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Sample records for anaerobic ammonium oxidizing

  1. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation in an estuarine sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risgaard-Petersen, N.; Meyer, R.L.; Schmid, M.C.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Enrich-Prast, A.; Rysgaard, S.; Revsbech, N.P.

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence and significance of the anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) process relative to denitrification was studied in photosynthetically active sediment from 2 shallow-water estuaries: Randers Fjord and Norsminde Fjord, Denmark. Anammox accounted for 5 to 24 % of N-2 production in Randers

  2. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation in an estuarine sediment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risgaard-Petersen, N.; Meyer, R.L.; Schmid, M.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Enrich-Prast, A.; Rysgaard, S.; Revsbech, N.P.

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence and significance of the anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) process relative to denitrification was studied in photosynthetically active sediment from 2 shallow-water estuaries: Randers Fjord and Norsminde Fjord, Denmark. Anammox accounted for 5 to 24% of N2 production in Randers

  3. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation in an estuarine sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Risgaard-Petersen, N.; Meyer, R.L.; Schmid, M.C.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Enrich-Prast, A.; Rysgaard, S.; Revsbech, N.P.

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence and significance of the anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) process relative to denitrification was studied in photosynthetically active sediment from 2 shallow-water estuaries: Randers Fjord and Norsminde Fjord, Denmark. Anammox accounted for 5 to 24 % of N-2 production in Randers Fjord sediment, whereas no indication was seen of the process in sediment from Norsminde Fjord, It is suggested that the presence of anammox in Randers Fjord and its absence from Norsminde Fjord i...

  4. [Achievement of Sulfate-Reducing Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Reactor Started with Nitrate-Reducting Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng-chuan; Yuan, Lin-jiang; Zhou, Guo-biao; Li, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The transformation of nitrite-reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation to sulfate-reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation in an UASB was performed and the changes in microbial community were studied. The result showed that the sulfate reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation process was successfully accomplished after 177 days' operation. The removal rate of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate were up to 58. 9% and 15. 7%, the removing load of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate were 74. 3 mg.(L.d)-1 and 77. 5 mg.(L.d)-1 while concentration of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate of influent were 130 mg.(L.d)-1 and 500 mg.(L.d)-1, respectively. The lost nitrogen and sulphur was around 2 in molar ratio. The pH value of the effluent was lower than that of the influent. Instead of Candidatus brocadia in nitrite reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation granular sludge, Bacillus benzoevorans became the dominant species in sulfate reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation sludge. The dominant bacterium in the two kinds of anaerobic ammonium oxidation process is different. Our results imply that the two anaerobic ammonium oxidation processes are carried out by different kind of bacterium.

  5. Cell biology of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niftrik, L.A.M.P. van

    2008-01-01

    Anammox bacteria perform anaerobic ammonium oxidation to dinitrogen gas and belong to the phylum Planctomycetes. Whereas most Prokaryotes consist of one compartment, the cytoplasm bounded by the cytoplasmic membrane and cell wall, the species within this phylum are compartmentalized by intracellular

  6. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by anammox bacteria in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Sliekers, A. Olav; Lavik, Gaute; Schmid, Markus; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Kuenen, J. Gijs; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Strous, Marc; Jetten, Mike S. M.

    2003-04-01

    The availability of fixed inorganic nitrogen (nitrate, nitrite and ammonium) limits primary productivity in many oceanic regions. The conversion of nitrate to N2 by heterotrophic bacteria (denitrification) is believed to be the only important sink for fixed inorganic nitrogen in the ocean. Here we provide evidence for bacteria that anaerobically oxidize ammonium with nitrite to N2 in the world's largest anoxic basin, the Black Sea. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences shows that these bacteria are related to members of the order Planctomycetales performing the anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) process in ammonium-removing bioreactors. Nutrient profiles, fluorescently labelled RNA probes, 15N tracer experiments and the distribution of specific `ladderane' membrane lipids indicate that ammonium diffusing upwards from the anoxic deep water is consumed by anammox bacteria below the oxic zone. This is the first time that anammox bacteria have been identified and directly linked to the removal of fixed inorganic nitrogen in the environment. The widespread occurrence of ammonium consumption in suboxic marine settings indicates that anammox might be important in the oceanic nitrogen cycle.

  7. Antibiotics with anaerobic ammonium oxidation in urban wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ruipeng; Yang, Yuanming

    2017-05-01

    Biofilter process is based on biological oxidation process on the introduction of fast water filter design ideas generated by an integrated filtration, adsorption and biological role of aerobic wastewater treatment process various purification processes. By engineering example, we show that the process is an ideal sewage and industrial wastewater treatment process of low concentration. Anaerobic ammonia oxidation process because of its advantage of the high efficiency and low consumption, wastewater biological denitrification field has broad application prospects. The process in practical wastewater treatment at home and abroad has become a hot spot. In this paper, anammox bacteria habitats and species diversity, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation process in the form of diversity, and one and split the process operating conditions are compared, focusing on a review of the anammox process technology various types of wastewater laboratory research and engineering applications, including general water quality and pressure filtrate sludge digestion, landfill leachate, aquaculture wastewater, monosodium glutamate wastewater, wastewater, sewage, fecal sewage, waste water salinity wastewater characteristics, research progress and application of the obstacles. Finally, we summarize the anaerobic ammonium oxidation process potential problems during the processing of the actual waste water, and proposed future research focus on in-depth study of water quality anammox obstacle factor and its regulatory policy, and vigorously develop on this basis, and combined process optimization.

  8. Engineering application of anaerobic ammonium oxidation process in wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Nianjia; Ren, Hongqiang; Geng, Jinju; Ding, Lili; Xu, Ke

    2017-08-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox), a promising biological nitrogen removal process, has been verified as an efficient, sustainable and cost-effective alternative to conventional nitrification and denitrification processes. To date, more than 110 full-scale anammox plants have been installed and are in operation, treating industrial NH 4 + -rich wastewater worldwide, and anammox-based technologies are flourishing. This review the current state of the art for engineering applications of the anammox process, including various anammox-based technologies, reactor selection and attempts to apply it at different wastewater plants. Process control and implementation for stable performance are discussed as well as some remaining issues concerning engineering application are exposed, including the start-up period, process disturbances, greenhouse gas emissions and especially mainstream anammox applications. Finally, further development of the anammox engineering application is proposed in this review.

  9. Electrodes as Terminal Electron Acceptors in Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Urigüen, M.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium (NH4+) oxidation under iron (Fe) reducing conditions is a microbial- mediated process known as Feammox. This is a novel pathway in the nitrogen cycle, and a key process for alleviating NH4+ accumulation in anoxic soils, wetlands, and wastewater. Acidimicrobiaceae-bacterium A6, phylum Actinobacteria, are one type of autotrophic bacteria linked to this process. The Feammox-bacteria obtain their energy by oxidizing NH4+ and transferring the electrons to a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Under environmental conditions, iron oxides are the TEAs. However, in this study we show that electrodes in Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs) or electrodes set in the field can be used as TEAs by Feammox-bacteria. The potential difference between electrodes is the driving force for electron transfer, making the reaction energetically feasible. Our results show that MECs containing Feammox cultures can remove NH4+ up to 3.5 mg/L in less than 4 hours, compared to an average of 9 mg/L in 2 weeks when cultured under traditional conditions. Concomitantly, MECs produce an average current of 30.5 A/m3 whilst dead bacteria produced low (application of Feammox-bacteria.

  10. Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing Bacteria in Cow Manure Composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Cheng, Lijun; Zhang, Wenhao; Xu, Xiuhong; Meng, Qingxin; Sun, Xuewei; Liu, Huajing; Li, Hongtao; Sun, Yu

    2017-07-28

    Composting is widely used to transform waste into valuable agricultural organic fertilizer. Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria play an important role in the global nitrogen cycle, but their role in composting remains poorly understood. In the present study, the community structure, diversity, and abundance of anammox bacteria were analyzed using cloning and sequencing methods by targeting the 16S rRNA gene and the hydrazine oxidase gene ( hzo ) in samples isolated from compost produced from cow manure and rice straw. A total of 25 operational taxonomic units were classified based on 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, and 14 operational taxonomic units were classified based on hzo gene clone libraries. The phylogenetic tree analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and deduced HZO protein sequences from the corresponding encoding genes indicated that the majority of the obtained clones were related to the known anammox bacteria Candidatus "Brocadia," Candidatus "Kuenenia," and Candidatus "Scalindua." The abundances of anammox bacteria were determined by quantitative PCR, and between 2.13 × 10 5 and 1.15 × 10 6 16S rRNA gene copies per gram of compost were found. This study provides the first demonstration of the existence of anammox bacteria with limited diversity in cow manure composting.

  11. Inactivation of ANAMMOX communities under concurrent operation of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) and denitrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamchoi, N.; Nitisoravut, S.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2008-01-01

    A concurrent operation of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) and denitrification was investigated in a well known UASB reactor seeding with both ANAMMOX and anaerobic granular sludges. ANAMMOX activity was confirmed by hydroxylamine test and the hybridization of biomass using the gene probes...

  12. Nitrogen loss from soil through anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to iron reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wendy H.; Weber, Karrie A.; Silver, Whendee L.

    2012-08-01

    The oxidation of ammonium is a key step in the nitrogen cycle, regulating the production of nitrate, nitrous oxide and dinitrogen. In marine and freshwater ecosystems, anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to nitrite reduction, termed anammox, accounts for up to 67% of dinitrogen production. Dinitrogen production through anaerobic ammonium oxidation has not been observed in terrestrial ecosystems, but the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium to nitrite has been observed in wetland soils under iron-reducing conditions. Here, we incubate tropical upland soil slurries with isotopically labelled ammonium and iron(III) to assess the potential for anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to iron(III) reduction, otherwise known as Feammox, in these soils. We show that Feammox can produce dinitrogen, nitrite or nitrate in tropical upland soils. Direct dinitrogen production was the dominant Feammox pathway, short-circuiting the nitrogen cycle and resulting in ecosystem nitrogen losses. Rates were comparable to aerobic nitrification and to denitrification, the latter being the only other process known to produce dinitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. We suggest that Feammox could fuel nitrogen losses in ecosystems rich in poorly crystalline iron minerals, with low or fluctuating redox conditions.

  13. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by anammox bacteria in the Black Sea RID B-8834-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuypers, MMM; Sliekers, AO; Lavik, G.

    2003-01-01

    ). Here we provide evidence for bacteria that anaerobically oxidize ammonium with nitrite to N(2) in the world's largest anoxic basin, the Black Sea. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences shows that these bacteria are related to members of the order Planctomycetales performing...... the anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) process in ammonium-removing bioreactors(3). Nutrient profiles, fluorescently labelled RNA probes, (15)N tracer experiments and the distribution of specific 'ladderane' membrane lipids(4) indicate that ammonium diffusing upwards from the anoxic deep water is consumed...... by anammox bacteria below the oxic zone. This is the first time that anammox bacteria have been identified and directly linked to the removal of fixed inorganic nitrogen in the environment. The widespread occurrence of ammonium consumption in suboxic marine settings(5-7) indicates that anammox might...

  14. Advances in methods for detection of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Meng; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), the biochemical process oxidizing ammonium into dinitrogen gas using nitrite as an electron acceptor, has only been recognized for its significant role in the global nitrogen cycle not long ago, and its ubiquitous distribution in a wide range of environments has changed our knowledge about the contributors to the global nitrogen cycle. Currently, several groups of methods are used in detection of anammox bacteria based on their physiological and biochem...

  15. Application of anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing consortium to achieve completely autotrophic ammonium and sulfate removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sitong; Yang, Fenglin; Gong, Zheng; Meng, Fangang; Chen, Huihui; Xue, Yuan; Furukawa, Kenji

    2008-10-01

    The simultaneous ammonium and sulfate removal was detected in an anammox reactor, consisted of ammonium oxidization with sulfate deoxidization, and subsequently traditional anammox process, in via of middle medium nitrite with solid sulfur and N2 as the terminal products. The pure anammox bacteria offered a great biotechnological potential for the completely autotrophic reaction indicated by batch tests. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis further revealed that a new organism belonging to Planctomycetales was strongly enriched in the defined niche: the redox of ammonium and sulfate. The new species "Anammoxoglobussulfate" was so considered as holding a critical role in the ammonium oxidization with sulfate deoxidization to nitrite. Afterwards, the Planctomyces existing in the bacteria community performed the anammox process together to achieve the complete nitrogen and sulfate removal. The potential use of sulfate as electron acceptor for ammonium oxidizing widens the usage of anammox bacteria.

  16. Nitrogen source effects on the denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation culture and anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria enrichment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang; Ding, Jing; Lu, Yong-Ze; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Zeng, Raymond J

    2017-05-01

    The co-culture system of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) has a potential application in wastewater treatment plant. This study explored the effects of permutation and combination of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium on the culture enrichment from freshwater sediments. The co-existence of NO 3 - , NO 2 - , and NH 4 + shortened the enrichment time from 75 to 30 days and achieved a total nitrogen removal rate of 106.5 mg/L/day on day 132. Even though ammonium addition led to Anammox bacteria increase and a higher nitrogen removal rate, DAMO bacteria still dominated in different reactors with the highest proportion of 64.7% and the maximum abundance was 3.07 ± 0.25 × 10 8 copies/L (increased by five orders of magnitude) in the nitrite reactor. DAMO bacteria showed greater diversity in the nitrate reactor, and one was similar to M. oxyfera; DAMO bacteria in the nitrite reactor were relatively unified and similar to M. sinica. Interestingly, no DAMO archaea were found in the nitrate reactor. This study will improve the understanding of the impact of nitrogen source on DAMO and Anammox co-culture enrichment.

  17. Structural identification of ladderane and other membrane lipids of planctomycetes capable of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Geenevasen, J.A.J.; Strous, M.; Jetten, M.S.M.

    2005-01-01

    The membrane lipid composition of planctomycetes capable of the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium (anammox), i.e. Candidatus ‘Brocadia anammoxidans’ and Candidatus ‘Kuenenia stuttgartiensis’, was shown to be composed mainly of so-called ladderane lipids. These lipids are comprised of three to five

  18. Present and past contribution of anaerobic ammonium oxidation to nitrogen cycling as revealed by ladderane lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeschke, A.

    2009-01-01

    Anammox, the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium to dinitrogen gas with nitrite as the electron acceptor, constitutes a novel route to convert biologically available (fixed) nitrogen to gaseous N2. This process is mediated by specific bacteria belonging to the Planctomycetes that were initially

  19. Present and past contribution of anaerobic ammonium oxidation to nitrogen cycling as revealed by ladderane lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeschke, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Anammox, the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium to dinitrogen gas with nitrite as the electron acceptor, constitutes a novel route to convert biologically available (fixed) nitrogen to gaseous N2. This process is mediated by specific bacteria belonging to the Planctomycetes that were initially

  20. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by Anammox bacteria in the Black Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Kuypers, M.M.M.; Sliekers, O.; Lavik, G.; Schmid, M.; Jørgensen, B.B.; Kuenen, J.G.; Strous, M.; Jetten, M.S.M.

    2003-01-01

    The availability of fixed inorganic nitrogen (nitrate, nitrite and ammonium) limits primary productivity in many oceanic regions1. The conversion of nitrate to N2 by heterotrophic bacteria (denitrification) is believed to be the only important sink for fixed inorganic nitrogen in the ocean2. Here we

  1. Present and past contribution of anaerobic ammonium oxidation to nitrogen cycling as revealed by ladderane lipids

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeschke, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Anammox, the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium to dinitrogen gas with nitrite as the electron acceptor, constitutes a novel route to convert biologically available (fixed) nitrogen to gaseous N2. This process is mediated by specific bacteria belonging to the Planctomycetes that were initially discovered in waste water systems. Within the nine years after their discovery, anammox bacteria have been identified as key players in the global nitrogen cycle. They have been found in different...

  2. Stable carbon isotopic fractionations associated with inorganic carbon fixation by anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Stefan; Strous, Marc; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Rijpstra, W Irene C; Baas, Marianne; Schubert, Carsten J; Jetten, Mike S M; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2004-06-01

    Isotopic analyses of Candidatus "Brocadia anammoxidans," a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that anaerobically oxidizes ammonium (anammox), show that it strongly fractionates against (13)C; i.e., lipids are depleted by up to 47 per thousand versus CO(2). Similar results were obtained for the anammox bacterium Candidatus "Scalindua sorokinii," which thrives in the anoxic water column of the Black Sea, suggesting that different anammox bacteria use identical carbon fixation pathways, which may be either the Calvin cycle or the acetyl coenzyme A pathway.

  3. Importance and controls of anaerobic ammonium oxidation influenced by riverbed geology

    OpenAIRE

    Lansdown, K.; McKew, B. A.; Whitby, C.; Heppell, C. M.; Dumbrell, A. J.; Binley, Andrew Mark; Olde, L.; Trimmer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Rivers are an important global sink for excess bioavailable nitrogen: they convert approximately 40% of terrestrial N-runoff per year (~47 Tg) to biologically unavailable N2 gas and return it to the atmosphere.1 Currently, riverine N2 production is conceptualised and modelled as denitrification.2-4 The contribution of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (or anammox), an alternate pathway of N2 production important in marine environments, is not well understood.5,6 Here we use in situ and laboratory ...

  4. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation mediated by Mn-oxides: from sediment to strain level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanaud, Cedric; Michotey, Valerie; Guasco, Sophie; Garcia, Nicole; Anschutz, Pierre; Canton, Mathieu; Bonin, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    Nitrite and (29)N(2) productions in slurry incubations of anaerobically sediment after (15)NO(3) or (15)NH(4) labelling in the presence of Mn-oxides suggested that anaerobic Mn-oxides mediated nitrification coupled with denitrification in muddy intertidal sediments of Arcachon Bay (SW Atlantic French coast). From this sediment, bacterial strains were isolated and physiologically characterized in terms of Mn-oxides and nitrate reduction as well as potential anaerobic nitrification. One of the isolated strain, identified as Marinobacter daepoensis strain M4AY14, was a denitrifier. Nitrous oxide production by this strain was demonstrated in the absence of nitrate and with Mn-oxides and NH(4) amendment, giving indirect proof of anaerobic nitrate or nitrite production. Anaerobic Mn-oxide-mediated nitrification was confirmed by (29)N(2) production in the presence of (15)NO(3) and (14)NH(4) under denitrifying conditions. Anaerobic nitrification by M4AY14 seemed to occur only in the absence of nitrate, or at nitrate levels lower than that of Mn-oxides. Most of the other isolates were affiliated with the Shewanella genus and were able to use both nitrate and Mn-oxides as electron acceptors. When both electron acceptors were present, whatever their concentrations, nitrate and Mn-oxide reduction co-occurred. These data indicate that bacterial Mn-oxide reduction could be an important process in marine sediments with low oxygen concentrations, and demonstrate for the first time the role of bacteria in anaerobic Mn-mediated nitrification. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria gain antibiotic resistance during long-term acclimatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng-Zhe; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Guo, Qiong; Chen, Qian-Qian; Jiang, Xiao-Yan; Jin, Ren-Cun

    2015-09-01

    Three broad-spectrum antibiotics, amoxicillin (AMX), florfenicol (FF) and sulfamethazine (SMZ), that inhibit bacteria via different target sites, were selected to evaluate the acute toxicity and long-term effects on anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) granules. The specific anammox activity (SAA) levels reduced by approximately half within the first 3 days in the presence of antibiotics but no nitrite accumulation was observed in continuous-flow experiments. However, the SAA levels and heme c content gradually recovered as the antibiotic concentrations increased. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) analysis suggested that anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria gradually developed a better survival strategy during long-term acclimatization, which reduced the antibiotic stress via increased EPS secretion that provided a protective 'cocoon.' In terms of nitrogen removal efficiency, anammox granules could resist 60 mg-AMX L(-1), 10 mg-FF L(-1) and 100 mg-SMZ L(-1). This study supported the feasibility of using anammox granules to treat antibiotic-containing wastewater. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation in traditional municipal wastewater treatment plants with low-strength ammonium loading: Widespread but overlooked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanyun; Peng, Yongzhen; Ma, Bin; Wang, Shuying; Zhu, Guibing

    2015-11-01

    Occurrence of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) in marine and freshwater systems has greatly changed our understanding of global nitrogen (N) cycle and promoted the investigation of the role and ecological features of anammox in anthropogenic ecosystems. This study focused on the spatio-temporal abundance, activity, and biodiversity of anammox bacteria in full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) via traditional nitrification/denitrification route with low-strength ammonium loading. The anammox bacteria were detected in all the treatment units at the five WWTPs tested, even in aerobic zones (dissolved oxygen >2 mg L(-1)) with abundance of 10(5)-10(7) hydrazine synthase (hzs) gene copies g(-1). The (15)N-isotope tracing technology revealed that the anammox rates in WWTPs ranged from 0.08 to 0.36 μmol N g(-1) h(-1) in winter and 0.12-1.20 μmol N g(-1) h(-1) in summer with contributions of 2.05-6.86% and 1.71-7.26% to N2 production, respectively. The diversity of anammox bacteria in WWTPs was distributed over only two genera, Brocadia and Kuenenia. Additionally, the exploration of potential interspecies relationships indicated that ammonia oxidation bacteria (AOB) was the major nitrite-substrate producer for anammox during nitrification, while Nitrospira, a nitrite oxidation bacteria (NOB), was the potential major competitor for nitrite. These results suggested the contribution of N-removal by the widespread of anammox has been overlooked in traditional municipal WWTPs, and the ecological habitats of anammox bacteria in anthropogenic ecosystems are much more abundant than previously assumed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of Electroactive and Anaerobic Ammonium-Oxidizing (Anammox Biofilms from Digestate in Microbial Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enea Gino Di Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial Fuel cells (MFCs have been proposed for nutrient removal and energy recovery from different wastes. In this study the anaerobic digestate was used to feed H-type MFC reactors, one with a graphite anode preconditioned with Geobacter sulfurreducens and the other with an unconditioned graphite anode. The data demonstrate that the digestate acts as a carbon source, and even in the absence of anode preconditioning, electroactive bacteria colonise the anodic chamber, producing a maximum power density of 172.2 mW/m2. The carbon content was also reduced by up to 60%, while anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox bacteria, which were found in the anodic compartment of the reactors, contributed to nitrogen removal from the digestate. Overall, these results demonstrate that MFCs can be used to recover anammox bacteria from natural sources, and it may represent a promising bioremediation unit in anaerobic digestor plants for the simultaneous nitrogen removal and electricity generation using digestate as substrate.

  8. Nitrogen loss from anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to Iron(III) reduction in a riparian zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bangjing; Li, Zhengkui; Qin, Yunbin

    2017-12-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to iron(III) reduction (termed Feammox) is a recently discovered pathway of nitrogen cycling. However, little is known about the pathways of N transformation via Feammox process in riparian zones. In this study, evidence for Feammox in riparian zones with or without vegetation cover was demonstrated using isotope tracing technique and high-throughput sequencing technology. The results showed that Feammox could occur in riparian zones, and demonstrated that N 2 directly from Feammox was dominant Feammox pathway. The Feammox rates in vegetated soil samples was 0.32-0.37 mg N kg -1 d -1 , which is higher than that in un-vegetated soil samples (0.20 mg N kg -1 d -1 ). Moreover, the growth of vegetation led to a 4.99-6.41% increase in the abundance of iron reducing bacteria (Anaeromyxobacter, Pseudomonas and Geobacter) and iron reducing bacteria play an essential role in Feammox process. An estimated loss of 23.7-43.9 kg N ha -1 year -1 was associated with Feammox in the examined riparian zone. Overall, the co-occurrence of ammonium oxidation and iron reduction suggest that Feammox can play an essential role in the pathway of nitrogen removal in riparian zones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Candidatus "Scalindua brodaea", spec. nov., Candidatus "Scalindua wagneri", spec. nov., two new species of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schmid, M.; Walsh, K.; Webb, R.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Pas-Schoonen, K. van de; Verbruggen, M.J.; Hill, T.; Moffett, B.; Fuerst, J.; Schouten, S.; Harris, James; Shaw, P.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Strous, M.

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is both a promising process in wastewater treatment and a long overlooked microbial physiology that can contribute significantly to biological nitrogen cycling in the world's oceans. Anammox is mediated by a monophyletic group of bacteria that branches deeply

  10. Potential roles of anaerobic ammonium and methane oxidation in the nitrogen cycle of wetland ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guibing; Jetten, Mike S M; Kuschk, Peter; Ettwig, Katharina F; Yin, Chengqing

    2010-04-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) and anaerobic methane oxidation (ANME coupled to denitrification) with nitrite as electron acceptor are two of the most recent discoveries in the microbial nitrogen cycle. Currently the anammox process has been relatively well investigated in a number of natural and man-made ecosystems, while ANME coupled to denitrification has only been observed in a limited number of freshwater ecosystems. The ubiquitous presence of anammox bacteria in marine ecosystems has changed our knowledge of the global nitrogen cycle. Up to 50% of N(2) production in marine sediments and oxygen-depleted zones may be attributed to anammox bacteria. However, there are only few indications of anammox in natural and constructed freshwater wetlands. In this paper, the potential role of anammox and denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria in natural and artificial wetlands is discussed in relation to global warming. The focus of the review is to explore and analyze if suitable environmental conditions exist for anammox and denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria in nitrogen-rich freshwater wetlands.

  11. Optimization of process performance in a granule-based anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Bao-Shan; Guo, Qiong; Zhang, Zheng-Zhe; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Hui-Zhong; Jin, Ren-Cun

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the individual and interactive effects of influent substrate concentration (TNinf), hydraulic retention time (HRT) and upflow velocity (Vup) on the performance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) in a granule-based upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor were investigated by employing response surface methodology (RSM) with a central composite design. The purpose of this work was to identify the optimal combination of TNinf, HRT and Vup with respect to the nitrogen removal efficiency (NRE) and nitrogen removal rate (NRR). The reduced cubic models developed for the responses indicated that the optimal conditions corresponded to a TNinf content of 644-728mgNL(-1), an HRT of 0.90-1.25h, and a Vup of 0.60-1.79mh(-1). The results of confirmation trials were similar to the predictions of the developed models. These results provide useful information for improving the nitrogen removal performance of the anammox process in a UASB reactor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydroxylamine-dependent Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) by “ Candidatus Brocadia sinica”

    KAUST Repository

    Oshiki, Mamoru

    2016-04-26

    Although metabolic pathways and associated enzymes of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) of “Ca. Kuenenia stuttgartiensis” have been studied, those of other anammox bacteria are still poorly understood. NO2- reduction to NO is considered to be the first step in the anammox metabolism of “Ca. K. stuttgartiensis”, however, “Ca. Brocadia” lacks the genes that encode canonical NO-forming nitrite reductases (NirS or NirK) in its genome, which is different from “Ca. K. stuttgartiensis”. Here, we studied the anammox metabolism of “Ca. Brocadia sinica”. 15N-tracer experiments demonstrated that “Ca. B. sinica” cells could reduce NO2- to NH2OH, instead of NO, with as yet unidentified nitrite reductase(s). Furthermore, N2H4 synthesis, downstream reaction of NO2- reduction, was investigated using a purified “Ca. B. sinica” hydrazine synthase (Hzs) and intact cells. Both the “Ca. B. sinica” Hzs and cells utilized NH2OH and NH4+, but not NO and NH4+, for N2H4 synthesis and further oxidized N2H4 to N2 gas. Taken together, the metabolic pathway of “Ca. B. sinica” is NH2OH-dependent and different from the one of “Ca. K. stuttgartiensis”, indicating metabolic diversity of anammox bacteria. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Importance and controls of anaerobic ammonium oxidation influenced by riverbed geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdown, K.; McKew, B. A.; Whitby, C.; Heppell, C. M.; Dumbrell, A. J.; Binley, A.; Olde, L.; Trimmer, M.

    2016-05-01

    Rivers are an important global sink for excess bioavailable nitrogen: they convert approximately 40% of terrestrial N runoff per year (~47 Tg) to biologically unavailable N2 gas and return it to the atmosphere. At present, riverine N2 production is conceptualized and modelled as denitrification. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation, known as anammox, is an alternative pathway of N2 production important in marine environments, but its contribution to riverine N2 production is not well understood. Here we use in situ and laboratory measurements of anammox activity using 15N tracers and molecular analyses of microbial communities to evaluate anammox in clay-, sand- and chalk-dominated river beds in the Hampshire Avon catchment, UK during summer 2013. Abundance of the hzo gene, which encodes an enzyme central to anammox metabolism, varied across the contrasting geologies. Anammox rates were similar across geologies but contributed different proportions of N2 production because of variation in denitrification rates. In spite of requiring anoxic conditions, anammox, most likely coupled to partial nitrification, contributed up to 58% of in situ N2 production in oxic, permeable riverbeds. In contrast, denitrification dominated in low-permeability clay-bed rivers, where anammox contributes roughly 7% to the production of N2 gas. We conclude that anammox can represent an important nitrogen loss pathway in permeable river sediments.

  14. Start-up of simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfate from an anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process in an anaerobic up-flow bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhiquan; Zhou Shaoqi; Sun Yanbo

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory testing of simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfate (SRAS) was studied from an anammox process in an anaerobic bioreactor filled with granular activated carbon. Two different phases of experiment were investigated to start up the SRAS process, and final batch tests were performed to analyze the SRAS process. The experiment included an anammox process and an SRAS process. During the anammox process, the highest removal efficiency of ammonium and nitrite was up to 97 and 98%, respectively. After 160 days in the stationary phase of anammox process, the ratio of ammonium to nitrite consumption was approximately 1:1.15, which is much higher than 1:1.32 in the traditional anammox process. The extra electron acceptor, such as sulfate, was thought to react with ammonium by bacteria. Synthetic wastewater containing ammonium chlorine and sodium sulfate was used as the feed for the bioreactor in the second phase of experiment. During the SRAS process, the influent concentrations of ammonium and sulfate were controlled to be 50-60 and 210-240 mg L -1 respectively. After start-up and acclimatization of this process for 60 days, the average effluent concentrations of ammonium and sulfate were 30 and 160 mg L -1 , respectively. The simultaneous ammonium and sulfate removal was detected in the reactor. In order to further validate the biochemical interaction between ammonium and sulfate, batch tests was carried out. Abiotic tests were carried out to demonstrate that the pure chemical action between ammonium and sulfate without microorganism was not possible. Biotic assays with different ammonium and sulfate concentrations were further investigated that high concentrations of ammonium and sulfate could promote simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfate. And elemental sulfur and nitrogen gas as the products measured in the SRAS process helped to demonstrate the occurrence of new interaction between nitrogen and sulfur. The new process of SRAS in the inorganic

  15. Start-up of simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfate from an anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process in an anaerobic up-flow bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiquan; Zhou, Shaoqi; Sun, Yanbo

    2009-09-30

    A laboratory testing of simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfate (SRAS) was studied from an anammox process in an anaerobic bioreactor filled with granular activated carbon. Two different phases of experiment were investigated to start up the SRAS process, and final batch tests were performed to analyze the SRAS process. The experiment included an anammox process and an SRAS process. During the anammox process, the highest removal efficiency of ammonium and nitrite was up to 97 and 98%, respectively. After 160 days in the stationary phase of anammox process, the ratio of ammonium to nitrite consumption was approximately 1:1.15, which is much higher than 1:1.32 in the traditional anammox process. The extra electron acceptor, such as sulfate, was thought to react with ammonium by bacteria. Synthetic wastewater containing ammonium chlorine and sodium sulfate was used as the feed for the bioreactor in the second phase of experiment. During the SRAS process, the influent concentrations of ammonium and sulfate were controlled to be 50-60 and 210-240 mg L(-1) respectively. After start-up and acclimatization of this process for 60 days, the average effluent concentrations of ammonium and sulfate were 30 and 160 mg L(-1), respectively. The simultaneous ammonium and sulfate removal was detected in the reactor. In order to further validate the biochemical interaction between ammonium and sulfate, batch tests was carried out. Abiotic tests were carried out to demonstrate that the pure chemical action between ammonium and sulfate without microorganism was not possible. Biotic assays with different ammonium and sulfate concentrations were further investigated that high concentrations of ammonium and sulfate could promote simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfate. And elemental sulfur and nitrogen gas as the products measured in the SRAS process helped to demonstrate the occurrence of new interaction between nitrogen and sulfur. The new process of SRAS in the inorganic

  16. Enrichment and physiological characterization of an anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacterium ‘ Candidatus Brocadia sapporoensis’

    KAUST Repository

    Narita, Yuko

    2017-08-18

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidation (anammox) is recognized as an important microbial process in the global nitrogen cycle and wastewater treatment. In this study, we successfully enriched a novel anammox bacterium affiliated with the genus ‘Candidatus Brocadia’ with high purity (>90%) in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). The enriched bacterium was distantly related to the hitherto characterized ‘Ca. Brocadia fulgida’ and ‘Ca. Brocadia sinica’ with 96% and 93% of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence identity, respectively. The bacterium exhibited the common structural features of anammox bacteria and the production of hydrazine in the presence of hydroxylamine under anoxic conditions. The temperature range of anammox activity was 20 − 45°C with a maximum activity at 37°C. The maximum specific growth rate (μmax) was determined to be 0.0082h−1 at 37°C, corresponding to a doubling time of 3.5 days. The half-saturation constant (KS) for nitrite was 5±2.5μM. The anammox activity was inhibited by nitrite with 11.6mM representing the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) but no significant inhibition was observed in the presence of formate and acetate. The major respiratory quinone was identified to be menaquinone-7 (MK-7). Comparative genome analysis revealed that the anammox bacterium enriched in present study shared nearly half of genes with ‘Ca. Brocadia sinica’ and ‘Ca. Brocadia fulgida’. The bacterium enriched in this study showed all known physiological characteristics of anammox bacteria and can be distinguished from the close relatives by its rRNA gene sequences. Therefore, we proposed the name ‘Ca. Brocadia sapporoensis’ sp. nov.

  17. Characteristics of aerobic and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the hyporheic zone of a contaminated river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyuan; Qi, Yun; Wang, Jun; Pei, Yuansheng

    2012-09-01

    Both β-proteobacterial aerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (ANAMMOX) bacteria were investigated in the hyporheic zone of a contaminated river in China containing high ammonium levels and low chemical oxygen demand. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and cloning-sequencing were employed in this study. FISH analysis illustrated that AOB (average population of 3.5 %) coexisted with ANAMMOX bacteria (0.7 %). The DGGE profile revealed a high abundance and diversity of bacteria at the water-air-soil interface rather than at the water-soil interface. The redundancy analysis correlated analysis showed that the diversity of ANAMMOX bacteria was positively related to the redox potential. The newly detected sequences of ANAMMOX organisms principally belonged to the genus Candidatus "Brocadia", while most ammonia monooxygenase subunit-A gene amoA sequences were affiliated with Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas. These results suggest that the water-air-soil interface performs an important function in the nitrogen removal process and that the bioresources of AOB and ANAMMOX bacteria can potentially be utilized for the eutrophication of rivers.

  18. Activity, Microenvironments, and Community Structure of Aerobic and Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidizing Prokaryotes in Estuarine Sediment (Randers Fjord, DK)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schramm, Andreas; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Dalsgaard, Tage

    2006-01-01

    stations where it accounted for 5-16% of the total N2 production and 0.1-0.25% of the total prokaryotic population. These numbers result in cell-specific anammox rates of about 6 fmol N day-1, comparable to literature values. Anammox cells occurred mainly in clusters and were related to the candidate genus......ACTIVITY, MICROENVIRONMENTS, AND COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF AEROBIC AND ANAEROBIC AMMONIUM OXIDIZING PROKARYOTES IN ESTUARINE SEDIMENT (RANDERS FJORD, DK) A. Schramm 1, N.P. Revsbech 1, T. Dalsgaard 2, E. Piña-Ochoa 3, J. de la Torré 4, D.A. Stahl 4, N. Risgaard-Petersen 2 1 Department of Biological...

  19. Candidatus "Scalindua brodae", sp. nov., Candidatus "Scalindua wagneri", sp. nov., two new species of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Markus; Walsh, Kerry; Webb, Rick; Rijpstra, W Irene C; van de Pas-Schoonen, Katinka; Verbruggen, Mark Jan; Hill, Thomas; Moffett, Bruce; Fuerst, John; Schouten, Stefan; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Harris, James; Shaw, Phil; Jetten, Mike; Strous, Marc

    2003-11-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is both a promising process in wastewater treatment and a long overlooked microbial physiology that can contribute significantly to biological nitrogen cycling in the world's oceans. Anammox is mediated by a monophyletic group of bacteria that branches deeply in the Planctomycetales. Here we describe a new genus and species of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing planctomycetes, discovered in a wastewater treatment plant (wwtp) treating landfill leachate in Pitsea, UK. The biomass from this wwtp showed high anammox activity (5.0 +/- 0.5 nmol/mg protein/min) and produced hydrazine from hydroxylamine, one of the unique features of anammox bacteria. Eight new planctomycete 16S rRNA gene sequences were present in the 16S rRNA gene clone library generated from the biomass. Four of these were affiliated to known anammox 16S rRNA gene sequences, but branched much closer to the root of the planctomycete line of descent. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with oligonucleotide probes specific for these new sequences showed that two species (belonging to the same genus) together made up > 99% of the planctomycete population which constituted 20% of the total microbial community. The identification of these organisms as typical anammox bacteria was confirmed with electron microscopy and lipid analysis. The new species, provisionally named Candidatus "Scalindua brodae" and "Scalindua wagneri" considerably extend the biodiversity of the anammox lineage on the 16S rRNA gene level, but otherwise resemble known anammox bacteria. Simultaneously, another new species of the same genus, Candidatus "Scalindua sorokinii", was detected in the water column of the Black Sea, making this genus the most widespread of all anammox bacteria described so far.

  20. Optimization of three FISH procedures for in situ detection of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria in biological wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlekovic, Marko; Schmid, Markus C; Schmider-Poignee, Nadja; Spring, Stefan; Pilhofer, Martin; Gaul, Tobias; Fiandaca, Mark; Löffler, Frank E; Jetten, Mike; Schleifer, K-H; Lee, Natuschka M

    2009-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using fluorochrome-labeled DNA oligonucleotide probes has been successfully applied for in situ detection of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria. However, application of the standard FISH protocols to visualize anammox bacteria in biofilms from a laboratory-scale wastewater reactor produced only weak signals. Increased signal intensity was achieved either by modifying the standard FISH protocol, using peptide nucleic acid probes (PNA FISH), or applying horse radish peroxidase- (HRP-) labeled probes and subsequent catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD-FISH). A comparative analysis using anammox biofilm samples and suspended anammox biomass from different laboratory wastewater bioreactors revealed that the modified standard FISH protocol and the PNA FISH probes produced equally strong fluorescence signals on suspended biomass, but only weak signals were obtained with the biofilm samples. The probe signal intensities in the biofilm samples could be enhanced by enzymatic pre-treatment of fixed cells, and by increasing the hybridization time of the PNA FISH protocol. CARD-FISH always produced up to four-fold stronger fluorescent signals but unspecific fluorescence signals, likely caused by endogenous peroxidases as reported in several previous studies, compromised the results. Interference of the development of fluorescence intensity with endogenous peroxidases was also observed in cells of aerobic ammonium oxidizers like Nitrosomonas europea, and sulfate-reducers like Desulfobacter postgatei. Interestingly, no interference was observed with other peroxidase-positive microorganisms, suggesting that CARD-FISH is not only compromised by the mere presence of peroxidases. Pre-treatment of cells to inactivate peroxidase with HCl or autoclavation/pasteurization failed to inactive peroxidases, but H(2)O(2) significantly reduced endogenous peroxidase activity. However, for optimal inactivation, different H(2)O(2

  1. Sulfate-reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation as a potential treatment method for high nitrogen-content wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikmann, Ergo; Zekker, Ivar; Tomingas, Martin; Tenno, Taavo; Menert, Anne; Loorits, Liis; Tenno, Toomas

    2012-07-01

    After sulfate-reducing ammonium oxidation (SRAO) was first assumed in 2001, several works have been published describing this process in laboratory-scale bioreactors or occurring in the nature. In this paper, the SRAO process was performed using reject water as a substrate for microorganisms and a source of NH(4) (+), with SO(4) (2-) being added as an electron acceptor. At a moderate temperature of 20°C in a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) sulfate reduction along with ammonium oxidation were established. In an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASBR) the SRAO process took place at 36°C. Average volumetric TN removal rates of 0.03 kg-N/m³/day in the MBBR and 0.04 kg-N/m³/day in the UASBR were achieved, with long-term moderate average removal efficiencies, respectively. Uncultured bacteria clone P4 and uncultured planctomycete clone Amx-PAn30 were detected from the biofilm of the MBBR, from sludge of the UASBR uncultured Verrucomicrobiales bacterium clone De2102 and Uncultured bacterium clone ATB-KS-1929 were found also. The stoichiometrical ratio of NH(4) (+) removal was significantly higher than could be expected from the extent of SO(4) (2-) reduction. This phenomenon can primarily be attributed to complex interactions between nitrogen and sulfur compounds and organic matter present in the wastewater. The high NH(4) (+) removal ratio can be attributed to sulfur-utilizing denitrification/denitritation providing the evidence that SRAO is occurring independently and is not a result of sulfate reduction and anammox. HCO(3) (-) concentrations exceeding 1,000 mg/l were found to have an inhibiting effect on the SRAO process. Small amounts of hydrazine were naturally present in the reaction medium, indicating occurrence of the anammox process. Injections of anammox intermediates, hydrazine and hydroxylamine, had a positive effect on SRAO process performance, particularly in the case of the UASBR.

