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Sample records for anaerobic feiii reduction

  1. Concurrent nitrate and Fe(III) reduction during anaerobic biodegradation of phenols in a sandstone aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette; Crouzet, C.; Arvin, Erik

    2000-01-01

    The biodegradation of phenols (similar to 5, 60, 600 mg 1(-1)) under anaerobic conditions (nitrate enriched and unamended) was studied in laboratory microcosms with sandstone material and groundwater from within an anaerobic ammonium plume in an aquifer, The aqueous phase was sampled and analyzed...... for phenols and selected redox sensitive parameters on a regular basis. An experiment with sandstone material from specific depth intervals from a vertical profile across the ammonium plume was also conducted. The miniature microcosms used in this experiment were sacrificed for sampling for phenols...... and selected redox sensitive parameters at the end of the experiment. The sandstone material was characterized with respect to oxidation and reduction potential and Fe(II) and Fe(III) speciation prior to use for all microcosms and at the end of the experiments for selected microcosms. The redox conditions...

  2. Microbiological evidence for Fe(III) reduction on early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Madeline; Kashefi, Kazem; Blunt-Harris, Elizabeth L.; Lovley, Derek R.

    1998-09-01

    It is generally considered that sulphur reduction was one of the earliest forms of microbial respiration, because the known microorganisms that are most closely related to the last common ancestor of modern life are primarily anaerobic, sulphur-reducing hyperthermophiles. However, geochemical evidence indicates that Fe(III) is more likely than sulphur to have been the first external electron acceptor of global significance in microbial metabolism. Here we show that Archaea and Bacteria that are most closely related to the last common ancestor can reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II) and conserve energy to support growth from this respiration. Surprisingly, even Thermotoga maritima, previously considered to have only a fermentative metabolism, could grow as a respiratory organism when Fe(III) was provided as an electron acceptor. These results provide microbiological evidence that Fe(III) reduction could have been an important process on early Earth and suggest that microorganisms might contribute to Fe(III) reduction in modern hot biospheres. Furthermore, our discovery that hyperthermophiles that had previously been thought to require sulphur for cultivation can instead be grown without the production of toxic and corrosive sulphide, should aid biochemical investigations of these poorly understood organisms.

  3. Mechanisms for Fe(III) oxide reduction in sedimentary environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovely, Derek R.

    2002-01-01

    Although it was previously considered that Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms must come into direct contact with Fe(III) oxides in order to reduce them, recent studies have suggested that electron-shuttling compounds and/or Fe(III) chelators, either naturally present or produced by the Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms themselves, may alleviate the need for the Fe(III) reducers to establish direct contact with Fe(III) oxides. Studies with Shewanella alga strain BrY and Fe(III) oxides sequestered within microporous beads demonstrated for the first time that this organism releases a compound(s) that permits electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides which the organism cannot directly contact. Furthermore, as much as 450 w M dissolved Fe(III) was detected in cultures of S. alga growing in Fe(III) oxide medium, suggesting that this organism releases compounds that can solublize Fe(III) from Fe(III) oxide. These results contrast with previous studies, which demonstrated that Geobacter metallireducens does not produce electron-shuttles or Fe(III) chelators. Some freshwater aquatic sediments and groundwaters contained compounds, which could act as electron shuttles by accepting electrons from G. metallireducens and then transferring the electrons to Fe(III). However, other samples lacked significant electron-shuttling capacity. Spectroscopic studies indicated that the electron-shuttling capacity of the waters was not only associated with the presence of humic substances, but water extracts of walnut, oak, and maple leaves contained electron-shuttling compounds did not appear to be humic substances. Porewater from a freshwater aquatic sediment and groundwater from a petroleum-contaminated aquifer contained dissolved Fe(III) (4-16 w M), suggesting that soluble Fe(III) may be available as an electron acceptor in some sedimentary environments. These results demonstrate that in order to accurately model the mechanisms for Fe(III) reduction in sedimentary environments it will be necessary

  4. Dissimilatory Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D R

    1991-06-01

    The oxidation of organic matter coupled to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV) is one of the most important biogeochemical reactions in aquatic sediments, soils, and groundwater. This process, which may have been the first globally significant mechanism for the oxidation of organic matter to carbon dioxide, plays an important role in the oxidation of natural and contaminant organic compounds in a variety of environments and contributes to other phenomena of widespread significance such as the release of metals and nutrients into water supplies, the magnetization of sediments, and the corrosion of metal. Until recently, much of the Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction in sedimentary environments was considered to be the result of nonenzymatic processes. However, microorganisms which can effectively couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV) have recently been discovered. With Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor, these organisms can completely oxidize fatty acids, hydrogen, or a variety of monoaromatic compounds. This metabolism provides energy to support growth. Sugars and amino acids can be completely oxidized by the cooperative activity of fermentative microorganisms and hydrogen- and fatty-acid-oxidizing Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reducers. This provides a microbial mechanism for the oxidation of the complex assemblage of sedimentary organic matter in Fe(III)- or Mn(IV)-reducing environments. The available evidence indicates that this enzymatic reduction of Fe(III) or Mn(IV) accounts for most of the oxidation of organic matter coupled to reduction of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) in sedimentary environments. Little is known about the diversity and ecology of the microorganisms responsible for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction, and only preliminary studies have been conducted on the physiology and biochemistry of this process.

  5. Simultaneous Fe(III) reduction and ammonia oxidation process in Anammox sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Huang, Yong; Liu, Heng-Wei; Wu, Chuan; Bi, Wei; Yuan, Yi; Liu, Xin

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, there have been a number of reports on the phenomenon in which ferric iron (Fe(III)) is reduced to ferrous iron [Fe(II)] in anaerobic environments, accompanied by simultaneous oxidation of ammonia to NO 2 - , NO 3 - , or N 2. However, studies on the relevant reaction characteristics and mechanisms are rare. Recently, in research on the effect of Fe(III) on the activity of Anammox sludge, excess ammonia oxidization has also been found. Hence, in the present study, Fe(III) was used to serve as the electron acceptor instead of NO 2 - , and the feasibility and characteristics of Anammox coupled to Fe(III) reduction (termed Feammox) were investigated. After 160days of cultivation, the conversion rate of ammonia in the reactor was above 80%, accompanied by the production of a large amount of NO 3 - and a small amount of NO 2 - . The total nitrogen removal rate was up to 71.8%. Furthermore, quantities of Fe(II) were detected in the sludge fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and denaturated gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses further revealed that in the sludge, some Anammox bacteria were retained, and some microbes were enriched during the acclimatization process. We thus deduced that in Anammox sludge, Fe(III) reduction takes place together with ammonia oxidation to NO 2 - and NO 3 - along with the Anammox process. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Microbial reduction of Fe(III) and turnover of acetate in Hawaiian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küsel, Kirsten; Wagner, Christine; Trinkwalter, Tanja; Gössner, Anita S; Bäumler, Rupert; Drake, Harold L

    2002-04-01

    Soils contain anoxic microzones, and acetate is an intermediate during the turnover of soil organic carbon. Due to negligible methanogenic activities in well-drained soils, acetate accumulates under experimentally imposed short-term anoxic conditions. In contrast to forest, agricultural, and prairie soils, grassland soils from Hawaii rapidly consumed rather than formed acetate when incubated under anoxic conditions. Thus, alternative electron acceptors that might be linked to the anaerobic oxidation of soil organic carbon in Hawaiian soils were assessed. Under anoxic conditions, high amounts of Fe(II) were formed by Hawaiian soils as soon as soils were depleted of nitrate. Rates of Fe(II) formation for different soils ranged from 0.01 to 0.31 micromol (g dry weight soil)(-1) h(-1), but were not positively correlated to increasing amounts of poorly crystallized iron oxides. In general, sulfate-reducing and methanogenic activities were negligible. Supplemental acetate was rapidly oxidized to CO2 via the sequential reduction of nitrate and Fe(III) in grassland soil (obtained near Kaena State Park). Supplemental H2 stimulated the formation of Fe(II), but H2-utilizing acetogens appeared to also be involved in the consumption of H2. Approximately 270 micromol Fe(III) (g dry weight soil)(-1) was available for Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, and acetate became a stable end product when Fe(III) was depleted in long-term incubations. Most-probable-number estimates of H2- and acetate-utilizing Fe(III) reducers and of H2-utilizing acetogens were similar. These results indicate that (i) the microbial reduction of Fe(III) is an important electron-accepting process for the anaerobic oxidation of organic matter in Fe(III)-rich Hawaiian soils of volcanic origin, and (ii) acetate, formed by the combined activity of fermentative and acetogenic bacteria, is an important trophic link in anoxic microsites of these soils.

  7. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang eShi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III] (oxy(hydroxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 has evolved the machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway for transferring electrons across the entire cell envelope to the surface of extracellular Fe(III oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt that is proposed to oxidize the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to redox proteins in the periplasm. Although the periplasmic proteins receiving electrons from CymA during Fe(III oxidation have not been identified, they are believed to relay the electrons to MtrA. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons across the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. Functioning as terminal reductases, the outer membrane and decaheme c-Cyts MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III oxides. MtrC and OmcA can also serve as the terminal reductases for soluble forms of Fe(III. Although our understanding of the Mtr pathway is still far from complete, it is the best characterized microbial pathway used for extracellular electron exchange. Characterizations of the Mtr pathway have made significant contributions to the molecular understanding of microbial reduction of Fe(III oxides.

  8. Microbial reductive transformation of phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in fluvial subsurface sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, James K; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; Boyanov, Maxim I; Kemner, Kenneth M; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W; Bjornstad, Bruce N; Konopka, Allan E; Moore, Dean A; Resch, Charles T; Phillips, Jerry L

    2012-04-03

    The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) was investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in subsurface sediments incubated in sulfate-containing synthetic groundwater with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without, and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction of phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

  9. Anaerobic azo dye reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Zee, van der, F.P.

    2002-01-01

    Azo dyes, aromatic moieties linked together by azo (-N=N-) chromophores, represent the largest class of dyes used in textile-processing and other industries. The release of these compounds into the environment is undesirable, not only because of their colour, but also because many azo dyes and their breakdown products are toxic and/or mutagenic to life. To remove azo dyes from wastewater, a biological treatment strategy based on anaerobic reduction of the azo dye...

  10. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in Acidic Sediments: Isolation of Acidiphilium cryptum JF-5 Capable of Coupling the Reduction of Fe(III) to the Oxidation of Glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küsel, Kirsten; Dorsch, Tanja; Acker, Georg; Stackebrandt, Erko

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the microbial populations involved in the reduction of Fe(III) in an acidic, iron-rich sediment, the anaerobic flow of supplemental carbon and reductant was evaluated in sediment microcosms at the in situ temperature of 12°C. Supplemental glucose and cellobiose stimulated the formation of Fe(II); 42 and 21% of the reducing equivalents that were theoretically obtained from glucose and cellobiose, respectively, were recovered in Fe(II). Likewise, supplemental H2 was consumed by acidic sediments and yielded additional amounts of Fe(II) in a ratio of approximately 1:2. In contrast, supplemental lactate did not stimulate the formation of Fe(II). Supplemental acetate was not consumed and inhibited the formation of Fe(II). Most-probable-number estimates demonstrated that glucose-utilizing acidophilic Fe(III)-reducing bacteria approximated to 1% of the total direct counts of 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained bacteria. From the highest growth-positive dilution of the most-probable-number series at pH 2.3 supplemented with glucose, an isolate, JF-5, that could dissimilate Fe(III) was obtained. JF-5 was an acidophilic, gram-negative, facultative anaerobe that completely oxidized the following substrates via the dissimilation of Fe(III): glucose, fructose, xylose, ethanol, glycerol, malate, glutamate, fumarate, citrate, succinate, and H2. Growth and the reduction of Fe(III) did not occur in the presence of acetate. Cells of JF-5 grown under Fe(III)-reducing conditions formed blebs, i.e., protrusions that were still in contact with the cytoplasmic membrane. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of JF-5 demonstrated that it was closely related to an Australian isolate of Acidiphilium cryptum (99.6% sequence similarity), an organism not previously shown to couple the complete oxidation of sugars to the reduction of Fe(III). These collective results indicate that the in situ reduction of Fe(III) in acidic sediments can be mediated by heterotrophic Acidiphilium

  11. Microbial reduction of Fe(III) in acidic sediments: isolation of Acidiphilium cryptum JF-5 capable of coupling the reduction of Fe(III) to the oxidation of glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küsel, K; Dorsch, T; Acker, G; Stackebrandt, E

    1999-08-01

    To evaluate the microbial populations involved in the reduction of Fe(III) in an acidic, iron-rich sediment, the anaerobic flow of supplemental carbon and reductant was evaluated in sediment microcosms at the in situ temperature of 12 degrees C. Supplemental glucose and cellobiose stimulated the formation of Fe(II); 42 and 21% of the reducing equivalents that were theoretically obtained from glucose and cellobiose, respectively, were recovered in Fe(II). Likewise, supplemental H(2) was consumed by acidic sediments and yielded additional amounts of Fe(II) in a ratio of approximately 1:2. In contrast, supplemental lactate did not stimulate the formation of Fe(II). Supplemental acetate was not consumed and inhibited the formation of Fe(II). Most-probable-number estimates demonstrated that glucose-utilizing acidophilic Fe(III)-reducing bacteria approximated to 1% of the total direct counts of 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained bacteria. From the highest growth-positive dilution of the most-probable-number series at pH 2. 3 supplemented with glucose, an isolate, JF-5, that could dissimilate Fe(III) was obtained. JF-5 was an acidophilic, gram-negative, facultative anaerobe that completely oxidized the following substrates via the dissimilation of Fe(III): glucose, fructose, xylose, ethanol, glycerol, malate, glutamate, fumarate, citrate, succinate, and H(2). Growth and the reduction of Fe(III) did not occur in the presence of acetate. Cells of JF-5 grown under Fe(III)-reducing conditions formed blebs, i.e., protrusions that were still in contact with the cytoplasmic membrane. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence of JF-5 demonstrated that it was closely related to an Australian isolate of Acidiphilium cryptum (99.6% sequence similarity), an organism not previously shown to couple the complete oxidation of sugars to the reduction of Fe(III). These collective results indicate that the in situ reduction of Fe(III) in acidic sediments can be mediated by heterotrophic

  12. Advanced Experimental Analysis of Controls on Microbial Fe(III) Oxide Reduction - Final Report - 09/16/1996 - 03/16/2001; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roden, Eric E.

    2001-01-01

    Considering the broad influence that microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction can have on subsurface metal/organic contaminant biogeochemistry, understanding the mechanisms that control this process is critical for predicting the behavior and fate of these contaminants in anaerobic subsurface environments. Knowledge of the factors that influence the rates of growth and activity of Fe(III) oxide-reducing bacteria is critical for predicting (i.e., modeling) the long-term influence of these organisms on the fate of contaminants in the subsurface, and for effectively utilizing Fe(III) oxide reduction and associated geochemical affects for the purpose of subsurface metal/organic contamination bioremediation. This research project will refine existing models for microbiological and geochemical controls on Fe(III) oxide reduction, using laboratory reactor systems that mimic, to varying degrees, the physical and chemical conditions of the subsurface. Novel experimental methods for studying the kinetics of microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction and measuring growth rates of Fe(III) oxide-reducing bacteria will be developed. These new methodologies will be directly applicable to studies on subsurface contaminant transformations directly coupled to or influenced by microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction

  13. Enhanced abiotic and biotic contributions to dechlorination of pentachlorophenol during Fe(III) reduction by an iron-reducing bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yan [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); He, Yan, E-mail: yhe2006@zju.edu.cn [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Feng, Xiaoli [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Liang, Luyi [Experiment Teaching Center for Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Xu, Jianming, E-mail: jmxu@zju.edu.cn [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Brookes, Philip C.; Wu, Jianjun [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2014-03-01

    A novel Fe(III) reducing bacterium, Clostridium beijerinckii Z, was isolated from glucose amended paddy slurries, and shown to dechlorinate pentachlorophenol (PCP). Fifty percent of added PCP was removed by C. beijerinckii Z alone, which increased to 83% in the presence of both C. beijerinckii Z and ferrihydrite after 11 days of incubation. Without C. beijerinckii Z, the surface-bound Fe(II) also abiotically dechlorinated more than 40% of the added PCP. This indicated that the biotic dechlorination by C. beijerinckii Z is a dominant process causing PCP transformation through anaerobic dechlorination, and that the dechlorination rates can be accelerated by simultaneous reduction of Fe(III). A biochemical electron transfer coupling process between sorbed Fe(II) produced by C. beijerinckii Z and reductive dehalogenation is a possible mechanism. This finding increases our knowledge of the role of Fe(III) reducing genera of Clostridium in dechlorinating halogenated organic pollutants, such as PCP, in anaerobic paddy soils. - Highlights: • A novel Fe(III) reducing bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii Z was isolated and could dechlorinate pentachlorophenol. • Anaerobic transformation of PCP by C. beijerinckii Z could be accelerated by simultaneous reduction of Fe(III). • Biochemical electron transfer coupling between Fe redox cycling and reductive dechlorination was the mechanism involved. • The finding increases our knowledge of Clostridium sp. regarding their multiple functions for dechlorinating pollutants.

  14. Enhanced abiotic and biotic contributions to dechlorination of pentachlorophenol during Fe(III) reduction by an iron-reducing bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii Z

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yan; He, Yan; Feng, Xiaoli; Liang, Luyi; Xu, Jianming; Brookes, Philip C.; Wu, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    A novel Fe(III) reducing bacterium, Clostridium beijerinckii Z, was isolated from glucose amended paddy slurries, and shown to dechlorinate pentachlorophenol (PCP). Fifty percent of added PCP was removed by C. beijerinckii Z alone, which increased to 83% in the presence of both C. beijerinckii Z and ferrihydrite after 11 days of incubation. Without C. beijerinckii Z, the surface-bound Fe(II) also abiotically dechlorinated more than 40% of the added PCP. This indicated that the biotic dechlorination by C. beijerinckii Z is a dominant process causing PCP transformation through anaerobic dechlorination, and that the dechlorination rates can be accelerated by simultaneous reduction of Fe(III). A biochemical electron transfer coupling process between sorbed Fe(II) produced by C. beijerinckii Z and reductive dehalogenation is a possible mechanism. This finding increases our knowledge of the role of Fe(III) reducing genera of Clostridium in dechlorinating halogenated organic pollutants, such as PCP, in anaerobic paddy soils. - Highlights: • A novel Fe(III) reducing bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii Z was isolated and could dechlorinate pentachlorophenol. • Anaerobic transformation of PCP by C. beijerinckii Z could be accelerated by simultaneous reduction of Fe(III). • Biochemical electron transfer coupling between Fe redox cycling and reductive dechlorination was the mechanism involved. • The finding increases our knowledge of Clostridium sp. regarding their multiple functions for dechlorinating pollutants

  15. Microbial Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction in northern Barents Sea sediments under different conditions of ice cover and organic carbon deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickel, Maren; Vandieken, Verona; Brüchert, Volker

    2008-01-01

    station, with seasonally extended ice cover, low organic carbon content and sedimentation rate combined with relatively high concentrations of Mn and Fe(III) oxides favored dissimilatory Fe and Mn reduction (98% of anaerobic carbon oxidation) over sulfate reduction in the top 12 cm of the sediment....... In contrast, in a sediment that had not been ice covered for at least 12 months and with more organic carbon and a higher sedimentation rate, sulfate reduction was the most important anaerobic electron-accepting process (>80% of anaerobic carbon oxidation). In the upper 3 cm, microbial Fe and sulfate...

  16. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) in Acidic Sediments: Isolation of Acidiphilium cryptum JF-5 Capable of Coupling the Reduction of Fe(III) to the Oxidation of Glucose

    OpenAIRE

    Küsel, Kirsten; Dorsch, Tanja; Acker, Georg; Stackebrandt, Erko

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the microbial populations involved in the reduction of Fe(III) in an acidic, iron-rich sediment, the anaerobic flow of supplemental carbon and reductant was evaluated in sediment microcosms at the in situ temperature of 12°C. Supplemental glucose and cellobiose stimulated the formation of Fe(II); 42 and 21% of the reducing equivalents that were theoretically obtained from glucose and cellobiose, respectively, were recovered in Fe(II). Likewise, supplemental H2 was consumed by acid...

  17. Microbial reduction of Fe(III) in the presence of oxygen under low pH conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusel, K.; Roth, U.; Drake, H.L. [University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    In acidic, coal mining lake sediments, facultatively anaerobic Acidiphilium species are probably involved in the reduction of Fe(III). Previous results indicate that these bacteria can co-respire O{sub 2} and Fe(III). In this study, we investigated the capacity of the sediment microbiota to reduce Fe(III) in the presence of O{sub 2} at pH 3. In sediment microcosms with 4% O{sub 2} in the headspace, the concentration of Fe(II) increased at a rate of 1.03 {mu}mol (g wet sediment){sup -1} day{sup -1} within the first 7 days of incubation which was similar to the rate obtained with controls incubated under anoxic conditions. However, in microcosms incubated under air, Fe(II) was consumed after a lag phase of 8 h with a rate of 2.66 {mu}mol (g wet sediment){sup -1} day{sup -1}. Acidiphilium cryptum JF-5, isolated from this sediment, reduced soluble Fe(III) with either 4 or 21% O{sub 2} in the headspace, and concomitantly consumed O{sub 2}. However, the rate of Fe(II) formation normalized for cell density decreased under oxic conditions. Schwertmannite, the predominant Fe(III)-mineral of this sediment, was also reduced by A. cryptum JF-5 under oxic conditions. The rate of Fe(II) formation by A. cryptum JF-5 decreased after transfer from preincubation under air in medium lacking Fe(III). Acidiphilium cryptum JF-5 did not form Fe(II) when preincubated under air and transferred to anoxic medium containing Fe(III) and chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of protein synthesis. These results indicate that: (i) the reduction of Fe(III) can occur at low O{sub 2} concentrations in acidic sediments; (ii) Fe(II) can be oxidized at O{sub 2} concentrations near saturation; and (iii) the enzyme(s) responsible for the reduction of Fe(III) in A. cryptum JF-5 are not constitutive.

  18. Shewanella putrefaciens mtrB encodes an outer membrane protein required for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliaev, A S; Saffarini, D A

    1998-12-01

    Iron and manganese oxides or oxyhydroxides are abundant transition metals, and in aquatic environments they serve as terminal electron acceptors for a large number of bacterial species. The molecular mechanisms of anaerobic metal reduction, however, are not understood. Shewanella putrefaciens is a facultative anaerobe that uses Fe(III) and Mn(IV) as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. Transposon mutagenesis was used to generate mutants of S. putrefaciens, and one such mutant, SR-21, was analyzed in detail. Growth and enzyme assays indicated that the mutation in SR-21 resulted in loss of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction but did not affect its ability to reduce other electron acceptors used by the wild type. This deficiency was due to Tn5 inactivation of an open reading frame (ORF) designated mtrB. mtrB encodes a protein of 679 amino acids and contains a signal sequence characteristic of secreted proteins. Analysis of membrane fractions of the mutant, SR-21, and wild-type cells indicated that MtrB is located on the outer membrane of S. putrefaciens. A 5.2-kb DNA fragment that contains mtrB was isolated and completely sequenced. A second ORF, designated mtrA, was found directly upstream of mtrB. The two ORFs appear to be arranged in an operon. mtrA encodes a putative 10-heme c-type cytochrome of 333 amino acids. The N-terminal sequence of MtrA contains a potential signal sequence for secretion across the cell membrane. The amino acid sequence of MtrA exhibited 34% identity to NrfB from Escherichia coli, which is involved in formate-dependent nitrite reduction. To our knowledge, this is the first report of genes encoding proteins involved in metal reduction.

  19. Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Kostandarithes, H.M.; Li, S.W.; Plymake, A.E.; Daly, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO 2 and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH 2 DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml -1 ) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms

  20. Mechanistic investigation of Fe(III) oxide reduction by low molecular weight organic sulfur species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, Eryn M.; Taillefert, Martial

    2017-10-01

    Low molecular weight organic sulfur species, often referred to as thiols, are known to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments and represent important chemical reductants of Fe(III) oxides. Thiols are excellent electron shuttles used during dissimilatory iron reduction, and in this capacity could indirectly affect the redox state of sediments, release adsorbed contaminants via reductive dissolution, and influence the carbon cycle through alteration of bacterial respiration processes. Interestingly, the reduction of Fe(III) oxides by thiols has not been previously investigated in environmentally relevant conditions, likely due to analytical limitations associated with the detection of thiols and their oxidized products. In this study, a novel electrochemical method was developed to simultaneously determine thiol/disulfide pair concentrations in situ during the reduction of ferrihydrite in batch reactors. First order rate laws with respect to initial thiol concentration were confirmed for Fe(III) oxyhydroxide reduction by four common thiols: cysteine, homocysteine, cysteamine, and glutathione. Zero order was determined for both Fe(III) oxyhydroxide and proton concentration at circumneutral pH. A kinetic model detailing the molecular mechanism of the reaction was optimized with proposed intermediate surface structures. Although metal oxide overall reduction rate constants were inversely proportional to the complexity of the thiol structure, the extent of metal reduction increased with structure complexity, indicating that surface complexes play a significant role in the ability of these thiols to reduce iron. Taken together, these results demonstrate the importance of considering the molecular reaction mechanism at the iron oxide surface when investigating the potential for thiols to act as electron shuttles during dissimilatory iron reduction in natural environments.

  1. Enrichment of Geobacter species in response to stimulation of Fe(III) reduction in sandy aquifer sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeyenbos-West, O.L.; Nevin, K.P.; Anderson, R.T.; Lovely, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    Engineered stimulation of Fe(III) has been proposed as a strategy to enhance the immobilization of radioactive and toxic metals in metal-contaminated subsurface environments. Therefore, laboratory and field studies were conducted to determine which microbial populations would respond to stimulation of Fe(III) reduction in the sediments of sandy aquifers. In laboratory studies, the addition of either various organic electron donors or electron shuttle compounds stimulated Fe(III) reduction and resulted in Geobacter sequences becoming important constituents of the Bacterial 16S rDNA sequences that could be detected with PCR amplification and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Quantification of Geobacteraceae sequences with a PCR most-probable-number technique indicated that the extent to which numbers of Geobacter increased was related to the degree of stimulation of Fe(III) reduction. Geothrix species were also enriched in some instances, but were orders of magnitude less numerous than Geobacter species. Shewanella species were not detected, even when organic compounds known to be electron donors for Shewanella species were used to stimulate Fe(III) reduction in the sediments. Geobacter species were also enriched in two field experiments in which Fe(III) reduction was stimulated with the addition of benzoate or aromatic hydrocarbons. The apparent growth of Geobacter species concurrent with increased Fe(III) reduction suggests that Geobacter species were responsible for much of the Fe(III) reduction in all of the stimulation approaches evaluated in three geographically distinct aquifers. Therefore, strategies for subsurface remediation that involve enhancing the activity of indigenous Fe(III)-reducing populations in aquifers should consider the physiological properties of Geobacter species in their treatment design.

  2. Microbial Fe(III) Oxide Reduction in Chocolate Pots Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, N. W.; Roden, E. E.; Boyd, E. S.; Converse, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Previous work on dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) has focused on high temperature, low pH environments where soluble Fe(III) is utilized as an electron acceptor for respiration. Much less attention has been paid to DIR in lower temperature, circumneutral pH environments, where solid phase Fe(III) oxides are the dominant forms of Fe(III). This study explored the potential for DIR in the warm (ca. 40-50°C), circumneutral pH Chocolate Pots hot springs (CP) in YNP. Most probable number (MPN) enumerations and enrichment culture studies confirmed the presence of endogenous microbial communities that reduced native CP Fe(III) oxides. Enrichment cultures demonstrated sustained DIR coupled to acetate and lactate oxidation through repeated transfers over ca. 450 days. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes indicated that the dominant organisms in the enrichments were closely affiliated with the well known Fe(III) reducer Geobacter metallireducens. Additional taxa included relatives of sulfate reducing bacterial genera Desulfohalobium and Thermodesulfovibrio; however, amendment of enrichments with molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, suggested that sulfate reduction was not a primary metabolic pathway involved in DIR in the cultures. A metagenomic analysis of enrichment cultures is underway in anticipation of identifying genes involved in DIR in the less well-characterized dominant organisms. Current studies are aimed at interrogating the in situ microbial community at CP. Core samples were collected along the flow path (Fig. 1) and subdivided into 1 cm depth intervals for geochemical and microbiological analysis. The presence of significant quantities of Fe(II) in the solids indicated that DIR is active in situ. A parallel study investigated in vitro microbial DIR in sediments collected from three of the coring sites. DNA was extracted from samples from both studies for 16S rRNA gene and metagenomic sequencing in order to obtain a

  3. Fate of Cd during microbial Fe(III) mineral reduction by a novel and Cd-tolerant Geobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehe, E Marie; Obst, Martin; Hitchcock, Adam; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Behrens, Sebastian; Schröder, Christian; Byrne, James M; Michel, F Marc; Krämer, Ute; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-12-17

    Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides affect the mobility of contaminants in the environment by providing reactive surfaces for sorption. This includes the toxic metal cadmium (Cd), which prevails in agricultural soils and is taken up by crops. Fe(III)-reducing bacteria can mobilize such contaminants by Fe(III) mineral dissolution or immobilize them by sorption to or coprecipitation with secondary Fe minerals. To date, not much is known about the fate of Fe(III) mineral-associated Cd during microbial Fe(III) reduction. Here, we describe the isolation of a new Geobacter sp. strain Cd1 from a Cd-contaminated field site, where the strain accounts for 10(4) cells g(-1) dry soil. Strain Cd1 reduces the poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxyhydroxide ferrihydrite in the presence of at least up to 112 mg Cd L(-1). During initial microbial reduction of Cd-loaded ferrihydrite, sorbed Cd was mobilized. However, during continuous microbial Fe(III) reduction, Cd was immobilized by sorption to and/or coprecipitation within newly formed secondary minerals that contained Ca, Fe, and carbonate, implying the formation of an otavite-siderite-calcite (CdCO3-FeCO3-CaCO3) mixed mineral phase. Our data shows that microbially mediated turnover of Fe minerals affects the mobility of Cd in soils, potentially altering the dynamics of Cd uptake into food or phyto-remediating plants.

  4. Reduction of Fe(III) oxides by phylogenetically and physiologically diverse thermophilic methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Chihaya; Kato, Souichiro; Kimura, Satoshi; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2014-09-01

    Three thermophilic methanogens (Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, Methanosaeta thermophila, and Methanosarcina thermophila) were investigated for their ability to reduce poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxides (ferrihydrite) and the inhibitory effects of ferrihydrite on their methanogenesis. This study demonstrated that Fe(II) generation from ferrihydrite occurs in the cultures of the three thermophilic methanogens only when H2 was supplied as the source of reducing equivalents, even in the cultures of Mst. thermophila that do not grow on and produce CH4 from H2/CO2. While supplementation of ferrihydrite resulted in complete inhibition or suppression of methanogenesis by the thermophilic methanogens, ferrihydrite reduction by the methanogens at least partially alleviates the inhibitory effects. Microscopic and crystallographic analyses on the ferrihydrite-reducing Msr. thermophila cultures exhibited generation of magnetite on its cell surfaces through partial reduction of ferrihydrite. These findings suggest that at least certain thermophilic methanogens have the ability to extracellularly transfer electrons to insoluble Fe(III) compounds, affecting their methanogenic activities, which would in turn have significant impacts on materials and energy cycles in thermophilic anoxic environments. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Kinetics of microbial Fe(III) oxyhydroxide reduction : The role of mineral properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonneville, S.C.

    2005-01-01

    In many soils, sediments and groundwaters, ferric iron is a major potential electron acceptor for the oxidation of organic matter. In contrast to other terminal electron acceptors (e.g. nitrate or sulfate), the concentration of Fe3+(aq), is limited by the low solubility of Fe(III) oxyhydroxides

  6. Impact of Fe(III) as an effective electron-shuttle mediator for enhanced Cr(VI) reduction in microbial fuel cells: Reduction of diffusional resistances and cathode overpotentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiang [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Huang, Liping, E-mail: lipinghuang@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Pan, Yuzhen [College of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Quan, Xie [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Ministry of Education (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li Puma, Gianluca, E-mail: g.lipuma@lboro.ac.uk [Environmental Nanocatalysis & Photoreaction Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-05

    Highlights: • Fe(III) shuttles electrons for enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) in MFCs. • The coulombic efficiency increases by 1.6 fold in the presence of Fe(III). • The reduction of Cr(VI) occurs via an indirect Fe(III) mediation mechanism. • Fe(III) decreases the diffusional resistances and the cathode overpotentials. - Abstract: The role of Fe(III) was investigated as an electron-shuttle mediator to enhance the reduction rate of the toxic heavy metal hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in wastewaters, using microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The direct reduction of chromate (CrO{sub 4}{sup −}) and dichromate (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 2−}) anions in MFCs was hampered by the electrical repulsion between the negatively charged cathode and Cr(VI) functional groups. In contrast, in the presence of Fe(III), the conversion of Cr(VI) and the cathodic coulombic efficiency in the MFCs were 65.6% and 81.7%, respectively, 1.6 times and 1.4 folds as those recorded in the absence of Fe(III). Multiple analytical approaches, including linear sweep voltammetry, Tafel plot, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and kinetic calculations demonstrated that the complete reduction of Cr(VI) occurred through an indirect mechanism mediated by Fe(III). The direct reduction of Cr(VI) with cathode electrons in the presence of Fe(III) was insignificant. Fe(III) played a critical role in decreasing both the diffusional resistance of Cr(VI) species and the overpotential for Cr(VI) reduction. This study demonstrated that the reduction of Cr(VI) in MFCs was effective in the presence of Fe(III), providing an alternative and environmentally benign approach for efficient remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated sites with simultaneous production of renewable energy.

  7. Impact of Fe(III) as an effective electron-shuttle mediator for enhanced Cr(VI) reduction in microbial fuel cells: Reduction of diffusional resistances and cathode overpotentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qiang; Huang, Liping; Pan, Yuzhen; Quan, Xie; Li Puma, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Fe(III) shuttles electrons for enhanced reduction of Cr(VI) in MFCs. • The coulombic efficiency increases by 1.6 fold in the presence of Fe(III). • The reduction of Cr(VI) occurs via an indirect Fe(III) mediation mechanism. • Fe(III) decreases the diffusional resistances and the cathode overpotentials. - Abstract: The role of Fe(III) was investigated as an electron-shuttle mediator to enhance the reduction rate of the toxic heavy metal hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in wastewaters, using microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The direct reduction of chromate (CrO_4"−) and dichromate (Cr_2O_7"2"−) anions in MFCs was hampered by the electrical repulsion between the negatively charged cathode and Cr(VI) functional groups. In contrast, in the presence of Fe(III), the conversion of Cr(VI) and the cathodic coulombic efficiency in the MFCs were 65.6% and 81.7%, respectively, 1.6 times and 1.4 folds as those recorded in the absence of Fe(III). Multiple analytical approaches, including linear sweep voltammetry, Tafel plot, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and kinetic calculations demonstrated that the complete reduction of Cr(VI) occurred through an indirect mechanism mediated by Fe(III). The direct reduction of Cr(VI) with cathode electrons in the presence of Fe(III) was insignificant. Fe(III) played a critical role in decreasing both the diffusional resistance of Cr(VI) species and the overpotential for Cr(VI) reduction. This study demonstrated that the reduction of Cr(VI) in MFCs was effective in the presence of Fe(III), providing an alternative and environmentally benign approach for efficient remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated sites with simultaneous production of renewable energy.

  8. Alkaline Fe(III) reduction by a novel alkali-tolerant Serratia sp. isolated from surface sediments close to Sellafield nuclear facility, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Clare L; Morris, Katherine; Boothman, Christopher; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2012-02-01

    Extensive denitrification resulted in a dramatic increase in pH (from 6.8 to 9.5) in nitrate-impacted, acetate-amended sediment microcosms containing sediment representative of the Sellafield nuclear facility, UK. Denitrification was followed by Fe(III) reduction, indicating the presence of alkali-tolerant, metal-reducing bacteria. A close relative (99% 16S rRNA gene sequence homology) to Serratia liquefaciens dominated progressive enrichment cultures containing Fe(III)-citrate as the sole electron acceptor at pH 9 and was isolated aerobically using solid media. The optimum growth conditions for this facultatively anaerobic Serratia species were investigated, and it was capable of metabolizing a wide range of electron acceptors including oxygen, nitrate, FeGel, Fe-NTA and Fe-citrate and electron donors including acetate, lactate, formate, ethanol, glucose, glycerol and yeast extract at an optimum pH of c. 6.5 at 20 °C. The alkali tolerance of this strain extends the pH range of highly adaptable Fe(III)-reducing Serratia species from mildly acidic pH values associated with acid mine drainage conditions to alkali conditions representative of subsurface sediments stimulated for extensive denitrification and metal reduction. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated dioxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunge, Michael [Aarhus Univ. (DK). Dept. of Biological Sciences, Microbiology, and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Centre (iNANO); Lechner, Ute [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany). Inst. of Biology/Microbiology

    2009-09-15

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans (PCDD/Fs) are among the most harmful environmental contaminants. Their widespread distribution due to unintentional or unknown release coincides with environmental persistence, acute and chronic toxicity to living organisms, and long-term effects due to the compounds' tendency for bioaccumulation and biomagnification. While microbial aerobic degradation of PCDD/Fs is mainly reported for the turnover of low chlorinated congeners, this review focuses on anaerobic reductive dehalogenation, which may constitute a potential remediation strategy for polychlorinated compounds in soils and sediments. Microorganisms in sediments and in microcosms or enrichment cultures have been shown to be involved in the reductive dechlorination of dioxins. Bacteria related to the genus Dehalococcoides are capable of the reductive transformation of dioxins leading to lower chlorinated dioxins including di- and monochlorinated congeners. Thus, reductive dehalogenation might be one of the very few mechanisms able to mediate the turnover of polychlorinated dioxins by reducing their toxicity and paving the way for a subsequent breakdown of the carbon skeleton. (orig.)

  10. Microbial Reduction of Fe(III) and SO42- and Associated Microbial Communities in the Alluvial Aquifer Groundwater and Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2017-11-25

    Agricultural demands continuously increased use of groundwater, causing drawdown of water table and need of artificial recharge using adjacent stream waters. River water intrusion into groundwater can alter the geochemical and microbiological characteristics in the aquifer and subsurface. In an effort to investigate the subsurface biogeochemical activities before operation of artificial recharge at the test site, established at the bank of Nakdong River, Changwon, South Korea, organic carbon transported from river water to groundwater was mimicked and the effect on the indigenous microbial communities was investigated with the microcosm incubations of the groundwater and subsurface sediments. Laboratory incubations indicated microbial reduction of Fe(III) and sulfate. Next-generation Illumina MiSeq sequences of V4 region of 16S rRNA gene provided that the shifts of microbial taxa to Fe(III)-reducing and/or sulfate-reducing microorganisms such as Geobacter, Albidiferax, Desulfocapsa, Desulfuromonas, and Desulfovibrio were in good correlation with the sequential flourishment of microbial reduction of Fe(III) and sulfate as the incubations progressed. This suggests the potential role of dissolved organic carbons migrated with the river water into groundwater in the managed aquifer recharge system on the indigenous microbial community composition and following alterations of subsurface biogeochemistry and microbial metabolic activities.

  11. Effect of dissimilatory Fe(III) reducers on bio-reduction and nickel-cobalt recovery from Sukinda chromite-overburden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esther, Jacintha; Panda, Sandeep; Behera, Sunil K; Sukla, Lala B; Pradhan, Nilotpala; Mishra, Barada K

    2013-10-01

    The effect of an adapted dissimilatory iron reducing bacterial consortium (DIRB) towards bio-reduction of Sukinda chromite overburden (COB) with enhanced recovery of nickel and cobalt is being reported for the first time. The remarkable ability of DIRB to utilize Fe(III) as terminal electron acceptor reducing it to Fe(II) proved beneficial for treatment of COB as compared to previous reports for nickel leaching. XRD studies showed goethite as the major iron-bearing phase in COB. Under facultative anaerobic conditions, goethite was reduced to hematite and magnetite with the exposure of nickel oxide. FESEM studies showed DIRB to be associated with COB through biofilm formation with secondary mineral precipitates of magnetite deposited as tiny globular clusters on the extra polymeric substances. The morphological and mineralogical changes in COB, post DIRB application, yielded a maximum of 68.5% nickel and 80.98% cobalt in 10 days using 8M H2SO4. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Electron transfer capacity dependence of quinone-mediated Fe(III) reduction and current generation by Klebsiella pneumoniae L17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomin; Liu, Liang; Liu, Tongxu; Yuan, Tian; Zhang, Wei; Li, Fangbai; Zhou, Shungui; Li, Yongtao

    2013-06-01

    Quinone groups in exogenous electron shuttles can accelerate extracellular electron transfer (EET) from bacteria to insoluble terminal electron acceptors, such as Fe(III) oxides and electrodes, which are important in biogeochemical redox processes and microbial electricity generation. However, the relationship between quinone-mediated EET performance and electron-shuttling properties of the quinones remains incompletely characterized. This study investigates the effects of a series of synthetic quinones (SQs) on goethite reduction and current generation by a fermenting bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae L17. In addition, the voltammetric behavior and electron transfer capacities (ETCs) of SQ, including electron accepting (EAC) and donating (EDC) capacities, is also examined using electrochemical methods. The results showed that SQ can significantly increase both the Fe(III) reduction rates and current outputs of L17. Each tested SQ reversibly accepted and donated electrons as indicated by the cyclic voltammograms. The EAC and EDC results showed that Carmine and Alizarin had low relative capacities of electron transfer, whereas 9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid (AQDS), 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (2-HNQ), and 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (5-HNQ) showed stronger relative ETC, and 9,10-anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQC) and 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid (AQS) had high relative ETC. Enhancement of microbial goethite reduction kinetics and current outputs by SQ had a good linear relationship with their ETC, indicating that the effectiveness of quinone-mediated EET may be strongly dependent on the ETC of the quinones. Therefore, the presence of quinone compounds and fermenting microorganisms may increase the diversity of microbial populations that contribute to element transformation in natural environments. Moreover, ETC determination of different SQ would help to evaluate their performance for microbial EET under anoxic conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  13. Microbial metal reduction by members of the genus Shewanella: novel strategies for anaerobic respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dichristina, Thomas; Bates, David J.; Burns, Justin L.; Dale, Jason R.; Payne, Amanda N.

    2006-01-01

    Metal-reducing members of the genus Shewanella are important components of the microbial community residing in redox-stratified freshwater and marine environments. Metal-reducing gram-negative bacteria such as Shewanella, however, are presented with a unique physiological challenge: they are required to respire anaerobically on terminal electron acceptors which are either highly insoluble (Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides) and reduced to soluble end-products or highly soluble (U(VI) and Tc(VII)) and reduced to insoluble end-products. To overcome physiological problems associated with metal solubility, metal-respiring Shewanella are postulated to employ a variety of novel respiratory strategies not found in other gram-negative bacteria which respire on soluble electron acceptors such as O2, NO3 and SO4. The following chapter highlights the latest findings on the molecular mechanism of Fe(III), U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction by Shewanella, with particular emphasis on electron transport chain physiology.

  14. The outer membrane protein Omp35 affects the reduction of Fe(III, nitrate, and fumarate by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers Charles R

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses several electron acceptors to support anaerobic respiration including insoluble species such as iron(III and manganese(IV oxides, and soluble species such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide and many others. MR-1 has complex branched electron transport chains that include components in the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm, and outer membrane (OM. Previous studies have implicated a role for anaerobically upregulated OM electron transport components in the use of insoluble electron acceptors, and have suggested that other OM components may also contribute to insoluble electron acceptor use. In this study, the role for an anaerobically upregulated 35-kDa OM protein (Omp35 in the use of anaerobic electron acceptors was explored. Results Omp35 was purified from the OM of anaerobically grown cells, the gene encoding Omp35 was identified, and an omp35 null mutant (OMP35-1 was isolated and characterized. Although OMP35-1 grew on all electron acceptors tested, a significant lag was seen when grown on fumarate, nitrate, and Fe(III. Complementation studies confirmed that the phenotype of OMP35-1 was due to the loss of Omp35. Despite its requirement for wild-type rates of electron acceptor use, analysis of Omp35 protein and predicted sequence did not identify any electron transport moieties or predicted motifs. OMP35-1 had normal levels and distribution of known electron transport components including quinones, cytochromes, and fumarate reductase. Omp35 is related to putative porins from MR-1 and S. frigidimarina as well as to the PorA porin from Neisseria meningitidis. Subcellular fraction analysis confirmed that Omp35 is an OM protein. The seven-fold anaerobic upregulation of Omp35 is mediated post-transcriptionally. Conclusion Omp35 is a putative porin in the OM of MR-1 that is markedly upregulated anaerobically by a post-transcriptional mechanism. Omp35 is required for normal rates of growth on Fe(III

  15. Biodegradation of RDX by Stimulating Humic Substance- and Fe(III) - Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-19

    30. Lovley, D. R. 1995. Microbial Reduction of Iron, Manganese, and Other Metals. Adv. Agronomy 54:175-231. 31. Lovley, D. R., and E. L. Blunt...167. 57. Stevenson, F. J. 1982. Humus chemistry genesis, composition, reactions. Wiley Interscience, New York. 58. Stolz, J. F., D. R. Lovley, and

  16. Azo dye reduction by mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic consortia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos A.B.; Madrid, de M.P.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lier, van J.B.; Cervantes, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    The reduction of the azo dye model compounds Reactive Red 2 (RR2) and Reactive Orange 14 (RO14) by mesophilic (30 C) and thermophilic (55 C) anaerobic consortia was studied in batch assays. The contribution of fermentative and methanogenic microorganisms in both temperatures was evaluated in the

  17. The potential impact of microbial Fe(III) reduction on subsurface U(VI) mobility at a low level radioactive waste storage site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, M.J.; Livens, F.R.; Vaughan, D.J.; Lloyd, J.R.; Beadle, I.; Small, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Fe(III) oxy-hydroxides have the potential to be utilised as terminal electron acceptors by indigenous microbial communities in the British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) low level radioactive waste storage site at Drigg (Cumbria, UK) and these organisms may have a critical control on the biogeochemical cycling of several environmentally important radionuclides. In terms of radiological impact at Drigg, uranium is the most significant contributor to radiological impact and it is strongly influenced by biogeochemical processes. In terms of mass (moles) it is also the most abundant radionuclide in the Drigg inventory. Thus, the potential biotic and abiotic effects of Fe(III) reduction on U(VI) mobility in the Drigg subsurface are of interest. Culture-dependent and molecular techniques showed that the sediments in and around the Drigg site contained a diversity of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria. A series of microcosm experiments were utilised to create environmentally relevant experimental conditions. Microcosms set up using Drigg sediment and synthetic ground water were spiked with 100 μM U(VI) and acetate as an electron donor. U(VI) concentrations in groundwater were measured using a chemical assay while total U levels were determined using ICP-MS. Fe(II) levels were determined using the ferrozine method. Sediment surface areas were measured using BET analysis. The low surface area of the sediments resulted in only a small proportion of the 100 μM U(VI) spike sorbing onto mineral surfaces. The addition of ferri-hydrite to some microcosms resulted in an immediate lowering of soluble U(VI) concentrations, suggesting that the formation of soluble U(VI) complexes were not responsible for the minimal adsorption. The presence of biogenic Fe(II) in the microcosms did not affect the soluble U(VI) concentration. Similarly, soluble U(VI) levels remained unchanged when sediments were spiked with U(VI) post-microbial Fe(III) reduction. However, a lowering in

  18. Direct Involvement of ombB, omaB and omcB Genes in Extracellular Reduction of Fe(III by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimo eLiu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The tandem gene clusters orfR-ombB-omaB-omcB and orfS-ombC-omaC-omcC of the metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA are responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III-citrate and ferrihydrite [a poorly crystalline Fe(III oxide]. Each gene cluster encodes a putative transcriptional factor (OrfR/OrfS, a porin-like outer-membrane protein (OmbB/OmbC, a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt, OmaB/OmaC and an outer-membrane c-Cyt (OmcB/OmcC. The individual roles of OmbB, OmaB and OmcB in extracellular reduction of Fe(III, however, have remained either uninvestigated or controversial. Here, we showed that replacements of ombB, omaB, omcB and ombB-omaB with an antibiotic gene in the presence of ombC-omaC-omcC had no impact on reduction of Fe(III-citrate by G. sulfurreducens PCA. Disruption of ombB, omaB, omcB and ombB-omaB in the absence of ombC-omaC-omcC, however, severely impaired the bacterial ability to reduce Fe(III-citrate as well as ferrihydrite. These results unequivocally demonstrate an overlapping role of ombB-omaB-omcB and ombC-omaC-omcC in extracellular Fe(III reduction by G. sulfurreducens PCA. Involvement of both ombB-omaB-omcB and ombC-omaC-omcC in extracellular Fe(III reduction reflects the importance of these trans-outer membrane protein complexes in the physiology of this bacterium. Moreover, the kinetics of Fe(III-citrate and ferrihydrite reduction by these mutants in the absence of ombC-omaC-omcC were nearly identical, which suggests that absence of any protein subunit eliminates function of OmaB/OmbB/OmcB protein complex. Finally, orfS was found to have a negative impact on the extracellular reduction of Fe(III-citrate and ferrihydrite in G. sulfurreducens PCA probably by serving as a transcriptional repressor.

  19. Effect of methanogenic substrates on anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment.

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J W; Jagersma, Christian G; Khadem, Ahmad F; Stams, Alfons J M; Lens, Piet N L

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) is assumed to be a syntrophic process, in which methanotrophic archaea produce an interspecies electron carrier (IEC), which is subsequently utilized by sulfate-reducing bacteria

  20. Stable Fe isotope fractionation during anaerobic microbial dissimilatory iron reduction at low pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, P.; Amenabar, M. J.; Boyd, E. S.; Beard, B. L.; Johnson, C.

    2017-12-01

    In low-temperature anaerobic environments microbial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) plays an important role in Fe cycling. At neutral pH, sorption of aqueous Fe(II) (Fe(II)aq, produced by DIR) catalyzes isotopic exchange between Fe(II) and solid Fe(III), producing 56Fe/54Fe fractionations on the order of 3‰ during DIR[1,2,3]. At low pH, however, the absence of sorbed Fe(II) produces only limited abiologic isotopic exchange[4]. Here we investigated the scope of isotopic exchange between Fe(II)aq and ferric (hydr)oxides (ferrihydrite and goethite) and the associated stable Fe isotope fractionation during DIR by Acidianus strain DS80 at pH 3.0 and 80°C[5]. Over 19 days, 13% reduction of both minerals via microbial DIR was observed. The δ56Fe values of the fluid varied from -2.31 to -1.63‰ (ferrihydrite) and -0.45 to 0.02‰ (goethite). Partial leaching of bulk solid from each reactor with dilute HCl showed no sorption of Fe(II), and the surface layers of the solids were composed of Fe(III) with high δ56Fe values (ferrihydrite: 0.20 to 0.48‰ and goethite: 1.20 to 1.30‰). These results contrast with the lack of Fe isotope exchange in abiologic low-pH systems and indicate a key role for biology in catalyzing Fe isotope exchange between Fe(II)aq and Fe(III) solids, despite the absence of sorbed Fe(II). The estimated fractionation factor (ΔFeFe(III) -Fe(II)aq 2.6‰) from leaching of ferrihydrite is similar to the abiologic equilibrium fractionation factor ( 3.0‰)[3]. The fractionation factor (ΔFeFe(III) -Fe(II)aq 2.0‰) for goethite is higher than the abiologic fractionation factor ( 1.05‰)[2], but is consistent with the previously proposed "distorted surface layer" of goethite produced during the exchange with Fe(II)aq at neutral pH[1]. This study indicates that significant variations in Fe isotope compositions may be produced in low-pH environments where biological cycling of Fe occurs, in contrast to the expected lack of isotopic fractionation in

  1. Identification of Multiple Soluble Fe(III Reductases in Gram-Positive Thermophilic Bacterium Thermoanaerobacter indiensis BSB-33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Pal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermoanaerobacter indiensis BSB-33 has been earlier shown to reduce Fe(III and Cr(VI anaerobically at 60°C optimally. Further, the Gram-positive thermophilic bacterium contains Cr(VI reduction activity in both the membrane and cytoplasm. The soluble fraction prepared from T. indiensis cells grown at 60°C was found to contain the majority of Fe(III reduction activity of the microorganism and produced four distinct bands in nondenaturing Fe(III reductase activity gel. Proteins from each of these bands were partially purified by chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry (MS with the help of T. indiensis proteome sequences. Two paralogous dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases (LPDs, thioredoxin reductase (Trx, NADP(H-nitrite reductase (Ntr, and thioredoxin disulfide reductase (Tdr were determined to be responsible for Fe(III reductase activity. Amino acid sequence and three-dimensional (3D structural similarity analyses of the T. indiensis Fe(III reductases were carried out with Cr(VI reducing proteins from other bacteria. The two LPDs and Tdr showed very significant sequence and structural identity, respectively, with Cr(VI reducing dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase from Thermus scotoductus and thioredoxin disulfide reductase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. It appears that in addition to their iron reducing activity T. indiensis LPDs and Tdr are possibly involved in Cr(VI reduction as well.

  2. The anaerobic degradation of organic matter in Danish coastal sediments: iron reduction, manganese reduction, and sulfate reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Thamdrup, B; Hansen, Jens Würgler

    1993-01-01

    ). In the deep portion of the basin, surface Mn enrichments reached 3.5 wt%, and Mn reduction was the only important anaerobic carbon oxidation process in the upper 10 cm of the sediment. In the less Mn-rich sediments from intermediate depths in the basin, Fe reduction ranged from somewhat less, to far more...... speculate that in shallow sediments of the Skagerrak, surface Mn oxides are present in a somewhat reduced oxidation level (deep basin....

  3. Anaerobic BTEX biodegradation linked to nitrate and sulfate reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou Junfeng; Liu Xiang; Hu Zhifeng; Deng Dong

    2008-01-01

    Effective anaerobic BTEX biodegradation was obtained under nitrate and sulfate reducing conditions by the mixed bacterial consortium that were enriched from gasoline contaminated soil. Under the conditions of using nitrate or sulfate as reducing acceptor, the degradation rates of the six tested substrates decreased with toluene > ethylbenzene > m-xylene > o-xylene > benzene > p-xylene. The higher concentrations of BTEX were toxic to the mixed cultures and led to reduce the degradation rates of BTEX. Benzene and p-xylene were more toxic than toluene and ethylbenzene. Nitrate was a more favorable electron acceptor compared to sulfate. The measured ratios between the amount of nitrate consumed and the amount of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene, m-xylene, p-xylene degraded were 9.47, 9.26, 11.14, 12.46, 13.36 and 13.02, respectively. The measured ratios between sulfate reduction and BTEX degradation were 3.51, 4.33, 4.89, 4.81, 4.86 and 4.76, respectively, which were nearly the same to theoretical ones, and the relative error between the measured and calculated ratios was less than 10%

  4. Enhancement of carbon dioxide reduction and methane production by an obligate anaerobe and gas dissolution device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungjin; Choi, Kwangkeun; Kim, Jong-Oh; Chung, Jinwook

    2016-01-25

    The use of gas dissolution devices to improve the efficiency of H2 dissolution has enhanced CO2 reduction and CH4 production. In addition, the nutrients that initially existed in anaerobic sludge were exhausted over time, and the activities of anaerobic microorganisms declined. When nutrients were artificially injected, CO2 reduction and CH4 production rates climbed. Thus, assuming that the activity of the obligatory anaerobic microorganisms is maintained, a gas dissolution device will further enhance the efficiency of CO2 reduction and CH4 production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Trace methane oxidation and the methane dependency of sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J.W.; Jagersma, Christian G.; Zhang, Yu; Petrillo, Michele; Cai, Hengzhe; Buisman, Cees J.N.; Stams, Alfons J.M.; Lens, Piet N.L.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the oxidation of labeled methane (CH4) and the CH4 dependence of sulfate reduction in three types of anaerobic granular sludge. In all samples, 13C-labeled CH4 was anaerobically oxidized to 13C-labeled CO2, while net

  6. Reductive dechlorination of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers in soil under anaerobic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middeldorp, P.J.M.; Doesburg, van W.C.J.; Schraa, G.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The biological anaerobic reductive dechlorination of -hexachlorocyclohexane under methanogenic conditions was tested in a number of contaminated soil samples from two locations in the Netherlands. Soils from a heavily polluted location showed rapid dechlorination of -hexachlorocyclohexane to benzene

  7. Characterization of Predominant Reductants in an Anaerobic Leachate-Contaminated Aquifer by Nitroaromatic Probe Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rügge, Kirsten; Hofstetter, Thomas B.; Haderlein, Stefan B.

    1998-01-01

    The biogeochemical processes controlling the reductive transformation of contaminants in an anaerobic aquifer were inferred from the relative reactivity patterns of redox-sensitive probe compounds. The fate of five nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) was monitored under different redox conditions in a...... results suggest that Fe(ll) associated with ferric iron minerals is a highly reactive reductant in anaerobic aquifers, which may also determine the fate of other classes of reducible contaminants such as halogenated solvents, azo compounds, sulfoxides, chromate, or arsenate....

  8. Evidence for Microbial Iron Reduction in a Landfill Leachate-Polluted Aquifer (Vejen, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1994-01-01

    Aquifer sediment samples obtained from the anaerobic part of a landfill leachate plume in Vejen, Denmark, were suspended in groundwater or in an artificial medium and incubated. The strictly anaerobic suspensions were tested for reduction of ferric iron (Fe(III)) oxides, which was measured...

  9. The role of humic substances in the anaerobic reductive dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by Comamonas koreensis strain CY01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yibo [College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangdong Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, Guangzhou, 510631 (China)] [Guangdong Institute of Eco-environment and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou, 510650 (China)] [College of Life Science and Chemistry, Tianshui Normal University, Tianshui, 741000 (China); Wu Chunyuan [Guangdong Institute of Eco-environment and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou, 510650 (China); Wang Xiaojing, E-mail: wangyb02@163.com [College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangdong Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, Guangzhou, 510631 (China); Zhou Shungui, E-mail: sgzhou@soil.gd.cn [Guangdong Institute of Eco-environment and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou, 510650 (China)

    2009-05-30

    The role of the humic model compound, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), in the anaerobic reductive dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) by the Fe(III)- and humic substances (HS)-reducing bacterium, Comamonas koreensis strain CY01 was investigated. The results taken as a whole indicated that (i) strain CY01 could couple glucose oxidation to 2,4-D reductive dechlorination; (ii) reductive dechlorination of 2,4-D by strain CY01 was greatly stimulated by the addition of AQDS; (iii) the transfer of electrons from biogenic AH{sub 2}QDS to 2,4-D was an abiotic process which can take place in the absence of microorganisms; and (iv) AH{sub 2}QDS was reoxidized during the chemical reaction, AQDS can serve again as electron acceptor for microorganisms, thus acting as electron shuttles. All the results suggested that 2,4-D reductive dechlorination by CY01 strain was a biochemical process that oxidizes the electron donors and transfers the electron to the acceptors through redox mediator, AQDS. We proposed the possible mechanism for the HS dependent reduction of 2,4-D. Our results suggested that microbial reduction of HS and subsequent chemical reduction of organic pollutants represent an important path of electron flow in anoxic natural environments. This work is a necessary preliminary step for better understanding the biodegradation of 2,4-D in subsurface soil.

  10. Novel mode of microbial energy metabolism: organic carbon oxidation coupled to dissimilatory reduction of iron or manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D R; Phillips, E J

    1988-06-01

    A dissimilatory Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing microorganism was isolated from freshwater sediments of the Potomac River, Maryland. The isolate, designated GS-15, grew in defined anaerobic medium with acetate as the sole electron donor and Fe(III), Mn(IV), or nitrate as the sole electron acceptor. GS-15 oxidized acetate to carbon dioxide with the concomitant reduction of amorphic Fe(III) oxide to magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). When Fe(III) citrate replaced amorphic Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor, GS-15 grew faster and reduced all of the added Fe(III) to Fe(II). GS-15 reduced a natural amorphic Fe(III) oxide but did not significantly reduce highly crystalline Fe(III) forms. Fe(III) was reduced optimally at pH 6.7 to 7 and at 30 to 35 degrees C. Ethanol, butyrate, and propionate could also serve as electron donors for Fe(III) reduction. A variety of other organic compounds and hydrogen could not. MnO(2) was completely reduced to Mn(II), which precipitated as rhodochrosite (MnCO(3)). Nitrate was reduced to ammonia. Oxygen could not serve as an electron acceptor, and it inhibited growth with the other electron acceptors. This is the first demonstration that microorganisms can completely oxidize organic compounds with Fe(III) or Mn(IV) as the sole electron acceptor and that oxidation of organic matter coupled to dissimilatory Fe(III) or Mn(IV) reduction can yield energy for microbial growth. GS-15 provides a model for how enzymatically catalyzed reactions can be quantitatively significant mechanisms for the reduction of iron and manganese in anaerobic environments.

  11. Anaerobic degradation of landfill leachate using an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor with microbial sulfate reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Dhia Thabet, Olfa; Bouallagui, Hassib; Cayol, Jean-luc; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Hamdi, Moktar

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the anaerobic degradation of landfill leachate and sulfate reduction as a function of COD/(SO 4 2- ) ratio in an upflow anaerobic fixed-bed reactor. The reactor, which was inoculated with a mixed consortium, was operated under a constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 5 days. We investigated the effect of COD/(SO 4 2- ) ratio variation on the sulfate reduction efficiency, hydrogen sulfide production, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, conductivity, and pH variation. The best reactor performance, with significant sulfate reduction efficiency and COD removal efficiency of 91% and 87%, respectively, was reached under a COD/(SO 4 2- ) ratio of 1.17. Under these conditions, microscopic analysis showed the abundance of vibrios and rod-shaped bacterial cells. Two anaerobic bacteria were isolated from the reactor sludge. Phylogenetic studies performed on these strains identified strain A1 as affiliated to Clostridium genus and strain H1 as a new species of sulfate-reducing bacteria affiliated to the Desulfovibrio genus. The closest phylogenetic relative of strain H1 was Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, at 96% similarity for partial 16S RNA gene sequence data. Physiological and metabolic characterization was performed for this strain.

  12. Catabolic thiosulfate disproportionation and carbon dioxide reduction in strain DCB-1, a reductively dechlorinating anaerobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohn, W.W.; Tiedje, J.M. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Strain DCB-1 is a strict anaerobe capable of reductive dehalogenation. We elucidated metabolic processes in DCB-1 which may be related to dehalogenation and which further characterize the organism physiologically. Sulfoxy anions and CO2 were used by DCB-1 as catabolic electron acceptors. With suitable electron donors, sulfate and thiosulfate were reduced to sulfide. Sulfate and thiosulfate supported growth with formate or hydrogen as the electron donor and thus are probably respiratory electron acceptors. Other electron donors supporting growth with sulfate were CO, lactate, pyruvate, butyrate, and 3-methoxybenzoate. Thiosulfate also supported growth without an additional electron donor, being disproportionated to sulfide and sulfate. In the absence of other electron acceptors, CO2 reduction to acetate plus cell material was coupled to pyruvate oxidation to acetate plus CO2. Pyruvate could not be fermented without an electron acceptor. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity was found in whole cells, indicating that CO2 reduction probably occurred via the acetyl coenzyme A pathway. Autotrophic growth occurred on H2 plus thiosulfate or sulfate. Diazotrophic growth occurred, and whole cells had nitrogenase activity. On the basis of these physiological characteristics, DCB-1 is a thiosulfate-disproportionating bacterium unlike those previously described.

  13. Role of an organic carbon-rich soil and Fe(III) reduction in reducing the toxicity and environmental mobility of chromium(VI) at a COPR disposal site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Weixuan; Stewart, Douglas I; Humphreys, Paul N; Rout, Simon P; Burke, Ian T

    2016-01-15

    Cr(VI) is an important contaminant found at sites where chromium ore processing residue (COPR) is deposited. No low cost treatment exists for Cr(VI) leaching from such sites. This study investigated the mechanism of interaction of alkaline Cr(VI)-containing leachate with an Fe(II)-containing organic matter rich soil beneath the waste. The soil currently contains 0.8% Cr, shown to be present as Cr(III)(OH)3 in EXAFS analysis. Lab tests confirmed that the reaction of Cr(VI) in site leachate with Fe(II) present in the soil was stoichiometrically correct for a reductive mechanism of Cr accumulation. However, the amount of Fe(II) present in the soil was insufficient to maintain long term Cr(VI) reduction at historic infiltration rates. The soil contains a population of bacteria dominated by a Mangroviflexus-like species, that is closely related to known fermentative bacteria, and a community capable of sustaining Fe(III) reduction in alkaline culture. It is therefore likely that in situ fermentative metabolism supported by organic matter in the soil produces more labile organic substrates (lactate was detected) that support microbial Fe(III) reduction. It is therefore suggested that addition of solid phase organic matter to soils adjacent to COPR may reduce the long term spread of Cr(VI) in the environment. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhancing the Process of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Coupled to Iron Reduction in Constructed Wetland Mesocosms with Supplementation of Ferric Iron Hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, W.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    Effective ammonium (NH4+) removal has been a challenge in wastewater treatment processes. Aeration, which is required for the conventional NH4+ removal approach by ammonium oxidizing bacteria, is an energy intensive process during the operation of wastewater treatment plant. The efficiency of NH4+ oxidation in natural systems is also limited by oxygen transfer in water and sediments. The objective of this study is to enhance NH4+ removal by applying a novel microbial process, anaerobic NH4+ oxidation coupled to iron (Fe) reduction (also known as Feammox), in constructed wetlands (CW). Our studies have shown that an Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium named A6 can carry out the Feammox process using ferric Fe (Fe(III)) minerals like ferrihydrite as their electron acceptor. To investigate the properties of the Feammox process in CW as well as the influence of electrodes, Feammox bacterium A6 was inoculated in planted CW mesocosms with electrodes installed at multiple depths. CW mesocosms were operated using high NH4+ nutrient solution as inflow under high or low sediment Fe(III) level. During the operation, NH4+ and ferrous Fe concentration, pore water pH, voltages between electrodes, oxidation reduction potential and dissolved oxygen were measured. At the end of the experiment, CW sediment samples at different depths were taken, DNAs were extracted and quantitative polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing were performed to analyze the microbial communities. The results show that the high Fe level CW mesocosm has much higher NH4+ removal ability than the low Fe level CW mesocosm after Fe-reducing conditions are developed. This indicates the enhanced NH4+ removal can be attributed to elevated Feammox activity in high Fe level CW mesocosm. The microbial community structures are different in high or low Fe level CW mesocosms and on or away from the installed electrodes. The voltages between cathode and anode increased after the injection of A6 enrichment culture in low Fe

  15. Influence of Reactive Transport on the Reduction of U(VI) in the Presence of Fe(III) and Nitrate: Implications for U(VI) Immobilization by Bioremediation/Biobarriers - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B.D. Wood

    2007-01-01

    Subsurface contamination by metals and radionuclides represent some of the most challenging remediation problems confronting the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. In situ remediation of these contaminants by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) has been proposed as a potential cost effective remediation strategy. The primary focus of this research is to determine the mechanisms by which the fluxes of electron acceptors, electron donors, and other species can be controlled to maximize the transfer of reductive equivalents to the aqueous and solid phases. The proposed research is unique in the NABIR portfolio in that it focuses on (i) the role of flow and transport in the initiation of biostimulation and the successful sequestration of metals and radionuclides [specifically U(VI)], (ii) the subsequent reductive capacity and stability of the reduced sediments produced by the biostimulation process, and (iii) the potential for altering the growth of biomass in the subsurface by the addition of specific metabolic uncoupling compounds. A scientifically-based understanding of these phenomena are critical to the ability to design successful bioremediation schemes. The laboratory research will employ Shewanella putrefaciens (CN32), a facultative DMRB that can use Fe(III) oxides as a terminal electron acceptor. Sediment-packed columns will be inoculated with this organism, and the reduction of U(VI) by the DMRB will be stimulated by the addition of a carbon and energy source in the presence of Fe(III). Separate column experiments will be conducted to independently examine: (1) the importance of the abiotic reduction of U(VI) by biogenic Fe(II); (2) the influence of the transport process on Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization, with emphasis on methods for controlling the fluxes of aqueous species to maximize uranium reduction; (3) the reductive capacity of biologically-reduced sediments (with respect to re-oxidation by convective fluxes of O2 and NO3-) and

  16. ANAEROBIC DDT BIOTRANSFORMATION: ENHANCEMENT BY APPLICATION OF SURFACTANTS AND LOW OXIDATION REDUCTION POTENTIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enhancement of anaerobic DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethane) biotransformation by mixed cultures was studied with application of surfactants and oxidation reduction potential reducing agents. Without amendments, DDT transformation resulted mainly in the pr...

