393 ml/l-reactor/day at an organic loading rate of 2.69 g/l-reactor/day. Under these operational conditions, the reactor had a greater biomass retention capacity and better reactor performance than those at other rotational speeds (0, 5 and 60 rpm). The results of 16S rRNA phylogenetic analysis indicated that the major methanogens in the reactor belonged to the genus Methanosarcina spp. The results of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis suggested that the cell density of methanogenic archaea immobilized on the polyurethane foam disk could be concentrated more than 2000 times relative to those in the original thermophilic sludge. Scanning electron microphotographs showed that there were more immobilized microbes at ω of 30 rpm than 60 rpm. A rotational speed on the outer layer of the disk of 6.6 m/min could be appropriate for anaerobic digestion using the polyurethane ARDR

  9. Feasibility of spent metalworking fluids as co-substrate for anaerobic co-digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Verde, Ivan; Regueiro, Leticia; Pena, Rocio; Álvarez, Juan A; Lema, Juan M; Carballa, Marta

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, anaerobic co-digestion of spent metalworking fluids (SMWF) and pig manure (PM) was evaluated. Three SMWF:PM ratios were tested in order to find the highest process efficiency. The best results (COD removal efficiencies of 74%) were achieved co-digesting a mixture with a SMWF:PM ratio of 1:99, w/w(1) (corresponding to 3.75mL SMWF/Lreactor week), which indicates that SMWF did not affect negatively PM degradation. Furthermore, two different weekly SMWF pulse-frequencies were performed (one reactor received 1 pulse of 3.75mL/Lreactor and the other 3 pulses of 1.25mL/Lreactor) and no differences in COD removal efficiency were observed. Microbiology analysis confirmed that Pseudomonas was the predominant genus when treating anaerobically SMWF and the presence of a higher fraction of Archaea was indicative of good digester performance. This study confirms the feasibility of anaerobic co-digestion as an appropriate technology for treating and valorising SMWF. PMID:24457301

  10. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  11. Distribution of Metabolically Active Prokaryotes (Archaea and Bacteria) throughout the Profiles of Chernozem and Brown Semidesert Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, M. V.; Manucharova, N. A.; Stepanov, A. L.

    2016-02-01

    The distribution of metabolically active cells of archaea and bacteria in the profiles of typical chernozems (Voronezh oblast) and brown semidesert soils (Astrakhan oblast) of natural and agricultural ecosystems was studied using the method of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The studied soils differed sharply in the microbial biomass and in the numbers of metabolically active cells of archaea and bacteria. The number of active bacterial cells was 3.5-7.0 times greater than that of archaea. In the arable chernozem, the numbers of active cells of archaea and bacteria were 2.6 and 1.5 times, respectively, lower than those in the chernozem under the shelterbelt. The agricultural use of the brown semidesert soil had little effect on the abundances of bacteria and archaea. The soil organic carbon content was the major factor controlling the numbers of metabolically active cells of both domains. However, the dependence of the abundance of bacteria on the organic matter content was more pronounced. The decrease in the organic carbon and total nitrogen contents down the soil profiles was accompanied by the decrease in the bacteria: archaea ratio attesting to a better adaptation of archaea to the permanent deficiency of carbon and nitrogen. The bacteria: archaea ratio can serve as an ecotrophic indicator of the state of soil microbial communities.

  12. Massive Expansion of Marine Archaea During The Early Albian Oceanic Anoxic Event 1B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuypers, M. M.; Kuypers, M. M.; Blokker, P.; Erbacher, J.; Kinkel, H.; Pancost, R. D.; Pancost, R. D.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2001-12-01

    Oceanic anoxic events (OAEs), periods of globally enhanced burial of organic matter (OM) in the marine realm, played an important role in the mid-Cretaceous `greenhouse climate' by effectively reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. It is generally believed that these OAEs were caused either by decreased remineralisation or increased production of phytoplanktonic OM. Here we show that enhanced organic carbon (OC) burial during the early Albian OAE1b (~112 My) was caused by a different process. Combined biogeochemical and stable carbon isotopic analyses indicate that black shales from this period contain up to 80% of OC derived from archaea. Archaea-derived isoprenoidal tetraether membrane lipids and free and macromolecularly bound isoprenoid alkanes are abundantly present in these black shales. More specifically the presence of certain ether lipids (cyclic biphytane tetraethers) indicates representatives of the pelagic archaea. To the best of our knowledge this is the earliest fossil evidence for marine planktonic archaea, extending their geological record by more than 60 million years. The diversity of archaeal lipids recovered from the OAE1b black shales suggests that they derive from a multitude of archaeal species. However, the specific 13C enrichment of all such lipids indicates a common `heavy' (13C-rich) carbon source for the archaea and/or a common pathway of carbon-fixation with a reduced 13C fractionation effect compared to the Calvin cycle used by algae, cyanobacteria and higher plants. The large differences (up to 12%) in 13C/12C ratios between the algal biomarkers and the much more abundant archaeal molecular fossils suggest that the latter were not living heterotrophically on photoautotrophic biomass. It seems likely that the archaea present during OAE1b used a chemical energy source (possibly ammonium) for carbon fixation since photoautotrophy within the domain of the Archaea is restricted to only a few species from hypersaline

  13. Unifying concepts in anaerobic respiration: insights from dissimilatory sulfur metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grein, Fabian; Ramos, Ana Raquel; Venceslau, Sofia S; Pereira, Inês A C

    2013-02-01

    Behind the versatile nature of prokaryotic energy metabolism is a set of redox proteins having a highly modular character. It has become increasingly recognized that a limited number of redox modules or building blocks appear grouped in different arrangements, giving rise to different proteins and functionalities. This modularity most likely reveals a common and ancient origin for these redox modules, and is obviously reflected in similar energy conservation mechanisms. The dissimilation of sulfur compounds was probably one of the earliest biological strategies used by primitive organisms to obtain energy. Here, we review some of the redox proteins involved in dissimilatory sulfur metabolism, focusing on sulfate reducing organisms, and highlight links between these proteins and others involved in different processes of anaerobic respiration. Noteworthy are links to the complex iron-sulfur molybdoenzyme family, and heterodisulfide reductases of methanogenic archaea. We discuss how chemiosmotic and electron bifurcation/confurcation may be involved in energy conservation during sulfate reduction, and how introduction of an additional module, multiheme cytochromes c, opens an alternative bioenergetic strategy that seems to increase metabolic versatility. Finally, we highlight new families of heterodisulfide reductase-related proteins from non-methanogenic organisms, which indicate a widespread distribution for these protein modules and may indicate a more general involvement of thiol/disulfide conversions in energy metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems. PMID:22982583

  14. Effects of Metal Nanoparticles on Methane Production from Waste-Activated Sludge and Microorganism Community Shift in Anaerobic Granular Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Dong; Dai, Lingling; Chen, Yinguang; Dai, Xiaohu

    2016-05-01

    Extensive use of nanoparticles (NPs) in consumer and industrial products has led to concerns about their potential environmental impacts; however, the influences of different NPs (e.g., nZVI (nano zero-valent iron), Ag NPs, Fe2O3 NPs and MgO NPs) on the anaerobic digestion of sludge have not yet been studied in depth. Additionally, a new guideline or the use of different NPs in the anaerobic digestion of sludge should be established to improve the anaerobic digestion of sludge and avoid inhibitory effects. This study investigated the effects of four representative NPs (i.e., nZVI, Ag NPs, Fe2O3 NPs and MgO NPs) on methane production during the anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS). The presence of 10 mg/g total suspended solids (TSS) nZVI and 100 mg/g TSS Fe2O3 NPs increased methane production to 120% and 117% of the control, respectively, whereas 500 mg/g TSS Ag NPs and 500 mg/g TSS MgO NPs generated lower levels of methane production (73.52% and 1.08% that of the control, respectively). These results showed that low concentrations of nZVI and Fe2O3 NPs promoted the amount of microbes (Bacteria and Archaea) and activities of key enzymes but that higher concentrations of Ag NPs and MgO NPs inhibited them.

  15. Effects of phosphate addition on methane fermentation in the batch and upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Sho; Shintani, Masaki; Sanchez, Zoe Kuizon; Kimura, Kohei; Numata, Mitsuru; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Kimbara, Kazuhide

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia inhibition of methane fermentation is one of the leading causes of failure of anaerobic digestion reactors. In a batch anaerobic digestion reactor with 429 mM NH3-N/L of ammonia, the addition of 25 mM phosphate resulted in an increase in methane production rate. Similar results were obtained with the addition of disodium phosphate in continuous anaerobic digestion using an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. While methane content and production rate decreased in the presence of more than 143 mM NH3-N/L of ammonium chloride in UASB, the addition of 5 mM disodium phosphate suppressed ammonia inhibition at 214 mM NH3-N/L of ammonium chloride. The addition prevented acetate/propionate accumulation, which might be one of the effects of the phosphate on the ammonia inhibition. The effects on the microbial community in the UASB reactor was also assessed, which was composed of Bacteria involved in hydrolysis, acidogenesis, acetogenesis, and dehydrogenation, as well as Archaea carrying out methanogenesis. The change in the microbial community was observed by ammonia inhibition and the addition of phosphate. The change indicates that the suppression of ammonia inhibition by disodium phosphate addition could stimulate the activity of methanogens, reduce shift in bacterial community, and enhance hydrogen-producing bacteria. The addition of phosphate will be an important treatment for future studies of methane fermentation.

  16. Massive expansion of marine archaea during a mid-Cretaceous oceanic anoxic event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuypers, M.M.M.; Blokker, P.; Erbacher, J.;

    2001-01-01

    Biogeochemical and stable carbon isotopic analysis of black-shale sequences deposited during an Albian oceanic anoxic event (∼112 million years ago) indicate that up to 80 weight percent of sedimentary organic carbon is derived from marine, nonthermophilic archaea. The carbon-13 content of archae...

  17. Role of multiprotein bridging factor 1 in archaea: bridging the domains?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de B.; Blombach, F.; Wu Hao,; Brouns, S.J.J.; Oost, van der J.

    2009-01-01

    MBF1 (multiprotein bridging factor 1) is a highly conserved protein in archaea and eukaryotes. It was originally identified as a mediator of the eukaryotic transcription regulator BmFTZ-F1 (Bombyx mori regulator of fushi tarazu). MBF1 was demonstrated to enhance transcription by forming a bridge bet

  18. Unique clusters of Archaea in Salar de Huasco, an athalassohaline evaporitic basin of the Chilean Altiplano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorador, Cristina; Vila, Irma; Remonsellez, Francisco; Imhoff, Johannes F; Witzel, Karl-Paul

    2010-08-01

    Analyses of clone libraries from water and sediments of different sites from Salar de Huasco, a high-altitude athalassohaline wetland in the Chilean Altiplano, revealed the presence of five unique clusters of uncultured Archaea that have not been previously reported or specifically assigned. These sequences were distantly related (83-96% sequence identity) to a limited number of other clone sequences and revealed no identity to cultured Archaea. The abundance of Archaea and Bacteria was estimated using qPCR and community composition was examined through the construction of clone libraries of archaeal 16S rRNA gene. Archaea were found to be dominant over Bacteria in sediments from two saline sites (sites H4: 6.31 x 10(4) and site H6: 1.37 x 10(4) microS cm(-1)) and in one of the water samples (freshwater from site H0: 607 muS cm(-1)). Euryarchaeotal sequences were more abundant than crenarchaeotal sequences. Many of the clone sequences (52%) were similar to uncultured archaeal groups found in marine ecosystems having identity values between 99% and 97%. A major fraction of the sequences (40%) were members of Methanobacteria, while others were included in the Marine Benthic Groups B and D, the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotic Group, the Terrestrial Miscellaneous Euryarchaeotal Group, Marine Group I and Halobacteria. The presence of uncultured archaeal groups in Salar de Huasco extends their known distribution in inland waters, providing new clues about their possible function in the environment.

  19. Archaea Dominate the Ammonia-Oxidizing Community in the Rhizosphere of the Freshwater Macrophyte Littorella uniflora▿

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann, Martina; Saunders, Aaron M.; Schramm, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Archaeal and bacterial ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA) had similar low relative abundances in freshwater sediment. In the rhizosphere of the submersed macrophyte Littorella uniflora, archaeal amoA was 500- to >8,000-fold enriched compared to bacterial amoA, suggesting that the enhanced nitrification activity observed in the rhizosphere was due to ammonia-oxidizing Archaea.

  20. Bacteria and Archaea in acidic environments and a key to morphological identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, E.I.

    2000-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic acidic environments are dominated by bacteria and Archaea. As many as 86 genera or species have been identified or isolated from pH <4.5 environments. This paper reviews the worldwide literature and provide tables of morphological characteristics, habitat information and a key for light microscope identification for the non-microbiologist.

  1. UV-inducible DNA exchange in hyperthermophilic archaea mediated by type IV pili

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ajon, Malgorzata; Froels, Sabrina; van Wolferen, Marleen; Stoecker, Kilian; Teichmann, Daniela; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Grogan, Dennis W.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Schleper, Christa; Ajon, Małgorzata

    2011-01-01

    Archaea, like bacteria and eukaryotes, contain proteins involved in various mechanisms of DNA repair, highlighting the importance of these processes for all forms of life. Species of the order Sulfolobales of hyperthermophilic crenarchaeota are equipped with a strongly UV-inducible type IV pilus sys

  2. A virus of hyperthermophilic archaea with a unique architecture among DNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensen, E.I.; Mochizuki, T,; Quemin, E.R. J.; Schouten, S.; Krupovica, M.; Prangishvili, D.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses package their genetic material in diverse ways. Most known strategies include encapsulation of nucleic acids into spherical or filamentous virions with icosahedral or helical symmetry, respectively. Filamentous viruses with dsDNA genomes are currently associated exclusively with Archaea. Her

  3. Murein and pseudomurein cell wall binding domains of bacteria and archaea-a comparative view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visweswaran, Ganesh Ram R.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Kok, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The cell wall, a major barrier protecting cells from their environment, is an essential compartment of both bacteria and archaea. It protects the organism from internal turgor pressure and gives a defined shape to the cell. The cell wall serves also as an anchoring surface for various proteins and a

  4. Bridging domains : a comparison between information processing in Archaea and Eukarya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de B.

    2015-01-01

    Bridging Domains A Comparison between Information Processing in Archaea and Eukarya

    Studying Information Processing Living cells evolved complex systems to handle the flow of information both accurately and efficiently.

  5. Detection of methanogenic archaea in seawater particles and the digestive tract of a marine fish species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Maarel, MJEC; Sprenger, W; Haanstra, R; Forney, LJ

    1999-01-01

    A methanogen-specific nested PCR approach was used to detect methanogenic archaea in seawater particles of the North Sea and the feces and the digestive tract of flounder (Platichthys flesus), a fish found in the North Sea. A number of 16S rDNA sequences with 97.6-99.5% similarity to Methanococcoide

  6. Diversity of membrane transport proteins for vitamins in bacteria and archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jähme, Michael; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: All organisms use cofactors to extend the catalytic capacities of proteins. Many bacteria and archaea can synthesize cofactors from primary metabolites, but there are also prokaryotes that do not have the complete biosynthetic pathways for all essential cofactors. These organisms are dep

  7. Bacteria, not archaea, restore nitrification in a zinc-contaminated soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, J.; Broos, K.; Wakelin, S.A.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Springael, D.; Smolders, E.

    2009-01-01

    Biological ammonia oxidation had long been thought to be mediated solely by discrete clades of - and -proteobacteria (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria; AOB). However, ammonia-oxidizing Crenarchaeota (ammonia-oxidizing archaea; AOA) have recently been identified and proposed to be the dominant agents of am

  8. Survival of Halophilic Archaea in the Stratosphere as a Mars Analog: A Transcriptomic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    DasSarma, S.; DasSarma, P.; Laye, V.; Harvey, J.; Reid, C.; Shultz, J.; Yarborough, A.; Lamb, A.; Koske-Phillips, A.; Herbst, A.; Molina, F.; Grah, O.; Phillips, T.