  2. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by marine and freshwater planctomycete-like bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetten, M S M; Sliekers, O; Kuypers, M; Dalsgaard, T; van Niftrik, L; Cirpus, I; van de Pas-Schoonen, K; Lavik, G; Thamdrup, B; Le Paslier, D; Op den Camp, H J M; Hulth, S; Nielsen, L P; Abma, W; Third, K; Engström, P; Kuenen, J G; Jørgensen, B B; Canfield, D E; Sinninghe Damsté, J S; Revsbech, N P; Fuerst, J; Weissenbach, J; Wagner, M; Schmidt, I; Schmid, M; Strous, M

    2003-12-01

    Recently, two fresh water species, " Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans" and " Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis", and one marine species, " Candidatus Scalindua sorokinii", of planctomycete anammox bacteria have been identified. " Candidatus Scalindua sorokinii" was discovered in the Black Sea, and contributed substantially to the loss of fixed nitrogen. All three species contain a unique organelle--the anammoxosome--in their cytoplasm. The anammoxosome contains the hydrazine/hydroxylamine oxidoreductase enzyme, and is thus the site of anammox catabolism. The anammoxosome is surrounded by a very dense membrane composed almost exclusively of linearly concatenated cyclobutane-containing lipids. These so-called 'ladderanes' are connected to the glycerol moiety via both ester and ether bonds. In natural and man-made ecosystems, anammox bacteria can cooperate with aerobic ammonium-oxidising bacteria, which protect them from harmful oxygen, and provide the necessary nitrite. The cooperation of these two groups of ammonium-oxidising bacteria is the microbial basis for a sustainable one reactor system, CANON (completely autotrophic nitrogen-removal over nitrite) to remove ammonia from high strength wastewater.

  3. Influence of substrates on nitrogen removal performance and microbiology of anaerobic ammonium oxidation by operating two UASB reactors fed with different substrate levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Chongjian; Zheng Ping; Hu Baolan; Chen Jianwei; Wang Caihua

    2010-01-01

    Both ammonium and nitrite act as substrates as well as potential inhibitors of anoxic ammonium-oxidizing (Anammox) bacteria. To satisfy demand of substrates for Anammox bacteria and to prevent substrate inhibition simultaneously; two strategies, namely high or low substrate concentration, were carefully compared in the operation of two Anammox upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors fed with different substrate concentrations. The reactor working at relatively low influent substrate concentration (NO 2 - N, 240 mg-N L -1 ) was shown to avoid the inhibition caused by nitrite and free ammonia. Using the strategy of low substrate concentration, a record super high volumetric nitrogen removal rate of 45.24 kg-N m -3 day -1 was noted after the operation of 230 days. To our knowledge, such a high value has not been reported previously. The evidence from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the morphology and ultrastructure of the Anammox cells in both the reactor enrichments was different.

  4. The content of trace element iron is a key factor for competition between anaerobic ammonium oxidation and methane-dependent denitrification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yong-Ze; Fu, Liang; Li, Na; Ding, Jing; Bai, Ya-Nan; Samaras, Petros; Zeng, Raymond Jianxiong

    2018-05-01

    Coupling of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) with denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) is a sustainable pathway for nitrogen removal and reducing methane emissions from wastewater treatment processes. However, studies on the competitive relation between Anammox bacteria and DAMO bacteria are limited. Here, we investigated the effects of variations in the contents of trace element iron on Anammox and DAMO microorganisms. The short-term results indicated that optimal concentrations of iron, which obviously stimulated the activity of Amammox bacteria, DAMO bacteria and DAMO archaea, were 80, 20, and 80 μM, respectively. The activity of Amammox bacteria increased more significant than DAMO bacteria with increasing contents of trace element iron. After long-term incubation with high content of trace element iron of 160 μM in the medium, Candidatus Brocadia (Amammox bacteria) outcompeted Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera (DAMO bacteria), and ANME-2d (DAMO archaea) remarkably increased in number and dominated the co-culture systems (64.5%). Meanwhile, with further addition of iron, the removal rate of ammonium and nitrate increased by 13.6 and 9.2 times, respectively, when compared with that noted in the control. As far as we know, this study is the first to explore the important role of trace element iron contents in the competition between Anammox bacteria and DAMO bacteria and further enrichment of DAMO archaea by regulating the contents of trace element iron. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) for biological nitrogen removal in domestic wastewater treatment (Case study: Surabaya City, Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, I. Made Wahyu; Soedjono, Eddy Setiadi; Fitriani, Nurina

    2017-11-01

    Domestic wastewater effluent is the main contributor to diverse water pollution problems. The contaminants contained in the wastewater lead the low quality of water. The presence of ammonium and nitrate along with phosphorus are potentially cause eutrophication and endanger aquatic life. Excess nutrients, mostly N and P is the main cause of eutrophication which is result in oxygen depletion, biodiversity reduction, fish kills, odor and increased toxicity. Most of the domestic wastewater in Surabaya City still contains nitrogen that exceeded the threshold. The range of ammonium and orthophosphate concentration in the domestic wastewater is between 6.29 mg/L - 38.91 mg/L and 0.44 mg/L - 1.86 mg/L, respectively. An advance biological nitrogen removal process called anammox is a sustainable and cost effective alternative to the basic method of nitrogen removal, such as nitrification and denitrification. Many research have been conducted through anammox and resulted promisingly way to remove nitrogen. In this process, ammonium will be oxidized with nitrite as an electron acceptor to produce nitrogen gas and low nitrate in anoxic condition. Anammox requires less oxygen demand, no needs external carbon source, and low operational cost. Based on its advantages, anammox is possible to apply in domestic wastewater treatment in Surabaya with many further studies.

  6. Influence of substrates on nitrogen removal performance and microbiology of anaerobic ammonium oxidation by operating two UASB reactors fed with different substrate levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Chongjian [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Zheng Ping, E-mail: pzheng@zju.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Hu Baolan; Chen Jianwei; Wang Caihua [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2010-09-15

    Both ammonium and nitrite act as substrates as well as potential inhibitors of anoxic ammonium-oxidizing (Anammox) bacteria. To satisfy demand of substrates for Anammox bacteria and to prevent substrate inhibition simultaneously; two strategies, namely high or low substrate concentration, were carefully compared in the operation of two Anammox upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors fed with different substrate concentrations. The reactor working at relatively low influent substrate concentration (NO{sub 2}{sup -}N, 240 mg-N L{sup -1}) was shown to avoid the inhibition caused by nitrite and free ammonia. Using the strategy of low substrate concentration, a record super high volumetric nitrogen removal rate of 45.24 kg-N m{sup -3} day{sup -1} was noted after the operation of 230 days. To our knowledge, such a high value has not been reported previously. The evidence from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the morphology and ultrastructure of the Anammox cells in both the reactor enrichments was different.

  7. Energy upcycle in anaerobic treatment: Ammonium, methane, and carbon dioxide reformation through a hybrid electrodeionization–solid oxide fuel cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Linji; Dong, Feifei; Zhuang, Huichuan; He, Wei; Ni, Meng; Feng, Shien-Ping; Lee, Po-Heng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • EDI-SOFC integrated with AD is introduced for energy extraction from C and N pollutants. • NH 4 + dissociation to NH 3 and H 2 in EDI avoids C deposition in SOFC. • EDI exhibits nutrient and heavy metal recovery. • SOFCs display its adaptability with NH 3 , H 2 , and biogas. • Energy balance ratio boosts from 1.11 to 1.75 by EDI-SOFC in a HK landfill plant. - Abstract: To create possibilities for a more sustainable wastewater management, a novel system consisting of electrodeionization (EDI) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is proposed in this study. This system is integrated with anaerobic digestion/landfills to capture energy from carbonaceous and nitrogenous pollutants. Both EDI and SOFCs showed good performances. EDI removed 95% and 76% ammonium-nitrogen (NH 4 + -N) from diluted (0.025 M) to concentrated (0.5 M) synthetic ammonium wastewaters, respectively, accompanied by hydrogen production. SOFCs converted the recovered fuels, biogas mixtures of methane and carbon dioxide, to electricity. Under the optimal conditions of EDI (3.0 V applied voltage and 7.5 mm internal electrode distance (IED), and SOFCs (750 °C operating temperature), the system achieved 60% higher net energy output as compared to conventional systems. The estimated energy benefit of this proposed system showed that the net energy balance ratio is enhanced from 1.11 (existing system) to 1.75 (this study) for a local Hong Kong active landfill facility with 10.0 g L −1 chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 0.21 M NH 4 + -N. Additionally, an average of 80% inorganic ions (heavy metals and nutrient elements) can be removed from the raw landfill leachate by EDI cell. The results are successful demonstrations of the upgrades of anaerobic processes for energy extraction from wastewater streams.

  8. [Cultivation of ANAMMOX bacteria and the ammonium anaerobic oxidation technology in the plug flow bio-reactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Du, Bing; Si, Ya-an; Sun, Yan-ling; Shen, Li-xian

    2005-03-01

    It is feasible that the ANAMMOX bacteria can be enriched and cultivated to red granular in plug flow immobilized floc bioreactor. Average ammonium and nitrite removal rate are more than 98 %, and average total nitrogen removal rate is 86% combined with 14% nitrate production; the removal volumetric total nitrogen load is 2.56kg/(m3 x d). The influence of the influent substrate ratio of ammonium to nitrite on reactor's performance has been studied. The granule structure has been observed by the scan electro-microscope.

  9. Massive nitrogen loss from the Benguela upwelling system through anaerobic ammonium oxidation RID B-8834-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuypers, MMM; Lavik, G.; Woebken, D.

    2005-01-01

    In many oceanic regions, growth of phytoplankton is nitrogen-limited because fixation of N-2 cannot make up for the removal of fixed inorganic nitrogen (NH4+, NO2-, and NO3-) by anaerobic microbial processes. Globally, 30-50% of the total nitrogen loss occurs in oxygen-minimum zones (OMZs) and is...

  10. Enhancing the Process of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Coupled to Iron Reduction in Constructed Wetland Mesocosms with Supplementation of Ferric Iron Hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, W.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    Effective ammonium (NH4+) removal has been a challenge in wastewater treatment processes. Aeration, which is required for the conventional NH4+ removal approach by ammonium oxidizing bacteria, is an energy intensive process during the operation of wastewater treatment plant. The efficiency of NH4+ oxidation in natural systems is also limited by oxygen transfer in water and sediments. The objective of this study is to enhance NH4+ removal by applying a novel microbial process, anaerobic NH4+ oxidation coupled to iron (Fe) reduction (also known as Feammox), in constructed wetlands (CW). Our studies have shown that an Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium named A6 can carry out the Feammox process using ferric Fe (Fe(III)) minerals like ferrihydrite as their electron acceptor. To investigate the properties of the Feammox process in CW as well as the influence of electrodes, Feammox bacterium A6 was inoculated in planted CW mesocosms with electrodes installed at multiple depths. CW mesocosms were operated using high NH4+ nutrient solution as inflow under high or low sediment Fe(III) level. During the operation, NH4+ and ferrous Fe concentration, pore water pH, voltages between electrodes, oxidation reduction potential and dissolved oxygen were measured. At the end of the experiment, CW sediment samples at different depths were taken, DNAs were extracted and quantitative polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing were performed to analyze the microbial communities. The results show that the high Fe level CW mesocosm has much higher NH4+ removal ability than the low Fe level CW mesocosm after Fe-reducing conditions are developed. This indicates the enhanced NH4+ removal can be attributed to elevated Feammox activity in high Fe level CW mesocosm. The microbial community structures are different in high or low Fe level CW mesocosms and on or away from the installed electrodes. The voltages between cathode and anode increased after the injection of A6 enrichment culture in low Fe

  11. [Rapid startup and nitrogen removal characteristic of anaerobic ammonium oxidation reactor in packed bed biofilm reactor with suspended carrier].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Sun, De-zhi; Yu, Guang-lu

    2010-03-01

    Packed bed biofilm reactor with suspended carrier was used to cultivate ANAMMOX bacteria with sludge inoculums from WWTP secondary settler. The startup of ANAMMOX reactor was comparatively studied using high nitrogen loading method and low nitrogen loading method with aerobically biofilmed on the carrier, and the nitrogen removal characteristic was further investigated. The results showed that the reactor could be started up successfully within 90 days using low nitrogen loading method, the removal efficiencies of ammonium and nitrite were nearly 100% and the TN removal efficiencywas over 75% , however, the high nitrogen loading method was proved unsuccessfully for startup of ANAMMOX reactor probably because of the inhibition effect of high concentration of ammonium and nitrite. The pH value of effluent was slightly higher than the influent and the pH value can be used as an indicator for the process of ANAMMOX reaction. The packed bed ANAMMOX reactor with suspended carrier showed good characteristics of high nitrogen loading and high removal efficiency, 100% of removal efficiency could be achieved when the influent ammonium and nitrite concentration was lower than 800 mg/L.

  12. Nitrous oxide production pathways in a partial nitritation-anammox reactor: Isotopic evidence for nitrous oxide production associated anaerobic ammonium oxidation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlin, P.; Harris, E. J.; Joss, A.; Emmenegger, L.; Kipf, M.; Mohn, J.; Siegrist, H.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a strong greenhouse gas and a major sink for stratospheric ozone. In biological wastewater treatment N2O can be produced via several pathways. This study investigates the dynamics of N2O emissions from a nitritation-anammox reactor, and links its interpretation to the nitrogen and oxygen isotopic signature of the emitted N2O. A 400-litre single-stage nitritation-anammox reactor was operated and continuously fed with digester liquid. The isotopic composition of N2O emissions was monitored online with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS; Aerodyne Research, Inc.; Waechter et al., 2008). Dissolved ammonium and nitrate were monitored online (ISEmax, Endress + Hauser), while nitrite was measured with test strips (Nitrite-test 0-24mgN/l, Merck). Table 1. Summary of experiments conducted to understand N2O emissions Experimental conditions O2[mgO2/L] NO2-[mgN/L] NH4+[mgN/L] N2O/NH4+[%] Normal operation in the reactor. Our data reveal that N2O emissions increased when reactor operation was not ideal, for example when dissolved oxygen was too high (Table 1). SP measurements confirmed that these N2O peaks were due to enhanced nitrifier denitrification, generally related to nitrite build-up in the reactor (Figure 1; Table 1). Overall, process control via online N2O monitoring was confirmed to be an ideal method to detect imbalances in reactor operation and regulate aeration, to ensure optimal reactor conditions and minimise N2O emissions. ReferencesWaechter H. et al. (2008) Optics Express, 16: 9239-9244. Wunderlin, P et al. (2013) Environmental Science & Technology 47: 1339-1348.

  13. [Effects of Total Nitrogen and BOD5/TN on Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation-Denitrification Synergistic Interaction of Mature Landfill Leachate in Aged Refuse Bioreactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying-ying; Chen, Yi; Lj, Ming-jie; Xie, Bing

    2015-04-01

    Mature landfill leachate, featured with high ammonium (NH4+) content and low biodegrade ability (low BOD5/COD ratio), is hard to be treated. This study mainly focused on the effects of influent TN (total nitrogen) loading and BOD5/TN ratios on the nitrogen removal efficiency of landfill leachate by landfill bioreactors. The results showed that when the influent total nitrogen loading was in the range of 15 g x (m3 x d)(-1) to 25 g x (m3 x d)(-1), the TN removal loading could remain stable between 10 g x (m3 x d)(-1) and 12 g x (m3 x d)(-1), while the TN removal efficiency decreased from 67.7% to 60.2% with the increasing loading. Therefore, TN loading shocks would lower the bioreactor's TN removal rate, but would not affect its TN removal loading. When the influent BOD5/TN ratio was increased from 0.3 to 0.4 and the TN loading was controlled at 9 g x (m3 x d)(-1), the TN removal rates were increased from 79.9% to 89.9% and 86.2% in anaerobic and aerobic, respectively. This implied that properly enhancing BOD5/TN ratio could significantly increase the TN removal efficiency of the bioreactor, and the effect was more significant under anaerobic condition. Analysis of nitrogen removal pathways showed that denitrification and anammox could take place synergistically in landfill bioreactor.

  14. Anaerobic ammonia oxidation in a fertilized paddy soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Guibing; Wang, Shanyun; Wang, Yu

    2011-01-01

    Evidence for anaerobic ammonium oxidation in a paddy field was obtained in Southern China using an isotope-pairing technique, quantitative PCR assays and 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, along with nutrient profiles of soil cores. A paddy field with a high load of slurry manure as fertilizer was se...

  15. Higher diversity of ammonia/ammonium-oxidizing prokaryotes in constructed freshwater wetland than natural coastal marine wetland

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yong-Feng; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria, aerobic ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are three groups of ammonium/ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes (AOPs) that are involved in the nitrogen cycle. This research compared the AOP communities in a constructed freshwater wetland with a natural coastal marine wetland in the subtropical Hong Kong. Both vegetated/rhizosphere and nonvegetated sediments were investigated to identify the effects of different macroph...

  16. Model-Based Feasibility Assessment of Membrane Biofilm Reactor to Achieve Simultaneous Ammonium, Dissolved Methane, and Sulfide Removal from Anaerobic Digestion Liquor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueming; Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) is proposed to achieve simultaneous removal of ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide from main-stream and side-stream anaerobic digestion liquors. To avoid dissolved methane stripping, oxygen is introduced through gas-permeable membranes, which also from the substratum for the growth of a biofilm likely comprising ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB), anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) bacteria, denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) microorganisms, aerobic methane oxidizing bacteria (MOB), and sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB). A mathematical model is developed and applied to assess the feasibility of such a system and the associated microbial community structure under different operational conditions. The simulation studies demonstrate the feasibility of achieving high-level (>97.0%), simultaneous removal of ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide in the MBfRs from both main-stream and side-stream anaerobic digestion liquors through adjusting the influent surface loading (or hydraulic retention time (HRT)) and the oxygen surface loading. The optimal HRT was found to be inversely proportional to the corresponding oxygen surface loading. Under the optimal operational conditions, AOB, DAMO bacteria, MOB, and SOB dominate the biofilm of the main-stream MBfR, while AOB, Anammox bacteria, DAMO bacteria, and SOB coexist in the side-stream MBfR to remove ammonium, dissolved methane, and sulfide simultaneously. PMID:27112502

  17. Pathways in bacterial and archaeal communities dictated by ammonium stress in a high solid anaerobic digester with dewatered sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; He, Jin; Yan, Han; Chen, Sisi; Dai, Xiaohu

    2017-10-01

    Metagenomic comparisons of microbial profiles were conducted to investigate differences between the samples from steady (Day 42), ammonium-adjusting (Day 63), and ammonium-stressed (Day 102) periods during the 110-day operation of a high solid anaerobic digester of sewage sludge. Comparing to the steady period, biogas production was slightly inhibited after ammonium adjustment, during which the microbes showed higher abundance in 6 of the total 22 ammonium-related genes. In addition, among the 19 amino-acid-related genes, 9 genes involved in amino acid generation and utilization were reduced, which partially revealed the reason of deterioration of volatile solids (VSs) degradation following ammonium stress. Furthermore, although the acetoclastic pathway was to some extent inhibited with the decrease of biogas amount and content, no enhancement of genes involved in hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was observed, elucidating the distinct role of ammonium stress in directing bacterial community structure toward the enhanced syntrophic acetate oxidation reaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. ANAMMOX-like performances for nitrogen removal from ammonium-sulfate-rich wastewater in an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prachakittikul, Pensiri; Wantawin, Chalermraj; Noophan, Pongsak Lek; Boonapatcharoen, Nimaradee

    2016-01-01

    Ammonium removal by the ANaerobic AMonium OXidation (ANAMMOX) process was observed through the Sulfate-Reducing Ammonium Oxidation (SRAO) process. The same concentration of ammonium (100 mg N L(-1)) was applied to two anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (AnSBRs) that were inoculated with the same activated sludge from the Vermicelli wastewater treatment process, while nitrite was fed in ANAMMOX and sulfate in SRAO reactors. In SRAO-AnSBR, in substrates that were fed with a ratio of NH4(+)/SO4(2-) at 1:0.4 ± 0.03, a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 48 h and without sludge draining, the Ammonium Removal Rate (ARR) was 0.02 ± 0.01 kg N m(-3).d(-1). Adding specific ANAMMOX substrates to SRAO-AnSBR sludge in batch tests results in specific ammonium and nitrite removal rates of 0.198 and 0.139 g N g(-1) VSS.d, respectively, indicating that the ANAMMOX activity contributes to the removal of ammonium in the SRAO process using the nitrite that is produced from SRAO. Nevertheless, the inability of ANAMMOX to utilize sulfate to oxidize ammonium was also investigated in batch tests by augmenting enriched ANAMMOX culture in SRAO-AnSBR sludge and without nitrite supply. The time course of sulfate in a 24-hour cycle of SRAO-AnSBR showed an increase in sulfate after 6 h. For enriched SRAO culture, the uptake molar ratio of NH4(+)/SO4(2-) at 8 hours in a batch test was 1:0.82 lower than the value of 1:0.20 ± 0.09 as obtained in an SRAO-AnSBR effluent, while the stoichiometric ratio of 1:0.5 that includes the ANAMMOX reaction was in this range. After a longer operation of more than 2 years without sludge draining, the accumulation of sulfate and the reduction of ammonium removal were observed, probably due to the gradual increase in the sulfur denitrification rate and the competitive use of nitrite with ANAMMOX. The 16S rRNA gene PCR-DGGE (polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) and PCR cloning analyses resulted in the detection of the ANAMMOX

  19. Inhibition experiments on anaerobic methane oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alperin, M.J.; Reeburgh, W.S.

    1985-10-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation is a general process important in controlling fluxes of methane from anoxic marine sediments. The responsible organism has not been isolated, and little is known about the electron acceptors and substrates involved in the process. Laboratory evidence indicates that sulfate reducers and methanogens are able to oxidize small quantities of methane. Field evidence suggests anaerobic methane oxidation may be linked to sulfate reduction. Experiments with specific inhibitors for sulfate reduction (molybdate), methanogenesis (2-bromoethanesulfonic acid), and acetate utilization (fluoroacetate) were performed on marine sediments from the zone of methane oxidation to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria or methanogenic bacteria are responsible for methane oxidation. The inhibition experiment results suggest that methane oxidation in anoxic marine sediments is not directly mediated by sulfate-reducing bacteria or methanogenic bacteria. Our results are consistent with two possibilities: anaerobic methane oxidation may be mediated by an unknown organism or a consortium involving an unknown methane oxidizer and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

  20. Metal-free catalytic oxidation of sulfides to sulfoxides with ammonium nitrate, ammonium hydrogen sulfate and ammonium bromide as catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Ghorbani-Choghamarani, Arash; Zolfigol, Mohammad Ali; Ayazi-Nasrabadi, Roia

    2010-01-01

    A general and metal-free catalytic oxidation of aliphatic and aromatic sulfides to their corresponding sulfoxides via combination of ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3), supported ammonium hydrogen sulfate on silica gel (NH4HSO4-SiO2) and a catalytic amount of ammonium bromide (NH4Br) in the presence of wet SiO2 (50%, w/w) has been investigated. The reactions were carried out heterogeneously and selectively in short reaction times in CH2Cl2 at room temperature. This protocol is mild and efficient compa...

  1. Anaerobic Benzene Oxidation by Geobacter Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Timothy S.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Barlett, Melissa A.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2012-01-01

    The abundance of Geobacter species in contaminated aquifers in which benzene is anaerobically degraded has led to the suggestion that some Geobacter species might be capable of anaerobic benzene degradation, but this has never been documented. A strain of Geobacter, designated strain Ben, was isolated from sediments from the Fe(III)-reducing zone of a petroleum-contaminated aquifer in which there was significant capacity for anaerobic benzene oxidation. Strain Ben grew in a medium with benzene as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) oxide as the sole electron acceptor. Furthermore, additional evaluation of Geobacter metallireducens demonstrated that it could also grow in benzene-Fe(III) medium. In both strain Ben and G. metallireducens the stoichiometry of benzene metabolism and Fe(III) reduction was consistent with the oxidation of benzene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) serving as the sole electron acceptor. With benzene as the electron donor, and Fe(III) oxide (strain Ben) or Fe(III) citrate (G. metallireducens) as the electron acceptor, the cell yields of strain Ben and G. metallireducens were 3.2 × 109 and 8.4 × 109 cells/mmol of Fe(III) reduced, respectively. Strain Ben also oxidized benzene with anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as the sole electron acceptor with cell yields of 5.9 × 109 cells/mmol of AQDS reduced. Strain Ben serves as model organism for the study of anaerobic benzene metabolism in petroleum-contaminated aquifers, and G. metallireducens is the first anaerobic benzene-degrading organism that can be genetically manipulated. PMID:23001648

  2. The Experiment Study of Anaerobic Ammonia Oxidation Start-up by Using the Upflow Double Layer Anaerobic Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAO Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Anammox is an efficient nitrogen removal process, but it is difficult to start-up and operate, and ananammox reactor is the efficient way to resolve this problem. The start-up of anammox reactor by upflow anaerobic filter was studied. Denitrifying sludge, anaerobic sludge, and mixed sludge was inoculated on the packing materials, respectively and an autotrophic denitrification condition was provided by the simulated wastewater influent. Along with the gradual increase of matrix concentration and hydraulic load, the microflora was converted to the anaerobic ammonium oxidation(anammoxreaction. The results showed that the anammox reaction could be started by all the three sludge, and the time of start-up of denitrifying sludge, anaerobic sludge, mixed sludge was 42, 54 days and 45 days, respectively. The best result was that inoculated with denitrifying sludge with 82.2% of the total nitrogen removal rate, which started-up quickly and nitrogen was removed efficiently. Double packing effectively improved the stability of anammox process in the reactor, in which the suitable influent concentration loading for the anammox bacteria was 270 mg·L-1 and 360 mg·L-1 for ammonia nitrogen and nitrite nitrogen, respectively, and the COD concentration could not be more than 150 mg· L-1. Furthermore, there was a coexist-effect for anaerobic ammonia oxidation and methanation in this reactor system.

  3. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by marine and freshwater planctomycete-like bacteria RID B-8834-2011 RID B-5428-2008 RID C-3269-2011 RID D-1875-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jetten, MSM; Sliekers, O.; Kuypers, M.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, two fresh water species, 'Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans' and 'Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis', and one marine species, 'Candidatus Scalindua sorokinii', of planctomycete anammox bacteria have been identified. 'Candidatus Scalindua sorokinii' was discovered in the Black Sea...... membrane composed almost exclusively of linearly concatenated cyclobutane-containing lipids. These so-called 'ladderanes' are connected to the glycerol moiety via both ester and ether bonds. In natural and man-made ecosystems, anammox bacteria can cooperate with aerobic ammonium-oxidising bacteria, which...... protect them from harmful oxygen, and provide the necessary nitrite. The cooperation of these two groups of ammonium-oxidising bacteria is the microbial basis for a sustainable one reactor system, CANON (completely autotrophic nitrogen-removal over nitrite) to remove ammonia from high strength wastewater....

  4. Anaerobic Oxidation of Hydrocarbon Contaminants in Marine and Estuarine Sediments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lovley, Derek

    1999-01-01

    .... Pristine harbor sediments did not have a significant potential for anaerobic PAH oxidation, but could be adapted for PAH oxidation by exposure to PAhs or inoculation with PAH-oxidizing microrganisms...

  5. Reuse of Ammonium Nitrate - Wet Air Oxidation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maloney, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    ... it. AN is commonly used as a fertilizer (80 percent of AN produced) and an oxidizer. Owing to the high demand and wide availability of AN for its most common use, the commercial cost is very low...

  6. Electrochemical oxidation of quaternary ammonium electrolytes : Unexpected side reactions in organic electrochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nouri Nigjeh, Eslam; de Vries, Marcel; Bruins, Andries P.; Bischoff, Rainer; Permentier, Hjalmar P.

    Quaternary ammonium salts are among the most widely used electrolytes in organic electrochemistry, but there is little known about their unwanted side oxidation reactions. We have, therefore, studied the constant potential oxidation products of quaternary ammonium electrolytes using mass

  7. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation in the old trickling filters at Daspoort ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The century-old trickling filters at the Daspoort Wastewater Treatment Works in Pretoria (Gauteng, South Africa) are known for their remarkable removal of nitrogen from municipal wastewater. Our study was conducted to identify the microbiological processes responsible for this phenomenon and to establish whether ...

  8. Anaerobic sulfide-oxidation in marine colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    Colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are ubiquitous in Indian waters and have the ability to oxidize sulfide under anaerobic conditions. These bacteria can not only mediate the sulfur cycle oxidatively but also the nitrogen cycle reductively without...

  9. Metabolic adaptation of microbial communities to ammonium stress in a high solid anaerobic digester with dewatered sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaohu; Yan, Han; Li, Ning; He, Jin; Ding, Yueling; Dai, Lingling; Dong, Bin

    2016-06-17

    A high solid digester with dewatered sludge was operated for 110 days to ascertain the interactions between bacterial and archaeal communities under ammonium stress, as well as the corresponding changes in bio-degradation mechanisms. The volatile solids reduction (95% confidence intervals in mean) changed from 31.6 ± 0.9% in the stable period (day 40-55) to 21.3 ± 1.5% in the last period (day 71-110) when ammonium concentration was elevated to be within 5,000-6,000 mgN/L. Biogas yield dropped accordingly from 11.9 ± 0.3 to 10.4 ± 0.2 L/d and carbon dioxide increased simultaneously from 35.2% to 44.8%. Anaerobranca better adapted to the ammonium stress, while the initially dominant protein-degrading microbes-Tepidimicrobium and Proteiniborus were suppressed, probably responsible for the increase of protein content in digestate. Meanwhile, Methanosarcina, as the dominant Archaea, was resistant to ammonium stress with the constant relative abundance of more than 92% during the whole operation. Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) analysis was thus conducted which indicated that the gradually increased TAN dictated the bacterial clusters. The dominant Methanosarcina and the increased carbon dioxide content under ammonium stress suggested that, rather than the commonly acknowledged syntrophic acetate oxidation (SAO) with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, only SAO pathway was enhanced during the initial 'ammonium inhibition'.

  10. Erratum to ;Coastal water column ammonium and nitrite oxidation are decoupled in summer;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Elise M.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2017-07-01

    Water column nitrification is a key process in the nitrogen cycle as it links reduced and oxidized forms of nitrogen and also provides the substrate (nitrate) needed for reactive nitrogen removal by denitrification. We measured potential water column ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates at four sites along an estuary to continental shelf gradient over two summers. In most cases, nitrite oxidation rates outpaced ammonium oxidation rates. Overall, ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates were higher outside of the estuary, and this trend was primarily driven by higher oxidation rates in deeper waters. Additionally, both ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates were impacted by different in situ variables. Ammonium oxidation rates throughout the water column as a whole were most positively correlated to depth and salinity and negatively correlated to dissolved oxygen, light, and temperature. In contrast, nitrite oxidation rates throughout the water column were negatively correlated with temperature, light and pH. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that surface (20 m) rates were regulated by temperature, light, and [H+] (i.e. pH). In addition, surface (20 m) nitrite oxidation rates. These results support the growing body of evidence that ammonium oxidation and nitrite oxidation are not always coupled, should be measured separately, and are influenced by different environmental conditions.

  11. Studies on a Novel Actinobacteria Species Capable of Oxidizing Ammonium under Iron Reduction Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanh, Shan; Ruiz-Urigüen, Melany; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) oxidation coupled to iron reduction in the absence of oxygen and nitrate/nitrite (NO3-/NO2-) was noted in a forested riparian wetland in New Jersey (1,2), and in tropical rainforest soils (3), and was coined Feammox (4). Through a 180-days anaerobic incubation of soil samples collected at the New Jersey site, and using 16S rDNA PCR-DGGE, 454-pyosequecing, and qPCR analysis, we have shown that an Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6, belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria, is responsible for this Feammox process, described previously (1,2). We have enriched these Feammox bacteria in a high efficiency Feammox membrane reactor (with 85% NH4+removal per 48h), and isolated the pure Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 strain 5, in an autotrophic medium. To determine if the Feammox bacteria found in this study are common, at least at the regional scale, we analyzed a series of local wetland-, upland-, as well as storm-water detention pond-sediments. Through anaerobic incubations and molecular biology analysis, the Feammox reaction and Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 were found in three of twenty soil samples collected, indicating that the Feammox pathway might be widespread in selected soil environments. Results show that soil pH and Fe(III) content are key environmental factors controlling the distributions of Feammox bacteria, which require acidic conditions and the presence of iron oxides. Results from incubation experiments conducted at different temperatures have shown that, in contrast to another anaerobic ammonium oxidation pathways (e.g., anammox), the optimal temperature of the Feammox process is ~ 20° and that the organisms are still active when the temperature is around 10°. An incubation experiment amended with acetylene gas (C2H2) as a selected inhibitor showed that in the Feammox reaction, Fe(III) is the electron acceptor, which is reduced to Fe(II), and NH4+is the electron donor, which is oxidized to NO2-. After this process, NO2- is converted to

  12. Using a tubular photosynthetic microbial fuel cell to treat anaerobically digested effluent from kitchen waste: Mechanisms of organics and ammonium removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Haiyan; Yang, Zhigang; Nie, Changliang; Hou, Qingjie; Zhang, Lijie; Wang, Yuting; Zhang, Shasha

    2018-05-01

    Anaerobically digested effluent from kitchen waste (ADE-KW) was used herein as the substrate of a tubular photosynthetic microbial fuel cell (PMFC) for power production, and also, after being diluted, as a medium for cultivation of algae in the cathodic chamber. Adding 3 mg/L phosphorus to the catholyte could efficiently enhance the algal growth and the PMFC performance. About 0.94 g/L algal biomass and 0.57 kWh/m 3 -ADE-KW bioelectricity were obtained from the PMFC. Soluble microbial byproduct-like material and aromatic proteins were the dominant organics in the ADE-KW, which were readily degradable in the system. About 79% of the 1550 mg/L ammonium in the anolyte transferred to the catholyte through the cation exchange membrane. The ammonium was removed mainly as electron acceptors at the cathode after being oxidized by oxygen, whereas algal assimilation only account for about 14.6% of the overall nitrogen. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Copolymerization of poly (ethylene oxide) and poly (methyl methacrylate) initiated by ceric ammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, A.S.; Ferreira, A.A.; Coutinho, F.M.B.; Marinho, J.R.D.

    1984-01-01

    Cerium (IV) salts such as the ceric ammonium nitrate and ceric ammonium sulfate in aqueous acid solution with reducing agents such as alcohols, thiols, glycols, aldehydes and amines are well known initiators of vinyl polymerization. In this work, the polymerization of methyl methacrylate initiated by ceric ammonium nitrate/HNO 3 -poly(ethylene oxide) with hydroxyl end group system was studied in aqueous solution at 25 0 C to obtain block copolymers. (Author) [pt

  14. Intensification of sonochemical degradation of ammonium perfluorooctanoate by persulfate oxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Feifei; Guo, Weilin; Wang, Anqi; Leng, Yanqiu; Li, Helian

    2014-03-01

    Ammonium perfluorooctanoate (APFO) is an emerging environmental pollutant attracting significant attention due to its global distribution, high persistence, and bioaccumulation properties. The decomposition of APFO in aqueous solution with a combination of persulfate oxidant and ultrasonic irradiation was investigated. The effects of operating parameters, such as ultrasonic power, persulfate concentration, APFO concentration, and initial media pH on APFO degradation were discussed. In the absence of persulfate, 35.5% of initial APFO in 46.4 μmol/L solution under ultrasound irradiation, was decomposed rapidly after 120 min with the defluorination ratio reaching 6.73%. In contrast, when 10 mmol/L persulfate was used, 51.2% of initial APFO (46.4 μmol/L) was decomposed and the defluorination ratio reached 11.15% within 120 min reaction time. Enhancement of the decomposition of APFO can be explained by acceleration of substrate decarboxylation, induced by sulfate radical anions formed from the persulfate during ultrasonic irradiation. The SO4(-•)/APFO reactions at the bubble-water interface appear to be the primary pathway for the sonochemical degradation of the perfluorinated surfactants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Australian zeolite on methane production and ammonium removal during anaerobic digestion of swine manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijesinghe, D. Thushari N.; Dassanayake, Kithsiri B.; Scales, Peter J.

    2018-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is one of the most effective methods for treating swine manure by converting it into green energy, and efficiently reducing methane (CH4) emission to the atmosphere. Low C/N ratio of swine manure and the production of high levels of total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) during...... acidogenesis due to the high N contents of swine manure considerably reduce CH4 yield. The reduction of N during anaerobic digestion by the addition of zeolite improves CH4 production and reduces potential environmental threats associated with ammonia (NH3) emissions from anaerobic digestion of swine manure....... The main objective of this study was to determine the optimum Australian zeolite dose that produces maximum NH4 + recovery at optimum CH4 production. In laboratory experiments, swine manure was treated with natural and sodium zeolites at 0, 10, 40, 70, 100 mg/L and digested anaerobically for 60 days...

  16. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in coastal sediment from Guishan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pearl River Estuary),. South China Sea, were ... profiles of the pore-water support the existence of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), which is mainly controlled by the ...... area; Environmental Microbiology 4 296–305. Niewöhner C, Hensen C, ...

  17. Diversity of aerobic and anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Naglaa M; Saito, Keiko; Tal, Yossi; Hill, Russell T

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AAOB) are known to have an important function in the marine nitrogen cycle. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) carried out by some members of Planctomycetales is also an important process in marine ecosystems. Ammonia-monooxygenase gene (amoA) fragments were amplified to investigate the potential for nitrification and the diversity of the AAOB in two marine sponges Ircinia strobilina and Mycale laxissima. All of the AmoA sequences obtained from the two sponges clustered with the AmoA sequences of the Betaproteobacteria Nitrosospira spp. To investigate the anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) in sponges, 16S rRNA gene fragments of Planctomycetales and anammox bacteria were also amplified with specific primers, and clone libraries were constructed. The Planctomycetales diversity detected in the two sponges was different. The Planctomycetales community in M. laxissima was affiliated with Pirellula, Planctomyces and anammox bacteria, while all of the I. strobilina Planctomycetales clones were solely affiliated with the candidate phylum 'Poribacteria'. Interestingly, sequences related to anammox genera were recovered only from M. laxissima. This is the first report of anammox bacteria in marine sponges. It is intriguing to find AAOB and AnAOB in M. laxissima, but the nature of their interaction with the sponge host and with each other remains unclear. This work further supports the potential of sponge-associated microorganisms for nitrification and sheds light on anammox as a new aspect of the nitrogen cycle in marine sponges.

  18. Diversity Profile of Microbes Associated with Anaerobic Sulfur Oxidation in an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor Treating Municipal Sewage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, Azrina A.; Kuroda, Kyohei; Yamamoto, Masamitsu; Nakamura, Akinobu; Hatamoto, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We herein analyzed the diversity of microbes involved in anaerobic sulfur oxidation in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor used for treating municipal sewage under low-temperature conditions. Anaerobic sulfur oxidation occurred in the absence of oxygen, with nitrite and nitrate as electron acceptors; however, reactor performance parameters demonstrated that anaerobic conditions were maintained. In order to gain insights into the underlying basis of anaerobic sulfur oxidation, the microbial diversity that exists in the UASB sludge was analyzed comprehensively to determine their identities and contribution to sulfur oxidation. Sludge samples were collected from the UASB reactor over a period of 2 years and used for bacterial 16S rRNA gene-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and next-generation sequencing analyses. T-RFLP and sequencing results both showed that microbial community patterns changed markedly from day 537 onwards. Bacteria belonging to the genus Desulforhabdus within the phylum Proteobacteria and uncultured bacteria within the phylum Fusobacteria were the main groups observed during the period of anaerobic sulfur oxidation. Their abundance correlated with temperature, suggesting that these bacterial groups played roles in anaerobic sulfur oxidation in UASB reactors. PMID:25817585

  19. A marine microbial consortium apparently mediating anaerobic oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boetius, A.; Ravenschlag, K.; Schubert, CJ

    2000-01-01

    microorganisms mediating this reaction have not yet been isolated, and the pathway of anaerobic oxidation of methane is insufficiently understood. Recent data suggest that certain archaea reverse the process of methanogenesis by interaction with sulphate-reducing bacteria(5-7). Here we provide microscopic...... evidence for a structured consortium of archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria, which we identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization using specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes. In this example of a structured archaeal-bacterial symbiosis, the archaea grow in dense aggregates of about 100...... cells and are surrounded by sulphate-reducing bacteria. These aggregates were abundant in gas-hydrate-rich sediments with extremely high rates of methane-based sulphate reduction, and apparently mediate anaerobic oxidation of methane....

  20. Tandem Brook Rearrangement/Silicon Polonovski Reaction via Oxidative Generation of Ammonium Ylides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Hiromasa; Nakago, Takahiro; Inoue, Seiichi; Hoshino, Yujiro; Honda, Kiyoshi

    2017-08-01

    A tandem Brook rearrangement/silicon Polonovski reaction has been achieved by in situ generation of ammonium ylides via the oxidation of α-silyl-tertiary amines. Furthermore, we found that the oxidation of N-(1-cyano-1-silyl)methyl-tertiary amines with peracids induced the tandem Brook rearrangement/silicon Polonovski reaction/fragmentation to give formamide derivatives in moderate yields.

  1. Using Iron-Manganese Co-Oxide Filter Film to Remove Ammonium from Surface Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruifeng Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available An iron-manganese co-oxide filter film (MeOx has been proven to be a good catalyst for the chemical catalytic oxidation of ammonium in groundwater. Compared with groundwater, surface water is generally used more widely and has characteristics that make ammonium removal more difficult. In this study, MeOx was used to remove ammonium from surface water. It indicated that the average ammonium removal efficiency of MeOx was greater than 90%, even though the water quality changed dramatically and the water temperature was reduced to about 6–8 °C. Then, through inactivating microorganisms, it showed that the removal capability of MeOx included both biological (accounted for about 41.05% and chemical catalytic oxidation and chemical catalytic oxidation (accounted for about 58.95%. The investigation of the characterizations suggested that MeOx was formed by abiotic ways and the main elements on the surface of MeOx were distributed homogenously. The analysis of the catalytic oxidation process indicated that ammonia nitrogen may interact with MeOx as both ammonia molecules and ammonium ions and the active species of O2 were possibly •O and O2−.