  17. Reductive Anaerobic Biological In Situ Treatment Technology Treatability Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alleman, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Enhanced biological reductive dechlorination (EBRD) shows a great deal of promise for efficiently treating groundwater contaminated with chlorinated solvents, but demonstration sites around the country were reporting mixed results...

  18. Effect of methanogenic substrates on anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment.

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J W

    2010-05-06

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) is assumed to be a syntrophic process, in which methanotrophic archaea produce an interspecies electron carrier (IEC), which is subsequently utilized by sulfate-reducing bacteria. In this paper, six methanogenic substrates are tested as candidate-IECs by assessing their effect on AOM and SR by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment. The presence of acetate, formate or hydrogen enhanced SR, but did not inhibit AOM, nor did these substrates trigger methanogenesis. Carbon monoxide also enhanced SR but slightly inhibited AOM. Methanol did not enhance SR nor did it inhibit AOM, and methanethiol inhibited both SR and AOM completely. Subsequently, it was calculated at which candidate-IEC concentrations no more Gibbs free energy can be conserved from their production from methane at the applied conditions. These concentrations were at least 1,000 times lower can the final candidate-IEC concentration in the bulk liquid. Therefore, the tested candidate-IECs could not have been produced from methane during the incubations. Hence, acetate, formate, methanol, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen can be excluded as sole IEC in AOM coupled to SR. Methanethiol did inhibit AOM and can therefore not be excluded as IEC by this study.

  19. Reductive immobilization of U(VI) in Fe(III) oxide-reducing subsurface sediments: Analysis of coupled microbial-geochemical processes in experimental reactive transport systems. Final Scientific/Technical Report-EMSP 73914

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eric E. Roden Matilde M. Urrutia Mark O. Barnett Clifford R. Lange

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to provide information to DOE on microbiological and geochemical processes underlying the potential use of dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) to create subsurface redox barriers for immobilization of uranium and other redox-sensitive metal/radionuclide contaminants that were released to the environment in large quantities during Cold War nuclear weapons manufacturing operations. Several fundamental scientific questions were addressed in order to understand and predict how such treatment procedures would function under in situ conditions in the subsurface. These questions revolved the coupled microbial-geochemical phenomena which are likely to occur within a redox barrier treatment zone, and on the dynamic interactions between hydrologic flux and biogeochemical process rates. First, we assembled a robust conceptual understanding and numerical framework for modeling the kinetics of microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction and associated DMRB growth in sediments. Development of this framework is a critical prerequisite for predicting the potential effectiveness of DMRB-promoted subsurface bioremediation, since Fe(III) oxides are expected to be the primary source of electron-accepting capacity for growth and maintenance of DMRB in subsurface environments. We also defined in detail the kinetics of microbial (enzymatic) versus abiotic, ferrous iron-promoted reduction of U(VI) in the presence and absence of synthetic and natural Fe(III) oxide materials. The results of these studies suggest that (i) the efficiency of dissolved U(VI) scavenging may be influenced by the kinetics of enzymatic U(VI) reduction in systems with relative short fluid residence times; (2) association of U(VI) with diverse surface sites in natural soils and sediments has the potential to limit the rate and extent of microbial U(VI) reduction, and in turn modulate the effectiveness of in situ U(VI) bioremediation; and (3) abiotic, ferrous iron (Fe(II)) drive n U

  20. Reductive precipitation of neptunium on iron surfaces under anaerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Cui, D.; Grolimund, D.; Rondinella, V. V.; Brütsch, R.; Amme, M.; Kutahyali, C.; Wiss, A. T.; Puranen, A.; Spahiu, K.

    2017-12-01

    Reductive precipitation of the radiotoxic nuclide 237Np from nuclear waste on the surface of iron canister material at simulated deep repository conditions was investigated. Pristine polished as well as pre-corroded iron specimens were interacted in a deoxygenated solution containing 10-100 μM Np(V), with 10 mM NaCl and 2 mM NaHCO3 as background electrolytes. The reactivity of each of the two different systems was investigated by analyzing the temporal evolution of the Np concentration in the reservoir. It was observed that pre-oxidized iron specimen with a 40 μm Fe3O4 corrosion layer are considerably more reactive regarding the reduction and immobilization of aqueous Np(V) as compared to pristine polished Fe(0) surfaces. 237Np immobilized by the reactive iron surfaces was characterized by scanning electron microscopy as well as synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. At the end of experiments, a 5-8 μm thick Np-rich layer was observed to be formed ontop of the Fe3O4 corrosion layer on the iron specimen. The findings from this work are significant in the context of performance assessments of deep geologic repositories using iron as high level radioactive waste (HLW) canister material and are of relevance regarding removing pollutants from contaminated soil or groundwater aquifer systems.

  1. Trace methane oxidation and the methane dependency of sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J.W.

    2010-05-01

    This study investigates the oxidation of labeled methane (CH4) and the CH4 dependence of sulfate reduction in three types of anaerobic granular sludge. In all samples, 13C-labeled CH4 was anaerobically oxidized to 13C-labeled CO2, while net endogenous CH4 production was observed. Labeled-CH4 oxidation rates followed CH4 production rates, and the presence of sulfate hampered both labeled-CH4 oxidation and methanogenesis. Labeled-CH4 oxidation was therefore linked to methanogenesis. This process is referred to as trace CH4 oxidation and has been demonstrated in methanogenic pure cultures. This study shows that the ratio between labeled-CH4 oxidation and methanogenesis is positively affected by the CH4 partial pressure and that this ratio is in methanogenic granular sludge more than 40 times higher than that in pure cultures of methanogens. The CH4 partial pressure also positively affected sulfate reduction and negatively affected methanogenesis: a repression of methanogenesis at elevated CH4 partial pressures confers an advantage to sulfate reducers that compete with methanogens for common substrates, formed from endogenous material. The oxidation of labeled CH 4 and the CH4 dependence of sulfate reduction are thus not necessarily evidence of anaerobic oxidation of CH4 coupled to sulfate reduction. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  2. Anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to thiosulfate reduction in a biotrickling filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassarini, Chiara; Rene, Eldon R; Bhattarai, Susma; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2017-09-01

    Microorganisms from an anaerobic methane oxidizing sediment were enriched with methane gas as the substrate in a biotrickling filter (BTF) using thiosulfate as electron acceptor for 213days. Thiosulfate disproportionation to sulfate and sulfide were the dominating sulfur conversion process in the BTF and the sulfide production rate was 0.5mmoll -1 day -1 . A specific group of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), belonging to the Desulforsarcina/Desulfococcus group, was enriched in the BTF. The BTF biomass showed maximum sulfate reduction rate (0.38mmoll -1 day -1 ) with methane as sole electron donor, measured in the absence of thiosulfate in the BTF. Therefore, a BTF fed with thiosulfate as electron acceptor can be used to enrich SRB of the DSS group and activate the inoculum for anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulfate reduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Anaerobic Aryl Reductive Dehalogenation of Halobenzoates by Cell Extracts of “Desulfomonile tiedjei”

    OpenAIRE

    DeWeerd, Kim A.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the transformation of halogenated benzoates by cell extracts of a dehalogenating anaerobe, “Desulfomonile tiedjei.” We found that cell extracts possessed aryl reductive dehalogenation activity. The activity was heat labile and dependent on the addition of reduced methyl viologen, but not on that of reduced NAD, NADP, flavin mononucleotide, flavin adenine dinucleotide, desulfoviridin, cytochrome c3, or benzyl viologen. Dehalogenation activity in extracts was stimulated by formate, C...

  4. Anaerobic carbon mineralisation through sulphate reduction in the inner shelf sediments of eastern Arabian sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, R.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Araujo, J.

    ,G.-J. .Reichart and S. W. Poulton. 2012. Sedimentary phosphorus and iron cycling in and below the oxygen minimum zone of the northern Arabian Sea.Biogeosciences Discussion. 9, 3829–3880. Pratihary A.K, S. W. A. Naqvi, H. Naik,B.R. Thorat, G. Narvenkar...). Other factors such as sedimentation rate and the presence of anaerobic electron acceptors asnitrate, Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides also affect sedimentary Corg mineralization rates.Under anoxic conditions, reductive dissolution of Fe oxyhyroxides produces...

  5. Are high rates of sulphate reduction associated with anaerobic oxidation of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devol, A H; Ahmed, S I

    1981-01-01

    Classical models of sulphur diagenesis in marine sediments are based on the assumption that the rate of sulphate reduction is first order with respect to oxidizable particulate organic carbon (POC). This assumption requires that oxidizable POC, sulphate concentration and the sulphate reduction rate be highest at the top of the sulphate reduction zone and decrease exponentially with increasing sediment depth. However, to explain recent observations of concave upwards methane distributions, the anaerobic consumption of methane has been proposed. Furthermore, it has been proposed that this consumption takes place near the bottom of the sulphate reducing zone where sulphate concentrations are low. Thus, if sulphate reducing bacteria are associated with the anaerobic oxidation of methane, a peak in sulphate reduction rate might be expected in this deep consumption zone. The importance of the process in sedimentary sulphur diagenesis is indicated by calculations estimating that 30 to 75% of the downward sulphate flux at depth may be consumed by methane oxidation within this zone. We present here profiles of sulphate reduction rate in anoxic sediments that show distinct local maxima at the depth where the anaerobic oxidation of methane would be expected. Our measurements were made during July and August 1978 in Saanich Inlet, an anoxic fjord located on the south-east of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. The inlet has a shallow sill (approx 70 m) which restricts circulation of the deeper water (maximum depth 225 m) inside the basin to the extent that for about 8 months of the year the bottom waters contain hydrogen sulphide, the inlet is an ideal location for studying sedimentary sulphate reduction because reactions with oxygen and the effects of burrowing organisms can be neglected.

  6. The kinetics of reductive dehalogenation of a set of halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic sediment slurries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peijnenburg, W; Eriksson, L; de Groot, A; Sjöström, M; Verboom, H

    1998-01-01

    Disappearance rate constants are reported for the reductive transformation of 17 halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic sediment-water samples. Statistical experimental design in combination with multivariate chemical characterization of their chemical properties was used to select the compounds. Degradation followed pseudo first-order kinetics through at least two half-lives for 15 of the 17 compounds. Of all the compounds investigated, 1,2,3-trichloropropane and dichloromethane were unique in that they were dehalogenated according to zero-order kinetics. Reductive dehalogenation was the sole transformation reaction taking place.

  7. Study of the oxidation-reduction kinetics involved in the Np(V) + Fe(II) in equilibrium Np(IV) + Fe(III) system in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jao, Y.

    1975-08-01

    Ferrous nitrate-hydrazine is one of the more attractive alternate reactants to the currently used reagent, ferrous sulfamate, for partitioning plutonium from neptunium and uranium. An understanding of the kinetics of the reduction of Np(VI) to Np(IV) by ferrous nitrate-hydrazine is needed before a satisfactory evaluation of the feasibility of this reductant in actinide element separations can be made. The purpose of this work was to study the kinetics and mechanisms of the reduction of Np(V) by Fe(II) and the oxidation of Np(IV) by Fe(III) in 1-2 M nitric acid solutions. The acid concentration range was chosen to include that typically used in the separation of plutonium from neptunium and uranium by solvent extraction with tributylphosphate. The forward and reverse rate constants, hydrogen ion dependence, temperature dependence, ionic strength effects and nitrate ion influence were determined. The proposed reaction mechanisms involve protonation of the NpO 2 + ions and hydroxyoxygenation of Np 4 + ions. (LK)

  8. Reductive debromination of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209) by anaerobic sediment microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, J.; Zegers, B.; Skoczynska, E.; Voogt, P. de [IBED-Environmental Chemistry, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-09-15

    The environmental fate and effects of brominated flame retardants have been receiving increasing interest. Because of their high hydrophobicity, polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants in the aquatic environment are mainly present in sediments and biota. The long-term fate of these compounds will to a large extent depend on the potential for microbial degradation in sediments. Dehalogenation in anaerobic sediments has been found for many chlorinated aromatic compounds such as PCBs and PCDDs. Although there is little information available on the microbial degradation of PBDEs, there are reports showing that polybrominated biphenyls are readily debrominated in anaerobic sediments. Complete debromination of PBDEs in marine sediments may be an important route by which these compounds are removed from the marine environment. On the other hand, incomplete debromination may lead to the accumulation of PBDE congeners that are more bioavailable and more readily taken up by marine organisms. Recent reports indicate that BDE 209 is debrominated in the gut of carp. In this study we investigated the potential for reductive debromination of BDE 209 in anaerobic sediment suspensions.

  9. Microbial reduction of 99Tc (as TcO4-) in anaerobic alkaline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khizhnyak, T.; Simonoff, M.; Sergeant, C.; Simonoff, G.; Medvedeva-Lyalikova, N.N.

    2003-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to reduce pertechnetate in alkaline conditions was investigated using halophilic bacteria isolated from soda-lakes environments. Anaerobic halophilic bacteria were able to reduce as much as 0.25 mM pertechnetate, whereas no reduction took place without bacteria or in the presence of heat-killed bacteria. The results obtained showed reduction of Tc(VII)O 4 - to the Tc(V) and Tc(IV) at pH 10 in the carbonate-bicarbonate medium. About 57% of the total technetium was determined to be Tc(IV), 1-3% as a Tc(V) and 17-20% as a Tc(VII) after 1-3 days of incubation with bacteria. The microbial reduction of Tc(VII) in alkaline conditions has been suggested as a potential mechanism for the removal of Tc from contaminated environments or waste streams. (author)

  10. Microbial dissimilatory iron(III) reduction: Studies on the mechanism and on processes of environmental relevance

    OpenAIRE

    Jahn, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Many microbes are able to respire aerobically oxygen or anaerobically other electron acceptors for example sulphate, nitrate, manganese(IV) or Fe(III). As iron minerals are widespread in nature, dissimilatory iron(III) reduction by different microorganisms is a very important process of anaerobic respiration. The general goal of this work was to improve the knowledge of processes, in which iron-reducing microbes are said to play an important role. For this purpose, in one part the focus wa...

  11. Reductive debromination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in anaerobic sediment and a biomimetic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarz, John A; Ahn, Mi-Youn; Leng, June; Filley, Timothy R; Nies, Loring

    2008-02-15

    Because of the bioaccumulation of penta- and tetrapolybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants in biota,the environmental biotransformation of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) is of interest. BDE-209 accounts for more than 80% by mass of PBDE production and is the dominant PBDE in sediments. Most sediments are anaerobic and reports of microbial reductive dehalogenation of hydrophobic persistent organohalogen pollutants are numerous. Reductive debromination of BDE-209 in the environment could provide a significant source of lesser-brominated PBDEs to biota. Moreover, a recent study showed that BDE-209 debrominates in sewage sludge, and another demonstrated that some halorespiring bacteria will debrominate BDE-209. To determine whether reductive debromination of BDE-209 occurs in sediments, parallel experiments were conducted using anaerobic sediment microcosms and a cosolvent-enhanced biomimetic system. In the biomimetic system, reductive debromination occurred at rates corresponding to bromine substitution levels with a BDE-209 half-life of only 18 s compared with a halflife of almost 60 days for 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether. In sediment, the measured debromination half-life of BDE-209 was well over a decade and was in good agreement with the predicted value obtained from the biomimetic experiment. Product congeners were predominantly double para-substituted. BDE-209 debrominated in sediment with a corresponding increase in nona-, octa-, hepta-, and hexa-PBDEs. Nine new PBDE congeners appeared in sediment from reductive debromination. Given the very large BDE-209 burden already in sediments globally, it is important to determine whether this transformation is a significant source of lesser-brominated PBDEs to the environment.

  12. REDOX AND REDUCTION POTENTIALS AS PARAMETERS TO PREDICT THE DEGRADATION PATHWAY OF CHLORINATED BENZENES IN ANAEROBIC ENVIRONMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOLFING, J; HARRISON, BK

    1993-01-01

    The anaerobic degradation pathway of hexachlorobenzene starts with a series of reductive dehalogenation steps. In the present paper it was evaluated whether the dehalogenation pathway observed in microbial ecosystems could be predicted by the redox potential and/or the reduction potential (the

  13. The contribution of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea to azo dye reduction by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos A.B.; Cervantes, F.J.; Madrid, de M.P.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lier, van J.B.

    2006-01-01

    The contribution of fermentative bacteria and methanogenic archaea to azo dye reduction by a thermophilic anaerobic consortium was studied. Additionally, the effects of different electron-donating substrates and the redox mediator riboflavin on dye reduction were assessed by using either a

  14. Growth of the facultative anaerobe Shewanella putrefaciens by elemental sulfur reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, D. P.; Nealson, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    The growth of bacteria by dissimilatory elemental sulfur reduction is generally associated with obligate anaerobes and thermophiles in particular. Here we describe the sulfur-dependent growth of the facultatively anaerobic mesophile Shewanella putrefaciens. Six of nine representative S. putrefaciens isolates from a variety of environments proved able to grow by sulfur reduction, and strain MR-1 was chosen for further study. Growth was monitored in a minimal medium (usually with 0.05% Casamino Acids added as a growth stimulant) containing 30 mM lactate and limiting concentrations of elemental sulfur. When mechanisms were provided for the removal of the metabolic end product, H2S, measurable growth was obtained at sulfur concentrations of from 2 to 30 mM. Initial doubling times were ca. 1.5 h and substrate independent over the range of sulfur concentrations tested. In the cultures with the highest sulfur concentrations, cell numbers increased by greater than 400-fold after 48 h, reaching a maximum density of 6.8 x 10(8) cells ml-1. Yields were determined as total cell carbon and ranged from 1.7 to 5.9 g of C mol of S(0) consumed-1 in the presence of the amino acid supplement and from 0.9 to 3.4 g of C mol of S(0-1) in its absence. Several lines of evidence indicate that cell-to-sulfur contact is not required for growth. Approaches for the culture of sulfur-metabolizing bacteria and potential ecological implications of sulfur reduction in Shewanella-like heterotrophs are discussed.

  15. Particle Aggregation During Fe(III) Bioreduction in Nontronite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaisi, D. P.; Dong, H.; Hi, Z.; Kim, J.

    2005-12-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the rate and mechanism of particle aggregation during bacterial Fe (III) reduction in different size fractions of nontronite and to investigate the role of different factors contributing to particle aggregation. To achieve this goal, microbial Fe(III) reduction experiments were performed with lactate as an electron donor, Fe(III) in nontronite as an electron acceptor, and AQDS as an electron shuttle in bicarbonate buffer using Shewanella putrefaceins CN32. These experiments were performed with and without Na- pyrophosphate as a dispersant in four size fractions of nontronite (0.12-0.22, 0.41-0.69, 0.73-0.96 and 1.42-1.8 mm). The rate of nontronite aggregation during the Fe(III) bioreduction was measured by analyzing particle size distribution using photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and SEM images analysis. Similarly, the changes in particle morphology during particle aggregation were determined by analyses of SEM images. Changes in particle surface charge were measured with electrophoretic mobility analyzer. The protein and carbohydrate fraction of EPS produced by cells during Fe(III) bioreduction was measured using Bradford and phenol-sulfuric acid extraction method, respectively. In the presence of the dispersant, the extent of Fe(III) bioreduction was 11.5-12.2% within the first 56 hours of the experiment. There was no measurable particle aggregation in control experiments. The PCS measurements showed that the increase in the effective diameter (95% percentile) was by a factor of 3.1 and 1.9 for particle size of 0.12-0.22 mm and 1.42-1.80 mm, respectively. The SEM image analyses also gave the similar magnitude of increase in particle size. In the absence of the dispersant, the extent of Fe(III) bioreduction was 13.4-14.5% in 56 hours of the experiment. The rate of aggregation was higher than that in the presence of the dispersant. The increase in the effective diameter (95% percentile) was by a factor of 13.6 and 4.1 for

  16. Microbial reduction of uranium(VI) by anaerobic microorganisms isolated from a former uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Ulrike; Krawczyk-Baersch, Evelyn [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry; Arnold, Thuro [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures

    2017-06-01

    The former uranium mine Koenigstein (Germany) is currently in the process of controlled flooding by reason of remediation purposes. However, the flooding water still contains high concentrations of uranium and other heavy metals. For that reason the water has to be cleaned up by a conventional waste water treatment plant. The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between anaerobic microorganisms and uranium for possible bioremediation approaches, which could be an great alternative for the intensive and expensive waste water treatment. EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) and XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) measurements were performed and revealed a complete reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) only by adding 10 mM glycerol.

  17. Microbial reduction of uranium(VI) by anaerobic microorganisms isolated from a former uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, Ulrike; Krawczyk-Baersch, Evelyn; Arnold, Thuro; Scheinost, Andreas C.

    2017-01-01

    The former uranium mine Koenigstein (Germany) is currently in the process of controlled flooding by reason of remediation purposes. However, the flooding water still contains high concentrations of uranium and other heavy metals. For that reason the water has to be cleaned up by a conventional waste water treatment plant. The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between anaerobic microorganisms and uranium for possible bioremediation approaches, which could be an great alternative for the intensive and expensive waste water treatment. EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) and XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) measurements were performed and revealed a complete reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) only by adding 10 mM glycerol.

  18. High rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane, ethane and propane coupled to thiosulphate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Zuluaga, Diego A; Weijma, Jan; Timmers, Peer H A; Buisman, Cees J N

    2015-03-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to sulphate reduction and the use of ethane and propane as electron donors by sulphate-reducing bacteria represent new opportunities for the treatment of streams contaminated with sulphur oxyanions. However, growth of microbial sulphate-reducing populations with methane, propane or butane is extremely slow, which hampers research and development of bioprocesses based on these conversions. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the growth rate with possible alternative terminal electron acceptors such as thiosulphate and elemental sulphur may be higher, which would facilitate future research. Here, we investigate the use of these electron acceptors for oxidation of methane, ethane and propane, with marine sediment as inoculum. Mixed marine sediments originating from Aarhus Bay (Denmark) and Eckernförde Bay (Germany) were cultivated anaerobically at a pH between 7.2 and 7.8 and a temperature of 15 °C in the presence of methane, ethane and propane and various sulphur electron acceptors. The sulphide production rates in the conditions with methane, ethane and propane with sulphate were respectively 2.3, 2.2 and 1.8 μmol S L(-1) day(-1). For sulphur, no reduction was demonstrated. For thiosulphate, the sulphide production rates were up to 50 times higher compared to those of sulphate, with 86.2, 90.7 and 108.1 μmol S L(-1) day(-1) for methane, ethane and propane respectively. This sulphide production was partly due to disproportionation, 50 % for ethane but only 7 and 14 % for methane and propane respectively. The oxidation of the alkanes in the presence of thiosulphate was confirmed by carbon dioxide production. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of thiosulphate use as electron acceptor with ethane and propane as electron donors. Additionally, these results indicate that thiosulphate is a promising electron acceptor to increase start-up rates for sulphate-reducing bioprocesses coupled to short-chain alkane oxidation.

  19. Reduction of sludge production from WWTP using thermal pretreatment and enhanced anaerobic methanisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graja, S; Chauzy, J; Fernandes, P; Patria, L; Cretenot, D

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the study presented here was to investigate the performance of an enhanced two-step anaerobic process for the treatment of WWTP sludge. This process was developed to answer the urgent need currently faced by WWTP operators to reduce the production of biosolids, for which disposal pathways are facing increasing difficulties. A pilot plant was operated on a full-scale WWTP (2,500 p.e.) over a period of 4 months. It consisted of a thermal pre-treatment of excess sludge at 175 degrees C and 40 min, followed by dewatering and methanisation of the centrate in a fixed-film reactor. The thermal lysis had a two-fold enhancing effect on sludge reduction efficiency: firstly, it allowed a decrease of the HRT in the methaniser to 2.9 days and secondly, it yielded biosolids with a high dewaterability. This contributed to further reductions in the final volume of sludge to be disposed of. The two-step process achieved a sludge reduction efficiency of 65% as TSS, thus giving an interesting treatment option for WWTP facing sludge disposal problems.

  20. Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane Coupled to Nitrite Reduction by Halophilic Marine NC10 Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhanfei; Geng, Sha; Cai, Chaoyang; Liu, Shuai; Liu, Yan; Pan, Yawei; Lou, Liping; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xinhua; Hu, Baolan

    2015-08-15

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to nitrite reduction is a novel AOM process that is mediated by denitrifying methanotrophs. To date, enrichments of these denitrifying methanotrophs have been confined to freshwater systems; however, the recent findings of 16S rRNA and pmoA gene sequences in marine sediments suggest a possible occurrence of AOM coupled to nitrite reduction in marine systems. In this research, a marine denitrifying methanotrophic culture was obtained after 20 months of enrichment. Activity testing and quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis were then conducted and showed that the methane oxidation activity and the number of NC10 bacteria increased correlatively during the enrichment period. 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that only bacteria in group A of the NC10 phylum were enriched and responsible for the resulting methane oxidation activity, although a diverse community of NC10 bacteria was harbored in the inoculum. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that NC10 bacteria were dominant in the enrichment culture after 20 months. The effect of salinity on the marine denitrifying methanotrophic culture was investigated, and the apparent optimal salinity was 20.5‰, which suggested that halophilic bacterial AOM coupled to nitrite reduction was obtained. Moreover, the apparent substrate affinity coefficients of the halophilic denitrifying methanotrophs were determined to be 9.8 ± 2.2 μM for methane and 8.7 ± 1.5 μM for nitrite. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Immunological detection of enzymes for sulfate reduction in anaerobic methane-oxidizing consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milucka, Jana; Widdel, Friedrich; Shima, Seigo

    2013-05-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) at marine gas seeps is performed by archaeal-bacterial consortia that have so far not been cultivated in axenic binary or pure cultures. Knowledge about possible biochemical reactions in AOM consortia is based on metagenomic retrieval of genes related to those in archaeal methanogenesis and bacterial sulfate reduction, and identification of a few catabolic enzymes in protein extracts. Whereas the possible enzyme for methane activation (a variant of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, Mcr) was shown to be harboured by the archaea, enzymes for sulfate activation and reduction have not been localized so far. We adopted a novel approach of fluorescent immunolabelling on semi-thin (0.3-0.5 μm) cryosections to localize two enzymes of the SR pathway, adenylyl : sulfate transferase (Sat; ATP sulfurylase) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr) in microbial consortia from Black Sea methane seeps. Both Sat and Dsr were exclusively found in an abundant microbial morphotype (c. 50% of all cells), which was tentatively identified as Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus-related bacteria. These results show that ANME-2 archaea in the Black Sea AOM consortia did not express bacterial enzymes of the canonical sulfate reduction pathway and thus, in contrast to previous suggestions, most likely cannot perform canonical sulfate reduction. Moreover, our results show that fluorescent immunolabelling on semi-thin cryosections which to our knowledge has been so far only applied on cell tissues, is a powerful tool for intracellular protein detection in natural microbial associations. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Microbial Reducibility of Fe(III Phases Associated with the Genesis of Iron Ore Caves in the Iron Quadrangle, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceth W. Parker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The iron mining regions of Brazil contain thousands of “iron ore caves” (IOCs that form within Fe(III-rich deposits. The mechanisms by which these IOCs form remain unclear, but the reductive dissolution of Fe(III (hydroxides by Fe(III reducing bacteria (FeRB could provide a microbiological mechanism for their formation. We evaluated the susceptibility of Fe(III deposits associated with these caves to reduction by the FeRB Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to test this hypothesis. Canga, an Fe(III-rich duricrust, contained poorly crystalline Fe(III phases that were more susceptible to reduction than the Fe(III (predominantly hematite associated with banded iron formation (BIF, iron ore, and mine spoil. In all cases, the addition of a humic acid analogue enhanced Fe(III reduction, presumably by shuttling electrons from S. oneidensis to Fe(III phases. The particle size and quartz-Si content of the solids appeared to exert control on the rate and extent of Fe(III reduction by S. oneidensis, with more bioreduction of Fe(III associated with solid phases containing more quartz. Our results provide evidence that IOCs may be formed by the activities of Fe(III reducing bacteria (FeRB, and the rate of this formation is dependent on the physicochemical and mineralogical characteristics of the Fe(III phases of the surrounding rock.

  3. Bioelectrochemical reduction of volatile fatty acids in anaerobic digestion effluent for the production of biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondaveeti, Sanath; Min, Booki

    2015-12-15

    This study proves for the first time the feasibility of biofuel production from anaerobic digestion effluent via bioelectrochemical cell operation at various applied cell voltages (1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 V). An increase in cell voltage from 1 to 2 V resulted in more reduction current generation (-0.48 to -0.78 mA) at a lowered cathode potential (-0.45 to -0.84 mV vs Ag/AgCl). Various alcohols were produced depending on applied cell voltages, and the main products were butanol, ethanol, and propanol. Hydrogen and methane production were also observed in the headspace of the cell. A large amount of lactic acid was unexpectedly formed at all conditions, which might be the primary cause of the limited biofuel production. The addition of neutral red (NR) to the system could increase the cathodic reduction current, and thus more biofuels were produced with an enhanced alcohol formation compared to without a mediator. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anaerobic baffled reactor coupled with chemical precipitation for treatment and toxicity reduction of industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laohaprapanona, Sawanya; Marquesa, Marcia; Hogland, William

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the reduction of soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODs) and the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), formaldehyde (FA) and nitrogen from highly polluted wastewater generated during cleaning procedures in wood floor manufacturing using a laboratory-scale biological anaerobic baffled reactor followed by chemical precipitation using MgCI2 .6H20 + Na2HPO4. By increasing the hydraulic retention time from 2.5 to 3.7 and 5 days, the reduction rates of FA, DOC and CODs of nearly 100%, 90% and 83%, respectively, were achieved. When the Mg:N:P molar ratio in the chemical treatment was changed from 1:1:1 to 1.3:1:1.3 at pH 8, the NH4+ removal rate increased from 80% to 98%. Biologically and chemically treated wastewater had no toxic effects on Vibrio fischeri and Artemia salina whereas chemically treated wastewater inhibited germination of Lactuca sativa owing to a high salt content. Regardless of the high conductivity of the treated wastewater, combined biological and chemical treatment was found to be effective for the removal of the organic load and nitrogen, and to be simple to operate and to maintain. A combined process such as that investigated could be useful for on-site treatment of low volumes of highly polluted wastewater generated by the wood floor and wood furniture industries, for which there is no suitable on-site treatment option available today.

  5. Nitrogen loss from anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to Iron(III) reduction in a riparian zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bangjing; Li, Zhengkui; Qin, Yunbin

    2017-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to iron(III) reduction (termed Feammox) is a recently discovered pathway of nitrogen cycling. However, little is known about the pathways of N transformation via Feammox process in riparian zones. In this study, evidence for Feammox in riparian zones with or without vegetation cover was demonstrated using isotope tracing technique and high-throughput sequencing technology. The results showed that Feammox could occur in riparian zones, and demonstrated that N 2 directly from Feammox was dominant Feammox pathway. The Feammox rates in vegetated soil samples was 0.32-0.37 mg N kg -1 d -1 , which is higher than that in un-vegetated soil samples (0.20 mg N kg -1 d -1 ). Moreover, the growth of vegetation led to a 4.99-6.41% increase in the abundance of iron reducing bacteria (Anaeromyxobacter, Pseudomonas and Geobacter) and iron reducing bacteria play an essential role in Feammox process. An estimated loss of 23.7-43.9 kg N ha -1 year -1 was associated with Feammox in the examined riparian zone. Overall, the co-occurrence of ammonium oxidation and iron reduction suggest that Feammox can play an essential role in the pathway of nitrogen removal in riparian zones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Microbial sulfate reduction under sequentially acidic conditions in an upflow anaerobic packed bed bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, T.; Parry, D.L. [Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT (Australia). Faculty for Educational Health & Science

    2006-07-15

    The aim of this study was to operate an upflow anaerobic packed bed reactor (UAPB) containing sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) under acidic conditions similar to those found in acid mine drainage (AMD). The UAPB was filled with sand and operated under continuous flow at progressively lower pH and was shown to be capable of supporting sulfate reduction at pH values of 6.0, 5.0, 4.5, 4.0 and 3.5 in a synthetic medium containing 53.5 mmol l{sup -1} lactate. Sulfate reduction rates of 553-1052 mmol m{sup -3} d{sup -1} were obtained when the influent solution pH was progressively lowered from pH 6.0 to 4.0, under an optimal flow rate of 2.61 ml min{sup -1}. When the influent pH was further lowered to pH 3.5, sulfate reduction was substantially reduced with only about 1% sulfate removed at a rate of 3.35 mmol m{sup -3} d{sup -1} after 20 days of operation. However, viable SRB were recovered from the column, indicating that the SRB population was capable of surviving and metabolizing at low levels even at pH 3.5 conditions for at least 20 days. The changes in conductivity in the SRB column did not always occur with changes in pH and redox potential, suggesting that conductivity measurements may be more sensitive to SRB activity and could be used as an additional tool for monitoring SRB activity. The bioreactor containing SRB was able to reduce sulfate and generate alkalinity even when challenged with influent as low as pH 3.5, indicating that such treatment systems have potential for bioremediating highly acidic, sulfate contaminated waste waters.

  7. Anaerobic treatment of sludge: focusing on reduction of LAS concentration in sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, Frank; Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Angelidaki, Irini

    2002-01-01

    Anaerobic degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) was tested in continuous stirred tank reactors (CSTR). LAS12 was used as a model compound and was spiked on sewage sludge. The experiments clearly showed that transformation of LAS12 occurred under anaerobic conditions. The degree...

  8. Constraining the relationships between anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction under in situ methane concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, G.; Wegener, G.; Joye, S. B.

    2017-12-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is an important microbial metabolism in the global carbon cycle. In marine methane seeps sediment, this process is mediated by syntrophic consortium that includes anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Stoichiometrically in AOM methane oxidation should be coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) in a 1:1 ratio. However, weak coupling of AOM and SR in seep sediments was frequently observed from the ex situ rate measurements, and the metabolic dynamics of AOM and SR under in situ conditions remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the metabolic activity of AOM and SR with radiotracers by restoring in situ methane concentrations under pressure to constrain the in situ relationships between AOM and SR in the cold seep sediments of Gulf of Mexico as well as the sediment-free AOM enrichments cultivated from cold seep of Italian Island Elba or hydrothermal vent of Guaymas Basin5. Surprisingly, we found that AOM rates strongly exceeded those of SR when high pressures and methane concentrations were applied at seep sites of GC600 and GC767 in Gulf of Mexico. With the addition of molybdate, SR was inhibited but AOM was not affected, suggesting the potential coupling of AOM with other terminal processes. Amendments of nitrate, iron, manganese and AQDS to the SR-inhibited slurries did not stimulate or inhibit the AOM activity, indicating either those electron acceptors were not limiting for AOM in the sediments or AOM was coupled to other process (e.g., organic matter). In the ANME enrichments, higher AOM rates were also observed with the addition of high concentrations of methane (10mM and 50 mM). The tracer transfer of CO2 to methane, i.e., the back reaction of AOM, increased with increasing methane concentrations and accounted for 1%-5% of the AOM rates. AOM rates at 10 mM and 50 mM methane concentration were much higher than the SR rates, suggesting those two processes were not tightly coupled

  9. IN-SITU CHEMICAL STABILIZATION OF METALS AND RADIONUCLIDES THROUGH ENHANCED ANAEROBIC REDUCTIVE PRECIPITATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher C. Lutes; Angela Frizzell, PG; Todd A. Thornton; James M. Harrington

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this NETL sponsored bench-scale study was to demonstrate the efficacy of enhanced anaerobic reductive precipitation (EARP) technology for precipitating uranium using samples from contaminated groundwater at the Fernald Closure Project (FCP) in Cincinnati, Ohio. EARP enhances the natural biological reactions in the groundwater through addition of food grade substrates (typically molasses) to drive the oxidative-reductive potential of the groundwater to a lower, more reduced state, thereby precipitating uranium from solution. In order for this in-situ technology to be successful in the long term, the precipitated uranium must not be re-dissolved at an unacceptable rate once groundwater geochemical conditions return to their pretreatment, aerobic state. The approach for this study is based on the premise that redissolution of precipitated uranium will be slowed by several mechanisms including the presence of iron sulfide precipitates and coatings, and sorption onto fresh iron oxides. A bench-scale study of the technology was performed using columns packed with site soil and subjected to a continuous flow of uranium-contaminated site groundwater (476 {micro}g/L). The ''treated'' column received a steady stream of dilute food grade molasses injected into the contaminated influent. Upon attainment of a consistently reducing environment and demonstrated removal of uranium, an iron sulfate amendment was added along with the molasses in the influent solution. After a month long period of iron addition, the treatments were halted, and uncontaminated, aerobic, unamended water was introduced to the treated column to assess rebound of uranium concentrations. In the first two months of treatment, the uranium concentration in the treated column decreased to the clean-up level (30 {micro}g/L) or below, and remained there for the remainder of the treatment period. A brief period of resolubilization of uranium was observed as the treated column

  10. Enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria and iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, F.B.; Li, X.M.; Zhou, S.G.; Zhuang, L.; Cao, F.; Huang, D.Y.; Xu, W.; Liu, T.X.; Feng, C.H.

    2010-01-01

    The transformation of DDT was studied in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (Shewanella decolorationis S12) and iron oxide (α-FeOOH). The results showed that S. decolorationis could reduce DDT into DDD, and DDT transformation rate was accelerated by the presence of α-FeOOH. DDD was observed as the primary transformation product, which was demonstrated to be transformed in the abiotic system of Fe 2+ + α-FeOOH and the system of DIRB + α-FeOOH. The intermediates of DDMS and DBP were detected after 9 months, likely suggesting that reductive dechlorination was the main dechlorination pathway of DDT in the iron-reducing system. The enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT was mainly due to biogenic Fe(II) sorbed on the surface of α-FeOOH, which can serve as a mediator for the transformation of DDT. This study demonstrated the important role of DIRB and iron oxide on DDT and DDD transformation under anaerobic iron-reducing environments. - This is the first case reporting the reductive dechlorination of DDT in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria and iron oxide.

  11. Enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria and iron oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, F.B., E-mail: cefbli@soil.gd.c [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Li, X.M. [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhou, S.G.; Zhuang, L. [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Cao, F. [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Huang, D.Y.; Xu, W.; Liu, T.X. [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Feng, C.H. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China)

    2010-05-15

    The transformation of DDT was studied in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (Shewanella decolorationis S12) and iron oxide (alpha-FeOOH). The results showed that S. decolorationis could reduce DDT into DDD, and DDT transformation rate was accelerated by the presence of alpha-FeOOH. DDD was observed as the primary transformation product, which was demonstrated to be transformed in the abiotic system of Fe{sup 2+} + alpha-FeOOH and the system of DIRB + alpha-FeOOH. The intermediates of DDMS and DBP were detected after 9 months, likely suggesting that reductive dechlorination was the main dechlorination pathway of DDT in the iron-reducing system. The enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT was mainly due to biogenic Fe(II) sorbed on the surface of alpha-FeOOH, which can serve as a mediator for the transformation of DDT. This study demonstrated the important role of DIRB and iron oxide on DDT and DDD transformation under anaerobic iron-reducing environments. - This is the first case reporting the reductive dechlorination of DDT in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria and iron oxide.

  12. Microbial Diversity and Characteristics in Anaerobic Environments in KURT Groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Yul; Oh, Jong Min; Rhee, Sung Keun; Yong, Jong Joong

    2008-03-01

    The Underground Research Tunnel (URT) located in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Daejeon, South Korea was recently constructed as an experimental site to study radionuclide transport, biogeochemistry, radionuclide-mineral interactions for the geological disposal of high level nuclear waste. Groundwater sampled from URT was used to examine microbial diversity and to enrich metal reducing bacteria for studying microbe-metal interactions. Genomic analysis indicated that the groundwater contained diverse microorganisms such as metal reducers, metal oxidizers, anaerobic denitrifying bacteria, and bacteria for reductive dechlorination. Metal-reducing bacteria enriched from the groundwater was used to study metal reduction and biomineralization. The metal-reducing bacteria enriched with acetate or lactate as the electron donors showed the bacteria reduced Fe(III)-citrate, Fe(III) oxyhydroxide, Mn(IV) oxide, and Cr(VI) as the electron acceptors. Preliminary study indicated that the enriched bacteria were able to use glucose, lactate, acetate, and hydrogen as electron donors while reducing Fe(III)-citrate or Fe(III) oxyhydroxide as the electron acceptor. The bacteria exhibited diverse mineral precipitation capabilities including the formation of magnetite, siderite, and rhodochrosite. The results indicated that Fe(III)- and metal-reducing communities are present in URT at the KAERI

  13. The nitrogen cycle in anaerobic methanotrophic mats of the Black Sea is linked to sulfate reduction and biomass decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Michael; Taubert, Martin; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen-Tomm, Martin; Basen, Mirko; Bastida, Felipe; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Krüger, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME) mats host methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes. Little is known about the nitrogen cycle in these communities. Here, we link the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) to the nitrogen cycle in microbial mats of the Black Sea by using stable isotope probing. We used four different (15)N-labeled sources of nitrogen: dinitrogen, nitrate, nitrite and ammonium. We estimated the nitrogen incorporation rates into the total biomass and the methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR). Dinitrogen played an insignificant role as nitrogen source. Assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction occurred. High rates of nitrate reduction to dinitrogen were stimulated by methane and sulfate, suggesting that oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds such as sulfides was necessary for AOM with nitrate as electron acceptor. Nitrate reduction to dinitrogen occurred also in the absence of methane as electron donor but at six times slower rates. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium was independent of AOM. Ammonium was used for biomass synthesis under all conditions. The pivotal enzyme in AOM coupled to sulfate reduction, MCR, was synthesized from nitrate and ammonium. Results show that AOM coupled to sulfate reduction along with biomass decomposition drive the nitrogen cycle in the ANME mats of the Black Sea and that MCR enzymes are involved in this process. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Biochar-mediated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from soil amended with anaerobic digestates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Sarah L.; Clarke, Michèle L.; Othman, Mukhrizah; Ramsden, Stephen J.; West, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation examines nitrous oxide (N 2 O) fluxes from soil with simultaneous amendments of anaerobic digestates and biochar. The main source of anthropogenic emissions of N 2 O is agriculture and in particular, manure and slurry application to fields. Anaerobic digestates are increasingly used as a fertiliser and interest is growing in their potential as sources of N 2 O via nitrification and denitrification. Biochar is a stable product of pyrolysis and may affect soil properties such as cation exchange capacity and water holding capacity. Whilst work has been conducted on the effects of biochar amendment on N 2 O emissions in soils fertilised with mineral fertilisers and raw animal manures, little work to date has focused on the effects of biochar on nitrogen transformations within soil amended with anaerobic digestates. The aim of the current investigation was to quantify the effects of biochar application on ammonification, nitrification and N 2 O fluxes within soil amended with three anaerobic digestates derived from different feedstocks. A factorial experiment was undertaken in which a sandy loam soil (Dunnington Heath series) was either left untreated, or amended with three different anaerobic digestates and one of three biochar treatments; 0%, 1% or 3%. Nitrous oxide emissions were greatest from soil amended with anaerobic digestate originating from a maize feedstock. Biochar amendment reduced N 2 O emissions from all treatments, with the greatest effect observed in treatments with maximum emissions. The degree of N 2 O production and efficacy of biochar amelioration of gas emissions is discussed in context of soil microbial biomass and soil available carbon. - Highlights: • Nitrous oxide was emitted from anaerobic digestates applied to soil. • Simultaneous amendment of soil with biochar and anaerobic digestate reduced N 2 O emissions. • Soil nitrate accumulation occurred but was digestate dependent

  15. Continuous reduction of tellurite to recoverable tellurium nanoparticles using an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Ruiz, Adriana; Sesma-Martin, Juan; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2017-01-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Energy and the European Union, tellurium is a critical element needed for energy and defense technology. Thus methods are needed to recover tellurium from waste streams. The objectives of this study was to determine the feasibility of utilizing upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors to convert toxic tellurite (Te IV ) oxyanions to non-toxic insoluble elemental tellurium (Te 0 ) nanoparticles (NP) that are amendable to separation from aqueous effluents. The reactors were supplied with ethanol as the electron donating substrate to promote the biological reduction of Te IV . One reactor was additionally amended with the redox mediating flavonoid compound, riboflavin (RF), with the goal of enhancing the bioreduction of Te IV . Its performance was compared to a control reactor lacking RF. The continuous formation of Te 0 NPs using the UASB reactors was found to be feasible and remarkably improved by the addition of RF. The presence of this flavonoid was previously shown to enhance the conversion rate of Te IV by approximately 11-fold. In this study, we demonstrated that this was associated with the added benefit of reducing the toxic impact of Te IV towards the methanogenic consortium in the UASB and thus enabled a 4.7-fold higher conversion rate of the chemical oxygen demand. Taken as a whole, this work demonstrates the potential of a methanogenic granular sludge to be applied as a bioreactor technology producing recoverable Te 0 NPs in a continuous fashion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. COMPARISON OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE REDUCTIVE DEHALOGENATION BY MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES STIMULATED ON SILICON-BASED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AS SLOW-RELEASE ANAEROBIC SUBSTRATES. (R828772C001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microcosm studies were conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of tetrabutoxysilane (TBOS) as a slow-release anaerobic substrate to promote reductive dehalogenation of trichloroethylene (TCE). The abiotic hydrolysis of TBOS and tetrakis(2-ethylbutoxy)silane (TKEBS), and the...

  17. Draft Technical Protocol: A Treatability Test for Evaluating the Potential Applicability of the Reductive Anaerobic Biological in Situ Treatment Technology (Rabitt) to Remediate Chloroethenes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morse, Jeff

    1998-01-01

    This draft, unvalidated protocol describes a comprehensive approach for conducting a phased treatability test to determine the potential for employing the Reductive Anaerobic Biological In Situ Treatment Technology (RABITT...

  18. Reductive dehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls by anaerobic microorganisms enriched from Dutch sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HartkampCommandeur, LCM; Gerritse, J; Govers, HAJ; Parsons, [No Value

    The dehalogenation of PCBs by anaerobic microbial cultures enriched from Dutch sediments was investigated. One mixed culture originating from estuarine sediments of the River Rhine (the Chemie Harbour), dehalogenated 2,2',3,3',4,4'- and 2,2,',3,3',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyls (HCB) to yield penta- and

  19. Simultaneous Cr(VI) bio-reduction and methane production by anaerobic granular sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qian; Sun, Jiaji; Sun, Dezhi; Tian, Lan; Ji, Yanan; Qiu, Bin

    2018-08-01

    Wastewater containing toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) were treated with well-organized anaerobic granular sludge in this study. Results showed that the anaerobic granular sludge rapidly removed Cr(VI), and 2000 µg·L -1 Cr(VI) was completely eliminated within 6 min, which was much faster than the reported duration of removal by reported artificial materials. Sucrose added as a carbon source acted as an initial electron donor to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III). This process was considered as the main mechanism of Cr(VI) removal. Methane production by anaerobic granular sludge was improved by the addition of Cr(VI) at a concentration lower than 500 µg·L -1 . Anaerobic granular sludge had a well-organized structure, which presented good resistance against toxic Cr(VI). Trichoccus accelerated the degradation of organic substances to generate acetates with a low Cr(VI) concentration, thereby enhancing methane production by acetotrophic methanogens. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sludge reduction and water quality improvement in anaerobic lagoons through influent pre-treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confined swine production generates large volumes of wastewater typically stored and treated in anaerobic lagoons. These lagoons may require cleanup and closure measures in the future. In practice, liquid and sludge need to be removed by pumping, usually at great expense of energy, and land applied ...

  1. Improving the cyanide toxicity tolerance of anaerobic reactor: Microbial interactions and toxin reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Pragya; Ahammad, S.Z.; Sreekrishnan, T.R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Anaerobic batch study of 110 days. • Acclimatization for cyanide biodegradation. • Understanding inhibitory effects of cyanide on methane generation and VFA production. • Identification of microorganisms tolerant to cyanide. • Community analysis using DGGE and qPCR analyses. - Abstract: Anaerobic biological treatment of high organics containing wastewater is amongst the preferred treatment options but poor tolerance to toxins makes its use prohibitive. In this study, efforts have been made to understand the key parameters for developing anaerobic reactor, resilient to cyanide toxicity. A laboratory scale anaerobic batch reactor was set up to treat cyanide containing wastewater. The reactor was inoculated with anaerobic sludge obtained from a wastewater treatment plant and fresh cow dung in the ratio of 3:1. The focus was on acclimatization and development of cyanide-degrading biomass and to understand the toxic effects of cyanide on the dynamic equilibrium between various microbial groups. The sludge exposed to cyanide was found to have higher bacterial diversity than the control. It was observed that certain hydrogenotrophic methanogens and bacterial groups were able to grow and produce methane in the presence of cyanide. Also, it was found that hydrogen utilizing methanogens were more cyanide tolerant than acetate utilizing methanogens. So, effluents from various industries like electroplating, coke oven plant, petroleum refining, explosive manufacturing, and pesticides industries which are having high concentrations of cyanide can be treated by favoring the growth of the tolerant microbes in the reactors. It will provide much better treatment efficiency by overcoming the inhibitory effects of cyanide to certain extent.

  2. Improving the cyanide toxicity tolerance of anaerobic reactor: Microbial interactions and toxin reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Pragya; Ahammad, S.Z.; Sreekrishnan, T.R., E-mail: sree@iitd.ac.in

    2016-09-05

    Highlights: • Anaerobic batch study of 110 days. • Acclimatization for cyanide biodegradation. • Understanding inhibitory effects of cyanide on methane generation and VFA production. • Identification of microorganisms tolerant to cyanide. • Community analysis using DGGE and qPCR analyses. - Abstract: Anaerobic biological treatment of high organics containing wastewater is amongst the preferred treatment options but poor tolerance to toxins makes its use prohibitive. In this study, efforts have been made to understand the key parameters for developing anaerobic reactor, resilient to cyanide toxicity. A laboratory scale anaerobic batch reactor was set up to treat cyanide containing wastewater. The reactor was inoculated with anaerobic sludge obtained from a wastewater treatment plant and fresh cow dung in the ratio of 3:1. The focus was on acclimatization and development of cyanide-degrading biomass and to understand the toxic effects of cyanide on the dynamic equilibrium between various microbial groups. The sludge exposed to cyanide was found to have higher bacterial diversity than the control. It was observed that certain hydrogenotrophic methanogens and bacterial groups were able to grow and produce methane in the presence of cyanide. Also, it was found that hydrogen utilizing methanogens were more cyanide tolerant than acetate utilizing methanogens. So, effluents from various industries like electroplating, coke oven plant, petroleum refining, explosive manufacturing, and pesticides industries which are having high concentrations of cyanide can be treated by favoring the growth of the tolerant microbes in the reactors. It will provide much better treatment efficiency by overcoming the inhibitory effects of cyanide to certain extent.

  3. Effects of ferric iron reduction and regeneration on nitrous oxide and methane emissions in a rice soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Yu, Kewei; Gambrell, Robert P

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory soil slurry experiment and an outdoor pot experiment were conducted to study effects of ferric iron (Fe(III)) reduction and regeneration on nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and methane (CH(4)) emissions in a rice (Oryza sativa L.) soil. The anoxic slurry experiment showed that enhancing microbial Fe(III) reduction by ferrihydrite amendment (40 mol Fe g(-1)) transitionally stimulated N(2)O production and lowered CH(4) production by 16% during an initial 33-day incubation. Increased regeneration of Fe(III) through a 4-day aeration period in the Fe-amended slurry compared to the control slurry reduced CH(4) emission by 30% in the subsequent 15-day anaerobic incubation. The pot experiment showed that ferrihydrite amendment (63 micromol Fe g(-1)) stimulated N(2)O fluxes in the days following flooding. The Fe amendment suppression on CH(4) emission was obscured in the early season but became significant upon reflooding in the mid- and late-seasons. As a result, seasonal CH(4) emission in Fe-amended pots was 26% lower than the control with a single 2-day drainage and 69% lower with a double 2-day drainage. The reduction in CH(4) emission upon reflooding from the Fe-amended pots was mainly attributed to the increased Fe(III) regeneration during drainage showing a mechanism of Fe(III) regeneration in mitigating CH(4) emission by short-term drainage in flooded soils.

  4. Controls on Fe reduction and mineral formation by a subsurface bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, Susan; Weidler, Peter G.; Langley, Sean; Beveridge, Terry J.

    2003-04-01

    The reductive dissolution of FeIII (hydr)oxides by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) could have a large impact on sediment genesis and Fe transport. If DIRB are able to reduce FeIII in minerals of high structural order to carry out anaerobic respiration, their range could encompass virtually every O 2-free environment containing FeIII and adequate conditions for cell growth. Previous studies have established that Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, a known DIRB, will reduce crystalline Fe oxides when initially grown at high densities in a nutrient-rich broth, conditions that poorly model the environments where CN32 is found. By contrast, we grew CN32 by batch culture solely in a minimal growth medium. The stringent conditions imposed by the growth method better represent the conditions that cells are likely to encounter in their natural habitat. Furthermore, the expression of reductases necessary to carry out dissimilatory Fe reduction depends on the method of growth. It was found that under anaerobic conditions CN32 reduced hydrous ferric oxide (HFO), a poorly crystalline FeIII mineral, and did not reduce suspensions containing 4 mM FeIII in the form of poorly ordered nanometer-sized goethite (α-FeOOH), well-ordered micron-sized goethite, or nanometer-sized hematite (α-Fe 2O 3) crystallites. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that all minerals but the micron-sized goethite attached extensively to the bacteria and appeared to penetrate the outer cellular membrane. In the treatment with HFO, new FeII and FeIII minerals formed during reduction of HFO-Fe in culture medium containing 4.0 mmol/L P i (soluble inorganic P), as observed by TEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and X-ray diffraction. The minerals included magnetite (Fe 3O 4), goethite, green rust, and vivianite [Fe 3(PO 4) 2 · 8H 2O]. Vivianite appeared to be the stable end product and the mean coherence length was influenced by the rate of FeIII

  5. Development of Sulfidogenic Sludge from Marine Sediments and Trichloroethylene Reduction in an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Barajas, Claudia; Ordaz, Alberto; García-Solares, Selene Montserrat; Garibay-Orijel, Claudio; Bastida-González, Fernando; Zárate-Segura, Paola Berenice

    2015-01-01

    The importance of microbial sulfate reduction relies on the various applications that it offers in environmental biotechnology. Engineered sulfate reduction is used in industrial wastewater treatment to remove large concentrations of sulfate along with the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and heavy metals. The most common approach to the process is with anaerobic bioreactors in which sulfidogenic sludge is obtained through adaptation of predominantly methanogenic granular sludge to sulfidogenesis. This process may take a long time and does not always eliminate the competition for substrate due to the presence of methanogens in the sludge. In this work, we propose a novel approach to obtain sulfidogenic sludge in which hydrothermal vents sediments are the original source of microorganisms. The microbial community developed in the presence of sulfate and volatile fatty acids is wide enough to sustain sulfate reduction over a long period of time without exhibiting inhibition due to sulfide. This protocol describes the procedure to generate the sludge from the sediments in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) type of reactor. Furthermore, the protocol presents the procedure to demonstrate the capability of the sludge to remove by reductive dechlorination a model of a highly toxic organic pollutant such as trichloroethylene (TCE). The protocol is divided in three stages: (1) the formation of the sludge and the determination of its sulfate reducing activity in the UASB, (2) the experiment to remove the TCE by the sludge, and (3) the identification of microorganisms in the sludge after the TCE reduction. Although in this case the sediments were taken from a site located in Mexico, the generation of a sulfidogenic sludge by using this procedure may work if a different source of sediments is taken since marine sediments are a natural pool of microorganisms that may be enriched in sulfate reducing bacteria. PMID:26555802

  6. Development of Sulfidogenic Sludge from Marine Sediments and Trichloroethylene Reduction in an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Barajas, Claudia; Ordaz, Alberto; García-Solares, Selene Montserrat; Garibay-Orijel, Claudio; Bastida-González, Fernando; Zárate-Segura, Paola Berenice

    2015-10-15

    The importance of microbial sulfate reduction relies on the various applications that it offers in environmental biotechnology. Engineered sulfate reduction is used in industrial wastewater treatment to remove large concentrations of sulfate along with the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and heavy metals. The most common approach to the process is with anaerobic bioreactors in which sulfidogenic sludge is obtained through adaptation of predominantly methanogenic granular sludge to sulfidogenesis. This process may take a long time and does not always eliminate the competition for substrate due to the presence of methanogens in the sludge. In this work, we propose a novel approach to obtain sulfidogenic sludge in which hydrothermal vents sediments are the original source of microorganisms. The microbial community developed in the presence of sulfate and volatile fatty acids is wide enough to sustain sulfate reduction over a long period of time without exhibiting inhibition due to sulfide. This protocol describes the procedure to generate the sludge from the sediments in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) type of reactor. Furthermore, the protocol presents the procedure to demonstrate the capability of the sludge to remove by reductive dechlorination a model of a highly toxic organic pollutant such as trichloroethylene (TCE). The protocol is divided in three stages: (1) the formation of the sludge and the determination of its sulfate reducing activity in the UASB, (2) the experiment to remove the TCE by the sludge, and (3) the identification of microorganisms in the sludge after the TCE reduction. Although in this case the sediments were taken from a site located in Mexico, the generation of a sulfidogenic sludge by using this procedure may work if a different source of sediments is taken since marine sediments are a natural pool of microorganisms that may be enriched in sulfate reducing bacteria.

  7. Anaerobic treatment of antibiotic production wastewater pretreated with enhanced hydrolysis: Simultaneous reduction of COD and ARGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Qizhen; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yingxin; Tian, Zhe; Yang, Min

    2017-03-01

    The presence of high concentration antibiotics in wastewater can disturb the stability of biological wastewater treatment systems and promote generation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during the treatment. To solve this problem, a pilot system consisting of enhanced hydrolysis pretreatment and an up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor in succession was constructed for treating oxytetracycline production wastewater, and the performance was evaluated in a pharmaceutical factory in comparison with a full-scale anaerobic system operated in parallel. After enhanced hydrolysis under conditions of pH 7 and 85 °C for 6 h, oxytetracycline production wastewater with an influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 11,086 ± 602 mg L -1 was directly introduced into the pilot UASB reactor. With the effective removal of oxytetracycline and its antibacterial potency (from 874 mg L -1 to less than 0.61 mg L -1 and from 900 mg L -1 to less than 0.84 mg L -1 , respectively) by the enhanced hydrolysis pretreatment, an average COD removal rate of 83.2%, 78.5% and 68.9% was achieved at an organic loading rate of 3.3, 4.8 and 5.9 kg COD m -3  d -1 , respectively. At the same time, the relative abundances of the total tetracycline (tet) genes and a mobile element (Class 1 integron (intI1)) in anaerobic sludge on day 96 were one order of magnitude lower than those in inoculated sludge on day 0 (P anaerobic system treating oxytetracycline production wastewater with an influent COD of 3720 ± 128 mg L -1 after dilution exhibited a COD removal of 51 ± 4% at an organic loading rate (OLR) 1.2 ± 0.2 kg m -3  d -1 , and a total tet gene abundance in sludge was five times higher than the pilot-scale system (P anaerobic treatment of oxytetracycline production wastewater containing high concentrations of oxytetracycline with significantly lower generation of ARGs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Limiting Factors for Microbial Fe(III)-Reduction In a Landfill Leachate Polluted Aquifer (Vejen, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Heron, Gorm; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1995-01-01

    Aquifer sediment samples from two locations within the anaerobic leachate plume of a municipal landfill were compared with respect to microbiology (especially Fe(III)-reduction) and geochemistry. The samples close to the landfill were characterized by low contents of Fe(III), whereas samples from...... the more distant cluster were rich in Fe(III)-oxides. The active microbial population seemed to be less dense in samples more distant from the landfill (measured by ATP and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA)), but the microbial communities were very similar in the two sample clusters according...... to the composition of PLFA. Very little, if any, Fe(III)-reduction was observed close to the landfill, but all the more distant samples showed evident microbially mediated Fe(III)-reduction. After amendment with both acetate and Fe(III), all the samples showed a potential for Fe(III)-reduction, and the in situ Fe...

  9. Anaerobic reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene: how can dual Carbon-Chlorine isotopic measurements help elucidating the underlying reaction mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badin, Alice; Buttet, Géraldine; Maillard, Julien; Holliger, Christof; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Chlorinated ethenes (CEs) such as tetrachloroethene (PCE) are common persistent groundwater contaminants. Among clean-up strategies applied to sites affected by such pollution, bioremediation has been considered with a growing interest as it represents a cost-effective, environmental friendly approach. This technique however sometimes leads to an incomplete and slow biodegradation of CEs resulting in an accumulation of toxic metabolites. Understanding the reaction mechanisms underlying anaerobic reductive dechlorination would thus help assessing PCE biodegradation in polluted sites. Stable isotope analysis can provide insight into reaction mechanisms. For chlorinated hydrocarbons, carbon (C) and chlorine (Cl) isotope data (δ13C and δ37Cl) tend to show a linear correlation with a slope (m ≡ ɛC/ɛCl) characteristic of the reaction mechanism [1]. This study hence aims at exploring the potential of a dual C-Cl isotope approach in the determination of the reaction mechanisms involved in PCE reductive dechlorination. C and Cl isotope fractionation were investigated during anaerobic PCE dechlorination by two bacterial consortia containing members of the Sulfurospirillum genus. The specificity in these consortia resides in the fact that they each conduct PCE reductive dechlorination catalysed by one different reductive dehalogenase, i.e. PceADCE which yields trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-dichloroethene (cDCE), and PceATCE which yields TCE only. The bulk C isotope enrichment factors were -3.6±0.3 o for PceATCE and -0.7±0.1o for PceADCE. The bulk Cl isotope enrichment factors were -1.3±0.2 o for PceATCE and -0.9±0.1 o for PceADCE. When applying the dual isotope approach, two m values of 2.7±0.1 and 0.7±0.2 were obtained for the reductive dehalogenases PceATCE and PceADCE, respectively. These results suggest that PCE can be degraded according to two different mechanisms. Furthermore, despite their highly similar protein sequences, each reductive dehalogenase seems

  10. [Analysis of carbon balance and study on mechanism in anoxic-oxic-settling-anaerobic sludge reduction process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiao-Min; Gao, Xu; Zhang, Man-Man; Jia, Li; Guo, Jin-Song

    2012-07-01

    In order to deeply explore the mechanism of sludge reduction in OSA system, carbon balance was performed in an anoxic-oxic-settling-anaerobic (A + OSA) system and a reference AO system to investigate effects of inserting a sludge holding tank in sludge cycle line on the sludge reduction process. Meanwhile, carbon mass change in each reaction unit was identified in terms of solid, liquid and gas phases. The causes of excess sludge reduction in A + OSA system were deduced. The carbon balance results show that when the hydraulic retention time in the sludge holding tank is 7.14 h, carbon percent in solid phase of the sludge reduction system is nearly 50% higher than that of the reference system, supporting the consequence that sludge reduction rate of 49.98% had been achieved. The insertion of a sludge holding tank in the sludge return circuit can be effective in sludge reduction. Carbon changes in each unit reveal that the amount of carbon consumed for biosynthesis in the anoxic and oxic tanks (main reaction zone) of the sludge reduction system is higher than in that of the reference system. Sludge decay is observed in the sludge holding tank. Furthermore, CH4 released from the sludge holding tank is significantly higher than that from the main reaction zone. The DGGE profiles show that there are hydrolytic-fermentative bacteria in the sludge holding tank related to sludge decay. The excess sludge reduction in the A + OSA system could be a result of the combination of sludge decay in the sludge holding tank and sludge compensatory growth in the main reaction cell.