    2016-05-01

    On Earth, halophilic Archaea tolerate multiple extreme conditions similar to those on Mars. In order to study their survival, we launched live cultures into Earth’s stratosphere on helium balloons. The effects on survival and transcriptomes were interrogated in the lab.

  9. Anaerobic Digestion of Piggery Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Velsen, van, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological process by which organic matter is converted to methane and carbon dioxide by microbes in the absence of air (oxygen). In nature, anaerobic conversions occur at all places where organic material accumulates and the supply of oxygen is deficient, e.g. in marshes and lake sediments. Microbial formation of methane also plays a role in the ruminant digestion.In digestion units, the external conditions acting upon the process can be regulated to speed it up as c...

  10. Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria have lagged behind similar studies in aerobes. However, the current interest in biotechnology, the involvement of anaerobes in disease and the emergence of antibioticresistant strains have focused attention on the genetics of anaerobes. This article reviews molecular genetic studies in Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and methanogens. Certain genetic systems in some anaerobes differ from those in aerobes and illustrate the genetic diversity among bacteria

  11. The phenomenon of granulation of anaerobic sludge.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshoff Pol, L.W.

    1989-01-01

    Successful high-rate anaerobic wastewater treatment can only be accomplished when the slowgrowing anaerobic biomass is efficiently held back in the anaerobic treatment system. This biomass retention can be achieved in various ways including immobilization of the organisms on fixed materials and immo

  12. Viscosity evolution of anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pevere, A.; Guibaud, G.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.; Baudu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the apparent viscosity at steady shear rate of sieved anaerobic granular sludge (20¿315 ¿m diameter) sampled from different full-scale anaerobic reactors was recorded using rotation tests. The ¿limit viscosity¿ of sieved anaerobic granular sludge was determined from the apparent vis

  13. Kinetics and modeling of anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion modeling started in the early 1970s when the need for design and efficient operation of anaerobic systems became evident. At that time not only was the knowledge about the complex process of anaerobic digestion inadequate but also there were computational limitations. Thus, th...

  14. Abundances, diversity and seasonality of (non-extremophilic) Archaea in Alpine freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitschuler, Christoph; Hofmann, Katrin; Illmer, Paul

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess abundances and community compositions of Archaea within a heterogeneous set of freshwater systems in the Austrian Alps. Seasonal changes and geographical differences within Archaea, considering abiotic and biotic factors (e.g. temperature, pH, total organic carbon (TOC), NH4 (+), bacteria, fungi), were analysed in this context. Water samples were collected from 8 lakes, 10 creeks and the river Inn in 2014. Qualitative-quantitative data were derived via a comprehensive set of (quantitative) PCR assays and PCR-DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) based methodology, which was evaluated concerning specificity and reliability either previously or in this study. QPCR-derived archaeal abundances reached values of 10(3) copies mL(-1) on average, with a peak in winter-spring ('Cold Peak'), and covered 0-15 % (average: 1 %) of the microbial populations. This peak correlated with significantly raised TOC and low NH4 (+) levels during the cold seasons. Stagnant waters showed significantly higher archaeal abundances and diversities than flowing ones. Among methanogens, Methanosarcinales were the most common order. PCR-DGGE data showed that the archaeal communities were site-specific and could function as an ecological marker, in contrast to the more heterogeneous and unsteady bacterial and fungal community. This is attributable to the highly heterogeneous community of methanogenic Archaea (MA, Euryarchaeota), while only two species, Nitrosopumilus maritimus and Ca. Nitrososphaera gargensis, were found to be the ubiquitous representatives of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA, Thaumarchaeota) in Alpine freshwaters. This work emphasises the diversity, distribution and seasonality of non-extremophilic Archaea in Alpine freshwaters, with a first insight into their ecophysiological potential. PMID:27002962

  15. Oxygen Effects in Anaerobic Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshai Botheju

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of free oxygen in bio-gasification is a sparsely studied area, apart from the common argument of oxygen being toxic and inhibitory for anaerobic micro-cultures. Some studies have, however, revealed increased solubilisation of organic matter in the presence of some free oxygen in anaerobic digestion. This article analyses these counterbalancing phenomena with a mathematical modelling approach using the widely accepted biochemical model ADM 1. Aerobic oxidation of soluble carbon and inhibition of obligatory anaerobic organisms are modelled using standard saturation type kinetics. Biomass dependent first order hydrolysis kinetics is used to relate the increased hydrolysis rate with oxygen induced increase in biomass growth. The amended model, ADM 1-Ox (oxygen, has 25 state variables and 22 biochemical processes, presented in matrix form. The computer aided simulation tool AQUASIM 2.1 is used to simulate the developed model. Simulation predictions are evaluated against experimental data obtained using a laboratory batch test array comprising miniature anaerobic bio-reactors of 100 ml total volume each, operated under different initial air headspaces giving rise to the different oxygen loading conditions. The reactors were initially fed with a glucose solution and incubated at 35 Celsius, for 563 hours. Under the oxygen load conditions of 22, 44 and 88 mg/L, the ADM1-Ox model simulations predicted the experimental methane potentials quite adequately. Both the experimental data and the simulations suggest a linear reduction of methane potential with respect to the increase in oxygen load within this range.

  16. Anaerobic Treatment of Methanolic Wastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettinga, G.; Geest, van der A.Th.; Hobma, S.W.; Laan, van der J.B.R.

    1979-01-01

    Although it is well known that methanol can be fermented directly by a specific species of methane bacteria, viz. Methanosarcina barkeri, until now little information was available about the effect of important environmental factors on the anaerobic fermentation of methanol. As methanol can be the m

  17. 'Methane oxidation on supported gold catalysts'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walther, Guido

    2008-01-01

    hydrocarbon oxygenates, even at mild conditions (p =1 bar, # B250XC). This has been taken as an indication that CH4 oxidation proceeds along a pathway of full combustion. Thus, it was decided to study the tail of the CH4 oxidation pathway, which is given by CO and H2 oxidation, in more detailed. Extensive...

  18. Anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye;

    2003-01-01

    by the immobilization of the biomass, which forms static biofilms, particle-supported biofilms, or granules depending on the reactor's operational conditions. The advantages of the high-rate anaerobic digestion over the conventional aerobic wastewater treatment methods has created a clear trend for the change......-rate anaerobic treatment systems based on anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm are described in this chapter. Emphasis is given to a) the Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) systems, b) the main characteristics of the anaerobic granular sludge, and c) the factors that control the granulation process...

  19. The Sulfate-Rich and Extreme Saline Sediment of the Ephemeral Tirez Lagoon: A Biotope for Acetoclastic Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Hydrogenotrophic Methanogenic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Montoya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our goal was to examine the composition of methanogenic archaea (MA and sulfate-reducing (SRP and sulfur-oxidizing (SOP prokaryotes in the extreme athalassohaline and particularly sulfate-rich sediment of Tirez Lagoon (Spain. Thus, adenosine-5′-phosphosulfate (APS reductase α (aprA and methyl coenzyme M reductase α (mcrA gene markers were amplified given that both enzymes are specific for SRP, SOP, and MA, respectively. Anaerobic populations sampled at different depths in flooded and dry seasons from the anoxic sediment were compared qualitatively via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE fingerprint analysis. Phylogenetic analyses allowed the detection of SRP belonging to Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfohalobiaceae, and Peptococcaceae in ∂-proteobacteria and Firmicutes and SOP belonging to Chromatiales/Thiotrichales clade and Ectothiorhodospiraceae in γ-proteobacteria as well as MA belonging to methylotrophic species in Methanosarcinaceae and one hydrogenotrophic species in Methanomicrobiaceae. We also estimated amino acid composition, GC content, and preferential codon usage for the AprA and McrA sequences from halophiles, nonhalophiles, and Tirez phylotypes. Even though our results cannot be currently conclusive regarding the halotolerant strategies carried out by Tirez phylotypes, we discuss the possibility of a plausible “salt-in” signal in SRP and SOP as well as of a speculative complementary haloadaptation between salt-in and salt-out strategies in MA.

  20. amoA-encoding archaea and thaumarchaeol in the lakes on the northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China

    OpenAIRE

    Jian eYang; Hongchen eJiang; Hailiang eDong; Huanye eWang; Geng eWu; Weiguo eHou; Weiguo eLiu; Chuanlun eZhang; Yongjuan eSun; Zhongping eLai

    2013-01-01

    All known ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) belong to the phylum Thaumarchaeota within the domain Archaea. AOA possess the diagnostic amoA gene (encoding the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) and produce lipid biomarker thaumarchaeol. Although the abundance and diversity of amoA gene-encoding archaea (AEA) in freshwater lakes have been well-studied, little is known about AEA ecology in saline/hypersaline lakes. In this study, the distribution of the archaeal amoA gene and thaumarchaeol we...

  1. Effect of incubation conditions on anaerobic susceptibility testing results.

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, P R; Niles, A C

    1982-01-01

    We determined the effect of performing antimicrobial susceptibility tests in five different anaerobic incubation systems: GasPak jar, large GasPak jar, evacuated-gassed anaerobic jar, anaerobic chamber, and Bio-Bag. Growth of the anaerobes was equivalent in all five incubation systems. The results of testing 38 anaerobes against 11 antimicrobial agents were comparable for the anaerobic jars and anaerobic chamber. However, discordant results were observed for metronidazole and cefamandole test...

  2. Nitrogen removal from wastewater by anaerobic methane-driven denitrification in a lab-scale reactor: heterotrophic denitrifiers associated with denitrifying methanotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhanfei; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Xu; Cai, Chaoyang; Geng, Sha; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xinhua; Hu, Baolan

    2015-12-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) is a newly discovered bioprocess that reduces nitrite to dinitrogen with methane as electron donor, which has promising potential to remove nitrogen from wastewater. In this work, a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated for 609 days with methane as the sole external electron donor. In the SBR, nitrite in synthetic wastewater was removed continuously; the final volumetric nitrogen removal rate was 12.22±0.02 mg N L(-1) day(-1) and the percentage of nitrogen removal was 98.5 ± 0.2 %. Microbial community analysis indicated that denitrifying methanotrophs dominated (60-70 %) the population of the final sludge. Notably, activity testing and microbial analysis both suggested that heterotrophic denitrifiers existed in the reactor throughout the operation period. After 609 days, the activity testing indicated the nitrogen removal percentage of heterotrophic denitrification was 17 ± 2 % and that of n-damo was 83 ± 2 %. A possible mutualism may be developed between the dominated denitrifying methanotrophs and the associated heterotrophs through cross-feed. Heterotrophs may live on the microbial products excreted by denitrifying methanotrophs and provide growth factors that are required by denitrifying methanotrophs. PMID:26342737

  3. Methanogenic Archaea and oral infections – ways to unravel the black box

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter Horz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Archaea, organisms that make up the third domain of cellular life are members of the human oral microflora. They are strikingly less diverse than oral bacteria and appear to be relatively rare with respect to their numerical abundance. Since they have been exclusively found in association with oral infections such as periodontitis and apical periodontitis and given their unique physiology and energy metabolism, it is highly plausible that they are more than just secondary colonizers of infected areas, but instead are actively involved in the overall poly-microbial infection process. Conversely, it is a highly challenging task to clearly demonstrate their possible active participation – mostly due to the difficulty to grow them in routine microbiology laboratories. This current review points out the importance for understanding the medical impact of methanogens and aims at devising strategies for elucidating the true function of archaea in the oral ecosystem.

  4. Ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in the Rhizosphere of Freshwater Macrophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Martina; Schramm, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    -specific microbial community distinct from that of unvegetated sediment and (ii) that aquatic macrophytes have an impact on abundance and activity of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria in freshwater sediment. The goal of this study was to test these hypotheses for the key functional group for coupled nitrification......AMMONIA-OXIDIZING ARCHAEA AND BACTERIA IN THE RHIZOSPHERE OF FRESHWATER MACROPHYTES Martina Herrmann and Andreas Schramm Department of Biological Sciences, Microbiology, University of Aarhus, Denmark Aquatic macrophytes such as Littorella uniflora and Lobelia dortmanna release oxygen from...... measurements revealed clear differences in ammonia oxidation rates. The diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was assessed using the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene as functional marker. Both AOA and AOB could be detected in the rhizosphere of all three plant...

  5. Anaerobic digestion of solid material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavilin, V.A.; Lokshina, L.Y.; Flotats, X.;

    2007-01-01

    A new multidimensional (3 and 2D) anaerobic digestion model for cylindrical reactor with non-uniform influent concentration distributions was developed to study the way in which mixing intensity affects the efficiency of continuous-flow anaerobic digestion. Batch experiments reported and simulated...... earlier by Vavilin and Angelidaki (2005) were used to modernize a kinetic scheme and to obtain the corresponding kinetic coefficients. In the new models, hydrolytic microorganisms were included using Contois kinetics for the hydrolysis/acidogenesis degradation of municipal solid waste (MSW). Monod...... kinetics was applied for description of methanogenesis. Both hydrolytic and methanogenic microorganisms were assumed to be inhibited by high volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentration. According to the new distributed models, the mixing level reduction expressed by increasing dimensionless Peclet number may...

  6. The genome of Salinibacter ruber: Convergence and gene exchange among hyperhalophilic bacteria and archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Mongodin, E. F.; Nelson, K. E.; Daugherty, S; DeBoy, R. T.; Wister, J.; Khouri, H; Weidman, J.; Walsh, D.A.; Papke, R. T.; Sanchez Perez, G.; Sharma, A K; Nesbø, C L; Macleod, D; Bapteste, E; Doolittle, W F

    2005-01-01

    Saturated thalassic brines are among the most physically demanding habitats on Earth: few microbes survive in them. Salinibacter ruber is among these organisms and has been found repeatedly in significant numbers in climax saltern crystallizer communities. The phenotype of this bacterium is remarkably similar to that of the hyperhalophilic Archaea (Haloarchaea). The genome sequence suggests that this resemblance has arisen through convergence at the physiological level (different genes produc...

  7. Survival of Methanogenic Archaea from Siberian Permafrost under Simulated Martian Thermal Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Daria Morozova; D. Möhlmann; Dirk Wagner

    2007-01-01

    Since ESA mission Mars Express determined water on Mars, a fundamental requirement for life, as well as the presence of CH4 in the Martian atmosphere, which could only have originated from active volcanism or from biological sources, it is obviously that microbial life could still exist on Mars, for example in the form of subsurface lithoautotrophic ecosystems, which are also exist in permafrost regions on Earth. Present work deals with the resistance investigation of methanogenic archaea fro...

  8. Diversity and abundance of ammonia oxidizing archaea in tropical compost systems

    OpenAIRE

    de Gannes, Vidya; Eudoxie, Gaius; Dyer, David H.; Hickey, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Composting is widely used to transform waste materials into valuable agricultural products. In the tropics, large quantities of agricultural wastes could be potentially useful in agriculture after composting. However, while microbiological processes of composts in general are well established, relatively little is known about microbial communities that may be unique to these in tropical systems, particularly nitrifiers. The recent discovery of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) has changed the p...

  9. Diversity and dynamics of Archaea in an activated sludge wastewater treatment plant

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksson, Nils Johan; Hermansson, Malte; Wilén, Britt-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Background The activated sludge process is one of the most widely used methods for treatment of wastewater and the microbial community composition in the sludge is important for the process operation. While the bacterial communities have been characterized in various activated sludge systems little is known about archaeal communities in activated sludge. The diversity and dynamics of the Archaea community in a full-scale activated sludge wastewater treatment plant were investigated by fluores...

