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Sample records for anaerobic aquifer polluted

  1. Atrazine removal in Danish anaerobic aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Philip Grinder; Arildskov, N.P.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    The pesticide atrazine (6-chloro-N-2-ethyl-N-4-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine -2,4-diamine) was removed from the water phase in anaerobic laboratory batch incubations with sediment and groundwater from a number of Danish anaerobic aquifers, but not in incubations from aerobic aquifers. The removal...... process was abiotic since atrazine was also removed from microbially inhibited autoclaved and chloroform amended controls, although in controls amended with mercury, atrazine removal was slowed down. (ring-U-C-14)- atrazine amended samples showed no mineralization to (CO2)-C-14 or transformation...... to soluble degradation products, indicating that a slow sorption process was responsible for the atrazine removal. Approximately 20% of the applied C-14-atrazine was present in a non-extractable residual sediment bound fraction, indicating the slow sorption process to be in part irreversible...

  2. Anaerobic degradation of alkylated benzenes in denitrifying laboratory aquifer columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toluene and m-xylene were rapidly mineralized in an anaerobic laboratory aquifer column operated under continuous-flow conditions with nitrate as an electron acceptor. The oxidation of toluene and m-xylene was coupled with the reduction of nitrate, and mineralization was confirmed by trapping 14CO2 evolved from 14C-ring-labeled substrates. Substrate degradation also took place when nitrous oxide replaced nitrate as an electron acceptor, but decomposition was inhibited in the presence of molecular oxygen or after the substitution of nitrate by nitrite. The m-xylene-adapted microorganisms in the aquifer column degraded toluene, benzaldehyde, benzoate, m-toluylaldehyde, m-toluate, m-cresol, p-cresol, and p-hydroxybenzoate but were unable to metabolize benzene, naphthalene, methylcyclohexane, and 1,3-dimethylcyclohexane. Isotope-dilution experiments suggested benzoate as an intermediate formed during anaerobic toluene metabolism. The finding that the highly water-soluble nitrous oxide served as electron acceptor for the anaerobic mineralization of some aromatic hydrocarbons may offer attractive options for the in situ restoration of polluted aquifers

  3. Key players and team play: anaerobic microbial communities in hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Schleinitz, Kathleen M; Vogt, Carsten

    2012-05-01

    Biodegradation of anthropogenic pollutants in shallow aquifers is an important microbial ecosystem service which is mainly brought about by indigenous anaerobic microorganisms. For the management of contaminated sites, risk assessment and control of natural attenuation, the assessment of in situ biodegradation and the underlying microbial processes is essential. The development of novel molecular methods, "omics" approaches, and high-throughput techniques has revealed new insight into complex microbial communities and their functions in anoxic environmental systems. This review summarizes recent advances in the application of molecular methods to study anaerobic microbial communities in contaminated terrestrial subsurface ecosystems. We focus on current approaches to analyze composition, dynamics, and functional diversity of subsurface communities, to link identity to activity and metabolic function, and to identify the ecophysiological role of not yet cultured microbes and syntrophic consortia. We discuss recent molecular surveys of contaminated sites from an ecological viewpoint regarding degrader ecotypes, abiotic factors shaping anaerobic communities, and biotic interactions underpinning the importance of microbial cooperation for microbial ecosystem services such as contaminant degradation. PMID:22476263

  4. Evidence for Microbial Iron Reduction in a Landfill Leachate-Polluted Aquifer (Vejen, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1994-01-01

    Aquifer sediment samples obtained from the anaerobic part of a landfill leachate plume in Vejen, Denmark, were suspended in groundwater or in an artificial medium and incubated. The strictly anaerobic suspensions were tested for reduction of ferric iron (Fe(III)) oxides, which was measured...... living bacteria were present. Mixed cultures were obtained from the sediment samples, and differences in apparent iron reduction rates among the different cultures were maintained during several transfers. In addition, iron reduction was observed in unamended incubation mixtures containing whole sediment...... and groundwater. Synthetic amorphous Fe(III) oxides, as well as naturally occurring sediment-bound Fe(III) oxides, could be reduced by the cultures. Together, our results provide evidence that iron-reducing bacteria are present and microbial iron reduction occurs in the polluted aquifer sediments which we studied....

  5. Pollution of an aquifer by produced oil field water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brine is produced from reservoirs as a waste material from crude oil and gas after processing. Waste water may be discharged at the surface or reinjected underground. When it is reinjected, it may be mixed with an underground fresh water source for several reasons. From this point of view, forecasting the pollutant concentrations by knowing the historical data at several locations on a field has great importance when planning the necessary precautions for environmental safety. Aquifer-M in Turkey, having the properties of potable water, is contaminated by oil field water that is injected for disposal purposes. A numerical model is used to determine the extent of pollution due to the injection of saline produced water into aquifer-M. Eight observation wells are drilled to take water and core samples in order to identify both rock and fluid properties of aquifer-M. Water samples taken from different intervals of aquifer-M are analyzed to determine the flow paths for the pollutant movement. The results are interpreted with the help of core property data obtained by computerized tomography (CT) analysis and routine core analysis. By using drilling records, log data, and CT analysis results, two subunits in aquifer-M with different lithological properties are identified. All data are used in a ground water pollution model. Aquifer-M has fresh water with salinity of 5-10 ppm, and the chlorine concentration of injected waste water is approximately 3410 pp. Since there is a significant difference between these concentrations, the chlorine ion is selected as the indicative ion for locating the pollution front. The model study indicated that the contaminated water has propagated 18.7 km from the site of injection. (author)

  6. Anaerobic Degradation of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Groundwater Aquifers or "Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation"

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, R. Brent; Jay D Keasling

    1997-01-01

    Groundwater contamination by chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as tetrachloroethene (PCE) or trichloroethene (TCE), is a major concern throughout the United States. A developing strategy for the remediation of PCE and TCE contaminated aquifers is anaerobic biodegradation. From a TCE contaminated groundwater site, microorganisms were enriched with the ability to anaerobically convert PCE and TCE completely to ethene. Kinetic studies performed with this culture showed that degradation of PCE, TCE...

  7. Testing water pollution in a two layer aquifer

    OpenAIRE

    García León, Manuel; Lin Ye, Jue

    2011-01-01

    Water bodies around urban areas may be polluted with chemical elements from urban or industrial activities. We study the case of underground water pollution. This is a serious problem, since under- ground water is high qualified drinkable water in a world where this natural resource is increasingly reduced. This study is focused on a two-layer aquifer. If the superficial layer is contaminated, the deeper layer could be spoiled as well. This contribution checks the equality of the mean or c...

  8. Microcosm experiments to control anaerobic redox conditions when studying the fate of organic micropollutants in aquifer material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Manuela; Carrera, Jesús; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Ayora, Carlos; Cama, Jordi; Köck-Schulmeyer, Marianne; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià; Tobella Brunet, Joana; Hernández García, Marta

    2011-11-01

    The natural processes occurring in subsurface environments have proven to effectively remove a number of organic pollutants from water. The predominant redox conditions revealed to be one of the controlling factors. However, in the case of organic micropollutants the knowledge on this potential redox-dependent behavior is still limited. Motivated by managed aquifer recharge practices microcosm experiments involving aquifer material, settings potentially feasible in field applications, and organic micropollutants at environmental concentrations were carried out. Different anaerobic redox conditions were promoted and sustained in each set of microcosms by adding adequate quantities of electron donors and acceptors. Whereas denitrification and sulfate-reducing conditions are easily achieved and maintained, Fe- and Mn-reduction are strongly constrained by the slower dissolution of the solid phases commonly present in aquifers. The thorough description and numerical modeling of the evolution of the experiments, including major and trace solutes and dissolution/precipitation of solid phases, have been proven necessary to the understanding of the processes and closing the mass balance. As an example of micropollutant results, the ubiquitous beta-blocker atenolol is completely removed in the experiments, the removal occurring faster under more advanced redox conditions. This suggests that aquifers constitute a potentially efficient alternative water treatment for atenolol, especially if adequate redox conditions are promoted during recharge and long enough residence times are ensured.

  9. Characterization of Predominant Reductants in an Anaerobic Leachate-Contaminated Aquifer by Nitroaromatic Probe Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rügge, Kirsten; Hofstetter, Thomas B.; Haderlein, Stefan B.;

    1998-01-01

    The biogeochemical processes controlling the reductive transformation of contaminants in an anaerobic aquifer were inferred from the relative reactivity patterns of redox-sensitive probe compounds. The fate of five nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) was monitored under different redox conditions in a...

  10. Geomicrobial and Geochemical Redox Processes in a Landfill-Polluted Aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Liselotte; Heron, Gorm; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen;

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of different dominant microbial-mediated redox processes in a landfill leachate-polluted aquifer (Grindsted, Denmark) was investigated. The most probable number method was utilized for detecting bacteria able to use each of the electron acceptors, and unamended incubations were...... to the landfill. Sulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate reduction were observed in the area where methanogenesis took place, but were also observed further downgradient in the leachate plume. Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were found in almost all samples from the entire anaerobic leachate plume, but no ongoing Fe...... utilized to detect the activity of the redox processes using the investigated electron acceptors. The redox processes investigated were methane production and reduction of sulfate, Fe(III), Mn(IV), and nitrate. The presence of methanogenic bacteria and methanogenic activity were observed close...

  11. Concurrent nitrate and Fe(III) reduction during anaerobic biodegradation of phenols in a sandstone aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette; Crouzet, C.; Arvin, Erik;

    2000-01-01

    The biodegradation of phenols (similar to 5, 60, 600 mg 1(-1)) under anaerobic conditions (nitrate enriched and unamended) was studied in laboratory microcosms with sandstone material and groundwater from within an anaerobic ammonium plume in an aquifer, The aqueous phase was sampled and analyzed...... for phenols and selected redox sensitive parameters on a regular basis. An experiment with sandstone material from specific depth intervals from a vertical profile across the ammonium plume was also conducted. The miniature microcosms used in this experiment were sacrificed for sampling for phenols...... and selected redox sensitive parameters at the end of the experiment. The sandstone material was characterized with respect to oxidation and reduction potential and Fe(II) and Fe(III) speciation prior to use for all microcosms and at the end of the experiments for selected microcosms. The redox conditions...

  12. Overview of the anaerobic toxicity caused by organic forest industry wastewater pollutants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierra-Alvarez, R.; Field, J.A.; Kortekaas, S.; Lettinga, G.

    1994-01-01

    Numerous types of organic environmental pollutants are encountered in forest industry effluents which potentially could inhibit consortia of anaerobic bacteria. The purpose of this study was to collect anaerobic bioassay data from the literature to better estimate the impact of these pollutants on a

  13. Relationships between microbial community structure and hydrochemistry in a landfill leachate-polluted aquifer.

    OpenAIRE

    Roling, W.F.M.; Breukelen, van, R.; Braster, M; Lin, B.; Verseveld, van, Marloes

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge about the relationship between microbial community structure and hydrogeochemistry (e.g., pollution, redox and degradation processes) in landfill leachate-polluted aquifers is required to develop tools for predicting and monitoring natural attenuation. In this study analyses of pollutant and redox chemistry were conducted in parallel with culture-independent profiling of microbial communities present in a well-defined aquifer (Banisveld, The Netherlands). Degradation of organic cont...

  14. Aquifer vulnerability to pesticide pollution - Combining soil, land-use and aquifer properties with molecular descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, F.; Kolpin, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    This study uses an extensive survey of herbicides in groundwater across the midwest United States to predict occurrences of a range of compounds across the region from a combination of their molecular properties and the properties of the catchment of a borehole. The study covers 100 boreholes and eight pesticides. For each of the boreholes its catchment the soil, land-use and aquifer properties were characterized. Discriminating boreholes where pollution occurred from those where no pollution occurred gave a model that was 74% correct with organic carbon content, percentage sand content and depth to the water table being significant properties of the borehole catchment. Molecular topological descriptors as well as Koc, solubility and half-life were used to characterize each compound included in the study. Inclusion of molecular properties makes it possible to discriminate between occurrence and non-occurrence of each compound in each well. The best-fit model combines: organic carbon content, percentage sand content and depth to the water table with molecular descriptors representing molecular size, molecular branching and functional group composition of the herbicides.

  15. Role of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) in Nitrogen Removal from a Freshwater Aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L; Böhlke, J K; Song, Bongkeun; Tobias, Craig R

    2015-10-20

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) couples the oxidation of ammonium with the reduction of nitrite, producing N2. The presence and activity of anammox bacteria in groundwater were investigated at multiple locations in an aquifer variably affected by a large, wastewater-derived contaminant plume. Anammox bacteria were detected at all locations tested using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and quantification of hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) gene transcripts. Anammox and denitrification activities were quantified by in situ (15)NO2(-) tracer tests along anoxic flow paths in areas of varying ammonium, nitrate, and organic carbon abundances. Rates of denitrification and anammox were determined by quantifying changes in (28)N2, (29)N2, (30)N2, (15)NO3(-), (15)NO2(-), and (15)NH4(+) with groundwater travel time. Anammox was present and active in all areas tested, including where ammonium and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were low, but decreased in proportion to denitrification when acetate was added to increase available electron supply. Anammox contributed 39-90% of potential N2 production in this aquifer, with rates on the order of 10 nmol N2-N L(-1) day(-1). Although rates of both anammox and denitrification during the tracer tests were low, they were sufficient to reduce inorganic nitrogen concentrations substantially during the overall groundwater residence times in the aquifer. These results demonstrate that anammox activity in groundwater can rival that of denitrification and may need to be considered when assessing nitrogen mass transport and permanent loss of fixed nitrogen in aquifers. PMID:26401911

  16. In-Situ Anaerobic Biosurfactant Production Process For Remediation Of DNAPL Contamination In Subsurface Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, J. D.; Nambi, I. M.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) and remediation of aquifers contaminated with hydrophobic contaminants require insitu production of biosurfactants for mobilization of entrapped hydrophobic liquids. Most of the biosurfactant producing microorganisms produce them under aerobic condition and hence surfactant production is limited in subsurface condition due to lack of oxygen. Currently bioremediation involves expensive air sparging or excavation followed by exsitu biodegradation. Use of microorganisms which can produce biosurfactants under anaerobic conditions can cost effectively expedite the process of insitu bioremediation or mobilization. In this work, the feasibility of anaerobic biosurfactant production in three mixed anaerobic cultures prepared from groundwater and soil contaminated with chlorinated compounds and municipal sewage sludge was investigated. The cultures were previously enriched under complete anaerobic conditions in the presence of Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) for more than a year before they were studied for biosurfactant production. Biosurfactant production under anaerobic conditions was simulated using two methods: i) induction of starvation in the microbial cultures and ii) addition of complex fermentable substrates. Positive result for biosurfactant production was not observed when the cultures were induced with starvation by adding PCE as blobs which served as the only terminal electron acceptor. However, slight reduction in interfacial tension was noticed which was caused by the adherence of microbes to water-PCE interface. Biosurfactant production was observed in all the three cultures when they were fed with complex fermentable substrates and surface tension of the liquid medium was lowered below 35 mN/m. Among the fermentable substrates tested, vegetable oil yielded highest amount of biosurfactant in all the cultures. Complete biodegradation of PCE to ethylene at a faster rate was also observed when vegetable oil was amended to the

  17. Degradation of weathered diesel fuel by microorganisms from a contaminated aquifer in aerobic and anaerobic microcosms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diesel fuel-contaminated aquifer in Menziken, Canton of Aargau, Switzerland, was in situ bioremediated from 1989 to 1994 by adding O2, NO3-, PO43-, and NH4+ through an infiltration well. After a remediation time of 3.5 years, aquifer material from the contaminated zone was excavated and found to contain > 106 hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms/g and 1.15 ± 0.15 mg/g weathered diesel fuel comprising mainly isoprenoid alkanes and an unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of unknown components. Samples of this material were incubated for up to 470 days in aerobic and anaerobic microcosms. The microbial activity was determined by measuring the production of inorganic carbon and the consumption of O2 and NO3-. The degradation of the weathered diesel fuel was quantified by infrared spectroscopy and by capillary gas chromatography. In aerobic microcosms, all isoprenoid alkanes and most of the UCM were biodegraded as long as a nitrogen source was present. The O2 consumption could be stimulated by adding KH2PO4 and by elevating the temperature to 22 C. In anaerobic microcosms with KNO3, NO3- was consumed, inorganic carbon was produced, and the isoprenoid alkanes and the UCM were partially metabolized. In some selected microcosms, the NO3- consumption rate was stimulated by adding external substrates such as toluene, o-xylene, m-xylene, p-xylene, n-alkanes, or fatty acids. Mineralization of toluene, naphthalene, and hexadecane to CO2 under denitrifying conditions was confirmed by using [14C]-labelled substrates

  18. Effects of biodegradation of mecoprop, dichlorprop and bentazone by changing the redox conditions from anaerobic to aerobic in sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Suzi; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    in combination with geological variations may affect microbial degradation processes by mixing in even low oxygen concentrations and create steep gradients and drastic redox zones in aquifers. The aim of the current study was to investigate the stimulation of pesticides biodegradation by adding oxygen...... knowledge, this is the first observation of bentazone degradation with aquifer. Optimization of redox conditions from anaerobic to aerobic by adding oxygen stimulated the biodegradation of three pesticides.......Pesticides and metabolites are detected in an increasing number of aquifers resulting in closure of many drinking water wells. The natural redox conditions of aquifers are considered to be one of the important factors governing the pesticides degradation in groundwater. Water abstraction strategy...

  19. Interpolation of extensive routine water pollution monitoring datasets: methodology and discussion of implications for aquifer management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuval; Rimon, Y.; Graber, E. R.; Furman, A.

    2013-07-01

    A large fraction of the fresh water available for human use is stored in groundwater aquifers. Since human activities such as mining, agriculture, industry and urbanization often result in incursion of various pollutants to groundwater, routine monitoring of water quality is an indispensable component of judicious aquifer management. Unfortunately, groundwater pollution monitoring is expensive and usually cannot cover an aquifer with the spatial resolution necessary for making adequate management decisions. Interpolation of monitoring data between points is thus an important tool for supplementing measured data. However, interpolating routine groundwater pollution data poses a special problem due to the nature of the observations. The data from a producing aquifer usually includes many zero pollution concentration values from the clean parts of the aquifer but may span a wide range (up to a few orders of magnitude) of values in the polluted areas. This manuscript presents a methodology that can cope with such datasets and use them to produce maps that present the pollution plumes but also delineates the clean areas that are fit for production. A method for assessing the quality of mapping in a way which is suitable to the data's dynamic range of values is also presented. Local variant of inverse distance weighting is employed to interpolate the data. Inclusion zones around the interpolation points ensure that only relevant observations contribute to each interpolated concentration. Using inclusion zones improves the accuracy of the mapping but results in interpolation grid points which are not assigned a value. That inherent trade-off between the interpolation accuracy and coverage is demonstrated using both circular and elliptical inclusion zones. A leave-one-out cross testing is used to assess and compare the performance of the interpolations. The methodology is demonstrated using groundwater pollution monitoring data from the Coastal aquifer along the Israeli

  20. Interpolation of extensive routine water pollution monitoring datasets: methodology and discussion of implications for aquifer management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A large fraction of the fresh water available for human use is stored in groundwater aquifers. Since human activities such as mining, agriculture, industry and urbanization often result in incursion of various pollutants to groundwater, routine monitoring of water quality is an indispensable component of judicious aquifer management. Unfortunately, groundwater pollution monitoring is expensive and usually cannot cover an aquifer with the spatial resolution necessary for making adequate management decisions. Interpolation of monitoring data between points is thus an important tool for supplementing measured data. However, interpolating routine groundwater pollution data poses a special problem due to the nature of the observations. The data from a producing aquifer usually includes many zero pollution concentration values from the clean parts of the aquifer but may span a wide range (up to a few orders of magnitude of values in the polluted areas. This manuscript presents a methodology that can cope with such datasets and use them to produce maps that present the pollution plumes but also delineates the clean areas that are fit for production. A method for assessing the quality of mapping in a way which is suitable to the data's dynamic range of values is also presented. Local variant of inverse distance weighting is employed to interpolate the data. Inclusion zones around the interpolation points ensure that only relevant observations contribute to each interpolated concentration. Using inclusion zones improves the accuracy of the mapping but results in interpolation grid points which are not assigned a value. That inherent trade-off between the interpolation accuracy and coverage is demonstrated using both circular and elliptical inclusion zones. A leave-one-out cross testing is used to assess and compare the performance of the interpolations. The methodology is demonstrated using groundwater pollution monitoring data from the Coastal aquifer

  1. Methanotrophic Bacteria and Facilitated Transport of Pollutants in Aquifer Material

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Michael B.; Chen, Jyh-Herng; Kadner, Debra J.; Lion, Leonard W.

    1994-01-01

    In situ stimulation of methanotrophic bacteria has been considered as a methodology for aquifer remediation. Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons such as trichloroethylene are fortuitously oxidized by the methane monooxygenase produced by methanotrophic bacteria. Experimental results are presented that indicate that both colloidal suspensions containing methanotrophic cells and the soluble extracellular polymers produced by methanotrophic cells have the potential to enhance the transport and re...

  2. Soil aquifer treatment to remove priority organic pollutants in the Llobregat river area

    OpenAIRE

    Huerta, Maria; Solé, Josep; Aceves, Mercè; Valhondo González, Cristina; Hernández, Marta; Gullón Santos, Martín

    2013-01-01

    The Llobregat River is the main source of water supply in this area. This river together with its aquifer has suffered from several damages which had contributed to endanger a suitable ecological and hydrological status; among them, pollution is a serious problem to deal with. In the last decades, the presence of organic pollutants in this river has been demonstrated [1,2]. Some of them are persistent to biological degradation and have shown to survive wastewater treatments almost unaltered a...

  3. Groundwater pollution risk mapping for the Eocene aquifer of the Oum Er-Rabia basin, Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettazarini, Said

    2006-11-01

    Sustainable development requires the management and preservation of water resources indispensable for all human activities. When groundwater constitutes the main water resource, vulnerability maps therefore are an important tool for identifying zones of high pollution risk and taking preventive measures in potential pollution sites. The vulnerability assessment for the Eocene aquifer in the Moroccan basin of Oum Er-Rabia is based on the DRASTIC method that uses seven parameters summarizing climatic, geological, and hydrogeological conditions controlling the seepage of pollutant substances to groundwater. Vulnerability maps were produced by using GIS techniques and applying the “generic” and “agricultural” models according to the DRASTIC charter. Resulting maps revealed that the aquifer is highly vulnerable in the western part of the basin and areas being under high contamination risk are more extensive when the “agricultural” model was applied.

  4. Assessing the correlation between anaerobic toluene degradation activity and bssA concentrations in hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazy, Sufia K; Monier, Amy L; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2010-09-01

    The assessment of biodegradation activity in contaminated aquifers is critical to demonstrate the performance of bioremediation and natural attenuation and to parameterize models of contaminant plume dynamics. Real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to target the catabolic bssA gene (coding for benzylsuccinate synthase) and a 16S rDNA phylogenetic gene (for total Bacteria) as potential biomarkers to infer on anaerobic toluene degradation rates. A significant correlation (P = 0.0003) was found over a wide range of initial toluene concentrations (1-100 mg/l) between toluene degradation rates and bssA concentrations in anaerobic microcosms prepared with aquifer material from a hydrocarbon contaminated site. In contrast, the correlation between toluene degradation activity and total Bacteria concentrations was not significant (P = 0.1125). This suggests that qPCR targeting of functional genes might offer a simple approach to estimate in situ biodegradation activity, which would enhance site investigation and modeling of natural attenuation at hydrocarbon-contaminated sites. PMID:20204467

  5. Quantification of organic pollutant degradation in contaminated aquifers using compound specific stable isotope analysis – Review of recent developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thullner, M.; Centler, F.; Richnow, H.-H.; Fischer, A.

    2012-01-01

    Compound specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) has been established as a viable tool for proving, characterizing and assessing degradation of organic pollutants within contaminated aquifers. The fractionation of stable isotopes during contaminant degradation leads to observable shifts in stable is

  6. Isotope-hydrological and hydrochemical study to investigate the penetration of pollution into a deep aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the city area of Munich the Younger Tertiary aquifer of the Obere Suesswassermolasse (OSM) is rich in water and is tapped by numerous wells reaching down to depths of about 250 m. The deep groundwater generally has the quality of drinking water and is used directly, for instance, by the food industry and as a public emergency water supply. The groundwater in the overlying Quaternary aquifer has become increasingly polluted. The groundwater in the deeper aquifer is more or less separated from the Quaternary gravels by a low-permeable clay and silt layer up to 40 m thick, which contains intermediate sand lenses. Within the city area of Munich the groundwater of the younger Tertiary aquifer is predominantly recharged by leakage through this layer from the Quaternary aquifer due to depression of the groundwater table caused by pumping. Combined isotope-hydrological and hydrochemical investigations were performed and, taking into account the hydrogeological and hydraulic conditions, used to clarify to what extent the clay and silt layer is able to protect the underlying aquifer from penetration of pollutants with different physical and chemical properties, in particular chlorinated hydrocarbons. Water samples were taken, in some cases repeatedly, from about 50 wells tapping the shallow and deep groundwater aquifer in selected sub-areas of the city of Munich, and the concentrations of 2H, 3H, 18O, 13C, 14C, and in some cases 3He, were measured, together with the usual hydrochemical parameters and concentrations of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The analyses of environmental isotopes made it possible to classify the sampling points with respect to the mean residence time of the groundwater. An attempt was also made to correlate the dispersal of pollutants in the Younger Tertiary aquifer with the residence time. The results obtained show that under hydraulic stress of the aquifer young tritium-containing groundwater has in general penetrated down to depths not greater

  7. Removal of pollutants from pulp and paper mill effluent by anaerobic and aerobic treatment in pilot scale bioreactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, P.; Katiyar, D.; Gupta, M.;

    2011-01-01

    Pilot-scale anaerobic and aerobic treatment in a two-step bioreactor was performed for the removal of pollutants from pulp and paper mill effluent. After seven days of anaerobic treatment, colour (45%), lignin (60%), COD (26%) and adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) (20%) were reduced. The anaerobic......Pilot-scale anaerobic and aerobic treatment in a two-step bioreactor was performed for the removal of pollutants from pulp and paper mill effluent. After seven days of anaerobic treatment, colour (45%), lignin (60%), COD (26%) and adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) (20%) were reduced....... The anaerobically treated effluent was then treated in a bioreactor in the presence of a fungal strain (Aspergillus fumigatus) or a bacterial strain (Pseudomonas ovalis). The results of this study indicated a reduction in colour (76% and 56%), lignin (78% and 68%), COD (85% and 78%) and AOX (70% and 82...

  8. Aquifers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This map layer contains the shallowest principal aquifers of the conterminous United States, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, portrayed as...

  9. Relationships between microbial community structure and hydrochemistry in a landfill leachate-polluted aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röling, W F; van Breukelen, B M; Braster, M; Lin, B; van Verseveld, H W

    2001-10-01

    Knowledge about the relationship between microbial community structure and hydrogeochemistry (e.g., pollution, redox and degradation processes) in landfill leachate-polluted aquifers is required to develop tools for predicting and monitoring natural attenuation. In this study analyses of pollutant and redox chemistry were conducted in parallel with culture-independent profiling of microbial communities present in a well-defined aquifer (Banisveld, The Netherlands). Degradation of organic contaminants occurred under iron-reducing conditions in the plume of pollution, while upstream of the landfill and above the plume denitrification was the dominant redox process. Beneath the plume iron reduction occurred. Numerical comparison of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA)-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles of Bacteria and Archaea in 29 groundwater samples revealed a clear difference between the microbial community structures inside and outside the contaminant plume. A similar relationship was not evident in sediment samples. DGGE data were supported by sequencing cloned 16S rDNA. Upstream of the landfill members of the beta subclass of the class Proteobacteria (beta-proteobacteria) dominated. This group was not encountered beneath the landfill, where gram-positive bacteria dominated. Further downstream the contribution of gram-positive bacteria to the clone library decreased, while the contribution of delta-proteobacteria strongly increased and beta-proteobacteria reappeared. The beta-proteobacteria (Acidovorax, Rhodoferax) differed considerably from those found upstream (Gallionella, Azoarcus). Direct comparisons of cloned 16S rDNA with bands in DGGE profiles revealed that the data from each analysis were comparable. A relationship was observed between the dominant redox processes and the bacteria identified. In the iron-reducing plume members of the family Geobacteraceae made a strong contribution to the microbial communities. Because the only known

  10. Analysis of arsenic pollution in groundwater aquifers by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The serious contamination of groundwater in the southeastern plain of the province of Cordoba (Argentina), a phenomenon mentioned in the literature for over 80 years, has given rise to this initial hydrologic study covering an area over 250 km2. This study analyzes a rural area near a little town called La Francia, and is motivated by the existence of an important pollution with arsenic in the first-aquifer groundwater of the region. This phenomenon has been mentioned for a long time and evidenced by the high incidence of diseases associated with this element in the local population. By means of the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique, and using an energy-dispersive spectrometer, 50 samples of groundwater of the rural zone of La Francia from about 100 m deep (second aquifer), were analyzed. The samples were excited with a 3 kW X-ray tube and measured using a reflecting geometry with 45 deg. of incident and take-off directions. Preconcentration techniques for the preparation of the samples were employed in order to obtain an adequate signal-to-noise ratio. The As concentration in water was obtained using calibration curves and the internal standard method for quantification. A high percentage of the analyzed samples showed concentrations lesser than or equal to 0.05 mg l-1. This value corresponds to the maximum pollutant level for humans. The maximum measured value reaches 3 mg l-1 in samples collected in perforations of first-aquifer wells and in some second-aquifer isolated wells

  11. Anaerobic biodegradability of macropollutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini

    2002-01-01

    A variety of test procedures for determination of anaerobic biodegradability has been reported. This paper reviews the methods developed for determination of anaerobic biodegradability of macro-pollutants. Anaerobic biodegradability of micro-pollutants is not included. Furthermore, factors import...

  12. Experimental and numerical study of pollution process in an aquifer in relation to a garbage dump field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changli, Liu; Feng-E, Zhang; Yun, Zhang; Shuhong, Song; Sheng, Zhang; Hao, Ye; Hongbing, Hou; Lijuan, Yang; Ming, Zhang

    2005-10-01

    The water quality of shallow aquifers that have direct relationship to human heath and ecological safety has been seriously threatened by widespread dumping of industrial solid waste, urban and rural garbage. A garbage dump field with hydrogeological, environ-geological characteristics typical of the Beijing plain was selected for investigation. A hydrogeological model was constructed and the equations used to describe pollutant transport in one-dimensional (1D) steady, uniform groundwater flow to investigate the transport/diffusion processes. In addition to the coefficients for calculation, diffusion coefficient and other coefficients of the aquifer were obtained by conducting in situ diffusion experiments and sample tests. Velocity and scope of pollutant transport/diffusion process were calculated. Accordingly, the real pollution situation in the aquifer was evaluated through in situ drilling and sample testing. Transport/diffusion processes of pollutants within the aquifer abide by the solute equation applicable to 1D steady flow. The transport and diffusion dominate in the direction of groundwater flowing at a speed of about 120 m per year. Comparably, the lateral diffusive width is much smaller. Pollution degree decreases by the law of Y=1.08 exp(33.533/ X), where Y is the distance from the garbage dump field and X is the overall pollution index.

  13. Molecular Analysis of Dominant Microbial Populations in Heavily and Slightly Polluted Aquifers by a Seaside Landfill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yangjie; YANG Hong; LI Daotang; WU Xiujuan

    2005-01-01

    The microbial populations were investigated in two groundwater samples, GW-H and GW-S, which represented heavily and slightly polluted aquifers by a seaside landfill. The concentrations of dissolved redox-relevant species suggested that iron-reduction/sulfate-reduction and denitrification were major redox processes for GW-H and GW-S. The dominant microbial populations were determined using restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. These microbes were then further studied by sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. The results indicate an obvious variation of the dominant populations between the two samples. The coexistence of sequences related to denitrifiers, sulfur-reducers, and methanotrophic bacteria was found in the GW-S sample, and a sequence associated with a sulfate-reducer was also found in the GW-H sample using molecular analyses. These results suggest that the molecular approach may be an important supplement to other approaches in characterizing the redox processes in polluted aquifers.

  14. Groundwater vulnerability and pollution risk assessment of porous aquifers to nitrate: Modifying the DRASTIC method using quantitative parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakis, Nerantzis; Voudouris, Konstantinos S.

    2015-06-01

    In the present study the DRASTIC method was modified to estimate vulnerability and pollution risk of porous aquifers to nitrate. The qualitative parameters of aquifer type, soil and impact of the vadose zone were replaced with the quantitative parameters of aquifer thickness, nitrogen losses from soil and hydraulic resistance. Nitrogen losses from soil were estimated based on climatic, soil and topographic data using indices produced by the GLEAMS model. Additionally, the class range of each parameter and the final index were modified using nitrate concentration correlation with four grading methods (natural breaks, equal interval, quantile and geometrical intervals). For this reason, seventy-seven (77) groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for nitrate. Land uses were added to estimate the pollution risk to nitrates. The two new methods, DRASTIC-PA and DRASTIC-PAN, were then applied in the porous aquifer of Anthemountas basin together with the initial versions of DRASTIC and the LOSN-PN index. The two modified methods displayed the highest correlations with nitrate concentrations. The two new methods provided higher discretisation of the vulnerability and pollution risk, whereas the high variance of the (ANOVA) F statistic confirmed the increase of the average concentrations of NO3-, increasing from low to high between the vulnerability and pollution risk classes. The importance of the parameters of hydraulic resistance of the vadose zone, aquifer thickness and land use was confirmed by single-parameter sensitivity analysis.

  15. Assessment of potential anaerobic biotransformation of organic pollutants in sediment caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anthony M; Kirisits, Mary Jo; Reible, Danny D

    2012-11-15

    In situ capping is a remedial approach for reducing the risk of biota exposure to sediment contaminants. Biotransformation of contaminants in sand-based sediment caps, rarely considered in sediment cap design, could further reduce the exposure risk. The anaerobic biotransformation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes (BTEX), monochlorobenzene, dichlorobenzenes and naphthalene was evaluated with sediments from Onondaga Lake in dilute sediment slurries and in sand-capped sediment laboratory-scale columns. The percentage of sediment samples demonstrating biotransformation under anaerobic conditions in slurries incubated at 12°C was greatest for BTEX, followed by monochlorobenzene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, 1,2-dichlorobenzene and 1,3-dichlorobenzene. Only toluene biotransformation was observed in sand cap columns. The rate of toluene biotransformation diminished over time, which might be due to inhibition caused by hydrogen from the experimental setup. Results suggest potential for the biotransformation of toluene, and possibly other pollutants, in sand-based sediment caps under anaerobic conditions at low temperatures.

  16. Hydrochemical characterization and pollution sources identification of groundwater in Salawusu aquifer system of Ordos Basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingchun; Wang, Luchen; Ma, Hongyun; Yu, Kun; Martín, Jordi Delgado

    2016-09-01

    Ordos Basin is located in an arid and semi-arid region of northwestern China, which is the most important energy source bases in China. Salawusu Formation (Q3 s) is one of the most important aquifer systems of Ordos Basin, which is adjacent to Jurassic coalfield areas. A large-scale exploitation of Jurassic coal resources over ten years results in series of influences to the coal minerals, such as exposed to the oxidation process and dissolution into the groundwater due to the precipitation infiltration. Therefore, how these processes impact groundwater quality is of great concerns. In this paper, the descriptive statistical method, Piper trilinear diagram, ratios of major ions and canonical correspondence analysis are employed to investigate the hydrochemical evolution, determine the possible sources of pollution processes, and assess the controls on groundwater compositions using the monitored data in 2004 and 2014 (before and after large-scale coal mining). Results showed that long-term exploration of coal resources do not result in serious groundwater pollution. The hydrochemical types changed from HCO3(-)-CO3(2-) facies to SO4(2-)-Cl facies during 10 years. Groundwater hardness, nitrate and sulfate pollution were identified in 2014, which was most likely caused by agricultural activities. PMID:27294785

  17. Model-based integration and analysis of biogeochemical and isotopic dynamics in a nitrate-polluted pyritic aquifer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.-C.; Prommer, H.; Broers, H.P.; Slomp, C.P.; Greskowiak, J.; Van Der Grift, B.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of nitrate from agricultural land to groundwater and the resulting nitrate pollution are a major environmental problem worldwide. Its impact is often mitigated in aquifers hosting sufficiently reactive reductants that can promote autotrophic denitrification. In the case of pyrite acting as

  18. Recovering the pollutant release history in aquifers with non uniform flow field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, A.; Butera, I.; Tanda, M.

    2005-12-01

    The great interest in environmental issues has led to an attention to the quality of groundwater. Scientific efforts in groundwater flow studies have primarily focused on the flow and transport behavior and on the identification of the corresponding parameters. Since '90 increasing attention has been paid to the problem of recovering the release history of a pollutant because the knowledge of the pollution injection function gives information about the future pollution spread and allows a better planning of remediation action (Liu and Ball, 1999, Snodgrass and Kitanidis, 1997, Skaggs and Kabala, 1994, Butera and Tanda, 2003). Moreover, from a legal and regulatory point of view, it is also important to determine the release time period and the highest values of concentration released; in fact, an available release history can be a useful tool for sharing the costs of remediation of a polluted area among the actors. Some approaches developed in the literature to the inverse problem solution (geostatistical approach (Snodgrass and Kitanidis, 1997), Tikhonov regularization method (Skaggs and Kabala, 1994)) require the computation of the function that describes the effect, in time at a certain location of the aquifer, due to an impulsive release of pollutant at the source. This function, named transfer or Kernel function can be analy1itically determined if the problem has a simple geometry and regular boundary conditions. In many cases the characteristic of the groundwater flow field do not allow for the analytical transfer function formulation; this is the case, for instance, of non uniform in the mean flow due to complicated boundary conditions, existence of pumping wells, high heterogeneity of the aquifer (Sudicky, 1986) etc.. With the available procedures the technician has to reduce the real problem to a very simplified scheme to which the analytical transfer function can be applied. As a consequence a rough approximation in the results can be expected. In this

  19. Numerical Simulation of the Anaerobic Transformation of Tetrachloroethene to cis-Dichloroethene in a Continuous Flow Aquifer Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, N.; Azizian, M.; Dolan, M.; Semprini, L.

    2007-12-01

    The anaerobic reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) to cis-dichloroethene (c-DCE) in a laboratory column study was numerically simulated and compared with experimental observations. The column study was conducted with continuous flow and injection of PCE in synthetic groundwater. The column was packed with aquifer solids from the Hanford DOE site and bioaugmented with the Evanite (EV) dechlorinating enrichment culture. After the column was bioaugmented and fed lactate as an electron donor, c-DCE concentrations in the column effluent exceeded the influent PCE concentration. This high c-DCE concentration resulted from enhanced PCE desorption and transformation. A 1-D reactive transport model was developed that included the processes of dispersion, advection, rate-limited sorption and desorption, reductive dechlorination kinetics with competitive inhibition and microbial growth and decay. The model was validated by mass balances, comparisons with analytical solutions and batch kinetic models. Previously determined kinetic and inhibition constants for the EV culture of Yu and Semprini (2004) were input into the model simulations. Initial biomass concentration was assumed to be exponentially distributed along the column. The sorption parameters including the aquifer: water distribution coefficients (Kds) and first-order mass transfer coefficients for PCE, trichloroethene (TCE), and c-DCE were determined in batch laboratory studies. The system of model equations was solved numerically using COMSOL 3.3, which employs finite-element methods. The reactive transport model successfully simulated the initial results of continuous flow column experiment. The increase in c-DCE above the influent PCE concentration was simulated and TCE was shown not to accumulate in the column effluent. The simulations showed that microbial kinetic values generated in previous studies and the sorption parameters generated in batch tests, when used in a transport model, did a

  20. Regression Models for Aquifer Vulnerability to Nitrate Pollution in Osona (NE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy Roura, M.; Nolan, B. T.; Menció Domingo, A.; Mas-Pla, J.

    2012-12-01

    Regression models were developed at a local scale in the Osona region (1,260 square kilometers) to predict nitrate concentrations in groundwater. Osona is a semi-arid region in northeast Spain, where livestock and agricultural activities are very intensive, and therefore, it is vulnerable to nitrate pollution from agricultural sources (European Nitrate Directive (91/676/EEC)). Nitrate concentrations in groundwater are commonly above 50 mg/L as nitrate, reaching up to 500 mg/L in some of the sampled wells. Regression models were based on explanatory variables such as geology, land use, and nitrogen inputs, which control the fate, transport and attenuation of nitrate in groundwater. Regression has been widely used to determine aquifer vulnerability to nitrate in groundwater at large spatial scales. We developed models with and without site-specific groundwater chemistry data to see the extent to which the latter improved the models. Although chemistry data could explain additional variation in groundwater nitrate concentration, such data were available only at the well locations and therefore were less amenable for spatial extrapolation. The data set consisted of nitrate data from 63 sampled wells and the following explanatory variables: 1) soils data consisting of texture and other physical properties; 2) geology indicating presence or absence of aquifers in the region, and their type (unconfined, leaky or confined); 3) land use (agricultural, urban, forested); 4) nitrogen input as manure; 5) occurrence of irrigated crops; 6) estimates of nitrogen uptake developed for 10 different crops; 7) slope; 8) population density, and 9) groundwater chemistry data comprising major ions and trace elements. Variables 1 and 2 were compiled as point data because their polygons were much larger than the well buffers which represented contributing areas to the sampled wells. Variables 3 to 8 were compiled within a 500-meter radius buffer around wells using a GIS-based weighted

  1. A two-stage anaerobic system for biodegrading wastewater containing terephthalic acid and high strength easily degradable pollutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The high strength easily biodegradable pollutants(represented by CODE) are strong inhibitors of terephthalic acid(TA) anaerobic biodegradation. At the same time, TA can inhibiteasily biodegradable pollutants removal under anaerobic conditionsto a limited extent. This mutual inhibition could happen and causea low removal efficiency of both TA and CODE, when the effluentfrom TA workshops containing TA and easily biodegradable pollutantsare treated by a single anaerobic reactor system. Based upon thetreatment kinetics analysis of both TA degradation and CODEremoval, a two-stage up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket and up-flowfixed film reactor(UASB-UAFF) system for dealing with this kind ofwastewater was developed and run successfully at laboratory scale.An UASB reactor with the methanogenic consortium as the first stageremoves the easily biodegradable pollutants(CODE). An UAFF reactor as the second stage is mainly in charge of TA degradation. At aHRT 18.5h, the CODE and TA removal rate of the system reached 89.2% and 71.6%, respectively.

  2. Impact of sulfate pollution on anaerobic biogeochemical cycles in a wetland sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Darren S; Mitchell, Alison

    2012-03-15

    The impact of sulfate pollution is increasingly being seen as an issue in the management of inland aquatic ecosystems. In this study we use sediment slurry experiments to explore the addition of sulfate, with or without added carbon, on the anaerobic biogeochemical cycles in a wetland sediment that previously had not been exposed to high levels of sulfate. Specifically we looked at the cycling of S (sulfate, dissolved and particulate sulfide--the latter measured as acid volatile sulfide; AVS), C (carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, methane and the short chain volatile fatty acids formate, acetate, butyrate and propionate), N (dinitrogen, ammonium, nitrate and nitrite) and redox active metals (Fe(II) and Mn(II)). Sulfate had the largest effects on the cycling of S and C. All the added S at lower loadings were converted to AVS over the course of the experiment (30 days). At the highest loading (8 mmol) less than 50% of consumed S was converted to AVS, however this is believed to be a kinetic effect. Although sulfate reduction was occurring in sediments with added sulfate, dissolved sulfide concentrations remained low throughout the study. Sulfate addition affected methanogenesis. In the absence of added carbon, addition of sulfate, even at a loading of 1 mmol, resulted in a halving of methane formation. The initial rate of formation of methane was not affected by sulfate if additional carbon was added to the sediment. However, there was evidence for anaerobic methane oxidation in those sediments with added sulfate and carbon, but not in those sediments treated only with carbon. Surprisingly, sulfate addition had little apparent impact on N dynamics; previous studies have shown that sulfide can inhibit denitrification and stimulate dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia. We propose that because most of the reduced sulfur was in particulate form, levels of dissolved sulfide were too low to interfere with the N cycle.

  3. Multiobjective optimization for Groundwater Nitrate Pollution Control. Application to El Salobral-Los Llanos aquifer (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llopis-Albert, C.; Peña-Haro, S.; Pulido-Velazquez, M.; Molina, J.

    2012-04-01

    Water quality management is complex due to the inter-relations between socio-political, environmental and economic constraints and objectives. In order to choose an appropriate policy to reduce nitrate pollution in groundwater it is necessary to consider different objectives, often in conflict. In this paper, a hydro-economic modeling framework, based on a non-linear optimization(CONOPT) technique, which embeds simulation of groundwater mass transport through concentration response matrices, is used to study optimal policies for groundwater nitrate pollution control under different objectives and constraints. Three objectives were considered: recovery time (for meeting the environmental standards, as required by the EU Water Framework Directive and Groundwater Directive), maximum nitrate concentration in groundwater, and net benefits in agriculture. Another criterion was added: the reliability of meeting the nitrate concentration standards. The approach allows deriving the trade-offs between the reliability of meeting the standard, the net benefits from agricultural production and the recovery time. Two different policies were considered: spatially distributed fertilizer standards or quotas (obtained through multi-objective optimization) and fertilizer prices. The multi-objective analysis allows to compare the achievement of the different policies, Pareto fronts (or efficiency frontiers) and tradeoffs for the set of mutually conflicting objectives. The constraint method is applied to generate the set of non-dominated solutions. The multi-objective framework can be used to design groundwater management policies taking into consideration different stakeholders' interests (e.g., policy makers, agricultures or environmental groups). The methodology was applied to the El Salobral-Los Llanos aquifer in Spain. Over the past 30 years the area has undertaken a significant socioeconomic development, mainly due to the intensive groundwater use for irrigated crops, which has

  4. Comparison of policies for controlling groundwater nitrate pollution from agriculture in the Eastern Mancha aquifer (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Haro, S.; Llopis-Albert, C.; Pulido-Velazquez, M.; Stalder, A.; Garcia-Prats, A.; Henriquez-Dole, L.

    2012-04-01

    Groundwater nitrate pollution from agriculture has given rise to different legal frameworks. The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) is the most recent one. This work aims to help in the definition of the most cost-efficient policy to control non-point groundwater to attain the objectives established in the WFD. In this study we performed a cost-effectiveness analysis of different policies for controlling groundwater nitrate pollution from agriculture. The policies considered were taxes on nitrogen fertilizers, water price, taxes on emissions and fertilizer standards. We used a hydro-economic model, where we maximized the farmer's benefits. The benefits were calculated as sum of crop revenue minus variable and fixed cost per hectare minus the damage costs from nitrogen leaching. In the cost-effectiveness analysis we considered the costs as the reduction on benefits due to the application of a policy and the effectiveness the reduction on nitrate leaching. The methodology was applied to Eastern Mancha aquifer in Spain. The aquifer is part of the Júcar River Basin, which was declared as EU Pilot Basin in 2002 for the implementation of the WFD. Over the past 30 years the area has undertaken a significant socioeconomic development, mainly due to the intensive groundwater use for irrigated crops, which has provoked a steady decline of groundwater levels and a reduction of groundwater discharged into the Júcar River, as well as nitrate concentrations higher than those allowed by the WFD at certain locations (above 100 mg/l.). Crop revenue was calculated using production functions and the amount of nitrate leached was estimated by calibrated leaching functions. These functions were obtained by using an agronomic model (a GIS version of EPIC, GEPIC), and they depend on the water and the fertilizer use. The Eastern Mancha System was divided into zones of homogeneous crop production and nitrate leaching properties. Given the different soil types and climatic

  5. Determining the source of nitrate pollution in the Niger discontinuous aquifers using the natural {15N }/{14N } ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Pierre; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude

    1997-12-01

    In the semi-arid Niamey area (Niger), more than 10% of the deep wells exploiting the fracture network of the Precambrian aquifer are contaminated by nitrates, with concentrations as high as 10 meq l -1. In order to identify the source(s) of this pollution, nitrate and 15N contents in the polluted wells were monitored over a 20-month period. Potential sources of nitrate contamination were also analyzed for their 15N content. The isotopic compositions of nitrate in polluted waters were > + 12‰ and in rare cases exceeded +17‰. Latrines (˜ + 15‰) may be the major nitrate source for wells showing δ15N values above +15‰. Below this value, waters may be polluted by a combination of nitrates from both latrine and soil sources (˜ + 10‰). In some cases, the soil may account for up to 85% of the groundwater nitrate load. This mode of groundwater pollution is thought to be a consequence of deforestation. Despite their reputation as polluting agents, fertilizers ( +0.5 < δ 15N < + 3.6‰ ) which are used in rice paddies close to the contaminated areas, do not appear to be a significant source of nitrate contamination. Denitrification is probably not a significant process in the study area. Results suggest that nitrate contamination of the aquifer is a consequence of unregulated urbanization (home-made latrines) and deforestation. While latrines are limited to the urban zones, intensive cutting of the forest to meet the city dwellers' wood demand occurs in an ever increasing area around the capital, threatening the local water supply.

  6. Impact of Sediment-Bound Iron on Redox Buffering in a Landfill Leachate Polluted Aquifer (Vejen, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heron, Gorm; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1995-01-01

    Sediments sampled along a central flow line of the leachate pollution plume at the Vejen Landfill, Denmark, were characterized in detail with respect to the forms and pools of Fe(ll) and Fe(lll). After 15 yr of leaching, redox reactions had diminished the pool of iron(ll1) oxides and hydroxides...... in the reduced zones close to the landfill, and the aquifer oxidation capacity (OXC) related to iron oxides was depleted. Less than 2% of the total Fe(ll) was recovered as dissolved Fe(ll), whereas 1-20% was ion-exchangeable on the sediments. The majority of the Fe(ll) was in the solid state either as pyrite......(ll). This study presents evidence of substantial iron reduction buffering the reducing power of landfill leachate entering a shallow aquifer. It is also proposed that reduced sedimentbound iron species form in the plume, thereby increasing the need for oxygen if the aquifer was to be remediated....

  7. INFLUENCE OF SEEPAGE FACE OBLIQUITY ON DISCHARGE OF GROUNDWATER AND ITS POLLUTANT INTO LAKE FROM A TYPICAL UNCONFINED AQUIFER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Lab experiment and mathematical simulation Modular three dimensional finite difference groundwater (MODFLOW) were performed in a soil tank to simulate the hydrogeochemical interaction between lake and typical unconfined aquifer. Results show that the velocity decreases exponentially with the transect distance on seepage face. The maximal velocity occurs at the top point of seepage face. The obliquity of seepage face has a great influence on the maximum and distribution of seepage velocity. With the increase of the obliquity of seepage face, the maximal velocity decreases quickly and the velocity distribution becomes much more even. Most of groundwater flow and pollutant flux discharges through a narrow portion near the top of seepage face. The flow and mass concentrated in the narrow portion increase with the decrease of the obliquity of seepage face. These will benefit to design a reasonable and economical scenario to manage lakeshore and to control the pollution of lake water near lakeshore.

  8. Nitrogen-isotope analysis of groundwater nitrate in carbonate aquifers: Natural sources versus human pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitler, Charles W.; Browning, Lawrence A.

    1983-02-01

    Results of nitrogen-isotope analyses of nitrate in the waters of the Cretaceous Edwards aquifer in Texas, U.S.A., indicate that the source of the nitrate is naturally-occurring nitrogen compounds in the recharge streams. In contrast, nitrogen isotopes of nitrate in the fresh waters of the Pleistocene Ironshore Formation on Grand Cayman Island, West Indies, indicate that human wastes are the source of the nitrate. The Cretaceous Edwards Limestone is a prolific aquifer that produces principally from fracture porosity along the Balcones Fault Zone. Recharge is primarily by streams crossing the fault zone. Rainfall is ˜ 70 cm yr. -1, and the water table is generally deeper than 30 m below land surface. The δ15 N of 73 samples of nitrate from Edwards waters ranged from + 1.9 to + 10‰ with an average of + 6.2‰. This δ15 N range is within the range of nitrate in surface water in the recharge streams ( δ 15N range = + 1 to + 8.3‰ ) and within the range of nitrate in surface water from the Colorado River, Texas, ( δ 15N range = + 1 to + 11‰ ). No sample was found to be enriched in 15N, which would suggest the presence of nitrate from animal waste ( δ 15N range = + 10 to + 22‰ ). The Ironshore Formation contains a small freshwater lens that is recharged entirely by percolation through the soil. Average rainfall is 165 cm yr. -1, and the water table is within 3 m of land surface. The δ15 N of four nitrate samples from water samples of the Ironshore Formation ranged from + 18 to + 23.9‰, which indicates a cesspool/septictank source of the nitrate. Limestone aquifers in humid environments that are recharged by percolation through the soil appear to be more susceptible to contamination by septic tanks than are aquifers in subhumid environments that feature thick unsaturated sections and are recharged by streams.

  9. Simulation of the transfer of organochlorine pollutants in an alluvial aquifer in an alpine valley: the case of tetrachloroethene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouamé, A. A.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Tacher, L.; Derron, M.-H.