  11. Benzene biodegradation using an anaerobic column coupled to Mn(IV) reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villatoro-Monzon, W.R.; Velasquez-Mejia, E.K.; Morales-Ibarria, M.G.; Razo-Flores, E. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (Mexico). Programo de Biotenologia del Petroleo

    2004-07-01

    Benzene, toluene, and o, m, p-xylene compounds make up a large proportion of gasoline. Due to spills and leaks from underground tanks, these compounds frequently contaminate groundwater and sediment. In particular the high solubility of benzene makes it very mobile and an extra danger to groundwater. Moreover, there are strong links between benzene and cancer and thus benzene is considered a serious pollutant. Contaminated sites usually become anaerobic due to microbe action. In this study, benzene biodegradation was done in a glass column inoculated with anaerobic Rhine River sediment and using Mn(IV) as the final electron acceptor. Under steady state operation, benzene biodegradation efficiency was as high as 95 per cent. Carbon dioxide and Mn(II) recovery rates were 81 and 77 per cent respectively. Reactor sediment was withdrawn on day 104 and subject to DGGE profiling. This sediment showed different band patterns than the original sediment that was not exposed to benzene. The authors conclude that the species associated with the degradation of benzene are of the genus Propionibacterium and Actinomyces. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Alkaline fermentation of waste sludge causes a significant reduction of antibiotic resistance genes in anaerobic reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haining; Zheng, Xiong; Chen, Yinguang; Liu, Hui; Wan, Rui; Su, Yinglong

    2017-02-15

    Alkaline fermentation has been reported to be an effective method to recover valuable products from waste sludge. However, to date, the potential effect of alkaline pH on the fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during anaerobic fermentation of sludge has never been documented. In this study, the target ARGs in sludge was observed to be removed effectively and stably when sludge was anaerobically fermented at pH10. Compared with the control (without pH adjustment), the abundances of target ARGs at pH10 were reduced by 0.87 (sulI), 1.36 (sulII), 0.42 (tet(O)), 1.11 (tet(Q)), 0.79 (tet(C)) and 1.04 (tet(X)) log units. Further investigations revealed that alkaline fermentation shifted the community structures of potential ARGs hosts. Moreover, alkaline fermentation remarkably decreased the quantities and the ARGs-possessing ability of genetic vectors (plasmid DNA, extracellular DNA and phage DNA), which might limit the transfer of ARGs via conjugation, transformation and transduction. These results suggest that the shifted compositions of gene hosts and restricted gene transfer potential might be the critical reasons for the attenuation of ARGs at pH10. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Post-anaerobic digestion thermal hydrolysis of sewage sludge and food waste: Effect on methane yields, dewaterability and solids reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Kine; Kjørlaug, Oda; Higgins, Matthew J; Linjordet, Roar; Horn, Svein J

    2018-04-01

    Post-anaerobic digestion (PAD) treatment technologies have been suggested for anaerobic digestion (AD) to improve process efficiency and assure hygenization of organic waste. Because AD reduces the amount of organic waste, PAD can be applied to a much smaller volume of waste compared to pre-digestion treatment, thereby improving efficiency. In this study, dewatered digestate cakes from two different AD plants were thermally hydrolyzed and dewatered, and the liquid fraction was recirculated to a semi-continuous AD reactor. The thermal hydrolysis was more efficient in relation to methane yields and extent of dewaterability for the cake from a plant treating waste activated sludge, than the cake from a plant treating source separated food waste (SSFW). Temperatures above 165 °C yielded the best results. Post-treatment improved volumetric methane yields by 7% and the COD-reduction increased from 68% to 74% in a mesophilic (37 °C) semi-continuous system despite lowering the solid retention time (from 17 to 14 days) compared to a conventional system with pre-treatment of feed substrates at 70 °C. Results from thermogravimetric analysis showed an expected increase in maximum TS content of dewatered digestate cake from 34% up to 46% for the SSFW digestate cake, and from 17% up to 43% in the sludge digestate cake, after the PAD thermal hydrolysis process (PAD-THP). The increased dewatering alone accounts for a reduction in wet mass of cake leaving the plant of 60% in the case of sludge digestate cake. Additionaly, the increased VS-reduction will contribute to further reduce the mass of wet cake. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of oxidation reduction potential in the bypass micro-aerobic sludge zone on sludge reduction for a modified oxic-settling-anaerobic process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kexun; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Zhongpin; Liu, Dongfang

    2014-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to determine the effect of oxidation reduction potential (ORP) on sludge reduction in a bypass micro-aerobic sludge reduction system. The system was composed of a modified oxic-settling-anaerobic process with a sludge holding tank in the sludge recycle loop. The ORPs in the micro-aerobic tanks were set at approximately +350, -90, -150, -200 and -250 mV, by varying the length of aeration time for the tanks. The results show that lower ORP result in greater sludge volume reduction, and the sludge production was reduced by 60% at the lowest ORP. In addition, low ORP caused extracellular polymer substances dissociation and slightly reduced sludge activity. Comparing the sludge backflow characteristics of the micro-aerobic tank's ORP controlled at -250 mV with that of +350 mV, the average soluble chemical oxygen (SCOD), TN and TP increased by 7, 0.4 and 2 times, median particle diameter decreased by 8.5 μm and the specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) decreased by 0.0043 milligram O2 per gram suspended solids per minute. For the effluent, SCOD and TN and TP fluctuated around 30, 8.7 and 0.66 mg/L, respectively. Therefore, the effective assignment of ORP in the micro-aerobic tank can remarkably reduce sludge volume and does not affect final effluent quality.

  15. Isolation of a star-shaped uranium(V/VI) cluster from the anaerobic photochemical reduction of uranyl(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelain, Lucile; White, Sarah; Scopelliti, Rosario; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2016-01-01

    Actinide oxo clusters are an important class of compounds due to their impact on actinide migration in the environment. The photolytic reduction of uranyl(VI) has potential application in catalysis and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, but the intermediate species involved in this reduction have not yet been elucidated. Here we show that the photolysis of partially hydrated uranyl(VI) in anaerobic conditions leads to the reduction of uranyl(VI), and to the incorporation of the resulting U V species into the stable mixed-valent star-shaped U VI /U V oxo cluster [U(UO 2 ) 5 (μ 3 -O) 5 (PhCOO) 5 (Py) 7 ]. This cluster is only the second example of a U VI /U V cluster and the first one associating uranyl groups to a non-uranyl(V) center. The U V center in 1 is stable, while the reaction of uranyl(V) iodide with potassium benzoate leads to immediate disproportionation and formation of the U 12 IV U 4 V O 24 cluster {[K(Py) 2 ] 2 [K(Py)] 2 [U 16 O 24 (PhCOO) 24 (Py) 2 ]}.

  16. Isolation of a star-shaped uranium(V/VI) cluster from the anaerobic photochemical reduction of uranyl(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatelain, Lucile; White, Sarah; Scopelliti, Rosario; Mazzanti, Marinella [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) (Switzerland). Inst. de Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques

    2016-11-07

    Actinide oxo clusters are an important class of compounds due to their impact on actinide migration in the environment. The photolytic reduction of uranyl(VI) has potential application in catalysis and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, but the intermediate species involved in this reduction have not yet been elucidated. Here we show that the photolysis of partially hydrated uranyl(VI) in anaerobic conditions leads to the reduction of uranyl(VI), and to the incorporation of the resulting U{sup V} species into the stable mixed-valent star-shaped U{sup VI}/U{sup V} oxo cluster [U(UO{sub 2}){sub 5}(μ{sub 3}-O){sub 5}(PhCOO){sub 5}(Py){sub 7}]. This cluster is only the second example of a U{sup VI}/U{sup V} cluster and the first one associating uranyl groups to a non-uranyl(V) center. The U{sup V} center in 1 is stable, while the reaction of uranyl(V) iodide with potassium benzoate leads to immediate disproportionation and formation of the U{sub 12}{sup IV}U{sub 4}{sup V}O{sub 24} cluster {[K(Py)_2]_2[K(Py)]_2[U_1_6O_2_4(PhCOO)_2_4(Py)_2]}.

  17. Anaerobic Biotransformation and Mobility of Pu and Pu-EDTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, H. Jr.; Rai, D.; Xun, L.

    2005-01-01

    The complexation of radionuclides (e.g., plutonium (Pu) and 60 Co) by codisposed ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) has enhanced their transport in sediments at DOE sites. Our previous NABIR research investigated the aerobic biodegradation and biogeochemistry of Pu(IV)-EDTA. Plutonium(IV) forms stable complexes with EDTA under aerobic conditions and an aerobic EDTA degrading bacterium can degrade EDTA in the presence of Pu and decrease Pu mobility. However, our recent studies indicate that while Pu(IV)-EDTA is stable in simple aqueous systems, it is not stable in the presence of relatively soluble Fe(III) compounds (i.e., Fe(OH) 3 (s)--2-line ferrihydrite). Since most DOE sites have Fe(III) containing sediments, Pu(IV) in likely not the mobile form of Pu-EDTA in groundwater. The only other Pu-EDTA complex stable in groundwater relevant to DOE sites would be Pu(III)-EDTA, which only forms under anaerobic conditions. Research is therefore needed in this brand new project to investigate the biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under anaerobic conditions. The biotransformation of Pu and Pu-EDTA under various anaerobic regimes is poorly understood including the reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) to Pu(III) from soluble (Pu(IV)-EDTA) and insoluble Pu(IV) as PuO2(am) by metal reducing bacteria, the redox conditions required for this reduction, the strength of the Pu(III)-EDTA complex, how the Pu(III)-EDTA complex competes with other dominant anoxic soluble metals (e.g., Fe(II)), and the oxidation kinetics of Pu(III)-EDTA. Finally, the formation of a stable soluble Pu(III)-EDTA complex under anaerobic conditions would require degradation of the EDTA complex to limit Pu(III) transport in geologic environments. Anaerobic EDTA degrading microorganisms have not been isolated. These knowledge gaps preclude the development of a mechanistic understanding of how anaerobic conditions will influence Pu and Pu-EDTA fate and transport to assess, model, and design approaches to stop Pu

  18. Cost and Performance Report for Reductive Anaerobic Biological in Situ Treatment Technology (RABITT) Treatability Testing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alleman, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Enhanced biological reductive dechlorination (EBRD) shows a great deal of promise for efficiently treating groundwater contaminated with chlorinated solvents, but demonstration sites around the country were reporting mixed results...

  19. Microbial removal of Fe(III) impurities from clay using dissimilatory iron reducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E Y; Cho, K S; Ryu, H W; Chang, Y K

    1999-01-01

    Fe(III) impurities, which detract refractoriness and whiteness from porcelain and pottery, could be biologically removed from low-quality clay by indigenous dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms. Insoluble Fe(III) in clay particles was leached out as soluble Fe(II), and the Fe(III) reduction reaction was coupled to the oxidation of sugars such as glucose, maltose and sucrose. A maximum removal of 44-45% was obtained when the relative amount of sugar was 5% (w/w; sugar/clay). By the microbial treatment, the whiteness of the clay was increased from 63.20 to 79.64, whereas the redness was clearly decreased from 13.47 to 3.55.

  20. [Influence of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction on the Speciation and Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, You-bin; Wang, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction by microbes is an important process of producing energy in the oxidation of organic compounds under anaerobic condition with Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor and Fe(II) as the reduction product. This process is of great significance in element biogeochemical cycle. Iron respiration has been described as one of the most ancient forms of microbial metabolism on the earth, which is bound up with material cycle in water, soil and sediments. Dissimilatory iron reduction plays important roles in heavy metal form transformation and the remediation of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated soils. In this paper, we summarized the research progress of iron reduction in the natural environment, and discussed the influence and the mechanism of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation and bioavailability of heavy metals in soil. The effects of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation of heavy metals may be attributed to oxidation and reduction, methytation and immobilization of heavy metals in relation to their bioavailability in soils. The mechanisms of Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction on heavy metal form transformation contain biological and chemical interactions, but the mode of interaction remains to be further investigated.

  1. Complete Reductive Dehalogenation of Brominated Biphenyls by Anaerobic Microorganisms in Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Donna L.; Van Dort, Heidi M.

    1998-01-01

    We sought to determine whether microorganisms from the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated sediment in Woods Pond (Lenox, Mass.) could dehalogenate brominated biphenyls. The PCB dechlorination specificities for the microorganisms in this sediment have been well characterized. This allowed us to compare the dehalogenation specificities for brominated biphenyls and chlorinated biphenyls within a single sediment. Anaerobic sediment microcosms were incubated separately at 25°C with 16 different mono- to tetrabrominated biphenyls (350 μM) and disodium malate (10 mM). Samples were extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography with an electron capture detector and a mass spectrometer detector at various times for up to 54 weeks. All of the tested brominated biphenyls were dehalogenated. For most congeners, including 2,6-dibromobiphenyl (26-BB) and 24-25-BB, the dehalogenation began within 1 to 2 weeks. However, for 246-BB and 2-2-BB, debromination was first observed at 7 and 14 weeks, respectively. Most intermediate products did not persist, but when 2-2-BB was produced as a dehalogenation product, it persisted for at least 15 weeks before it was dehalogenated to 2-BB and then to biphenyl. The dehalogenation specificities for brominated and chlorinated biphenyls were similar: meta and para substituents were generally removed first, and ortho substituents were more recalcitrant. However, the brominated biphenyls were better dehalogenation substrates than the chlorinated biphenyls. All of the tested bromobiphenyls, including those with ortho and unflanked meta and para substituents, were ultimately dehalogenated to biphenyl, whereas their chlorinated counterparts either were not dehalogenation substrates or were only partially dehalogenated. Our data suggest that PCB-dechlorinating microorganisms may be able to dehalogenate brominated biphenyls and may exhibit a relaxed specificity for these substrates. PMID:16349530

  2. Effect of dye structure and redox mediators on anaerobic azo and anthraquinone dye reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Carantino Costa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the biological decolourisation of dyes with different molecular structures. The kinetic constant values (k1 achieved with azo dye Reactive Red 120 were 7.6 and 10.1 times higher in the presence of RM (redox mediators AQDS and riboflavin, respectively, than the assays lacking RM. The kinetic constant achieved with the azo dye Congo Red was 42 times higher than that obtained with the anthraquinone dye Reactive Blue 4. The effect of RM on dye reduction was more evident for azo dyes resistant to reductive processes, and ineffective for anthraquinone dyes because of the structural stability of the latter.

  3. Biotechnological aspects of anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulfate reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulepas, R.J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate reduction (SR) can be used for the removal and recovery of metals and oxidized sulfur compounds from waste streams. Sulfate-reducing bacteria reduce oxidized sulfur compounds to sulfide. Subsequently, sulfide can precipitate dissolved metals or can be oxidized to elemental sulfur. Both metal

  4. Genome sequence of Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2, a Gram-positive anaerobe capable of dehalogenation and metal reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sang-Hoon

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome of the Gram-positive, metal-reducing, dehalorespiring Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2 was sequenced in order to gain insights into its metabolic capacities, adaptive physiology, and regulatory machineries, and to compare with that of Desulfitobacterium hafniense Y51, the phylogenetically closest strain among the species with a sequenced genome. Results The genome of Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2 is composed of a 5,279,134-bp circular chromosome with 5,042 predicted genes. Genome content and parallel physiological studies support the cell's ability to fix N2 and CO2, form spores and biofilms, reduce metals, and use a variety of electron acceptors in respiration, including halogenated organic compounds. The genome contained seven reductive dehalogenase genes and four nitrogenase gene homologs but lacked the Nar respiratory nitrate reductase system. The D. hafniense DCB-2 genome contained genes for 43 RNA polymerase sigma factors including 27 sigma-24 subunits, 59 two-component signal transduction systems, and about 730 transporter proteins. In addition, it contained genes for 53 molybdopterin-binding oxidoreductases, 19 flavoprotein paralogs of the fumarate reductase, and many other FAD/FMN-binding oxidoreductases, proving the cell's versatility in both adaptive and reductive capacities. Together with the ability to form spores, the presence of the CO2-fixing Wood-Ljungdahl pathway and the genes associated with oxygen tolerance add flexibility to the cell's options for survival under stress. Conclusions D. hafniense DCB-2's genome contains genes consistent with its abilities for dehalogenation, metal reduction, N2 and CO2 fixation, anaerobic respiration, oxygen tolerance, spore formation, and biofilm formation which make this organism a potential candidate for bioremediation at contaminated sites.

  5. Anaerobic Co-digestion for Enhanced Renewable Energy and Green House Gas Emission Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navaratnam, Navaneethan; Zitomer, Daniel

    2012-05-01

    The need to develop renewable energy is important for replacing fossil fuel, which is limited in quantity and also tends to increase in price over time. The addition of high strength organic wastes in municipal anaerobic digesters is growing and tends to increase renewable energy production. In addition, conversion of wastes to energy significantly reduces uncontrolled greenhouse gas emissions. Co-digestion of municipal sludge with any combination of wastes can result in synergistic, antagonistic or neutral outcomes. The objectives of this study were to identify potential co-digestates, determine synergistic, antagonistic and neutral effects, determine economic benefits, quantify performance of bench scale co-digesters, identify influence of co-digestion on microbial communities and implement appropriate co-digestion, if warranted, after full-scale testing. A market study was used to identify promising co-digestates. Most promising wastes were determined by biochemical methane potential (BMP) and other testing followed by a simple economic analysis. Performance was investigated using bench-scale digesters receiving synthetic primary sludge with and without co-digestates. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses were performed on the gene encoding the α subunit of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) to compare methanogen communities among the digesters. One significant band contributing to the greatest difference in banding patterns was excised, cloned, amplified and sequenced. Full- scale co-digestion was conducted using the most promising co-digestate at South Shore Wastewater Reclamation Facility (Oak Creek, WI). Over 80 wastes were identified from 54 facilities within 160 km of an existing municipal digester. A simple economic comparison identified the greatest benefits for seven co-digestates. Methane production rates of two co- digester systems increased by 105% and 66% in comparison to a control

  6. Analysis on carbon dioxide emission reduction during the anaerobic synergetic digestion technology of sludge and kitchen waste: Taking kitchen waste synergetic digestion project in Zhenjiang as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qia; Dai, Xiaohu

    2017-11-01

    With the popularization of municipal sewage treatment facilities, the improvement of sewage treatment efficiency and the deepening degree of sewage treatment, the sludge production of sewage plant has been sharply increased. Carbon emission during the process of municipal sewage treatment and disposal has become one of the important sources of greenhouse gases that cause greenhouse effect. How to reduce carbon dioxide emissions during sewage treatment and disposal process is of great significance for reducing air pollution. Kitchen waste and excess sludge, as two important organic wastes, once uses anaerobic synergetic digestion technology in the treatment process can on the one hand, avoid instability of sludge individual anaerobic digestion, improve sludge degradation rate and marsh gas production rate, and on the other hand, help increase the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions to a great extent. The paper uses material balance method, analyzes and calculates the carbon dioxide emissions from kitchen waste and sludge disposed by the anaerobic synergetic digestion technology, compares the anaerobic synergetic digestion technology with traditional sludge sanitary landfill technology and works out the carbon dioxide emission reductions after synergetic digestion. It takes the kitchen waste and sludge synergetic digestion engineering project of Zhenjiang city in Jiangsu province as an example, makes material balance analysis using concrete data and works out the carbon dioxide daily emission reductions. The paper analyzes the actual situation of emission reduction by comparing the data, and found that the synergetic digestion of kitchen waste and sludge can effectively reduce the carbon dioxide emission, and the reduction is obvious especially compared with that of sludge sanitary landfill, which has a certain effect on whether to promote the use of the technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of the oxidation rate and Fe(II) state on microbial nitrate-dependent Fe(III) mineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senko, John M.; Dewers , Thomas A.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2005-01-01

    A nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium was isolated and used to evaluate whether Fe(II) chemical form or oxidation rate had an effect on the mineralogy of biogenic Fe(III) (hydr)oxides resulting from nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The isolate (designated FW33AN) had 99% 16S rRNA sequence similarity to Klebsiella oxytoca. FW33AN produced Fe(III) (hydr)oxides by oxidation of soluble Fe(II) [Fe(II)sol] or FeS under nitrate-reducing conditions. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fe(III) (hydr)oxide produced by oxidation of FeS was shown to be amorphous, while oxidation of Fe(II)sol yielded goethite. The rate of Fe(II) oxidation was then manipulated by incubating various cell concentrations of FW33AN with Fe(II)sol and nitrate. Characterization of products revealed that as Fe(II) oxidation rates slowed, a stronger goethite signal was observed by XRD and a larger proportion of Fe(III) was in the crystalline fraction. Since the mineralogy of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides may control the extent of subsequent Fe(III) reduction, the variables we identify here may have an effect on the biogeochemical cycling of Fe in anoxic ecosystems.

  8. Flow Velocity Effects on Fe(III Clogging during Managed Aquifer Recharge Using Urban Storm Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinqiang Du

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Storm water harvesting and storage has been employed for nearly a hundred years, and using storm water to recharge aquifers is one of the most important ways to relieve water scarcity in arid and semi-arid regions. However, it cannot be widely adopted because of clogging problems. The risk of chemical clogging is mostly associated with iron oxyhydroxide precipitation; anhydrous ferric oxide (HFO clogging remains a problem in many wellfields. This paper investigates Fe(III clogging levels at three flow velocities (Darcy velocities, 0.46, 1.62 and 4.55 m/d. The results indicate that clogging increases with flow velocity, and is mostly affected by the first 0–3 cm of the column. The highest water velocity caused full clogging in 35 h, whereas the lowest took 53 h to reach an stable 60% reduction in hydraulic conductivity. For the high flow velocity, over 90% of the HFO was deposited in the 0–1 cm section. In contrast, the lowest flow velocity deposited only 75% in this section. Fe(III deposition was used as an approximation for Fe(OH3. High flow velocity may promote Fe(OH3 flocculent precipitate, thus increasing Fe(III deposition. The main mechanism for a porous matrix interception of Fe(III colloidal particles was surface filtration. Thus, the effects of deposition, clogging phenomena, and physicochemical mechanisms, are more significant at higher velocities.

  9. Influence of co-substrate on textile wastewater treatment and microbial community changes in the anaerobic biological sulfate reduction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasool, Kashif; Mahmoud, Khaled A. [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar Foundation, PO BOX 5825, Doha (Qatar); Lee, Dae Sung, E-mail: daesung@knu.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Kyungpook National University, 80 Daehak-ro, Buk-gu, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Textile wastewater treatment performance was investigated with different co-substrates. • Dye biodegradation and biotransformation enhanced with lactate as co-substrate. • Sulfate removal significantly decreased under limited co-substrate concentration. • Changes in microbial community structure were studied using bar-coded pyrosequencing. • Lactate as co-substrate showed the highest relative abundance of sulfate reducing bacteria. - Abstract: This study investigated the anaerobic treatment of sulfate-rich synthetic textile wastewater in three sulfidogenic sequential batch reactors (SBRs). The experimental protocol was designed to examine the effect of three different co-substrates (lactate, glucose, and ethanol) and their concentrations on wastewater treatment performance. Sulfate reduction and dye degradation were improved when lactate and ethanol were used as electron donors, as compared with glucose. Moreover, under co-substrate limited concentrations, color, sulfate, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies were declined. By reducing co-substrate COD gradually from 3000 to 500 mg/L, color removal efficiencies were decreased from 98.23% to 78.46%, 63.37%, and 69.10%, whereas, sulfate removal efficiencies were decreased from 98.42%, 82.35%, and 87.0%, to 30.27%, 21.50%, and 10.13%, for lactate, glucose, and ethanol fed reactors, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and total aromatic amine analysis revealed lactate to be a potential co-substrate for further biodegradation of intermediate metabolites formed after dye degradation. Pyrosequencing analysis showed that microbial community structure was significantly affected by the co-substrate. The reactor with lactate as co-substrate showed the highest relative abundance of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRBs), followed by ethanol, whereas the glucose-fed reactor showed the lowest relative abundance of SRB.

  10. Influence of co-substrate on textile wastewater treatment and microbial community changes in the anaerobic biological sulfate reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasool, Kashif; Mahmoud, Khaled A.; Lee, Dae Sung

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Textile wastewater treatment performance was investigated with different co-substrates. • Dye biodegradation and biotransformation enhanced with lactate as co-substrate. • Sulfate removal significantly decreased under limited co-substrate concentration. • Changes in microbial community structure were studied using bar-coded pyrosequencing. • Lactate as co-substrate showed the highest relative abundance of sulfate reducing bacteria. - Abstract: This study investigated the anaerobic treatment of sulfate-rich synthetic textile wastewater in three sulfidogenic sequential batch reactors (SBRs). The experimental protocol was designed to examine the effect of three different co-substrates (lactate, glucose, and ethanol) and their concentrations on wastewater treatment performance. Sulfate reduction and dye degradation were improved when lactate and ethanol were used as electron donors, as compared with glucose. Moreover, under co-substrate limited concentrations, color, sulfate, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies were declined. By reducing co-substrate COD gradually from 3000 to 500 mg/L, color removal efficiencies were decreased from 98.23% to 78.46%, 63.37%, and 69.10%, whereas, sulfate removal efficiencies were decreased from 98.42%, 82.35%, and 87.0%, to 30.27%, 21.50%, and 10.13%, for lactate, glucose, and ethanol fed reactors, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and total aromatic amine analysis revealed lactate to be a potential co-substrate for further biodegradation of intermediate metabolites formed after dye degradation. Pyrosequencing analysis showed that microbial community structure was significantly affected by the co-substrate. The reactor with lactate as co-substrate showed the highest relative abundance of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRBs), followed by ethanol, whereas the glucose-fed reactor showed the lowest relative abundance of SRB.

  11. A Polycarboxyl-Decorated FeIII -Based Xerogel-Derived Multifunctional Composite (Fe3 O4 /Fe/C) as an Efficient Electrode Material towards Oxygen Reduction Reaction and Supercapacitor Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Bandhana; Venkateswarulu, Mangili; Kushwaha, Himmat Singh; Halder, Aditi; Koner, Rik Rani

    2018-05-02

    Low cost, non-noble metal catalysts with a good oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity comparable to that of platinum and also having good energy storage properties are highly desirable but challenging. Several challenges are associated with the development of such materials. Herein, we demonstrate a new polycarboxyl-functionalised Fe III -based gel material, synthesised following a solvothermal method and the development of its composite (Fe 3 O 4 /Fe/C) by annealing at optimised temperature. The developed composite displayed excellent electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction with an onset potential of 0.87 V (vs. RHE) and a current density value of -5 mA cm -2 , which are comparable with commercial 20 wt % Pt/C. In addition, as one of the most desirable properties, the composite exhibits a better methanol tolerance and greater durability than Pt/C. The same material was explored as an energy storage material for supercapacitors, which showed a specific capacitance of 245 F g -1 at a current density of 1 A g -1 . It is expected that this Fe 3 O 4 /Fe/C composite with a disordered graphitised carbon matrix will pave a horizon for developing energy conversion and energy storage devices. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Bioavailability of Fe(III) in Natural Soils and the Impact on Mobility of Inorganic Contaminants (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosson, David S. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Cowan, Robert M. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science; Young, Lily Y. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States). Center for Agriculture and the Environment; Hatcherl, Eric L. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Scala, David J. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2005-08-02

    Inorganic contaminants, such as heavy metals and radionuclides, can adhere to insoluble Fe(III) minerals resulting in decreased mobility of these contaminants through subsurface environments. Dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (DIRB), by reducing insoluble Fe(III) to soluble Fe(II), may enhance contaminant mobility. The Savannah River Site, South Carolina (SRS), has been subjected to both heavy metal and radionuclide contamination. The overall objective of this project is to investigate the release of inorganic contaminants such as heavy metals and radionuclides that are bound to solid phase soil Fe complexes and to elucidate the mechanisms for mobilization of these contaminants that can be associated with microbial Fe(III) reduction. This is being accomplished by (i) using uncontaminated and contaminated soils from SRS as prototype systems, (ii) evaluating the diversity of DIRBs within the samples and isolating cultures for further study, (iii) using batch microcosms to evaluate the bioavailability of Fe(III) from pure minerals and SRS soils, (iv) developing kinetic and mass transfer models that reflect the system dynamics, and (v) carrying out soil column studies to elucidate the dynamics and interactions amongst Fe(III) reduction, remineralization and contaminant mobility.

  13. Anaerobic azo dye reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, van der F.P.

    2002-01-01

    Azo dyes, aromatic moieties linked together by azo (-N=N-) chromophores, represent the largest class of dyes used in textile-processing and other industries. The release of these compounds into the environment is undesirable, not only because of their colour, but also

  14. Biodegradation of phenol with chromium(VI) reduction in an anaerobic fixed-biofilm process-Kinetic model and reactor performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yen-Hui; Wu, Chih-Lung; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Li, Hsin-Lung

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical model system was derived to describe the simultaneous removal of phenol biodegradation with chromium(VI) reduction in an anaerobic fixed-biofilm reactor. The model system incorporates diffusive mass transport and double Monod kinetics. The model was solved using a combination of the orthogonal collocation method and Gear's method. A laboratory-scale column reactor was employed to validate the kinetic model system. Batch kinetic tests were conducted independently to evaluate the biokinetic parameters used in the model simulation. The removal efficiencies of phenol and chromium(VI) in an anaerobic fixed-biofilm process were approximately 980 mg/g and 910 mg/g, respectively, under a steady-state condition. In the steady state, model-predicted biofilm thickness reached up to 350 μm and suspended cells in the effluent were 85 mg cell/l. The experimental results agree closely with the results of the model simulations.

  15. Engineering a synthetic anaerobic respiration for reduction of xylose to xylitol using NADH output of glucose catabolism by Escherichia coli AI21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Andrew; Garza, Erin; Manow, Ryan; Wang, Jinhua; Gao, Yuanyuan; Grayburn, Scott; Zhou, Shengde

    2016-04-16

    Anaerobic rather than aerobic fermentation is preferred for conversion of biomass derived sugars to high value redox-neutral and reduced commodities. This will likely result in a higher yield of substrate to product conversion and decrease production cost since substrate often accounts for a significant portion of the overall cost. To this goal, metabolic pathway engineering has been used to optimize substrate carbon flow to target products. This approach works well for the production of redox neutral products such as lactic acid from redox neutral sugars using the reducing power NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced) generated from glycolysis (2 NADH per glucose equivalent). Nevertheless, greater than two NADH per glucose catabolized is needed for the production of reduced products (such as xylitol) from redox neutral sugars by anaerobic fermentation. The Escherichia coli strain AI05 (ΔfrdBC ΔldhA ΔackA Δ(focA-pflB) ΔadhE ΔptsG ΔpdhR::pflBp 6-(aceEF-lpd)), previously engineered for reduction of xylose to xylitol using reducing power (NADH equivalent) of glucose catabolism, was further engineered by 1) deleting xylAB operon (encoding for xylose isomerase and xylulokinase) to prevent xylose from entering the pentose phosphate pathway; 2) anaerobically expressing the sdhCDAB-sucABCD operon (encoding for succinate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA synthetase) to enable an anaerobically functional tricarboxcylic acid cycle with a theoretical 10 NAD(P)H equivalent per glucose catabolized. These reducing equivalents can be oxidized by synthetic respiration via xylose reduction, producing xylitol. The resulting strain, AI21 (pAI02), achieved a 96 % xylose to xylitol conversion, with a yield of 6 xylitol per glucose catabolized (molar yield of xylitol per glucose consumed (YRPG) = 6). This represents a 33 % improvement in xylose to xylitol conversion, and a 63 % increase in xylitol yield per glucose catabolized over

  16. A new model for calculating the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions through anaerobic co-digestion of manure and organic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, S.G.; Moeller, H.B.; Petersen, S.O.

    2002-01-01

    Biogenic emissions of methane (CH 4 ) and nitrous oxide (N 2 0) occur during handling, storage and after field application of animal manure. The emissions are linked to decomposition of volatile solids (VS), which provide energy for microorganisms. During anaerobic storage, turnover of VS drives the microbial processes which lead to CH 4 , production. Also, turnover of VS in slurry applied to fields will consume oxygen and can thereby stimulate N 2 0 production. Anaerobic digestion of manure and organic wastes for biogas production removes VS prior to storage and field application, and therefore this treatment also reduces the potential for CH 4 , and N 2 0 emissions. A model has been developed to evaluate the effect of anaerobic co-digestion of animal manure and organic waste on CH, and N 2 0 emissions. The model estimates the reduction in VS during storage and digestion, and an algorithm for prediction of CH 4 , emissions from manure during storage relates the emission to VS, temperature and storage time. Nitrous oxide emissions from field-applied slurry are calculated using VS, slurry N, soil water potential and application method as input variables, thus linking C and N turnover. The amount of fossil fuel that is substituted by CH 4 , produced during digestion is also calculated in order to estimate the total effect of anaerobic digestion on greenhouse gas emissions from slurry. Model calculations show the potential of manure digestion to modify the emission of greenhouse gases from agriculture. The experience from application of the model to different scenarios is that the emission of greenhouse gases and their reduction must be calculated with dynamic and integrated models. Specifically, the results indicate that digestion of slurry and organic wastes could reduce Danish greenhouse gas emissions by as much as 3%. (au)

  17. Petrophilic, Fe(III Reducing Exoelectrogen Citrobacter sp. KVM11, Isolated From Hydrocarbon Fed Microbial Electrochemical Remediation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnaveni Venkidusamy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Exoelectrogenic biofilms capable of extracellular electron transfer are important in advanced technologies such as those used in microbial electrochemical remediation systems (MERS Few bacterial strains have been, nevertheless, obtained from MERS exoelectrogenic biofilms and characterized for bioremediation potential. Here we report the identification of one such bacterial strain, Citrobacter sp. KVM11, a petrophilic, iron reducing bacterial strain isolated from hydrocarbon fed MERS, producing anodic currents in microbial electrochemical systems. Fe(III reduction of 90.01 ± 0.43% was observed during 5 weeks of incubation with Fe(III supplemented liquid cultures. Biodegradation screening assays showed that the hydrocarbon degradation had been carried out by metabolically active cells accompanied by growth. The characteristic feature of diazo dye decolorization was used as a simple criterion for evaluating the electrochemical activity in the candidate microbe. The electrochemical activities of the strain KVM11 were characterized in a single chamber fuel cell and three electrode electrochemical cells. The inoculation of strain KVM11 amended with acetate and citrate as the sole carbon and energy sources has resulted in an increase in anodic currents (maximum current density of 212 ± 3 and 359 ± mA/m2 with respective coulombic efficiencies of 19.5 and 34.9% in a single chamber fuel cells. Cyclic voltammetry studies showed that anaerobically grown cells of strain KVM11 are electrochemically active whereas aerobically grown cells lacked the electrochemical activity. Electrobioremediation potential of the strain KVM11 was investigated in hydrocarbonoclastic and dye detoxification conditions using MERS. About 89.60% of 400 mg l-1 azo dye was removed during the first 24 h of operation and it reached below detection limits by the end of the batch operation (60 h. Current generation and biodegradation capabilities of strain KVM11 were examined using an

  18. Petrophilic, Fe(III) Reducing Exoelectrogen Citrobacter sp. KVM11, Isolated From Hydrocarbon Fed Microbial Electrochemical Remediation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkidusamy, Krishnaveni; Hari, Ananda Rao; Megharaj, Mallavarapu

    2018-01-01

    Exoelectrogenic biofilms capable of extracellular electron transfer are important in advanced technologies such as those used in microbial electrochemical remediation systems (MERS) Few bacterial strains have been, nevertheless, obtained from MERS exoelectrogenic biofilms and characterized for bioremediation potential. Here we report the identification of one such bacterial strain, Citrobacter sp. KVM11, a petrophilic, iron reducing bacterial strain isolated from hydrocarbon fed MERS, producing anodic currents in microbial electrochemical systems. Fe(III) reduction of 90.01 ± 0.43% was observed during 5 weeks of incubation with Fe(III) supplemented liquid cultures. Biodegradation screening assays showed that the hydrocarbon degradation had been carried out by metabolically active cells accompanied by growth. The characteristic feature of diazo dye decolorization was used as a simple criterion for evaluating the electrochemical activity in the candidate microbe. The electrochemical activities of the strain KVM11 were characterized in a single chamber fuel cell and three electrode electrochemical cells. The inoculation of strain KVM11 amended with acetate and citrate as the sole carbon and energy sources has resulted in an increase in anodic currents (maximum current density) of 212 ± 3 and 359 ± mA/m2 with respective coulombic efficiencies of 19.5 and 34.9% in a single chamber fuel cells. Cyclic voltammetry studies showed that anaerobically grown cells of strain KVM11 are electrochemically active whereas aerobically grown cells lacked the electrochemical activity. Electrobioremediation potential of the strain KVM11 was investigated in hydrocarbonoclastic and dye detoxification conditions using MERS. About 89.60% of 400 mg l-1 azo dye was removed during the first 24 h of operation and it reached below detection limits by the end of the batch operation (60 h). Current generation and biodegradation capabilities of strain KVM11 were examined using an initial

  19. Effect of ultrasonic and ozone pre-treatments on pharmaceutical waste activated sludge's solubilisation, reduction, anaerobic biodegradability and acute biological toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Jin; Yao, Hong; Wang, Hui; Shan, Dan; Jiang, Yichen; Ma, Lanqianya; Yu, Xiaohua

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasonic and ozone pre-treatment technologies were employed in this study to improve the anaerobic digestion efficiency of pharmaceutical waste activated sludge. The sludge solubilisation achieved 30.01% (150,000 kJ/kg TS) and 28.10% (0.1g O3/g TS) after ultrasonic treatment and ozone treatment. The anaerobic biodegradability after ultrasonic treatment was higher compared to ozonation due to the higher cumulative methane volume observed after 6 days (249 ml vs 190 ml). The ozonated sludge released the highest concentration of Cu(2+) into the liquid phase (6.640 mg L(-1)) compared to 0.530 mg/L for untreated sludge and 0.991 mg/L for sonicated sludge. The acute toxicity test measured by luminescent bacteria showed that anaerobic digestion could degrade toxic compounds and result in a reduction in toxicity. The main mechanism of action led to some differences in the treated sludge exhibiting higher potential for methane production from pharmaceutical waste sludge with ultrasonic treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Potential for Methanosarcina to contribute to uranium reduction during acetate-promoted groundwater bioremediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmes, Dawn E; Orellana, Roberto; Giloteaux, Ludovic

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies of in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater with acetate injections have focused on the role of Geobacter species in U(VI) reduction because of a lack of other abundant known U(VI)-reducing microorganisms. Monitoring the levels of methyl CoM reductase subunit...... an important role in the long-term bioremediation of uranium-contaminated aquifers after depletion of Fe(III) oxides limits the growth of Geobacter species. The results also suggest that Methanosarcina have the potential to influence uranium geochemistry in a diversity of anaerobic sedimentary environments....

  1. pH controls over methanogenesis and iron reduction along soil depth profile in Arctic tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Gu, B.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Graham, D. E.

    2017-12-01

    Increasing soil temperature in the Arctic is expected to accelerate rates of soil organic matter decomposition. However, the magnitude of this impact is uncertain due to the many physical, chemical, and biological processes that control the decomposition pathways. Varying soil redox conditions present a key control over pathways of organic matter decomposition by diverting the flow of reductants among different electron accepting processes and further driving acid-base reactions that alter soil pH. In this study we investigated the pH controls over anaerobic carbon mineralization, methanogenesis, Fe(III) reduction and the interplay between these processes across a range of pH and redox conditions. pH manipulation experiments were conducted by incubating soils representing organic, mineral, cryoturbated transitional layers and permafrost. In the experiments we sought to understand (1) if methanogenesis or Fe(III) reduction had similar pH optima; (2) if this pH response also occurs at `upstream' fermentation process; and (3) if pH alters organo-mineral association or organic matter sorption and desorption and its availability for microbial degradation. Our preliminary results suggest that the common bell-shaped pH response curve provides a good fit for both Fe(III) reduction and methanogenesis, with optimum pH at 6.0-7.0. Exceptions to this were found in transitional layer where methanogenesis rates positively correlated with increasing pH, with maximum rates measured at pH 8.5. It is likely that the transitional layer harbors distinct groups of methanogens that prefer a high pH. Variations in the optimum pH of Fe(III) reduction and methanogenesis may play a significant role in regulating organic matter decomposition pathways and thus greenhouse gas production in thawing soils. These results support biogeochemical modeling efforts to accurately simulate organic matter decomposition under changing redox and pH conditions.

  2. Mechanisms for Electron Transfer Through Pili to Fe(III) Oxide in Geobacter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovley, Derek R. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2015-03-09

    The purpose of these studies was to aid the Department of Energy in its goal of understanding how microorganisms involved in the bioremediation of metals and radionuclides sustain their activity in the subsurface. This information is required in order to incorporate biological processes into decision making for environmental remediation and long-term stewardship of contaminated sites. The proposed research was designed to elucidate the mechanisms for electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides in Geobacter species because Geobacter species are abundant dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms in a diversity of sites in which uranium is undergoing natural attenuation via the reduction of soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) or when this process is artificially stimulated with the addition of organic electron donors. This study investigated the novel, but highly controversial, concept that the final conduit for electron transfer to Fe(III) oxides are electrically conductive pili. The specific objectives were to: 1) further evaluate the conductivity along the pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens and related organisms; 2) determine the mechanisms for pili conductivity; and 3) investigate the role of pili in Fe(III) oxide reduction. The studies demonstrated that the pili of G. sulfurreducens are conductive along their length. Surprisingly, the pili possess a metallic-like conductivity similar to that observed in synthetic organic conducting polymers such as polyaniline. Detailed physical analysis of the pili, as well as studies in which the structure of the pili was genetically modified, demonstrated that the metallic-like conductivity of the pili could be attributed to overlapping pi-pi orbitals of aromatic amino acids. Other potential mechanisms for conductivity, such as electron hopping between cytochromes associated with the pili were definitively ruled out. Pili were also found to be essential for Fe(III) oxide reduction in G. metallireducens. Ecological studies demonstrated

  3. Rapid isolation of a facultative anaerobic electrochemically active bacterium capable of oxidizing acetate for electrogenesis and azo dyes reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Nan; Yuan, Shi-Jie; Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Song, Xiang-Ning; Li, Wen-Wei; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-05-01

    In this study, 27 strains of electrochemically active bacteria (EAB) were rapidly isolated and their capabilities of extracellular electron transfer were identified using a photometric method based on WO3 nanoclusters. These strains caused color change of WO3 from white to blue in a 24-well agar plate within 40 h. Most of the isolated EAB strains belonged to the genera of Aeromonas and Shewanella. One isolate, Pantoea agglomerans S5-44, was identified as an EAB that can utilize acetate as the carbon source to produce electricity and reduce azo dyes under anaerobic conditions. The results confirmed the capability of P. agglomerans S5-44 for extracellular electron transfer. The isolation of this acetate-utilizing, facultative EBA reveals the metabolic diversity of environmental bacteria. Such strains have great potential for environmental applications, especially at interfaces of aerobic and anaerobic environments, where acetate is the main available carbon source.

  4. Iron and manganese in anaerobic respiration: environmental significance, physiology, and regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealson, K. H.; Saffarini, D.

    1994-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron and/or manganese reduction is known to occur in several organisms, including anaerobic sulfur-reducing organisms such as Geobacter metallireducens or Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, and facultative aerobes such as Shewanella putrefaciens. These bacteria couple both carbon oxidation and growth to the reduction of these metals, and inhibitor and competition experiments suggest that Mn(IV) and Fe(III) are efficient electron acceptors similar to nitrate in redox abilities and capable of out-competing electron acceptors of lower potential, such as sulfate (sulfate reduction) or CO2 (methanogenesis). Field studies of iron and/or manganese reduction suggest that organisms with such metabolic abilities play important roles in coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to metal reduction under anaerobic conditions. Because both iron and manganese oxides are solids or colloids, they tend to settle downward in aquatic environments, providing a physical mechanism for the movement of oxidizing potential into anoxic zones. The resulting biogeochemical metal cycles have a strong impact on many other elements including carbon, sulfur, phosphorous, and trace metals.

  5. An Exploratory Study on the Pathways of Cr (VI) Reduction in Sulfate-reducing Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jin; Wei, Li; Liu, Rulong; Jiang, Feng; Hao, Xiaodi; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-03-29

    Electroplating wastewater contains both Cr (VI) and sulfate. So Cr (VI) removal under sulfate-rich condition is quite complicated. This study mainly investigates the pathways for Cr (VI) removal under biological sulfate-reducing condition in the up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor. Two potential pathways are found for the removal of Cr (VI). The first one is the sulfidogenesis-induced Cr (VI) reduction pathway (for 90% Cr (VI) removal), in which Cr (VI) is reduced by sulfide generated from biological reduction of sulfate. The second one leads to direct reduction of Cr (VI) which is utilized by bacteria as the electron acceptor (for 10% Cr (VI) removal). Batch test results confirmed that sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur instead of sulfate during Cr (VI) reduction. The produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) provided protection to the microbes, resulting in effective removal of Cr (VI). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera accounted for 11.1% of the total bacterial community; thus they could be the major organisms mediating the sulfidogenesis-induced reduction of Cr (VI). In addition, chromate-utilizing genera (e.g. Microbacterium) were also detected, which were possibly responsible for the direct reduction of Cr (VI) using organics as the electron donor and Cr (VI) as the electron acceptor.

  6. An Exploratory Study on the Pathways of Cr (VI) Reduction in Sulfate-reducing Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jin; Wei, Li; Liu, Rulong; Jiang, Feng; Hao, Xiaodi; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Electroplating wastewater contains both Cr (VI) and sulfate. So Cr (VI) removal under sulfate-rich condition is quite complicated. This study mainly investigates the pathways for Cr (VI) removal under biological sulfate-reducing condition in the up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor. Two potential pathways are found for the removal of Cr (VI). The first one is the sulfidogenesis-induced Cr (VI) reduction pathway (for 90% Cr (VI) removal), in which Cr (VI) is reduced by sulfide generated from biological reduction of sulfate. The second one leads to direct reduction of Cr (VI) which is utilized by bacteria as the electron acceptor (for 10% Cr (VI) removal). Batch test results confirmed that sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur instead of sulfate during Cr (VI) reduction. The produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) provided protection to the microbes, resulting in effective removal of Cr (VI). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera accounted for 11.1% of the total bacterial community; thus they could be the major organisms mediating the sulfidogenesis-induced reduction of Cr (VI). In addition, chromate-utilizing genera (e.g. Microbacterium) were also detected, which were possibly responsible for the direct reduction of Cr (VI) using organics as the electron donor and Cr (VI) as the electron acceptor. PMID:27021522

  7. An Exploratory Study on the Pathways of Cr (VI) Reduction in Sulfate-reducing Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jin; Wei, Li; Liu, Rulong; Jiang, Feng; Hao, Xiaodi; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-03-01

    Electroplating wastewater contains both Cr (VI) and sulfate. So Cr (VI) removal under sulfate-rich condition is quite complicated. This study mainly investigates the pathways for Cr (VI) removal under biological sulfate-reducing condition in the up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor. Two potential pathways are found for the removal of Cr (VI). The first one is the sulfidogenesis-induced Cr (VI) reduction pathway (for 90% Cr (VI) removal), in which Cr (VI) is reduced by sulfide generated from biological reduction of sulfate. The second one leads to direct reduction of Cr (VI) which is utilized by bacteria as the electron acceptor (for 10% Cr (VI) removal). Batch test results confirmed that sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur instead of sulfate during Cr (VI) reduction. The produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) provided protection to the microbes, resulting in effective removal of Cr (VI). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera accounted for 11.1% of the total bacterial community; thus they could be the major organisms mediating the sulfidogenesis-induced reduction of Cr (VI). In addition, chromate-utilizing genera (e.g. Microbacterium) were also detected, which were possibly responsible for the direct reduction of Cr (VI) using organics as the electron donor and Cr (VI) as the electron acceptor.

  8. Selenate reduction to elemental selenium by anaerobic bacteria in sediments and culture: biogeochemical significance of a novel, sulfate-independent respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Hollibaugh, James T.; Maest, Ann S.; Presser, Theresa S.; Miller, Laurence G.; Culbertson, Charles W.

    1989-01-01

    Interstitial water profiles of SeO42−, SeO32−, SO42−, and Cl− in anoxic sediments indicated removal of the seleno-oxyanions by a near-surface process unrelated to sulfate reduction. In sediment slurry experiments, a complete reductive removal of SeO42− occurred under anaerobic conditions, was more rapid with H2 or acetate, and was inhibited by O2, NO3−, MnO2, or autoclaving but not by SO42− or FeOOH. Oxidation of acetate in sediments could be coupled to selenate but not to molybdate. Reduction of selenate to elemental selenium was determined to be the mechanism for loss from solution. Selenate reduction was inhibited by tungstate and chromate but not by molybdate. A small quantity of the elemental selenium precipitated into sediments from solution could be resolublized by oxidation with either nitrate or FeOOH, but not with MnO2. A bacterium isolated from estuarine sediments demonstrated selenate-dependent growth on acetate, forming elemental selenium and carbon dioxide as respiratory end products. These results indicate that dissimilatory selenate reduction to elemental selenium is the major sink for selenium oxyanions in anoxic sediments. In addition, they suggest application as a treatment process for removing selenium oxyanions from wastewaters and also offer an explanation for the presence of selenite in oxic waters.

  9. Oxidation of a Dimethoxyhydroquinone by Ferrihydrite and Goethite Nanoparticles: Iron Reduction versus Surface Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumina, Lelde; Lyngsie, Gry; Tunlid, Anders; Persson, Per

    2017-08-15

    Hydroquinones are important mediators of electron transfer reactions in soils with a capability to reduce Fe(III) minerals and molecular oxygen, and thereby generating Fenton chemistry reagents. This study focused on 2,6-dimethoxy hydroquinone (2,6-DMHQ), an analogue to a common fungal metabolite, and its reaction with ferrihydrite and goethite under variable pH and oxygen concentrations. Combined wet-chemical and spectroscopic analyses showed that both minerals effectively oxidized 2,6-DMHQ in the presence of oxygen. Under anaerobic conditions the first-order oxidation rate constants decreased by one to several orders of magnitude depending on pH and mineral. Comparison between aerobic and anaerobic results showed that ferrihydrite promoted 2,6-DMHQ oxidation both via reductive dissolution and heterogeneous catalysis while goethite mainly caused catalytic oxidation. These results were in agreement with changes in the reduction potential (E H ) of the Fe(III) oxide/Fe(II) aq redox couple as a function of dissolved Fe(II) where E H of goethite was lower than ferrihydrite at any given Fe(II) concentration, which makes ferrihydrite more prone to reductive dissolution by the 2,6-DMBQ/2,6-DMHQ redox couple. This study showed that reactions between hydroquinones and iron oxides could produce favorable conditions for formation of reactive oxygen species, which are required for nonenzymatic Fenton-based decomposition of soil organic matter.

  10. A new method for the simultaneous enhancement of methane yield and reduction of hydrogen sulfide production in the anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaohu; Hu, Chongliang; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Yinguang

    2017-11-01

    The biogas generated from anaerobic digestion (AD) also includes undesirable by-product such as hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), which must be removed before the biogas can be used as a clean energy source. Therefore, it is necessary to find an appropriate strategy to simultaneously enhance the methane yield and reduce H 2 S production. An efficient strategy-pretreating sludge at pH 10 for 8d and adjusting the system at neutral pH to produce methane for 20d-is reported for the synchronous enhancement of methane production and reduction of H 2 S production during AD. The experimental results showed that the cumulative methane yield was 861.2±6.1mL/g volatile solids (VS) of sludge pretreated at pH 10 in semi-continuous stirred anaerobic reactors for 84d, an increase of 49.6% over the yield in the control. Meanwhile, the cumulative production of H 2 S was 144.1×10 -4 mL/g VS, 54.2% lower than that in the control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Intermittent Theta Burst Over M1 May Increase Peak Power of a Wingate Anaerobic Test and Prevent the Reduction of Voluntary Activation Measured with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giboin, Louis-Solal; Thumm, Patrick; Bertschinger, Raphael; Gruber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Despite the potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to improve performances in patients suffering from motor neuronal afflictions, its effect on motor performance enhancement in healthy subjects during a specific sport task is still unknown. We hypothesized that after an intermittent theta burst (iTBS) treatment, performance during the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT) will increase and supraspinal fatigue following the exercise will be lower in comparison to a control treatment. Ten subjects participated in two randomized experiments consisting of a WAnT 5 min after either an iTBS or a control treatment. We determined voluntary activation (VA) of the right knee extensors with TMS (VATMS) and with peripheral nerve stimulation (VAPNS) of the femoral nerve, before and after the WAnT. T-tests were applied to the WAnT results and a two way within subject ANOVA was applied to VA results. The iTBS treatment increased the peak power and the maximum pedalling cadence and suppressed the reduction of VATMS following the WAnT compared to the control treatment. No behavioral changes related to fatigue (mean power and fatigue index) were observed. These results indicate for the first time that iTBS could be used as a potential intervention to improve anaerobic performance in a sport specific task.

  12. Intermittent theta burst over M1 may increase peak power of a Wingate anaerobic test and prevent the reduction of voluntary activation measured with transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Solal Giboin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to improve performances in patients suffering from motor neuronal afflictions, its effect on motor performance enhancement in healthy subjects during a specific sport task is still unknown. We hypothesised that after an intermittent theta burst (iTBS treatment, performance during the Wingate Anaerobic Test (WAnT, will increase and supraspinal fatigue following the exercise will be lower in comparison to a control treatment.Ten subjects participated in two randomised experiments consisting of a WAnT 5 minutes after either an iTBS or a control treatment. We determined voluntary activation (VA of the right knee extensors with TMS (VATMS and with peripheral nerve stimulation (VAPNS of the femoral nerve, before and after the WAnT. T-tests were applied to the WAnT results and a 2 way within subject ANOVA was applied to VA results. The iTBS treatment increased the peak power and the maximum pedalling cadence and suppressed the reduction of VATMS following the WAnT compared to the control treatment. No behavioural changes related to fatigue (mean power and fatigue index were observed.These results indicate for the first time that iTBS could be used as a potential intervention to improve anaerobic performance in a sport specific task.

  13. Anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these bacteria ... Brook I. Diseases caused by non-spore-forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  14. Enhanced biotic and abiotic transformation of Cr(vi) by quinone-reducing bacteria/dissolved organic matter/Fe(iii) in anaerobic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Gu, Lipeng; He, Huan; Xu, Zhixiang; Pan, Xuejun

    2016-09-14

    This study investigated the simultaneous transformation of Cr(vi) via a closely coupled biotic and abiotic pathway in an anaerobic system of quinone-reducing bacteria/dissolved organic matters (DOM)/Fe(iii). Batch studies were conducted with quinone-reducing bacteria to assess the influences of sodium formate (NaFc), electron shuttling compounds (DOM) and the Fe(iii) on Cr(vi) reduction rates as these chemical species are likely to be present in the environment during in situ bioremediation. Results indicated that the concentration of sodium formate and anthraquinone-2-sodium sulfonate (AQS) had apparently an effect on Cr(vi) reduction. The fastest decrease in rate for incubation supplemented with 5 mM sodium formate and 0.8 mM AQS showed that Fe(iii)/DOM significantly promoted the reduction of Cr(vi). Presumably due to the presence of more easily utilizable sodium formate, DOM and Fe(iii) have indirect Cr(vi) reduction capability. The coexisting cycles of Fe(ii)/Fe(iii) and DOM(ox)/DOM(red) exhibited a higher redox function than the individual cycle, and their abiotic coupling action can significantly enhance Cr(vi) reduction by quinone-reducing bacteria.

  15. Reduction and Immobilization of Radionuclides and Toxic Metal Ions Using Combined Zero Valent Iron and Anaerobic Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weathers, Lenly J.; Katz, Lynn E.

    2002-01-01

    The use of zero valent iron, permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for groundwater remediation continues to increase. AN exciting variation of this technology involves introducing anaerobic bacteria into these barriers so that both biological and abiotic pollutant removal processes are functional. This work evaluated the hypothesis that a system combining a mixed culture of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) with zero valent iron would have a greater cr(VI) removal efficiency and a greater total Cr(VI) removal capacity than a zero valent iron system without the microorganisms. Hence, the overall goal of this research was to compare the performance of these types of systems with regard to their Cr(VI) removal efficiency and total Cr(VI) removal capacity. Both batch and continuous flow reactor systems were evaluated

  16. Reduction and Immobilization of Radionuclides and Toxic Metal Ions Using Combined Zero Valent Iron and Anaerobic Bacteria; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenly J. Weathers; Lynn E. Katz

    2002-01-01

    The use of zero valent iron, permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for groundwater remediation continues to increase. AN exciting variation of this technology involves introducing anaerobic bacteria into these barriers so that both biological and abiotic pollutant removal processes are functional. This work evaluated the hypothesis that a system combining a mixed culture of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) with zero valent iron would have a greater cr(VI) removal efficiency and a greater total Cr(VI) removal capacity than a zero valent iron system without the microorganisms. Hence, the overall goal of this research was to compare the performance of these types of systems with regard to their Cr(VI) removal efficiency and total Cr(VI) removal capacity. Both batch and continuous flow reactor systems were evaluated

  17. Reduction and Immobilization of Radionuclides and Toxic Metal Ions Using Combined Zero Valent Iron and Anaerobic Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenly J. Weathers; Lynn E. Katz

    2002-05-29

    The use of zero valent iron, permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for groundwater remediation continues to increase. AN exciting variation of this technology involves introducing anaerobic bacteria into these barriers so that both biological and abiotic pollutant removal processes are functional. This work evaluated the hypothesis that a system combining a mixed culture of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) with zero valent iron would have a greater cr(VI) removal efficiency and a greater total Cr(VI) removal capacity than a zero valent iron system without the microorganisms. Hence, the overall goal of this research was to compare the performance of these types of systems with regard to their Cr(VI) removal efficiency and total Cr(VI) removal capacity. Both batch and continuous flow reactor systems were evaluated.

  18. Microbial iron reduction related to metal speciation in mine waste at the former uranium mine in Ranstad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejad, F.T.

    1998-02-01

    Mining activities in Ranstad uranium mine started in 1965 and ended in 1969. In 1988 the final restoration was discussed, and it was proposed to water-fill the open pit and cover the waste disposal area using the 'dry method'. Today the open pit has become a lake. Also some alum shale was placed on the land surface where it has been weathered by oxygen and water during 30 years. In 1994 it was observed that the color of the lake turned over to brown-red. Further studies showed increasing iron concentration in the lake and around the tailings area. For estimation of microbial iron reduction in the lake, three iron reducing bacteria were isolated from the water-filled open pit. For the enrichment process, water samples were inoculated in an anoxic enrichment medium. The isolates were able to reduce Fe(III) oxyhydroxide by oxidation of lactate as energy source. Growth of these strains was determined by production of a black precipitation of iron sulfide and was confirmed by estimation of total number of cells. Fe(III) reduction was monitored by measuring the accumulation of Fe(II) over time. Comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains Tran-l, Tran-2, and Tran-3 with the EMBL data base showed 98.6% identity with Shewanella putrefaciens, 98.7% identity with Shewanella alga and 98.2% identity with Aeromonas salmonicida, respectively. S. putrefaciens strains have been isolated from many different environments, many of which are suboxic or anoxic. In addition to growing aerobically, S. putrefaciens can use Fe(III) as terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. To distinguish if the Fe(III) and/or organic compounds presence in weathered alum shale can be utilized by iron reducing bacteria isolated from the lake, reduction of Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds in sterile and non-sterile weathered alum shale was studied. The reduction of Fe(III) coupled to growth of bacteria on sterile and non-sterile shale was observed. Furthermore

  19. Microbial iron reduction related to metal speciation in mine waste at the former uranium mine in Ranstad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nejad, F.T. [Goeteborg Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology

    1998-02-01

    Mining activities in Ranstad uranium mine started in 1965 and ended in 1969. In 1988 the final restoration was discussed, and it was proposed to water-fill the open pit and cover the waste disposal area using the `dry method`. Today the open pit has become a lake. Also some alum shale was placed on the land surface where it has been weathered by oxygen and water during 30 years. In 1994 it was observed that the color of the lake turned over to brown-red. Further studies showed increasing iron concentration in the lake and around the tailings area. For estimation of microbial iron reduction in the lake, three iron reducing bacteria were isolated from the water-filled open pit. For the enrichment process, water samples were inoculated in an anoxic enrichment medium. The isolates were able to reduce Fe(III) oxyhydroxide by oxidation of lactate as energy source. Growth of these strains was determined by production of a black precipitation of iron sulfide and was confirmed by estimation of total number of cells. Fe(III) reduction was monitored by measuring the accumulation of Fe(II) over time. Comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of strains Tran-l, Tran-2, and Tran-3 with the EMBL data base showed 98.6% identity with Shewanella putrefaciens, 98.7% identity with Shewanella alga and 98.2% identity with Aeromonas salmonicida, respectively. S. putrefaciens strains have been isolated from many different environments, many of which are suboxic or anoxic. In addition to growing aerobically, S. putrefaciens can use Fe(III) as terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. To distinguish if the Fe(III) and/or organic compounds presence in weathered alum shale can be utilized by iron reducing bacteria isolated from the lake, reduction of Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds in sterile and non-sterile weathered alum shale was studied. The reduction of Fe(III) coupled to growth of bacteria on sterile and non-sterile shale was observed. Furthermore

  20. Enhancement of Bacterial Transport in Aerobic and Anaerobic Environments: Assessing the Effect of Metal Oxide Chemical Heterogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T.C. Onstott

    2005-01-01

    The goal of our research was to understand the fundamental processes that control microbial transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers and from this enhanced understanding determine the requirements for successful, field-scale delivery of microorganisms to metal contaminated subsurface sites. Our specific research goals were to determine; (1) the circumstances under which the preferential adsorption of bacteria to Fe, Mn, and Al oxyhydroxides influences field-scale bacterial transport, (2) the extent to which the adhesion properties of bacterial cells affect field-scale bacterial transport, (3) whether microbial Fe(III) reduction can enhance field-scale transport of Fe reducing bacteria (IRB) and other microorganisms and (4) the effect of field-scale physical and chemical heterogeneity on all three processes. Some of the spin-offs from this basic research that can improve biostimulation and bioaugmentation remediation efforts at contaminated DOE sites have included; (1) new bacterial tracking tools for viable bacteria; (2) an integrated protocol which combines subsurface characterization, laboratory-scale experimentation, and scale-up techniques to accurately predict field-scale bacterial transport; and (3) innovative and inexpensive field equipment and methods that can be employed to enhance Fe(III) reduction and microbial transport and to target microbial deposition under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions

  1. Anaerobic transformation of DDT related to iron(III) reduction and microbial community structure in paddy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Manjia; Cao, Fang; Li, Fangbai; Liu, Chengshuai; Tong, Hui; Wu, Weijian; Hu, Min

    2013-03-06

    We studied the mechanisms of microbial transformation in functional bacteria on 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) in two different field soils, Haiyan (HY) and Chenghai (CH). The results showed that microbial activities had a steady dechlorination effect on DDT and its metabolites (DDx). Adding lactate or glucose as carbon sources increased the amount of Desulfuromonas, Sedimentibacter, and Clostridium bacteria, which led to an increase in adsorbed Fe(II) and resulted in increased DDT transformation rates. The electron shuttle of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic disodium salt resulted in an increase in the negative potential of soil by mediating the electron transfer from the bacteria to the DDT. Moreover, the DDT-degrading bacteria in the CH soil were more abundant than those in the HY soil, which led to higher DDT transformation rates in the CH soil. The most stable compound of DDx was 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chloro-phenyl)ethane, which also was the major dechlorination metabolite of DDT, and 1-chloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl)ethane and 4,4'-dichlorobenzo-phenone were found to be the terminal metabolites in the anaerobic soils.

  2. Selenite reduction by anaerobic microbial aggregates: Microbial community structure, and proteins associated to the produced selenium spheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela eGonzalez-Gil

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Certain types of anaerobic granular sludge, which consists of microbial aggregates, can reduce selenium oxyanions. To envisage strategies for removing those oxyanions from wastewater and recovering the produced elemental selenium (Se0, insights into the microbial community structure and synthesis of Se0 within these microbial aggregates are required. High-throughput sequencing showed that Veillonellaceae (c.a. 20 % and Pseudomonadaceae (c.a.10 % were the most abundant microbial phylotypes in selenite reducing microbial aggregates. The majority of the Pseudomonadaceae sequences were affiliated to the genus Pseudomonas. A distinct outer layer (~200 m of selenium deposits indicated that bioreduction occurred in the outer zone of the microbial aggregates. In that outer layer, SEM analysis showed abundant intracellular and extracellular Se0 (nano spheres, with some cells having high numbers of intracellular Se0 spheres. Electron tomography showed that microbial cells can harbor a single large intracellular sphere that stretches the cell body. The Se0 spheres produced by the microorganisms were capped with organic material. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis of extracted Se0 spheres, combined with a mathematical approach to analyzing XPS spectra from biological origin, indicated that proteins and lipids were components of the capping material associated to the Se0 spheres. The most abundant proteins associated to the spheres were identified by proteomic analysis. Most of the proteins or peptide sequences capping the Se0 spheres were identified as periplasmic outer membrane porins and as the cytoplasmic elongation factor Tu protein, suggesting an intracellular formation of the Se0 spheres. In view of these and previous findings, a schematic model for the synthesis of Se0 spheres by the microorganisms inhabiting the granular sludge is proposed.

  3. Selenite Reduction by Anaerobic Microbial Aggregates: Microbial Community Structure, and Proteins Associated to the Produced Selenium Spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela

    2016-04-26

    Certain types of anaerobic granular sludge, which consists of microbial aggregates, can reduce selenium oxyanions. To envisage strategies for removing those oxyanions from wastewater and recovering the produced elemental selenium (Se0), insights into the microbial community structure and synthesis of Se0 within these microbial aggregates are required. High-throughput sequencing showed that Veillonellaceae (c.a. 20%) and Pseudomonadaceae (c.a.10%) were the most abundant microbial phylotypes in selenite reducing microbial aggregates. The majority of the Pseudomonadaceae sequences were affiliated to the genus Pseudomonas. A distinct outer layer (∼200 μm) of selenium deposits indicated that bioreduction occurred in the outer zone of the microbial aggregates. In that outer layer, SEM analysis showed abundant intracellular and extracellular Se0 (nano)spheres, with some cells having high numbers of intracellular Se0 spheres. Electron tomography showed that microbial cells can harbor a single large intracellular sphere that stretches the cell body. The Se0 spheres produced by the microorganisms were capped with organic material. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of extracted Se0 spheres, combined with a mathematical approach to analyzing XPS spectra from biological origin, indicated that proteins and lipids were components of the capping material associated to the Se0 spheres. The most abundant proteins associated to the spheres were identified by proteomic analysis. Most of the proteins or peptide sequences capping the Se0 spheres were identified as periplasmic outer membrane porins and as the cytoplasmic elongation factor Tu protein, suggesting an intracellular formation of the Se0 spheres. In view of these and previous findings, a schematic model for the synthesis of Se0 spheres by the microorganisms inhabiting the granular sludge is proposed.