  10. Accurate Prediction of the Statistics of Repetitions in Random Sequences: A Case Study in Archaea Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régnier, Mireille; Chassignet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive patterns in genomic sequences have a great biological significance and also algorithmic implications. Analytic combinatorics allow to derive formula for the expected length of repetitions in a random sequence. Asymptotic results, which generalize previous works on a binary alphabet, are easily computable. Simulations on random sequences show their accuracy. As an application, the sample case of Archaea genomes illustrates how biological sequences may differ from random sequences.

  11. Archaea and Fungi of the Human Gut Microbiome: Correlations with Diet and Bacterial Residents

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Hoffmann; Serena Dollive; Stephanie Grunberg; Jun De Chen; Hongzhe Li; Wu, Gary D.; Lewis, James D.; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2013-01-01

    Diet influences health as a source of nutrients and toxins, and by shaping the composition of resident microbial populations. Previous studies have begun to map out associations between diet and the bacteria and viruses of the human gut microbiome. Here we investigate associations of diet with fungal and archaeal populations, taking advantage of samples from 98 well-characterized individuals. Diet was quantified using inventories scoring both long-term and recent diet, and archaea and fungi w...

  12. Accurate Prediction of the Statistics of Repetitions in Random Sequences: A Case Study in Archaea Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régnier, Mireille; Chassignet, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive patterns in genomic sequences have a great biological significance and also algorithmic implications. Analytic combinatorics allow to derive formula for the expected length of repetitions in a random sequence. Asymptotic results, which generalize previous works on a binary alphabet, are easily computable. Simulations on random sequences show their accuracy. As an application, the sample case of Archaea genomes illustrates how biological sequences may differ from random sequences. PMID:27376057

  13. Detection of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Fish Processing Effluent Treatment Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Devivaraprasad Reddy, A.; Subrahmanyam, Gangavarapu; Shivani Kallappa, Girisha; Karunasagar, Iddya; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the rate limiting step in nitrification and thus have an important role in removal of ammonia in natural and engineered systems with participation of both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). However, their relative distribution and activity in fish processing effluent treatment plants (FPETPs) though significant, is hitherto unreported. Presence of AOA in sludge samples obtained from FPETPs was studied by amplification and sequencing of t...

  14. Global biodiversity of aquatic ammonia-oxidizing archaea is partitioned by habitat

    OpenAIRE

    Biller, Steven J.; Mosier, Annika C.; Wells, George F.; Francis, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Archaea play an important role in nitrification and are, thus, inextricably linked to the global carbon and nitrogen cycles. Since the initial discovery of an ammonia monooxygenase α-subunit (amoA) gene associated with an archaeal metagenomic fragment, archaeal amoA sequences have been detected in a wide variety of nitrifying environments. Recent sequencing efforts have revealed extensive diversity of archaeal amoA sequences within different habitats. In this study, we have examined over 800...

  15. Anaerobic procedures of wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Zupančič, Tadeja

    2013-01-01

    Highly polluted wastewater is formed in dairies, pig farms and slaughterhouses. Before released into watercourses, wastewater should be properly processed with different treatment procedures in wastewater treatment plants. The thesis deals with the descriptions of mechanical, physical and chemical, and biological wastewater treatment procedures and the description of the factors which affect the reactions in wastewater treatment plants. I give special emphasis on anaerobic wastewater treatmen...

  16. Anaerobic digestion of aliphatic polyesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmejkalová, Pavla; Kužníková, Veronika; Merna, Jan; Hermanová, Soňa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic processes for the treatment of plastic materials waste represent versatile and effective approach in environmental protection and solid waste management. In this work, anaerobic biodegradability of model aliphatic polyesters, poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), in the form of powder and melt-pressed films with varying molar mass, was studied. Biogas production was explored in batch laboratory trials at 55 ± 1°C under a nitrogen atmosphere. The inoculum used was thermophilic digested sludge (total solids concentration of 2.9%) from operating digesters at the Central Waste Water Treatment Plant in Prague, Czech Republic. Methanogenic biodegradation of PCLs typically yielded from 54 to 60% of the theoretical biogas yield. The biodegradability of PLAs achieved from 56 to 84% of the theoretical value. High biogas yield (up to 677 mL/g TS) with high methane content (more than 60%), comparable with conventionally processed materials, confirmed the potential of polyester samples for anaerobic treatment in the case of their exploitation in agriculture or as a packaging material in the food industry. PMID:27191559

  17. Macroecological drivers of archaea and bacteria in benthic deep-sea ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovaro, Roberto; Molari, Massimiliano; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Bacteria and archaea dominate the biomass of benthic deep-sea ecosystems at all latitudes, playing a crucial role in global biogeochemical cycles, but their macroscale patterns and macroecological drivers are still largely unknown. We show the results of the most extensive field study conducted so far to investigate patterns and drivers of the distribution and structure of benthic prokaryote assemblages from 228 samples collected at latitudes comprising 34°N to 79°N, and from ca. 400- to 5570-m depth. We provide evidence that, in deep-sea ecosystems, benthic bacterial and archaeal abundances significantly increase from middle to high latitudes, with patterns more pronounced for archaea, and particularly for Marine Group I Thaumarchaeota. Our results also reveal that different microbial components show varying sensitivities to changes in temperature conditions and food supply. We conclude that climate change will primarily affect deep-sea benthic archaea, with important consequences on global biogeochemical cycles, particularly at high latitudes. PMID:27386507

  18. Methane production and methanogenic Archaea in the digestive tracts of millipedes (Diplopoda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Šustr

    Full Text Available Methane production by intestinal methanogenic Archaea and their community structure were compared among phylogenetic lineages of millipedes. Tropical and temperate millipedes of 35 species and 17 families were investigated. Species that emitted methane were mostly in the juliform orders Julida, Spirobolida, and Spirostreptida. The irregular phylogenetic distribution of methane production correlated with the presence of the methanogen-specific mcrA gene. The study brings the first detailed survey of methanogens' diversity in the digestive tract of millipedes. Sequences related to Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and some unclassified Archaea were detected using molecular profiling (DGGE. The differences in substrate preferences of the main lineages of methanogenic Archaea found in different millipede orders indicate that the composition of methanogen communities may reflect the differences in available substrates for methanogenesis or the presence of symbiotic protozoa in the digestive tract. We conclude that differences in methane production in the millipede gut reflect differences in the activity and proliferation of intestinal methanogens rather than an absolute inability of some millipede taxa to host methanogens. This inference was supported by the general presence of methanogenic activity in millipede faecal pellets and the presence of the 16S rRNA gene of methanogens in all tested taxa in the two main groups of millipedes, the Helminthophora and the Pentazonia.

  19. Methane production and methanogenic Archaea in the digestive tracts of millipedes (Diplopoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šustr, Vladimír; Chroňáková, Alica; Semanová, Stanislava; Tajovský, Karel; Šimek, Miloslav

    2014-01-01

    Methane production by intestinal methanogenic Archaea and their community structure were compared among phylogenetic lineages of millipedes. Tropical and temperate millipedes of 35 species and 17 families were investigated. Species that emitted methane were mostly in the juliform orders Julida, Spirobolida, and Spirostreptida. The irregular phylogenetic distribution of methane production correlated with the presence of the methanogen-specific mcrA gene. The study brings the first detailed survey of methanogens' diversity in the digestive tract of millipedes. Sequences related to Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and some unclassified Archaea were detected using molecular profiling (DGGE). The differences in substrate preferences of the main lineages of methanogenic Archaea found in different millipede orders indicate that the composition of methanogen communities may reflect the differences in available substrates for methanogenesis or the presence of symbiotic protozoa in the digestive tract. We conclude that differences in methane production in the millipede gut reflect differences in the activity and proliferation of intestinal methanogens rather than an absolute inability of some millipede taxa to host methanogens. This inference was supported by the general presence of methanogenic activity in millipede faecal pellets and the presence of the 16S rRNA gene of methanogens in all tested taxa in the two main groups of millipedes, the Helminthophora and the Pentazonia.

  20. A review of acquired thermotolerance, heat shock proteins, and molecular chaperones in archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    Acquired thermotolerance, the associated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) under stress conditions, and the role of HSPs as molecular chaperones under normal growth conditions have been studied extensively in eukaryotes and bacteria, whereas research in these areas in archaea is only beginning. All organisms have evolved a variety of strategies for coping with high-temperature stress, and among these strategies is the increased synthesis of HSPs. The facts that both high temperatures and chemical stresses induce the HSPs and that some of the HSPs recognize and bind to unfolded proteins in vitro have led to the theory that the function of HSPs is to prevent protein aggregation in vivo. The facts that some HSPs are abundant under normal growth conditions and that they assist in protein folding in vitro have led to the theory that they assist protein folding in vivo; in this role, they are referred to as molecular chaperones. The limited research on acquired thermotolerance, HSPs, and molecular chaperones in archaea, particularly the hyperthermophilic archaea, suggests that these extremophiles provide a new perspective in these areas of research, both because they are members of a separate phylogenetic domain and because they have evolved to live under extreme conditions.

  1. Phylogenetic diversity of Archaea in the intestinal tract of termites from different lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Huang, Zhou; Han, Shuai; Fan, Shuo; Yang, Hong

    2015-08-01

    Termites are among the few arthropods that emit methane to the atmosphere, which is a significant source of global greenhouse gas due to their huge biomass on earth. In this study, phylogenetic diversity of Archaea of five termite species from different lineages were analyzed based on 16S rRNA genes. Archaea associated with wood-feeding lower termite, R. chinensis were exclusively Methanobrevibacter in the order Methanobacteriales. This type of methanogens was also found in Nasutitermes sp. and Microcerotermes sp. but not in the fungus-cultivating termites, Odontotermes formosanus and Macrotermes barneyi, which harbor Archaea of the order Methanoplasmatales and Methanosarcinales in their guts. Archaeal diversity of wood-feeding higher termites was higher than wood-feeding lower termites. The highest archaeal diversity was found in Nasutitermes sp. In addition to methanogens affiliated with the orders Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, and Methanoplasmatales, 37% of archaeal clones were affiliated with non-methanogenic Thaumarchaeota. The results of this study will be significant for further understanding of symbiotic relationship between intestinal microbiota and termites.

  2. Archaea and fungi of the human gut microbiome: correlations with diet and bacterial residents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Diet influences health as a source of nutrients and toxins, and by shaping the composition of resident microbial populations. Previous studies have begun to map out associations between diet and the bacteria and viruses of the human gut microbiome. Here we investigate associations of diet with fungal and archaeal populations, taking advantage of samples from 98 well-characterized individuals. Diet was quantified using inventories scoring both long-term and recent diet, and archaea and fungi were characterized by deep sequencing of marker genes in DNA purified from stool. For fungi, we found 66 genera, with generally mutually exclusive presence of either the phyla Ascomycota or Basiodiomycota. For archaea, Methanobrevibacter was the most prevalent genus, present in 30% of samples. Several other archaeal genera were detected in lower abundance and frequency. Myriad associations were detected for fungi and archaea with diet, with each other, and with bacterial lineages. Methanobrevibacter and Candida were positively associated with diets high in carbohydrates, but negatively with diets high in amino acids, protein, and fatty acids. A previous study emphasized that bacterial population structure was associated primarily with long-term diet, but high Candida abundance was most strongly associated with the recent consumption of carbohydrates. Methobrevibacter abundance was associated with both long term and recent consumption of carbohydrates. These results confirm earlier targeted studies and provide a host of new associations to consider in modeling the effects of diet on the gut microbiome and human health.

  3. Ammonia-oxidising bacteria not archaea dominate nitrification activity in semi-arid agricultural soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banning, Natasha C.; Maccarone, Linda D.; Fisk, Louise M.; Murphy, Daniel V.

    2015-06-01

    Ammonia-oxidising archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) are responsible for the rate limiting step in nitrification; a key nitrogen (N) loss pathway in agricultural systems. Dominance of AOA relative to AOB in the amoA gene pool has been reported in many ecosystems, although their relative contributions to nitrification activity are less clear. Here we examined the distribution of AOA and AOB with depth in semi-arid agricultural soils in which soil organic matter content or pH had been altered, and related their distribution to gross nitrification rates. Soil depth had a significant effect on gene abundances, irrespective of management history. Contrary to reports of AOA dominance in soils elsewhere, AOA gene copy numbers were four-fold lower than AOB in the surface (0-10 cm). AOA gene abundance increased with depth while AOB decreased, and sub-soil abundances were approximately equal (10-90 cm). The depth profile of total archaea did not mirror that of AOA, indicating the likely presence of archaea without nitrification capacity in the surface. Gross nitrification rates declined significantly with depth and were positively correlated to AOB but negatively correlated to AOA gene abundances. We conclude that AOB are most likely responsible for regulating nitrification in these semi-arid soils.

  4. Towards a natural system of organisms: proposal for the domains Archaea, Bacteria, and Eucarya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woese, C R; Kandler, O; Wheelis, M L

    1990-06-01

    Molecular structures and sequences are generally more revealing of evolutionary relationships than are classical phenotypes (particularly so among microorganisms). Consequently, the basis for the definition of taxa has progressively shifted from the organismal to the cellular to the molecular level. Molecular comparisons show that life on this planet divides into three primary groupings, commonly known as the eubacteria, the archaebacteria, and the eukaryotes. The three are very dissimilar, the differences that separate them being of a more profound nature than the differences that separate typical kingdoms, such as animals and plants. Unfortunately, neither of the conventionally accepted views of the natural relationships among living systems--i.e., the five-kingdom taxonomy or the eukaryote-prokaryote dichotomy--reflects this primary tripartite division of the living world. To remedy this situation we propose that a formal system of organisms be established in which above the level of kingdom there exists a new taxon called a "domain." Life on this planet would then be seen as comprising three domains, the Bacteria, the Archaea, and the Eucarya, each containing two or more kingdoms. (The Eucarya, for example, contain Animalia, Plantae, Fungi, and a number of others yet to be defined). Although taxonomic structure within the Bacteria and Eucarya is not treated herein, Archaea is formally subdivided into the two kingdoms Euryarchaeota (encompassing the methanogens and their phenotypically diverse relatives) and Crenarchaeota (comprising the relatively tight clustering of extremely thermophilic archaebacteria, whose general phenotype appears to resemble most the ancestral phenotype of the Archaea. PMID:2112744

  5. Synergistic effects of the chitosan addition and polysaccharides-EPS on the formation of anaerobic granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudayah, N; Suraraksa, B; Chaiprasert, P

    2016-11-01

    Concomitant early granulation with chitosan addition under a syntroph-specific substrate and enhancement of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production were aimed at to build anaerobic granules with high syntrophic activities in a short period. Two laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors were operated as control (R1) and chitosan addition (R2) reactors during early granulation (phase 1). Chitosan decreased the negativity of microbial surface charges (zeta potential) to -10.5 mV on day 58 which led to increases in average diameter sizes, nuclei and granule ratio of approximately 115 µm, 55.1% and 8.2%, respectively. While zeta potential in R1 slightly changed, this resulted in less microbial aggregation. Although microbial aggregation in R2 was rapidly triggered by chitosan addition during phase 1, its structure was clumpy with rough surface due to lack of EPS. Substrate switching to glucose increased polysaccharides-EPS during phase 2 which was synergistically improved on the structural characteristics of microbial aggregate in R2, that is, more spherical and compact, with a smoother surface. Rapid-growth microorganism was also boosted, which then dominated the outer layer of the aggregate. The Archaea clumps were observed at a deeper layer and were surrounded by Eubacteria, presumably acetogens, indicating a syntrophic relationship due to substrate association between these microbial groups. PMID:27553457

  6. Modelling Methane Production and Sulfate Reduction in Anaerobic Granular Sludge Reactor with Ethanol as Electron Donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Dai, Xiaohu; Wang, Qilin; Pan, Yuting; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a mathematical model based on growth kinetics of microorganisms and substrates transportation through biofilms was developed to describe methane production and sulfate reduction with ethanol being a key electron donor. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from two case studies conducted in granule-based Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactors. The results suggest that the developed model could satisfactorily describe methane and sulfide productions as well as ethanol and sulfate removals in both systems. The modeling results reveal a stratified distribution of methanogenic archaea, sulfate-reducing bacteria and fermentative bacteria in the anaerobic granular sludge and the relative abundances of these microorganisms vary with substrate concentrations. It also indicates sulfate-reducing bacteria can successfully outcompete fermentative bacteria for ethanol utilization when COD/SO42‑ ratio reaches 0.5. Model simulation suggests that an optimal granule diameter for the maximum methane production efficiency can be achieved while the sulfate reduction efficiency is not significantly affected by variation in granule size. It also indicates that the methane production and sulfate reduction can be affected by ethanol and sulfate loading rates, and the microbial community development stage in the reactor, which provided comprehensive insights into the system for its practical operation.