    2012-04-01

    During a series of environmental analysis carried out in soil and groundwater in the Alpine Valley (Rhone valley Western Switzerland), were identified high levels of chlorinated solvents, particularly the tetrachloroethene. The leakage of this pollutant originates from industry. The geological substratum in this part of the valley is mainly composed of alluvial deposits and the deposit of a large rock avalanche. The sediments are composed of sandy silt, sandy clay, sand and gravel. The rock avalanche deposit which is the wall of the alluvial aquifer consists of fine materials, stones and large debris mainly of limestone. The investigations developed in this area have shown the presence of a contaminant plume of 60 m long and 35 m wide approximately. Thus the technique of venting / sparging was proposed as remediation measure. Despite the effectiveness of this technique, it turns out that there are still some pockets of contamination of groundwater in the area. In order to assess the potential pollution, a numerical modeling was developed by using the Visual Modflow software. The stages of this modeling are: • Selecting the parameters of the models; • Developing conceptual and numerical models; • Calibration and validation of the model; • Reproducing the observed concentrations; • Sensitivity analysis; • Making a parametric study to see at different stages the tetrachloroethene plume. The first results of the simulation show a slow leakage of the pollutant forming a pocket in the water flow direction.

  10. Composition and functioning of iron-reducing communities in two contrasting environments, i.e. a landfill leachate-polluted aquifer and estuarine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, B.

    2006-01-01

    The research in this thesis is to advance the mechanistic understanding of the geochemical, environmental and ecophysiological factors control on the activity of Fe (III)-reducing microbial populations in two contrasting environments, an aquifer polluted by a neighbouring landfill, and the estuarine

  11. Anaerobic cleanup of waste water with a high organic and inorganic pollutant burden by separate acidification and methanization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cleaning of heavily polluted waste water was studied in a two-stage test set-up using distiller's wash. The two stages consisted of a pulsed bioreactor each for anaerobic treatment of immobilized biomass. In the first reactor, organic compounds of high molecular weight are converted into fatty acids of low molecular weight; in the second reactor they are degraded into biogas. At the same time, nitrogen compounds are reduced to ammonium and sulfur compounds to sulfides. The conversion rate of organic pollutants was found to deteriorate considerably in the presence of ammonium-nitrogen concentrations of 1.5 kg NH4+-N/m3 or higher and sulfide concentrations of 0.1 kg S2--S/m3 or higher. Given a retention time of 30 hours, some 90% of degradable organic pollutants can be removed from waste water in the second bioreactor. The course of the degradation process was monitored by determining the proportion of the individual low-molecular-weight fatty acids and different sum parameters. Records were also kept of the quantity and composition of the biogas produced by the two reactors. (orig.). 48 figs., 4 tabs

  12. Hydrogeological Charateristics and Vulnerability of Pollution of the Aquifer Grdovski Orman Near Kocani

    OpenAIRE

    Mircovski, Vlado

    2012-01-01

    Master thesis is done defining hydrogeological features of the aquifere Grdovski Orman and vulnerability assessment of his pollution based on filtration characteristics of the water bearing and overlay sediments. Also, it was performed determination the groundwater quality. The definition of the hydrogeological features was done on the basis of the data obtained by making several exploitation wells and pollution vulnerability assessment by hydrogeological data and filtration characteristic...

  13. Concept of Compound Retention Time for Organic Micro Pollutants in Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor with Nanofiltration

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Jiangjiang

    2011-12-01

    Organic micropollutants (OMPs) have received more and more attention in recent years due to their potential harmful effects on public health and aquatic ecosystems, and eliminating OMPs in wastewater treatment systems is an important solution to control OMPs wastage. An innovative hybrid process, anaerobic membrane bioreactor with nanofiltration (AnMBR-NF), in which enhanced OMPs removal is possible based on the concept of compound retention time (CRT) through coupling anaerobic biodegradation and NF rejection, is proposed and examined in terms of preliminary feasibility in this study. First, NF membrane screening through sludge water dead-end filtration tests demonstrated that KOCH NF200 (molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) 200 Da, acid/base stable) performed best in organic matter rejection. Then, selected OMPs (ketobrofen and naproxen) in MQ water and a biologically treated wastewater matrix were filtered through NF200 under constant-pressure dead-end mode, with and without stirring, and several methods (contact angle, scanning electronic microscopy, Zeta potential, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy) were used to characterize membranes. Results show selected OMPs in MQ could be rejected (about 40%) by a clean NF200 membrane. The main rejection mechanism was initial absorption by the membrane followed by size exclusion (electric charge interaction plays a less important role). The wastewater matrix could enhance the rejection significantly (up to 90%) because effluent organic matter (EfOM) enhanced size exclusion and electric charge interaction through blocking membrane pores and forming a gel layer as well as binding some OMPs through partitioning followed by retention by NF. Third, an anaerobic bioreactor was set up to evaluate the anaerobic biodegradability of selected OMPs. Results showed selected OMPs could be absorbed by sludge and reached equilibrium within one day, and then were consumed by anaerobic microorganism with a half life 9.4 days for

  14. Point source pollution and variability of nitrate concentrations in water from shallow aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemčić-Jurec, Jasna; Jazbec, Anamarija

    2016-01-01

    Agriculture is one of the several major sources of nitrate pollution, and therefore the EU Nitrate Directive, designed to decrease pollution, has been implemented. Point sources like septic systems and broken sewage systems also contribute to water pollution. Pollution of groundwater by nitrate from 19 shallow wells was studied in a typical agricultural region, middle Podravina, in northwest Croatia. The concentration of nitrate ranged from R6, there was no statistically significant difference in nitrate concentrations (F = 1.98; p = 0.15) during the years 2002-2007. Average concentrations of nitrate in all 19 wells for all the analyzed years were between recommended limit value of 25 mg/l (RLV) and MAV except in 2002 (concentration was under RLV). The results of the repeated measures ANOVA showed statistically significant differences between the wells at the point source distance (proximity) of 20 m (F = 10.6; p < 0.001). Average annual concentrations of nitrate during the years studied are not statistically different, but interaction between proximity and years is statistically significant (F = 2.07; p = 0.04). Results of k-means clustering confirmed division into four clusters according to the pollution. Principal component analysis showed that there is only one significant factor, proximity, which explains 91.6 % of the total variability of nitrate. Differences in water quality were found as a result of different environmental factors. These results will contribute to the implementation of the Nitrate Directive in Croatia and the EU.

  15. Nitrate groundwater pollution and aquifer vulnerability: the case of the Osona region

    OpenAIRE

    Boy Roura, Mercè

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate groundwater pollution in the Osona region is a persistent and widespread problem. Nitrate concentrations are commonly above the drinking water threshold of 50 mg/L in wells and springs. ANOVA and logistic regression analyses showed that nitrate concentration is more dependent on land use than on the geological setting of springs. Nitrate content presented stationary values in most of the springs over time, while discharge and electrical conductivity evolution depends on the geological...

  16. Method for previsional evaluation of pollutant transfers in an aquifer. First results obtained in a sandy environment (at the BARP workings, GIRONDE). Report DSN No. 261

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madoz-Escande, C.; Peyrus, J.C.

    1979-07-01

    The hydrogeological studies undertaken within the frame-work of the radiological safety of nuclear facilities aim, in particular, at quantitatively predicting the consequences of the accidental release of radioactive pollutants into an aquifer. Such a quantitative forecasting is arrived at through a mathematical model based on sequential emission, the use of which requires a knowledge of the physical parameters of the aquifer and an understanding of pollutant behavior in relation to the aquiferous environment. The physical parameters of a saturated porous environment are brought into light by means of radioactive tracer tests on mock-up as well in the field. The first results obtained in a sandy environment (BARP workings) are presented. The difficulty of extrapolating mock-up test results to actual field conditions has, more particularly, made it necessary to commission a mobile laboratory fitted for in situ studies.

  17. How can we be sure fracking will not pollute aquifers? Lessons from a major longwall coal mining analogue (Selby, Yorkshire, UK)

    OpenAIRE

    Younger, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Development of shale gas by hydraulic fracturing (‘fracking’) is opposed by campaigners who propose (inter alia) that freshwater aquifers could be polluted by upward migration of fractures and any fluids they contain. Prima facie hydrogeological analysis of this proposition has been undertaken. For it to occur, two conditions must be satisfied: (i) sufficient hydraulic interconnection (i.e., a continuous permeable pathway); and(ii) a sustained driving head, oriented upwards. With regard...

  18. Retooling the ethanol industry: thermophilic anaerobic digestion of thin stillage for methane production and pollution prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Scott H; Sung, Shihwu

    2008-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion of corn ethanol thin stillage was tested at thermophilic temperature (55 degrees C) with two completely stirred tank reactors. The thin stillage wastestream was organically concentrated with 100 g/L total chemical oxygen demand and 60 g/L volatiles solids and a low pH of approximately 4.0. Steady-state was achieved at 30-, 20-, and 15-day hydraulic retention times (HRTs) and digester failure at a 12-day HRT. Significant reduction of volatile solids was achieved, with a maximum reduction (89.8%) at the 20-day HRT. Methane yield ranged from 0.6 to 0.7 L methane/g volatile solids removed during steady-state operation. Effluent volatile fatty acids below 200 mg/L as acetic acid were achieved at 20- and 30-day HRTs. Ultrasonic pretreatment was used for one digester, although no significant improvement was observed. Ethanol plant natural gas consumption could be reduced 43 to 59% with the methane produced, while saving an estimated $7 to $17 million ($10 million likely) for a facility producing 360 million L ethanol/y.

  19. A strictly anaerobic betaproteobacterium Georgfuchsia toluolica gen. nov., sp. nov. degrades aromatic compounds with Fe(III), Mn(IV) or nitrate as an electron acceptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weelink, S.A.B.; Doesburg, van W.C.J.; Talarico Saia, F.; Rijpstra, I.; Smidt, H.; Röling, W.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    A bacterium (strain G5G6) that grows anaerobically with toluene was isolated from a polluted aquifer (Banisveld, the Netherlands). The bacterium uses Fe(III), Mn(IV) and nitrate as terminal electron acceptors for growth on aromatic compounds. The bacterium does not grow on sugars, lactate or acetate

  20. Aquifer and Vadose Zone Pollution Determined From Geoelectrical Measurements With Multi- Electrode Wells and Surface Multi-Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, O. A.; Pereira, P. D.

    2007-05-01

    During the last three years we are developing hydrobiogeological researches to quantitatively describe the underground contamination of a 4.0 km2 area, including two landfill deposits and a tannery industry of Alagoinhas city, Bahia state, Brazil. We used electrical geophysics, geological, geochemical and biological analysis to gain a general understanding of the complex interactions between organic and inorganic pollutants and their environmental impacts. A geological reconnaissance work and a geoelectrical survey using vertical electrical soundings were made around the area to detect and to delineate the extent of the underground contamination plume. The results pointed out the presence of a strong conductive anomaly within the aquifer resulting from invasive fluids both from the landfills and from the surface disposal lagoons from the tannery. Water samples collected at available wells and along the Sauipe river, have shown drastic changes in the total dissolved solids, total chromium, inorganic macro-components, biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, nutrients and bacterial content. As a complimentary work, apparent resistivity and chargeability data were measured as a function of depth along three new multi-electrode wells, and as a function of electrode spacing along five double semi-Schlumberger subsurface profiles. A multi-electrode well is a special monitoring well where we externally install copper electrodes as thin metallic rings spaced by 0.50 m, along its entire filter and casing length. Such electrodes are connected through insulated cables to the ground surface and may be combined into different arrays. Two-side semi-Schlumberger soundings expanded up to 200 m AB/2 spacing and with centers spaced by 50 m along special transverse centered at the plume were inverted using 1D and 2D models. Both techniques were used to detail the groundwater contamination around the Alagoinhas landfills. The electrical measurements performed at the earth

  1. Inhibitory Effects of Silver Nanoparticles on Removal of Organic Pollutants and Sulfate in an Anaerobic Biological Wastewater Treatment Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasool, Kashif; Lee, Dae Sung

    2016-05-01

    The increasing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in commercial products and industrial processes raises issues regarding the toxicity of sludge biomass in biological wastewater treatment plants, due to potential antimicrobial properties. This study investigated the effects of AgNPs on removal of organic pollutants and sulfate in an anaerobic biological sulfate reduction process. At AgNPs concentrations of up to 10 mg/L, no significant inhibition of sulfate and COD removal was observed. However, at higher concentrations (50-200 mg/L) sulfate and COD removal efficiencies were significantly decreased to 51.8% and 33.6%, respectively. Sulfate and COD reduction followed first-order kinetics at AgNPs concentrations of up to 10 mg/L and second-order kinetics at AgNPs concentrations of 50-200 mg/L. Lactate dehydrogenase release profiles showed increases in cytotoxicity at AgNPs concentrations greater than 50 mg/L suggesting cell membrane disruption. Analysis of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from sulfidogenic sludge biomass and of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra showed a decrease in concentrations of carbohydrates, proteins, humic substances, and lipids in the presence of AgNPs. Moreover, the interaction of AgNPs with sludge biomass and the damage caused to cell walls were confirmed through scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. PMID:27483773

  2. Microbial Communities and Their Performances in Anaerobic Hybrid Sludge Bed-Fixed Film Reactor for Treatment of Palm Oil Mill Effluent under Various Organic Pollutant Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Kanlayanee Meesap; Nimaradee Boonapatcharoen; Somkiet Techkarnjanaruk; Pawinee Chaiprasert

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic hybrid reactor consisting of sludge and packed zones was operated with organic pollutant loading rates from 6.2 to 8.2 g COD/L day, composed mainly of suspended solids (SS) and oil and grease (O&G) concentrations between 5.2 to 10.2 and 0.9 to 1.9 g/L, respectively. The overall process performance in terms of chemical oxygen demands (COD), SS, and O&G removals was 73, 63, and 56%, respectively. When the organic pollutant concentrations were increased, the resultant methane poten...

  3. Mitigating Non-Point Source Pollution in the Abbotsford Sumas Aquifer: An Evidence Based Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the BC Action Plan to Tackle Non-Point Source Water Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, Beverly

    2016-01-01

    At the turn of the 20th century, BC completed its first public status report on the quality of water and found that 10% of the water sources monitored had poor water quality caused primarily by non-point source pollution. The Abbotsford-Sumas Aquifer (ASA) was mentioned in this report and it has had persistent and significant nitrate contamination, primarily from agriculture, for decades despite mitigation efforts. This poses significant public health, ecological and economic risks to the reg...

  4. Remediation of an aquifer polluted with dissolved tetrachloroethylene by an array of wells filled with activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortone, I; Di Nardo, A; Di Natale, M; Erto, A; Musmarra, D; Santonastaso, G F

    2013-09-15

    In this work, an array of deep passive wells filled with activated carbon, namely a Discontinuous Permeable Adsorptive Barrier (PAB-D), has been proposed for the remediation of an aquifer contaminated by tetrachloroethylene (PCE). The dynamics of the aquifer in the particular PAB-D configuration chosen, including the contaminant transport in the aquifer and the adsorption onto the barrier material, has been accurately performed by means of a computer code which allows describing all the phenomena occurring in the aquifer, simultaneously. A PAB-D design procedure is presented and the main dimensions of the barrier (number and position of passive wells) have been evaluated. Numerical simulations have been carried out over a long time span to follow the contaminant plume and to assess the effectiveness of the remediation method proposed. The model results show that this PAB-D design allows for a complete remediation of the aquifer under a natural hydraulic gradient, the PCE concentrations flowing out of the barrier being always lower than the corresponding Italian regulation limit. Finally, the results have been compared with those obtained for the design of a more traditional continuous barrier (PAB-C) for the same remediation process.

  5. Isolation of an arsenate-respiring bacterium from a redox front in an arsenic-polluted aquifer in West Bengal, Bengal Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Thomas H; McArthur, John M; Sikdar, Pradip K; Santini, Joanne M

    2015-04-01

    Natural pollution of groundwater by arsenic adversely affects the health of tens of millions of people worldwide, with the deltaic aquifers of SE Asia being particularly polluted. The pollution is caused primarily by, or as a side reaction of, the microbial reduction of sedimentary Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides, but the organism(s) responsible for As release have not been isolated. Here we report the first isolation of a dissimilatory arsenate reducer from sediments of the Bengal Basin in West Bengal. The bacterium, here designated WB3, respires soluble arsenate and couples its reduction to the oxidation of acetate; WB3 is therefore implicated in the process of arsenic pollution of groundwater, which is largely by arsenite. The bacterium WB3 is also capable of reducing dissolved Fe(III) citrate, solid Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide, and elemental sulfur, using acetate as the electron donor. It is a member of the Desulfuromonas genus and possesses a dissimilatory arsenate reductase that was identified using degenerate polymerase chain reaction primers. The sediment from which WB3 was isolated was brown, Pleistocene sand at a depth of 35.2 m below ground level (mbgl). This level was some 3 cm below the boundary between the brown sands and overlying reduced, gray, Holocene aquifer sands. The color boundary is interpreted to be a reduction front that releases As for resorption downflow, yielding a high load of labile As sorbed to the sediment at a depth of 35.8 mbgl and concentrations of As in groundwater that reach >1000 μg/L.

  6. Anaerobes beyond anaerobic digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, D. Z.; Pereira, M A; Alves, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms are widespread in nature. Sediments, gastrointestinal tracks, volcanic vents, geothermal sources are examples of habitats where anaerobic metabolism prevail, in some cases at extreme temperature, pH and pressure conditions. In such microbial ecosystems waste of some is food for others in a true integrated structure. Anaerobic microorganisms are able to use a wide variety of organic and inorganic compounds. Recalcitrant compounds, such as hydrocarbons, a...

  7. Pollution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Dürr; R. Jaffe

    2014-01-01

    This essay points to the role of pollution in understanding the social construction of hierarchies and urban space. Conceptualizations of pollution and approaches to waste management always reflect the Zeitgeist and tend to be politically charged. We argue that an ethnographic approach to pollution

  8. Fate of the herbicides 2,4,5-T, atrazine, and DNOC in a shallow, anaerobic aquifer investigated by in situ passive diffusive emitters and laboratory batch experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arildskov, N.P.; Pedersen, Philip Grinder; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2001-01-01

    simultaneously with tritiated water (HTO) as tracer in the depth interval 3 to 4 rubs (meters below surface) by use of passive diffusive emitters. Atrazine and 2,4,5-T were persistent during the approximately 18 days residence time in the aquifer. In contrast, DNOC was rapidly removed from the water phase...... first-order kinetics, and when normalized to the sediment/water-ratio, the field and laboratory derived rate constants compared well. The DNOC degradation in the methanogenic incubations (8 to 9 rubs) was up to 50 times faster than in the sediments from 3 to 4 rubs, likely due to the low redox potential....

  9. Effect of anaerobic digestion at 35, 55 and 60 °C ON pharmaceuticals and organic pollutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsson, Å.; Kjerstadius, H.; Haghighatafshar, S.;

    The application of treated sewage sludge on farmland is a suggested method for recycling nutrients and reducing demand for commercial fertilizer. However sludge needs to be rendered safe from possible contaminants which can cause acute and long-term health and environmental problems. Residual...... hydrocarbons (PAHs) during anaerobic digestion at 35, 55 and 60ºC and during pasteurization at 70°C. The substrate used was mixed primary and secondary sludge from a 300 000 person-equivalents municipal wastewater treatment plant in southern Sweden. In general no reduction of pharmaceuticals could be observed...

  10. Biofouling and pollutant removal during long-term operation of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Robledo, M; Morgan-Sagastume, J M; Noyola, A

    2010-01-01

    Two different sludge retention times (SRTs) were tested in order to assess the impact on membrane fouling and effluent quality in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR). Two up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors (1 l volume) coupled to external tubular ultrafiltration membranes (filtration area = 81 cm(2)) were operated at a hydraulic retention time of 3 h and two different SRTs (100 and 60 days). The transmembrane pressure (TMP), flux (J) and relevant parameters to assess water quality were measured. Effluents from UASB reactors were filtered for 500 h without intermediate cleaning. The permeate met Mexican standards for wastewater reclamation in both tested conditions. Abrupt and periodical changes in the TMP and J were noticed during the experimental period. A fouling layer collapse and compression hypothesis was set forth in order to explain these changes. An autopsy performed on biofouled membranes indicated that deposited mass was mainly composed of volatile solids (85%) and the rest related to mineral matter, with the presence of inorganic salts containing Ca, Mg, Fe, P and Si. Biomass in the fouling layer was estimated at 0.27% based on the DNA/biomass ratio for the bacterial biofilm. No clear difference in membrane fouling was detected under the two SRTs applied to the systems. However, when operated over 500 h, repetitive sudden TMP and flux changes occurred later in system A (SRT of 100 days) than in system B (SRT of 60 days) suggesting a stronger fouling layer structure in the former. PMID:20390553

  11. Improving pollutants removal by microalgae Chlorella PY-ZU1 with 15% CO2 from undiluted anaerobic digestion effluent of food wastes with ozonation pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Ye, Qing; Xu, Jiao; Yang, Zongbo; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-09-01

    In order to purify various pollutants (3108mg COD/L, 2120mg NH3-N/L) in the undiluted anaerobic digestion effluent of food wastes (UADEFW), ozonation pretreatment was employed to improve pollutants removal by microalgae mutant Chlorella PY-ZU1 with 15% CO2. Ozonation pretreatment broke CC bonds and benzene rings of refractory organics such as unsaturated fatty acids and phenols in UADEFW and degraded them into low-molecular-weight organics such as methanoic acid and methanal, but excessive ozone induced the accumulation of toxic by-products. The microalgal growth rate and biomass yield markedly increased to the peaks of 456mg/L/d and 4.3g/L, respectively, when the UADEFW was pretreated with 2mg-O3/mg-C of ozone. The removal efficiencies of NH3-N, TP and COD reached 99%, 99% and 68%, respectively. The lipid and carbohydrate contents of microalgal biomass increased because of the relative lack of nitrogen when microalgae was cultured with 15% CO2 to purify the UADEFW with ozonation pretreatment. PMID:27243605

  12. Correlating phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) in a landfill leachate polluted aquifer with biogeochemical factors by multivariate statistical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludvigsen, Liselotte; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Rootzén, Helle;

    1997-01-01

    effect and to redox processes and the second principal component described the geological and geochemical features of the samples. Dependent on the data transformation of the phospholipid fatty acid profiles in either absolute concentrations (logarithm transformed) or in mol% of total phospholipid fatty...... acids, different groups of samples and outliers were revealed by the principal component analysis. The principal component analysis on data in absolute concentrations revealed that many phospholipid fatty acids reflected the pollution effect on the biomass composition. In contrast, the phospholipid...... fatty acids in mol% divided the samples into one group of the more polluted samples and another with the nearly unpolluted samples. The important phospholipid fatty acids for this grouping were mainly a few of the normal saturated phospholipid fatty acids (10:0, 16:0 and 18:0). Discriminant analysis...

  13. Degradation of organic pollutants and characteristics of activated sludge in an anaerobic/anoxic/oxic reactor treating chemical industrial wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory-scale anaerobic/anoxic/oxic system operated at the hydraulic retention times (HRT of 20, 40, and 60 h with mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS concentrations of 3 g/L and 6 g/L was considered for treating chemical industrial wastewater rich in complex organic compounds and total dissolved solids. Extending the HRT and increasing the MLSS concentration resulted in higher removal efficiency for chemical oxygen demand at 72%. Organic compounds in wastewater could be classified into easily-removed and refractory compounds during treatment. The easily-removed compounds consisted primarily of ethers, alcohols, and aldehydes, whereas the refractory compounds included mainly oxygen-containing heterocyclic and benzene-containing compounds. Results from energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed that several metal ions accumulated in activated sludge, particularly Fe(III. Fe accumulated mainly on the surface of sludge floc pellets and resulted in the compactness of activated sludge, which caused the values of mixed liquor volatile suspended solids /MLSS and sludge volume index to decrease.

  14. Alluvial Aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This coverage shows the extents of the alluvial aquifers in Kansas. The alluvial aquifers consist of unconsolidated Quaternary alluvium and contiguous terrace...

  15. Microbial Communities and Their Performances in Anaerobic Hybrid Sludge Bed-Fixed Film Reactor for Treatment of Palm Oil Mill Effluent under Various Organic Pollutant Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanlayanee Meesap

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic hybrid reactor consisting of sludge and packed zones was operated with organic pollutant loading rates from 6.2 to 8.2 g COD/L day, composed mainly of suspended solids (SS and oil and grease (O&G concentrations between 5.2 to 10.2 and 0.9 to 1.9 g/L, respectively. The overall process performance in terms of chemical oxygen demands (COD, SS, and O&G removals was 73, 63, and 56%, respectively. When the organic pollutant concentrations were increased, the resultant methane potentials were higher, and the methane yield increased to 0.30 L CH4/g CODremoved. It was observed these effects on the microbial population and activity in the sludge and packed zones. The eubacterial population and activity in the sludge zone increased to 6.4 × 109 copies rDNA/g VSS and 1.65 g COD/g VSS day, respectively, whereas those in the packed zone were lower. The predominant hydrolytic and fermentative bacteria were Pseudomonas, Clostridium, and Bacteroidetes. In addition, the archaeal population and activity in the packed zone were increased from to 9.1 × 107 copies rDNA/g VSS and 0.34 g COD-CH4/g VSS day, respectively, whereas those in the sludge zone were not much changed. The most represented species of methanogens were the acetoclastic Methanosaeta, the hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium sp., and the hydrogenotrophic Methanomicrobiaceae.

  16. 含水层介质对石油类污染质的吸附特征研究%Adsorption Characteristics of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Pollution in Aquifer Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏小四; 袁文真; 宋绵; 张玉玲; 王威

    2012-01-01

    Because of the petroleum pipelines corrosion in northeastern China, the groundwater would be polluted by the hydrocarbons and the adsorption by aquifer media would have impael on the transport of hydrocarbons in aquifer. According to the test results of groundwater quality, combining with the hydrogeology conditions, by means of ihe kinetics and isothermal experiments of adsorption, taking the largest adsorption, absorption rate, and adsorption dynamics constant as quantitative indices, the adsorption characteristics of the aquifer medium to petroleum pollution in the regions are qualitative analyzed. The results show that the adsorption dynamics law involving aquifer medium to petroleum pollution are complied with two class dynamics model, adsorption volume is proportional to the specific surface area of aquifer medium, the major adsorption effect is physical adsorption effect; the isothermal adsorption law of aquifer medium to petroleum pollution is nonlinear isothermal adsorption; based on Langmuir model, by colloids, adsorption quantity and adsorption rate for aquifer medium to petroleum hydrocarbon by the order from large to small are silty, silty sand, and fine sand. The above experimental results provide the reliable scientific basis for the further study on the gas transform rule for petroleum pollutant in aquifer media and relevant repair technology.%东北某石油采区由于输油管道锈蚀而发生石油泄漏,对地下水造成了一定的污染,含水介质的吸附作用对石油类污染质的迁移转化具有重要影响.根据该地下水石油娄污染场地水化学测试结果,结合其典型的地质及水文地质条件,通过吸附动力学和等温吸附实验,以最大吸附量、吸附速率、吸附动力学常数等为定量指标,分析该地区的含水层介质对石油类污染质的吸附特征.研究结果表明,含水层介质对石油类污染质的吸附动力学规律符合准二级动力学模型,吸附量与含水层介

  17. Intrinsic and enhanced biodegradation of benzene in strongly reduced aquifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiningen, W.N.M. van; Rijnaarts, H.H.M; Langenhoff, A.A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory microcosm studies were performed to examine intrinsic and enhanced benzene bioremediation using five different sediment and groundwater samples from three deeply anaerobic aquifers sited in northern Netherlands. The influence of addition of nitrate, sulfate, limited amounts of oxygen, and

  18. Study of the pollution impact from the usage of sewage and drainage waters on the groundwater of the quaternary aquifer, west Cairo, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this study is to assess the water quality of surface and groundwater in the western part of Cairo and to estimate the sources of pollution as salinisation, nutrients, trace elements and microbiological activity as a result of re-use of partially treated drainage and sewage waters for irrigation. In the studied area fresh water problems that need for irrigation arise from the limitation of water resources, high degree of use for cultivating in different seasons and the extension of the reclamation lands. Recently new applications were applied by mixing fresh and wastewater to substitute this decline. Two sewerage stations (Zinen and Abu-Rawash) are located in the area of study for collecting and partially treating wastewater from Giza area. The poorly treated effluents that discharge from these stations in open channels or mixed with fresh water in some canals are flowing through the cultivating land for agricultural irrigation. This could lead to direct pollution to the surface and ground waters in this area, which is the point that needs to detect in this work. The studied area is located in the western region of greater Cairo at latitudes 30 deg. 00' and 30 deg. 15' N and longitudes 31 deg. 00' and 31 deg. 15' E. About 97 water samples were collected from canals, drains and groundwater from the Quaternary aquifer in the area of study. The estimated values of total dissolved solid for most surface and ground waters samples don't exceed 1000 mg/l except about 12% have salinity>1000mg/l. This increase in salinity could be attributed to the ion exchange process between Na- Ca as a result of water- rock interaction, or from the recycling of drainage water containing excess of fertilizers that used in cultivating practices. The predominant water types of surface and groundwater samples are NaHCO3 and Na2SO4 representing meteoric and mixed water type. Few groundwater samples have MgCl2 (marine water type), these samples are located in the east and

  19. Microbial dynamics in natural aquifers

    OpenAIRE

    Bajracharya, Bijendra Man

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms in groundwater form ecosystems that can transform chemical compounds. Quantitatively understanding microbial dynamics in soils and groundwater is thus essential for pollutant dynamics and biogeochemistry in the subsurface. This dissertation addresses three factors influencing microbial dynamics in aquifers and soils, namely: (1) the influence of grazing on bacteria in eutrophic aquifers, posing the question whether the carrying capacity of bacteria, which has been observed i...

  20. Which monetary values for the quality of our environment? The example of pollution in the Krška kotlina alluvial aquifer in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Prestor

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing integration of economic issues into environmental policy has put the valuation of environmentalgoods and services at the forefront of the agenda of experts and researchers involved in the design and implementationof this policy. In the case of water, the European Union Water Framework Directive clearly indicates theneed to consider environmental and resource costs in designing water pricing policies that better account for theenvironmental objectives of the Directive. And the assessment of environmental and resource costs is also referredto in the context of the definition of alternative environmental objectives in cases where costs of reaching the Directive’sobjectives are considered disproportionate or for allowing the development of new sustainable economicactivities.The paper presents the application of contingent valuation to assess the environmental costs that originate fromgroundwater (nitrates and pesticides pollution in the Kr{ko kotlina aquifer. Average willingness-to-pay valuesfor groundwater quality improvements to stabilize groundwater quality below drinking water standards or to reducepollution close to natural background concentrations are equal to 4,7 € and 4,8 € per household per month,respectively. The location where respondents live, their income level or their appurtenance or not to an environmentalorganization are independent variables that influence respondents’ willingness to pay. The relatively lowoverall statistical significance of the regressions obtained stresses that only part of the variability of respondents’responses can be explained with the information obtained and variables considered. This is however in line withsimilar studies undertaken in other parts of Europe and elsewhere.Overall, the paper demonstrates that contingent valuation is possible under Slovenian conditions. In addition toproviding estimate of values of environmental costs and benefits, such contingent valuation surveys

  1. Mississippian aquifers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the Mississippian aquifers in the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama,...

  2. Ozark Aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — These digital maps contain information on the altitude of the base and top, the extent, and the potentiometric surface of the Ozark aquifer in Kansas. The Ozark...

  3. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellinger, A. [INFOENERGIE, Ettenhausen (Switzerland)

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  4. Anaerobic Metabolism: Linkages to Trace Gases and Aerobic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megonigal, J. P.; Hines, M. E.; Visscher, P. T.

    2003-12-01

    Life evolved and flourished in the absence of molecular oxygen (O2). As the O2 content of the atmosphere rose to the present level of 21% beginning about two billion years ago, anaerobic metabolism was gradually supplanted by aerobic metabolism. Anaerobic environments have persisted on Earth despite the transformation to an oxidized state because of the combined influence of water and organic matter. Molecular oxygen diffuses about 104 times more slowly through water than air, and organic matter supports a large biotic O2 demand that consumes the supply faster than it is replaced by diffusion. Such conditions exist in wetlands, rivers, estuaries, coastal marine sediments, aquifers, anoxic water columns, sewage digesters, landfills, the intestinal tracts of animals, and the rumen of herbivores. Anaerobic microsites are also embedded in oxic environments such as upland soils and marine water columns. Appreciable rates of aerobic respiration are restricted to areas that are in direct contact with air or those inhabited by organisms that produce O2.Rising atmospheric O2 reduced the global area of anaerobic habitat, but enhanced the overall rate of anaerobic metabolism (at least on an area basis) by increasing the supply of electron donors and acceptors. Organic carbon production increased dramatically, as did oxidized forms of nitrogen, manganese, iron, sulfur, and many other elements. In contemporary anaerobic ecosystems, nearly all of the reducing power is derived from photosynthesis, and most of it eventually returns to O2, the most electronegative electron acceptor that is abundant. This photosynthetically driven redox gradient has been thoroughly exploited by aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms for metabolism. The same is true of hydrothermal vents (Tunnicliffe, 1992) and some deep subsurface environments ( Chapelle et al., 2002), where thermal energy is the ultimate source of the reducing power.Although anaerobic habitats are currently a small fraction of Earth

  5. Anaerobic Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Ju, Mei-Ting; Li, Wei-Zun; Liu, Le; Wang, Yan-Nan; Chang, Chein-Chi

    2016-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2015 on the focus of Anaerobic Process. It is divided into the following sections. Pretreatment Organic waste Multiple-stage co-digestion Process Methodology and Technology. PMID:27620085

  6. Anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook I, Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 297. Stedman's Online ...

  7. Initiation de la modélisation de la lixiviation du nitrate à l'échelle de la parcelle : problématique de la pollution de l'aquifère de l'Oued Souhil, Tunisie.

    OpenAIRE

    De Smet, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    L’aquifère de l’Oued Souhil fait l’objet d’une pollution nitratée (130 mg/l) qui est due à l’utilisation massive de fertilisant, à la baisse du niveau des nappes ainsi qu’à l’utilisation d’eaux usées traitées (EUT). Par conséquent, l’objectif de ce mémoire est de fournir un outil adéquat de modélisation de la lixiviation du nitrate dans les sols sableux tunisiens. A cette fin, un essai d’irrigation en cases lysimétriques (avec répétitions) est effectué selon trois schémas différents : irrigat...

  8. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eGieg

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contibuting to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more benefical technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments.

  9. Microbial anaerobic digestion (bio-digesters) as an approach to the decontamination of animal wastes in pollution control and the generation of renewable energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyi-Loh, Christy E; Mamphweli, Sampson N; Meyer, Edson L; Okoh, Anthony I; Makaka, Golden; Simon, Michael

    2013-09-01

    With an ever increasing population rate; a vast array of biomass wastes rich in organic and inorganic nutrients as well as pathogenic microorganisms will result from the diversified human, industrial and agricultural activities. Anaerobic digestion is applauded as one of the best ways to properly handle and manage these wastes. Animal wastes have been recognized as suitable substrates for anaerobic digestion process, a natural biological process in which complex organic materials are broken down into simpler molecules in the absence of oxygen by the concerted activities of four sets of metabolically linked microorganisms. This process occurs in an airtight chamber (biodigester) via four stages represented by hydrolytic, acidogenic, acetogenic and methanogenic microorganisms. The microbial population and structure can be identified by the combined use of culture-based, microscopic and molecular techniques. Overall, the process is affected by bio-digester design, operational factors and manure characteristics. The purpose of anaerobic digestion is the production of a renewable energy source (biogas) and an odor free nutrient-rich fertilizer. Conversely, if animal wastes are accidentally found in the environment, it can cause a drastic chain of environmental and public health complications. PMID:24048207

  10. Microbial anaerobic digestion (bio-digesters) as an approach to the decontamination of animal wastes in pollution control and the generation of renewable energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyi-Loh, Christy E; Mamphweli, Sampson N; Meyer, Edson L; Okoh, Anthony I; Makaka, Golden; Simon, Michael

    2013-09-17

    With an ever increasing population rate; a vast array of biomass wastes rich in organic and inorganic nutrients as well as pathogenic microorganisms will result from the diversified human, industrial and agricultural activities. Anaerobic digestion is applauded as one of the best ways to properly handle and manage these wastes. Animal wastes have been recognized as suitable substrates for anaerobic digestion process, a natural biological process in which complex organic materials are broken down into simpler molecules in the absence of oxygen by the concerted activities of four sets of metabolically linked microorganisms. This process occurs in an airtight chamber (biodigester) via four stages represented by hydrolytic, acidogenic, acetogenic and methanogenic microorganisms. The microbial population and structure can be identified by the combined use of culture-based, microscopic and molecular techniques. Overall, the process is affected by bio-digester design, operational factors and manure characteristics. The purpose of anaerobic digestion is the production of a renewable energy source (biogas) and an odor free nutrient-rich fertilizer. Conversely, if animal wastes are accidentally found in the environment, it can cause a drastic chain of environmental and public health complications.

  11. Microbial Anaerobic Digestion (Bio-Digesters as an Approach to the Decontamination of Animal Wastes in Pollution Control and the Generation of Renewable Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golden Makaka

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available With an ever increasing population rate; a vast array of biomass wastes rich in organic and inorganic nutrients as well as pathogenic microorganisms will result from the diversified human, industrial and agricultural activities. Anaerobic digestion is applauded as one of the best ways to properly handle and manage these wastes. Animal wastes have been recognized as suitable substrates for anaerobic digestion process, a natural biological process in which complex organic materials are broken down into simpler molecules in the absence of oxygen by the concerted activities of four sets of metabolically linked microorganisms. This process occurs in an airtight chamber (biodigester via four stages represented by hydrolytic, acidogenic, acetogenic and methanogenic microorganisms. The microbial population and structure can be identified by the combined use of culture-based, microscopic and molecular techniques. Overall, the process is affected by bio-digester design, operational factors and manure characteristics. The purpose of anaerobic digestion is the production of a renewable energy source (biogas and an odor free nutrient-rich fertilizer. Conversely, if animal wastes are accidentally found in the environment, it can cause a drastic chain of environmental and public health complications.

  12. Fate of pathogens and micro-pollutants during organic wastes and by-products anaerobic digestion - a review; Etat des connaissances sur le devenir des germes pathogenes et des micropolluants au cours de la methanisation des dechets et sous-produits organiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couturier, Ch.; Galtier, L.

    1998-09-01

    Based on 300 scientific papers, the following bibliographical research deals with the fate of micro-pollutants (pathogens, heavy metals, organic pollutants) during anaerobic digestion. Different biological and chemical mechanisms allow organic compounds elimination, except from some Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals which are fixed to the solid biomass, permitting water contamination risks attenuation. Unlike mesophilic digestion, thermophilic digestion is a 'sanitation' process regarding pathogens elimination. However, mesophilic digestion offers an important reliability compared with competitive or complementary processes. In particular, energy recovery from anaerobic digestion allows temperature control and makes easier further sanitation heat treatments. In general, anaerobic digestion represents a tool which can be included in an organic waste treatment line assuming waste selection and good agricultural practices. Otherwise, sanitation problem is still badly handled by waste operators and constructors which have been consulted. Research orientations seem especially interesting in improving knowledge of real industrial processes performances. (author)

  13. Deposition, persistence and turnover of pollutants: first results from the EU project AquaTerra for selected river basins and aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barth, J.A.C.; Steidle, D.; Kuntz, D.;

    2007-01-01

    that range from biogeochemistry, environmental engineering, computer modelling and chemistry to socio-economic sciences. Field study areas are the river basins of the Ebro, the Meuse, the Elbe and the Danube as well as the 3-km(2) French catchment of the Brevilles Spring. Within the first 2 years...... in laboratory studies with soils and aquifer material from selected sites. For sediment transport of contaminants, new flood sampling techniques revealed highest deposition rates of beta-hexachlorocyclohexane (beta-HCH) in river sediments at hotspot areas on the Mulde River in the Bitterfeld region (Elbe Basin...

  14. Deep aquifer prokaryotic community responses to CO2 geosequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, A.; Moreau, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about potential microbial responses to supercritical CO2 (scCO2) injection into deep subsurface aquifers, a currently experimental means for mitigating atmospheric CO2 pollution being trialed at several locations around the world. One such site is the Paaratte Formation of the Otway Basin (~1400 m below surface; 60°C; 2010 psi), Australia. Microbial responses to scCO2 are important to understand as species selection may result in changes to carbon and electron flow. A key aim is to determine if biofilm may form in aquifer pore spaces and reduce aquifer permeability and storage. This study aimed to determine in situ, using 16S rRNA gene, and functional metagenomic analyses, how the microbial community in the Otway Basin geosequestration site responded to experimental injection of 150 tons of scCO2. We demonstrate an in situ sampling approach for detecting deep subsurface microbial community changes associated with geosequestration. First-order level analyses revealed a distinct shift in microbial community structure following the scCO2 injection event, with proliferation of genera Comamonas and Sphingobium. Similarly, functional profiling of the formation revealed a marked increase in biofilm-associated genes (encoding for poly-β-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine). Global analysis of the functional gene profile highlights that scCO2 injection potentially degraded the metabolism of CH4 and lipids. A significant decline in carboxydotrophic gene abundance (cooS) and an anaerobic carboxydotroph OTU (Carboxydocella), was observed in post-injection samples. The potential impacts on the flow networks of carbon and electrons to heterotrophs are discussed. Our findings yield insights for other subsurface systems, such as hydrocarbon-rich reservoirs and high-CO2 natural analogue sites.

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL AUDITING: An Aquifer Vulnerability Assessment of the Paluxy Aquifer, Central Texas, USA, Using GIS and a Modified DRASTIC Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritch; McKnight; Yelderman; Arnold

    2000-03-01

    / The Paluxy aquifer in north-central Texas is composed primarily of Lower Cretaceous clastics. This aquifer provides water for both domestic and agricultural purposes in the region. The study area for this investigation incorporates the outcrop and recharge areas, as well as the confined and unconfined portions of the aquifer. The purpose of this investigation is to perform a groundwater vulnerability assessment on the Paluxy aquifer using the GRASS 4.1 geographic information system combined with a modified DRASTIC approach. DRASTIC is an acronym for the variables that control the groundwater pollution potential (Depth to water, net Recharge, Aquifer media, Soil media,Topography, Impact of the vadose zone, andConductivity of the aquifer). Using such an approach allows one to investigate the potential for groundwater contamination on a regional, rather than site-specific, scale. Based upon data from variables such as soil permeability, depth to water, aquifer hydraulic conductivity, and topography, subjective numerical weightings have been assigned according to the variable's relative importance in regional groundwater quality. The weights for each variable comprise a GIS map layer. These map layers are combined to formulate the final groundwater pollution potential map. Using this method of investigation, the pollution potential map for the study area classifies 47% of the area as having low pollution potential, 26% as having moderate pollution potential, 22% as having high pollution potential, and 5% as having very high pollution potential.

  16. Deep aquifers: last resort water resources in case of major pollution crisis; Les nappes profondes: ressources en eau d`ultime recours en cas de crise de pollution majeure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesny, M. [Ministere de l`Environnement, 75 - Paris (France); Comte, J.P. [BRGM, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    1996-12-31

    Within the framework of a reflection dealing with the possibility to insure sufficient drinking water supply in case of major crisis, the Ministry of the Environment undertook an inventory of the aquiferous systems on the whole French (continental) territory. In case of a generalized surface water and groundwater contamination, these aquifers could provide substitution water, qualified as `a last resorted water` because of its temporary - fast definitive - protection statute. A scale of value relative to the protection level was created, which enables the researchers to identify three levels of protection and to draw up a 1/1,500,000 scale map of France, on which the limits of 98 phreatic water-tables, identified as protected, have been reported. The great majority of the aquifers corresponds to confined waters. A statistical analysis on the existence of protected resources reveals that 16 departments out of 96 have got protected resources on the whole territory, and that 22 others haven`t got any that are registered at national scale. Otherwise, 61 towns out of 103 which count more that 50,000 inhabitants have got protected resources, which correspond to 61 % of the urban population. In a second time, the cases of the urban centres of Paris and Lyon will be looked into more in detail, stating precisely the protected resources which could be mobilized and the existing collecting equipments which could possibility be integrated in a device used as a last resort. (authors). 3 figs.

  17. Anaerobic arsenite oxidation with an electrode serving as the sole electron acceptor: A novel approach to the bioremediation of arsenic-polluted groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pous, Narcis [Laboratory of Chemical and Environmental Engineering (LEQUiA), Institute of the Environment, University of Girona, C/Maria Aurèlia Capmany, 69 E-17071 Girona (Spain); Casentini, Barbara; Rossetti, Simona; Fazi, Stefano [Water Research Institute (IRSA-CNR), National Research Council, Via Salaria Km 29.300, 00015 Monterotondo (Italy); Puig, Sebastià [Laboratory of Chemical and Environmental Engineering (LEQUiA), Institute of the Environment, University of Girona, C/Maria Aurèlia Capmany, 69 E-17071 Girona (Spain); Aulenta, Federico, E-mail: aulenta@irsa.cnr.it [Water Research Institute (IRSA-CNR), National Research Council, Via Salaria Km 29.300, 00015 Monterotondo (Italy)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • As(III) was oxidized to As(V) in a bioelectrochemical system. • A polarized graphite electrode served as electron acceptor. • Gammaproteobacteria were the dominating organisms at the electrode. - Abstract: Arsenic contamination of soil and groundwater is a serious problem worldwide. Here we show that anaerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), a form which is more extensively and stably adsorbed onto metal-oxides, can be achieved by using a polarized (+497 mV vs. SHE) graphite anode serving as terminal electron acceptor in the microbial metabolism. The characterization of the microbial populations at the electrode, by using in situ detection methods, revealed the predominance of gammaproteobacteria. In principle, the proposed bioelectrochemical oxidation process would make it possible to provide As(III)-oxidizing microorganisms with a virtually unlimited, low-cost and low-maintenance electron acceptor as well as with a physical support for microbial attachment.

  18. Anaerobic arsenite oxidation with an electrode serving as the sole electron acceptor: A novel approach to the bioremediation of arsenic-polluted groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • As(III) was oxidized to As(V) in a bioelectrochemical system. • A polarized graphite electrode served as electron acceptor. • Gammaproteobacteria were the dominating organisms at the electrode. - Abstract: Arsenic contamination of soil and groundwater is a serious problem worldwide. Here we show that anaerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), a form which is more extensively and stably adsorbed onto metal-oxides, can be achieved by using a polarized (+497 mV vs. SHE) graphite anode serving as terminal electron acceptor in the microbial metabolism. The characterization of the microbial populations at the electrode, by using in situ detection methods, revealed the predominance of gammaproteobacteria. In principle, the proposed bioelectrochemical oxidation process would make it possible to provide As(III)-oxidizing microorganisms with a virtually unlimited, low-cost and low-maintenance electron acceptor as well as with a physical support for microbial attachment

  19. Anaerobic workout

    OpenAIRE

    McAdam, Ewan J.

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic technology cannot directly replace current wastewater treatment processes exclusively. The UASB reactor configuration removes slightly less organic carbon by comparison as the process relies on lamella separation for passive clarification rather than using fine pores like anMBR. By contrast, whilst anMBR can operate as a single unit process for organic carbon removal, the membrane surface has to be cleaned using gas sparging to limit surface deposition, which requires extra energy. ...

  20. Biodegradation of cresol isomers in anoxic aquifers.

    OpenAIRE

    Smolenski, W J; Suflita, J M

    1987-01-01

    The biodegradation of o-, m-, and p-cresol was examined in material obtained from a shallow anaerobic alluvial sand aquifer. The cresol isomers were preferentially metabolized, with p-cresol being the most easily degraded. m-Cresol was more persistent than the para-isomer, and o-cresol persisted for over 90 days. Biodegradation of cresol isomers was favored under sulfate-reducing conditions (SRC) compared with that under methanogenic conditions (MC). Slurries that were acclimated to p-cresol ...

  1. Prospects of Anaerobic Digestion Technology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    As the world's largest developing country, China must face the problem of managing municipal solid waste, and the challenge of organic waste disposal is even more serious. Considering the characteristics of traditional waste disposal technologies and the subsequent secondary pollution, anaerobic digestion has various advantages such as reduction in the land needed for disposal and preservation of environmental quality. In light of the energy crisis, this paper focuses on the potential production of biogas from biowaste through anaerobic digestion processes, the problems incurred by the waste collection system, and the efficiency of the anaerobic digestion process. Use of biogas in a combined heat and power cogeneration system is also discussed. Finally, the advantages of anaerobic digestion technology for the Chinese market are summarized. The anaerobic digestion is suggested to be a promising treating technology for the organic wastes in China.

  2. Anaerobic procedures of wastewater treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Zupančič, Tadeja

    2013-01-01

    Highly polluted wastewater is formed in dairies, pig farms and slaughterhouses. Before released into watercourses, wastewater should be properly processed with different treatment procedures in wastewater treatment plants. The thesis deals with the descriptions of mechanical, physical and chemical, and biological wastewater treatment procedures and the description of the factors which affect the reactions in wastewater treatment plants. I give special emphasis on anaerobic wastewater treatmen...

  3. Anaerobic thermophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canganella, Francesco; Wiegel, Juergen

    2014-01-01

    The term "extremophile" was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of "extreme" environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally "hot environments" on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong to the Archaea has definitely

  4. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Canganella

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong

  5. Anaerobe Tolerance to Oxygen and the Potentials of Anaerobic and Aerobic Cocultures for Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Kato

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic treatment processes are considered to be well-established methods for the elimination of easily biodegradable organic matter from wastewaters. Some difficulties concerning certain wastewaters are related to the possible presence of dissolved oxygen. The common belief is that anaerobes are oxygen intolerant. Therefore, the common practice is to use sequencing anaerobic and aerobic steps in separate tanks. Enhanced treatment by polishing off the residual biodegradable oxygen demand from effluents of anaerobic reactors, or the biodegradation of recalcitrant wastewater pollutants, usually requires sequenced anaerobic and aerobic bacteria activities. However, the combined activity of both bacteria can also be obtained in a single reactor. Previous experiments with either pure or mixed cultures showed that anaerobes can tolerate oxygen to a certain extent. The oxygen toxicity to methanogens in anaerobic sludges was quantified in batch experiments, as well as in anaerobic reactors. The results showed that methanogens have a high tolerance to oxygen. In practice, it was confirmed that dissolved oxygen does not constitute any detrimental effect on reactor treatment performance. This means that the coexistence of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria in one single reactor is feasible and increases the potentials of new applications in wastewater treatment

  6. Anaerobic digestion: biodegradability and biogas production of model wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Lausund, Erlend

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a desirable treatment practice in terms of minimizing volume, treating of pollutants and biogas production. In this thesis model wastes have been investigated with respect to biogas and methane production in order to find out what wastes are suitable for anaerobic digestion, and discussing ways to further the research to optimize the production of renewable energy.

  7. Assessment of heavy metal and bacterial pollution in coastal aquifers from SIPCOT industrial zones, Gulf of Mannar, South Coast of Tamil Nadu, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvam, S.; Antony Ravindran, A.; Venkatramanan, S.; Singaraja, C.

    2015-06-01

    Heavy metals and microbiological contamination were investigated in groundwater in the industrial and coastal city of Thoothukudi. The main sources of drinking water in this area are water bores which are dug up to the depth of 10-50 m in almost every house. A number of chemical and pharmaceutical industries have been established since past three decades. Effluents from these industries are reportedly being directly discharged onto surrounding land, irrigation fields and surface water bodies forming point and non-point sources of contamination for groundwater in the study area. The study consists of the determination of physico-chemical properties, trace metals, heavy metals and microbiological quality of drinking water. Heavy metals were analysed using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry and compared with the (WHO in Guidelines for drinking water quality, 2004) standards. The organic contamination was detected in terms of most probable number (MPN) test in order to find out faecal coliforms that were identified through biochemical tests. A comparison of the results of groundwater samples with WHO guidelines reveals that most of the groundwater samples are heavily contaminated with heavy metals like arsenic, selenium, lead, boron, aluminium, iron and vanadium. The selenium level was higher than 0.01 mg/l in 82 % of the study area and the arsenic concentration exceeded 0.01 mg/l in 42 % of the area. The results reveal that heavy metal contamination in the area is mainly due to the discharge of effluents from copper industries, alkali chemical industry, fertiliser industry, thermal power plant and sea food industries. The results showed that there are pollutions for the groundwater, and the total Coliform means values ranged from 0.6-145 MPN ml-1, faecal Coliform ranged from 2.2-143 MPN ml-1, Escherichia coli ranged from 0.9 to 40 MPN ml-1 and faecal streptococci ranged from 10-9.20 × 102 CFU ml-1. The coastal regions are highly contaminated with total

  8. Anaerobic Metabolism and Bioremediation of Explosives-Contaminated Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boopathy, Raj

    Nitroaromatic compounds pollute soil, water, and food via use of pesticides, plastics, pharmaceuticals, landfill dumping of industrial wastes, and the military use of explosives. Biotransformation of trinitrotoluene and other nitroaromatics by aerobic bacteria in the laboratory has been frequently reported, but the anaerobic bacterial metabolism of nitroaromatics has not been studied as extensively perhaps due to the difficulty in working with anaerobic cultures and the slow growth of anaerobes. Sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria can metabolize nitroaromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions if appropriate electron donors and electron acceptors are present in the environment.