  4. Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide to formate with Fe-C electrodes in anaerobic sludge digestion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zisheng; Zhang, Yaobin; Li, Yang; Zhao, Huimin; Quan, Xie

    2016-12-01

    Electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to useful chemicals is an attractive strategy to cut its emission in atmosphere. However, high overpotential and energy consumption required in the electrochemical reduction are the major barriers of this process. In this study, a new CO 2 reduction technique for production of formic acid was proposed from waste activated sludge digestion in a microbial electrosynthesis system (MES) with iron plate and carbon pillar as the electrodes. Compared with other reactors, methane production of the Fe-C MES reactor was slightly lower and CO 2 was undetectable. Instead, considerable formate (672.3 mg/L) and H 2 (45.8 mL) were produced in this Fe-C MES reactor, but not found in the other reactors. It should be ascribed to the reduction of CO 2 and H + at cathode. The reduction of H + resulted in a weak alkaline pH (9.3), which made the methanogenesis slightly lower in Fe-C MES. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Activated sludge mass reduction and biodegradability of the endogenous residues by digestion under different aerobic to anaerobic conditions: Comparison and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, C G; Fall, C; Olguín, M T

    2016-03-01

    This study was performed to identify suitable conditions for the in-situ reduction of excess sludge production by intercalated digesters in recycle-activated sludge (RAS) flow. The objective was to compare and model biological sludge mass reduction and the biodegradation of endogenous residues (XP) by digestion under hypoxic, aerobic, anaerobic, and five intermittent-aeration conditions. A mathematical model based on the heterotrophic endogenous decay constant (bH) and including the biodegradation of XP was used to fit the long-term data from the digesters to identify and estimate the parameters. Both the bH constant (0.02-0.05 d(-1)) and the endogenous residue biodegradation constant (bP, 0.001-0.004 d(-1)) were determined across the different mediums. The digesters with intermittent aeration cycles of 12 h-12 h and 5 min-3 h (ON/OFF) were the fastest, compared to the aerobic reactor. The study provides a basis for rating RAS-digester volumes to avoid the accumulation of XP in aeration tanks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhanced high-solids anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by the addition of scrap iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaobin; Feng, Yinghong; Yu, Qilin; Xu, Zibin; Quan, Xie

    2014-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge usually requires pretreatment procedure to improve the bioavailability of sludge, which involves considerable energy and high expenditures. This study proposes a cost-effective method for enhanced anaerobic digestion of sludge without a pretreatment by directly adding iron into the digester. The results showed that addition of Fe(0) powder could enhance 14.46% methane yield, and Fe scrap (clean scrap) could further enhance methane yield (improving rate 21.28%) because the scrap has better mass transfer efficiency with sludge and liquid than Fe(0) powder. The scrap of Fe with rust (rusty scrap) could induce microbial Fe(III) reduction, which resulted in achieving the highest methane yield (improving rate 29.51%), and the reduction rate of volatile suspended solids (VSS) was also highest (48.27%) among Fe powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap. PCR-DGGE proved that the addition of rusty scrap could enhance diversity of acetobacteria and enrich iron-reducing bacteria to enhance degradation of complex substrates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reduction of the hydraulic retention time at constant high organic loading rate to reach the microbial limits of anaerobic digestion in various reactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziganshin, Ayrat M; Schmidt, Thomas; Lv, Zuopeng; Liebetrau, Jan; Richnow, Hans Hermann; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2016-10-01

    The effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) reduction at constant high organic loading rate on the activity of hydrogen-producing bacteria and methanogens were investigated in reactors digesting thin stillage. Stable isotope fingerprinting was additionally applied to assess methanogenic pathways. Based on hydA gene transcripts, Clostridiales was the most active hydrogen-producing order in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), fixed-bed reactor (FBR) and anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), but shorter HRT stimulated the activity of Spirochaetales. Further decreasing HRT diminished Spirochaetales activity in systems with biomass retention. Based on mcrA gene transcripts, Methanoculleus and Methanosarcina were the predominantly active in CSTR and ASBR, whereas Methanosaeta and Methanospirillum activity was more significant in stably performing FBR. Isotope values indicated the predominance of aceticlastic pathway in FBR. Interestingly, an increased activity of Methanosaeta was observed during shortening HRT in CSTR and ASBR despite high organic acids concentrations, what was supported by stable isotope data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biogenic Hydrogen Conversion of De-Oiled Jatropha Waste via Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Reactor Operation: Process Performance, Microbial Insights, and CO2 Reduction Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishnan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the semicontinuous, direct (anaerobic sequencing batch reactor operation hydrogen fermentation of de-oiled jatropha waste (DJW. The effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT was studied and results show that the stable and peak hydrogen production rate of 1.48 L/L*d and hydrogen yield of 8.7 mL H2/g volatile solid added were attained when the reactor was operated at HRT 2 days (d with a DJW concentration of 200 g/L, temperature 55°C, and pH 6.5. Reduced HRT enhanced the production performance until 1.75 d. Further reduction has lowered the process efficiency in terms of biogas production and hydrogen gas content. The effluent from hydrogen fermentor was utilized for methane fermentation in batch reactors using pig slurry and cow dung as seed sources. The results revealed that pig slurry was a feasible seed source for methane generation. Peak methane production rate of 0.43 L CH4/L*d and methane yield of 20.5 mL CH4/g COD were observed at substrate concentration of 10 g COD/L, temperature 30°C, and pH 7.0. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that combination of celluloytic and fermentative bacteria were present in the hydrogen producing ASBR.

  9. Effects of graphene oxide on the performance, microbial community dynamics and antibiotic resistance genes reduction during anaerobic digestion of swine manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junya; Wang, Ziyue; Wang, Yawei; Zhong, Hui; Sui, Qianwen; Zhang, Changping; Wei, Yuansong

    2017-12-01

    The role of graphene oxide (GO) on anaerobic digestion (AD) of swine manure concerning the performance, microbial community and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) reduction was investigated. Results showed that methane production was reduced by 13.1%, 10.6%, 2.7% and 17.1% at GO concentration of 5mg/L, 50mg/L, 100mg/L and 500mg/L, respectively, but propionate degradation was enhanced along with GO addition. Both bacterial and archaeal community changed little after GO addition. AD could well reduce ARGs abundance, but it was deteriorated at the GO concentration of 50mg/L and 100mg/L and enhanced at 500mg/L, while no obvious changes at 5mg/L. Network and SEM analysis indicated that changes of each ARG was closely associated with variation of microbial community composition, environmental variables contributed most to the dynamics of ARGs indirectly, GO influenced the ARGs dynamics negatively and (heavy metal resistance genes (MRGs)) influenced the most directly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Protection of Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria from UV Radiation by Biogenic Fe(III) Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Tina; Konhauser, Kurt; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Due to the lack of an ozone layer in the Archean, ultraviolet radiation (UVR) reached early Earth's surface almost unattenuated; as a consequence, a terrestrial biosphere in the form of biological soil crusts would have been highly susceptible to lethal doses of irradiation. However, a self-produced external screen in the form of nanoparticular Fe(III) minerals could have effectively protected those early microorganisms. In this study, we use viability studies by quantifying colony-forming units (CFUs), as well as Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction rates, to show that encrustation in biogenic and abiogenic Fe(III) minerals can protect a common soil bacteria such as the nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 and strain 2AN from harmful UVC radiation. Analysis of DNA damage by quantifying cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) confirmed the protecting effect by Fe(III) minerals. This study suggests that Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, as would have grown in association with mafic and ultramafic soils/outcrops, would have been able to produce their own UV screen, enabling them to live in terrestrial habitats on early Earth.

  11. Nitrate reduction, nitrous oxide formation, and anaerobic ammonia oxidation to nitrite in the gut of soil-feeding termites (Cubitermes and Ophiotermes spp.)

    KAUST Repository

    Ngugi, David

    2011-11-28

    Soil-feeding termites play important roles in the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen in tropical soils. Through the mineralization of nitrogenous humus components, their intestinal tracts accumulate enormous amounts of ammonia, and nitrate and nitrite concentrations are several orders of magnitude above those in the ingested soil. Here, we studied the metabolism of nitrate in the different gut compartments of two Cubitermes and one Ophiotermes species using 15N isotope tracer analysis. Living termites emitted N 2 at rates ranging from 3.8 to 6.8nmolh -1 (g fresh wt.) -1. However, in homogenates of individual gut sections, denitrification was restricted to the posterior hindgut, whereas nitrate ammonification occurred in all gut compartments and was the prevailing process in the anterior gut. Potential rates of nitrate ammonification for the entire intestinal tract were tenfold higher than those of denitrification, implying that ammonification is the major sink for ingested nitrate in the intestinal tract of soil-feeding termites. Because nitrate is efficiently reduced already in the anterior gut, reductive processes in the posterior gut compartments must be fuelled by an endogenous source of oxidized nitrogen species. Quite unexpectedly, we observed an anaerobic oxidation of 15N-labelled ammonia to nitrite, especially in the P4 section, which is presumably driven by ferric iron; nitrification and anammox activities were not detected. Two of the termite species also emitted substantial amounts of N 2O, ranging from 0.4 to 3.9nmolh -1 (g fresh wt.) -1, providing direct evidence that soil-feeding termites are a hitherto unrecognized source of this greenhouse gas in tropical soils. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Biological activity of Fe(III) aquo-complexes towards ferric chelate reductase (FCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Rosa; Gómez-Gallego, Mar; Romano, Santiago; Fernández, Israel; Gutiérrez-Alonso, Ángel; Sierra, Miguel A; López-Rayo, Sandra; Nadal, Paloma; Lucena, Juan J

    2012-03-21

    In this study we have obtained experimental evidence that confirms the high activity of aquo complexes III and IV towards the enzyme FCR, responsible for the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) in the process of iron acquisition by plants. The in vivo FCR assays in roots of stressed cucumber plants have shown a higher efficiency of the family of complexes III and a striking structure-activity relationship with the nature of the substituent placed in a phenyl group far away from the metal center. The results obtained in this work demonstrate that all the aquo compounds tested interact efficiently with the enzyme FCR and hence constitute a new concept of iron chelates that could be of great use in agronomy.

  13. Characterization and Optimization of Dual Anaerobic/Aerobic Biofilm Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Togna, A

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this Phase I STTR effort was to develop and characterize a dual anaerobic/aerobic biofilm process that promotes anaerobic reductive dehalogenation and aerobic cometabolic biodegradation...

  14. Reductive dehalogenation by anaerobic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Holliger, H.C.

    1992-01-01

    The understanding of the fate of synthetic halogenated hydrocarbons became a matter of major interest over the last two decades. Halogenated compounds may threaten ecosystems due to their biocide properties. The degradability of halocompounds determines whether they will accumulate in a certain environment or whether they will be transformed to harmless products. A whole range of anthropogenic organohalogen compounds was detected in soils, sediments, surface and subsurface waters, an...

  15. Reductive dehalogenation by anaerobic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holliger, H.C.

    1992-01-01

    The understanding of the fate of synthetic halogenated hydrocarbons became a matter of major interest over the last two decades. Halogenated compounds may threaten ecosystems due to their biocide properties. The degradability of halocompounds determines whether they will accumulate in a

  16. Anaerobic biological treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speece, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Enso-Fenox process has been very successfully used to remove chlorinated phenolic compounds from pulp bleaching effluents. It is a two-stage anaerobic/aerobic process consisting of a nonmethanogenic anaerobic fluidized bed followed by a trickling filter. Studies have been conducted on reductive dechlorination of chlorinated aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions with chlorinated phenols as the sole carbon and energy source. Approximately 40% of the added chlorophenols was converted to CH 4 and CO 2 . Substrate loading rates were 20 mg/L/d at hydraulic detention times of 2-4 days with 90% substrate conversion efficiency. Reductive dechlorination of mono, di-, tri-, and pentachlorophenols has been demonstrated in anaerobic sewage sludge. The following constituents were tested in the laboratory at their approximate concentrations in coal conversion wastewater (CCWW) and were anaerobically degraded in serum bottles: 1,000 mg/L phenol; 500 mg/L resorcinol; 1,000 mg/L benzoic acid; 500 mg/L p-cresol; 200 mg/L pyridine; 2,000 mg/L benzoic acid; 250 mg/L 40 methylcatechol; 500 mg/L 4-ethylpyridine; and 2,000 mg/L hexanoic acid. A petrochemical may initially exhibit toxicity to an unacclimated population of methane-fermenting bacteria, but with acclimation the toxicity may be greatly reduced or disappear. In addition, the microorganisms may develop the capacity to actually degrade compounds which showed initial toxicity. Since biomass digestion requires a complete consortium of bacteria, it is relevant to study the effect of a given process as well as to individual steps within the process. A toxicant can inhibit the rate-limiting step and/or change the step that is rate-limiting. Both manifestations of toxicity can severely affect the overall process

  17. Effect of contaminant concentration on in situ bacterial sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in phenol-contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, Kieran M.; Bottrell, Simon H.; Thornton, Steven F.; Peel, Kate E.; Spence, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The availability of dissolved O 2 can limit biodegradation of organic compounds in aquifers. Where O 2 is depleted, biodegradation proceeds via anaerobic processes, including NO 3 -, Mn(IV)-, Fe(III)- and SO 4 -reduction and fermentation/methanogenesis. The environmental controls on these anaerobic processes must be understood to support implementation of management strategies such as monitored natural attenuation (MNA). In this study stable isotope analysis is used to show that the relative significance of two key anaerobic biodegradation processes (bacterial SO 4 reduction (BSR) and methanogenesis) in a phenol-contaminated sandstone aquifer is sensitive to spatial and temporal changes in total dissolved phenols concentration (TPC) (= phenol + cresols + dimethylphenols) over a 5-a period. In general, 34 SO 4 -enrichment (characteristic of bacterial SO 4 reduction) is restricted spatially to locations where TPC −1 . In contrast, 13 C-depleted CH 4 and 13 C-enriched CO 2 isotope compositions (characteristic of methanogenesis) were measured at TPC up to 8000 mg L −1 . This is consistent with previous studies that demonstrate suppression of BSR at TPC of >500 mg L −1 , and suggests that methanogenic microorganisms may have a higher tolerance for TPC in this contaminant plume. It is concluded that isotopic enrichment trends can be used to identify conditions under which in situ biodegradation may be limited by the properties of the biodegradation substrate (in this case TPC). Such data may be used to deduce the performance of MNA for contaminated groundwater in similar settings.

  18. Introduction of a De Novo Bioremediation Ability, Aryl Reductive Dechlorination, into Anaerobic Granular Sludge by Inoculation of Sludge with Desulfomonile tiedjei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Christiansen, Nina; Mathrani, Indra Madan

    1992-01-01

    Methanogenic upflow anaerobic granular-sludge blanket (UASB) reactors treat wastewaters at a high rate while simultaneously producing a useful product, methane; however, recalcitrant environmental pollutants may not be degraded. To impart 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CB)-dechlorinating ability to UASB rea...

  19. Anaerobic biodegradability of macropollutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini

    2002-01-01

    A variety of test procedures for determination of anaerobic biodegradability has been reported. This paper reviews the methods developed for determination of anaerobic biodegradability of macro-pollutants. Anaerobic biodegradability of micro-pollutants is not included. Furthermore, factors...

  20. Use of Fe(III) oxalate for oxidativewastewater treatment; Einsatz von Fe(III)-Oxalat zur chemisch-oxidativen Abwasserbehandlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.M.; Vogelpohl, A. [Clausthal Univ., Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Thermische Verfahrenstechnik

    1998-08-01

    Iron(III)-oxalate was used as an iron catalyst for the Photo Fenton reaction. Iron(III) oxalations ([Fe(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}]{sup 3-}) are reduced to Fe(II) by irradiation using near UV-light ({lambda} = 300 - 400 nm) or visible light ({lambda} > 400 nm). At the same time, CO{sub 2}{sup -} or C{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup -}-radicals originate, which cause the secondary reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II). By means of the photolytically regenerated Fe(II) ions, hydroxyl radicals are increasingly formed, so that the degradation of organic substances is accelerated. The work aimed to assess the catalytic effect of Fe(III) oxalate for photochemical oxidation processes and to establish the parameters influencing further treatment of leachate from a municipal waste sanitary landfill by means of technical-scale experiments. (orig.) [Deutsch] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde Eisen(III)-Oxalat als Eisenkatalysator fuer die Photo-Fenton-Reaktion eingesetzt. Eisen(III)-Oxalationen ([Fe(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}]{sup 3-}) werden durch Strahlung mit nahem UV-Licht ({lambda}=300 bis 400 nm) oder mit sichtbarem Licht ({lambda}>400 nm) zu Fe(II) reduziert. Gleichzeitig entstehen CO{sub 2}{sup .-} oder C{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup .-}-Radikale, die eine sekundaere Reduktion von Fe(III) zu Fe(II) bewirken. Mit Hilfe der photolytiisch regenerierten Fe(II)-Ionen werden vermehrt Hydroxylradikale gebildet und damit die Abbaugeschwindigkeit der organischen Substanzen beschleunigt. Ziel der hier vorgestellten Arbeit war es, die katalytische Wirkung von Fe(III)-Oxalat fuer photochemische Oxidationsverfahren abzuschaetzen und die Einflussparameter zur weitergehenden Behandlung eines Deponiesickerwassers aus Hausmuelldeponie anhand von Technikumsversuchen zu ermitteln. (orig.)

  1. Mineral transformations associated with goethite reduction by Methanosarcina barkeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Wang, Hongfang; Dong, H.; Qiu, X.; Dong, X.; Cravotta, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the interaction between methanogens and iron-containing minerals in anoxic environments, we conducted batch culture experiments with Methanosarcina barkeri in a phosphate-buffered basal medium (PBBM) to bioreduce structural Fe(III) in goethite with hydrogen as the sole substrate. Fe(II) and methane concentrations were monitored over the course of the bioreduction experiments with wet chemistry and gas chromatography, respectively. Subsequent mineralogical changes were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the presence of an electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), 30% Fe(III) in goethite (weight basis) was reduced to Fe(II). In contrast, only 2% Fe(III) (weight basis) was bioreduced in the absence of AQDS. Most of the bioproduced Fe(II) was incorporated into secondary minerals including dufr??nite and vivianite. Our data implied a dufr??nite-vivianite transformation mechanism where a metastable dufr??nite transformed to a more stable vivianite over extended time in anaerobic conditions. Methanogenesis was greatly inhibited by bioreduction of goethite Fe(III). These results have important implications for the methane flux associated with Fe(III) bioreduction and ferrous iron mineral precipitation in anaerobic soils and sediments. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Accelerated anaerobic dechlorination of DDT in slurry with Hydragric Acrisols using citric acid and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cuiying; Xu, Xianghua; Fan, Jianling

    2015-12-01

    The application of electron donor and electron shuttle substances has a vital influence on electron transfer, thus may affect the reductive dechlorination of 1,1,1-trichoro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) in anaerobic reaction systems. To evaluate the roles of citric acid and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) in accelerating the reductive dechlorination of DDT in Hydragric Acrisols that contain abundant iron oxide, a batch anaerobic incubation experiment was conducted in a slurry system with four treatments of (1) control, (2) citric acid, (3) AQDS, and (4) citric acid+AQDS. Results showed that DDT residues decreased by 78.93%-92.11% of the initial quantities after 20days of incubation, and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-ethane (DDD) was the dominant metabolite. The application of citric acid accelerated DDT dechlorination slightly in the first 8days, while the methanogenesis rate increased quickly, and then the acceleration effect improved after the 8th day while the methanogenesis rate decreased. The amendment by AQDS decreased the Eh value of the reaction system and accelerated microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides to generate Fe(II), which was an efficient electron donor, thus enhancing the reductive dechlorination rate of DDT. The addition of citric acid+AQDS was most efficient in stimulating DDT dechlorination, but no significant interaction between citric acid and AQDS on DDT dechlorination was observed. The results will be of great significance for developing an efficient in situ remediation strategy for DDT-contaminated sites. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Anaerobic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finneran, K T; Lovley, D R

    2001-05-01

    The potential for anaerobic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) was investigated in laboratory incubations of sediments from a petroleum-contaminated aquifer and in aquatic sediments. The addition of humic substances (HS) stimulated the anaerobic degradation of MTBE in aquifer sediments in which Fe(III) was available as an electron acceptor. This is attributed to the fact that HS and other extracellular quinones can stimulate the activity of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms by acting as an electron shuttle between Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms and insoluble Fe(III) oxides. MTBE was not degraded in aquifer sediments without Fe(III) and HS. [14C]-MTBE added to aquatic sediments adapted for anaerobic MTBE degradation was converted to 14CO2 in the presence or absence of HS or the HS analog, anthraquione-2,6-disulfonate. Unamended aquatic sediments produced 14CH4 as well as 14CO2 from [14C]-MTBE. The aquatic sediments also rapidly consumed TBA under anaerobic conditions and converted [14C]-TBA to 14CH4 and 14CO2. An adaptation period of ca. 250-300 days was required prior to the most rapid anaerobic MTBE degradation in both sediment types, whereas TBA was metabolized in the aquatic sediments without a lag. These results demonstrate that, under the appropriate conditions, MTBE and TBA can be degraded in the absence of oxygen. This suggests that it may be possible to design strategies for the anaerobic remediation of MTBE in petroleum-contaminated subsurface environments.

  4. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Canganella

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong

  5. Prospects of Anaerobic Digestion Technology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As the world's largest developing country, China must face the problem of managing municipal solid waste, and the challenge of organic waste disposal is even more serious. Considering the characteristics of traditional waste disposal technologies and the subsequent secondary pollution, anaerobic digestion has various advantages such as reduction in the land needed for disposal and preservation of environmental quality. In light of the energy crisis, this paper focuses on the potential production of biogas from biowaste through anaerobic digestion processes, the problems incurred by the waste collection system, and the efficiency of the anaerobic digestion process. Use of biogas in a combined heat and power cogeneration system is also discussed. Finally, the advantages of anaerobic digestion technology for the Chinese market are summarized. The anaerobic digestion is suggested to be a promising treating technology for the organic wastes in China.

  6. Combination of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) for berberine reduction from wastewater and the effects of berberine on bacterial community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Guanglei; Song, Yonghui; Zeng, Ping; Duan, Liang; Xiao, Shuhu

    2013-02-15

    Berberine is a broad-spectrum antibiotic extensively used in personal medication. The production of berberine results in the generation of wastewater containing concentrated residual berberine. However, few related studies up to date focus on berberine removal from wastewaters. In this study, a lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB)-membrane bioreactor (MBR) process was developed for berberine removal from synthetic wastewater. The performance of the UASB-MBR system on berberine, COD and NH(4)(+)--N removal was investigated at different berberine loadings. And the effects of berberine on bacterial communities were evaluated using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Results showed that, as the increase of berberine loadings, UASB performance was affected remarkably, whereas, efficient and stable performance of MBR ensured the overall removal rates of berberine, COD and NH(4)(+)--N consistently reached up to 99%, 98% and 98%, respectively. Significant shifts of bacterial community structures were detected in both UASB and MBR, especially in the initial operations. Along with the increase of berberine loadings, high antibiotic resisting species and some functional species, i.e. Acinetobacter sp., Clostridium sp., Propionibacterium sp., and Sphingomonas sp. in UASB, as well as Sphingomonas sp., Methylocystis sp., Hydrogenophaga sp. and Flavobacterium sp. in MBR were enriched in succession. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimized coupling of a submerged membrane electro-bioreactor with pre-anaerobic reactors containing anode electrodes for wastewater treatment and fouling reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Taghipour

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the performance of a submerged membrane electro-bioreactor with pre-anaerobic reactors containing anode electrodes (SMEBR+ was compared with that of a membrane bioreactor (MBR in municipal wastewater treatment. The new design idea of the SMEBR+ was based on applications of direct current (DC on the anode and cathode electrodes. The pilot study was divided into 2 stages and operated for 48 days. In Stage I, the MBR was continuously operated for 24 days without the application of electrodes. In Stage II, the SMEBR+ was continuously operated for 24 days, while aluminum electrodes and an intermittent DC were working with an operational mode of 2 min ON/4 min OFF at a constant voltage of 1.4 V. The results indicated that membrane fouling was reduced by nearly 22.02% in the SMEBR+ compared to the MBR. The results also showed that the SMEBR+ increased the quality of effluent to the extent that high removals of NH3+-N, PO43−-P, and chemical oxygen demand (COD were 98%, 76%, and 90%, respectively. This system, in comparison with those proposed in other studies, showed a suitable improvement in biological treatments, considering the high removal of NH3+-N. Therefore, SMEBR+ can be considered as a promising treatment alternative to the conventional MBR.

  8. Selective transport of Fe(III) using ionic imprinted polymer (IIP) membrane particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djunaidi, Muhammad Cholid; Jumina, Siswanta, Dwi; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2015-12-01

    The membrane particles was prepared from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polymer IIP with weight ratios of 1: 2 and 1: 1 using different adsorbent templates and casting thickness. The permeability of membrane towards Fe(III) and also mecanism of transport were studied. The selectivity of the membrane for Fe(III) was studied by performing adsorption experiments also with Cr(III) separately. In this study, the preparation of Ionic Imprinted Polymer (IIP) membrane particles for selective transport of Fe (III) had been done using polyeugenol as functional polymer. Polyeugenol was then imprinted with Fe (III) and then crosslinked with PEGDE under alkaline condition to produce polyeugenol-Fe-PEGDE polymer aggregates. The agrregates was then crushed and sieved using mesh size of 80 and the powder was then used to prepare the membrane particles by mixing it with PVA (Mr 125,000) solution in 1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solvent. The membrane was obtained after casting at a speed of 25 m/s and soaking in NaOH solution overnight. The membrane sheet was then cut and Fe(III) was removed by acid to produce IIP membrane particles. Analysis of the membrane and its constituent was done by XRD, SEM and size selectivity test. Experimental results showed the transport of Fe(III) was faster with the decrease of membrane thickness, while the higher concentration of template ion correlates with higher Fe(III) being transported. However, the transport of Fe(III) was slower for higher concentration of PVA in the membrane. IImparticles works through retarded permeation mechanism, where Fe(III) was bind to the active side of IIP. The active side of IIP membrane was dominated by the -OH groups. The selectivity of all IIP membranes was confirmed as they were all unable to transport Cr (III), while NIP (Non-imprinted Polymer) membrane was able transport Cr (III).

  9. Reductive reactivity of iron(III) oxides in the east china sea sediments: characterization by selective extraction and kinetic dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-Jin; Zhu, Mao-Xu; Yang, Gui-Peng; Huang, Xiang-Li

    2013-01-01

    Reactive Fe(III) oxides in gravity-core sediments collected from the East China Sea inner shelf were quantified by using three selective extractions (acidic hydroxylamine, acidic oxalate, bicarbonate-citrate buffered sodium dithionite). Also the reactivity of Fe(III) oxides in the sediments was characterized by kinetic dissolution using ascorbic acid as reductant at pH 3.0 and 7.5 in combination with the reactive continuum model. Three parameters derived from the kinetic method: m 0 (theoretical initial amount of ascorbate-reducible Fe(III) oxides), k' (rate constant) and γ (heterogeneity of reactivity), enable a quantitative characterization of Fe(III) oxide reactivity in a standardized way. Amorphous Fe(III) oxides quantified by acidic hydroxylamine extraction were quickly consumed in the uppermost layer during early diagenesis but were not depleted over the upper 100 cm depth. The total amounts of amorphous and poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxides are highly available for efficient buffering of dissolved sulfide. As indicated by the m 0, k' and γ, the surface sediments always have the maximum content, reactivity and heterogeneity of reactive Fe(III) oxides, while the three parameters simultaneously downcore decrease, much more quickly in the upper layer than at depth. Albeit being within a small range (within one order of magnitude) of the initial rates among sediments at different depths, incongruent dissolution could result in huge discrepancies of the later dissolution rates due to differentiating heterogeneity, which cannot be revealed by selective extraction. A strong linear correlation of the m 0 at pH 3.0 with the dithionite-extractable Fe(III) suggests that the m 0 may represent Fe(III) oxide assemblages spanning amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Maximum microbially available Fe(III) predicted by the m 0 at pH 7.5 may include both amorphous and a fraction of other less reactive Fe(III) phases.

  10. Livestock Anaerobic Digester Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Anaerobic Digester Database provides basic information about anaerobic digesters on livestock farms in the United States, organized in Excel spreadsheets. It includes projects that are under construction, operating, or shut down.

  11. Anaerobes in pleuropulmonary infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De A

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 76 anaerobes and 122 aerobes were isolated from 100 patients with pleuropulmonary infections, e.g. empyema (64, pleural effusion (19 and lung abscess (13. In 14% of the patients, only anaerobes were recovered, while a mixture of aerobes and anaerobes was encountered in 58%. From all cases of lung abscess, anaerobic bacteria were isolated, alone (04 or along with aerobic bacteria (13. From empyema and pleural effusion cases, 65.6% and 68.4% anaerobes were recovered respectively. Amongst anaerobes, gram negative anaerobic bacilli predominated (Prevotella melaninogenicus 16, Fusobacterium spp. 10, Bacteroides spp. 9, followed by gram positive anaerobic cocci (Peptostreptococcus spp. 31. Coliform bacteria (45 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (42 were the predominant aerobic isolates.

  12. Oxygen Effects in Anaerobic Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshai Botheju

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of free oxygen in bio-gasification is a sparsely studied area, apart from the common argument of oxygen being toxic and inhibitory for anaerobic micro-cultures. Some studies have, however, revealed increased solubilisation of organic matter in the presence of some free oxygen in anaerobic digestion. This article analyses these counterbalancing phenomena with a mathematical modelling approach using the widely accepted biochemical model ADM 1. Aerobic oxidation of soluble carbon and inhibition of obligatory anaerobic organisms are modelled using standard saturation type kinetics. Biomass dependent first order hydrolysis kinetics is used to relate the increased hydrolysis rate with oxygen induced increase in biomass growth. The amended model, ADM 1-Ox (oxygen, has 25 state variables and 22 biochemical processes, presented in matrix form. The computer aided simulation tool AQUASIM 2.1 is used to simulate the developed model. Simulation predictions are evaluated against experimental data obtained using a laboratory batch test array comprising miniature anaerobic bio-reactors of 100 ml total volume each, operated under different initial air headspaces giving rise to the different oxygen loading conditions. The reactors were initially fed with a glucose solution and incubated at 35 Celsius, for 563 hours. Under the oxygen load conditions of 22, 44 and 88 mg/L, the ADM1-Ox model simulations predicted the experimental methane potentials quite adequately. Both the experimental data and the simulations suggest a linear reduction of methane potential with respect to the increase in oxygen load within this range.

  13. Microbial community composition during anaerobic mineralization of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) in fuel-contaminated aquifer material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Na; Finneran, Kevin T

    2011-04-01

    Anaerobic mineralization of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) were studied in sediment incubations prepared with fuel-contaminated aquifer material. Microbial community compositions in all incubations were characterized by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). The aquifer material mineralized 42.3±9.9% of [U-(14)C]-TBA to 14CO2 without electron acceptor amendment. Fe(III), sulfate, and Fe(III) plus anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate addition also promoted U-[14C]-TBA mineralization at levels similar to those of the unamended controls. Nitrate actually inhibited TBA mineralization relative to unamended controls. In contrast to TBA, [U-(14)C]-MTBE was not significantly mineralized in 400 days regardless of electron acceptor amendment. Microbial community analysis indicated that the abundance of one dominant clone group correlated closely with anaerobic TBA mineralization. The clone was phylogenetically distinct from known aerobic TBA-degrading microorganisms, Fe(III)- or sulfate-reducing bacteria. It was most closely associated with organisms belonging to the alphaproteobacteria. Microbial communities were different in MTBE and TBA amended incubations. Shannon indices and Simpson indices (statistical community comparison tools) both demonstrated that microbial community diversity decreased in incubations actively mineralizing TBA, with distinct "dominant" clones developing. These data contribute to our understanding of anaerobic microbial transformation of fuel oxygenates in contaminated aquifer material and the organisms that may catalyze the reactions.

  14. Electrochemistry of carbonaceous materials; 1. Oxidation of Sardinian coal by Fe(III) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomat, R.; Salmaso, R.; Zecchin, S. (CNR-Instituto di Polarografia ed Elettrochimica Preparativa, Padova (Italy))

    1992-04-01

    Oxidation of subbitiminous coal (Sulcis basin, Sardinia, Italy) by Fe(III) ions in aqueous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution was investigated over a wide temperature range (20-80{degree}C). Experimental results are in accord with a reaction scheme involving a reversible complex between coal particles and Fe(III) ions as a first step in the oxidation process. At low coal concentration, the reaction rate follows first-order kinetics in both coal and ferric ions (overall second order), while at sufficiently high coal concentration, the reaction rate is consistent with first-order kinetics in Fe(III) concentration, appearing to be independent of coal concentration. The kinetic results obtained give preliminary information on the advantageous use of the Fe(III)/slurried coal reaction system to depolarize the anodic compartment of an electrolysis cell, for the production of H{sub 2}. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Anaerobic Digestion: Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Batstone, Damien J.

    2011-01-01

    Organic waste may degrade anaerobically in nature as well as in engineered systems. The latter is called anaerobic digestion or biogasification. Anaerobic digestion produces two main outputs: An energy-rich gas called biogas and an effluent. The effluent, which may be a solid as well as liquid...... with very little dry matter may also be called a digest. The digest should not be termed compost unless it specifically has been composted in an aerated step. This chapter describes the basic processes of anaerobic digestion. Chapter 9.5 describes the anaerobic treatment technologies, and Chapter 9...

  16. Influence of riboflavin on the reduction of radionuclides by Shewanella oneidenis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkouk, Andrea; Law, Gareth T W; Rizoulis, Athanasios; Law, Katie; Renshaw, Joanna C; Morris, Katherine; Livens, Francis R; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2016-03-28

    Uranium (as UO2(2+)), technetium (as TcO4(-)) and neptunium (as NpO2(+)) are highly mobile radionuclides that can be reduced enzymatically by a range of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms, including Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to poorly soluble species. The redox chemistry of Pu is more complicated, but the dominant oxidation state in most environments is highly insoluble Pu(IV), which can be reduced to Pu(III) which has a potentially increased solubility which could enhance migration of Pu in the environment. Recently it was shown that flavins (riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN)) secreted by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can act as electron shuttles, promoting anoxic growth coupled to the accelerated reduction of poorly-crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Here, we studied the role of riboflavin in mediating the reduction of radionuclides in cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Our results demonstrate that the addition of 10 μM riboflavin enhances the reduction rate of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), Pu(IV) to Pu(III) and to a lesser extent, Np(V) to Np(IV), but has no significant influence on the reduction rate of U(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Thus riboflavin can act as an extracellular electron shuttle to enhance rates of Tc(VII), Np(V) and Pu(IV) reduction, and may therefore play a role in controlling the oxidation state of key redox active actinides and fission products in natural and engineered environments. These results also suggest that the addition of riboflavin could be used to accelerate the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated environments.

  17. Fe(III) mobilisation by carbonate in low temperature environments: Study of the solubility of ferrihydrite in carbonate media and the formation of Fe(III) carbonate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grivé, Mireia; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We have determined thermodynamic stabilities of Fe(III)-carbonate species. • We have determined the effect of those species on the solubility of ferrihydrite. • Results. • Highlight the importance of two Fe(III)-carbonate: FeOHCO 3 and Fe(CO 3 ) 3 3− . - Abstract: The linkage between the iron and the carbon cycles is of paramount importance to understand and quantify the effect of increased CO 2 concentrations in natural waters on the mobility of iron and associated trace elements. In this context, we have quantified the thermodynamic stability of mixed Fe(III) hydroxo-carbonate complexes and their effect on the solubility of Fe(III) oxihydroxides. We present the results of carefully performed solubility measurements of 2-line ferrihydrite in the slightly acidic to neutral–alkaline pH ranges (3.8–8.7) under constant pCO 2 varying between (0.982–98.154 kPa) at 25 °C. The outcome of the work indicates the predominance of two Fe(III) hydroxo carbonate complexes FeOHCO 3 and Fe(CO 3 ) 3 3− , with formation constants log * β° 1,1,1 = 10.76 ± 0.38 and log β° 1,0,3 = 24.24 ± 0.42, respectively. The solubility constant for the ferrihydrite used in this study was determined in acid conditions (pH: 1.8–3.2) in the absence of CO 2 and at T = (25 ± 1) °C, as log * K s,0 = 1.19 ± 0.41. The relative stability of the Fe(III)-carbonate complexes in alkaline pH conditions has implications for the solubility of Fe(III) in CO 2 -rich environments and the subsequent mobilisation of associated trace metals that will be explored in subsequent papers

  18. Identification of genes specifically required for the anaerobic metabolism of benzene in Geobacter metallireducens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Tian; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Although the biochemical pathways for the anaerobic degradation of many of the hydrocarbon constituents in petroleum reservoirs have been elucidated, the mechanisms for anaerobic activation of benzene, a very stable molecule, are not known. Previous studies have demonstrated that Geobacter...... metallireducens can anaerobically oxidize benzene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor and that phenol is an intermediate in benzene oxidation. In an attempt to identify enzymes that might be involved in the conversion of benzene to phenol, whole-genome gene transcript abundance...... was compared in cells metabolizing benzene and cells metabolizing phenol. Eleven genes had significantly higher transcript abundance in benzene-metabolizing cells. Five of these genes had annotations suggesting that they did not encode proteins that could be involved in benzene metabolism and were not further...

  19. Biogenic Fe(III) minerals lower the efficiency of iron-mineral based commercial filter systems for arsenic removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinert, Susanne; Muehe, Eva M.; Posth, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Millions of people worldwide are affected by As (arsenic) contaminated groundwater. Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides sorb As efficiently and are therefore used in water purification filters. Commercial filters containing abiogenic Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides (GEH) showed varying As removal, and it was unclear...

  20. Adaptation of the Biolog Phenotype MicroArrayTM Technology to Profile the Obligate Anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyner, Dominique; Fortney, Julian; Chakraborty, Romy; Hazen, Terry

    2010-05-17

    The Biolog OmniLog? Phenotype MicroArray (PM) plate technology was successfully adapted to generate a select phenotypic profile of the strict anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens (G.m.). The profile generated for G.m. provides insight into the chemical sensitivity of the organism as well as some of its metabolic capabilities when grown with a basal medium containing acetate and Fe(III). The PM technology was developed for aerobic organisms. The reduction of a tetrazolium dye by the test organism represents metabolic activity on the array which is detected and measured by the OmniLog(R) system. We have previously adapted the technology for the anaerobic sulfate reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris. In this work, we have taken the technology a step further by adapting it for the iron reducing obligate anaerobe Geobacter metallireducens. In an osmotic stress microarray it was determined that the organism has higher sensitivity to impermeable solutes 3-6percent KCl and 2-5percent NaNO3 that result in osmotic stress by osmosis to the cell than to permeable non-ionic solutes represented by 5-20percent ethylene glycol and 2-3percent urea. The osmotic stress microarray also includes an array of osmoprotectants and precursor molecules that were screened to identify substrates that would provide osmotic protection to NaCl stress. None of the substrates tested conferred resistance to elevated concentrations of salt. Verification studies in which G.m. was grown in defined medium amended with 100mM NaCl (MIC) and the common osmoprotectants betaine, glycine and proline supported the PM findings. Further verification was done by analysis of transcriptomic profiles of G.m. grown under 100mM NaCl stress that revealed up-regulation of genes related to degradation rather than accumulation of the above-mentioned osmoprotectants. The phenotypic profile, supported by additional analysis indicates that the accumulation of these osmoprotectants as a response to salt stress does not

  1. Farklı Hidrolik Bekletme Sürelerinin Anaerobik Perdeli Reaktörde Sülfat İndirgenmesi Üzerine Etkisi / Effect of Different Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT on Sulfate Reduction in Anaerobic Baffled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şebnem ÖZDEMİR

    2012-12-01

    üresinin 2 gün olduğu çalışma koşullarında çıkış suyundaki KOİ ve SO4-2 verimleri %84 ile %88 olarak gözlemlenirken bekleme süresinin 0,5 gün olduğu çalışma koşullarında ise bu değer %80 ve %75 olarak gözlemlenmiştir. Ayrıca bekleme süresinin 2 gün olduğu çalışma koşullarında son bölmedeki sülfür oluşum verimi % 75 iken, bekleme süresi 0,5 güne indirildiğinde aynı bölmedeki sülfür oluşum veriminin %96’a çıktığı gözlemlenmiştir. Çıkarımlar ve Özgün Değer: Yapılan bu çalışma ile yüksek sülfat konsantrasyona sahip atıksuların arıtımında anaerobik perdeli reaktörün iyi bir alternatif olabileceği kanıtlanmıştır. Ayrıca çıkış sülfat ve sülfür konsantrasyonlarının değişen HBS’den etkilenmediği gözlenmiştir. Effect of Different Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT on Sulfate Reduction in Anaerobic Baffled Reactor Design and Method: The anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR is a modification of up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB reactor. A laboratory scale ABR was inoculated with an effluent of a full scale anaerobic digester located in Kayseri Wastewater Treatment Plant, Turkey. Before inoculation, the sludge was sieved to remove coarse materials. The ABR was 20 cm wide, 80 cm long, 20 cm deep and constructed from glass, with a working volume of 19 L. Reactor was divided into four equal 4.75 L compartments by vertical baffles, each compartment having down-comer and riser regions created by further vertical baffle. The lower parts of down-comer baffles were angled at 450 in order to direct the flow evenly through the riser. Ethanol and sulfate are consumed as electron donor and electron acceptor, respectively. Sulfate, dissolved sulfide, pH, alkalinity and chemical oxygen demand (COD have measured three times a week. Aim: There are varying structures and concentrations of sulfate compounds in natural waters. In addition, the amount of sulfate is higher in some industrial wastewaters In addition, some

  2. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Autotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R. S.

    2008-12-01

    That microbes have resistance to the toxic arsenic oxyanions arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] has been recognized for some time. More recently it was shown that certain prokaryotes can demonstrate As- dependent growth by conserving the energy gained from the aerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), or from the reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anaerobic conditions. During the course of our field studies of two alkaline, hypersaline soda lakes (Mono Lake and Searles Lake, CA) we have discovered several new anaerobic chemo- and photo-autotrophic bacteria that can center their energy gain around the redox reactions between As(III) and As(V). Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii, isolated from the water column of Mono Lake is a nitrate-respiring, As(III)-oxidizing chemoautotroph of the gamma-proteobacteria that has a highly flexible metabolism. It can function either as a facultative anaerobe or as a chemo-autotroph, or as a heterotroph (Hoeft et al., 2007). In contrast, strain MLMS-1 of the delta-proteobacteria was also isolated from Mono Lake, but to date is the first example of an obligate As(V)-respirer that is also an obligate chemo-autotroph, gaining its energy via the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate (Hoeft et al., 2004). Strain SLAS-1, isolated from salt-saturated Searles Lake is a member of the Halananerobiales, and can either grow as a heterotroph (lactate e-donor) or chemo- autotroph (sulfide e-donor) while respiring As(V). The fact that it can achieve this feat at salt-saturation (~ 340 g/L) makes it a true extremophile (Oremland et. al., 2005). Finally, strain PHS-1 isolated from a hot spring on Paoha island in Mono Lake is the first example of a photosynthetic bacterium of the gamma- proteobacteria able to link its growth to As(III)-dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis (Kulp et al., 2008). These novel microbes give us new insights into the evolution of arsenic-based metabolism and their role in the biogeochemical cycling of this toxic element. Hoeft, S.E., et

  3. Microbial reductive dehalogenation.

    OpenAIRE

    Mohn, W W; Tiedje, J M

    1992-01-01

    A wide variety of compounds can be biodegraded via reductive removal of halogen substituents. This process can degrade toxic pollutants, some of which are not known to be biodegraded by any other means. Reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds has been found primarily in undefined, syntrophic anaerobic communities. We discuss ecological and physiological principles which appear to be important in these communities and evaluate how widely applicable these principles are. Anaerobic commun...

  4. Immobilization of radionuclides and heavy metals through anaerobic bio-oxidation of Fe(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lack, J.G.; Chaudhuri, S.K.; Kelly, S.D.; Kemner, K.M.; O'Connor, S.M.; Coates, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    Adsorption of heavy metals and radionuclides (HMR) onto iron and manganese oxides has long been recognized as an important reaction for the immobilization of these compounds. However, in environments containing elevated concentrations of these HMR the adsorptive capacity of the iron and manganese oxides may well be exceeded, and the HMR can migrate as soluble compounds in aqueous systems. Here we demonstrate the potential of a bioremediative strategy for HMR stabilization in reducing environments based on the recently described anaerobic nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation by Dechlorosoma species. Bio-oxidation of 10 mM Fe(II) and precipitation of Fe(III) oxides by these organisms resulted in rapid adsorption and removal of 55 μM uranium and 81 μM cobalt from solution. The adsorptive capacity of the biogenic Fe(III) oxides was lower than that of abiotically produced Fe(III) oxides (100 μM for both metals), which may have been a result of steric hindrance by the microbial cells on the iron oxide surfaces. The binding capacity of the biogenic oxides for different heavy metals was indirectly correlated to the atomic radius of the bound element. X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that the uranium was bound to the biogenically produced Fe(III) oxides as U(VI) and that the U(VI) formed bidentate and tridentate inner-sphere complexes with the Fe(III) oxide surfaces. Dechlorosoma suillum oxidation was specific for Fe(II), and the organism did not enzymatically oxidize U(IV) or Co(II). Small amounts (less than 2.5 μM) of Cr(III) were reoxidized by D. suillum; however, this appeared to be inversely dependent on the initial concentration of the Cr(III). The results of this study demonstrate the potential of this novel approach for stabilization and immobilization of HMR in the environment.

  5. Anaerobic digestion of solid material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavilin, V.A.; Lokshina, L.Y.; Flotats, X.

    2007-01-01

    A new multidimensional (3 and 2D) anaerobic digestion model for cylindrical reactor with non-uniform influent concentration distributions was developed to study the way in which mixing intensity affects the efficiency of continuous-flow anaerobic digestion. Batch experiments reported and simulated...... earlier by Vavilin and Angelidaki (2005) were used to modernize a kinetic scheme and to obtain the corresponding kinetic coefficients. In the new models, hydrolytic microorganisms were included using Contois kinetics for the hydrolysis/acidogenesis degradation of municipal solid waste (MSW). Monod...... kinetics was applied for description of methanogenesis. Both hydrolytic and methanogenic microorganisms were assumed to be inhibited by high volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentration. According to the new distributed models, the mixing level reduction expressed by increasing dimensionless Peclet number may...

  6. An anaerobic field injection experiment in a landfill leachate plume, Grindsted, Denmark: 2. Deduction of anaerobic (methanogenic, sulfate-, and Fe (III)-reducing) redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-JøRgen; Bjerg, Poul L.; Ludvigsen, Liselotte; Rügge, Kirsten; Christensen, Thomas H.

    1999-04-01

    Redox conditions may be environmental factors which affect the fate of the xenobiotic organic compounds. Therefore the redox conditions were characterized in an anaerobic, leachate-contaminated aquifer 15-60 m downgradient from the Grindsted Landfill, Denmark, where an field injection experiment was carried out. Furthermore, the stability of the redox conditions spatially and over time were investigated, and different approaches to deduce the redox conditions were evaluated. The redox conditions were evaluated in a set of 20 sediment and groundwater samples taken from locations adjacent to the sediment samples. Samples were investigated with respect to groundwater chemistry, including hydrogen and volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and sediment geochemistry, and bioassays were performed. The groundwater chemistry, including redox sensitive species for a large number of samples, varied over time during the experimental period of 924 days owing to variations in the leachate from the landfill. However, no indication of change in the redox environment resulting from the field injection experiment or natural variation was observed in the individual sampling points. The methane, Fe(II), hydrogen, and VFA groundwater chemistry parameters strongly indicated a Fe(III)-reducing environment. This was further supported by the bioassays, although methane production and sulfate-reduction were also observed in a few samples close to the landfill. On the basis of the calculated carbon conversion, Fe(III) was the dominant electron acceptor in the region of the aquifer, which was investigated. Because of the complexity of a landfill leachate plume, several redox processes may occur simultaneously, and an array of methods must be applied for redox characterization in such multicomponent systems.

  7. Reductive Dissolution of Goethite and Hematite by Reduced Flavins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Zhi; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-10-02

    The abiotic reductive dissolution of goethite and hematite by the reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) and riboflavin (RBFH2), electron transfer mediators (ETM) secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella, was investigated under stringent anaerobic conditions. In contrast to the rapid redox reaction rate observed for ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite (Shi et al., 2012), the reductive dissolution of crystalline goethite and hematite was slower, with the extent of reaction limited by the thermodynamic driving force at circumneutral pH. Both the initial reaction rate and reaction extent increased with decreasing pH. On a unit surface area basis, goethite was less reactive than hematite between pH 4.0 and 7.0. AH2DS, the reduced form of the well-studied synthetic ETM anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), yielded higher rates than FMNH2 under most reaction conditions, despite the fact that FMNH2 was a more effective reductant than AH2DS for ferryhydrite and lepidocrocite. Two additional model compounds, methyl viologen and benzyl viologen, were investigated under similar reaction conditions to explore the relationship between reaction rate and thermodynamic properties. Relevant kinetic data from the literature were also included in the analysis to span a broad range of half-cell potentials. Other conditions being equal, the surface area normalized initial reaction rate (ra) increased as the redox potential of the reductant became more negative. A non-linear, parabolic relationship was observed between log ra and the redox potential for eight reducants at pH 7.0, as predicted by Marcus theory for electron transfer. When pH and reductant concentration were fixed, log ra was positively correlated to the redox potential of four Fe(III) oxides over a wide pH range, following a non-linear parabolic relationship as well.

  8. Smectite alteration by anaerobic iron corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, D.; Kaufhold, S.; Hassel, A.W.; Dohrmann, R.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The interaction of smectites with corroding steel/iron represents a crucial topic in the estimation of the long term confinement properties of clay barriers for the encasement of steel/iron containers. Especially in case of engineered clay barriers a possible deterioration of favourable smectite properties as response to corrosion could reduce the barrier capacity. The extent of this reduction is unknown, yet. The essential properties of bentonite clays in this context are on the one hand the relatively high swelling pressure together with low hydraulic conductivity, which results from the well known expandability of smectite interlayers in aqueous environments. On the other hand smectites are cation exchangers being able to long term encase radioactive cations in a way that negative charges of silicate layers are compensated by easily exchangeable hydrated cations. Both properties are directly related to the crystal and chemical composition of smectites. The nature of the corrosion of steel canisters in clay barriers will - after a first short aerobic phase - predominantly be anaerobic resulting in the formation of Fe(II) and two equivalents of hydroxide ions. In a set of exposition experiments anaerobic corroding iron in bentonite gels was studied in order to determine alteration of the smectite fraction. During the exposition a green coloration of the bentonite neighbouring to corroding iron was observed. Upon contact to oxygen in a humid state the bentonite turned reddish indicating the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). This observation is in accordance with reported results indicating the formation of an iron rich smectite. Chemical analysis of the 'green bentonite' reveals an increase of iron fraction e.g. from 3.4% mass to 9.3% mass . The adsorbed iron is predominantly Fe(II) which was proven by chromato-metric titration. The estimated ratio between silicon to increased iron content is Si: Fe ≅ 2

  9. Synthesis of peptide templated copper nanoclusters for fluorometric determination of Fe(III) in human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Ting; Ouyang, Jiang; Hu, Lanshuang; Guo, Linyan; Yang, Minghui; Chen, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Copper nanoclusters (Cu-NCs) were prepared by reducing CuCl 2 with ascorbic acid in the presence of the short peptide template Cys-Cys-Cys-Asp-Leu. They were characterized by UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Cu-NCs have a size of ∼2 nm, can be well dispersed in water and are photostable. Their fluorescence (peaking at 425 nm under 365-nm excitation) is quenched by Fe(III) ions. Based on this finding, a sensitive and selective fluorescence assay for the detection of Fe(III) was developed. Under optimized conditions and a pH value of 2.0, the assay displays a linear response in the 0.05 to 30 μM Fe(III) concentration range, with a detection limit of 20 nM based on an S/N ratio of 3. The assay was successfully applied to the determination of Fe(III) in spiked human serum where is gave recoveries that ranged from 96.2 % to 98.3 %. (author)

  10. Kinetics of microbial Fe(III) oxyhydroxidereduction: The role of mineral properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonneville, Steeve

    2005-01-01

    In many soils, sediments and groundwaters, ferric iron is a major potential electron acceptor for the oxidation of organic matter. In contrast to other terminal electron acceptors (e.g. nitrate or sulfate), the concentration of Fe3+(aq), is limited by the low solubility of Fe(III) oxyhydroxides

  11. Mechanisms for the reduction of actinide ions by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renshaw, J.C.; Livens, F.R.; May, I.; Lloyd, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Three of the most problematic radioactive contaminants are the actinide elements uranium, neptunium and plutonium. All three pose considerable long-term environmental risks. The most stable environmental oxidation states of uranium and neptunium are VI and V, respectively, as the di-oxo cations [UO 2 ] 2+ and [NpO 2 ] + ; both are highly soluble and so are relatively mobile and biologically available in the environment. In similar conditions, plutonium mainly exists as Pu(IV), which forms a highly insoluble hydrous oxide, although is also environmentally stable in the more soluble III, V and VI oxidation states. The bio-reduction of U(VI) by anaerobic subsurface microorganisms has been the focus of much recent interest. Both Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacteria have been shown to reduce soluble [U VI O 2 ] 2+ to insoluble U IV O 2 , with c-type cytochromes involved in electron transfer to the actinide. Such transformations offer a strategy for the bio-remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater and a potential mechanism for the bio-deposition of uranium ores. The mechanism of U(VI). reduction has important implications for the potential microbial reduction of transuranic elements with environmentally stable lower oxidation states. Reduction of mobile 237 Np(V) to Np(IV) and subsequent precipitation may be advantageous whilst remobilization of immobile Pu(IV) as more soluble Pu(III) species could have important environmental implications. Conversely, selective reduction might allow targeting of particular radionuclide species. The model anaerobic bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is typical of those found in contaminated subsurface environments and has been shown to reduce soluble [U VI O 2 ] 2+ to insoluble U IV O 2 . In the course of this study we use X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to show that G. sulfurreducens reduces U(VI) by a one-electron reduction, forming an unstable [UO 2 ] + species which subsequently

  12. Anaerobic treatment techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehnke, B.; Bischofsberger, W.; Seyfried, C.F.

    1993-01-01

    This practical and theoretical guide presents the current state of knowledge in anaerobic treatment of industrial effluents with a high organic pollutant load and sewage sludges resulting from the treatment of municipal and industrial waste water. Starting from the microbiological bases of anaerobic degradation processes including a description and critical evaluation of executed plants, the book evolves the process-technical bases of anaerobic treatment techniques, derives relative applications, and discusses these with reference to excuted examples. (orig./UWA). 232 figs [de

  13. Anaerobic digestion of dairy farm slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, C

    1973-04-01

    Bell described the intermittent operation of a pilot-scale anaerobic digester receiving dilute dairy farm slurry. A 65 to 75 percent reduction of the ''permanganate (COD) value'' could be obtained at 35/sup 0/ and a 60 day detention time. Methane content of the gases ranged between 40 and 70 percent.

  14. Sediment studies of the biological factors controlling the reduction of U(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2004-01-01

    Studies were conducted primarily with sediments, both in laboratory incubations and in a field experiment, with supporting studies with pure cultures. To our knowledge the sediment studies were the first on microbial U(VI) reduction in actual uranium-contaminated subsurface sediments, under conditions that mimic those found in situ. Important findings included: (1) U(VI) reduction is a biotic process in subsurface sediments. (2) U(VI) reduction can be stimulated most effectively with the addition of acetate. Although it had been speculated that microbial U(VI) reduction might be capable of this type of environmental remediation ever since the discovery of microbial U(VI) reduction, this had not been previously demonstrated under environmentally relevant conditions. (3) U(VI) is reduced concurrently with Fe(III) and prior to sulfate reduction. U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction proceeded concurrently, accompanied by a dramatic enrichment in organisms in the Geobacteraceae. Sulfate-reducing microorganisms do not appear to be important components of the microbial community reducing U(VI) in these subsurface sediments. (4) Nitrate has important influences on U(VI) reduction. Nitrate inhibits the reduction of metals until nitrate is depleted. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms such as Geobacter metallireducens and Desulfitobacterium species can oxidize Fe(II) with the reduction of nitrate which is an important consideration because our previous studies have demonstrated that freshly precipitated Fe(III) oxides can reoxidize U(IV) to U(VI). The discovery that G. metallireducens can ''run backwards'' and oxidize U(IV) when nitrate is present reveals another mechanism preventing precipitation of U(IV) in the presence of nitrate as well as potential novel strategy for removing uranium from the subsurface after a site has been remediated. (5) Importance of understanding Fe(III) forms available for microbial reduction. Fe(III) is orders of magnitude more abundant than U(VI) as an

  15. Detoxification of Pesticide-Containing Wastewater with FeIII, Activated Carbon and Fenton Reagent and Its Control Using Three Standardized Bacterial Inhibition Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Rott

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Discharge of toxic industrial wastewaters into biological wastewater treatment plants may result in inhibition of activated sludge bacteria (ASB. In order to find an appropriate method of detoxification, the wastewater of a pesticide-processing plant in Vietnam was treated with three different methods (FeIII, powdered activated carbon (PAC, Fenton (FeII/H2O2 analyzing the detoxification effect with the nitrification inhibition test (NIT, respiration inhibition test (RIT and luminescent bacteria test (LBT. The heterotrophic ASB were much more resistant to the wastewater than the autotrophic nitrificants. The NIT turned out to be more suitable than the RIT since the NIT was less time-consuming and more reliable. In addition, the marine Aliivibrio fischeri were more sensitive than the nitrificants indicating that a lack of inhibition in the very practical and time-efficient LBT correlates with a lack of nitrification inhibition. With 95%, the Fenton method showed the highest efficiency regarding the chemical oxygen demand (COD removal. Although similar COD removal (60–65% was found for both the FeIII and the PAC method, the inhibitory effect of the wastewater was reduced much more strongly with PAC. Both the NIT and the LBT showed that the PAC and Fenton methods led to a similar reduction in the inhibitory effect.

  16. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  17. Treatment of textile sludge using anaerobic technology | Asia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samples were subjected to mesophilic anaerobic treatment at the temperature of 35±2°C. The method achieved solids reduction of 61% total solids, 68% settleable solids and 51% volatile solids and a total bacteria reduction of 99.99%. The reduction in BOD and COD were 89% each. Nitrate and phosphate were found to ...

  18. Anaerobic digestion of cheese whey using up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, J.Q.; Lo, K.V.; Liao, P.H.

    1989-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment of cheese whey using a 17.5-litre up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor was investigated in the laboratory. The reactor was studied over a range of influent concentration from 4.5 to 38.1 g chemical oxygen demand per litre at a constant hydraulic retention time of 5 days. The reactor start-up and the sludge acclimatization were discussed. The reactor performance in terms of methane production, volatile fatty acids conversion, sludge net growth and chemical oxygen demand reduction were also presented in this paper. Over 97% chemical oxygen demand reduction was achieved in this experiment. At the influent concentration of 38.1 g chemical oxygen demand per litre, an instability of the reactor was observed. The results indicated that the up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor process could treat cheese whey effectively.

  19. Anaerobic Digestion Foaming Causes

    OpenAIRE

    Ganidi, Nafsika

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion foaming has been encountered in several sewage treatment plants in the UK. Foaming has raised major concerns for the water utilities due to significant impacts on process efficiency and operational costs. Several foaming causes have been suggested over the past few years by researchers. However, the supporting experimental information is limited and in some cases site specific. The present report aimed to provide a better understanding of the anaerobic di...

  20. Process and design considerations for the anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, S.R.; Bastuk, B. [Larsen Engineers, Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Full scale experience exists and justifies implementing anaerobic digestion for pretreatment of high strength industrial waste water and side streams. Anaerobic treatment of sludge and manure have demonstrated cost effective, environmentally sound treatment of these wastes. Recent attention has focused on the potential for anaerobically treating high solids municipal solid wastes to assist in meeting state waste reduction goals and provide a new renewable source of energy. This paper focuses on the fundamental facility design and process protocol considerations necessary for a high solids anaerobic digesting facility. The primary design and equipment considerations are being applied to a 5 to 10 ton per day demonstration anaerobic digestion facility in Bergen, New York.

  1. Periplasmic Cytochrome c(3) of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Is Directly Involved in H2-Mediated Metal but Not Sulfate Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Suflita, Joseph M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2004-01-01

    Kinetic parameters and the role of cytochrome c3 in sulfate, Fe(III), and U(VI) reduction were investigated in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. While sulfate reduction followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km 220 uM), loss of Fe(III) and U(VI) was first-order at all concentrations tested. Initial reduction rates of all electron acceptors were similar for cells grown with H2 and sulfate, while cultures grown using lactate and sulfate had similar rates of metal loss but lower sulfate reduction activities. The similarities in metal, but not sulfate, reduction with H2 and lactate suggest divergent pathways. Respiration assays and reduced minus oxidized spectra were carried out to determine c-type cytochrome involvement in electron acceptor reduction. c-type cytochrome oxidation was immediate with Fe(III) and U(VI) in the presence of H2, lactate, or pyruvate. Sulfidogenesis occurred with all three electron donors and effectively oxidized the c-type cytochrome in lactate or pyruvate-reduced, but not H2-reduced cells. Correspondingly, electron acceptor competition assays with lactate or pyruvate as electron donors showed that Fe(III) inhibited U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) inhibited sulfate loss. However, sulfate reduction was slowed but not halted when H2 was the electron donor in the presence of Fe(III) or U(VI). U(VI) loss was still impeded by Fe(III) when H2 was used. Hence, we propose a modified pathway for the reduction of sulfate, Fe(III), and U(VI) which helps explain why these bacteria cannot grow using these metals. We further propose that cytochrome c3 is an electron carrier involved in lactate and pyruvate oxidation and is the reductase for alternate electron acceptors with higher redox potentials than sulfate

  2. Microbial reduction of 99Tc in organic matter-rich soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelouas, A.; Grambow, B.; Fattahi, M.; Andres, Y.; Leclerc-Cessac, E.

    2005-01-01

    For safety assessment purposes, it is necessary to study the mobility of long-lived radionuclides in the geosphere and the biosphere. Within this framework, we studied the behaviour of 99 Tc in biologically active organic matter-rich soils. To simulate the redox conditions in soils, we stimulated the growth of aerobic and facultative denitrifying and anaerobic sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In the presence of either a pure culture of denitrifiers (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) or a consortium of soil denitrifiers, the solubility of TcO 4 - was not affected. The nonsorption of TcO 4 - onto bacteria was confirmed in biosorption experiments with washed cells of P. aeruginosa regardless of the pH. At the end of denitrification with indigenous denitrifiers in soil/water batch experiments, the redox potential (E H ) dropped and this was accompanied by an increase of Fe concentration in solution as a result of reduction of less soluble Fe(III) to Fe(II) from the soil particles. It is suggested that this is due to the growth of a consortium of anaerobic bacteria (e.g., Fe-reducing bacteria). The drop in E H was accompanied by a strong decrease in Tc concentration as a result of Tc(VII) reduction to Tc(IV). Thermodynamic calculations suggested the precipitation of TcO 2 . The stimulation of the growth of indigenous sulphate-reducing bacteria in soil/water systems led to even lower E H with final Tc concentration of 10 -8 M. Experiments with glass columns filled with soil reproduced the results obtained with batch cultures. Sequential chemical extraction of precipitated Tc in soils showed that this radionuclide is strongly immobilised within soil particles under anaerobic conditions. More than 90% of Tc is released together with organic matter (60-66%) and Fe-oxyhydroxides (23-31%). The present work shows that ubiquitous indigenous anaerobic bacteria in soils play a major role in Tc immobilisation. In addition, organic matter plays a key role in the stability of the reduced Tc

  3. Anaerobic prosthetic joint infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neel B; Tande, Aaron J; Patel, Robin; Berbari, Elie F

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to improve mobility and alleviate pain from degenerative and connective tissue joint disease, an increasing number of individuals are undergoing prosthetic joint replacement in the United States. Joint replacement is a highly effective intervention, resulting in improved quality of life and increased independence [1]. By 2030, it is predicted that approximately 4 million total hip and knee arthroplasties will be performed yearly in the United States [2]. One of the major complications associated with this procedure is prosthetic joint infection (PJI), occurring at a rate of 1-2% [3-7]. In 2011, the Musculoskeletal Infectious Society created a unifying definition for prosthetic joint infection [8]. The following year, the Infectious Disease Society of America published practice guidelines that focused on the diagnosis and management of PJI. These guidelines focused on the management of commonly encountered organisms associated with PJI, including staphylococci, streptococci and select aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. However, with the exception of Propionibacterium acnes, management of other anaerobic organisms was not addressed in these guidelines [1]. Although making up approximately 3-6% of PJI [9,10], anaerobic microorganisms cause devastating complications, and similar to the more common organisms associated with PJI, these bacteria also result in significant morbidity, poor outcomes and increased health-care costs. Data on diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI is mostly derived from case reports, along with a few cohort studies [3]. There is a paucity of published data outlining factors associated with risks, diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI. We therefore reviewed available literature on anaerobic PJI by systematically searching the PubMed database, and collected data from secondary searches to determine information on pathogenesis, demographic data, clinical features, diagnosis and management. We focused our search on five commonly

  4. Estimation of redox potentials of Fe(III)- gallic acid complexes at different pH by spectrophotometric titration with ascorbate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.; Tasneem, Z.; Kazmi, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Fe(III) is strongly chelated by Gallic acid. This equilibrium as well as the kinetics of reduction of the complex is strongly pH dependent. The complex was prepared in acetate buffers of pH 4.6, 5.0 and 5.6 and in Tris buffer of pH 7.0.The complex was reduced by ascorbate. The reduced absorbance was taken to be a measure of reaction. Nernst equation was then applied to determine the standard redox potentials of the complex taking the literature values of the redox potentials of ascorbate at different pH. The values of redox potentials of complex were found to be 0.197 V at pH 4.6. 0.181 V at pH 5.0 1.132 V at pH 5.6 and 0.092 V at pH 7.0. (author)

  5. The limited role of aquifer heterogeneity on metal reduction in an Atlantic coastal plain determined by push-pull tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailloux, Brian J.; Devlin, Stephanie; Fuller, Mark E.; Onstott, T.C.; De Flaun, Mary F.; Choi, K.-H.; Green-Blum, Maria; Swift, Donald J.P.; McCarthy, John; Dong Hailiang

    2007-01-01

    Sixty push-pull experiments were conducted to determine the factors controlling Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction in a well-characterized, shallow, coastal plain aquifer near Oyster, VA, USA. The five multi-level samplers each equipped with 12 ports sampled a heterogeneous portion of the aquifer from 4.4 to 8m-bgs. Each multi-level sampler (MLS) was injected with groundwater that contained NO 3 - and Br - along with: (1) just groundwater (control treatment), (2) humics, (3) lactate (conducted twice) and (4) lactate plus humics. Microbially mediated Fe(III) reduction caused the aqueous Fe Tot concentrations to increase at every depth in the lactate treatment with significant increases within 1 day even while NO 3 - was present. Little change in the Fe Tot concentrations were observed in the control and humics treatment. Humics may have acted as an electron shuttle to increase Fe(III) reduction in the lactate plus humics treatment. The amount of Mn(IV) reduction was significantly lower than that of Fe(III) reduction. Geochemical modeling indicated that gas formation, sorption on reactive surfaces, and mineral precipitation were important processes and that Fe(III) and SO 4 2- reduction were co-occurring. Conditions were favorable for the precipitation of Fe-carbonates, Fe-sulfides and Fe-silicates. In the lactate treatment protist concentrations increased then decreased and planktonic cell concentrations steadily increased, whereas no change was observed in the control treatment. Correlations of Fe(III) reduction with physical and chemical heterogeneity were weak, probably as a result of the abundance of Fe(III) bearing minerals relative to electron donor abundance and that the push-pull test sampled a representative elemental volume that encompassed the microbial diversity within the aquifer. This work indicates that stimulating metal reduction in aquifer systems is a feasible method for remediating heterogeneous subsurface sites contaminated with metals and

  6. Anaerobic Dehalogenation of Hydroxylated Polychlorinated Biphenyls by Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegel, Juergen; Zhang, Xiaoming; Wu, Qingzhong

    1999-01-01

    Ten years after reports on the existence of anaerobic dehalogenation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in sediment slurries, we report here on the rapid reductive dehalogenation of para-hydroxylated PCBs (HO-PCBs), the excreted main metabolites of PCB in mammals, which can exhibit estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities in humans. The anaerobic bacterium Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans completely dehalogenates all flanking chlorines (chlorines in ortho position to the para-hydroxyl group) ...