  7. Potential for anaerobic conversion of xenobiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Dolfing, J.; Haagensen, Frank;

    2003-01-01

    This review covers the latest research on the anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic xenobiotic compounds, with emphasis on surfactants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalate esters, polychlorinated biphenyls, halogenated phenols, and pesticides. The versatility of anaerobic reactor systems...... regarding the treatment of xenobiotics is shown with the focus on the UASB reactor, but the applicability of other reactor designs for treatment of hazardous waste is also included. Bioaugmentation has proved to be a viable technique to enhance a specific activity in anaerobic reactors and recent research...

  8. Molecular ecology of anaerobic reactor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H. Jacob Peider; Zheng, D.; Westermann, Peter;

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic reactor systems are essential for the treatment of solid and liquid wastes and constitute a core facility in many waste treatment plants. Although much is known about the basic metabolism in different types of anaerobic reactors, little is known about the microbes responsible...... to the abundance of each microbe in anaerobic reactor systems by rRNA probing. This chapter focuses on various molecular techniques employed and problems encountered when elucidating the microbial ecology of anaerobic reactor systems. Methods such as quantitative dot blot/fluorescence in-situ probing using various...

  9. Performance and microbial community analysis of the anaerobic reactor with coke oven gas biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Xie, Li; Luo, Gang; Zhou, Qi; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-10-01

    A new method for simultaneous coke oven gas (COG) biomethanation and in situ biogas upgrading in anaerobic reactor was developed in this study. The simulated coke oven gas (SCOG) (92% H2 and 8% CO) was injected directly into the anaerobic reactor treating sewage sludge through hollow fiber membrane (HFM). With pH control at 8.0, the added H2 and CO were fully consumed and no negative effects on the anaerobic degradation of sewage sludge were observed. The maximum CH4 content in the biogas was 99%. The addition of SCOG resulted in enrichment and dominance of homoacetogenetic genus Treponema and hydrogenotrophic genus Methanoculleus in the liquid, which indicated that H2 were converted to methane by both direct (hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis) and indirect (homoacetogenesis+aceticlastic methanogenesis) pathways in the liquid. However, the aceticlasitic genus Methanosaeta was dominant for archaea in the biofilm on the HFM, which indicated indirect (homoacetogenesis+aceticlastic methanogenesis) H2 conversion pathway on the biofilm. PMID:23941705

  10. Anaerobic digestion of coffee waste

    OpenAIRE

    L. Neves; Ribeiro, R.; Oliveira, Rosário; Alves, M. M.

    2005-01-01

    The anaerobic co-digestion of five different by-products from instant coffee substitutes production was studied in mesophilic conditions. The co-substrate was the excess of sewage sludge from the wastewater treatment plant located in the same coffee factory. Four of the tested wastes produced methane in the range of 0.24-0.28 m³CH4(STP)/kgVSinitial . Reduction of 50-73% in total solids and 75-80% in volatile solids were obtained and the hydrolysis rate constants were in the ran...

  11. Geochemistry and Mixing Drive the Spatial Distribution of Free-living Archaea and Bacteria in Yellowstone Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjun eKan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Yellowstone Lake, the largest subalpine lake in the United States, harbors great novelty and diversity of Bacteria and Archaea. Size-fractionated water samples (0.1-0.8 µm, 0.8-3.0 µm, and 3.0-20 µm were collected from surface photic zone, deep mixing zone, and vent fluids at different locations in the lake by using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV. Quantification with real-time PCR indicated that Bacteria dominated free-living microorganisms with Bacteria/Archaea ratios ranging from 4037:1 (surface water to 25:1 (vent water. Microbial population structures (both Bacteria and Archaea were assessed using 454-FLX sequencing with a total of 662,302 pyrosequencing reads for V1 & V2 regions of 16S rRNA genes. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS analyses indicated that strong spatial distribution patterns existed from surface to deep vents for free-living Archaea and Bacteria in the Lake. Along with pH, major vent-associated geochemical constituents including CH4, CO2, H2, DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon, DOC (dissolved organic carbon, SO42-, O2 and metals were likely the major drivers for microbial population structures, however mixing events occurring in the lake also impacted the distribution patterns. Distinct Bacteria and Archaea were present among size fractions, and bigger size fractions included particle-associated microbes (>3 µm and contained higher predicted OTU richness and microbial diversities (genus level than free-living ones (< 0.8 µm. Our study represents the first attempt at addressing the spatial distribution of Bacteria and Archaea in Yellowstone Lake, and our results highlight the variable contribution of Archaea and Bacteria to the hydrogeochemical-relevant metabolism of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur.

  12. Geochemistry and Mixing Drive the Spatial Distribution of Free-Living Archaea and Bacteria in Yellowstone Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Jinjun; Clingenpeel, Scott; Dow, Charles L; McDermott, Timothy R; Macur, Richard E; Inskeep, William P; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone Lake, the largest subalpine lake in the United States, harbors great novelty and diversity of Bacteria and Archaea. Size-fractionated water samples (0.1-0.8, 0.8-3.0, and 3.0-20 μm) were collected from surface photic zone, deep mixing zone, and vent fluids at different locations in the lake by using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Quantification with real-time PCR indicated that Bacteria dominated free-living microorganisms with Bacteria/Archaea ratios ranging from 4037:1 (surface water) to 25:1 (vent water). Microbial population structures (both Bacteria and Archaea) were assessed using 454-FLX sequencing with a total of 662,302 pyrosequencing reads for V1 and V2 regions of 16S rRNA genes. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analyses indicated that strong spatial distribution patterns existed from surface to deep vents for free-living Archaea and Bacteria in the lake. Along with pH, major vent-associated geochemical constituents including CH4, CO2, H2, DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon), DOC (dissolved organic carbon), SO4 (2-), O2 and metals were likely the major drivers for microbial population structures, however, mixing events occurring in the lake also impacted the distribution patterns. Distinct Bacteria and Archaea were present among size fractions, and bigger size fractions included particle-associated microbes (> 3 μm) and contained higher predicted operational taxonomic unit richness and microbial diversities (genus level) than free-living ones (<0.8 μm). Our study represents the first attempt at addressing the spatial distribution of Bacteria and Archaea in Yellowstone Lake, and our results highlight the variable contribution of Archaea and Bacteria to the hydrogeochemical-relevant metabolism of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. PMID:26973602

  13. Geochemistry and Mixing Drive the Spatial Distribution of Free-Living Archaea and Bacteria in Yellowstone Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Jinjun; Clingenpeel, Scott; Dow, Charles L.; McDermott, Timothy R.; Macur, Richard E.; Inskeep, William P.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone Lake, the largest subalpine lake in the United States, harbors great novelty and diversity of Bacteria and Archaea. Size-fractionated water samples (0.1–0.8, 0.8–3.0, and 3.0–20 μm) were collected from surface photic zone, deep mixing zone, and vent fluids at different locations in the lake by using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Quantification with real-time PCR indicated that Bacteria dominated free-living microorganisms with Bacteria/Archaea ratios ranging from 4037:1 (surface water) to 25:1 (vent water). Microbial population structures (both Bacteria and Archaea) were assessed using 454-FLX sequencing with a total of 662,302 pyrosequencing reads for V1 and V2 regions of 16S rRNA genes. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) analyses indicated that strong spatial distribution patterns existed from surface to deep vents for free-living Archaea and Bacteria in the lake. Along with pH, major vent-associated geochemical constituents including CH4, CO2, H2, DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon), DOC (dissolved organic carbon), SO42-, O2 and metals were likely the major drivers for microbial population structures, however, mixing events occurring in the lake also impacted the distribution patterns. Distinct Bacteria and Archaea were present among size fractions, and bigger size fractions included particle-associated microbes (> 3 μm) and contained higher predicted operational taxonomic unit richness and microbial diversities (genus level) than free-living ones (<0.8 μm). Our study represents the first attempt at addressing the spatial distribution of Bacteria and Archaea in Yellowstone Lake, and our results highlight the variable contribution of Archaea and Bacteria to the hydrogeochemical-relevant metabolism of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. PMID:26973602

  14. Instrumentation in anaerobic treatment - research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjers, H.; Lier, van J.B.

    2006-01-01

    High rate anaerobic treatment reactors are able to uncouple solids and liquid retention time, resulting in high biomass concentrations. Principal advantages of anaerobic treatment include: energy efficiency, low biomass yield, low nutrient requirement and high volumetric organic loadings. In order t

  15. Carbon monoxide conversion by anaerobic bioreactor sludges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipma, J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P.N.L.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    Seven different anaerobic sludges from wastewater treatment reactors were screened for their ability to convert carbon monoxide (CO) at 30 and 55degreesC
    Seven different anaerobic sludges from wastewater treatment reactors were screened for their ability to convert carbon monoxide (CO) at 30 and

  16. Anaerobic critical velocity in four swimming techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, H P; Fernandes, R J; Vilas-Boas, J P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess critical velocity in order to control and evaluate anaerobic swimming training. 51 highly trained male swimmers performed maximal 15, 25, 37.5 and 50 m in the 4 swimming techniques to determine critical velocity from the distance-time relationship. Anaerobic critical velocity was compared with 100 m swimming performance and corresponding partials. Complementarily, 9 swimmers performed a 6×50 m (4 min interval) training series at front crawl individual anaerobic critical velocity, capillary blood lactate concentrations being assessed after each repetition. The mean±SD values of anaerobic critical velocity and its relationship with the 100 m event were: 1.61±0.07 (r=0.60, p=0.037), 1.53±0.05 (r=0.81, p=0.015), 1.33±0.05 (r=0.83, p=0.002), and 1.75±0.05 (r=0.74, p=0.001), for butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and front crawl, respectively. However, differences between anaerobic critical velocity and performance were observed (with exception of the second half of the 100 m swimming events in breaststroke and butterfly). Lactate concentration values at the end of the series were 14.52±1.06 mmol.l (-1), which suggests that it was indeed an anaerobic training set. In this sense, anaerobic critical velocity can be used to prescribe anaerobic training intensities.

  17. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  18. Effects of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles on methane production from anaerobic co-digestion of primary and excess sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiong; Wu, Lijuan; Chen, Yinguang; Su, Yinglong; Wan, Rui; Liu, Kun; Huang, Haining

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of primary and excess sludge is regarded as an efficient way to reuse sludge organic matter to produce methane. In this study, short-term and long-term exposure experiments were conducted to investigate the possible effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) on methane production from anaerobic co-digestion of primary and excess sludge. The data showed that TiO2 NPs had no measurable impact on methane production, even at a high concentration (150 mg/g total suspended solids (TSS)). However, short-term (8 days) exposure to 30 or 150 mg/g-TSS of ZnO NPs significantly decreased methane production. More importantly, these negative effects of ZnO NPs on anaerobic sludge co-digestion were not alleviated by increasing the adaptation time to 105 days. Further studies indicated that the presence of ZnO NPs substantially decreased the abundance of methanogenic archaea, which reduced methane production. Meanwhile, the activities of some key enzymes involved in methane production, such as protease, acetate kinase, and coenzyme F420, were remarkably inhibited by the presence of ZnO NPs, which was also an important reason for the decreased methane production. These results provide a better understanding of the potential risks of TiO2 and ZnO NPs to methane production from anaerobic sludge co-digestion.

  19. Public aquaria as long-term enrichments for investigating planktonic Archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenstein, Nadine I.; Warren, Courtney E.; Lipp, Julius S.; Pagani, Mark; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-04-01

    The most abundant group of planktonic Archaea , the so-called Thaumarchaeota, represents 20% of all marine planktonic microorganisms (Karner et al., 2001) and their energy efficient performance of nitrification makes them key players in the global nitrogen- and carbon-cycle (Könneke et al., 2014). Furthermore, planktonic Archaea are considered to be the major producers of specific microbial membrane lipids that are extensively used as paleoproxies in marine climate research (Schouten et al., 2002). Therefore, assessing the parameters controlling the distribution of Archaea in the marine water column is crucial for studies of modern and past marine environments. Although diverse studies utilizing DNA- and biomarker-based approaches have constrained the turnover and distribution of marine Archaea, the environmental factors affecting their abundance and activity (e.g., Wuchter et al., 2006; Bale et al., 2013) are still poorly understood. Further, previous surveys, using enrichment cultivation and pure culture experiments, provided valuable information on adaptation of planktonic Archaea to changes of parameters affecting growth conditions, such as temperature, salinity and growth stage (Elling et al., 2014, 2015). Hence, we know that planktonic Archaea directly adapt their membranes to changing growth conditions, but also that environmental selection for individual phylogenetic groups of these organisms is also reflected in the membrane lipid pool. Extending these studies, this project further aims at constraining the environmental parameters controlling archaeal abundance in the marine environment. Public aquaria, which are comparable to perfectly monitored long-term enrichment cultures, are optimal sampling sites for this task. A comprehensive set of 120 water and substrate samples from fresh, marine and brackish systems exhibiting diverse conditions was selected from 15 public aquaria at the east and west coast of the USA. These samples were examined for their

  20. Prospects of Anaerobic Digestion Technology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As the world's largest developing country, China must face the problem of managing municipal solid waste, and the challenge of organic waste disposal is even more serious. Considering the characteristics of traditional waste disposal technologies and the subsequent secondary pollution, anaerobic digestion has various advantages such as reduction in the land needed for disposal and preservation of environmental quality. In light of the energy crisis, this paper focuses on the potential production of biogas from biowaste through anaerobic digestion processes, the problems incurred by the waste collection system, and the efficiency of the anaerobic digestion process. Use of biogas in a combined heat and power cogeneration system is also discussed. Finally, the advantages of anaerobic digestion technology for the Chinese market are summarized. The anaerobic digestion is suggested to be a promising treating technology for the organic wastes in China.

  1. Anaerobic biorefinery: Current status, challenges, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatdeenarunat, Chayanon; Nguyen, Duc; Surendra, K C; Shrestha, Shilva; Rajendran, Karthik; Oechsner, Hans; Xie, Li; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) has been in use for many decades. To date, it has been primarily aimed at treating organic wastes, mainly manures and wastewater sludge, and industrial wastewaters. However, with the current advancements, a more open mind is required to look beyond these somewhat restricted original applications of AD. Biorefineries are such concepts, where multiple products including chemicals, fuels, polymers etc. are produced from organic feedstocks. The anaerobic biorefinery concept is now gaining increased attention, utilizing AD as the final disposal step. This review aims at evaluating the potential significance of anaerobic biorefineries, including types of feedstocks, uses for the produced energy, as well as sustainable applications of the generated residual digestate. A comprehensive analysis of various types of anaerobic biorefineries has been developed, including both large-scale and household level applications. Finally, future directives are highlighted showing how anaerobic biorefinery concept could impact the bioeconomy in the near future. PMID:27005786

  2. Archaea and Bacteria in deep lake hypolimnion: in situ dark inorganic carbon uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Callieri

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The interest for microorganisms inhabiting the hypolimnion and for their role in biogeochemical cycles of lakes is considerable, but knowledge is far from complete. The presence of chemolithoautotrophic Bacteria and mesophilic Archaea (e.g., Thaumarchaeota assimilating inorganic carbon in the deep hypolimnion of lakes has been ascertained. We measured, for the first time at 350 m in Lake Maggiore (Northern Italy, the prokaryotic in situ dark [14C]HCO3 incorporation with a new custom-made apparatus, which takes samples and adds tracers in situ. Thereby stress factors affecting prokaryotes during sample recovery from the depth were avoided. We tested the new instrument at different depths and conditions, performing parallel conventional on board incubations. We found that dark [14C]HCO3 incorporations had lower standard deviation in in situ incubations with respect to the on board ones, but their means were not statistically different. At 350 m we estimated an uptake of 187.7±15 μg C m–3 d–1, which is in line with the published uptake rates in aquatic systems. By inhibiting the bacterial metabolism, we found that Archaea were responsible for 28% of the total CO2 uptake. At the same depth, Thaumarchaeota, on average, constituted 11% of total DAPI counts. Dark [14C]HCO3 incorporation integrated along the aphotic water column was 65.8±5.2 mg C m–2 d–1 which corresponds to 87% of picophytoplanktonic autotrophic fixation in the euphotic layer. This study provides the first evidence of Bacteria and Archaea dark CO2 fixation in the deep hypolimnion of a subalpine lake and indicates a potentially significant prokaryotic CO2 sink.