  9. Characterization of Aquifer Hydraulic Parameters: from Theis to Hydraulic Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    D'Oria, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater is in many parts of the world an important source of fresh water for several purpose such as domestic and industrial use and irrigation. Pollution and bad management of groundwater are only two of the problems that affect the aquifers around the world. Detailed information about the spatial distribution of hydraulic properties in subsurface are of crucial importance for a proper management of groundwater and for the prediction of the solutes transport in aquifer and therefore for ...

  10. Gender comparisons in anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity tests.

    OpenAIRE

    Maud, P. J.; Shultz, B B

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare anaerobic power and anaerobic capacity test scores between young active men and women. Three performance measures of anaerobic power and two of anaerobic capacity were administered to a sample comprising 52 male and 50 female college students (means age = 21.4 yrs). Results indicated significant differences between men and women in body height, weight and per cent fat, in fat free mass (FFM), anaerobic power, and anaerobic capacity when recorded as gros...

  11. Arsenic release from Floridan Aquifer rock during incubations simulating aquifer storage and recovery operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jin; Zimmerman, Andrew R; Norton, Stuart B; Annable, Michael D; Harris, Willie G

    2016-05-01

    While aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is becoming widely accepted as a way to address water supply shortages, there are concerns that it may lead to release of harmful trace elements such as arsenic (As). Thus, mechanisms of As release from limestone during ASR operations were investigated using 110-day laboratory incubations of core material collected from the Floridan Aquifer, with treatment additions of labile or refractory dissolved organic matter (DOM) or microbes. During the first experimental phase, core materials were equilibrated with native groundwater lacking in DO to simulate initial non-perturbed anaerobic aquifer conditions. Then, ASR was simulated by replacing the native groundwater in the incubations vessels with DO-rich ASR source water, with DOM or microbes added to some treatments. Finally, the vessels were opened to the atmosphere to mimic oxidizing conditions during later stages of ASR. Arsenic was released from aquifer materials, mainly during transitional periods at the beginning of each incubation stage. Most As released was during the initial anaerobic experimental phase via reductive dissolution of Fe oxides in the core materials, some or all of which may have formed during the core storage or sample preparation period. Oxidation of As-bearing Fe sulfides released smaller amounts of As during the start of later aerobic experimental phases. Additions of labile DOM fueled microbially-mediated reactions that mobilized As, while the addition of refractory DOM did not, probably due to mineral sorption of DOM that made it unavailable for microbial utilization or metal chelation. The results suggest that oscillations of groundwater redox conditions, such as might be expected to occur during an ASR operation, are the underlying cause of enhanced As release in these systems. Further, ASR operations using DOM-rich surface waters may not necessarily lead to additional As releases.

  12. Hydrogeochemical Analysis of an Overexploited Aquifer In Bangladesh Toward Managed Aquifer Recharge Project Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. A.; Wiegand, B. A.; Pervin, M.; Sauter, M.

    2012-12-01

    In most parts of the upper Dupitila aquifer (Dhaka City, Bangladesh) the average groundwater depletion reaches 2-3 m/year due to increasing water demands of the growing population. To counteract overexploitation of the aquifer, a more sustainable water management is required. The analysis of the local water resources system suggests that Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) would help to restore groundwater resources to strengthen water supply of Dhaka City, e.g., by using collected urban monsoon runoff and excess surface water from rivers. To assess possible effects of surface water or rainwater injection on groundwater quality, a comprehensive hydrogeochemical survey of the Dupitila aquifer is required. This paper presents hydrogeochemical data to document the current status of groundwater quality and to evaluate potential groundwater pollution by mobilization of hazardous chemicals as a result of changes in the hydrochemical equilibria. We performed a comprehensive review of available secondary data sources and will present new results from hydrochemical and Sr isotope investigations of water samples that were conducted within this study. Currently, groundwater quality in the upper Dupitila aquifer is characterized by variations in the electrical conductivity in the range of 200 to 1100 μS/cm, which may indicate some anthropogenic contamination by leakage from waste disposal including the sewage network and from surface water infiltration into the groundwater aquifer. Dissolved oxygen concentrations range from 1.0 to 4.9 mg/L (average 2.5 mg/L) in the upper Dupitila aquifer, while the lower Dupilita aquifer shows dissolved oxygen concentrations in the range 0 to 0.7 mg/L. Concentrations of major ions show some variation primarily due to a sedimentologically/mineralogically heterogeneous aquifer composition (sand, gravel, clay horizons), but may also be affected by anthropogenic processes. The groundwater composition is predominated by Ca-Mg-HCO3 and saturation values

  13. Anaerobic Digestion: Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Batstone, Damien J.

    2011-01-01

    with very little dry matter may also be called a digest. The digest should not be termed compost unless it specifically has been composted in an aerated step. This chapter describes the basic processes of anaerobic digestion. Chapter 9.5 describes the anaerobic treatment technologies, and Chapter 9...

  14. Anaerobic sludge granulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Castro Lopes, de S.I.; Lettinga, G.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews different theories on anaerobic sludge granulation in UASB-reactors that have been proposed during the past two decades
    This paper reviews different theories on anaerobic sludge granulation in UASB-reactors that have been proposed during the past two decades. The initial stage

  15. EPA Sole Source Aquifers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Information on sole source aquifers (SSAs) is widely used in assessments under the National Environmental Policy Act and at the state and local level. A national...

  16. Lower Cretaceous aquifers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the Lower Cretaceous aquifers in the states of Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa, and Minnesota..

  17. Mississippi embayment aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the Mississippi embayment aquifer system in the states of Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, and Kentucky.

  18. Early Mesozoic basin aquifers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the Early Mesozoic basin aquifers in the states of Massachusettes, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland,...

  19. Ogallala Aquifer Mapping Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computerized data file has been established which can be used efficiently by the contour-plotting program SURFACE II to produce maps of the Ogallala aquifer in 17 counties of the Texas Panhandle. The data collected have been evaluated and compiled into three sets, from which SURFACE II can generate maps of well control, aquifer thickness, saturated thickness, water level, and the difference between virgin (pre-1942) and recent (1979 to 1981) water levels. 29 figures, 1 table

  20. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  1. Investigating river–aquifer relations using water temperature in an anthropized environment (Motril-Salobreña aquifer)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duque, Carlos; Calvache, Marie; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard

    2010-01-01

    . Temperature measurements in river, air, and a number of boreholes located at different distances away from the river were monitored over a 6 year period. Temperature is easy to monitor and especially useful in anthropized aquifers due to their natural and non-pollutant characteristics. The thermal responses......Heat was applied as a tracer for determining river–aquifer relations in the Motril-Salobreña aquifer (S Spain). The aquifer has typically been recharged by River Guadalfeo infiltration, nevertheless from 2005 a dam was constructed changing the traditional dynamic river flow and recharge events...... of recharge events have been analyzed with different methodologies for the characterization of the recharge process. Changes in groundwater temperatures recorded between 15 and 40 m deep are detected during the periods of higher river discharge. Temperature logs envelopes reveal areas of infiltration...

  2. Reductive dechlorination of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers in soil under anaerobic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middeldorp, P.J.M.; Doesburg, van W.C.J.; Schraa, G.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The biological anaerobic reductive dechlorination of -hexachlorocyclohexane under methanogenic conditions was tested in a number of contaminated soil samples from two locations in the Netherlands. Soils from a heavily polluted location showed rapid dechlorination of -hexachlorocyclohexane to benzene

  3. Caractérisation expérimentale et modélisation des effets des pratiques culturales sur la pollution nitrique d'un aquifère en zone de grande culture

    OpenAIRE

    Beaudoin, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    Surface and groundwaters must regain good chemical and biological quality before 2015 according to European Directives. Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) establish a compromise between the risks of pollution and the loss of revenue. The minimum result expected is conformity with the drinking water standard of 50 mgNO3.L-1 in the collected water and the avoidance of transfer of pollution from the hydrosphere into the atmosphere. However their implementation does not guarantee that these objec...

  4. Particle Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Particle Pollution Public Health Issues Particle Pollution Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Particle pollution ... see them in the air. Where does particle pollution come from? Particle pollution can come from two ...

  5. APPLICATION OF ANAEROBIC BIOTECHNOLOGY FOR PHARMACEUTICAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreeshivadasan Chelliapan and Paul J. Sallis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The wastewater generated from pharmaceutical industry generally contain high organic load and the treatment is primarily carried out using two major types of biological methods; aerobic and anaerobic. However, due to high strength, it is infeasible to treat some pharmaceutical wastewater using aerobic biological processes. As an alternative, an anaerobic process is preferred to remove high strength organic matter. Anaerobic wastewater treatment is considered as the most cost effective solution for organically polluted industrial waste streams. In particular the development of high rate systems, in which hydraulic retention times (HRT are uncoupled from solids retention times (SRT, has led to a worldwide acceptance of anaerobic wastewater treatment. In this paper, literature on anaerobic digestion, anaerobic reactor technology and existing anaerobic treatment of pharmaceutical wastewater are presented. In addition, fate of pharmaceuticals in the environment was also discussed in brief. A case study of a laboratory investigation into the treatment of pharmaceutical wastewater containing the antibiotic Tylosin in an anaerobic reactor was also given. Specifically, it was determined whether the anaerobic reactor could be used as a pre-treatment system at an existing pharmaceutical production plant. The performance of the reactor treating real pharmaceutical wastewater at various organic loading rate (OLR was investigated and showed efficient substrate removal at low OLRs (0.43 – 1.86 kg COD.m-3.d-1 by promoting efficient chemical oxygen demand (COD reduction (70 – 75%. Under these conditions, an average of 95% Tylosin reduction was achieved in the UASR. However, increasing the OLRs to 3.73 kg COD.m-3.d-1 by reducing the hydraulic retention time (HRT (4 – 2 d reduced the COD removal efficiency (45%. Changes in the organic loading affected the treatment performance of the anaerobic reactor, and at high OLRs, it was not able to withstand the short

  6. Specific yield, High Plains aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster data set represents specific-yield ranges in the High Plains aquifer of the United States. The High Plains aquifer underlies 112.6 million acres...

  7. Prediction of ground water pollution in karst aquifer with conduit based on GMS simulation in Chongzuo of Guangxi%利用GMS模拟预测崇左市拟建稀土分离项目影响区岩溶水污染

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪淑娜; 蓝俊康; 陈丽娜; 夏源

    2014-01-01

    In order to predict the karst ground water polluted by a REE separation project in Chongzuo,GMS software was used to simulate the migration of contaminants in various kinds of sewage leaking emergencies. The simulation results showed that as the migration of contaminants in the aquifer was very slow,there was a certain distance from the seepage point to the pipes of north side,and the pollution plume was roughly round. The analysis shows that the the migration of contaminants can be classified as molecular diffusion.The slow mi-gration of polluted ground water was caused by the slow flow of the ground water in rock matrix on the leaking site and the polluted ground water could not immediately flow into karst conduits.The untreated sewage can form a high concentration of the pollution plume and pollute the karst ground water seriously.%为了预测稀土分离项目在生产过程中可能对当地地下水环境造成的污染状况,运用GMS软件模拟在各类污水泄漏突发事件时污染物在岩溶含水系统中的运移。模拟结果表明:影响区域内地下水在以裂隙-孔隙控制的岩体介质内的运动速度十分缓慢,污水渗漏点离北侧的岩溶管道还有一定的距离,污水从入渗点下渗后因未能很快流入岩溶管道,污染物在岩体介质中的运移主要以分子扩散为主,其污染晕大致呈圆形向四周扩散;未经处理的污水若发生泄露下渗,将会在含水层内形成浓度较高的污染晕,引起地下水严重污染。

  8. Sequential anaerobic-adsorption treatment of chemical industry wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daga, Kailash; Pallavi, V; Patel, Dharmendra

    2011-10-01

    Treatment technologies needed to reduce the pollutant load of chemical industry effluent have been found to involve exorbitantly high costs. The present investigation aimed to treat the wastewater from chemical industry by cost effective sequential anaerobic-adsorption treatment. Wastewaters from chemical industry that are rich in biodegradable organics are tested for anaerobic treatability. The efficiency of anaerobic reactor is relatively lower 79.3%, and therefore post treatment of effluent was done by adsorption using Poly vinyl alcohol coated Datura stramonium (PVAC-DS) as an adsorbent. An overall COD removal of 93.8 % was achieved after sequential Anaerobic-Adsorption treatment, which lead to a better final effluent and a more economical treatment system.

  9. Aquifer stability investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.

    1981-09-01

    The study of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in porous rock reservoirs is carried out within the Reservoir Stability Studies Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of the study is to establish criteria for long-term stability of aquifer CAES reservoirs. These criteria are intended to be guidelines and check lists that utilities and architect-engineering firms may use to evaluate reservoir stability at candidate CAES sites. These criteria will be quantitative where possible, qualitative where necessary, and will provide a focal point for CAES relevant geotechnical knowledge, whether developed within this study or available from petroleum, mining or other geotechnical practices using rock materials. The Reservoir Stability Studies Program had four major activities: a state-of-the-art survey to establish preliminary stability criteria and identify areas requiring research and development; numerical modeling; laboratory testing to provide data for use in numerical models and to investigate fundamental rock mechanics, thermal, fluid, and geochemical response of aquifer materials; and field studies to verify the feasibility of air injection and recovery under CAES conditions in an aquifer, to validate and refine the stability criteria, and to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of the numerical and experimental methodologies developed in previous work. Three phases of study, including preliminary criteria formulation, numerical model development, and experimental assessment of CAES reservoir materials have been completed. Present activity consists of construction and operation of the aquifer field test, and associated numerical and experimental work in support of that activity. Work is presently planned to be complete by 1983 at the end of the field test. At that time the final stability criteria for aquifers will be issued. Attached here also are preliminary criteria for aquifers.

  10. Advances in high rate anaerobic treatment: staging of reactor systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lier, van J.B.; Zee, van der F.P.; Tan, N.C.G.; Rebac, S.; Kleerebezem, R.

    2001-01-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment (AnWT) is considered as the most cost-effective solution for organically polluted industrial waste streams. Particularly the development of high-rate systems, in which hydraulic retention times are uncoupled from solids retention times, has led to a world-wide acceptan

  11. The fate of methanol in thermophilic-anaerobic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, P.L.

    2002-01-01

    Methanol is a simple C1-compound, which sustains a complex web of possible degradation routes under anaerobic conditions. Methanol can be the main pollutant in some specific wastewaters, but it is also a compound that may be formed under natural conditions, as intermediate in the decomposition of or

  12. Wave-Induced Groundwater Flows in a Freshwater Beach Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malott, S. S.; Robinson, C. E.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Wave-induced recirculation across the sediment-water interface can impact the transport of pollutants through a beach aquifer and their ultimate flux into coastal waters. The fate of nutrients (e.g. from septic and agricultural sources) and fecal indicator bacteria (e.g. E. coil) near the sediment-water interface are of particular concern as these pollutants often lead to degradation of recreational water quality and nearshore ecosystems. This paper presents detailed field measurements of groundwater flows in a freshwater beach aquifer on Lake Huron over periods of intensified wave conditions. Quantifying wave-driven processes in a freshwater beach aquifer enables wave effects to be studied in isolation from density and tidal effects that complicate groundwater flows in marine beaches. Water exchange across the sediment-water interface and groundwater flow patterns were measured using groundwater wells, arrays of vertically nested pressure transducers and manometers. Results show that wave action induces rapid infiltration/exfiltration across the sediment-water interface and a larger recirculation cell through the beach aquifer. Field data is used to validate a numerical groundwater model of wave-induced groundwater flows. While prior studies have simulated the effects of waves on beach groundwater flows, this study is the first attempt to validate these sophisticated modeling approaches. Finally, field data illustrating the impact of wave-induced groundwater flows on nutrient and bacteria fate and transport in beach aquifers will also be presented.

  13. Environment Of Underground Water And Pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jeong Sang

    1998-02-15

    This book deals with environment of underground water and pollution, which introduces the role of underground water in hydrology, definition of related study of under water, the history of hydro-geology, basic conception of underground water such as origin of water, and hydrogeologic characteristic of aquifers, movement of underground water, hydrography of underground water and aquifer test analysis, change of an underground water level, and water balance analysis and development of underground water.

  14. Environment Of Underground Water And Pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book deals with environment of underground water and pollution, which introduces the role of underground water in hydrology, definition of related study of under water, the history of hydro-geology, basic conception of underground water such as origin of water, and hydrogeologic characteristic of aquifers, movement of underground water, hydrography of underground water and aquifer test analysis, change of an underground water level, and water balance analysis and development of underground water.

  15. Anaerobic bacteria in otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulghum, R S; Daniel, H J; Yarborough, J G

    1977-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria, Peptostrepotococcus intermedius and Propionibacterium acnes, were found in mixed culture specimens from four to ten tested cases of chronic secretory otitis media. These anaerobic bacteria were in a mixed infection flora with aerobic bacteria most often Staphylococcus epidermidis and Cornybacterium sp. which do not fit any established species. The findings of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media is consistent with the sporadic report of the involvement of anaerobic bacteria in otitis media in the literature since 1898.

  16. EFFECT OF ANAEROBIOSIS ON FILTER MEDIA POLLUTANT RETENTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents the results of experiments conducted to determine if four potential filter media (sand, activated carbon, peat moss, and compost) could retain previously-trapped pollutants even under anaerobic conditions. The results indicated that permanent retention of heav...

  17. The anaerobic digestion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, C.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Boone, D.R. [Oregon Graduate Inst., Portland, OR (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  18. Anaerobic biotransformation of estrogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czajka, Cynthia P. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Londry, Kathleen L. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada)]. E-mail: londryk@cc.umanitoba.ca

    2006-08-31

    Estrogens are important environmental contaminants that disrupt endocrine systems and feminize male fish. We investigated the potential for anaerobic biodegradation of the estrogens 17-{alpha}-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) in order to understand their fate in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Cultures were established using lake water and sediment under methanogenic, sulfate-, iron-, and nitrate-reducing conditions. Anaerobic degradation of EE2 (added at 5 mg/L) was not observed in multiple trials over long incubation periods (over three years). E2 (added at 5 mg/L) was transformed to estrone (E1) under all four anaerobic conditions (99-176 {mu}g L{sup -1} day{sup -1}), but the extent of conversion was different for each electron acceptor. The oxidation of E2 to E1 was not inhibited by E1. Under some conditions, reversible inter-conversion of E2 and E1 was observed, and the final steady state concentration of E2 depended on the electron-accepting condition but was independent of the total amount of estrogens added. In addition, racemization occurred and E1 was also transformed to 17-{alpha}-estradiol under all but nitrate-reducing conditions. Although E2 could be readily transformed to E1 and in many cases 17-{alpha}-estradiol under anaerobic conditions, the complete degradation of estrogens under these conditions was minimal, suggesting that they would accumulate in anoxic environments.

  19. Elucidation of the thermophilic phenol biodegradation pathway via benzoate during the anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyos, C.; Hoffmann, M; Guenne, A.; Mazéas, L.

    2014-01-01

    International audience Anaerobic digestion makes it possible to valorize municipal solid waste (MSW) into biogas and digestate which are, respectively, a renewable energy source and an organic amendment for soil. Phenols are persistent pollutants present in MSW that can inhibit the anaerobic digestion process and have a toxic effect on microbiota if they are applied to soil together with digestate. It is then important to define the operational conditions of anaerobic digestion which allow...

  20. Anaerobic biological treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Enso-Fenox process has been very successfully used to remove chlorinated phenolic compounds from pulp bleaching effluents. It is a two-stage anaerobic/aerobic process consisting of a nonmethanogenic anaerobic fluidized bed followed by a trickling filter. Studies have been conducted on reductive dechlorination of chlorinated aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions with chlorinated phenols as the sole carbon and energy source. Approximately 40% of the added chlorophenols was converted to CH4 and CO2. Substrate loading rates were 20 mg/L/d at hydraulic detention times of 2-4 days with 90% substrate conversion efficiency. Reductive dechlorination of mono, di-, tri-, and pentachlorophenols has been demonstrated in anaerobic sewage sludge. The following constituents were tested in the laboratory at their approximate concentrations in coal conversion wastewater (CCWW) and were anaerobically degraded in serum bottles: 1,000 mg/L phenol; 500 mg/L resorcinol; 1,000 mg/L benzoic acid; 500 mg/L p-cresol; 200 mg/L pyridine; 2,000 mg/L benzoic acid; 250 mg/L 40 methylcatechol; 500 mg/L 4-ethylpyridine; and 2,000 mg/L hexanoic acid. A petrochemical may initially exhibit toxicity to an unacclimated population of methane-fermenting bacteria, but with acclimation the toxicity may be greatly reduced or disappear. In addition, the microorganisms may develop the capacity to actually degrade compounds which showed initial toxicity. Since biomass digestion requires a complete consortium of bacteria, it is relevant to study the effect of a given process as well as to individual steps within the process. A toxicant can inhibit the rate-limiting step and/or change the step that is rate-limiting. Both manifestations of toxicity can severely affect the overall process

  1. Management of city aquifers from anthropogenic activities: Example of the Windhoek aquifer, Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapani, Benjamin S.; Schreiber, Ute

    As the city of Windhoek is growing rapidly, it has become increasingly obvious that dangers to the underlying groundwater aquifer have become imminent, and need addressing immediately. Water infiltration and the transportation of contaminants from anthropogenic activities through soils into the bedrock and hence the aquifer involve soil maturity, chemical and microbial processes and the climate of a particular area. The thin immature soil horizon (circa 5-20 cm) over the Windhoek schist implies that most areas of the city are built directly on bedrock, making the aquifer vulnerable. Anthropogenic activities from the use of pesticides for weed control, oil spills, toxic chemical spills, dumping of undesired substances by residents and high fertilizer application rates for lawns can lead to the contamination of groundwater. The result of our study show that the soil composition in Windhoek lacks mature clay minerals and is enriched in micas, quartz and albite. Some areas in the northern and southern industrial areas show contamination in heavy metals Pb, Zn, Cu and Ni. To the west of the city, close to the textile factory, soils are contaminated with ammonium compounds. The hydrochemistry of these pesticides and fertilizers can cause severe pollution to the groundwater if the practice is not carefully monitored. In addition, the rapid expansion of uncontrolled settlements without proper sanitation and reticulation has made the problems much more difficult. The geology of the city of Windhoek consists of the Kuiseb Schist, locally known as the “Windhoek Schist” and amphibolites. The Kuiseb schist possesses pervasive cleavage that renders the underlying lithology to be permeable to percolating water and fluids from the surface into the aquifer. The fissility and fracture density of the schist imply that leakage of surface waters, phenols, septic tank spills and industrial contaminants may reach the aquifer in unusually high rainfall years. Organic fuels and oils

  2. Water quality management of aquifer recharge using advanced tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarova, Valentina; Emsellem, Yves; Paille, Julie; Glucina, Karl; Gislette, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) with recycled water or other alternative resources is one of the most rapidly growing techniques that is viewed as a necessity in water-short areas. In order to better control health and environmental effects of MAR, this paper presents two case studies demonstrating how to improve water quality, enable reliable tracing of injected water and better control and manage MAR operation in the case of indirect and direct aquifer recharge. Two water quality management strategies are illustrated on two full-scale case studies, including the results of the combination of non conventional and advanced technologies for water quality improvement, comprehensive sampling and monitoring programs including emerging pollutants, tracer studies using boron isotopes and integrative aquifer 3D GIS hydraulic and hydrodispersive modelling.

  3. Microbial community analysis in sludge of anaerobic wastewater treatment systems : integrated culture-dependent and culture-independent approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, C.

    2007-01-01

    The need for clean water is increasing and anaerobic wastewater treatment can be used as a cost-effective solution for purification of organically polluted industrial waste streams. This thesis presents results from microbiological investigations of several full-scale and lab-scale anaerobic wastewa

  4. Sole Source Aquifers for NY and NJ

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This layer is the designated sole source aquifers of New York and New Jersey. A Sole Source Aquifer, is an aquifer that supplies 50% or more of the drinking water...

  5. Isotope techniques in the study of the Guarani Aquifer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA, through the Technical Cooperation Project (RLA8036), supports the application of isotope tools as part of a large international project which addresses a number of key questions in hydrolgeology and groundwater uses of the Guarani Aquifer. Groundwater constitutes around 95% of all the planet's fresh and liquid water. It is used by more than two billion people in the world and is considered as the greatest strategic reserve for the next decades. About 26% of the available freshwater in the world is in South America, and more than 50% of its population is supplied by groundwater. Low vulnerability to short climate variations places groundwater in a privileged position when societies' sustainability is evaluated. In spite of this importance, in many of our countries, groundwater resources have not received, nor receive, the attention deserved. During the last decade, the interest in South America about groundwater has grown but the few available management schemes operating in most countries are no longer adequate. As a result of a lack of adequate management schemes, ground pollution and inadequate well-head protection measures, some overexploitation (greater water extraction than the aquifer's potential) and pollution signs have been observed in some aquifers. If actions are not taken to ensure the preservation of these resources and correction measures are not adopted in critical areas, we will place at risk public and private water supply schemes, mainly in urban centres. The actions to be adopted will depend on the existing technical knowledge of the aquifers an on the countries' initiatives

  6. The vulnerability of the free aquifers using functions of time of trip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of an aquifers vulnerability degree represents a support instrument for hydraulic resources management. It is also important for territory ordering and planning because it guarantors groundwater conservation. Achieving the determination of procedures for vulnerability maps construction, using measurable parameters, integrated as a function, is a practical methodology with very important and vantages over traditional methodologies. It is considered that the pollutant trip time from the surface to the aquifers is a good vulnerability indicator

  7. A study of chlorinated solvent contamination of the aquifers of an industrial area in central Italy: a possibility of bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FEDERICA eMATTEUCCI

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Perchloroethene, Trichloroethene, and other chlorinated solvents are widespread groundwater pollutants. They form Dense Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs that sink through permeable groundwater aquifers until non-permeable zone is reached. In Italy there are many situations of serious contamination of groundwater that might compromise their use in industry, agriculture, private, as the critical case of a Central Italy valley located in the province of Teramo (Val Vibrata, characterized by a significant chlorinated solvents contamination. Data from the various monitoring campaigns that have taken place over time were collected, and new samplings were carried out, resulting in a complete database. The data matrix was processed with a multivariate statistic analysis (in particular Principal Components Analysis, PCA and was then imported into Geographic Information System (GIS, to obtain a model of the contamination. A microcosm anaerobic study was utilized to assess the potential for in situ natural or enhanced bioremediation. Most of the microcosms were positive for dechlorination, particularly those inoculated with a mineral medium. This indicate the presence of an active native dechlorinating population in the subsurface, probably inhibited by co-contaminants in the groundwater, or more likely by the absence or lack of nutritional factors. Among the tested electron donors (i.e., yeast extract, lactate, and butyrate lactate and butyrate enhanced dechlorination of chlorinated compounds. PCA and GIS studies allowed delimiting the contamination; the microcosm study helped to identify the conditions to promote the bioremediation of the area.

  8. Natural attenuation processes of nitrate in a saline lake-aquifer system: Pétrola Basin (Central Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Nicolas; Menchen, Alfonso; Jirsa, Franz; Hein, Thomas; Wanek, Wolfgang; Gomez-Alday, Juan Jose

    2016-04-01

    Saline wetlands associated with intense agricultural activities in semi-arid to arid climates are among the most vulnerable environments to NO3- pollution. The endorheic Pétrola Basin (High Segura River Basin, Central Spain) was declared vulnerable to NO3- pollution by the Regional Government of Castilla-La Mancha in 1998. The hypersaline lake was classified as a heavily modified waterbody, due to the inputs of pollutants from agricultural sources and urban waste waters, the latest are discharged directly into the lake without proper treatment. Previous studies showed that the aquifer system has two main flow components: regional groundwater flow from recharge areas into the lake, and a density-driven flow from the lake to the underlying aquifer. The NO3- inputs derived from agriculture originate from nitrification of synthetic ammonium fertilizers, and afterwards, NO3- is expected to be attenuated by denitrification (up to 60%) in the saltwater-freshwater interface around the lake. However, the spatial and temporal pattern of nitrate reduction in lake sediments is not known. In this study, an isotope pairing technique was used in order to clarify the main pathways for the NO3- attenuation linked to the sediment-water interface. For that purpose mesocosm experiments were performed: organic-rich lake sediment (up to 23% organic carbon content) was incubated for 96 hours with the addition of 15N nitrate tracer. During the experiments two factors were modified: light and oxic conditions. Analyzing inorganic N-species (n=20) over time (72 hours) showed that NO3- attenuation was coupled with an increment in the NH4+ concentration (from 0.8 mg/L up to 5.3 mg/L) and a decrease in redox values (from 135.1 mV up to -422 mV) in the water column. The main outcome of this study was to elucidate the importance of different microbial pathways denitrification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox), in controlling the fate

  9. Anaerobic azo dye reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Zee, van der, KG Kristoffer

    2002-01-01

    Azo dyes, aromatic moieties linked together by azo (-N=N-) chromophores, represent the largest class of dyes used in textile-processing and other industries. The release of these compounds into the environment is undesirable, not only because of their colour, but also because many azo dyes and their breakdown products are toxic and/or mutagenic to life. To remove azo dyes from wastewater, a biological treatment strategy based on anaerobic reduction of the azo dyes, followed by aerobic transfo...

  10. High Temperature Aquifer Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueckert, Martina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Combined heat and power generation (CHP) is highly efficient because excess heat is used for heating and/or process energy. However, the demand of heat energy varies considerably throughout the year while the demand for electrical energy is rather constant. It seems economically and ecologically highly beneficial for municipalities and large power consumers such as manufacturing plants to store excess heat in groundwater aquifers and to recuperate this energy at times of higher demand. Within the project High Temperature Aquifer Storage, scientists investigate storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the bavarian Malm aquifer. Apart from high transmissivity and favorable pressure gradients, the hydrochemical conditions are crucial for long-term operation. An enormous technical challenge is the disruption of the carbonate equilibrium - modeling results indicated a carbonate precipitation of 10 - 50 kg/d in the heat exchangers. The test included five injection pulses of hot water (60 °C up to 110 °C) and four tracer pulses, each consisting of a reactive and a conservative fluorescent dye, into a depth of about 300 m b.s.l. resp. 470 m b.s.l. Injection and production rates were 15 L/s. To achieve the desired water temperatures, about 4 TJ of heat energy were necessary. Electrical conductivity, pH and temperature were recorded at a bypass where also samples were taken. A laboratory container at the drilling site was equipped for analysing the concentration of the dyes and the major cations at sampling intervals of down to 15 minutes. Additional water samples were taken and analysed in the laboratory. The disassembled heat exchanger prooved that precipitation was successfully prevented by adding CO2 to the water before heating. Nevertheless, hydrochemical data proved both, dissolution and precipitation processes in the aquifer. This was also suggested by the hydrochemical modelling with PhreeqC and is traced back to mixture dissolution and changing

  11. Contribution to the study of Arapey Salto-Aquifer System (Department of Salto - Uruguay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provide hydrogeological data about the Salto Arapey aquifer system constituted by sedimentary deposits and fisurate effusive rocks, respectively Tertiary and Cretacic aged. The information belongs to an area located at latitude South 31º20' West. North of the Salto city (NW of Uruguay) 500 km away from Montevideo. A regional aquifer system can be defined where the biggest flows are originated in the basaltic fisurate d rocks of the Arapey formation. Environment features are also considered and data about the main polluting agents - both organic and inorganic ones- are provided, bearing in mind that they justify an urgent safety design to protect the aquifer system

  12. Treatment of Distillery Wastewater by Anaerobic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Patyal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the major environmental problems faced by the world is management of wastes. Industrial processes create a wide range of wastewater pollutants; which are not only difficult but costly to treat. Characteristics of wastewater and level of pollutants vary significantly from industry to industry. To control this problem today emphasis is laid on waste minimization and revenue generation through by-product and energy recovery. Pollution prevention focuses on preventing the harmful effect of generated wastewater on the environment, while waste minimization refers to reducing the volume or toxicity of hazardous wastes by water recycling and reuse, process modifications and by by-product recovery. Production of ethyl alcohol in distilleries based on cane sugar molasses constitutes a major industry in Asia and South America. The world’s total production of alcohol from cane molasses is more than13 million m3 /annum. The aqueous distillery effluent stream known as spent wash is a dark brown highly organic effluent and is approximately 12-15 times by volume of the product alcohol. This highly aqueous, organic soluble containing residue is considered a troublesome and potentially polluting waste due to its extremely high BOD and COD values. Because of the high concentration of organic load, distillery spent wash is a potential source of renewable energy. The paper reviews the possibility of anaerobic treatment of the distillery wastewater.

  13. Water Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, H. J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Deals with water pollution in the following categories: a global view, self purification, local pollution, difficulties in chemical analysis, and remedies for water pollution. Emphasizes the extent to which man's activities have modified the cycles of certain elements. (GS)

  14. Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, dust, pollen and ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, ...

  15. Noise Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview » Title IV - Noise Pollution Title IV - Noise Pollution The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments added a ... abatement 7642 Authorization of appropriations What is Noise Pollution? The traditional definition of noise is “unwanted or ...

  16. Groundwater vulnerability mapping in Guadalajara aquifers system (Western Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizo-Decelis, L. David; Marín, Ana I.; Andreo, Bartolomé

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater vulnerability mapping is a practical tool to implement strategies for land-use planning and sustainable socioeconomic development coherent with groundwater protection. The objective of vulnerability mapping is to identify the most vulnerable zones of catchment areas and to provide criteria for protecting the groundwater used for drinking water supply. The delineation of protection zones in fractured aquifers is a challenging task due to the heterogeneity and anisotropy of hydraulic conductivities, which makes difficult prediction of groundwater flow organization and flow velocities. Different methods of intrinsic groundwater vulnerability mapping were applied in the Atemajac-Toluquilla groundwater body, an aquifers system that covers around 1300 km2. The aquifer supplies the 30% of urban water resources of the metropolitan area of Guadalajara (Mexico), where over 4.6 million people reside. Study area is located in a complex neotectonic active volcanic region in the Santiago River Basin (Western Mexico), which influences the aquifer system underneath the city. Previous works have defined the flow dynamics and identified the origin of recharge. In addition, the mixture of fresh groundwater with hydrothermal and polluted waters have been estimated. Two main aquifers compose the multilayer system. The upper aquifer is unconfined and consists of sediments and pyroclastic materials. Recharge of this aquifer comes from rainwater and ascending vertical fluids from the lower aquifer. The lower aquifer consists of fractured basalts of Pliocene age. Formerly, the main water source has been the upper unit, which is a porous and unconsolidated unit, which acts as a semi-isotropic aquifer. Intense groundwater usage has resulted in lowering the water table in the upper aquifer. Therefore, the current groundwater extraction is carried out from the deeper aquifer and underlying bedrock units, where fracture flow predominates. Pollution indicators have been reported in

  17. Geochemistry at the sulfate reduction-methanogenesis transition zone in an anoxic aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Rasmus; Cold, L.

    2007-01-01

    The study addresses a 10 m deep phreatic postglacial sandy aquifer of vertically varying lithology and horizontally varying infiltration water chemistry, displaying calcite dissolution, ion-exchange, and anaerobic redox processes. The simple variations in lithology and infiltration combine into a...... by implementing specific energy yields for the microbial redox processes, could explain most of the observed groundwater geochemistry as an expression of a closely coupled system of mineral equilibria and redox processes occurring at partial equilibrium....

  18. Animal and industrial waste anaerobic digestion: USA status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusk, P.D. [Resource Development Associates, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Pollutants from unmanaged animal and bio-based industrial wastes can degrade the environment, and methane emitted from decomposing wastes may contribute to global climate change. One waste management system prevents pollution and converts a disposal problem into a new profit center. Case studies of operating systems indicate that the anaerobic digestion of animal and industrial wastes is a commercially available bioconversion technology with considerable potential for providing profitable coproducts, including a cost-effective renewable fuel. Growth and concentration of the livestock industry create opportunities to properly dispose of the large quantities of manures generated at dairy, swine, and poultry farms. Beyond the farm, extension of the anaerobic digestion process to recover methane has considerable potential for certain classified industries - with a waste stream characterization similar to livestock manures. More than 35 example industries have been identified, and include processors of chemicals, fiber, food, meat, milk, and pharmaceuticals. Some of these industries already recover methane for energy. This status report examines some current opportunities for recovering methane from the anaerobic digestion of animal and industrial wastes in the US. Case studies of operating digesters, including project and maintenance histories, and the operator`s {open_quotes}lessons learned,{close_quotes} are included as a reality check. Factors necessary for successful projects, as well as a list of reasons explaining why some anaerobic digestion projects fail, are provided. The role of management is key; not only must digesters be well engineered and built with high-quality components, they must also be sited at facilities willing to incorporate the uncertainties of a new technology. Anaerobic digestion can provide monetary benefits and mitigate possible pollution problems, thereby sustaining development while maintaining environmental quality.

  19. New perspectives in anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lier, J.B.; Tilche, A.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær;

    2001-01-01

    requirements. In fact, most advances were achieved during the last three decades, when high-rate reactor systems were developed and a profound insight was obtained in the microbiology of the anaerobic communities. This insight led to a better understanding of anaerobic treatment and, subsequently, to a broader......The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern...

  20. [Physical process based risk assessment of groundwater pollution in the mining area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fa-Sheng; Cheng, Pin; Zhang, Bo

    2014-04-01

    Case studies of groundwater pollution risk assessment at home and abroad generally start from groundwater vulnerability, without considering the influence of characteristic pollutants on the consequences of pollution too much. Vulnerability is the natural sensitivity of the environment to pollutants. Risk assessment of groundwater pollution should reflect the movement and distribution of pollutants in groundwater. In order to improve the risk assessment theory and method of groundwater pollution, a physical process based risk assessment methodology for groundwater pollution was proposed in a mining area. According to the sensitivity of the economic and social conditions and the possible distribution of pollutants in the future, the spatial distribution of risk levels in aquifer was ranged before hand, and the pollutant source intensity corresponding to each risk level was deduced accordingly. By taking it as the criterion for the classification of groundwater pollution risk assessment, the groundwater pollution risk in the mining area was evaluated by simulating the migration of pollutants in the vadose zone and aquifer. The result show that the risk assessment method of groundwater pollution based on physical process can give the concentration distribution of pollutants and the risk level in the spatial and temporal. For single punctuate polluted area, it gives detailed risk characterization, which is better than the risk assessment method that based on aquifer intrinsic vulnerability index, and it is applicable to the risk assessment of existing polluted sites, optimizing the future sites and providing design parameters for the site construction.

  1. Comparing the value of bioproducts from different stages of anaerobic membrane bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M A; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Liu, Y W; Zhou, J L; Zhang, J; Liang, S; Ni, B J; Zhang, X B; Wang, J

    2016-08-01

    The anaerobic digestion process in anaerobic membrane bioreactors is an effective way for waste management, energy sustainability and pollution control in the environment. This digestion process basically involves the production of volatile fatty acids and biohydrogen as intermediate products and methane as a final product. This paper compares the value of bioproducts from different stages of anaerobic membrane bioreactors through a thorough assessment. The value was assessed in terms of technical feasibility, economic assessment, environmental impact and impact on society. Even though the current research objective is more inclined to optimize the production of methane, the intermediate products could also be considered as economically attractive and environment friendly options. Hence, this is the first review study to correlate the idea into an anaerobic membrane bioreactor which is expected to guide future research pathways regarding anaerobic process and its bioproducts. PMID:27233838

  2. Anaerobic Treatment of Agricultural Residues and Wastewater - Application of High-Rate Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Parawira, Wilson

    2004-01-01

    The production of methane via anaerobic digestion of agricultural residues and industrial wastewater would benefit society by providing a clean fuel from renewable feedstocks. This would reduce the use of fossil-fuel-derived energy and reduce environmental impact, including global warming and pollution. Limitation of carbon dioxide and other emissions through emission regulations, carbon taxes, and subsidies on biomass energy is making anaerobic digestion a more attractive and competitive tec...

  3. State Detection and Feedback Control of the Anaerobic Wastewater Treatment Using Fuzzy Logic

    OpenAIRE

    Murnleitner, Ernst

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic treatment of wastewater offers the advantage of the elimination of the main part of pollutants, which saves disposal charges. Compared to the aerobic technology, less sludge is formed, and energy is produced in the form of biogas. However, anaerobic treatment has also several drawbacks. These are the more difficult handling and the extreme long characteristical times, whereby particularly an overload can lead to a complete break-down of the plant. A restart takes weeks to months, wh...

  4. Timeline of bio-hydrogen production by anaerobic digestion of biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Bernadette E. TELEKY; Mugur C. BĂLAN; Nikolausz, Marcell

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of biomass is a process capable to produce biohydrogen, a clean source of alternative energy. Lignocellulosic biomass from agricultural waste is considered a renewable energy source; therefore its utilization also contributes to the reduction of water, soil and air pollution. The study consists in five consecutive experiments designed to utilize anaerobic bacterial enrichment cultures originating from the Hungarian Lake, Hévíz. Wheat straw was used as com...

  5. Winter meeting on ground water pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the winter meeting 1995 pollution from the most usual waste disposal sites was discussed: pesticides, chlorinated solvents, sanitary landfills and tar. Transport and biodegradation of pesticides and chlorinated solvents in soils, aquifers and ground water, and remediation means were considered on basis of the Danish and foreign experience. (EG)

  6. In situ biodegradation potential of aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic groundwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, D. W.; Barker, J. F.

    1992-04-01

    Three types of experiments were conducted to assess the potential for enhancing the in situ biodegradation of nine aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic, leachate-impacted aquifers at North Bay, Ontario, and at Canada Forces Base Borden. Laboratory micrososms containing authentic aquifer material and groundwater from the North Bay site were amended with nitrate and glucose. No significant losses of aromatic hydrocarbons were observed compared to unamended controls, over a period of 187 days. A total of eight in situ biodegradation columns were installed in the North Bay and Borden aquifers. Remedial additions included electron acceptors (nitrate and sulphate) and primary substrates (acetate, lactate and yeast extract). Six aromatic hydrocarbons [toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, o-xylene, cumene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene ( 1,2,4-TMB)] were completely degraded in at least one in situ column at the North Bay site. Only toluene was degraded in the Borden aquifer. In all cases, aromatic hydrocarbon attenuation was attributed to biodegradation by methanogenic and fermentative bacteria. No evidence of aromatic hydrocarbon degradation was observed in columns remediated with nitrate or primary substrates. A continuous forced gradient injection experiment with sulphate addition was conducted at the North Bay site over a period of 51 days. The concentration of six aromatic hydrocarbons was monitored over time in the injection wells and at piezometer fences located 2, 5 and 10 m downgradient. All compounds except toluene reached injection concentration between 14 and 26 days after pumping began, and showed some evidence of selective retardation. Toluene broke through at a subdued concentration (˜ 50% of injection levels), and eventually declined to undetectable levels on day 43. This attenuation was attributed to adaptation and biodegradation by anaerobic bacteria. The results from these experiments indicate that considerable anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in

  7. Anaerobic wastewater treatment using anaerobic baffled bioreactor: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Siti; Dahlan, Irvan

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is receiving renewed interest because it offers a means to treat wastewater with lower energy investment. Because the microorganisms involved grow more slowly, such systems require clever design so that the microbes have sufficient time with the substrate to complete treatment without requiring enormous reactor volumes. The anaerobic baffled reactor has inherent advantages over single compartment reactors due to its circulation pattern that approaches a plug flow reactor. The physical configuration of the anaerobic baffled reactor enables significant modifications to be made; resulting in a reactor which is proficient of treating complex wastewaters which presently require only one unit, ultimately significant reducing capital costs. This paper also concerns about mechanism, kinetic and hydrodynamic studies of anaerobic digestion for future application of the anaerobic baffled reactor for wastewater treatment.

  8. Molecular characterization of anaerobic dehalogenation by Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans

    OpenAIRE

    Smidt, H.

    2001-01-01

    Haloorganics such as chlorophenols and chlorinated ethenes are among the most abundant pollutants in soil, sediments and groundwater, mainly caused by past and present industrial and agricultural activities. Due to bioaccumulation and toxicity, these compounds threaten the integrity of the environment, and human and animal health. A recently discovered, phylogenetically diverse, group of anaerobic so-called halorespiring bacteria is able to couple the reductive dehalogenation of various haloo...

  9. Degradation of BTEX by anaerobic bacteria: physiology and application

    OpenAIRE

    Weelink, S.A.B.; Eekert, van, M.H.A.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Pollution of the environment with aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (so-called BTEX) is often observed. The cleanup of these toxic compounds has gained much attention in the last decades. In situ bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons contaminated soils and groundwater by naturally occurring microorganisms or microorganisms that are introduced is possible. Anaerobic bioremediation is an attractive technology as these compounds are often present in the a...

  10. Deploying anaerobic digesters: Current status and future possibilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusk, P. [International Energy Agency, Paris (France); Wheeler, P. [ETSU (United Kingdom); Rivard, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Unmanaged pollutants from putrescible farm, industrial, and municipal wastes degrade in the environment, and methane emitted from their decomposition may contribute to global climate change. Under modern environmental regulations, these wastes are becoming difficult to dispose of using traditional means. One waste management system, anaerobic digestion or AD, not only provides pollution prevention but can also convert a disposal problem into a new profit center. This report is drawn from a special session of the Second Biomass Conference of the Americas. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. Anaerobic Digestion of Piggery Waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velsen, van A.F.M.

    1981-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological process by which organic matter is converted to methane and carbon dioxide by microbes in the absence of air (oxygen). In nature, anaerobic conversions occur at all places where organic material accumulates and the supply of oxygen is deficient, e.g. in marshes an

  12. Integrating the Sciences to Investigate Groundwater Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Julie R.; Madden, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    Investigations that integrate concepts from geological sciences with biology and chemistry are rare. The authors present an investigation that introduces high school students to microbe-mineral interactions by tying together anaerobic respiration, reduction reactions, metal ion solubility, and groundwater pollution. During the investigation,…

  13. Alluvial and bedrock aquifers of the Denver Basin; eastern Colorado's dual ground-water resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Stanley G.

    1989-01-01

    not exceeded 40 feet. By contrast, only 9 percent of the water pumped from wells is obtained from the bedrock aquifer, yet water-level declines in this aquifer have exceeded 500 feet in some areas. Depth to water in the alluvial aquifer generally is less than 40 feet, while depth to water in the bedrock aquifer may exceed 1,000 feet in some areas. Cost of pumping water to the surface and cost of maintaining existing supplies in areas of rapidly declining water levels in the bedrock aquifer affect water use. Water use is also affected by the generally poorer quality water found in the alluvial aquifer and, to a lesser extent, by the greater susceptibility of the alluvial aquifer to pollution from surface sources. Because of these factors, the alluvial aquifer is used primarily as a source of irrigation supply, which is the largest water use in the area. The bedrock aquifer is used primarily as a source of domestic or municipal supply, which is the smaller of the two principal uses, even though the bedrock aquifer contains 50 times more stored ground water than the alluvial aquifer.

  14. Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in the states of Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, and...

  15. (SUPERCEDED) High Plains aquifer (SUPERCEDED)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the High Plains aquifer in the states of South Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas....

  16. Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the Southeastern Coastal Plain aquifer system in Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina.

  17. Region 9 Sole Source Aquifers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — There are 7 polygons representing 6 individual sole source aquifer boundaries and one streamflow source area in California, Arizona, and Nevada. Various efforts...

  18. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized aquifer boundaries for the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma. The Enid isolated terrace aquifer covers...

  19. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Elk City aquifer in western Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized aquifer boundaries for the Elk City aquifer in western Oklahoma. The aquifer covers an area of approximately 193,000 acres and...

  20. Anaerobic fungal populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of molecular techniques has greatly broadened our view of microbial diversity and enabled a more complete detection and description of microbial communities. The application of these techniques provides a simple means of following community changes, for example, Ishii et al. described transient and more stable inhabitants in another dynamic microbial system, compost. Our present knowledge of anaerobic gut fungal population diversity within the gastrointestinal tract is based upon isolation, cultivation and observations in vivo. It is likely that there are many species yet to be described, some of which may be non-culturable. We have observed a distinct difference in the ease of cultivation between the different genera, for example, Caecomyes isolates are especially difficult to isolate and maintain in vitro, a feature that is likely to result in the under representation of this genera in culture-based enumerations. The anaerobic gut fungi are the only known obligately anaerobic fungi. For the majority of their life cycles, they are found tightly associated with solid digesta in the rumen and/or hindgut. They produce potent fibrolytic enzymes and grow invasively on and into the plant material they are digesting making them important contributors to fibre digestion. This close association with intestinal digesta has made it difficult to accurately determine the amount of fungal biomass present in the rumen, with Orpin suggesting 8% contribution to the total microbial biomass, whereas Rezaeian et al. more recently gave a value of approximately 20%. It is clear that the rumen microbial complement is affected by dietary changes, and that the fungi are more important in digestion in the rumens of animals fed with high-fibre diets. It seems likely that the gut fungi play an important role within the rumen as primary colonizers of plant fibre, and so we are particularly interested in being able to measure the appearance and diversity of fungi on the plant

  1. Recovery of energetically overexploited urban aquifers using surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Sánchez-Navarro, José Ángel; Mateo Lázaro, Jesús

    2015-12-01

    Shallow aquifers have an important role in reducing greenhouse gases through helping manage the temperature of urban environments. Nevertheless, the uncontrolled rapid use of shallow groundwater resources to heat or cool urban environments can cause thermal pollution that will limit the long term sustainability of the resource. Therefore, there is a need for appropriate mitigation/remediation strategies capable of recovering energetically overexploited aquifers. In this work, a novel remediation strategy based on surface water recharge into aquifers is presented. To evaluate the capabilities of such measures for effective remediation, this strategy is optimized for a management problem raised in the overheated "Urban Alluvial Aquifer of Zaragoza" (Spain). The application of a transient groundwater flow and heat transport model under 512 different mitigation scenarios has enabled to quantify and discuss the magnitude of the remediation effect as a respond to injection rates of surface water, seasonal schedule of the injection and location of injection. The quantification of the relationship between these variables together with the evaluation of the amount of surface water injected per year in each scenario proposed have provided a better understanding of the system processes and an optimal management alternative. This work also makes awareness of the magnitude of the remediation procedure which is in an order of magnitude of tenths of years.

  2. Regional Variation of CH4 and N2 Production Processes in the Deep Aquifers of an Accretionary Prism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Makoto; Ishikawa, Shugo; Nagai, Kazushige; Hirata, Yuichiro; Ozawa, Kunio; Mitsunobu, Satoshi; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Accretionary prisms are mainly composed of ancient marine sediment scraped from the subducting oceanic plate at a convergent plate boundary. Large amounts of anaerobic groundwater and natural gas, mainly methane (CH4) and nitrogen gas (N2), are present in the deep aquifers associated with an accretionary prism; however, the origins of these gases are poorly understood. We herein revealed regional variations in CH4 and N2 production processes in deep aquifers in the accretionary prism in Southwest Japan, known as the Shimanto Belt. Stable carbon isotopic and microbiological analyses suggested that CH4 is produced through the non-biological thermal decomposition of organic matter in the deep aquifers in the coastal area near the convergent plate boundary, whereas a syntrophic consortium of hydrogen (H2)-producing fermentative bacteria and H2-utilizing methanogens contributes to the significant production of CH4 observed in deep aquifers in midland and mountainous areas associated with the accretionary prism. Our results also demonstrated that N2 production through the anaerobic oxidation of organic matter by denitrifying bacteria is particularly prevalent in deep aquifers in mountainous areas in which groundwater is affected by rainfall. PMID:27592518

  3. Anaerobic biodesulfurization of thiophenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcelis, C.L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Distillates from crude oil such as diesel and fuel oil may contain significant amounts of dibenzothiophenes and their alkylated derivatives, containing organically bound sulfur. Combustion of those fossil fuels leads to the release of polluting sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere, where it causes 'ac

  4. Environmental assessment of the potential effects of aquifer thermal energy storage systems on microorganisms in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, R.J.; Stewart, D.L.