  7. Isolation and Cultivation of Anaerobes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aragao Börner, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms play important roles in different biotechnological processes. Their complex metabolism and special cultivation requirements have led to less isolated representatives in comparison to their aerobic counterparts.In view of that, the isolation and cultivation of anaerobic...

  8. Anaerobes in bacterial vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Four hundred high vaginal swabs were taken from patients attending gynaecology and obstetrics department of Govt. medical college, Amritsar. The patients were divided into four groups i.e. women in pregnancy (Group I, in labour/post partum (Group II, with abnormal vaginal discharge or bacterial vaginosis (Group III and asymptomatic women as control (Group IV. Anaerobic culture of vaginal swabs revealed that out of 400 cases, 212(53% were culture positive. Maximum isolation of anaerobes was in group III (84% followed by group II (56%, group I (36% and control group (15%. Gram positive anaerobes (69.2% out numbered gram negatives (30.8%. Among various isolates Peptostreptococcus spp. and Bacteroides spp. were predominant.

  9. The reduction of 4-chloronitrobenzene by Fe(II)-Fe(III) oxide systems - correlations with reduction potential and inhibition by silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Adele M., E-mail: adele.jones1@unsw.edu.au; Kinsela, Andrew S.; Collins, Richard N.; Waite, T. David, E-mail: d.waite@unsw.edu.au

    2016-12-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the rate at which Fe(II)-Fe(III) oxyhydroxide systems catalyze the reduction of reducible contaminants, such as 4-chloronitrobenzene, is well correlated to their thermodynamic reduction potential. Here we confirm this effect in the presence of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide phases not previously assessed, namely ferrihydrite and nano-goethite, as well as Fe(III) oxyhydroxide phases previously examined. In addition, silicate is found to decrease the extent of Fe(II) sorption to the Fe(III) oxyhydroxide surface, increasing the reduction potential of the Fe(II)-Fe(III) oxyhydroxide suspension and, accordingly, decreasing the rate of 4-chloronitrobenzene reduction. A linear relationship between the reduction potential of the Fe(II)-Fe(III) oxyhydroxide suspensions and the reduction rate of 4-chloronitrobenzene (normalized to surface area and concentration of sorbed Fe(II)) was obtained in the presence and absence of silicate. However, when ferrihydrite was doped with Si (through co-precipitation) the reduction of 4-chloronitrobenzene was much slower than predicted from its reduction potential. The results obtained have significant implications to the likely effectiveness of naturally occurring contaminant degradation processes involving Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxyhydroxides in groundwater environments containing high concentrations of silicate, or other species which compete with Fe(II) for sorption sites.

  10. Perspectives for anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    The modern society generates large amounts of waste that represent a tremendous threat to the environment and human and animal health. To prevent and control this, a range of different waste treatment and disposal methods are used. The choice of method must always be based on maximum safety...... to the soil. Anaerobic digestion (AD) is one way of achieving this goal and it will furthermore, reduce energy consumption or may even be net energy producing. This chapter aims at provide a basic understanding of the world in which anaerobic digestion is operating today. The newest process developments...

  11. Transformation of tetrachloroethene in an upflow anaerobic sludgeblanket reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, N.; Christensen, S.R.; Arvin, E.

    1997-01-01

    Reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene was studied in a mesophilic upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor. Operating the reactor in batch mode the dynamic transformation of tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene and dichloroethene (DCE) was monitored. Tetrachloroethene was reductively...... methane-producing bacteria were inhibited by the chlorinated ethenes....

  12. Novel processes for anaerobic sulfate production from elemental sulfur by sulfate-reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Sulfate reducers and related organisms which had previously been found to reduce Fe(III) with H2 or organic electron donors oxidized S0 to sulfate when Mn(IV) was provided as an electron acceptor. Organisms catalyzing this reaction in washed cell suspensions included Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfomicrobium baculatum. Desulfobacterium autotrophicum, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans, and Geobacter metallireducens. These organisms produced little or no sulfate from S0 with Fe(III) as a potential electron acceptor or in the absence of an electron acceptor. In detailed studies with Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, the stoichiometry of sulfate and Mn(II) production was consistent with the reaction S0 + 3 MnO2 + 4H+ ???SO42- + 3Mn(II) + 2H2O. None of the organisms evaluated could be grown with S0 as the sole electron donor and Mn(IV) as the electron acceptor. In contrast to the other sulfate reducers evaluated, Desulfobulbus propionicus produced sulfate from S0 in the absence of an electron acceptor and Fe(III) oxide stimulated sulfate production. Sulfide also accumulated in the absence of Mn(IV) or Fe(III). The stoichiometry of sulfate and sulfide production indicated that Desulfobulbus propionicus disproportionates S0 as follows: 4S0 + 4H2O???SO42- + 3HS- + 5 H+. Growth of Desulfobulbus propionicus with S0 as the electron donor and Fe(III) as a sulfide sink and/or electron acceptor was very slow. The S0 oxidation coupled to Mn(IV) reduction described here provides a potential explanation for the Mn(IV)-dependent sulfate production that previous studies have observed in anoxic marine sediments. Desulfobulbus propionicus is the first example of a pure culture known to disproportionate S0.

  13. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  14. Study on the extraction characteristics of Fe(III) with trialkylphosphine oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qiwei; Jiao Rongzhou; Song Chongli

    1994-08-01

    The extractive properties of TRPO (trialkyephosphine oxide) as the extractant for the Fe(III) have been studied. Under this experiment condition, the distribution ratio D of Fe (III) with the changes of extraction equilibrium time, temperature, nitric acid concentration and Fe 3+ concentration in aqueous solution have been determined. The ΔH degree, ΔS degree and apparent equilibrium constant K of the reaction in which Fe (III) is extracted by TRPO have been calculated. The experiment results show that the third phase appearance in 30% TRPO extractive system has close relations with Fe 3+ concentration in aqueous solution. When nitric acid concentration is 1.5 mol/L and Fe 3+ initial concentration is higher than 8.0 g/L in aqueous solution, the extractant system appears third phase. Two organic phase volume ratio and Fe(III) concentration ratio in the organic phases have been determined respectively, and they vary with the Fe 3+ concentration in aqueous solution

  15. Single peak parameters technique for simultaneous measurements: Spectrophotometric sequential injection determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, J; Paluch, J; Węgrzecka, A; Kozak, M; Wieczorek, M; Kochana, J; Kościelniak, P

    2016-02-01

    Spectrophotometric sequential injection system (SI) is proposed to automate the method of simultaneous determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) on the basis of parameters of a single peak. In the developed SI system, sample and mixture of reagents (1,10-phenanthroline and sulfosalicylic acid) are introduced into a vessel, where in an acid environment (pH≅3) appropriate compounds of Fe(II) and Fe(III) with 1,10-phenanthroline and sulfosalicylic acid are formed, respectively. Then, in turn, air, sample, EDTA and sample again, are introduced into a holding coil. After the flow reversal, a segment of air is removed from the system by an additional valve and as EDTA replaces sulfosalicylic acid forming a more stable colorless compound with Fe(III), a complex signal is registered. Measurements are performed at wavelength 530 nm. The absorbance measured at minimum of the negative peak and the area or the absorbance measured at maximum of the signal can be used as measures corresponding to Fe(II) and Fe(III) concentrations, respectively. The time of the peak registration is about 2 min. Two-component calibration has been applied to analysis. Fe(II) and Fe(III) can be determined within the concentration ranges of 0.04-4.00 and 0.1-5.00 mg L(-1), with precision less than 2.8% and 1.7% (RSD), respectively and accuracy better than 7% (RE). The detection limit is 0.04 and 0.09 mg L(-1) for Fe(II) and Fe(III), respectively. The method was applied to analysis of artesian water samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Structure and dynamics of hydrated Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions. Quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remsungnen, T.

    2002-11-01

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) and combined em ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics (QM/MM-MD) simulations have been performed to investigate structural, dynamical and energetical properties of Fe(II), and Fe(III) transition metal ions in aqueous solution. In the QM/MM-MD simulations the ion and its first hydration sphere were treated at the Hartree-Fock ab initio quantum mechanical level, while ab initio generated pair plus three-body potentials were employed for the remaining system. For the classical MD simulation the pair plus three-body potential were employed for all ion-water interactions. The coordination number of the first hydration shell is 100 % of 6 in both cases. The number of waters in the second hydration shell obtained from classical simulations are 13.4 and 15.1 for Fe(II) and Fe(III), respectively, while QM/MM-MD gives the values of 12.4 and 13.4 for Fe(II) and Fe(III). The energies of hydration obtained from MD and QM/MM-MD for Fe(II) are 520 and 500 kcal/mol, and for Fe(III) 1160 and 1100 kcal/mol respectively. The mean residence times of water in the second shell obtained from QM/MM-MD are 24 and 48 ps for Fe(II) and Fe(III), respectively. In contrast to the data obtained from classical MD simulation, the QM/MM-MD values are all in good agreement with the experimental data available. These investigations and results clearly indicate that many-body effects are essential for the proper description of all properties of the aqueous solution of both Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions. (author)

  17. Bacteria attenuation by iron electrocoagulation governed by interactions between bacterial phosphate groups and Fe(III) precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaire, Caroline; van Genuchten, Case M; Amrose, Susan E; Gadgil, Ashok J

    2016-10-15

    Iron electrocoagulation (Fe-EC) is a low-cost process in which Fe(II) generated from an Fe(0) anode reacts with dissolved O2 to form (1) Fe(III) precipitates with an affinity for bacterial cell walls and (2) bactericidal reactive oxidants. Previous work suggests that Fe-EC is a promising treatment option for groundwater containing arsenic and bacterial contamination. However, the mechanisms of bacteria attenuation and the impact of major groundwater ions are not well understood. In this work, using the model indicator Escherichia coli (E. coli), we show that physical removal via enmeshment in EC precipitate flocs is the primary process of bacteria attenuation in the presence of HCO3(-), which significantly inhibits inactivation, possibly due to a reduction in the lifetime of reactive oxidants. We demonstrate that the adhesion of EC precipitates to cell walls, which results in bacteria encapsulation in flocs, is driven primarily by interactions between EC precipitates and phosphate functional groups on bacteria surfaces. In single solute electrolytes, both P (0.4 mM) and Ca/Mg (1-13 mM) inhibited the adhesion of EC precipitates to bacterial cell walls, whereas Si (0.4 mM) and ionic strength (2-200 mM) did not impact E. coli attenuation. Interestingly, P (0.4 mM) did not affect E. coli attenuation in electrolytes containing Ca/Mg, consistent with bivalent cation bridging between bacterial phosphate groups and inorganic P sorbed to EC precipitates. Finally, we found that EC precipitate adhesion is largely independent of cell wall composition, consistent with comparable densities of phosphate functional groups on Gram-positive and Gram-negative cells. Our results are critical to predict the performance of Fe-EC to eliminate bacterial contaminants from waters with diverse chemical compositions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bio digester : anaerobic methanogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bullema, Marten; Hulzen, Hans; Keizer, Melvin; Pruisscher, Gerlof; Smint, Martin; Vincent, Helene

    2014-01-01

    As part of the theme 13 and 14, our group have to realize a project in the field of the renewable energy. This project consist of the design of a bio-digester for the canteen of Zernikeplein. Gert Hofstede is our client. To produce energy, a bio-digester uses the anaerobic digestion, which is made

  19. Anaerobic biotransformation of estrogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajka, Cynthia P.; Londry, Kathleen L.

    2006-01-01

    Estrogens are important environmental contaminants that disrupt endocrine systems and feminize male fish. We investigated the potential for anaerobic biodegradation of the estrogens 17-α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17-β-estradiol (E2) in order to understand their fate in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Cultures were established using lake water and sediment under methanogenic, sulfate-, iron-, and nitrate-reducing conditions. Anaerobic degradation of EE2 (added at 5 mg/L) was not observed in multiple trials over long incubation periods (over three years). E2 (added at 5 mg/L) was transformed to estrone (E1) under all four anaerobic conditions (99-176 μg L -1 day -1 ), but the extent of conversion was different for each electron acceptor. The oxidation of E2 to E1 was not inhibited by E1. Under some conditions, reversible inter-conversion of E2 and E1 was observed, and the final steady state concentration of E2 depended on the electron-accepting condition but was independent of the total amount of estrogens added. In addition, racemization occurred and E1 was also transformed to 17-α-estradiol under all but nitrate-reducing conditions. Although E2 could be readily transformed to E1 and in many cases 17-α-estradiol under anaerobic conditions, the complete degradation of estrogens under these conditions was minimal, suggesting that they would accumulate in anoxic environments

  20. The anaerobic digestion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, C.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Boone, D.R. [Oregon Graduate Inst., Portland, OR (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  1. Anaerobic treatment in Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Borghi, M; Solisio, C; Ferrailo, G

    1984-02-01

    In Italy, environmental protection and energy conservation have become very important since the increase in oil prices. The law requires that all waste waters have a B.O.D. of 40 mg/l by 1986 so there has been an expansion of purification plants since 1976, using anaerobic digestion. The report deals with the current state of anaerobic treatment in Italy with particular reference to (1) animal wastes. In intensive holdings, anaerobic digestion leads to a decrease in pollution and an increase in biogas generation which can be used to cover the energy demand of the process. The factors which influence the builders of digestors for farms are considered. (2) Non toxic industrial wastes. These are the waste waters emanating from the meat packing, brewing, pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Particular reference is made to the distillery plants using anaerobic treatment prior to aerobic digestion. (3) Urban wastes. The advantages and the disadvantages are considered and further research and development is recommended. 20 references.

  2. Redução de Bactérias Indicadoras de Poluição Fecal em Estrume de Aves de Postura Tratados por Biodigestão Anaeróbia Reduction of Bacterial Indicators of Fecal Pollution in Laying Hens Manure Treated by Anaerobic Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LA1 Amaral

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available A digestão anaeróbia pode auxiliar na redução de patógenos e poluição ambiental pela redução dos sólidos e microrganismos de presença indesejável nos efluentes. No presente trabalho objetivou-se a avaliação da redução de microorganismos indicadores de contaminação fecal através do processo de biodigestão anaeróbica de dejetos de aves de postura em biodigestores contínuos, operados em diferentes tempos de retenção hidráulica (TRH: 40, 30, 25, 20 e 15 dias, e biodigestores de batelada com e sem a utilização de inóculo. Foi observada nos dois tipos de biodigestores uma redução acima de 99,0% para os coliformes totais e fecais, mostrando a eficiência do processo. Os resultados obtidos no presente trabalho mostram que o processo de biodigestão anaeróbia melhora a qualidade microbiológica do estrume, constituindo-se uma medida preventiva importante para se preservar a qualidade do solo e dos mananciais de água, quando da sua aplicação como biofertilizante.The anaerobic digestion can help in the reduction of pathogenic bacteria and to decrease the environmental pollution through the reduction of solids and undesirable microorganisms in the effluents . The present work has as the objective of estimating the reduction of indicators of microorganisms during and after the anaerobic digesting process of litter of hens in continuous bio-digester with different retention time and in non-continuous bio-digester with and without starter A reduction, over 99% of coliforms was observed, showing the efficiency of the process.

  3. Spectrophotometric speciation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) using hydrazone-micelle systems and flow injections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khojali, Inas Osman

    1999-04-01

    Two hydrazones were synthesised, namely salicylhyrazone (SH) and trihydroxyacetophenone (THAPH) were synthesised with the objective of developing a method for determining of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in the presence of each other and hence the total iron.those hydrazones were selected so as to combine the ability of phenolic compounds to complex Fe(III) ions and the complexing characteristics of hydrazones. The complexes of Fe(II) S H and Fe(III) S H as well those of Fe(II)-THAPH and Fe(III)-THAPH had shown maximum absorbance at λ=412 nm which was not not modified by presence of micelles i.e. sodium n-dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and n-hexa dodecyl pyridinium bromide. The maximum absorbance for all complexes takes place around a neutral pH. Generally, in addition, of n-hexa dodecylpyridinium bromide to fe(II)-SH and Fe(III)-SH absorbance of the complexes increases with increasing the concentration of the micelle. The effects of the addition of sodium n-dodecyle sulphate (SDS) to Fe(III)-SH is also studied. Generally, increasing the concentration of the micelle decrease the absorbance of the complexes. To study the effect of the presence of Fe(II) and Fe(III) on the determination of each other,mixtures of Fe(II)-SH and Fe(III)-SH are studied. However, the use of ascorbic acid as a reducing reagent for Fe(III) did not produce the needed results but non reducible results, which may be due to the masking effect of ascorbic acid and thus making the metal not available to the ligand. However, conversion of Fe(II) to Fe(III) prior to the determination was avoided as this requires the use of oxidant, which will oxidise the ligand as well. To establish the condition for the maximum absorbance of THAPH complexes, the effect of the base was investigated by using sodium and ammonium hydroxide. Generally, increasing the concentration of the base decreases the abosrbance. as expected, ammonium hydroxide produced positive results than sodium hydroxide. After establishing the optimum Fi

  4. Speciative Determination of Dissolved Inorganic Fe(II), Fe(III) and Total Fe in Natural Waters by Coupling CPE with FAAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurkan, R.; Altunay, N.

    2013-01-01

    A new cloud point extraction (CPE) method for the preconcentration of trace iron speciation in natural waters prior to determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was developed in the present study. In this method, Fe(II) sensitively and selectively reacts with Calcon carboxylic acid (CCA) in presence of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) yielding a hydrophobic complex at pH 10.5, which is then entrapped in surfactant-rich phase. Total Fe was accurately and reliably determined after the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) with sulfite. The amount of Fe(III) in samples was determined from the difference between total Fe and Fe(II). CPC was used not only as an auxiliary ligand in CPE, but also as sensitivity enhancement agent in FAAS. The nonionic surfactant, polyethylene glycol tert-octylphenyl ether (Triton X-114) was used as an extracting agent. The analytical variables affecting CPE efficiency were investigated in detail. The preconcentration/enhancement factors of 50 and 82 respectively, were obtained for the preconcentration of Fe(II) with 50 mL solution. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of Fe(II) in linear range of 0.2-60 μg L/sup -1/ was 0.06 μg L/sup -1/. The relative standard deviation was 2.7 percentage (20 μg L/sup -1/, N: 5), recoveries for Fe(II) were in range of 99.0-102.0 percentage for all water samples including certified reference materials (CRMs). In order to verify its accuracy, two CRMs were analyzed and the results obtained were statistically in good agreement with the certified values. (author)

  5. Microbial reductive dehalogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, W W; Tiedje, J M

    1992-01-01

    A wide variety of compounds can be biodegraded via reductive removal of halogen substituents. This process can degrade toxic pollutants, some of which are not known to be biodegraded by any other means. Reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds has been found primarily in undefined, syntrophic anaerobic communities. We discuss ecological and physiological principles which appear to be important in these communities and evaluate how widely applicable these principles are. Anaerobic communities that catalyze reductive dehalogenation appear to differ in many respects. A large number of pure cultures which catalyze reductive dehalogenation of aliphatic compounds are known, in contrast to only a few organisms which catalyze reductive dehalogenation of aromatic compounds. Desulfomonile tiedjei DCB-1 is an anaerobe which dehalogenates aromatic compounds and is physiologically and morphologically unusual in a number of respects, including the ability to exploit reductive dehalogenation for energy metabolism. When possible, we use D. tiedjei as a model to understand dehalogenating organisms in the above-mentioned undefined systems. Aerobes use reductive dehalogenation for substrates which are resistant to known mechanisms of oxidative attack. Reductive dehalogenation, especially of aliphatic compounds, has recently been found in cell-free systems. These systems give us an insight into how and why microorganisms catalyze this activity. In some cases transition metal complexes serve as catalysts, whereas in other cases, particularly with aromatic substrates, the catalysts appear to be enzymes. Images PMID:1406492

  6. In Vitro Enzymatic Reduction Kinetics of Mineral Oxides by Membrane Fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebush, S.; Icopini, G.; Brantley, S.; Tien, M.

    2006-01-01

    This study documents the first example of in vitro solid-phase mineral oxide reduction by enzyme-containing membrane fractions. Previous in vitro studies have only reported the reduction of aqueous ions. Total membrane (TM) fractions from iron-grown cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were isolated and shown to catalyze the reduction of goethite, hematite, birnessite, and ramsdellite/pyrolusite using formate. In contrast, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and succinate cannot function as electron donors. The significant implications of observations related to this cell-free system are: (i) both iron and manganese mineral oxides are reduced by the TM fraction, but aqueous U(VI) is not; (ii) TM fractions from anaerobically grown, but not aerobically grown, cells can reduce the mineral oxides; (iii) electron shuttles and iron chelators are not needed for this in vitro reduction, documenting conclusively that reduction can occur by direct contact with the mineral oxide; (iv) electron shuttles and EDTA stimulate the in vitro Fe(III) reduction, documenting that exogenous molecules can enhance rates of enzymatic mineral reduction; and (v) multiple membrane components are involved in solid-phase oxide reduction. The membrane fractions, consisting of liposomes of cytoplasmic and outer membrane segments, contain at least 100 proteins including the enzyme that oxidizes formate, formate dehydrogenase. Mineral oxide reduction was inhibited by the addition of detergent Triton X-100, which solubilizes membranes and their associated proteins, consistent with the involvement of multiple electron carriers that are disrupted by detergent addition. In contrast, formate dehydrogenase activity was not inhibited by Triton X-100. The addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and menaquinone-4 was unable to restore activity; however, menadione (MD) restored 33% of the activity. The addition of AQDS and MD to reactions without added detergent increased the rate of goethite

  7. Vivianite Precipitation and Phosphate Sorption following Iron Reduction in Anoxic Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Lisa; Bender Koch, Christian; Kjærgaard, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    , the Fe(II) production reached its maximum and 34% of the citrate–bicarbonate–dithionite extractable Fe (FeCBD) was reduced to Fe(II) in the sandy soil. The peat soil showed a much faster reduction of Fe(III) and the maximum reduction of 89% of FeCBD was reached after 200 d. Neoformation...

  8. Evidence for the Occurrence of Microbial Iron Reduction in Bulk Aerobic Unsaturated Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, D. C.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Smith, W. A.; Fox, D. T.; Plummer, M. A.; Hull, L. C.

    2003-12-01

    Radionuclide transport experiments conducted in a large, meso-scale column reactor (MSCR, 10 ft high x 3 ft dia) operated under unsaturated flow conditions with simulated rainwater influent provide evidence that microbial iron reduction can occur in bulk-aerobic vadose zone systems with a low organic carbon content (~0.5 wt%). Soil gas analyses indicate that CO2 varied between ~0.1% of soil gas (top) and 12% to 18% of soil gas (bottom). O2 varied inversely with CO2, and the ratio of (CO2 produced) / (O2 consumed) was 0.8 +/- 0.1. NO3- was present at high concentrations, and originated from soluble NO3- salts present in the packing material. Ammonia was present at low levels, and limited NO2- production was observed. There was no increase in aqueous iron, and methane and sulfide were not produced. M\\H{o}ssbauer analyses of sediment iron mineralogy indicate that the sedimentary iron in the packing material is 63% illite Fe(III), 16% illite Fe(II), 13% hematite, and 8% poorly-crystalline/small-particulate (pc/sp) iron oxide. Sediments collected from the lower portion of the column (5.5 fbs, feet below surface) still contain illite and hematite, but have lost the pc/sp iron oxide component. The Fe(III)/Fe(II) ratio of the illite appears to be unchanged at this depth. Analyses of sediment extractable DNA and cell number indicate that bacterial abundances increase from the surface to 0.5 fbs, and then remain constant with depth. Initial results from DGGE and 16s rDNA clone libraries indicate that microbial community structure alters with increasing depth, decreasing O2 content, and loss of pc/sp iron oxides. These data indicate a predominance of Clostridium at the column top, with Bacillus, Desulfobacterium, and Pseudomonas also providing a significant contribution. At 0.5 fbs, Clostridium represents a larger fraction of the total community with Desulfobacterium present as the second most abundant component. By 5.5 fbs, Clostridium is a minor component and the community

  9. Anaerobic oxidation of acetylene by estuarine sediments and enrichment cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culbertson, C.W.; Zehnder, A.J.B.; Oremland, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Acetylene disappeared from the gas phase of anaerobically incubated estuarine sediment slurries, and loss was accompanied by increased levels of carbon dioxide. Acetylene loss was inhibited by chloroamphenicol, air, and autoclaving. Addition of 14 C 2 H 2 to slurries resulted in the formation of 14 CO 2 and the transient appearance of 14 C-soluble intermediates, of which acetate was a major component. Acetylene oxidation stimulated sulfate reduction; however, sulfate reduction was not required for the loss of C 2 H 2 to occur. Enrichment cultures were obtained which grew anaerobically at the expense of C 2 H 2

  10. Early anaerobic metabolisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Rosing, Minik T; Bjerrum, Christian

    2006-01-01

    probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity......Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were...... of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent...

  11. New method for simultaneous determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in water using flow injection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, J.; Gutowski, J.; Kozak, M.; Wieczorek, M.; Koscielniak, P.

    2010-01-01

    The method exploits the possibilities of flow injection gradient titration in a system of reversed flow with spectrophotometric detection. In the developed approach a small amount of titrant (EDTA) is injected into a stream of sample containing a mixture of indicators (sulfosalicylic acid and 1,10-phenanthroline). In acid environment sulfosalicylic acid forms a complex with Fe(III), whereas 1,10-phenanthroline forms a complex with Fe(II). Measurements are performed at wavelength λ = 530 nm when radiation is absorbed by both complexes. After injection EDTA replaces sulfosalicylic acid and forms with Fe(III) more stable colourless complex. As a result, a characteristic 'cut off' peak is registered with a width corresponding to the Fe(III) concentration and with a height corresponding to the Fe(II) concentration. Calibration was performed by titration of four two-component standard solutions of the Fe(II)/Fe(III) concentrations established in accordance with 2 2 factorial plan. The method was tested with the use of synthetic samples and then it was applied to the analysis of water samples taken from artesian wells. Under optimized experimental conditions Fe(II) and Fe(III) were determined with precision less than 0.8 and 2.5% (RSD) and accuracy less than 3.2 and 5.1% (relative error) within the concentration ranges of 0.1-3.0 and 0.9-3.5 mg L -1 of both analytes, respectively.

  12. Bacteria attenuation by iron electrocoagulation governed by interactions between bacterial phosphate groups and Fe(III) precipitates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delaire, Caroline; van Genuchten, Case M.; Amrose, Susan E.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2016-01-01

    Iron electrocoagulation (Fe-EC) is a low-cost process in which Fe(II) generated from an Fe(0) anode reacts with dissolved O2 to form (1) Fe(III) precipitates with an affinity for bacterial cell walls and (2) bactericidal reactive oxidants. Previous work suggests that Fe-EC is a promising treatment

  13. Effects of anaerobic digestion and aerobic treatment on gaseous emissions from dairy manure storages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of anaerobic digestion and aerobic treatment on the reduction of gaseous emissions from dairy manure storages were evaluated in this study. Screened dairy manure containing 3.5% volatile solids (VS) was either anaerobically digested or aerobically treated prior to storage in air-tight vessel...

  14. The effect of anaerobic digestion on the survival of salmonella and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The decline in viable number of salmonella and coliform bacteria was investigated in laboratory based anaerobic and aerobic digesters using cow dung. The results indicated that unheated anaerobic digestion had greater reduction in the viable number of salmonella and coliform bacteria 1.05x104 and 1.26 x 104 cells/ml ...

  15. Synergic effect of tribenzylamine on the extraction of Fe(III) with 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone in chloroform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheema, M.N.; Saeed, M.M.; Qureshi, I.H.

    1980-01-01

    Synergic effect of tribenzylamine (TBA) on the solvent extraction of Fe(III), Co(II) and Cu(II), by thenoyltrifluoracetone (HTTA) in chloroform from aqueous medium of ionic strength 0.33 M (H + ,NaClO 4 ) has been studied. For trivalent iron an enhanced extraction > 98% was observed at pH 2.5 and the equilibrium was attained within 5 minutes. Extraction parameters such as concentrations of HTTA, TBA and pH were optimised by a triangular co-ordinate graph. The stoichiometry of the extractable adduct Fe (TTA) 3 TBA was established by slope analysis. Extraction and formation constants of extractable species were computed. (orig.) [de

  16. Predictive modelling of Fe(III) precipitation in iron removal process for bioleaching circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurmi, Pauliina; Ozkaya, Bestamin; Kaksonen, Anna H; Tuovinen, Olli H; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2010-05-01

    In this study, the applicability of three modelling approaches was determined in an effort to describe complex relationships between process parameters and to predict the performance of an integrated process, which consisted of a fluidized bed bioreactor for Fe(3+) regeneration and a gravity settler for precipitative iron removal. Self-organizing maps were used to visually evaluate the associations between variables prior to the comparison of two different modelling methods, the multiple regression modelling and artificial neural network (ANN) modelling, for predicting Fe(III) precipitation. With the ANN model, an excellent match between the predicted and measured data was obtained (R (2) = 0.97). The best-fitting regression model also gave a good fit (R (2) = 0.87). This study demonstrates that ANNs and regression models are robust tools for predicting iron precipitation in the integrated process and can thus be used in the management of such systems.

  17. New perspectives in anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lier, J.B.; Tilche, A.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2001-01-01

    The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern...... requirements. In fact, most advances were achieved during the last three decades, when high-rate reactor systems were developed and a profound insight was obtained in the microbiology of the anaerobic communities. This insight led to a better understanding of anaerobic treatment and, subsequently, to a broader...

  18. [Anaerobic bacteria isolated from patients with suspected anaerobic infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercis, Serpil; Tunçkanat, Ferda; Hasçelik, Gülşen

    2005-10-01

    The study involved 394 clinical samples sent to the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory of Hacettepe University Adult Hospital between January 1997 and May 2004 for anaerobic cultivation. Since multiple cultures from the same clinical samples of the same patient were excluded, the study was carried on 367 samples. The anaerobic cultures were performed in anaerobic jar using AnaeroGen kits (Oxoid, Basingstoke, U.K.) or GENbox (bioMérieux, Lyon, France). The isolates were identified by both classical methods and "BBL Crystal System" (Becton Dickinson, U.S.A.). While no growth was detected in 120 (32.7%) of the clinical samples studied, in 144 samples (39.2%) only aerobes, in 28 (7.6%) only anaerobes and in 75 (20.5%) of the samples both aerobes and anaerobes were isolated. The number of the anaerobic isolates was 217 from 103 samples with anaerobic growth. Of these 103 samples 15 showed single bacterial growth whereas in 88 samples multiple bacterial isolates were detected. Anaerobic isolates consisted of 92 Gram negative bacilli (Bacteroides spp. 50, Prevotella spp. 14, Porphyromonas spp. 10, Fusobacterium spp. 7, Tisierella spp. 2, unidentified 9), 57 Gram positive bacilli (Clostridium spp.17, Propionibacterium spp. 16, Lactobacillus spp. 8, Actinomyces spp. 5, Eubacterium spp. 2, Bifidobacterium adolescentis 1, Mobiluncus mulieris 1, unidentified nonspore forming rods 7), 61 Gram positive cocci (anaerobic cocci 44, microaerophilic cocci 17), and 7 Gram negative cocci (Veillonella spp.). In conclusion, in the samples studied with prediagnosis of anaerobic infection, Bacteroides spp. (23%) were the most common bacteria followed by anaerobic Gram positive cocci (20.3%) and Clostridium spp (7.8%).

  19. ARSENIC ADSORPTION AND REDUCTION IN IRON-RICH SOILS NEARBY LANDFILLS IN NORTHWEST FLORIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongqin Xue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Florida, soils are mainly composed of Myakka, an acid soil characterized by a subsurface accumulation of humus and Al(III and Fe(III oxides. Downgradient of the landfills in Northwest Florida, elevated levels of iron and arsenic observations had been made in the groundwater from monitoring wells, which was attributed to the geomicrobial iron and arsenic reduction. There is thus an immediate research need for a better understanding of the reduction reactions that are responsible for the mobilization of iron and arsenic in the subsurface soil nearby landfills. Owing to the high Fe(III oxide content, As(V adsorption reactions with Fe(III oxide surfaces are particularly important, which may control As(V reduction. This research focused on the investigation of the biogeochemical processes of the subsurface soil nearby landfills of Northwest Florida. Arsenic and iron reduction was studied in batch reactors and quantified based on Monod-type microbial kinetic growth simulations. As(V adsorption in iron-rich Northwest Floridian soils was further investigated to explain the reduction observations. It was demonstrated in this research that solubilization of arsenic in the subsurface soil nearby landfills in Northwest Florida would likely occur under conditions favoring Fe(III dissimilatory reduction.

  20. Anaerobic biodegradation of (emerging) organic contaminants in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghattas, Ann-Kathrin; Fischer, Ferdinand; Wick, Arne; Ternes, Thomas A

    2017-06-01

    Although strictly anaerobic conditions prevail in several environmental compartments, up to now, biodegradation studies with emerging organic contaminants (EOCs), such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products, have mainly focused on aerobic conditions. One of the reasons probably is the assumption that the aerobic degradation is more energetically favorable than degradation under strictly anaerobic conditions. Certain aerobically recalcitrant contaminants, however, are biodegraded under strictly anaerobic conditions and little is known about the organisms and enzymatic processes involved in their degradation. This review provides a comprehensive survey of characteristic anaerobic biotransformation reactions for a variety of well-studied, structurally rather simple contaminants (SMOCs) bearing one or a few different functional groups/structural moieties. Furthermore it summarizes anaerobic degradation studies of more complex contaminants with several functional groups (CMCs), in soil, sediment and wastewater treatment. While strictly anaerobic conditions are able to promote the transformation of several aerobically persistent contaminants, the variety of observed reactions is limited, with reductive dehalogenations and the cleavage of ether bonds being the most prevalent. Thus, it becomes clear that the transferability of degradation mechanisms deduced from culture studies of SMOCs to predict the degradation of CMCs, such as EOCs, in environmental matrices is hampered due the more complex chemical structure bearing different functional groups, different environmental conditions (e.g. matrix, redox, pH), the microbial community (e.g. adaptation, competition) and the low concentrations typical for EOCs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Hexavalent uranium reduction from solid phase by thermophilic bacterium Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khijniak, T.V.; Slobodkin, A.I.; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, E.A.; Medvedeva-Lyalikova, N.N.; Coker, V.; Lloyd, J.R.; Birkeland, N.K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: It has been reported that in uranium-contaminated sites, solid-phase U(VI) present in sediments is resistant to microbial reduction. Also, it was demonstrated that mesophilic iron and sulfate-reducing bacteria can reduce hexavalent uranium and sulphate-reducing bacteria were able to grow via uranium reduction. Among thermophilic microorganisms reduction of hexavalent uranium has been demonstrated only for cell suspensions of two genera: Pyrobaculum and Thermus. In the present study, Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens was tested for reduction of U(VI), a thermophilic, gram-positive anaerobic bacterium capable for growth with the reduction of various electron acceptors including Fe(III). Kinetic of bacterial growth, uranium reduction and influence of different uranium concentrations were investigated at 65 deg. C. Due to presence of phosphate in the basal medium yellow uranium phosphate precipitate was formed after addition of uranyl acetate. After 68 h of incubation control tubes without bacteria were contained yellow precipitate whereas in presence of bacteria precipitate turned to the grey color. In the control tubes uranium phosphates and other elements formed a uniform mixture of crystals, but in presence of bacteria the round shape particles, containing uranium, were found by Environmental Scan Electron Microscopy of air-dried or frozen samples. To determine valent state speciation spectroscopic investigations were performed also. Initial yellow uranium phosphate precipitate was separated and identified as uramphite - (NH 4 )(UO 2 )(PO 4 )*3H 2 O by X-Ray Powder Diffraction. Grey precipitate, which was formed by bacterial reduction, was identified as ningyoite - CaU(PO 4 ) 2 *H 2 O. The fact that final grey precipitate contain U(IV) was also confirmed by EXAFS investigation. High concentration of uranium has toxic effect. 1 and 2.5 mM of uranium (VI) support bacterial growth and bacterial biomass was accumulated, but if 5 or 10

  2. Biogeochemistry of anaerobic crude oil biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Ian; Gray, Neil; Aitken, Caroline; Sherry, Angela; Jones, Martin; Larter, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Anaerobic degradation of crude oil and petroleum hydrocarbons is widely recognized as a globally significant process both in the formation of the world's vast heavy oil deposits and for the dissipation of hydrocarbon pollution in anoxic contaminated environments. Comparative analysis of crude oil biodegradation under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions has revealed differences not only in the patterns of compound class removal but also in the microbial communities responsible. Under methanogenic conditions syntrophic associations dominated by bacteria from the Syntropheaceae are prevalent and these are likely key players in the initial anaerobic degradation of crude oil alkanes to intermediates such as hydrogen and acetate. Syntrophic acetate oxidation plays an important role in these systems and often results in methanogenesis dominated by CO2 reduction by members of the Methanomicrobiales. By contrast the bacterial communities from sulfate-reducing crude oil-degrading systems were more diverse and no single taxon dominated the oil-degrading sulfate-reducing systems. All five proteobacterial subdivisions were represented with Delta- and Gammaproteobacteria being detected most consistently. In sediments which were pasteurized hydrocarbon degradation continued at a relatively low rate. Nevertheless, alkylsuccinates characteristic of anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation accumulated to high concentrations. This suggested that the sediments harbour heat resistant, possibly spore-forming alkane degrading sulfate-reducers. This is particularly interesting since it has been proposed recently, that spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria found in cold arctic sediments may have originated from seepage of geofluids from deep subsurface hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  3. Anaerobic sulfide-oxidation in marine colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    Colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are ubiquitous in Indian waters and have the ability to oxidize sulfide under anaerobic conditions. These bacteria can not only mediate the sulfur cycle oxidatively but also the nitrogen cycle reductively without...

  4. Impact of Fe(III)-OM complexes and Fe(III) polymerization on SOM pools reactivity under different land uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannetta, B.; Plaza, C.; Zaccone, C.; Siebecker, M. G.; Rovira, P.; Vischetti, C.; Sparks, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) protection and long-term accumulation are controlled by adsorption to mineral surfaces in different ways, depending on its molecular structure and pedo-climatic conditions. Iron (Fe) oxides are known to be key regulators of the soil carbon (C) cycle, and Fe speciation in soils is highly dependent on environmental conditions and chemical interactions with SOM. However, the molecular structure and hydrolysis of Fe species formed in association with SOM is still poorly described. We hypothesize the existence of two pools of Fe which interact with SOM: mononuclear Fe(III)-SOM complexes and precipitated Fe(III) hydroxides. To verify our hypothesis, we investigated the interactions between Fe(III) and physically isolated soil fractions by means of batch experiments at pH 7. Specifically, we examined the fine silt plus clay (FSi+C) fraction, obtained by ultrasonic dispersion and wet sieving. The soil samples spanned several land uses, including coniferous forest (CFS), grassland (GS), technosols (TS) and agricultural (AS) soils. Solid phase products and supernatants were analyzed for C and Fe content. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis were also performed. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to assess the main C functional groups involved in C complexation and desorption experiments. Preliminary linear combination fitting (LCF) of Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra suggested the formation of ferrihydrite-like polymeric Fe(III) oxides in reacted CFS and GS samples, with higher C and Fe concentration. Conversely, mononuclear Fe(III) OM complexes dominated the speciation for TS and AS samples, characterized by lower C and Fe concentration, inhibiting the hydrolysis and polymerization of Fe (III). This approach will help revealing the mechanisms by which SOM pools can control Fe(III) speciation, and will elucidate how both Fe

  5. Degradation of chlorinated compounds in an anaerobic-aerobic process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfan-Guzman, R.; Guerrero-Barajas, C.; Garcia-Pena, I.

    2009-07-01

    Remediation technologies that involves gas transport (e.g., soil vapor extraction and air sparging of groundwater) cause the emission of gases contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Under anaerobic conditions, reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) proceeds via the formation of cis and trans dichloroethene (DCEs) and vinyl chloride (VC) as intermediates. (Author)

  6. New perspectives in anaerobic digestion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lier, van J.B.; Tilche, A.; Ahring, B.K.; Macarie, H.; Moletta, R.; Dohanyos, M.; Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Lens, P.N.L.; Verstraete, W.

    2001-01-01

    The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern

  7. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellinger, A. [INFOENERGIE, Ettenhausen (Switzerland)

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  8. Anaerobic digestion of piggery waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velsen, van A.F.M.

    1981-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological process by which organic matter is converted to methane and carbon dioxide by microbes in the absence of air (oxygen). In nature, anaerobic conversions occur at all places where organic material accumulates and the supply of oxygen is deficient, e.g. in marshes

  9. Improvement of anaerobic digestion of sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohanyos, Michael; Zabranska, Jana; Kutil, Josef; Jenicek, Pavel

    2003-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion improvement can be accomplished by different methods. Besides optimization of process conditions is frequently used pretreatment of input sludge and increase of process temperature. Thermophilic process brings a higher solids reduction and biogas production, the high resistance to foaming, no problems with odour, the higher effect of destroying pathogens and the improvement of the energy balance of the whole treatment plant. Disintegration of excess activated sludge in lysate centrifuge was proved in full-scale conditions causing increase of biogas production. The rapid thermal conditioning of digested sludge is acceptable method of particulate matter disintegration and solubilization. (author)

  10. Selected Topics in Anaerobic Bacteriology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Deirdre L

    2016-08-01

    Alteration in the host microbiome at skin and mucosal surfaces plays a role in the function of the immune system, and may predispose immunocompromised patients to infection. Because obligate anaerobes are the predominant type of bacteria present in humans at skin and mucosal surfaces, immunocompromised patients are at increased risk for serious invasive infection due to anaerobes. Laboratory approaches to the diagnosis of anaerobe infections that occur due to pyogenic, polymicrobial, or toxin-producing organisms are described. The clinical interpretation and limitations of anaerobe recovery from specimens, anaerobe-identification procedures, and antibiotic-susceptibility testing are outlined. Bacteriotherapy following analysis of disruption of the host microbiome has been effective for treatment of refractory or recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, and may become feasible for other conditions in the future.

  11. Anaerobic Nitrogen Fixers on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. G.

    2000-07-01

    The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen gas to the protein of living systems is an amazing process of nature. The first step in the process is biological nitrogen fixation, the transformation of N2 to NH3. The phenomenon is crucial for feeding the billions of our species on Earth. On Mars, the same process may allow us to discover how life can adapt to a hostile environment, and render it habitable. Hostile environments also exist on Earth. For example, nothing grows in coal refuse piles due to the oxidation of pyrite and marcasite to sulfuric acid. Yet, when the acidity is neutralized, alfalfa and soybean plants develop root nodules typical of symbiotic nitrogen fixation with Rhizobium species possibly living in the pyritic material. When split open, these nodules exhibited the pinkish color of leghemoglobin, a protein in the nodule protecting the active nitrogen-fixing enzyme nitrogenase against the toxic effects of oxygen. Although we have not yet obtained direct evidence of nitrogenase activity in these nodules (reduction of acetylene to ethylene, for example), these findings suggested the possibility that nitrogen fixation was taking place in this hostile, non-soil material. This immediately raises the possibility that freeliving anaerobic bacteria which fix atmospheric nitrogen on Earth, could do the same on Mars.

  12. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.D.; Donaldson, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of low-level radioactive cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work has been completed using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale. Start-up and operating procedures have been developed, and effluent was generated for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and fed-batch conditions were made lasting 36, 90, and 423 d. Solids solubilization rates and gas production rates averaged approximately 1.8 g cellulose per L of reactor per d and 1.2 L of off-gas per L reactor per d. Greater than 80% destruction of the volatile suspended solids was obtained. A simple dynamic process model was constructed to aid in process design and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester

  13. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, T.L.; Lee, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work is underway using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale, to develop start-up and operating procedures, and to generate effluent for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and batch-fed conditions have been made lasting 36, 90, and over 200 days. Solids solubilization and gas production rates and total solids destruction have met or exceeded the target values of 0.6 g cellulose per L of reactor per day, 0.5 L off-gas per L of reactor per day, and 80% destruction of solids, respectively. Successful start-up procedures have been developed, and preliminary effluent characterization and disposal studies have been done. A simple dynamic process model has been constructed to aid in further process development and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester. 7 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  14. Quantitative Environmental Cell - Transmission Electron Microscopy: Studies of Microbial Cr(VI) and Fe(III) Reduction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daulton, Tyron

    2002-01-01

    .... Measurements by EELS demonstrated that cell boundaries became saturated with low concentrations of Cr and the precipitates encrusting bacterial cells contained a reduced form of Cr in oxidation state +3 or lower...

  15. Biogas and reduction of organic matter in anaerobic reactor with continuous flow means support; Producao de biogas e reducao de materia organica em reatores anaerobicos de fluxo continuo com meio suporte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunzler, Kathia Regina; Gomes, Simone Damasceno; Goncalves, Jefferson Luiz; Kuczman, Osvaldo [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (PGEAGRI/UNIOESTE), Cascavel, PR (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Agricola], Emails: kathiark@yahoo.com.br, simoned@unioeste.br; Piana, Pitagoras Augusto [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), Toledo, PR (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Starch processing industries are to obtain cassava starch. Its main residue is the effluent resulting from pressing the roots, Manipueira, high organic load and toxic. In this study, we compared the removal efficiency of organic loading and biogas production in anaerobic reactors, with the support means bamboo in different relations width: height. The first lesion diameter of 15 cm and a length of 90 cm, a ratio 1:6 and the second with a diameter of 20 cm and 60 cm long, ratio of 1:3. The support medium consisted of rings of bamboo with 10 cm length and diameters between 1.7 and 2.5 cm. The loads applied were 0.519, 1.156, 1.471, 3.813, 4.347, 4.708 and 5.601gDQO/L.day. To evaluate the removal efficiency of organic matter, the samples were subjected to analysis of DQO biogas production was assessed in terms of organic load removed. Bamboo as a support allowed the application of higher loads. The higher efficiency in the production of biogas was produced in the reactor with the highest ratio width: height, being more significant for the organic load of 5, 601 gCOD/L.day, showing more stability this. (author)

  16. Subsurface bio-mediated reduction of higher-valent uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Donald T.; Pepper, Sarah E.; Richmann, Michael K.; Smith, Geof; Deo, Randhir; Rittmann, Bruce E.

    2007-01-01

    Bio-mediated reduction of multivalent actinide contaminants plays an important role in their fate and transport in the subsurface. To initiate the process of extending recent progress in uranium biogeochemistry to plutonium, a side-by-side comparison of the bioreduction of uranyl and plutonyl species was conducted with Shewanella alga BrY, a facultative metal-reducing bacterium that is known to enzymatically reduce uranyl. Uranyl was reduced in our system, consistent with literature reports, but we have noted a strong coupling between abiotic and biotic processes and observe that non-reductive pathways to precipitation typically exist. Additionally, a key role of biogenic Fe 2+ , which is known to reduce uranyl at low pH, is suggested. In contrast, residual organics, present in biologically active systems, reduce Pu(VI) species to Pu(V) species at near-neutral pH. The predominance of relatively weak complexes of PuO 2 + is an important difference in how the uranyl and plutonyl species interacted with S. alga. Pu(V) also led to increased toxicity towards S. alga and is also more easily reduced by microbial activity. Biogenic Fe 2+ , produced by S. alga when Fe(III) is present as an electron acceptor, also played a key role in understanding redox controls and pathways in this system. Overall, the bioreduction of plutonyl is observed under anaerobic conditions, which favors its immobilization in the subsurface. Understanding the mechanism by which redox control is established in biologically active systems is a key aspect of remediation and immobilization strategies for actinides when they are present as subsurface contaminants

  17. Equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganic aqueous Fe(III) and the siderophore complex, Fe(III)-desferrioxamine B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Baker, Joel A.; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2008-01-01

    be controlled by isotope fractionation between the free and complexed iron.We have determined the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation induced by organic ligand activity in experiments with solutions having co-existing inorganic Fe(III) species and siderophore complexes, Fedesferrioxamine B (at pH 2). The two......-type fractionation during precipitation, this experiment yielded an isotope fractionation factor of a56Fesolution-solid=1.00027. Calculations based on these results indicate that isotopic re-equilibration is unlikely to significantly affect our determined equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganically...... and organically complexed Fe. To determine the equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between inorganically and organically bound Fe(III), experiments with variable proportions of inorganic Fe were carried out at 25 °C. Irrespective of the proportion of inorganic Fe, equilibrium fractionation factors were within...

  18. Polarized Neutron Diffraction to Probe Local Magnetic Anisotropy of a Low-Spin Fe(III) Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridier, Karl; Mondal, Abhishake; Boilleau, Corentin; Cador, Olivier; Gillon, Béatrice; Chaboussant, Grégory; Le Guennic, Boris; Costuas, Karine; Lescouëzec, Rodrigue

    2016-03-14

    We have determined by polarized neutron diffraction (PND) the low-temperature molecular magnetic susceptibility tensor of the anisotropic low-spin complex PPh4 [Fe(III) (Tp)(CN)3]⋅H2O. We found the existence of a pronounced molecular easy magnetization axis, almost parallel to the C3 pseudo-axis of the molecule, which also corresponds to a trigonal elongation direction of the octahedral coordination sphere of the Fe(III) ion. The PND results are coherent with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, magnetometry, and ab initio investigations. Through this particular example, we demonstrate the capabilities of PND to provide a unique, direct, and straightforward picture of the magnetic anisotropy and susceptibility tensors, offering a clear-cut way to establish magneto-structural correlations in paramagnetic molecular complexes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Dissolution of Fe(III) (hydr) oxides by metal-EDTA complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwack, Bernd; Sigg, Laura

    1997-03-01

    The dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides (goethite and hydrous ferric oxide) by metal-EDTA complexes occurs by ligand-promoted dissolution. The process is initiated by the adsorption of metal-EDTA complexes to the surface and is followed by the dissociation of the complex at the surface and the release of Fe(III)EDTA into solution. The dissolution rate is decreased to a great extent if EDTA is complexed by metals in comparison to the uncomplexed EDTA. The rate decreases in the order EDTA CaEDTA ≫ PbEDTA > ZnEDTA > CuEDTA > Co(II)EDTA > NiEDTA. Two different rate-limiting steps determine the dissolution process: (1) detachment of Fe(III) from the oxide-structure and (2) dissociation of the metal-EDTA complexes. In the case of goethite, step 1 is slower than step 2 and the dissolution rates by various metals are similar. In the case of hydrous ferric oxide, step 2 is rate-limiting and the effect of the complexed metal is very pronounced.

  20. Biomethanation of salty cheese whey using multichamber anaerobic bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Chirag; Madamwar, Datta [Sardar Patel Univ., Gujarat (India)

    1998-07-01

    To obtain enriched methane content and improve anaerobic digestion of salty cheese whey after diluting with total dairy waste water, a multichamber anaerobic bioreactor has been developed using different combination of bedding materials in different chambers. Best performance has been obtained at 37''oC under the combination of polystyrene chips, pumice stones and PVC beads as supporting materials, and operating at 2 day hydraulic retention time. Maximum gas production of 3.2 litre/litre of digester/day with methane content of 68% and 83% reduction in COD have been noticed. (Author)

  1. Anaerobic was co-digestion with OMW and glycerol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athanasoulia, E.; Melidis, P.; Aivasidis, A.

    2009-01-01

    The main by-product of any biological wastewater treatment is waste activated sludge (WAS). Anaerobic digestion is the most common treatment technique for sludge stabilization, resulting in a reduction in the amount of volatile solids (VS) with biogas production, at the same time. On the other hand, many agro-industrial organic wastes are readily biodegradable and as a result, anaerobic co-digestion of sludge with agro-industrial wastes is being developed potential advantages such as increased biogas production and improved nutrience balance. (Author)

  2. Anaerobic degradation of benzene by enriched consortia with humic acids as terminal electron acceptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes, Francisco J., E-mail: fjcervantes@ipicyt.edu.mx [Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4a. Seccion, San Luis Potosi, SLP, 78216 Mexico (Mexico); Mancilla, Ana Rosa; Toro, E. Emilia Rios-del [Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4a. Seccion, San Luis Potosi, SLP, 78216 Mexico (Mexico); Alpuche-Solis, Angel G.; Montoya-Lorenzana, Lilia [Division de Biologia Molecular, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4a. Seccion, San Luis Potosi, SLP, 78216 Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Enriched consortia were able to couple the anaerobic degradation of benzene to the reduction of humic acids. {yields} Electron-equivalents derived from anaerobic benzene oxidation were highly recovered as reduced humic acids. {yields} Several species from classes {beta}-, {delta}- and {gamma}-Proteobacteria were enriched during the anaerobic degradation of benzene. - Abstract: The anaerobic degradation of benzene coupled to the reduction of humic acids (HA) was demonstrated in two enriched consortia. Both inocula were able to oxidize benzene under strict anaerobic conditions when the humic model compound, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), was supplied as terminal electron acceptor. An enrichment culture originated from a contaminated soil was also able to oxidize benzene linked to the reduction of highly purified soil humic acids (HPSHA). In HPSHA-amended cultures, 9.3 {mu}M of benzene were degraded, which corresponds to 279 {+-} 27 micro-electron equivalents ({mu}Eq) L{sup -1}, linked to the reduction of 619 {+-} 81 {mu}Eq L{sup -1} of HPSHA. Neither anaerobic benzene oxidation nor reduction of HPSHA occurred in sterilized controls. Anaerobic benzene oxidation did not occur in soil incubations lacking HPSHA. Furthermore, negligible reduction of HPSHA occurred in the absence of benzene. The enrichment culture derived from this soil was dominated by two {gamma}-Proteobacteria phylotypes. A benzene-degrading AQDS-reducing enrichment originated from a sediment sample showed the prevalence of different species from classes {beta}-, {delta}- and {gamma}-Proteobacteria. The present study provides clear quantitative demonstration of anaerobic degradation of benzene coupled to the reduction of HA.

  3. Anaerobic degradation of benzene by enriched consortia with humic acids as terminal electron acceptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervantes, Francisco J.; Mancilla, Ana Rosa; Toro, E. Emilia Rios-del; Alpuche-Solis, Angel G.; Montoya-Lorenzana, Lilia

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Enriched consortia were able to couple the anaerobic degradation of benzene to the reduction of humic acids. → Electron-equivalents derived from anaerobic benzene oxidation were highly recovered as reduced humic acids. → Several species from classes β-, δ- and γ-Proteobacteria were enriched during the anaerobic degradation of benzene. - Abstract: The anaerobic degradation of benzene coupled to the reduction of humic acids (HA) was demonstrated in two enriched consortia. Both inocula were able to oxidize benzene under strict anaerobic conditions when the humic model compound, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), was supplied as terminal electron acceptor. An enrichment culture originated from a contaminated soil was also able to oxidize benzene linked to the reduction of highly purified soil humic acids (HPSHA). In HPSHA-amended cultures, 9.3 μM of benzene were degraded, which corresponds to 279 ± 27 micro-electron equivalents (μEq) L -1 , linked to the reduction of 619 ± 81 μEq L -1 of HPSHA. Neither anaerobic benzene oxidation nor reduction of HPSHA occurred in sterilized controls. Anaerobic benzene oxidation did not occur in soil incubations lacking HPSHA. Furthermore, negligible reduction of HPSHA occurred in the absence of benzene. The enrichment culture derived from this soil was dominated by two γ-Proteobacteria phylotypes. A benzene-degrading AQDS-reducing enrichment originated from a sediment sample showed the prevalence of different species from classes β-, δ- and γ-Proteobacteria. The present study provides clear quantitative demonstration of anaerobic degradation of benzene coupled to the reduction of HA.

  4. Anaerobic fungal populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookman, J.L.; Nicholson, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    The development of molecular techniques has greatly broadened our view of microbial diversity and enabled a more complete detection and description of microbial communities. The application of these techniques provides a simple means of following community changes, for example, Ishii et al. described transient and more stable inhabitants in another dynamic microbial system, compost. Our present knowledge of anaerobic gut fungal population diversity within the gastrointestinal tract is based upon isolation, cultivation and observations in vivo. It is likely that there are many species yet to be described, some of which may be non-culturable. We have observed a distinct difference in the ease of cultivation between the different genera, for example, Caecomyes isolates are especially difficult to isolate and maintain in vitro, a feature that is likely to result in the under representation of this genera in culture-based enumerations. The anaerobic gut fungi are the only known obligately anaerobic fungi. For the majority of their life cycles, they are found tightly associated with solid digesta in the rumen and/or hindgut. They produce potent fibrolytic enzymes and grow invasively on and into the plant material they are digesting making them important contributors to fibre digestion. This close association with intestinal digesta has made it difficult to accurately determine the amount of fungal biomass present in the rumen, with Orpin suggesting 8% contribution to the total microbial biomass, whereas Rezaeian et al. more recently gave a value of approximately 20%. It is clear that the rumen microbial complement is affected by dietary changes, and that the fungi are more important in digestion in the rumens of animals fed with high-fibre diets. It seems likely that the gut fungi play an important role within the rumen as primary colonizers of plant fibre, and so we are particularly interested in being able to measure the appearance and diversity of fungi on the plant

  5. Effect of metal ion Fe(III on the performance of chlorophyll as photosensitizers on dye sensitized solar cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsasi Setyawati

    Full Text Available The energy crisis is a major problem facing the world today and will need a renewable energy source that is environmentally friendly; one of these is the dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC. DSSC is photochemical electric cell that can convert solar energy into electrical energy. This research aims to study the characteristics of chlorophyll compounds with the addition of metal ions Fe(III and to determine the effect of Fe(III on the performance of chlorophyll as a photosensitizer in the DSSC. The formation of complex compounds of Fe(III-chlorophyll is shown by the phenomenon of metal ligand charge transfer (MLCT at a wavelength of 263.00 nm and absorption transition d-d at 745.00 nm. Fourier transform infrared characterization of the binding of Fe-O complex compounds appears at 486.06 cm−1. The complex compound of Fe(III-chlorophyll has a magnetic moment value of 9.62 Bohr Magneton (BM. The existence of ion Fe(III in chlorophyll can improve the performance of chlorophyll as a dye sensitizer with a maximum current of 4.00 mA/cm2, maximum voltage of 0.18 volts and efficiency values of 1.35%. Keywords: Fe(III-chlorophyll, Dye sensitized solar cell, Metal ligand charge transfer, Photosensitizer

  6. PVC-membrane potentiometric sensors based on a recently synthesized Schiff base for Fe(III ion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yousef Ebrahimipur

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A potentiometric iron sensor based on the use 3-(2-diethylamino-ethylimino-1,3-dihydro-indol-2-one (DEDIO as an ionophore in poly(vinyl chloride (PVC matrix, is reported. The plasticized membrane sensor exhibits a Nernstian response for Fe(III ions over a wide concentration range (2.0 × 10-6 - 5.0 × 10-2 M with a super Nernstian slope of 26(plus or minus 1 mV per decade. It has a fast response time of less than 12 s and can be used for ten weeks without any considerable divergences in its potentials the electrode can be used in the pH range 4.5-8.0. The proposed sensor shows fairly good discriminating ability towards Fe(III ion in comparison with a large number of alkali, alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal ions. The sensor was used as indicator electrode in potentiometric titration of Fe(III ions vs. EDTA.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v26i1.7

  7. A Simple Small Size and Low Cost Sensor Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance for Selective Detection of Fe(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunzio Cennamo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A simple, small size, and low cost sensor based on a Deferoxamine Self Assembled Monolayer (DFO-SAM and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR transduction, in connection with a Plastic Optical Fiber (POF, has been developed for the selective detection of Fe(III. DFO-SAM sensors based on appropriate electrochemical techniques can be frequently found in the scientific literature. In this work, we present the first example of a DFO-SAM sensor based on SPR in an optical fiber. The SPR sensing platform was realized by removing the cladding of a plastic optical fiber along half the circumference, spin coating a buffer of Microposit S1813 photoresist on the exposed core, and finally sputtering a thin gold film. The hydroxamate siderophore deferoxamine (DFO, having high binding affinity for Fe(III, is then used in its immobilized form, as self-assembled monolayer on the gold layer surface of the POF sensor. The results showed that the DFO-SAM-POF-sensor was able to sense the formation of the Fe(III/DFO complex in the range of concentrations between 1 μm and 50 μm with a linearity range from 0 to 30 μm of Fe(III. The selectivity of the sensor was also proved by interference tests.

  8. A simple small size and low cost sensor based on surface plasmon resonance for selective detection of Fe(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cennamo, Nunzio; Alberti, Giancarla; Pesavento, Maria; D'Agostino, Girolamo; Quattrini, Federico; Biesuz, Raffaela; Zeni, Luigi

    2014-03-07

    A simple, small size, and low cost sensor based on a Deferoxamine Self Assembled Monolayer (DFO-SAM) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) transduction, in connection with a Plastic Optical Fiber (POF), has been developed for the selective detection of Fe(III). DFO-SAM sensors based on appropriate electrochemical techniques can be frequently found in the scientific literature. In this work, we present the first example of a DFO-SAM sensor based on SPR in an optical fiber. The SPR sensing platform was realized by removing the cladding of a plastic optical fiber along half the circumference, spin coating a buffer of Microposit S1813 photoresist on the exposed core, and finally sputtering a thin gold film. The hydroxamate siderophore deferoxamine (DFO), having high binding affinity for Fe(III), is then used in its immobilized form, as self-assembled monolayer on the gold layer surface of the POF sensor. The results showed that the DFO-SAM-POF-sensor was able to sense the formation of the Fe(III)/DFO complex in the range of concentrations between 1 μm and 50 μm with a linearity range from 0 to 30 μm of Fe(III). The selectivity of the sensor was also proved by interference tests.

  9. Energy positive domestic wastewater treatment: the roles of anaerobic and phototrophic technologies

    KAUST Repository

    Shoener, B. D.

    2014-01-01

    The negative energy balance of wastewater treatment could be reversed if anaerobic technologies were implemented for organic carbon oxidation and phototrophic technologies were utilized for nutrient recovery. To characterize the potential for energy positive wastewater treatment by anaerobic and phototrophic biotechnologies we performed a comprehensive literature review and analysis, focusing on energy production (as kJ per capita per day and as kJ m-3 of wastewater treated), energy consumption, and treatment efficacy. Anaerobic technologies included in this review were the anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR), anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR), anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFB), upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), and microbial fuel cell (MFC). Phototrophic technologies included were the high rate algal pond (HRAP), photobioreactor (PBR), stirred tank reactor, waste stabilization pond (WSP), and algal turf scrubber (ATS). Average energy recovery efficiencies for anaerobic technologies ranged from 1.6% (MFC) to 47.5% (ABR). When including typical percent chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals by each technology, this range would equate to roughly 40-1200 kJ per capita per day or 110-3300 kJ m-3 of treated wastewater. The average bioenergy feedstock production by phototrophic technologies ranged from 1200-4700 kJ per capita per day or 3400-13000 kJ m-3 (exceeding anaerobic technologies and, at times, the energetic content of the influent organic carbon), with usable energy production dependent upon downstream conversion to fuels. Energy consumption analysis showed that energy positive anaerobic wastewater treatment by emerging technologies would require significant reductions of parasitic losses from mechanical mixing and gas sparging. Technology targets and critical barriers for energy-producing technologies are identified, and the role of integrated anaerobic and phototrophic

  10. Energy positive domestic wastewater treatment: the roles of anaerobic and phototrophic technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoener, B D; Bradley, I M; Cusick, R D; Guest, J S

    2014-05-01

    The negative energy balance of wastewater treatment could be reversed if anaerobic technologies were implemented for organic carbon oxidation and phototrophic technologies were utilized for nutrient recovery. To characterize the potential for energy positive wastewater treatment by anaerobic and phototrophic biotechnologies we performed a comprehensive literature review and analysis, focusing on energy production (as kJ per capita per day and as kJ m(-3) of wastewater treated), energy consumption, and treatment efficacy. Anaerobic technologies included in this review were the anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR), anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR), anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFB), upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), and microbial fuel cell (MFC). Phototrophic technologies included were the high rate algal pond (HRAP), photobioreactor (PBR), stirred tank reactor, waste stabilization pond (WSP), and algal turf scrubber (ATS). Average energy recovery efficiencies for anaerobic technologies ranged from 1.6% (MFC) to 47.5% (ABR). When including typical percent chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals by each technology, this range would equate to roughly 40-1200 kJ per capita per day or 110-3300 kJ m(-3) of treated wastewater. The average bioenergy feedstock production by phototrophic technologies ranged from 1200-4700 kJ per capita per day or 3400-13 000 kJ m(-3) (exceeding anaerobic technologies and, at times, the energetic content of the influent organic carbon), with usable energy production dependent upon downstream conversion to fuels. Energy consumption analysis showed that energy positive anaerobic wastewater treatment by emerging technologies would require significant reductions of parasitic losses from mechanical mixing and gas sparging. Technology targets and critical barriers for energy-producing technologies are identified, and the role of integrated anaerobic and

  11. Microbial reduction of structural iron in interstratified illite-smectite minerals by a sulfate-reducing bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D; Dong, H; Bishop, M E; Zhang, J; Wang, H; Xie, S; Wang, S; Huang, L; Eberl, D D

    2012-03-01

    Clay minerals are ubiquitous in soils, sediments, and sedimentary rocks and could coexist with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in anoxic environments, however, the interactions of clay minerals and SRB are not well understood. The objective of this study was to understand the reduction rate and capacity of structural Fe(III) in dioctahedral clay minerals by a mesophilic SRB, Desulfovibrio vulgaris and the potential role in catalyzing smectite illitization. Bioreduction experiments were performed in batch systems, where four different clay minerals (nontronite NAu-2, mixed-layer illite-smectite RAr-1 and ISCz-1, and illite IMt-1) were exposed to D. vulgaris in a non-growth medium with and without anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and sulfate. Our results demonstrated that D. vulgaris was able to reduce structural Fe(III) in these clay minerals, and AQDS enhanced the reduction rate and extent. In the presence of AQDS, sulfate had little effect on Fe(III) bioreduction. In the absence of AQDS, sulfate increased the reduction rate and capacity, suggesting that sulfide produced during sulfate reduction reacted with the phyllosilicate Fe(III). The extent of bioreduction of structural Fe(III) in the clay minerals was positively correlated with the percentage of smectite and mineral surface area of these minerals. X-ray diffraction, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy results confirmed formation of illite after bioreduction. These data collectively showed that D. vulgaris could promote smectite illitization through reduction of structural Fe(III) in clay minerals. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Effect of Organic Substances on the Efficiency of Fe(Ii to Fe(Iii Oxidation and Removal of Iron Compounds from Groundwater in the Sedimentation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupińska Izabela

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the problems with iron removal from groundwater is organic matter. The article presents the experiments involved groundwater samples with a high concentration of total iron - amounting to 7.20 mgFe/dm3 and an increased amount of organic substances (TOC from 5.50 to 7.50 mgC/dm3. The water samples examined differed in terms of the value of the ratio of the TOC concentration and the concentration of total iron (D. It was concluded that with increase in the coexistence ratio of organic substances and total iron in water (D = [TOC]/[Fetot], efficiency of Fe(II to Fe(III oxidization with dissolved oxygen decreased, while the oxidation time was increasing. This rule was not demonstrated for potassium manganate (VII when used as an oxidizing agent. The application of potassium manganate (VII for oxidation of Fe(II ions produced the better results in terms of total iron concentration reduction in the sedimentation process than the oxidation with dissolved oxygen.