  3. Higher-level classification of the Archaea: evolution of methanogenesis and methanogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Bapteste

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We used a phylogenetic approach to analyze the evolution of methanogenesis and methanogens. We show that 23 vertically transmitted ribosomal proteins do not support the monophyly of methanogens, and propose instead that there are two distantly related groups of extant archaea that produce methane, which we have named Class I and Class II. Based on this finding, we subsequently investigated the uniqueness of the origin of methanogenesis by studying both the enzymes of methanogenesis and the proteins that synthesize its specific coenzymes. We conclude that hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis appeared only once during evolution. Genes involved in the seven central steps of the methanogenic reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 are ubiquitous in methanogens and share a common history. This suggests that, although extant methanogens produce methane from various substrates (CO2, formate, acetate, methylated C-1 compounds, these archaea have a core of conserved enzymes that have undergone little evolutionary change. Furthermore, this core of methanogenesis enzymes seems to originate (as a whole from the last ancestor of all methanogens and does not appear to have been horizontally transmitted to other organisms or between members of Class I and Class II. The observation of a unique and ancestral form of methanogenesis suggests that it was preserved in two independent lineages, with some instances of specialization or added metabolic flexibility. It was likely lost in the Halobacteriales, Thermoplasmatales and Archaeoglobales. Given that fossil evidence for methanogenesis dates back 2.8 billion years, a unique origin of this process makes the methanogenic archaea a very ancient taxon.

  4. Rooting the domain archaea by phylogenomic analysis supports the foundation of the new kingdom Proteoarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitjean, Céline; Deschamps, Philippe; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2015-01-01

    The first 16S rRNA-based phylogenies of the Archaea showed a deep division between two groups, the kingdoms Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. This bipartite classification has been challenged by the recent discovery of new deeply branching lineages (e.g., Thaumarchaeota, Aigarchaeota, Nanoarchaeota, Korarchaeota, Parvarchaeota, Aenigmarchaeota, Diapherotrites, and Nanohaloarchaeota) which have also been given the same taxonomic status of kingdoms. However, the phylogenetic position of some of these lineages is controversial. In addition, phylogenetic analyses of the Archaea have often been carried out without outgroup sequences, making it difficult to determine if these taxa actually define lineages at the same level as the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeota. We have addressed the question of the position of the root of the Archaea by reconstructing rooted archaeal phylogenetic trees using bacterial sequences as outgroup. These trees were based on commonly used conserved protein markers (32 ribosomal proteins) as well as on 38 new markers identified through phylogenomic analysis. We thus gathered a total of 70 conserved markers that we analyzed as a concatenated data set. In contrast with previous analyses, our trees consistently placed the root of the archaeal tree between the Euryarchaeota (including the Nanoarchaeota and other fast-evolving lineages) and the rest of archaeal species, which we propose to class within the new kingdom Proteoarchaeota. This implies the relegation of several groups previously classified as kingdoms (e.g., Crenarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota, Aigarchaeota, and Korarchaeota) to a lower taxonomic rank. In addition to taxonomic implications, this profound reorganization of the archaeal phylogeny has also consequences on our appraisal of the nature of the last archaeal ancestor, which most likely was a complex organism with a gene-rich genome. PMID:25527841

  5. Diversity, dynamics and activity of mesophilic Archaea in stratified feshwater lakes. Implications in biogeochemical cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Llirós Dupré, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Aquesta tesi doctoral va estudiar la diversitat (riquesa i abundància), la distribució i la dinàmica de les comunitats planctòniques d'Archaea presents a diferents llacs estratificats temperats d'aigua dolça per aportar evidencies sobre la seva distribució i la seva possible activitat en aquests ecosistemes en relació als cicles biogeoquímics presents en els mateixos. Es varen estudiar dos estanyols d'origen càrstic (l'Estanyol del Vilar durant cinc anys consecutius (2001-2005) i l'Estanyol d...

  6. Relation between methanogenic archaea and methane production potential in selected natural wetland ecosystems across China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D. Y.; Ding, W. X.; Jia, Z. J.; Cai, Z. C.

    2011-02-01

    Methane (CH4) emissions from natural wetland ecosystems exhibit large spatial variability at regional, national, and global levels related to temperature, water table, plant type and methanogenic archaea etc. To understand the underlying factors that induce spatial differences in CH4 emissions, and the relationship between the population of methanogenic archaea and CH4 production potential in natural wetlands around China, we measured the CH4 production potential and the abundance of methanogenic archaea in vertical soil profiles sampled from the Poyang wetland in the subtropical zone, the Hongze wetland in the warm temperate zone, the Sanjiang marsh in the cold temperate zone, and the Ruoergai peatland in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in the alpine climate zone. The top soil layer had the highest population of methanogens (1.07-8.29 × 109 cells g-1 soil) in all wetlands except the Ruoergai peatland and exhibited the maximum CH4 production potential measured at the mean in situ summer temperature. There is a significant logarithmic correlation between the abundance of methanogenic archaea and the soil organic carbon (R2 = 0.72, P nitrogen concentrations (R2 = 0.76, P affect the population of methanogens in wetland ecosystems. While the CH4 production potential is not significantly related to methanogen population (R2 = 0.01, P > 0.05, n = 13), it is related to the dissolved organic carbon concentration (R2 = 0.31, P = 0.05, n = 13). This suggests that the methanogen population might be not an effective index for predicting the CH4 production in wetland ecosystems. The CH4 production rate of the top soil layer increases with increasing latitude, from 273.64 μg CH4 kg-1 soil d-1 in the Poyang wetland to 664.59 μg CH4 kg-1 soil d-1 in the Carex lasiocarpa marsh of the Sanjiang Plain. We conclude that CH4 production potential in the freshwater wetlands of Eastern China is mainly affected by the supply of methanogenic substrates rather than temperature; in contrast

  7. Ammonia-oxidising bacteria not archaea dominate nitrification activity in semi-arid agricultural soil

    OpenAIRE

    Banning, Natasha C.; Maccarone, Linda D.; Fisk, Louise M.; Murphy, Daniel V.

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidising archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) are responsible for the rate limiting step in nitrification; a key nitrogen (N) loss pathway in agricultural systems. Dominance of AOA relative to AOB in the amoA gene pool has been reported in many ecosystems, although their relative contributions to nitrification activity are less clear. Here we examined the distribution of AOA and AOB with depth in semi-arid agricultural soils in which soil organic matter content or pH had been altered, an...

  8. Identification of Archaea-specific chemotaxis proteins which interact with the flagellar apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Judith

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Archaea share with bacteria the ability to bias their movement towards more favorable locations, a process known as taxis. Two molecular systems drive this process: the motility apparatus and the chemotaxis signal transduction system. The first consists of the flagellum, the flagellar motor, and its switch, which allows cells to reverse the rotation of flagella. The second targets the flagellar motor switch in order to modulate the switching frequency in response to external stimuli. While the signal transduction system is conserved throughout archaea and bacteria, the archaeal flagellar apparatus is different from the bacterial one. The proteins constituting the flagellar motor and its switch in archaea have not yet been identified, and the connection between the bacterial-like chemotaxis signal transduction system and the archaeal motility apparatus is unknown. Results Using protein-protein interaction analysis, we have identified three proteins in Halobacterium salinarum that interact with the chemotaxis (Che proteins CheY, CheD, and CheC2, as well as the flagella accessory (Fla proteins FlaCE and FlaD. Two of the proteins belong to the protein family DUF439, the third is a HEAT_PBS family protein. In-frame deletion strains for all three proteins were generated and analyzed as follows: a photophobic responses were measured by a computer-based cell tracking system b flagellar rotational bias was determined by dark-field microscopy, and c chemotactic behavior was analyzed by a swarm plate assay. Strains deleted for the HEAT_PBS protein or one of the DUF439 proteins proved unable to switch the direction of flagellar rotation. In these mutants, flagella rotate only clockwise, resulting in exclusively forward swimming cells that are unable to respond to tactic signals. Deletion of the second DUF439 protein had only minimal effects. HEAT_PBS proteins could be identified in the chemotaxis gene regions of all motile haloarchaea

  9. Thermal and geochemical influences on microbial biogeography in the hydrothermal sediments of Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Luke; Klokman, Vincent W; Mendlovitz, Howard P; LaRowe, Douglas E; Hoer, Daniel R; Albert, Daniel; Amend, Jan P; Teske, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Extreme thermal gradients and compressed metabolic zones limit the depth range of microbial colonization in hydrothermally active sediments at Guaymas Basin. We investigated the physicochemical characteristics of this ecosystem and their influence on microbial community structure. Temperature-related trends of δ(13)C values of methane and dissolved inorganic carbon from 36 sediment cores suggest in situ thermal limits for microbial anaerobic methane oxidation and organic carbon re-mineralization near 80°C and 100°C respectively. Temperature logging probes deposited in hydrothermal sediments for 8 days demonstrate substantial thermal fluctuations of up to 25°C. Putative anaerobic methanotroph (ANME) populations dominate the archaeal community, transitioning from ANME-1 archaea in warm surficial sediments towards ANME-1 Guaymas archaea as temperatures increase downcore. Since ANME archaea performing anaerobic oxidation of methane double on longer time scales (months) compared with relatively rapid in situ temperature fluctuations (hours to days), we conclude that ANME archaea possess a high tolerance for short-term shifts in the thermal regime.

  10. Activity, Microenvironments, and Community Structure of Aerobic and Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidizing Prokaryotes in Estuarine Sediment (Randers Fjord, DK)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schramm, Andreas; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Dalsgaard, Tage;

    2006-01-01

    ACTIVITY, MICROENVIRONMENTS, AND COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC AMMONIUM OXIDIZING PROKARYOTES IN ESTUARINE SEDIMENT (RANDERS FJORD, DK) A. Schramm 1, N.P. Revsbech 1, T. Dalsgaard 2, E. Piña-Ochoa 3, J. de la Torré 4, D.A. Stahl 4, N. Risgaard-Petersen 2 1 Department of Biological...... oxidizing bacteria and archaea (AOB and AOA) or nitrate-reducing/denitrifying bacteria via their supply of nitrite. Along the Randers Fjord estuary (Denmark), gradients of salinity, nutrients, and organic loading can be observed, and anammox has been detected previously at some sites. The aim of this study...... was to correlate the activity, abundance, and diversity of anammox bacteria, AOB and AOA in surface sediment along the fjord with the sediment microdistribution of nitrite. Using 15N incubations, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization, anammox was only detected at the two innermost...

  11. Diversity of bacteria and archaea from a landfill in Chandigarh, India as revealed by culture-dependent and culture-independent molecular approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthi, S; Chakrabarti, T

    2013-02-01

    The bacterial community structure of a municipal landfill in Chandigarh, India was analysed by culture-dependent as well as culture-independent molecular approaches, and archaeal structure by the latter method. Samples were collected in two phases from the surface and a depth of 0.91 m in June, 2004 and from 0.91 m, 1.52 m and 1.68 m in May, 2005. After serial dilutions, samples were plated onto tryptic soy agar (TSA), plate count agar (PCA), tryptic soy broth agar (TSBA) and TSBA100 (TSBA diluted 100 times and solidified with agarose), and incubated aerobically at 30°C. The number of bacteria (CFU) on different media ranged between 9.4×10⁵g⁻¹ (on PCA) and 1.9×10⁷g⁻¹ (on TSA) (wet weight). The numbers of bacteria enumerated from plates incubated anaerobically (anaerobic agar and reinforced clostridial agar) were 2.1×10⁷and 1.7×10⁶g⁻¹, respectively. Of the 468 isolated and purified bacteria (183 in the first phase and 285 in the second phase), 135 were characterised using phenotypic characteristics as well as 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. It was found that members of the phylum Firmicutes were overwhelmingly predominant (86.6%) in the landfill, followed by Actinobacteria (9.6%) and Proteobacteria (3.7%). Among the Firmicutes, at least 17 species from the single genus Bacillus were the most abundant inhabitants of the landfill. Detailed polyphasic characterisation of many of these isolates led to the discovery of a novel genus Paenisporosarcina (and the species P. quisquiliarum), a novel species of Microbacterium, M. immunditiarum, and reclassification of Sporosarcina macmurdoensis, Pelagibacillus goriensis, Bacillus silvestris, Bacillus insolitus, Bacillus psychrotolerans and Bacillus psychrodurans. Culture-independent analysis of two 16S rRNA gene libraries also revealed that the phylum Firmicutes was the predominant group in this community. The diversity of Archaea was found to be limited mainly to members of two orders: Methanosarcinales

  12. Macroscopic biofilms in fracture-dominated sediment that anaerobically oxidize methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, B.R.; Pohlman, J.W.; Torres, M.; Riedel, M.; Brodie, E.L.; Colwell, F.S.

    2011-01-01

    Methane release from seafloor sediments is moderated, in part, by the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) performed by consortia of archaea and bacteria. These consortia occur as isolated cells and aggregates within the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) of diffusion and seep-dominant environments. Here we report on a new SMT setting where the AOM consortium occurs as macroscopic pink to orange biofilms within subseafloor fractures. Biofilm samples recovered from the Indian and northeast Pacific Oceans had a cellular abundance of 10 7 to 10 8 cells cm -3. This cell density is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude greater than that in the surrounding sediments. Sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes indicated that the bacterial component is dominated by Deltaproteobacteria, candidate division WS3, and Chloroflexi, representing 46%, 15%, and 10% of clones, respectively. In addition, major archaeal taxa found in the biofilm were related to the ANME-1 clade, Thermoplasmatales, and Desulfurococcales, representing 73%, 11%, and 10% of archaeal clones, respectively. The sequences of all major taxa were similar to sequences previously reported from cold seep environments. PhyloChip microarray analysis detected all bacterial phyla identified by the clone library plus an additional 44 phyla. However, sequencing detected more archaea than the PhyloChip within the phyla of Methanosarcinales and Desulfurococcales. The stable carbon isotope composition of the biofilm from the SMT (-35 to-43%) suggests that the production of the biofilm is associated with AOM. These biofilms are a novel, but apparently widespread, aggregation of cells represented by the ANME-1 clade that occur in methane-rich marine sediments. ?? 2011, American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Effect of music on anaerobic exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atan, T

    2013-03-01

    For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST) under 3 conditions on separate days: while listening to "slow rhythm music", "fast rhythm music" or "no music". 48 hours after the subjects completed RAST under 3 conditions, Wingate Anaerobic Power (WAN) tests were performed under 3 music conditions. The order of the 3 conditions (slow music, fast music and no music) was selected randomly to prevent an order effect. Results showed no significant differences between 3 conditions in anaerobic power assessments, heart rate or blood lactate (p > 0.05). On the basis of these results it can be said that music cannot improve anaerobic performance. The type of music had no impact on power outputs during RAST and WAN exercise. As a conclusion, listening to music and its rhythm cannot enhance anaerobic performance and cannot change the physiological response to supramaximal exercise. PMID:24744463

  14. Short-term changes in anaerobic oxidation of methane in response to varying methane and sulfate fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wegener

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A major role in global methane fluxes has been attributed to the process of anaerobic oxidation of methane, which is performed by consortia of methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria. An important question remains how these very slow growing microorganisms with generation times of 3–7 months respond to natural variations in methane fluxes at cold seeps. Here, we used an experimental flow-through column system filled with cold seep sediments naturally enriched in methanotrophic communities, to test their response to short-term variations in methane and sulfate fluxes. At stable methane and sulfate concentrations of ~2 mM and 28 mM, respectively, we measured constant rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM and sulfide production (SR for up to 160 days of incubation. When percolated with methane-free medium, the anaerobic methanotrophs ceased to oxidize methane and to produce sulfide. After a starvation phase of 40 days, the addition of methane restored former AOM and SR rates immediately. At methane concentrations between 0–2.3 mM we measured a linear correlation between methane availability, AOM and SR. At constant fluid flow rates of 30 m yr−1, ca. 50% of the methane was consumed by the ANME population at all concentrations tested. Reducing the sulfate concentration from 28 to 1 mM, a decrease in AOM and SR by 35% was observed. Hence, the marine anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME are capable to consume substantial amounts of methane rising from the subsurface seabed to the hydrosphere over a wide range of fluxes of methane and sulfate.