  2. Ammonium Oxidation Under Iron Reducing Conditions: Environmental Factors Characterization and Process Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shan; Ruiz, Melany; Jaffe, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) oxidation coupled to iron (Fe) reduction in the absence of oxygen and nitrate/nitrite (NO3-/NO2-) has been reported by several investigators and is referred to as Feammox. Feammox is a biological reaction, where Fe(III) is the electron acceptor, which is reduced to Fe(II), and NH4+ is the electron donor, which is oxidized to NO2-. An Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium named A6, a previously unreported species in the Acidimicrobiaceae family, has been identified as being responsible for the Feammox process(1, 2) Feammox process was noted in riparian wetland soils in New Jersey(1,3), in tropical rainforest soils in Puerto Rico (4) and in paddy soils in China (5). In addition to these published locations, Feammox process was also found in samples collected from a series of local wetland-, upland-, as well as storm-water detention pond-sediments in New Jersey, river sediments from South Carolina, and forested soils near an acid mine drainage (Dabaoshan, Guangdong province) in China. Using primers acm342f - 439r (2), Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 was detected in samples where Feammox was observed, after strictly anaerobic incubations. According to a canonical correspondence analysis with environmental characteristics and soil microbial communities, the species-environment relationship indicated that pH and Fe oxides content were the primary factors controlling Feammox process. Anaerobic incubations of Feammox enrichment cultures adjusted to different pH, revealed that the optimal pH for Feammox is 4 ~ 5, and the reaction does not proceed when pH > 7. No correlation was found between the distributions of Feammox bacteria and other NH4+ oxidation bacteria. Pure Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 strain was isolated in an autotrophic medium, from an active Feammox membrane reactor (A6 was enriched to 65.8% of the total bacteria). A 13C labeled CO2 amendment was conducted, and the 13C in cells of A6 increased from 1.80% to 10.3% after 14 days incubation. In a separate

  3. Iron biomineralization by anaerobic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    precipitation in the periplasm (in a few tens of minutes), followed by the formation of surface-bound globules. Moreover, we frequently observed an asymmetric mineral thickening at the cell poles. In parallel, the evolution of iron oxidation was quantified by STXM: iron both contained in the bacteria......Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate......-dependent iron-oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 in the presence of dissolved Fe(II) using electron microscopy and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). All detected minerals consisted mainly of amorphous iron phosphates, but based on their morphology and localization, three types...

  4. Fabrication of ammonium perchlorate/copper-chromium oxides core-shell nanocomposites for catalytic thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslami, Abbas, E-mail: eslami@umz.ac.ir [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, P.O.Box 47416-95447, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Juibari, Nafise Modanlou [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, P.O.Box 47416-95447, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, Seyed Ghorban [Department of Chemistry, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, P.O. Box 16765-3454, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The ammonium perchlorate/Cu(II)-Cr(III)-oxides(AP/Cu-Cr-O) core-shell nanocomposites were in-situ prepared by deposition of copper and chromium oxides on suspended ammonium perchlorate particles in ethyl acetate as solvent. The results of differential scanning calorimetery (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments showed that the nanocomposites have excellent catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of AP, so that the released heat increases up to about 3-fold over initial values, changing from 450 J/g for pure AP to 1510 J/g for most appropriate mixture. For better comparison, single metal oxide/AP core-shell nanocomposite have also been prepared and the results showed that they have less catalytic effect respect to mixed metal oxides system. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results revealed homogenous deposition of nanoparticles on the surface of AP and fabrication of core-shell structures. The kinetic parameters of thermal decomposition of both pure AP and AP/Cu-Cr-O samples have been calculated by Kissinger method and the results showed that the values of pre-exponential factor and activation energy are higher for AP/Cu-Cr-O nanocomposite. The better catalytic effect of Cu-Cr-O nanocomposites is probably attributed to the synergistic effect between Cu{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+} in the nanocomposites, smaller particle size and more crystal defect. - Highlights: • The Cu-Cr-O nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical liquid deposition method. • Then, the AP/Cu-Cr-O core-shell nanocomposites were prepared. • The core-shell samples showed high catalytic activity for AP decomposition. • Thermal decomposition of samples occurs at lower temperature range.

  5. Fabrication of ammonium perchlorate/copper-chromium oxides core-shell nanocomposites for catalytic thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslami, Abbas; Juibari, Nafise Modanlou; Hosseini, Seyed Ghorban

    2016-01-01

    The ammonium perchlorate/Cu(II)-Cr(III)-oxides(AP/Cu-Cr-O) core-shell nanocomposites were in-situ prepared by deposition of copper and chromium oxides on suspended ammonium perchlorate particles in ethyl acetate as solvent. The results of differential scanning calorimetery (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments showed that the nanocomposites have excellent catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of AP, so that the released heat increases up to about 3-fold over initial values, changing from 450 J/g for pure AP to 1510 J/g for most appropriate mixture. For better comparison, single metal oxide/AP core-shell nanocomposite have also been prepared and the results showed that they have less catalytic effect respect to mixed metal oxides system. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results revealed homogenous deposition of nanoparticles on the surface of AP and fabrication of core-shell structures. The kinetic parameters of thermal decomposition of both pure AP and AP/Cu-Cr-O samples have been calculated by Kissinger method and the results showed that the values of pre-exponential factor and activation energy are higher for AP/Cu-Cr-O nanocomposite. The better catalytic effect of Cu-Cr-O nanocomposites is probably attributed to the synergistic effect between Cu 2+ and Cr 3+ in the nanocomposites, smaller particle size and more crystal defect. - Highlights: • The Cu-Cr-O nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical liquid deposition method. • Then, the AP/Cu-Cr-O core-shell nanocomposites were prepared. • The core-shell samples showed high catalytic activity for AP decomposition. • Thermal decomposition of samples occurs at lower temperature range.

  6. Oxidation and methylation of dissolved elemental mercury by anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Haiyan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Lin, Hui [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zheng, Wang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tomanicek, Stephen J [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Johs, Alexander [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, Xinbin [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Elias, Dwayne A [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liang, Liyuan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gu, Baohua [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-08-04

    Methylmercury is a neurotoxin that poses significant health risks to humans. Some anaerobic sulphate- and iron-reducing bacteria can methylate oxidized forms of mercury, generating methylmercury1-4. One strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132) can also methylate elemental mercury5. The prevalence of this trait among different bacterial strains and species remains unclear, however. Here, we compare the ability of two strains of the sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio and one strain of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in a series of laboratory incubations. Experiments were carried out under dark, anaerobic conditions, in the presence of environmentally-relevant concentrations of elemental mercury. We report differences in the ability of these organisms to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. In line with recent findings5, we show that Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 can both oxidise and methylate elemental mercury. However, the rate of methylation of elemental mercury is only about one third the rate of methylation of oxidized mercury. We also show that Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 can oxidise, but not methylate, elemental mercury. Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA is able to oxidise and methylate elemental mercury in the presence of cysteine. We suggest that the activity of methylating and non-methylating bacteria may together enhance the formation of methylmercury in anaerobic environments.

  7. Potential rates of ammonium oxidation, nitrite oxidation, nitrate reduction and denitrification in the young barley rhizosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højberg, Ole; Binnerup, S. J.; Sørensen, Jan

    1996-01-01

    and denitrifiers. The results indicate that potential activities (enzyme contents) in the four bacterial groups were less dependent on their inorganic N substrates in the bulk and rhizosphere soils, but showed distinct and different responses to duration of soil wetting after rainfall.......Potential activities (enzyme contents) of ammonium (NH4+) oxidizing, nitrite (NO2-) oxidizing, nitrate (NO3-) reducing and denitrifying bacteria were measured in bulk and rhizosphere soil obtained from young barley plants in the field. The activities as well as pools of inorganic N (NH4+, NO2......- and NO3-) were followed for 3 weeks in the beginning of the growth season (May-June). During the 3 weeks two separate periods of rain gave dramatic changes in soil water content. A rainfall in the beginning of the sampling period, resulting in a short-term wetting of the soil, stimulated the potential...

  8. Decomposition of aluminum oxide, titanium(IV) oxide and niobium(V) oxide by fusion with ammonium sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiba, Minoru; Miura, Eiji; Nurishi, Yukio; Hibino, Taizo

    1980-01-01

    A decomposition method with ammonium sulfate for Al 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and Nb 2 O 5 is presented. Al 2 O 3 and TiO 2 were fused at 400 and 450 0 C, for 2 h and 1 h, respectively, in the presence of ammonium sulfate (oxide/ammonium sulfate = 1/20 in weight). The fused products were dissolved and extracted into 4N H 2 SO 4 aqueous solution by warming on the water bath or gently boiling on asbestos. The degree of decomposition by fusion was confirmed from the amount of the oxides recovered in the following manner; with the aid of filter pulp, the residue was completely separated by filtration and washed thoroughly by hot water. To the filtrate was added ammonia water in order to precipitate aluminum and titanium hydroxide. The precipitates were ignited in platinum crucible at 1000 0 C and weighed in oxide form. Nb 2 O 5 was fused at 400 0 C for 1 h in the presence of ammonium sulfate (niobium pentoxide/ammonium sulfate = 1/10 in weight). The fused product was extracted with 20% tartaric acid aqueous solution. The degree of decomposition by fusion was confirmed from the amount of the oxide recovered as follows; after separation of the residue by a filter paper with the aid of filter pulp and washed thoroughly by 2% tartaric acid aqueous solution, freshly prepared 6% aqueous solution of cupferron was added to the filtrate and the precipitate formed was filtered immediately. The precipitate was ignited in platinum crucible at 1000 0 C and weighed as Nb 2 O 5 . The recovery of Al 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and Nb 2 O 5 by the present method was (99.2 +- 0.4), (100.1 +- 0.2) and (100.1 +- 0.2)%, respectively. It is concluded that Al 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and Nb 2 O 5 could be completely decomposed with ammonium sulfate. (author)

  9. Nitrogen removal performance of anaerobic ammonia oxidation (ANAMMOX) in presence of organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiqiang; Zhang, Peiyu; Yu, Deshuang; Dong, Huiyu; Li, Jin

    2017-06-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was used to test the nitrogen removal performance of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) in presence of organic matter. Mesophilic operation (30 ± 0.5 °C) was performed with influent pH 7.5. The results showed, independent of organic matter species, ANAMMOX reaction was promoted when COD was lower than 80 mg/L. However, specific ANAMMOX activity decreased with increasing organic matter content. Ammonium removal efficiency decreased to 80% when COD of sodium succinate, sodium potassium tartrate, peptone and lactose were 192.5, 210, 225 and 325 mg/L, respectively. The stoichiometry ratio resulting from different OM differed largely and R 1 could be as an indicator for OM inhibition. When COD concentration was 240 mg/L, the loss of SAA resulting from lactose, peptone, sodium potassium tartrate and sodium succinate were 28, 36, 50 and 55%, respectively. Sodium succinate had the highest inhibitory effect on SAA. When ANAMMOX process was used to treat wastewater containing OM, the modified Logistic model could be employed to predict the NRE max .

  10. Growth at low ammonium concentrations and starvation response as potential factors involved in niche differentiation among ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmann, Annette; Bär-Gilissen, Marie-José; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2002-10-01

    In nature, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria have to compete with heterotrophic bacteria and plants for limiting amounts of ammonium. Previous laboratory experiments conducted with Nitrosomonas europaea suggested that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria are weak competitors for ammonium. To obtain a better insight into possible methods of niche differentiation among ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, we carried out a growth experiment at low ammonium concentrations with N. europaea and the ammonia oxidizer G5-7, a close relative of Nitrosomonas oligotropha belonging to Nitrosomonas cluster 6a, enriched from a freshwater sediment. Additionally, we compared the starvation behavior of the newly enriched ammonia oxidizer G5-7 to that of N. europaea. The growth experiment at low ammonium concentrations showed that strain G5-7 was able to outcompete N. europaea at growth-limiting substrate concentrations of about 10 micro M ammonium, suggesting better growth abilities of the ammonia oxidizer G5-7 at low ammonium concentrations. However, N. europaea displayed a more favorable starvation response. After 1 to 10 weeks of ammonium deprivation, N. europaea became almost immediately active after the addition of fresh ammonium and converted the added ammonium within 48 to 96 h. In contrast, the regeneration time of the ammonia oxidizer G5-7 increased with increasing starvation time. Taken together, these results provide insight into possible mechanisms of niche differentiation for the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria studied. The Nitrosomonas cluster 6a member, G5-7, is able to grow at ammonium concentrations at which the growth of N. europaea, belonging to Nitrosomonas cluster 7, has already ceased, providing an advantage in habitats with continuously low ammonium concentrations. On the other hand, the ability of N. europaea to become active again after longer periods of starvation for ammonium may allow better exploitation of irregular pulses of ammonium in the environment.

  11. Anaerobic digestate as substrate for microalgae culture: the role of ammonium concentration on the microalgae productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uggetti, Enrica; Sialve, Bruno; Latrille, Eric; Steyer, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the increasing interest received by microalgae as potential alternatives for biofuel production, the technology is still not industrially viable. The utilization of digestate as carbon and nutrients source can enhance microalgal growth reducing costs and environmental impacts. This work assesses microalgal growth utilizing the liquid phase of anaerobic digestate effluent as substrate. The effect of inoculum/substrate ratio on microalgal growth was studied in a laboratory batch experiment conduced in 0.5L flasks. Results suggested that digestate may be an effective substrate for microalgal growth promoting biomass production up to 2.6 gTSS/L. Microalgal growth rate was negatively affected by a self-shading phenomenon, while biomass production was positively correlated with the inoculum and substrate concentrations. Thus, the increasing of both digestate and microalgal initial concentration may reduce the initial growth rate (μ from 0.9 to 0.04 d(-1)) but significantly enhances biomass production (from 0.1 to 2.6 gTSS/L). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Plants Growth Rate in Evapotranspiration continuous system reactors as the 2nd Treatment at Anaerobic-evapotranspiration system with High Strength Ammonium in Leachate Influent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrus Zaman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium is one of parameter which responsible to leachate toxicity. Preliminary research was shown that the Fimbristylis globulosa (water plant, Alocasia macrorrhiza (terrestrial plant and Eleusine indica (terrestrial grass were potential plants for used as object in evaporation reactor system with high strength ammonium  concentration in leachate treatment. This research was integrated of anaerobic system with evapotranspiration system with continuous influent using ammonium concentration in leachate was 2000 mg/l NH4-N. Plants growth rate was analyzed for 25 days operated. The result shown that average of thallus growth rate of Fimbristylis globulosa was 17,5 cm d-1. The average of leaf and thallus growth rate of Alocasia macrorrhiza was 18,1 cm d-1 and 3,2 cm d-1 respectively. The average of blade and thallus of Eleusine indica were same that was 4,7 cm d-1.This research conclude that integration system of anaerobic and evpotranspiration was be potential used for high strength ammonium in leachate treatment.

  13. Growth at low ammonium concentrations and starvation response as potential factors involved in niche differentiation among ammonia-oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, A.; Bär-Gilissen, M.J.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    In nature, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria have to compete with heterotrophic bacteria and plants for limiting amounts of ammonium. Previous laboratory experiments conducted with Nitrosomonas europaea suggested that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria are weak competitors for ammonium. To obtain a better

  14. Growth at low ammonium concentrations and starvation response as potential factors involved in niche differentiation among ammonia-oxidizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, A.; Bär-Gilissen, M.J.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    In nature, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria have to compete with heterotrophic bacteria and plants for limiting amounts of ammonium. Previous laboratory experiments conducted with Nitrosomonas europaea suggested that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria are weak competitors for ammonium. To obtain a better insight

  15. Preparation of ammonium sulfate, calcium oxide and rare earth concentrate from phospho-gypsum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrianov, A.M.; Rusin, N.F.; Dejneka, G.F.; Zinchenko, T.A.; Burova, T.I.

    1978-01-01

    A technological scheme is proposed which gives ammonium sulfate, purified (from admixtures of silicon, iron, titanium, aluminium) calcium oxide with direct yield of calcium 91% and rare-earth concentrate, containing 5.6% of Ln 2 O 3 with direct yield of 99.5%

  16. Continuous culture enrichments of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria at low ammonium concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollmann, A.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Until now enrichments of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria from natural ammonium-limited environments have been performed mainly in the presence of much higher ammonia concentrations than those present in the natural environment and many have resulted in the enrichment and isolation of environmentally less

  17. Trace methane oxidation and the methane dependency of sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulepas, R.J.W.; Jagersma, C.G.; Zhang, Y.; Petrillo, M.; Cai, H.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the oxidation of labeled methane (CH(4)) and the CH(4) dependence of sulfate reduction in three types of anaerobic granular sludge. In all samples, (13)C-labeled CH(4) was anaerobically oxidized to (13)C-labeled CO(2), while net endogenous CH(4) production was observed.

  18. The role of paraffin oil on the interaction between denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation and Anammox processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Ding, Jing; Zhang, Fang; Zeng, Raymond J

    2015-10-01

    Methane is sparingly soluble in water, resulting in a slow reaction rate in the denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) process. The slow rate limits the feasibility of research to examine the interaction between the DAMO and the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process. In this study, optimized 5 % (v/v) paraffin oil was added as a second liquid phase to improve methane solubility in a reactor containing DAMO and Anammox microbes. After just addition, methane solubility was found to increase by 25 % and DAMO activity was enhanced. After a 100-day cultivation, the paraffin reactor showed almost two times higher consumption rates of NO3 (-) (0.2268 mmol/day) and NH4 (+) (0.1403 mmol/day), compared to the control reactor without paraffin oil. The microbes tended to distribute in the oil-water interface. The quantitative (q) PCR result showed the abundance of gene copies of DAMO archaea, DAMO bacteria, and Anammox bacteria in the paraffin reactor were higher than those in the control reactor after 1 month. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that the percentages of the three microbes were 55.5 and 77.6 % in the control and paraffin reactors after 100 days, respectively. A simple model of mass balance was developed to describe the interactions between DAMO and Anammox microbes and validate the activity results. A mechanism was proposed to describe the possible way that paraffin oil enhanced DAMO activity. It is quite clear that paraffin oil enhances not only DAMO activity but also Anammox activity via the interaction between them; both NO3 (-) and NH4 (+) consumption rates were about two times those of the control.

  19. The fate of ammonium in anoxic manganese oxide-rich marine sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamdrup, Bo; Dalsgaard, Tage

    2000-12-01

    The possibility for anaerobic NH 4+ oxidation and N 2 formation was explored in a Mn oxide-rich continental basin sediment from Skagerrak. The surface sediment contained 2.9 weight-% Mn(IV), and reactive Mn oxide persisted to ≥10 cm depth. Microbial Mn reduction completely dominated anaerobic carbon oxidation, whereas neither Fe reduction nor sulfate reduction were significant. Accumulation rates of soluble NH 4+ during anoxic incubations scaled with Mn reduction rates and did not indicate any substantial oxidation of NH 4+. No sustained production of 15N-labelled N 2 from added 15NH 4+ was detectable during the four-day incubations, which constrains the rate of NH 4+ conversion to N 2 to coupled nitrification/denitrification resulting from sediment handling. Oxidation of NH 4+ to NO 3- was also insignificant as there was no accumulation of NO 3- during the incubations and added 15NO 3- was rapidly consumed with N 2 as a major product. Although the oxidation of NH 4+ with Mn oxide is thermodynamically favorable, our results demonstrate that such oxidation was insignificant and that NH 4+ can be considered the end product of nitrogen mineralization in this anoxic Mn oxide-rich sediment.

  20. Biogeography of anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puntipar eSonthiphand

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic ammonia-oxidizing (anammox bacteria are able to oxidize ammonia and reduce nitrite to produce N2 gas. After being discovered in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP, anammox bacteria were subsequently characterized in natural environments, including marine, estuary, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats. Anammox bacteria play an important role in removing fixed N from both engineered and natural ecosystems, but broad scale anammox bacterial distributions, based on available data, have not yet been summarized. The objectives of this study were to explore global distributions and diversity of anammox bacteria and to identify factors that influence their biogeography. Over 6,000 anammox 16S rRNA gene sequences from the public database were analyzed in this current study. Data ordinations indicated that salinity was an important factor governing anammox bacterial distributions, with distinct populations inhabiting natural and engineered ecosystems. Gene phylogenies and rarefaction analysis demonstrated that freshwater environments and the marine water column harbored the highest and the lowest diversity of anammox bacteria, respectively. A co-occurrence network analysis indicated that Ca. Scalindua strongly correlated with other Ca. Scalindua taxa, whereas Ca. Brocadia co-occurred with taxa from both known and unknown anammox genera. Our survey provides a better understanding of ecological factors affecting anammox bacterial distributions and provides a comprehensive baseline for understanding the relationships among anammox communities in global environments.

  1. High pressure structural, elastic and vibrational properties of green energetic oxidizer ammonium dinitramide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedukondalu, N.; Ghule, Vikas D.; Vaitheeswaran, G.

    2016-08-01

    Ammonium DiNitramide (ADN) is one of the most promising green energetic oxidizers for future rocket propellant formulations. In the present work, we report a detailed theoretical study on structural, elastic, and vibrational properties of the emerging oxidizer under hydrostatic compression using various dispersion correction methods to capture weak intermolecular (van der Waals and hydrogen bonding) interactions. The calculated ground state lattice parameters, axial compressibilities, and equation of state are in good accord with the available experimental results. Strength of intermolecular interactions has been correlated using the calculated compressibility curves and elastic moduli. Apart from this, we also observe discontinuities in the structural parameters and elastic constants as a function of pressure. Pictorial representation and quantification of intermolecular interactions are described by the 3D Hirshfeld surfaces and 2D finger print maps. In addition, the computed infra-red (IR) spectra at ambient pressure reveal that ADN is found to have more hygroscopic nature over Ammonium Perchlorate (AP) due to the presence of strong hydrogen bonding. Pressure dependent IR spectra show blue- and red-shift of bending and stretching frequencies which leads to weakening and strengthening of the hydrogen bonding below and above 5 GPa, respectively. The abrupt changes in the calculated structural, mechanical, and IR spectra suggest that ADN might undergo a first order structural transformation to a high pressure phase around 5-6 GPa. From the predicted detonation properties, ADN is found to have high and low performance characteristics (DCJ = 8.09 km/s and PCJ = 25.54 GPa) when compared with ammonium based energetic oxidizers (DCJ = 6.50 km/s and PCJ = 17.64 GPa for AP, DCJ = 7.28 km/s and PCJ = 18.71 GPa for ammonium nitrate) and well-known secondary explosives for which DCJ = ˜8-10 km/s and PCJ = ˜30-50 GPa, respectively.

  2. Impact of a high ammonia-ammonium-pH system on methane-producing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria in mesophilic anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaohu; Hu, Chongliang; Zhang, Dong; Dai, Lingling; Duan, Nina

    2017-12-01

    A novel strategy for acclimation to ammonia stress was implemented by stimulating a high ammonia-ammonium-pH environment in a high-solid anaerobic digestion (AD) system in this study. Three semi-continuously stirred anaerobic reactors performed well over the whole study period under mesophilic conditions, especially in experimental group (R-2) when accommodated from acclimation period which the maximum total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) and free ammonia nitrogen (FAN) increased to 4921 and 2996mg/L, respectively. Moreover, when it accommodated the high ammonia-ammonium-pH system, the daily biogas production and methane content were similar to those in R-1 (the blank control to R-2), but the hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) content lower than the blank control. Moreover, mechanistic studies showed that high ammonia stress enhanced the activity of coenzyme F 420 . The results of real-time fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) showed that ammonia stress decreased the abundance of sulfate-reducing bacteria and increased the abundance of methane-producing archaea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultrastructure and viral metagenome of bacteriophages from an anaerobic methane oxidizing methylomirabilis bioreactor enrichment culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gambelli, Lavinia; Cremers, Geert; Mesman, Rob; Guerrero, Simon; Dutilh, Bas E.; Jetten, Mike S M; den Camp, Huub J M Op; van Niftrik, Laura

    2016-01-01

    With its capacity for anaerobic methane oxidation and denitrification, the bacterium Methylomirabilis oxyfera plays an important role in natural ecosystems. Its unique physiology can be exploited for more sustainable wastewater treatment technologies. However, operational stability of full-scale

  4. Ultrastructure and Viral Metagenome of Bacteriophages from an Anaerobic Methane Oxidizing Methylomirabilis Bioreactor Enrichment Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gambelli, L.; Cremers, G.; Mesman, R.; Guerrero, S.; Dutilh, B.E.; Jetten, M.S.; Camp, H.J. Op den; Niftrik, L. van

    2016-01-01

    With its capacity for anaerobic methane oxidation and denitrification, the bacterium Methylomirabilis oxyfera plays an important role in natural ecosystems. Its unique physiology can be exploited for more sustainable wastewater treatment technologies. However, operational stability of full-scale

  5. The Geologic Signature of Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussler, W.; Paull, C. K.

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is an enormous sink in anoxic marine sediments for methane produced in situ or ascending through the sediment column towards the seafloor. Existing estimates indicate that between 75 and 382 Tg of sedimentary methane are oxidized each year before reaching the sediment-water interface making AOM a diagenetic process of global significance. This methane is derived from a variety of sources including microbial production, thermocatalytic cracking of complex organic matter, decomposing gas hydrates, and possibly abiogenic processes. Stables isotopes of membrane lipid biomarkers and authigenic carbonates associated with zones of AOM, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and anaerobic methane incubations have substantiated the role Archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria have in driving AOM. The products of AOM are dissolved inorganic carbon (predominantly HCO3-) and bisulfide (HS-). Stable isotope measurements of authigenic carbonates associated with zones of AOM are consistent with the diagenetic carbon being primarily methane derived. These methane-derived carbonates occur in a variety of forms including sedimentary nodules and thin lenses within and below zones of contemporary AOM; outcrops of slabs, ledges, and jagged authigenic carbonates exhumed on the seafloor; and authigenic carbonate mounds associated with near-subsurface methane gas accumulations. Examples of exhumed authigenic carbonates include rugged outcrops along the Guaymas Transform in the Gulf of California, extensive slabs and ledges in the Eel River Basin, and mounds in various stages of development near Bullseye Vent, off Vancouver Island and in the Santa Monica Basin. It is clear from basic microbial biogeochemistry and the occurrences of massive authigenic carbonate which span a large range in size that DIC produced by AOM is preserved as authigenic carbonate within the seafloor and not on the seafloor. These exhumed authigenic carbonate provide a glimpse of how

  6. Kinetic study on anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hou; Kashima, Hiroyuki; Regan, John M; Hussain, Abid; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2017-09-01

    Monod kinetic parameters provide information required for kinetic analysis of anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to denitrification (AOM-D). This information is critical for engineering AOM-D processes in wastewater treatment facilities. We first experimentally determined Monod kinetic parameters for an AOM-D enriched culture and obtained the following values: maximum specific growth rate (μ max ) 0.121/d, maximum substrate-utilization rate (q max ) 28.8mmol CH 4 /g cells-d, half maximum-rate substrate concentration (K s ) 83μΜ CH 4 , growth yield (Y) 4.76gcells/mol CH 4 , decay coefficient (b) 0.031/d, and threshold substrate concentration (S min ) 28.8μM CH 4 . Clone library analysis of 16S rRNA and mcrA gene fragments suggested that AOM-D reactions might have occurred via the syntrophic interaction between denitrifying bacteria (e.g., Ignavibacterium, Acidovorax, and Pseudomonas spp.) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens (Methanobacterium spp.), supporting reverse methanogenesis-dependent AOM-D in our culture. High μ max and q max , and low K s for the AOM-D enrichment imply that AOM-D could play a significant role in mitigating atmospheric methane efflux. In addition, these high kinetic features suggest that engineered AOM-D systems may provide a sustainable alternative to nitrogen removal in wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of methane by marine microbial consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holler, Thomas; Widdel, Friedrich; Knittel, Katrin; Amann, Rudolf; Kellermann, Matthias Y; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Teske, Andreas; Boetius, Antje; Wegener, Gunter

    2011-12-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with sulfate controls the emission of the greenhouse gas methane from the ocean floor. AOM is performed by microbial consortia of archaea (ANME) associated with partners related to sulfate-reducing bacteria. In vitro enrichments of AOM were so far only successful at temperatures ≤25 °C; however, energy gain for growth by AOM with sulfate is in principle also possible at higher temperatures. Sequences of 16S rRNA genes and core lipids characteristic for ANME as well as hints of in situ AOM activity were indeed reported for geothermally heated marine environments, yet no direct evidence for thermophilic growth of marine ANME consortia was obtained to date. To study possible thermophilic AOM, we investigated hydrothermally influenced sediment from the Guaymas Basin. In vitro incubations showed activity of sulfate-dependent methane oxidation between 5 and 70 °C with an apparent optimum between 45 and 60 °C. AOM was absent at temperatures ≥75 °C. Long-term enrichment of AOM was fastest at 50 °C, yielding a 13-fold increase of methane-dependent sulfate reduction within 250 days, equivalent to an apparent doubling time of 68 days. The enrichments were dominated by novel ANME-1 consortia, mostly associated with bacterial partners of the deltaproteobacterial HotSeep-1 cluster, a deeply branching phylogenetic group previously found in a butane-amended 60 °C-enrichment culture of Guaymas sediments. The closest relatives (Desulfurella spp.; Hippea maritima) are moderately thermophilic sulfur reducers. Results indicate that AOM and ANME archaea could be of biogeochemical relevance not only in cold to moderate but also in hot marine habitats.

  8. Nitrogen Cycling in Seagrass Beds Dominated by Thalassia testudinum and Halodule wrightii: the Role of Nitrogen Fixation and Ammonium Oxidation in Regulating Ammonium Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, R.; Caffrey, J. M.; Hester, C.

    2016-02-01

    Seagrass meadows provide key ecosystem services including nursery and foraging grounds, storm and erosion buffers, biodiversity enhancers and global carbon and nutrient cycling. Nitrogen concentrations are often very low in coastal waters and sediments, which may limit primary productivity. Biological nitrogen fixation is a microbial process that converts dinitrogen to ammonium, which is readily taken up by seagrasses. In the oxygenated rhizospheres, diazotrophs provide the plant with ammonium and use root exudates as an energy source. Nitrogen fixation rates and nutrient concentrations differ between seagrass species and substrate types. Thalassia testudinum has a higher biomass and is a climax species than Halodule wrightii, which is a pioneer species. Nitrogen fixation rates are relatively consistent in Thalassia testudinum dominated sediments. However, it is relatively variable in sediments occupied by Halodule wrightii. Nitrogen fixation rates are higher in bare substrate compared to areas with Thalassia testudinum, which may be due to T. testudinum's greater efficiency in nutrient retention because it is a climax species. We hypothesize that seasonal shifts in nitrogen fixation will coincide with seasonal shifts in seagrass biomass due to higher nutrient requirements during peak growth and lower requirements during senescence and dormancy. The ratio of porewater ammonium to phosphate suggests that seagrass growth may be nitrogen limited as does nitrogen demand, estimated from gross primary productivity. Significant rates of ammonium oxidation in both surface and rhizosphere sediments contribute to this imbalance. Thus, nitrogen fixation may be critical in supporting plant growth.

  9. In-situ leaching of South Texas uranium ores - 2. Oxidative removal of adsorbed ammonium ions with sodium hypochlorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, J.M.; Johnson, W.F.; Fletcher, A.; Venuto, P.B.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports a laboratory study of the oxidative destruction, by sodium hypochlorite, of ammonium ions adsorbed on relatively reduced South Texas uranium ore. Included are an assessment of reaction stoichiometry, determination of some major reaction pathways and side reactions, and identification of several intermediates. Adsorbed ammonium ions were completely removed by 0.5% sodium hypochlorite with the concentration of ammonia in the effluent falling to a very low value after 10-15 pore volumes of the oxidant. Substantial quantities of sulfate, reflecting oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite, were formed. Large amounts of uranium were leached out, and substantial amounts of calcium and magnesium ions were also produced during the pre-saturation with ammonium bicarbonate during the oxidation stage. 28 refs

  10. A microbial consortium couples anaerobic methane oxidation to denitrification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raghoebarsing, A.A.; Pol, A.; Pas-Schoonen, K.T. van de; Smolders, A.J.P.; Ettwig, K.F.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Camp, H.J.M. op den; Jetten, M.S.M.; Strous, M.

    2006-01-01

    Modern agriculture has accelerated biological methane and nitrogen cycling on a global scale. Freshwater sediments often receive increased downward fluxes of nitrate from agricultural runoff and upward fluxes of methane generated by anaerobic decomposition. In theory, prokaryotes should be

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis of one-dimensional tungsten oxide nanostructures using cobalt ammonium sulfate as a structure-directing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajagopal, Shanmugasundaram; Lee, Hae-Min; Kim, Chang-Koo; Lee, Kangtaek

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermal synthesis of one-dimensional tungsten oxide nanostructures was performed using cobalt ammonium sulfate as a structure-directing agent, and the effect of the concentration of cobalt ammonium sulfate on the characteristics of the tungsten oxide nanostructures was investigated. XRD measurements showed that hexagonal tungsten oxide (h-WO 3 ) structures were obtained at a higher concentration of cobalt ammonium sulfate (0.2 M), while cubic tungsten oxide (c-WO 3 ) structures were obtained at a lower concentration of cobalt ammonium sulfate (0.01M). Mixed structures of h-WO 3 and c-WO 3 were observed at an intermediate concentration of cobalt ammonium sulfate. Morphological studies revealed that h-WO 3 appeared as nanowires with a diameter of about 40 nm and an average length of 1 µm. c-WO 3 was shaped in pillar-like nanorods with a diameter of about 30 nm. A red-shift in the UV/Vis absorption peak was observed with different phases of tungsten oxide nanostructures

  12. Ammonium carbonate and/or bicarbonate plus alkaline chlorate oxidant for recovery of uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, uranium values are extracted from materials containing uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state by contacting the materials containing uranium with an aqueous alkaline leach solution containing an alkaline chlorate in an amount sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state to its hexavalent state. In a further embodiment of the present invention, the alkaline leach solution is an aqueous solution of a carbonate selected from the group consisting of ammonium carbonate, ammonium bicarbonate and mixtures thereof. In yet another embodiment of the present invention, at least one catalytic compound of a metal selected from the group consisting of copper, cobalt, iron, nickel, chromium and mixtures thereof adapted to assure the presence of the ionic species Cu ++ , Co ++ , Fe +++ , Ni ++ , Cr +++ and mixtures thereof, respectively, during the contacting of the material containing uranium with the alkaline leach solution and in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of at least a portion of the uranium in its lower valence states to its hexavalent state, is present

  13. Rethinking anaerobic As(III) oxidation in filters: Effect of indigenous nitrate respirers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jinli; Du, Jingjing; Tian, Haixia; Chan, Tingshan; Jing, Chuanyong

    2018-04-01

    Microorganisms play a key role in the redox transformation of arsenic (As) in aquifers. In this study, the impact of indigenous bacteria, especially the prevailing nitrate respirers, on arsenite (As(III)) oxidation was explored during groundwater filtration using granular TiO 2 and subsequent spent TiO 2 anaerobic landfill. X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy analysis showed As(III) oxidation (46% in 10 days) in the presence of nitrate in the simulated anaerobic landfills. Meanwhile, iron (Fe) species on the spent TiO 2 were dominated by amorphous ferric arsenate, ferrihydrite and goethite. The Fe phase showed no change during the anaerobic landfill incubation. Batch incubation experiments implied that the indigenous bacteria completely oxidized As(III) to arsenate (As(V)) in 10 days using nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions. The bacterial community analysis indicated that various kinds of microbial species exist in groundwater matrix. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that Proteobacteria was the dominant phylum, with Hydrogenophaga (34%), Limnohabitans (16%), and Simplicispira (7%) as the major bacterial genera. The nitrate respirers especially from the Hydrogenophaga genus anaerobically oxidized As(III) using nitrate as an electron acceptor instead of oxygen. Our study implied that microbes can facilitate the groundwater As oxidation using nitrate on the adsorptive media. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Anaerobic Benzene Oxidation via Phenol in Geobacter metallireducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar; Smith, Jessica A.; Bain, Timothy S.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic activation of benzene is expected to represent a novel biochemistry of environmental significance. Therefore, benzene metabolism was investigated in Geobacter metallireducens, the only genetically tractable organism known to anaerobically degrade benzene. Trace amounts (benzene to carbon dioxide with the reduction of Fe(III). Phenol was not detected in cell-free controls or in Fe(II)- and benzene-containing cultures of Geobacter sulfurreducens, a Geobacter species that cannot metabolize benzene. The phenol produced in G. metallireducens cultures was labeled with 18O during growth in H218O, as expected for anaerobic conversion of benzene to phenol. Analysis of whole-genome gene expression patterns indicated that genes for phenol metabolism were upregulated during growth on benzene but that genes for benzoate or toluene metabolism were not, further suggesting that phenol was an intermediate in benzene metabolism. Deletion of the genes for PpsA or PpcB, subunits of two enzymes specifically required for the metabolism of phenol, removed the capacity for benzene metabolism. These results demonstrate that benzene hydroxylation to phenol is an alternative to carboxylation for anaerobic benzene activation and suggest that this may be an important metabolic route for benzene removal in petroleum-contaminated groundwaters, in which Geobacter species are considered to play an important role in anaerobic benzene degradation. PMID:24096430

  15. LEACHING OF MALACHITE ORE IN AMMONIUM SULFATE SOLUTIONS AND PRODUCTION OF COPPER OXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ekmekyapar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malachite ore is one of the most important of oxidized copper ores. Copper production can be performed by using this ore. In this work, the leaching kinetics of malachite in ammonium sulfate solutions was investigated, and metallic copper was recovered by a cementation method from the resulting actual leach solution. Copper (II oxide was prepared by an isothermal oxidation method from the cement copper. In the leaching experiments, the effects of reaction temperature, particle size, and stirring speed on copper leaching from malachite ore were studied. In the cementation experiments, metallic zinc was used as the reductant metal to recover the copper from the solution. Thermal oxidation of cement copper was performed under isothermal conditions. It was found that the leaching rate increased with increasing stirring speed and temperature, and decreased with particle size. It was observed that the leaching reaction fit to diffusion through the product layer. The activation energy of the leaching process was determined to be 25.4 kJ/mol. It was determined that the copper content of the metallic product obtained by the cementation method increased up to 96%. It was found that copper oxide prepared from cement copper had a tenorite structure.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Nitrosomonas sp. Is79, an ammonia oxidizing bacterium adapted to low ammonium concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Bollmann, A.; Sedlacek, C.J.; Norton, J.; Laanbroek, H.J.; Suwa, Y.; Stein, L.Y.; Klotz, M.G.; Arp, D.; Sayavedra-Soto, L.; Lu, M.; Bruce, D.; Detter, C.; Tapia, R.; Han, J.; Woyke, T.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 is a chemolithoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium that belongs to the family Nitrosomonadaceae within the phylum Proteobacteria. Ammonia oxidation is the first step of nitrification, an important process in the global nitrogen cycle ultimately resulting in the production of nitrate. Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 is an ammonia oxidizer of high interest because it is adapted to low ammonium and can be found in freshwater environments around the world. The 3,783,444-bp chromos...

  17. Quaternary ammonium salts with tetrafluoroborate anion: Phytotoxicity and oxidative stress in terrestrial plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biczak, Robert, E-mail: r.biczak@ajd.czest.pl

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • The level of oxidative stress in mono- and dicotyledonous plants was comparable. • Chlorophyll content in the plants was correlated with QAS concentration in the soil. • POD activity increased in plants cultivated in soil with high QAS content. - Abstract: This paper discusses the impact of four quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) such as tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate [TEA][BF{sub 4}], tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate [TBA][BF{sub 4}], tetrahexylammonium tetrafluoroborate [THA][BF{sub 4}], and tetraoctylammonium tetrafluoroborate [TOA][BF{sub 4}] on the growth and development of spring barley and common radish. Analogous tests were performed with the inorganic salt ammonium tetrafluoroborate [A][BF{sub 4}] for comparison purposes. Results indicated that the phytotoxicity of the QAS applied is dependent on the concentration of the substance and their number of carbon atoms. The most toxic compound was [TBA][BF{sub 4}], causing the greatest drop in fresh weight of both study plants, similar to the phytotoxic effects of [A][BF{sub 4}]. All the tested compounds caused oxidative stress in spring barley and common radish seedlings due to a drop in the chlorophyll content. Stress was also observed in plants, which was indicated by the increased level of ROS (reactive oxygen species) such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and lipid peroxidation of MDA (malondialdehyde). Due to the stress, both plants displayed changes in the activity of antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD). Based on the results of the study, it was concluded that changes in chlorophyll levels and peroxidase activity are the best biomarkers to determine oxidative stress in plants.

  18. Ammonium conversion and its feedback effect on methane oxidation of Methylosinus sporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ruo; Chen, Min; Ma, Ruo-Chan; Su, Yao; Zhang, Xuan

    2017-04-01

    Ammonium (NH 4 + ) is not only nitrogen source that can support methanotrophic growth, but also it can inhibit methane (CH 4 ) oxidation by competing with CH 4 for the active site of methane monooxygenase. NH 4 + conversion and its feedback effect on the growth and activity of methanotrophs were evaluated with Methylosinus sporium used as a model methanotroph. Nitrogen sources could affect the CH 4 -derived carbon distribution, which varied with incubation time and nitrogen concentrations. More CH 4 -derived carbon was incorporated into biomass in the media with NH 4 + -N, compared to nitrate-nitrogen (NO 3 - -N), as sole nitrogen source at the nitrogen concentrations of 10-18 mmol L -1 . Although ammonia (NH 3 ) oxidation activity of methanotrophs was considerably lower, only accounting for 0.01-0.06% of CH 4 oxidation activity in the experimental cultures, NH 4 + conversion could lead to the pH decrease and toxic intermediates accumulation in the their habits. Compared with NH 4 + , nitrite (NO 2 - ) accumulation in the NH 4 + conversion of methanotroph had stronger inhibition on its activity, especially the joint inhibition of NO 2 - accumulation and the pH decrease during the NH 4 + -N conversion. These results suggested that more attention should be paid to the feedback effects of NH 4 + conversion by methanotrophs to understand effects of NH 4 + on CH 4 oxidation in the environments. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Destruction of organic wastes by ammonium peroxydisulfate with electrolytic regeneration of the oxidant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.F.; Wang, J.F.; Krueger, R.; King, K.