    1988-03-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the potential environmental effects (both adverse and beneficials) of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) technology pertaining to microbial communities indigenous to subsurface environments (i.e., aquifers) and the propagation, movement, and potential release of pathogenic microorganisms (specifically, Legionella) within ATES systems. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in aquifers shows great promise to reduce peak demand; reduce electric utility load problems; contribute to establishing favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems; and reduce pollution from extraction, refining, and combustion of fossil fuels. However, concerns that the widespread implementation of this technology may have adverse effects on biological systems indigeneous to aquifers, as well as help to propagate and release pathogenic organisms that enter thee environments need to be resolved. 101 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Risk assesment of an urban aquifer based on environmental tracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branka Trček

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater from a Pleistocene sandy-gravel aquifer is a drinking water resource for the Union brewery, located nearthe centre of Ljubljana (Slovenia. A large part of the aquifer recharge area is highly urbanized, which represents a greatrisk for the groundwater quality assurance. The groundwater dating techniques were used to study the contaminationrisk of this drinking-water resource. The application of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs, sulphur hexafluoride (SF6 andtritium-helium-3 (3H-3He age indicator was tested, as they haven’t been used in Slovene urban areas so far. The resultsreflect that the 3H-3He dating technique is the most suitable for a groundwater age determination in the study urbanaquifer, since SF6 and particularly CFCs concentrations could be affected by the local contaminations. They indicatedthat average groundwater residence times range from 10 to 30 years. Boreholes that are more distant from the Ši{enskihrib hill are more vulnerable to contamination due to flow of young groundwater from a direction of the main aquifer,which is exposed to the urban pollution. The presented results were supplemented with chemical investigations ofgroundwater organic pollutants. An unknown trace organic pollutant with a base ion mass-to-charge ratio 147 was putinto focus. Its identification based on chromatographic separation and a mass spectrometric detection with GC-MS,LC-MS and LC-TOF MS techniques. The newly detected trace organic pollutant in sampled groundwater representstogether with the 3H and 3He data a new technique to study the flow paths and contaminant transport in the urbanaquifer in both, the lateral and vertical directions.

  6. Water pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Institute, Marine

    2013-01-01

    Students will learn about what causes water pollution and how to be environmentally aware. *Note: Students should understand the concept of the water cycle before moving onto water pollution (see Lesson Plan “Oceans all Around Us”).

  7. Evaluation of ethyl tert-butyl ether biodegradation in a contaminated aquifer by compound-specific isotope analysis and in situ microcosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombach, Petra, E-mail: petra.bombach@ufz.de [UFZ – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Isodetect GmbH Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5b, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Nägele, Norbert [Kuvier the Biotech Company S.L., Ctra. N-I, p.k. 234–P.E. INBISA 23" a, E-09001 Burgos (Spain); Rosell, Mònica [UFZ – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Grup de Mineralogia Aplicada i Medi Ambient, Departament de Cristallografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona (UB), C/Martí i Franquès s/n, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Richnow, Hans H. [UFZ – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Permoserstrasse 15, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Fischer, Anko [Isodetect GmbH Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5b, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • In situ biodegradation of ETBE was investigated in a fuel contaminated aquifer. • Degradation was studied by CSIA and in situ microcosms in combination with TLFA-SIP. • ETBE was degraded when ETBE was the main groundwater contaminant. • ETBE was also degraded in the presence of BTEX and MTBE. • Hydrochemical analysis indicated aerobic and anaerobic ETBE biodegradation. - Abstract: Ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) is an upcoming groundwater pollutant in Europe whose environmental fate has been less investigated, thus far. In the present study, we investigated the in situ biodegradation of ETBE in a fuel-contaminated aquifer using compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA), and in situ microcosms in combination with total lipid fatty acid (TLFA)-stable isotope probing (SIP). In a first field investigation, CSIA revealed insignificant carbon isotope fractionation, but low hydrogen isotope fractionation of up to +14‰ along the prevailing anoxic ETBE plume suggesting biodegradation of ETBE. Ten months later, oxygen injection was conducted to enhance the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) at the field site. Within the framework of this remediation measure, in situ microcosms loaded with [{sup 13}C{sub 6}]-ETBE (BACTRAP{sup ®}s) were exposed for 119 days in selected groundwater wells to assess the biodegradation of ETBE by TLFA-SIP under the following conditions: (i) ETBE as main contaminant; (ii) ETBE as main contaminant subjected to oxygen injection; (iii) ETBE plus other PH; (iv) ETBE plus other PH subjected to oxygen injection. Under all conditions investigated, significant {sup 13}C-incorporation into microbial total lipid fatty acids extracted from the in situ microcosms was found, providing clear evidence of ETBE biodegradation.

  8. In situ biorestoration of contaminated aquifers and hazardous waste sites in Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Texas is one of the nation's most polluted states, and its aquifers are at risk from contamination by numerous industrial and hazardous waste sites (Texas Water Commission, 1989). Because ground water supplies a significant amount of drinking water for the state, contamination of Texas aquifer is a major concern. One method that is sometimes used to remediate contaminated ground water and subsurface materials is in situ bioremediation (ISB). This paper discusses ISB and its potential application to remediate ground water and subsurface materials in Texas. To assess application of ISB in Texas, aquifer characteristics and ground water to pollution as well as the location of possible contamination sources are determined to locate those areas of the state that are at risk from ground water contamination

  9. Air Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, K.; And Others

    Pollution of the general environment, which exposes an entire population group for an indeterminate period of time, certainly constitutes a problem in public health. Serious aid pollution episodes have resulted in increased mortality and a possible relationship between chronic exposure to a polluted atmosphere and certain diseases has been…

  10. Heat Transport Modeling in an Aquifer Downgradient a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajandrea Sethi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat generation inside municipal solid waste (MSW landfills is due to aerobic and anaerobic exothermic reactions occurring inside the waste. The result of heat generation and transport inside sanitary landfill leads to a temperature field that varies from mesophylic range (optimum at 30 40 °C to thermophylic range (optimum at 50-60 °C. Due to high temperatures at the bottom of the landfill, liner systems can be severely damaged. The increment in convective and conductive heat transport could lead to an increase of the temperature in the surrounding geological layers and in the underlying aquifer. Hydrodynamic thermodispersion and convection are the most important mechanisms of heat transport in saturated porous medium with a moving fluid such as aquifer systems. The aim of the study is to model and investigate the origin of a thermal anomaly in the aquifer underneath a municipal landfill in the North of Italy. In order to model the system a detailed experimental analysis was conducted inside the landfill, measuring the temperature of the biogas and leachate, and in the aquifer system measuring the temperature in monitoring wells and conducting a constant rate pumping test. Heat transport model has been exploited using the analogy between heat and mass transport in porous media. The model showed that the thermal anomaly is due to convective and conductive heat transport from the landfill to the aquifer.

  11. Degradation of BTEX compounds under iron-reducing conditions in contaminated aquifer microcosms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Botton; J.R. Parsons

    2006-01-01

    The potential for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) degradation was investigated in microcosms inoculated with sediment and groundwater from a polluted iron reducing aquifer. Benzene, toluene, and each of the three xylene isomers were degraded by the intrinsic microorganisms under i

  12. ADAPTATIONS OF INDIGENOUS BACTERIA TO FUEL CONTAMINATION IN KARST AQUIFERS IN SOUTH-CENTRAL KENTUCKY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byl, Thomas D.; Metge, David W.; Daniel T. Agymang,; Bradley, Michael W.; Hileman, Gregg; Harvey, Ronald W.

    2014-01-01

    The karst aquifer systems in southern Kentucky can be dynamic and quick to change. Microorganisms that live in these unpredictable aquifers are constantly faced with environmental changes. Their survival depends upon adaptations to changes in water chemistry, taking advantage of positive stimuli and avoiding negative environmental conditions. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in 2001 to determine the capability of bacteria to adapt in two distinct regions of water quality in a karst aquifer, an area of clean, oxygenated groundwater and an area where the groundwater was oxygen depleted and contaminated by jet fuel. Water samples containing bacteria were collected from one clean well and two jet fuel contaminated wells in a conduit-dominated karst aquifer. Bacterial concentrations, enumerated through direct count, ranged from 500,000 to 2.7 million bacteria per mL in the clean portion of the aquifer, and 200,000 to 3.2 million bacteria per mL in the contaminated portion of the aquifer over a twelve month period. Bacteria from the clean well ranged in size from 0.2 to 2.5 mm, whereas bacteria from one fuel-contaminated well were generally larger, ranging in size from 0.2 to 3.9 mm. Also, bacteria collected from the clean well had a higher density and, consequently, were more inclined to sink than bacteria collected from contaminated wells. Bacteria collected from the clean portion of the karst aquifer were predominantly (,95%) Gram-negative and more likely to have flagella present than bacteria collected from the contaminated wells, which included a substantial fraction (,30%) of Gram-positive varieties. The ability of the bacteria from the clean portion of the karst aquifer to biodegrade benzene and toluene was studied under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in laboratory microcosms. The rate of fuel biodegradation in laboratory studies was approximately 50 times faster under aerobic conditions as compared to anaerobic, sulfur-reducing conditions. The

  13. Molecular analysis of microbial community in a groundwater sample polluted by landfill leachate and seawater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yang-jie; YANG Hong; WU Xiu-juan; LI Dao-tang

    2005-01-01

    Seashore landfill aquifers are environments of special physicochemical conditions (high organic load and high salinity), and microbes in leachate-polluted aquifers play a significant role for intrinsic bioremediation. In order to characterize microbial diversity and look for clues on the relationship between microbial community structure and hydrochemistry, a culture-independent examination of a typical groundwater sample obtained from a seashore landfill was conducted by sequence analysis of 16S rDNA clone library. Two sets of universal 16S rDNA primers were used to amplify DNA extracted from the groundwater so that problems arising from primer efficiency and specificity could be reduced. Of 74 clones randomly selected from the libraries, 30 contained unique sequences whose analysis showed that the majority of them belonged to bacteria (95.9%), with Proteobacteria (63.5%) being the dominant division. One archaeal sequence and one eukaryotic sequence were found as well. Bacterial sequences belonging to the following phylogenic groups were identified: Bacteroidetes (20.3%), β, γ, δ and ε-subdivisions of Proteobacteria (47.3%, 9.5%, 5.4% and 1.3%, respectively), Firmicutes (1.4%), Actinobacteria (2.7%), Cyanobacteria (2.7%). The percentages of Proteobacteria and Bacteroides in seawater were greater than those in the groundwater from a non-seashore landfill, indicating a possible influence of seawater. Quite a few sequences had close relatives in marine or hypersaline environments. Many sequences showed affiliations with microbes involved in anaerobic fermentation. The remarkable abundance of sequences related to (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria (C1RB) in the groundwater was significant and worthy of further study.

  14. Constraining nitrogen cycling hotspots in contaminated aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Naomi; Knoeller, Kay

    2014-05-01

    Accurate assessments of the fate of inorganic nitrogen (N) in groundwater are needed in order to mitigate the threat that ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-) pose to water quality and the long-term health of down-gradient ecosystems. However, such assessments are currently limited by difficulties in measuring the biological attenuation (via either denitrification or anaerobic ammonia oxidation (anammox)) of these reactive species in-situ. Based on the knowledge that both of these processes can create unique fractionation patterns in the residual N pools, the objective of this research was to build a template for identifying and quantifying N removal hotspots within complex aquifers using isofluxes. The variations in concentration and isotopic abundance of multiple dissolved inorganic N species (δ15N of NH4+, and δ15N and δ18O of NO2- and NO3-) were measured in 100 wells across two contaminated megasites in Western Europe. The sampling locations were selected span the NH4+ (the dominant N form in both sites) concentration gradient (0 to 900 mg NH4+-N l-1) over depth and distance, which coincided with gradients in co-contaminants BTEX and sulphate of 0 to 5 mg l-1 4 to 11000 mg l-1, respectively. Although NO2- is a key component of both anaerobic and aerobic ammonium oxidation, it is rarely detected in groundwater. Yet, by analysing for it on-site, we found that NO2- concentrations reached up to 0.7 mg NO2-N l-1 and had a highly sensitive isotopic composition (mean of -5 ±23o (δ15N) and +11 ±12o (δ18O)). The largest NO2- concentrations coincided with those of NH4+ levels, meaning that attenuation fluxes could be partitioned between anammox and denitrification using simple isotope mass balance calculations based on Rayleigh type isotope fractionation and established nitrate (δ15N and δ18O) isotope dynamics during denitrification. The constraints on N attenuation within these complex hydrological and chemical setting created by overlaying isoflux maps for each

  15. Saturated thickness, High Plains aquifer, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster data set represents the saturated thickness of the High Plains aquifer of the United States, 2009, in feet. The High Plains aquifer underlies...

  16. As contamination in Mercedes aquifer groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is about the quality of the groundwater an the arsenic content in different aquifers in Uruguay. The first data obtained of arsenic concentrations are from subterranes water in the Mercedes aquifers

  17. National Sole Source Aquifer GIS Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data set contains indexes and Esri shape files of boundaries of the designated sole source aquifers and related aquifer boundaries. Data provide a vector...

  18. Genomic and Physiological Characterization of the Chromate-Reducing, Aquifer-Derived Firmicute Pelosinus sp. Strain HCF1

    OpenAIRE

    Beller, Harry R.; Han, Ruyang; Karaoz, Ulas; Lim, HsiaoChien; Eoin L. Brodie

    2013-01-01

    Pelosinus spp. are fermentative firmicutes that were recently reported to be prominent members of microbial communities at contaminated subsurface sites in multiple locations. Here we report metabolic characteristics and their putative genetic basis in Pelosinus sp. strain HCF1, an isolate that predominated anaerobic, Cr(VI)-reducing columns constructed with aquifer sediment. Strain HCF1 ferments lactate to propionate and acetate (the methylmalonyl-coenzyme A [CoA] pathway was identified in t...

  19. Potential use of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in anaerobic co-digestion with wastewater in submerged anaerobic membrane technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moñino, P; Jiménez, E; Barat, R; Aguado, D; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2016-10-01

    Food waste was characterized for its potential use as substrate for anaerobic co-digestion in a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor pilot plant that treats urban wastewater (WW). 90% of the particles had sizes under 0.5mm after grinding the food waste in a commercial food waste disposer. COD, nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were 100, 2 and 20 times higher in food waste than their average concentrations in WW, but the relative flow contribution of both streams made COD the only pollutant that increased significantly when both substrates were mixed. As sulphate concentration in food waste was in the same range as WW, co-digestion of both substrates would increase the COD/SO4-S ratio and favour methanogenic activity in anaerobic treatments. The average methane potential of the food waste was 421±15mLCH4g(-1)VS, achieving 73% anaerobic biodegradability. The anaerobic co-digestion of food waste with WW is expected to increase methane production 2.9-fold. The settleable solids tests and the particle size distribution analyses confirmed that both treatment lines of a conventional WWTP (water and sludge lines) would be clearly impacted by the incorporation of food waste into its influent. Anaerobic processes are therefore preferred over their aerobic counterparts due to their ability to valorise the high COD content to produce biogas (a renewable energy) instead of increasing the energetic costs associated with the aeration process for aerobic COD oxidation.

  20. Anaerobic biodegradation of organochlorine pesticides in contaminated soil - Significance of temperature and availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baczynski, T.H.; Pleissner, D.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic biodegradation of the pesticides: ¿-hexachlorocyclohexane, methoxychlor, o,p'- and p,p'-DDT in field polluted soil was tested at 12, 22 and 30 °C, using methanogenic granular sludge as inoculum. The contaminants were removed quite effectively at all temperatures and their removal rates inc

  1. Anaerobic treatment of sulfate-containing wastewater from distilleries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioprocess evaluation of a staged arrangement of a Pulse Driven Loop Reaktor (PDLR) and a Pulsed Anaerobic Filter (PAF) using highly polluted cherry slops as industrial wastewater shows a COD removal efficiency of 80-90% at loading rates of 8-4 kg COD/(M3.d). Contamination of cherry slops by sulfate (2 g/l) and copper (150-200 mg/l) reduces COD degradation to 40-50 percent. A pulsed anaerobic baffled reactor was envisaged as a corrective tool to improve mineralisation in the presence of sulfate-rich substrates by confining sulfate reducing bacteria to the first 4 chambers of the reactor. Phasing slightly improves COD degradation yield, but is not sufficient for stable process performance. Consequently, the use of lactic acid in stead of sulfuric acid in cherry-fermentation was suggested as a preventive method to avoid sulphide-induced digester failure. (orig.)

  2. Enviormental Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Kanika Saini; Dr. Sona Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Environment Pollution is one of the greatest problems today which is increasing with every passing year and causing crucial and severe damage to the earth. It has become a real problem since the beginning of the industrial revolution. It is the contamination of physical and biological components of the Earth / atmosphere system to such an extent that normal environmental processes are harmed. Pollution of the environment consists of five main types of pollution, namely air, water,...

  3. Chemical controls on abiotic and biotic release of geogenic arsenic from Pleistocene aquifer sediments to groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillispie, Elizabeth C; Andujar, Erika; Polizzotto, Matthew L

    2016-08-10

    Over 150 million people in South and Southeast Asia consume unsafe drinking water from arsenic-rich Holocene aquifers. Although use of As-free water from Pleistocene aquifers is a potential mitigation strategy, such aquifers are vulnerable to geogenic As pollution, placing millions more people at potential risk. The goal of this research was to define chemical controls on abiotic and biotic release of geogenic As to groundwater. Batch incubations of sediments with natural chemical variability from a Pleistocene aquifer in Cambodia were conducted to evaluate how interactions among arsenic, manganese and iron oxides, and dissolved and sedimentary organic carbon influenced As mobilization from sediments. The addition of labile dissolved organic carbon produced the highest concentrations of dissolved As after >7 months, as compared to sediment samples incubated with sodium azide or without added carbon, and the extent of As release was positively correlated with the percent of initial extractable Mn released from the sediments. The mode of As release was impacted by the source of DOC supplied to the sediments, with biological processes responsible for 81% to 85% of the total As release following incubations with lactate and acetate but only up to 43% to 61% of the total As release following incubations with humic and fulvic acids. Overall, cycling of key redox-active elements and organic-carbon reactivity govern the potential for geogenic As release to groundwater, and results here may be used to formulate better predictions of the arsenic pollution potential of aquifers in South and Southeast Asia. PMID:27463026

  4. Characterization of polluted sites. Assessment of pollutant behaviour and transfer in mediums; Caracterisation des sites pollues. L`evaluation du comportement et du transfert des polluants dans les milieux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goubier, R. [Agence de l`Environnement et de la Maitrise de l`Energie, 75 - Paris (France); Chassagnac, T. [CSD Azur (France); Schlegel, T. [ATE, (France); Coste, B. [ANTEA, (France)

    1996-12-31

    After a presentation of methods and tools for the basic and extensive characterization of polluted sites and the study of evolution and transfer of current organic pollutants in the ground, the example of the rehabilitation of an old Rhone-Poulenc site (at Chauny, France) polluted with metals and arsenic, is described: soil and aquifer diagnosis, risk analysis and determination of migration schemes

  5. Attenuation capacity of a coastal aquifer under managed recharge by reclaimed wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, George; Dokou, Zoi; Tzoraki, Ourania; Gaganis, Petros; Karatzas, George

    2013-08-01

    Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) is becoming an increasingly attractive water management option, especially in semiarid areas. Nevertheless, field studies on the fate and transport of priority substances, heavy metals and pharmaceutical products within the recharged aquifer are rare. Based on the above, the objective of this project is to study the hydrological conditions of the coastal aquifer of Ezousa (Cyprus) and its ability to attenuate pollutants. The Ezousa riverbed is a locally important aquifer used for a MAR project where treated effluent from the Paphos Waste Water Treatment Plant is recharged into the aquifer through a number of artificial ponds along the riverbed. Additionally, groundwater is pumped for irrigation purposes from wells located nearby. The hydrological conditions of the area are unique due to the construction of the Kannaviou dam in 2005 that reduced natural recharge of the Ezousa aquifer significantly, inducing the saltwater intrusion phenomenon. A three-dimensional finite element model of the area was constructed using the FEFLOW software to simulate the groundwater flow conditions and transport of Phosphorous and cooper in the subsurface from the recharge process. The model was calibrated using hydraulic head and chemical data for the time period of 2002-2011. The groundwater model was coupled with a geochemical model PHREEQC attempting to evaluate nitrate and Copper processes. Inverse modeling calculation was used to determine sets of moles transfers of phases that are attributed to the water composition change in groundwater between the mixture of natural groundwater and reclaimed wastewater and the final water composition.

  6. Inibição de lodo biológico anaeróbio por constituintes de efluente de laboratório de controle de poluição Inhibition of anaerobic biological sludge by effluent constituents of pollution control laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa de Carvalho Alves

    2005-09-01

    of H2SO4, containing heavy metals such as chromium, silver and mercury and organic compounds as phenol. The presence of these elements in the laboratory effluent can cause inhibition of the biological activity, especially in the anaerobic treatment processes due to the sensitivity of the methanogens to some chemical compounds. This work had as objective to characterize the effluent from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro Chemistry School Environmental Technology Laboratory (LTA/UFRJ and to determine which constituents of the effluent one would be inhibitors for anaerobic microorganisms in the treatment of the sewage generated in the campus. The effluent one presents a weekly average production of 43.4 L, with pH = 0.7, COD = 1350 mg/L, sulfate = 33500 mg/L; 28.2 mg Hg/L; 82.1 mg Cr total/L; 30.8 mg Cu/L; 57.4 mg Fe total/L; 16.2 mg Al/L and 2.44 g Na/L. The parameters analyzed presented high variability as the study was conducted in function of the analyses and researches carried out in that period. In experimental design performed, the elements sodium, chromium, phenol and sulfate, as well as the interactions sulfate-mercury and sulfate-sodium, were significantly more effective on the inhibition of the specific methanogenic activity (SMA. The effects of the other elements (cupper, mercury, aluminum and iron, analyzed alone and their interactions were not significant for a confidence level of 95% in the t-Student distribution. The results indicate the necessity of a specific treatment for the laboratory effluent, since universities must be examples of combating pollution and encouraging the environmental control.

  7. On Pollution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘磊

    2005-01-01

    Long long ago,our world was very beautiful, there were trees, flowers,rivers ... they were very clean and tidy.But now, the hillsarenrt green, the rivers aren't clean,the fish has died. Pollution is becoming more and more serious all over the world. We are living in a polluted environment which is bad forour health.

  8. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  9. Performance of the In Situ Microcosm Technique for Measuring the Degradation of Organic Chemicals in Aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per H.; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    An in situ microcosm (ISM) consists of a stainless steel cylinder isolating about 2 L of the aquifer and is equipped with valves allowing for loading and sampling from the ground surface. During the last five years, this technique has been used frequently to study the degradation of organic...... chemicals in polluted and pristine aquifers representing different redox environments. The ISM technique has great potential for providing field-relevant degradation potentials and rate constants, but care must be taken in using the equipment and interpreting the results. This paper provides details...

  10. Anaerobic Digestion of Piggery Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Velsen, van, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological process by which organic matter is converted to methane and carbon dioxide by microbes in the absence of air (oxygen). In nature, anaerobic conversions occur at all places where organic material accumulates and the supply of oxygen is deficient, e.g. in marshes and lake sediments. Microbial formation of methane also plays a role in the ruminant digestion.In digestion units, the external conditions acting upon the process can be regulated to speed it up as c...

  11. Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria have lagged behind similar studies in aerobes. However, the current interest in biotechnology, the involvement of anaerobes in disease and the emergence of antibioticresistant strains have focused attention on the genetics of anaerobes. This article reviews molecular genetic studies in Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and methanogens. Certain genetic systems in some anaerobes differ from those in aerobes and illustrate the genetic diversity among bacteria

  12. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of methane gas migration from decommissioned hydrocarbon production wells into shallow aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, N.; Molson, J.; Lemieux, J.-M.; Van Stempvoort, D.; Nowamooz, A.

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations are used to provide insight into the behavior of methane as it migrates from a leaky decommissioned hydrocarbon well into a shallow aquifer. The conceptual model includes gas-phase migration from a leaky well, dissolution into groundwater, advective-dispersive transport and biodegradation of the dissolved methane plume. Gas-phase migration is simulated using the DuMux multiphase simulator, while transport and fate of the dissolved phase is simulated using the BIONAPL/3D reactive transport model. Methane behavior is simulated for two conceptual models: first in a shallow confined aquifer containing a decommissioned leaky well based on a monitored field site near Lindbergh, Alberta, Canada, and secondly on a representative unconfined aquifer based loosely on the Borden, Ontario, field site. The simulations show that the Lindbergh site confined aquifer data are generally consistent with a 2 year methane leak of 2-20 m3/d, assuming anaerobic (sulfate-reducing) methane oxidation and with maximum oxidation rates of 1 × 10-5 to 1 × 10-3 kg/m3/d. Under the highest oxidation rate, dissolved methane decreased from solubility (110 mg/L) to the threshold concentration of 10 mg/L within 5 years. In the unconfined case with the same leakage rate, including both aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidation, the methane plume was less extensive compared to the confined aquifer scenarios. Unconfined aquifers may therefore be less vulnerable to impacts from methane leaks along decommissioned wells. At other potential leakage sites, site-specific data on the natural background geochemistry would be necessary to make reliable predictions on the fate of methane in groundwater.

  13. The phenomenon of granulation of anaerobic sludge.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshoff Pol, L.W.

    1989-01-01

    Successful high-rate anaerobic wastewater treatment can only be accomplished when the slowgrowing anaerobic biomass is efficiently held back in the anaerobic treatment system. This biomass retention can be achieved in various ways including immobilization of the organisms on fixed materials and immo

  14. Viscosity evolution of anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pevere, A.; Guibaud, G.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.; Baudu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the apparent viscosity at steady shear rate of sieved anaerobic granular sludge (20¿315 ¿m diameter) sampled from different full-scale anaerobic reactors was recorded using rotation tests. The ¿limit viscosity¿ of sieved anaerobic granular sludge was determined from the apparent vis

  15. Kinetics and modeling of anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion modeling started in the early 1970s when the need for design and efficient operation of anaerobic systems became evident. At that time not only was the knowledge about the complex process of anaerobic digestion inadequate but also there were computational limitations. Thus, th...

  16. Mathematical Modelling of Cassava Wastewater Treatment Using Anaerobic Baffled Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    A.O. Ibeje

    2013-01-01

    The performance of an anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) was evaluated in the treatment of cassava wastewater as a pollutant residue. An ABR divided in four equal volume compartments (total volume 4L) and operated at 35°C was used in cassava wastewater treatment. Feed tank chemical oxygen demand (COD) was varied from 2000 to 7000mg L-1. The objective of the study was to formulate an improved mathematical model to describe cassava wastewater treatment without taking into account its inhibition ch...

  17. Both Phosphorus Fertilizers and Indigenous Bacteria Enhance Arsenic Release into Groundwater in Arsenic-Contaminated Aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Wei, Chia-Cheng; Huang, Chi-Wei; Chang, Chun-Han; Hsu, Fu-Lan; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2016-03-23

    Arsenic (As) is a human carcinogen, and arsenic contamination in groundwater is a worldwide public health concern. Arsenic-affected areas are found in many places but are reported mostly in agricultural farmlands, yet the interaction of fertilizers, microorganisms, and arsenic mobilization in arsenic-contaminated aquifers remains uncharacterized. This study investigates the effects of fertilizers and bacteria on the mobilization of arsenic in two arsenic-contaminated aquifers. We performed microcosm experiments using arsenic-contaminated sediments and amended with inorganic nitrogenous or phosphorus fertilizers for 1 and 4 months under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The results show that microcosms amended with 100 mg/L phosphorus fertilizers (dipotassium phosphate), but not nitrogenous fertilizers (ammonium sulfate), significantly increase aqueous As(III) release in arsenic-contaminated sediments under anaerobic condition. We also show that concentrations of iron, manganese, potassium, sodium, calcium, and magnesium are increased in the aqueous phase and that the addition of dipotassium phosphate causes a further increase in aqueous iron, potassium, and sodium, suggesting that multiple metal elements may take part in the arsenic release process. Furthermore, microbial analysis indicates that the dominant microbial phylum is shifted from α-proteobacteria to β- and γ-proteobacteria when the As(III) is increased and phosphate is added in the aquifer. Our results provide evidence that both phosphorus fertilizers and microorganisms can mediate the release of arsenic to groundwater in arsenic-contaminated sediments under anaerobic condition. Our study suggests that agricultural activity such as the use of fertilizers and monitoring phosphate concentration in groundwater should be taken into consideration for the management of arsenic in groundwater.

  18. Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, A S; Dhagat, N N

    2001-04-01

    Biological treatment of wastewater basically reduces the pollutant concentration through microbial coagulation and removal of non-settleable organic colloidal solids. Organic matter is biologically stabilized so that no further oxygen demand is exerted by it. The biological treatment requires contact of the biomass with the substrate. Various advances and improvements in anaerobic reactors to achieve variations in contact time and method of contact have resulted in development of in suspended growth systems, attached growth or fixed film systems or combinations thereof. Although anaerobic systems for waste treatment have been used since late 19th century, they were considered to have limited treatment efficiencies and were too slow to serve the needs of a quickly expanding wastewater volume, especially in industrialized and densely populated areas. At present aerobic treatment is the most commonly used process to reduce the organic pollution level of both domestic and industrial wastewaters. Aerobic techniques, such as activated sludge process, trickling filters, oxidation ponds and aerated lagoons, with more or less intense mixing devices, have been successfully installed for domestic wastewater as well as industrial wastewater treatment. Anaerobic digestion systems have undergone modifications in the last two decades, mainly as a result of the energy crisis. Major developments have been made with regard to anaerobic metabolism, physiological interactions among different microbial species, effects of toxic compounds and biomass accumulation. Recent developments however, have demonstrated that anaerobic processes might be an economically attractive alternative for the treatment of different types of industrial wastewaters and in (semi-) tropical areas also for domestic wastewaters. The anaerobic degradation of complex, particulate organic matter has been described as a multistep process of series and parallel reactions. It involves the decomposition of organic and

  19. Aerobic degradation potential of the herbicides mecoprop, dichlorprop and bentazone in groundwater from chalk aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, Suzi; Hybel, Anne-Marie; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup;

    2011-01-01

    The aerobic degradation potential of mecoprop, dichlorprop and bentazone was studied at concentration of 1 μg/L in laboratory batch experiments with groundwater from chalk aquifers. Within the incubation period of 129 days, 14C-mecoprop concentration decreased to 60-80% in the microcosms with gro......The aerobic degradation potential of mecoprop, dichlorprop and bentazone was studied at concentration of 1 μg/L in laboratory batch experiments with groundwater from chalk aquifers. Within the incubation period of 129 days, 14C-mecoprop concentration decreased to 60-80% in the microcosms...... with groundwater collected from two monitoring wells (Well 1 and 2). Dichlorprop degradation was neither observed under aerobic nor anaerobic conditions, while 17-27% of the initial concentration of 14C-bentazone was removed. The results indicated a degradation potential of mecoprop and bentazone under aerobic...

  20. Anaerobic Biodegradation of Ethylene Glycol within Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyob, K. M.; Mouser, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Ethylene glycol (EG) is a commonly used organic additive in hydraulic fracturing fluids used for shale gas recovery. Under aerobic conditions, this compound readily biodegrades to acetate and CO2 or is oxidized through the glycerate pathway. In the absence of oxygen, organisms within genera Desulfovibrio, Acetobacterium, and others can transform EG to acetaldehyde, a flammable and suspected carcinogenic compound. Acetaldehyde can then be enzymatically degraded to ethanol or acetate and CO2. However, little is known on how EG degrades in the presence of other organic additives, particularly under anaerobic conditions representative of deep groundwater aquifers. To better understand the fate and attenuation of glycols within hydraulic fracturing fluids we are assessing their biodegradation potential and pathways in batch anaerobic microcosm treatments. Crushed Berea sandstone was inoculated with groundwater and incubated with either EG or a synthetic fracturing fluid (SFF) containing EG formulations. We tracked changes in dissolved organic carbon (DOC), EG, and its transformation products over several months. Approximately 41% of bulk DOC in SFF is degraded within 21 days, with 58% DOC still remaining after 63 days. By comparison, this same SFF degrades by 70% within 25 days when inoculated with sediment-groundwater microbial communities, suggesting that bulk DOC degradation occurs at a slower rate and to a lesser extent with bedrock. Aerobic biodegradation of EG occurs rapidly (3-7 days); however anaerobic degradation of EG is much slower, requiring several weeks for substantial DOC loss to be observed. Ongoing experiments are tracking the degradation pathways of EG alone and in the presence of SFF, with preliminary data showing incomplete glycol transformation within the complex hydraulic fracturing fluid mixture. This research will help to elucidate rates, processes, and pathways for EG biodegradation and identify key microbial taxa involved in its degradation.

  1. Methanogenic degradation kinetics of phenolic compounds in aquifer-derived microcosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godsy, E.M.; Goerlitz, D.F.; Grbic-Galic, D.

    1992-01-01

    In this segment of a larger multidisciplinary study of the movement and fate of creosote derived compounds in a sand-and-gravel aquifer, we present evidence that the methanogenic degradation of the major biodegradable phenolic compounds and concomitant microbial growth in batch microcosms derived from contaminated aquifer material can be described using Monod kinetics. Substrate depletion and bacterial growth curves were fitted to the Monod equations using nonlinear regression analysis. The method of Marquardt was used for the determination of parameter values that best fit the experimental data by minimizing the residual sum of squares. The Monod kinetic constants (??max, Ks, Y, and kd) that describe phenol, 2-, 3-, and 4-methylphenol degradation and concomitant microbial growth were determined under conditions that were substantially different from those previously reported for microcosms cultured from sewage sludge. The Ks values obtained in this study are approximately two orders of magnitude lower than values obtained for the anaerobic degradation of phenol in digesting sewage sludge, indicating that the aquifer microorganisms have developed enzyme systems that are adapted to low nutrient conditions. The values for kd are much less than ??max, and can be neglected in the microcosms. The extremely low Y values, approximately 3 orders of magnitude lower than for the sewage sludge derived cultures, and the very low numbers of microorganisms in the aquifer derived microcosms suggest that these organisms use some unique strategies to survive in the subsurface environment. ?? 1992 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  2. Use of environmental isotopes to characterise the groundwaters from tertiary aquifers of Kuttanad, Kerala, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuttanad area commonly known as the 'rice bowl' of Kerala is of importance as it contributes to the majority of rice production of the state. Even though more than 75% of the area is covered by surface waters and wetlands, groundwater is the only source of potable water supply to the nearby Alleppey town and the rural areas of Kuttanad because of contamination and inherent water quality problems in surface waters. Due to large-scale exploitation of groundwater resources for almost five decades, it is important to understand the sustainability of aquifers in this area in view of the increasing demand for domestic and irrigation requirements. Since the hydraulic gradient is mild and owing to the lowering of piezometric heads over the years, seawater ingression and deterioration of water quality in some parts of this coastal aquifer is apprehended. More over, the impact of agricultural pollution by the excessive use of fertilizers and pesticides need to be dealt with for the protection and mitigation of pollution in aquifers. As a pre-requisite to address the above problems, a systematic environmental isotope (δD, δ18O, 3H, 13C and 14C) study is carried out to understand the flow pattern, source and process of replenishment and possible hydraulic interconnection between aquifers and surface waters of this region. From the hydrogeological settings, it is seen that Kuttanad is a multi-aquifer system of formations of Eocene to Recent age. Quarternary Alluvium and Laterite form the top phreatic aquifer and is underlain by Tertiary sediments that are under confined condition. Archaean crystalline rock forms the basement and is exposed at the eastern periphery of the area. There are four distinct groups of formations in Tertiary sediments namely, Warkali bed, Quilon bed, Vaikom bed and Alleppey bed of which Vaikom and Warkali are potential aquifers. Pre-monsoon (May, 2000) and post-monsoon (November 2000) samples were collected from tube wells tapping different aquifers

  3. Transport and degradation of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in the pyritic Rabis Creek aquifer, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinsby, K.; Hojberg, A.L.; Engesgaard, P.;

    2007-01-01

    Vertical profiles of the chlorofluorocarbons CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113 penetrating aerobic and anaerobic parts of a shallow sandy aquifer show that the CFC gases are degraded in the .... Two-dimensional solute transport simulations with either zero-order or first-order degradation in the anaerobic zone corroborate this interpretation. The transport model was previously calibrated against detailed tritium profiles in the same wells. First-order degradation is found to best match...... the observed CFC profiles yielding an approximate half-life of a few months for CFC-11. Degradation is not as clearly recognized for CFC-12 and CFC-113, but it may occur with rates corresponding to a half-life of a few years or more. Data indicate a geochemical control of the CFC concentration gradient...

  4. Stimulation of aerobic degradation of bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop by oxygen addition to aquifer sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate aerobic degradation potential for the herbicides bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop, anaerobic groundwater samples from two monitoring and three drinking water wells near a drinking water abstraction field in Nybølle, Denmark, were screened for their degradation potential for the herbicides. In the presence of oxygen 14C-labelled bentazone and mecoprop were removed significantly from the two monitoring wells' groundwater samples. Oxygen was added to microcosms in order to investigate whether different oxygen concentrations stimulate the biodegradation of the three herbicides in microcosms using groundwater and sandy aquifer materials. To maintain a certain oxygen concentration this level was measured from the outside of the bottles with a fibre oxygen meter using oxygen-sensitive luminescent sensor foil mounted inside the microcosm, to which supplementary oxygen was added. The highest oxygen concentrations (corresponding to 4–11 mg L−1) stimulated degradation (a 14–27% increase for mecoprop, 3–9% for dichlorprop and 15–20% for bentazone) over an experimental period of 200 days. Oxygen was required to biodegrade the herbicides, since no degradation was observed under anaerobic conditions. This is the first time bentazone degradation has been observed in aquifer material at low oxygen concentrations (2 mg L−1). The sediment had substantial oxygen consumption (0.92–1.45 O2 g-1 dw over 200 days) and oxygen was depleted rapidly in most incubations soon after its addition, which might be due to the oxidation of organic matter and other reduced species such as Fe2+, S2− and Mn in sediment before the biodegradation of herbicides takes place. This study suggests that oxygen enhancement around a drinking water abstraction field could stimulate the bioremediation of diffuse source contamination. - Highlights: • Addition of different oxygen concentrations stimulated degradation of herbicides in anaerobic aquifer sediment material.

  5. Stimulation of aerobic degradation of bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop by oxygen addition to aquifer sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levi, S.; Hybel, A.-M.; Bjerg, P.L.; Albrechtsen, H.-J., E-mail: hana@env.dtu.dk

    2014-03-01

    In order to investigate aerobic degradation potential for the herbicides bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop, anaerobic groundwater samples from two monitoring and three drinking water wells near a drinking water abstraction field in Nybølle, Denmark, were screened for their degradation potential for the herbicides. In the presence of oxygen {sup 14}C-labelled bentazone and mecoprop were removed significantly from the two monitoring wells' groundwater samples. Oxygen was added to microcosms in order to investigate whether different oxygen concentrations stimulate the biodegradation of the three herbicides in microcosms using groundwater and sandy aquifer materials. To maintain a certain oxygen concentration this level was measured from the outside of the bottles with a fibre oxygen meter using oxygen-sensitive luminescent sensor foil mounted inside the microcosm, to which supplementary oxygen was added. The highest oxygen concentrations (corresponding to 4–11 mg L{sup −1}) stimulated degradation (a 14–27% increase for mecoprop, 3–9% for dichlorprop and 15–20% for bentazone) over an experimental period of 200 days. Oxygen was required to biodegrade the herbicides, since no degradation was observed under anaerobic conditions. This is the first time bentazone degradation has been observed in aquifer material at low oxygen concentrations (2 mg L{sup −1}). The sediment had substantial oxygen consumption (0.92–1.45 O{sub 2} g{sup -1} dw over 200 days) and oxygen was depleted rapidly in most incubations soon after its addition, which might be due to the oxidation of organic matter and other reduced species such as Fe{sup 2+}, S{sup 2−} and Mn in sediment before the biodegradation of herbicides takes place. This study suggests that oxygen enhancement around a drinking water abstraction field could stimulate the bioremediation of diffuse source contamination. - Highlights: • Addition of different oxygen concentrations stimulated degradation of

  6. Oxygen Effects in Anaerobic Digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshai Botheju

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of free oxygen in bio-gasification is a sparsely studied area, apart from the common argument of oxygen being toxic and inhibitory for anaerobic micro-cultures. Some studies have, however, revealed increased solubilisation of organic matter in the presence of some free oxygen in anaerobic digestion. This article analyses these counterbalancing phenomena with a mathematical modelling approach using the widely accepted biochemical model ADM 1. Aerobic oxidation of soluble carbon and inhibition of obligatory anaerobic organisms are modelled using standard saturation type kinetics. Biomass dependent first order hydrolysis kinetics is used to relate the increased hydrolysis rate with oxygen induced increase in biomass growth. The amended model, ADM 1-Ox (oxygen, has 25 state variables and 22 biochemical processes, presented in matrix form. The computer aided simulation tool AQUASIM 2.1 is used to simulate the developed model. Simulation predictions are evaluated against experimental data obtained using a laboratory batch test array comprising miniature anaerobic bio-reactors of 100 ml total volume each, operated under different initial air headspaces giving rise to the different oxygen loading conditions. The reactors were initially fed with a glucose solution and incubated at 35 Celsius, for 563 hours. Under the oxygen load conditions of 22, 44 and 88 mg/L, the ADM1-Ox model simulations predicted the experimental methane potentials quite adequately. Both the experimental data and the simulations suggest a linear reduction of methane potential with respect to the increase in oxygen load within this range.

  7. Anaerobic Treatment of Methanolic Wastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettinga, G.; Geest, van der A.Th.; Hobma, S.W.; Laan, van der J.B.R.

    1979-01-01

    Although it is well known that methanol can be fermented directly by a specific species of methane bacteria, viz. Methanosarcina barkeri, until now little information was available about the effect of important environmental factors on the anaerobic fermentation of methanol. As methanol can be the m

  8. Arsenic release from shallow aquifers of the Hetao Basin, Inner Mongolia: Evidence from bacterial community in aquifer sediments and groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Guo, H.

    2013-12-01

    Indigenous microbes play crucial roles in arsenic mobilization in high arsenic groundwater systems. Databases concerning the presence and the activity of microbial communities are very useful in evaluating the potential of microbe-mediated arsenic mobilization in shallow aquifers hosting high arsenic groundwater. This study characterized microbial communities in groundwaters at different depths with different arsenic concentrations by DGGE and one sediment by 16S rDNA gene clone library, and evaluated arsenic mobilization in microcosm batches with the presence of indigenous bacteria. DGGE fingerprints revealed that the community structure changed substantially with depth at the same location. It indicated that a relatively higher bacterial diversity was present in the groundwater sample with lower arsenic concentration. The clone library of sediment sample 2009M1 and DGGE profiles of microbial community structures of groundwater samples indicated NO3-, Fe(III) and SO42- reducing bacteria are abundant in the As-affected aquifer, which are facultative or anaerobic chemoautotrophic bacteria. Pseudomonas that was rich in both high arsenic groundwater and sediment included a great number of denitrifying bacterium strains that may contribute to the low concentration of nitrate in the groundwater. Fe(III)-reducing bacteria belonging to different species, such as Aquabacterium sp., Thauera sp., Georgfuchsia sp., Methyloversatilis sp., Clostridium sp., were widely found in the community. The genus Desulfosporosinus observed in the sediment sample of 2009M1 was believed to be sulfate reducer. These results offered direct evidences that anaerobic reducing bacteria play a role in the formation of toxic, mobile As(III) in the groundwater of the Hetao basin, especially Fe(III)-reducing bacteria. Incubation of sediments without the addition of organic carbon source showed a significant release of arsenic (predominantly as As(III)). By contrast, sterile incubations and incubations

  9. Anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye;

    2003-01-01

    by the immobilization of the biomass, which forms static biofilms, particle-supported biofilms, or granules depending on the reactor's operational conditions. The advantages of the high-rate anaerobic digestion over the conventional aerobic wastewater treatment methods has created a clear trend for the change......-rate anaerobic treatment systems based on anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm are described in this chapter. Emphasis is given to a) the Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) systems, b) the main characteristics of the anaerobic granular sludge, and c) the factors that control the granulation process...

  10. Interconnectivity between the Superficial Aquifer and the Deep Confined Aquifers of the Gnangara Mound, Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perth groundwater resources are obtained from three major aquifers that occur beneath the Perth metropolitan area: the Superficial aquifer, Leederville aquifer and Yarragadee aquifer. Each aquifer has a unique seasonal water level pattern controlled by soils, geomorphology and geology. Land use is mainly responsible for variations in recharge; however, the hydraulic properties control aquifer response and water level pattern to a greater degree. Groundwater in the three aquifers is generally of very good quality except in localised areas. Salinity increases with depth and in direction of groundwater flow in the three aquifers. The best water quality is in the Superficial aquifer in the Wanneroo well field area. The geochemistry and stable isotope signatures from the three major aquifers revealed distinct water types that suggest very little hydraulic connection or mixing of waters between these aquifers at the present abstraction and recharge regimes. The results also show that the Leederville and Yarragadee aquifers were recharged during earlier cooler times while the Superficial aquifer is being recharged at present

  11. Light Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Kurt W.

    1973-01-01

    Outdoor lighting is light pollution which handicaps certain astronomical programs. Protective measures must be adopted by the government to aid observational astronomy without sacrificing legitimate outdoor lighting needs. (PS)

  12. Ground water pollution: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning sources, contaminant transport, and monitoring of pollutants in aquifers. Topics include pollution characterization from landfills and mine drainage, descriptions of study programs undertaken by specific states, and Superfund site studies of contaminated areas. The uses of mathematical models are also discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  13. Anaerobic biotechnological approaches for production of liquid energy carriers from biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Thomsen, Anne Belinda; Angelidaki, Irini

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the use of renewable biomass for energy production. Anaerobic biotechnological approaches for production of liquid energy carriers (ethanol and a mixture of acetone, butanol and ethanol) from biomass can be employed to decrease environmental...... pollution and reduce dependency on fossil fuels. There are two major biological processes that can convert biomass to liquid energy carriers via anaerobic biological breakdown of organic matter: ethanol fermentation and mixed acetone, butanol, ethanol (ABE) fermentation. The specific product formation...

  14. An anaerobic field injection experiment in a landfill leachate plume (Grindsted, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Ludvigsen, L.;

    1999-01-01

    Redox conditions may be environmental factors which affect the fate of the xenobiotic organic compounds. Therefore the redox conditions were characterized in an anaerobic, leachate-contaminated aquifer 15–60 m downgradient from the Grindsted Landfill, Denmark, where an field injection experiment...... the experimental period of 924 days owing to variations in the leachate from the landfill. However, no indication of change in the redox environment resulting from the field injection experiment or natural variation was observed in the individual sampling points. The methane, Fe(II), hydrogen, and VFA groundwater...

  15. Redox zones of a landfill leachate pollution plume (Vejen, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngkilde, John; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1992-01-01

    Downgradient from an old municipal landfill allowing leachate, rich in dissolved organic carbon, to enter a shallow sandy aerobic aquifer, a sequence of redoxe zones is identified from groundwater chemical analysis. Below the landfill, methanogenic conditions prevail, followed by sulfidogenic, fe...... the fate of reactive pollutants leached from the landfill....

  16. Treatment of melanoidin wastewater by anaerobic digestion and coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimi, Milton M; Zhang, Yongjun; Götz, Gesine; Geißen, Sven-Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Melanoidins are dark-coloured recalcitrant pollutants found in many industrial wastewaters including coffee-manufacturing effluent, molasses distillery wastewater (MDWW) and other wastewater with molasses as the raw material. The wastewaters are mostly treated with anaerobic digestion after some dilution to minimize the inhibition effect. However, the dark colour and recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon (DOC) mainly caused by melanoidin are not effectively removed. The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of colour and remnant DOC by different coagulants from anaerobically digested MDWW. From the six coagulants tested, ferric chloride had the highest melanoidin (48%), colour (92.7%) and DOC (63.3%) removal at pH 5 and a dosage of 1.6 g/l. Both polymer and inorganic salt coagulants tested had optimal colour, melanoidin and DOC removal at acidic pH. The molecular size distribution of synthetic melanoidins by liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection indicated a preferential removal of high-molecular-weight melanoidins over low weight melanoidins by the coagulation. Further studies should focus on how to improve biodegradability of the treated effluent for it to be reused as dilution water for anaerobic digestion. PMID:25799161

  17. [Anaerobic biodegradation of phthalic acid esters (Paes) in municipal sludge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhi-Feng; Zhou, Wen; Lin, Qing-Qi; Yang, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Shi-Zhong; Cai, Xin-De; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2014-04-01

    Phthalic acid esters (PAEs), a class of organic pollutants with potent endocrine-disrupting properties, are widely present in municipal sludge. Study of PAEs biodegradation under different anaerobic biological treatment processes of sludge is, therefore, essential for a safe use of sludge in agricultural practice. In this study, we selected two major sludge PAEs, i.e. di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) and di-(2-enthylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), to investigate their biodegradation behaviors in an anaerobic sludge digestion system and a fermentative hydrogen production system. The possible factors influencing PAEs biodegradation in relation to changes of sludge properties were also discussed. The results showed that the biodegradation of DBP reached 99.6% within 6 days, while that of DEHP was 46.1% during a 14-day incubation period in the anaerobic digestion system. By comparison, only 19.5% of DBP was degraded within 14 days in the fermentative hydrogen production system, while no degradation was detected for DEHP. The strong inhibition of the degradation of both PAEs in the fermentative hydrogen production system was ascribed to the decreases in microbial biomass and ratios of gram-positive bacteria/gram-negative bacteria and fungi/ bacteria, and the increase of concentrations of volatile fatty acids (e. g. acetic acid, propionic acid and butyric acid) during the fermentative hydrogen-producing process.

  18. RESPONSE OF RICE ROOT IN RESPIRATION AT JOINTING STAGE TO OZONE POLLUTION AND ALTERNATION OF ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC CONDITIONS%水稻拔节期根系呼吸对臭氧污染和厌氧—有氧环境变化的响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    寇太记; 朱建国

    2013-01-01

    Effects of elevated atmospheric ozone (pO3) (50% higher than the ambient pO3 in concentration) on root respiration and biomass accumulation and distribution of rice (Oryza sativa L.cv.Xiandao 63) at the jointing stage were investigated in fully open-air field conditions,and effect of alternation of anaerobic and aerobic conditions on root respiration was analyzed using special gas-collecting installations.Results show that under elevated pO3canopy and total biomass of the crop decreased slightly,while its root dry matter weight and ratio of root/canopy dropped significantly by 14.7% and 10.4%,respectively.The mixture of N2 and O2at a ratio of 9∶1 or 9.5∶0.5 was the most propitious for root respiration,whereas in pure N2,natural air and CO2-saturated distilled water root respiration rate was lowered to a varying degree.The treatment of elevated pO3 coupled with measurement inn CO2-saturated distilled water and the treatment of ambient air coupled with measurement in pure N2 was the least in root respiration rate,indicating that although the condition in which root respiration was measured affected root respiration rate,the impact was restricted in degree by the atmospheric environment in which the plant grew.The root respiration rate of rice growing under elevated ozone was 23.6% ~52.7% higher than that under natural atmosphere when measured in pure gas condition,and the difference between the two was insignificant when the measurement was done in CO2-saturated distilled water,showing that the influence of ozone pollution on root respiration obviously decreased.Under elevated and ambient pO3 environments,root respiration of the rice displayed a curve of convex quadratic function with increasing oxygen supply in the gaseous environment for measurement.The oxygen concentration of 5%~ 10% in the environment promoted rice root respiration,while stronge anaerobic condition (i.e.,pure N2) and aerobic conditions (i.e.,air) both affected root

  19. Innovative reactive layer to enhance soil aquifer treatment: successful installation in the Llobregat aquifer (Catalonia, ne Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, M.; Gilbert, O.; Bernat, X.; Valhondo, C.; Kock-Schulmeyer, M.; Huerta-Fontela, M.; Colomer, M. V.

    2014-10-01

    The Life+ ENSAT project has demonstrated the effectiveness of a reactive organic layer on the improvement of recharge water quality in an aquifer recharge system. The vegetal compost layer was installed at the bottom of an existing infiltration pond in the Llobregat Lower Valley (Barcelona region) with the purpose of promoting biodegradation and improving the removal emerging micro-pollutants from Llobregat River water. A comprehensive monitoring of water quality including bulk chemistry, emerging micro-pollutants and priority substances indicated that hydro biochemical changes within the organic layer enhance denitrification processes and reduce the levels of gemfibrozil and carbamazepine TP. This effect is due to the release of dissolved organic carbon which promotes biodegradation processes at local scale in the unsaturated zones, without affecting the furthest piezometers. The reactive layer is still active more than 3 years after its installation. The economic assessment of this innovative reactive layer shows that it is a promising solution for the improvement of aquifer recharge with low quality waters, not only technically but also from the economic sustainability standpoint. (Author)

  20. Innovative reactive layer to enhance soil aquifer treatment: successful installation in the Llobregat aquifer (Catalonia, ne Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Life+ ENSAT project has demonstrated the effectiveness of a reactive organic layer on the improvement of recharge water quality in an aquifer recharge system. The vegetal compost layer was installed at the bottom of an existing infiltration pond in the Llobregat Lower Valley (Barcelona region) with the purpose of promoting biodegradation and improving the removal emerging micro-pollutants from Llobregat River water. A comprehensive monitoring of water quality including bulk chemistry, emerging micro-pollutants and priority substances indicated that hydro biochemical changes within the organic layer enhance denitrification processes and reduce the levels of gemfibrozil and carbamazepine TP. This effect is due to the release of dissolved organic carbon which promotes biodegradation processes at local scale in the unsaturated zones, without affecting the furthest piezometers. The reactive layer is still active more than 3 years after its installation. The economic assessment of this innovative reactive layer shows that it is a promising solution for the improvement of aquifer recharge with low quality waters, not only technically but also from the economic sustainability standpoint. (Author)

  1. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized water-level elevation contours for the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma. The Enid isolated terrace aquifer...