  15. The effect of enzymatic pre-hydrolysis of dairy wastewater on the granular and immobilized microbial community in anaerobic bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarota, Magali C; Rosa, Daniela R; Duarte, Iolanda C S; Saavedra, Nora K; Varesche, Maria B A; Zaiat, Marcelo; Freire, Denise M G

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a lipase-rich enzyme preparation produced by the fungus Penicillium sp. on solid-state fermentation was evaluated in two anaerobic bioreactors (up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass (HAIB)) treating dairy wastewater with 1200 mg oil and grease/L. The oil and grease hydrolysis step was carried out with 0.1% (w/v) of the solid enzymatic preparation at 30 degrees C for 24 h. This resulted in a final concentration of free acids eight times higher than the initial value. The bioreactors operated at 30 degrees C with hydraulic retention times of 12 h (HAIB) and 20 h (UASB) for a period of 430 days, and had high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies (around 90%) when fed with pre-hydrolyzed wastewater. There was, however, an increase in the effluent oil and grease concentration (from values as low as 17 mg/L to values above 150 mg/L in the UASB bioreactor, and from 38-242 mg/L in the HAIB bioreactor), and oil and grease accumulation in the biomass throughout the operational period (the oil and grease content reached 1.7 times that found in the inoculum of the UASB bioreactor). The HAIB bioreactor gave better results because the support for biomass immobilization acted as a filter, retaining oil and grease at the entry of the bioreactor. The molecular analysis of the Bacteria and Archaea domains revealed significant differences in the microbial profiles in experiments conducted with and without the pre-hydrolysis step. The differences observed in the overall parameters could be related to the microbial diversity of the anaerobic sludge. PMID:23530355

  16. Solid-state fermentation as a potential technique for esterase/lipase production by halophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin del Campo, Martha; Camacho, Rosa M; Mateos-Díaz, Juan C; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Córdova, Jesus; Rodríguez, Jorge A

    2015-11-01

    Halophilic archaea are extremophiles, adapted to high-salt environments, showing a big biotechnological potential as enzyme, lipids and pigments producers. Four inert supports (perlite, vermiculite, polyurethane foam and glass fiber) were employed for solid-state fermentation (SSF) of the halophilic archaeon Natronococcus sp. TC6 to investigate biomass and esterase production. A very low esterase activity and high water activity were observed when perlite, vermiculite and polyurethane were used as supports. When glass fiber was employed, an important moisture loss was observed (8.6%). Moreover, moisture retention was improved by mixing polyurethane and glass fiber, resulting in maximal biomass and esterase production. Three halophilic archaea: Natronococcus sp. TC6, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and Haloarcula marismortui were cultured by submerged fermentation (SmF) and by SSF; an improvement of 1.3- to 6.2-fold was observed in the biomass and esterase production when SSF was used. Growth was not homogeneous in the mixture, but was predominant in the glass fiber thus was probably because the glass fiber provides a holder to the cells, while the polyurethane acts as an impregnation medium reservoir. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first report on haloarchaea cultivation by SSF aiming biomass and esterase/lipase activity production.

  17. Halophilic archaea cultivated from surface sterilized middle-late eocene rock salt are polyploid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salla T Jaakkola

    Full Text Available Live bacteria and archaea have been isolated from several rock salt deposits of up to hundreds of millions of years of age from all around the world. A key factor affecting their longevity is the ability to keep their genomic DNA intact, for which efficient repair mechanisms are needed. Polyploid microbes are known to have an increased resistance towards mutations and DNA damage, and it has been suggested that microbes from deeply buried rock salt would carry several copies of their genomes. Here, cultivable halophilic microbes were isolated from a surface sterilized middle-late Eocene (38-41 million years ago rock salt sample, drilled from the depth of 800 m at Yunying salt mine, China. Eight unique isolates were obtained, which represented two haloarchaeal genera, Halobacterium and Halolamina. We used real-time PCR to show that our isolates are polyploid, with genome copy numbers of 11-14 genomes per cell in exponential growth phase. The ploidy level was slightly downregulated in stationary growth phase, but the cells still had an average genome copy number of 6-8. The polyploidy of halophilic archaea living in ancient rock salt might be a factor explaining how these organisms are able to overcome the challenge of prolonged survival during their entombment.

  18. Evolutionary patterns in the sequence and structure of transfer RNA: early origins of archaea and viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Jie Sun

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are ancient molecules that are central to translation. Since they probably carry evolutionary signatures that were left behind when the living world diversified, we reconstructed phylogenies directly from the sequence and structure of tRNA using well-established phylogenetic methods. The trees placed tRNAs with long variable arms charging Sec, Tyr, Ser, and Leu consistently at the base of the rooted phylogenies, but failed to reveal groupings that would indicate clear evolutionary links to organismal origin or molecular functions. In order to uncover evolutionary patterns in the trees, we forced tRNAs into monophyletic groups using constraint analyses to generate timelines of organismal diversification and test competing evolutionary hypotheses. Remarkably, organismal timelines showed Archaea was the most ancestral superkingdom, followed by viruses, then superkingdoms Eukarya and Bacteria, in that order, supporting conclusions from recent phylogenomic studies of protein architecture. Strikingly, constraint analyses showed that the origin of viruses was not only ancient, but was linked to Archaea. Our findings have important implications. They support the notion that the archaeal lineage was very ancient, resulted in the first organismal divide, and predated diversification of tRNA function and specificity. Results are also consistent with the concept that viruses contributed to the development of the DNA replication machinery during the early diversification of the living world.

  19. Genomic Analysis of Deeply-Branching Bacteria and Archaea from IODP Leg 347: Baltic Sea Paleoenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, J. T.; Lloyd, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Among the diverse inhabitants of the marine subsurface are "deeply-branching" bacteria and archaea, whose recent evolutionary ancestors have eluded isolation and characterization by traditional culture-based methods. By using single-cell genomics, we were able to target members of common deeply-branching mircorganisms found in a sediment core acquired during IODP Leg 347. Cells were separated from sediment layers (37 and 84 meters below the seafloor) deposited at site 60, hole B, near Anholt Island tens to hundreds of thousands of years ago. Ten single amplified genomes from 4 bacterial and 1 archaeal lineages were chosen from the 60 successfully sorted cells. The lineages include: Desulfobacterium sp., OPB41, OP8, NT-B2, Marine Group II archaea. Two lineages have not been genomically sampled before, while all 5 are frequently found in a variety of marine sediment habitats. The genome assemblies range in completeness from 45 - 85% and contain a number of phylogenetically relevant genes that has helped to anchor their position in the tree of life. The metabolic strategies, including putative sulfate reduction and carbon degradation pathways, employed by these cells have allowed them to survive in an environment with diminishing sources of labile carbon substrates.

  20. Solid-state fermentation as a potential technique for esterase/lipase production by halophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin del Campo, Martha; Camacho, Rosa M; Mateos-Díaz, Juan C; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Córdova, Jesus; Rodríguez, Jorge A

    2015-11-01

    Halophilic archaea are extremophiles, adapted to high-salt environments, showing a big biotechnological potential as enzyme, lipids and pigments producers. Four inert supports (perlite, vermiculite, polyurethane foam and glass fiber) were employed for solid-state fermentation (SSF) of the halophilic archaeon Natronococcus sp. TC6 to investigate biomass and esterase production. A very low esterase activity and high water activity were observed when perlite, vermiculite and polyurethane were used as supports. When glass fiber was employed, an important moisture loss was observed (8.6%). Moreover, moisture retention was improved by mixing polyurethane and glass fiber, resulting in maximal biomass and esterase production. Three halophilic archaea: Natronococcus sp. TC6, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and Haloarcula marismortui were cultured by submerged fermentation (SmF) and by SSF; an improvement of 1.3- to 6.2-fold was observed in the biomass and esterase production when SSF was used. Growth was not homogeneous in the mixture, but was predominant in the glass fiber thus was probably because the glass fiber provides a holder to the cells, while the polyurethane acts as an impregnation medium reservoir. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first report on haloarchaea cultivation by SSF aiming biomass and esterase/lipase activity production. PMID:26369647

  1. Identification of a glycolytic regulon in the archaea Pyrococcus and Thermococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Werken, Harmen J G; Verhees, Corné H; Akerboom, Jasper; de Vos, Willem M; van der Oost, John

    2006-07-01

    The glycolytic pathway of the hyperthermophilic archaea that belong to the order Thermococcales (Pyrococcus, Thermococcus and Palaeococcus) differs significantly from the canonical Embden-Meyerhof pathway in bacteria and eukarya. This archaeal glycolysis variant consists of several novel enzymes, some of which catalyze unique conversions. Moreover, the enzymes appear not to be regulated allosterically, but rather at transcriptional level. To elucidate details of the gene expression control, the transcription initiation sites of the glycolytic genes in Pyrococcus furiosus have been mapped by primer extension analysis and the obtained promoter sequences have been compared with upstream regions of non-glycolytic genes. Apart from consensus sequences for the general transcription factors (TATA-box and BRE) this analysis revealed the presence of a potential transcription factor binding site (TATCAC-N(5)-GTGATA) in glycolytic and starch utilizing promoters of P. furiosus and several thermococcal species. The absence of this inverted repeat in Pyrococcus abyssi and Pyrococcus horikoshii probably reflects that their reduced catabolic capacity does not require this regulatory system. Moreover, this phyletic pattern revealed a TrmB-like regulator (PF0124 and TK1769) which may be involved in recognizing the repeat. This Thermococcales glycolytic regulon, with more than 20 genes, is the largest regulon that has yet been described for Archaea.

  2. Enhanced abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea in the Pearl River estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, W.; Zhang, C. L.; Wang, P.; Zhou, X.; Guo, W.

    2014-12-01

    Thaumarchaeota are recently recognized as an important group of Archaea that can perform aerobic oxidation of ammonia in a wide range of environments. The goal of this study was to evaluate changes in abundance and diversity of planktonic ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (e.g., Thaumarchaeota) along a salinity gradient from the lower Pearl River to the northern South China Sea. Quantitative PCR and sequencing of total archaeal 16S rRNA gene and the archaeal amoA gene were performed on suspended particulate organic matter collected in different seasons from the freshwater to the ocean water. Total amoA gene copies and relative abundance of Thaumarchaeota all peaked in the estuary where salinity ranged between 4.5‰ and 26.7‰. The diversity of archaeal amoA gene was also highest in the estuary. Seasonality and SiO32- appear to be two major factors affecting the distribution of subclusters of archaeal amoA genes. For example, Nitrosopumilus subcluster 7.1 was most abundant in winter in fresh water, whereas Nitrososphaera were more abundant in summer. Samples collected from the area around Wanshan Island, which is located at the outermost part of the Pearl River estuary, had high abundance of unclassified archaeal amoA genes, suggesting some new groups of Thaumarchaeota might inhabit this water body. Overall, the high abundance and diversity of Thaumarchaeota in the Pearl River estuary may indicate enhanced role of AOA in nitrogen cycle in this dynamic ecosystem.

  3. Global biodiversity of aquatic ammonia-oxidizing archaea is partitioned by habitat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Biller

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Archaea play an important role in nitrification and are, thus, inextricably linked to the global carbon and nitrogen cycles. Since the initial discovery of an ammonia monooxygenase α-subunit (amoA gene associated with an archaeal metagenomic fragment, archaeal amoA sequences have been detected in a wide variety of nitrifying environments. Recent sequencing efforts have revealed extensive diversity of archaeal amoA sequences within different habitats. In this study, we have examined over 8000 amoA sequences from the literature and public databases in an effort to understand the ecological factors influencing the distribution and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA, with a particular focus on sequences from aquatic habitats. This broad survey provides strong statistical support for the hypothesis that different environments contain distinct clusters of AOA amoA sequences, as surprisingly few sequences are found in more than one habitat type. Within aquatic environments, salinity, depth in the water column, and temperature were significantly correlated with the distribution of sequence types. These findings support the existence of multiple distinct aquatic AOA populations in the environment and suggest some possible selective pressures driving the partitioning of AOA amoA diversity.

  4. Structure determination of archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a reveals a novel protein fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Yingang, E-mail: fengyg@qibebt.ac.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, Shandong 266101 (China); Song, Xiaxia [Department of Biological Science and Engineering, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Lin, Jinzhong [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Xuan, Jinsong [Department of Biological Science and Engineering, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Cui, Qiu [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, Shandong 266101 (China); Wang, Jinfeng [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a has no homology to known proteins. • Three dimensional structure and backbone dynamics of L46a were determined by NMR. • The structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. • A potential rRNA-binding surface on L46a was identified. • The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed. - Abstract: Three archaea-specific ribosomal proteins recently identified show no sequence homology with other known proteins. Here we determined the structure of L46a, the most conserved one among the three proteins, from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 using NMR spectroscopy. The structure presents a twisted β-sheet formed by the N-terminal part and two helices at the C-terminus. The L46a structure has a positively charged surface which is conserved in the L46a protein family and is the potential rRNA-binding site. Searching homologous structures in Protein Data Bank revealed that the structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. The backbone dynamics identified by NMR relaxation experiments reveal significant flexibility at the rRNA binding surface. The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed by fitting the structure into a previous electron microscopy map of the ribosomal 50S subunit, which indicated that L46a contacts to domain I of 23S rRNA near a multifunctional ribosomal protein L7ae.