    1997-01-01

    Research is reported concerning a new aqueous process for oxidative destruction of solid- and liquid organic wastes. This process uses acidified ammonium peroxydisulfate and operates at ambient pressure and at 80- to 100 degrees C. The oxidant may be efficiently regenerated by electrolysis of the sulfate by-product at Pt anodes, even in the presence of organic and inorganic contaminants expected to be entrained in the cycle. Integral rate constants were determined for the oxidation of 25 diverse organic compounds at low (50 ppm) concentrations through fixed-time experiments with excess oxidant and a Pt wire catalyst. For high initial concentrations, uncatalyzed mineralization rates were measured for waste surrogates including kerosene, triethylamine, ion exchange resin, oxalic acid, trinitrotoluene, and cellulose. A packed bed reactor was tested with ethylene glycol, with offgas analysis by mass spectroscopy. Rate data extrapolate to throughputs of approximately 200 kg/m 3 -day. The process may benefit the destruction of highly toxic or specialized industrial wastes as well as the organic fraction of mixed wastes

  20. Trace methane oxidation and the methane dependency of sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J.W.

    2010-05-01

    This study investigates the oxidation of labeled methane (CH4) and the CH4 dependence of sulfate reduction in three types of anaerobic granular sludge. In all samples, 13C-labeled CH4 was anaerobically oxidized to 13C-labeled CO2, while net endogenous CH4 production was observed. Labeled-CH4 oxidation rates followed CH4 production rates, and the presence of sulfate hampered both labeled-CH4 oxidation and methanogenesis. Labeled-CH4 oxidation was therefore linked to methanogenesis. This process is referred to as trace CH4 oxidation and has been demonstrated in methanogenic pure cultures. This study shows that the ratio between labeled-CH4 oxidation and methanogenesis is positively affected by the CH4 partial pressure and that this ratio is in methanogenic granular sludge more than 40 times higher than that in pure cultures of methanogens. The CH4 partial pressure also positively affected sulfate reduction and negatively affected methanogenesis: a repression of methanogenesis at elevated CH4 partial pressures confers an advantage to sulfate reducers that compete with methanogens for common substrates, formed from endogenous material. The oxidation of labeled CH 4 and the CH4 dependence of sulfate reduction are thus not necessarily evidence of anaerobic oxidation of CH4 coupled to sulfate reduction. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  1. Perfluorinated quaternary ammonium salts of polyoxometalate anions: Fluorous biphasic oxidation catalysis with and without fluorous solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maayan, Galia; Fish, Richard H.; Neumann, Ronny

    2003-05-28

    Perfluorinated quaternary ammonium cations, [CF{sub 3}(CF{sub 2}){sub 7}(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sub 3}CH{sub 3}N{sup +} (RFN{sup +}), were synthesized and used as counter cations for the [WZnM{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(ZnW{sub 9}O{sub 34}){sub 2}]{sup 12-} (M = Mn(II), Zn(II)), polyoxometalate. The (RFN{sup +}){sub 12}[WZnM{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(ZnW9O{sub 34}){sub 2}] compounds were fluorous biphasic catalysts for alcohol and alkenol oxidation, and alkene epoxidation with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. Reaction protocols with or without a fluorous solvent were tested. The catalytic activity and selectivity was affected both by the hydrophobicity of the solvent and the substrate.

  2. The optical constants of several atmospheric aerosol species - Ammonium sulfate, aluminum oxide, and sodium chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, O. B.; Pollack, J. B.; Khare, B. N.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of problems which are related to a use of measured optical constants in the simulation of the optical constants of real atmospheric aerosols. The techniques of measuring optical constants are discussed, taking into account transmission measurements through homogeneous and inhomogeneous materials, the immersion of a material in a liquid of a known refractive index, the consideration of the minimum deviation angle of prism measurement, the interference of multiply reflected light, reflectivity measurements, and aspects of mathematical analysis. Graphs show the real and the imaginary part of the refractive index as a function of wavelength for aluminum oxide, NaCl, and ammonium sulfate. Tables are provided for the dispersion parameters and the optical constants.

  3. Anaerobic oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Boetius, A.; Knittel, K.

    2003-01-01

    At Hydrate Ridge (HR), Cascadia convergent margin, surface sediments contain massive gas hydrates formed from methane that ascends together with fluids along faults from deeper reservoirs. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by a microbial consortium of archaea and sulfate-reducing bac......At Hydrate Ridge (HR), Cascadia convergent margin, surface sediments contain massive gas hydrates formed from methane that ascends together with fluids along faults from deeper reservoirs. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by a microbial consortium of archaea and sulfate...... oxidation was extremely low (2.1 mmol m(-2) d(-1)) and was probably due to aerobic oxidation of methane. SR was fueled largely by methane at flow-impacted sites, but exceeded AOM in some cases, most likely due to sediment heterogeneity. At the Acharax field, SR was decoupled from methane oxidation...

  4. The formation processes of oxide phases from polymer-salt complexes of ammonium molybdate and wolframate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiev, E.; Bogdanov, S.; Pirogov, A.; Teplykh, A.; Ostroushko, A.; Mogilnikov, Yu.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The thermal decomposition processes of the polymer-salt solutions of ammonium molybdate and wolframate are the basic methods to synthesize the powder catalysts MoO 3 and WO 3 . The results of the investigations of these processes by small angle neutron scattering and X-ray diffraction methods are presented. The parameters of the crystal structure of the oxide phase particles, a particle size distribution function, a specific surface and fractal dimension of particles surface, a volume part and mean particle size have been obtained. It is shown that the best catalytic properties are reached by heating initial samples up to 400 deg C. This state is defined by the mean particle size ∼ 15 nm, the specific surface ∼ 10 m 2 /g, the volume concentrations of particles ∼ 5 x 10 -2 and the fractal dimension of particles surface ∼ 2,5. A general mechanism for the formation of the oxide phases from different polymer-salt solution are established. The processes of the oxide phase formations occurs as the phase transition of the first kind, is also shown. This work has partly supported by state program 'Neutron Matter Investigations' (Project N96/104 and 96/305). (author)

  5. [Geochemical characteristics of the carbonate constructions formed during microbial oxidation of methane under anaerobic conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lein, A Iu; Ivanov, M V; Pimenov, N V; Gulin, M B

    2002-01-01

    The aragonite constructions of the Black Sea are formed in a stable anaerobic zone and are a perfect object to study the natural mechanism of anaerobic methane oxidation. The most probable pathway of methane oxidation is its methanogen-mediated reaction with bicarbonates, dissolved in seawater, with the formation of water and acetate, which is then consumed by other components of the anaerobic community. Comparison of the delta 13C values of carbonate minerals and organic matter once more demonstrated that the formation of the organic matter of biomass is accompanied by intense fractionation of carbon isotopes, as a result of which the total organic matter of biomass acquires an extremely light isotopic composition, characterized by delta 13C values as low as -83.8@1000.

  6. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by marine and fresh water planctomycete-like bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Sliekers, O.; Kuypers, M.; Dalsgaard, T.; Niftrik, L. van; Cirpus, I.; Pas-Schoonen, K. van de; Lavik, G.; Thamdrup, B.; Le Paslier, D.; Camp, S. op den; Hulth, S.; Nielen, L.P.; Abma, W.; Third, K.; Engström, P.; Kuenen, J.G.; Jørgensen, B.B.; Canfield, D.E.; Revsbech, N.P.; Fuerst, J.; Weissenbach, J.; Wagner, M.; Schmidt, I.; Schmid, M.; Strous, M.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, two fresh water species, 'Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans' and 'Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis', and one marine species, 'Candidatus Scalindua sorokinii', of planctomycete anammox bacteria have been identified. 'Candidatus Scalindua sorokinii' was discovered in the Black Sea, and

  7. Evaluation on the microbial interactions of anaerobic ammonium oxidizers and heterotrophs in Anammox biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Ruscalleda, Mael; Smets, Barth F.

    2012-01-01

    with the experimental observations of the bacterial distribution, as well as the nitrogenous transformations in batch and continuous experiments. The modeling results showed that low nitrogen surface loading resulted in a lower availability of SMP leading to low heterotrophic growth in Anammox biofilm, but high...

  8. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation in the old trickling filters at Daspooort wastewater treatment works

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wilsenach, J

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available _(sup+)-N) and nitrite-nitrogen (NO(sub2)(sup-)-N). These reactors were subsequently monitored by conducting stoichiometric analyses of chemical oxygen demand (COD), NH(sub4)(sup+)-N, NO(sub2)(sup-)-N, and nitrate-nitrogen (NO(sub3)(sup...

  9. Growth of thermal oxide layers on GaAs and InP in the presence of ammonium heptamolybdate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittova, I.Ya.; Lavrushina, S.S.; Afonchikova, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    Processes of thermal oxidation of GaAs and InP in the presence of ammonium heptamolybdate were studied using the methods of X-ray fluorescence analysis and IR spectroscopy at temperatures 480-580 Deg C. It was ascertained that introduction of the activator into the system results in accelerated growth of layers on semiconductors due to participation of anionic component of the chemostimulator in oxidation processes. The activator is integrated into the salts formed [ru

  10. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in grassland soils used for cattle husbandry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bannert, A.; Bogen, C.; Esperschütz, J.; Koubová, Anna; Buegger, F.; Fischer, D.; Radl, V.; Fuss, R.; Chroňáková, Alica; Elhottová, Dana; Šimek, Miloslav; Schloter, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 10 (2012), s. 3891-3899 ISSN 1726-4170 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/09/1570 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : anaerobic oxidation of methane * grassland soils * cattle husbandry Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.754, year: 2012

  11. Anaerobic oxidation of methane in an iron-rich Danish freshwater lake sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordi, Katrin á; Thamdrup, Bo; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2013-01-01

    Freshwater systems are identified as one of the main natural methane sources, but little is known about the importance of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in these systems. We investigated AOM in a lake sediment characterized by a high reactive iron content, normal sulfate concentrations in t...

  12. Biogeochemical evidence that thermophilic Archaea mediate the anaerobic oxidation of methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.; Wakeham, S.G.; Hopmans, E.C.

    2003-01-01

    Distributions and isotopic analyses of lipids from sediment cores at a hydrothermally active site in the Guaymas Basin with a steep sedimentary temperature gradient revealed the presence of archaea that oxidize methane anaerobically. The presence of strongly 13C-depleted lipids at greater depths in

  13. Quantitative analysis of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments: a modeling perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regnier, P.; Dale, A.W.; Arndt, S.; LaRowe, D.E.; Mogollon, J.M.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in the quantitativemodeling of methane dynamics and anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments are critically reviewed. The first part of the review begins with a comparison of alternative kinetic models for AOM. The roles of bioenergetic limitations, intermediate

  14. Fe(II) oxidation kinetics and Fe hydroxyphosphate precipitation upon aeration of anaerobic (ground)water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Grift, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/373433484; Griffioen, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/091129265; Behrends, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30484358X; Wassen, M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07165710X; Schot, P.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08071563X; Osté, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Exfiltration of anaerobic Fe-rich groundwater into surface water plays an important role in controlling the transport of phosphate (P) from agricultural areas to the sea. Previous laboratory and field studies showed that Fe(II) oxidation upon aeration leads to effective immobilization of dissolved P

  15. Microbial Selenate Reduction Driven by a Denitrifying Anaerobic Methane Oxidation Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jing-Huan; Chen, Hui; Hu, Shihu; Cai, Chen; Yuan, Zhiguo; Guo, Jianhua

    2018-04-03

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) plays a crucial role in controlling the flux of methane from anoxic environments. Sulfate-, nitrite-, nitrate-, and iron-dependent methane oxidation processes have been considered to be responsible for the AOM activities in anoxic niches. We report that nitrate-reducing AOM microorganisms, enriched in a membrane biofilm bioreactor, are able to couple selenate reduction to AOM. According to ion chromatography, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and long-term bioreactor performance, we reveal that soluble selenate was reduced to nanoparticle elemental selenium. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicates that Candidatus Methanoperedens and Candidatus Methylomirabilis remained the only known methane-oxidizing microorganisms after nitrate was switched to selenate, suggesting that these organisms could couple anaerobic methane oxidation to selenate reduction. Our findings suggest a possible link between the biogeochemical selenium and methane cycles.

  16. The inhibitory effects of free ammonia on ammonia oxidizing bacteria and nitrite oxidizing bacteria under anaerobic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wenting; Peng, Yongzhen; Li, Xiyao; Zhang, Qiong; Ma, Bin

    2017-11-01

    The free ammonia (FA) inhibition on ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) under anaerobic condition was investigated in this study. The results indicated that NOB was more sensitive to the FA anaerobic treatment than AOB. The FA anaerobic inhibition on nitrifier gradually heightened with the increase of FA concentration. Accompanied with FA concentration increase from 0 to 16.82mgNH 3 -N·L -1 (the highest concentration adopted in this study), the activity of AOB reduced by 15.9%, while NOB decreased by 29.2%. After FA anaerobic treatment, nitrite was accumulated during nitrification. However, the nitrite accumulation disappeared on the sixth cycle of activity recovery tests with excessive aeration. Based on this result, a novel strategy for achieving nitritation is proposed, which involves recirculating a portion of the activated sludge through a side-line sludge treatment unit, where the sludge is subjected to treatment with FA under anaerobic condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Isotope effects associated with the anaerobic oxidation of sulfide by the purple photosynthetic bacterium, Chromatium vinosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, B.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Small inverse isotope effects of 1-3 per thousand were consistently observed for the oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur during anaerobic photometabolism by Chromatium vinosum. The inverse fractionation can be accounted for by an equilibrium isotope effect between H 2 S and HS - , and may indicate that C. vinosum (and other photosynthetic bacteria) utilizes H 2 S rather than HS - as the substrate during sulfide oxidation. (Auth.)

  18. Effect of methanogenic substrates on anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment.

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J W

    2010-05-06

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) is assumed to be a syntrophic process, in which methanotrophic archaea produce an interspecies electron carrier (IEC), which is subsequently utilized by sulfate-reducing bacteria. In this paper, six methanogenic substrates are tested as candidate-IECs by assessing their effect on AOM and SR by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment. The presence of acetate, formate or hydrogen enhanced SR, but did not inhibit AOM, nor did these substrates trigger methanogenesis. Carbon monoxide also enhanced SR but slightly inhibited AOM. Methanol did not enhance SR nor did it inhibit AOM, and methanethiol inhibited both SR and AOM completely. Subsequently, it was calculated at which candidate-IEC concentrations no more Gibbs free energy can be conserved from their production from methane at the applied conditions. These concentrations were at least 1,000 times lower can the final candidate-IEC concentration in the bulk liquid. Therefore, the tested candidate-IECs could not have been produced from methane during the incubations. Hence, acetate, formate, methanol, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen can be excluded as sole IEC in AOM coupled to SR. Methanethiol did inhibit AOM and can therefore not be excluded as IEC by this study.

  19. Microbial reefs in the Black Sea fueled by anaerobic oxidation of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Walter; Seifert, Richard; Nauhaus, Katja; Treude, Tina; Thiel, Volker; Blumenberg, Martin; Knittel, Katrin; Gieseke, Armin; Peterknecht, Katharina; Pape, Thomas; Boetius, Antje; Amann, Rudolf; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Widdel, Friedrich; Peckmann, Jörn; Pimenov, Nikolai V; Gulin, Maksim B

    2002-08-09

    Massive microbial mats covering up to 4-meter-high carbonate buildups prosper at methane seeps in anoxic waters of the northwestern Black Sea shelf. Strong 13C depletions indicate an incorporation of methane carbon into carbonates, bulk biomass, and specific lipids. The mats mainly consist of densely aggregated archaea (phylogenetic ANME-1 cluster) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus group). If incubated in vitro, these mats perform anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulfate reduction. Obviously, anaerobic microbial consortia can generate both carbonate precipitation and substantial biomass accumulation, which has implications for our understanding of carbon cycling during earlier periods of Earth's history.

  20. Microbial Reefs in the Black Sea Fueled by Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Walter; Seifert, Richard; Nauhaus, Katja; Treude, Tina; Thiel, Volker; Blumenberg, Martin; Knittel, Katrin; Gieseke, Armin; Peterknecht, Katharina; Pape, Thomas; Boetius, Antje; Amann, Rudolf; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Widdel, Friedrich; Peckmann, Jörn; Pimenov, Nikolai V.; Gulin, Maksim B.

    2002-08-01

    Massive microbial mats covering up to 4-meter-high carbonate buildups prosper at methane seeps in anoxic waters of the northwestern Black Sea shelf. Strong 13C depletions indicate an incorporation of methane carbon into carbonates, bulk biomass, and specific lipids. The mats mainly consist of densely aggregated archaea (phylogenetic ANME-1 cluster) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus group). If incubated in vitro, these mats perform anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulfate reduction. Obviously, anaerobic microbial consortia can generate both carbonate precipitation and substantial biomass accumulation, which has implications for our understanding of carbon cycling during earlier periods of Earth's history.

  1. Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification is the dominant methane sink in a deep lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deutzmann, Joerg S.; Stief, Peter; Brandes, Josephin

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification, also known as “nitrate/nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation” (n-damo), was discovered in 2006. Since then, only a few studies have identified this process and the associated microorganisms in natural environments. In aquatic sediments......, the close proximity of oxygen- and nitrate-consumption zones can mask n-damo as aerobic methane oxidation. We therefore investigated the vertical distribution and the abundance of denitrifying methanotrophs related to Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera with cultivation-independent molecular techniques...... in the sediments of Lake Constance. Additionally, the vertical distribution of methane oxidation and nitrate consumption zones was inferred from high-resolution microsensor profiles in undisturbed sediment cores. M. oxyfera-like bacteria were virtually absent at shallow-water sites (littoral sediment) and were...

  2. Anaerobic Oxidation of Benzene by the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Ferroglobus placidus▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Dawn E.; Risso, Carla; Smith, Jessica A.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2011-01-01

    Anaerobic benzene oxidation coupled to the reduction of Fe(III) was studied in Ferroglobus placidus in order to learn more about how such a stable molecule could be metabolized under strict anaerobic conditions. F. placidus conserved energy to support growth at 85°C in a medium with benzene provided as the sole electron donor and Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor. The stoichiometry of benzene loss and Fe(III) reduction, as well as the conversion of [14C]benzene to [14C]carbon dioxide, was consistent with complete oxidation of benzene to carbon dioxide with electron transfer to Fe(III). Benzoate, but not phenol or toluene, accumulated at low levels during benzene metabolism, and [14C]benzoate was produced from [14C]benzene. Analysis of gene transcript levels revealed increased expression of genes encoding enzymes for anaerobic benzoate degradation during growth on benzene versus growth on acetate, but genes involved in phenol degradation were not upregulated during growth on benzene. A gene for a putative carboxylase that was more highly expressed in benzene- than in benzoate-grown cells was identified. These results suggest that benzene is carboxylated to benzoate and that phenol is not an important intermediate in the benzene metabolism of F. placidus. This is the first demonstration of a microorganism in pure culture that can grow on benzene under strict anaerobic conditions and for which there is strong evidence for degradation of benzene via clearly defined anaerobic metabolic pathways. Thus, F. placidus provides a much-needed pure culture model for further studies on the anaerobic activation of benzene in microorganisms. PMID:21742914

  3. Sulfate reduction and anaerobic methane oxidation in Black Sea sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, BB; Weber, A.; Zopfi, J.

    2001-01-01

    Beyond the shelf break at ca. 150 m water depth, sulfate reduction is the only important process of organic matter oxidation in Black Sea sediments from the surface down to the sulfate-methane transition at 2-4 m depth. Sulfate reduction rates were measured experimentally with (SO42-)-S-35...... the process was very sluggish with turnover times of methane within the sulfate-methane transition zone of 20 yr or more. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.Beyond the shelf break at ca. 150 m water depth, sulfate reduction is the only important process of organic matter oxidation in Black Sea...... oxidation accounted for 7-11% of the total sulfate reduction in slope and deep-sea sediments. Although this methane-driven sulfate reduction shaped the entire sulfate gradient, it was only equivalent to the sulfate reduction in the uppermost 1.5 cm of surface sediment. Methane oxidation was complete, yet...

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis and optical properties of hexagonal tungsten oxide nanocrystals assisted by ammonium tartrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Hua-Feng; Li, Zhi-Jie [Department of Applied Physics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu (China); Xiang, Xia; Zu, Xiao-Tao [Department of Applied Physics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu (China); International Center for Material Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China); Fu, Yong-Qing [Thin Film Center, Scottish Universities of Physics Alliance (SUPA), University of the West of Scotland, Paisley (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    Crystals of hexagonal tungsten oxides (hex-WO{sub 3}) have been synthesized using hydrothermal method at 150 C, assisted by the capping reagent of ammonium tartrate (AT). The XRD and EDX results reveal that the lattice distortion exists in all the samples, possibly due to the defects and the intercalation of the residual sodium ions. Different crystal shapes including plate-like, urchin-like, and particle structures were obtained by varying concentration of AT and pH values in the precursor solution. Beside the absorption action of the NH{sub 4}{sup +} and Na{sup +} ions, the capping effect can be reinforced by the hydrogen bonding from the tartrate groups in the crystallization process. The bandgap energies were modulated by the size of the nanostructured hex-WO{sub 3} crystals due to quantum confinement effect, which increases from 2.74 to 3.04 eV. Based on the analysis of the photoluminescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the enhancement of the blue emission of the nanocrystals is assigned as a result of a complex of the local intercalation of the residual sodium ions and the oxygen vacancies or defects. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Nitrous Oxide and Methane Fluxes Following Ammonium Sulfate and Vinasse Application on Sugar Cane Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Debora da S; Alves, Bruno J R; dos Santos, Marco A; Bolonhezi, Denizart; Sant'Anna, Selenobaldo A C; Urquiaga, Segundo; Lima, Magda A; Boddey, Robert M

    2015-09-15

    This study aimed to quantify nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) emission/sink response from sugar cane soil treated with fertilizer nitrogen (N) and vinasse applied separately or in sequence, the latter being investigated with regard to the time interval between applications for a possible effect on emissions. The study was carried out in a traditional area of unburned sugar cane in São Paulo state, Brazil. Two levels of N fertilization (0 and 100 kg N ha(-1)) with no added vinasse and combined with vinasse additions at different times (100 m(-3) ha(-1) at 3 and 15 days after N fertilization) were evaluated. Methane and N2O fluxes were monitored for 211 days. On average, the soil was a sink for CH4, which was not affected by the treatments. Emissions of N2O were induced by N fertilizer and vinasse applications. For ammonium sulfate, 0.6% of the added N was emitted as N2O, while for vinasse, this ranged from 1.0 to 2.2%. Changes in N2O fluxes were detected the day after application of vinasse on the N fertilized areas, but although the emission factor (EF) was 34% greater, the EF was not significantly different from fertilizer N alone. Nevertheless, we recommend to not apply vinasse after N fertilization to avoid boosting N2O emissions.

  6. Oxide growth on aluminium alloys in the presence of ammonium fluoborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, J.; Paterson, P.; Flavell, T.; Biddle, G.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study as to determine the mechanisms involved in using ammonium fluoborate as a reducing atmosphere when preheating a high magnesium content aluminium alloy. Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) has been the major technique used in the analysis of samples, it revealed significant reduction in both the diffusion of magnesium to the surface and the calculated oxide thickness in the presence of NH 4 BF 4 . At temperatures above 500 deg C in air, SEM images revealed depressions and voids due to incipient melting at various stages, around the grain boundaries. Grain boundaries effectively acted as pipes aiding the diffusion of magnesium to the surface. These results have been verified through compositional analysis with both RBS and auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Results from NH 4 BF 4 atmosphere preheat conditions showed significant improvements. It was verified experimentally that above 500 deg C , AA5182 alloys undergo incipient melting at the grain boundaries with magnesium diffusing through to the surface. 5 refs., 1 fig

  7. Oxide growth on aluminium alloys in the presence of ammonium fluoborate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, J.; Paterson, P.; Flavell, T. [Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech., VIC (Australia); Biddle, G. [Alcoa Rolled Products (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The aim of this study as to determine the mechanisms involved in using ammonium fluoborate as a reducing atmosphere when preheating a high magnesium content aluminium alloy. Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) has been the major technique used in the analysis of samples, it revealed significant reduction in both the diffusion of magnesium to the surface and the calculated oxide thickness in the presence of NH{sub 4}BF{sub 4}. At temperatures above 500 deg C in air, SEM images revealed depressions and voids due to incipient melting at various stages, around the grain boundaries. Grain boundaries effectively acted as pipes aiding the diffusion of magnesium to the surface. These results have been verified through compositional analysis with both RBS and auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Results from NH{sub 4}BF{sub 4} atmosphere preheat conditions showed significant improvements. It was verified experimentally that above 500 deg C , AA5182 alloys undergo incipient melting at the grain boundaries with magnesium diffusing through to the surface. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Microbial Oxidation of Iron Sulfides in Anaerobic Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaclavkova, Sarka

    Abstract (shortened): Iron sulfides (FeSx), representing 0.04-10 % of Danish dry soil weight, oxidize in a presence of oxygen, releasing sulfuric acid and free iron. Environmental impact of FeSx oxidation is commonly seen on agricultural sites cultivated by drainage as acid sulfate soil formation...... presented in this PhD study may be important for the future planning of agricultural NO3--buffer zones and may be used as an input into the reactive transport models, predicting the behavior of NO3- in the aquatic environments...

  9. Anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to thiosulfate reduction in a biotrickling filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassarini, Chiara; Rene, Eldon R; Bhattarai, Susma; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2017-09-01

    Microorganisms from an anaerobic methane oxidizing sediment were enriched with methane gas as the substrate in a biotrickling filter (BTF) using thiosulfate as electron acceptor for 213days. Thiosulfate disproportionation to sulfate and sulfide were the dominating sulfur conversion process in the BTF and the sulfide production rate was 0.5mmoll -1 day -1 . A specific group of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), belonging to the Desulforsarcina/Desulfococcus group, was enriched in the BTF. The BTF biomass showed maximum sulfate reduction rate (0.38mmoll -1 day -1 ) with methane as sole electron donor, measured in the absence of thiosulfate in the BTF. Therefore, a BTF fed with thiosulfate as electron acceptor can be used to enrich SRB of the DSS group and activate the inoculum for anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulfate reduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Co-occurrence of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidizing and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria in two Qinghai-Tibetan saline lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Jiang, Hongchen; Wu, Geng; Hou, Weiguo; Sun, Yongjuan; Lai, Zhongping; Dong, Hailiang

    2012-12-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing (n-damo) bacteria and anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (anammox) bacteria are two groups of microorganisms involved in global carbon and nitrogen cycling. In order to test whether the n-damo and anammox bacteria co-occur in natural saline environments, the DNA and cDNA samples obtained from the surficial sediments of two saline lakes (with salinity of 32 and 84 g/L, respectively) on the Tibetan Plateau were PCR-amplified with the use of anammox- and n-damo-specific primer sets, followed by clone library construction and phylogenetic analysis. DNA and cDNA-based clones affiliated with n-damo and anammox bacteria were successfully retrieved from the two samples, indicating that these two groups of bacteria can co-occur in natural saline environments with salinity as high as 84 g/L. Our finding has great implications for our understanding of the global carbon and nitrogen cycle in nature.

  11. Ammonium Oxidation Kinetics in the Presence of Nitrification Inhibitor Dicyandiamide (DCD in some Calcareous Soils of Chaharmahal va Bakhtiari Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    roza kazemi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nitrification inhibitors (NIs are compounds that retard the biological oxidation of ammonium to nitrite by depressing the activity of Nitrosomonas bacteria in the soil. Many popular NIs such as nitrapyrine (NP, dicyandiamide (DCD and 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP are produced and used in agricultural soils. Dicyandiamide is a very popular NI in some of the world countries. It delays nitrification process in the soil through its bacterial static property. It is easy to blend with commercial fertilizers such as urea, due to its low volatile nature. Application of urea in combination with nitrification inhibitor DCD lengthens nitrogen presence in soil as ammonium form. It has several beneficial effects for agriculture and enhances environmental protection. Studying the ammonium oxidation kinetics in the presence of nitrification inhibitor DCD can provide the experts in agriculture with very useful information regarding the ammoniumdurability in different soils. This research has been done to study the effect of using NI dicyandiamide on the kinetics of ammoniumloss in some calcareous soils of Chaharmahal Va Bakhtiari province, Iran. Materials and Methods: This research was conducted as factorial using completely randomized design with two factors of nitrogen fertilizer type and soil type with three replications at laboratory conditions. In this experiment, nitrogen fertilizer type included 2 levels of: 1- urea 2- urea plus nitrification inhibitor DCD (3.2%. A no added nitrogen fertilizer was considered as control treatment.The soil factor also consisted of 5different soils with a wide variation in soil physical and chemical characteristics. Five selected soils were non-saline (EC1:2=0.14-0.76 dS m-1 and alkaline (pH1:2=7.5-8.2. Organic carbon and cation exchange capacity (CEC ranged from 0.48 to 2.34% and 10 to 30 cmolc kg-1, respectively. The dose of applied nitrogen in all experimental treatments was 50 mg kg-1 N as urea

  12. Rapid anaerobic benzene oxidation with a variety of chelated Fe(III) forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Woodward, J.C.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    Fe(III) chelated to such compounds as EDTA, N-methyliminodiacetie acid, ethanol diglycine, humic acids, and phosphates stimulated benzene oxidation coupled to Fe(III) reduction in anaerobic sediments from a petroleum- contaminated aquifer as effectively as or more effectively than nitrilotriacetic acid did in a previously demonstrated stimulation experiment. These results indicate that many forms of chelated Fe(III) might be applicable to aquifer remediation.

  13. Effect of freshwater mussels on the vertical distribution of anaerobic ammonia oxidizers and other nitrogen-transforming microorganisms in upper Mississippi river sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen M. Black

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Targeted qPCR and non-targeted amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA genes within sediment layers identified the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox niche and characterized microbial community changes attributable to freshwater mussels. Anammox bacteria were normally distributed (Shapiro-Wilk normality test, W-statistic =0.954, p = 0.773 between 1 and 15 cm depth and were increased by a factor of 2.2 (p < 0.001 at 3 cm below the water-sediment interface when mussels were present. Amplicon sequencing of sediment at depths relevant to mussel burrowing (3 and 5 cm showed that mussel presence reduced observed species richness (p = 0.005, Chao1 diversity (p = 0.005, and Shannon diversity (p < 0.001, with more pronounced decreases at 5 cm depth. A non-metric, multidimensional scaling model showed that intersample microbial species diversity varied as a function of mussel presence, indicating that sediment below mussels harbored distinct microbial communities. Mussel presence corresponded with a 4-fold decrease in a majority of operational taxonomic units (OTUs classified in the phyla Gemmatimonadetes, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Plantomycetes, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Crenarcheota, and Verrucomicrobia. 38 OTUs in the phylum Nitrospirae were differentially abundant (p < 0.001 with mussels, resulting in an overall increase from 25% to 35%. Nitrogen (N-cycle OTUs significantly impacted by mussels belonged to anammmox genus Candidatus Brocadia, ammonium oxidizing bacteria family Nitrosomonadaceae, ammonium oxidizing archaea genus Candidatus Nitrososphaera, nitrite oxidizing bacteria in genus Nitrospira, and nitrate- and nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidizing organisms in the archaeal family “ANME-2d” and bacterial phylum “NC10”, respectively. Nitrosomonadaceae (0.9-fold (p < 0.001 increased with mussels, while NC10 (2.1-fold (p < 0.001, ANME-2d (1.8-fold (p < 0.001, and Candidatus Nitrososphaera (1.5-fold (p < 0

  14. Thermal wet oxidation improves anaerobic biodegradability of raw and digested biowaste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissens, G.; Thomsen, Anne Belinda; De Baere, L.

    2004-01-01

    yield and digestion kinetics and permitted lignin utilization during a subsequent second digestion. The increase of the specific methane yield for the full-scale biogas plant by applying thermal wet oxidation was 35-40%, showing that there is still a considerable amount of methane that can be harvested...... profits. The objective of this research was to enhance the anaerobic biodegradability and methane yields from different biowastes (food waste, yard waste, and digested biowaste already treated in a full-scale biogas plant (DRANCO, Belgium)) by assessing thermal wet oxidation. The biodegradability...

  15. Trace metal pyritization variability in response to mangrove soil aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, W; Borrelli, N L; Ferreira, T O; Marques, A G B; Osterrieth, M; Guizan, C

    2014-02-15

    The degree of iron pyritization (DOP) and degree of trace metal pyritization (DTMP) were evaluated in mangrove soil profiles from an estuarine area located in Rio de Janeiro (SE Brazil). The soil pH was negatively correlated with redox potential (Eh) and positively correlated with DOP and DTMP of some elements (Mn, Cu and Pb), suggesting that pyrite oxidation generated acidity and can affect the importance of pyrite as a trace metal-binding phase, mainly in response to spatial variability in tidal flooding. Besides these aerobic oxidation effects, results from a sequential extraction analyses of reactive phases evidenced that Mn oxidized phase consumption in reaction with pyrite can be also important to determine the pyritization of trace elements. Cumulative effects of these aerobic and anaerobic oxidation processes were evidenced as factors affecting the capacity of mangrove soils to act as a sink for trace metals through pyritization processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Enzymes involved in the anaerobic oxidation of n-alkanes: from methane to long-chain paraffins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy V. Callaghan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic microorganisms play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of methane and non-methane alkanes. To date, there appear to be at least three proposed mechanisms of anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM. The first pathway is mediated by consortia of archaeal anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-reducing bacteria via ‘reverse methanogenesis’ and is catalyzed by a homologue of methyl-coenzyme M reductase. The second pathway is also mediated by anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-reducing bacteria, wherein the archaeal members catalyze both methane oxidation and sulfate reduction and zero-valent sulfur is a key intermediate. The third AOM mechanism is a nitrite-dependent, intra-aerobic pathway described for the denitrifying bacterium, ‘Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera.’ It is hypothesized that AOM proceeds via reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, followed by the conversion of two nitric oxide molecules to dinitrogen and molecular oxygen. The latter can be used to functionalize the methane via a particulate methane monooxygenase. With respect to non-methane alkanes, there also appears to be novel mechanisms of activation. The most well-described pathway is the addition of non-methane alkanes across the double bond of fumarate to form alkyl-substituted succinates via the putative glycyl radical enzyme, alkylsuccinate synthase (also known as methylalkylsuccinate synthase. Other proposed mechanisms include anaerobic hydroxylation via ethylbenzene dehydrogenase-like enzymes and an ‘intra-aerobic’ denitrification pathway similar to that described for ‘M. oxyfera.’

  17. Illumina sequencing-based analysis of a microbial community enriched under anaerobic methane oxidation condition coupled to denitrification revealed coexistence of aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalchi, Luciene Alves Batista; Leite, Laura Rabelo; Oliveira, Guilherme; Chernicharo, Carlos Augusto Lemos; de Araújo, Juliana Calabria

    2017-07-01

    Methane is produced in anaerobic environments, such as reactors used to treat wastewaters, and can be consumed by methanotrophs. The composition and structure of a microbial community enriched from anaerobic sewage sludge under methane-oxidation condition coupled to denitrification were investigated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis retrieved sequences of Methylocaldum and Chloroflexi. Deep sequencing analysis revealed a complex community that changed over time and was affected by methane concentration. Methylocaldum (8.2%), Methylosinus (2.3%), Methylomonas (0.02%), Methylacidiphilales (0.45%), Nitrospirales (0.18%), and Methanosarcinales (0.3%) were detected. Despite denitrifying conditions provided, Nitrospirales and Methanosarcinales, known to perform anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification (DAMO) process, were in very low abundance. Results demonstrated that aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs coexisted in the reactor together with heterotrophic microorganisms, suggesting that a diverse microbial community was important to sustain methanotrophic activity. The methanogenic sludge was a good inoculum to enrich methanotrophs, and cultivation conditions play a selective role in determining community composition.

  18. Anaerobic methane oxidation in low-organic content methane seep sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, John W.; Riedel, Michael; Bauer, James E.; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Paull, Charles K.; Lapham, Laura; Grabowski, Kenneth S.; Coffin, Richard B.; Spence, George D.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfate-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is the key sedimentary microbial process limiting methane emissions from marine sediments and methane seeps. In this study, we investigate how the presence of low-organic content sediment influences the capacity and efficiency of AOM at Bullseye vent, a gas hydrate-bearing cold seep offshore of Vancouver Island, Canada. The upper 8 m of sediment contains 14C. A fossil origin for the DIC precludes remineralization of non-fossil OM present within the sulfate zone as a significant contributor to pore water DIC, suggesting that nearly all sulfate is available for anaerobic oxidation of fossil seep methane. Methane flux from the SMT to the sediment water interface in a diffusion-dominated flux region of Bullseye vent was, on average, 96% less than at an OM-rich seep in the Gulf of Mexico with a similar methane flux regime. Evidence for enhanced methane oxidation capacity within OM-poor sediments has implications for assessing how climate-sensitive reservoirs of sedimentary methane (e.g., gas hydrate) will respond to ocean warming, particularly along glacially-influenced mid and high latitude continental margins.

  19. Treatment of slaughter wastewater by coagulation sedimentation-anaerobic biological filter and biological contact oxidation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, M.; Yu, P. F.; Fu, J. X.; Ji, X. Q.; Jiang, T.

    2017-08-01

    The optimal process parameters and conditions for the treatment of slaughterhouse wastewater by coagulation sedimentation-AF - biological contact oxidation process were studied to solve the problem of high concentration organic wastewater treatment in the production of small and medium sized slaughter plants. The suitable water temperature and the optimum reaction time are determined by the experiment of precipitation to study the effect of filtration rate and reflux ratio on COD and SS in anaerobic biological filter and the effect of biofilm thickness and gas water ratio on NH3-N and COD in biological contact oxidation tank, and results show that the optimum temperature is 16-24°C, reaction time is 20 min in coagulating sedimentation, the optimum filtration rate is 0.6 m/h, and the optimum reflux ratio is 300% in anaerobic biological filter reactor. The most suitable biological film thickness range of 1.8-2.2 mm and the most suitable gas water ratio is 12:1-14:1 in biological contact oxidation pool. In the coupling process of continuous operation for 80 days, the average effluent’s mass concentrations of COD, TP and TN were 15.57 mg/L, 40 mg/L and 0.63 mg/L, the average removal rates were 98.93%, 86.10%, 88.95%, respectively. The coupling process has stable operation effect and good effluent quality, and is suitable for the industrial application.

  20. Bioenergetic Analysis of the Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane in Diverse Biogeochemical Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larowe, D.; Dale, A.; Regnier, P.

    2006-12-01

    The microorganisms responsible for the oxidation of methane in anoxic marine sediments constitute the largest sink of methane on Earth. It is generally accepted that the mechanism by which this process occurs involves a consortium of microbes that couple the reduction of sulfate to the oxidation of methane. However, whether this process occurs directly or through one of several reactive intermediate species such as hydrogen, acetate, and/or formate is a matter of debate. To better understand the biogeochemistry of the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), we have calculated and compared the energetics of a number of candidate reactions that could supply AOM-microbial communities with enough energy to synthesize ATP in different environments. We present the results of thermodynamic computations quantifying the oxidation of methane to CO2 and H2, and, alternatively, to a variety of carbon species with intermediate nominal oxidation states. The potential role that these species have in the reduction of sulfate in three distinct organic-rich, anoxic sediment types is then investigated: 1) a shallow, coastal lagoon (Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, USA), 2) deep Black Sea sediments, and 3) a hydrothermal environment (Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, Mexico). Furthermore, we compare the energetics of these reactions to the energy required to synthesize ATP from ADP and phosphate in situ. The results of these calculations can be used to better understand the temperature, pressure, and bulk compositional constraints on organisms responsible for oxidizing methane in anoxic environments.

  1. Oxidation of ferrocene by thiocyanic acid in the presence of ammonium oxalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruslin, Farah bt; Yamin, Bohari M. [School of Chemical Science and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    A flake-like crystalline salt was obtained from the reaction of ferrocene, oxalic acid and ammonium thiocyanate in ethanol The elemental analysis and spectroscopic data were in agreement with the preliminary X-ray molecular structure. The compound consists of four ferrocenium moieties and a counter anion consisting of two (tetraisothiocyanato)iron(III) linked by an oxalato bridging group in such a way that both iron central atoms adopt octahedral geometries.

  2. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M Adams

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C2, propane (C3, and butane (C4 in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C1. In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV, Juan de Fuca Ridge are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C1-C4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C1-C4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75 °C anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR measurements provide clear evidence for C1-C4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C2-C4 alkanes. Maximum C1-C4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55 °C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM. Of the alkanes investigated, C3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C4, C2, and C1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C2-C4 alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C1 derived from these hydrothermal systems.