  13. Effect of Organic Substances on the Efficiency of Fe(Ii) to Fe(Iii) Oxidation and Removal of Iron Compounds from Groundwater in the Sedimentation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupińska, Izabela

    2017-09-01

    One of the problems with iron removal from groundwater is organic matter. The article presents the experiments involved groundwater samples with a high concentration of total iron - amounting to 7.20 mgFe/dm3 and an increased amount of organic substances (TOC from 5.50 to 7.50 mgC/dm3). The water samples examined differed in terms of the value of the ratio of the TOC concentration and the concentration of total iron (D). It was concluded that with increase in the coexistence ratio of organic substances and total iron in water (D = [TOC]/[Fetot]), efficiency of Fe(II) to Fe(III) oxidization with dissolved oxygen decreased, while the oxidation time was increasing. This rule was not demonstrated for potassium manganate (VII) when used as an oxidizing agent. The application of potassium manganate (VII) for oxidation of Fe(II) ions produced the better results in terms of total iron concentration reduction in the sedimentation process than the oxidation with dissolved oxygen.

  14. Mercury methylation coupled to iron reduction by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Youbin; Zou, Yan; Liu, Xiaohong; Si, Xiongyuan; Mao, Jingdong

    2015-03-01

    Iron reduction and mercury methylation by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB), Geobacter sulfurreducens and Shewanella oneidensis, were studied, and the relationship of mercury methylation coupled to iron reduction was determined. The ability of both bacteria for reducing iron was tested, and Fe(III) reduction occurred with the highest rate when ferric oxyhydroxide was used as a terminal electron acceptor. G. sulfurreducens had proven to mediate the production of methylmercury (MeHg), and a notable increase of MeHg following the addition of inorganic Hg was observed. When the initial concentration of HgCl2 was 500nM, about 177.03nM of MeHg was determined at 8d after G. sulfurreducens inoculation. S. oneidensis was tested negligible for Hg methylation and only 12.06nM of MeHg was determined. Iron reduction could potentially influence Hg methylation rates. The increase in MeHg was consistent with high rate of iron reduction, indicating that Fe(III) reduction stimulated the formation of MeHg. Furthermore, the net MeHg concentration increased at low Fe(III) additions from 1.78 to 3.57mM, and then decreased when the added Fe(III) was high from 7.14 to 17.85mM. The mercury methylation rate was suppressed with high Fe(III) additions, which might have been attributable to mercury complexation and low availability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Methanization potential of anaerobic biodigestion of solid food waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís R. G. de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Anaerobic biodigestion of solid and semi-solid wastes has been widely used for the treatment of these residues and methane production; however, during the process (more specifically in the acidogenic phase, there is a tendency of pH reduction, an unfavorable condition to methanogenic bacteria. Thus, the present work aims to evaluate the methanization potential of an agroindustrial anaerobic granular sludge (AIS from UASB (Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactor, individually and biodigested with food waste (FW from the University Restaurant of the Federal University of Pernambuco with buffering agent (AIS + FW + b and without it (AIS + FW. After the laboratory tests, the AIS + FW + b configuration obtained a cumulative methane production approximately six times greater than that of AIS + FW, and approximately twice that of the inoculum alone (AIS.

  16. A marine microbial consortium apparently mediating anaerobic oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boetius, A.; Ravenschlag, K.; Schubert, CJ

    2000-01-01

    microorganisms mediating this reaction have not yet been isolated, and the pathway of anaerobic oxidation of methane is insufficiently understood. Recent data suggest that certain archaea reverse the process of methanogenesis by interaction with sulphate-reducing bacteria(5-7). Here we provide microscopic...... cells and are surrounded by sulphate-reducing bacteria. These aggregates were abundant in gas-hydrate-rich sediments with extremely high rates of methane-based sulphate reduction, and apparently mediate anaerobic oxidation of methane.......A large fraction of globally produced methane is converted to CO2 by anaerobic oxidation in marine sediments(1). Strong geochemical evidence for net methane consumption in anoxic sediments is based on methane profiles(2), radiotracer experiments(3) and stable carbon isotope data(4). But the elusive...

  17. Anaerobic and aerobic transformation of TNT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulpa, C.F. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Boopathy, R.; Manning, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Research Div.

    1996-12-31

    Most studies on the microbial metabolism of nitroaromatic compounds have used pure cultures of aerobic microorganisms. In many cases, attempts to degrade nitroaromatics under aerobic conditions by pure cultures result in no mineralization and only superficial modifications of the structure. However, mixed culture systems properly operated result in the transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and in some cases mineralization of TNT occurs. In this paper, the mixed culture system is described with emphasis on intermediates and the characteristics of the aerobic microbial process including the necessity for a co-substrate. The possibility of removing TNT under aerobic/anoxic conditions is described in detail. Another option for the biodegradation of TNT and nitroaromatics is under anaerobic, sulfate reducing conditions. In this instance, the nitroaromatic compounds undergo a series of reductions with the formation of amino compounds. TNT under sulfate reducing conditions is reduced to triaminotoluene presumably by the enzyme nitrite reductase, which is commonly found in many Desulfovibrio spp. The removal of nitro groups from TNT is achieved by a series of reductive reactions with the formation of ammonia and toluene by Desulfovibrio sp. (B strain). These metabolic processes could be applied to other nitroaromatic compounds like nitrobenzene, nitrobenzoic acids, nitrophenols, and aniline. The data supporting the anaerobic transformation of TNT under different growth condition are reviewed in this report.

  18. Implementing Livestock Anaerobic Digestion Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page provides information to help make an informed decision about installing an anaerobic digester. Is it a good match for a farm’s organic waste, project financing, development guidelines and permit requirements?

  19. Anaerobic bacteria that dechlorinate perchloroethene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathepure, B Z; Nengu, J P; Boyd, S A

    1987-01-01

    In this study, we identified specific cultures of anaerobic bacteria that dechlorinate perchlorethene (PCE). The bacteria that significantly dechlorinated PCE were strain DCB-1, an obligate anaerobe previously shown to dechlorinate chlorobenzoate, and two strains of Methanosarcina. The rate of PCE dechlorination by DCB-1 compared favorably with reported rates of trichloroethene bio-oxidation by methanotrophs. Even higher PCE dechlorination rates were achieved when DCB-1 was grown in a methanogenic consortium. PMID:3426224

  20. Flow injection spectrophotometric determination of Fe(III) and V(v)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elrahman, Azza Mohamed

    2000-01-01

    Phenylflourone was synthesized with the objective of developing a method for determining Fe(III) and V(V) in the pressence of micelles using flow injectoin technique. Phenylflourone showed a wavelength of maximum absorption at 412 nm which was not affected by the presence of miccelles i.e. n-hexadodecylpyridinum bromide and sodium n-dodecylsulphate, but they have different effects on the absorbance of PHF. The example of PHF-Fe(III) and PHF-V(V) showed the wavelength of the maximum absorption at 4428 nm and 412 nm, respectively. Presence of micelles shifted the wavelength of the two complexes to a lower one. Generally the addition of micelles increased the absorbance of phenylflourone metal ions complexes except for PHF-V(V) with hexadodecylpyridinum bromide. With flow injection technique two approaches were practiced the use of micelle as a carrier or water as a carrier. Sodium n-dodecylsulphate increased the absorbance of the two complexes when it was used as a carrier or added to the metal ions using water as carrier. On the other hand, the use of n-hexadodecylpyridinum bromide as carrieer increased the absorbance of the complexes but it decreased the absorbance when it was used in conjunction with metal ions and water as a carrier. After establishing the optimum FI conditions for PHF-Fe(III) and PHF-V(V) complexes, the calibration curves were construction and produced semiliner response in the concentration range studied. Ti(IV) III, Mo(VI) showed a positive interference in PHF-Fe(III) and PHF-V(V) complexes, respectively.(Author)

  1. PENGOLAHAN LIMBAH CAIR INDUSTRI FARMASI FORMULASI DENGAN METODE ANAEROB-AEROB DAN ANAEROB-KOAGULASI

    OpenAIRE

    Farida Crisnaningtyas; Hanny Vistanty

    2016-01-01

    Studi ini membahas mengenai pengolahan limbah cair industri farmasi dalam skala laboratorium dengan menggunakan konsep anaerob-kimia-fisika dan anaerob-aerob. Proses anaerob dilakukan dengan menggunakan reaktor Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed reactor (UASBr) pada kisaran OLR (Organic Loading Rate) 0,5 – 2 kg COD/m3hari, yang didahului dengan proses aklimatisasi menggunakan substrat gula. Proses anaerob mampu memberikan efisiensi penurunan COD hingga 74%. Keluaran dari proses anaerob diolah lebih ...

  2. Geobacter daltonii sp. nov., an Fe(III)- and uranium(VI)-reducing bacterium isolated from a shallow subsurface exposed to mixed heavy metal and hydrocarbon contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Om; Gihring, Thomas M; Dalton, Dava D; Chin, Kuk-Jeong; Green, Stefan J; Akob, Denise M; Wanger, Greg; Kostka, Joel E

    2010-03-01

    An Fe(III)- and uranium(VI)-reducing bacterium, designated strain FRC-32(T), was isolated from a contaminated subsurface of the USA Department of Energy Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the sediments are exposed to mixed waste contamination of radionuclides and hydrocarbons. Analyses of both 16S rRNA gene and the Geobacteraceae-specific citrate synthase (gltA) mRNA gene sequences retrieved from ORFRC sediments indicated that this strain was abundant and active in ORFRC subsurface sediments undergoing uranium(VI) bioremediation. The organism belonged to the subsurface clade of the genus Geobacter and shared 92-98 % 16S rRNA gene and 75-81 % rpoB gene sequence similarities with other recognized species of the genus. In comparison to its closest relative, Geobacter uraniireducens Rf4(T), according to 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain FRC-32(T) showed a DNA-DNA relatedness value of 21 %. Cells of strain FRC-32(T) were Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, curved rods, 1.0-1.5 microm long and 0.3-0.5 microm in diameter; the cells formed pink colonies in a semisolid cultivation medium, a characteristic feature of the genus Geobacter. The isolate was an obligate anaerobe, had temperature and pH optima for growth at 30 degrees C and pH 6.7-7.3, respectively, and could tolerate up to 0.7 % NaCl although growth was better in the absence of NaCl. Similar to other members of the Geobacter group, strain FRC-32(T) conserved energy for growth from the respiration of Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide coupled with the oxidation of acetate. Strain FRC-32(T) was metabolically versatile and, unlike its closest relative, G. uraniireducens, was capable of utilizing formate, butyrate and butanol as electron donors and soluble ferric iron (as ferric citrate) and elemental sulfur as electron acceptors. Growth on aromatic compounds including benzoate and toluene was predicted from preliminary genomic analyses and was confirmed through successive transfer with

  3. THE INFLUENCES OF Fe(III ION and Fe(OH3 COLLOID ON THE PHOTODEGRADATION of p-CHLOROPHENOL CATALYZED BY TiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Tri Wahyuni

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The influences of ionic Fe(III and colloidal Fe(OH3 on the effectiveness of p-chlorophenol photodegradation catalyzed by TiO2 has been studied. Photodegradation was carried out in a batch system by irradiating a suspension of TiO2, p-chlorophenol, and Fe(III as ionic or colloidal forms, using UV lamp for a period of time accompanied by magnetic stirring. Concentration of photodegraded p-chlorophenol was calculated by subtracting the initial concentration with that of undegraded p-chlorophenol. Concentration of undegraded p-chlorophenol was determined by gas chromatography. In this study, TiO2 mass and the photodegradation time were optimized. The influences of concentration of Fe(III solution, mass of Fe(OH3, and pH of the solution have also been systematically studied. The research results showed that the presence of Fe(III ions improved the effectiveness of photocatalytical degradation of p-chlorophenol, which was proportional to the concentrations of Fe(III ion. In contrast, the increasing mass of Fe(OH3 led to a decrease in the degree of p-chlorophenol photodegradation. Furthermore, it was observed that increasing pH of the solution resulted in a decrease in the photodegradation of p-chlorophenol. This phenomena may be due to the different species of TiO2 available at the surface of photocatalyst and of ionic Fe(III and colloidal Fe(OH3 in the solution resulted from the pH alteration. The highest photodegradation degree, ca. 80 % was obtained when 20 mg of TiO2 was applied in the photodegradation of 50 mL of 100 ppm p-chlorophenol solution in the presence of 100 ppm Fe3+ irradiated by UV-light for 25 hours.    Keywords: p-chlorophenol photodegradation, TiO2, Fe(III species

  4. Ferrihydrite-associated organic matter (OM stimulates reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and a complex microbial consortia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Cooper

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation of Fe(III oxides in natural environments occurs in the presence of natural organic matter (OM, resulting in the formation of OM–mineral complexes that form through adsorption or coprecipitation processes. Thus, microbial Fe(III reduction in natural environments most often occurs in the presence of OM–mineral complexes rather than pure Fe(III minerals. This study investigated to what extent does the content of adsorbed or coprecipitated OM on ferrihydrite influence the rate of Fe(III reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model Fe(III-reducing microorganism, in comparison to a microbial consortium extracted from the acidic, Fe-rich Schlöppnerbrunnen fen. We found that increased OM content led to increased rates of microbial Fe(III reduction by S. oneidensis MR-1 in contrast to earlier findings with the model organism Geobacter bremensis. Ferrihydrite–OM coprecipitates were reduced slightly faster than ferrihydrites with adsorbed OM. Surprisingly, the complex microbial consortia stimulated by a mixture of electrons donors (lactate, acetate, and glucose mimics S. oneidensis under the same experimental Fe(III-reducing conditions suggesting similar mechanisms of electron transfer whether or not the OM is adsorbed or coprecipitated to the mineral surfaces. We also followed potential shifts of the microbial community during the incubation via 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses to determine variations due to the presence of adsorbed or coprecipitated OM–ferrihydrite complexes in contrast to pure ferrihydrite. Community profile analyses showed no enrichment of typical model Fe(III-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella or Geobacter sp., but an enrichment of fermenters (e.g., Enterobacteria during pure ferrihydrite incubations which are known to use Fe(III as an electron sink. Instead, OM–mineral complexes favored the enrichment of microbes including Desulfobacteria and Pelosinus sp., both of which can utilize lactate and

  5. Ferrihydrite-associated organic matter (OM) stimulates reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and a complex microbial consortia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Rebecca Elizabeth; Eusterhues, Karin; Wegner, Carl-Eric; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2017-11-01

    The formation of Fe(III) oxides in natural environments occurs in the presence of natural organic matter (OM), resulting in the formation of OM-mineral complexes that form through adsorption or coprecipitation processes. Thus, microbial Fe(III) reduction in natural environments most often occurs in the presence of OM-mineral complexes rather than pure Fe(III) minerals. This study investigated to what extent does the content of adsorbed or coprecipitated OM on ferrihydrite influence the rate of Fe(III) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model Fe(III)-reducing microorganism, in comparison to a microbial consortium extracted from the acidic, Fe-rich Schlöppnerbrunnen fen. We found that increased OM content led to increased rates of microbial Fe(III) reduction by S. oneidensis MR-1 in contrast to earlier findings with the model organism Geobacter bremensis. Ferrihydrite-OM coprecipitates were reduced slightly faster than ferrihydrites with adsorbed OM. Surprisingly, the complex microbial consortia stimulated by a mixture of electrons donors (lactate, acetate, and glucose) mimics S. oneidensis under the same experimental Fe(III)-reducing conditions suggesting similar mechanisms of electron transfer whether or not the OM is adsorbed or coprecipitated to the mineral surfaces. We also followed potential shifts of the microbial community during the incubation via 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses to determine variations due to the presence of adsorbed or coprecipitated OM-ferrihydrite complexes in contrast to pure ferrihydrite. Community profile analyses showed no enrichment of typical model Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella or Geobacter sp., but an enrichment of fermenters (e.g., Enterobacteria) during pure ferrihydrite incubations which are known to use Fe(III) as an electron sink. Instead, OM-mineral complexes favored the enrichment of microbes including Desulfobacteria and Pelosinus sp., both of which can utilize lactate and acetate as an electron

  6. Sphaerotilus natans encrusted with nanoball-shaped Fe(III) oxide minerals formed by nitrate-reducing mixotrophic Fe(II) oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunhwa; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2014-10-01

    Ferrous iron has been known to function as an electron source for iron-oxidizing microorganisms in both anoxic and oxic environments. A diversity of bacteria has been known to oxidize both soluble and solid-phase Fe(II) forms coupled to the reduction of nitrate. Here, we show for the first time Fe(II) oxidation by Sphaerotilus natans strain DSM 6575(T) under mixotrophic condition. Sphaerotilus natans has been known to form a sheath structure enclosing long chains of rod-shaped cells, resulting in a thick biofilm formation under oxic conditions. Here, we also demonstrate that strain DSM 6575(T) grows mixotrophically with pyruvate, Fe(II) as electron donors and nitrate as an electron acceptor and single cells of strain DSM 6575(T) are dominant under anoxic conditions. Furthermore, strain DSM 6575(T) forms nanoball-shaped amorphous Fe(III) oxide minerals encrusting on the cell surfaces through the mixotrophic iron oxidation reaction under anoxic conditions. We propose that cell encrustation results from the indirect Fe(II) oxidation by biogenic nitrite during nitrate reduction and that causes the bacterial morphological change to individual rod-shaped single cells from filamentous sheath structures. This study extends the group of existing microorganisms capable of mixotrophic Fe(II) oxidation by a new strain, S. natans strain DSM 6575(T) , and could contribute to biogeochemical cycles of Fe and N in the environment. © 2014 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Ecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  7. Importance of c-Type cytochromes for U(VI reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leang Ching

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to study the mechanism of U(VI reduction, the effect of deleting c-type cytochrome genes on the capacity of Geobacter sulfurreducens to reduce U(VI with acetate serving as the electron donor was investigated. Results The ability of several c-type cytochrome deficient mutants to reduce U(VI was lower than that of the wild type strain. Elimination of two confirmed outer membrane cytochromes and two putative outer membrane cytochromes significantly decreased (ca. 50–60% the ability of G. sulfurreducens to reduce U(VI. Involvement in U(VI reduction did not appear to be a general property of outer membrane cytochromes, as elimination of two other confirmed outer membrane cytochromes, OmcB and OmcC, had very little impact on U(VI reduction. Among the periplasmic cytochromes, only MacA, proposed to transfer electrons from the inner membrane to the periplasm, appeared to play a significant role in U(VI reduction. A subpopulation of both wild type and U(VI reduction-impaired cells, 24–30%, accumulated amorphous uranium in the periplasm. Comparison of uranium-accumulating cells demonstrated a similar amount of periplasmic uranium accumulation in U(VI reduction-impaired and wild type G. sulfurreducens. Assessment of the ability of the various suspensions to reduce Fe(III revealed no correlation between the impact of cytochrome deletion on U(VI reduction and reduction of Fe(III hydroxide and chelated Fe(III. Conclusion This study indicates that c-type cytochromes are involved in U(VI reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens. The data provide new evidence for extracellular uranium reduction by G. sulfurreducens but do not rule out the possibility of periplasmic uranium reduction. Occurrence of U(VI reduction at the cell surface is supported by the significant impact of elimination of outer membrane cytochromes on U(VI reduction and the lack of correlation between periplasmic uranium accumulation and the capacity for uranium

  8. Removal of pollutants from pulp and paper mill effluent by anaerobic and aerobic treatment in pilot scale bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, P.; Katiyar, D.; Gupta, M.

    2011-01-01

    Pilot-scale anaerobic and aerobic treatment in a two-step bioreactor was performed for the removal of pollutants from pulp and paper mill effluent. After seven days of anaerobic treatment, colour (45%), lignin (60%), COD (26%) and adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) (20%) were reduced. The anaerobic......Pilot-scale anaerobic and aerobic treatment in a two-step bioreactor was performed for the removal of pollutants from pulp and paper mill effluent. After seven days of anaerobic treatment, colour (45%), lignin (60%), COD (26%) and adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) (20%) were reduced....... The anaerobically treated effluent was then treated in a bioreactor in the presence of a fungal strain (Aspergillus fumigatus) or a bacterial strain (Pseudomonas ovalis). The results of this study indicated a reduction in colour (76% and 56%), lignin (78% and 68%), COD (85% and 78%) and AOX (70% and 82...

  9. Radionuclides can be mobilized by bacteria from the subsurface grown under aerobic as well as anaerobic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsson, A.; Arlinger, J.; Pedersen, K.; Albinsson, Y.; Andlid, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Microbes can influence radionuclide mobility in many ways. They can change the pH or redox of their surroundings, act as nucleation sites for precipitation, transport metals sorbed to the cell surface and excrete organic compounds that form mobile radionuclide complexes. The processes behind bio-mobilization of radionuclides are important to study as they may have implications on e g radioactive waste disposal. Three bacterial species; Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas stutzeri and Shewanella putrefaciens were selected for this study. All bacteria were grown under aerobic conditions and P. stutzeri and S. putrefaciens were also grown under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic and anaerobic cultures were centrifuged after having reached stationary phase. The supernatants, containing the exudates of the bacteria, were collected. 59 Fe(III), 147 Pm(III), 234 Th(IV) and 241 Am(III) were added to the supernatants and SiO 2 was added to the supernatant radionuclide mix. The amount of radionuclide in the liquid phase was analyzed using liquid scintillation counting and Na-I gamma spectrometry. Supernatants of all three species of aerobically grown bacteria mobilize more than 60% of all four radionuclides. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis detected four Fe-complexing substances in the supernatant of P. fluorescens and two peaks and one peak, respectively, in the supernatants of P. stutzeri and S. putrefaciens. All substances eluted from the column varied in retention times, indicating that the microbes produced several metabolites that have different complexing abilities. Comparing HPLC data with mobilization data show that P. fluorescens mobilizes the largest percentage of radionuclide and S. putrefaciens mobilizes the least amount of radionuclides in all cases. Like aerobic supernatants the supernatants of anaerobically grown bacteria test positive for siderophores. Despite this 59 Fe(III) shows no net mobilization

  10. Hydroponic system for the treatment of anaerobic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnasamy, K; Nair, J; Bäuml, B

    2012-01-01

    The effluent from anaerobic digestion process has high concentrations of nutrients, particularly nitrogen, essential for plant growth but is not suitable for direct disposal or application due to high chemical oxygen demand (COD), low dissolved oxygen (DO), odour issues and is potentially phytotoxic. This research explored the optimum conditions of anaerobic effluent for application and dilutions of the effluent required to obtain better plant growth. A small-scale hydroponic system was constructed in a glasshouse to test different concentrations of anaerobic effluent against a commercial hydroponic medium as the control for the growth of silverbeet. It was found that the survival of silverbeet was negatively affected at 50% concentration due to low DO and NH(4) toxicity. The concentration of 20% anaerobic liquid was found to be the most efficient with highest foliage yield and plant growth. The hydroponic system with 20% concentrated effluent had better utilisation of nutrients for plant growth and a COD reduction of 95% was achieved during the 50-day growth period. This preliminary evaluation revealed that the growth and development of silverbeet was significantly lower in anaerobic effluent compared with a commercial hydroponic plant growth solution. The nutrient quality of anaerobic effluent could be highly variable with the process and the waste material used and dilution may depend on the nutrient content of the effluent. It is recommended that, a pre-treatment of the effluent to increase DO and reduce ammonium content is required before plant application, and simple dilution by itself is not suitable for optimum plant growth in a hydroponic system.

  11. Influence of dissimilatory metal reduction on fate of organic and metal contaminants in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, Derek R.; Anderson, Robert T.

    Dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms have the ability to destroy organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions by oxidizing them to carbon dioxide. Some Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can also reductively dechlorinate chlorinated contaminants. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can reduce a variety of contaminant metals and convert them from soluble forms to forms that are likely to be immobilized in the subsurface. Studies in petroleum-contaminated aquifers have demonstrated that Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be effective agents in removing aromatic hydrocarbons from groundwater under anaerobic conditions. Laboratory studies have demonstrated the potential for Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms to remove uranium from contaminated groundwaters. The activity of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be stimulated in several ways to enhance organic contaminant oxidation and metal reduction. Molecular analyses in both field and laboratory studies have demonstrated that microorganisms of the genus Geobacter become dominant members of the microbial community when Fe(III)-reducing conditions develop as the result of organic contamination, or when Fe(III) reduction is artificially stimulated. These results suggest that further understanding of the ecophysiology of Geobacter species would aid in better prediction of the natural attenuation of organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions and in the design of strategies for the bioremediation of subsurface metal contamination. Des micro-organismes simulant la réduction du fer ont la capacité de détruire des polluants organiques dans des conditions anérobies en les oxydant en dioxyde de carbone. Certains micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent aussi dé-chlorer par réduction des polluants chlorés. Des micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent réduire tout un ensemble de métaux polluants et les faire passer de formes solubles à des formes qui sont susceptibles d'être immobilisées dans le milieu

  12. Photocatalytic Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Induced by Photolysis of Ferric/tartrate Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xianghua; Ding, Shimin; Zhang, Lixian [Yangtze Normal Univ., Fuling (China)

    2012-11-15

    Photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in ferric-tartrate system under irradiation of visible light was investigated. Effects of light resources, initial pH value and initial concentration of various reactants on Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction were studied. Photoreaction kinetics was discussed and a possible photochemical pathway was proposed. The results indicate that Fe(III)-tartrate system is able to rapidly and effectively photocatalytically reduce Cr(VI) utilizing visible light. Initial pH variations results in the concentration changes of Fe(III)-tartrate complex in this system, and pH at 3.0 is optimal for Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction. Efficiency of Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction increases with increasing initial concentrations of Cr(VI), Fe(III) and tartrate. Kinetics analysis indicates that initial Fe(III) concentration affects Cr(VI) photoreduction most significantly.

  13. Photocatalytic Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium Induced by Photolysis of Ferric/tartrate Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xianghua; Ding, Shimin; Zhang, Lixian

    2012-01-01

    Photocatalytic reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in ferric-tartrate system under irradiation of visible light was investigated. Effects of light resources, initial pH value and initial concentration of various reactants on Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction were studied. Photoreaction kinetics was discussed and a possible photochemical pathway was proposed. The results indicate that Fe(III)-tartrate system is able to rapidly and effectively photocatalytically reduce Cr(VI) utilizing visible light. Initial pH variations results in the concentration changes of Fe(III)-tartrate complex in this system, and pH at 3.0 is optimal for Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction. Efficiency of Cr(VI) photocatalytic reduction increases with increasing initial concentrations of Cr(VI), Fe(III) and tartrate. Kinetics analysis indicates that initial Fe(III) concentration affects Cr(VI) photoreduction most significantly

  14. Instrumentation in anaerobic treatment - research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjers, H.; Lier, van J.B.

    2006-01-01

    High rate anaerobic treatment reactors are able to uncouple solids and liquid retention time, resulting in high biomass concentrations. Principal advantages of anaerobic treatment include: energy efficiency, low biomass yield, low nutrient requirement and high volumetric organic loadings. In order

  15. RISK FACTORS IN NEONATAL ANAEROBIC INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Tabib

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic bacteria are well known causes of sepsis in adults but there are few studies regarding their role in neonatal sepsis. In an attempt to define the incidence of neonatal anaerobic infections a prospective study was performed during one year period. A total number of 400 neonates under sepsis study were entered this investigation. Anaerobic as well as aerobic cultures were sent. The patients were subjected to comparison in two groups: anaerobic culture positive and anaerobic culture negative and this comparison were analyzed statistically. There were 7 neonates with positive anaerobic culture and 35 neonates with positive aerobic culture. A significant statistical relationship was found between anaerobic infections and abdominal distention and pneumonia. It is recommended for those neonates with abdominal distention and pneumonia refractory to antibiotic treatment to be started on antibiotics with anaerobic coverage.

  16. Rapid arsenic(V)-reduction by fire in schwertmannite-rich soil enhances arsenic mobilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnston, Scott G.; Bennett, William W.; Burton, Edward D.

    2018-01-01

    (III) formation (∼90%) within 5–10 min at 400–600 °C, followed by partial re-oxidation to As(V) thereafter. In contrast, heating As(V)-schwertmannite in the absence of soil-organic matter did not cause reduction of As(V) or Fe(III), nor form maghemite; thus highlighting the critical role of organic matter......Arsenic in acid sulfate soil (ASS) landscapes commonly associates with schwertmannite, a poorly crystalline Fe(III) mineral. Fires in ASS landscapes can thermally transform Fe(III) minerals to more crystalline phases, such as maghemite (γFe2O3). Although thermal genesis of maghemite requires...... and hematite at temperatures above 300–400 °C, with some transitory formation of magnetite, and electrons are readily transferred to both Fe(III) and As(V). As(V) reduction to As(III) is influenced by a combination of temperature, heating duration and carbon content and is significantly (P

  17. Anaerobic biological treatment of in-situ retort water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ossio, E.; Fox, P.

    1980-03-01

    Anaerobic fermentation was successfully used in a laboratory-scale batch digester to remove soluble organics from retort water. Required pretreatment includes reduction of ammonia levels to 360 mg-N/l, pH adjustment to 7.0, sulfide control, and the addition of the nutrients, calcium, magnesium, and phoshorus. If the prescribed pretreatment is used, BOD/sub 5/ and COD removal efficiencies of 89 to 90% and 65 to 70% are achieved, respectively.

  18. Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria have lagged behind similar studies in aerobes. However, the current interest in biotechnology, the involvement of anaerobes in disease and the emergence of antibioticresistant strains have focused attention on the genetics of anaerobes. This article reviews molecular genetic studies in Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and methanogens. Certain genetic systems in some anaerobes differ from those in aerobes and illustrate the genetic diversity among bacteria

  19. [Anaerobic hydrolysis of terramycin crystallizing mother solution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, W; Wang, J; Liang, C; Qi, R; Yang, M

    2001-09-01

    The terramycin crystallizing mother solution contained high organics and high nitrogen. There were many kinds of bioinhibition in it but not enough electronic donor. Anaerobic hydrolysis of terramycin crystallizing mother solution was completed with up anarobic sludge bed in order to improve the biodegradability of wastewater and electronic donor in it. The variations of pH, COD, NH4+, and SO4(2-) were monitored. The COD removal was in a narrow range between 10% and 16.4% even when the HRT of the reactor was changed from 1.5 h to 6 h. pH increased because of formation of NH3 and reduction of SO4(2-). Most of SO4(2-) was reduced to S2- when the HRT was longer than 2 h. Batch experiments on hydrolyzed wastewater demonstrated that reaction rates of nitrification and denitrification increased by 90.9% and 45.2%, respectively.

  20. Studies of Binary Complexes of Tripodal Ligand cis,cis-1,3,5-tris(methylaminocyclohexane with Cr(III and Fe(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Esakki Muthu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of binary complexes of Cr(III and Fe(III with a tripodal ligand cis,cis-1,3,5-tris(methylaminocyclohexane (tmach (L has been investigated in solution. The overall stability constants of tmach with Cr(III and Fe(III were determined by potentiometric method at an ionic strength of 0.1 M NaClO4 at 25±1°C in aqueous medium. The formation of species like MLH25+, MLH4+, ML3+, ML(OH2+ and ML(OH3 were observed. Fe(III was found to form more stable complexes than Cr(III. Molecular mechanics calculations were performed to explain the mode of coordination in solution.

  1. Modification of Natural Zeolite with Fe(III) and Its Application as Adsorbent Chloride and Carbonate ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhartana; Sukmasari, Emmanuella; Azmiyawati, Choiril

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the research is to natural zeolite with Fe(III) using anion exchange process to improve the anion exchange capacity. Natural zeolite was activated using HNO3 1 N and then mixed with FeCl3 solution and refluxed followed by oven and calcination at a temperature of 550°C. The influence of Fe(III) to zeolite was characterized by FTIR while presence of Fe in zeolite characterized by AAS. Zeolite and Zeolite-Fe adsorption capacity of chloride and carbonate anions were determined through adsorption test by variation of pH and contact time. In advanced, and then to determining the Fe adsorbed concentration at Zeolite using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. FTIR analysis result showed that the addition of Fe does not affect the zeolite’s structure but change the intensity of the zeolite spectra. The Fe concentration in Zeolite-Fe of 714 mg L-1, indicate that Fe was present in the zeolite. Both Zeolite and Zeolite-Fe adsorbtion results showed that optimum pH of Chloride anion is 2, with adsorption capacity 2,33 x 10-3 gg-1 and optimum contact time is 8 minutes. While Zeolite and Zeolite-Fe adsorbtion results showed that optimum pH of Carbonate anion is 5, with adsorption capacity 5,31 x 10-3 gg-1 and optimum contact time is 8 minutes.

  2. Kinetics and modeling of anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion modeling started in the early 1970s when the need for design and efficient operation of anaerobic systems became evident. At that time not only was the knowledge about the complex process of anaerobic digestion inadequate but also there were computational limitations. Thus...

  3. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber. (a) Identification. An anaerobic chamber is a device intended for medical purposes to maintain an anaerobic (oxygen...

  4. Viscosity evolution of anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pevere, A.; Guibaud, G.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.; Baudu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the apparent viscosity at steady shear rate of sieved anaerobic granular sludge (20¿315 ¿m diameter) sampled from different full-scale anaerobic reactors was recorded using rotation tests. The ¿limit viscosity¿ of sieved anaerobic granular sludge was determined from the apparent

  5. The phenomenon of granulation of anaerobic sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshoff Pol, L.

    1989-01-01

    Successful high-rate anaerobic wastewater treatment can only be accomplished when the slowgrowing anaerobic biomass is efficiently held back in the anaerobic treatment system. This biomass retention can be achieved in various ways including immobilization of the organisms on fixed materials

  6. Dynamic simulation model for anaerobic digestion of cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.D.; Donaldson, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    A simple yet useful dynamic simulator for the anaerobic digestion of cellulosic feedstock has been developed. The incentive for this simulator is a need for guidance in design and optimization of an anaerobic digestin process for volume reduction and stabilization of low-level radioactive wastes generated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These wastes are primarily blotter and other paper and cotton/polyester clothing. Anaerobic digestion will convert a substantial mass (and hence volume) of waste to gaseous products which can be flared or simply released. The remaining sludge will contain the radionuclides and is expected to have only 5 to 10% of the original waste volume. This stabilized sludge will be more suitable for disposal by shallow land burial than is the original untreated waste. The liquid effluent will go to existing treatment facilities for hot liquids at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). An anaerobic digestion process can be scaled to handle small or modest quantities of waste and is expected to be vastly superior to incineration in this regard

  7. Global niche of marine anaerobic metabolisms expanded by particle microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Daniele; Weber, Thomas S.; Kiko, Rainer; Deutsch, Curtis

    2018-04-01

    In ocean waters, anaerobic microbial respiration should be confined to the anoxic waters found in coastal regions and tropical oxygen minimum zones, where it is energetically favourable. However, recent molecular and geochemical evidence has pointed to a much broader distribution of denitrifying and sulfate-reducing microbes. Anaerobic metabolisms are thought to thrive in microenvironments that develop inside sinking organic aggregates, but the global distribution and geochemical significance of these microenvironments is poorly understood. Here, we develop a new size-resolved particle model to predict anaerobic respiration from aggregate properties and seawater chemistry. Constrained by observations of the size spectrum of sinking particles, the model predicts that denitrification and sulfate reduction can be sustained throughout vast, hypoxic expanses of the ocean, and could explain the trace metal enrichment observed in particles due to sulfide precipitation. Globally, the expansion of the anaerobic niche due to particle microenvironments doubles the rate of water column denitrification compared with estimates based on anoxic zones alone, and changes the sensitivity of the marine nitrogen cycle to deoxygenation in a warming climate.

  8. Metagenomic insights into anaerobic metabolism along an Arctic peat soil profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Lipson

    Full Text Available A metagenomic analysis was performed on a soil profile from a wet tundra site in northern Alaska. The goal was to link existing biogeochemical knowledge of the system with the organisms and genes responsible for the relevant metabolic pathways. We specifically investigated how the importance of iron (Fe oxides and humic substances (HS as terminal electron acceptors in this ecosystem is expressed genetically, and how respiratory and fermentative processes varied with soil depth into the active layer and into the upper permafrost. Overall, the metagenomes reflected a microbial community enriched in a diverse range of anaerobic pathways, with a preponderance of known Fe reducing species at all depths in the profile. The abundance of sequences associated with anaerobic metabolic processes generally increased with depth, while aerobic cytochrome c oxidases decreased. Methanogenesis genes and methanogen genomes followed the pattern of CH4 fluxes: they increased steeply with depth into the active layer, but declined somewhat over the transition zone between the lower active layer and the upper permafrost. The latter was relatively enriched in fermentative and anaerobic respiratory pathways. A survey of decaheme cytochromes (MtrA, MtrC and their homologs revealed that this is a promising approach to identifying potential reducers of Fe(III or HS, and indicated a possible role for Acidobacteria as Fe reducers in these soils. Methanogens appear to coexist in the same layers, though in lower abundance, with Fe reducing bacteria and other potential competitors, including acetogens. These observations provide a rich set of hypotheses for further targeted study.

  9. Anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2003-01-01

    by the immobilization of the biomass, which forms static biofilms, particle-supported biofilms, or granules depending on the reactor's operational conditions. The advantages of the high-rate anaerobic digestion over the conventional aerobic wastewater treatment methods has created a clear trend for the change......-rate anaerobic treatment systems based on anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm are described in this chapter. Emphasis is given to a) the Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) systems, b) the main characteristics of the anaerobic granular sludge, and c) the factors that control the granulation process...

  10. Inhibition of Anaerobic Biological Treatment: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li; Ji, Dandan; Zang, Lihua

    2018-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a method for treating living and industrial wastewater by anaerobic degradation of organic compounds, which can produce biogas (carbon dioxide and methane mixture) and microbial biomass. And biogas as a renewable resource, can replace the use of ore fuel. In the process of anaerobic digestion, the problems of low methane yield and unstable reaction process are often encountered, which limits the widespread use of this technology. Various inhibitors are the main limiting factors for anaerobic digestion. In this paper, the main factors limiting anaerobic digestion are reviewed, and the latest research progress is introduced.

  11. Anaerobic bacteria as producers of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnken, Swantje; Hertweck, Christian

    2012-10-01

    Anaerobic bacteria are the oldest terrestrial creatures. They occur ubiquitously in soil and in the intestine of higher organisms and play a major role in human health, ecology, and industry. However, until lately no antibiotic or any other secondary metabolite has been known from anaerobes. Mining the genome sequences of Clostridium spp. has revealed a high prevalence of putative biosynthesis genes (PKS and NRPS), and only recently the first antibiotic from the anaerobic world, closthioamide, has been isolated from the cellulose degrading bacterium Clostridium cellulolyticum. The successful genetic induction of antibiotic biosynthesis in an anaerobe encourages further investigations of obligate anaerobes to tap their hidden biosynthetic potential.

  12. [Current clinical significance of anaerobic bacteremia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, Roman; Marešová, Veronika; Brož, Zdeněk

    2010-10-01

    to estimate tje current clinical significance of anaerobic bacteremia in a group of Czech hospitals. this retrospective analysis comprised 8 444 anaerobic blood cultures in patients admitted to four Czech hospitals between 2004 and 2007. in 16 patients, blood cultures yielded significant anaerobic bacteria. Thus, anaerobic bacteremia accounted for less than 2 % of clinically significant bacteremia. Four patients (18 %) died but none of the deaths could be clearly attributable to anaerobic bacteria in the bloodstream. The most common comorbidities predisposing to anaerobic bacteremia and the most frequent sources of infection were similar to those reported by other authors. The majority of anaerobic bacteremia cases were due to gram-negative bacteria, followed by Clostridium perfringens and, surprisingly, Eubacterium spp. (particularly Eubacterium lentum). anaerobic bacteremia remains rare. The comparison of our data with those by other authors suggests that (despite the reported high mortality) the actual clinical significance of anaerobic bacteremia is rather controversial and that the anaerobic bacteremia might not correspond to more serious pathogenic role of the anaerobic bacteria as the source of infection.

  13. The utility of anaerobic blood culture in detecting facultative anaerobic bacteremia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Kensuke; Komuro, Hisako; Watanabe, Yasushi; Miyairi, Isao

    2013-08-01

    Routine anaerobic blood culture is not recommended in children because obligate anaerobic bacteremia is rare in the pediatric population. However, a number of facultative anaerobic bacteria can cause community and hospital acquired infections in children and the utility of anaerobic blood culture for detection of these organisms is still unclear. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all blood culture samples (n = 24,356) at a children's hospital in Japan from October 2009 to June 2012. Among the samples that had paired aerobic and anaerobic blood cultures, 717 samples were considered clinically significant with 418 (58%) organisms detected from both aerobic and anaerobic cultures, 167 (23%) detected only from aerobic culture and 132 (18%) detected only from anaerobic culture. While most facultative anaerobes were detectable by aerobic culture, over 25% of Enterobacteriaceae and 15% of Staphylococcus sp. were detected from anaerobic cultures bottles only, suggesting its potential role in selected settings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes and presence of putative pathogens during ambient temperature anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, J A; Diniz, C G; Silva, V L; Otenio, M H; Bonnafous, A; Arcuri, P B; Godon, J-J

    2014-12-01

    This study was focused on evaluating the persistency of antimicrobial resistance (AR) genes and putative pathogenic bacteria in an anaerobic digesters operating at mesophilic ambient temperature, in two different year seasons: summer and winter. Abundance and dynamic of AR genes encoding resistance to macrolides (ermB), aminoglycosides (aphA2) and beta-lactams (blaTEM -1 ) and persistency of potentially pathogenic bacteria in pilot-scale anaerobic digesters were investigated. AR genes were determined in the influent and effluent in both conditions. Overall, after 60 days, reduction was observed for all evaluated genes. However, during the summer, anaerobic digestion was more related to the gene reduction as compared to winter. Persistency of potentially pathogenic bacteria was also evaluated by metagenomic analyses compared to an in-house created database. Clostridium, Acinetobacter and Stenotrophomonas were the most identified. Overall, considering the mesophilic ambient temperature during anaerobic digestion (summer and winter), a decrease in pathogenic bacteria detection through metagenomic analysis and AR genes is reported. Although the mesophilic anaerobic digestion has been efficient, the results may suggest medically important bacteria and AR genes persistency during the process. This is the first report to show AR gene dynamics and persistency of potentially pathogenic bacteria through metagenomic approach in cattle manure ambient temperature anaerobic digestion. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Reductive Dechlorination of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Marine Sediments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sowers, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    ... Community by Comparative Sequence Analysis of Genes Coding for 16S rRNA, Microbial Reductive Dechlorination of Aroclor 1260 in Anaerobic Slurries of Estuarine Sediments, Differential RFLP patterns of PCR...

  16. [Anaerobic bacteria 150 years after their discovery by Pasteur].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, José Elías; García-Sánchez, Enrique; Martín-Del-Rey, Ángel; García-Merino, Enrique

    2015-02-01

    In 2011 we celebrated the 150th anniversary of the discovery of anaerobic bacteria by Louis Pasteur. The interest of the biomedical community on such bacteria is still maintained, and is particularly focused on Clostridium difficile. In the past few years important advances in taxonomy have been made due to the genetic, technological and computing developments. Thus, a significant number of new species related to human infections have been characterised, and some already known have been reclassified. At pathogenic level some specimens of anaerobic microflora, that had not been isolated from human infections, have been now isolated in some clinical conditions. There was emergence (or re-emergence) of some species and clinical conditions. Certain anaerobic bacteria have been associated with established infectious syndromes. The virulence of certain strains has increased, and some hypotheses on their participation in certain diseases have been given. In terms of diagnosis, the routine use of MALDI-TOF has led to a shortening of time and a cost reduction in the identification, with an improvement directly related to the improvement of data bases. The application of real-time PCR has been another major progress, and the sequencing of 16srRNA gene and others is currently a reality for several laboratories. Anaerobes have increased their resistance to antimicrobial agents, and the emergence of resistance to carbapenems and metronidazole, and multi-resistance is a current reality. In this situation, linezolid could be an effective alternative for Bacteroides. Fidaxomicin is the only anti-anaerobic agent introduced in the recent years, specifically for the diarrhoea caused by C.difficile. Moreover, some mathematical models have also been proposed in relation with this species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. Environmentally-relevant concentrations of Al(III) and Fe(III) cations induce aggregation of free DNA by complexation with phosphate group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chao; Kang, Fuxing; Zhang, Wei; Shou, Weijun; Hu, Xiaojie; Gao, Yanzheng

    2017-10-15

    Environmental persistence of free DNA is influenced by its complexation with other chemical species and its aggregation mechanisms. However, it is not well-known how naturally-abundant metal ions, e.g., Al(III) and Fe(III), influence DNA aggregation. This study investigated aggregation behaviors of model DNA from salmon testes as influenced by metal cations, and elucidated the predominant mechanism responsible for DNA aggregation. Compared to monovalent (K + and Na + ) and divalent (Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ ) cations, Al(III) and Fe(III) species in aqueous solution caused rapid DNA aggregations. The maximal DNA aggregation occurred at 0.05 mmol/L Al(III) or 0.075 mmol/L Fe(III), respectively. A combination of atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that Al(III) and Fe(III) complexed with negatively charged phosphate groups to neutralize DNA charges, resulting in decreased electrostatic repulsion and subsequent DNA aggregation. Zeta potential measurements and molecular computation further support this mechanism. Furthermore, DNA aggregation was enhanced at higher temperature and near neutral pH. Therefore, DNA aggregation is collectively determined by many environmental factors such as ion species, temperature, and solution pH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Factors affecting the line-shape of the EPR signal of high-spin Fe(III) in soybean lipoxygenase-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slappendel, S.; Aasa, R.; Malmström, B.G.; Verhagen, J.; Veldink, G.A.; Vliegenthart, J.F.G.

    1982-01-01

    The yellow form of soybean lipoxygenase-1 (linoleate:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.13.11.12), obtained upon addition of one molar equivalent of acid (13--HPOD) to the native enzyme, shows a complex EPR signal around g 6 which results from contributions of different high-spin Fe(III) species with

  19. Desulfovibrio frigidus sp. nov. and Desulfovibrio ferrireducens sp. nov., psychrotolerant bacteria isolated from Arctic fjord sediments (Svalbard) with the ability to reduce Fe(III)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandieken, Verona; Knoblauch, Christian; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2006-01-01

    fermentation products such as hydrogen, formate and lactate with sulfate as the electron acceptor. Sulfate could be replaced by sulfite, thiosulfate or elemental sulfur. Poorly crystalline and soluble Fe(III) compounds were reduced in sulfate-free medium, but no growth occurred under these conditions...

  20. The Nature of the intermediates in the reactions of Fe(III)- and Mn(III)-microperoxidase-8 with H2O2 : a rapid kinetic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Primus, J.L.; Grunenwald, S.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Albrecht-Gary, A.M.; Mandon, D.; Veeger, C.

    2002-01-01

    Kinetic studies were performed with microperoxidase-8 (Fe(III)MP-8), the proteolytic breakdown product of horse heart cytochrome c containing an octapeptide linked to an iron protoporphyrin IX. Mn(III) was substituted for Fe(III) in Mn(III)MP-8.The mechanism of formation of the reactive metal-oxo

  1. Review of reactive kinetic models describing reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes in soil and groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Reductive dechlorination is a major degradation pathway of chlorinated ethenes in anaerobic subsurface environments, and reactive kinetic models describing the degradation process are needed in fate and transport models of these contaminants. However, reductive dechlorination is a complex biologi...

  2. Clinical features of anaerobic orthopaedic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, Dan; Kressmann, Benjamin; Gjoni, Shpresa; Zenelaj, Besa; Grosgurin, Olivier; Marti, Christophe; Zingg, Matthieu; Uçkay, Ilker

    2017-02-01

    Some patient populations and types of orthopaedic surgery could be at particular risk for anaerobic infections. In this retrospective cohort study of operated adult patients with infections from 2004 to 2014, we assessed obligate anaerobes and considered first clinical infection episodes. Anaerobes, isolated from intra-operative samples, were identified in 2.4% of 2740 surgical procedures, of which half (33/65; 51%) were anaerobic monomicrobial infections. Propionibacterium acnes, a penicillin and vancomycin susceptible pathogen, was the predominantly isolated anaerobe. By multivariate analysis, the presence of fracture fixation plates was the variable most strongly associated with anaerobic infection (odds ratio: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.3-3.5). Anaerobes were also associated with spondylodesis and polymicrobial infections. In contrast, it revealed less likely in native bone or prosthetic joint infections and was not related to prior antibiotic use. In conclusion, obligate anaerobes in our case series of orthopaedic infections were rare, and mostly encountered in infections related to trauma with open-fracture fixation devices rather than clean surgical site infection. Anaerobes were often co-pathogens, and cultures most frequently recovered P. acnes. These observations thus do not support changes in current practices such as broader anaerobe coverage for perioperative prophylaxis.

  3. The formation of light absorbing insoluble organic compounds from the reaction of biomass burning precursors and Fe(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Avi; Lin, Peng; Bhaduri, Bhaskar; Laskin, Alexander; Rudich, Yinon

    2017-04-01

    Dust particles and volatile organic compounds from fuel or biomass burning are two major components that affect air quality in urban polluted areas. We characterized the products from the reaction of soluble Fe(III), a reactive transition metal originating from dust particles dissolution processes, with phenolic compounds , namely, guaiacol, syringol, catechol, o- and p- cresol that are known products of incomplete fuel and biomass combustion but also from other natural sources such as humic compounds degradation. We found that under acidic conditions comparable to those expected on a dust particle surface, phenolic compounds readily react with dissolved Fe(III), leading to the formation of insoluble polymeric compounds. We characterized the insoluble products by x-ray photoelectron microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, elemental analysis and thermo-gravimetric analysis. We found that the major chromophores formed are oligomers (from dimers to pentamers) of the reaction precursors that efficiently absorb light between 300nm and 500nm. High variability of the mass absorption coefficient of the reaction products was observed with catechol and guaiacol showing high absorption at the 300-500nm range that is comparable to that of brown carbon (BrC) from biomass burning studies. The studied reaction is a potential source for the in-situ production of secondary BrC material under dark conditions. Our results suggest a reaction path for the formation of bio-available iron in coastal polluted areas where dust particles mix with biomass burning pollution plumes. Such mixing can occur, for instance in the coast of West Africa or North Africa during dust and biomass burning seasons

  4. Photoinduced electron transfer between Fe(III) and adenosine triphosphate-BODIPY conjugates: Application to alkaline-phosphatase-linked immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jia-Hui; Yang, Ya-Chun; Shih, Ya-Chen; Hung, Szu-Ying; Lu, Chi-Yu; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2016-03-15

    Fluorescent boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) analogs are often used as sensors for detecting various species because of their relatively high extinction coefficients, outstanding fluorescence quantum yields, photostability, and pH-independent fluorescence. However, there is little-to-no information in the literature that describes the use of BODIPY analogs for detecting alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and inhibition. This study discovered that the fluorescence of BODIPY-conjugated adenosine triphosphate (BODIPY-ATP) was quenched by Fe(III) ions through photoinduced electron transfer. The ALP-catalyzed hydrolysis of BODIPY-ATP resulted in the formation of BODIPY-adenosine and phosphate ions. The fluorescence of the generated BODIPY-adenosine was insensitive to the change in the concentration of Fe(III) ions. Thus, the Fe(III)-induced fluorescence quenching of BODIPY-ATP can be paired with its ALP-mediated dephosphorylation to design a turn-on fluorescence probe for ALP sensing. A method detection limit at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for ALP was estimated to be 0.02 units/L (~6 pM; 1 ng/mL). This probe was used for the screening of ALP inhibitors, including Na3VO4, imidazole, and arginine. Because ALP is widely used in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, the probe was coupled to an ALP-linked immunosorbent assay for the sensitive and selective detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG). The lowest detectable concentration for IgG in this system was 5 ng/mL. Compared with the use of 3,6-fluorescein diphosphate as a signal reporter in an ALP-linked immunosorbent assay, the proposed system provided comparable sensitivity, large linear range, and high stability over temperature and pH changes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Anaerobic biodegradation of spent sulphite liquor in a UASB reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantsch, T.G.; Angelidaki, Irini; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2002-01-01

    Anaerobic biodegradation of fermented spent sulphite liquor, SSL, which is produced during the manufacture of sulphite pulp, was investigated. SSL contains a high concentration of lignin products in addition to hemicellulose and has a very high COD load (173 g COD l1). Batch experiments...... ðl dÞ1 and hydraulic retention time from 3.7 to 1.5 days. The biogas productivity was 3 l ðlreactor dÞ1, with a yield of 0.05 l gas ðg VSÞ1. These results suggest that anaerobic digestion in UASB reactors may provide a new alternative for the treatment of SSL to other treatment strategies...... such as incineration. Although the total COD reduction achieved is limited, bioenergy is produced and readily biodegradable matter is removed causing less load on post-treatment installations. 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  6. Anaerobic treatment of distillery spent wash - a study on upflow anaerobic fixed film bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Bhavik K; Mohana, Sarayu; Madamwar, Datta

    2008-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of wastewater from a distillery industry having very high COD (1,10,000-1,90,000 mg/L) and BOD (50,000-60,000 mg/L) was studied in a continuously fed, up flow fixed film column reactor using different support materials such as charcoal, coconut coir and nylon fibers under varying hydraulic retention time and organic loading rates. The seed consortium was prepared by enrichment with distillery spent wash in a conventional type reactor having working capacity of 3 L and was used for charging the anaerobic column reactor. Amongst the various support materials studied the reactor having coconut coir could treat distillery spent wash at 8d hydraulic retention time with organic loading rate of 23.25 kg COD m(-3)d(-1) leading to 64% COD reduction with biogas production of 7.2 m3 m(-3)d(-1) having high methane yield without any pretreatment or neutralization of the distillery spent wash. This study indicates fixed film biomethanation of distillery spent wash using coconut coir as the support material appears to be a cost effective and promising technology for mitigating the problems caused by distillery effluent.

  7. Reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from vinasse through anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moraes, Bruna S.; Petersen, Søren O.; Zaiat, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Vinasse is a residue from bioethanol production that is produced in large quantities in Brazil and Europe and is applied to fields as a source of plant nutrients (fertirrigation). A side effect of this use is greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during storage and transport in open channels to fields...... with digestate, ranging from 0.173 to 0.193 kg CO2eq m−2 in the former and from 0.045 to 0.100 kg CO2eq m−2 in the latter. Extrapolation of the results to a Brazilian case indicated that AD treatment prior to storage/transport and field application could reduce GHG emissions from the vinasse management chain...

  8. Anaerobic thermophilic culture-system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljungdahl, L G; Wiegel, J K.W.

    1981-04-14

    A mixed culture system of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus and Clostridium thermocellum is employed for anaerobic, thermophilic ethanol fermentation of cellulose. By cellulase action, monosaccharides are formed which inhibit the growth of C. thermocellum, but are fermented by T. ethanolicus. Thus, at a regulated pH-value of 7.5, this mixed culture system of micro organisms results in a cellulose fermentation with a considerably higher ethanol yield.

  9. Endocarditis caused by anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestler, M; Muñoz, P; Marín, M; Goenaga, M A; Idígoras Viedma, P; de Alarcón, A; Lepe, J A; Sousa Regueiro, D; Bravo-Ferrer, J M; Pajarón, M; Costas, C; García-López, M V; Hidalgo-Tenorio, C; Moreno, M; Bouza, E

    2017-10-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) caused by anaerobic bacteria is a rare and poorly characterized disease. Most data reported in the literature are from case reports [1-3]. Therefore, we assessed the situation of anaerobic IE (AIE) in Spain using the database of the Spanish Collaboration on Endocarditis (GAMES). We performed a prospective study from 2008 to 2016 in 26 Spanish centers. We included 2491 consecutive cases of definite IE (Duke criteria). Anaerobic bacteria caused 22 cases (0.9%) of definite IE. Median age was 66 years (IQR, 56-73), and 19 (86.4%) patients were men. Most patients (14 [63.6%]) had prosthetic valve IE and all episodes were left-sided: aortic valves, 12 (54.5%); and mitral valves, 8 (36.4%). The most common pathogens were Propionibacterium acnes (14 [63.6%]), Lactobacillus spp (3 [13.63%]), and Clostridium spp. (2 [9.0%]), and the infection was mainly odontogenic. Fifteen of the 22 patients (68.2%) underwent cardiac surgery. Mortality was 18.2% during admission and 5.5% after 1 year of follow-up. When patients with AIE were compared with the rest of the cohort, we found that although those with AIE had a similar age and Charlson comorbidity index, they were more likely to have community-acquired IE (86.4% vs. 60.9%, p = 0.01), have undergone cardiac surgery (68.2% vs 48.7% p = 0.06), and have had lower mortality rates during admission (18.2% vs. 27.3%). IE due to anaerobic bacteria is an uncommon disease that affects mainly prosthetic valves and frequently requires surgery. Otherwise, there are no major differences between AIE and IE caused by other microorganisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Simple and convenient method for culturing anaerobic bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Behbehani, M J; Jordan, H V; Santoro, D L

    1982-01-01

    A simple and convenient method for culturing anaerobic bacteria is described. Cultures can be grown in commercially available flasks normally used for preparation of sterile external solutions. A special disposable rubber flask closure maintains anaerobic conditions in the flask after autoclaving. Growth of a variety of anaerobic oral bacteria was comparable to that obtained after anaerobic incubation of broth cultures in Brewer Anaerobic Jars.

  11. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation mediated by Mn-oxides: from sediment to strain level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanaud, Cedric; Michotey, Valerie; Guasco, Sophie; Garcia, Nicole; Anschutz, Pierre; Canton, Mathieu; Bonin, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    Nitrite and (29)N(2) productions in slurry incubations of anaerobically sediment after (15)NO(3) or (15)NH(4) labelling in the presence of Mn-oxides suggested that anaerobic Mn-oxides mediated nitrification coupled with denitrification in muddy intertidal sediments of Arcachon Bay (SW Atlantic French coast). From this sediment, bacterial strains were isolated and physiologically characterized in terms of Mn-oxides and nitrate reduction as well as potential anaerobic nitrification. One of the isolated strain, identified as Marinobacter daepoensis strain M4AY14, was a denitrifier. Nitrous oxide production by this strain was demonstrated in the absence of nitrate and with Mn-oxides and NH(4) amendment, giving indirect proof of anaerobic nitrate or nitrite production. Anaerobic Mn-oxide-mediated nitrification was confirmed by (29)N(2) production in the presence of (15)NO(3) and (14)NH(4) under denitrifying conditions. Anaerobic nitrification by M4AY14 seemed to occur only in the absence of nitrate, or at nitrate levels lower than that of Mn-oxides. Most of the other isolates were affiliated with the Shewanella genus and were able to use both nitrate and Mn-oxides as electron acceptors. When both electron acceptors were present, whatever their concentrations, nitrate and Mn-oxide reduction co-occurred. These data indicate that bacterial Mn-oxide reduction could be an important process in marine sediments with low oxygen concentrations, and demonstrate for the first time the role of bacteria in anaerobic Mn-mediated nitrification. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become

  13. Molecular ecology of anaerobic reactor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H. Jacob Peider; Zheng, D.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic reactor systems are essential for the treatment of solid and liquid wastes and constitute a core facility in many waste treatment plants. Although much is known about the basic metabolism in different types of anaerobic reactors, little is known about the microbes responsible for these ......Anaerobic reactor systems are essential for the treatment of solid and liquid wastes and constitute a core facility in many waste treatment plants. Although much is known about the basic metabolism in different types of anaerobic reactors, little is known about the microbes responsible...... to the abundance of each microbe in anaerobic reactor systems by rRNA probing. This chapter focuses on various molecular techniques employed and problems encountered when elucidating the microbial ecology of anaerobic reactor systems. Methods such as quantitative dot blot/fluorescence in-situ probing using various...

  14. Potential for anaerobic conversion of xenobiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Dolfing, J.; Haagensen, Frank

    2003-01-01

    This review covers the latest research on the anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic xenobiotic compounds, with emphasis on surfactants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalate esters, polychlorinated biphenyls, halogenated phenols, and pesticides. The versatility of anaerobic reactor systems...... regarding the treatment of xenobiotics is shown with the focus on the UASB reactor, but the applicability of other reactor designs for treatment of hazardous waste is also included. Bioaugmentation has proved to be a viable technique to enhance a specific activity in anaerobic reactors and recent research...

  15. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1991-06-01

    This study seeks to determine numbers, diversity, and morphology of anaerobic microorganisms in 15 samples of subsurface material from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in 18 samples from the Hanford Reservation and in 1 rock sample from the Nevada Test Site; set up long term experiments on the chemical activities of anaerobic microorganisms based on these same samples; work to improve methods for the micro-scale determination of in situ anaerobic microbial activity;and to begin to isolate anaerobes from these samples into axenic culture with identification of the axenic isolates.

  16. In situ and laboratory studies on the fate of specific organic compounds in an anaerobic landfill leachate plume, 1. Experimental conditions and fate of phenolic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Per H.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Heron, Gorm; Christensen, Thomas H.

    1995-11-01

    The transformation of specific organic compounds was investigated by in situ and laboratory experiments in an anaerobic landfill leachate pollution plume at four different distances from the landfill. This paper presents the experimental conditions in the in situ microcosm and laboratory batch microcosm experiments performed and the results on the fate of 7 phenolic compounds. Part 2 of this series of papers, also published in this issue, presents the results on the fate of 8 aromatic compounds and 4 chlorinated aliphatic compounds. The redox conditions in the plume were characterized as methanogenic, Fe(III)-reducing and NO 3--reducing by the redox sensitive species present in groundwater and sediment and by bioassays. With a few exceptions the aquifer redox conditions were maintained throughout the experiments as monitored by redox sensitive species present in groundwater during the experiments, by redox sensitive species present in the sediment after the experiments and by bioassays performed after the experiments. Transformation of nitrophenol was very fast close to the landfill in strongly reducing conditions, while transformation was slower in the more oxidized part of the plume. Lag phases for the nitrophenols were short (maximum 10 days). Phenol was only transformed in the more distant part of the plume in experiments where NO 3-, Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction was dominant. Lag phases for phenol were either absent or lasted up to 2 months. Dichlorophenols were only transformed in experiments representing strongly reducing, presumably methanogenic, redox conditions close to the landfill after lag phases of up to 3 months. Transformation of o-cresol was not observed in any of the experiments throughout the plume. Generally, there was good accordance between the results obtained by in situ and laboratory experiments, both concerning redox conditions and the fate of the phenolic compounds. However, for phenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol, transformation was observed

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED ANAEROBIC GROWTH OF BACILLUS MOJAVENSIS STRAIN JF-2 FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVED ANAEROBIC BIOSURFACTANT PRODUCTION FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.J. McInerney; M. Folmsbee; D. Nagle

    2004-05-31

    Our work focuses on the use of microorganisms to recover petroleum hydrocarbons that remain entrapped after current recovery technologies reach their economic limit. Capillary forces between the hydrocarbon and aqueous phases are largely responsible for trapping the hydrocarbons in the pores of the rock and large reductions in the interfacial tension between the hydrocarbon and aqueous phases are needed for hydrocarbon mobilization (1-3, 10, 11). Microorganisms produce a variety of biosurfactants (4), several of which generate the ultra low interfacial tensions needed for hydrocarbon mobilization (4, 5, 8). In particular, the lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus mojavensis strain JF-2 reduces the interfacial tension between hydrocarbon and aqueous phases to very low levels (<0.016 mN/m) (8) (9). B. mojavensis JF-2 grows under the environmental conditions found in many oil reservoirs, i. e., anaerobic, NaCl concentrations up to 80 g l{sup -1}, and temperatures up to 45 C (6, 7), making it ideally suited for in situ applications. However, anaerobic growth of B. mojavensis JF-2 was inconsistent and difficult to replicate, which limited its use for in situ applications. Our initial studies revealed that enzymatic digests, such as Proteose Peptone, were required for anaerobic growth of Bacillus mojavensis JF-2. Subsequent purification of the growth-enhancing factor in Proteose Peptone resulted in the identification of the growth-enhancing factor as DNA or deoxyribonucleosides. The addition of salmon sperm DNA, herring sperm DNA, E. coli DNA or synthetic DNA (single or double stranded) to Medium E all supported anaerobic growth of JF-2. Further, we found that JF-2 required all four deoxyribonucleosides (deoxyadeonosine, deoxyguanosine, deoxycytidine and thymidine) for growth under strict anaerobic conditions. The requirement for the deoxyribonucleosides did not occur under aerobic growth conditions. DNA was not used as a sole energy source; sucrose was required

  18. Application of a tetrazolium dye as an indicator of viability in anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhupathiraju, V K; Hernandez, M; Landfear, D; Alvarez-Cohen, L

    1999-09-01

    The use of the redox dye 5-cyano-2,3,-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) for evaluating the metabolic activity of aerobic bacteria has gained wide application in recent years. In this study, we examined the utility of CTC in capturing the metabolic activity of anaerobic bacteria. In addition, the factors contributing to abiotic reduction of CTC were also examined. CTC was used in conjunction with the fluorochrome 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl) aminofluorescein (DTAF), that targets bacterial cell wall proteins, to quantitate the active fraction of total bacterial numbers. Facultative anaerobic bacteria, including Escherichia coli grown fermentatively, and Pseudomonas chlorophis, P. fluorescens, P. stutzeri, and P. pseudoalcalegenes subsp. pseudoalcalegenes grown under nitrate-reducing conditions, actively reduced CTC during all phases of growth. Greater than 95% of these cells accumulated intracellular CTC-formazan crystals during the exponential phase. Obligate anaerobic bacteria, including Syntrophus aciditrophicus grown fermentatively, Geobacter sulfurreducens grown with fumarate as the electron acceptor, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans subsp. desulfuricans and D. halophilus grown under sulfate-reducing conditions, Methanobacterium formicicum grown on formate, H2 and CO2, and Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum grown autotrophically on H2 and CO2 all reduced CTC to intracellular CTC-formazan crystals. The optimal CTC concentration for all organisms examined was 5 mM. Anaerobic CTC incubations were not required for quantification of anaerobically grown cells. CTC-formazan production by all cultures examined was proportional to biomass production, and CTC reduction was observed even in the absence of added nutrients. CTC was reduced by culture fluids containing ferric citrate as electron acceptor following growth of either G. metallireducens or G. sulfurreducens. Abiotic reduction of CTC was observed in the presence of ascorbic acid, cysteine hydrochloride, dithiothreitol

  19. Enhanced natural attenuation of heterocyclic hydrocarbons: biodegradation under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of H2O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagner, A.; Tiehm, A.