  2. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Central Oklahoma aquifer in central Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized aquifer boundaries created for a previously published report about the Central Oklahoma aquifer in central Oklahoma. This area...

  3. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Elk City aquifer in western Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized polygons of constant recharge values for the Elk City aquifer in western Oklahoma. The aquifer covers an area of approximately...

  4. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the High Plains aquifer in western Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digital aquifer boundaries for the High Plains aquifer in western Oklahoma. This area encompasses the panhandle counties of Cimarron,...

  5. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Antlers aquifer in southeastern Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized aquifer boundaries of the Antlers aquifer in southeastern Oklahoma. The Early Cretaceous-age Antlers Sandstone is an important...

  6. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Rush Springs aquifer in western Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized aquifer boundaries for the Rush Springs aquifer in western Oklahoma. This area encompasses all or part of Blaine, Caddo,...

  7. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Elk City aquifer in western Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized water-level elevation contours for the Elk City aquifer in western Oklahoma. The aquifer covers an area of approximately 193,000...

  8. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Elk City aquifer in western Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized polygons of constant hydraulic conductivity values for the Elk City aquifer in western Oklahoma. The aquifer covers an area of...

  9. Ground Pollution Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book deals with ground pollution science and soil science, classification of soil and fundamentals, ground pollution and human, ground pollution and organic matter, ground pollution and city environment, environmental problems of the earth and ground pollution, soil pollution and development of geological features of the ground, ground pollution and landfill of waste, case of measurement of ground pollution.

  10. Effect of incubation conditions on anaerobic susceptibility testing results.

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, P R; Niles, A C

    1982-01-01

    We determined the effect of performing antimicrobial susceptibility tests in five different anaerobic incubation systems: GasPak jar, large GasPak jar, evacuated-gassed anaerobic jar, anaerobic chamber, and Bio-Bag. Growth of the anaerobes was equivalent in all five incubation systems. The results of testing 38 anaerobes against 11 antimicrobial agents were comparable for the anaerobic jars and anaerobic chamber. However, discordant results were observed for metronidazole and cefamandole test...

  11. Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, A S; Dhagat, N N

    2001-04-01

    Biological treatment of wastewater basically reduces the pollutant concentration through microbial coagulation and removal of non-settleable organic colloidal solids. Organic matter is biologically stabilized so that no further oxygen demand is exerted by it. The biological treatment requires contact of the biomass with the substrate. Various advances and improvements in anaerobic reactors to achieve variations in contact time and method of contact have resulted in development of in suspended growth systems, attached growth or fixed film systems or combinations thereof. Although anaerobic systems for waste treatment have been used since late 19th century, they were considered to have limited treatment efficiencies and were too slow to serve the needs of a quickly expanding wastewater volume, especially in industrialized and densely populated areas. At present aerobic treatment is the most commonly used process to reduce the organic pollution level of both domestic and industrial wastewaters. Aerobic techniques, such as activated sludge process, trickling filters, oxidation ponds and aerated lagoons, with more or less intense mixing devices, have been successfully installed for domestic wastewater as well as industrial wastewater treatment. Anaerobic digestion systems have undergone modifications in the last two decades, mainly as a result of the energy crisis. Major developments have been made with regard to anaerobic metabolism, physiological interactions among different microbial species, effects of toxic compounds and biomass accumulation. Recent developments however, have demonstrated that anaerobic processes might be an economically attractive alternative for the treatment of different types of industrial wastewaters and in (semi-) tropical areas also for domestic wastewaters. The anaerobic degradation of complex, particulate organic matter has been described as a multistep process of series and parallel reactions. It involves the decomposition of organic and

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of MCPA-Degrading Sphingomonas sp. Strain ERG5, Isolated from a Groundwater Aquifer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tue Kjærgaard; Kot, Witold; Sørensen, Sebastian R;

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomonas sp. strain ERG5 was isolated from a bacterial community, originating from a groundwater aquifer polluted with low pesticide concentrations. This bacterium degrades 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in a wide spectrum of concentrations and has been shown to function in...

  13. Characteristics and performance of anaerobic wastewater treatment (a review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summary: Pakistan's current population of 180 million is expected to grow to about 221 million by the year 2025. In developing countries such as Pakistan water pollution is a major threat to the livelihood of people. Pakistan is also currently experiencing profound demographic, economic changes and energy crisis that have major implications for water management. The contamination of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems with heavy metals is a major environmental problem. Each pollution problem calls for specific optimal and cost effective solution so if one technology proves less or ineffective other takes its place. Every day the vast amounts of the municipal, industrial and agricultural wastes are released in to the environment and create serious problems. Anaerobic digestion is very attractive and cost-effective option and technology for the highly loaded waste water treatment and energy conversion. The anaerobic process is in many ways ideal for waste treatment. It has several significant advantages over other available methods. In this process organic matter is utilized as source of electron donor to reduce carbon dioxide to produce methane gas. It involves three bacterial groups namely: hydrolytic, acetogenic and methanogenic bacteria that work optimally at pH and temperature ranges of 6.8 to 7.5 and 30-35 degree C, respectively. The residence time in a digester varies with the amount and type of feed material, the configuration of the digestion system, and whether it be one-stage or two-stage. It is ideal for all kinds of wastewaters. Currently anaerobic technology is being operated at full scale in many industrialized nations. (author)

  14. Evaluation of hydrochemical changes due to intensive aquifer exploitation: case studies from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller, M V; Rodríguez, R; Cardona, A; Padilla-Sánchez, L

    2012-09-01

    The impact of intensive aquifer exploitation has been observed in numerous places around the world. Mexico is a representative example of this problem. In 2010, 101 out of the 653 aquifers recognized in the country, showed negative social, economic, and environmental effects related to intensive exploitation. The environmental effects include, among others, groundwater level decline, subsidence, attenuation, and drying up of springs, decreased river flow, and deterioration of water quality. This study aimed at determining the hydrochemical changes produced by intensive aquifer exploitation and highlighting water quality modifications, taking as example the Valle de Toluca, Salamanca, and San Luis Potosi aquifers in Mexico's highlands. There, elements such as fluoride, arsenic, iron, and manganese have been detected, resulting from the introduction of older groundwater with longer residence times and distinctive chemical composition (regional flows). High concentrations of other elements such as chloride, sulfate, nitrate, and vanadium, as well as pathogens, all related to anthropogenic pollution sources (wastewater infiltration, irrigation return flow, and atmospheric pollutants, among others) were also observed. Some of these elements (nitrate, fluoride, arsenic, iron, and manganese) have shown concentrations above Mexican and World Health Organization drinking water standards. PMID:21997844

  15. Urban pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancini, Angela; Tomei, Francesco; Tomei, Gianfranco; Caciari, Tiziana; Di Giorgio, Valeria; André, Jean-Claude; Palermo, Paola; Andreozzi, Giorgia; Nardone, Nadia; Schifano, Maria Pia; Fiaschetti, Maria; Cetica, Carlotta; Ciarrocca, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution represents a health risk for people living in urban environment. Urban air consists in a complex mixture of chemicals and carcinogens and its effects on health can be summarized in acute respiratory effects, neoplastic nonneoplastic (e.g. chronic bronchitis) chronic respiratory effects, and effects on other organs and systems. Air pollution may be defined according to origin of the phenomena that determine it: natural causes (natural fumes, decomposition, volcanic ash) or anthropogenic causes which are the result of human activities (industrial and civil emissions). Transport is the sector that more than others contributes to the deterioration of air quality in cities. In this context, in recent years, governments of the territory were asked to advance policies aimed at solving problems related to pollution. In consideration of the many effects on health caused by pollution it becomes necessary to know the risks from exposure to various environmental pollutants and to limit and control their effects. Many are the categories of "outdoor" workers, who daily serve the in urban environment: police, drivers, newsagents, etc.

  16. Anaerobic digestion of solid material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavilin, V.A.; Lokshina, L.Y.; Flotats, X.;

    2007-01-01

    A new multidimensional (3 and 2D) anaerobic digestion model for cylindrical reactor with non-uniform influent concentration distributions was developed to study the way in which mixing intensity affects the efficiency of continuous-flow anaerobic digestion. Batch experiments reported and simulated...... earlier by Vavilin and Angelidaki (2005) were used to modernize a kinetic scheme and to obtain the corresponding kinetic coefficients. In the new models, hydrolytic microorganisms were included using Contois kinetics for the hydrolysis/acidogenesis degradation of municipal solid waste (MSW). Monod...... kinetics was applied for description of methanogenesis. Both hydrolytic and methanogenic microorganisms were assumed to be inhibited by high volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentration. According to the new distributed models, the mixing level reduction expressed by increasing dimensionless Peclet number may...

  17. Evolution of carbon isotope signatures during reactive transport of hydrocarbons in heterogeneous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höyng, Dominik; Prommer, Henning; Blum, Philipp; Grathwohl, Peter; Mazo D'Affonseca, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of organic pollutants has become a well-established tool for assessing the occurrence and extent of biodegradation processes in contaminated aquifers. However, the precision of CSIA is influenced by the degree to which assumptions underlying CSIA data interpretation hold under realistic field-scale conditions. For the first time this study demonstrates how aquifer analogs combined with reactive transport models offer an underexplored way to develop generic process understanding, evaluate monitoring and quantification strategies in highly heterogeneous subsurface settings. Data from high-resolution aquifer analogs were used in numerical experiments to track the propagation of a representative oxidizable organic compound (toluene) within a variety of realistic heterogeneous aquifers and to investigate its detailed fate. The simulations were used to analyze (1) the effects of physical aquifer heterogeneities on spatiotemporal patterns of contaminant concentrations and isotope signatures, (2) the performance of the commonly applied Rayleigh equation and (3) the applicability of an extension of the Rayleigh equation for complex hydrogeological conditions. The results indicate that if field-derived enrichment factors are applied without corrections for dilution, the conventional Rayleigh equation is inaccurate and estimates for biodegradation are typically overestimated and unreliable in heterogeneous aquifers. Underestimations can occur due to the partial source zone depletion. In contrast, if dilution can be accurately accounted for, field-derived enrichment factors comprise a suitable alternative to laboratory-derived and redox-specific enrichment factors. The study also examines to what extent variations in monitoring/sampling strategies influence the obtained results. Especially measurements from long-screened wells (> 1 m) reveal to be inappropriate for the application of the Rayleigh equation in the investigated aquifer

  18. Regional water quality patterns in an alluvial aquifer: direct and indirect influences of rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillieux, A; Campisi, D; Jammet, N; Bucher, S; Hunkeler, D

    2014-11-15

    The influence of rivers on the groundwater quality in alluvial aquifers can be twofold: direct and indirect. Rivers can have a direct influence via recharge and an indirect one by controlling the distribution of fine-grained, organic-carbon rich flood deposits that induce reducing conditions. These direct and indirect influences were quantified for a large alluvial aquifer on the Swiss Plateau (50km(2)) in interaction with an Alpine river using nitrate as an example. The hydrochemistry and stable isotope composition of water were characterized using a network of 115 piezometers and pumping stations covering the entire aquifer. Aquifer properties, land use and recharge zones were evaluated as well. This information provided detailed insight into the factors that control the spatial variability of groundwater quality. Three main factors were identified: (1) diffuse agricultural pollution sources; (2) dilution processes resulting from river water infiltrations, revealed by the δ(18)OH2O and δ(2)HH2O contents of groundwater; and (3) denitrification processes, controlled by the spatial variability of flood deposits governed by fluvial depositional processes. It was possible to quantify the dependence of the nitrate concentration on these three factors at any sampling point of the aquifer using an end-member mixing model, where the average nitrate concentration in recharge from the agricultural area was evaluated at 52mg/L, and the nitrate concentration of infiltrating river at approximately 6mg/L. The study shows the importance of considering the indirect and direct impacts of rivers on alluvial aquifers and provides a methodological framework to evaluate aquifer scale water quality patterns.

  19. Hydrogeochemistry and isotopic tracing of nitrate contamination of two aquifer systems on Jeju Island, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eun-Hee; Kaown, Dugin; Mayer, Bernhard; Kang, Bong-Rae; Moon, Hee Sun; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2012-01-01

    The groundwater of Jeju Island (Republic of Korea) is vulnerable to contamination because its aquifers are mainly composed of highly permeable geological units and its agricultural fields are often exposed to excessive use of predominantly synthetic fertilizers. In the Gosan area of Jeju Island, we investigated nitrate contamination in both a perched aquifer above an impermeable clay bed and the regional groundwater beneath this aquitard. The δO and δD values indicate that the perched groundwater is recharged by local precipitation, whereas the regional groundwater is recharged mainly by regional flow from an adjacent mountainous region. The perched groundwater contained very high NO-N concentrations of up to 87 mg/L. The isotopic composition of nitrate in the perched groundwater showed that synthetic fertilizers applied in high excesses of crop N needs were the main cause of aquifer pollution. Elevated nitrate concentrations were also observed in the regional groundwater especially after precipitation events. Concentration and isotopic data revealed that the inflow of shallow perched groundwater along the poorly cemented or uncemented annulus of regional groundwater wells was one of the main reasons for the nitrate contamination observed in the regional groundwater. In both aquifers, δN and δO values showed that the sources of nitrate were derived from synthetic fertilizers that had been recycled in the soil zone by nitrification and in some portions of the perched aquifer (dissolved oxygen concentrations <2 mg/L) indicated that denitrification occurred locally. PMID:23128740

  20. Anaerobic digestion of aliphatic polyesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šmejkalová, Pavla; Kužníková, Veronika; Merna, Jan; Hermanová, Soňa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic processes for the treatment of plastic materials waste represent versatile and effective approach in environmental protection and solid waste management. In this work, anaerobic biodegradability of model aliphatic polyesters, poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), in the form of powder and melt-pressed films with varying molar mass, was studied. Biogas production was explored in batch laboratory trials at 55 ± 1°C under a nitrogen atmosphere. The inoculum used was thermophilic digested sludge (total solids concentration of 2.9%) from operating digesters at the Central Waste Water Treatment Plant in Prague, Czech Republic. Methanogenic biodegradation of PCLs typically yielded from 54 to 60% of the theoretical biogas yield. The biodegradability of PLAs achieved from 56 to 84% of the theoretical value. High biogas yield (up to 677 mL/g TS) with high methane content (more than 60%), comparable with conventionally processed materials, confirmed the potential of polyester samples for anaerobic treatment in the case of their exploitation in agriculture or as a packaging material in the food industry. PMID:27191559

  1. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Tillman terrace and alluvial aquifer in southwestern Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digital aquifer boundaries for the Tillman terrace and alluvial aquifer in southwestern Oklahoma. The Tillman terrace aquifer encompasses...

  2. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer in east-central Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized aquifer boundaries for the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer in east-central Oklahoma. The Vamoosa-Ada aquifer is an important source of water...

  3. Organic micropollutants in aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Changes in microbial communities and gene expression

    KAUST Repository

    Harb, Moustapha

    2016-07-09

    Organic micro-pollutants (OMPs) are contaminants of emerging concern in wastewater treatment due to the risk of their proliferation into the environment, but their impact on the biological treatment process is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the presence of OMPs on the core microbial populations of wastewater treatment. Two nanofiltration-coupled membrane bioreactors (aerobic and anaerobic) were subjected to the same operating conditions while treating synthetic municipal wastewater spiked with OMPs. Microbial community dynamics, gene expression levels, and antibiotic resistance genes were analyzed using molecular-based approaches. Results showed that presence of OMPs in the wastewater feed had a clear effect on keystone bacterial populations in both the aerobic and anaerobic sludge while also significantly impacting biodegradation-associated gene expression levels. Finally, multiple antibiotic-type OMPs were found to have higher removal rates in the anaerobic MBR, while associated antibiotic resistance genes were lower.

  4. Organic micropollutants in aerobic and anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Changes in microbial communities and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, Moustapha; Wei, Chun-Hai; Wang, Nan; Amy, Gary; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2016-10-01

    Organic micro-pollutants (OMPs) are contaminants of emerging concern in wastewater treatment due to the risk of their proliferation into the environment, but their impact on the biological treatment process is not well understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the presence of OMPs on the core microbial populations of wastewater treatment. Two nanofiltration-coupled membrane bioreactors (aerobic and anaerobic) were subjected to the same operating conditions while treating synthetic municipal wastewater spiked with OMPs. Microbial community dynamics, gene expression levels, and antibiotic resistance genes were analyzed using molecular-based approaches. Results showed that presence of OMPs in the wastewater feed had a clear effect on keystone bacterial populations in both the aerobic and anaerobic sludge while also significantly impacting biodegradation-associated gene expression levels. Finally, multiple antibiotic-type OMPs were found to have higher removal rates in the anaerobic MBR, while associated antibiotic resistance genes were lower. PMID:27441825

  5. Hydro-geological properties of the Savian aquifer in the county Obrenovac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojadinović Dušan D.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a description of hydrogeological researches of alluvial layers of the Sava River in the area of the source "Vić Bare" near Obrenovac. This source supplies groundwater to that town. The depth of these layers amounts to 25 m. With regard to collecting capacity, the most significant are gravel-sand sediments of high filtration properties. Their average depth amounts to about 13 m with the underlying layer made of Pleistocene clays. Compact aquifer is formed within these sediments and it refills partly from the Sava River at places where river cuts its channel into the gravel-sand layer. The analysis of the groundwater regime in the riparian area points out that groundwater levels follow stages of the Sava River. Such an influence lessens with the distance. Established hydraulic connection between the river and the aquifer enables its permanent replenishment. On the other hand, due to certain pollutions this river flow might bring along, it represents a potential danger. Those pollutions could enter water-bearing layer of the aquifer as well as the exploitation well of the source. Such presumptions have been confirmed in the experiment of pollution transport carried out in the water-bearing layer. Unabsorbable chloride was used as a tracer whose movement velocity through exploitation well proved that there were real possibilities of intrusion of aggressive pollutants into the water-bearing layer and into the aquifer as well. Therefore, the protection of the source must be in the function of the protection of surface waters.

  6. Fate of MTBE and DCPD Compounds Relative to BTEX in Gasoline-Contaminated Aquifers

    OpenAIRE

    Olivella, L.; Figueras, M.; J. Fraile; Vilanova, M.; Ginebreda, A.; Barceló, D.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this communication is to provide preliminary results on MTBE monitoring, and at the same time to propose some new tracers of gasoline pollution in groundwater. An overview is presented on benzene-toluene-ethylbenzene-xylene (BTEX), methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE), and dicyclopentadienes (DCPD) contents in gasoline formulations. Their specific fate in gasoline-contaminated aquifers are consistent with their physical-chemical properties.

  7. VULNERABILITY OF KARST AQUIFERS TO CHEMICAL CONTAMINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ground water flow in karst aquifers is very different from flow in granular or fractured aquifers. arst ground water flow is often turbulent within discrete conduits that are convergent in the upper reaches and divergent in the lower, simulating discharge to one or more springs. ...

  8. Geohydrology of the Cerro Prieto geothermal aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez R, J.; de la Pena L, A.

    1981-01-01

    The most recent information on the Cerro Prieto geothermal aquifer is summarized, with special emphasis on the initial production zone where the wells completed in the Alpha aquifer are located. These wells produce steam for power plant units 1 and 2. Brief comments also are made on the Beta aquifer, which underlies the Alpha aquifer in the Cerro Prieto I area and which extends to the east to what is known as the Cerro Prieto II and Cerro Prieto III areas. The location of the area studied is shown. The Alpha and Beta aquifers differ in their mineralogy and cementing mineral composition, temperatures, and piezometric levels. The difference in piezometric levels indicates that there is no local communication between the two aquifers. This situation has been verified by a well interference test, using well E-1 as a producer in the Beta aquifer and well M-46 as the observation well in the Alpha aquifer. No interference between them was observed. Information on the geology, geohydrology, and geochemistry of Cerro Prieto is presented.

  9. Potential for anaerobic conversion of xenobiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Dolfing, J.; Haagensen, Frank;

    2003-01-01

    This review covers the latest research on the anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic xenobiotic compounds, with emphasis on surfactants, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalate esters, polychlorinated biphenyls, halogenated phenols, and pesticides. The versatility of anaerobic reactor systems...... regarding the treatment of xenobiotics is shown with the focus on the UASB reactor, but the applicability of other reactor designs for treatment of hazardous waste is also included. Bioaugmentation has proved to be a viable technique to enhance a specific activity in anaerobic reactors and recent research...

  10. Water Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    We all need clean water. People need it to grow crops and to operate factories, and for drinking and recreation. Fish and wildlife depend on ... and phosphorus make algae grow and can turn water green. Bacteria, often from sewage spills, can pollute ...

  11. Anaerobic co-digestion of dairy manure and potato waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadanaparthi, Sai Krishna Reddy

    Dairy and potato are two important agricultural commodities in Idaho. Both the dairy and potato processing industries produce a huge amount of waste which could cause environmental pollution. To minimize the impact of potential pollution associated with dairy manure (DM) and potato waste (PW), anaerobic co-digestion has been considered as one of the best treatment process. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the anaerobic co-digestion of dairy manure and potato waste in terms of process stability, biogas generation, construction and operating costs, and potential revenue. For this purpose, I conducted 1) a literature review, 2) a lab study on anaerobic co-digestion of dairy manure and potato waste at three different temperature ranges (ambient (20-25°C), mesophilic (35-37°C) and thermophilic (55-57°C) with five mixing ratios (DM:PW-100:0, 90:10, 80:20, 60:40, 40:60), and 3) a financial analysis for anaerobic digesters based on assumed different capital costs and the results from the lab co-digestion study. The literature review indicates that several types of organic waste were co-digested with DM. Dairy manure is a suitable base matter for the co-digestion process in terms of digestion process stability and methane (CH4) production (Chapter 2). The lab tests showed that co-digestion of DM with PW was better than digestion of DM alone in terms of biogas and CH4 productions (Chapter 3). The financial analysis reveals DM and PW can be used as substrate for full size anaerobic digesters to generate positive cash flow within a ten year time period. Based on this research, the following conclusions and recommendations were made: ▸ The ratio of DM:PW-80:20 is recommended at thermophilic temperatures and the ratio of DM:PW-90:10 was recommended at mesophilic temperatures for optimum biogas and CH4 productions. ▸ In cases of anaerobic digesters operated with electricity generation equipment (generators), low cost plug flow digesters (capital cost of 600/cow

  12. Molecular ecology of anaerobic reactor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H. Jacob Peider; Zheng, D.; Westermann, Peter;

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic reactor systems are essential for the treatment of solid and liquid wastes and constitute a core facility in many waste treatment plants. Although much is known about the basic metabolism in different types of anaerobic reactors, little is known about the microbes responsible...... to the abundance of each microbe in anaerobic reactor systems by rRNA probing. This chapter focuses on various molecular techniques employed and problems encountered when elucidating the microbial ecology of anaerobic reactor systems. Methods such as quantitative dot blot/fluorescence in-situ probing using various...

  13. Geochemistry of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Scott; Hunt, Andrew G.; Parkhurst, David L.; Osborn, Noel I.

    2009-01-01

    The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma provides water for public supply, farms, mining, wildlife conservation, recreation, and the scenic beauty of springs, streams, and waterfalls. A new understanding of the aquifer flow system was developed as part of the Arbuckle-Simpson Hydrology Study, done in 2003 through 2008 as a collaborative research project between the State of Oklahoma and the Federal government. The U.S. Geological Survey collected 36 water samples from 32 wells and springs in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in 2004 through 2006 for geochemical analyses of major ions, trace elements, isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, dissolved gases, and dating tracers. The geochemical analyses were used to characterize the water quality in the aquifer, to describe the origin and movement of ground water from recharge areas to discharge at wells and springs, and to determine the age of water in the aquifer.

  14. Stable groundwater quality in deep aquifers of Southern Bangladesh: The case against sustainable abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravenscroft, P., E-mail: pravenscroft@unicef.org [UNICEF, BSL Office Complex, Minto Road, Dhaka 1000 (Bangladesh); McArthur, J.M.; Hoque, M.A. [Earth Sciences, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-01

    In forty six wells > 150 m deep, from across the arsenic-polluted area of south-central Bangladesh, groundwater composition remained unchanged between 1998 and 2011. No evidence of deteriorating water quality was found in terms of arsenic, iron, manganese, boron, barium or salinity over this period of 13 years. These deep tubewells have achieved operating lives of more than 20 years with minimal institutional support. These findings confirm that tubewells tapping the deep aquifers in the Bengal Basin provide a safe, popular, and economic, means of arsenic mitigation and are likely to do so for decades to come. Nevertheless, concerns remain about the sustainability of a resource that could serve as a source of As-safe water to mitigate As-pollution in shallower aquifers in an area where tens of millions of people are exposed to dangerous levels of arsenic in well water. The conjunction of the stable composition in deep groundwater and the severe adverse health effects of arsenic in shallow groundwater lead us to challenge the notion that strong sustainability principles should be applied to the management of deep aquifer abstraction in Bangladesh is, the notion that the deep groundwater resource should be preserved for future generations by protecting it from adverse impacts, probably of a minor nature, that could occur after a long time and might not happen at all. Instead, we advocate an ethical approach to development of the deep aquifer, based on adaptive abstraction management, which allows possibly unsustainable exploitation now in order to alleviate crippling disease and death from arsenic today while also benefiting future generations by improving the health, education and economy of living children. - Highlights: • Tens of millions of people in Bangladesh are affected by arsenic pollution of groundwater. • Deep wells in potentially non-renewable aquifers are the dominant form of mitigation. • Water quality in these aquifers has remained stable for 13

  15. Economics of Managed Aquifer Recharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Maliva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Managed aquifer recharge (MAR technologies can provide a variety of water resources management benefits by increasing the volume of stored water and improving water quality through natural aquifer treatment processes. Implementation of MAR is often hampered by the absence of a clear economic case for the investment to construct and operate the systems. Economic feasibility can be evaluated using cost benefit analysis (CBA, with the challenge of monetizing benefits. The value of water stored or treated by MAR systems can be evaluated by direct and indirect measures of willingness to pay including market price, alternative cost, value marginal product, damage cost avoided, and contingent value methods. CBAs need to incorporate potential risks and uncertainties, such as failure to meet performance objectives. MAR projects involving high value uses, such as potable supply, tend to be economically feasible provided that local hydrogeologic conditions are favorable. They need to have low construction and operational costs for lesser value uses, such as some irrigation. Such systems should therefore be financed by project beneficiaries, but dichotomies may exist between beneficiaries and payers. Hence, MAR projects in developing countries may be economically viable, but external support is often required because of limited local financial resources.

  16. Degradation of phenolic contaminants in ground water by anaerobic bacteria: St. Louis Park, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, G.G.; Goerlitz, D.F.; Godsy, E.M.; Hult, M.F.

    1982-01-01

    Coal-tar derivatives from a coal-tar distillation and wood-treating plant that operated from 1918 to 1972 at St. Louis Park, Minnesota contaminated the near-surface ground water. Solutions of phenolic compounds and a water-immiscible mixture of polynuclear aromatic compounds accumulated in wetlands near the plant site and entered the aquifer. The concentration of phenolic compounds in the aqueous phase under the wetlands is about 30 mg/1 but decreases to less than 0.2 mg/1 at a distance of 430 m immediately downgradient from the source. Concentrations of naphthalene (the predominant polynuclear compound in the ground water) and sodium (selected as a conservative tracer) range from about 20 mg/1 and 430 mg/1 in the aqueous phase at the source to about 2 mg/1 and 120 mg/1 at 430 m downgradient, respectively. Phenolic compounds and naphthalene are disappearing faster than expected if only dilution were occurring. Sorption of phenolic compounds on aquifer sediments is negligible but naphthalene is slightly sorbed. Anaerobic biodegradation of phenolic compounds is primarily responsible for the observed attenuation. Methane was found only in water samples from the contaminated zone (2-20 mg/1). Methane-producing bacteria were found only in water from the contaminated zone. Methane was produced in laboratory cultures of contaminated water inoculated with bacteria from the contaminated zone. Evidence for anaerobic biodegradation of naphthalene under either field or laboratory conditions was not obtained.

  17. [Studies on the anaerobic phased solid digester system for municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-qin; Shen, Dong-sheng

    2004-05-01

    Through analyzing and detecting the leaching pollutant (COD) in two bioreactors, anaerobic phased solid digester system and leachate direct-recirculating landfill, the changing rule of municipal solid waste and the characteristics of methanogenesis were studied. The results showed that anaerobic phased solid digester system accelerated the process of degrading municipal solid waste and stabilizing landfill site. The relationship between the leaching pollutant (COD) and refuse age was logarithmic linear correlation. More than 80% of biogas in volume occured in the methanogenisis bioreactor, the methane content in which was 55%-69%. The preferable volumetric COD loading rate of the methanogenisis bioreactor was 6.5-7.5 g/(L x d). PMID:15327275

  18. Anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that toluene and m-xylene were rapidly mineralized in a denitrifying laboratory aquifer column operated under continuous flow conditions in the complete absence of molecular oxygen. A bacterium, tentatively identified as a Pseudomonas sp., was isolated from this column. This organism mineralized toluene and m-xylene under pure culture conditions with nitrate or nitrous oxide as the sole electron acceptors. Carbon balance studies using 0.3mM [ring-UL-14C]toluene revealed that more than 50 percent of the radioactivity was evolved as 14CO2

  19. Intrinsic and specific vulnerability of groundwater in central Spain: the risk of nitrate pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Bastida, Juan J.; Arauzo, Mercedes; Valladolid, Maria

    2010-05-01

    The intrinsic vulnerability of groundwater in the Comunidad de Madrid (central Spain) was evaluated using the DRASTIC and GOD indexes. Groundwater vulnerability to nitrate pollution was also assessed using the composite DRASTIC (CD) and nitrate vulnerability (NV) indexes. The utility of these methods was tested by analyzing the spatial distribution of nitrate concentrations in the different aquifers located in the study area: the Tertiary Detrital Aquifer, the Moor Limestone Aquifer, the Cretaceous Limestone Aquifer and the Quaternary Aquifer. Vulnerability maps based on these four indexes showed very similar results, identifying the Quaternary Aquifer and the lower sub-unit of the Moor Limestone Aquifer as deposits subjected to a high risk of nitrate pollution due to intensive agriculture. As far as the spatial distribution of groundwater nitrate concentrations is concerned, the NV index showed the greatest statistical significance ( p < 0.01). This new type of multiplicative model offers greater accuracy in estimations of specific vulnerability with respect to the real impact of each type of land use. The results of this study provide a basis on which to guide the designation of nitrate vulnerable zones in the Comunidad de Madrid, in line with European Union Directive 91/676/EEC.

  20. Integrating indicator-based geostatistical estimation and aquifer vulnerability of nitrate-N for establishing groundwater protection zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Cheng-Shin; Chen, Shih-Kai

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater nitrate-N contamination occurs frequently in agricultural regions, primarily resulting from surface agricultural activities. The focus of this study is to establish groundwater protection zones based on indicator-based geostatistical estimation and aquifer vulnerability of nitrate-N in the Choushui River alluvial fan in Taiwan. The groundwater protection zones are determined by univariate indicator kriging (IK) estimation, aquifer vulnerability assessment using logistic regression (LR), and integration of the IK estimation and aquifer vulnerability using simple IK with local prior means (sIKlpm). First, according to the statistical significance of source, transport, and attenuation factors dominating the occurrence of nitrate-N pollution, a LR model was adopted to evaluate aquifer vulnerability and to characterize occurrence probability of nitrate-N exceeding 0.5 mg/L. Moreover, the probabilities estimated using LR were regarded as local prior means. IK was then used to estimate the actual extent of nitrate-N pollution. The integration of the IK estimation and aquifer vulnerability was obtained using sIKlpm. Finally, groundwater protection zones were probabilistically determined using the three aforementioned methods, and the estimated accuracy of the delineated groundwater protection zones was gauged using a cross-validation procedure based on observed nitrate-N data. The results reveal that the integration of the IK estimation and aquifer vulnerability using sIKlpm is more robust than univariate IK estimation and aquifer vulnerability assessment using LR for establishing groundwater protection zones. Rigorous management practices for fertilizer use should be implemented in orchards situated in the determined groundwater protection zones.

  1. Simulation of the transfer of hydrocarbons in unconfined aquifer in tropical zone: the case of benzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnès Kouamé, Amenan; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Derron, Marc-Henri; Kouamé, Kan Jean

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater is the largest global reserves of continental freshwater (Bosca, 2002) and also an important source of drinking water in many parts of the world (Brassington. 2007). However, this resource is today threatened by pollution such as inadequate supply of drinking water services, inaccessibility and / or dilapidated sanitation facilities and excessive use fertilizers, and industrial wastewater and solid waste pesticides (Boubacar, 2010) and the rapid urbanization in great cities (Foster, 2001). Abidjan, the largest city in Côte d'Ivoire is also facing pollution problems such as illegal dumping of waste, waste oil spilled garages, land application of domestic and industrial wastewater, automotive workshops, overexploitation of sand in the Ebrié lagoon, open waste dump of Akouédo and the spill of about 400,000 liters of toxic waste from the ship "Probo Koala" in August 2006. The Abidjan aquifer or the Continental terminal aquifer is the main source of supply drinking water. It is mainly composed of sandy and it is an unconfined aquifer as a whole (Jourda, 1987). According to Gilli and al., (2012), the recharge of unconfined aquifers comes mostly from the infiltration of surface water including rainwater. These waters on their transport in the basement could carry certain pollutants into groundwater. Kouamé (2007) reports a potential groundwater pollution of the "Continental terminal" aquifer in Abidjan. In addition to the cases cited pollution, there has been a proliferation of service stations in the district of Abidjan and this can cause possible pollution. We deemed it necessary to conduct a study on the groundwater pollution of Abidjan by oil in general. We chose benzene to simulate organic pollution in case of accident. To observe the likely evolution of such contaminants in the subsurface, we developed hydrogeological models that couple groundwater flow and benzene transport with FEFLOW software in steady and transient states. The models are composed

  2. Ultrasonic cell disruption of stabilised sludge with subsequent anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyeche, T I; Schläfer, O; Bormann, H; Schröder, C; Sievers, M

    2002-05-01

    The world-wide increasing environmental awareness and its subsequent regulations have led to the application of improved technologies in wastewater purification plants. This has resulted in higher wastewater and sludge productions. Sludge is the by-product of such plants and it is not only rich in organic carbon and pathogens but also in heavy metals and other environmental pollutants. In Europe, agricultural application of dried sludge (bio-solids) is confronted with negative reactions from the citizens, governmental organisations, farmers and the food industry. Ultrasonic disruption of sludge is a popular mechanical disruption process in sludge treatment. During ultrasonic treatment, high frequency acoustic signals are used to initiate the cavitation process. The applied ultrasonic field leads to a breakdown of cohesive forces of the liquid molecules resulting in the generation of cavitation bubbles. A shock wave is released by the collapse of the cavitation bubbles and propagates in the surrounding medium forming jet streams that cause the disruption of cells in sludge. Disruption of sludge cells enables the release of light organic substances into the sludge water thereby exposing them for further anaerobic digestion. This paper presents results on the disruption of conventionally stabilised sludge through the application of the ultrasonic field. In order to reduce the specific energy input (i.e. ratio of the consumed energy during ultrasonic disruption to the input sludge mass) and improve biogas production, the total solids content of the stabilised sludge was increased before disruption. The anaerobic digestion of sludge samples was carried out in a set of specially constructed laboratory anaerobic digesters. Results showed that subsequent anaerobic digestion of the ultrasonically disrupted sludge could improve biogas production with reduced sludge quantity that is vital to the economic consideration of the wastewater treatment plants. This process

  3. Anaerobic digestion of coffee waste

    OpenAIRE

    L. Neves; Ribeiro, R.; Oliveira, Rosário; Alves, M. M.

    2005-01-01

    The anaerobic co-digestion of five different by-products from instant coffee substitutes production was studied in mesophilic conditions. The co-substrate was the excess of sewage sludge from the wastewater treatment plant located in the same coffee factory. Four of the tested wastes produced methane in the range of 0.24-0.28 m³CH4(STP)/kgVSinitial . Reduction of 50-73% in total solids and 75-80% in volatile solids were obtained and the hydrolysis rate constants were in the ran...

  4. A contribution to resource recovery from wastewater. Anaerobic processes for organic matter and nitrogen treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Basset Olivé, Núria

    2015-01-01

    Organic matter and nutrients present in urban and industrial wastewater should be removed or valorised to reduce its impact on the environment. Conventional wastewater treatments are focused on the removal of these pollution sources at the minimum cost. The idea of resource recovery from wastewater is changing the concept of the conventional wastewater treatment plants that tend to incorporate little by little processes as anaerobic digestion, MBR, biofilm, granulation, etc. However, their ap...

  5. Anaerobic digestion of oily wastewater as a valuable source of bioenergy

    OpenAIRE

    Cavaleiro, A. J.; Salvador, Andreia Filipa Ferreira; Alves, M. M.

    2008-01-01

    Lipids are a group of organic pollutants whose conversion into biogas has been considered very difficult. During the anaerobic treatment of lipid-rich wastewater this conversion generally decreases with the increase of the organic loading rate (OLR) applied, due to long chain fatty acids (LCFA) accumulation. To overcome this problem, correct equilibrium between LCFA accumulation and degradation should be assured [1, 2, 3], and discontinuous operation was proposed by Pereira et ...

  6. Phytoremediation of Anaerobic Digester Effluent for Water Purification and Production of Animal Feed

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel E. Ghaly; H. A. Farag

    2007-01-01

    The application of phytoremediation for purification of an anaerobically treated dairy manure and production of forage crops was investigated. Four crops (two cereals and two grasses) were examined for their ability to grow hydroponically and to remove pollutants (nutrients) from dairy wastewater. The preliminary experiments showed that timothygrass and orchardgrass did not perform well as aquatic plants. Only 24 and 29% of the seeds germinated after 19-21 days giving a crop yield of 21 and 1...

  7. Groundwater flow system and Nitrogen cycle in volcanic aquifer of pyroclastic flow uplands, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, K.; Shimada, J.; Tashiro, S.; Niimi, H.

    2007-12-01

    Study area is well-known agriculture area in Southern Kyushu, Japan and highly depends on groundwater resources for their everyday use. Local unconfined groundwater aquifer is widely polluted by Nitrate-Nitrogen originated from agriculture and cattle farming. It will become serious problem if this unconfined Nitrate pollution enlarges into the confined aquifer system which is used for local city water source. The detailed three dimensional groundwater flow system study has been done by using existing wells in the basin to understand the three dimensional distribution pattern of Nitrate-Nitrogen in the aquifer. However, the detailed groundwater age analysis by using Tritium for unconfined and confined groundwater has not been succeeded because of present low atmosphere tritium concentration. Thus we applied to challenge the CFCs dating method. Although the CFCs method has been widely used for dating the young groundwater instead of tritium in many countries, in Japan CFCs has been used only by Oceanographic study and has not been used in the field of Hydrology. The history and fate of Nitrate contamination have been shown in multidisciplinary local transect studies in areas with agricultural sources (Bohlke and Denver 1995). However, identification of Nitrogen sources can be difficult in larger regional studies because of co-occurrence of multiple anthropogenic Nitrogen sources and uncertainty in Nitrogen transformation pathways. Thus, the characterization of N geochemistry remains challenging, particularly in aquifer-scale assessments (Stephen 2006). In this study, the evidence of the shallow groundwater flowing towards deep aquifer was verified by the groundwater dating and the detailed Nitrogen reduction process was confirmed along the groundwater flow.

  8. Hazardous Air Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Hazardous Air Pollutants Hazardous air pollutants are those known to cause ... protect against adverse environmental effects. About Hazardous Air Pollutants What are hazardous air pollutants? Health and Environmental ...

  9. The Internet Pollution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐宁宁

    2005-01-01

    Life today has brought new problems. As we know, there are fourterrible pollutions in the world: water pollution, noise pollution, air pol-lution and rubbish pollution. Water pollution kills our fish and pollutesour drinking water. Noise pollution makes us talk louder and become angry more easily. Air pollution makes us hold our breath longer and be badto all living things in the world. Rubbish pollution often makes our livingenvironment much dirtier. But I think that the Internet pollution is anothernew pollution in the world.

  10. Survival of bacterial indicators and the functional diversity of native microbial communities in the Floridan aquifer system, south Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisle, John T.

    2014-01-01

    model than when exposed to groundwater from the APPZ (range: 0.540–0.684 h-1). The inactivation rates for the first phase of the models for P. aeruginosa were not significantly different between the UFA (range: 0.144–0.770 h-1) and APPZ (range: 0.159–0.772 h-1) aquifer zones. The inactivation rates for the second phase of the model for this P. aeruginosa were also similar between UFA (range: 0.003–0.008 h-1) and APPZ (0.004–0.005 h-1) zones, although significantly slower than the model’s first phase rates for this bacterial species. Geochemical data were used to determine which dissimilatory biogeochemical reactions were most likely to occur under the native conditions in the UFA and APPZ zones using thermodynamics principles to calculate free energy yields and other cell-related energetics data. The biogeochemical processes of acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic sulfate reduction, methanogenesis and anaerobic oxidation of methane dominated in all six groundwater sites. A high throughput DNA microarray sequencing technology was used to characterize the diversity in the native aquifer bacterial communities (bacteria and archaea) and assign putative physiological capabilities to the members of those communities. The bacterial communities in both zones of the aquifer were shown to possess the capabilities for primary and secondary fermentation, acetogenesis, methanogenesis, anaerobic methane oxidation, syntrophy with methanogens, ammonification, and sulfate reduction. The data from this study provide the first determination of bacterial indicator survival during exposure to native geochemical conditions of the Floridan aquifer in south Florida. Additionally, the energetics and functional bacterial diversity characterizations are the first descriptions of native bacterial communities in this region of the Floridan aquifer and reveal how these communities persist under such extreme conditions. Collectively, these types of data can be used to develop and refine

  11. Instrumentation in anaerobic treatment - research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjers, H.; Lier, van J.B.

    2006-01-01

    High rate anaerobic treatment reactors are able to uncouple solids and liquid retention time, resulting in high biomass concentrations. Principal advantages of anaerobic treatment include: energy efficiency, low biomass yield, low nutrient requirement and high volumetric organic loadings. In order t

  12. Carbon monoxide conversion by anaerobic bioreactor sludges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipma, J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P.N.L.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    Seven different anaerobic sludges from wastewater treatment reactors were screened for their ability to convert carbon monoxide (CO) at 30 and 55degreesC
    Seven different anaerobic sludges from wastewater treatment reactors were screened for their ability to convert carbon monoxide (CO) at 30 and

  13. Anaerobic critical velocity in four swimming techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, H P; Fernandes, R J; Vilas-Boas, J P

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess critical velocity in order to control and evaluate anaerobic swimming training. 51 highly trained male swimmers performed maximal 15, 25, 37.5 and 50 m in the 4 swimming techniques to determine critical velocity from the distance-time relationship. Anaerobic critical velocity was compared with 100 m swimming performance and corresponding partials. Complementarily, 9 swimmers performed a 6×50 m (4 min interval) training series at front crawl individual anaerobic critical velocity, capillary blood lactate concentrations being assessed after each repetition. The mean±SD values of anaerobic critical velocity and its relationship with the 100 m event were: 1.61±0.07 (r=0.60, p=0.037), 1.53±0.05 (r=0.81, p=0.015), 1.33±0.05 (r=0.83, p=0.002), and 1.75±0.05 (r=0.74, p=0.001), for butterfly, backstroke, breaststroke and front crawl, respectively. However, differences between anaerobic critical velocity and performance were observed (with exception of the second half of the 100 m swimming events in breaststroke and butterfly). Lactate concentration values at the end of the series were 14.52±1.06 mmol.l (-1), which suggests that it was indeed an anaerobic training set. In this sense, anaerobic critical velocity can be used to prescribe anaerobic training intensities.

  14. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  15. Groundwater exploration and exploitation of the Caracas aquifer, Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Caracas valley is bordered by crystalline rocks, and the valley fill (Caracas aquifer) comprises the weathering products of these rocks, such as fluvial gravels and sands, in addition to clay and silts from former lakes. All these sediments intercalate in a very irregular manner. Groundwater recharge below Caracas is pronounced because of significant exfiltrations of drinking water out of the distribution net. This creates an important dilution potential for pollutants and stimulates the development of microbiological activity. These, however, cannot favour groundwater withdrawal from the active recharge zone, because protection measures will be difficult to realize. It is therefore recommended that groundwater exploitation be restricted to the passive recharge zone by wells with filter screens more than 100 m below the surface

  16. Predicting the denitrification capacity of sandy aquifers from shorter-term incubation experiments and sediment properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Eschenbach

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the spatial variability of denitrification rates and the lifetime of denitrification in nitrate-contaminated aquifers is crucial to predict the development of groundwater quality. Therefore, regression models were derived to estimate the measured cumulative denitrification of aquifer sediments after one year of incubation from initial denitrification rates and several sediment parameters, namely total sulphur, total organic carbon, extractable sulphate, extractable dissolved organic carbon, hot water soluble organic carbon and potassium permanganate labile organic carbon.

    For this purpose, we incubated aquifer material from two sandy Pleistocene aquifers in Northern Germany under anaerobic conditions in the laboratory using the 15N tracer technique. The measured amount of denitrification ranged from 0.19 to 56.2 mg N kg−1 yr−1. The laboratory incubations exhibited high differences between non-sulphidic and sulphidic aquifer material in both aquifers with respect to all investigated sediment parameters. Denitrification rates and the estimated lifetime of denitrification were higher in the sulphidic samples. For these samples, the cumulative denitrification measured during one year of incubation (Dcum(365 exhibited distinct linear regressions with the stock of reduced compounds in the investigated aquifer samples. Dcum(365 was predictable from sediment variables within a range of uncertainty of 0.5 to 2 (calculated Dcum(365/measured Dcum(365 for aquifer material with a Dcum(365 > 20 mg N kg−1 yr−1. Predictions were poor for samples with lower Dcum(365, such as samples from the NO3 bearing groundwater zone, which includes the non-sulphidic samples, from the upper part of both aquifers where denitrification is not sufficient to

  17. Remediation of Trichloroethylene and Monochlorobenzene-Contaminated Aquifers Using the ORC-GAC-Fe0-CaCO3 System:Volatilization, Precipitation,and Porosity Losses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qi; V. PLAGENTZ; D. SCHAFER; A. DAHMKE

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to illustrate the reaction processes, to identify and quantify the precipitates formed, and to estimate the porosity losses in order to eliminate drawbacks during remediating monochlorobenzene (MCB) and trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated aquifers using the ORC-GAC-Fe0-CaCO3 system. The system consisted of four columns (112 cm long and 10 cm in diameter) with oxygen-releasing compound (ORC), granular activated carbon (GAC),zero-valent iron (Fe0), and calcite used sequentially as the reactive media. The concentrations of MCB in the GAC column effluent and TCE in the Fe0 column effluent were below the detection limit. However, the concentrations of MCB and TCE in the final calcite column exceeded the maximum contaminant level (MCL) under the Safe Drinking Water Act of the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) that protects human health and environment. These results suggested that partitioning of MCB and TCE into the gas phase could occur, and also that transportation of volatile organic pollutants in the gas phase was important. Three main precipitates formed in the ORC-GAC-Fe0-CaCO3 system:CaCO3 in the ORC column along with Fe(OH)2 and FeCO3 in the Fe0 column. The total porosity losses caused by mineral precipitation corresponded to about 0.24% porosity in the ORC column, and 1% in the Fe0 column. The most important cause of porosity losses was anaerobic corrosion of iron. The porosity losses caused by gas because of the production and entrapment of oxygen in the ORC column and hydrogen in the Fe0 column should not be ignored. Volatilization, precipitation and porosity losses were considered to be the main drawbacks of the ORC-GAC-Fe0-CaCO3 system in remediating the MCB and TCE-contaminated aquifers. Thus, measurements such as using a suitable oxygen-releasing compound, weakening the increase in pH using a buffer material such as soil, stimulating biodegradation rates and minimizing the plugging caused by the relatively high

  18. Occurrence of pesticides in transboundary aquifers of North-eastern Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vryzas, Zisis; Papadakis, Emmanuel N; Vassiliou, George; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, Euphemia

    2012-12-15

    A five-year groundwater monitoring program undertaken in Evros (north-east Greece), showed a diversification in the levels of pesticide residues detected in adjacent transboundary aquifers. During the first two years 37 wells, including irrigation, drinking water and artesian wells were monitored while the next three years the survey was focused on the 11 most contaminated wells. The presence of pesticide residues was also monitored in the phreatic horizon (shallow groundwater) of four experimental boreholes drilled in the respective margins of four fields. Among the compounds found alachlor, metolachlor, atrazine, desethylatrazine (DEA), desisopropylatrazine (DIA) and caffeine were constantly detected. Pesticide concentrations were much lower (up to 1.54 μg/L) in the water of the monitored drinking water wells (deep groundwater aquifers) compared to those found in the phreatic horizon (experimental boreholes) of the respective areas (up to 5.20 μg/L). DEA to atrazine concentration ratios (DAR) determined for the phreatic horizon of the three boreholes and respective wells were lower than 1, indicating that preferential flow was the cause of the fast downward movement of atrazine to the phreatic horizon. In contrast the DAR for the fourth borehole and the adjacent well were greater than 1 indicating the absence of preferential flow of atrazine. Catabolic processes of the soil converted atrazine to DEA which is more mobile than atrazine itself through chromatographic (darcian) flow. This differential behavior of pesticides in adjacent aquifers (3 km) was further investigated by determining the apparent age of water in the two wells. The apparent age of the water present in the first aquifer was 21.7 years whereas the apparent age of that in the second aquifer was approximately 1.2 years. The faster replenishing rate of the latter is an indication that this aquifer is very vulnerable to contamination with pollutants present in the infiltrated soil water. PMID

  19. Anaerobic biorefinery: Current status, challenges, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatdeenarunat, Chayanon; Nguyen, Duc; Surendra, K C; Shrestha, Shilva; Rajendran, Karthik; Oechsner, Hans; Xie, Li; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) has been in use for many decades. To date, it has been primarily aimed at treating organic wastes, mainly manures and wastewater sludge, and industrial wastewaters. However, with the current advancements, a more open mind is required to look beyond these somewhat restricted original applications of AD. Biorefineries are such concepts, where multiple products including chemicals, fuels, polymers etc. are produced from organic feedstocks. The anaerobic biorefinery concept is now gaining increased attention, utilizing AD as the final disposal step. This review aims at evaluating the potential significance of anaerobic biorefineries, including types of feedstocks, uses for the produced energy, as well as sustainable applications of the generated residual digestate. A comprehensive analysis of various types of anaerobic biorefineries has been developed, including both large-scale and household level applications. Finally, future directives are highlighted showing how anaerobic biorefinery concept could impact the bioeconomy in the near future. PMID:27005786

  20. Recharge from rectangular areas to finite aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N. H.; Sarma, P. B. S.

    1981-10-01

    A generalized analytical solution is derived for the growth of groundwater mound in finite aquifers bounded by open water bodies, in response to recharge from rectangular areas. Finite Fourier transforms are used to solve the linearized differential equation of groundwater flow. Unlike earlier solutions, the method presented here does not require the use of tables for evaluation of complicated functions. The solution is evaluated by comparison with existing numerical and analytical results. In stream-aquifer systems similar to those described above, application of the proposed solution is more realistic than using solutions available for infinite aquifers.

  1. Water Pollution. Project COMPSEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, H. B., Jr.

    This is an introductory program on water pollution. Examined are the cause and effect relationships of water pollution, sources of water pollution, and possible alternatives to effect solutions from our water pollution problems. Included is background information on water pollution, a glossary of pollution terminology, a script for a slide script…

  2. Assessment of groundwater vulnerability and risk to pollution in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sangam; Semkuyu, Dickson John; Pandey, Vishnu P

    2016-06-15

    Groundwater vulnerability and risk assessment is a useful tool for groundwater pollution prevention and control. In this study, GIS based DRASTIC model have been used to assess intrinsic aquifer vulnerability to pollution whereas Groundwater Risk Assessment Model (GRAM) was used to assess the risk to groundwater pollution in the groundwater basin of Kathmandu Valley. Seven hydrogeological factors were used in DRASTIC model to produce DRASTIC Index (DI) map which represent intrinsic groundwater vulnerability to pollution of the area. The seven hydrogeological factors used were depth to water, net recharge, aquifer media, soil media, topography, impact of vadose zone, and hydraulic conductivity of aquifer. GIS based GRAM was used to produce likelihood of release of hazards, likelihood of detection of hazards, consequence of hazards and residual risk of groundwater contamination in terms of nitrate in the groundwater basin. It was found that more than 50% of the groundwater basin area in the valley is susceptible to groundwater pollution and these areas are mostly in Northern groundwater district Low and very low vulnerable areas account for only 13% and are located in Central and Southern groundwater districts. However after taking into account the barriers to groundwater pollution and likelihood of hazards release and detection, it was observed that most areas i.e. about 87% of the groundwater basin are at moderate residual risk to groundwater pollution. The resultant groundwater vulnerability and risk map provides a basis for policy makers and planner's ability to use information effectively for decision making at protecting the groundwater from pollutants.