  3. Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification is the dominant methane sink in a deep lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutzmann, Joerg S.; Stief, Peter; Brandes, Josephin; Schink, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to denitrification, also known as “nitrate/nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation” (n-damo), was discovered in 2006. Since then, only a few studies have identified this process and the associated microorganisms in natural environments. In aquatic sediments, the close proximity of oxygen- and nitrate-consumption zones can mask n-damo as aerobic methane oxidation. We therefore investigated the vertical distribution and the abundance of denitrifying methanotrophs related to Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera with cultivation-independent molecular techniques in the sediments of Lake Constance. Additionally, the vertical distribution of methane oxidation and nitrate consumption zones was inferred from high-resolution microsensor profiles in undisturbed sediment cores. M. oxyfera-like bacteria were virtually absent at shallow-water sites (littoral sediment) and were very abundant at deep-water sites (profundal sediment). In profundal sediment, the vertical distribution of M. oxyfera-like bacteria showed a distinct peak in anoxic layers that coincided with the zone of methane oxidation and nitrate consumption, a strong indication for n-damo carried out by M. oxyfera-like bacteria. Both potential n-damo rates calculated from cell densities (660–4,890 µmol CH4⋅m−2⋅d−1) and actual rates calculated from microsensor profiles (31–437 µmol CH4⋅m−2⋅d−1) were sufficiently high to prevent methane release from profundal sediment solely by this process. Additionally, when nitrate was added to sediment cores exposed to anoxic conditions, the n-damo zone reestablished well below the sediment surface, completely preventing methane release from the sediment. We conclude that the previously overlooked n-damo process can be the major methane sink in stable freshwater environments if nitrate is available in anoxic zones. PMID:25472842

  4. Identification and Heterologous Expression of Genes Involved in Anaerobic Dissimilatory Phosphite Oxidation by Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonova, Diliana Dancheva; Wilson, Marlena Marie; Metcalf, William W.; Schink, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans is a strictly anaerobic, Gram-negative bacterium that utilizes phosphite as the sole electron source for homoacetogenic CO2 reduction or sulfate reduction. A genomic library of D. phosphitoxidans, constructed using the fosmid vector pJK050, was screened for clones harboring the genes involved in phosphite oxidation via PCR using primers developed based on the amino acid sequences of phosphite-induced proteins. Sequence analysis of two positive clones revealed a putative operon of seven genes predicted to be involved in phosphite oxidation. Four of these genes (ptxD-ptdFCG) were cloned and heterologously expressed in Desulfotignum balticum, a related strain that cannot use phosphite as either an electron donor or as a phosphorus source. The ptxD-ptdFCG gene cluster was sufficient to confer phosphite uptake and oxidation ability to the D. balticum host strain but did not allow use of phosphite as an electron donor for chemolithotrophic growth. Phosphite oxidation activity was measured in cell extracts of D. balticum transconjugants, suggesting that all genes required for phosphite oxidation were cloned. Genes of the phosphite gene cluster were assigned putative functions on the basis of sequence analysis and enzyme assays. PMID:20622064

  5. Identification and heterologous expression of genes involved in anaerobic dissimilatory phosphite oxidation by Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonova, Diliana Dancheva; Wilson, Marlena Marie; Metcalf, William W; Schink, Bernhard

    2010-10-01

    Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans is a strictly anaerobic, Gram-negative bacterium that utilizes phosphite as the sole electron source for homoacetogenic CO2 reduction or sulfate reduction. A genomic library of D. phosphitoxidans, constructed using the fosmid vector pJK050, was screened for clones harboring the genes involved in phosphite oxidation via PCR using primers developed based on the amino acid sequences of phosphite-induced proteins. Sequence analysis of two positive clones revealed a putative operon of seven genes predicted to be involved in phosphite oxidation. Four of these genes (ptxD-ptdFCG) were cloned and heterologously expressed in Desulfotignum balticum, a related strain that cannot use phosphite as either an electron donor or as a phosphorus source. The ptxD-ptdFCG gene cluster was sufficient to confer phosphite uptake and oxidation ability to the D. balticum host strain but did not allow use of phosphite as an electron donor for chemolithotrophic growth. Phosphite oxidation activity was measured in cell extracts of D. balticum transconjugants, suggesting that all genes required for phosphite oxidation were cloned. Genes of the phosphite gene cluster were assigned putative functions on the basis of sequence analysis and enzyme assays.

  6. Final Report: Molecular mechanisms and kinetics of microbial anaerobic nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Day, Peggy A. [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Asta, Maria P. [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Kanematsu, Masakazu [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Beller, Harry [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhou, Peng [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Steefel, Carl [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-02-27

    In this project, we combined molecular genetic, spectroscopic, and microscopic techniques with kinetic and reactive transport studies to describe and quantify biotic and abiotic mechanisms underlying anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, which influences the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium at DOE sites. In these studies, Thiobacillus denitrificans, an autotrophic bacterium that catalyzes anaerobic U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, was used to examine coupled oxidation-reduction processes under either biotic (enzymatic) or abiotic conditions in batch and column experiments with biogenically produced UIVO2(s). Synthesis and quantitative analysis of coupled chemical and transport processes were done with the reactive transport modeling code Crunchflow. Research focused on identifying the primary redox proteins that catalyze metal oxidation, environmental factors that influence protein expression, and molecular-scale geochemical factors that control the rates of biotic and abiotic oxidation.

  7. Application of Ammonium Persulfate for Selective Oxidation of Guanines for Nucleic Acid Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafen Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids can be sequenced by a chemical procedure that partially damages the nucleotide positions at their base repetition. Many methods have been reported for the selective recognition of guanine. The accurate identification of guanine in both single and double regions of DNA and RNA remains a challenging task. Herein, we present a new, non-toxic and simple method for the selective recognition of guanine in both DNA and RNA sequences via ammonium persulfate modification. This strategy can be further successfully applied to the detection of 5-methylcytosine by using PCR.

  8. Transport, fate, and long-term impacts of metal oxide nanoparticles on the stability of an anaerobic methanogenic system with anaerobic granular sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiting; Cui, Fuyi; Liu, Zhiquan; Li, Dapeng

    2017-06-01

    The fate and long-term effect of different metal oxide (TiO 2 , CuO and ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) on anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) was evaluated in an anaerobic methanogenic system. Operation stability and structural characteristics of the granules were compared, the metabolism changes in the microbial community were quantified, and NPs fate were investigated. CuO NPs had greatest toxic effect on AGS after extended exposure, whereas ZnO NPs benefited methanogenesis temporarily (no more than 5d). The inhibition on AGS caused by NPs varied due to the unique structure of AGS and different toxic mechanism. Structural changes of AGS provided new evidence that tested NPs have different toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Electron acceptors for anaerobic oxidation of methane drive microbial community structure and diversity in mud volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ge; Ma, Anzhou; Zhang, Yanfen; Deng, Ye; Zheng, Guodong; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Fortin, Danielle

    2018-04-06

    Mud volcanoes (MVs) emit globally significant quantities of methane into the atmosphere, however, methane cycling in such environments is not yet fully understood, as the roles of microbes and their associated biogeochemical processes have been largely overlooked. Here, we used data from high-throughput sequencing of microbial 16S rRNA gene amplicons from six MVs in the Junggar Basin in northwest China to quantify patterns of diversity and characterize the community structure of archaea and bacteria. We found anaerobic methanotrophs and diverse sulfate- and iron-reducing microbes in all of the samples, and the diversity of both archaeal and bacterial communities was strongly linked to the concentrations of sulfate, iron, and nitrate, which could act as electron acceptors in anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The impacts of sulfate/iron/nitrate on AOM in the MVs were verified by microcosm experiments. Further, two representative MVs were selected to explore the microbial interactions based on phylogenetic molecular ecological networks. The sites showed distinct network structures, key species and microbial interactions, with more complex and numerous linkages between methane-cycling microbes and their partners being observed in the iron/sulfate-rich MV. These findings suggest that electron acceptors are important factors driving the structure of microbial communities in these methane-rich environments. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Ultrastructure and viral metagenome of bacteriophages from an anaerobic methane oxidizing Methylomirabilis bioreactor enrichment culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Gambelli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available With its capacity for anaerobic methane oxidation and denitrification, the bacterium Methylomirabilis oxyfera plays an important role in natural ecosystems. Its unique physiology can be exploited for more sustainable wastewater treatment technologies. However, operational stability of full-scale bioreactors can experience setbacks due to, for example, bacteriophage blooms. By shaping microbial communities through mortality, horizontal gene transfer and metabolic reprogramming, bacteriophages are important players in most ecosystems. Here, we analysed an infected Methylomirabilis sp. bioreactor enrichment culture using (advanced electron microscopy, viral metagenomics and bioinformatics. Electron micrographs revealed four different viral morphotypes, one of which was observed to infect Methylomirabilis cells. The infected cells contained densely packed ~55 nm icosahedral bacteriophage particles with a putative internal membrane. Various stages of virion assembly were observed. Moreover, during the bacteriophage replication, the host cytoplasmic membrane appeared extremely patchy, which suggests that the bacteriophages may use host bacterial lipids to build their own putative internal membrane. The viral metagenome contained 1.87 million base pairs of assembled viral sequences, from which five putative complete viral genomes were assembled and manually annotated. Using bioinformatics analyses, we could not identify which viral genome belonged to the Methylomirabilis- infecting bacteriophage, in part because the obtained viral genome sequences were novel and unique to this reactor system. Taken together these results show that new bacteriophages can be detected in anaerobic cultivation systems and that the effect of bacteriophages on the microbial community in these systems is a topic for further study.

  11. Are there multiple mechanisms of anaerobic sulfur oxidation with ferric iron in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Jiri; Pakostova, Eva; Lochman, Jan; Janiczek, Oldrich; Mandl, Martin

    2016-06-01

    To clarify the pathway of anaerobic sulfur oxidation coupled with dissimilatory ferric iron reduction in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain CCM 4253 cells, we monitored their energy metabolism gene transcript profiles. Several genes encoding electron transporters involved in aerobic iron and sulfur respiration were induced during anaerobic growth of ferrous iron-grown cells. Most sulfur metabolism genes were either expressed at the basal level or their expression declined. However, transcript levels of genes assumed to be responsible for processing of elemental sulfur and other sulfur intermediates were elevated at the beginning of the growth period. In contrast, genes with predicted functions in formation of hydrogen sulfide and sulfate were significantly repressed. The main proposed mechanism involves: outer membrane protein Cyc2 (assumed to function as a terminal ferric iron reductase); periplasmic electron shuttle rusticyanin; c4-type cytochrome CycA1; the inner membrane cytochrome bc1 complex I; and the quinone pool providing connection to the sulfur metabolism machinery, consisting of heterodisulfide reductase, thiosulfate:quinone oxidoreductase and tetrathionate hydrolase. However, an alternative mechanism seems to involve a high potential iron-sulfur protein Hip, c4-type cytochrome CycA2 and inner membrane cytochrome bc1 complex II. Our results conflict with findings regarding the type strain, indicating strain- or phenotype-dependent pathway variation. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. More evidence that anaerobic oxidation of methane is prevalent in soils: Is it time to upgrade our biogeochemical models?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gauthier, M.; Bradley, R.L.; Šimek, Miloslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 80, January (2015), s. 167-174 ISSN 0038-0717 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/09/1570 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : anaerobic oxidation of methane * isotope dilution * peatland soil * shoreline soil * acid sulfate soil * alternative electron acceptors Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 4.152, year: 2015

  13. Sulfidogenic biotreatment of synthetic acid mine drainage and sulfide oxidation in anaerobic baffled reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekmezci, Ozan K; Ucar, Deniz; Kaksonen, Anna H; Sahinkaya, Erkan

    2011-05-30

    The treatment of synthetic acid mine drainage (AMD) water (pH 3.0-6.5) containing sulfate (3.0-3.5 g L(-1)) and various metals (Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Zn) was studied in an ethanol-fed sulfate-reducing 4-compartment anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) at 32°C. The reactor was operated for 160 days at different chemical oxygen demand (COD)/sulfate ratios, hydraulic retention times (HRT), pH, and metal concentrations to study the robustness of the process. The last compartment of the reactor was aerated at different rates to study the bio-oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur. The highest sulfate reduction efficiency (88%) was obtained with a feed sulfate concentration of 3.5 g L(-1), COD/sulfate mass ratio of 0.737, feed pH of 3.0 and HRT of 2 days without aeration in the 4th compartment. The corresponding COD removal efficiency was about 92%. The alkalinity produced in the sulfidogenic ethanol oxidation neutralized the acidic mine water from pH 3.0-4.5 to pH 7.0-8.0. Effluent soluble and total heavy metal concentrations were substantially reduced with removal efficiencies generally higher than 99%, except for Mn (25-77%). Limited aeration in the 4th compartment of ABR promoted incomplete oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur rather than complete oxidation to sulfate. Depending on the aeration rate and HRT, 32-74% of produced sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur. This study demonstrates that by optimizing operating conditions, sulfate reduction, metal removal, alkalinity generation, and excess sulfide oxidation can be achieved in a single ABR treating AMD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantification of the methane concentration using anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to extracellular electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yaohuan; Ryu, Hodon; Rittmann, Bruce E; Hussain, Abid; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2017-10-01

    A biofilm anode acclimated with growth media containing acetate, then acetate+methane, and finally methane alone produced electrical current in a microbial electrochemical cell (MxC) fed with methane as the sole electron donor. Geobacter was the dominant genus for the bacterial domain (93%) in the biofilm anode, while methanogens (Methanocorpusculum labreanum and Methanosaeta concilii) accounted for 82% of the total archaeal clones in the biofilm. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) imaging clearly showed a biofilm of mixed bacteria and archaea, suggesting a syntrophic interaction between them for performing anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in the biofilm anode. Measured cumulative coulombs were linearly correlated to the methane-gas concentration in the range of 10-99.97% (R 2 ≥0.99) when the measurement was sustained for at least 50min Thus, cumulative coulombs over 50min could be used to quantify the methane concentration in gas samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of a method for direct biological removal of ammonium to nitrogen in treatment of waste waters of the anaerobic sludge digestion - deammonification. Final report; Entwicklung eines Verfahrens zur direkten biologischen Umsetzung von Ammonium zu Stickstoff bei der Behandlung von Abwaessern der Anaerob-Klaerschlammfaulung - Deammonifikation. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenwinkel, K.H.; Seyfried, C.F.; Kunst, S.; Diekmann, H.; Hippen, A.; Helmer, C.; Scholten, E.

    2001-07-01

    The nitrogen elimination in municipal and industrial wastewater continues to play a major role in wastewater treatment, especially since the Wastewater Directive (AbwV) from 1997 introduced several changes in the requirements and regulations in regard to the pollutant and nutrient removal. As particularly the nitrogen elimination often makes for a considerable cost factor in wastewater treatment, especially when part-streams with high nitrogen loads must be (co-)treated, there is a constant search for economically viable treatment concepts. In this research project, the method of deammonification was developed, that is the process sequence of aerobic nitritation and anoxic ammonium oxidation ('biological comproportioning' of ammonium and nitrite into molecular nitrogen), which is based completely on the metabolism processes of autotrophic micro-organisms, which leads to saving potentials, especially of the carbon demand. Because of the shortened aerobic oxidation steps and the application of biofilm technology, it is also possible to reduce the oxygen demand and the reaction volume. In regard to the purposeful application of deammonification in operation technology, the project steps were targeted to determine the process-defining parameters and to check suitable method technologies and operation control systems in greater detail. To achieve this, the crucial frame conditions for the realisation and the operation performance of the autotrophic nitrogen elimination were defined on the basis of industrial and pilot-technical examinations under consideration of the (micro-)biological connections. Eventually, directives on the establishment of a stable deammonification operation could be derived. On the one hand, we ran a stock-taking of the operation of three industrial leachate treatment plants, on the other hand we operated test-plants on sludge-water treatment. Furthermore, various examinations with different reactor configurations and purposeful

  16. Anaerobic Methane Oxidation Driven by Microbial Reduction of Natural Organic Matter in a Tropical Wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Edgardo I; Prieto-Davó, Alejandra; López-Lozano, Nguyen E; Hernández-Eligio, Alberto; Vega-Alvarado, Leticia; Juárez, Katy; García-González, Ana Sarahí; López, Mercedes G; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2017-06-01

    Wetlands constitute the main natural source of methane on Earth due to their high content of natural organic matter (NOM), but key drivers, such as electron acceptors, supporting methanotrophic activities in these habitats are poorly understood. We performed anoxic incubations using freshly collected sediment, along with water samples harvested from a tropical wetland, amended with 13 C-methane (0.67 atm) to test the capacity of its microbial community to perform anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) linked to the reduction of the humic fraction of its NOM. Collected evidence demonstrates that electron-accepting functional groups (e.g., quinones) present in NOM fueled AOM by serving as a terminal electron acceptor. Indeed, while sulfate reduction was the predominant process, accounting for up to 42.5% of the AOM activities, the microbial reduction of NOM concomitantly occurred. Furthermore, enrichment of wetland sediment with external NOM provided a complementary electron-accepting capacity, of which reduction accounted for ∼100 nmol 13 CH 4 oxidized · cm -3 · day -1 Spectroscopic evidence showed that quinone moieties were heterogeneously distributed in the wetland sediment, and their reduction occurred during the course of AOM. Moreover, an enrichment derived from wetland sediments performing AOM linked to NOM reduction stoichiometrically oxidized methane coupled to the reduction of the humic analogue anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate. Microbial populations potentially involved in AOM coupled to microbial reduction of NOM were dominated by divergent biota from putative AOM-associated archaea. We estimate that this microbial process potentially contributes to the suppression of up to 114 teragrams (Tg) of CH 4 · year -1 in coastal wetlands and more than 1,300 Tg · year -1 , considering the global wetland area. IMPORTANCE The identification of key processes governing methane emissions from natural systems is of major importance considering the global warming

  17. Formation of single domain magnetite by green rust oxidation promoted by microbial anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Li, Jinhua; Benzerara, Karim; Sougrati, Moulay Tahar; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Bernard, Sylvain; Jumas, Jean-Claude; Guyot, François

    2014-08-01

    Biomineralization of magnetite is a central geomicrobiological process that might have played a primordial role over Earth’s history, possibly leaving traces of life in the geological record or controlling trace metal(loid)s and organic pollutants mobility in modern environments. Magnetite biomineralization has been attributed to two main microbial pathways to date (namely magnetotactic bacteria and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria). Here, we uncover a new route of magnetite biomineralization involving the anaerobic nitrate-reducing iron(II) oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1. Using transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy and rock magnetic analyses, this strain is shown to promote the transformation of hydroxychloride green rust in equilibrium with dissolved Fe(II) to (1) periplasmic lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and (2) extracellular magnetite, thus leading to strong redox heterogeneities at the nanometer scale. On the one hand, lepidocrocite was associated with protein moieties and exhibited an anisotropic texture, with the elongated axis parallel to the cell wall. On the other hand, magnetite crystals exhibited grain sizes and magnetic properties consistent with stable single domain particles. By comparison, abiotic controls led to a very slow (4 months vs. 2 days in BoFeN1 cultures) and incomplete oxidation of hydroxychloride green rust towards magnetite. As this abiotic magnetite exhibited the same size and magnetic properties (stable single domain particles) as magnetite produced in BoFeN1 cultures, only the co-occurrence of textured Fe(III)-oxides and magnetite, associated with the persistence of organic carbon molecules, might constitute valuable biosignatures to be looked for in the geological record. Our results furthermore contribute to a more complex picture of Fe redox cycling in the environment, providing an additional process of Fe(II)-bearing phase

  18. UV-Vis spectrophotometric studies of self-oxidation/dissociation of quaternary ammonium permanganates (QAP) - impact of solvent polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, Suraj Prakash; Guru, Partha Sarathi; Dash, Sukalyan

    2015-05-01

    Self-oxidation/dissociation of some quaternary ammonium permanganates (QAPs), such as cetyltrimethylammonium permanganate (CTAP) and tetrabutylammonium permanganate (TBAP), have been studied spectrophotometrically in six different organic solvent media of different polarities wherein the compounds show good solubility and stability. The optical densities of the substrates at zero time (ODo) and first-order rate constants of dissociation (k1) have been determined from their successive scanning for 40 min. At comparable experimental conditions, absorption capabilities of the substrates are compared from the ODo values in various organic media; the stability of the solutions is compared from the successive scan spectra in those media. The ODo values and the k1 values have been plotted against some solvent parameters to understand their effects on the absorbance and reactivity of the QAPs. These data are also subjected to multiple regression analysis to explain the influence of various solvent parameters on the ion-pairing properties of the substrates, thus elucidating their effects on the process of self-oxidation/dissociation of the substrates.

  19. Post-treatment of anaerobic reactor effluent using coagulation/oxidation followed by double filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallini, Grasiele Soares; de Sousa Vidal, Carlos Magno; de Souza, Jeanette Beber; de Campos, Sandro Xavier

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluates the efficacy of a sanitary sewage treatment system, proposing post-treatment of the effluent generated by the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket UASB reactor, through a Fenton coagulation/oxidation ((ferric chloride (FC) or ferrous sulfate (FS) and peracetic acid (PAA)), followed by a double filtration system, composed of a gravel ascending drainage filter and a sand descending filter. Following the assessment of treatability, the system efficiency was evaluated using physicochemical and microbiological parameters. In all treatments performed in the pilot unit, total suspended solids (TSS) were completely removed, leading to a decrease in turbidity greater than 90% and close to 100% removal of total phosphorous. In the FC and PAA combination, the effluent was oxygenated prior to filtration, enabling a more significant removal of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), which characterizes aerobic degradation even in a quick sand filter. The treatments carried out in the presence of the PAA oxidizing agent showed a more significant bleaching of the effluent. Concerning the microbiological parameters, the simultaneous use of PAA and FC contributed to the partial inactivation of the assessed microorganisms. A 65% recovery of the effluent was obtained with the proposed treatment system, considering the volume employed in filter backwashing.

  20. Vanadium Oxide Thin Film Formation on Graphene Oxide by Microexplosive Decomposition of Ammonium Peroxovanadate and Its Application as a Sodium Ion Battery Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylov, Alexey A; Medvedev, Alexander G; Grishanov, Dmitry A; Sladkevich, Sergey; Gun, Jenny; Prikhodchenko, Petr V; Xu, Zhichuan J; Nagasubramanian, Arun; Srinivasan, Madhavi; Lev, Ovadia

    2018-02-27

    Formation of vanadium oxide nanofilm-coated graphene oxide (GO) is achieved by thermally induced explosive disintegration of a microcrystalline ammonium peroxovanadate-GO composite. GO sheets isolate the microcrystalline grains and capture and contain the microexplosion products, resulting in the deposition of the nanoscale products on the GO. Thermal treatment of the supported nanofilm yields a sequence of nanocrystalline phases of vanadium oxide (V 3 O 7 , VO 2 ) as a function of temperature. This is the first demonstration of microexplosive disintegration of a crystalline peroxo compound to yield a nanocoating. The large number of recently reported peroxide-rich crystalline materials suggests that the process can be a useful general route for nanofilm formation. The V 3 O 7 @GO composite product was tested as a sodium ion battery anode and showed high charge capacity at high rate charge-discharge cycling (150 mAh g -1 at 3000 mA g -1 vs 300 mAh g -1 at 100 mA g -1 ) due to the nanomorphology of the vanadium oxide.

  1. Effect of chain length and electrical charge on properties of ammonium-bearing bisphosphonate-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: formulation and physicochemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimi, Ali [Inserm U646, Universite d' Angers (France); Denizot, Benoit, E-mail: BDenizot@chi-annemasse-bonneville.f [Centre Hospitalier Annemasse-Bonneville (France); Hindre, Francois [Inserm U646, Universite d' Angers (France); Filmon, Robert [Universite d' Angers, Service Commun d' Imagerie et d' Analyses Microscopiques (France); Greneche, Jean-Marc [Universite du Mans, Laboratoire de Physique de I' Etat Condense UMR 6087 (France); Laurent, Sophie [NMR and Molecular Imaging Laboratory, University of Mons-Hainaut, Department of General, Organic and Biochemical Chemistry (Belgium); Daou, T. Jean [UMR CNRS-ULP 7504, Institut de Physique et Chimie des Materiaux de Strasbourg (France); Begin-Colin, Sylvie [Universite de Haute Alsace, Laboratoire de Materiaux a Porosite Controlee, UMR CNRS 7016 (France); Jeune, Jean-Jacques Le [Inserm U646, Universite d' Angers (France)

    2010-05-15

    Bisphosphonates BP molecules have shown to be efficient for coating superparamagnetic iron oxide particles. In order to clarify the respective roles of electrical charge and the length of the molecules, bisphosphonates with one or two ammonium moieties with an intermediate aliphatic group of 3, 5 or 7 carbons were synthesized and iron oxide nanoparticles coated. The evaluation on their iron core properties was made by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles and Moessbauer spectra. The core size is close to 5 nm, with a global superparamagnetic behaviour modified by a paramagnetic Fe-based layer, probably due to surface crystal alteration. The hydrodynamic sizes increase slightly with aliphatic chain length (from 9.8 to 18.6 nm). The presence of one or two ammonium group(s) lowers the negative electrophoretic mobility up to bear zero values but reduces their colloidal stability. These BP-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are promising Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agents.

  2. ANAMMOX process start up and stabilization with an anaerobic seed in Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor (AnMBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneethi, S; Joseph, Kurian

    2011-10-01

    ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation (ANAMMOX) process, an advanced biological nitrogen removal alternative to traditional nitrification--denitrification removes ammonia using nitrite as the electron acceptor without oxygen. The feasibility of enriching anammox bacteria from anaerobic seed culture to start up an Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor (AnMBR) for N-removal is reported in this paper. The Anammox activity was established in the AnMBR with anaerobic digester seed culture from a Sewage Treatment Plant in batch mode with recirculation followed by semi continuous process and continuous modes of operation. The AnMBR performance under varying Nitrogen Loading Rates (NLR) and HRTs is reported for a year, in terms of nitrogen transformations to ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate along with hydrazine and hydroxylamine. Interestingly ANAMMOX process was evident from simultaneous Amm-N and nitrite reduction, consistent nitrate production, hydrazine and hydroxylamine presence, notable organic load reduction and bicarbonate consumption. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermodynamics and kinetics of extracting zinc from zinc oxide ore by the ammonium sulfate roasting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Shen, Xiao-yi; Zhai, Yu-chun

    2015-05-01

    Thermodynamic analyses and kinetic studies were performed on zinc oxide ore treatment by (NH4)2SO4 roasting technology. The results show that it is theoretically feasible to realize a roasting reaction between the zinc oxide ore and (NH4)2SO4 in a temperature range of 573-723 K. The effects of reaction temperature and particle size on the extraction rate of zinc were also examined. It is found that a surface chemical reaction is the rate-controlling step in roasting kinetics. The calculated activation energy of this process is about 45.57 kJ/mol, and the kinetic model can be expressed as follows: 1 - (1 - α)1/3 = 30.85 exp(-45.57/ RT)· t. An extraction ratio of zinc as high as 92% could be achieved under the optimum conditions.

  4. Genome-enabled studies of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation in the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry R Beller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Thiobacillus denitrificans is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV and Fe(II oxidation, both of which can strongly influence the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium in contaminated aquifers. We previously identified two c-type cytochromes involved in nitrate-dependent U(IV oxidation in T. denitrificans and hypothesized that c-type cytochromes would also catalyze Fe(II oxidation, as they have been found to play this role in anaerobic phototrophic Fe(II-oxidizing bacteria. Here we report on efforts to identify genes associated with nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation, namely (a whole-genome transcriptional studies [using FeCO3, Fe2+, and U(IV oxides as electron donors under denitrifying conditions], (b Fe(II oxidation assays performed with knockout mutants targeting primarily highly expressed or upregulated c-type cytochromes, and (c random transposon-mutagenesis studies with screening for Fe(II oxidation. Assays of mutants for 26 target genes, most of which were c-type cytochromes, indicated that none of the mutants tested were significantly defective in nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation. The non-defective mutants included the c1-cytochrome subunit of the cytochrome bc1 complex (complex III, which has relevance to a previously proposed role for this complex in nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation and to current concepts of reverse electron transfer. A transposon mutant with a disrupted gene associated with NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I was ~35% defective relative to the wild-type strain; this strain was similarly defective in nitrate reduction with thiosulfate as the electron donor. Overall, our results indicate that nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation in T. denitrificans is not catalyzed by the same c-type cytochromes involved in U(IV oxidation, nor have other c-type cytochromes yet been implicated in the process.

  5. Effect of Low-Density Static Magnetic Field on the Oxidation of Ammonium by Nitrosomonas europaea and by Activated Sludge in Municipal Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipič, Jasmina; Kraigher, Barbara; Tepuš, Brigita; Kokol, Vanja

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ammonium removal is a key step in biological wastewater treatment and novel approaches that improve this process are in great demand. The aim of this study is to test the hypothesis that ammonium removal from wastewater can be stimulated by static magnetic fields. This was achieved by analysis of the effects of static magnetic field (SMF) on the growth and activity of Nitrosomonas europaea, a key ammonia-oxidising bacterium, where increased growth and increased ammonia oxidation rate were detected when bacteria were exposed to SMF at 17 mT. Additionally, the effect of SMF on mixed cultures of ammonia oxidisers in activated sludge, incubated in sequencing batch bioreactors simulating wastewater treatment process, was assessed. SMFs of 30 and 50 mT, but not of 10 mT, increased ammonium oxidation rate in municipal wastewater by up to 77% and stimulated ammonia oxidiser growth. The results demonstrate the potential for use of static magnetic fields in increasing ammonium removal rates in biological wastewater treatment plants. PMID:27904349

  6. A multi-proxy study of anaerobic ammonium oxidation in marine sediments of the Gullmar Fjord, Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandsma, Joost; van de Vossenberg; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils

    2011-01-01

    bacteria in marine sediments of the Gullmar Fjord, and compared the results obtained with each technique. 15N labelling experiments showed that nitrogen removal through N(2) production was essentially limited to the upper 2 cm of the sediment, where anammox contributed 23-47% of the total production....... The presence of marine anammox bacteria belonging to the genus 'Candidatus Scalindua' was shown by 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison. FISH counts of anammox bacteria correlated well with anammox activity, while quantitative PCR may have underestimated the number of anammox bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies...

  7. Increased expression of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and gluconeogenesis in anaerobically growing xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fermentation of xylose to ethanol has been achieved in S. cerevisiae by genetic engineering. Xylose utilization is however slow compared to glucose, and during anaerobic conditions addition of glucose has been necessary for cellular growth. In the current study, the xylose-utilizing strain TMB 3415 was employed to investigate differences between anaerobic utilization of glucose and xylose. This strain carried a xylose reductase (XYL1 K270R engineered for increased NADH utilization and was capable of sustained anaerobic growth on xylose as sole carbon source. Metabolic and transcriptional characterization could thus for the first time be performed without addition of a co-substrate or oxygen. Results Analysis of metabolic fluxes showed that although the specific ethanol productivity was an order of magnitude lower on xylose than on glucose, product yields were similar for the two substrates. In addition, transcription analysis identified clear regulatory differences between glucose and xylose. Respiro-fermentative metabolism on glucose during aerobic conditions caused repression of cellular respiration, while metabolism on xylose under the same conditions was fully respiratory. During anaerobic conditions, xylose repressed respiratory pathways, although notably more weakly than glucose. It was also observed that anaerobic xylose growth caused up-regulation of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and gluconeogenesis, which may be driven by an increased demand for NADPH during anaerobic xylose catabolism. Conclusion Co-factor imbalance in the initial twp steps of xylose utilization may reduce ethanol productivity by increasing the need for NADP+ reduction and consequently increase reverse flux in glycolysis.

  8. Characterization of Microbes Capable of Using Vinyl Chloride and Ethene as Sole Carbon and Energy Sources by Anaerobic Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    12.2 mg COD/mg COD. Two types of phosphate-buffered fermentative media were used, as previously described by Hata et al. (2003, 2004). Glucose was...1985. Biotransformation of tetrachloroethylene to trichloroethylene, dichloroethylene, vinyl chloride, and carbon dioxide under methanogenic...FINAL REPORT Characterization of Microbes Capable of Using Vinyl Chloride and Ethene as Sole Carbon and Energy Sources by Anaerobic Oxidation

  9. Current advances in molecular methods for detection of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidizing bacteria in natural environments

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jing; Dick, Richard; Lin, Jih-Gaw; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) process uniquely links microbial nitrogen and carbon cycles. Research on n-damo bacteria progresses quickly with experimental evidences through enrichment cultures. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detecting them in various natural ecosystems and engineered systems play a very important role in the discovery of their distribution, abundance, and biodiversity in the ecosystems. Important characteristics of n-damo enrichmen...

  10. Ammonia oxidation, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium in two US Great Basin hot springs with abundant ammonia-oxidizing archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Hungate, Bruce A; Hedlund, Brian P

    2011-08-01

    Many thermophiles catalyse free energy-yielding redox reactions involving nitrogenous compounds; however, little is known about these processes in natural thermal environments. Rates of ammonia oxidation, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) were measured in source water and sediments of two ≈ 80°C springs in the US Great Basin. Ammonia oxidation and denitrification occurred mainly in sediments. Ammonia oxidation rates measured using (15)N-NO(3)(-) pool dilution ranged from 5.5 ± 0.8 to 8.6 ± 0.9 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) and were unaffected or only mildly stimulated by amendment with NH(4) Cl. Denitrification rates measured using acetylene block ranged from 15.8 ± 0.7 to 51 ± 12 nmol N g(-1) h(-1) and were stimulated by amendment with NO(3)(-) and complex organic compounds. The DNRA rate in one spring sediment measured using an (15)N-NO(3)(-) tracer was 315 ± 48 nmol N g(-1) h(-1). Both springs harboured distinct planktonic and sediment microbial communities. Close relatives of the autotrophic, ammonia-oxidizing archaeon 'Candidatus Nitrosocaldus yellowstonii' represented the most abundant OTU in both spring sediments by 16S rRNA gene pyrotag analysis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) indicated that 'Ca. N. yellowstonii'amoA and 16S rRNA genes were present at 3.5-3.9 × 10(8) and 6.4-9.0 × 10(8) copies g(-1) sediment. Potential denitrifiers included members of the Aquificales and Thermales. Thermus spp. comprised springs and suggest that ammonia oxidation may be a major source of energy fuelling primary production. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Anaerobic methane oxidation rates at the sulfate-methane transition in marine sediments from Kattegat and Skagerrak (Denmark)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iversen, N.; Jorgensen, B.B.

    1985-01-01

    Concomitant radiotracer measurements were made of in situ rates of sulfate reduction and anaerobic methane oxidation in 2-3-m-long sediment cores. Methane accumulated to high concentrations (> 1 mM CH 4 ) only below the sulfate zone, at 1 m or deeper in the sediment. Sulfate reduction showed a broad maximum below the sediment surface and a smaller, narrow maximum at the sulfate-methane transition. Methane oxidation was low (0.002-0.1 nmol CH 4 cm -3 d -1 ) throughout the sulfate zone and showed a sharp maximum at the sulfate-methane transition, coinciding with the sulfate reduction maximum. Total anaerobic methane oxidation at two stations was 0.83 and 1.16 mmol CH 4 m -2 d -1 , of which 96% was confined to the sulfate-methane transition. All the methane that was calculated to diffuse up into the sulfate-methane transition was oxidized in this zone. The methane oxidation was equivalent to 10% of the electron donor requirement for the total measured sulfate reduction. A third station showed high sulfate concentrations at all depths sampled and the total methane oxidation was only 0.013 mmol m -2 d -1 . From direct measurements of rates, concentration gradients, and diffusion coefficients, simple calculations were made of sulfate and methane fluxes and of methane production rates

  12. Enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria and iron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, F.B.; Li, X.M.; Zhou, S.G.; Zhuang, L.; Cao, F.; Huang, D.Y.; Xu, W.; Liu, T.X.; Feng, C.H.

    2010-01-01

    The transformation of DDT was studied in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (Shewanella decolorationis S12) and iron oxide (α-FeOOH). The results showed that S. decolorationis could reduce DDT into DDD, and DDT transformation rate was accelerated by the presence of α-FeOOH. DDD was observed as the primary transformation product, which was demonstrated to be transformed in the abiotic system of Fe 2+ + α-FeOOH and the system of DIRB + α-FeOOH. The intermediates of DDMS and DBP were detected after 9 months, likely suggesting that reductive dechlorination was the main dechlorination pathway of DDT in the iron-reducing system. The enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT was mainly due to biogenic Fe(II) sorbed on the surface of α-FeOOH, which can serve as a mediator for the transformation of DDT. This study demonstrated the important role of DIRB and iron oxide on DDT and DDD transformation under anaerobic iron-reducing environments. - This is the first case reporting the reductive dechlorination of DDT in an anaerobic system of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria and iron oxide.

  13. The potential for biologically catalyzed anaerobic methane oxidation on ancient Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Jeffrey J; Larowe, Douglas E; Ehlmann, Bethany L; Amend, Jan P; Orphan, Victoria J

    2014-04-01

    This study examines the potential for the biologically mediated anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction on ancient Mars. Seven distinct fluids representative of putative martian groundwater were used to calculate Gibbs energy values in the presence of dissolved methane under a range of atmospheric CO2 partial pressures. In all scenarios, AOM is exergonic, ranging from -31 to -135 kJ/mol CH4. A reaction transport model was constructed to examine how environmentally relevant parameters such as advection velocity, reactant concentrations, and biomass production rate affect the spatial and temporal dependences of AOM reaction rates. Two geologically supported models for ancient martian AOM are presented: a sulfate-rich groundwater with methane produced from serpentinization by-products, and acid-sulfate fluids with methane from basalt alteration. The simulations presented in this study indicate that AOM could have been a feasible metabolism on ancient Mars, and fossil or isotopic evidence of this metabolic pathway may persist beneath the surface and in surface exposures of eroded ancient terrains.

  14. Fuzzy-logic modeling of Fenton's oxidation of anaerobically pretreated poultry manure wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetilmezsoy, Kaan

    2012-07-01

    A multiple inputs and multiple outputs (MIMO) fuzzy-logic-based model was proposed to estimate color and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies in the post-treatment of anaerobically pretreated poultry manure wastewater effluent using Fenton's oxidation process. Three main input variables including initial pH, Fe+2, and H2O2 dosages were fuzzified in a new numerical modeling scheme by the use of an artificial intelligence-based approach. Trapezoidal membership functions with eight levels were conducted for the fuzzy subsets, and a Mamdani-type fuzzy inference system was used to implement a total of 70 rules in the IF-THEN format. The product (prod) and the center of gravity (centroid) methods were applied as the inference operator and defuzzification methods, respectively. Fuzzy-logic predicted results were compared with the outputs of two first-order polynomial regression models derived in the scope of this study. Estimated results were also compared to the multiple regression approach by means of various descriptive statistical indicators, such as root mean-squared error, index of agreement, fractional variance, proportion of systematic error, etc. Results of the statistical analysis clearly revealed that, compared to conventional regression models, the proposed MIMO fuzzy-logic model produced very smaller deviations and demonstrated a superior predictive performance on forecasting of color and COD removal efficiencies with satisfactory determination coefficients over 0.98. Due to high capability of the fuzzy-logic methodology in capturing the non-linear interactions, it was demonstrated that a complex dynamic system, such as Fenton's oxidation, could be easily modeled.

  15. Clostridium acetireducens sp nov, a novel amino acid-oxidizing, acetate-reducing anaerobic bacterium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlygsson, J; Krooneman, J; Collins, Matthew D.; Pascual, C; Gottschall, JC

    Strain 30A(T) (T = type strain), which was isolated from an anaerobic bioreactor fed on waste from a potato starch factory in De Krim, The Netherlands, is a nonmotile, gram-positive, anaerobic, rod-shaped organism that is able to degrade various amino acids, including alanine, leucine, isoleucine,

  16. Bioleaching of heavy metals from sewage sludge by indigenous iron-oxidizing microorganisms using ammonium ferrous sulfate and ferrous sulfate as energy sources: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Dastidar, M G; Sreekrishnan, T R

    2009-11-15

    The potential of indigenous iron-oxidizing microorganisms enriched at initial neutral pH of the sewage sludge for bioleaching of heavy metals was investigated at initial neutral pH of the sludge using ammonium ferrous sulfate (FAS) and ferrous sulfate (FS) as an energy sources in two different sets of experiments. After 16 days of bioleaching, 56% Cu, 48% Ni, 68% Zn and 42% C were removed from the sludge using ammonium ferrous sulfate as an energy source. On the other hand, 64% Cu, 58% Ni, 76% Zn and 52% Cr were removed using ferrous sulfate. Further, 32% nitrogen and 24% phosphorus were leached from the sludge using ferrous sulfate, whereas only 22% nitrogen and 17% phosphorus were removed using ammonium ferrous sulfate. The BCR sequential extraction study on speciation of metals showed that using ammonium ferrous sulfate and ferrous sulfate, all the metals remained in bioleached sludge as stable form (F4 fraction). The results of the present study indicate that the bioleached sludge would be safer for land application. Also, the fertilizing property was largely conserved in the bioleached sludge using both the substrates.

  17. Thioarsenate Formation Coupled with Anaerobic Arsenite Oxidation by a Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Isolated from a Hot Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Wu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Thioarsenates are common arsenic species in sulfidic geothermal waters, yet little is known about their biogeochemical traits. In the present study, a novel sulfate-reducing bacterial strain Desulfotomaculum TC-1 was isolated from a sulfidic hot spring in Tengchong geothermal area, Yunnan Province, China. The arxA gene, encoding anaerobic arsenite oxidase, was successfully amplified from the genome of strain TC-1, indicating it has a potential ability to oxidize arsenite under anaerobic condition. In anaerobic arsenite oxidation experiments inoculated with strain TC-1, a small amount of arsenate was detected in the beginning but became undetectable over longer time. Thioarsenates (AsO4-xSx2- with x = 1–4 formed with mono-, di- and tri-thioarsenates being dominant forms. Tetrathioarsenate was only detectable at the end of the experiment. These results suggest that thermophilic microbes might be involved in the formation of thioarsenates and provide a possible explanation for the widespread distribution of thioarsenates in terrestrial geothermal environments.

  18. Acclimation of denitrifying activated sludge to a single vs. complex external carbon source during a start-up of sequencing batch reactors treating ammonium-rich anaerobic sludge digester liquors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Luczkiewicz, Aneta; Majtacz, Joanna; Kowal, Przemyslaw; Jankowska, Katarzyna; Ciesielski, Slawomir; Pagilla, Krishna; Makinia, Jacek

    2014-11-01

    In this study, denitrification of ammonium-reach anaerobic sludge digester liquor was investigated during start-up periods of two laboratory-scale "fill-and-draw" reactors. One reactor was fed with a single carbon source (ethanol), whereas the other reactor was fed with a complex carbon source (fusel oil). During two acclimation experiments, the structure of microbial community involved in denitrification was analyzed using 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints and fluorescent in situ hybridization. The characteristics of the mixed liquor were additionally supported by regular measurements of nitrate uptake rates. The addition of fusel oil and ethanol resulted in a significant enhancement of the denitrification rate and efficiency combined with the increasing volumetric addition of sludge digester liquor up to 15 % of the reactor volume. The microbiological analyses revealed that the addition of sludge digester liquor as well as both external carbon sources (fusel oil and ethanol) did not affect the structure of microbial communities in a severe way. In both reactors, Curvibacter sp. and Azoarcus sp. were found as the most abundant representatives of denitrifiers.

  19. Macroscopic biofilms in fracture-dominated sediment that anaerobically oxidize methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, B.R.; Pohlman, J.W.; Torres, M.; Riedel, M.; Brodie, E.L.; Colwell, F.S.