    2005-01-01

    Heterocyclic aromatic compounds containing nitrogen, sulfur, or oxygen (NSO-HET) are highly mobile due to their high water solubility and low anaerobic degradation rates. In addition some of them are highly toxic and also carcinogenic. However, this class of pollutants is not included in standard risk assessment protocols. In our study, NSO-HET were analyzed in tar oil polluted groundwater plumes originating from (i) a small landfill and (ii) an abandoned manufactured gas plant site. A similar composition of the NSO-HET benzofuran, dibenzo-furan, benzo-thiophene, dibenzo-thiophene, quinoline, and carbazole was found at the two sites. In the polluted groundwater plume, the two ring NSO-HET decreased more rapidly as compared to the three ring NSO-HET. In anaerobic microcosm studies, only benzofuran was degraded under sulfate reducing conditions. In the presence of Fe(III) or nitrate, benzo-thiophene and dibenzo-thiophene were degraded within 400 days. Under aerobic conditions, the degradation of all NSO-HET was observed. In conclusion, the addition of oxygen or hydrogen peroxide is a suitable measure to stimulate biodegradation of hetero-aromatic compounds. (authors)

  20. Correlation between aerobic and anaerobic microflora of the urogenital tract at dysbiosis in women of Dnipropetrovsk city

    OpenAIRE

    Yaderna, A.; Golodok, L.; Vinnikov, A.

    2014-01-01

    The method of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in real-time was used to analyze the quantitative characteristics of normal and potentially pathogenic aerobic/facultative-anaerobic and anaerobic biota in the urethra, cervical channel and vagina in healthy women aged 10-40. The biota of all the women under 40 years and some of women older than 40 was mostly represented by lactobacilli. Microbial composition of the biocenosis in some women older than 40 is characterized by reduction in quantity o...

  1. Deep sequencing-based analysis of the anaerobic stimulon in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Virginia L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintenance of an anaerobic denitrification system in the obligate human pathogen, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, suggests that an anaerobic lifestyle may be important during the course of infection. Furthermore, mounting evidence suggests that reduction of host-produced nitric oxide has several immunomodulary effects on the host. However, at this point there have been no studies analyzing the complete gonococcal transcriptome response to anaerobiosis. Here we performed deep sequencing to compare the gonococcal transcriptomes of aerobically and anaerobically grown cells. Using the information derived from this sequencing, we discuss the implications of the robust transcriptional response to anaerobic growth. Results We determined that 198 chromosomal genes were differentially expressed (~10% of the genome in response to anaerobic conditions. We also observed a large induction of genes encoded within the cryptic plasmid, pJD1. Validation of RNA-seq data using translational-lacZ fusions or RT-PCR demonstrated the RNA-seq results to be very reproducible. Surprisingly, many genes of prophage origin were induced anaerobically, as well as several transcriptional regulators previously unknown to be involved in anaerobic growth. We also confirmed expression and regulation of a small RNA, likely a functional equivalent of fnrS in the Enterobacteriaceae family. We also determined that many genes found to be responsive to anaerobiosis have also been shown to be responsive to iron and/or oxidative stress. Conclusions Gonococci will be subject to many forms of environmental stress, including oxygen-limitation, during the course of infection. Here we determined that the anaerobic stimulon in gonococci was larger than previous studies would suggest. Many new targets for future research have been uncovered, and the results derived from this study may have helped to elucidate factors or mechanisms of virulence that may have otherwise been overlooked.

  2. Investigation of iron(III) reduction and trace metal interferences in the determination of dissolved iron in seawater using flow injection with luminol chemiluminescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ussher, Simon J. [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Milne, Angela [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4320 (United States); Landing, William M. [Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4320 (United States); Attiq-ur-Rehman, Kakar [Department of Chemistry, University of Balochistan, Quetta (Pakistan); Seguret, Marie J.M.; Holland, Toby [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Achterberg, Eric P. [National Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH (United Kingdom); Nabi, Abdul [Department of Chemistry, University of Balochistan, Quetta (Pakistan); Worsfold, Paul J., E-mail: pworsfold@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences (SEOES), University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-12

    A detailed investigation into the performance of two flow injection-chemiluminescence (FI-CL) manifolds (with and without a preconcentration column) for the determination of sub-nanomolar dissolved iron (Fe(II) + Fe(III)), following the reduction of Fe(III) by sulphite, in seawater is described. Kinetic experiments were conducted to examine the efficiency of reduction of inorganic Fe(III) with sulphite under different conditions and a rigorous study of the potential interference caused by other transition metals present in seawater was conducted. Using 100 {mu}M concentrations of sulphite a reduction time of 4 h was sufficient to quantitatively reduce Fe(III) in seawater. Under optimal conditions, cobalt(II) and vanadium(IV)/(III) were the major positive interferences and strategies for their removal are reported. Specifically, cobalt(II) was masked by the addition of dimethylglyoxime to the luminol solution and vanadium(IV) was removed by passing the sample through an 8-hydroxyquinoline column in a low pH carrier stream. Manganese(II) also interfered by suppression of the CL response but this was not significant at typical open ocean concentrations.

  3. Microbial Ecology of Anaerobic Digesters: The Key Players of Anaerobiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Shah, Fayyaz; Mahmood, Qaisar; Maroof Shah, Mohammad; Pervez, Arshid; Ahmad Asad, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the method of wastes treatment aimed at a reduction of their hazardous effects on the biosphere. The mutualistic behavior of various anaerobic microorganisms results in the decomposition of complex organic substances into simple, chemically stabilized compounds, mainly methane and CO2. The conversions of complex organic compounds to CH4 and CO2 are possible due to the cooperation of four different groups of microorganisms, that is, fermentative, syntrophic, acetogenic, and methanogenic bacteria. Microbes adopt various pathways to evade from the unfavorable conditions in the anaerobic digester like competition between sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and methane forming bacteria for the same substrate. Methanosarcina are able to use both acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic pathways for methane production. This review highlights the cellulosic microorganisms, structure of cellulose, inoculum to substrate ratio, and source of inoculum and its effect on methanogenesis. The molecular techniques such as DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) utilized for dynamic changes in microbial communities and FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) that deal with taxonomy and interaction and distribution of tropic groups used are also discussed. PMID:24701142

  4. Microbial ecology of anaerobic digesters: the key players of anaerobiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Shah, Fayyaz; Mahmood, Qaisar; Maroof Shah, Mohammad; Pervez, Arshid; Ahmad Asad, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the method of wastes treatment aimed at a reduction of their hazardous effects on the biosphere. The mutualistic behavior of various anaerobic microorganisms results in the decomposition of complex organic substances into simple, chemically stabilized compounds, mainly methane and CO2. The conversions of complex organic compounds to CH4 and CO2 are possible due to the cooperation of four different groups of microorganisms, that is, fermentative, syntrophic, acetogenic, and methanogenic bacteria. Microbes adopt various pathways to evade from the unfavorable conditions in the anaerobic digester like competition between sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and methane forming bacteria for the same substrate. Methanosarcina are able to use both acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic pathways for methane production. This review highlights the cellulosic microorganisms, structure of cellulose, inoculum to substrate ratio, and source of inoculum and its effect on methanogenesis. The molecular techniques such as DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) utilized for dynamic changes in microbial communities and FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) that deal with taxonomy and interaction and distribution of tropic groups used are also discussed.

  5. Factors controlling pathogen destruction during anaerobic digestion of biowastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.R.; Lang, N.L.; Cheung, K.H.M.; Spanoudaki, K.

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is the principal method of stabilising biosolids from urban wastewater treatment in the UK, and it also has application for the treatment of other types of biowaste. Increasing awareness of the potential risks to human and animal health from environmental sources of pathogens has focused attention on the efficacy of waste treatment processes at destroying pathogenic microorganisms in biowastes recycled to agricultural land. The degree of disinfection achieved by a particular anaerobic digester is influenced by a variety of interacting operational variables and conditions, which can often deviate from the ideal. Experimental investigations demonstrate that Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. are not damaged by mesophilic temperatures, whereas rapid inactivation occurs by thermophilic digestion. A hydraulic, biokinetic and thermodynamic model of pathogen inactivation during anaerobic digestion showed that a 2 log 10 reduction in E. coli (the minimum removal required for agricultural use of conventionally treated biosolids) is likely to challenge most conventional mesophilic digesters, unless strict maintenance and management practices are adopted to minimise dead zones and by-pass flow. Efficient mixing and organic matter stabilisation are the main factors controlling the rate of inactivation under mesophilic conditions and not a direct effect of temperature per se on pathogenic organisms

  6. Integrated anaerobic/aerobic biological treatment for intensive swine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortone, Giuseppe

    2009-11-01

    Manure processing could help farmers to effectively manage nitrogen (N) surplus load. Many pig farms have to treat wastewater. Piggery wastewater treatment is a complex challenge, due to the high COD and N concentrations and low C/N ratio. Anaerobic digestion (AD) could be a convenient pre-treatment, particularly from the energetic view point and farm income, but this causes further reduction of C/N ratio and makes denitrification difficult. N removal can only be obtained integrating anaerobic/aerobic treatment by taking into account the best use of electron donors. Experiences gained in Italy during development of integrated biological treatment approaches for swine manure, from bench to full scale, are reported in this paper. Solid/liquid separation as pre-treatment of raw manure is an efficient strategy to facilitate liquid fraction treatment without significantly lowering C/N ratio. In Italy, two full scale SBRs showed excellent efficiency and reliability. Current renewable energy policy and incentives makes economically attractive the application of AD to the separated solid fraction using high solid anaerobic digester (HSAD) technology. Economic evaluation showed that energy production can reduce costs up to 60%, making sustainable the overall treatment.

  7. The effect of aerobic corrosion on anaerobically-formed sulfide layers on carbon steel in dilute near-neutral pH saline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherar, B.W.A.; Keech, P.G.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The corrosion rate is low when steel is exposed to anaerobic conditions (pH = 8.9). •An anaerobic corrosion with sulfide to aerobic switch increases the corrosion rate. •Aerobic conditions leads to corrosion and oxide deposition beneath FeS. •Continual air exposure leads to the blistering of the original FeS film. -- Abstract: The aerobic corrosion of pipeline steel was investigated in an aqueous sulfide solution by monitoring the corrosion potential and periodically measuring the polarization resistance. The properties and composition of the corrosion product deposits formed were determined using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. The establishment of aerobic conditions leads to corrosion and (oxyhydr)oxide deposition beneath the anaerobically-formed mackinawite film originally present on the steel surface. This leads to blistering and spalling of the sulfide film. Chemical conversion of the mackinawite to Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides also occurs but is a relatively slow reaction

  8. ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF A BIODEGRADABLE MATERIAL UNDER ANAEROBIC - THERMOPHILIC DIGESTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RICARDO CAMACHO-MUÑOZ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper dertermined the anaerobic biodegradation of a polymer obtained by extrusion process of native cassava starch, polylactic acid and polycaprolactone. Initially a thermophilic - methanogenic inoculum was prepared from urban solid waste. The gas final methane concentration and medium’s pH reached values of 59,6% and 7,89 respectively. The assay assembly was carried out according ASTM D5511 standard. The biodegradation percent of used materials after 15 day of digestion were: 77,49%, 61,27%, 0,31% for cellulose, sample and polyethylene respectively. Due cellulose showed biodegradation levels higher than 70% it’s deduced that the inoculum conditions were appropriate. A biodegradation level of 61,27%, 59,35% of methane concentration in sample’s evolved gas and a medium’s finale pH of 7,71 in sample’s vessels, reveal the extruded polymer´s capacity to be anaerobically degraded under thermophilic- high solid concentration conditions.

  9. Effect Of Imposed Anaerobic Conditions On Metals Release From Acid-Mine Drainage Contaminated Streambed Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remediation of streams influenced by mine-drainage may require removal and burial of metal-containing bed sediments. Burial of aerobic sediments into an anaerobic environment may release metals, such as through reductive dissolution of metal oxyhydroxides. Mining-impacted aerob...

  10. Engineering of the redox imbalance of Fusarium oxysporum enables anaerobic growth on xylose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Christakopoulos, Paul; Grotkjær, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Dissimilatory nitrate reduction metabolism, of the natural xylose-fermenting fungus Fusarium oxysporum, was used as a strategy to achieve anaerobic growth and ethanol production from xylose. Beneficial alterations of the redox fluxes and thereby of the xylose metabolism were obtained by taking ad...

  11. Method for anaerobic fermentation and biogas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for biomass processing, anaerobic fermentation of the processed biomass, and the production biogas. In particular, the invention relates to a system and method for generating biogas from anaerobic fermentation of processed organic material that comprises...

  12. Integrated anaerobic and aerobic treatment of sewage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, K.

    1994-01-01

    This thesis describes results of investigations dealing with sequential concept of anaerobic-aerobic treatment of municipal wastewater. The main purposes of the study were 1) to develop a proper anaerobic hydrolytic pretreatment unit, consisting of a Hydrolysis Upflow Sludge Bed (HUSB-)

  13. Anaerobic exercise - Induced changes in serum mineral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaerobic exercise, a non 02 – dependent energy metabolism leads to transient metabolic changes, which are corrected gradually by homestatic mechanism. We investigated in eight male subjects, the effects of anaerobic exercise after a day sedentary activity on serum mineral concentration. There was significant ...

  14. Low intensity surplus activated sludge pretreatment before anaerobic digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suschka Jan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sewage sludge (municipal, or industrial treatment is still a problem in so far that it is not satisfactorily resolved in terms of cost and final disposal. Two common forms of sludge disposal are possible; the first being direct disposal on land (including agriculture and the second being incineration (ash production, although neither of these methods are universally applied. Simplifying the issue, direct sludge disposal on land is seldom applied for sanitary and environmental reasons, while incineration is not popular for financial (high costs reasons. Very often medium and large wastewater treatment plants apply anaerobic digestion for sludge hygiene principles, reducing the amount to be disposed and for biogas (energy production. With the progress in sewage biological treatment aiming at nutrient removal, primary sludge has been omitted in the working processes and only surplus activated sludge requires handling. Anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS is more difficult due to the presence of microorganisms, the decomposition of which requires a relatively long time for hydrolysis. In order to upgrade the hydrolysis effects, several different pre-treatment processes have already been developed and introduced. The additional pre-treatment processes applied are aimed at residual sludge bulk mass minimization, shortening of the anaerobic digestion process or higher biogas production, and therefore require additional energy. The water-energy-waste Nexus (treads of of the benefits and operational difficulties, including energy costs are discussed in this paper. The intensity of pre-treatment processes to upgrade the microorganism’s hydrolysis has crucial implications. Here a low intensity pre-treatment process, alkalisation and hydrodynamic disintegration - hybrid process - were presented in order to achieve sufficient effects of WAS anaerobic digestion. A sludge digestion efficiency increase expressed as 45% biogas additional

  15. Natranaerobaculum magadiense gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic, alkalithermophilic bacterium from soda lake sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavarzina, Daria G; Zhilina, Tatyana N; Kuznetsov, Boris B; Kolganova, Tatyana V; Osipov, Georgy A; Kotelev, Mikhail S; Zavarzin, Georgy A

    2013-12-01

    An obligately alkaliphilic, anaerobic, thermo- and halotolerant, spore-forming bacterium was isolated from sediments of soda lake Magadi (Kenya) and designated strain Z-1001(T). Cells of strain Z-1001(T) were straight, Gram-positive rods, slowly motile. Strain Z-1001(T) was found to be an obligate anaerobe. It grew within a pH range from 7.5 to 10.7 with an optimum at 9.25-9.5 (at 40 °C), a temperature range from 20 to 57 °C with an optimum at 45-50 °C, and a NaCl concentration range from 0 to 1.55 M with an optimum at 1.2-1.4 M. Peptides, such as meat and yeast extracts, peptone and tryptone, were fermented by Z-1001(T). Carbohydrates did not support growth. With yeast extract as an electron donor, strain Z-1001(T) reduced S(2)O(3)(2-), NO(-)(3), AsO(3-)(4), Fe(III) citrate and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as electron acceptors. The isolate was able to grow oligotrophically with a very small amount of yeast extract: 0.03 g l(-1). The main fatty acids were C16 : 0, C16 : 1ω7c, C18 : 0 and C18 : 1ω9. The DNA G+C content of the isolate was 35.6 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that strain Z-1001(T) is a member of family Natranaerobiaceae, clustering with the type strain of Natranaerobius thermophilus (95.8-96.0 % sequence similarity). On the basis of physiological and phylogenetic data it is proposed that strain Z-1001(T) ( = DSM 24923(T) = VKM B-2666(T)) represents a novel genus and species, Natranaerobaculum magadiense gen. nov., sp. nov.

  16. Biomass stabilization in the anaerobic digestion of wastewater sludges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaiz, C. [Universidad de Sevilla, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Ambiental, Sevilla (Spain); Gutierrez, J.C. [Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Dept. de Ciencias Ambientales, Sevilla (Spain); Lebrato, J. [Universidad de Sevilla, Grupo Tratamiento de Aguas Residuales, Sevilla (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    Sludge stabilization processes include both volatile solid destruction and biomass stabilization. Traditionally, both processes have been considered together, in such a way that, when volatile solid destruction is achieved, the biomass is considered stabilized. In this study, volatile solids reduction and biomass stabilization in the anaerobic digestion of primary, secondary and mixed sludges from municipal wastewater treatment plants were researched in batch cultures by measurements of suspended solids and suspended lipid-phosphate. The estimated kinetic constants were higher in all sludge types tested for the biomass stabilization process, indicating that volatile solids destruction and biomass stabilization are not parallel processes, since the latter one is reached before the former. (Author)

  17. Biochemistry of Catabolic Reductive Dehalogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincker, Maeva; Spormann, Alfred M

    2017-06-20

    A wide range of phylogenetically diverse microorganisms couple the reductive dehalogenation of organohalides to energy conservation. Key enzymes of such anaerobic catabolic pathways are corrinoid and Fe-S cluster-containing, membrane-associated reductive dehalogenases. These enzymes catalyze the reductive elimination of a halide and constitute the terminal reductases of a short electron transfer chain. Enzymatic and physiological studies revealed the existence of quinone-dependent and quinone-independent reductive dehalogenases that are distinguishable at the amino acid sequence level, implying different modes of energy conservation in the respective microorganisms. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about catabolic reductive dehalogenases and the electron transfer chain they are part of. We review reaction mechanisms and the role of the corrinoid and Fe-S cluster cofactors and discuss physiological implications.

  18. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes: laboratory tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.D.; Donaldson, T.L.

    1984-11-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work is underway using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale, to develop start-up and operating procedures, and to generate effluent for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and batch-fed conditions have been made lasting 36, 90, and over 200 days. Solids solubilization and gas production rates and total solids destruction have met or exceeded the target values of 0.6 g cellulose per L of reactor per day, 0.5 L off-gas per L of reactor per day, and 80% destruction of solids, respectively. Successful start-up procedures have been developed, and preliminary effluent characterization and disposal studies have been done. A simple dynamic process model has been constructed to aid in further process development and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester. 10 references, 17 figures, 4 tables

  19. Fe(III Is Essential for Porcine Embryonic Development via Mitochondrial Function Maintenance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hui Zhao

    Full Text Available Iron is an important trace element involved in several biological processes. The role of iron in porcine early embryonic development remains unknown. In the present study, we depleted iron (III, Fe3+ with deferoxamine (DFM, a specific Fe3+ chelator, in cultured porcine parthenotes and monitored embryonic development, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential, and ATP production. Results showed biphasic function of Fe3+ in porcine embryo development. 0.5 μM DFM obviously increased blastocyst formation (57.49 ± 2.18% vs. control, 43.99 ± 1.72%, P < 0.05 via reduced (P < 0.05 production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, further increased mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production in blastocysts (P < 0.05. 0.5 μM DFM decreased mRNA expression of Caspase 3 (Casp3 and increased Bcl-xL. However, results showed a significant reduction in blastocyst formation in the presence of 5.0 μM DFM compared with the control group (DFM, 21.62 ± 3.92% vs. control, 43.99 ± 1.73%, P < 0.05. Fe3+ depletion reduced the total (DFM, 21.10 ± 8.78 vs. control, 44.09 ± 13.65, P < 0.05 and increased apoptotic cell number (DFM, 11.10 ± 5.24 vs. control, 2.64 ± 1.43, P < 0.05 in the blastocyst. An obvious reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP level after 5.0 μM DFM treatment was observed. Co-localization between mitochondria and cytochrome c was reduced after high concentration of DFM treatment. In conclusion, Fe3+ is essential for porcine embryonic development via mitochondrial function maintenance, but redundant Fe3+ impairs the function of mitochondria.

  20. Preparation and characterisation of mixed ligand complexes of Co(III), Fe(III) and Cr(III) containing phthalimide and phenols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M.A.J.; Islam, M.S.; Pal, S.C.; Barma, T.K.

    1996-01-01

    Some novel mixed ligand complexes of Co(III), Fe(III) and Cr(III) containing phthalimide as primary and 2-aminophenol and 3-aminophenol as secondary ligands have been synthesized and characterised on the basis of elemental analyses, conductivity and magnetic measurements and infrared and electronic spectral studies. Complexes containing 2-aminophenol are 1:1 electrolyte in N,N dimethylformamide. Spectral studies indicate that all the complexes exhibit octahedral geometry. The complexes have the general composition; K[M(pim)/sub 2/(L)/sub 2/]; where m=Co(III), Fe(III) and Cr(III), pim-anion of phthalimamide and L=anion of 2-aminophenol and 3-aminophenol. (author)

  1. IR, UV-Vis, magnetic and thermal characterization of chelates of some catecholamines and 4-aminoantipyrine with Fe(III) and Cu(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; Zayed, M. A.; El-Dien, F. A. Nour; El-Nahas, Reham G.

    2004-07-01

    The dopamine derivatives participate in the regulation of wide variety of physiological functions in the human body and in medication life. Increase and/or decrease in the concentration of dopamine in human body reflect an indication for diseases such as Schizophrenia and/or Parkinson diseases. α-Methyldopa (α-MD) in tablets is used in medication of hypertension. The Fe(III) and Cu(II) chelates with coupled products of adrenaline hydrogen tartarate (AHT), levodopa (LD), α-MD and carbidopa (CD) with 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AAP) are prepared and characterized. Different physico-chemical methods like IR, magnetic and UV-Vis spectra are used to investigate the structure of these chelates. Fe(III) form 1:2 (M:catecholamines) chelates while Cu(II) form 1:1 chelates. Catecholamines behave as a bidentate mono- or dibasic ligands in binding to the metal ions. IR spectra show that the catecholamines are coordinated to the metal ions in a bidentate manner with O,O donor sites of the phenolic - OH. Magnetic moment measurements reveal the presence of Fe(III) chelates in octahedral geometry while the Cu(II) chelates are square planar. The thermal decomposition of Fe(III) and Cu(II) complexes is studied using thermogravimetric (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) techniques. The water molecules are removed in the first step followed immediately by decomposition of the ligand molecules. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, energy of activation, enthalpy, entropy and free energy change of the complexes are evaluated and the relative thermal stability of the complexes are discussed.

  2. Thiophene-based rhodamine as selectivef luorescence probe for Fe(III) and Al(III) in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun-Peng; Chen, Ju-Peng; Zhang, Si-Jie; Lei, Yang; Zhong, Hua; Chen, Shaojin; Zhou, Xin-Hong; Hu, Zhi-Qiang

    2017-09-01

    The thiophene-modified rhodamine 6G (GYJ) has been synthesized as a novel chemosensor. The sensor has sufficiently high selectivity and sensitivity for the detection of Fe 3+ and Al 3+ ions (M 3+ ) by fluorescence and ultraviolet spectroscopy with a strong ability for anti-interference performance. The binding ratio of M 3+ -GYJ complex was determined to be 2:1 according to the Job's plot. The binding constants for Fe 3+ and Al 3+ were calculated to be 3.91 × 10 8 and 5.26 × 10 8  M -2 , respectively. All these unique features made it particularly favorable for cellular imaging applications. The obvious fluorescence microscopy experiments demonstrated that the probes could contribute to the detection of Fe 3+ and Al 3+ in related cells and biological organs with satisfying resolution. Graphical abstract GYJ has high selectivity and sensitivity for the detection of Fe(III) and Al(III) with the binding ratio of 2:1.

  3. Purification of Anthocyanins with o-Dihydroxy Arrangement by Sorption in Cationic Resins Charged with Fe(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Castañeda-Ovando

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a new purification method of anthocyanins with o-dihydroxy arrangement is proposed. This method is based on a ligand-exchange mechanism, using a cationic exchange resin loaded with metallic ions in order to increase the affinity of the resin to the anthocyanin(s with o-dihydroxy arrangement. This method was used to purify the main anthocyanin (cyanidin-3-glucoside; Cy-3-glc from the anthocyanic methanolic extract of blue corn. The best sorption result was using Fe(III in its ion form. The purification procedure begins with the formation of a metal-anthocyanin complex (Cy-3-glc-Fe which was optimal at pH 5, followed by a NaOH 0.1 M elution process in order to eliminate anthocyanins without o-dihydroxy arrangement, sugars, and organic acids. Finally, the pure anthocyanin is obtained by adding HCl 0.1 M which breaks the metal-anthocyanin complex.

  4. Synthesis, Structural Characterization and Antimicrobial Activity of Cu(II and Fe(III Complexes Incorporating Azo-Azomethine Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Azam

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a novel azo-azomethine ligand, HL and its complexes with Cu(II and Fe(III ions. The ligand and its complexes are characterized by various physico-chemical techniques using C,H,N analyses, FT-IR, 1H-NMR, ESI-MS and UV-Vis studies. TGA analyses reveal complexes are sufficiently stable and undergo two-step degradation processes. The redox behavior of the complexes was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. Furthermore, the ligand and its complexes were tested for antimicrobial activity against bacterial and fungal strains by determining inhibition zone, minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC. The complexes showed moderate antimicrobial activity when tested against Gram +ve and Gram −ve bacterial strains. To obtain insights into the structure of ligand, DFT studies are recorded. The results obtained are quite close to the experimental results. In addition, the energy gap, chemical hardness, softness, electronegativity, electrophilic index and chemical potential were calculated using HOMO, LUMO energy value of ligand.

  5. Turn-on fluorogenic and chromogenic detection of Fe(III) and its application in living cell imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaraman, Gandhi; Sathiyaraja, Vijayaraj; Chellappa, Duraisamy

    2014-01-01

    Two rhodamine-based sensors RDI-1, RDI-2 was designed and synthesized by incorporation of the rhodamine 6G fluorophore and 2-formyl imidazole as the recognizing unit via the imine linkages. RDI-1, RDI-2 exhibits very high selectivity and an excellent sensitivity towards Fe(III) ions in aqueous buffer solution on compared with other probes. The color change from colorless to pink and turn-on fluorescence after binding with iron (III) was observed. Based on jobs plot and ESI-MS studies, the 1:1 binding mode was proposed. Live cell imaging experiments with each probe showed that these probes widely applicable to detect Fe 3+ in living cells. -- Highlights: • Two rhodamine based probes was synthesized and used to recognize iron (III). • The chemosensors can be applied to detect iron(III) ions by color and turn-on fluorescent changes. • The very low detection limit was reported. • The applicability of these probes for live cell fluorescence imaging was studied

  6. Turn-on fluorogenic and chromogenic detection of Fe(III) and its application in living cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaraman, Gandhi; Sathiyaraja, Vijayaraj; Chellappa, Duraisamy, E-mail: dcmku123@gmail.com

    2014-01-15

    Two rhodamine-based sensors RDI-1, RDI-2 was designed and synthesized by incorporation of the rhodamine 6G fluorophore and 2-formyl imidazole as the recognizing unit via the imine linkages. RDI-1, RDI-2 exhibits very high selectivity and an excellent sensitivity towards Fe(III) ions in aqueous buffer solution on compared with other probes. The color change from colorless to pink and turn-on fluorescence after binding with iron (III) was observed. Based on jobs plot and ESI-MS studies, the 1:1 binding mode was proposed. Live cell imaging experiments with each probe showed that these probes widely applicable to detect Fe{sup 3+} in living cells. -- Highlights: • Two rhodamine based probes was synthesized and used to recognize iron (III). • The chemosensors can be applied to detect iron(III) ions by color and turn-on fluorescent changes. • The very low detection limit was reported. • The applicability of these probes for live cell fluorescence imaging was studied.

  7. Interaction of Vimang (Mangifera indica L. extract) with Fe(III) improves its antioxidant and cytoprotecting activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L; Sánchez-Baldoquín, Carlos; Avila-González, Rizette; Yamamoto, Edgar T Suzuki; Revilla, Andrés; Uyemura, Sérgio Akira; Naal, Zeki; Delgado, René; Curti, Carlos

    2006-11-01

    A standard aqueous stem bark extract from selected species of Mangifera indica L. (Anacardiaceae)--Vimang, whose major polyphenolic component is mangiferin, displays potent in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activity. The present study provides evidence that the Vimang-Fe(III) mixture is more effective at scavenging 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide radicals, as well as in protecting against t-butyl hydroperoxide-induced mitochondrial lipid peroxidation and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced hepatocytes injury, compared to Vimang alone. Voltammetric assays demonstrated that Vimang, in line with the high mangiferin content of the extract, behaves electrochemically like mangiferin, as well as interacts with Fe(III) in close similarity with mangiferin's interaction with the cation. These results justify the high efficiency of Vimang as an agent protecting from iron-induced oxidative damage. We propose Vimang as a potential therapy against the deleterious action of reactive oxygen species generated during iron-overload, such as that occurring in diseases like beta-thalassemia, Friedreich's ataxia and haemochromatosis.

  8. Crystal structure of the coordination polymer [FeIII2{PtII(CN4}3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksym Seredyuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The title complex, poly[dodeca-μ-cyanido-diiron(IIItriplatinum(II], [FeIII2{PtII(CN4}3], has a three-dimensional polymeric structure. It is built-up from square-planar [PtII(CN4]2− anions (point group symmetry 2/m bridging cationic [FeIIIPtII(CN4]+∞ layers extending in the bc plane. The FeII atoms of the layers are located on inversion centres and exhibit an octahedral coordination sphere defined by six N atoms of cyanide ligands, while the PtII atoms are located on twofold rotation axes and are surrounded by four C atoms of the cyanide ligands in a square-planar coordination. The geometrical preferences of the two cations for octahedral and square-planar coordination, respectively, lead to a corrugated organisation of the layers. The distance between neighbouring [FeIIIPtII(CN4]+∞ layers corresponds to the length a/2 = 8.0070 (3 Å, and the separation between two neighbouring PtII atoms of the bridging [PtII(CN4]2− groups corresponds to the length of the c axis [7.5720 (2 Å]. The structure is porous with accessible voids of 390 Å3 per unit cell.

  9. Application Of Bacterial Iron Reduction For The Removal Of Iron Impurities From Industrial Silica Sand And Kaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, A.; Yahaya, S.; Fialips, C. I.; White, M.; Manning, D. A.; Gray, N.

    2008-12-01

    Biogeochemical evidence exists to support the potential importance of crystalline or amorphous Fe minerals as electron acceptor for Fe reducing bacteria in soils and subsurface sediments. This microbial metabolic activity can be exploited as alternative method in different industrial applications. For instance, the removal of ferric iron impurities from minerals for the glass and paper industries currently rely on physical and chemical treatments having substantial economical and environmental disadvantages. The ability to remove iron by other means, such as bacterial iron reduction, may reduce costs, allow lower grade material to be mined, and improve the efficiency of mineral processing. Kaolin clay and silica sand are used in a wide range of industrial applications, particularly in paper, ceramics and glass manufacturing. Depending on the geological conditions of deposition, they are often associated with iron (hydr)oxides that are either adsorbed to the mineral surfaces or admixed as separate iron bearing minerals. In this study, we have examined the Fe(III) removal efficiency from kaolin and silica sand by a series of iron- reducing bacteria from the Shewanella species (S. alga BrY, S. oneidensis MR-1, S. putrefaciens CN32 and S. putrefaciens ATCC 8071) in the presence of anthraquinone 2,6 disulfonate (AQDS). We have also investigated the effectiveness of a natural organic matter, extracted with the silica sand, as a substitute to AQDS for enhancing Fe(III) reduction kinetics. The microbial reduction of Fe(III) was achieved using batch cultures under non-growth conditions. The rate and the extent of Fe(III) reduction was monitored as a function of the initial Fe(III) content, Shewanella species and temperature. The bacterially- treated minerals were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to observe any textural and mineralogical transformation. The whiteness and ISO brightness of the kaolin was also measured by

  10. Solid-solution partitioning and thionation of diphenylarsinic acid in a flooded soil under the impact of sulfate and iron reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Meng [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Tu, Chen [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Hu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Haibo [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Lijuan [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Wei, Jing [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Li, Yuan [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Luo, Yongming, E-mail: ymluo@yic.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China); Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Christie, Peter [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is a major organic arsenic (As) compound derived from abandoned chemical weapons. The solid-solution partitioning and transformation of DPAA in flooded soils are poorly understood but are of great concern. The identification of the mechanisms responsible for the mobilization and transformation of DPAA may help to develop effective remediation strategies. Here, soil and Fe mineral incubation experiments were carried out to elucidate the partitioning and transformation of DPAA in anoxic (without addition of sulfate or sodium lactate) and sulfide (with the addition of sulfate and sodium lactate) soil and to examine the impact of sulfate and Fe(III) reduction on these processes. Results show that DPAA was more effectively mobilized and thionated in sulfide soil than in anoxic soil. At the initial incubation stages (0–4 weeks), 6.7–74.5% of the total DPAA in sulfide soil was mobilized likely by sorption competition with sodium lactate. At later incubation stage (4–8 weeks), DPAA was almost completely released into the solution likely due to the near-complete Fe(III) reduction. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) results provide further direct evidence of elevated DPAA release coupled with Fe(III) reduction in sulfide environments. The total DPAA fraction decreased significantly to 24.5% after two weeks and reached 3.4% after eight weeks in sulfide soil, whereas no obvious elimination of DPAA occurred in anoxic soil at the initial two weeks and the total DPAA fraction decreased to 10.9% after eight weeks. This can be explained in part by the enhanced mobilization of DPAA and sulfate reduction in sulfide soil compared with anoxic soil. These results suggest that under flooded soil conditions, Fe(III) and sulfate reduction significantly promote DPAA mobilization and thionation, respectively, and we suggest that it is essential to consider both sulfate and Fe(III) reduction to further our understanding of the environmental fate of

  11. The Role of Coulomb Interactions for Spin Crossover Behaviors and Crystal Structural Transformation in Novel Anionic Fe(III Complexes from a π-Extended ONO Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suguru Murata

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the π-extension effect on an unusual negative-charged spin crossover (SCO FeIII complex with a weak N2O4 first coordination sphere, we designed and synthesized a series of anionic FeIII complexes from a π-extended naphthalene derivative ligand. Acetonitrile-solvate tetramethylammonium (TMA salt 1 exhibited an SCO conversion, while acetone-solvate TMA salt 2 was in a high-spin state. The crystal structural analysis for 2 revealed that two-leg ladder-like cation-anion arrays derived from π-stacking interactions between π-ligands of the FeIII complex anion and Coulomb interactions were found and the solvated acetone molecules were in one-dimensional channels between the cation-anion arrays. A desolvation-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to desolvate compound 2’ may be driven by Coulomb energy gain. Furthermore, the structural comparison between quasi-polymorphic compounds 1 and 2 revealed that the synergy between Coulomb and π-stacking interactions induces a significant distortion of coordination structure of 2.

  12. Preliminary study on the photoproduction of hydroxyl radicals in aqueous solution with Aldrich humic acid, algae and Fe(III) under high-pressure mercury lamp irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianli; Xu, Dong; Wu, Feng; Liao, Zhenhuan; Liu, Jiantong; Deng, Nansheng

    2004-03-01

    Under a high-pressure mercury lamp (HPML) and using an exposure time of 4 h, the photoproduction of hydroxyl radicals (*OH) could be induced in an aqueous solution containing humic acid (HA). Hydroxyl radicals were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography using benzene as a probe. The results showed that *OH photoproduction increased from 1.80 to 2.74 microM by increasing the HA concentration from 10 to 40 mg L(-1) at an exposure time of 4 h (pH 6.5). Hydroxyl radical photoproduction in aqueous solutions of HA containing algae was greater than that in the aqueous solutions of HA without algae. The photoproduction of *OH in the HA solution with Fe(III) was greater than that of the solution without Fe(III) at pH ranging from 4.0 to 8.0. The photoproduction of *OH in HA solution with algae with or without Fe(III) under a 250 W HPML was greater than that under a 125 W HPML. The photoproduction of *OH in irradiated samples was influenced by the pH. The results showed that HPML exposure for 4 h in the 4-8 pH range led to the highest *OH photoproduction at pH 4.0.

  13. A voltammetric method for Fe(iii) in blood serum using a screen-printed electrode modified with a Schiff base ionophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Susheel K; Rana, Sonia; Kaur, Navneet; Banks, Craig E

    2018-05-23

    Herein, a potent electrochemical ionophore (SMS-2) based on a Schiff base has been used for the modification of a screen-printed electrode (SPE). The modified disposable electrode can selectively detect ferric ions in an aqueous medium. Redox behavior of the proposed strip was characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Incorporation of the ligand in the ink of the SPE enhanced the analytical performance of the electrode, and its surface modification was confirmed by SEM and EDX analysis. Shifting/quenching of the cathodic peak potential of the ionophore after binding with Fe(iii) ions was used to detect and measure the ferric ion concentration. This sensor can identify Fe(iii) in the detection range from 0.625 μM to 7.5 μM. The modified SPE can selectively detect ferric ions in the presence of many other interfering ions and has been successfully used to determine the Fe(iii) content in blood serum samples. The metal-ionophore complex structure was optimized using DFT calculations to study the energetics of the metal-ionophore interactions.

  14. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF DEGRADATION OF ISOPROTURON (3-(4-isopropylphenyl-1,1dimethylurea PHOTOINDUCED BY FE(III AND FE(III-PHOTOINDUCED SONOCHEMICAL IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Azizi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The degradation of isoproturon 3-(4-isopropylphenyl-1,1dimethylurea photoinduced by Fe(III in aqueous solution has been investigated. The rate of degradation depends on the concentration of Fe(OH2+, the most photoreactive species in terms of .OH radical formation. These .OH radicals are able to degrade isoproturon until total mineralisation. The formation  of  Fe(II in the irradiated solution was monitored. The sonophotochemical degradation of isoproturon has been found to be dependent on the intensity of sonication. The combination of ultrasound and photochemistry has been used to degrade an aqueous solution of Isoproturon (IP. The degradation of IP in aqueous solution was investigated under sonolysis at         500 kHz and in the presence of Fe(III, as well as under simultaneous sonolysis and photoinduced Fe(III. Coupling photolysis with ultrasound for degradation of IP has been developed. The photosonochemical decomposition rate constant is greater than the additive rate constants of the two processes. Degradation products were analysed by CG/MS performed in the electron-impact (EI mode, at 70 eV potential using full scan mode. Degradation photoproducts were identified and a mechanism of degradation is proposed for two processes.

  15. Reduction of Ferrrihydrite and Akaganeite by Shewanella alga (PAH93)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, M.; Kim, Y.; Lee, Y.; Kwon, K.; Roh, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Shewanella species are capable of oxidizing diverse organic acids coupled to reducing Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides to crystalline Fe(II)-containing phases such as magnetite, siderite, and vivianite. The objective of this study was to examine reduction of ferrihydrite and akaganeite as the electron acceptors using various organic acids as the electron donors by Shewanella alga (PAH93) isolated from Yeosu, South Korea. Microbial reduction of akaganeite (40 mM) and ferrihydrite (40 mM) was examined using acetate (10 mM), glucose (10 mM), and lactate (10 mM) as electron donors at room temperature. Ferrozine method was used to analyze both water soluble and HCl soluble Fe(II) concentrations during the microbial Fe(III) reduction. XRD and TEM-EDX analyses were used to characterize biominerals formed by PAH93. PAH93 was completely reduced ferrihydrite to Fe(II), which transformed as siderite (FeCO3). PAH93 was oxidized acetate, glucose, and lactate coupled to reducing akaganeite to magnetite or green rust. Microbial reduction of ferrihydrite resulted in higher soluble Fe(II) concentration (446 - 498 mg/L) than the reduction of akaganeite (255 - 284 mg/L) within 6 days of incubation. For 21 days of incubation, souble Fe(II) concentration during akaganeite reduction (945 - 1316 mg/L) was higher than ferrihydrite reduction (120 - 738 mg/L). It may be attributed to the differences of crystallinity of the iron minerals used for microbial iron reduction. This study indicates types of the electron acceptors, ferrihydrite and akaganeite, affect Fe(II) reduction rate and types of the biotransformed minerals.

  16. Kraft pulp and paper mill wastewater treatment using fixed bed anaerobic reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damianovic, M. H. R. Z; Ruas, D.; Pires, E. C.; Foresti, E.

    2009-01-01

    The effluents of pulp mills contain a myriad of toxic compounds, biodegradable organic matter and sulfur compounds. to decrease the amount of fresh water required for pulp and paper production closed circuits are in use, however, higher concentrations of slat, as oxidized sulfur compounds, are encountered in the wastewaters. energy costs and new environmental concerns are motivating the use of anaerobic pretreatment as a way to decrease energy expenditure in the treatment plant together with lower sludge production. In anaerobic environment, the organic matter removal can follow methanogenic or sulfidogenic paths and with the latter simultaneous reduction of the oxidized sulfur compounds also occurs. (Author)

  17. EFFECT OF MUSIC ON ANAEROBIC EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülin Atan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST under 3 conditions on separate days: while listening to “slow rhythm music”, “fast rhythm music” or “no music”. 48 hours after the subjects completed RAST under 3 conditions, Wingate Anaerobic Power (WAN tests were performed under 3 music conditions. The order of the 3 conditions (slow music, fast music and no music was selected randomly to prevent an order effect. Results showed no significant differences between 3 conditions in anaerobic power assessments, heart rate or blood lactate (p>0.05. On the basis of these results it can be said that music cannot improve anaerobic performance. The type of music had no impact on power outputs during RAST and WAN exercise. As a conclusion, listening to music and its rhythm cannot enhance anaerobic performance and cannot change the physiological response to supramaximal exercise.

  18. A simple anaerobic system for onsite treatment of domestic wastewater

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among several anaerobic treatment processes, high rate anaerobic digesters receive great attention due to its high loading capacity and chemical oxygen demand removal rate. Up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB) is getting wide acceptance among several anaerobic processes. However, its application is still ...

  19. Isolation of anaerobes from bubo associated with chancroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B; Sharma, V K; Bakaya, V; Ayyagiri, A

    1991-01-01

    Ten men with bubo associated with chancroid were studied for bacterial flora especially anaerobes. Anaerobes were isolated from all 10 buboes and eight out of 10 ulcers of chancroid. Anaerobic cocci, B melaninogenicus and B fragilis were the most common isolates. anaerobes probably play a role in the pathogenesis of bubo in chancroid. PMID:1680792

  20. Anaerobic digestion of hog wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taiganides, E P; Baumann, E R; Johnson, H P; Hazen, T E

    1963-01-01

    A short history, a list of advantages and limitations, and a short introduction to the principles of the process of anaerobic digestion are given. Six five gallon bottle digesters were daily fed hog manure, maintained at 35/sup 0/C, and constantly agitated. Satisfactory operation was assured at 3.2 g VS/l/day with a detention time of 10 days, yielding 490-643 ml gas/g VS/day with a CH/sub 4/ content of 59% (2.1 x 10/sup 7/ joules/m/sup 3/). A figure and discussion portray the interrelationships of loading rate, solids concentration and detention time. They estimate that a marginal profit might be obtained by the operation of a heated digester handling the wastes of 10,000 hogs.

  1. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr Robin Gerlach; Erin K. Field; Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel; Al B. Cunningham

    2011-09-01

    Microbially reduced iron minerals can reductively transform a variety of contaminants including heavy metals, radionuclides, chlorinated aliphatics, and nitroaromatics. A number of Cellulomonas spp. strains, including strain ES6, isolated from aquifer samples obtained at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington, have been shown to be capable of reducing Cr(VI), TNT, natural organic matter, and soluble ferric iron [Fe(III)]. This research investigated the ability of Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to reduce solid phase and dissolved Fe(III) utilizing different carbon sources and various electron shuttling compounds. Results suggest that Fe(III) reduction by and growth of strain ES6 was dependent upon the type of electron donor, the form of iron present, and the presence of synthetic or natural organic matter, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) or humic substances. This research suggests that Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 could play a significant role in metal reduction in the Hanford subsurface and that the choice of carbon source and organic matter addition can allow for independent control of growth and iron reduction activity.

  2. Anaerobic degradation of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Haagensen, Frank; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    Linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) found in wastewater is removed in the wastewater treatment facilities by sorption and aerobic biodegradation. The anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge has not been shown to contribute to the removal. The concentration of LAS based on dry matter typically...... increases during anaerobic stabilization due to transformation of easily degradable organic matter. Hence, LAS is regarded as resistant to biodegradation under anaerobic conditions. We present data from a lab-scale semi-continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) spiked with linear dodecylbenzene sulfonate (C...

  3. Intraspecific variation in aerobic and anaerobic locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jon Christian; Tirsgård, Bjørn; Cordero, Gerardo A.

    2015-01-01

    to unsteady (i.e., burst-assisted) swimming is associated with anaerobic metabolism evidenced as excess post exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC); (2) variation in swimming performance (critical swimming speed; U crit) correlates with metabolic scope (MS) or anaerobic capacity (i.e., maximum EPOC); (3...... respirometry and video analysis. Results showed that anaerobic swimming costs (i.e., EPOC) increase linearly with the number of bursts in S. aurata, with each burst corresponding to 0.53 mg O2 kg(-1). Data are consistent with a previous study on striped surfperch (Embiotoca lateralis), a labriform swimmer...

  4. Effects of chlortetracycline and copper on tetracyclines and copper resistance genes and microbial community during swine manure anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Chen, Meixue; Feng, Feng; Zhang, Junya; Sui, Qianwen; Tong, Juan; Wei, Yuansong; Wei, Dongbin

    2017-08-01

    As antibiotic and heavy metals are over used in the livestock industry, animal manure is a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Anaerobic digestion has been reported to have the potential to reduce ARGs. However, few studies investigated whether reduction of ARGs would be affected by different external pressures including antibiotics and heavy metals during anaerobic digestion. The purpose of this study was thus to investigate effects of both chlortetracycline (CTC) and Cu on reduction of ARGs, heavy metal resistance genes (HMRGs) and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) during the swine manure anaerobic digestion. The results showed that the predominant ARGs (tetO, tetW, tetX, tetL) could be effectively reduced (approximately 1.00 log copies/g TS) through mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Microbial community evolution was the main driver. It was interesting that Treponema might indicate the termination of anaerobic digestion and compete with ARGs host bacteria. Addition of CTC, Cu and CTC+Cu affected microbial community change and hindered removal of ARGs, especially, CTC+Cu seriously affected Treponema and ARGs during anaerobic digestion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Accelerated anaerobic hydrolysis rates under a combination of intermittent aeration and anaerobic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T. R.; Lastra Milone, T.; Petersen, G.

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic hydrolysis in activated return sludge was investigated in laboratory scale experiments to find if intermittent aeration would accelerate anaerobic hydrolysis rates compared to anaerobic hydrolysis rates under strict anaerobic conditions. The intermittent reactors were set up in a 240 h...... for calculating hydrolysis rates based on soluble COD were compared. Two-way ANOVA with the Bonferroni post-test was performed in order to register any significant difference between reactors with intermittent aeration and strictly anaerobic conditions respectively. The experiment demonstrated a statistically...... significant difference in favor of the reactors with intermittent aeration showing a tendency towards accelerated anaerobic hydrolysis rates due to application of intermittent aeration. The conclusion of the work is thus that intermittent aeration applied in the activated return sludge process (ARP) can...

  6. Energetic and biochemical valorization of cork boiling wastewater by anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Isabel Paula; Gil, Luís; La Cara, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    In addition to energy benefits, anaerobic digestion offers other interesting advantages. The cork industry is of great environmental, economic and social significance in the western Mediterranean region, with Portugal being the world-leading producer and exporter. Cork boiling wastewater (CBW) is a toxic and recalcitrant organic effluent produced by this sector, which constitutes a serious environmental hazard. However, there is no documented research on anaerobic treatment/valorization performed with this effluent. The work presented here was developed with the aim to use the anaerobic digestion process to convert the CBW polluting organic load into an energy carrier gas and valuable molecules for industry. No lag phases were observed and a methane yield of 0.126 to 0.142 m(3) kg(-1) chemical oxygen demand (COD)added was registered in the mesophilic consortium experiments carried out in batch flasks at 37 ± 1°C. Anaerobic digestion can be advantageously connected to ultrafiltration or electrochemical processes, due to the following: 1) reduction of ellagic acid content and consequent decrease of CBW viscosity; and 2) increase in conductivity after the anaerobic process, avoiding the electrolyte application of the electrochemical process. The improvement of several CBW biochemical features shows that anaerobic digestion may provide additionally useful molecules. The rise in concentration of some of these compounds, belonging to the benzoic acid family (gallic, protocatechuic, vanillic and syringic acids), is responsible for the increase of antiradical activity of the phenolic fraction. Additionally, some enzymatic activity was also observed and while the laccase activity increased in the digested effluent by anaerobiosis, xylanase was formed in the process. The multidisciplinary approach adopted allowed the valorization of CBW in terms of energy and valuable biomolecules. By exploiting the anaerobic digestion process potential, a novel methodology to toxic

  7. Mesophilic anaerobic digestion of a mixture of cheese whey and dairy manure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, K.V.; Liao, P.H.; Chiu, C.

    1988-01-01

    Mesophilic anaerobic digestion of a mixture of cheese whey and dairy manure was investigated using an anaerobic rotating biological contact reactor operated over a range of hydraulic retention time at various organic loading rates. Dairy manure provided nutrients and acted as a buffer to the cheese whey. Rates of production of methane from the mixture were between those of cheese whey and screened dairy manure and in agreement with calculated theoretical methane production rates. Methane production rate showed a linear relationship with the organic loading rate. The highest methane production rate was 3.74 liter methane litre/sup -1/ day/sup -1/. Reduction in the chemical oxygen demand ranged from 46.3% to 67.5%. Anaerobic digestion of such mixtures could be used as an initial waste treatment for cheese whey.

  8. Influence of leachate recirculation on aerobic and anaerobic decomposition of solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilgili, M. Sinan; Demir, Ahmet; Ozkaya, Bestamin

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the effect of leachate recirculation on aerobic and anaerobic degradation of municipal solid wastes is determined by four laboratory-scale landfill reactors. The options studied and compared with the traditional anaerobic landfill are: leachate recirculation, landfill aeration, and aeration with leachate recirculation. Leachate quality is regularly monitored by the means of pH, alkalinity, total dissolved solids, conductivity, oxidation-reduction potential, chloride, chemical oxygen demand, ammonia, and total Kjeldahl nitrogen, in addition to generated leachate quantity. Aerobic leachate recirculated landfill appears to be the most effective option in the removal of organic matter and ammonia. The main difference between aerobic recirculated and non-recirculated landfill options is determined at leachate quantity. Recirculation is more effective on anaerobic degradation of solid waste than aerobic degradation. Further studies are going on to determine the optimum operational conditions for aeration and leachate recirculation rates, also with the operational costs of aeration and recirculation

  9. Anaerobic digestion of olive oil mill effluents together with swine manure in UASB reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Deng, H.

    2002-01-01

    Combined anaerobic digestion of olive oil mill effluent (OME) with swine manure, was investigated. In batch experiments was shown that for anaerobic degradation of OME alone nitrogen addition was needed. A COD:N ratio in the range of 65:1 to 126:1 was necessary for the optimal degradation process....... Furthermore, it was found that methane productions rates during digestion of either swine manure alone or OME alone were much lower than the rates achieved when OME and manure were digested together. Admixing OME with manure at a concentration of 5 to 10% OME resulted in the highest methane production rates....... Using upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors, it was shown that codigestion of OME with swine manure (up to 50% OME) was successful with a COD reduction up to 75%. The process was adapted for degradation of OME with stepwise increase of the OME load to the UASB reactor. The results showed...

  10. Anaerobic methanotrophic communities thrive in deep submarine permafrost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Matthias; Mitzscherling, Julia; Overduin, Pier P; Horn, Fabian; Winterfeld, Maria; Rijkers, Ruud; Grigoriev, Mikhail N; Knoblauch, Christian; Mangelsdorf, Kai; Wagner, Dirk; Liebner, Susanne

    2018-01-22

    Thawing submarine permafrost is a source of methane to the subsurface biosphere. Methane oxidation in submarine permafrost sediments has been proposed, but the responsible microorganisms remain uncharacterized. We analyzed archaeal communities and identified distinct anaerobic methanotrophic assemblages of marine and terrestrial origin (ANME-2a/b, ANME-2d) both in frozen and completely thawed submarine permafrost sediments. Besides archaea potentially involved in anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) we found a large diversity of archaea mainly belonging to Bathyarchaeota, Thaumarchaeota, and Euryarchaeota. Methane concentrations and δ 13 C-methane signatures distinguish horizons of potential AOM coupled either to sulfate reduction in a sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) or to the reduction of other electron acceptors, such as iron, manganese or nitrate. Analysis of functional marker genes (mcrA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) corroborate potential activity of AOM communities in submarine permafrost sediments at low temperatures. Modeled potential AOM consumes 72-100% of submarine permafrost methane and up to 1.2 Tg of carbon per year for the total expected area of submarine permafrost. This is comparable with AOM habitats such as cold seeps. We thus propose that AOM is active where submarine permafrost thaws, which should be included in global methane budgets.

  11. A simple and sensitive quality control method of the anaerobic atmosphere for identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Tage; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of a strict anaerobic atmosphere is essential for the culture of strict anaerobic bacteria. We describe a simple and sensitive quality control method of the anaerobic atmosphere, based on the measurement of the zone diameter around a 5-μg metronidazole disk when testing...... an aerotolerant Clostridium perfringens strain. A zone diameter above 27 mm was indicative of acceptable anaerobic conditions....

  12. Mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of primary and secondary sludge. Effect of pre-treatment at elevated temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Yenal, U.; Skiadas, Ioannis V.

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an appropriate technique for the treatment of sludge before final disposal and it is employed worldwide as the oldest and most important process for sludge stabilization. In general, mesophilic anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge is more widely used compared to thermophilic...... digestion. Furthermore, thermal pre-treatment is suitable for the improvement of stabilization, enhancement of dewatering of the sludge, reduction of the numbers of pathogens and could be realized at relatively low cost especially at low temperatures. The present study investigates (a) the differences...... between mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of sludge and (b) the effect of the pretreatment at 70 degreesC on mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion of primary and secondary sludge. The pretreatment step showed very positive effect on the methane potential and production rate upon...

  13. Pathogen inactivation in liquid dairy manure during anaerobic and aerobic digestions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, S.; Pandey, P.; Castillo, A. R.; Vaddella, V. K.

    2014-12-01

    Controlling manure-borne pathogens such as E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes are crucial for protecting surface and ground water as well as mitigating risks to human health. In California dairy farms, flushing of dairy manure (mainly animal feces and urine) from freestall barns and subsequent liquid-solid manure separation is a common practice for handling animal waste. The liquid manure fraction is generally pumped into the settling ponds and it goes into aerobic and/or anaerobic lagoons for extended period of time. Considering the importance of controlling pathogens in animal waste, the objective of the study was to understand the effects of anaerobic and aerobic digestions on the survival of three human pathogens in animal waste. The pathogen inactivation was assessed at four temperatures (30, 35, 42, and 50 °C), and the relationships between temperature and pathogen decay were estimated. Results showed a steady decrease of E. coli levels in aerobic and anaerobic digestion processes over the time; however, the decay rates varied with pathogens. The effect of temperature on Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes survival was different than the E. coli survival. In thermophilic temperatures (42 and 50 °C), decay rate was considerable greater compared to the mesophilic temperatures (30 and 35°C). The E. coli log reductions at 50 °C were 2.1 in both aerobic and anaerobic digestions after 13 days of incubation. The Salmonella spp. log reductions at 50 °C were 5.5 in aerobic digestion, and 5.9 in anaerobic digestion. The Listeria monocytogenes log reductions at 50 °C were 5.0 in aerobic digestion, and 5.6 in anaerobic digestion. The log reduction of E. coli, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogens at 30 °C in aerobic environment were 0.1, 4.7, and 5.6, respectively. In anaerobic environment, the corresponding reductions were 0.4, 4.3, and 5.6, respectively. We anticipate that the outcomes of the study will help improving the

  14. Rates of cuticular penetration of chelated Fe(III): role of humidity, concentration, adjuvants, temperature, and type of chelate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönherr, Jörg; Fernández, Victoria; Schreiber, Lukas

    2005-06-01

    Time courses of cuticular penetration of FeCl3 and Fe(III) complexes of citric acid, EDTA, EDDHA (Sequestrene 138Fe), imidodisuccinic acid (IDHA), and ligninsulfonic acid (Natrel) were studied using astomatous cuticular membranes (CMs) isolated from Populus x canescens leaves. At 100% relative humidity, the Fe(III) chelates disappeared exponentially with time from the surface of the CMs; that is, penetration was a first-order process that can be described using rate constants or half-times of penetration (t(1/2)). Half-times ranged from 20 to 30 h. At 90% humidity, penetration rates were insignificant with the exception of Natrel, for which t(1/2) amounted to 58 h. Rate constants were independent of temperature (15, 25, and 35 degrees C). Permeability decreased with increasing Fe chelate concentration (IDHA and EDTA). At 100% humidity, half-times measured with FeIDHA were 11 h (2 mmol L(-1)), 17 h (10 mmol L(-1)) and 36 h (20 mmol L(-1)), respectively. In the presence of FeEDTA, penetration of CaCl2 was slowed greatly. Half-times for penetration of CaCl2, which were 1.9 h in the absence of FeEDTA, rose to 3.12 h in the presence of an equimolar concentration of EDTA and 13.3 h when the FeEDTA concentration was doubled. Hence, Fe chelates reduced permeability of CMs to CaCl2 and to the Fe chelates themselves. It is suggested that Fe chelates reduced the size of aqueous pores. This view is supported by the fact that rate constants for calcium salts were about 5 times higher than for Fe chelates with the same molecular weights. Adding Tween 20 (5 g L(-1)) as a humectant did not increase permeability to FeIDHA at 90% humidity and below, while addition of glycine betaine did. Penetration of FeCl3 applied at 5 g L(-1) (pH 1.5) was not a first order process as rate constants decreased rapidly with time. Only 2% of the dose penetrated during the first 2 h and less than that in the subsequent 8 h. Recovery was only 70%. This was attributed to the formation of insoluble Fe

  15. Anaerobe Tolerance to Oxygen and the Potentials of Anaerobic and Aerobic Cocultures for Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Kato

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic treatment processes are considered to be well-established methods for the elimination of easily biodegradable organic matter from wastewaters. Some difficulties concerning certain wastewaters are related to the possible presence of dissolved oxygen. The common belief is that anaerobes are oxygen intolerant. Therefore, the common practice is to use sequencing anaerobic and aerobic steps in separate tanks. Enhanced treatment by polishing off the residual biodegradable oxygen demand from effluents of anaerobic reactors, or the biodegradation of recalcitrant wastewater pollutants, usually requires sequenced anaerobic and aerobic bacteria activities. However, the combined activity of both bacteria can also be obtained in a single reactor. Previous experiments with either pure or mixed cultures showed that anaerobes can tolerate oxygen to a certain extent. The oxygen toxicity to methanogens in anaerobic sludges was quantified in batch experiments, as well as in anaerobic reactors. The results showed that methanogens have a high tolerance to oxygen. In practice, it was confirmed that dissolved oxygen does not constitute any detrimental effect on reactor treatment performance. This means that the coexistence of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria in one single reactor is feasible and increases the potentials of new applications in wastewater treatment

  16. PENGOLAHAN LIMBAH CAIR INDUSTRI FARMASI FORMULASI DENGAN METODE ANAEROB-AEROB DAN ANAEROB-KOAGULASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Crisnaningtyas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Studi ini membahas mengenai pengolahan limbah cair industri farmasi dalam skala laboratorium dengan menggunakan konsep anaerob-kimia-fisika dan anaerob-aerob. Proses anaerob dilakukan dengan menggunakan reaktor Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed reactor (UASBr pada kisaran OLR (Organic Loading Rate 0,5 – 2 kg COD/m3hari, yang didahului dengan proses aklimatisasi menggunakan substrat gula. Proses anaerob mampu memberikan efisiensi penurunan COD hingga 74%. Keluaran dari proses anaerob diolah lebih lanjut dengan menggunakan dua opsi proses: (1 fisika-kimia, dan (2 aerob. Koagulan alumunium sulfat dan flokulan kationik memberikan efisiensi penurunan COD tertinggi (73% pada kecepatan putaran masing-masing 100 rpm dan 40 rpm. Uji coba aerob dilakukan pada kisaran MLSS antara 4000-5000 mg/L dan mampu memberikan efisiensi penurunan COD hingga 97%. Hasil uji coba menunjukkan bahwa efisiensi penurunan COD total yang dapat dicapai dengan menggunakan teknologi anaerob-aerob adalah 97%, sedangkan kombinasi anaerob-koagulasi-flokulasi hanya mampu menurunkan COD total sebesar 72,53%. Berdasarkan hasil tersebut, kombinasi proses anaerob-aerob merupakan teknologi yang potensial untuk diaplikasikan dalam sistem pengolahan limbah cair industri farmasi. 

  17. Kinetic study of treatment of wastewater contains food preservative agent by anaerobic baffled reactor : An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumantri, Indro; Purwanto,; Budiyono

    2015-01-01

    The characteristic of wastewater of food industries with preservative substances is high content of organic substances, degradable and high total suspended solid. High organic content in this waste forced the treatment is biologically and pointed out to anaerobic treatment. Anaerobic showed the better performance of degradation than aerobic for high content organic and also for toxic materials. During that day the treatment of food wastewater is aerobically which is high consume of energy required and high volume of sludge produced. The advantage of anaerobic is save high energy, less product of sludge, less requirement of nutrients of microorganism and high efficiency reduction of organic load. The high efficiency of reduction will reduce the load of further treatment, so that, the threshold limit based on the regulation would be easy to achieve. Research of treatment of wastewater of food industries would be utilized by both big scale industries and small industries using addition of preservative substances. The type reactor of anaerobic process is anaerobic baffled reactor that will give better contact between wastewater and microorganism in the sludge. The variables conducted in this research are the baffled configuration, sludge height, preservative agent contents, hydralic retention time and influence of micro nutrients. The respons of this research are the COD effluent, remaining preservative agent, pH, formation of volatile fatty acid and total suspended solid. The result of this research is kinetic model of the anaerobic baffled reactor, reaction kinetic of preservative agent degradation and technology of treatment wastewater contains preservative agent. The benefit of this research is to solve the treatment of wastewater of food industries with preservative substance in order to achieve wastewater limit regulation and also to prevent the environmental deterioration

  18. Kinetic study of treatment of wastewater contains food preservative agent by anaerobic baffled reactor : An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumantri, Indro; Purwanto, Budiyono

    2015-12-01

    The characteristic of wastewater of food industries with preservative substances is high content of organic substances, degradable and high total suspended solid. High organic content in this waste forced the treatment is biologically and pointed out to anaerobic treatment. Anaerobic showed the better performance of degradation than aerobic for high content organic and also for toxic materials. During that day the treatment of food wastewater is aerobically which is high consume of energy required and high volume of sludge produced. The advantage of anaerobic is save high energy, less product of sludge, less requirement of nutrients of microorganism and high efficiency reduction of organic load. The high efficiency of reduction will reduce the load of further treatment, so that, the threshold limit based on the regulation would be easy to achieve. Research of treatment of wastewater of food industries would be utilized by both big scale industries and small industries using addition of preservative substances. The type reactor of anaerobic process is anaerobic baffled reactor that will give better contact between wastewater and microorganism in the sludge. The variables conducted in this research are the baffled configuration, sludge height, preservative agent contents, hydralic retention time and influence of micro nutrients. The respons of this research are the COD effluent, remaining preservative agent, pH, formation of volatile fatty acid and total suspended solid. The result of this research is kinetic model of the anaerobic baffled reactor, reaction kinetic of preservative agent degradation and technology of treatment wastewater contains preservative agent. The benefit of this research is to solve the treatment of wastewater of food industries with preservative substance in order to achieve wastewater limit regulation and also to prevent the environmental deterioration.

  19. Kinetic study of treatment of wastewater contains food preservative agent by anaerobic baffled reactor : An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumantri, Indro; Purwanto,; Budiyono [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Diponegoro University Jl. Prof. H. Soedarto, SH, Kampus Baru Tembalang, Semarang (Indonesia)

    2015-12-29

    The characteristic of wastewater of food industries with preservative substances is high content of organic substances, degradable and high total suspended solid. High organic content in this waste forced the treatment is biologically and pointed out to anaerobic treatment. Anaerobic showed the better performance of degradation than aerobic for high content organic and also for toxic materials. During that day the treatment of food wastewater is aerobically which is high consume of energy required and high volume of sludge produced. The advantage of anaerobic is save high energy, less product of sludge, less requirement of nutrients of microorganism and high efficiency reduction of organic load. The high efficiency of reduction will reduce the load of further treatment, so that, the threshold limit based on the regulation would be easy to achieve. Research of treatment of wastewater of food industries would be utilized by both big scale industries and small industries using addition of preservative substances. The type reactor of anaerobic process is anaerobic baffled reactor that will give better contact between wastewater and microorganism in the sludge. The variables conducted in this research are the baffled configuration, sludge height, preservative agent contents, hydralic retention time and influence of micro nutrients. The respons of this research are the COD effluent, remaining preservative agent, pH, formation of volatile fatty acid and total suspended solid. The result of this research is kinetic model of the anaerobic baffled reactor, reaction kinetic of preservative agent degradation and technology of treatment wastewater contains preservative agent. The benefit of this research is to solve the treatment of wastewater of food industries with preservative substance in order to achieve wastewater limit regulation and also to prevent the environmental deterioration.