  3. Assessment of groundwater vulnerability and risk to pollution in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sangam; Semkuyu, Dickson John; Pandey, Vishnu P

    2016-06-15

    Groundwater vulnerability and risk assessment is a useful tool for groundwater pollution prevention and control. In this study, GIS based DRASTIC model have been used to assess intrinsic aquifer vulnerability to pollution whereas Groundwater Risk Assessment Model (GRAM) was used to assess the risk to groundwater pollution in the groundwater basin of Kathmandu Valley. Seven hydrogeological factors were used in DRASTIC model to produce DRASTIC Index (DI) map which represent intrinsic groundwater vulnerability to pollution of the area. The seven hydrogeological factors used were depth to water, net recharge, aquifer media, soil media, topography, impact of vadose zone, and hydraulic conductivity of aquifer. GIS based GRAM was used to produce likelihood of release of hazards, likelihood of detection of hazards, consequence of hazards and residual risk of groundwater contamination in terms of nitrate in the groundwater basin. It was found that more than 50% of the groundwater basin area in the valley is susceptible to groundwater pollution and these areas are mostly in Northern groundwater district Low and very low vulnerable areas account for only 13% and are located in Central and Southern groundwater districts. However after taking into account the barriers to groundwater pollution and likelihood of hazards release and detection, it was observed that most areas i.e. about 87% of the groundwater basin are at moderate residual risk to groundwater pollution. The resultant groundwater vulnerability and risk map provides a basis for policy makers and planner's ability to use information effectively for decision making at protecting the groundwater from pollutants. PMID:26971207

  4. Phylogenetic and functional diversity within toluene-degrading, sulphate-reducing consortia enriched from a contaminated aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppardt, Anke; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Vogt, Carsten; Lüders, Tillmann; Harms, Hauke; Chatzinotas, Antonis

    2014-08-01

    Three toluene-degrading microbial consortia were enriched under sulphate-reducing conditions from different zones of a benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) plume of two connected contaminated aquifers. Two cultures were obtained from a weakly contaminated zone of the lower aquifer, while one culture originated from the highly contaminated upper aquifer. We hypothesised that the different habitat characteristics are reflected by distinct degrader populations. Degradation of toluene with concomitant production of sulphide was demonstrated in laboratory microcosms and the enrichment cultures were phylogenetically characterised. The benzylsuccinate synthase alpha-subunit (bssA) marker gene, encoding the enzyme initiating anaerobic toluene degradation, was targeted to characterise the catabolic diversity within the enrichment cultures. It was shown that the hydrogeochemical parameters in the different zones of the plume determined the microbial composition of the enrichment cultures. Both enrichment cultures from the weakly contaminated zone were of a very similar composition, dominated by Deltaproteobacteria with the Desulfobulbaceae (a Desulfopila-related phylotype) as key players. Two different bssA sequence types were found, which were both affiliated to genes from sulphate-reducing Deltaproteobacteria. In contrast, the enrichment culture from the highly contaminated zone was dominated by Clostridia with a Desulfosporosinus-related phylotype as presumed key player. A distinct bssA sequence type with high similarity to other recently detected sequences from clostridial toluene degraders was dominant in this culture. This work contributes to our understanding of the niche partitioning between degrader populations in distinct compartments of BTEX-contaminated aquifers.

  5. Volcanic and sedimentary-rock aquifers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the Volcanic and sedimentary-rock aquifers in the states of Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Nevada, California, Oregon, and...

  6. Hydrogeology - MO 2014 Thermoclines Ozark Aquifer (SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Ozark Aquifer thermo cline correlates the temperature data throughout the state in the Ordovician System and the Upper Cambrian Series, consisting of the Eminence...

  7. Aquifer vulnerability for Colorado and New Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey Data Series provides raster data representing an estimate of aquifer vulnerability calculated for each 30-meter raster cell. Depth to...

  8. Hydrogeologic characterization of devonian aquifers in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article carried out the assistance research project implementation in devonian sedimentary units as a potentials aquifers and their best use to school supplying and rural population in central area of Uruguay.

  9. Nitrate reduction in an unconfined sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Boesen, Carsten; Kristiansen, Henning;

    1991-01-01

    in the reduced zone of the aquifer are organic matter, present as reworked brown coal fragments from the underlying Miocene, and small amounts of pyrite at an average concentration of 3.6 mmol/kg. Electron balances across the redoxcline, based on concentrations of O2, NO3-, SO4(2-) and total inorganic carbon......Nitrate distribution and reduction processes were investigated in an unconfined sandy aquifer of Quaternary age. Groundwater chemistry was studied in a series of eight multilevel samplers along a flow line, deriving water from both arable and forested land. Results show that plumes of nitrate......-contaminated groundwater emanate from the agricultural areas and spread through the aquifer. The aquifer can be subdivided into an upper 10- to 15-m thick oxic zone that contains O2 and NO3-, and a lower anoxic zone characterized by Fe2+-rich waters. The redox boundary is very sharp, which suggests that reduction...

  10. As contamination in Mercedes (Uruguay) aquifer groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study presents data on the concentration of arsenic in groundwater aquifer Mercedes, where the highest concentration area is located in New Palmira.A geological formation decryption of the Mercedes for the Upper Cretaceous is made.

  11. North Atlantic Coastal Plain aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the North Atlantic Coastal Plain aquifer system in North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Deleware, and New Jersey.

  12. Biodegradation of phenols in a sandstone aquifer under aerobic conditions and mixed nitrate and iron reducing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette; Arvin, Erik

    2000-01-01

    in the groundwater. The potential for biodegradation of the phenols in the sandstone aquifer at the site has been investigated in laboratory microcosms under aerobic (oxygen amended) and mixed nitrate and iron reducing (nitrate enriched and unamended) anaerobic conditions, at a range of concentrations (low: similar...... to 5 mg 1(-1): high: similar to 60 mg 1(-1), and very high: similar to 600 mg 1(-1)) and in the presence of other organic coal-tar compounds (mono- and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (BTEXs and PAHs) and heterocyclic compounds (NSOs)) and ammonia liquor. Sandstone cores and groundwater for the microcosms...

  13. Investigating sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in aquifers in Tokyo using multiple tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We employed a multi-tracer approach to investigate sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in urban groundwater, based on 53 groundwater samples taken from confined aquifers and unconfined aquifers in Tokyo. While the median concentrations of groundwater PFAAs were several ng/L, the maximum concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, 990 ng/L), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA, 1800 ng/L) and perfluorononanoate (PFNA, 620 ng/L) in groundwater were several times higher than those of wastewater and street runoff reported in the literature. PFAAs were more frequently detected than sewage tracers (carbamazepine and crotamiton), presumably owing to the higher persistence of PFAAs, the multiple sources of PFAAs beyond sewage (e.g., surface runoff, point sources) and the formation of PFAAs from their precursors. Use of multiple methods of source apportionment including principal component analysis–multiple linear regression (PCA–MLR) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acid ratio analysis highlighted sewage and point sources as the primary sources of PFAAs in the most severely polluted groundwater samples, with street runoff being a minor source (44.6% sewage, 45.7% point sources and 9.7% street runoff, by PCA–MLR). Tritium analysis indicated that, while young groundwater (recharged during or after the 1970s, when PFAAs were already in commercial use) in shallow aquifers (< 50 m depth) was naturally highly vulnerable to PFAA pollution, PFAAs were also found in old groundwater (recharged before the 1950s, when PFAAs were not in use) in deep aquifers (50–500 m depth). This study demonstrated the utility of multiple uses of tracers (pharmaceuticals and personal care products; PPCPs, tritium) and source apportionment methods in investigating sources and pathways of PFAAs in multiple aquifer systems. - Highlights: • Aquifers in Tokyo had high levels of perfluoroalkyl acids (up to 1800 ng/L). • PFAAs were more frequently detected than sewage

  14. Investigating sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in aquifers in Tokyo using multiple tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, Keisuke, E-mail: keisukekr@gmail.com [Department of Urban Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Murakami, Michio [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Oguma, Kumiko [Department of Urban Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takada, Hideshige [Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry (LOG), Institute of Symbiotic Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Fuchu, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan); Takizawa, Satoshi [Department of Urban Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We employed a multi-tracer approach to investigate sources and pathways of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) in urban groundwater, based on 53 groundwater samples taken from confined aquifers and unconfined aquifers in Tokyo. While the median concentrations of groundwater PFAAs were several ng/L, the maximum concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, 990 ng/L), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA, 1800 ng/L) and perfluorononanoate (PFNA, 620 ng/L) in groundwater were several times higher than those of wastewater and street runoff reported in the literature. PFAAs were more frequently detected than sewage tracers (carbamazepine and crotamiton), presumably owing to the higher persistence of PFAAs, the multiple sources of PFAAs beyond sewage (e.g., surface runoff, point sources) and the formation of PFAAs from their precursors. Use of multiple methods of source apportionment including principal component analysis–multiple linear regression (PCA–MLR) and perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acid ratio analysis highlighted sewage and point sources as the primary sources of PFAAs in the most severely polluted groundwater samples, with street runoff being a minor source (44.6% sewage, 45.7% point sources and 9.7% street runoff, by PCA–MLR). Tritium analysis indicated that, while young groundwater (recharged during or after the 1970s, when PFAAs were already in commercial use) in shallow aquifers (< 50 m depth) was naturally highly vulnerable to PFAA pollution, PFAAs were also found in old groundwater (recharged before the 1950s, when PFAAs were not in use) in deep aquifers (50–500 m depth). This study demonstrated the utility of multiple uses of tracers (pharmaceuticals and personal care products; PPCPs, tritium) and source apportionment methods in investigating sources and pathways of PFAAs in multiple aquifer systems. - Highlights: • Aquifers in Tokyo had high levels of perfluoroalkyl acids (up to 1800 ng/L). • PFAAs were more frequently detected than sewage

  15. Effective distribution of emulsified edible oil for enhanced anaerobic bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, Robert C.

    2007-10-01

    Recent laboratory and field studies have shown that injection of emulsified edible oils can provide an effective, low-cost alternative for stimulating anaerobic biodegradation processes. A pilot-scale permeable reactive bio-barrier (PRBB) was installed at a perchlorate and chlorinated solvent impacted site by injecting 380 L of commercially available emulsion (EOS ®) containing emulsified soybean oil, food-grade surfactants, lactate, and yeast extract through ten direct push injection wells over a two day period. Soil cores collected six months after emulsion injection indicate the oil was distributed up to 5 m downgradient of the injection wells. A previously developed emulsion transport model was used to simulate emulsion transport and retention using independently estimated model parameters. While there was considerable variability in the soil sampling results, the model simulations generally agreed with the observed oil distribution at the field site. Model sensitivity analyses indicate that increasing the injection flow rate or diluting the oil with more water will have little effect on final oil distribution in the aquifer. The only effective approach for enhancing the spread of emulsified oil away from the injection well appears to be injecting a greater mass of oil.

  16. Improving Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    S. Kranz; G. Blöcher; Ali Saadat

    2015-01-01

    Aquifer thermal energy storage systems play an important role for the future energy supply systems. Such systems can decouple energy availability (e.g. fluctuating renewable energy, waste heat) and energy supply in times of demand. In order to fully contribute to the sustainability of energy supply, the essential requirements of energy storages are high energy efficiency, high reliability, cost effectiveness, as well as operational flexibility. Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Systems (ATES) me...

  17. Annual and nycthemeral studies of the survival and circulation of indicator bacteria in a schist aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisey, Elise; Belle, Emilien; Mudry, Jacques; Aleya, Lotfi

    2011-07-01

    Escherichia coli and Enterococci are widely used as indicators of faecal contamination of groundwater while total coliforms, which are of environmental but also of faecal origin, are indicators of the overall quality of the water. The survival of bacteria in groundwater is dependent on many factors including temperature, competition with indigenous bacteria and entrapment in aquifer material. Previous studies showed two sources of faecal contamination of a schist aquifer: infiltration into the ground from nearby septic tank effluents and seepage of landfill leachate. Water samples for bacterial analysis were collected from a piezometer on a monthly basis (15 months) and every six hours over two non-consecutive days. The intermittent sampling showed relatively stable concentrations of bacteria over time after the removal of stagnant water. Therefore, a continuous bacterial contamination without significant daily variation exists. The ratio of E. coli densities to total coliforms densities (EC/TC) allowed differentiation between the sources of faecal pollution in groundwater by comparing the populations of faecal bacteria with those of environmental bacteria. Enumeration indicated that the densities of bacteria were much higher in this schist aquifer than those in alluvial aquifers contaminated by a septic tank reported in the literature. PMID:21882565

  18. Long-distance electron transfer by cable bacteria in aquifer sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Hubert; Bosch, Julian; Griebler, Christian; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Lueders, Tillmann; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2016-08-01

    The biodegradation of organic pollutants in aquifers is often restricted to the fringes of contaminant plumes where steep countergradients of electron donors and acceptors are separated by limited dispersive mixing. However, long-distance electron transfer (LDET) by filamentous 'cable bacteria' has recently been discovered in marine sediments to couple spatially separated redox half reactions over centimeter scales. Here we provide primary evidence that such sulfur-oxidizing cable bacteria can also be found at oxic-anoxic interfaces in aquifer sediments, where they provide a means for the direct recycling of sulfate by electron transfer over 1-2-cm distance. Sediments were taken from a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer, amended with iron sulfide and saturated with water, leaving the sediment surface exposed to air. Steep geochemical gradients developed in the upper 3 cm, showing a spatial separation of oxygen and sulfide by 9 mm together with a pH profile characteristic for sulfur oxidation by LDET. Bacterial filaments, which were highly abundant in the suboxic zone, were identified by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as cable bacteria belonging to the Desulfobulbaceae. The detection of similar Desulfobulbaceae at the oxic-anoxic interface of fresh sediment cores taken at a contaminated aquifer suggests that LDET may indeed be active at the capillary fringe in situ.

  19. The influence of bedrock hydrogeology on catchment-scale nitrate fate and transport in fractured aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Alison; Nitsche, Janka; Archbold, Marie; Deakin, Jenny; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Flynn, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    Characterising catchment scale biogeochemical processes controlling nitrate fate in groundwater constitutes a fundamental consideration when applying programmes of measures to reduce risks posed by diffuse agricultural pollutants to water quality. Combining hydrochemical analyses with nitrate isotopic data and physical hydrogeological measurements permitted characterisation of biogeochemical processes influencing nitrogen fate and transport in the groundwater in two fractured bedrock aquifers with contrasting hydrogeology but comparable nutrient loads. Hydrochemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater samples collected from moderately fractured, diffusely karstified limestone indicated nitrification controlled dissolved nitrogen fate and delivery to aquatic receptors. By contrast nitrate concentrations in groundwater were considerably lower in a low transmissivity highly lithified sandstone and pyrite-bearing shale unit with patchy subsoil cover. Geophysical and hydrochemical investigations showed shallower intervals contained hydraulically active fractures where denitrification was reflected through lower nitrogen levels and an isotopic enrichment ratio of 1.7 between δ(15)N and δ(18)O. Study findings highlight the influence of bedrock hydrogeological conditions on aqueous nitrogen mobility. Investigation results demonstrate that bedrock conditions need to be considered when implementing catchment management plans to reduce the impact of agricultural practices on the quality of groundwater and baseflow in receiving rivers. Nitrate isotopic signatures in the groundwater of a freely draining catchment underlain by a karstified aquifer and a poorly draining aquifer with a low transmissivity aquifer. PMID:27432726

  20. Effect of music on anaerobic exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atan, T

    2013-03-01

    For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-based Anaerobic Sprint Test (RAST) under 3 conditions on separate days: while listening to "slow rhythm music", "fast rhythm music" or "no music". 48 hours after the subjects completed RAST under 3 conditions, Wingate Anaerobic Power (WAN) tests were performed under 3 music conditions. The order of the 3 conditions (slow music, fast music and no music) was selected randomly to prevent an order effect. Results showed no significant differences between 3 conditions in anaerobic power assessments, heart rate or blood lactate (p > 0.05). On the basis of these results it can be said that music cannot improve anaerobic performance. The type of music had no impact on power outputs during RAST and WAN exercise. As a conclusion, listening to music and its rhythm cannot enhance anaerobic performance and cannot change the physiological response to supramaximal exercise. PMID:24744463

  1. Modeling multi-component transport and enhanced anaerobic dechlorination processes in a single fracture-clay matrix system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Broholm, Mette Martina; Binning, Philip John;

    2010-01-01

    of a contaminant in a single fracture-clay matrix system coupled with a reactive model for anaerobic dechlorination. The model takes into account microbially driven anaerobic dechlorination, where sequential Monod kinetics with competitive inhibition is used to model the reaction rates, and degradation...... is localized to account for potential pore size limitations on microbial entry to the clay matrix. The model is used to assess the distribution of TCE and its daughter products in the clay matrix and the concentration of the different compounds at the outlet of the fracture. The time frame for complete cleanup...... to the physical processes, mainly diffusion in the matrix, than to the biogeochemical processes, when dechlorination is assumed to take place in a limited reaction zone only. The inclusion of sequential dechlorination in clay fracture transport models is crucial, as the contaminant flux to the aquifer...

  2. The nitrogen cycle in highly urbanized tropical regions and the effect of river-aquifer interactions: The case of Jakarta and the Ciliwung River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Diogo; Burlando, Paolo; Priadi, Cindy; Shie-Yui, Liong

    2016-09-01

    Groundwater is extensively used in Jakarta to compensate for the limited public water supply network. Recent observations show a rise in nitrate (NO3-) levels in the shallow aquifer, thus pointing at a potential risk for public health. The detected levels are still below national and international regulatory limits for drinking water but a strategy is necessary to contain the growing problem. We combine 3 years of available data in the Ciliwung River, the major river flowing through Jakarta, with a distributed river-aquifer interaction model to characterise the impact of urbanisation on the N-cycle of both surface and groundwater systems. Results show that the N-cycle in the river-aquifer system is heterogeneous in space, seasonal dependent (i.e. flow regime) and strongly affected by urban pollution. Results suggest also that although the main sources of N related groundwater pollution are leaking septic tanks, the aquifer interaction with the Ciliwung River may locally have a strong effect on the concentrations. In the general context of pollution control in urban areas, this study demonstrates how advanced process-based models can be efficiently used in combination with field measurements to bring new insights into complex contamination problems. These are essential for more effective and integrated management of water quality in river-aquifer systems.

  3. Predicting long-term denitrification capacity of sandy aquifers from incubation experiments and sediment properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Eschenbach

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the spatial variability of denitrification rates and the lifetime of denitrification in nitrate-contaminated aquifers is crucial to predict the development of groundwater quality. Therefore, regression models were derived to estimate the measured denitrification capacity of incubated aquifer sediments from initial denitrification rates and several sediment parameters, namely total sulphur, total organic carbon, extractable sulfate, extractable dissolved organic carbon, hot water soluble organic carbon and potassium permanganate labile organic carbon.

    For this purpose, we incubated aquifer material from two sandy Pleistocene aquifers in Northern Germany under anaerobic conditions in the laboratory using the 15N tracer technique. The measured long-term denitrification capacities ranged from 0.18 to 56.2 mg N kg−1 yr−1. The laboratory incubations exhibited high differences between non-sulphidic and sulphidic aquifer material in both aquifers with respect to all investigated sediment parameters. Denitrification rates and the estimated lifetime of denitrification were higher in the sulphidic samples. Denitrification capacity measured during one year of incubation (Dcap was predictable from sediment variables within a range of uncertainty of 0.5 to 2 (calculated Dcap/measured Dcap for aquifer material with a Dcap > 20 mg N kg−1 yr−1. Predictions were poor for samples with lower Dcap like samples from the NO3-bearing groundwater zone, which includes the non-sulphidic samples, from the upper part of both aquifers where Dcap is not sufficient to protect groundwater from anthropogenic NO3 input. Calculation of Dcap from initial denitrification rates was only successful for samples from the NO

  4. Indoor Air Pollution (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Students to Environmental Health Information Menu Home Air Pollution Air Pollution Home Indoor Air Pollution Outdoor Air Pollution ... Pollution Indoor Air Pollution Print this Page Air Pollution Air Pollution Home Indoor Air Pollution Outdoor Air Pollution ...

  5. Anaerobic digestion of organic solid waste for energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayono, Satoto Endar

    2010-07-01

    The total amount of municipal solid waste is continuously rising. Consequently, there are millions of tons of solid waste being produced every year which have to be safely disposed without any negative impact to the environment. On the other hand, as one of the driving forces for economic and social development the availability of energy in sufficient and sustainable amount has been becoming world's main interest. However, depending on the way the energy is produced, distributed and used, it may contribute to environmental problems such as water, land and air pollution or even global climate change. Anaerobic digestion as a pre-treatment prior to landfill disposal or composting offers several advantages, such as minimization of masses and volume, inactivation of biological and biochemical processes in order to avoid landfill-gas and odor emissions, reduction of landfill settlements and energy production in the form of methane. Therefore, anaerobic digestion of bio-degradable solid wastes can be considered an alternative option to improve the environment condition caused by organic solid waste and at the same time taking an advantage as an environmentally-friendly resource of energy. This study was carried out in order to evaluate the performance of anaerobic reactors treating OFMSW (organic fraction of municipal solid waste), especially in terms of its energy recovery, either by investigating the maximum organic loading rate or by co-digestion with other types of wastes for energy recovery. In order to reach the research purpose, several experimental activities such as characteristics examination of different organic solid wastes, which are potential substrates for anaerobic digestion and performance evaluation of the anaerobic reactors treating OFMSW were initiated. The Except for source-sorted OFMSW (later called biowaste), the substrates examined in this study were pressing leachate from an OFMSW composting plant (press water), source-sorted foodwaste

  6. Antimicrobial resistance and susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetz, Audrey N

    2014-09-01

    Infections due to anaerobic bacteria can be severe and life-threatening. Susceptibility testing of anaerobes is not frequently performed in laboratories, but such testing is important to direct appropriate therapy. Anaerobic resistance is increasing globally, and resistance trends vary by geographic region. An overview of a variety of susceptibility testing methods for anaerobes is provided, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are reviewed. Specific clinical situations warranting anaerobic susceptibility testing are discussed.

  7. Characterizing the Anaerobic Response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by Quantitative Proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Terashima, Mia; Specht, Michael; Naumann, Bianca; Hippler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The versatile metabolism of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is reflected in its complex response to anaerobic conditions. The anaerobic response is also remarkable in the context of renewable energy because C. reinhardtii is able to produce hydrogen under anaerobic conditions. To identify proteins involved during anaerobic acclimation as well as to localize proteins and pathways to the powerhouses of the cell, chloroplasts and mitochondria from C. reinhardtii in aerobic and anaerobic...

  8. Performance analysis of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors in the treatment of swine wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz A. V. Sarmento

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of confined systems for swine production have been increased the use of water in these installations and, consequently, an each time greater production of wastewater. Diagnostics have been showed a high level of water pollution due the waste material release on lands without criterions and in waters without previous treatment. The utilization of anaerobic process to reduce the liquid residues pollutant power has been detaching because beyond reducing the environmental pollution they allow to recover the energetic potential as fertilizer and biogas. In this work the performance of two real scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactors treating swine wastewater were evaluated through operational system analysis, physical-chemical parameters of pollution and biogas production measurement. The results permitted to verify upflow rate speeds above of the value for which these reactors were designed and hydraulic residence times under of the design value. These factors affected negatively the treatment and had reflected on the law removal of the physical-chemical parameters and biogas production. The maximum removal efficiencies reached for TSS, BOD and COD were 72,5%, 34,7% and 40,0%, respectively. The mean rate of biogas liberation was 0,011 m-³ m-².h-1.

  9. Basement Aquifers : How Useful Are Gravity Data ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genthon, P.; Mouhouyouddine, A. H.; Hinderer, J.; Hector, B.; Yameogo, S.

    2014-12-01

    Gravity data with a few microgal precision were proved to be able to constrain the specific yield of various kinds of aquifer in West Africa from annual fluctuations of both the gravimetric and piezometric signals (Pfeffer et al., Geophys. J. Int., 2011; Hector et al., Geophys. J. Int., 2013). However some recent papers reported a disappointing potential of gravity measurements during a pumping experiment in a sandy aquifer (Blainey et al., WRR, 2007; Herckenrath et al., WRR, 2012) and their poor ability in constraining the transmissity and specific yield of the aquifer, which are the parameters to which pumping tests give access. Fresh basement rocks present generally a null porosity and the structure of basement aquifers is given by the weathering profile. In tropical climate, this profile consists of a few tens meter thick saprolite layer, with noticeable porosity but low permeability overlying the weathering front. This weathering front includes in many instances a fractured medium and presents a high permeability with variable porosity. It is hardly sampled in coring experiments. We present some numerical simulation results on the ability of gravity to constrain the transmissivity of this medium. Due to poroelasticity of clay minerals in the saprolite, soil subsidence is expected to occur during pumping with a significant gravity effect. Gravity measurements have therefore to be completed with leveling data at a millimetric precision. We present first the results of numerical modeling of the gravity and subsidence for a theoretical horizontally stratified basement aquifer, and show that gravity and leveling are able to provide independently the poroelasticity coefficient and a single transmissivity coefficient for the bottom of the aquifer, if the properties of the upper saprolites are known. We will discuss then the general case, where the aquifer presents a vertical fracture where the weathering profile thickens.

  10. Multidepth pumping tests in deep aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, N; Olsthoorn, T N

    2014-09-01

    Multidepth pumping tests (MDPTs), in which different sections of a screen are pumped in sequence, are not being used by hydrogeologists, despite the capability of such tests to resolve uncertainties in the estimation of aquifer characteristics. MDPTs can be used to discern the effects of partial penetration and vertical anisotropy. This article demonstrates the use of MDPTs for a deep and vertically anisotropic aquifer, based on a real and unique series of pumping tests conducted in the Indus Basin. Traditional single-layer methods, which incorporate partial penetration and vertical scaling, were employed to evaluate these tests. However, the drawdowns of the 19 piezometers at different depths for which times series data were available could not be matched, presumably because of the layered structure of the aquifer. Numerical (MODFLOW) and multilayer analytical (Hemker and Maas 1987; Hemker 1999) approaches were used to assess the benefits of using MDPTs in the analysis of deep layered and anisotropic aquifers. The multilayer analytical solution results are consistent with the measured and numerically computed drawdowns. The original step-drawdown data were used to verify the model independently. The results of statistical analyses indicate that the parameters for a three-layer system are uniquely estimated. A sensitivity analysis showed that aquifer depths greater than 900 m do not affect the drawdown. The multilayer analytical solution was implemented in MATLAB and can be found in the online version of this article. This multilayer analytical approach was implemented in MLU by Hemker and Randall (2013) for up to 40 layers. The results of this study will be useful in groundwater management, exploration, and optimal well depth estimation for the Indus Basin aquifer and other vertically heterogeneous aquifers. PMID:24428328

  11. Aquifer recharge with reclaimed water in the Llobregat Delta. Laboratory batch experiments and field test site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobella, J.

    2010-05-01

    Summary Spain, as most other Mediterranean countries, faces near future water shortages, generalized pollution and loss of water dependent ecosystems. Aquifer recharge represents a promising option to become a source for indirect potable reuse purposes but presence of pathogens as well as organic and inorganic pollutants should be avoided. To this end, understanding the processes of biogeochemical degradation occurring within the aquifer during infiltration is capital. A set of laboratory batch experiments has been assembled in order to assess the behaviour of selected pesticides, drugs, estrogens, surfactant degradation products, biocides and phthalates under different redox conditions. Data collected during laboratory experiments and monitoring activities at the Sant Vicenç dels Horts test site will be used to build and calibrate a numerical model (i) of the physical-chemical-biochemical processes occurring in the batches and (ii) of multicomponent reactive transport in the unsaturated/saturated zone at the test site. Keywords Aquifer recharge, batch experiments, emerging micropollutants, infiltration, numerical model, reclaimed water, redox conditions, Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT). 1. Introduction In Spain, the Llobregat River and aquifers, which supply water to Barcelona, have been overexploited for years and therefore, suffer from serious damages: the river dries up on summer, riparian vegetation has disappeared and seawater has intruded the aquifer. In a global context, solutions to water stress problems are urgently needed yet must be sustainable, economical and safe. Recent developments of analytical techniques detect the presence of the so-called "emerging" organic micropollutants in water and soils. Such compounds may affect living organisms when occurring in the environment at very low concentrations (microg/l or ng/l). In wastewater and drinking water treatment plants, a remarkable removal of these chemicals from water can be obtained only using

  12. Aquifer recharge with reclaimed water in the Llobregat Delta. Laboratory batch experiments and field test site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobella, J.

    2010-05-01

    Summary Spain, as most other Mediterranean countries, faces near future water shortages, generalized pollution and loss of water dependent ecosystems. Aquifer recharge represents a promising option to become a source for indirect potable reuse purposes but presence of pathogens as well as organic and inorganic pollutants should be avoided. To this end, understanding the processes of biogeochemical degradation occurring within the aquifer during infiltration is capital. A set of laboratory batch experiments has been assembled in order to assess the behaviour of selected pesticides, drugs, estrogens, surfactant degradation products, biocides and phthalates under different redox conditions. Data collected during laboratory experiments and monitoring activities at the Sant Vicenç dels Horts test site will be used to build and calibrate a numerical model (i) of the physical-chemical-biochemical processes occurring in the batches and (ii) of multicomponent reactive transport in the unsaturated/saturated zone at the test site. Keywords Aquifer recharge, batch experiments, emerging micropollutants, infiltration, numerical model, reclaimed water, redox conditions, Soil Aquifer Treatment (SAT). 1. Introduction In Spain, the Llobregat River and aquifers, which supply water to Barcelona, have been overexploited for years and therefore, suffer from serious damages: the river dries up on summer, riparian vegetation has disappeared and seawater has intruded the aquifer. In a global context, solutions to water stress problems are urgently needed yet must be sustainable, economical and safe. Recent developments of analytical techniques detect the presence of the so-called "emerging" organic micropollutants in water and soils. Such compounds may affect living organisms when occurring in the environment at very low concentrations (microg/l or ng/l). In wastewater and drinking water treatment plants, a remarkable removal of these chemicals from water can be obtained only using

  13. Multivariate monitoring of anaerobic co-digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Michael; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo

    Anaerobic digestion processes for production of renewable energy in the form of biogas, and in the future hydrogen, are becoming increasingly important worldwide. Sustainable solutions for renewable energy production systems are given high political priority, amongst other things due to global...... warming and environmental concerns. Anaerobic digestion applied in agriculture can simultaneously convert heterogeneous biomasses and wastes from the primary agricultural sector and from the bio processing industries, for instance food processing, pharma, and biofuel production, into valuable organic...... distinct scales. The aim was to investigate, whether changes in the chemical environment in the anaerobic digesters could be monitored by NIRS enabling biogas plant operators to respond to the process dynamics. Results show that several key intermediates suitable for control of the anaerobic digestion...

  14. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Bok, de F.A.M.; Plugge, C.M.; Eekert, van M.H.A.; Dolfing, J.; Schraa, G.

    2006-01-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory

  15. An anaerobic mitochondrion that produces hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxma, Brigitte; Graaf, Rob M. de; Staay, Georg W.M. van der; Alen, Theo A. van; Ricard, Guenola; Gabaldón, Toni; Hoek, Angela H.A.M. van; Moon-van der Staay, Seung Yeo; Koopman, Werner J.H.; Hellemond, Jaap J. van; Tielens, Aloysius G.M.; Friedrich, Thorsten; Veenhuis, Marten; Huynen, Martijn A.; Hackstein, Johannes H.P.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogenosomes are organelles that produce ATP and hydrogen, and are found in various unrelated eukaryotes, such as anaerobic flagellates, chytridiomycete fungi and ciliates. Although all of these organelles generate hydrogen, the hydrogenosomes from these organisms are structurally and metabolicall

  16. A Black Hills-Madison Aquifer origin for Dakota Aquifer groundwater in northeastern Nebraska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotler, Randy; Harvey, F Edwin; Gosselin, David C

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of the Dakota Aquifer in South Dakota attributed elevated groundwater sulfate concentrations to Madison Aquifer recharge in the Black Hills with subsequent chemical evolution prior to upward migration into the Dakota Aquifer. This study examines the plausibility of a Madison Aquifer origin for groundwater in northeastern Nebraska. Dakota Aquifer water samples were collected for major ion chemistry and isotopic analysis ((18)O, (2)H, (3)H, (14)C, (13)C, (34)S, (18)O-SO(4), (87)Sr, (37)Cl). Results show that groundwater beneath the eastern, unconfined portion of the study area is distinctly different from groundwater sampled beneath the western, confined portion. In the east, groundwater is calcium-bicarbonate type, with delta(18)O values (-9.6 per thousand to -12.4 per thousand) similar to local, modern precipitation (-7.4 per thousand to -10 per thousand), and tritium values reflecting modern recharge. In the west, groundwater is calcium-sulfate type, having depleted delta(18)O values (-16 per thousand to -18 per thousand) relative to local, modern precipitation, and (14)C ages 32,000 to more than 47,000 years before present. Sulfate, delta(18)O, delta(2)H, delta(34)S, and delta(18)O-SO(4) concentrations are similar to those found in Madison Aquifer groundwater in South Dakota. Thus, it is proposed that Madison Aquifer source water is also present within the Dakota Aquifer beneath northeastern Nebraska. A simple Darcy equation estimate of groundwater velocities and travel times using reported physical parameters from the Madison and Dakota Aquifers suggests such a migration is plausible. However, discrepancies between (14)C and Darcy age estimates indicate that (14)C ages may not accurately reflect aquifer residence time, due to mixtures of varying aged water.

  17. Comparative Studies of Alternative Anaerobic Digestion Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Inman, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Washington D.C. Water and Sewage Authority is planning to construct a new anaerobic digestion facility at its Blue Plains WWTP by 2008. The research conducted in this study is to aid the designers of this facility by evaluating alternative digestion technologies. Alternative anaerobic digestion technologies include thermophilic, acid/gas phased, and temperature phased digestion. In order to evaluate the relative merits of each, a year long study evaluated the performance of bench scale dig...

  18. Anaerobic Digestion of Paper Mill Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Shreeshivadasan Chelliapan; Siti Baizura Mahat; Md. Fadjil Md. Din; A. Yuzir; Othman, N.

    2012-01-01

    In general, paper mill wastewater contains complex organic substances which could not be treated completely using conventional treatment processes, e.g. aerobic processes. As a result, anaerobic technology is a promising alternative for paper mill wastewater treatment due to its ability to degrade hard organic compounds. In the present study, treatment of paper mill wastewater using a stage anaerobic reactor was investigated. The more specific objectives of this study were to confirm whether ...

  19. Psychrophilic anaerobic treatment of low strength wastewaters.

    OpenAIRE

    Rebac, S.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to design a high-rate anaerobic system for the treatment low strength wastewaters under psychrophilic conditions.Psychrophilic (3 to 20 °C) anaerobic treatment of low strength synthetic and malting wastewater was investigated using a single and two stage expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor system. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies found in the experiments with synthetic wastewater exceeded 90 % in the single stage reactor at im...

  20. EFFECT OF MUSIC ON ANAEROBIC EXERCISE PERFORMANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Atan, T.

    2013-01-01

    For years, mostly the effects of music on cardiorespiratory exercise performance have been studied, but a few studies have examined the effect of music on anaerobic exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of listening to music and its rhythm on anaerobic exercise: on power output, heart rate and the concentration of blood lactate. 28 male subjects were required to visit the laboratory on 6 occasions, each separated by 48 hours. Firstly, each subject performed the Running-...

  1. Mapping global vulnerability index in mining sectors: A case study Moulares-Redayef aquifer system, southwestern Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khelif, Nadia; Jmal, Ikram; Bouri, Salem

    2016-09-01

    Contrary to the DRASTIC model grouping together the saturated and unsaturated zones to compute a global intrinsic vulnerability index, the global vulnerability index method incorporates both hydrogeological and hydrochemical data for a comprehensive index mapping for the saturated zones. This concept depends on the behavior and the uses of the groundwater. The main aim of this study is to propose a scientific basis for sustainable land use planning and groundwater management of the Moulares-Reayef aquifer, located in Southwestern Tunisia. The overexploitation of this aquifer causes the threat of groundwater quality by various sources of pollution. The global vulnerability index was applied in the Moulares-Reayef aquifer. The results show that the most favorable zones to pollutant percolation are situated along the wadis (Tabaddit, Zallaz, Berka, …) which are drained by continuous discharges. The global vulnerability values were correlated with nitrates values for validation. It revealed a significant correlation showing that high values of nitrates occurred in highly vulnerable zones with a value of 0.69 for the Pearson coefficient. The global vulnerability evaluation shows that the aquifer is characterized by high vertical vulnerability and high susceptibility.

  2. The Leachate Release and Microstructure of the Sewage Sludge under the Anaerobic Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqie Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollutant release, pore structure, and thermal effect of sewage sludge during anaerobic fermentation were investigated. Results showed that the pH value firstly declined and then increased during anaerobic fermentation. The BOD5 and organics of sewage sludge declined, and the BOD5 of samples which was originally neutral declined as much as 53.6%. The micropore of samples was relatively developed. The biggest adsorption amount was 69.2 cm3/g. The average pore size was enlarged about 16.0–19.8% under anaerobic fermentation. There existed endothermic valley during heating procedure of 0–200∘C because of the dehydration, and the mass loss was 60.9–72.5%. The endothermic valley of the sample fluctuated at the 14th day in the anaerobic fermentation. During the heating procedure of 200–600∘C, there existed exothermal peaks because of the oxidation and burning of the organics. The curve of sample which was originally neutral had comparatively large endothermic valley and exothermal peak.

  3. SLEEP DEPRIVATION INDUCED ANXIETY AND ANAEROBIC PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Arzu Vardar

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sleep deprivation induced anxiety on anaerobic performance. Thirteen volunteer male physical education students completed the Turkish version of State Anxiety Inventory and performed Wingate anaerobic test for three times: (1 following a full-night of habitual sleep (baseline measurements, (2 following 30 hours of sleep deprivation, and (3 following partial-night sleep deprivation. Baseline measurements were performed the day before total sleep deprivation. Measurements following partial sleep deprivation were made 2 weeks later than total sleep deprivation measurements. State anxiety was measured prior to each Wingate test. The mean state anxiety following total sleep deprivation was higher than the baseline measurement (44.9 ± 12.9 vs. 27.6 ± 4.2, respectively, p = 0.02 whereas anaerobic performance parameters remained unchanged. Neither anaerobic parameters nor state anxiety levels were affected by one night partial sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that 30 hours continuous wakefulness may increase anxiety level without impairing anaerobic performance, whereas one night of partial sleep deprivation was ineffective on both state anxiety and anaerobic performance

  4. River and Stream Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Games Activities Lessons MENU River and Stream Pollution Kids Homepage Topics Pollution River and Stream Pollution ... stream in the first place by disturbing the land as little as possible. Farmers and construction workers ...

  5. [Anaerobic membrane bioreactors for treating agricultural and food processing wastewater at high strength].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yuan-Song; Yu, Da-Wei; Cao, Lei

    2014-04-01

    As the second largest amounts of COD discharged in 41 kinds of industrial wastewater, it is of great urgency for the agricultural and food processing industry to control water pollution and reduce pollutants. Generally the agricultural and food processing industrial wastewater with high strength COD of 8 000-30 000 mg x L(-1), is mainly treated with anaerobic and aerobic processes in series, but which exists some issues of long process, difficult maintenance and high operational costs. Through coupling anaerobic digestion and membrane separation together, anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) has typical advantages of high COD removal efficiency (92%-99%), high COD organic loading rate [2.3-19.8 kg x (m3 x d)(-1)], little sludge discharged (SRT > 40 d) and low cost (HRT of 8-12 h). According to COD composition of high strength industrial wastewater, rate-limiting step of methanation could be either hydrolysis and acidification or methanogenesis. Compared with aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR), membrane fouling of AnMBR is more complicated in characterization and more difficult in control. Measures for membrane fouling control of AnMBR are almost the same as those of MBR, including cross flow, air sparging and membrane relaxation. For meeting discharging standard of food processing wastewater with high strength, AnMBR is a promising technology with very short process, by enhancing COD removal efficiency, controlling membrane fouling and improving energy recovery. PMID:24946624

  6. Anaerobic microbial processes in a petroleum plume in fractured rock, northern Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel plumes are among the most common groundwater pollution problems at polluted sites throughout Canada, including the Canadian Shield region. However, the microbial processes that occur under cold climate conditions in fuel-contaminated groundwater are poorly understood. This study focused on evidence for anaerobic microbial processes in fuel plumes in groundwater at a Canadian Shield site in the Northwest Territories, within a zone mapped as having extensive discontinuous permafrost. In particular, the study examined redox-sensitive species in the groundwater, specifically iron, manganese, sulfate and nitrate. The data reported in the paper were based on a sampling program conducted in September 2007. The data showed strong evidence that anaerobic microorganisms are active in fuel-contaminated groundwater in fractured rock at the study site. The microbial processes include the reduction of electron acceptors, notably sulfate, ferric iron, manganese and possibly nitrate. It is possible that such anaerobic processes play an important role in the biodegradation of dissolved petroleum hydrocarbons in the groundwater at this site. However, it was concluded that additional analysis is needed in order to infer rates of these processes in the groundwater and to understand the relationship of these processes to degradation of the fuel plume. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Diversity of planktonic and attached bacterial communities in a phenol-contaminated sandstone aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizoulis, Athanasios; Elliott, David R; Rolfe, Stephen A; Thornton, Steven F; Banwart, Steven A; Pickup, Roger W; Scholes, Julie D

    2013-07-01

    Polluted aquifers contain indigenous microbial communities with the potential for in situ bioremediation. However, the effect of hydrogeochemical gradients on in situ microbial communities (especially at the plume fringe, where natural attenuation is higher) is still not clear. In this study, we used culture-independent techniques to investigate the diversity of in situ planktonic and attached bacterial communities in a phenol-contaminated sandstone aquifer. Within the upper and lower plume fringes, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles indicated that planktonic community structure was influenced by the steep hydrogeochemical gradient of the plume rather than the spatial location in the aquifer. Under the same hydrogeochemical conditions (in the lower plume fringe, 30 m below ground level), 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing showed that planktonic and attached bacterial communities differed markedly and that the attached community was more diverse. The 16S rRNA gene phylogeny also suggested that a phylogenetically diverse bacterial community operated at this depth (30 mbgl), with biodegradation of phenolic compounds by nitrate-reducing Azoarcus and Acidovorax strains potentially being an important process. The presence of acetogenic and sulphate-reducing bacteria only in the planktonic clone library indicates that some natural attenuation processes may occur preferentially in one of the two growth phases (attached or planktonic). Therefore, this study has provided a better understanding of the microbial ecology of this phenol-contaminated aquifer, and it highlights the need for investigating both planktonic and attached microbial communities when assessing the potential for natural attenuation in contaminated aquifers.

  8. Pollution Prevention Pays: Pollution Charges in Cambodia

    OpenAIRE

    Sideth Muong

    2006-01-01

    Across the developing world, governments are grappling with the problem of industrial pollution. A new report from Cambodia looks into a system of pollution levies that would encourage polluting firms to clean up their emissions. This study sets out a series of charges that are projected to produce pollution reductions of up to 85%. It recommends a number of regulatory and administrative changes that would help bring about such an outcome.

  9. Use of activated carbon and natural zeolite as support materials, in an anaerobic fluidised bed reactor, for vinasse treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, N; Fdz-Polanco, F; Montalvo, S J; Toledano, D

    2001-01-01

    In Cuba, the alcohol distillation process from cane sugar molasses, produces a final waste (vinasse), with an enormous polluting potential and a high sulfate content. Applying the anaerobic technology, most of the biodegradable organic matter can turn into biogas, rich in methane but with concentrations of sulfide above 1%. The present work develops two experiences with anaerobic fluidized bed reactors (AFBR) using both Cuban raw material, activated carbon and natural zeolite, as support media, with the purpose of obtaining high organic matter removal rates and keeping sulfide and ammonium concentrations in the permissible ranges. The reactors were operated during 120 days, achieving an organic loading rate of 10 kg COD/m3 day, with COD removal above 70%, and a methane production of 2 L/d. The activated carbon and natural zeolite used support materials in anaerobic fluidized bed reactors, and showed good results of distillery waste removal. PMID:11575071

  10. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work is underway using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale, to develop start-up and operating procedures, and to generate effluent for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and batch-fed conditions have been made lasting 36, 90, and over 200 days. Solids solubilization and gas production rates and total solids destruction have met or exceeded the target values of 0.6 g cellulose per L of reactor per day, 0.5 L off-gas per L of reactor per day, and 80% destruction of solids, respectively. Successful start-up procedures have been developed, and preliminary effluent characterization and disposal studies have been done. A simple dynamic process model has been constructed to aid in further process development and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester. 7 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  11. Anaerobic digestion of cellulosic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic digestion is a potentially attractive technology for volume reduction of low-level radioactive cellulosic wastes. A substantial fraction of the waste is converted to off-gas and a relatively small volume of biologically stabilized sludge is produced. Process development work has been completed using a 75-L digester to verify rates and conversions obtained at the bench scale. Start-up and operating procedures have been developed, and effluent was generated for characterization and disposal studies. Three runs using batch and fed-batch conditions were made lasting 36, 90, and 423 d. Solids solubilization rates and gas production rates averaged approximately 1.8 g cellulose per L of reactor per d and 1.2 L of off-gas per L reactor per d. Greater than 80% destruction of the volatile suspended solids was obtained. A simple dynamic process model was constructed to aid in process design and for use in process monitoring and control of a large-scale digester

  12. USCG Facility Pollution

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Marine Casualty and Pollution Data files provide details about marine casualty and pollution incidents investigated by Coast Guard Offices throughout the United...

  13. USCG Vessel Pollution

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Marine Casualty and Pollution Data files provide details about marine casualty and pollution incidents investigated by Coast Guard Offices throughout the United...

  14. Preventive measures of water pollution in China; Chugoku ni okeru suishitsu odaku boshi taisaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Y.; Huang, X.

    1996-01-10

    This paper describes the progress and the major results of research and development on technologies and measures to prevent water pollution in China. Tests and researches have been performed on an upward anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), a vertical baffled anaerobic sludge blanket, two-phase anaerobic digestion, and an anaerobic fluidized bed. When anaerobically digested sludge and aerobic active sludge are inoculated in the UASB, particle-shaped sludge was formed well in both sludges. This technology has begun to be used in breweries and citric acid factories. With anaerobic treatment of waste water containing sulfate, the sulfate was recovered as sulfur by using the first and second phases. Research and development is being progressed on the oxidation ditch technology as an improved version of the active sludge method. In a pilot test of a soil treatment system and a stabilization pond treatment system as alternative technology for the active sludge method, the BOD in the treated water was found 2.5 mg{times}1/l. Attentions are drawn on primary treatment, a living organism contact oxidation method, and a continuous filtration treatment process as technologies to turn polluted water into resources. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  15. A study of chlorinated solvent contamination of the aquifers of an industrial area in central Italy: a possibility of bioremediation

    OpenAIRE

    Matteucci, Federica; Ercole, Claudia; del Gallo, Maddalena

    2015-01-01

    Perchloroethene, trichloroethene, and other chlorinated solvents are widespread groundwater pollutants. They form dense non-aqueous phase liquids that sink through permeable groundwater aquifers until non-permeable zone is reached. In Italy, there are many situations of serious contamination of groundwater that might compromise their use in industry, agriculture, private, as the critical case of a Central Italy valley located in the province of Teramo (“Val Vibrata”), characterized by a signi...

  16. Water-level change, High Plains aquifer, 1980 to 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster data set represents water-level change in the High Plains aquifer of the United States from 1980 to 1995, in feet. The High Plains aquifer underlies...

  17. Water-level change, High Plains aquifer, 2000 to 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster data set represents water-level change in the High Plains aquifer of the United States from 2000 to 2005, in feet. The High Plains aquifer underlies...

  18. Water-level change, High Plains aquifer, 2005 to 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster data set represents water-level change in the High Plains aquifer of the United States from 2005 to 2009, in feet. The High Plains aquifer underlies...

  19. Water-level change, High Plains aquifer, 1995 to 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster data set represents water-level change in the High Plains aquifer of the United States from 1995 to 2000, in feet. The High Plains aquifer underlies...

  20. Snake River Plain Basin-fill aquifer system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the Snake River Plain aquifer system, which includes both the basaltic and basin-fill aquifers. This dataset does not...

  1. Aquifers of Alluvial and Glacial Origin - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the alluvial and glacial aquifers north of the southern-most line of glaciation. Aquifers are shown in the States of Maine,...

  2. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become m

  3. Aquifer parameter estimation from surface resistivity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwas, Sri; de Lima, Olivar A L

    2003-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the additional use, other than ground water exploration, of surface geoelectrical sounding data for aquifer hydraulic parameter estimation. In a mesoscopic framework, approximated analytical equations are developed separately for saline and for fresh water saturations. A few existing useful aquifer models, both for clean and shaley sandstones, are discussed in terms of their electrical and hydraulic effects, along with the linkage between the two. These equations are derived for insight and physical understanding of the phenomenon. In a macroscopic scale, a general aquifer model is proposed and analytical relations are derived for meaningful estimation, with a higher level of confidence, of hydraulic parameter from electrical parameters. The physical reasons for two different equations at the macroscopic level are explicitly explained to avoid confusion. Numerical examples from existing literature are reproduced to buttress our viewpoint. PMID:12533080

  4. Genetic algorithms and aquifer parameter identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-sheng(李竞生); YAO Lei-hua(姚磊华); LI Yang(李杨)

    2003-01-01

    In order to identify aquifer parameter,authors develops an improved combinatorial method called best chromosome clone plus younger generation chromosome prepotency genetic algorithm (BCC-YGCP-GA), based on a decimal system simple genetic algorithm (SGA). The paper takes unsteady state flows in a two-dimensional, inhomogeneous, confined aquifer for a ideal model, and utilizes SGA and BCC-YGCP-GA coupled to finite element method for identifying aquifer hydraulic conductivity K1,K2,K3 and storage S1,S2,S3, respectively. It is shown from the result that GSA does not reach convergence with 100 generations, whereas convergence rate of BCC-YGCD-GA is very fast. Objective function value calculated by BCC-YGCD-GA is 0.001 29 with 100 generations, and hydraulic conductivity and storage of three zones are almost equal to the "true" values of ideal model.

  5. Modeling contaminant plumes in fractured limestone aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosthaf, Klaus; Brauns, Bentje; Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann;

    Determining the fate and transport of contaminant plumes from contaminated sites in limestone aquifers is important because they are a major drinking water resource. This is challenging because they are often heavily fractured and contain chert layers and nodules, resulting in a complex transport...... the established approaches of the equivalent porous medium, discrete fracture and dual continuum models. However, these modeling concepts are not well tested for contaminant plume migration in limestone geologies. Our goal was to develop and evaluate approaches for modeling the transport of dissolved contaminant...... plumes in fractured limestone aquifers in 3D and to test methods for determining the required flow and transport parameters. The models were compared for a contaminated site in Denmark, where a plume of dissolved PCE has migrated through a fractured limestone aquifer. Numerical modeling was used...

  6. Groundwater Mounding in Non-uniform Aquifers with Implications for Managed Aquifer Recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnik, V. A.; Noel, P.; Kacimov, A. R.; Al Maktoumi, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Many areas of the world (e.g. the Middle East and North Africa countries) are deficient in observation networks and hydrogeological data needed for Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) design. Therefore, diagnostic analytical approaches are appropriate for feasibility studies of MAR. It was found that the common assumption of aquifer thickness uniformity often does not hold, especially in mountainous watersheds. However, the only practical result available for non-uniform aquifers was developed for well hydraulics applications (point sinks or sources) by Hantush (1962), while the recharge zones may cover large areas on the scale of kilometers, such as temporarily filled impoundments (natural and engineered reservoirs in wadis, depressions, trenches, etc.) or perennial streams accepting massive treated wastewater discharge. To address these important, but overlooked MAR problems in sloping aquifers, a set of new closed-form analytical solutions for water table elevations were obtained. Interestingly, the 2D groundwater flow equation acquires the advection-dispersion equation form in these cases. The quadratures in closed-form solutions obtained by the Green's function method converge rapidly. These models account for both shapes and orientations of sources with respect to the direction of the aquifer base gradient. Qualitatively, solutions in sloping aquifers have an important trait: the mounding is limited in time and space, unlike in aquifers with a horizontal base. Aquifers with the greater slopes have the lesser potential of waterlogging from the rising water table and different storage characteristics (height and volume of locally stored water). Computational aspects of these solutions for MAR analyses are illustrated by example utilizing regional aquifer properties near Az Zarqa River, Jordan. (This study was supported by a grant from USAID-FABRI, project contract: AID-OAA-TO-11-00049, Subcontract: 1001624 -12S-19745).