    2011-01-01

    Methane release from seafloor sediments is moderated, in part, by the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) performed by consortia of archaea and bacteria. These consortia occur as isolated cells and aggregates within the sulfate-methane transition (SMT) of diffusion and seep-dominant environments. Here we report on a new SMT setting where the AOM consortium occurs as macroscopic pink to orange biofilms within subseafloor fractures. Biofilm samples recovered from the Indian and northeast Pacific Oceans had a cellular abundance of 10 7 to 10 8 cells cm -3. This cell density is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude greater than that in the surrounding sediments. Sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes indicated that the bacterial component is dominated by Deltaproteobacteria, candidate division WS3, and Chloroflexi, representing 46%, 15%, and 10% of clones, respectively. In addition, major archaeal taxa found in the biofilm were related to the ANME-1 clade, Thermoplasmatales, and Desulfurococcales, representing 73%, 11%, and 10% of archaeal clones, respectively. The sequences of all major taxa were similar to sequences previously reported from cold seep environments. PhyloChip microarray analysis detected all bacterial phyla identified by the clone library plus an additional 44 phyla. However, sequencing detected more archaea than the PhyloChip within the phyla of Methanosarcinales and Desulfurococcales. The stable carbon isotope composition of the biofilm from the SMT (-35 to-43%) suggests that the production of the biofilm is associated with AOM. These biofilms are a novel, but apparently widespread, aggregation of cells represented by the ANME-1 clade that occur in methane-rich marine sediments. ?? 2011, American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Quantitative analysis of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments: A modeling perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, P.; Dale, A. W.; Arndt, S.; LaRowe, D. E.; Mogollón, J.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2011-05-01

    Recent developments in the quantitative modeling of methane dynamics and anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments are critically reviewed. The first part of the review begins with a comparison of alternative kinetic models for AOM. The roles of bioenergetic limitations, intermediate compounds and biomass growth are highlighted. Next, the key transport mechanisms in multi-phase sedimentary environments affecting AOM and methane fluxes are briefly treated, while attention is also given to additional controls on methane and sulfate turnover, including organic matter mineralization, sulfur cycling and methane phase transitions. In the second part of the review, the structure, forcing functions and parameterization of published models of AOM in sediments are analyzed. The six-orders-of-magnitude range in rate constants reported for the widely used bimolecular rate law for AOM emphasizes the limited transferability of this simple kinetic model and, hence, the need for more comprehensive descriptions of the AOM reaction system. The derivation and implementation of more complete reaction models, however, are limited by the availability of observational data. In this context, we attempt to rank the relative benefits of potential experimental measurements that should help to better constrain AOM models. The last part of the review presents a compilation of reported depth-integrated AOM rates (ΣAOM). These rates reveal the extreme variability of ΣAOM in marine sediments. The model results are further used to derive quantitative relationships between ΣAOM and the magnitude of externally impressed fluid flow, as well as between ΣAOM and the depth of the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ). This review contributes to an improved understanding of the global significance of the AOM process, and helps identify outstanding questions and future directions in the modeling of methane cycling and AOM in marine sediments.

  1. Role of oxidants in enhancing dewaterability of anaerobically digested sludge through Fe (II) activated oxidation processes: hydrogen peroxide versus persulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kang; Zhou, Xu; Liu, Yiqi; Gong, Yanyan; Zhou, Beibei; Wang, Dongbo; Wang, Qilin

    2016-01-01

    Improving dewaterability of sludge is important for the disposal of sludge in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). This study, for the first time, investigated the Fe(II) activated oxidization processes in improving anaerobically digested sludge (ADS) dewaterability. The combination of Fe(II) (0–100 mg/g total solids (TS)) and persulfate (0–1,000 mg/g TS) under neutral pH as well as the combination of Fe(II) (0–100 mg/g TS) and hydrogen peroxide (HP) (0–1,000 mg/g TS) under pH 3.0 were used to examine and compare their effect on the ADS dewaterability enhancement. The highest ADS dewaterability enhancement was attained at 25 mg Fe(II)/g TS and 50 mg HP/g TS, when the CST (CST: the capillary suction time, a sludge dewaterability indicator) was reduced by 95%. In contrast, the highest CST reduction in Fe(II)-persulfate conditioning was 90%, which was obtained at 50 mg Fe(II)/g TS and 250 mg persulfate/g TS. The results showed that Fe(II)-HP conditioning was comparable with Fe(II)-persulfate conditioning in terms of highest CST reduction. Economic analysis suggested that the Fe(II)-HP conditioning was more promising for improving ADS dewaterability compared with Fe(II)-persulfate conditioning, with the saving being up to $65,000 per year in a WWTP with a population equivalent of 100,000. PMID:27109500

  2. Long Term Performance of an Arsenite-Oxidizing-Chlorate-Reducing Microbial Consortium in an Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjie; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A.

    2011-01-01

    A chlorate (ClO3−) reducing microbial consortium oxidized arsenite (As(III)) to arsenate (As(V)) in an upflow anaerobic sludge-bed bioreactor over 550 d operation. As(III) was converted with high conversion efficiencies (>98%) at volumetric loadings ranging from 0.45 to 1.92 mmol As/(Lreactor d). The oxidation of As(III) was linked to the complete reduction of ClO3− to Cl− and H2O, as demonstrated by a molar ratio of approximately 3.0 mol As(III) oxidized per mole of Cl− formed and by the greatly lowered ClO3−-reducing capacity without As(III) feeding. An autotrophic enrichment culture was established from the bioreactor biofilm. A 16S rRNA gene clone library indicated that the culture was dominated by Dechloromonas, and Stenotrophomonas as well as genera within the family Comamonadaceae. The results indicate that the oxidation of As(III) to less mobile As(V) utilizing ClO3− as a terminal electron acceptor provides a sustainable bioremediation strategy for arsenic contamination in anaerobic environments. PMID:21333531

  3. In-situ leaching of south Texas uranium ores--part 2: Oxidative removal of adsorbed ammonium ions with sodium hypochlorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, J.M.; Fletcher, A.; Johnson, W.F.; Venuto, P.B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports a laboratory study of the oxidative destruction by sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) of ammonium ions adsorbed on relatively reduced south Texas uranium ore. Included are an assessment of reaction stoichiometry, determination of some major reaction pathways and side reactions, and identification of several intermediates. Adsorbed ammonium ions were completely removed by 0.5% NaOCl, with the concentration of NH 3 in the effluent falling to a very low value after 10 to 15 PV NaOCl oxidant. A small fraction (5 to 10%) of NaOCl was utilized in reacting with NH 3 . After the NH 3 was nearly depleted, mono-, di-, and trichloramines, the expected intermediates in NaOCl oxidation of NH 3 , were observed. Chloramine decomposition studies showed that all three decomposed completely within 12 days. Since the ore was relatively highly reducing, the major part of the NaOCl was, not unexpectedly, consumed in side reactions. Substantial quantities of sulfate, reflecting oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite, were formed, large amounts of uranium were leached out, and substantial amounts of calcium and magnesium ions were also produced during the presaturation with NH 4 HCO 3 preceding the oxidation stage

  4. In-situ leaching of south Texas uranium ores--part 2: oxidative removal of adsorbed ammonium ions with sodium hypochlorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, J.M.; Fletcher, A.; Johnson, W.F.; Venuto, P.B.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports a laboratory study of the oxidative destruction by sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) of ammonium ions adsorbed on relatively reduced south Texas uranium ore. Included are an assessment of reaction stoichiometry, determination of some major reaction pathways and side reactions, and identification of several intermediates. Adsorbed ammonium ions were completely removed by 0.5% NaOCl, with the concentration of NH 3 in the effluent falling to a very low value after 10 to 15 PV NaOCl oxidant. A small fraction (5 to 10%) of NaOCl was utilized in reacting with NH 3 . After the NH 3 was nearly depleted, mono-, di-, and trichloramines, the expected intermediates in NaOCl oxidation of NH 3 , were observed. Chloramine decomposition studies showed that all three decomposed completely within 12 days. Since the ore was relatively highly reducing, the major part of the NaOCl was, not unexpectedly, consumed in side reactions. Substantial quantities of sulfate, reflecting oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite, were formed, large amounts of uranium were leached out, and substantial amounts of calcium and magnesium ions were also produced during the presaturation with NH 4 HCO 3 preceding the oxidation stage

  5. Archaeal and anaerobic methane oxidizer communities in the Sonora Margin cold seeps, Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, Adrien; Cruaud, Perrine; Pignet, Patricia; Caprais, Jean-Claude; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Godfroy, Anne; Toffin, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    Cold seeps, located along the Sonora Margin transform fault in the Guaymas Basin, were extensively explored during the 'BIG' cruise in June 2010. They present a seafloor mosaic pattern consisting of different faunal assemblages and microbial mats. To investigate this mostly unknown cold and hydrocarbon-rich environment, geochemical and microbiological surveys of the sediments underlying two microbial mats and a surrounding macrofaunal habitat were analyzed in detail. The geochemical measurements suggest biogenic methane production and local advective sulfate-rich fluxes in the sediments. The distributions of archaeal communities, particularly those involved in the methane cycle, were investigated at different depths (surface to 18 cm below the sea floor (cmbsf)) using complementary molecular approaches, such as Automated method of Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA), 16S rRNA libraries, fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction with new specific primer sets targeting methanogenic and anaerobic methanotrophic lineages. Molecular results indicate that metabolically active archaeal communities were dominated by known clades of anaerobic methane oxidizers (archaeal anaerobic methanotroph (ANME)-1, -2 and -3), including a novel 'ANME-2c Sonora' lineage. ANME-2c were found to be dominant, metabolically active and physically associated with syntrophic Bacteria in sulfate-rich shallow sediment layers. In contrast, ANME-1 were more prevalent in the deepest sediment samples and presented a versatile behavior in terms of syntrophic association, depending on the sulfate concentration. ANME-3 were concentrated in small aggregates without bacterial partners in a restricted sediment horizon below the first centimetres. These niche specificities and syntrophic behaviors, depending on biological surface assemblages and environmental availability of electron donors, acceptors and carbon substrates, suggest that ANME could support

  6. Syntrophy of aerobic and anaerobic ammonia oxidisers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wett, B; Hell, M; Nyhuis, G; Puempel, T; Takacs, I; Murthy, S

    2010-01-01

    Deammonification is known as an efficient and resource saving sidestream process option to remove the nitrogen load from sludge liquors. The transfer of the intermediate product nitrite between both syntrophic groups of organisms - aerobic and anaerobic ammonia oxidizers (AOB) - appears very sensitive to process conditions such as temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO) and operating nitrite level. Growth kinetics for aerobic and anaerobic AOBs differ by one order of magnitude and require an adequate selection of sludge retention time. This paper provides measurement- and model-based results on how selected sludge wasting impacts population dynamics in a suspended growth deammonification system. Anammox enrichment up to a doubled portion in mixed liquor solids can substantially improve process stability in difficult conditions. A case-study on low temperature operations outlines two possible strategies to balance syntrophic consumption of ammonium and nitrite.

  7. Growth of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria in a high-pressure membrane capsule bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Peer H A; Gieteling, Jarno; Widjaja-Greefkes, H C Aura; Plugge, Caroline M; Stams, Alfons J M; Lens, Piet N L; Meulepas, Roel J W

    2015-02-01

    Communities of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) grow slowly, which limits the ability to perform physiological studies. High methane partial pressure was previously successfully applied to stimulate growth, but it is not clear how different ANME subtypes and associated SRB are affected by it. Here, we report on the growth of ANME-SRB in a membrane capsule bioreactor inoculated with Eckernförde Bay sediment that combines high-pressure incubation (10.1 MPa methane) and thorough mixing (100 rpm) with complete cell retention by a 0.2-m-pore-size membrane. The results were compared to previously obtained data from an ambient-pressure (0.101 MPa methane) bioreactor inoculated with the same sediment. The rates of oxidation of labeled methane were not higher at 10.1 MPa, likely because measurements were done at ambient pressure. The subtype ANME-2a/b was abundant in both reactors, but subtype ANME-2c was enriched only at 10.1 MPa. SRB at 10.1 MPa mainly belonged to the SEEP-SRB2 and Eel-1 groups and the Desulfuromonadales and not to the typically found SEEP-SRB1 group. The increase of ANME-2a/b occurred in parallel with the increase of SEEP-SRB2, which was previously found to be associated only with ANME-2c. Our results imply that the syntrophic association is flexible and that methane pressure and sulfide concentration influence the growth of different ANME-SRB consortia. We also studied the effect of elevated methane pressure on methane production and oxidation by a mixture of methanogenic and sulfate-reducing sludge. Here, methane oxidation rates decreased and were not coupled to sulfide production, indicating trace methane oxidation during net methanogenesis and not anaerobic methane oxidation, even at a high methane partial pressure.

  8. Diversity and abundance of aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidizers at the Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, Barents Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lösekann, Tina; Knittel, Katrin; Nadalig, Thierry; Fuchs, Bernhard; Niemann, Helge; Boetius, Antje; Amann, Rudolf

    2007-05-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are formed by expulsions of mud, fluids, and gases from deeply buried subsurface sources. They are highly reduced benthic habitats and often associated with intensive methane seepage. In this study, the microbial diversity and community structure in methane-rich sediments of the Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano (HMMV) were investigated by comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. In the active volcano center, which has a diameter of about 500 m, the main methane-consuming process was bacterial aerobic oxidation. In this zone, aerobic methanotrophs belonging to three bacterial clades closely affiliated with Methylobacter and Methylophaga species accounted for 56%+/-8% of total cells. In sediments below Beggiatoa mats encircling the center of the HMMV, methanotrophic archaea of the ANME-3 clade dominated the zone of anaerobic methane oxidation. ANME-3 archaea form cell aggregates mostly associated with sulfate-reducing bacteria of the Desulfobulbus (DBB) branch. These ANME-3/DBB aggregates were highly abundant and accounted for up to 94%+/-2% of total microbial biomass at 2 to 3 cm below the surface. ANME-3/DBB aggregates could be further enriched by flow cytometry to identify their phylogenetic relationships. At the outer rim of the mud volcano, the seafloor was colonized by tubeworms (Siboglinidae, formerly known as Pogonophora). Here, both aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidizers were found, however, in lower abundances. The level of microbial diversity at this site was higher than that at the central and Beggiatoa species-covered part of the HMMV. Analysis of methyl-coenzyme M-reductase alpha subunit (mcrA) genes showed a strong dominance of a novel lineage, mcrA group f, which could be assigned to ANME-3 archaea. Our results further support the hypothesis of Niemann et al. (54), that high methane availability and different fluid flow regimens at the HMMV provide distinct niches for aerobic and

  9. Diversity and Abundance of Aerobic and Anaerobic Methane Oxidizers at the Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano, Barents Sea▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lösekann, Tina; Knittel, Katrin; Nadalig, Thierry; Fuchs, Bernhard; Niemann, Helge; Boetius, Antje; Amann, Rudolf

    2007-01-01

    Submarine mud volcanoes are formed by expulsions of mud, fluids, and gases from deeply buried subsurface sources. They are highly reduced benthic habitats and often associated with intensive methane seepage. In this study, the microbial diversity and community structure in methane-rich sediments of the Haakon Mosby Mud Volcano (HMMV) were investigated by comparative sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. In the active volcano center, which has a diameter of about 500 m, the main methane-consuming process was bacterial aerobic oxidation. In this zone, aerobic methanotrophs belonging to three bacterial clades closely affiliated with Methylobacter and Methylophaga species accounted for 56% ± 8% of total cells. In sediments below Beggiatoa mats encircling the center of the HMMV, methanotrophic archaea of the ANME-3 clade dominated the zone of anaerobic methane oxidation. ANME-3 archaea form cell aggregates mostly associated with sulfate-reducing bacteria of the Desulfobulbus (DBB) branch. These ANME-3/DBB aggregates were highly abundant and accounted for up to 94% ± 2% of total microbial biomass at 2 to 3 cm below the surface. ANME-3/DBB aggregates could be further enriched by flow cytometry to identify their phylogenetic relationships. At the outer rim of the mud volcano, the seafloor was colonized by tubeworms (Siboglinidae, formerly known as Pogonophora). Here, both aerobic and anaerobic methane oxidizers were found, however, in lower abundances. The level of microbial diversity at this site was higher than that at the central and Beggiatoa species-covered part of the HMMV. Analysis of methyl-coenzyme M-reductase alpha subunit (mcrA) genes showed a strong dominance of a novel lineage, mcrA group f, which could be assigned to ANME-3 archaea. Our results further support the hypothesis of Niemann et al. (54), that high methane availability and different fluid flow regimens at the HMMV provide distinct niches for aerobic and

  10. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments from the Skagerrak (Denmark): II. Reaction-transport modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dale, A.W.; Regnier, P.; Knab, N.J.

    2008-01-01

    A steady-state reaction-transport model is applied to sediments retrieved by gravity core from two stations (S10 and S13) in the Skagerrak to determine the main kinetic and thermodynamic controls on anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The model considers an extended biomass-implicit reaction...... methane diffuses up from the SMTZ to the top of the core without being consumed. The tailing is due to bioenergetic limitation of AOM in the sulfate reduction zone, because the methane concentration is too low to engender favorable thermodynamic drive. AOM is also bioenergetically inhibited below the SMTZ...

  11. Polyethylene Glycols as Efficient Catalysts for the Oxidation of Xanthine Alkaloids by Ceric Ammonium Nitrate in Acetonitrile: A Kinetic and Mechanistic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shylaja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetics of oxidation of xanthine alkaloids, such as Xanthine (XAN, hypoxanthine (HXAN, caffeine (CAF, theophylline (TPL, and theobromine (TBR, have been studied with ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN using poly ethylene glycols (PEG as catalysts. Reaction obeyed first order kinetics in both [CAN] and [Xanthine alkaloid]. Highly sluggish CAN-xanthine alkaloid reactions (in acetonitrile media even at elevated temperatures are enhanced in presence PEGs (PEG-200, -300, -400, -600. An increase in [PEG] increased the rate of oxidation linearly. This observation coupled with a change in absorption of CAN in presence of PEG, [H–(OCH2–CH2n–O–NH4Ce(NO34(CH3CN] (PEG bound CAN species, is considered to be more reactive than CAN. The mechanism of oxidation in PEG media has been explained by Menger-Portnoy’s enzymatic model.

  12. New method for synthesis of N-alkyl and N,N-dialkyl-O-ethyl and O-isopropylthiocarbamates by oxidation of ammonium salt of xhantogenic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milisavljević Smiljka S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A synthesis of N-alkyl and N,N-dialkyl-O-ethyl and O-isopropyl thiocarbamates by oxidation of ammonium salt of ethyl and isopropylxanthogenic acid in a presence of sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide were performed. Ammonium salt of ethyl and isopropylxanthogenic acid was obtained by the reaction of alkylammonium sulfate and sodium ethyl and isopropyl xanthate. Studies on a dependence of N-ethyl-O-isopropylthiocarbamate yield and purity with respect to reaction parameters (reaction time, molar ratio of oxidant and ethylamonium salt of isopropylxanthogenic acid were performed. Optimal reaction conditions for synthesis of N-alkyl and N,N-dialkyl-O-ethyl and O-isopropyl thiocarbamates were established. Synthesized compounds have been fully characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR and MS data, while purity has been determined by GC method. A plausible pathway for the N-alkyl and N,N-dialkyl-O-ethyl and O-isopropyl thiocarbamates synthesis, in the presence of the oxidative agents sodium hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide, was proposed. The presented synthetic methods has been developed at laboratory and applied at semi-industrial level. The developed optimal method provides a powerful and versatile method for the preparation of N-alkyl and N,N-dialkyl-O-ethyl and O-isopropyl thiocarbamates. This new optimized method offer several benefits, namely, simple operation, mild reaction conditions, bypass of hazardous organic solvents, moderately toxic and inexpensive reagents, and also short reaction times and high product yields.

  13. Adaptation of anaerobic cultures of E scherichia coli  K‐12 in response to environmental trimethylamine‐N‐oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denby, Katie J.; Rolfe, Matthew D.; Crick, Ellen; Sanguinetti, Guido; Poole, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Systematic analyses of transcriptional and metabolic changes occurring when E scherichia coli  K‐12 switches from fermentative growth to anaerobic respiratory growth with trimethylamine‐N‐oxide (TMAO) as the terminal electron acceptor revealed: (i) the induction of torCAD, but not genes encoding alternative TMAO reductases; (ii) transient expression of frmRAB, encoding formaldehyde dehydrogenase; and (iii) downregulation of copper resistance genes. Simultaneous inference of 167 transcription factor (TF) activities implied that transcriptional re‐programming was mediated by 20 TFs, including the transient inactivation of the two‐component system ArcBA; a prediction validated by direct measurement of phosphorylated ArcA. Induction of frmRAB, detection of dimethylamine in culture medium and formaldehyde production when cell‐free extracts were incubated with TMAO suggested the presence of TMAO demethylase activity. Accordingly, the viability of an frmRAB mutant was compromised upon exposure to TMAO. Downregulation of genes involved in copper resistance could be accounted for by TMAO inhibition of Cu(II) reduction. The simplest interpretation of the data is that during adaptation to the presence of environmental TMAO, anaerobic fermentative cultures of E . coli respond by activating the TorTSR regulatory system with consequent induction of TMAO reductase activity, resulting in net oxidation of menaquinone and inhibition of Cu(II) reduction, responses that are sensed by ArcBA and CusRS respectively. PMID:25471524

  14. Catalase (KatA) plays a role in protection against anaerobic nitric oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Wilson, Jeffrey J; Mahtani, Harry K; Li, Qian; Vanderwielen, Bradley D; Makris, Thomas M; Rogers, Melanie; McDaniel, Cameron; Lipscomb, John D; Irvin, Randall T; Schurr, Michael J; Lancaster, Jack R; Kovall, Rhett A; Hassett, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a common bacterial pathogen, responsible for a high incidence of nosocomial and respiratory infections. KatA is the major catalase of PA that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a reactive oxygen intermediate generated during aerobic respiration. Paradoxically, PA displays elevated KatA activity under anaerobic growth conditions where the substrate of KatA, H2O2, is not produced. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the mechanism underlying this phenomenon and define the role of KatA in PA during anaerobiosis using genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches. We demonstrated that anaerobic wild-type PAO1 cells yielded higher levels of katA transcription and expression than aerobic cells, whereas a nitrite reductase mutant ΔnirS produced ∼50% the KatA activity of PAO1, suggesting that a basal NO level was required for the increased KatA activity. We also found that transcription of the katA gene was controlled, in part, by the master anaerobic regulator, ANR. A ΔkatA mutant and a mucoid mucA22 ΔkatA bacteria demonstrated increased sensitivity to acidified nitrite (an NO generator) in anaerobic planktonic and biofilm cultures. EPR spectra of anaerobic bacteria showed that levels of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC), indicators of NO stress, were increased significantly in the ΔkatA mutant, and dramatically in a ΔnorCB mutant compared to basal levels of DNIC in PAO1 and ΔnirS mutant. Expression of KatA dramatically reduced the DNIC levels in ΔnorCB mutant. We further revealed direct NO-KatA interactions in vitro using EPR, optical spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. KatA has a 5-coordinate high spin ferric heme that binds NO without prior reduction of the heme iron (Kd ∼6 μM). Collectively, we conclude that KatA is expressed to protect PA against NO generated during anaerobic respiration. We proposed that such protective effects of KatA may involve buffering of free NO when potentially toxic concentrations of

  15. Catalase (KatA) Plays a Role in Protection against Anaerobic Nitric Oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shengchang; Panmanee, Warunya; Wilson, Jeffrey J.; Mahtani, Harry K.; Li, Qian; VanderWielen, Bradley D.; Makris, Thomas M.; Rogers, Melanie; McDaniel, Cameron; Lipscomb, John D.; Irvin, Randall T.; Schurr, Michael J.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Kovall, Rhett A.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is a common bacterial pathogen, responsible for a high incidence of nosocomial and respiratory infections. KatA is the major catalase of PA that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a reactive oxygen intermediate generated during aerobic respiration. Paradoxically, PA displays elevated KatA activity under anaerobic growth conditions where the substrate of KatA, H2O2, is not produced. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the mechanism underlying this phenomenon and define the role of KatA in PA during anaerobiosis using genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches. We demonstrated that anaerobic wild-type PAO1 cells yielded higher levels of katA transcription and expression than aerobic cells, whereas a nitrite reductase mutant ΔnirS produced ∼50% the KatA activity of PAO1, suggesting that a basal NO level was required for the increased KatA activity. We also found that transcription of the katA gene was controlled, in part, by the master anaerobic regulator, ANR. A ΔkatA mutant and a mucoid mucA22 ΔkatA bacteria demonstrated increased sensitivity to acidified nitrite (an NO generator) in anaerobic planktonic and biofilm cultures. EPR spectra of anaerobic bacteria showed that levels of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC), indicators of NO stress, were increased significantly in the ΔkatA mutant, and dramatically in a ΔnorCB mutant compared to basal levels of DNIC in PAO1 and ΔnirS mutant. Expression of KatA dramatically reduced the DNIC levels in ΔnorCB mutant. We further revealed direct NO-KatA interactions in vitro using EPR, optical spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. KatA has a 5-coordinate high spin ferric heme that binds NO without prior reduction of the heme iron (K d ∼6 μM). Collectively, we conclude that KatA is expressed to protect PA against NO generated during anaerobic respiration. We proposed that such protective effects of KatA may involve buffering of free NO when potentially toxic concentrations of

  16. Catalase (KatA plays a role in protection against anaerobic nitric oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengchang Su

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA is a common bacterial pathogen, responsible for a high incidence of nosocomial and respiratory infections. KatA is the major catalase of PA that detoxifies hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, a reactive oxygen intermediate generated during aerobic respiration. Paradoxically, PA displays elevated KatA activity under anaerobic growth conditions where the substrate of KatA, H2O2, is not produced. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the mechanism underlying this phenomenon and define the role of KatA in PA during anaerobiosis using genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches. We demonstrated that anaerobic wild-type PAO1 cells yielded higher levels of katA transcription and expression than aerobic cells, whereas a nitrite reductase mutant ΔnirS produced ∼50% the KatA activity of PAO1, suggesting that a basal NO level was required for the increased KatA activity. We also found that transcription of the katA gene was controlled, in part, by the master anaerobic regulator, ANR. A ΔkatA mutant and a mucoid mucA22 ΔkatA bacteria demonstrated increased sensitivity to acidified nitrite (an NO generator in anaerobic planktonic and biofilm cultures. EPR spectra of anaerobic bacteria showed that levels of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC, indicators of NO stress, were increased significantly in the ΔkatA mutant, and dramatically in a ΔnorCB mutant compared to basal levels of DNIC in PAO1 and ΔnirS mutant. Expression of KatA dramatically reduced the DNIC levels in ΔnorCB mutant. We further revealed direct NO-KatA interactions in vitro using EPR, optical spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. KatA has a 5-coordinate high spin ferric heme that binds NO without prior reduction of the heme iron (Kd ∼6 μM. Collectively, we conclude that KatA is expressed to protect PA against NO generated during anaerobic respiration. We proposed that such protective effects of KatA may involve buffering of free NO when potentially toxic

  17. Fabrication of porous tungsten oxide via anodizing in an ammonium nitrate/ethylene glycol/water mixture for visible light-driven photocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Kawashima, Jun; Natsui, Shungo; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2017-11-01

    Fabrication of a nanoporous tungsten oxide film via anodizing of tungsten in an ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3)/ethylene glycol (EG)/water (H2O) mixture is reported for use as a visible light-driven photocatalyst. Anodizing of tungsten in a 1.0 M NH4NO3/EG solution containing less than 0.1 vol% H2O resulted in active dissolution of the tungsten substrate. As the H2O concentration increased to more than 25 vol%, a thin barrier oxide film was formed on the tungsten substrate. A thick porous tungsten oxide with numerous nanopores measuring several tens of nanometer in diameter was fabricated via anodizing at a moderate H2O concentration of 1.0 vol%. The porous oxide consisted of a double-layered structure with an outer porous layer and an inner dense layer, and the outer porous layer became thinner as the NH4NO3 concentration decreased. A uniform porous oxide film from the top surface to the bottom interface was fabricated via anodizing at 20 V in a 0.02 M NH4NO3/EG solution containing 1.0 vol% H2O at 313 K. The porous tungsten oxide exhibited visible light-driven photocatalytic activity for the photocatalytic decomposition of methylene blue.

  18. Anaerobic nitrite-dependent methane-oxidizing bacteria - novel participants in methane cycling of drained peatlands ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Irina; Sukhacheva, Marina; Menko, Ekaterina; Sirin, Andrey

    2014-05-01

    Northern peatlands are one of the key sources of atmospheric methane. Process-based studies of methane dynamic are based on the hypothesis of the balance between microbial methane production and oxidation, but this doesn't explain all variations in and constraints on peatland CH4 emissions. One of the reasons for this discrepancy could be anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) - the process which is still poorly studied and remained controversial. Very little is known about AOM in peatlands, where it could work as an important 'internal' sink for CH4. This lack of knowledge primarily originated from researchers who generally consider AOM quantitatively insignificant or even non-existent in northern peatland ecosystems. But not far ago, Smemo and Yavitt (2007) presented evidence for AOM in freshwater peatlands used indirect techniques including isotope dilution assays and selective methanogenic inhibitors. Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation NC10 group bacteria (n-damo) were detected in a minerotrophic peatland in the Netherlands that is infiltrated by nitrate-rich ground water (Zhu et al., 2012). Present study represents the first, to our knowledge, characterization of AOM in human disturbed peatlands, including hydrological elements of artificial drainage network. The experiments were conducted with samples of peat from drained peatlands, as well as of water and bottom sediments of ditches from drained Dubnensky mire massif, Moscow region (Chistotin et al., 2006; Sirin et al., 2012). This is the key testing area of our research group in European part of Russia for the long-term greenhouse gases fluxes measurements supported by testing physicochemical parameters, intensity and genomic diversity of CH4-cycling microbial communities. Only in sediments of drainage ditches the transition anaerobic zone was found, where methane and nitrate occurred, suggested the possible ecological niche for n-damo bacteria. The NC10 group methanotrophs were analyzed by PCR

  19. Reduction of greenhouse gases emissions during anoxic wastewater treatment by strengthening nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ru; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Jian; Ma, Hao; Jiang, Liping; Ru, Dongyun

    2017-07-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) is a recently discovered process performed by NC10 phylum, which plays an important role in greenhouse gases (GHG) reduction. In this study, co-existence of n-damo bacteria and methanogens was successfully achieved by using upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. Reactor with inorganic carbon source (CO 2 /H 2 ) showed the highest abundance of n-damo bacteria and the highest n-damo potential activity, resulted in its highest nitrogen removal rate. Significant reduction in GHG was obtained after introduction of n-damo process, especially for N 2 O. Furthermore, GHG emissions decreased with the increase of n-damo bacteria abundance. Community structure analysis found carbon source could influence the diversity of n-damo bacteria indirectly. And phylogenetic analysis showed that all the obtained sequences were assigned to group B, mainly due to in situ production and consumption of CH 4 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Environmental evaluation of coexistence of denitrifying anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in a paddy field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jing; Fu, Liang; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Lu, Yong-Ze; Cheng, Shuk H; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    The nitrate-dependent denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) process, which is metabolized together by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and NC10 phylum bacteria, is expected to be important for the global carbon and nitrogen cycles. However, there are little studies about the existence of this process and the functional microbes in environments. Therefore, the coexistence of DAMO archaea and bacteria in a paddy field was evaluated in this study. Next-generation sequencing showed that the two orders, Methanosarcinales and Nitrospirales, to which DAMO archaea and DAMO bacteria belong, were detected in the four soil samples. Then the in vitro experiments demonstrated both of nitrite- and nitrate-dependent DAMO activities, which confirmed the coexistence of DAMO archaea and DAMO bacteria. It was the first report about the coexistence of DAMO archaea and bacteria in a paddy field. Furthermore, anammox bacteria were detected in two of the four samples. The in vitro experiments did not show anammox activity in the initial period but showed low anammox activity after 20 days' enrichment. These results implicated that anammox bacteria may coexist with DAMO microorganisms in this field, but at a very low percentage.

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis of sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans CCM 4253 cultures having lost the ability to couple anaerobic elemental sulfur oxidation with ferric iron reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Jiri; Sedo, Ondrej; Potesil, David; Janiczek, Oldrich; Zdrahal, Zbynek; Mandl, Martin

    2016-09-01

    In extremely acidic environments, ferric iron can be a thermodynamically favorable electron acceptor during elemental sulfur oxidation by some Acidithiobacillus spp. under anoxic conditions. Quantitative 2D-PAGE proteomic analysis of a resting cell suspension of a sulfur-grown Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans CCM 4253 subculture that had lost its iron-reducing activity revealed 147 protein spots that were downregulated relative to an iron-reducing resting cell suspension of the antecedent sulfur-oxidizing culture and 111 that were upregulated. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of strongly downregulated spots identified several physiologically important proteins that apparently play roles in ferrous iron oxidation, including the outer membrane cytochrome Cyc2 and rusticyanin. Other strongly repressed proteins were associated with sulfur metabolism, including heterodisulfide reductase, thiosulfate:quinone oxidoreductase and sulfide:quinone reductase. Transcript-level analyses revealed additional downregulation of other respiratory genes. Components of the iron-oxidizing system thus apparently play central roles in anaerobic sulfur oxidation coupled with ferric iron reduction in the studied microbial strain. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Biotechnological aspects of anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to sulfate reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulepas, R.J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfate reduction (SR) can be used for the removal and recovery of metals and oxidized sulfur compounds from waste streams. Sulfate-reducing bacteria reduce oxidized sulfur compounds to sulfide. Subsequently, sulfide can precipitate dissolved metals or can be oxidized to elemental sulfur. Both metal

  3. Anaerobic Respiration Using a Complete Oxidative TCA Cycle Drives Multicellular Swarming in Proteus mirabilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alteri, Christopher J.; Himpsl, Stephanie D.; Engstrom, Michael D.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteus mirabilis rapidly migrates across surfaces using a periodic developmental process of differentiation alternating between short swimmer cells and elongated hyperflagellated swarmer cells. To undergo this vigorous flagellum-mediated motility, bacteria must generate a substantial proton gradient across their cytoplasmic membranes by using available energy pathways. We sought to identify the link between energy pathways and swarming differentiation by examining the behavior of defined central metabolism mutants. Mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (fumC and sdhB mutants) caused altered patterns of swarming periodicity, suggesting an aerobic pathway. Surprisingly, the wild-type strain swarmed on agar containing sodium azide, which poisons aerobic respiration; the fumC TCA cycle mutant, however, was unable to swarm on azide. To identify other contributing energy pathways, we screened transposon mutants for loss of swarming on sodium azide and found insertions in the following genes that involved fumarate metabolism or respiration: hybB, encoding hydrogenase; fumC, encoding fumarase; argH, encoding argininosuccinate lyase (generates fumarate); and a quinone hydroxylase gene. These findings validated the screen and suggested involvement of anaerobic electron transport chain components. Abnormal swarming periodicity of fumC and sdhB mutants was associated with the excretion of reduced acidic fermentation end products. Bacteria lacking SdhB were rescued to wild-type pH and periodicity by providing fumarate, independent of carbon source but dependent on oxygen, while fumC mutants were rescued by glycerol, independent of fumarate only under anaerobic conditions. These findings link multicellular swarming patterns with fumarate metabolism and membrane electron transport using a previously unappreciated configuration of both aerobic and anaerobic respiratory chain components. PMID:23111869

  4. Molecular isotopic evidence for anaerobic oxidation of methane in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environment in Okinawa Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, M.; Takai, K.; Inagaki, F.

    2003-04-01

    Large amount of methane in anoxic marine sediments as well as cold seeps and hydrothermal vents is recycled through for an anoxic oxidation of methane processes. Now that combined results of field and laboratory studies revealed that microbiological activity associated with syntrophic consortium of archaea performing reversed methanogenesis and sulfate-reducing bacteria is significant roles in methane recycling, anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). In this study, we examined the diversity of archaeal and bacterial assemblages of AOM using compound-specific stable carbon isotopic and phylogenetic analyses. "Iheya North" in Okinawa Trough is sediment-rich, back arc type hydrothermal system (27^o47'N, 126^o53'E). Sediment samples were collected from three sites where are "bubbling sites", yellow-colored microbial mats are formed with continuous bubbling from the seafloor bottom, vent mussel's colonies site together with slowly venting and simmering, and control site off 100 m distance from thermal vent. This subsea floor structure has important effect in the microbial ecosystem and interaction between their activity and geochemical processes in the subseafloor habitats. Culture-independent, molecular biological analysis clearly indicated the presence of thermophilic methanogens in deeper area having higher temperatures and potential activity of AMOs consortium in the shallower area. AMO is composed with sulfate-reducing bacterial components (Desulfosarcina spp.) and anoxic methane oxidizing archaea (ANME-2). These results were consistent with the results of compound-specific carbon analysis of archaeal biomarkers. They showed extremely depleted 13C contents (-80 ppm ˜ -100 ppm), which also appeared to be capable of directly oxidizing methane.

  5. Denitrification of groundwater using a sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying anaerobic fluidized-bed MBR: performance and bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Chengzhi; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-03-01

    This paper investigates a novel sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (AnFB-MBR) that has the potential to overcome the limitations of conventional sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification systems. The AnFB-MBR produced consistent high-quality product water when fed by a synthetic groundwater with NO3 (-)-N ranging 25-80 mg/L and operated at hydraulic retention times of 0.5-5.0 h. A nitrate removal rate of up to 4.0 g NO3 (-)-N/Lreactord was attained by the bioreactor, which exceeded any reported removal capacity. The flux of AnFB-MBR was maintained in the range of 1.5-15 L m(-2) h(-1). Successful membrane cleaning was practiced with cleaning cycles of 35-81 days, which had no obvious effect on the AnFB-MBR performance. The (15) N-tracer analyses elucidated that nitrogen was converted into (15) N2-N and (15) N-biomass accounting for 88.1-93.1 % and 6.4-11.6 % of the total nitrogen produced, respectively. Only 0.3-0.5 % of removed nitrogen was in form of (15)N2O-N in sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification process, reducing potential risks of a significant amount of N2O emissions. The sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying bacterial consortium was composed mainly of bacteria from Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, and Chloroflexi phyla, with genera Thiobacillus, Sulfurimonas, and Ignavibacteriales dominating the consortium. The pyrosequencing assays also suggested that the stable microbial communities corresponded to the elevated performance of the AnFB-MBR. Overall, this research described relatively high nitrate removal, acceptable flux, indicating future potential for the technology in practice.

  6. Detection of active, potentially acetate-oxidizing syntrophs in an anaerobic digester by flux measurement and formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS) expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Tomoyuki; Sasaki, Daisuke; Haruta, Shin; Shigematsu, Toru; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Ishii, Masaharu; Igarashi, Yasuo

    2011-07-01

    Syntrophic oxidation of acetate, so-called reversed reductive acetogenesis, is one of the most important degradation steps in anaerobic digesters. However, little is known about the genetic diversity of the micro-organisms involved. Here we investigated the activity and composition of potentially acetate-oxidizing syntrophs using a combinatorial approach of flux measurement and transcriptional profiling of the formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (FTHFS) gene, an ecological biomarker for reductive acetogenesis. During the operation of a thermophilic anaerobic digester, volatile fatty acids were mostly depleted, suggesting a high turnover rate for dissolved H(2), and hydrogenotrophic methanogens were the dominant archaeal members. Batch cultivation of the digester microbiota with (13)C-labelled acetate indicated that syntrophic oxidation accounted for 13.1-21.3 % of methane production from acetate. FTHFS genes were transcribed in the absence of carbon monoxide, methoxylated compounds and inorganic electron acceptors other than CO(2), which is implicated in the activity of reversed reductive acetogenesis; however, expression itself does not distinguish whether biosynthesis or biodegradation is functioning. The mRNA- and DNA-based terminal RFLP and clone library analyses indicated that, out of nine FTHFS phylotypes detected, the FTHFS genes from the novel phylotypes I-IV in addition to the known syntroph Thermacetogenium phaeum (i.e. phylotype V) were specifically expressed. These transcripts arose from phylogenetically presumed homoacetogens. The results of this study demonstrate that hitherto unidentified phylotypes of homoacetogens are responsible for syntrophic acetate oxidation in an anaerobic digester.

  7. Quaternary ammonium oxidative demethylation: X-ray crystallographic, resonance Raman, and UV-visible spectroscopic analysis of a Rieske-type demethylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughtry, Kelly D; Xiao, Youli; Stoner-Ma, Deborah; Cho, Eunsun; Orville, Allen M; Liu, Pinghua; Allen, Karen N

    2012-02-08

    Herein, the structure resulting from in situ turnover in a chemically challenging quaternary ammonium oxidative demethylation reaction was captured via crystallographic analysis and analyzed via single-crystal spectroscopy. Crystal structures were determined for the Rieske-type monooxygenase, stachydrine demethylase, in the unliganded state (at 1.6 Å resolution) and in the product complex (at 2.2 Å resolution). The ligand complex was obtained from enzyme aerobically cocrystallized with the substrate stachydrine (N,N-dimethylproline). The ligand electron density in the complex was interpreted as proline, generated within the active site at 100 K by the absorption of X-ray photon energy and two consecutive demethylation cycles. The oxidation state of the Rieske iron-sulfur cluster was characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy throughout X-ray data collection in conjunction with resonance Raman spectra collected before and after diffraction data. Shifts in the absorption band wavelength and intensity as a function of absorbed X-ray dose demonstrated that the Rieske center was reduced by solvated electrons generated by X-ray photons; the kinetics of the reduction process differed dramatically for the liganded complex compared to unliganded demethylase, which may correspond to the observed turnover in the crystal.

  8. Anaerobic Nitroxide-Catalyzed Oxidation of Alcohols Using the NO+/NO center dot Redox Pair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holan, Martin; Jahn, Ullrich

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2014), s. 58-61 ISSN 1523-7060 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-40188S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : oxidation * nitroxides * aldehydes * alcohols * ketones * alkyl nitrites Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 6.364, year: 2014

  9. Environmental control on anaerobic oxidation of methane in the gassy sediments of Eckernforde Bay (German Baltic)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Kruger, M.; Boetius, A.