  20. [Enhancement of anaerobic digestion of excess sludge by acid-alkali pretreatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Guang-Huan; Zhou, Xing-Qiu; Wu, Jian-Dong

    2012-06-01

    In order to enhance the efficiency of anaerobic digestion of excess sludge, acid-alkali pretreatment method was studied. Three different pretreatment methods (alkali alone,acid-alkali, alkali-acid) were compared to investigate their impacts on hydrolysis and acidification of activated sludge. In addition, their influences on methane-producing in subsequent anaerobic digestion process were also studied. The results showed that the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of alkaline treatment alone was about 16% higher than the combining of acid and alkali treatment, SCOD concentration increased to 5406.1 mg x L(-1) after 8 d pretreatment. After treated by acid (pH 4.0, 4 d) and alkali (pH 10.0, 4 d), the acetic acid production and its content in short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were higher than other pretreatment methods. And the acetic acid production (as COD/VSS) could reach 74.4 mg x g(-1), accounting for 60.5% of SCFAs. After acid-alkali pretreatment, the C: N ratio of the sludge mixed liquor was about 25, and the C: P ratio was between 35-40, which was more favorable than C: N and C: P ratio of alkali alone and alkali-acid to subsequent anaerobic digestion. The control experiments showed that, after acid-alkali pretreatment, anaerobic digestion cumulative methane yield (CH4/VSS(in)) reached to 136.1 mL x g(-1) at 15 d, which was about 2.5-, 1.6-, and 1.7-fold of the blank (unpretreated), alkali alone pretreatment and alkali-acid pretreatment, respectively. After acid-alkali pretreatment for 8 d and anaerobic digestion for 15 d, the removal efficiency of VSS was about 60.9%, and the sludge reduction effect was better than other pretreatments. It is obvious that the acid-alkali pretreatment method was more favorable to anaerobic digestion and sludge reduction.

  1. Cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid as external carbon sources in biological nutrient removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Fan; Hu, Xiang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of one kind of food industry effluent, cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, on biological nutrient removal (BNR) from municipal wastewater in anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Experiments were carried out with cassava stillage supernatant and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, and one pure compound (sodium acetate) served as an external carbon source. Cyclic studies indicated that the cassava by-products not only affected the transformation of nitrogen, phosphorus, poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), and glycogen in the BNR process, but also resulted in higher removal efficiencies for phosphorus and nitrogen compared with sodium acetate. Furthermore, assays for phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) and denitrifying phosphorus accumulating organisms (DPAOs) demonstrated that the proportion of DPAOs to PAOs reached 62.6% (Day 86) and 61.8% (Day 65) when using cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, respectively, as the external carbon source. In addition, the nitrate utilization rates (NURs) of the cassava by-products were in the range of 5.49-5.99 g N/(kg MLVSS⋅h) (MLVSS is mixed liquor volatile suspended solids) and 6.63-6.81 g N/(kg MLVSS⋅h), respectively. The improvement in BNR performance and the reduction in the amount of cassava stillage to be treated in-situ make cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid attractive alternatives to sodium acetate as external carbon sources for BNR processes.

  2. Cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid as external carbon sources in biological nutrient removal*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Fan; Hu, Xiang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of one kind of food industry effluent, cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, on biological nutrient removal (BNR) from municipal wastewater in anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). Experiments were carried out with cassava stillage supernatant and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, and one pure compound (sodium acetate) served as an external carbon source. Cyclic studies indicated that the cassava by-products not only affected the transformation of nitrogen, phosphorus, poly-β-hydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), and glycogen in the BNR process, but also resulted in higher removal efficiencies for phosphorus and nitrogen compared with sodium acetate. Furthermore, assays for phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) and denitrifying phosphorus accumulating organisms (DPAOs) demonstrated that the proportion of DPAOs to PAOs reached 62.6% (Day 86) and 61.8% (Day 65) when using cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid, respectively, as the external carbon source. In addition, the nitrate utilization rates (NURs) of the cassava by-products were in the range of 5.49–5.99 g N/(kg MLVSS∙h) (MLVSS is mixed liquor volatile suspended solids) and 6.63–6.81 g N/(kg MLVSS∙h), respectively. The improvement in BNR performance and the reduction in the amount of cassava stillage to be treated in-situ make cassava stillage and its anaerobic fermentation liquid attractive alternatives to sodium acetate as external carbon sources for BNR processes. PMID:25845364

  3. Techno-economic assessment of anaerobic digestion systems for agri-food wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, A.; Baldwin, S.; Wang, M. [British Colombia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Activities in British Columbia's Fraser Valley generate an estimated 3 million tones of agriculture and food wastes annually, of which 85 per cent are readily available for anaerobic digestion. The potential for energy generation from biogas through anaerobic digestion is approximately 30 MW. On-farm manure-based systems represent the most likely scenario for the development of anaerobic digestion in British Columbia in the near future. Off-farm food processing wastes may be an alternative option to large centralized industrial complexes. Odour control, pathogen reduction, improved water quality, reduced greenhouse gas emissions and reduced landfill usage are among the environmental benefits of anaerobic digestion. The economical benefits include power and heat generation, biogas upgrading, and further processing of the residues to produce compost or animal bedding. This paper described a newly developed anaerobic digestion (AD) calculator that helps users regarding their investment decision in AD facilities. The calculator classifies various technology options into several major types of AD systems. It also constructs kinetic and economic models for these systems and provides a fair estimation on biogas yield, digester volume, capital cost and annual income. The calculator takes into consideration factors such as the degradability of wastes with different compositions and different operating parameters.

  4. Efficient Anaerobic Digestion of Microalgae Biomass: Proteins as a Key Macromolecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdalena, Jose Antonio; Ballesteros, Mercedes; González-Fernandez, Cristina

    2018-05-06

    Biogas generation is the least complex technology to transform microalgae biomass into bioenergy. Since hydrolysis has been pointed out as the rate limiting stage of anaerobic digestion, the main challenge for an efficient biogas production is the optimization of cell wall disruption/hydrolysis. Among all tested pretreatments, enzymatic treatments were demonstrated not only very effective in disruption/hydrolysis but they also revealed the impact of microalgae macromolecular composition in the anaerobic process. Although carbohydrates have been traditionally recognized as the polymers responsible for the low microalgae digestibility, protease addition resulted in the highest organic matter solubilization and the highest methane production. However, protein solubilization during the pretreatment can result in anaerobic digestion inhibition due to the release of large amounts of ammonium nitrogen. The possible solutions to overcome these negative effects include the reduction of protein biomass levels by culturing the microalgae in low nitrogen media and the use of ammonia tolerant anaerobic inocula. Overall, this review is intended to evidence the relevance of microalgae proteins in different stages of anaerobic digestion, namely hydrolysis and methanogenesis.

  5. Enhancing anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by pretreatment: effect of volatile to total solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Duan, Xu; Chen, Jianguang; Fang, Kuo; Feng, Leiyu; Yan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effect of volatile to total solids (VS/TS) on anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) pretreated by alkaline, thermal and thermal-alkaline strategies was studied. Experimental results showed that the production of methane from sludge was increased with VS/TS. When anaerobic digesters were fed with sludge pretreated by the thermal-alkaline method, the average methane yield was improved from 2.8 L/d at VS/TS 0.35 to 4.7 L/d at VS/TS 0.56. Also, the efficiency of VS reduction during sludge anaerobic digestion varied between 18.9% and 45.6%, and increased gradually with VS/TS. Mechanism investigation of VS/TS on WAS anaerobic digestion suggested that the general activities of anaerobic microorganisms, activities of key enzymes related to sludge hydrolysis, acidification and methanogenesis, and the ratio of Archaea to Bacteria were all increased with VS/TS, showing good agreement with methane production.

  6. Anaerobic biodigestion of sugarcane vinasse under mesophilic conditions using manure as inoculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo de Farias Silva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane vinasse is one of the most polluting residues produced by Brazilian ethanol industries, mainly because of its harmful effects on the environmental, such as high organic matter load and acidity. Anaerobic digestion is a highly efficient wastewater treatment method that could potentially be used to treat sugarcane vinasse. This study examined the anaerobic biodigestion of sugarcane vinasse in mesophilic conditions (30 - 45°C by varying the inoculum concentration (0.5 to 5.5% and pH (6 - 8. Changes of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD, total solids content, and yield and composition of biogas after the biodigestion of the vinasse were assessed. The vinasse was efficiently digested under mesophilic anaerobic conditions over a 23-day Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT and a 5-day acidogenic phase with a consequent reduction of COD (54 - 83% and total solids (52 - 87%. Statistical analyses at a confidence level of 95% suggested that temperature, pH and inoculum concentration did not influence on the anaerobic biodigestion of the vinasse. The optimal operating parameters were found to be temperatures of 30 - 35°C, inoculum concentration of 0.5% and pH of 6 - 7. The results emphasize the promising use of the treated sugarcane vinasse as a biofertilizer for agriculture, indicating that the anaerobic digestion process is an excellent alternative for Brazilian ethanol industries.

  7. Anaerobic ammonia removal in presence of organic matter: A novel route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabumon, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the feasibility of anaerobic ammonia removal process in presence of organic matter. Different sources of biomass collected from diverse eco-systems containing ammonia and organic matter (OM) were screened for potential anaerobic ammonia removal. Sequential batch studies confirmed the possibility of anaerobic ammonia removal in presence of OM, but ammonia was oxidized anoxically to nitrate (at oxidation reduction potential; ORP -248 ± 25 mV) by an unknown mechanism unlike in the reported anammox process. The oxygen required for oxidation of ammonia might have been generated through catalase enzymatic activity of facultative anaerobes in mixed culture. The oxygen generation possibility by catalase enzyme route was demonstrated. Among the inorganic electron acceptors (NO 2 - , NO 3 - and SO 4 2- ) studied, NO 2 - was found to be most effective in total nitrogen removal. Denitrification by the developed culture was much effective and faster compared to ammonia oxidation. The results of this study show that anaerobic ammonia removal is feasible in presence of OM. The novel nitrogen removal route is hypothesized as enzymatic anoxic oxidation of NH 4 + to NO 3 - , followed by denitrification via autotrophic and/or heterotrophic routes. The results of batch study were confirmed in continuous reactor operation

  8. Size-dependent antibacterial activities of silver nanoparticles against oral anaerobic pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong; Rong, Kaifeng; Li, Ju; Yang, Hao; Chen, Rong

    2013-06-01

    Dental caries and periodontal disease are widespread diseases for which microorganism infections have been identified as the main etiology. Silver nanoparticles (Ag Nps) were considered as potential control oral bacteria infection agent due to its excellent antimicrobial activity and non acute toxic effects on human cells. In this work, stable Ag Nps with different sizes (~5, 15 and 55 nm mean values) were synthesized by using a simple reduction method or hydrothermal method. The Nps were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The antibacterial activities were evaluated by colony counting assay and growth inhibition curve method, and corresponding minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against five anaerobic oral pathogenic bacteria and aerobic bacteria E. coli were determined. The results showed that Ag Nps had apparent antibacterial effects against the anaerobic oral pathogenic bacteria and aerobic bacteria. The MIC values of 5-nm Ag against anaerobic oral pathogenic bacteria A. actinomycetemcomitans, F. nuceatum, S. mitis, S. mutans and S. sanguis were 25, 25, 25, 50 and 50 μg/mL, respectively. The aerobic bacteria were more susceptible to Ag NPs than the anaerobic oral pathogenic bacteria. In the mean time, Ag NPs displayed an obvious size-dependent antibacterial activity against the anaerobic bacteria. The 5-nm Ag presents the highest antibacterial activity. The results of this work indicated a potential application of Ag Nps in the inhibition of oral microorganism infections.

  9. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Monica [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, FCT-DQF (edificio 8), Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Faleiro, Maria Leonor [IBB - Centro de Biomedicina Molecular e Estrutural, Universidade do Algarve, FCT, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Costa, Ana M. Rosa da [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica do Algarve, Universidade do Algarve, FCT, DQF, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genomica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Campus de FCUL, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Matos, Antonio Pedro [Servico de Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Curry Cabral, Lisboa (Portugal); Costa, Maria Clara, E-mail: mcorada@ualg.pt [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, FCT-DQF (edificio 8), Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-12-15

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family.

  10. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Monica; Faleiro, Maria Leonor; Costa, Ana M. Rosa da; Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio; Matos, Antonio Pedro; Costa, Maria Clara

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family.

  11. Anaerobic Methane-Oxidizing Microbial Community in a Coastal Marine Sediment: Anaerobic Methanotrophy Dominated by ANME-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Susma; Cassarini, Chiara; Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Egger, Matthias; Slomp, Caroline P; Zhang, Yu; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2017-10-01

    The microbial community inhabiting the shallow sulfate-methane transition zone in coastal sediments from marine Lake Grevelingen (The Netherlands) was characterized, and the ability of the microorganisms to carry out anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulfate reduction was assessed in activity tests. In vitro activity tests of the sediment with methane and sulfate demonstrated sulfide production coupled to the simultaneous consumption of sulfate and methane at approximately equimolar ratios over a period of 150 days. The maximum sulfate reduction rate was 5 μmol sulfate per gram dry weight per day during the incubation period. Diverse archaeal and bacterial clades were retrieved from the sediment with the majority of them clustered with Euryarchaeota, Thaumarcheota, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the sediment from marine Lake Grevelingen contained anaerobic methanotrophic Archaea (ANME) and methanogens as archaeal clades with a role in the methane cycling. ANME at the studied site mainly belong to the ANME-3 clade. This study provides one of the few reports for the presence of ANME-3 in a shallow coastal sediment. Sulfate-reducing bacteria from Desulfobulbus clades were found among the sulfate reducers, however, with very low relative abundance. Desulfobulbus has previously been commonly found associated with ANME, whereas in our study, ANME-3 and Desulfobulbus were not observed simultaneously in clusters, suggesting the possibility of independent AOM by ANME-3.

  12. Simulation of the anaerobic digestion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maia, C A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic model of anaerobic fermentation includes an inhibition function to relate volatile acid concentration to a specific growth rate for the methane bacteria and also includes the interactions between the liquid, gaseous, and biology phases of the digester.

  13. Anaerobic Toxicity of Cationic Silver Nanoparticles

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Toxicity data for the impact of nano-silver on anaerobic degradation. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Gitipour, A., S. Thiel, K. Scheckel,...

  14. Solar pond for heating anaerobic digesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Kehui; Li Shensheng

    1991-10-01

    A theoretical analysis and numerical results calculated for solar pond heating anaerobic digesters in Beijing area in China are presented. The effect of temperature rise is evident and rather steady. 3 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  15. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Plugge, C.M.; Eekert, van M.H.A.; Dolfing, J.; Schraa, G.

    2006-01-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory

  16. An anaerobic mitochondrion that produces hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxma, Brigitte; Graaf, Rob M. de; Staay, Georg W.M. van der; Alen, Theo A. van; Ricard, Guenola; Gabaldón, Toni; Hoek, Angela H.A.M. van; Moon-van der Staay, Seung Yeo; Koopman, Werner J.H.; Hellemond, Jaap J. van; Tielens, Aloysius G.M.; Friedrich, Thorsten; Veenhuis, Marten; Huynen, Martijn A.; Hackstein, Johannes H.P.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogenosomes are organelles that produce ATP and hydrogen, and are found in various unrelated eukaryotes, such as anaerobic flagellates, chytridiomycete fungi and ciliates. Although all of these organelles generate hydrogen, the hydrogenosomes from these organisms are structurally and

  17. Anaerobic membrane bioreactor under extreme conditions (poster)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz Sierra, J.D.; De Kreuk, M.K.; Spanjers, H.; Van Lier, J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors ensure biomass retention by the application of micro or ultrafiltration processes. This allows operation at high sludge concentrations. Previous studies have shown that anaerobic membrane bioreactors is an efficient way to retain specialist microorganisms for treating

  18. Application of Methanobrevibacter acididurans in anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savant, D V; Ranade, D R

    2004-01-01

    To operate anaerobic digesters successfully under acidic conditions, hydrogen utilizing methanogens which can grow efficiently at low pH and tolerate high volatile fatty acids (VFA) are desirable. An acid tolerant hydrogenotrophic methanogen viz. Methanobrevibacter acididurans isolated from slurry of an anaerobic digester running on alcohol distillery wastewater has been described earlier by this lab. This organism could grow optimally at pH 6.0. In the experiments reported herein, M. acididurans showed better methanogenesis under acidic conditions with high VFA, particularly acetate, than Methanobacterium bryantii, a common hydrogenotrophic inhabitant of anaerobic digesters. Addition of M. acididurans culture to digesting slurry of acidogenic as well as methanogenic digesters running on distillery wastewater showed increase in methane production and decrease in accumulation of volatile fatty acids. The results proved the feasibility of application of M. acididurans in anaerobic digesters.

  19. Anaerobes in Industrial- and Environmental Biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatti-Kaul, Rajni; Mattiasson, Bo

    Anaerobic microorganisms present in diverse ecological niches employ alternative strategies for energy conservation in the absence of oxygen which enables them to play a key role in maintaining the global cycles of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur, and the breakdown of persistent compounds. Thereby they become useful tools in industrial and environmental biotechnology. Although anaerobes have been relatively neglected in comparison to their aerobic counterparts, with increasing knowledge about their diversity and metabolic potential and the development of genetic tools and process technologies to utilize them, we now see a rapid expansion of their applications in the society. This chapter summarizes some of the developments in the use of anaerobes as tools for biomass valorization, in production of energy carriers and chemicals, wastewater treatment, and the strong potential in soil remediation. The ability of several autotrophic anaerobes to reduce carbon dioxide is attracting growing attention as a means for developing a platform for conversion of waste gases to chemicals, materials, and biofuels.

  20. Microbial Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Under Iron Reducing Conditions, Alternative Electron Acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Urigüen, M.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Autotrophic Acidimicrobiaceae-bacterium named A6 (A6), part of the Actinobacteria phylum have been linked to anaerobic ammonium (NH4+) oxidation under iron reducing conditions. These organisms obtain their energy by oxidizing NH4+ and transferring the electrons to a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Under environmental conditions, the TEAs are iron oxides [Fe(III)], which are reduced to Fe(II), this process is known as Feammox. Our studies indicate that alternative forms of TEAs can be used by A6, e.g. iron rich clays (i.e. nontronite) and electrodes in bioelectrochemical systems such as Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs), which can sustain NH4+removal and A6 biomass production. Our results show that nontronite can support Feammox and promote bacterial cell production. A6 biomass increased from 4.7 x 104 to 3.9 x 105 cells/ml in 10 days. Incubations of A6 in nontronite resulted in up to 10 times more NH4+ removal and 3 times more biomass production than when ferrihydrite is used as the Fe(III) source. Additionally, Fe in nontronite can be reoxidized by aeration and A6 can reutilize it; however, Fe is still finite in the clay. In contrast, in MECs, A6 harvest electrons from NH4+ and use an anode as an unlimited TEA, as a result current is produced. We operated multiple MECs in parallel using a single external power source, as described by Call & Logan (2011). MECs were run with an applied voltage of 0.7V and different growing mediums always containing initial 5mM NH4+. Results show that current production is favored when anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttled, is present in the medium as it facilitates the transfer of electrons from the bacterial cell to the anode. Additionally, A6 biomass increased from 1 x 104 to 9.77 x 105cells/ml in 14 days of operation. Due to Acidimicrobiaceae-bacterium A6's ability to use various TEAs, MECs represent an alternative, iron-free form, for optimized biomass production of A6 and its application in NH4

  1. A Year in the Life: Annual Patterns of CO2 and CH4 from a Northern Finland Peatland, Including Anaerobic Methane Oxidation and Summer Ebullition Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K.; Lipson, D.; Biasi, C.; Dorodnikov, M.; Männistö, M.; Lai, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    The major ecological controls on methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes in northern wetland systems are well known, yet estimates of source/sink magnitudes are often incongruous with measured rates. This mismatch persists because holistic flux datasets are rare, preventing 'whole picture' determinations of flux controls. To combat this, we measured net CO2 and CH4 fluxes from September 2012-2013 within a peatland in northern Lapland, Finland. In addition, we performed in situ manipulations and in vitro soil incubations to quantify anaerobic methane oxidation and methanogenic rates as they related to alternative electron acceptor availability. Average annual fluxes varied substantially between different depressions within the wetland, a pattern that persisted through all seasons. Season was a strong predictor of both CO2 and CH4 flux rates, yet CH4 rates were not related to melt-season 10cm or 30cm soil temperatures, and only poorly predicted with air temperatures. We found evidence for both autumnal and spring thaw CH4 bursts, collectively accounting for 26% of annual CH4 flux, although the autumnal burst was more than 5 fold larger than the spring burst. CH4 ebullition measured throughout the growing season augmented the CH4 source load by a factor of 1.5, and was linked with fine-scale spatial heterogeneity within the wetland. Surprisingly, CH4 flux rates were insensitive to Fe(III) and humic acid soil amendments, both of which amplified CO2 fluxes. Using in vitro incubations, we determined anaerobic methane oxidation and methanogenesis rates. Measured anaerobic oxidation rates showed potential consumption of between 6-39% of the methane produced, contributing approximately 1% of total carbon dioxide flux. Treatments of nitrate, sulfate and ferric iron showed that nitrate suppressed methanogenesis, but were not associated with anaerobic oxidation rates.

  2. Anaerobic bacteraemia revisited: species and susceptibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Lily S Y; Kwang, Lee Ling; Rao, Suma; Tan, Thean Yen

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study was performed to evaluate the frequency of anaerobic bacteraemia over a 10-year period, and to provide updated antibiotic susceptibilities for the more clinically relevant anaerobes causing blood stream infection. Data were retrieved from the laboratory information system for the period 2003 to 2012. During this time, blood cultures were inoculated in Bactec™ Plus vials (BD, USA) and continuously monitored in the Bactec™ 9000 blood culture system (BD, USA). Anaerobic organisms were identified using commercial identification kits, predominantly API 20 A (bioMérieux, France) supplemented with Vitek ANC cards (bioMérieux, France) and AN-Ident discs (Oxoid, United Kingdom). A representative subset of isolates were retrieved from 2009 to 2011 and antimicrobial susceptibilities to penicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, clindamycin, imipenem, moxifloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam and metronidazole were determined using the Etest method. Anaerobes comprised 4.1% of all positive blood culture with 727 obligate anaerobes recovered over the 10-year period, representing a positivity rate of 0.35%. The only significant change in anaerobe positivity rates occurred between 2003 and 2004, with an increase of 0.2%. The Bacteroides fragilis group (45%) were the predominant anaerobic pathogens, followed by Clostridium species (12%), Propioniobacterium species (11%) and Fusobacterium species (6%). The most active in vitro antibiotics were imipenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, amoxicillin-clavulanate and metronidazole, with susceptibilities of 95.0%, 93.3%, 90.8% and 90.8% respectively. Resistance was high to penicillin, clindamycin and moxifl oxacin. However, there were apparent differences for antibiotic susceptibilities between species. This study indicates that the anaerobes comprise a small but constant proportion of bloodstream isolates. Antibiotic resistance was high to some antibiotics, but metronidazole, the beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitors and

  3. Anaerobic digester for treatment of organic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, V. K. [Indian Insitute of Technology, Delhi (India)]|[ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Matera (Italy); Fortuna, F.; Canditelli, M.; Cornacchia, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Trisaia, Matera (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; Farina, R. [ENEA, centro Ricerche ``Ezio Clementel``, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1997-09-01

    The essential features of both new and more efficient reactor systems and their appropriate applications for various organic waste management situations, description of several working plants are discussed in the present communication. It is hoped that significant development reported here would be useful in opening a new vista to the application of anaerobic biotechnology for the waste treatment of both low/high organic strength and specialized treatment for toxic substances, using appropriate anaerobic methods.

  4. Covering Materials for Anaerobic Digesters Producing Biogas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itodo, I. N.; Philips, T. K.

    2002-01-01

    The suitability of foam, concrete and clay soil as covering material on anaerobic digesters producing biogas was investigated using four batch-type digesters of 20 litres volume. The methane yield from the digesters was of the order: foam >control> concrete > clay soil. The digester covered with foam had the highest methane yield, best temperature control and most favourable pH conditions. It is most suitable as cover material on anaerobic digesters

  5. Anaerobic Digestion Assessment for Contingency Base Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    heating. The use of anaerobic digestion for high solids organic waste (15 to 50 percent solids; i.e., mixed organic solids, such as food waste, manure ...but the team was not able to identify any for anaerobic digestion . One potentially widespread source is manure from ruminant organisms, such as...plug-flow digesters treating swine manure and used cooking grease. Bioresource Technology 101:4362-4370. ERDC TR-14-3 63 Lansing, S., and A.R

  6. Mechanism of quinolone resistance in anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, H; Edlund, C

    2003-06-01

    Several recently developed quinolones have excellent activity against a broad range of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and are thus potential drugs for the treatment of serious anaerobic and mixed infections. Resistance to quinolones is increasing worldwide, but is still relatively infrequent among anaerobes. Two main mechanisms, alteration of target enzymes (gyrase and topoisomerase IV) caused by chromosomal mutations in encoding genes, or reduced intracellular accumulation due to increased efflux of the drug, are associated with quinolone resistance. These mechanisms have also been found in anaerobic species. High-level resistance to the newer broad-spectrum quinolones often requires stepwise mutations in target genes. The increasing emergence of resistance among anaerobes may be a consequence of previous widespread use of quinolones, which may have enriched first-step mutants in the intestinal tract. Quinolone resistance in the Bacteroides fragilis group strains is strongly correlated with amino acid substitutions at positions 82 and 86 in GyrA (equivalent to positions 83 and 87 of Escherichia coli). Several studies have indicated that B. fragilis group strains possess efflux pump systems that actively expel quinolones, leading to resistance. DNA gyrase seems also to be the primary target for quinolones in Clostridium difficile, since amino acid substitutions in GyrA and GyrB have been detected in resistant strains. To what extent other mechanisms, such as mutational events in other target genes or alterations in outer-membrane proteins, contribute to resistance among anaerobes needs to be further investigated.

  7. Integrated Analysis of Protein Complexes and Regulatory Networks Involved in Anaerobic Energy Metabolism of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiedje, James M.

    2005-06-01

    Anaerobic Nitrate Reduction. Nitrate is an extensive co-contaminant at some DOE sites making metal and radionuclide reduction problematic. Hence, we sought to better understand the nitrate reduction pathway and its control in S. oneidensis MR-1. It is not known whether the nitrate reduction is by denitrification or dissimilatory nitrate reduction into ammonium (DNRA). By both physiological and genetic evidence, we proved that DNRA is the nitrate reduction pathway in this organism. Using the complete genome sequence of S. oneidensis MR-1, we identified a gene encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase based on its 72% sequence identity with the napA gene in E. coli. Anaerobic growth of MR-1 on nitrate was abolished in a site directed napA mutant, indicating that NapA is the only nitrate reductase present. The anaerobic expression of napA and nrfA, a homolog of the cytochrome b552 nitrite reductase in E. coli, increased with increasing nitrate concentration until a plateau was reached at 3 mM KNO3. This indicates that these genes are not repressed by increasing concentrations of nitrate. The reduction of nitrate can generate intermediates that can be toxic to the microorganism. To determine the genetic response of MR-1 to high concentrations of nitrate, DNA microarrays were used to obtain a complete gene expression profile of MR-1 at low (1 mM) versus high (40 mM) nitrate concentrations. Genes encoding transporters and efflux pumps were up-regulated, perhaps as a mechanism to export toxic compounds. In addition, the gene expression profile of MR-1, grown anaerobically with nitrate as the only electron acceptor, suggested that this dissimilatory pathway contributes to N assimilation. Hence the nitrate reduction pathway could serve a dual purpose. The role of EtrA, a homolog of Fnr (global anaerobic regulator in E. coli) was examined using an etrA deletion mutant we constructed, S. oneidensis EtrA7-1.

  8. Anaerobic digestion potential for ecological and decentralised sanitation in urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmitwalli, Tarek; Feng, Yucheng; Behrendt, Joachim; Otterpohl, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    The potential of anaerobic digestion in ecological and decentralised sanitation has been investigated in this research. Different anaerobic digestion systems were proposed for the treatment of sewage, grey water, black water and faeces. Moreover, mathematical models based on anaerobic digestion model no.1 (ADM1) were developed for determination of a suitable design for each system. For stable performance of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating sewage, the model results indicated that optimisation of wastewater conversion to biogas (not COD removal) should be selected for determination of the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the reactor. For the treatment of sewage or black water in a UASB septic-tank, the model results showed that the sludge removal period was the main parameter for determination of the HRT. At such HRT, both COD removal and wastewater conversion are also optimised. The model results demonstrated that for treatment of faeces in an accumulation (AC) system at temperature > or = 25 degrees C, the filling period of the system should be higher than 60 days. For maximisation of the net biogas production (i.e. reduction of biogas losses as dissolved in the effluent), the separation between grey water, urine and faeces and reduction of water consumption for faeces flushing are required. Furthermore, the faeces and kitchen organic wastes and grey water are digested in, respectively, an AC system and UASB reactor, while the urine is stored.

  9. Transformation impacts of dissolved and solid phase Fe(II) on trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in an iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) mixed column system: a mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yeunook; Kim, Dooil; Cho, Hyun-Hee; Singhal, Naresh; Park, Jae-Woo

    2012-12-01

    In this research, we conducted trichloroethylene (TCE) reduction in a column filled with iron and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) and developed a mathematical model to investigate the critical reactions between active species in iron/IRB/contaminant systems. The formation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) in this system with IRB and zero-valent iron (ZVI, Fe(0)) coated with a ferric iron (Fe(III)) crust significantly affected TCE reduction and IRB respiration in various ways. This study presents a new framework for transformation property and reducing ability of both dissolved (Fe(II)(dissolved)) and solid form ferrous iron (Fe(II)(solid)). Results showed that TCE reduction was strongly depressed by Fe(II)(solid) rather than by other inhibitors (e.g., Fe(III) and lactate), suggesting that Fe(II)(solid) might reduce IRB activation due to attachment to IRB cells. Newly exposed Fe(0) from the released Fe(II)(dissolved) was a strong contributor to TCE reduction compared to Fe(II)(solid). In addition, our research confirmed that less Fe(II)(solid) production strongly supported long-term TCE reduction because it may create an easier TCE approach to Fe(0) or increase IRB growth. Our findings will aid the understanding of the contributions of iron media (e.g., Fe(II)(solid), Fe(II)(dissolved), Fe(III), and Fe(0)) to IRB for decontamination in natural groundwater systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of manganese oxide on arsenic reduction and leaching from contaminated floodplain soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ehlert, Katrin; Mikutta, Christian; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Reductive release of the potentially toxic metalloid As from Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides has been identified as an important process leading to elevated As porewater concentrations in soils and sediments. Despite the ubiquitous presence of Mn oxides in soils and their oxidizing power toward As.......7) on As speciation and release from an As-contaminated floodplain soil (214 mg As/kg) under anoxic conditions. Our results show that birnessite additions significantly decreased As leaching. The reduction of both As and Fe was delayed, and As(III) accumulated in birnessite-rich column parts, indicating...

  11. Anaerobic energy metabolism in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atteia, Ariane; van Lis, Robert; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Martin, William F

    2013-02-01

    Anaerobic metabolic pathways allow unicellular organisms to tolerate or colonize anoxic environments. Over the past ten years, genome sequencing projects have brought a new light on the extent of anaerobic metabolism in eukaryotes. A surprising development has been that free-living unicellular algae capable of photoautotrophic lifestyle are, in terms of their enzymatic repertoire, among the best equipped eukaryotes known when it comes to anaerobic energy metabolism. Some of these algae are marine organisms, common in the oceans, others are more typically soil inhabitants. All these species are important from the ecological (O(2)/CO(2) budget), biotechnological, and evolutionary perspectives. In the unicellular algae surveyed here, mixed-acid type fermentations are widespread while anaerobic respiration, which is more typical of eukaryotic heterotrophs, appears to be rare. The presence of a core anaerobic metabolism among the algae provides insights into its evolutionary origin, which traces to the eukaryote common ancestor. The predicted fermentative enzymes often exhibit an amino acid extension at the N-terminus, suggesting that these proteins might be compartmentalized in the cell, likely in the chloroplast or the mitochondrion. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella NC64 have the most extended set of fermentative enzymes reported so far. Among the eukaryotes with secondary plastids, the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana has the most pronounced anaerobic capabilities as yet. From the standpoints of genomic, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies, anaerobic energy metabolism in C. reinhardtii remains the best characterized among photosynthetic protists. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic...... consortia. Despite the potentially adverse effects, only few inorganic electron acceptors potentially utilizable for anaerobic respiration have been investigated with respect to negative interactions in anaerobic digesters. In this chapter we review competitive and inhibitory interactions between anaerobic...... respiring populations and methanogenic consortia in bioreactors. Due to the few studies in anaerobic digesters, many of our discussions are based upon studies of defined cultures or natural ecosystems...

  13. Effects of anaerobic growth conditions on biomass accumulation, root morphology, and efficiencies of nutrient uptake and utilization in seedlings of some southern coastal plain pine species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topa, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    Seedlings of pond (Pinus serotina (Michx.)), sand (P. clausa (Engelm.) Sarg.), and loblolly pines (P. taeda L., drought-hardy and wet site seed sources) were grown in a non-circulating, continuously-flowing solution culture under anaerobic or aerobic conditions to determine the effects of anaerobics on overall growth, root morphology and efficiencies of nutrient uptake and utilization. Although shoot growth of the 11-week old loblolly and pond pines was not affected by anaerobic treatment, it did significantly reduce root biomass. Sand pine suffered the largest biomass reduction. Flooding tolerance was positively correlated with specific morphological changes which enhanced root internal aeration. Oxygen transport from shoot to the root in anaerobically-grown loblolly and pond pine seedlings was demonstrated via rhizosphere oxidation experiments. Tissue elemental analyses showed that anaerobic conditions interfered with nutrient absorption and utilization. Short-term 32 p uptake experiments with intact seedlings indicated that net absorption decreased because of the reduction in root biomass, since H 2 PO 4 - influx in the anaerobically-grown seedlings was more than twice that of their aerobic counterparts. Sand pine possessed the physiological but not morphological capacity to increase P uptake under anaerobic growth conditions. Pond and wet-site loblolly pine seedlings maintained root growth, perhaps through enhanced internal root aeration - an advantage in field conditions where the phosphorus supply may be limited or highly localized

  14. Concerning the role of cell lysis-cryptic growth in anaerobic side-stream reactors: the single-cell analysis of viable, dead and lysed bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foladori, P; Velho, V F; Costa, R H R; Bruni, L; Quaranta, A; Andreottola, G

    2015-05-01

    In the Anaerobic Side-Stream Reactor (ASSR), part of the return sludge undergoes alternating aerobic and anaerobic conditions with the aim of reducing sludge production. In this paper, viability, enzymatic activity, death and lysis of bacterial cells exposed to aerobic and anaerobic conditions for 16 d were investigated at single-cell level by flow cytometry, with the objective of contributing to the understanding of the mechanisms of sludge reduction in the ASSR systems. Results indicated that total and viable bacteria did not decrease during the anaerobic phase, indicating that anaerobiosis at ambient temperature does not produce a significant cell lysis. Bacteria decay and lysis occurred principally under aerobic conditions. The aerobic decay rate of total bacteria (bTB) was considered as the rate of generation of lysed bacteria. Values of bTB of 0.07-0.11 d(-1) were measured in anaerobic + aerobic sequence. The enzymatic activity was not particularly affected by the transition from anaerobiosis to aerobiosis. Large solubilisation of COD and NH4(+) was observed only under anaerobic conditions, as a consequence of hydrolysis of organic matter, but not due to cell lysis. The observations supported the proposal of two independent mechanisms contributing equally to sludge reduction: (1) under anaerobic conditions: sludge hydrolysis of non-bacterial material, (2) under aerobic conditions: bacterial cell lysis and oxidation of released biodegradable compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Inactivation of ANAMMOX communities under concurrent operation of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) and denitrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamchoi, N.; Nitisoravut, S.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2008-01-01

    of Amx 820 and EUB 338 mixed. Denitrification was observed through the reductions of both COD and nitrate–nitrite concentrations under anaerobic/anoxic conditions. By providing a stoichiometric ratio of nitrite to ammonium nitrogen with addition nitrate nitrogen, a gradual reduction of ANAMMOX activity...... was found with an increase of COD concentration in a range of 100–400 mg l−1. This is equivalent to the COD to N ratio of 0.9–2.0. The COD concentration was found to be a control variable for process selection between ANAMMOX reaction and denitrification. A reduction of COD and nitrite–nitrate...

  16. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  17. Dissociation kinetics of Fe(III)- and Al(III)-natural organic matter complexes at pH 6.0 and 8.0 and 25 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Adele M.; Pham, A. Ninh; Collins, Richard N.; Waite, T. David

    2009-05-01

    The rate at which iron- and aluminium-natural organic matter (NOM) complexes dissociate plays a critical role in the transport of these elements given the readiness with which they hydrolyse and precipitate. Despite this, there have only been a few reliable studies on the dissociation kinetics of these complexes suggesting half-times of some hours for the dissociation of Fe(III) and Al(III) from a strongly binding component of NOM. First-order dissociation rate constants are re-evaluated here at pH 6.0 and 8.0 and 25 °C using both cation exchange resin and competing ligand methods for Fe(III) and a cation exchange resin method only for Al(III) complexes. Both methods provide similar results at a particular pH with a two-ligand model accounting satisfactorily for the dissociation kinetics results obtained. For Fe(III), half-times on the order of 6-7 h were obtained for dissociation of the strong component and 4-5 min for dissociation of the weak component. For aluminium, the half-times were on the order of 1.5 h and 1-2 min for the strong and weak components, respectively. Overall, Fe(III) complexes with NOM are more stable than analogous complexes with Al(III), implying Fe(III) may be transported further from its source upon dilution and dispersion.

  18. Effect of increasing total solids contents on anaerobic digestion of food waste under mesophilic conditions: performance and microbial characteristics analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yi

    Full Text Available The total solids content of feedstocks affects the performances of anaerobic digestion and the change of total solids content will lead the change of microbial morphology in systems. In order to increase the efficiency of anaerobic digestion, it is necessary to understand the role of the total solids content on the behavior of the microbial communities involved in anaerobic digestion of organic matter from wet to dry technology. The performances of mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste with different total solids contents from 5% to 20% were compared and the microbial communities in reactors were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing technology. Three stable anaerobic digestion processes were achieved for food waste biodegradation and methane generation. Better performances mainly including volatile solids reduction and methane yield were obtained in the reactors with higher total solids content. Pyrosequencing results revealed significant shifts in bacterial community with increasing total solids contents. The proportion of phylum Chloroflexi decreased obviously with increasing total solids contents while other functional bacteria showed increasing trend. Methanosarcina absolutely dominated in archaeal communities in three reactors and the relative abundance of this group showed increasing trend with increasing total solids contents. These results revealed the effects of the total solids content on the performance parameters and the behavior of the microbial communities involved in the anaerobic digestion of food waste from wet to dry technologies.

  19. Effect of Increasing Total Solids Contents on Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste under Mesophilic Conditions: Performance and Microbial Characteristics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jingwei; Dai, Xiaohu

    2014-01-01

    The total solids content of feedstocks affects the performances of anaerobic digestion and the change of total solids content will lead the change of microbial morphology in systems. In order to increase the efficiency of anaerobic digestion, it is necessary to understand the role of the total solids content on the behavior of the microbial communities involved in anaerobic digestion of organic matter from wet to dry technology. The performances of mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste with different total solids contents from 5% to 20% were compared and the microbial communities in reactors were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing technology. Three stable anaerobic digestion processes were achieved for food waste biodegradation and methane generation. Better performances mainly including volatile solids reduction and methane yield were obtained in the reactors with higher total solids content. Pyrosequencing results revealed significant shifts in bacterial community with increasing total solids contents. The proportion of phylum Chloroflexi decreased obviously with increasing total solids contents while other functional bacteria showed increasing trend. Methanosarcina absolutely dominated in archaeal communities in three reactors and the relative abundance of this group showed increasing trend with increasing total solids contents. These results revealed the effects of the total solids content on the performance parameters and the behavior of the microbial communities involved in the anaerobic digestion of food waste from wet to dry technologies. PMID:25051352

  20. Effect of increasing total solids contents on anaerobic digestion of food waste under mesophilic conditions: performance and microbial characteristics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jing; Dong, Bin; Jin, Jingwei; Dai, Xiaohu

    2014-01-01

    The total solids content of feedstocks affects the performances of anaerobic digestion and the change of total solids content will lead the change of microbial morphology in systems. In order to increase the efficiency of anaerobic digestion, it is necessary to understand the role of the total solids content on the behavior of the microbial communities involved in anaerobic digestion of organic matter from wet to dry technology. The performances of mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste with different total solids contents from 5% to 20% were compared and the microbial communities in reactors were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing technology. Three stable anaerobic digestion processes were achieved for food waste biodegradation and methane generation. Better performances mainly including volatile solids reduction and methane yield were obtained in the reactors with higher total solids content. Pyrosequencing results revealed significant shifts in bacterial community with increasing total solids contents. The proportion of phylum Chloroflexi decreased obviously with increasing total solids contents while other functional bacteria showed increasing trend. Methanosarcina absolutely dominated in archaeal communities in three reactors and the relative abundance of this group showed increasing trend with increasing total solids contents. These results revealed the effects of the total solids content on the performance parameters and the behavior of the microbial communities involved in the anaerobic digestion of food waste from wet to dry technologies.

  1. Sulfate reduction in freshwater peatlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oequist, M.

    1996-12-31

    This text consist of two parts: Part A is a literature review on microbial sulfate reduction with emphasis on freshwater peatlands, and part B presents the results from a study of the relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane formation for the anaerobic decomposition in a boreal peatland. The relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane production for the anaerobic decomposition was studied in a small raised bog situated in the boreal zone of southern Sweden. Depth distribution of sulfate reduction- and methane production rates were measured in peat sampled from three sites (A, B, and C) forming an minerotrophic-ombrotrophic gradient. SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations in the three profiles were of equal magnitude and ranged from 50 to 150 {mu}M. In contrast, rates of sulfate reduction were vastly different: Maximum rates in the three profiles were obtained at a depth of ca. 20 cm below the water table. In A it was 8 {mu}M h{sup -1} while in B and C they were 1 and 0.05 {mu}M h{sup -1}, respectively. Methane production rates, however, were more uniform across the three nutrient regimes. Maximum rates in A (ca. 1.5 {mu}g d{sup -1} g{sup -1}) were found 10 cm below the water table, in B (ca. 1.0 {mu}g d{sup -1} g{sup -1}) in the vicinity of the water table, and in C (0.75 {mu}g d{sup -1} g{sup -1}) 20 cm below the water table. In all profiles both sulfate reduction and methane production rates were negligible above the water table. The areal estimates of methane production for the profiles were 22.4, 9.0 and 6.4 mmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, while the estimates for sulfate reduction were 26.4, 2.5, and 0.1 mmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, respectively. The calculated turnover times at the sites were 1.2, 14.2, and 198.7 days, respectively. The study shows that sulfate reducing bacteria are important for the anaerobic degradation in the studied peatland, especially in the minerotrophic sites, while methanogenic bacteria dominate in ombrotrophic sites Examination

  2. Sulfate reduction in freshwater peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oequist, M.

    1996-01-01

    This text consist of two parts: Part A is a literature review on microbial sulfate reduction with emphasis on freshwater peatlands, and part B presents the results from a study of the relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane formation for the anaerobic decomposition in a boreal peatland. The relative importance of sulfate reduction and methane production for the anaerobic decomposition was studied in a small raised bog situated in the boreal zone of southern Sweden. Depth distribution of sulfate reduction- and methane production rates were measured in peat sampled from three sites (A, B, and C) forming an minerotrophic-ombrotrophic gradient. SO 4 2- concentrations in the three profiles were of equal magnitude and ranged from 50 to 150 μM. In contrast, rates of sulfate reduction were vastly different: Maximum rates in the three profiles were obtained at a depth of ca. 20 cm below the water table. In A it was 8 μM h -1 while in B and C they were 1 and 0.05 μM h -1 , respectively. Methane production rates, however, were more uniform across the three nutrient regimes. Maximum rates in A (ca. 1.5 μg d -1 g -1 ) were found 10 cm below the water table, in B (ca. 1.0 μg d -1 g -1 ) in the vicinity of the water table, and in C (0.75 μg d -1 g -1 ) 20 cm below the water table. In all profiles both sulfate reduction and methane production rates were negligible above the water table. The areal estimates of methane production for the profiles were 22.4, 9.0 and 6.4 mmol m -2 d -1 , while the estimates for sulfate reduction were 26.4, 2.5, and 0.1 mmol m -2 d -1 , respectively. The calculated turnover times at the sites were 1.2, 14.2, and 198.7 days, respectively. The study shows that sulfate reducing bacteria are important for the anaerobic degradation in the studied peatland, especially in the minerotrophic sites, while methanogenic bacteria dominate in ombrotrophic sites Examination paper. 67 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  3. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-01-01

    During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the

  4. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-07-31

    During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the

  5. Industrial symbiosis: corn ethanol fermentation, hydrothermal carbonization, and anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Brandon M; Jader, Lindsey R; Schendel, Frederick J; Hahn, Nicholas J; Valentas, Kenneth J; McNamara, Patrick J; Novak, Paige M; Heilmann, Steven M

    2013-10-01

    The production of dry-grind corn ethanol results in the generation of intermediate products, thin and whole stillage, which require energy-intensive downstream processing for conversion into commercial animal feed products. Hydrothermal carbonization of thin and whole stillage coupled with anaerobic digestion was investigated as alternative processing methods that could benefit the industry. By substantially eliminating evaporation of water, reductions in downstream energy consumption from 65% to 73% were achieved while generating hydrochar, fatty acids, treated process water, and biogas co-products providing new opportunities for the industry. Processing whole stillage in this manner produced the four co-products, eliminated centrifugation and evaporation, and substantially reduced drying. With thin stillage, all four co-products were again produced, as well as a high quality animal feed. Anaerobic digestion of the aqueous product stream from the hydrothermal carbonization of thin stillage reduced chemical oxygen demand (COD) by more than 90% and converted 83% of the initial COD to methane. Internal use of this biogas could entirely fuel the HTC process and reduce overall natural gas usage. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Iron biomineralization by anaerobic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate-dependent ......Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate...... precipitation in the periplasm (in a few tens of minutes), followed by the formation of surface-bound globules. Moreover, we frequently observed an asymmetric mineral thickening at the cell poles. In parallel, the evolution of iron oxidation was quantified by STXM: iron both contained in the bacteria...... and in the extracellular precipitates reached complete oxidation within 6 days. While a progressive oxidation of Fe in the bacteria and in the medium could be observed, spatial redox (oxido-reduction state) heterogeneities were detected at the cell poles and in the extracellular precipitates after 1 day. All...

  7. Assessment of anaerobic biodegradability of five different solid organic wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristanto, Gabriel Andari; Asaloei, Huinny

    2017-03-01

    The concept of waste to energy emerges as an alternative solution to increasing waste generation and energy crisis. In the waste to energy concept, waste will be used to produce renewable energy through thermochemical, biochemical, and physiochemical processes. In an anaerobic digester, organic matter brake-down due to anaerobic bacteria produces methane gas as energy source. The organic waste break-down is affected by various characteristics of waste components, such as organic matter content (C, N, O, H, P), solid contents (TS and VS), nutrients ratio (C/N), and pH. This research aims to analyze biodegradability and potential methane production (CH4) from organic waste largely available in Indonesia. Five solid wastes comprised of fecal sludge, cow rumen, goat farm waste, traditional market waste, and tofu dregs were analyzed which showed tofu dregs as waste with the highest rate of biodegradability compared to others since the tofu dregs do not contain any inhibitor which is lignin, have 2.7%VS, 14 C/N ratios and 97.3% organic matter. The highest cumulative methane production known as Biochemical Methane Potential was achieved by tofu dregs with volume of 77 ml during 30-day experiment which then followed by cow rumen, goat farm waste, and traditional market waste. Subsequently, methane productions were calculated through percentage of COD reduction, which showed the efficiency of 99.1% that indicates complete conversion of the high organic matter into methane.

  8. Fate of neptunium in an anaerobic, methanogenic microcosm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banaszak, J.E.; Webb, S.M.; Rittmann, B.E.; Gaillard, J.F.; Reed, D.T.

    1999-01-01

    Neptunium is found predominantly as Np(IV) in reducing environments, but as Np(V) in aerobic environments. Currently, it is not known how the interplay between biotic and abiotic processes affects Np redox speciation in the environment. To evaluate the effect of anaerobic microbial activity on the fate of Np in natural systems, Np(V) was added to a microcosm inoculated with anaerobic sediments from a metal-contaminated freshwater lake. The consortium included metal-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic microorganisms, and acetate was supplied as the only exogenous substrate. Addition of more than 10 -5 M Np did not inhibit methane production. Total Np solubility in the active microcosm, as well as in sterilized control samples, decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude. A combination of analytical techniques, including VIS-NIR absorption spectroscopy and XANES, identified Np(IV) as the oxidation state associated with the sediments. The similar results from the active microcosm and the abiotic controls suggest that microbially produced Mn(II/III) and Fe(II) may serve as electron donors for Np reduction

  9. The anaerobic phototrophic metabolism of 3-chlorobenzoate by Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, V S

    1992-10-09

    The degradation of chlorinated aromatic compounds by anaerobic bacteria is now known to be an important mechanism of bioremediation. In an experimental study, a mixed phototrophic culture was found to metabolize 3-chlorobenzoate in the presence of benzoate following adaptation on a benzoate and 3-chlorobenzoate medium for 7 weeks. The dominant bacterial isolate was identified as Rhodopseudomonas palustris. Radioisotopic studies showed [sup 14]C-3-chlorobenzoate was converted by the isolate to [sup 14]CO[sub 2] and cell biomass in the absence of oxygen and in the presence of a cosubstrate red light. Cyclohexane carboxylate was able to replace the cosubstrate, benzoate. The isolate also metabolized 3-chlorobenzoate in the presence of pimelic acid, sodium acetate, and sodium succinate; however, the metabolic rate was reduced. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry and high pressure liquid chromatography indicated the intracellular presence of 3-chlorobenzoate and benzoyl-CoA. Cell-free extracts produced benzoate and benzoyl-CoA. A probable route of 3-chlorobenzoate metabolism via dehalogenation followed by steps similar to the benzoate reductive ring fission pathway is suggested. Comparison of kinetic coefficients showed a higher affinity of the isolate for benzoate. Isolates from representative samples of various freshwater and wastewater ecosystems indicated widespread ecological distribution of R. palustris and the common occurrence of the 3-chlorobenzoate metabolic phenotype. R. palustris was found to grow in mixed anaerobic cultures and retained its 3-chlorobenzoate degradation property. 91 refs., 25 figs., 14 tabs.

  10. Azoreductase activity of anaerobic bacteria isolated from human intestinal microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, F; Franklin, W; Cerniglia, C E

    1990-01-01

    A plate assay was developed for the detection of anaerobic bacteria that produce azoreductases. With this plate assay, 10 strains of anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing azo dyes were isolated from human feces and identified as Eubacterium hadrum (2 strains), Eubacterium spp. (2 species), Clostridium clostridiiforme, a Butyrivibrio sp., a Bacteroides sp., Clostridium paraputrificum, Clostridium nexile, and a Clostridium sp. The average rate of reduction of Direct Blue 15 dye (a dimethoxybenzidine-based dye) in these strains ranged from 16 to 135 nmol of dye per min per mg of protein. The enzymes were inactivated by oxygen. In seven isolates, a flavin compound (riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide, or flavin mononucleotide) was required for azoreductase activity. In the other three isolates and in Clostridium perfringens, no added flavin was required for activity. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that each bacterium expressed only one azoreductase isozyme. At least three types of azoreductase enzyme were produced by the different isolates. All of the azoreductases were produced constitutively and released extracellularly. Images PMID:2202258

  11. Azoreductase activity of anaerobic bacteria isolated from human intestinal microflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, F; Franklin, W; Cerniglia, C E

    1990-07-01

    A plate assay was developed for the detection of anaerobic bacteria that produce azoreductases. With this plate assay, 10 strains of anaerobic bacteria capable of reducing azo dyes were isolated from human feces and identified as Eubacterium hadrum (2 strains), Eubacterium spp. (2 species), Clostridium clostridiiforme, a Butyrivibrio sp., a Bacteroides sp., Clostridium paraputrificum, Clostridium nexile, and a Clostridium sp. The average rate of reduction of Direct Blue 15 dye (a dimethoxybenzidine-based dye) in these strains ranged from 16 to 135 nmol of dye per min per mg of protein. The enzymes were inactivated by oxygen. In seven isolates, a flavin compound (riboflavin, flavin adenine dinucleotide, or flavin mononucleotide) was required for azoreductase activity. In the other three isolates and in Clostridium perfringens, no added flavin was required for activity. Nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that each bacterium expressed only one azoreductase isozyme. At least three types of azoreductase enzyme were produced by the different isolates. All of the azoreductases were produced constitutively and released extracellularly.

  12. Influence of Nutrient Impregnated into Zeolite Addition on Anaerobic Digestion of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellyanawaty, M.; Chusna, F. M. A.; Sudibyo, H.; Nurjanah, N.; Budhijanto, W.

    2018-03-01

    Palm oil mill effluent (POME) was wastewater generated from palm oil milling activities which was brownish liquid, acidic with pH 3-4, and contained soluble materials which were hazardous to the environment. It was characterized by high organic loading (COD 40,000–60,000 mg/L). According to its characteristics, POME was identified as a potential source to generate renewable energy through anaerobic digestion. In other words, a combination of wastewater treatment and renewable energy production would be an additional advantage to the palm oil industries. Methanogenesis was the rate limiting step in anaerobic digestion. In the conventional anaerobic digester, it required large reactors and long retention time. The addition of microbial immobilization media was to improve anaerobic reactor performance in term of higher organic removal and methane production. Additionally, better performance could lead to reduction of reactor volume and shorter retention time in high rate anaerobic digester. The loading of essential microorganism nutrient into the media might increase the affinity of bacteria to attach and grow on the media surface. Activating or inhibition effects of natural and modified zeolite addition in anaerobic digestion of POME was studied in batch reactors using erlenmeyer of 1,000 mL at COD concentrations of about 8,000 mg/L. Zeolite was impregnated with nickel and magnesium at concentrations of 0.0561 mg Ni/g zeolite and 0.0108 mg Mg/g zeolite. The effect of the different zeolite addition was determined by the measurement of soluble COD (sCOD), Volatile Fatty Acids (VFAs) and biogas production. Greater effect of modified zeolite was observed in zeolite impregnated with nickel with a 54% increase of biogas production. Meanwhile, the modified zeolite impregnated with magnesium had no positive impact to the methanogenic bacteria activities.

  13. A comparative study of leachate quality and biogas generation in simulated anaerobic and hybrid bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qiyong; Tian, Ying; Wang, Shen; Ko, Jae Hac, E-mail: jaehacko@pkusz.edu.cn

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Temporary aeration shortened the initial acid inhibition phase for methanogens. • COD decreased faster in the hybrid bioreactor than that in the anaerobic control. • Methane generations from hybrid bioreactors were 133.4 L/kg{sub vs} and 113.2 L/kg{sub vs}. • MSW settlement increased with increasing the frequency of intermittent aeration. - Abstract: Research has been conducted to compare leachate characterization and biogas generation in simulated anaerobic and hybrid bioreactor landfills with typical Chinese municipal solid waste (MSW). Three laboratory-scale reactors, an anaerobic (A1) and two hybrid bioreactors (C1 and C2), were constructed and operated for about 10 months. The hybrid bioreactors were operated in an aerobic–anaerobic mode with different aeration frequencies by providing air into the upper layer of waste. Results showed that the temporary aeration into the upper layer aided methane generation by shortening the initial acidogenic phase because of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) reduction and pH increase. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased faster in the hybrid bioreactors, but the concentrations of ammonia–nitrogen in the hybrid bioreactors were greater than those in the anaerobic control. Methanogenic conditions were established within 75 d and 60 d in C1 and C2, respectively. However, high aeration frequency led to the consumption of organic matters by aerobic degradation and resulted in reducing accumulative methane volume. The temporary aeration enhanced waste settlement and the settlement increased with increasing the frequency of aeration. Methane production was inhibited in the anaerobic control; however, the total methane generations from hybrid bioreactors were 133.4 L/kg{sub vs} and 113.2 L/kg{sub vs}. As for MSW with high content of food waste, leachate recirculation right after aeration stopped was not recommended due to VFA inhibition for methanogens.

  14. Is anaerobic blood culture necessary? If so, who needs it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Kentaro; Takahashi, Miwa

    2008-07-01

    The role of anaerobic blood cultures is not validated, although they are drawn routinely. We performed a retrospective chart review at a private hospital in Japan for patients admitted between July 1, 2004 to June 30, 2005 to determine patient characteristics resulting in anaerobic blood culture. During the study period, 17,775 blood culture bottles were sent for the analysis, and 2132 bottles (12.0%) were positive for microbial growth. Bacteria were grown from 958 anaerobic bottles (44.7%), and 719 (33.7%) of those were judged to represent real infections, which accounted for 410 cases of bacteremia. Only 47 cases (11.5%) were detected by anaerobic cultures alone. Among those 47, obligate anaerobes represented 12 cases. Clinical evaluation could have predicted 7 of 12 cases of obligate anaerobic bacteremia. In the remaining 5 cases, the source of bacteremia was unclear. There were 2.7 cases of anaerobic bacteremia per 1000 blood cultures. The mortality attributable to anaerobic bacteremia was 50%. Among bacteremic cases not caused by obligate anaerobes yet diagnosed solely by anaerobic bottles, either the standard 2 sets of blood were not taken or their clinical outcomes were favorable. Anaerobic blood culture can be avoided in most cases. Anaerobic blood culture may be most helpful when (1) bacteremia because of obligate anaerobes is clinically suspected, (2) patients are severely immunocompromised, and (3) source of bacteremia is not identified by clinical evaluation.

  15. Anaerobic digestion of onion residuals using a mesophilic Anaerobic Phased Solids Digester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, Rowena T.; Zhang, Ruihong

    2011-01-01

    The anaerobic digestion of onion residual from an onion processing plant was studied under batch-fed and continuously-fed mesophilic (35 ± 2 o C) conditions in an Anaerobic Phased Solids (APS) Digester. The batch digestion tests were performed at an initial loading of 2.8 gVS L -1 and retention time of 14 days. The biogas and methane yields, and volatile solids reduction from the onion residual were determined to be 0.69 ± 0.06 L gVS -1 , 0.38 ± 0.05 L CH 4 gVS -1 , and 64 ± 17%, respectively. Continuous digestion tests were carried out at organic loading rates (OLRs) of 0.5-2.0 gVS L -1 d -1 . Hydrated lime (Ca(OH) 2 ) was added to the APS-Digester along with the onion residual at 16 mg Ca(OH) 2 gVS -1 to control the pH of the biogasification reactor above 7.0. At steady state the average biogas yields were 0.51, 0.56, and 0.62 L gVS -1 for the OLRs of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 gVS L -1 d -1 respectively. The methane yields at steady state were 0.29, 0.32, and 0.31 L CH 4 gVS -1 for the OLRs of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 gVS L -1 d -1 respectively. The study shows that the digestion of onion residual required proper alkalinity and pH control, which was possible through the use of caustic chemicals. However, such chemicals will begin to have an inhibitory effect on the microbial population at high loading rates, and therefore alternative operational parameters are needed. -- Highlights: → An APS-Digester was used to study biogas production from onion solid residues. → Biogas and methane yields from onion solids were determined. → Study showed substantial findings for treating onion solid residues.

  16. Rapid arsenic(V)-reduction by fire in schwertmannite-rich soil enhances arsenic mobilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Scott G.; Bennett, William W.; Burton, Edward D.; Hockmann, Kerstin; Dawson, Nigel; Karimian, Niloofar

    2018-04-01

    Arsenic in acid sulfate soil (ASS) landscapes commonly associates with schwertmannite, a poorly crystalline Fe(III) mineral. Fires in ASS landscapes can thermally transform Fe(III) minerals to more crystalline phases, such as maghemite (γFe2O3). Although thermal genesis of maghemite requires electron transfer via organic matter pyrolysis, the possibility of fire causing concurrent transfer of electrons to schwertmannite-bound As(V) remains unexplored. Here, we subject an organic-rich soil with variable carbon content (∼9-44% organic C) mixed (4:1) with As(V)-bearing schwertmannite (total As of 4.7-5.4 μmol g-1), to various temperatures (200-800 °C) and heating durations (5-120 min). We explore the consequences for As and Fe via X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and selective extracts. Heating transforms schwertmannite to mainly maghemite and hematite at temperatures above 300-400 °C, with some transitory formation of magnetite, and electrons are readily transferred to both Fe(III) and As(V). As(V) reduction to As(III) is influenced by a combination of temperature, heating duration and carbon content and is significantly (P moderate fires in ASS landscapes, even of short duration, may generate considerable labile As(III) species and cause a pulse of As(III)aq mobilisation following initial re-wetting. Further research is warranted to examine if analogous As(III) formation occurs during combustion of organic-rich soil containing common As-bearing Fe(III) minerals such as ferrihydrite and goethite.

  17. A hydrogen-oxidizing, Fe(III)-reducing microorganism from the Great Bay estuary, New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccavo, F.; Blakemore, R.P.; Lovley, D.R.

    1992-01-01

    A dissimilatory Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-reducing bacterium was isolated from bottom sediments of the Great Bay estuary, New Hampshire. The isolate was a facultatively anaerobic gram-negative rod which did not appear to fit into any previously described genus. It was temporarily designated strain BrY. BrY grew anaerobically in a defined medium with hydrogen or lactate as the electron donor and Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. BrY required citrate, fumarate, or malate as a carbon source for growth on H2 and Fe(III). With Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor, BrY metabolized hydrogen to a minimum threshold at least 60-fold lower than the threshold reported for pure cultures of sulfate reducers. This finding supports the hypothesis that when Fe(III) is available, Fe(III) reducers can outcompete sulfate reducers for electron donors. Lactate was incompletely oxidized to acetate and carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the electron acceptor. Lactate oxidation was also coupled to the reduction of Mn(IV), U(VI), fumarate, thiosulfate, or trimethylamine n-oxide under anaerobic conditions. BrY provides a model for how enzymatic metal reduction by respiratory metal-reducing microorganisms has the potential to contribute to the mobilization of iron and trace metals and to the immobilization of uranium in sediments of Great Bay Estuary.

  18. Thermal and enzymatic pretreatment of sludge containing phthalate esters prior to mesophilic anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Yenal, U.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2004-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the effect of thermal pretreatment of sludge at 70degreesC on the anaerobic degradation of three commonly found phthalic acid esters (PAE): di-ethyl phthalate (DEP), di-butyl phthalate (DBP), and di-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). Also, the enzymatic treatment...... at 28degreesC with a commercial lipase was studied as a way to enhance PAE removal. Pretreatment at 70degreesC of the sludge containing PAE negatively influenced the anaerobic biodegradability of phthalate esters at 37degreesC. The observed reduction of PAE biodegradation rates after the thermal...... pretreatment was found to be proportional to the PAE solubility in water: the higher the solubility, the higher the percentage of the reduction (DEP > DBP > DEHP). PAE were slowly degraded during the pretreatment at 70degreesC, yet this was probably due to physicochemical reactions than to microbial...

  19. Study on Effects of Electron Donors on Phosphine Production from Anaerobic Activated Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Cao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different types and concentrations of electron donors (glucose, starch, methanol and sodium acetate on the formation of phosphine from anaerobic activated sludge that has been domesticated for a prolonged period were studied in small batch experiments. The results show that types and concentrations of electron donor have significant effects on the production of phosphine from anaerobic activated sludge. Among them, glucose was the most favourable electron donor, whereas sodium acetate was the least favourable electron donor for the removal of phosphorus and the production of phosphine. Higher concentrations of electron donors were more favourable for the reduction of phosphate into phosphine, and supplying more than nine times the amount of electron donor as theoretically required for the reduction of phosphate into phosphine was favourable for the production of phosphine.

  20. Thermophillic Sidestream Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors: The Shear Rate Dilemma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeison, D.A.; Telkamp, P.; Lier, van J.B.

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic biomass retention under thermophilic conditions has proven difficult. Membrane filtration can be used as alternative way to achieve high sludge concentrations. This research studied the feasibility of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) under thermophilic conditions. A sidestream MBR

  1. The effect of tannic compounds on anaerobic wastewater treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Field, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is an alternative to the conventional aerobic treatment processes for the removal of easily biodegradable organic matter in medium to high strength industrial wastestreams. Anaerobic treatment has several advantages, however one important disadvantage is the

  2. Physiologically anaerobic microorganisms of the deep subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, S.E. Jr.; Chung, K.T.

    1992-06-01

    A variety of different media were used to isolate facultatively (FAB) and obligately anaerobic bacteria (OAB). These bacteria were isolated from core subsamples obtained from boreholes at the Idaho National Engineering Lab. (INEL) or at the Hanford Lab. (Yakima). Core material was sampled at various depths to 600 feet below the surface. All core samples with culturable bacteria contained at least FAB making thisthe most common physiological type of anaerobic bacteria present in the deep subsurface at these two sites. INEL core samples are characterized by isolates of both FAB and OAB. No isolates of acetogenic, methanogenic, or sulfate reducing bacteria were obtained. Yakima core samples are characterized by a marked predominance of FAB in comparison to OAB. In addition, isolates of acetogenic, methanogenic, and sulfate reducing bacteria were obtained. The Yakima site has the potential for complete anaerobic mineralization of organic compounds whereas this potential appears to be lacking at INEL.

  3. Biochemistry and physiology of anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-18

    We welcome you to The Power of Anaerobes. This conference serves two purposes. One is to celebrate the life of Harry D. Peck, Jr.,who was born May 18, 1927 and would have celebrated his 73rd birthday at this conference. He died November 20, 1998. The second is to gather investigators to exchange views within the realm of anaerobic microbiology, an area in which tremendous progress has been seen during recent years. It is sufficient to mention discoveries of a new form of life (the archaea), hyper or extreme thermophiles, thermophilic alkaliphiles and anaerobic fungi. With these discoveries has come a new realization about physiological and metabolic properties of microorganisms, and this in turn has demonstrated their importance for the development, maintenance and sustenance of life on Earth.

  4. Detoxification of carbaryl by anaerobic gastrointestinal organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laszewski, S.J.; Harkin, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Bacteria originating from the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) were tested in vitro for their ability to hydrolyze carbaryl, the most widely used carbamate insecticide. Carbaryl hydrolysis prevents acetylcholinesterase inhibition. Degradation of [1- 14 C]naphthyl N-methylcarbamate was assessed through the use of carbon-and nitrogen-free enrichment cultures as well as a cometabolic enrichment culture. The carbon-free enrichment culture showed the greatest ability to hydrolyze carbaryl. Two facultative anaerobes, identified as DF-3 and Citrobacter freundii were isolated. Cell-free extracts from these bacteria were able to hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl acetate, 1-naphthyl acetate and carbaryl. This investigation suggests carbaryl degradation could occur prior to gastrointestinal absorption. Human GIT organisms are also widespread in anaerobic environments. Microbial hydrolysis of a xenobiotic can be an important reaction in the anaerobic environments of man or nature

  5. Radiotracer study of the adsorption of Fe(III), Cr(III) and Cd(II) on natural and chemically modified Slovak zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foeldesova, M.; Dillinger, P.; Lukac, P.

    1998-01-01

    In order to minimize the contamination of environment with metals in ionic form the more types of natural and chemically modified zeolites were examined to their uptake of Fe(III), Cr(III) and Cd(II) from water solutions by batch radio-exchange equilibration method. In this study was used zeolitic tuff from deposit Niz