  7. Potential contaminant pathways from hydraulically fractured shale to aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing of deep shale beds to develop natural gas has caused concern regarding the potential for various forms of water pollution. Two potential pathways-advective transport through bulk media and preferential flow through fractures-could allow the transport of contaminants from the fractured shale to aquifers. There is substantial geologic evidence that natural vertical flow drives contaminants, mostly brine, to near the surface from deep evaporite sources. Interpretative modeling shows that advective transport could require up to tens of thousands of years to move contaminants to the surface, but also that fracking the shale could reduce that transport time to tens or hundreds of years. Conductive faults or fracture zones, as found throughout the Marcellus shale region, could reduce the travel time further. Injection of up to 15,000,000 L of fluid into the shale generates high pressure at the well, which decreases with distance from the well and with time after injection as the fluid advects through the shale. The advection displaces native fluids, mostly brine, and fractures the bulk media widening existing fractures. Simulated pressure returns to pre-injection levels in about 300 d. The overall system requires from 3 to 6 years to reach a new equilibrium reflecting the significant changes caused by fracking the shale, which could allow advective transport to aquifers in less than 10 years. The rapid expansion of hydraulic fracturing requires that monitoring systems be employed to track the movement of contaminants and that gas wells have a reasonable offset from faults. PMID:22509908

  8. 不同季节及厌氧发酵对奶牛场污水及沼液各污染指标的影响%Influence of Different Seasons and Anaerobic Fermentation on Pollution Indicators of Wastewater and Biogas Slurry of Dairy Farm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王庆红; 娜仁花; 王超; 李倜字

    2012-01-01

    随着奶牛养殖业的迅猛发展,奶牛场排放的废弃物越来越集中,产生的环境问题也日益受到人们的关注。其中奶牛场排出的废水严重污染着水体和土壤,因此对其进行排污分析尤为重要。本试验对规模化奶牛场产生污水的主要污染指标及沼液的特性进行了测定分析,以期为规模化奶牛场污水的处理和利用提供依据。%With the rapid development of the dairy industry, pollutants discharged by the dairy farm become increasingly serious, and the consequent environmental problems receive more and more attention from society. Among all the pollutants, wastewater discharged by the dairy farm heavily damages the water body and the earth. Therefore, it is of particular importance to analyze the wastewater discharge. This research tested and analyzed the major pollution indicators and the features of liquid biogas of the wastewater discharged by large-scale dairy farms, so as to provide reference fieures to the treatment .ncl ,,,;1;~.~-;^- ^c

  9. New Bio-Indicators for Long Term Natural Attenuation of Monoaromatic Compounds in Deep Terrestrial Aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aüllo, Thomas; Berlendis, Sabrina; Lascourrèges, Jean-François; Dessort, Daniel; Duclerc, Dominique; Saint-Laurent, Stéphanie; Schraauwers, Blandine; Mas, Johan; Patriarche, Delphine; Boesinger, Cécile; Magot, Michel; Ranchou-Peyruse, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Deep subsurface aquifers despite difficult access, represent important water resources and, at the same time, are key locations for subsurface engineering activities for the oil and gas industries, geothermal energy, and CO2 or energy storage. Formation water originating from a 760 m-deep geological gas storage aquifer was sampled and microcosms were set up to test the biodegradation potential of BTEX by indigenous microorganisms. The microbial community diversity was studied using molecular approaches based on 16S rRNA genes. After a long incubation period, with several subcultures, a sulfate-reducing consortium composed of only two Desulfotomaculum populations was observed able to degrade benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, extending the number of hydrocarbonoclastic-related species among the Desulfotomaculum genus. Furthermore, we were able to couple specific carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionation during benzene removal and the results obtained by dual compound specific isotope analysis (C = -2.4‰ ± 0.3‰; H = -57‰ ± 0.98‰; AKIEC: 1.0146 ± 0.0009, and AKIEH: 1.5184 ± 0.0283) were close to those obtained previously in sulfate-reducing conditions: this finding could confirm the existence of a common enzymatic reaction involving sulfate-reducers to activate benzene anaerobically. Although we cannot assign the role of each population of Desulfotomaculum in the mono-aromatic hydrocarbon degradation, this study suggests an important role of the genus Desulfotomaculum as potential biodegrader among indigenous populations in subsurface habitats. This community represents the simplest model of benzene-degrading anaerobes originating from the deepest subterranean settings ever described. As Desulfotomaculum species are often encountered in subsurface environments, this study provides some interesting results for assessing the natural response of these specific hydrologic systems in response to BTEX contamination during remediation projects.

  10. Unconsolidated Aquifers in Tompkins County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Todd S.

    2000-01-01

    Unconsolidated aquifers consisting of saturated sand and gravel are capable of supplying large quantities of good-quality water to wells in Tompkins County, but little published geohydrologic inform ation on such aquifers is available. In 1986, the U.S.Geological Survey (USGS) began collecting geohydrologic information and well data to construct an aquifer map showing the extent of unconsolidated aquifers in Tompkins county. Data sources included (1) water-well drillers. logs; (2) highway and other construction test-boring logs; (3) well data gathered by the Tompkins County Department of Health, (4) test-well logs from geohydrologic consultants that conducted projects for site-specific studies, and (5) well data that had been collected during past investigations by the USGS and entered into the National Water Information System (NWIS) database. In 1999, the USGS, in cooperation with the Tompkins County Department of Planning, compiled these data to construct this map. More than 600 well records were entered into the NWIS database in 1999 to supplement the 350 well records already in the database; this provided a total of 950 well records. The data were digitized and imported into a geographic information system (GIS) coverage so that well locations could be plotted on a map, and well data could be tabulated in a digital data base through ARC/INFO software. Data on the surficial geology were used with geohydrologic data from well records and previous studies to delineate the extent of aquifers on this map. This map depicts (1) the extent of unconsolidated aquifers in Tompkins County, and (2) locations of wells whose records were entered into the USGS NWIS database and made into a GIS digital coverage. The hydrologic information presented here is generalized and is not intended for detailed site evaluations. Precise locations of geohydrologic-unit boundaries, and a description of the hydrologic conditions within the units, would require additional detailed, site

  11. Aquifer thermal energy storage. International symposium: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    Aquifers have been used to store large quantities of thermal energy to supply process cooling, space cooling, space heating, and ventilation air preheating, and can be used with or without heat pumps. Aquifers are used as energy sinks and sources when supply and demand for energy do not coincide. Aquifer thermal energy storage may be used on a short-term or long-term basis; as the sole source of energy or as a partial storage; at a temperature useful for direct application or needing upgrade. The sources of energy used for aquifer storage are ambient air, usually cold winter air; waste or by-product energy; and renewable energy such as solar. The present technical, financial and environmental status of ATES is promising. Numerous projects are operating and under development in several countries. These projects are listed and results from Canada and elsewhere are used to illustrate the present status of ATES. Technical obstacles have been addressed and have largely been overcome. Cold storage in aquifers can be seen as a standard design option in the near future as it presently is in some countries. The cost-effectiveness of aquifer thermal energy storage is based on the capital cost avoidance of conventional chilling equipment and energy savings. ATES is one of many developments in energy efficient building technology and its success depends on relating it to important building market and environmental trends. This paper attempts to provide guidance for the future implementation of ATES. Individual projects have been processed separately for entry onto the Department of Energy databases.

  12. Unconfined Aquifer Flow Theory - from Dupuit to present

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Phoolendra K.; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.

    2013-01-01

    Analytic and semi-analytic solution are often used by researchers and practicioners to estimate aquifer parameters from unconfined aquifer pumping tests. The non-linearities associated with unconfined (i.e., water table) aquifer tests makes their analysis more complex than confined tests. Although analytical solutions for unconfined flow began in the mid-1800s with Dupuit, Thiem was possibly the first to use them to estimate aquifer parameters from pumping tests in the early 1900s. In the 195...

  13. Groundwater thermal-effective injection systems in shallow aquifers: possible alternatives to vertical water wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Russo, Stefano; Taddia, Glenda; Cerino Abdin, Elena

    2014-05-01

    Urbanized areas have environmental features that may influence the development of low-enthalpy geothermal systems and the choice of the most suitable among the available (roughly earth-coupled closed-loop and groundwater open-loop type). In particular, if compared to less anthropized areas, some characteristic urban elements require particular attention: underground extensive use, contamination of groundwater, interference between the systems, authorization procedures and planning restrictions, the competition with cogeneration systems and the impact on emissions of pollutants. In this general context, the increasing implementation in several areas of the world of the open-loop groundwater heat pumps technology which discharge into the aquifer for cooling and heating buildings, could potentially cause, even in the short term, a significant environmental impact associated with thermal interference with groundwater, particularly in the shallow aquifers. The discharge of water at different temperatures compared to baseline (warmer in summer and colder in winter) poses a number of problems in relation to the potential functionality of many existing situations of use of the groundwater (drinking water wells, agricultural, industrial, etc.). In addition, there may be cases of interference between systems, especially in the more densely urbanized areas. Appropriate hydrogeological investigations should be performed for the characterization of the main hydrogeological parameters of the subsoil at the considered site in order to minimize the environmental impact of discharges into aquifers. The current Italian legislation related to withdrawals and discharges into aquifers designs a framework suitable for the protection of groundwater and induce deciding the best configuration of the plant with a case by case approach. An increased contact area between the dispersant system and the ground makes it possible to affect a greater volume of aquifer and, consequently, reduce the

  14. Anaerobic digestion of agricultural wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobson, P.N.

    1984-01-01

    Farm digesters can operate satisfactorily and have a useful role on the farm. Gas production from the farm digester treating animal slurries could be boosted by adding silage liquid, old potatoes, waste cabbages and other crop wastes to the slurry, although the energy economics of maceration have not been calculated. Pollution control and types of digester are discussed. Uses of digested slurry other than for fertilizers are being tested - as protein supplement to farm animal feeds, silage making, hydroponics, fish farming and growing of worms on algae. Overall, digestion could be a contributor to power requirements especially in countries with high all year round crop production.

  15. Pollution par les nitrates des eaux souterraines du bassin d'Essaouira (Maroc)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laftouhi, Nour-Eddine; Vanclooster, Marnik; Jalal, Mohammed; Witam, Omar; Aboufirassi, Mohamed; Bahir, Mohamed; Persoons, Étienne

    2003-03-01

    The Essaouira Basin (Morocco) contains a multi-layered aquifer situated in fractured and karstic materials from the Middle and Upper Cretaceous (the Cenomanian, Turonian and Senonian). Water percolates through the limestone and dolomite formations of the Turonian stage either through the marls and calcareous marls of the Cenomanian or through the calcareous marly materials of the Senonian. The aquifer system may be interconnected since the marl layer separating the Turonian, Cenomanian and Senonian aquifers is thin or intensively fractured. In that case, the water is transported through a network of fractures and stratification joints. This paper describes the extent of the nitrate pollution in the area and its origin. Most of the wells and drillholes located in the Kourimat perimeter are contaminated by nitrates with some concentrations over 400 mg l-1. Nitrate contamination is also observed in the surface water of the Qsob River, which constitutes the natural outlet of the multi-layered complex aquifer system. In this area, agriculture is more developed than in the rest of the Essaouira Basin. Diffuse pollution of the karstic groundwater body by agricultural fertiliser residues may therefore partially explain the observed nitrate pollution. However, point pollution around the wells, springs and drillholes from human wastewater, livestock faeces and the mineralisation of organic debris close to the Muslim cemeteries cannot be excluded.

  16. In situ microcosms in aquifer bioremediation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbaum, R T; Shati, M R; Ronen, D

    1997-07-01

    The extent to which aquifer microbiota can be studied under laboratory or simulated conditions is limited by our inability to authentically duplicate natural conditions in the laboratory. Therefore, extrapolation of laboratory results to real aquifer situations is often criticized, unless validation of the data is performed in situ. Reliable data acquisition is critical for the estimation of chemical and biological reaction rates of biodegradation processes in groundwater and as input data for mathematical models. Typically, in situ geobiochemical studies relied on the injection of groundwater spiked with compounds or bacteria of interest into the aquifer, followed by monitoring the changes over time and space. In situ microcosms provide a more confined study site for measurements of microbial reactions, yet closer to natural conditions than laboratory microcosms. Two basic types of in situ aquifer microcosm have been described in recent years, and both originated from in situ instruments initially designed for geochemical measurements. Gillham et al. [Ground Water 28 (1990) 858-862] constructed an instrument that isolates a portion of an aquifer for in situ biochemical rate measurements. More recently Shati et al. [Environ. Sci. Technol. 30 (1996) 2646-2653] modified a multilayer sampler for studying the activity of inoculated bacteria in a contaminated aquifer Keeping in mind recent advances in environmental microbiology methodologies such as immunofluorescence direct counts, oligonucleotide and PCR probes, fatty acid methyl esther analysis for the detection and characterization of bacterial communities, measurement of mRNA and expression of proteins, it is evident that much new information can now be gained from in situ work. Using in situ microcosms to study bioremediation efficiencies, the fate of introduced microorganisms and general geobiochemical aquifer processes can shed more realistic light on the microbial underworld. The aim of this paper is to

  17. Introduction of a De Novo Bioremediation Ability, Aryl Reductive Dechlorination, into Anaerobic Granular Sludge by Inoculation of Sludge with Desulfomonile tiedjei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Christiansen, Nina; Mathrani, Indra Madan;

    1992-01-01

    Methanogenic upflow anaerobic granular-sludge blanket (UASB) reactors treat wastewaters at a high rate while simultaneously producing a useful product, methane; however, recalcitrant environmental pollutants may not be degraded. To impart 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CB)-dechlorinating ability to UASB rea...

  18. Anaerobic digestion performance of vinegar residue in continuously stirred tank reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Feng, Lu; Zhang, Ruihong; He, Yanfeng; Wang, Wen; Chen, Chang; Liu, Guangqing

    2015-06-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of vinegar residue was investigated in continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The influence of organic loading rate (OLR) and effluent recirculation on AD performance of vinegar residue was tested. Five OLRs, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 g(vs) L(-1) d(-1), were used. The highest volumetric methane productivity of 581.88 mL L(-1) was achieved at OLR of 2.5 g(vs) L(-1) d(-1). Effluent reflux ratio was set as 50%, the results showed that effluent recirculation could effectively neutralize the acidity of vinegar residue, raise the pH of the feedstock, and enhance the buffering capacity of the AD system. Anaerobic digestion of vinegar residue could be a promising way not only for converting this waste into gas energy but also alleviating environmental pollution which might be useful for future industrial application.

  19. Anaerobic biodegradability essays from brewery wastewater using granular and flocculent sludges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C J Collazos Chávez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of nineties the colombian beer industry begun the application of anaerobic technology for the treatment of their wastewater efluents throught different regions of the country. These treatment plants have not been working appropriately due to different factors, and are creating concern among the industrial sector and the water pollution control agencies. This work constitutes the second phase of a research project designed to establish a selection and improvement criteria of the sludges used in the systems. It also looks to analyze other associated factors such as: waste, characteristics, operation conditions and design parameters. The investigation was conducted in two phases using granular and floculent sludges. This method was used for determining the anaerobic biodegradability of wastewater from two industrial plants.

  20. Timeline of bio-hydrogen production by anaerobic digestion of biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadette E. TELEKY

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion of biomass is a process capable to produce biohydrogen, a clean source of alternative energy. Lignocellulosic biomass from agricultural waste is considered a renewable energy source; therefore its utilization also contributes to the reduction of water, soil and air pollution. The study consists in five consecutive experiments designed to utilize anaerobic bacterial enrichment cultures originating from the Hungarian Lake, Hévíz. Wheat straw was used as complex substrate to produce hydrogen. The timeline evolution of hydrogen production was analyzed and modelled by two functions: Logistic and Boltzmann. The results proved that hydrogen production is significant, with a maximum of 0.24 mlN/ml and the highest hydrogen production occurs between the days 4-10 of the experiment.

  1. The effect of outside conditions on anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Min; WANG Shu-bo

    2016-01-01

    Organic carbon, inorganic carbon, temperature, pH and ORP are all to have a certain influence on the anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction. We can draw some conclusions on the optimum conditions of anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction. The optimum temperature of the anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction is 30-35℃. And the optimum pH of the anaerobic ammonia reaction is 7.5-8.3. The presence of organic matters can affect the anaerobic ammonia reaction, and different organic matters have different influence on it. The concentration of the inorganic carbon also exist great influence on the reaction. High inorganic carbon concentration also can inhibit anaerobic ammonia oxidation reaction.

  2. Predicted nitrate and arsenic concentrations in basin-fill aquifers of the Southwest Principal Aquifers study area

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This product "Predicted nitrate and arsenic concentrations in basin-fill aquifers of the Southwest Principal Aquifers study area" is a 1:250,000-scale vector...

  3. EPA Region 6 Sole Source Aquifers in Louisiana, Geographic NAD83, EPA (1996) [sole_source_aquifers_LA_EPA_1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — Polygon layer of EPA Region 6 sole source aquifers in Louisiana. The sole source aquifers represented are Chicot and Southern Hills in Louisiana/Mississippi.

  4. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer in east-central Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized water-level elevation contours for the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer in east-central Oklahoma. The Vamoosa-Ada aquifer is an important...

  5. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer in east-central Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized polygons of constant hydraulic conductivity values for the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer in east-central Oklahoma. The Vamoosa-Ada aquifer...

  6. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer in east-central Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized polygons of constant recharge values for the Vamoosa-Ada aquifer, in east-central Oklahoma. The Vamoosa-Ada aquifer is an...

  7. Examples of transient sounding from groundwater exploration in sedimentary aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitterman, D.V.

    1987-01-01

    Examples of the use of transient electromagnetic soundings for three groundwater exploration problems in sedimentary aquifers are given. The examples include: 1) estimating depths to water table and bedrock in an alluvium-filled basin, 2) mapping a confined freshwater aquifer in bedrock sediments, and 3) locating a freshwater/saltwater interface in a glacial-outwash aquifer. -from Author

  8. Review: The Yucatán Peninsula karst aquifer, Mexico

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Gondwe, Bibi Ruth Neuman; Charvet, Guillaume;

    2011-01-01

    The Yucatán Peninsula karst aquifer is one of the most extensive and spectacular karst aquifer systems on the planet. This transboundary aquifer system extends over an area of approximately 165,000 km2 in México, Guatemala and Belize. The Triassic to Holocene Yucatán limestone platform is located...

  9. Groundwater modeling of the Calera Aquifer region in Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Calera Aquifer is the main source of water for irrigated agriculture, industrial, and drinking water purposes in the Calera Aquifer Region (CAR) in the state of Zacatecas, Mexico. Irrigated agriculture accounts for 80% of the total groundwater extracted from the Calera Aquifer. In recent years, ...

  10. Natural attenuation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a freshwater tidal wetland: Field evidence of anaerobic biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorah, M.M.; Olsen, L.D.

    1999-01-01

    Field evidence collected along two groundwater flow paths shows that anaerobic biodegradation naturally attenuates a plume of chlorinated volatile organic compounds as it discharges from an aerobic sand aquifer through wetland sediments. A decrease in concentrations of two parent contaminants, trichloroethylene (TCE) and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (PCA), and a concomitant increase in concentrations of anaerobic daughter products occurs along upward flow paths through the Wetland sediments. The daughter products 1,2-dichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and 1,2-dichloroethane are produced from hydrogenolysis of TCE and from PCA degradation through hydrogenolysis and dichloroelimination (reductive dechlorination) pathways. Total concentrations of TCE, PCA, and their degradation products, however, decrease to below detection levels within 0.15-0.30 m of land surface. The enhanced reductive dechlorination of TCE and PCA in the wetland sediments is associated with the naturally higher concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and the lower redox state of the groundwater compared to the aquifer. This field study indicates that wetlands and similar organic-rich environments at groundwater/surface-water interfaces may be important in intercepting groundwater contaminated with chlorinated organics and in naturally reducing concentrations and toxicity before sensitive surface-water receptors are reached.

  11. ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John R. Gallagher

    2001-07-31

    During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the

  12. Anaerobic in situ biodegradation of TNT using whey as an electron donor: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innemanová, Petra; Velebová, Radka; Filipová, Alena; Čvančarová, Monika; Pokorný, Petr; Němeček, Jan; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2015-12-25

    Contamination by 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), an explosive extensively used by the military, represents a serious environmental problem. In this study, whey has been selected as the most technologically and economically suitable primary substrate for anaerobic in situ biodegradation of TNT. Under laboratory conditions, various additions of whey, molasses, acetate and activated sludge as an inoculant were tested and the process was monitored using numerous chemical analyses including phospholipid fatty acid analysis. The addition of whey resulted in the removal of more than 90% of the TNT in real contaminated soil (7 mg kg(-1) and 12 mg kg(-1) of TNT). The final bioremediation strategy was suggested on the basis of the laboratory results and tested under real conditions at a TNT contaminated site in the Czech Republic. During the pilot test, three repeated injections of whey suspension into the sandy aquifer were performed over a 10-month period. In total, approximately 5m(3) of whey were used. A substantial decrease in the TNT groundwater concentration from the original levels (equalling 1.49 mg l(-1) to 8.58 mg l(-1)) was observed in most of the injection wells, while the concentrations of the TNT biotransformation products were found to be elevated. Pilot-scale application results showed that the anoxic and/or anaerobic conditions in the aquifer were sufficient for TNT bio-reduction by autochthonous microorganisms. Whey application was not accompanied by undesirable effects such as a substantial decrease in the pH or clogging of the wells. The results of the study document the suitability of application of whey to bioremediate TNT contaminated sites in situ. PMID:25882606

  13. Biodegradation: Updating the Concepts of Control for Microbial Cleanup in Contaminated Aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meckenstock, Rainer U.; Elsner, Martin; Griebler, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation is one of the most favored and sustainable means of removing organic pollutants from contaminated aquifers but the major steering factors are still surprisingly poorly understood. Growing evidence questions some of the established concepts for control of biodegradation. Here, we cr...... on the controls of biodegradation in contaminant plumes. These include the plume fringe concept, transport limitations, and transient conditions as currently underestimated processes affecting biodegradation....... critically discuss classical concepts such as the thermodynamic redox zonation, or the use of steady state transport scenarios for assessing biodegradation rates. Furthermore, we discuss if the absence of specific degrader populations can explain poor biodegradation. We propose updated perspectives...

  14. Modeling of pheratic aquifers on E, coli transport influenced by preconsolidation and compressibility of soil

    OpenAIRE

    solomon Ndubuisi Eluozo

    2012-01-01

    The rate of pollution on soil are the major problem of ground water contamination in the study area,  the   influence from   preconsolidation and compressibility of soil influence on E.coli transport  has been carried out. This  is  to determine the rate of influence on  E.coli transport in pheratic aquifers, mathematical model were developed to monitor the influence on the preconsolidation and compressibility of soil on  microbial transports, experimental analysis were also carried out throu...

  15. Column experiments to investigate transport of colloidal humic acid through porous media during managed aquifer recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Zhou, Jingjing; Zhang, Wenjing; Huan, Ying; Yu, Xipeng; Li, Fulin; Chen, Xuequn

    2016-09-01

    Colloids act as vectors for pollutants in groundwater, thereby creating a series of environmental problems. While managed aquifer recharge plays an important role in protecting groundwater resources and controlling land subsidence, it has a significant effect on the transport of colloids. In this study, particle size and zeta potential of colloidal humic acid (HA) have been measured to determine the effects of different hydrochemistry conditions. Column experiments were conducted to examine the effects on the transport of colloidal HA under varying conditions of pH (5, 7, 9), ionic strength (area.

  16. Aquifer geochemistry at potential aquifer storage and recovery sites in coastal plain aquifers in the New York city area, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C.J.; Misut, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of injecting oxic water from the New York city (NYC) drinking-water supply and distribution system into a nearby anoxic coastal plain aquifer for later recovery during periods of water shortage (aquifer storage and recovery, or ASR) were simulated by a 3-dimensional, reactive-solute transport model. The Cretaceous aquifer system in the NYC area of New York and New Jersey, USA contains pyrite, goethite, locally occurring siderite, lignite, and locally varying amounts of dissolved Fe and salinity. Sediment from cores drilled on Staten Island and western Long Island had high extractable concentrations of Fe, Mn, and acid volatile sulfides (AVS) plus chromium-reducible sulfides (CRS) and low concentrations of As, Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu and U. Similarly, water samples from the Lloyd aquifer (Cretaceous) in western Long Island generally contained high concentrations of Fe and Mn and low concentrations of other trace elements such as As, Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu and U, all of which were below US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and NY maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). In such aquifer settings, ASR operations can be complicated by the oxidative dissolution of pyrite, low pH, and high concentrations of dissolved Fe in extracted water.The simulated injection of buffered, oxic city water into a hypothetical ASR well increased the hydraulic head at the well, displaced the ambient groundwater, and formed a spheroid of injected water with lower concentrations of Fe, Mn and major ions in water surrounding the ASR well, than in ambient water. Both the dissolved O2 concentrations and the pH of water near the well generally increased in magnitude during the simulated 5-a injection phase. The resultant oxidation of Fe2+ and attendant precipitation of goethite during injection provided a substrate for sorption of dissolved Fe during the 8-a extraction phase. The baseline scenario with a low (0.001M) concentration of pyrite in aquifer sediments, indicated that nearly 190% more water

  17. Elucidation of the thermophilic phenol biodegradation pathway via benzoate during the anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos-Hernandez, Carolina; Hoffmann, Marieke; Guenne, Angeline; Mazeas, Laurent

    2014-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion makes it possible to valorize municipal solid waste (MSW) into biogas and digestate which are, respectively, a renewable energy source and an organic amendment for soil. Phenols are persistent pollutants present in MSW that can inhibit the anaerobic digestion process and have a toxic effect on microbiota if they are applied to soil together with digestate. It is then important to define the operational conditions of anaerobic digestion which allow the complete degradation of phenol. In this context, the fate of phenol during the anaerobic digestion of MSW at 55°C was followed using an isotopic tracing approach ((13)C6-phenol) in experimental microcosms with inoculum from an industrial thermophilic anaerobic digester. With this approach, it was possible to demonstrate the complete phenol biodegradation into methane and carbon dioxide via benzoate. Benzoate is known to be a phenol metabolite under mesophilic conditions, but in this study it was found for the first time to be a phenol degradation product at thermophilic temperature.

  18. Elucidation of the thermophilic phenol biodegradation pathway via benzoate during the anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos-Hernandez, Carolina; Hoffmann, Marieke; Guenne, Angeline; Mazeas, Laurent

    2014-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion makes it possible to valorize municipal solid waste (MSW) into biogas and digestate which are, respectively, a renewable energy source and an organic amendment for soil. Phenols are persistent pollutants present in MSW that can inhibit the anaerobic digestion process and have a toxic effect on microbiota if they are applied to soil together with digestate. It is then important to define the operational conditions of anaerobic digestion which allow the complete degradation of phenol. In this context, the fate of phenol during the anaerobic digestion of MSW at 55°C was followed using an isotopic tracing approach ((13)C6-phenol) in experimental microcosms with inoculum from an industrial thermophilic anaerobic digester. With this approach, it was possible to demonstrate the complete phenol biodegradation into methane and carbon dioxide via benzoate. Benzoate is known to be a phenol metabolite under mesophilic conditions, but in this study it was found for the first time to be a phenol degradation product at thermophilic temperature. PMID:24238916

  19. Anaerobic biodegradation of nonylphenol in river sediment under nitrate- or sulfate-reducing conditions and associated bacterial community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • NP biodegradation can occur under both nitrate- and sulfate-reducing conditions. • Anaerobic condition affects sediment bacterial diversity during NP biodegradation. • NP-degrading bacterial community structure varies under different anaerobic conditions. - Abstract: Nonylphenol (NP) is a commonly detected pollutant in aquatic ecosystem and can be harmful to aquatic organisms. Anaerobic degradation is of great importance for the clean-up of NP in sediment. However, information on anaerobic NP biodegradation in the environment is still very limited. The present study investigated the shift in bacterial community structure associated with NP degradation in river sediment microcosms under nitrate- or sulfate-reducing conditions. Nearly 80% of NP (100 mg kg−1) could be removed under these two anaerobic conditions after 90 or 110 days’ incubation. Illumina MiSeq sequencing analysis indicated that Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi became the dominant phylum groups with NP biodegradation. The proportion of Gammaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria and Choloroflexi showed a marked increase in nitrate-reducing microcosm, while Gammaproteobacteria and Firmicutes in sulfate-reducing microcosm. Moreover, sediment bacterial diversity changed with NP biodegradation, which was dependent on type of electron acceptor

  20. Bacterial vaginosis with special reference to anaerobes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumati A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study was undertaken to assess the prevalence of bacterial vaginosis (BV and to estimate the prevalence of anaerobic organisms in vaginal discharge of women suffering from bacterial vaginosis. Settings and Design: Patients attending the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department of a Medical College Hospital. A one year cross-sectional study. Methods and Materials: High vaginal swabs taken from 174 female patients complaining of abnormal vaginal discharge. BV was diagnosed by clinical composite criteria and by gram stain. Anaerobes were isolated and identified from the discharge. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi square test, with level of significance set at a value of P< 0.05. Results: BV was diagnosed in 68.39% of the cases by using clinical composite criteria and in 58.4% of the cases by gram stain. Anaerobic culture isolation of vaginal swabs revealed that out of 174 cases 143 (82.65% were culture positive for anaerobes. Bacteroides were significantly raised in BV as compared with non bacterial vaginosis (NBV; < 0.05%. Conclusions: Anaerobic bacteria are important pathogens in the causation of bacterial vaginosis along with other aerobic organisms. Bacteroides and peptostreptococci are significantly raised in BV.

  1. Iron in the aquifer system of Suffolk County, New York, 1990-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Craig J.; Walter, Donald A.; Colabufo, Steven

    1999-01-01

    High concentrations of dissolved iron in ground water contribute to the biofouling of public-supply wells, and the treatment and remediation of biofouling are costly. Water companies on Long Island, N.Y., spend several million dollars annually to recondition, redevelop, and replace supply wells and distribution lines; treat dissolved iron with sequestering agents or by filtration; and respond to iron-related complaints by customers. This report summarizes the results of studies done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Suffolk County Water Authority, to characterize the geochemistry and microbiology of iron in the aquifer system of Suffolk County. This information should be helpful for the siting and operation of supply wells. Concentrations of dissolved iron in Long Island?s ground water, and the frequency of iron biofouling of wells, are highest in ground-water-discharge zones, particularly near the south shore. Ground water along a deep north-south flowpath of the Magothy aquifer in southwestern Suffolk County becomes anaerobic (oxygen deficient) and Fe(III) reducing at a distance of 8 to 10 kilometers south of the ground-water divide, and this change coincides with the downgradient increase in dissolved iron concentrations. The distribution of organic carbon, and the distribution and local variations in reactivity of Fe(III), in Magothy aquifer sediments have resulted in localized differences in redox microenvironments. For example, Fe(III)-reducing zones are associated with anaerobic conditions, where relatively large amounts of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide grain coatings are present, whereas sulfate-reducing zones are associated with lignite-rich lenses of silt and clay and appear to have developed in response to the depletion of available Fe(III) oxyhydroxides. The sulfate-reducing zones are characterized by relatively low concentrations of dissolved iron (resulting from iron-disulfide precipitation) and may be large enough to warrant water

  2. Cadmium removal by Euglena gracilis is enhanced under anaerobic growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago-Martínez, M. Geovanni; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Encalada, Rusely; Pineda, Erika; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología (Mexico); Zepeda-Rodriguez, Armando [Facultad de Medicina, UNAM, Mexico City (Mexico); Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Saavedra, Emma [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología (Mexico); Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo, E-mail: rjass_cardiol@yahoo.com.mx [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología (Mexico)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • The protist Euglena gracilis had the ability to grow and remove large amounts of Cd{sup 2+} under anaerobic conditions. • High biomass was attained by combination of glycolytic and mitochondrial carbon sources. • Routes of degradation of glucose, glutamate and malate under anaerobic conditions in E. gracilis are described. • Biosorption was the main mechanism of Cd{sup 2+} removal in anaerobiosis, whereas the Cd{sup 2+} intracellularly accumulated was inactivated by thiol-molecules and polyphosphate. - Abstract: The facultative protist Euglena gracilis, a heavy metal hyper-accumulator, was grown under photo-heterotrophic and extreme conditions (acidic pH, anaerobiosis and with Cd{sup 2+}) and biochemically characterized. High biomass (8.5 × 10{sup 6} cells mL{sup −1}) was reached after 10 days of culture. Under anaerobiosis, photosynthetic activity built up a microaerophilic environment of 0.7% O{sub 2}, which was sufficient to allow mitochondrial respiratory activity: glutamate and malate were fully consumed, whereas 25–33% of the added glucose was consumed. In anaerobic cells, photosynthesis but not respiration was activated by Cd{sup 2+} which induced higher oxidative stress. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were 20 times lower in control cells under anaerobiosis than in aerobiosis, although Cd{sup 2+} induced a higher MDA production. Cd{sup 2+} stress induced increased contents of chelating thiols (cysteine, glutathione and phytochelatins) and polyphosphate. Biosorption (90%) and intracellular accumulation (30%) were the mechanisms by which anaerobic cells removed Cd{sup 2+} from medium, which was 36% higher versus aerobic cells. The present study indicated that E. gracilis has the ability to remove Cd{sup 2+} under anaerobic conditions, which might be advantageous for metal removal in sediments from polluted water bodies or bioreactors, where the O{sub 2} concentration is particularly low.

  3. Estimation of groundwater vulnerability to pollution based on DRASTIC in the Niipele sub-basin of the Cuvelai Etosha Basin, Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamutoko, J. T.; Wanke, H.; Voigt, H. J.

    2016-06-01

    Surface water is a scarce resource in Namibia with about sixty percent of Namibia's population dependent on groundwater for drinking purposes. With increasing population, the country faces water challenges and thus groundwater resources need to be managed properly. One important aspect of Integrated Water Resources Management is the protection of water resources, including protection of groundwater from contamination and over-exploitation. This study explores vulnerability mapping as a basic tool for protecting groundwater resources from pollution. It estimates groundwater vulnerability to pollution in the upper Niipele sub-basin of the Cuvelai-Etosha in Northern Namibia using the DRASTIC index. The DRASTIC index uses GIS to estimate groundwater vulnerability by overlaying different spatially referenced hydrogeological parameters that affect groundwater contamination. The study assesses the discontinuous perched aquifer (KDP) and the Ohangwena multi-layered aquifer 1 (KOH-1). For perched aquifers, point data was regionalized by a hydrotope approach whereas for KOH-1 aquifer, inverse distance weighting was used. The hydrotope approach categorized different parts of the hydrogeological system with similar properties into five hydrotopes. The result suggests that the discontinuous perched aquifers are more vulnerable than Ohangwena multi-layered aquifer 1. This implies that vulnerability increases with decreasing depth to water table because contaminants have short travel time to reach the aquifer when they are introduced on land surface. The nitrate concentration ranges between 2 and 288 mg/l in perched aquifers while in Ohangwena multi-layered aquifer 1, it ranges between 1 and 133 mg/l. It was observed that perched aquifers have high nitrate concentrations than Ohangwena 1 aquifer, which correlates well with the vulnerability results.

  4. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of a digitized polygon of a constant recharge value for the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma. The Enid isolated terrace...

  5. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized polygons of constant hydraulic conductivity values for the Enid isolated terrace aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma. The Enid...

  6. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Rush Springs aquifer in western Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized polygons of constant recharge values for the Rush Springs aquifer in western Oklahoma. This area encompasses all or part of...

  7. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Central Oklahoma aquifer in central Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized water-level elevation contours for the Central Oklahoma aquifer in central Oklahoma. This area encompasses all or part of...

  8. Denitrification in a deep basalt aquifer: implications for aquifer storage and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Dennis; Melady, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) can provide a means of storing water for irrigation in agricultural areas where water availability is limited. A concern, however, is that the injected water may lead to a degradation of groundwater quality. In many agricultural areas, nitrate is a limiting factor. In the Umatilla Basin in north central Oregon, shallow alluvial groundwater with elevated nitrate-nitrogen of 9 mg/L is injected into the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG), a transmissive confined aquifer(s) with low natural recharge rates. Once recovery of the injected water begins, however, NO3 -N in the recovered water decreases quickly to  +50, and correlate inversely with NO3 -N concentrations. This variation occurs in basalt aquifer, averaging 3.0 mg/L. Similar to nitrate concentrations, TOC drops in the recovered water, consistent with this component contributing to the denitrification of nitrate during storage.

  9. State Aquifer Recharge Atlas Plates, Geographic NAD83, LDEQ (1999) [aquifer_recharge_potential_LDEQ_1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This is a polygon dataset depicting the boundaries of aquifer systems in the state of Louisiana and adjacent areas of Texas, Arkansas and a portion of Mississippi....

  10. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Rush Springs aquifer in western Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized polygons of constant hydraulic conductivity values for the Rush Springs aquifer in western Oklahoma. This area encompasses all...

  11. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Antlers aquifer in southeastern Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized polygons of a constant hydraulic conductivity value for the Antlers aquifer in southeastern Oklahoma. The Early Cretaceous-age...

  12. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Antlers aquifer in southeastern Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized water-level elevation contours for the Antlers aquifer in southeastern Oklahoma. The Early Cretaceous-age Antlers Sandstone is...

  13. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the High Plains aquifer in western Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digital polygons of constant hydraulic conductivity values for the High Plains aquifer in Oklahoma. This area encompasses the panhandle...

  14. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Central Oklahoma aquifer in central Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized polygons of a constant recharge value for the Central Oklahoma aquifer in central Oklahoma. This area encompasses all or part of...

  15. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the High Plains aquifer in western Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized water-level elevation contours for the High Plains aquifer in western Oklahoma. This area encompasses the panhandle counties of...

  16. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the High Plains aquifer in western Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digital polygons of constant recharge rates for the High Plains aquifer in Oklahoma. This area encompasses the panhandle counties of...

  17. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Central Oklahoma aquifer in central Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized polygons of a constant hydraulic conductivity value for the Central Oklahoma aquifer in central Oklahoma. This area encompasses...

  18. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Rush Springs aquifer in western Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized water-level elevation contours for the Rush Springs aquifer in western Oklahoma. This area encompasses all or part of Blaine,...

  19. Digital data sets that describe aquifer characteristics of the Antlers aquifer in southeastern Oklahoma

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digitized polygons of constant recharge values for the Antlers aquifer in southeastern Oklahoma. The Early Cretaceous-age Antlers...

  20. Aquifer Boundary of the Wood River Valley Aquifer System, South-Central Idaho

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains the boundary of the Wood River Valley aquifer system as modified and expanded from that defined by Skinner and others (2007): It has been...

  1. Fate of organic micropollutants during anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge: localization of micropollutants within sludge organic matter pools

    OpenAIRE

    Aemig, Quentin; Cheron, Claire; Delgenès, Nadine; Houot, Sabine; Patureau, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Many organic micropolluants enter the environment through wastewaters. Some are partly degraded during wastewater treatment. For others, due to hydrophobic properties, sorption to sludge is the main removal process. Anaerobic digestion is widely used to treat sludge because it produced renewable energy in the form of methane. The digested sludge can be used as organic fertilizer. To evaluate the risk of soil contamination, it is necessary to know if organic pollutants are dissipated during th...

  2. The effect of pH and operation mode for COD removal of slaughterhouse wastewater with Anaerobic Batch Reactor (ABR)

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Octoviane Dyan; Gita Permana Putra; Budiyono Budiyono; Siswo Sumardiono; Tutuk Djoko Kusworo

    2015-01-01

    Disposal of industrial wastes in large quantities was not in accordance with today's standards of waste into environmental issues that must be overcome with proper treatment. Similarly, the abattoir wastewater that contains too high organic compounds and suspended solids. The amount of liquid waste disposal Slaughterhouse (SW) with high volume also causes pollution. The research aim to resolve this problem by lowering the levels of BOD-COD to comply with effluent quality standard. Anaerobic p...

  3. Toxic Effects of Pollutants on the Mineralization of Acetate in Methanogenic River Sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vlaardingen PLA; van Beelen P

    1993-01-01

    The functioning of anaerobic bacteria in river sediments is vital for the stability of freshwater ecosystems. The sensitivity of these organisms for pollutants is therefore important for the establishment of valid sediment quality criteria. Acetate is a key intermediate in the carbon cycle and was

  4. Steady state phreatic surfaces in sloping aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loáiciga, Hugo A.

    2005-08-01

    Steady state groundwater flow driven by constant recharge in an unconfined aquifer overlying sloping bedrock is shown to be represented, using the Dupuit approximation, by an ordinary differential equation of the Abel type y(x) . y'(x) + a . y(x) + x = 0, whose analytical solution is derived in this work. This article first investigates the case of zero saturated thickness at the upstream boundary, a flow system reminiscent of perched groundwater created by percolation of precipitation or irrigation in a sloping aquifer fully draining at its downstream boundary. A variant of this flow system occurs when the phreatic surface mounds and produces groundwater discharge toward the upstream boundary. This variant is a generalization of the classical groundwater flow problem involving two lakes connected by an aquifer, the latter being on sloping terrain in this instance. Analytical solutions for the phreatic surface's steady state geometry are derived for the case of monotonically declining hydraulic head as well as for the case of a mounded phreatic surface. These solutions are of practical interest in drainage studies, slope stability, and runoff formation investigations. It is shown that the flow factor a = -$\\sqrt{{\\rm K}/{\\rm N} tan β (where K, N, and tan β are the hydraulic conductivity, vertical recharge, and aquifer slope, respectively) has a commanding role on the phreatic surface's solutions. Two computational examples illustrate the implementation of this article's results.

  5. Biogeochemical aspects of aquifer thermal energy storage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brons, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    During the process of aquifer thermal energy storage the in situ temperature of the groundwater- sediment system may fluctuate significantly. As a result the groundwater characteristics can be considerably affected by a variety of chemical, biogeochemical and microbiological reactions. The inter

  6. PREDICTING CONTAMINANT MIGRATION IN KARST AQUIFERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Time-of-travel transport estimation is employed to predict contaminant migration in karst aquifers. stimation of time-of-travel transport is conditioned on the set of hydraulic-flow and geometric parameters that describe different transport processes that occur within karst condu...

  7. Transport of nonlinearly biodegradable contaminants in aquifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, H.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis deals with the transport behavior of nonlinearly biodegradable contaminants in aquifers. Such transport occurs during in situ bioremediation which is based on the injection of an electron acceptor or electron donor. The main interests in this thesis are the mutual influences of underlyin

  8. Groundwater sustainability assessment in coastal aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathashri, U. A.; Mahesha, A.

    2016-08-01

    The present work investigates the response of shallow, coastal unconfined aquifers to anticipated overdraft conditions and climate change effect using numerical simulation. The groundwater flow model MODFLOW and variable density groundwater model SEAWAT are used for this investigation. The transmissivity and specific yield estimated from the existing database range from 10 to 810 m 2/day and 0.08% to 10.92% respectively. After successful calibration with Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency greater than 0.80, the values of horizontal hydraulic conductivity and specific yield of the unconfined aquifer were set in the range 1.85-61.90 m/day and 0.006-0.24 respectively. After validating the model, it is applied for forecasting the aquifer's response to anticipated future scenarios of groundwater draft, recharge rate and sea level rise. The findings of the study illustrate that saltwater intrusion is intensified in the area adjoining the tidal rivers, rather than that due to the sea alone. Of all the scenarios simulated, the immense negative impact on groundwater quality emerges due to overdraft conditions and reduced recharge with the areal extent of seawater intrusion exceeding about 67% (TDS >1 kg/m 3). The study also arrives at the conclusion that, regional sea level rise of 1 mm/year has no impact on the groundwater dynamics of the aquifer.

  9. 40 CFR 147.102 - Aquifer exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.102 Section 147.102 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS...) Granite Point. (ii) McArthur River Field. (iii) Middle Ground Shoal Field. (iv) Trading Bay Field. (3)...

  10. Microbial diversity in a hydrocarbon- and chlorinated-solvent- contaminated aquifer undergoing intrinsic bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dojka, M.A.; Hugenholtz, P.; Haack, S.K.; Pace, N.R.

    1998-01-01

    A culture-independent molecular phylogenetic approach was used to survey constituents of microbial communities associated with an aquifer contaminated with hydrocarbons (mainly jet fuel) and chlorinated solvents undergoing intrinsic bioremediation. Samples were obtained from three redox zones: methanogenic, methanogenic-sulfate reducing, and iron or sulfate reducing. Small-subunit rRNA genes were amplified directly from aquifer material DNA by PCR with universally conserved or Bacteria- or Archaea-specific primers and were cloned. A total of 812 clones were screened by restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP), approximately 50% of which were unique. All RFLP types that occurred more than once in the libraries, as well as many of the unique types, were sequenced. A total of 104 (94 bacterial and 10 archaeal) sequence types were determined. Of the 94 bacterial sequence types, 10 have no phylogenetic association with known taxonomic divisions and are phylogenetically grouped in six novel division level groups (candidate divisions WS1 to WS6); 21 belong to four recently described candidate divisions with no cultivated representatives (OPS, OP8, OP10, and OP11); and 63 are phylogenetically associated with 10 well-recognized divisions. The physiology of two particularly abundant sequence types obtained from the methanogenic zone could be inferred from their phylogenetic association with groups of microorganisms with a consistent phenotype. One of these sequence types is associated with the genus Syntrophus; Syntrophus spp. produce energy from the anaerobic oxidation of organic acids, with the production of acetate and hydrogen. The organism represented by the other sequence type is closely related to Methanosaeta spp., which are known to be capable of energy generation only through aceticlastic methanogenesis. We hypothesize, therefore, that the terminal step of hydrocarbon degradation in the methanogenic zone of the aquifer is aceticlastic methanogenesis and

  11. Effects of microbially induced transformations and shift in bacterial community on arsenic mobility in arsenic-rich deep aquifer sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suvendu; Liu, Chia-Chuan; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Lee, Chuan-Chun; Yang, Huai-Jen

    2016-06-01

    Elevated concentration of arsenic (As) prevailed in deep aquifers of Chianan Plain, Taiwan. Arsenic release in relation to microbially induced transformations and shift in bacterial communities in deep aquifer sediments of Budai, southwestern Taiwan were investigated using microcosm experiments and substrate amendments over 90 days of anaerobic incubation. The results revealed that As reduction was independent of Fe reduction and a modest rate of sedimentary As release into aqueous phase occurred at the expense of the native organic carbon. Addition of lactate resulted in a parallel increase in As(III) (3.7-fold), Fe(II) (6.2-fold) and Mn (3.5 fold) in aqueous phase compared to un-amended slurries and the enrichment of sequences related to mostly Bacillus, Flavisolibacter, and Geobacter spp, suggesting the important role of these bacteria in As enrichment through reductive dissolution of As-bearing Fe and Mn minerals. The increase in phosphate-extractable As in solid phase with concomitant rise in As in aqueous phase over the course of incubation further attested to the importance of reductive dissolution in promoting As release. Furthermore, the increase in arrA gene abundance with addition of labile carbon suggests that dissimilatory As reduction also may contribute to As enrichment in the water of the deep aquifer of Budai.

  12. Effects of microbially induced transformations and shift in bacterial community on arsenic mobility in arsenic-rich deep aquifer sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suvendu; Liu, Chia-Chuan; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Lee, Chuan-Chun; Yang, Huai-Jen

    2016-06-01

    Elevated concentration of arsenic (As) prevailed in deep aquifers of Chianan Plain, Taiwan. Arsenic release in relation to microbially induced transformations and shift in bacterial communities in deep aquifer sediments of Budai, southwestern Taiwan were investigated using microcosm experiments and substrate amendments over 90 days of anaerobic incubation. The results revealed that As reduction was independent of Fe reduction and a modest rate of sedimentary As release into aqueous phase occurred at the expense of the native organic carbon. Addition of lactate resulted in a parallel increase in As(III) (3.7-fold), Fe(II) (6.2-fold) and Mn (3.5 fold) in aqueous phase compared to un-amended slurries and the enrichment of sequences related to mostly Bacillus, Flavisolibacter, and Geobacter spp, suggesting the important role of these bacteria in As enrichment through reductive dissolution of As-bearing Fe and Mn minerals. The increase in phosphate-extractable As in solid phase with concomitant rise in As in aqueous phase over the course of incubation further attested to the importance of reductive dissolution in promoting As release. Furthermore, the increase in arrA gene abundance with addition of labile carbon suggests that dissimilatory As reduction also may contribute to As enrichment in the water of the deep aquifer of Budai. PMID:26897570

  13. The Coffee Sand and Ripley aquifers in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, E.H.

    1978-01-01

    The Coffee Sand and Ripley aquifers, of Cretaceous age, are in the Selma Group in northern Mississippi. The aquifers contain freshwater in an area of about 4,400 square miles in northern Mississippi. Water produced from the aquifers by public water systems and numerous industries in 1975 averaged about 4 Mgal/d. Regional water-level declines have been very small and the aquifers have a moderate potential for future development. The aquifers are used in some areas where there are no other significant sources of ground water. The most common problems in developing water supplies are low yields to wells and hard water. (Kosco-USGS)

  14. [Anaerobic-aerobic infection in acute appendicitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamchich, V I; Ulitovskiĭ, I V; Savich, E I; Znamenskiĭ, V A; Beliaeva, O A

    1998-01-01

    362 patients with acute appendicitis (AA) were examined. For microbiological diagnosis of aerobic and anaerobic nonclostridial microflora we used complex accelerated methods (including evaluation of gram-negative microorganisms in comparison with tinctorial-fermentative method of differential staining according to oxygen sensitivity of catalasopositive together with aerobic and cathalasonegative anaerobic microorganisms) as well as complete bacteriologic examination with determination of sensitivity of the above microorganism to antimicrobial remedies. High rate of aerobic-anaerobic microbial associations and substantial identity of microflora from appendicis and exudate from abdominal cavity was revealed, which evidenced the leading role of endogenous microorganisms in etiology and pathogenesis of AA and peritonitis i. e. autoinfection. In patients with destructive forms of AA, complicated by peritonitis it is recommended to use the accelerated method of examination of pathologic material as well as the complete scheme of examination with the identification of the isolated microorganisms and the correction of antibiotic treatment. PMID:9511291

  15. Anaerobic fermentation of beef cattle manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, A. G.; Chen, Y. R.; Varel, V. H.

    1981-01-01

    The conversion of livestock manure and crop residues into methane and a high protein feed ingredient by thermophilic anaerobic fermentation is summarized. The major biological and operational factors involved in methanogenesis are discussed, and a kinetic model that describes the fermentation process is presented. Substrate biodegradability, fermentation temperature, and influent substrate concentration to have significant effects on CH4 production rate. Assessment of the energy requirements for anaerobic fermentation systems showed that the major energy requirement for a thermophilic system was for maintaining the fermenter temperature. The next major energy consumption was due to the mixing of the influent slurry and fermenter liquor. An approach to optimizing anaerobic fermenter s by selecting design criteria that maximize the net energy production per unit cost is presented.

  16. Biochemistry and physiology of anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-18

    We welcome you to The Power of Anaerobes. This conference serves two purposes. One is to celebrate the life of Harry D. Peck, Jr.,who was born May 18, 1927 and would have celebrated his 73rd birthday at this conference. He died November 20, 1998. The second is to gather investigators to exchange views within the realm of anaerobic microbiology, an area in which tremendous progress has been seen during recent years. It is sufficient to mention discoveries of a new form of life (the archaea), hyper or extreme thermophiles, thermophilic alkaliphiles and anaerobic fungi. With these discoveries has come a new realization about physiological and metabolic properties of microorganisms, and this in turn has demonstrated their importance for the development, maintenance and sustenance of life on Earth.

  17. Biochar from anaerobically digested sugarcane bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyang, Mandu; Gao, Bin; Pullammanappallil, Pratap; Ding, Wenchuan; Zimmerman, Andrew R

    2010-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of anaerobic digestion on biochar produced from sugarcane bagasse. Sugarcane bagasse was anaerobically digested to produce methane. The digested residue and fresh bagasse was pyrolyzed separately into biochar at 600 degrees C in nitrogen environment. The digested bagasse biochar (DBC) and undigested bagasse biochar (BC) were characterized to determine their physicochemical properties. Although biochar was produced from the digested residue (18% by weight) and the raw bagasse (23%) at a similar rate, there were many physiochemical differences between them. Compared to BC, DBC had higher pH, surface area, cation exchange capacity (CEC), anion exchange capacity (AEC), hydrophobicity and more negative surface charge, all properties that are generally desirable for soil amelioration, contaminant remediation or wastewater treatment. Thus, these results suggest that the pyrolysis of anaerobic digestion residues to produce biochar may be an economically and environmentally beneficial use of agricultural wastes. PMID:20634061

  18. Metabolic interactions between methanogenic consortia and anaerobic respiring bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stams, A.J.; Oude Elferink, S.J.; Westermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Most types of anaerobic respiration are able to outcompete methanogenic consortia for common substrates if the respective electron acceptors are present in sufficient amounts. Furthermore, several products or intermediate compounds formed by anaerobic respiring bacteria are toxic to methanogenic...

  19. ANAEROBIC AND AEROBIC TREATMENT OF CHLORINATED ALIPHATIC COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological degradation of 12 chlorinated aliphatic compounds (CACs) was assessed in bench-top reactors and in serum bottle tests. Three continuously mixed daily batch-fed reactor systems were evaluated: anaerobic, aerobic, and sequential-anaerobic-aerobic (sequential). Glucose,...