  5. Relation between methanogenic archaea and methane production potential in selected natural wetland ecosystems across China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Y. Liu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Methane (CH4 emissions from natural wetland ecosystems exhibit large spatial variability at regional, national, and global levels related to temperature, water table, plant type and methanogenic archaea etc. To understand the underlying factors that induce spatial differences in CH4 emissions, and the relationship between the population of methanogenic archaea and CH4 production potential in natural wetlands around China, we measured the CH4 production potential and the abundance of methanogenic archaea in vertical soil profiles sampled from the Poyang wetland in the subtropical zone, the Hongze wetland in the warm temperate zone, the Sanjiang marsh in the cold temperate zone, and the Ruoergai peatland in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in the alpine climate zone. The top soil layer had the highest population of methanogens (1.07–8.29 × 109 cells g−1 soil in all wetlands except the Ruoergai peatland and exhibited the maximum CH4 production potential measured at the mean in situ summer temperature. There is a significant logarithmic correlation between the abundance of methanogenic archaea and the soil organic carbon (R2 = 0.72, P < 0.001, n = 13 and between the abundance of methanogenic archaea and the total nitrogen concentrations (R2 = 0.76, P < 0.001, n = 13 in wetland soils. This indicates that the amount of soil organic carbon may affect the population of methanogens in wetland ecosystems. While the CH4 production potential is not significantly related to methanogen population (R2 = 0.01, P > 0.05, n = 13, it is related to the dissolved organic carbon concentration (R2 = 0.31, P = 0.05, n = 13. This suggests that the methanogen population might be not an effective index for predicting the CH4 production in wetland

  6. Geochemistry and Mixing Drive the Spatial Distribution of Free-Living Archaea and Bacteria in Yellowstone Lake

    OpenAIRE

    Kan, Jinjun; Clingenpeel, Scott; Dow, Charles L.; McDermott, Timothy R.; Macur, Richard E.; Inskeep, William P.; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2016-01-01

    Yellowstone Lake, the largest subalpine lake in the United States, harbors great novelty and diversity of Bacteria and Archaea. Size-fractionated water samples (0.1–0.8, 0.8–3.0, and 3.0–20 μm) were collected from surface photic zone, deep mixing zone, and vent fluids at different locations in the lake by using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Quantification with real-time PCR indicated that Bacteria dominated free-living microorganisms with Bacteria/Archaea ratios ranging from 4037:1 (surf...

  7. 缺氧嗜甲烷古菌研究进展%Advances in Research on Anaerobic Methanotrophs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李江; 刘晓风; 廖银章; 袁月祥; 闫志英

    2011-01-01

    The distribution, niche, form and metabolism charaleristics of anaerobic methanotrophs (ANME) are summarized, and the phylogenetic relationship between ANME and methanogenic archaea are discussed. Methane can be oxidized by syntrophism of ANME and sulfate-reducing bacteria under the oxygen deficit condition. ANME mainly distribute in deep-sea and cold-seep area, and generally associate sulfate-reducing bacteria to carry out anaerobic oxidation of methane by proposed "reverse methanogenesis" or "methylogenesis" pathways. Little is known about the niche of such archaea as there is no pure culture. The cells are coccoid or rod, often occuring as consortia or in long multicellular chains. ANME are phylogenetically related to methanogenic archaea and they have common characters. Fig 1, Tab 1, Ref 37%综述了缺氧嗜甲烷古菌的分布、生态位、形态与代谢特征的新发现,并讨论了其与产甲烷菌的关系.在无氧条件下,缺氧嗜甲烷古菌与硫酸盐还原菌互养,氧化甲烷气体以阻止其进入大气.缺氧嗜甲烷古菌主要分布于深海甲烷渗漏区和冷泉区域,在其他多种缺氧环境中也能发现,由于还未获得纯培养,对这类微生物的生态位知之甚少.其细胞呈球状、杆状,有时聚集成球状集合体或连接形成丝状体.缺氧甲烷氧化可能经过“反甲烷合成”、“甲基合成”等路径.嗜甲烷古菌与产甲烷菌有着较近的亲缘关系,并且存在许多相似点.图1表1参37

  8. Antimicrobial resistance and susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Audrey N

    2014-09-01

    Infections due to anaerobic bacteria can be severe and life-threatening. Susceptibility testing of anaerobes is not frequently performed in laboratories, but such testing is important to direct appropriate therapy. Anaerobic resistance is increasing globally, and resistance trends vary by geographic region. An overview of a variety of susceptibility testing methods for anaerobes is provided, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are reviewed. Specific clinical situations warranting anaerobic susceptibility testing are discussed.

  9. Characterizing the Anaerobic Response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by Quantitative Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Terashima, Mia; Specht, Michael; Naumann, Bianca; Hippler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The versatile metabolism of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is reflected in its complex response to anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic response is also remarkable in the context of renewable energy because C. reinhardtii is able to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. To identify proteins involved during anaerobic acclimation as well as to localize proteins and pathways to the powerhouses of the cell, chloroplasts and mitochondria from C. reinhardtii in aerobic and anaerobic...

  10. Anaerobe Tolerance to Oxygen and the Potentials of Anaerobic and Aerobic Cocultures for Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Kato

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic treatment processes are considered to be well-established methods for the elimination of easily biodegradable organic matter from wastewaters. Some difficulties concerning certain wastewaters are related to the possible presence of dissolved oxygen. The common belief is that anaerobes are oxygen intolerant. Therefore, the common practice is to use sequencing anaerobic and aerobic steps in separate tanks. Enhanced treatment by polishing off the residual biodegradable oxygen demand from effluents of anaerobic reactors, or the biodegradation of recalcitrant wastewater pollutants, usually requires sequenced anaerobic and aerobic bacteria activities. However, the combined activity of both bacteria can also be obtained in a single reactor. Previous experiments with either pure or mixed cultures showed that anaerobes can tolerate oxygen to a certain extent. The oxygen toxicity to methanogens in anaerobic sludges was quantified in batch experiments, as well as in anaerobic reactors. The results showed that methanogens have a high tolerance to oxygen. In practice, it was confirmed that dissolved oxygen does not constitute any detrimental effect on reactor treatment performance. This means that the coexistence of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria in one single reactor is feasible and increases the potentials of new applications in wastewater treatment

  11. Multivariate monitoring of anaerobic co-digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Michael; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo

    Anaerobic digestion processes for production of renewable energy in the form of biogas, and in the future hydrogen, are becoming increasingly important worldwide. Sustainable solutions for renewable energy production systems are given high political priority, amongst other things due to global...... warming and environmental concerns. Anaerobic digestion applied in agriculture can simultaneously convert heterogeneous biomasses and wastes from the primary agricultural sector and from the bio processing industries, for instance food processing, pharma, and biofuel production, into valuable organic...... distinct scales. The aim was to investigate, whether changes in the chemical environment in the anaerobic digesters could be monitored by NIRS enabling biogas plant operators to respond to the process dynamics. Results show that several key intermediates suitable for control of the anaerobic digestion...

  12. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Plugge, C.M.; Eekert, van M.H.A.; Dolfing, J.; Schraa, G.

    2006-01-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory

  13. An anaerobic mitochondrion that produces hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxma, Brigitte; Graaf, Rob M. de; Staay, Georg W.M. van der; Alen, Theo A. van; Ricard, Guenola; Gabaldón, Toni; Hoek, Angela H.A.M. van; Moon-van der Staay, Seung Yeo; Koopman, Werner J.H.; Hellemond, Jaap J. van; Tielens, Aloysius G.M.; Friedrich, Thorsten; Veenhuis, Marten; Huynen, Martijn A.; Hackstein, Johannes H.P.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogenosomes are organelles that produce ATP and hydrogen, and are found in various unrelated eukaryotes, such as anaerobic flagellates, chytridiomycete fungi and ciliates. Although all of these organelles generate hydrogen, the hydrogenosomes from these organisms are structurally and metabolicall

  14. Comparative Studies of Alternative Anaerobic Digestion Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Inman, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Washington D.C. Water and Sewage Authority is planning to construct a new anaerobic digestion facility at its Blue Plains WWTP by 2008. The research conducted in this study is to aid the designers of this facility by evaluating alternative digestion technologies. Alternative anaerobic digestion technologies include thermophilic, acid/gas phased, and temperature phased digestion. In order to evaluate the relative merits of each, a year long study evaluated the performance of bench scale dig...

  15. Anaerobic Digestion of Paper Mill Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Shreeshivadasan Chelliapan; Siti Baizura Mahat; Md. Fadjil Md. Din; A. Yuzir; Othman, N.

    2012-01-01

    In general, paper mill wastewater contains complex organic substances which could not be treated completely using conventional treatment processes, e.g. aerobic processes. As a result, anaerobic technology is a promising alternative for paper mill wastewater treatment due to its ability to degrade hard organic compounds. In the present study, treatment of paper mill wastewater using a stage anaerobic reactor was investigated. The more specific objectives of this study were to confirm whether ...

  16. Psychrophilic anaerobic treatment of low strength wastewaters.

    OpenAIRE

    Rebac, S.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to design a high-rate anaerobic system for the treatment low strength wastewaters under psychrophilic conditions.Psychrophilic (3 to 20 °C) anaerobic treatment of low strength synthetic and malting wastewater was investigated using a single and two stage expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor system. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies found in the experiments with synthetic wastewater exceeded 90 % in the single stage reactor at im...

  17. EFFECT OF MUSIC ON ANAEROBIC EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Atan, T.

    2013-01-01

    For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-...

  18. SLEEP DEPRIVATION INDUCED ANXIETY AND ANAEROBIC PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Arzu Vardar

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation induced anxiety on anaerobic performance. Thirteen volunteer male physical education students completed the Turkish version of State Anxiety Inventory and performed Wingate anaerobic test for three times: (1 following a full-night of habitual sleep (baseline measurements, (2 following 30 hours of sleep deprivation, and (3 following partial-night sleep deprivation. Baseline measurements were performed the day before total sleep deprivation. Measurements following partial sleep deprivation were made 2 weeks later than total sleep deprivation measurements. State anxiety was measured prior to each Wingate test. The mean state anxiety following total sleep deprivation was higher than the baseline measurement (44.9 ± 12.9 vs. 27.6 ± 4.2, respectively, p = 0.02 whereas anaerobic performance parameters remained unchanged. Neither anaerobic parameters nor state anxiety levels were affected by one night partial sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that 30 hours continuous wakefulness may increase anxiety level without impairing anaerobic performance, whereas one night of partial sleep deprivation was ineffective on both state anxiety and anaerobic performance

  19. Low-ammonia niche of ammonia-oxidizing archaea in rotating biological contactors of a municipal wastewater treatment plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauder, L.A.; Peterse, F.; Schouten, S.; Neufeld, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    The first step of nitrification is catalysed by both ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA), but physicochemical controls on the relative abundance and function of these two groups are not yet fully understood, especially in freshwater environments. This study investigated ammonia-oxidiz

  20. RNA-Based Investigation of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Hot Springs of Yunnan Province, China ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Hongchen; Huang, Qiuyuan; DONG, HAILIANG; WANG, Peng; Wang, Fengping; Li, Wenjun; Zhang, Chuanlun

    2010-01-01

    Using RNA-based techniques and hot spring samples collected from Yunnan Province, China, we show that the amoA gene of aerobic ammonia-oxidizing archaea can be transcribed at temperatures higher than 74°C and up to 94°C, suggesting that archaeal nitrification can potentially occur at near boiling temperatures.

  1. Genetic analysis of the br gene in halophilic archaea isolated from Xinjiang region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohong XU; Min WU; Huibin ZHANG; Zhihu LIU

    2008-01-01

    Some novel members of extremely halophilic archaea, strains AJ 11, AJ 12 and AJ 13, were isolated from the Aularz Lake located in the Altun Mountain National Nature Reserve of Xinjiang, Uygur Autonomous Region in China. Partial DNA fragments encoding a bacteriorho-dopsin (BR), as well as for 16S rRNA of isolated strains, were amplified by PCR and their DNA sequences were determined subsequently. On the basis of homology and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA, we thought that the isolated strains forming a microbiological population are the members of the genus Natrinema. The results of genetic analysis, such as GC content, transition/transver-sion (Ti/Tv) rate ratios and synonymous substitution rates (Ks) indicate that the br fragments, with a high level of genetic divergence, are faced with both purifying selection and bias mutation pressure. The study provides the basis for use of species and BR proteins resources.

  2. Characterization of large-insert DNA libraries from soil for environmental genomic studies of Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treusch, Alexander H; Kletzin, Arnulf; Raddatz, Guenter;

    2004-01-01

    of taxonomic marker genes (other than 16S rRNA) has been identified that allows the assignment of genome fragments to specific lineages. The complete sequences of two genome fragments identified as being affiliated with Archaea, based on a gene encoding a CDC48 homologue and a thermosome subunit, respectively......Complex genomic libraries are increasingly being used to retrieve complete genes, operons or large genomic fragments directly from environmental samples, without the need to cultivate the respective microorganisms. We report on the construction of three large-insert fosmid libraries in total...... covering 3 Gbp of community DNA from two different soil samples, a sandy ecosystem and a mixed forest soil. In a fosmid end sequencing approach including 5376 sequence tags of approximately 700 bp length, we show that mostly bacterial and, to a much lesser extent, archaeal and eukaryotic genome fragments...

  3. 2001 Gordon Research Conference on Archaea: Ecology [sic], Metabolism. Final progress report [agenda and attendee list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, Charles

    2001-08-10

    The Gordon Research Conference on Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism [and Molecular Biology] was held at Proctor Academy, Andover, New Hampshire, August 5-10, 2001. The conference was attended by 135 participants. The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field, coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, and included US and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate discussion about the key issues in the field today. Session topics included the following: Ecology and genetic elements; Genomics and evolution; Ecology, genomes and gene regulation; Replication and recombination; Chromatin and transcription; Gene regulation; Post-transcription processing; Biochemistry and metabolism; Proteomics and protein structure; Metabolism and physiology. The featured speaker addressed the topic: ''Archaeal viruses, witnesses of prebiotic evolution?''

  4. The discovery of archaea origin phosphomannomutase in algae based on the algal transcriptome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Yanjing; CHI Shan; LIU Cui; CHEN Shengping; YU Jun; WANG Xumin; LIU Tao

    2014-01-01

    Phosphomannomutase (PMM;EC 5.4.2.8) is an enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion reaction between mannose-6-phosphate and mannose-1-phosphate. However, its systematic molecular and functional in-vestigations in algae have not hitherto been reported. In this work, with the accomplishment of the 1 000 Plant Project (OneKP) in which more than 218 species of Chromista, including 19 marine phaeophytes, 22 marine rhodophytes, 171 chlorophytes, 5 cryptophytes, 4 haptophytes, and 5 glaucophytes were sequenced, we used a gene analysis method to analyze the PMM gene sequences in algae and confirm the existence of the PMM gene in the transcriptomic sequencing data of Rhodophyta and Ochrophyta. Our results showed that only one type of PMM with four conserved motifs exists in Chromista which is similar to human PMM. Moreover, the phylogenetic tree revealed that algae PMM possibly originated from archaea.

  5. Characterising the CRISPR immune system in Archaea using genome sequence analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Shiraz Ali

    Archaea, a group of microorganisms distinct from bacteria and eukaryotes, are equipped with an adaptive immune system called the CRISPR system, which relies on an RNA interference mechanism to combat invading viruses and plasmids. Using a genome sequence analysis approach, the four components...... of archaeal genomic CRISPR loci were analysed, namely, repeats, spacers, leaders and cas genes. Based on analysis of spacer sequences it was predicted that the immune system combats viruses and plasmids by targeting their DNA. Furthermore, analysis of repeats, leaders and cas genes revealed that CRISPR...... systems exist as distinct families which have key differences between themselves. Closely related organisms were seen harbouring different CRISPR systems, while some distantly related species carried similar systems, indicating frequent horizontal exchange. Moreover, it was found that cas genes of Type I...

  6. Fishery by-product as a nutrient source for bacteria and archaea growth media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martone, Celina B; Pérez Borla, Olinda; Sánchez, Jorge J

    2005-02-01

    A highly soluble fish protein hydrolysates (FPH) with an 80% protein (peptide size between 1.5 and 20 kDa) and a low free amino acid content was obtained from hake (Merluccius hubssi) filleting waste [Lat. Am. Appl. Res. 30 (2000) 241]. Assays with Halobacterium salinarum, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus epidermidis were performed in order to test that FPH as nutrient source for archaea and eubacteria culture media. Cell growth was evaluated by plate count, and by monitoring turbidity and nucleic acids content in liquid cultures. Neither cell growth nor generation times resulting from control and FPH cultures exhibited statistically significant differences at alpha: 0.05 suggesting that FPH can be used as an alternative substrate for microorganism cultural purposes. PMID:15474942

  7. Synthesis, Production, and Biotechnological Applications of Exopolysaccharides and Polyhydroxyalkanoates by Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annarita Poli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme environments, generally characterized by atypical temperatures, pH, pressure, salinity, toxicity, and radiation levels, are inhabited by various microorganisms specifically adapted to these particular conditions, called extremophiles. Among these, the microorganisms belonging to the Archaea domain are of significant biotechnological importance as their biopolymers possess unique properties that offer insights into their biology and evolution. Particular attention has been devoted to two main types of biopolymers produced by such peculiar microorganisms, that is, the extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs, considered as a protection against desiccation and predation, and the endocellular polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs that provide an internal reserve of carbon and energy. Here, we report the composition, biosynthesis, and production of EPSs and PHAs by different archaeal species.