    2005-01-01

    and March. Field rates of AOM and sulfate reduction (SR) were measured with radiotracer methods. Additional parameters were determined that potentially influence AOM, i.e., temperature, salinity, methane, sulfate, and chlorophyll a. Methanogenesis as well as potential rates of AOM and aerobic oxidation...

  10. The nitrogen cycle in anaerobic methanotrophic mats of the Black Sea is linked to sulfate reduction and biomass decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, Michael; Taubert, Martin; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen-Tomm, Martin; Basen, Mirko; Bastida, Felipe; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Krüger, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME) mats host methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing prokaryotes. Little is known about the nitrogen cycle in these communities. Here, we link the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) to the nitrogen cycle in microbial mats of the Black Sea by using stable isotope probing. We used four different (15)N-labeled sources of nitrogen: dinitrogen, nitrate, nitrite and ammonium. We estimated the nitrogen incorporation rates into the total biomass and the methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR). Dinitrogen played an insignificant role as nitrogen source. Assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction occurred. High rates of nitrate reduction to dinitrogen were stimulated by methane and sulfate, suggesting that oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds such as sulfides was necessary for AOM with nitrate as electron acceptor. Nitrate reduction to dinitrogen occurred also in the absence of methane as electron donor but at six times slower rates. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium was independent of AOM. Ammonium was used for biomass synthesis under all conditions. The pivotal enzyme in AOM coupled to sulfate reduction, MCR, was synthesized from nitrate and ammonium. Results show that AOM coupled to sulfate reduction along with biomass decomposition drive the nitrogen cycle in the ANME mats of the Black Sea and that MCR enzymes are involved in this process. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Year in the Life: Annual Patterns of CO2 and CH4 from a Northern Finland Peatland, Including Anaerobic Methane Oxidation and Summer Ebullition Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K.; Lipson, D.; Biasi, C.; Dorodnikov, M.; Männistö, M.; Lai, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    The major ecological controls on methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes in northern wetland systems are well known, yet estimates of source/sink magnitudes are often incongruous with measured rates. This mismatch persists because holistic flux datasets are rare, preventing 'whole picture' determinations of flux controls. To combat this, we measured net CO2 and CH4 fluxes from September 2012-2013 within a peatland in northern Lapland, Finland. In addition, we performed in situ manipulations and in vitro soil incubations to quantify anaerobic methane oxidation and methanogenic rates as they related to alternative electron acceptor availability. Average annual fluxes varied substantially between different depressions within the wetland, a pattern that persisted through all seasons. Season was a strong predictor of both CO2 and CH4 flux rates, yet CH4 rates were not related to melt-season 10cm or 30cm soil temperatures, and only poorly predicted with air temperatures. We found evidence for both autumnal and spring thaw CH4 bursts, collectively accounting for 26% of annual CH4 flux, although the autumnal burst was more than 5 fold larger than the spring burst. CH4 ebullition measured throughout the growing season augmented the CH4 source load by a factor of 1.5, and was linked with fine-scale spatial heterogeneity within the wetland. Surprisingly, CH4 flux rates were insensitive to Fe(III) and humic acid soil amendments, both of which amplified CO2 fluxes. Using in vitro incubations, we determined anaerobic methane oxidation and methanogenesis rates. Measured anaerobic oxidation rates showed potential consumption of between 6-39% of the methane produced, contributing approximately 1% of total carbon dioxide flux. Treatments of nitrate, sulfate and ferric iron showed that nitrate suppressed methanogenesis, but were not associated with anaerobic oxidation rates.

  12. Genomic Analysis of Anaerobic Respiration in the Archaeon Halobacterium sp. Strain NRC-1: Dimethyl Sulfoxide and Trimethylamine N-Oxide as Terminal Electron Acceptors†

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Jochen A.; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated anaerobic respiration of the archaeal model organism Halobacterium sp. strain NRC-1 by using phenotypic and genetic analysis, bioinformatics, and transcriptome analysis. NRC-1 was found to grow on either dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) as the sole terminal electron acceptor, with a doubling time of 1 day. An operon, dmsREABCD, encoding a putative regulatory protein, DmsR, a molybdopterin oxidoreductase of the DMSO reductase family (DmsEABC), and...

  13. Modeling the competitive effect of ammonium oxidizers and heterotrophs on the degradation of MTBE in a packed bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waul, Christopher Kevin; Arvin, Erik; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2008-01-01

    where the co-contaminants were oxidized. The results of the model further indicate that contradicting findings in the literature about the effects of BTEX on the degradation of MTBE are mainly due to differences in the study methodologies. Effects such as short-term toxicity of BTEX and the lack...

  14. Correlation between microbial community and granule conductivity in anaerobic bioreactors for brewery wastewater treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Pravin; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Werner, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Prior investigation of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating brewery wastes suggested that direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) significantly contributed to interspecies electron transfer to methanogens. To investigate DIET in granules further, the electrical conducti......Prior investigation of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating brewery wastes suggested that direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) significantly contributed to interspecies electron transfer to methanogens. To investigate DIET in granules further, the electrical...... conductivity and bacterial community composition of granules in fourteen samples from four different UASB reactors treating brewery wastes were investigated. All of the UASB granules were electrically conductive whereas control granules from ANAMMOX (ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation) reactors and microbial...... granules from an aerobic bioreactor designed for phosphate removal were not. There was a moderate correlation (r = 0.67) between the abundance of Geobacter species in the UASB granules and granule conductivity, suggesting that Geobacter contributed to granule conductivity. These results, coupled...

  15. Ambient temperature SNAD process treating anaerobic digester liquor of swine wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daverey, Achlesh; Hung, Nien-Tzu; Dutta, Kasturi; Lin, Jih-Gaw

    2013-08-01

    In present study, effluent from anaerobic digestion of swine wastewater was treated by the simultaneous partial nitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation and denitrification (SNAD) process using a lab scale 5L sequencing batch reactor (SBR) under ambient temperature. The fluctuation of anaerobic digester liquor quality (COD, 387 ± 145 mg/L; TKN, 662 ± 190 mg/L; NH₄(+)-N, 519 ± 134 mg/L) and temperature created difficulties to develop a stable SNAD process in the SBR (days 1-285). Fed batch feeding strategy was adopted to have a stable condition in the reactor and overcome the negative effects of organic nitrogen. The average total nitrogen, NH₄(+)-N and COD removal efficiencies in the SBR under steady state conditions (days 485-523) were 80%, 96% and 76%, respectively. The results showed that presence of organic nitrogen, mode of feeding and reactor temperature affects the SNAD process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Enrichment of sulfate reducing anaerobic methane oxidizing community dominated by ANME-1 from Ginsburg Mud Volcano (Gulf of Cadiz) sediment in a biotrickling filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Susma; Cassarini, Chiara; Rene, Eldon R; Zhang, Yu; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2018-07-01

    This study was performed to enrich anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) present in sediment from the Ginsburg Mud Volcano (Gulf of Cadiz) in a polyurethane foam packed biotrickling filter (BTF). The BTF was operated at 20 (±2) °C, ambient pressure with continuous supply of methane for 248 days. Sulfate reduction with simultaneous sulfide production (accumulating ∼7 mM) after 200 days of BTF operation evidenced anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction. High-throughput sequence analysis of 16S rRNA genes showed that after 248 days of BTF operation, the ANME clades enriched to more than 50% of the archaeal sequences, including ANME-1b (40.3%) and ANME-2 (10.0%). Enrichment of the AOM community was beneficial to Desulfobacteraceae, which increased from 0.2% to 1.8%. Both the inoculum and the BTF enrichment contained large populations of anaerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria, suggesting extensive sulfur cycling in the BTF. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Anaerobic arsenite oxidation with an electrode serving as the sole electron acceptor: A novel approach to the bioremediation of arsenic-polluted groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pous, Narcis [Laboratory of Chemical and Environmental Engineering (LEQUiA), Institute of the Environment, University of Girona, C/Maria Aurèlia Capmany, 69 E-17071 Girona (Spain); Casentini, Barbara; Rossetti, Simona; Fazi, Stefano [Water Research Institute (IRSA-CNR), National Research Council, Via Salaria Km 29.300, 00015 Monterotondo (Italy); Puig, Sebastià [Laboratory of Chemical and Environmental Engineering (LEQUiA), Institute of the Environment, University of Girona, C/Maria Aurèlia Capmany, 69 E-17071 Girona (Spain); Aulenta, Federico, E-mail: aulenta@irsa.cnr.it [Water Research Institute (IRSA-CNR), National Research Council, Via Salaria Km 29.300, 00015 Monterotondo (Italy)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • As(III) was oxidized to As(V) in a bioelectrochemical system. • A polarized graphite electrode served as electron acceptor. • Gammaproteobacteria were the dominating organisms at the electrode. - Abstract: Arsenic contamination of soil and groundwater is a serious problem worldwide. Here we show that anaerobic oxidation of As(III) to As(V), a form which is more extensively and stably adsorbed onto metal-oxides, can be achieved by using a polarized (+497 mV vs. SHE) graphite anode serving as terminal electron acceptor in the microbial metabolism. The characterization of the microbial populations at the electrode, by using in situ detection methods, revealed the predominance of gammaproteobacteria. In principle, the proposed bioelectrochemical oxidation process would make it possible to provide As(III)-oxidizing microorganisms with a virtually unlimited, low-cost and low-maintenance electron acceptor as well as with a physical support for microbial attachment.

  18. Evidence for nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation as a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bao-lan; Shen, Li-dong; Lian, Xu; Zhu, Qun; Liu, Shuai; Huang, Qian; He, Zhan-fei; Geng, Sha; Cheng, Dong-qing; Lou, Li-ping; Xu, Xiang-yang; Zheng, Ping; He, Yun-feng

    2014-01-01

    The process of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) was recently discovered and shown to be mediated by “Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera” (M. oxyfera). Here, evidence for n-damo in three different freshwater wetlands located in southeastern China was obtained using stable isotope measurements, quantitative PCR assays, and 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase gene clone library analyses. Stable isotope experiments confirmed the occurrence of n-damo in the examined wetlands, and the potential n-damo rates ranged from 0.31 to 5.43 nmol CO2 per gram of dry soil per day at different depths of soil cores. A combined analysis of 16S rRNA and particulate methane monooxygenase genes demonstrated that M. oxyfera-like bacteria were mainly present in the deep soil with a maximum abundance of 3.2 × 107 gene copies per gram of dry soil. It is estimated that ∼0.51 g of CH4 m−2 per year could be linked to the n-damo process in the examined wetlands based on the measured potential n-damo rates. This study presents previously unidentified confirmation that the n-damo process is a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in wetlands, and n-damo has the potential to be a globally important methane sink due to increasing nitrogen pollution. PMID:24616523

  19. On the Mechanisms Linking Nitrogen Oxides to Trends in Ammonium Nitrate Aerosol over the Last Decade in the San Joaquin Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusede, S. E.; Zhang, Q.; Parworth, C.; Kim, H.; Shusterman, A.; Saleh, A.; Duffey, K.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Valin, L. C.; Fried, A.; Nowak, J. B.; Crawford, J. H.; Cohen, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen oxide (NOx) abundances across the U.S. have fallen steadily over the last fifteen years. Patterns in anthropogenic sources result in 2-fold lower NOx on weekends than weekdays largely without co-occurring changes in other emissions. These trends taken together provide a near perfect NOx constraint on the nonlinear chemistry of ozone, on the key oxidants nitrate radical (NO3) and hydroxyl radical (OH), and on secondary aerosol formation. We use this NOx constraint to interpret trends in wintertime PM2.5 over the last decade in San Joaquin Valley, California, a location with severe aerosol pollution and where a large portion of the total aerosol mass is ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3). We combine the 12-year routine monitoring record and the air- and ground-based DISCOVER-AQ-2013 datasets to quantify the impact of NOx emission controls on the frequency of wintertime exceedances of the national PM2.5 standard. Nitrate ion (NO3-) is the oxidation product of NO2 and is formed by distinct daytime and nighttime pathways, both of which are nonlinear functions of the NO2 abundance. We present observationally derived decadal trends in both pathways and show that NOx reductions have worked to simultaneously increase daytime and decrease nighttime NH4NO3 production over the last 15 years. The net effect has been a substantial decrease in NH4NO3 via decreased NO3-radical initiated production in the nocturnal residual layer, a layer largely separated from nighttime emissions at the surface. Whereas NO3- production in the nocturnal residual layer drove NH4NO3 chemistry over the last decade, OH-initiated chemistry at the surface is poised to be the most important source of NH4NO3 in the next decade.

  20. Ethanol production from maize silage as lignocellulosic biomass in anaerobically digested and wet-oxidized manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr; Lisiecki, P.; Holm-Nielsen, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    was investigated using 2 1 bioreactors. Wet oxidation performed for 20 min at 121 degrees C was found as the most suitable pretreatment conditions for AD manure. High ammonia concentration and significant amount of macro- and micro-nutrients in the AD manure had a positive influence on the ethanol fermentation....... No extra nitrogen source was needed in the fermentation broth. It was shown that the AD manure could successfully substitute process water in SSF of pretreated lignocellulosic fibres. Theoretical ethanol yields of 82% were achieved, giving 30.8 kg ethanol per 100 kg dry mass of maize silage. (C) 2007...

  1. Comment on "Selective anaerobic oxidation of methane enables direct synthesis of methanol".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periana, Roy A

    2017-10-13

    Sushkevich et al (Reports, 5 May 2017, p. 523) report on the use of water to oxidize methane to methanol. This seems problematic because the reaction of CH 4 and water to generate methanol and H 2 is highly unfavorable at any temperature (Δ G of reaction ≈ +28 kcal/mol at 200°C, equilibrium constant K ≈ 10 -13 ). Consequently, even if the reaction is separated into two steps, it seems inconceivable to carry out such a net reaction in a practical manner. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. A multi-defense strategy: Enhancing bactericidal activity of a medical grade polymer with a nitric oxide donor and surface-immobilized quaternary ammonium compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Jitendra; Gao, Jing; Goudie, Marcus J; Hopkins, Sean P; Locklin, Jason; Handa, Hitesh

    2017-08-01

    Although the use of biomedical devices in hospital-based care is inevitable, unfortunately, it is also one of the leading causes of the nosocomial infections, and thus demands development of novel antimicrobial materials for medical device fabrication. In the current study, a multi-defense mechanism against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is demonstrated by combining a nitric oxide (NO) releasing agent with a quaternary ammonium antimicrobial that can be covalently grafted to medical devices. Antibacterial polymeric composites were fabricated by incorporating an NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP) in CarboSil® polymer and top coated with surface immobilized benzophenone based quaternary ammonium antimicrobial (BPAM) small molecule. The results suggest that SNAP and BPAM individually have a different degree of toxicity towards Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, while the SNAP-BPAM combination is effective in reducing both types of adhered viable bacteria equally well. SNAP-BPAM combinations reduced the adhered viable Pseudomonas aeruginosa by 99.0% and Staphylococcus aureus by 99.98% as compared to the control CarboSil films. Agar diffusion tests demonstrate that the diffusive nature of NO kills bacteria beyond the direct point of contact which the non-leaching BPAM cannot achieve alone. This is important for potential application in biofilm eradication. The live-dead bacteria staining shows that the SNAP-BPAM combination has more attached dead bacteria (than live) as compared to the controls. The SNAP-BPAM films have increased hydrophilicity and higher NO flux as compared to the SNAP films useful for preventing blood protein and bacterial adhesion. Overall the combination of SNAP and BPAM imparts different attributes to the polymeric composite that can be used in the fabrication of antimicrobial surfaces for various medical device applications. A significant increase in the biomedical device related infections (BDRIs), inability of

  3. Relating methanogen community structure and anaerobic digester function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocher, B T W; Cherukuri, K; Maki, J S; Johnson, M; Zitomer, D H

    2015-03-01

    Much remains unknown about the relationships between microbial community structure and anaerobic digester function. However, knowledge of links between community structure and function, such as specific methanogenic activity (SMA) and COD removal rate, are valuable to improve anaerobic bioprocesses. In this work, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) were developed using multiple linear regression (MLR) to predict SMA using methanogen community structure descriptors for 49 cultures. Community descriptors were DGGE demeaned standardized band intensities for amplicons of a methanogen functional gene (mcrA). First, predictive accuracy of MLR QSARs was assessed using cross validation with training (n = 30) and test sets (n = 19) for glucose and propionate SMA data. MLR equations correlating band intensities and SMA demonstrated good predictability for glucose (q(2) = 0.54) and propionate (q(2) = 0.53). Subsequently, data from all 49 cultures were used to develop QSARs to predict SMA values. Higher intensities of two bands were correlated with higher SMA values; high abundance of methanogens associated with these two bands should be encouraged to attain high SMA values. QSARs are helpful tools to identify key microorganisms or to study and improve many bioprocesses. Development of new, more robust QSARs is encouraged for anaerobic digestion or other bioprocesses, including nitrification, nitritation, denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation, and enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Copolymerization and terpolymerization of carbon dioxide/propylene oxide/phthalic anhydride using a (salenCo(III complex tethering four quaternary ammonium salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Yeob Jeon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The (salenCo(III complex 1 tethering four quaternary ammonium salts, which is a highly active catalyst in CO2/epoxide copolymerizations, shows high activity for propylene oxide/phthalic anhydride (PO/PA copolymerizations and PO/CO2/PA terpolymerizations. In the PO/PA copolymerizations, full conversion of PA was achieved within 5 h, and strictly alternating copolymers of poly(1,2-propylene phthalates were afforded without any formation of ether linkages. In the PO/CO2/PA terpolymerizations, full conversion of PA was also achieved within 4 h. The resulting polymers were gradient poly(1,2-propylene carbonate-co-phthalates because of the drift in the PA concentration during the terpolymerization. Both polymerizations showed immortal polymerization character; therefore, the molecular weights were determined by the activity (g/mol-1 and the number of chain-growing sites per 1 [anions in 1 (5 + water (present as impurity + ethanol (deliberately fed], and the molecular weight distributions were narrow (Mw/Mn, 1.05–1.5. Because of the extremely high activity of 1, high-molecular-weight polymers were generated (Mn up to 170,000 and 350,000 for the PO/PA copolymerization and PO/CO2/PA terpolymerization, respectively. The terpolymers bearing a substantial number of PA units (fPA, 0.23 showed a higher glass-transition temperature (48 °C than the CO2/PO alternating copolymer (40 °C.

  5. Copolymerization and terpolymerization of carbon dioxide/propylene oxide/phthalic anhydride using a (salen)Co(III) complex tethering four quaternary ammonium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jong Yeob; Eo, Seong Chan; Varghese, Jobi Kodiyan; Lee, Bun Yeoul

    2014-01-01

    The (salen)Co(III) complex 1 tethering four quaternary ammonium salts, which is a highly active catalyst in CO2/epoxide copolymerizations, shows high activity for propylene oxide/phthalic anhydride (PO/PA) copolymerizations and PO/CO2/PA terpolymerizations. In the PO/PA copolymerizations, full conversion of PA was achieved within 5 h, and strictly alternating copolymers of poly(1,2-propylene phthalate)s were afforded without any formation of ether linkages. In the PO/CO2/PA terpolymerizations, full conversion of PA was also achieved within 4 h. The resulting polymers were gradient poly(1,2-propylene carbonate-co-phthalate)s because of the drift in the PA concentration during the terpolymerization. Both polymerizations showed immortal polymerization character; therefore, the molecular weights were determined by the activity (g/mol-1) and the number of chain-growing sites per 1 [anions in 1 (5) + water (present as impurity) + ethanol (deliberately fed)], and the molecular weight distributions were narrow (M w/M n, 1.05-1.5). Because of the extremely high activity of 1, high-molecular-weight polymers were generated (M n up to 170,000 and 350,000 for the PO/PA copolymerization and PO/CO2/PA terpolymerization, respectively). The terpolymers bearing a substantial number of PA units (f PA, 0.23) showed a higher glass-transition temperature (48 °C) than the CO2/PO alternating copolymer (40 °C).

  6. Inhibition factors and Kinetic model for ammonium inhibition on the anammox process of the SNAD biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhaoming; Li, Jun; Ma, Jing; Du, Jia; Wang, Fan; Bian, Wei; Zhang, Yanzhuo; Zhao, Baihang

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity of simultaneous partial nitrification, anammox and denitrification (SNAD) biofilm with different substrate concentrations and pH values. Kaldnes rings taken from the SNAD biofilm reactor were incubated in batch tests to determine the anammox activity. Haldane model was applied to investigate the ammonium inhibition on anammox process. As for nitrite inhibition, the NH 4 + -N removal rate of anammox process remained 87.4% of the maximum rate with the NO 2 - -N concentration of 100mg/L. Based on the results of Haldane model, no obvious difference in kinetic coefficients was observed under high or low free ammonia (FA) conditions, indicating that ammonium rather than FA was the true inhibitor for anammox process of SNAD biofilm. With the pH value of 7.0, the r max , Ks and K I of ammonium were 0.209kg NO 2 - -N/kg VSS/day, 9.5mg/L and 422mg/L, respectively. The suitable pH ranges for anammox process were 5.0 to 9.0. These results indicate that the SNAD biofilm performs excellent tolerance to adverse conditions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Nitrate reduction, nitrous oxide formation, and anaerobic ammonia oxidation to nitrite in the gut of soil-feeding termites (Cubitermes and Ophiotermes spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngugi, David Kamanda; Brune, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Soil-feeding termites play important roles in the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen in tropical soils. Through the mineralization of nitrogenous humus components, their intestinal tracts accumulate enormous amounts of ammonia, and nitrate and nitrite concentrations are several orders of magnitude above those in the ingested soil. Here, we studied the metabolism of nitrate in the different gut compartments of two Cubitermes and one Ophiotermes species using (15)N isotope tracer analysis. Living termites emitted N(2) at rates ranging from 3.8 to 6.8 nmol h(-1) (g fresh wt.)(-1). However, in homogenates of individual gut sections, denitrification was restricted to the posterior hindgut, whereas nitrate ammonification occurred in all gut compartments and was the prevailing process in the anterior gut. Potential rates of nitrate ammonification for the entire intestinal tract were tenfold higher than those of denitrification, implying that ammonification is the major sink for ingested nitrate in the intestinal tract of soil-feeding termites. Because nitrate is efficiently reduced already in the anterior gut, reductive processes in the posterior gut compartments must be fuelled by an endogenous source of oxidized nitrogen species. Quite unexpectedly, we observed an anaerobic oxidation of (15)N-labelled ammonia to nitrite, especially in the P4 section, which is presumably driven by ferric iron; nitrification and anammox activities were not detected. Two of the termite species also emitted substantial amounts of N(2) O, ranging from 0.4 to 3.9 nmol h(-1) (g fresh wt.)(-1), providing direct evidence that soil-feeding termites are a hitherto unrecognized source of this greenhouse gas in tropical soils. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Nitrate reduction, nitrous oxide formation, and anaerobic ammonia oxidation to nitrite in the gut of soil-feeding termites (Cubitermes and Ophiotermes spp.)

    KAUST Repository

    Ngugi, David

    2011-11-28

    Soil-feeding termites play important roles in the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen in tropical soils. Through the mineralization of nitrogenous humus components, their intestinal tracts accumulate enormous amounts of ammonia, and nitrate and nitrite concentrations are several orders of magnitude above those in the ingested soil. Here, we studied the metabolism of nitrate in the different gut compartments of two Cubitermes and one Ophiotermes species using 15N isotope tracer analysis. Living termites emitted N 2 at rates ranging from 3.8 to 6.8nmolh -1 (g fresh wt.) -1. However, in homogenates of individual gut sections, denitrification was restricted to the posterior hindgut, whereas nitrate ammonification occurred in all gut compartments and was the prevailing process in the anterior gut. Potential rates of nitrate ammonification for the entire intestinal tract were tenfold higher than those of denitrification, implying that ammonification is the major sink for ingested nitrate in the intestinal tract of soil-feeding termites. Because nitrate is efficiently reduced already in the anterior gut, reductive processes in the posterior gut compartments must be fuelled by an endogenous source of oxidized nitrogen species. Quite unexpectedly, we observed an anaerobic oxidation of 15N-labelled ammonia to nitrite, especially in the P4 section, which is presumably driven by ferric iron; nitrification and anammox activities were not detected. Two of the termite species also emitted substantial amounts of N 2O, ranging from 0.4 to 3.9nmolh -1 (g fresh wt.) -1, providing direct evidence that soil-feeding termites are a hitherto unrecognized source of this greenhouse gas in tropical soils. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Ammonium removal pathways and microbial community in GAC-sand dual media filter in drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuo; Xie, Shuguang; Zhang, Xiaojian; Yang, Zhiyu; Ding, Wei; Liao, Xiaobin; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Chao

    2012-01-01

    A GAC-sand dual media filter (GSF) was devised as an alternative solution for drinking water treatment plant to tackle the raw water polluted by ammonium in place of expensive ozone-GAC processes or bio-pretreatments. The ammonium removal pathways and microbial community in the GSFs were investigated. The concentrations of ammonium, nitrite and nitrate nitrogen were monitored along the filter. Total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) loss occurred during the filtration. For 1 mg ammonium removal, the TIN loss was as high as 0.35 mg, DO consumption was 3.06 mg, and alkalinity consumption was 5.55 mg. It was assumed that both nitrification and denitrification processes occur in the filters to fit the TIN loss and low DO consumption. During the filtration, nitritation, nitrification and nitritation-anaerobic ammonium oxidation processes probably occur, while traditional nitrification and denitrification and simultaneous nitrification and denitrification processes may occur. In the GSFs, Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira are likely to be involved in nitrification processes, while Novosphingobium, Comamonadaceae and Oxalobacteraceae may be involved in denitrification processes.

  10. Novel Ammonium Metal Borohydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinderslev, Jakob; Jepsen, Lars Haahr; Cerny, Radovan

    halide-free ammonium metal borohydrides is presented, which have the chemical compositions (NH4)xM(BH4)n+x. The ammonium metal borohydrides are synthesized by cryomilling of NH4BH4 – M(BH4)n (M = Li, Na, K, Mg, Sr, Y, Mn, La, Gd) in different ratios. A new range of ammonium metal borohydrides is formed...

  11. Response of anaerobic granular sludge to iron oxide nanoparticles and multi-wall carbon nanotubes during beet sugar industrial wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambuchi, John J; Zhang, Zhaohan; Shan, Lili; Liang, Dandan; Zhang, Peng; Feng, Yujie

    2017-06-15

    The accelerated use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in the consumer and industrial sectors has triggered the need to understand their potential environmental impact. The response of anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) to IONPs and MWCNTs during the anaerobic digestion of beet sugar industrial wastewater (BSIW) was investigated in this study. The IONPs increased the biogas and subsequent CH 4 production rates in comparison with MWCNTs and the control samples. This might be due to the utilization of IONPs and MWCNTs as conduits for electron transfer toward methanogens. The MWCNTs majorly enriched the bacterial growth, while IONP enrichment mostly benefitted the archaea population. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that AGS produced extracellular polymeric substances, which interacted with the IONPs and MWCNTs. This provided cell protection and prevented the nanoparticles from piercing through the membranes and thus cytotoxicity. The results provide useful information and insights on the adjustment of anaerobic microorganisms to the natural complex environment based on nanoparticles infiltration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A long-term cultivation of an anaerobic methane-oxidizing microbial community from deep-sea methane-seep sediment using a continuous-flow bioreactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Aoki

    Full Text Available Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM in marine sediments is an important global methane sink, but the physiological characteristics of AOM-associated microorganisms remain poorly understood. Here we report the cultivation of an AOM microbial community from deep-sea methane-seep sediment using a continuous-flow bioreactor with polyurethane sponges, called the down-flow hanging sponge (DHS bioreactor. We anaerobically incubated deep-sea methane-seep sediment collected from the Nankai Trough, Japan, for 2,013 days in the bioreactor at 10°C. Following incubation, an active AOM activity was confirmed by a tracer experiment using 13C-labeled methane. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that phylogenetically diverse Archaea and Bacteria grew in the bioreactor. After 2,013 days of incubation, the predominant archaeal components were anaerobic methanotroph (ANME-2a, Deep-Sea Archaeal Group, and Marine Benthic Group-D, and Gammaproteobacteria was the dominant bacterial lineage. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that ANME-1 and -2a, and most ANME-2c cells occurred without close physical interaction with potential bacterial partners. Our data demonstrate that the DHS bioreactor system is a useful system for cultivating fastidious methane-seep-associated sedimentary microorganisms.

  13. MRI-monitored intra-tumoral injection of iron-oxide labeled Clostridium novyi-NT anaerobes in pancreatic carcinoma mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linfeng Zheng

    Full Text Available To validate the feasibility of labeling Clostridium novyi-NT (C.novyi-NT anaerobes with iron-oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and demonstrate the potential to use MRI to visualize intra-tumoral delivery of these iron-oxide labeled C.novyi-NT during percutaneous injection procedures.All studies were approved by IACUC. C.novyi-NT were labeled with hybrid iron-oxide Texas red nanoparticles. Growth of labeled and control samples were evaluated with optical density. Labeling was confirmed with confocal fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. MRI were performed using a 7 Tesla scanner with T2*-weighted (T2*W sequence. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR measurements were performed for phantoms and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR measurements performed in C57BL/6 mice (n = 12 with Panc02 xenografts before and after percutaneous injection of iron-oxide labeled C.novyi-NT. MRI was repeated 3 and 7 days post-injection. Hematoxylin-eosin (HE, Prussian blue and Gram staining of tumor specimens were performed for confirmation of intra-tumoral delivery.Iron-oxide labeling had no influence upon C.novyi-NT growth. The signal intensity (SI within T2*W images was significantly decreased for iron-oxide labeled C.novyi-NT phantoms compared to unlabeled controls. Under confocal fluorescence microscopy, the iron-oxide labeled C.novyi-NT exhibited a uniform red fluorescence consistent with observed regions of DAPI staining and overall labeling efficiency was 100% (all DAPI stained C.novyi-NT exhibited red fluorescence. Within TEM images, a large number iron granules were observed within the iron-oxide labeled C.novyi-NT; these were not observed within unlabeled controls. Intra-procedural MRI measurements permitted in vivo visualization of the intra-tumoral distribution of iron-oxide labeled C.novyi-NT following percutaneous injection (depicted as punctate regions of SI reductions within T2*-weighted images; tumor SNR decreased

  14. Ammonium nitrate explosion hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negovanović Milanka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate (AN primarily is used as a fertilizer but it is also very important compound in the production of industrial explosives. The application of ammonium nitrate in the production of industrial explosives was related with the early era of Nobel dynamite and widely increased with the appearance of blasting agents such as ANFO and Slurry, in the middle of the last Century. Throughout the world millions of tons of ammonium nitrate are produced annually and handled without incident. Although ammonium nitrate generally is used safely, accidental explosions involving AN have high impact resulting in loss of lives and destruction of property. The paper presents the basic properties of ammonium nitrate as well as hazards in handling of ammonium nitrate in order to prevent accidents. Several accidents with explosions of ammonium nitrate resulted in catastrophic consequences are listed in the paper as examples of non-compliance with prescribed procedures.

  15. Improving anaerobic digestion of pig manure by adding in the same reactor a stabilizing agent formulated with low-grade magnesium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero-Güiza, M.S.; Astals, S.; Chimenos, J.M.; Martínez, M.; Mata-Alvarez, J.

    2014-01-01

    Struvite precipitation and pig manure anaerobic digestion were coupled in the same reactor in order to mitigate the inhibitory effect of free ammonia and avoid precipitator costs. The stabilizing agent used to facilitate struvite precipitation was formulated with low-grade magnesium oxide by-product; an approach that would notably reduce struvite processing costs. The interaction between pig manure and stabilizing agent was analyzed in batch experiments, on a wide range of stabilizing agent additions from 5 to 100 kg m −3 . The monitoring of the pH and ammonia removal during 24 h showed the high capacity of the stabilizing agent to remove ammonia; removal efficiencies above 80% were obtained from 40 kg m −3 . However, a long-term anaerobic digester operation was required to assess the feasibility of the process and to ensure that the stabilizing agent does not introduce any harmful compound for the anaerobic biomass. In this vein, the addition of 5 and 30 kg m −3 of the stabilizing agent in a pig manure continuous digester resulted in a 25% (0.17 m 3  kg −1 ) and a 40% (0.19 m 3  kg −1 ) increase in methane production per mass of volatile solid, respectively, when compared with the reference digester (0.13 m 3  kg −1 ). Moreover, the stability of the process during four hydraulic retention times guarantees that the stabilizing agent did not exert a negative effect on the consortium of microorganisms. Finally, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the presence of struvite as well as two precipitation mechanisms, struvite precipitation on the stabilizing agent surface and in the bulk solution. - Highlights: • Anaerobic digestion and struvite precipitation were satisfactorily coupled. • The stabilizing agent showed high ammonia removals efficiencies. • The stabilizing agent improved the methane production of a pig manure digester. • The stabilizing agent does not introduce harmful compound for the

  16. Online and offline mass spectrometric study of the impact of oxidation and ageing on glyoxal chemistry and uptake onto ammonium sulfate aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jacqueline F; Baeza-Romero, M Teresa; Finessi, Emanuela; Rickard, Andrew R; Healy, Robert M; Peppe, Salvatore; Adams, Thomas J; Daniels, Mark J S; Ball, Stephen M; Goodall, Iain C A; Monks, Paul S; Borrás, Esther; Muñoz, Amalia

    2013-01-01

    Recent laboratory and modelling studies have shown that reactive uptake of low molecular weight alpha-dicarbonyls such as glyoxal (GLY) by aerosols is a potentially significant source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). However, previous studies disagree in the magnitude of the uptake of GLY, the mechanism involved and the physicochemical factors affecting particle formation. In this study, the chemistry of GLY with ammonium sulfate (AS) in both bulk laboratory solutions and in aerosol particles is investigated. For the first time, Aerosol Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (ATOFMS), a single particle technique, is used together with offline (ESI-MS and LC-MS2) mass spectrometric techniques to investigate the change in composition of bulk solutions of GLY and AS resulting from aqueous photooxidation by OH and from ageing of the solutions in the dark. The mass spectral ions obtained in these laboratory studies were used as tracers of GLY uptake and chemistry in AS seed particles in a series of experiments carried out under dark and natural irradiated conditions at the outdoor European Photo-reactor (EUPHORE). Glyoxal oligomers formed were not detected by the ATOFMS, perhaps due to inefficient absorption at the laser wavelength. However, the presence of organic nitrogen compounds, formed by reaction of GLY with ammonia was confirmed, resulting in an increase in the absorption efficiency of the aerosol, and this increased the number of particles successfully ionised by the ATOFMS. A number of light absorbing organic nitrogen species, including 1H-imidazole, 1H-imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde, 2,2'-bis-imidazole and a glyoxal substituted 2,2'-bisimidazole, previously identified in aqueous laboratory solutions, were also identified in chamber aerosol and formed on atmospherically relevant timescales. An additional compound, predicted to be 1,2,5-oxadiazole, had an enhanced formation rate when the chamber was open and is predicted to be formed via a light activated pathway

  17. A mass balance model to estimate the rate of composting, methane oxidation and anaerobic digestion in soil covers and shallow waste layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee, Reza; Obersky, Lizanne; Xie, Sihuang; Clarke, William P

    2017-05-01

    Although CH 4 oxidation in landfill soil covers is widely studied, the extent of composting and CH 4 oxidation in underlying waste layers has been speculated but not measured. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a mass balance model to estimate the simultaneous rates of anaerobic digestion (r AD ), CH 4 oxidation (r OX ) and composting (r COM ) in environments where O 2 penetration is variable and zones of aerobic and anaerobic activity are intermingled. The modelled domain could include, as an example, a soil cover and the underlying shallow waste to a nominated depth. The proposed model was demonstrated on a blend of biogas from three separate known sources of gas representing the three reaction processes: (i) a bottle of laboratory grade 50:50% CH 4 :CO 2 gas representing anaerobic digestion biogas; (ii) an aerated 250mL bottle containing food waste that represented composting activity; and (iii) an aerated 250mL bottle containing non-degradable graphite granules inoculated with methanotrophs and incubated with CH 4 and O 2 to represent methanotrophic activity. CO 2 , CH 4 , O 2 and the stable isotope 13 C-CO 2 were chosen as the components for the mass balance model. The three reaction rates, r (=r AD , r OX , r COM ) were calculated as fitting parameters to the overdetermined set of 4mass balance equations with the net flux of these components from the bottles q (= [Formula: see text] , [Formula: see text] , [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] ) as inputs to the model. The coefficient of determination (r 2 ) for observed versus modelled values of r were 1.00, 0.97, 0.98 when the stoichiometry of each reaction was based on gas yields measured in the individual bottles and q was calculated by summing yields from the three bottles. r 2 deteriorated to 0.95, 0.96, 0.87 when using an average stoichiometry from 11 incubations of each of the composting and methane oxidation processes. The significant deterioration in the estimation of r

  18. Thermal decomposition of phase-stabilised ammonium nitrate (PSAM), HTPB based propellants. The effect of iron(III)oxide burning-rate catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalheira, P.; Gadiot, G.M.H.J.L.; Klerk, W.P.C. de

    1995-01-01

    Phase-stabilised ammonium nitrate (PSAN) and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) are the main ingredients of propellants used with success in some pyrotechnic igniter components of the VULCAIN liquid rocket engine for the ARIANE 5. Small amounts of selected additives play an important role in

  19. Combining in situ chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to reduce contaminant mass and leachability in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassidy, Daniel P., E-mail: daniel.cassidy@wmich.edu [Department of Geosciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Srivastava, Vipul J., E-mail: vipul.srivastava@ch2m.com [CH2M HILL, 125S Wacker, Ste 3000, Chicago, IL 60606 (United States); Dombrowski, Frank J., E-mail: frank.dombrowski@we-energies.com [We Energies, 333W Everett St., A231, Milwaukee, WI 53203 (United States); Lingle, James W., E-mail: jlingle@epri.com [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), 4927W Willow Road, Brown Deer, WI 53223 (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Portland cement and lime activated persulfate by increasing pH and temperature. • Chemical oxidation achieved BTEX and PAH removal ranging from 55% to 75%. • Activating persulfate with ISS amendments reduced leachability more than NaOH. • Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded PAHs within weeks after ISCO finished. • ISCO, ISS, and anaerobic bioremediation were combined in a single application. - Abstract: Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks.

  20. Correlation between microbial community and granule conductivity in anaerobic bioreactors for brewery wastewater treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrestha, Pravin; Malvankar, Nikhil S.; Werner, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    conductivity and bacterial community composition of granules in fourteen samples from four different UASB reactors treating brewery wastes were investigated. All of the UASB granules were electrically conductive whereas control granules from ANAMMOX (ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation) reactors and microbial......Prior investigation of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating brewery wastes suggested that direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) significantly contributed to interspecies electron transfer to methanogens. To investigate DIET in granules further, the electrical...... granules from an aerobic bioreactor designed for phosphate removal were not. There was a moderate correlation (r = 0.67) between the abundance of Geobacter species in the UASB granules and granule conductivity, suggesting that Geobacter contributed to granule conductivity. These results, coupled...

  1. Elevated ammonium levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Novak, Ivana; MacAulay, Nanna

    2012-01-01

    Increased ammonium (NH(4)(+)/NH(3)) in the brain is a significant factor in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy, which involves altered glutamatergic neurotransmission. In glial cell cultures and brain slices, glutamate uptake either decreases or increases following acute ammonium expos...

  2. Oxidation reduction potential as a parameter to regulate micro-oxygen injection into anaerobic digester for reducing hydrogen sulphide concentration in biogas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Long D; Manassa, Patrick; Dawson, Marcia; Fitzgerald, Shona K

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of oxidation reduction potential (ORP) to regulate the injection of a small amount of oxygen into an anaerobic digester for reducing H2S concentration in biogas. The results confirm that micro-oxygen injection can be effective for controlling H2S formation during anaerobic digestion without disturbing the performance of the digester. Biogas production, composition, and the removal of volatile solids (VS) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were monitored to assessment the digester's performance. Six days after the start of the micro-oxygen injection, the ORP values increased to between -320 and -270 mV, from the natural baseline value of -485 mV. Over the same period the H2S concentration in the biogas decreased from over 6000 ppm to just 30 ppm. No discernible changes in the VS and COD removal rates, pH and alkalinity of the digestate or in the biogas production or composition were observed. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biological nutrients removal from the supernatant originating from the anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamis, S; Katsou, E; Di Fabio, S; Bolzonella, D; Fatone, F

    2014-09-01

    This study critically evaluates the biological processes and techniques applied to remove nitrogen and phosphorus from the anaerobic supernatant produced from the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and from its co-digestion with other biodegradable organic waste (BOW) streams. The wide application of anaerobic digestion for the treatment of several organic waste streams results in the production of high quantities of anaerobic effluents. Such effluents are characterized by high nutrient content, because organic and particulate nitrogen and phosphorus are hydrolyzed in the anaerobic digestion process. Consequently, adequate post-treatment is required in order to comply with the existing land application and discharge legislation in the European Union countries. This may include physicochemical and biological processes, with the latter being more advantageous due to their lower cost. Nitrogen removal is accomplished through the conventional nitrification/denitrification, nitritation/denitritation and the complete autotrophic nitrogen removal process; the latter is accomplished by nitritation coupled with the anoxic ammonium oxidation process. As anaerobic digestion effluents are characterized by low COD/TKN ratio, conventional denitrification/nitrification is not an attractive option; short-cut nitrogen removal processes are more promising. Both suspended and attached growth processes have been employed to treat the anaerobic supernatant. Specifically, the sequencing batch reactor, the membrane bioreactor, the conventional activated sludge and the moving bed biofilm reactor processes have been investigated. Physicochemical phosphorus removal via struvite precipitation has been extensively examined. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal from the anaerobic supernatant can take place through the sequencing anaerobic/aerobic process. More recently, denitrifying phosphorus removal via nitrite or nitrate has been explored. The removal of

  4. Ammonium dichromate poisoning: A rare cause of acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium dichromate is an inorganic compound frequently used in screen and color printing. Being a strong oxidizing agent, it causes oxygen free radical injury resulting in organ failure. We report a 25-year-old female who presented with acute kidney injury after consumption of ammonium dichromate. She was managed successfully with hemodialysis and supportive measures. This case is reported to highlight the toxicity of ammonium dichromate.