  20. The effect of tannic compounds on anaerobic wastewater treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Field, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is an alternative to the conventional aerobic treatment processes for the removal of easily biodegradable organic matter in medium to high strength industrial wastestreams. Anaerobic treatment has several advantages, however one important disadvantage is the high sensi

  1. Succession of lignocellulolytic bacterial consortia bred anaerobically from lake sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korenblum, Elisa; Jiménez Avella, Diego; van Elsas, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria degrade lignocellulose in various anoxic and organically rich environments, often in a syntrophic process. Anaerobic enrichments of bacterial communities on a recalcitrant lignocellulose source were studied combining polymerase chain reaction–denaturing gradient gel electrophoresi

  2. Ecological assessment of water quality in relation to hydrogeology in a shallow urban aquifer: Somesul Mic River aquifer (North-Western, Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iepure, Sanda; Marin, Constantin; Fekete, Alexandru; Rajka, Geza; Brad, Traian; Samsudean, Cristian

    2014-05-01

    The River Basin Management Plan is the main instrument for the implementation of the Water Framework Directive (2000/60/CE), one of its main requirements being the evaluation and quantification of human impacts on aquatic environments including the groundwater or groundwater dependent ecosystems. The Someş-Tisa basin is the largest hydrographical basin in NW Romania (22,380 km2), containing 15 Quaternary detrital groundwater bodies prone to intensive agricultural and urban industrial use. So far, no studies have addressed the groundwater fauna assemblages and their ecological response to human disturbances and aquifer contamination. Here we investigate a Quaternary shallow detrital aquifer (urban-industrial and agricultural contaminants, aiming to evaluate the sensitivity and structural patterns of groundwater crustaceans communities to aquifer contamination with trace metals (Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Mo, Pb), As, Se and nitrates. We conducted a survey in seven monitoring boreholes (1-8 m beneath the surface) through the Quaternary porrous aquifer of the Somesul Mic River on a 10 km long longitudinal transect. Hydrologic and geologic variables (rainfall amount, drainage network density, aquifer and drainage elevation, transmisivity and aquifer porosity) were extracted from previous works and Pearson correlations were calculated for paired variables. Water and faunal sampling was performed on a seasonal basis at one pristine and six impacted sites during 2013. Invertebrates were sampled with a submersible pump by extracting a volume of 50-100 l of water and filtering through a 63 microns planktonic net. Subsequently, 2 l of water was extracted after pumping for compositional analyses of major constituents, trace elements (by ICP-MS) and nutrients. The results of water geochemical analyses indicate a significant pollutant charge of groundwater with Mn (max. 29.26 μg/l), Ni (16.55 μg/l), Fe (509.74 μg/l), As (3.87 μg/l), Se (5.07 μg/l), sulphates (549.9

  3. Characteristics of Point Recharge in Karst Aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara Somaratne

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Karstic groundwater basins are characterized by both point and diffuse recharge. This paper describes the hydrologic characteristics of point recharge and their influence on recharge estimation for four groundwater basins. Point recharge is highly transient and may occur in relatively short-time periods, yet is capable of recharging a large volume of water, even from a single extreme rainfall event. Preferential groundwater flows are observed in karst aquifers with local fresher water pockets of low salinity that develop around point recharge sources. Measurable fresh water plumes develop only when a large quantity of surface water enters the aquifer as a point recharge. In fresh water plumes, the difference in chloride concentrations in diffuse and point recharge zones decreases as the plumes become enriched through mixing. The relative contributions to total recharge from point sources using the measured gap between groundwater and rainwater chloride in the chloride vs. δ18O plot is not necessarily indicative of sinkholes not directly recharging the aquifer. In karst aquifers, recharge estimation methods based on groundwater age distribution; average annual rainfall and basin average chloride in the conventional chloride mass balance (CMB method are questionable due to theoretical limitations and key assumptions of these methods not being met. In point recharge dominant groundwater basins, application of: watertable fluctuation, numerical groundwater modelling, Darcy flow calculation or water budget methods are more suitable for recharge estimation as they are independent of the particular mode of recharge. The duality of the recharge mechanism in karst aquifers suggests that modification to the CMB method may be required to include both point and diffuse recharge components.

  4. Treatment of phenolics, aromatic hydrocarbons, and cyanide-bearing wastewater in individual and combined anaerobic, aerobic, and anoxic bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Naresh K; Philip, Ligy

    2015-01-01

    Studies were conducted on a mixture of pollutants commonly found in coke oven wastewater (CWW) to evaluate the biodegradation of various pollutants under anaerobic, aerobic, and anoxic conditions. The removal of the pollutants was monitored during individual bioreactor operation and using a combination of bioreactors operating in anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic sequence. While studying the performance of individual reactors, it was observed that cyanide removal (83.3 %) was predominant in the aerobic bioreactor, while much of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) (69 %) was consumed in the anoxic bioreactor. With the addition of cyanide, the COD removal efficiency was affected in all the bioreactors, and several intermediates were detected. While treating synthetic CWW using the combined bioreactor system, the overall COD removal efficiency was 86.79 % at an OLR of 2.4 g COD/L/day and an HRT of 96 h. The removal efficiency of 3,5-xylenol and cyanide, with inlet concentration of 150 and 10 mg/L, was found to be 91.8 and 93.6 % respectively. It was found that the impact of xylenol on the performance of the bioreactors was less than cyanide toxicity. Molecular analysis using T-RFLP revealed the dominance of strictly aerobic, mesophilic proteobacterium, Bosea minatitlanensis, in the aerobic bioreactor. The anoxic bioreactor was dominant with Rhodococcus pyridinivorans, known for its remarkable aromatic decomposing activity, while an unclassified Myxococcales bacterium was identified as the predominant bacterial species in the anaerobic bioreactor.

  5. Main Factors Effecting Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-fei

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (ANAMMOX) drew more attentions because of its denitrification in wastewater with low carbon resource. The external conditions of ANAMMOX are relatively harsh,however this reaction does not require the participation of oxygen and organics. So the research and technology development of ANAMMOX has the significance of sustainable development.In this paper, the main influencing factors of ANAMMOX were summarized,Combined with recent research status of ANAMMOX technology, the development trend of the anaerobic ammonium oxidation technology was prospected.

  6. The Pasteur effect in facultative anaerobic metazoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, H; Kamp, G

    1996-05-15

    The existence and the regulatory mechanisms of the Pasteur effect in facultative anaerobic metazoa are discussed. There are three reasons for the controversy surrounding this phenomenon. 1) The different definitions of the Pasteur effect, 2) the antagonistic effect of metabolic depression and its species specific response to hypoxia, as well as 3) the laboratory-specific differences in the experimental procedures for analyzing the Pasteur effect and its regulation. This review aims to clarify the confusion about the existence of the Pasteur effect in facultative anaerobic metazoa and to offer possible molecular mechanisms.

  7. Groundwater Vulnerability Assessment Using Fuzzy Logic: A Case Study in the Zayandehrood Aquifers, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Farshad; Safavi, Hamid R.; Ahmadi, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater is an important source of water, especially in arid and semi-arid regions where surface water is scarce. Groundwater pollution in these regions is consequently a major concern, especially as pollution control and removal in these resources are not only expensive but at times impossible. It is, therefore, essential to prevent their contamination in the first place by properly identifying vulnerable zones. One method most commonly used for evaluating groundwater pollution is the DRASTIC method, in which the Boolean logic is used to rank and classify the parameters involved. Problems arise, however, in the application of the Boolean logic. In this paper, the fuzzy logic has been used to avoid the problems. For this purpose, three critical cases of minimum, maximum, and mean values have been considered for the net recharge parameter. The process has been performed on the Zayandehrood river basin aquifers. The fuzzy-DRASTIC vulnerability map thus obtained indicates that the western areas of the basin generally have the maximum pollution potential followed by the areas located in the east. The central parts of the study area are found to have a low pollution potential. Finally, two sensitivity analyses are performed to show the significance of each value of the net recharge parameter in the calculation of vulnerability index.

  8. Groundwater vulnerability assessment using fuzzy logic: a case study in the Zayandehrood aquifers, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Farshad; Safavi, Hamid R; Ahmadi, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater is an important source of water, especially in arid and semi-arid regions where surface water is scarce. Groundwater pollution in these regions is consequently a major concern, especially as pollution control and removal in these resources are not only expensive but at times impossible. It is, therefore, essential to prevent their contamination in the first place by properly identifying vulnerable zones. One method most commonly used for evaluating groundwater pollution is the DRASTIC method, in which the Boolean logic is used to rank and classify the parameters involved. Problems arise, however, in the application of the Boolean logic. In this paper, the fuzzy logic has been used to avoid the problems. For this purpose, three critical cases of minimum, maximum, and mean values have been considered for the net recharge parameter. The process has been performed on the Zayandehrood river basin aquifers. The fuzzy-DRASTIC vulnerability map thus obtained indicates that the western areas of the basin generally have the maximum pollution potential followed by the areas located in the east. The central parts of the study area are found to have a low pollution potential. Finally, two sensitivity analyses are performed to show the significance of each value of the net recharge parameter in the calculation of vulnerability index.

  9. pH Control for Effective Anaerobic Bioremediation of Chlorinated Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C.; Barry, D.; Gerhard, J. I.; Kouznetsova, I.

    2007-12-01

    SABRE (Source Area BioREmediation) is a 4-year collaborative project that aims to evaluate the performance of enhanced anaerobic bioremediation for the treatment of chlorinated solvent DNAPL source areas. The project focuses on a pilot scale demonstration at a trichloroethene (TCE) DNAPL field site, and includes complementary laboratory and modelling studies. Organic acids and hydrogen ions (HCl) typically build up in the treatment zone during anaerobic bioremediation. In aquifer systems with relatively low buffering capacity the generation of these products can cause significant groundwater acidification thereby inhibiting dehalogenating activity. Where the soil buffering capacity is exceeded, addition of buffer may be needed for the effective continuation of TCE degradation. As an aid to the design of remediation schemes, a geochemical model was designed to predict the amount of buffer required to maintain the source zone pH at a suitable level for dechlorinating bacteria (i.e. > 6.5). The model accounts for the amount of TCE to be degraded, site water chemistry, type of organic amendment and soil mineralogy. It assumes complete dechlorination of TCE, and further considers mineral dissolution and precipitation kinetics. The model is applicable to a wide range of sites. For illustration we present results pertinent to the SABRE field site. Model results indicate that, for the extensive dechlorination expected in proximity to the SABRE DNAPL source zone, significant buffer addition may be necessary. Additional simulations are performed to identify buffer requirements over a wider range of field conditions.

  10. Startup and stabilization of anaerobic membrane bioreactors at ambient temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Benito Peña, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    There has been an increasing interest in wastewater treatment in last decades to reduce human footprint. Primarily, anaerobic technology focused on treatment and stabilization of sludge, but now the tendency is to give it a major role in low cost treatment of high/low strength wastewaters, since anaerobic digestion offers energy generation through gas production. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR) combine anaerobic digestion with membrane filtration. They are becoming a feasible opti...

  11. The Financial Feasibility of Anaerobic Digestion for Ontario's Livestock Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Weersink, Alfons; Mallon, Shawn

    2007-01-01

    This report is an investigation of the financial feasibility of farm based anaerobic digestion investments under Ontario's Standard Offer Contract electricity prices. Using Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) Agricultural Anaerobic Digestion Calculation Spreadsheet (AADCS) anaerobic digestion inputs, outputs, cost and revenues were estimated and used to conduct a financial analysis on the feasibility of four sized farm base anaerobic digestion investments. The res...

  12. The effect of tannic compounds on anaerobic wastewater treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Field, J. A.

    1989-01-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is an alternative to the conventional aerobic treatment processes for the removal of easily biodegradable organic matter in medium to high strength industrial wastestreams. Anaerobic treatment has several advantages, however one important disadvantage is the high sensitivity of the anaerobic bacteria (ie. methanogenic bacteria) to toxic compounds. The anaerobic technologies were initially developed for the treatment of non-toxic organic wastewaters. As the techn...

  13. Groundwater vulnerability to pollution mapping of Ranchi district using GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, R.; Iqbal, J.; Gorai, A. K.; Pathak, G.; Tuluri, F.; Tchounwou, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater pollution due to anthropogenic activities is one of the major environmental problems in urban and industrial areas. The present study demonstrates the integrated approach with GIS and DRASTIC model to derive a groundwater vulnerability to pollution map. The model considers the seven hydrogeological factors [Depth to water table ( D), net recharge ( R), aquifer media ( A), soil media ( S), topography or slope ( T), impact of vadose zone ( I) and hydraulic Conductivity( C)] for generating the groundwater vulnerability to pollution map. The model was applied for assessing the groundwater vulnerability to pollution in Ranchi district, Jharkhand, India. The model was validated by comparing the model output (vulnerability indices) with the observed nitrate concentrations in groundwater in the study area. The reason behind the selection of nitrate is that the major sources of nitrate in groundwater are anthropogenic in nature. Groundwater samples were collected from 30 wells/tube wells distributed in the study area. The samples were analyzed in the laboratory for measuring the nitrate concentrations in groundwater. A sensitivity analysis of the integrated model was performed to evaluate the influence of single parameters on groundwater vulnerability index. New weights were computed for each input parameters to understand the influence of individual hydrogeological factors in vulnerability indices in the study area. Aquifer vulnerability maps generated in this study can be used for environmental planning and groundwater management.

  14. Digital Map Of Base of Aquifer for High Plains Aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of digital base of aquifer elevation contours for the High Plains aquifer in the central United States. The High Plains aquifer extends from...

  15. Digital map of aquifer boundary for the High Plains aquifer in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set consists of aquifer boundaries for the High Plains aquifer in the central United States. The High Plains aquifer extends from south of 32...

  16. Isotopic characterization of the Precambrian carbonate aquifers under the city of Bangui (Central African Republic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huneau, Frederic; Djebebe-Ndjiguim, Chantal-Laure; Foto, Eric; Ito, Mari; Celle-Jeanton, Helene; Garel, Emilie; Mabingui, Joseph

    2013-04-01

    The city of Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic, is located on the right bank of the Ubangi River which is the northernmost tributary of the Congo River. From its foundation in 1889 this city has always suffered from serious problems of water management. This is related to the specificity of the site configuration (steep hills surrounding a large swampy flat valley poorly drained) and to the urbanisation process responsible for the waterproofing of soils and the associated increased runoff processes under tropical humid condition.This paper presents the results of a geochemical and isotopic survey carried out in 2011 aiming at evaluating the type and chemical quality of the groundwater resources of the Bangui region. By combining geological, hydrogeochemical and isotopic data it appears that the underground of Bangui seems favourable to the development of a secured and sustainable water supply from groundwater provided that the conditions of exploitation would be constrained by the local authorities. The deep fractured (and locally kastified) Precambrian carbonate aquifers known as Bimbo and Fatima formations are identified as target resources considering the relatively good quality of the resource from the chemical point of view, and the semi-confined structure of the aquifer preventing the mixing with shallow aquifers already strongly impacted by domestic and industrial pollutions.

  17. Transport of enterococci and F+ coliphage through the saturated zone of the beach aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sieyes, Nicholas R; Russell, Todd L; Brown, Kendra I; Mohanty, Sanjay K; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2016-02-01

    Coastal groundwater has been implicated as a source of microbial pollution to recreational beaches. However, there is little work investigating the transport of fecal microbes through beach aquifers where waters of variable salinity are present. In this study, the potential for fecal indicator organisms enterococci (ENT) and F+ coliphage to be transported through marine beach aquifers was investigated. Native sediment and groundwaters were collected from the fresh and saline sections of the subterranean estuary at three beaches along the California coast where coastal communities utilize septic systems for wastewater treatment. Groundwaters were seeded with sewage and removal of F+ coliphage and ENT by the sediments during saturated flow was tested in laboratory column experiments. Removal varied significantly between beach and organism. F+ coliphage was removed to a greater extent than ENT, and removal was greater in saline sediments and groundwater than fresh. At one of the three beaches, a field experiment was conducted to investigate the attenuation of F+ coliphage and ENT down gradient of a septic leach field. ENT were detected up to 24 m from the leach field. The column study and field observations together suggest ENT can be mobile within native aquifer sediments and groundwater under certain conditions. PMID:26837827

  18. Assessment of groundwater dynamics in Uganda using a combination of isotope tracers and aquifer hydraulics data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater is widely developed for low-cost town, water supplies in areas underlain by weathered crystalline rock in sub-Saharan Africa but the sustainability of abstraction is unknown. In this study, we assess groundwater dynamics in fluvial deposits and weathered-fractured crystalline rocks underlying the town of Rukungiri, Uganda using environmental tracers and aquifer hydraulics data. CFC and 3H concentrations in pumped groundwater highlight that mixing of groundwaters of different residence times has occurred. Application of lumped parameter models based on tracer concentrations and reconstructed input functions indicate that groundwater underlying Rukungiri Town is generally young (less than 50 years old). A change in groundwater flow dimension from 2 (radial) to 1 (linear) since the commencement of intensive abstraction 8 years ago combined with a steady decline in groundwater levels over the last 8 years give rise to a conceptual model of a locally bounded isotropic (gravel) aquifer. Our results suggest that current groundwater development in Rukungiri is unsustainable. To maintain current abstraction and plan for increased abstraction for rapidly growing towns, strategies to optimise groundwater abstraction and protection are therefore required to control overexploitation and possible pollution of the aquifer. (author)

  19. Redox patterns and trace-element behavior in the East Midlands Triassic Sandstone Aquifer, U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, Pauline L; Edmunds, W Mike

    2002-01-01

    Redox conditions exercise important controls on water chemistry in the red-bed Sherwood Sandstone Aquifer of the English East Midlands. A distinct redox boundary exists some 3 to 5 km downgradient of the onset of confined conditions, defined by a 300 mV drop in Eh and complete reaction of dissolved oxygen. The aerobic aquifer contains polluted water with high nitrate concentrations and organic carbon significantly above background concentrations (> 0.2 mg/L). Concentrations of Fe, Mn, and Mo are highest in reducing ground water. As, Sb, Se, and U show a residence-time-dependent increase in aerobic ground water, but are much lower under reducing conditions. Iron oxides are believed to play a key role in determining the spatial patterns in many of these trace elements as a result of Eh- and pH-controlled sorption/desorption reactions, as well as some reductive dissolution in the confined aquifer. Fresh ground water persists in the confined aquifer to approximately 30 km downgradient of the redox boundary. However, SO4 concentrations increase progressively along the flowline as a result of the dissolution of gypsum or anhydrite. Concentrations of available organic carbon are low in ground water (1 mg/L or less) and are also likely to be limited in the sediments; conditions are insufficiently reducing for significant sulphate reduction to have taken place. Only in the extreme down-gradient (eastern) part of the aquifer do conditions become sufficiently reducing with some evidence of sulphate reduction. In this part of the aquifer, ground water is more saline (TDS values up to 10 g/L) and is believed to be composed substantially of older formation water. This has distinctive concentrations of several redox-influenced trace elements, with relatively high Fe, Mn, As, and Sb, occasional high Cr, and low Mo relative to the confined fresh ground water upgradient.

  20. Treatment of domestic sewage in a two-step system anaerobic filter/anaerobic hybrid reactor at low temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elmitwalli, T.A.; Zeeman, G.; Oahn, K.L.T.; Lettinga, G.

    2002-01-01

    The treatment of domestic sewage at low temperature of 13 degrees Celsius was investigated in a two-step system consisting of an anaerobic filter (AF) + an anaerobic hybrid (AH) reactor operated at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs)

  1. Anaerobic Digestion. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie, John W., Ed.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a four-lesson unit on anaerobic digestion control. Areas addressed include: (1) anaerobic sludge digestion (considering the nature of raw sludge, purposes of anaerobic digestion, the results of digestion, types of equipment, and other topics); (2) digester process control (considering feeding…

  2. Techniques for controlling variability in gram staining of obligate anaerobes.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, M. J.; Thatcher, E; Cox, M E

    1995-01-01

    Identification of anaerobes recovered from clinical samples is complicated by the fact that certain gram-positive anaerobes routinely stain gram negative; Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus, Eubacterium plautii, Clostridium ramosum, Clostridium symbiosum, and Clostridium clostridiiforme are among the nonconformists with regard to conventional Gram-staining procedures. Accurate Gram staining of American Type Culture Collection strains of these anaerobic bacteria is possible by implementing fi...

  3. The Influence of Hydration on Anaerobic Performance: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Justin A.; Green, James M.; Bishop, Phillip A.; Richardson, Mark T.; Neggers, Yasmin H.; Leeper, James D.

    2012-01-01

    This review examines the influence of dehydration on muscular strength and endurance and on single and repeated anaerobic sprint bouts. Describing hydration effects on anaerobic performance is difficult because various exercise modes are dominated by anaerobic energy pathways, but still contain inherent physiological differences. The critical…

  4. Changing anaerobic spectrum in suppurative lung disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beena, V K; Kumari, G R; Rao, P V; Murty, M V; Shivananda, P G

    1996-01-01

    A spectrum of three different anaerobes were isolated from a debilitated patient with suppurative lung disease, within a two-year period. Repeated isolation from three consecutive samples and symptomatic relief with metronidazole provide clinical evidence of anaerobic lung infection. This case emphasizes the importance of anaerobic culture in cases of protracted pulmonary suppurative disease. PMID:8822645

  5. Large fractions of CO2-fixing microorganisms in pristine limestone aquifers appear to be involved in the oxidation of reduced sulfur and nitrogen compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Martina; Rusznyák, Anna; Akob, Denise M.; Schulze, Isabel; Opitz, Sebastian; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The traditional view of the dependency of subsurface environments on surface-derived allochthonous carbon inputs is challenged by increasing evidence for the role of lithoautotrophy in aquifer carbon flow. We linked information on autotrophy (Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle) with that from total microbial community analysis in groundwater at two superimposed—upper and lower—limestone groundwater reservoirs (aquifers). Quantitative PCR revealed that up to 17% of the microbial population had the genetic potential to fix CO2 via the Calvin cycle, with abundances of cbbM and cbbL genes, encoding RubisCO (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) forms I and II, ranging from 1.14 × 103 to 6 × 106 genes liter−1 over a 2-year period. The structure of the active microbial communities based on 16S rRNA transcripts differed between the two aquifers, with a larger fraction of heterotrophic, facultative anaerobic, soil-related groups in the oxygen-deficient upper aquifer. Most identified CO2-assimilating phylogenetic groups appeared to be involved in the oxidation of sulfur or nitrogen compounds and harbored both RubisCO forms I and II, allowing efficient CO2 fixation in environments with strong oxygen and CO2 fluctuations. The genera Sulfuricellaand Nitrosomonas were represented by read fractions of up to 78 and 33%, respectively, within the cbbM and cbbL transcript pool and accounted for 5.6 and 3.8% of 16S rRNA sequence reads, respectively, in the lower aquifer. Our results indicate that a large fraction of bacteria in pristine limestone aquifers has the genetic potential for autotrophic CO2 fixation, with energy most likely provided by the oxidation of reduced sulfur and nitrogen compounds.

  6. Assessment of ground water quality in a fractured aquifer under continue wastewater injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies have been carried out in a fractured coastal aquifer of the Salento Region (Nardo' (Le) Italy), subject since 1991 to injection of 12000 m3/d of treated municipal wastewater in a natural sink. The analytical parameters of ground water sampled in monitoring wells, have been compared before and after the injection started. The mound of water table (1.5 m), the reduction of seawater extent of 2 km and the spreading of pollutants injected were evaluated by means of mathematical model results. After ten years operation, the volume of the available resource for agricultural and drinking use has been increased, without notable decrease of the pre existent ground water quality. Moreover for preserving such resource from pollution, the mathematical model allowed the standards of wastewater quality for recharge to be identified. Around the sink, a restricted area was also defined with prohibition of withdrawals, to avoid infection and other risks on human health

  7. Environmental impacts of anaerobic digestion and the use of anaerobic residues as soil amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosey, F.E. [VFA Services Ltd., Herts (United Kingdom)

    1996-01-01

    This paper defines the environmental role of anaerobic digestion within the overall objective of recovering energy from renewable biomass resources. Examples and opportunities for incorporating anaerobic digestion into biomass-to-energy schemes are discussed, together with environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion plants. These include visual, public amenity, pathogens and public health, odor control, and gaseous emissions. Digestate disposal and the benefits of restrictions on recycling organic wastes and biomass residues back to the land are discussed, particularly as they relate to American and European codes of practice and environmental legislation. The paper concludes that anaerobic digestion, if performed in purpose-designed reactors that efficiently recover and use biogas, is an environmentally benign process that can enhance energy recovery and aid the beneficial land use of plant residues in many biomass-to-energy schemes.

  8. Source, variability, and transformation of nitrate in a regional karst aquifer: Edwards aquifer, central Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrove, M; Opsahl, S P; Mahler, B J; Herrington, C; Sample, T L; Banta, J R

    2016-10-15

    Many karst regions are undergoing rapid population growth and expansion of urban land accompanied by increases in wastewater generation and changing patterns of nitrate (NO3(-)) loading to surface and groundwater. We investigate variability and sources of NO3(-) in a regional karst aquifer system, the Edwards aquifer of central Texas. Samples from streams recharging the aquifer, groundwater wells, and springs were collected during 2008-12 from the Barton Springs and San Antonio segments of the Edwards aquifer and analyzed for nitrogen (N) species concentrations and NO3(-) stable isotopes (δ(15)N and δ(18)O). These data were augmented by historical data collected from 1937 to 2007. NO3(-) concentrations and discharge data indicate that short-term variability (days to months) in groundwater NO3(-) concentrations in the Barton Springs segment is controlled by occurrence of individual storms and multi-annual wet-dry cycles, whereas the lack of short-term variability in groundwater in the San Antonio segment indicates the dominance of transport along regional flow paths. In both segments, longer-term increases (years to decades) in NO3(-) concentrations cannot be attributed to hydrologic conditions; rather, isotopic ratios and land-use change indicate that septic systems and land application of treated wastewater might be the source of increased loading of NO3(-). These results highlight the vulnerability of karst aquifers to NO3(-) contamination from urban wastewater. An analysis of N-species loading in recharge and discharge for the Barton Springs segment during 2008-10 indicates an overall mass balance in total N, but recharge contains higher concentrations of organic N and lower concentrations of NO3(-) than does discharge, consistent with nitrification of organic N within the aquifer and consumption of dissolved oxygen. This study demonstrates that subaqueous nitrification of organic N in the aquifer, as opposed to in soils, might be a previously unrecognized

  9. Selecting Aquifer Wells for Planned Gyroscopic Logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohe, Michael James; Studley, Gregory Wayne

    2002-04-01

    Understanding the configuration of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer's water table is made difficult, in part, due to borehole deviation in aquifer wells. A borehole has deviation if it is not vertical or straight. Deviation impairs the analysis of water table elevation measurements because it results in measurements that are greater than the true distance from the top of the well to the water table. Conceptual models of the water table configuration are important to environmental management decision-making at the INEEL; these models are based on measurements of depth to the water table taken from aquifer wells at or near the INEEL. When accurate data on the amount of deviation in any given borehole is acquired, then measurements of depth-to-water can be adjusted to reflect the true depth so more accurate conceptual models can be developed. Collection of additional borehole deviation data with gyroscopic logging is planned for selected wells to further our confidence in the quality of water level measurements. Selection of wells for the planned logging is based on qualitative and quantitative screening criteria. An existing data set from magnetic deviation logs was useful in establishing these criteria however, are considered less accurate than gyroscopic deviation logs under certain conditions. Population distributions for 128 aquifer wells with magnetic deviation data were used to establish three quantitative screening thresholds. Qualitative criteria consisted of administrative controls, accessibility issues, and drilling methods. Qualitative criteria eliminated all but 116 of the 337 aquifer wells, in the vicinity of the INEEL, that were initially examined in this screening effort. Of these, 72 have associated magnetic deviation data; 44 do not. Twenty-five (25) of the 72 wells with magnetic deviation data have deviation greater than one of the three quantitative screening thresholds. These 25 are recommended for the planned gyroscopic borehole deviation

  10. A simple and sensitive quality control method of the anaerobic atmosphere for identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Tage; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of a strict anaerobic atmosphere is essential for the culture of strict anaerobic bacteria. We describe a simple and sensitive quality control method of the anaerobic atmosphere, based on the measurement of the zone diameter around a 5-μg metronidazole disk when testing an...

  11. Combining sound science, legal action and stakeholder involvement to protect a vulnerable coastal aquifer on the island of St. Kitts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahely, H.; Nettles, S.; Burrowes, R.; Haas, G.

    2011-12-01

    Water resources in small island developing states (SIDS), especially those in the Caribbean are among the most vulnerable systems to human activities and climate change. This vulnerability is exacerbated by a fragmented approach to water resources management. The unconfined coastal aquifer underlying the Basseterre Valley is a significant asset for the people of St. Kitts-Nevis. The potable water extracted from this aquifer represents over 40% of the total water supply for St. Kitts. The area is subject to urban encroachment, inappropriate land use and threats from pollution. A project was implemented using an integrated approach to help government and communities take practical actions to protect this vulnerable aquifer by demonstrating proper management on three fronts: mitigation of threats from contaminants, protection of the aquifer and improved water resources management. The project is funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) as part of the Integrating Watershed and Coastal Areas Management (IWCAM) project for Caribbean Small Island States. A comprehensive hydrogeologic evaluation of the aquifer was undertaken in order to aid in the development of a water resources management strategy for the Basseterre Valley Aquifer. Multi-electrode electrical resistivity (MER), a novel surface geophysical technique, was used to delineate the thickness and distribution of sediments throughout the aquifer, zones of increased porosity, zones of possible contamination and the fresh/salt water interface. Together with slowly declining static water levels and elevated dissolved solids levels, the early stages of salt water intrusion have been documented. Groundwater modelling suggests that adjusting the pumping regime, redeveloping some of the existing wells and relocating other wells is a viable option for increasing efficiency and preventing long term dewatering. Overall, the study has provided a wealth of new information about the aquifer for a reasonable cost. A

  12. NUMERICAL MODELING OF WASTEWATER TRANSPORT AND DEGRADATION IN SOIL AQUIFER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Hai-long; XU Zu-xin; LI Huai-zheng; LI Song

    2006-01-01

    Modeling of wastewater transport and degradation in soil aquifer is a problem of concern with regard to the optimization of design and operation of the wastewater soil treatment system.To solve this problem, three-dimensional groundwater flow and wastewater transport and degradation model was developed using MODFLOW and MT3DMS modeling.The developed model was calibrated using the Soil Infiltration Treatment System (SITS) in the Chongming island of China after considering the river-groundwater interaction and the regional geological and hydrological conditions.Using the calibrated model, the following problems with regard to the design and operation of SITS were discussed: (1) Allowable hydraulic load.The hydraulic load increases with the drop in the water level of the adjoining river, the increase in the actual soil area under operation, and the increase in the distance among the individual operation units of SITS.(2) Optimized layout of the groundwater monitoring wells.The concentration contour of the simulated contaminants is very useful to depict the typical areas that are most severely polluted and very sensitive to the peripheral environment,, thus lesser number of monitoring wells can be set up based on the model, and the goal of the accurate assessment of the influence of soil-infiltrated wastewater on groundwater can be achieved.

  13. Anaerobic effluent disinfection using ozone: Byproducts formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, G.H.R.; Daniel, L.A.; Bruning, H.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2010-01-01

    This research was aimed at studying oxidation processes, coliform inactivation effectiveness and disinfection byproducts (DBPs) associated with the disinfection of anaerobic sanitary wastewater effluent with ozone applied at doses of 5.0, 8.0 and 10.0mg O(3)L(-1) for contact times of 5, 10 and 15 mi

  14. Sulfate-reducing bacteria in anaerobic bioreactors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, S.J.W.H.

    1998-01-01

    The treatment of industrial wastewaters containing high amounts of easily degradable organic compounds in anaerobic bioreactors is a well-established process. Similarly, wastewaters which in addition to organic compounds also contain sulfate can be treated in this way. For a long time, the occurrenc

  15. Anaerobic work capacity in elite wheelchair athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, L H; Bakker, W H; Elkhuizen, J W; Veeger, DirkJan (H. E. J.); Gwinn, T

    1997-01-01

    To study the anaerobic work capacity in wheelchair athletes, 67 elite wheelchair athletes (50 male) were studied in a 30-second sprint test on a computer-controlled wheelchair ergometer during the World Championships and Games for the Disabled in Assen (1990). The experimental set-up (ergometer, pro

  16. Anaerobic Pre-treatment of Strong Sewage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halalsheh, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to assess the feasibility of applying low cost anaerobic technology for the treatment of relatively high strength sewage of Jordan using two-stage and one-stage UASB reactors operated at ambient temperatures. The wastewater produced in Jordan is characterised

  17. Anaerobic Digestion in a Flooded Densified Leachbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chynoweth, David P.; Teixeira, Arthur A.; Owens, John M.; Haley, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses the adaptation of a patented biomass-digesting process, denoted sequential batch anaerobic composting (SEBAC), to recycling of wastes aboard a spacecraft. In SEBAC, high-solids-content biomass wastes are converted into methane, carbon dioxide, and compost.

  18. Comparative activity of ciprofloxacin against anaerobic bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Sutter, V L; Kwok, Y Y; Bulkacz, J

    1985-01-01

    The in vitro activity of ciprofloxacin was assessed against 362 strains of anaerobic bacteria and compared with that of cefoxitin, clindamycin, metronidazole, and mezlocillin. Only 31% of the strains tested were susceptible to ciprofloxacin. The other agents were active against most of the strains tested.

  19. Essential metal depletion in an anaerobic reactor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osuna, M.B.; Iza, J.M.; Zandvoort, M.H.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of the absence of trace elements on the conversion of a mixture of volatile fatty acids by a distillery anaerobic granular sludge was investigated. Two UASB reactors were operated under identical operational conditions except for the influent trace metal concentrations, during 140 days. E

  20. Anaerobic Digestion: Mass Balances and Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jacob; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Jansen, Jes la Cour

    2011-01-01

    While the basic processes involved in anaerobic digestion of waste are described in Chapter 9.4 and the main digestion technologies are presented in Chapter 9.5, this chapter focuses on mass balances, gas production and energy aspects, environmental emissions and unit process inventories...

  1. The fate of methanol in anaerobic bioreactors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florencio, L.

    1994-01-01

    Methanol is an important component of certain industrial wastewaters. In anaerobic environments, methanol can be utilized by methanogens and acetogens. In wastewater treatment plants, the conversion of methanol into methane is preferred because this conversion is responsible for chemical oxygen dema

  2. Enhanced anaerobic biological treatment of phenolic wastewaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindzierski, W.B.

    1989-01-01

    The combined treatment requirements for a high strength phenolic wastewater were examined in batch and semicontinuous anaerobic methanogenic bioassays. Solvent extraction pretreatment and in-situ addition of activated carbon during anaerobic treatment were effective in removing phenol from a coal liquefaction wastewater from the H-coal process. The selective pH adjustment of high strength phenolic wastewater followed by diisopropyl ether extraction reduced the phenolic concentration to non-inhibitory levels, and removed non-phenolic inhibitory compounds. The weakly acid nature of phenol and substituted phenols allows for their selective removal by solvent extraction. Anaerobic bacteria were able to degrade phenol in the solvent extracted wastwater, however, the bacteria exhibited instability under semicontinuous feeding conditions. The addition of activated carbon to the stressed phenol-degrading cultures improved their ability to remove phenol from solution. Further investigation into the role activated carbon performed during anaerobic phenol treatment demonstrated its importance as a biological support, in addition to providing adsorptive capacity for organic (including inhibitory) compounds. The similar study of other support materials (ion exchange resins) which did not possess an adsorptive capacity for organic compounds supported these findings. Excellent agreement was demonstrated among physical evaluation methods, performance bioassays, radiolabelled cell adsorption studies, and scanning electron microscopy observations in judging the value of the materials as biological supports.

  3. Anaerobic digestion in sustainable biomass chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pabon Pereira, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the potential contribution of anaerobic digestion (AD) to the sustainability of biomass chains. Results provide insights in the technological potential to recover energy and valuable by-products from energy crops and residues, and evaluate biomass cascades involving AD technolo

  4. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors: Are membranes really necessary?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davila, M.; Kassab, G.; Klapwijk, A.; Lier, van J.B.

    2008-01-01

    Membranes themselves represent a significant cost for the full scale application of anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBR). The possibility of operating an AnMBR with a self-forming dynamic membrane generated by the substances present in the reactor liquor would translate into an important saving. A

  5. Anaerobic microbial LCFA degradation in bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sousa, D.Z.; Pereira, M.A.; Alves, J.I.; Smidt, H.; Stams, A.J.M.; Alves, M.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews recent results obtained on long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) anaerobic degradation. Two LCFA were used as model substrates: oleate, a mono-unsaturated LCFA, and palmitate, a saturated LCFA, both abundant in LCFA-rich wastewaters. 16S rRNA gene analysis of sludge samples submitted to c

  6. Anaerobic hydrolysis during digestion of complex substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, W.T.M.

    2001-01-01

    Complex waste(water) such as, raw sewage, dairy wastewater, slaughterhouse wastewater, fish processing wastewater, primary sludge and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste have been proven to be degradable under anaerobic conditions. However, during the digestion process the conversion of th

  7. Anaerobic Toxicity of Cationic Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag+ under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged p...

  8. Early Microbial Evolution: The Age of Anaerobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, William F; Sousa, Filipa L

    2016-02-01

    In this article, the term "early microbial evolution" refers to the phase of biological history from the emergence of life to the diversification of the first microbial lineages. In the modern era (since we knew about archaea), three debates have emerged on the subject that deserve discussion: (1) thermophilic origins versus mesophilic origins, (2) autotrophic origins versus heterotrophic origins, and (3) how do eukaryotes figure into early evolution. Here, we revisit those debates from the standpoint of newer data. We also consider the perhaps more pressing issue that molecular phylogenies need to recover anaerobic lineages at the base of prokaryotic trees, because O2 is a product of biological evolution; hence, the first microbes had to be anaerobes. If molecular phylogenies do not recover anaerobes basal, something is wrong. Among the anaerobes, hydrogen-dependent autotrophs--acetogens and methanogens--look like good candidates for the ancestral state of physiology in the bacteria and archaea, respectively. New trees tend to indicate that eukaryote cytosolic ribosomes branch within their archaeal homologs, not as sisters to them and, furthermore tend to root archaea within the methanogens. These are major changes in the tree of life, and open up new avenues of thought. Geochemical methane synthesis occurs as a spontaneous, abiotic exergonic reaction at hydrothermal vents. The overall similarity between that reaction and biological methanogenesis fits well with the concept of a methanogenic root for archaea and an autotrophic origin of microbial physiology. PMID:26684184

  9. Biodegradability of leathers through anaerobic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhayalan, K; Fathima, N Nishad; Gnanamani, A; Rao, J Raghava; Nair, B Unni; Ramasami, T

    2007-01-01

    Leather processing generates huge amounts of both solid and liquid wastes. The management of solid wastes, especially tanned leather waste, is a challenging problem faced by tanners. Hence, studies on biodegradability of leather become imperative. In this present work, biodegradability of untanned, chrome tanned and vegetable tanned leather under anaerobic conditions has been addressed. Two different sources of anaerobes have been used for this purpose. The effect of detanning as a pretreatment method before subjecting the leather to biodegradation has also been studied. It has been found that vegetable tanned leather leads to more gas production than chrome tanned leather. Mixed anaerobic isolates when employed as an inoculum are able to degrade the soluble organics of vegetable tanned material and thus exhibit an increased level of gas production during the initial days, compared to the results of the treatments that received the anaerobic sludge. With chrome tanned materials, there was not much change in the volume of the gas produced from the two different sources. It has been found that detanning tends to improve the biodegradability of both types of leathers. PMID:16740383

  10. An anaerobic mitochondrion that produces hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxma, B.; Graaf, de R.M.; Staay, van der G.W.M.; Alen, T.A.; Richard, G.; Gabalon, T.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Moon - van der Staay, S.Y.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Hellemond, van J.J.; Tielens, A.G.M.; Friedrich, T.; Veenhuis, M.; Huynen, M.A.; Hackstein, J.H.P.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogenosomes are organelles that produce ATP and hydrogen(1), and are found in various unrelated eukaryotes, such as anaerobic flagellates, chytridiomycete fungi and ciliates(2). Although all of these organelles generate hydrogen, the hydrogenosomes from these organisms are structurally and metabo

  11. Pectinase Activity of Anaerobic and Facultatively Anaerobic Bacteria Associated with Soft Rot of Yam (Diascorea rotundata)

    OpenAIRE

    Obi, Samuel K. C.

    1981-01-01

    Anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria associated with soft rot of yam (Diascorea rotundata) were isolated by the looping-out method and found to consist of Clostridium (three isolates), Corynebacterium (three isolates), Vibrio (one isolate), and Bacillus lentus (one isolate). Enzyme assay for hydrolase, lyase, and pectinesterase activities by the cup-plate method showed that except for Vibrio sp., B. lentus, and two isolates of Corynebacterium no pectinase activity could be detected ...

  12. Optimal pollution trading without pollution reductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many kinds of water pollution occur in pulses, e.g., agricultural and urban runoff. Ecosystems, such as wetlands, can serve to regulate these pulses and smooth pollution distributions over time. This smoothing reduces total environmental damages when “instantaneous” damages are m...

  13. The origin of groundwater composition in the Pampeano Aquifer underlying the Del Azul Creek basin, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pampean plain is the most productive region in Argentina. The Pampeano Aquifer beneath the Pampean plain is used mostly for drinking water. The study area is the sector of the Pampeano Aquifer underlying the Del Azul Creek basin, in Buenos Aires province. The main objective is to characterize the chemical and isotopic compositions of groundwater and their origin on a regional scale. The methodology used involved the identification and characterization of potential sources of solutes, the study of rain water and groundwater chemical and isotopic characteristics to deduce processes, the development of a hydrogeochemical conceptual model, and its validation by hydrogeochemical modelling with PHREEQC. Groundwater samples come mostly from a two-depth monitoring network of the “Dr. Eduardo J. Usunoff” Large Plains Hydrology Institute (IHLLA). Groundwater salinity increases from SW to NE, where groundwater is saline. In the upper basin groundwater is of the HCO3-Ca type, in the middle basin it is HCO3-Na, and in the lower basin it is ClSO4–NaCa and Cl–Na. The main processes incorporating solutes to groundwater during recharge in the upper basin are rain water evaporation, dissolution of CO2, calcite, dolomite, silica, and anorthite; cationic exchange with Na release and Ca and Mg uptake, and clay precipitation. The main processes modifying groundwater chemistry along horizontal flow at 30 m depth from the upper to the lower basin are cationic exchange, dissolution of silica and anorthite, and clay precipitation. The origin of salinity in the middle and lower basin is secular evaporation in a naturally endorheic area. In the upper and middle basins there is agricultural pollution. In the lower basin the main pollution source is human liquid and solid wastes. Vertical infiltration through the boreholes annular space during the yearly flooding stages is probably the pollution mechanism of the samples at 30 m depth. - Highlights: • The work studies the origin of

  14. The origin of groundwater composition in the Pampeano Aquifer underlying the Del Azul Creek basin, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabala, M.E., E-mail: mzabala@faa.unicen.edu.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Hidrología de Llanuras “Dr. Eduardo J. Usunoff”, Av. República Italia 780, 7300 Azul, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Manzano, M., E-mail: marisol.manzano@upct.es [Escuela de Ingeniería de Caminos, Canales y Puertos y de Ingeniería de Minas, Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, P° de Alfonso XIII 52, E-30203 Cartagena (Spain); Vives, L., E-mail: lvives@faa.unicen.edu.ar [Instituto de Hidrología de Llanuras “Dr. Eduardo J. Usunoff”, Av. República Italia 780, 7300 Azul, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-06-15

    The Pampean plain is the most productive region in Argentina. The Pampeano Aquifer beneath the Pampean plain is used mostly for drinking water. The study area is the sector of the Pampeano Aquifer underlying the Del Azul Creek basin, in Buenos Aires province. The main objective is to characterize the chemical and isotopic compositions of groundwater and their origin on a regional scale. The methodology used involved the identification and characterization of potential sources of solutes, the study of rain water and groundwater chemical and isotopic characteristics to deduce processes, the development of a hydrogeochemical conceptual model, and its validation by hydrogeochemical modelling with PHREEQC. Groundwater samples come mostly from a two-depth monitoring network of the “Dr. Eduardo J. Usunoff” Large Plains Hydrology Institute (IHLLA). Groundwater salinity increases from SW to NE, where groundwater is saline. In the upper basin groundwater is of the HCO{sub 3}-Ca type, in the middle basin it is HCO{sub 3}-Na, and in the lower basin it is ClSO{sub 4}–NaCa and Cl–Na. The main processes incorporating solutes to groundwater during recharge in the upper basin are rain water evaporation, dissolution of CO{sub 2}, calcite, dolomite, silica, and anorthite; cationic exchange with Na release and Ca and Mg uptake, and clay precipitation. The main processes modifying groundwater chemistry along horizontal flow at 30 m depth from the upper to the lower basin are cationic exchange, dissolution of silica and anorthite, and clay precipitation. The origin of salinity in the middle and lower basin is secular evaporation in a naturally endorheic area. In the upper and middle basins there is agricultural pollution. In the lower basin the main pollution source is human liquid and solid wastes. Vertical infiltration through the boreholes annular space during the yearly flooding stages is probably the pollution mechanism of the samples at 30 m depth. - Highlights: • The

  15. Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, R.E.; Londergan, J.T.; Pickens, J.F. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Many DOE facilities are situated in areas of sand and gravel which have become polluted with dense, non-aqueous phase liquids or DNAPLs, such as chlorinated solvents, from the various industrial operations at these facilities. The presence of such DNAPLs in sand and gravel aquifers is now recognized as the principal factor in the failure of standard ground-water remediation methods. The principal objective of this study, as stated in the Statement of Work of the contract (DE-AC21-92MC29111), is to demonstrate that multi-component DNAPLs can be readily solubilized in sand and gravel aquifers by dilute surfactant solutions. The specific objectives of the contract are: to identify dilute surfactants or blends of surfactants in the laboratory that will efficiently extract multi-component DNAPLs from sand and gravel aquifers by micellar solubilization (Phase 1); 2. to test the efficacy of the identified surfactants or blends of surfactants to solubilize in situ perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) DNAPLs by the injection and the subsequent extraction through an existing well or wells at a government-owned contaminated site (Phase 1); and 3. to demonstrate the full-scale operation of this remedial technology at a government-owned contaminated site (Phase 2). Specific objective number 1 has been completed and reported to DOE. However, the results of the test referred to in specific objective number 2, conducted at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in 1994, were inconclusive. Following this first test, it was decided by DOE and INTERA to move the test site elsewhere due to difficulties with obtaining core samples of the sand and gravel aquifer containing the DNAPL and with ascertaining the location of the DNAPL relative to the injection well. The solubilization test at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) will constitute the second test of Phase 1 of this contract.

  16. The High Plains Aquifer, USA: Groundwater development and sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, K.F.; Litke, D.W.; McMahon, P.B.

    2002-01-01

    The High Plains Aquifer, located in the United States, is one of the largest freshwater aquifers in the world and is threatened by continued decline in water levels and deteriorating water quality. Understanding the physical and cultural features of this area is essential to assessing the factors that affect this groundwater resource. About 27% of the irrigated land in the United States overlies this aquifer, which yields about 30% of the nation's groundwater used for irrigation of crops including wheat, corn, sorghum, cotton and alfalfa. In addition, the aquifer provides drinking water to 82% of the 2.3 million people who live within the aquifer boundary. The High Plains Aquifer has been significantly impacted by human activities. Groundwater withdrawals from the aquifer exceed recharge in many areas, resulting in substantial declines in groundwater level. Residents once believed that the aquifer was an unlimited resource of high-quality water, but they now face the prospect that much of the water may be gone in the near future. Also, agricultural chemicals are affecting the groundwater quality. Increasing concentrations of nitrate and salinity can first impair the use of the water for public supply and then affect its suitability for irrigation. A variety of technical and institutional measures are currently being planned and implemented across the aquifer area in an attempt to sustain this groundwater resource for future generations. However, because groundwater withdrawals remain high and water quality impairments are becoming more commonplace, the sustainability of the High Plains Aquifer is uncertain.

  17. Reduction of Wastewater Pollutants of Mandalay City Slaughterhouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaughterhouse (Meat Production Factor)under Mandaly City Development Committee (MCDC) in Myanmar has been discharging raw wastewater directly into Tat Thay Pont which is located at the back side of the slaughterhouse.It can cause some water pollutants in water source and need to prevent environmental impact. This paper was studied on the treatment of slaughterhouse wastewater using appropriate technique available in local area. Sample collection of slaughterhouse waste, analysing of waste quality on current situation,different ways of pre-treating and anaerobically digestion without recycling were done. Screening, coagulation, sedimentation and charcoal filtration were included as pre-treating steps before major anaerobic digestion. Ferric chloride and aluminum sulphate chemicals of both commercial and analytical grades were used as coagulants. Laboratory-scaled anaerobic reactor constructed with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) material was 15 cm diameter and 90 cm heigh. MCDC slaughterhouse wastewater containing 98.56% of total coarse particles was removed via minimum size of 1500 micron screen. Aluminium sulphate gave the best removal of fine solid particles. It was observed that pre-treating steps can reduce 56.72% of initial biological oxygen demand (BOD), 51.482% of initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 45.18% of inital total suspended solid (TSS) and anaerobic digester after 30 days can reduce 77.4% of influent BOD,81.5% of influent COD and 87.3% of influent TSS.

  18. Modeling the transport behavior of 16 emerging organic contaminants during soil aquifer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nham, Hang Thuy Thi; Greskowiak, Janek; Nödler, Karsten; Rahman, Mohammad Azizur; Spachos, Thomas; Rusteberg, Bernd; Massmann, Gudrun; Sauter, Martin; Licha, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    In this study, four one-dimensional flow and transport models based on the data of a field scale experiment in Greece were constructed to investigate the transport behavior of sixteen organic trace pollutants during soil aquifer treatment. At the site, tap water and treated wastewater were intermittently infiltrated into a porous aquifer via a small pilot pond. Electrical conductivity data was used to calibrate the non-reactive transport models. Transport and attenuation of the organic trace pollutants were simulated assuming 1st order degradation and linear adsorption. Sorption was found to be largely insignificant at this site for the compounds under investigation. In contrast, flow path averaged first order degradation rate constants were mostly higher compared to the literature and lay between 0.036 d(-1) for clofibric acid and 0.9 d(-1) for ibuprofen, presumably owing to the high temperatures and a well adapted microbial community originating from the wastewater treatment process. The study highlights the necessity to obtain intrinsic attenuation parameters at each site, as findings cannot easily be transferred from one site to another. PMID:25687671

  19. Chromium(VI) transport and fate in unsaturated zone and aquifer: 3D Sandbox results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingmin; Sobecky, Patricia A; Zhao, Lanpo; Crawford, Patrice; Li, Mingtang

    2016-04-01

    The simulation of Cr(VI) behavior in an unsaturated zone and aquifer, using a 3D experimental set-up were performed to illustrate the distribution, transport and transformation of Cr(VI), and further to reveal the potential harm of Cr(VI) after entering the groundwater. The result indicated that chromium(VI) was transported in the vertical direction, meanwhile, was transported in the horizontal direction under the influence of groundwater flow. The direction and distance away from the pollution source zone had great effect on the chromium(VI) concentration. At the sampling sites near the pollution source zone, there was a sudden increase of chromium(VI) concentration. The concentration of chromium(III) concentration in some random effluent samples was not detected. Chromium had not only transported but also had fraction and specie transformation in the unsaturated zone and aquifer. The relative concentration of residue fraction chromium was decreased with time. The content of Fe-Mn oxide fraction chromium was increased with time. The relative content of exchangeable and carbonate-bound fraction chromium was lower and the content variations were not obvious. Chromium(VI) (91-98%) was first reduced to chromium(III) rapidly. The oxidation reaction occurred later and the relative content of chromium(VI) was increased again. The presence of manganese oxides under favorable soil conditions can promote the reoxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI).

  20. DRASTIC-GIS model for assessing vulnerability to pollution of the phreatic aquiferous formations in Douala-Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victorine Neh, Akenji; Ako Ako, Andrew; Richard Ayuk, Akoachere; Hosono, Takahiro

    2015-02-01

    The pollution potentials of the aquiferous formations in Douala was obtained by evaluating the aquifer vulnerability. Aquifer vulnerability is an intrinsic property of groundwater which gives the possibility of percolation and diffusion of contaminants from the ground surface into the subsurface. Aquifer vulnerability to pollution was evaluated for the phreatic aquifer in Douala using the DRASTIC method. DRASTIC is a groundwater quality model representing; Depth to Water, Net Recharge, Aquifer Media, Soil Media, Topography, Impact of vadose Zones, and Hydraulic Conductivity. From data, five thematic maps were generated and an intrinsic vulnerability map was developed based upon calculations of DRASTIC Indices (D.I). The D.I for the different inhabited quarters were; Bonamoussadi (BS) = 145, Bali (BA) = 138, Bonapriso (BP) = 140, Airport(AP) = 129, Ndogbong(ND) = 120, Bepanda(BE) = 130, Vallee Besengue (VB) = 134, New Bell (NB) = 125, Bonassama BM) = 128 and Rail(RA) = 167. ArcGIS quantile classification subdivided the area into four groups; very low, low, moderate and high ground water vulnerability risk zones covering about 30%, 30%, 20% and 20% of the study area respectively. An in-depth study is recommended to give a detailed perspective to the evolution and nature of actual pollution in the area.