  8. Genome of Rice Cluster I archaea--the key methane producers in the rice rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkel, Christoph; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Liesack, Werner

    2006-07-21

    Rice fields are a global source of the greenhouse gas methane, which is produced by methanogenic archaea, and by methanogens of Rice Cluster I (RC-I) in particular. RC-I methanogens are not yet available in pure culture, and the mechanistic reasons for their prevalence in rice fields are unknown. We reconstructed a complete RC-I genome (3.18 megabases) using a metagenomic approach. Sequence analysis demonstrated an aerotolerant, H2/CO2-dependent lifestyle and enzymatic capacities for carbohydrate metabolism and assimilatory sulfate reduction, hitherto unknown among methanogens. These capacities and a unique set of antioxidant enzymes and DNA repair mechanisms as well as oxygen-insensitive enzymes provide RC-I with a selective advantage over other methanogens in its habitats, thereby explaining the prevalence of RC-I methanogens in the rice rhizosphere. PMID:16857943

  9. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work is underway using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale, to develop start-up and operating procedures, and to generate effluent for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and batch-fed conditions have been made lasting 36, 90, and over 200 days. Solids solubilization and gas production rates and total solids destruction have met or exceeded the target values of 0.6 g cellulose per L of reactor per day, 0.5 L off-gas per L of reactor per day, and 80% destruction of solids, respectively. Successful start-up procedures have been developed, and preliminary effluent characterization and disposal studies have been done. A simple dynamic process model has been constructed to aid in further process development and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester. 7 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  10. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of low-level radioactive cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work has been completed using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale. Start-up and operating procedures have been developed, and effluent was generated for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and fed-batch conditions were made lasting 36, 90, and 423 d. Solids solubilization rates and gas production rates averaged approximately 1.8 g cellulose per L of reactor per d and 1.2 L of off-gas per L reactor per d. Greater than 80% destruction of the volatile suspended solids was obtained. A simple dynamic process model was constructed to aid in process design and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester

  11. Changes in N-transforming archaea and bacteria in soil during the establishment of bioenergy crops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuejian Mao

    Full Text Available Widespread adaptation of biomass production for bioenergy may influence important biogeochemical functions in the landscape, which are mainly carried out by soil microbes. Here we explore the impact of four potential bioenergy feedstock crops (maize, switchgrass, Miscanthus X giganteus, and mixed tallgrass prairie on nitrogen cycling microorganisms in the soil by monitoring the changes in the quantity (real-time PCR and diversity (barcoded pyrosequencing of key functional genes (nifH, bacterial/archaeal amoA and nosZ and 16S rRNA genes over two years after bioenergy crop establishment. The quantities of these N-cycling genes were relatively stable in all four crops, except maize (the only fertilized crop, in which the population size of AOB doubled in less than 3 months. The nitrification rate was significantly correlated with the quantity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA not bacteria (AOB, indicating that archaea were the major ammonia oxidizers. Deep sequencing revealed high diversity of nifH, archaeal amoA, bacterial amoA, nosZ and 16S rRNA genes, with 229, 309, 330, 331 and 8989 OTUs observed, respectively. Rarefaction analysis revealed the diversity of archaeal amoA in maize markedly decreased in the second year. Ordination analysis of T-RFLP and pyrosequencing results showed that the N-transforming microbial community structures in the soil under these crops gradually differentiated. Thus far, our two-year study has shown that specific N-transforming microbial communities develop in the soil in response to planting different bioenergy crops, and each functional group responded in a different way. Our results also suggest that cultivation of maize with N-fertilization increases the abundance of AOB and denitrifiers, reduces the diversity of AOA, and results in significant changes in the structure of denitrification community.

  12. Uranium association with halophilic and non-halophilic bacteria and archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Dodge, C.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Harris, R.; Beveridge, T.J. [Univ. of Guelph, ON (Canada); Papenguth, H.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2004-07-01

    We determined the association of uranium with bacteria isolated from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Carlsbad, New Mexico, and compared this with known strains of halophilic and non-halophilic bacteria and archaea. Examination of the cultures by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) showed uranium accumulation extracellularly and/or intracellularly to a varying degree. In Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus subtilis uranium was associated with the cell surface and in the latter it was present as irregularly shaped grains. In Halobacterium halobium, the only archeon studied here, uranium was present as dense deposits and with Haloanaerobium praevalens as spikey deposits. Halomonas sp. isolated from the WIPP site accumulated uranium both extracellularly on the cell surface and intracellularly as electron-dense discrete granules. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of uranium with the halophilic and non-halophilic bacteria and archaea showed that the uranium present in whole cells was bonded to an average of 2.4 {+-} 0.7 phosphoryl groups at a distance of 3.65 {+-} 0.03 Aa. Comparison of whole cells of Halomonas sp. with the cell wall fragments of lysed cells showed the presence of a uranium bidentate complex at 2.91 {+-} 0.03 Aa with the carboxylate group on the cell wall, and uranyl hydroxide with U-U interaction at 3.71 {+-} 0.03 Aa due to adsorption or precipitation reactions; no U-P interaction was observed. Addition of uranium to the cell lysate of Halomonas sp. resulted in the precipitation of uranium due to the inorganic phosphate produced by the cells. These results show that the phosphates released from bacteria bind a significant amount of uranium. However, the bacterially immobilized uranium was readily solubilized by bicarbonate with concurrent release of phosphate into solution. (orig.)

  13. Integrating genomics into the taxonomy and systematics of the Bacteria and Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Jongsik; Rainey, Fred A

    2014-02-01

    The polyphasic approach used today in the taxonomy and systematics of the Bacteria and Archaea includes the use of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic data. The use of 16S rRNA gene sequence data has revolutionized our understanding of the microbial world and led to a rapid increase in the number of descriptions of novel taxa, especially at the species level. It has allowed in many cases for the demarcation of taxa into distinct species, but its limitations in a number of groups have resulted in the continued use of DNA-DNA hybridization. As technology has improved, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has provided a rapid and cost-effective approach to obtaining whole-genome sequences of microbial strains. Although some 12,000 bacterial or archaeal genome sequences are available for comparison, only 1725 of these are of actual type strains, limiting the use of genomic data in comparative taxonomic studies when there are nearly 11,000 type strains. Efforts to obtain complete genome sequences of all type strains are critical to the future of microbial systematics. The incorporation of genomics into the taxonomy and systematics of the Bacteria and Archaea coupled with computational advances will boost the credibility of taxonomy in the genomic era. This special issue of International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology contains both original research and review articles covering the use of genomic sequence data in microbial taxonomy and systematics. It includes contributions on specific taxa as well as outlines of approaches for incorporating genomics into new strain isolation to new taxon description workflows.

  14. The Role of Tetraether Lipid Composition in the Adaptation of Thermophilic Archaea to Acidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eBoyd

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Diether and tetraether lipids are fundamental components of the archaeal cell membrane. Archaea adjust the degree of tetraether lipid cyclization in order to maintain functional membranes and cellular homeostasis when confronted with pH and/or thermal stress. Thus, the ability to adjust tetraether lipid composition likely represents a critical phenotypic trait that enabled archaeal diversification into environments characterized by extremes in pH and/or temperature. Here we assess the relationship between geochemical variation, core- and polar-isoprenoid glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT, respectively lipid composition, and archaeal 16S rRNA gene diversity and abundance in 27 geothermal springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP, Wyoming. The composition and abundance of C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal ecosystems were distinct from surrounding soils, indicating that they are synthesized endogenously. With the exception of GDGT-0 (no cyclopentyl rings, the abundances of individual C-iGDGT and P-iGDGT lipids were significantly correlated. The abundance of a number of individual tetraether lipids varied positively with the relative abundance of individual 16S rRNA gene sequences, most notably crenarchaeol in both the core and polar GDGT fraction and sequences closely affiliated with Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii. This finding supports the proposal that crenarchaeol is a biomarker for nitrifying archaea. Variation in the degree of cyclization of C- and P-iGDGT lipids recovered from geothermal mats and sediments could best be explained by variation in spring pH, with lipids from acidic environments tending to have, on average, more internal cyclic rings than those from higher pH ecosystems. Likewise, variation in the phylogenetic composition of archaeal 16S rRNA genes could best be explained by spring pH. In turn, the phylogenetic similarity of archaeal 16S rRNA genes was significantly

  15. Differences down-under: alcohol-fueled methanogenesis by archaea present in Australian macropodids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoedt, Emily C; Cuív, Páraic Ó; Evans, Paul N; Smith, Wendy J M; McSweeney, Chris S; Denman, Stuart E; Morrison, Mark

    2016-10-01

    The Australian macropodids (kangaroos and wallabies) possess a distinctive foregut microbiota that contributes to their reduced methane emissions. However, methanogenic archaea are present within the macropodid foregut, although there is scant understanding of these microbes. Here, an isolate taxonomically assigned to the Methanosphaera genus (Methanosphaera sp. WGK6) was recovered from the anterior sacciform forestomach contents of a Western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus). Like the human gut isolate Methanosphaera stadtmanae DSMZ 3091(T), strain WGK6 is a methylotroph with no capacity for autotrophic growth. In contrast, though with the human isolate, strain WGK6 was found to utilize ethanol to support growth, but principally as a source of reducing power. Both the WGK6 and DSMZ 3091(T) genomes are very similar in terms of their size, synteny and G:C content. However, the WGK6 genome was found to encode contiguous genes encoding putative alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases, which are absent from the DSMZ 3091(T) genome. Interestingly, homologs of these genes are present in the genomes for several other members of the Methanobacteriales. In WGK6, these genes are cotranscribed under both growth conditions, and we propose the two genes provide a plausible explanation for the ability of WGK6 to utilize ethanol for methanol reduction to methane. Furthermore, our in vitro studies suggest that ethanol supports a greater cell yield per mol of methane formed compared to hydrogen-dependent growth. Taken together, this expansion in metabolic versatility can explain the persistence of these archaea in the kangaroo foregut, and their abundance in these 'low-methane-emitting' herbivores. PMID:27022996

  16. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become m

  17. Enrichment of a microbial community performing anaerobic oxidation of methane in a continuous high-pressure bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Fengping

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulphate reduction (SR-AOM prevents more than 90% of the oceanic methane emission to the atmosphere. In a previous study, we demonstrated that the high methane pressure (1, 4.5, and 8 MPa stimulated in vitro SR-AOM activity. However, the information on the effect of high-pressure on the microbial community structure and architecture was still lacking. Results In this study we analysed the long-term enrichment (286 days of this microbial community, which was mediating SR-AOM in a continuous high-pressure bioreactor. 99.7% of the total biovolume represented cells in the form of small aggregates (diameter less then 15 μm. An increase of the total biovolume was observed (2.5 times. After 286 days, the ANME-2 (anaerobic methanotrophic archaea subgroup 2 and SRB (sulphate reducing bacteria increased with a factor 12.5 and 8.4, respectively. Conclusion This paper reports a net biomass growth of communities involved in SR-AOM, incubated at high-pressure.

  18. Metabolic potential of fatty acid oxidation and anaerobic respiration by abundant members of Thaumarchaeota and Thermoplasmata in deep anoxic peat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Xueju [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Handley, Kim M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gilbert, Jack A. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Marine Biological Lab., Woods Hole, MA (United States); Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China); Kostka, Joel E. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-05-22

    To probe the metabolic potential of abundant Archaea in boreal peats, we reconstructed two near-complete archaeal genomes, affiliated with Thaumarchaeota group 1.1c (bin Fn1, 8% abundance), which was a genomically unrepresented group, and Thermoplasmata (bin Bg1, 26% abundance), from metagenomic data acquired from deep anoxic peat layers. Each of the near-complete genomes encodes the potential to degrade long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) via β-oxidation. Fn1 has the potential to oxidize LCFA either by syntrophic interaction with methanogens or by coupling oxidation with anaerobic respiration using fumarate as a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Fn1 is the first Thaumarchaeota genome without an identifiable carbon fixation pathway, indicating that this mesophilic phylum encompasses more diverse metabolisms than previously thought. Furthermore, we report genetic evidence suggestive of sulfite and/or organosulfonate reduction by Thermoplasmata Bg1. In deep peat, inorganic TEAs are often depleted to extremely low levels, yet the anaerobic respiration predicted for two abundant archaeal members suggests organic electron acceptors such as fumarate and organosulfonate (enriched in humic substances) may be important for respiration and C mineralization in peatlands.

  19. Application of Ventilation Air Methane Oxidization and Waste Heat Utilization Technology in Shanxi Lu’an Gaohe Coal Mine%乏风氧化及余热利用技术在山西潞安高河煤矿的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾剑

    2014-01-01

    A large amount of coal mine ventilation air methane was directly exhausted into the atmosPhere,which not only intensified the greenhouse effect,but also caused the energy consumPtion,and if an aPProPriate technology was aPPlied to make full use of the mine ventilation air methane,huge benefits in energy saving and environmental Protection would be Produced. This PaPer described the mine ventilation air methane oxidation and the waste heat utilization technology in the home and abroad, emPhatically described the design and aPPlication of the Power generation Project with the mine ventilation methane oxidation in Lu’an Gaohe Mine in Shanxi Province,including the collecting and mixing system of the mine ventilation air methane,the safe delivery system of low-concentration gas,the oxidation system of the mine ventilation air methane,the utilization system of the waste heat and so on,and analyzed the significance of the successful construction of this Project.%大量煤矿乏风瓦斯的直接排空,在加剧温室效应的同时亦造成能源的浪费,而通过采用合适的技术对乏风瓦斯加以利用,将产生巨大的节能环保效益。介绍了国内外煤矿乏风瓦斯氧化及余热利用技术,重点介绍了山西潞安高河煤矿的乏风瓦斯氧化发电项目的设计及应用情况,包括乏风收集及掺混系统、低浓度瓦斯输送安全保障系统、乏风氧化系统、余热利用系统等,并分析了该项目建设成功的意义。

  20. Biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community in mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Kurola, J M; Lähde, K; Kymäläinen, M; Sinkkonen, A; Romantschuk, M

    2014-10-01

    Over 258 Mt of solid waste are generated annually in Europe, a large fraction of which is biowaste. Sewage sludge is another major waste fraction. In this study, biowaste and sewage sludge were co-digested in an anaerobic digestion reactor (30% and 70% of total wet weight, respectively). The purpose was to investigate the biogas production and methanogenic archaeal community composition in the anaerobic digestion reactor under meso- (35-37 °C) and thermophilic (55-57 °C) processes and an increasing organic loading rate (OLR, 1-10 kg VS m(-3) d(-1)), and also to find a feasible compromise between waste treatment capacity and biogas production without causing process instability. In summary, more biogas was produced with all OLRs by the thermophilic process. Both processes showed a limited diversity of the methanogenic archaeal community which was dominated by Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales (e.g. Methanosarcina) in both meso- and thermophilic processes. Methanothermobacter was detected as an additional dominant genus in the thermophilic process. In addition to operating temperatures, the OLRs, the acetate concentration, and the presence of key substrates like propionate also affected the methanogenic archaeal community composition. A bacterial cell count 6.25 times higher than archaeal cell count was observed throughout the thermophilic process, while the cell count ratio varied between 0.2 and 8.5 in the mesophilic process. This suggests that the thermophilic process is more stable, but also that the relative abundance between bacteria and archaea can vary without seriously affecting biogas production.