  5. Pre-concentration of ammonium to enhance treatment of wastewater using the partial nitritation/anammox process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Agyeman, Isaac; Malovanyy, Andriy; Plaza, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process is one of the most cost-effective technologies for removing excessive nitrogen compounds from effluents of wastewater treatment plants. The study was conducted to assess the feasibility of using ion exchange (IE) and reverse osmosis (RO) methods to concentrate ammonium to support partial nitritation/anammox process, which so far has been used for treating only wastewater with high concentrations of ammonium. Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor effluents with 40.40, 37.90 and 21.80 mg NH4─N/L levels were concentrated with IE method to 367.20, 329.50 and 187.50 mg NH4─N/L, respectively, which were about nine times the initial concentrations. RO method was also used to concentrate 41.0 mg NH4─N/L of UASB effluent to 163 mg NH4─N/L at volume reduction factor 5. The rates of nitrogen removal from respective RO pretreated concentrates by partial nitritation/anammox technology were 0.60, 1.10 and 0.50 g N/m2 day. The rates were largely influenced by initial nitrogen concentration. However, rates of RO concentrates were 0.74, 0.92 and 0.81 g N/m2 day even at lower initial NH4─N concentration. It was found out from the study that higher salinity decreased the rate of nitrogen removal when using partial nitritation/anammox process. Dissolved oxygen concentration of ∼1 mg/L was optimal for the operation of the partial nitritation/anammox process when treating IE and RO concentrates. The result shows that IE and RO methods can precede a partial nitritation/anammox process to enhance the treatment of wastewater with low ammonium loads.

  6. The nature of electron acceptor (MnIV/NO3) triggers differential expression of genes associated with stress and ammonium limitation responses in Shewanella algae C6G3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigle, Axel; Bonin, Patricia; -Nunez, Nicolas Fernandez; Loriod, Béatrice; Guasco, Sophie; Bergon, Aurélie; Armougom, Fabrice; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal; Imbert, Jean; Michotey, Valérie

    2018-03-16

    Shewanella algae C6G3 can reduce dissimilatively nitrate into ammonium and manganese-oxide (MnIV) into MnII. It has the unusual ability to produce anaerobically nitrite from ammonium in the presence of MnIV. To gain insight into their metabolic capabilities, global mRNA expression patterns were investigated by RNA-seq and qRT-PCR in cells growing with lactate and ammonium as carbon and nitrogen sources and with either MnIV or nitrate as electron acceptors. Gene exhibiting higher expression levels in the presence of MnIV belonged to functional categories of carbohydrate, coenzyme, lipid metabolisms and inorganic ion transport. Comparative transcriptomic pattern between MnIV and NO3 revealed that the strain presented an ammonium limitation status with MnIV, despite the presence of non-limiting concentration of ammonium under both culture conditions. In addition, in presence of MnIV, ntrB/nrtC regulators, ammonium channel, nitrogen regulatory protein P-II, glutamine synthetase and asparagine synthetase glutamine dependent genes were over-represented. Under nitrate condition, the expression of genes involved in the synthesis of several amino acids was increased. Finally, expression level of genes associated with the general stress response was also amplified and among them, katE, a putative catalase/peroxidase present on several Shewanella genomes, was highly expressed with a relative median value higher in MnIV condition.

  7. Simultaneous anaerobic oxidation/partial nitrification-denitrification for cost-effective and efficient removal of organic carbon and nitrogen from highly polluted streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinlou, Daniel; Sartaj, Majid; Delatolla, Robert

    2018-02-15

    Laboratory bench-scale anoxic/aerobic reactors with complete mix and continuous flow conditions were operated with high-strength synthetic wastewater to achieve simultaneous COD and nitrogen removal. High concentrations of organic carbon and nitrogen can be found in slaughterhouse, dairy, and food processing wastewaters, and also in some landfill leachates. Therefore, the goal of this study is to find a simple, efficient, reliable, cost-effective, and general solution for organic carbon and ammonia removal from streams with high influent concentrations of more than 5000 mg/L COD and 250 mg/L NH 3 -N. The highest COD (97%) and NH 3 -N (91%) removal efficiencies were obtained with initial COD and ammonia concentrations of 5211 mg/L and 262.8 mg/L NH 3 -N with volumetric loading rates of 11.26 kg COD/m 3  d and 0.57 kg NH 3 -N/m 3  d for COD and ammonia, respectively. Anaerobic oxidation is the main COD removal pathway in a simultaneous anaerobic oxidation/partial nitrification-denitrification (SAO/PND) system, and nitrogen removal significantly occurs via bacterial assimilation and partial nitrification-denitrification pathways. There are several advantages for this proposed SAO/PND system from a practical point of view, such as feasibility of simultaneous COD and nitrogen removal in a single reactor; simple operation; flexibility and practicality of this system as a general solution and cost effectiveness.

  8. Constraints on mechanisms and rates of anaerobic oxidation of methane by microbial consortia: process-based modeling of ANME-2 archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Orcutt

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM is the main process responsible for the removal of methane generated in Earth's marine subsurface environments. However, the biochemical mechanism of AOM remains elusive. By explicitly resolving the observed spatial arrangement of methanotrophic archaea and sulfate reducing bacteria found in consortia mediating AOM, potential intermediates involved in the electron transfer between the methane oxidizing and sulfate reducing partners were investigated via a consortium-scale reaction transport model that integrates the effect of diffusional transport with thermodynamic and kinetic controls on microbial activity. Model simulations were used to assess the impact of poorly constrained microbial characteristics such as minimum energy requirements to sustain metabolism and cell specific rates. The role of environmental conditions such as the influence of methane levels on the feasibility of H2, formate and acetate as intermediate species, and the impact of the abundance of intermediate species on pathway reversal were examined. The results show that higher production rates of intermediates via AOM lead to increased diffusive fluxes from the methane oxidizing archaea to sulfate reducing bacteria, but the build-up of the exchangeable species can cause the energy yield of AOM to drop below that required for ATP production. Comparison to data from laboratory experiments shows that under the experimental conditions of Nauhaus et al. (2007, none of the potential intermediates considered here is able to support metabolic activity matching the measured rates.

  9. Denitrification synergized with ANAMMOX for the anaerobic degradation of benzene: performance and microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shuchan; Zhang, Lilan; Zhang, DaiJun; Lu, Peili; Zhang, Xiaoting; He, Qiang

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) on benzene degradation under denitrification, a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) under denitrification synergized with ANAMMOX (SBR-DenAna) for benzene degradation was established by inoculating anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AnAOB) into a SBR under denitrification reactor (SBR-Den) for benzene degradation. The average rate of benzene degradation and the maximum first-order kinetic constant in SBR-DenAna were 2.34- and 1.41-fold those in SBR-Den, respectively, indicating that ANAMMOX improved the degradation of benzene under denitrification synergized with ANAMMOX. However, the average rate of benzene degradation decreased by 35% in the denitrification-ANAMMOX synergistic reactor when 10 mg N L -1 NO 2 - was added; the rate recovered once NO 2 - was depleted, indicating that ANAMMOX might detoxify NO 2 - . Results from high-throughput sequencing analysis revealed that Azoarcus within the family Rhodocyclaceae might be associated with benzene degradation in the two SBRs. AnAOB affiliated with the family Candidatus Brocadiaceae were just detected in SBR-DenAna.

  10. Ginger-supplemented diet ameliorates ammonium nitrate-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to evaluate the capacity of ginger to repair the oxidative stress induced by ammonium nitrate. 50 male rats were divided into 5 groups; they underwent an oral treatment of ammonium nitrate and/or ginger (N mg/kg body weight + G% in diet) during 30 days. Group I served as control (C); ...

  11. Influences of Temperature on the Conversion of Ammonium Tungstate Pentahydrate to Tungsten Oxide Particles with Controllable Sizes, Crystallinities, and Physical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Bayu Dani Nandiyanto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate influences of temperature on the conversion of ammonium tungstate pentahydrate (ATP powder to tungsten trioxide (WO3 particles with controllable sizes, crystallinities, and physicochemical properties. In this study, we used a simple thermal decomposition method. In the experimental procedure, we explored the effect of temperature on the physicochemical properties of ATP by testing various heating temperatures (from 100 to 900 °C. The heated ATP samples were then characterized by a physical observation (i.e. color and various analysis methods (i.e. a thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, an X-ray diffraction, and a scanning electron microscope. Experimental results showed that increases in temperature had an impact to the decreases in particle size, the change in material crystallinity, and the change in physical properties (e.g. change of color from white, orange, to yellowish green. The relationships between the reaction temperatures and the physicochemical properties of the ATP were also investigated in detail along with the theoretical consideration and the proposal of the WO3 particle formation mechanism. In simplification, the phenomena can be described into three zones of temperatures. (1 Below 250 °C (release of water molecules and some ammonium ions.; (2 At 250-400 °C (release of water molecules and ammonium ions, restructurization of tungsten and oxygen elements, and formation of amorphous tungsten trioxide. (3 At higher than 400 °C (crystallization of tungsten trioxide. Since ATP possessed reactivity on temperature, its physicochemical properties changing could be observed easily, and the experimental procedure could be done easily. The present study will benefit not only for “chemistry and material science” but also potentially to be used as a model material for explaining the thermal behavior of material to undergraduate students (suitable

  12. Anaerobic biotransformation of estrogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajka, Cynthia P.; Londry, Kathleen L.

    2006-01-01

    Estrogens are important environmental contaminants that disrupt endocrine systems and feminize male fish. We investigated the potential for anaerobic biodegradation of the estrogens 17-α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17-β-estradiol (E2) in order to understand their fate in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Cultures were established using lake water and sediment under methanogenic, sulfate-, iron-, and nitrate-reducing conditions. Anaerobic degradation of EE2 (added at 5 mg/L) was not observed in multiple trials over long incubation periods (over three years). E2 (added at 5 mg/L) was transformed to estrone (E1) under all four anaerobic conditions (99-176 μg L -1 day -1 ), but the extent of conversion was different for each electron acceptor. The oxidation of E2 to E1 was not inhibited by E1. Under some conditions, reversible inter-conversion of E2 and E1 was observed, and the final steady state concentration of E2 depended on the electron-accepting condition but was independent of the total amount of estrogens added. In addition, racemization occurred and E1 was also transformed to 17-α-estradiol under all but nitrate-reducing conditions. Although E2 could be readily transformed to E1 and in many cases 17-α-estradiol under anaerobic conditions, the complete degradation of estrogens under these conditions was minimal, suggesting that they would accumulate in anoxic environments

  13. Anaerobic biotransformation of estrogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czajka, Cynthia P. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Londry, Kathleen L. [Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada)]. E-mail: londryk@cc.umanitoba.ca

    2006-08-31

    Estrogens are important environmental contaminants that disrupt endocrine systems and feminize male fish. We investigated the potential for anaerobic biodegradation of the estrogens 17-{alpha}-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) in order to understand their fate in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Cultures were established using lake water and sediment under methanogenic, sulfate-, iron-, and nitrate-reducing conditions. Anaerobic degradation of EE2 (added at 5 mg/L) was not observed in multiple trials over long incubation periods (over three years). E2 (added at 5 mg/L) was transformed to estrone (E1) under all four anaerobic conditions (99-176 {mu}g L{sup -1} day{sup -1}), but the extent of conversion was different for each electron acceptor. The oxidation of E2 to E1 was not inhibited by E1. Under some conditions, reversible inter-conversion of E2 and E1 was observed, and the final steady state concentration of E2 depended on the electron-accepting condition but was independent of the total amount of estrogens added. In addition, racemization occurred and E1 was also transformed to 17-{alpha}-estradiol under all but nitrate-reducing conditions. Although E2 could be readily transformed to E1 and in many cases 17-{alpha}-estradiol under anaerobic conditions, the complete degradation of estrogens under these conditions was minimal, suggesting that they would accumulate in anoxic environments.

  14. Combining in situ chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to reduce contaminant mass and leachability in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Daniel P; Srivastava, Vipul J; Dombrowski, Frank J; Lingle, James W

    2015-10-30

    Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Treatment of high salt oxidized modified starch waste water using micro-electrolysis, two-phase anaerobic aerobic and electrolysis for reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xuenong; Wang, Yulin

    2017-06-01

    A combined process of micro-electrolysis, two-phase anaerobic, aerobic and electrolysis was investigated for the treatment of oxidized modified starch wastewater (OMSW). Optimum ranges for important operating variables were experimentally determined and the treated water was tested for reuse in the production process of corn starch. The optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) of micro-electrolysis, methanation reactor, aerobic process and electrolysis process were 5, 24, 12 and 3 h, respectively. The addition of iron-carbon fillers to the acidification reactor was 200 mg/L while the best current density of electrolysis was 300 A/m2. The biodegradability was improved from 0.12 to 0.34 by micro-electrolysis. The whole treatment was found to be effective with removal of 96 % of the chemical oxygen demand (COD), 0.71 L/day of methane energy recovery. In addition, active chlorine production (15,720 mg/L) was obtained by electrolysis. The advantage of this hybrid process is that, through appropriate control of reaction conditions, effect from high concentration of salt on the treatment was avoided. Moreover, the process also produced the material needed in the production of oxidized starch while remaining emission-free and solved the problem of high process cost.

  16. Combination of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and partial nitritation/anammox moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) for municipal wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malovanyy, Andriy; Yang, Jingjing; Trela, Jozef; Plaza, Elzbieta

    2015-03-01

    In this study the combination of an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and a deammonification moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) for mainstream wastewater treatment was tested. The competition between aerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) was studied during a 5months period of transition from reject water to mainstream wastewater followed by a 16months period of mainstream wastewater treatment. The decrease of influent ammonium concentration led to a wash-out of suspended biomass which had a major contribution to nitrite production. Influence of a dissolved oxygen concentration and a transient anoxia mechanism of NOB suppression were studied. It was shown that anoxic phase duration has no effect on NOB metabolism recovery and oxygen diffusion rather than affinities of AOB and NOB to oxygen determine the rate of nitrogen conversion in a biofilm system. Anammox activity remained on the level comparable to reject water treatment systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Novel Ammonium Metal Borohydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grinderslev, Jakob; Jepsen, Lars Haahr; Cerny, Radovan

    , it cannot store hydrogen reversibly. Recently, the first ammonium metal borohydride, NH4Ca(BH4)3 was published, which may be considered as substitution of K+ by NH4+ in KCa(BH4)3, due to the similar sizes of NH4+ and K+[1]. This compound successfully stabilizes NH4BH4. In the present work, a series of novel...... halide-free ammonium metal borohydrides is presented, which have the chemical compositions (NH4)xM(BH4)n+x. The ammonium metal borohydrides are synthesized by cryomilling of NH4BH4 – M(BH4)n (M = Li, Na, K, Mg, Sr, Y, Mn, La, Gd) in different ratios. A new range of ammonium metal borohydrides is formed......, and the crystal structures and thermal decompositions are investigated. Mixtures of NH4BH4 - NaBH4 do not react, while solid solutions, K1-x(NH4)xBH4, are formed for NH4BH4 - KBH4. For the other composites, novel ammonium metal borohydrides are formed. Several of these structures have been solved from high...

  18. Enhancement of Bacterial Transport in Aerobic and Anaerobic Environments: Assessing the Effect of Metal Oxide Chemical Heterogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T.C. Onstott

    2005-01-01

    The goal of our research was to understand the fundamental processes that control microbial transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers and from this enhanced understanding determine the requirements for successful, field-scale delivery of microorganisms to metal contaminated subsurface sites. Our specific research goals were to determine; (1) the circumstances under which the preferential adsorption of bacteria to Fe, Mn, and Al oxyhydroxides influences field-scale bacterial transport, (2) the extent to which the adhesion properties of bacterial cells affect field-scale bacterial transport, (3) whether microbial Fe(III) reduction can enhance field-scale transport of Fe reducing bacteria (IRB) and other microorganisms and (4) the effect of field-scale physical and chemical heterogeneity on all three processes. Some of the spin-offs from this basic research that can improve biostimulation and bioaugmentation remediation efforts at contaminated DOE sites have included; (1) new bacterial tracking tools for viable bacteria; (2) an integrated protocol which combines subsurface characterization, laboratory-scale experimentation, and scale-up techniques to accurately predict field-scale bacterial transport; and (3) innovative and inexpensive field equipment and methods that can be employed to enhance Fe(III) reduction and microbial transport and to target microbial deposition under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions

  19. Sub micrometric fibrillar structures of codoped poly aniline obtained by co-oxidation using the NaCl O/ammonium peroxydisulfate system: synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio F, J. E.; Gomez Y, C.; Hernandez P, M. A.; Corea T, M. L., E-mail: josorio@ipn.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Quimica e Industrias Extractivas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-07-01

    A mixture of ammonium peroxydisulfate and sodium hypochlorite (NaCl O) (co-oxi dating system) were used to obtain poly aniline (PANi) doped with HCl and camphorsulfonic acid (CsA) (co-doping). The effect of HCl/CsA ratio added during polymerization structure, morphology and electrical conductivity of the conducting polymer was investigated. When NaCl O is used, the polymerization rate is substantially increased and the morphology changes from micrometric granular to nano metric fibrillar. CsA was used as complementary dopant but also to improve the solubility of PANi in common solvents. However, results suggest that quinone-like heterocycles containing carbonyl radicals as well as phenazine-type aromatic rings might be impeding an efficient doping in detriment of the conductivity. For the characterization X-Ray diffraction analysis, UV visible spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used. (Author)

  20. High rates of denitrification and nitrous oxide emission in arid biological soil crusts from the Sultanate of Oman

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abed, Raeid M M; Lam, Phyllis; De Beer, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Using a combination of process rate determination, microsensor profiling and molecular techniques, we demonstrated that denitrification, and not anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), is the major nitrogen loss process in biological soil crusts from Oman. Potential denitrification rates were 584...... that nitrogen loss via denitrification is a dominant process in crusts from Oman, which leads to N 2 O gas emission and potentially reduces desert soil fertility....

  1. Anaerobic oxidation of methane at a marine methane seep in a forearc sediment basin off Sumatra, Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eSiegert

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A cold methane-seep was discovered in a forearc sediment basin off the island Sumatra, exhibiting a methane-seep adapted microbial community. A defined seep centre of activity, like in mud volcanoes, was not discovered. The seep area was rather characterized by a patchy distribution of active spots. The relevance of AOM was reflected by 13C depleted isotopic signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC. The anaerobic conversion of methane to CO2 was confirmed in a 13C-labelling experiment. Methane fuelled a vital microbial and invertebrate community which was reflected in cell numbers of up to 4 x 109 cells cm 3 sediment and 13C depleted guts of crabs populating the seep area. The microbial community was analysed by total cell counting, catalyzed reporter deposition – fluorescence in situ hybridisation (CARD-FISH, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE. CARD-FISH cell counts and qPCR measurements showed the presence of Bacteria and Archaea, but only small numbers of Eukarya. The archaeal community comprised largely members of ANME-1 and ANME-2. Furthermore, members of the Crenarchaeota were frequently detected in the DGGE analysis. Three major bacterial phylogenetic groups (δ-Proteobacteria, candidate division OP9 and Anaerolineaceae were abundant across the study area. Several of these sequences were closely related to the genus Desulfococcus of the family Desulfobacteraceae, which is in good agreement with previously described AOM sites. In conclusion, the majority of the microbial community at the seep consisted of AOM related microorganisms, while the relevance of higher hydrocarbons as microbial substrates was negligible.

  2. Competition for Ammonium between Plant-Roots and Nitrifying and Heterotrophic Bacteria and the Effects of Protozoan Grazing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, F.J.M.; Laanbroek, H.J.; Woldendorp, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    The competition for limiting amounts of ammonium between the chemolithotrophic ammonium-oxidizing species Nitrosomonas europaea, the heterotrophic species Arthrobacter globiformis and roots of Plantago lanceolata (Ribwort plantain) was studied in a series of model systems of increasing complexity,

  3. Graphene oxide as an anaerobic membrane scaffold for the enhancement of B. adolescentis proliferation and antagonistic effects against pathogens E. coli and S. aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Han-qing; Gao, Di; Wang, Bing; Zhao, Rui-fang; Guan, Ming; Zheng, Ling-na; Zhou, Xiao-yan; Chai, Zhi-fang; Feng, Wei-yue

    2014-04-01

    The impact of the gut microbiota on human health is widely perceived as the most exciting advancement in biomedicine. The gut microbiota has been known to play a crucial role in defining states of human health and diseases, and thus becomes a potential new territory for drug targeting. Herein, graphene oxide (GO) interaction with five common human gut bacteria, B. adolescentis, L. acidophilus, E. coli, E. faecalis, and S. aureus, was studied. It was shown that, in bacterial media, GO sheets were able to form effective, anaerobic membrane scaffolds that enhanced the antagonistic activity of B. adolescentis against the pathogens E. coli andS. aureus. Data obtained using bacterial growth measurements, colony counting and 16S rRNA gene sequencing consistently indicated that GO sheets promoted proliferation of gut bacteria, particularly for B. adolescentis. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy images, and membrane potential measurements showed that cell membranes maintained their integrity and that no observable variations in cell morphology were induced after interaction with GO sheets, indicating good biocompatibility of GO. These results suggest the possibility of using GO sheets as efficient drug carriers in therapeutic applications to treat diseases related to the gut microbiota.

  4. Distribution and characteristic of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation bacteria by comparative analysis of wastewater treatment plants and agriculture fields in northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Hu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo is a recently discovered biological process which has been arousing global attention because of its potential in minimizing greenhouse gases emissions. In this study, molecular biological techniques and potential n-damo activity batch experiments were conducted to investigate the presence and diversity of M. oxyfera bacteria in paddy field, corn field, and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP sites in northern China, as well as lab-scale n-damo enrichment culture. N-damo enrichment culture showed the highest abundance of M. oxyfera bacteria, and positive correlation was observed between potential n-damo rate and abundance of M. oxyfera bacteria. Both paddy field and corn field sites were believed to be better inoculum than WWTP for the enrichment of M. oxyfera bacteria due to their higher abundance and the diversity of M. oxyfera bacteria. Comparative analysis revealed that long biomass retention time, low NH ${}_{4}^{+}$ 4 + and high NO ${}_{2}^{-}$ 2 − content were suitable for the growth of M. oxyfera bacteria.

  5. Effects of graphene oxide on the performance, microbial community dynamics and antibiotic resistance genes reduction during anaerobic digestion of swine manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junya; Wang, Ziyue; Wang, Yawei; Zhong, Hui; Sui, Qianwen; Zhang, Changping; Wei, Yuansong

    2017-12-01

    The role of graphene oxide (GO) on anaerobic digestion (AD) of swine manure concerning the performance, microbial community and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) reduction was investigated. Results showed that methane production was reduced by 13.1%, 10.6%, 2.7% and 17.1% at GO concentration of 5mg/L, 50mg/L, 100mg/L and 500mg/L, respectively, but propionate degradation was enhanced along with GO addition. Both bacterial and archaeal community changed little after GO addition. AD could well reduce ARGs abundance, but it was deteriorated at the GO concentration of 50mg/L and 100mg/L and enhanced at 500mg/L, while no obvious changes at 5mg/L. Network and SEM analysis indicated that changes of each ARG was closely associated with variation of microbial community composition, environmental variables contributed most to the dynamics of ARGs indirectly, GO influenced the ARGs dynamics negatively and (heavy metal resistance genes (MRGs)) influenced the most directly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ammonium ions determination with polypyrrole modified electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Dall´Antonia

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work relates the preparation of polypyrrole films (PPy deposited on surfaces of glass carbon, nickel and ITO (tin oxide doped with indium on PET plastic, in order to study the ammonium detection. The popypyrrole films were polymerized with dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBSA on the electrodes, at + 0,70 V vs. Ag/AgCl, based on a solution containing the pyrrole monomer and the amphiphilic salt. Films deposited on glass carbon presented better performance. Cyclic voltammetries, between – 1,50 to + 0,5 V vs. Ag/AgCl, were repeated adding different concentrations of NH4Cl, in order to observe the behavior of the film as a possible detector of ions NH4+. The peak current for oxidation varies with the concentration of ammonium. A linear region can be observed in the band of 0 to 80 mM, with a sensibility (Sppy approximately similar to 4,2 mA mM-1 cm-2, showing the efficacy of the electrodes as sensors of ammonium ions. The amount of deposited polymer, controlled by the time of growth, does not influence on the sensor sensibility. The modified electrode was used to determine ammonium in grounded waters.

  7. Protein Precipitation Using Ammonium Sulfate

    OpenAIRE

    Wingfield, Paul T.

    2001-01-01

    The basic theory of protein precipitation by addition of ammonium sulfate is presented and the most common applications are listed, Tables are provided for calculating the appropriate amount of ammonium sulfate to add to a particular protein solution.

  8. Rocket Solid Propellant Alternative Based on Ammonium Dinitramide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigore CICAN

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the continuous run for a green environment the current article proposes a new type of solid propellant based on the fairly new synthesized oxidizer, ammonium dinitramide (ADN. Apart of having a higher specific impulse than the worldwide renowned oxidizer, ammonium perchlorate, ADN has the advantage, of leaving behind only nitrogen, oxygen and water after decomposing at high temperatures and therefore totally avoiding the formation of hydrogen chloride fumes. Based on the oxidizer to fuel ratios of the current formulations of the major rocket solid booster (e.g. Space Shuttle’s SRB, Ariane 5’s SRB which comprises mass variations of ammonium perchlorate oxidizer (70-75%, atomized aluminum powder (10-18% and polybutadiene binder (12-20% a new solid propellant was formulated. As previously stated, the new propellant formula and its variations use ADN as oxidizer and erythritol tetranitrate as fuel, keeping the same polybutadiene as binder.

  9. Concurrent nitrate and Fe(III) reduction during anaerobic biodegradation of phenols in a sandstone aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette; Crouzet, C.; Arvin, Erik

    2000-01-01

    The biodegradation of phenols (similar to 5, 60, 600 mg 1(-1)) under anaerobic conditions (nitrate enriched and unamended) was studied in laboratory microcosms with sandstone material and groundwater from within an anaerobic ammonium plume in an aquifer, The aqueous phase was sampled and analyzed...

  10. Anaerobic biodegradability of macropollutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini

    2002-01-01

    A variety of test procedures for determination of anaerobic biodegradability has been reported. This paper reviews the methods developed for determination of anaerobic biodegradability of macro-pollutants. Anaerobic biodegradability of micro-pollutants is not included. Furthermore, factors...

  11. Influência da quantidade de amônio na síntese de nanopartículas de óxido de ferro por microemulsão The influence of ammonium quantity on the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles in microemulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tereza Cortez Fernandes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized in microemulsion systems composed by Triton X-100/hexyl alcohol/cyclohexane/aqueous solution. The nanoparticles were synthesized in microemulsions containing different amounts of ammonium, in order to evaluate the influence of this parameter on the size of the nanoparticles and on the phase transformation after heat treatment. Powder materials were obtained after centrifugation, washing and drying, and they were analyzed as synthesized and after heating at 350, 500 and 1000 °C. It was observed that the higher amount of ammonium induced smaller particles and minor phase transformation, possibly due to a preferential nucleation process.

  12. Effects of continuous addition of nitrate to a thermophilic anaerobic digestion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    The biodegradation of complex organic matter is regulated partially by the ability to dump electrons which build up in the form of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). The effects of the continuous addition of the oxidant, nitrate, were investigated on a single-stage, thermophilic, anaerobic digester. The digester acclimated rapidly to nitrate addition. The continuous addition of nitrate resulted in a constant inhibition of total gas (30%) and methane production (36%). Reduction in total gas and methane production was accompanied by increases in sludge pH and acetate, propionate, and ammonium ion pools. Effluent particle size distribution revealed a shift to smaller particle sizes in the nitrate-pumped sludge. The continuous addition of nitrate resulted in lower numbers of methanogens and sulfate reducers in the sludge, with increases in nitrate-reducing and cellulose-degrading microorganisms. These findings indicate that added nitrate underwent dissimilatory reduction to ammonium ion, as determined from gas analysis, ammonium pools, and 15 N-nitrate-label experiments. Continuous nitrate addition to a single-phase digestion system was determined to inhibit methane production from biomass and wastes. Thus for the single-stage digestion system in which maximum methane production is desired, the addition of nitrate is not recommended. However, in a multistage digestion system, the continuous addition of nitrate in the primary stage to increase the rate and extent of degradation of organic matter to volatile fatty acids, which then would serve as feed to a second stage, may be advantageous

  13. Sulfate-nitrate-ammonium aerosols over China: response to 2000–2015 emission changes of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We use a chemical transport model to examine the change of sulfate-nitrate-ammonium (SNA aerosols over China due to anthropogenic emission changes of their precursors (SO2, NOx and NH3 from 2000 to 2015. From 2000 to 2006, annual mean SNA concentrations increased by about 60% over China as a result of the 60% and 80% increases in SO2 and NOx emissions. During this period, sulfate is the dominant component of SNA over South China (SC and Sichuan Basin (SCB, while nitrate and sulfate contribute equally over North China (NC. Based on emission reduction targets in the 12th (2011–2015 Five-Year Plan (FYP, China's total SO2 and NOx emissions are projected to change by −16% and +16% from 2006 to 2015, respectively. The amount of NH3 emissions in 2015 is uncertain, given the lack of sufficient information on the past and present levels of NH3 emissions in China. With no change in NH3 emissions, SNA mass concentrations in 2015 will decrease over SCB and SC compared to their 2006 levels, but increase over NC where the magnitude of nitrate increase exceeds that of sulfate reduction. This suggests that the SO2 emission reduction target set by the 12th FYP, although effective in reducing SNA over SC and SCB, will not be successful over NC, for which NOx emission control needs to be strengthened. If NH3 emissions are allowed to keep their recent growth rate and increase by +16% from 2006 to 2015, the benefit of SO2 reduction will be completely offset over all of China due to the significant increase of nitrate, demonstrating the critical role of NH3 in regulating nitrate. The effective strategy to control SNA and hence PM2.5 pollution over China should thus be based on improving understanding of current NH3 emissions and putting more emphasis on controlling NH3 emissions in the future.

  14. Evidence of Sulfate-Dependent Anaerobic Methane Oxidation within an Area Impacted by Coalbed Methane-Related Gas Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, A. L.; Wikin, R. T.

    2017-12-01

    We evaluated water quality characteristics in the northern Raton Basin of Colorado and documented the response of the Poison Canyon aquifer system several years after upward migration of methane gas occurred from the deeper Vermejo Formation coalbed production zone. Over a 17-month study period, water samples were obtained from domestic water wells and monitoring wells located within the impacted area, and analyzed for 245 constituents, including organic compounds, nutrients, major and trace elements, dissolved gases, and isotopic tracers for carbon, sulfur, oxygen, and hydrogen. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that sulfate-dependent methane biodegradation, which involves the oxidation of methane (CH4) to carbon dioxide (CO2) using sulfate (SO42-) as the terminal electron acceptor, is occurring: (i) consumption of methane and sulfate and production of sulfide and bicarbonate, (ii) methane loss coupled to production of higher molecular weight (C2+) gaseous hydrocarbons, (iii) patterns of 13C enrichment and depletion in methane and dissolved inorganic carbon, and (iv) a systematic shift in sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios of sulfate, indicative of microbial sulfate reduction. Groundwater-methane attenuation is linked to the production of dissolved sulfide, and elevated dissolved sulfide concentrations represent an undesirable secondary water quality impact. The biogeochemical response of the aquifer system has not mobilized naturally occurring trace metals, including arsenic, chromium, cobalt, nickel, and lead, likely due to the microbial production of hydrogen sulfide, which favors stabilization of metals in aquifer solids.

  15. Constructing Sheet-On-Sheet Structured Graphitic Carbon Nitride/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Layered MnO2 Ternary Nanocomposite with Outstanding Catalytic Properties on Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianhua; Li, Dongnan; Chen, Yu; Tan, Linghua; Kou, Bo; Wan, Fushun; Jiang, Wei; Li, Fengsheng

    2017-01-01

    We unprecedentedly report that layered MnO2 nanosheets were in situ formed onto the surface of covalently bonded graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (g-C3N4/rGO), forming sheet-on-sheet structured two dimension (2D) graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide/layered MnO2 ternary nanocomposite (g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2) with outstanding catalytic properties on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). The covalently bonded g-C3N4/rGO was firstly prepared by the calcination of graphene oxide-guanidine hydrochloride precursor (GO-GndCl), following by its dispersion into the KMnO4 aqueous solution to construct the g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 ternary nanocomposite. FT-IR, XRD, Raman as well as the XPS results clearly demonstrated the chemical interaction between g-C3N4, rGO and MnO2. TEM and element mapping indicated that layered g-C3N4/rGO was covered with thin MnO2 nanosheets. Furthermore, the obtained g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 nanocomposite exhibited promising catalytic capacity on thermal decomposition of AP. Upon addition of 2 wt % g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 ternary nanocomposite as catalyst, the thermal decomposition temperature of AP was largely decreased up by 142.5 °C, which was higher than that of pure g-C3N4, g-C3N4/rGO and MnO2, respectively, demonstrating the synergistic catalysis of the as-prepared nanocomposite. PMID:29244721

  16. Constructing Sheet-On-Sheet Structured Graphitic Carbon Nitride/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Layered MnO2 Ternary Nanocomposite with Outstanding Catalytic Properties on Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We unprecedentedly report that layered MnO2 nanosheets were in situ formed onto the surface of covalently bonded graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (g-C3N4/rGO, forming sheet-on-sheet structured two dimension (2D graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide/layered MnO2 ternary nanocomposite (g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 with outstanding catalytic properties on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP. The covalently bonded g-C3N4/rGO was firstly prepared by the calcination of graphene oxide-guanidine hydrochloride precursor (GO-GndCl, following by its dispersion into the KMnO4 aqueous solution to construct the g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 ternary nanocomposite. FT-IR, XRD, Raman as well as the XPS results clearly demonstrated the chemical interaction between g-C3N4, rGO and MnO2. TEM and element mapping indicated that layered g-C3N4/rGO was covered with thin MnO2 nanosheets. Furthermore, the obtained g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 nanocomposite exhibited promising catalytic capacity on thermal decomposition of AP. Upon addition of 2 wt % g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 ternary nanocomposite as catalyst, the thermal decomposition temperature of AP was largely decreased up by 142.5 °C, which was higher than that of pure g-C3N4, g-C3N4/rGO and MnO2, respectively, demonstrating the synergistic catalysis of the as-prepared nanocomposite.

  17. Constructing Sheet-On-Sheet Structured Graphitic Carbon Nitride/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Layered MnO₂ Ternary Nanocomposite with Outstanding Catalytic Properties on Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianhua; Li, Dongnan; Chen, Yu; Tan, Linghua; Kou, Bo; Wan, Fushun; Jiang, Wei; Li, Fengsheng

    2017-12-15

    We unprecedentedly report that layered MnO₂ nanosheets were in situ formed onto the surface of covalently bonded graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (g-C₃N₄/rGO), forming sheet-on-sheet structured two dimension (2D) graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide/layered MnO₂ ternary nanocomposite (g-C₃N₄/rGO/MnO₂) with outstanding catalytic properties on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). The covalently bonded g-C₃N₄/rGO was firstly prepared by the calcination of graphene oxide-guanidine hydrochloride precursor (GO-GndCl), following by its dispersion into the KMnO₄ aqueous solution to construct the g-C₃N₄/rGO/MnO₂ ternary nanocomposite. FT-IR, XRD, Raman as well as the XPS results clearly demonstrated the chemical interaction between g-C₃N₄, rGO and MnO₂. TEM and element mapping indicated that layered g-C₃N₄/rGO was covered with thin MnO₂ nanosheets. Furthermore, the obtained g-C₃N₄/rGO/MnO₂ nanocomposite exhibited promising catalytic capacity on thermal decomposition of AP. Upon addition of 2 wt % g-C₃N₄/rGO/MnO₂ ternary nanocomposite as catalyst, the thermal decomposition temperature of AP was largely decreased up by 142.5 °C, which was higher than that of pure g-C₃N₄, g-C₃N₄/rGO and MnO₂, respectively, demonstrating the synergistic catalysis of the as-prepared nanocomposite.

  18. Modeling sulfate reduction in methane hydrate-bearing continental margin sediments: Does a sulfate-methane transition require anaerobic oxidation of methane?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverno, A.; Pohlman, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The sulfate-methane transition (SMT), a biogeochemical zone where sulfate and methane are metabolized, is commonly observed at shallow depths (1-30 mbsf) in methane-bearing marine sediments. Two processes consume sulfate at and above the SMT, anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and organoclastic sulfate reduction (OSR). Differentiating the relative contribution of each process is critical to estimate methane flux into the SMT, which, in turn, is necessary to predict deeper occurrences of gas hydrates in continental margin sediments. To evaluate the relative importance of these two sulfate reduction pathways, we developed a diagenetic model to compute the pore water concentrations of sulfate, methane, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). By separately tracking DIC containing 12C and 13C, the model also computes ??13C-DIC values. The model reproduces common observations from methane-rich sediments: a well-defined SMT with no methane above and no sulfate below and a ??13C-DIC minimum at the SMT. The model also highlights the role of upward diffusing 13C-enriched DIC in contributing to the carbon isotope mass balance of DIC. A combination of OSR and AOM, each consuming similar amounts of sulfate, matches observations from Site U1325 (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 311, northern Cascadia margin). Without AOM, methane diffuses above the SMT, which contradicts existing field data. The modeling results are generalized with a dimensional analysis to the range of SMT depths and sedimentation rates typical of continental margins. The modeling shows that AOM must be active to establish an SMT wherein methane is quantitatively consumed and the ??13C-DIC minimum occurs. The presence of an SMT generally requires active AOM. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Molecular and stable isotopic evidence for the occurrence of nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria in the mangrove sediment of Zhangjiang Estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Manping; Luo, Yi; Lin, Li'an; Lin, Xiaolan; Hetharua, Buce; Zhao, Weijun; Zhou, Mengkai; Zhan, Qing; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling; Tian, Yun

    2018-03-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo), which is mediated by "Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera-like" bacteria, is unique in linking the carbon and nitrogen cycles. However, the niche and activity of n-damo bacteria in the mangrove ecosystem have not been confirmed. Here, we report the occurrence of the n-damo process in the mangrove wetland of the Zhangjiang Estuary, China. The widespread occurrence of n-damo bacteria in mangrove wetland was confirmed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay, which showed that the abundance of Methylomirabilis oxyfera-like bacterial 16S rRNA and pmoA genes ranged from 2.43 × 10 6 to 2.09 × 10 7 and 2.07 × 10 6 to 3.38 × 10 7 copies per gram of dry soil in the examined sediment cores. The highest amount of targeting genes was all detected in the upper layer (0-20 cm). Phylogenetic analyses of n-damo bacterial 16S rRNA and pmoA genes illustrated the depth-specific distribution and high diversity of n-damo bacteria in the mangrove wetland. Stable isotope experiments further confirmed the occurrence of n-damo in the examined mangrove sediments, and the potential n-damo rates ranged from 25.93 to 704.08 nmol CO 2 per gram of dry soil per day at different depths of the sediment cores, with the n-damo being more active in the upper layer of the mangrove sediments. These results illustrate the existence of active M. oxyfera-like bacteria and indicate that the n-damo process is a previously overlooked microbial methane sink in the mangrove wetlands.

  20. Development of partial nitrification as a first step of nitrite shunt process in a Sequential Batch Reactor (SBR) using Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) controlled by mixing regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Moomen; Eldyasti, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Shortcut biological nitrogen removal is a non-conventional way of removing nitrogen from wastewater using two processes either nitrite shunt or deammonification. In the nitrite shunt process, the ammonia oxidation step stops at the nitrite stage, which is known as partial nitrification, then nitrite is directly reduced to nitrogen gas. Effective partial nitrification could be achieved by accumulating Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) and inhibiting Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria (NOB). In this research, a novel control strategy has been developed to control the DO using the variable mixing regime in a suspended growth system using a Sequential Batch Reactor (SBR) in order to achieve a stable ammonia removal efficiency (ARE) and nitrite accumulation rate (NAR) at a high nitrogen loading rate (NLR). The new controlled SBR system has been successfully running at NLR up to 1.2kg/(m 3 .day) and achieved an ARE of 98.6±2.8% and NAR of 93.0±0.7%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Anaerobic Thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Canganella

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The term “extremophile” was introduced to describe any organism capable of living and growing under extreme conditions. With the further development of studies on microbial ecology and taxonomy, a variety of “extreme” environments have been found and an increasing number of extremophiles are being described. Extremophiles have also been investigated as far as regarding the search for life on other planets and even evaluating the hypothesis that life on Earth originally came from space. The first extreme environments to be largely investigated were those characterized by elevated temperatures. The naturally “hot environments” on Earth range from solar heated surface soils and water with temperatures up to 65 °C, subterranean sites such as oil reserves and terrestrial geothermal with temperatures ranging from slightly above ambient to above 100 °C, to submarine hydrothermal systems with temperatures exceeding 300 °C. There are also human-made environments with elevated temperatures such as compost piles, slag heaps, industrial processes and water heaters. Thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms have been known for a long time, but scientists have often resisted the belief that some organisms do not only survive at high temperatures, but actually thrive under those hot conditions. They are perhaps one of the most interesting varieties of extremophilic organisms. These microorganisms can thrive at temperatures over 50 °C and, based on their optimal temperature, anaerobic thermophiles can be subdivided into three main groups: thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 50 °C and 64 °C and a maximum at 70 °C, extreme thermophiles with an optimal temperature between 65 °C and 80 °C, and finally hyperthermophiles with an optimal temperature above 80 °C and a maximum above 90 °C. The finding of novel extremely thermophilic and hyperthermophilic anaerobic bacteria in recent years, and the fact that a large fraction of them belong

  2. Ammonium Transformation in 14 Lakes along a Trophic Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Leoni

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is a widespread pollutant in aquatic ecosystems originating directly and indirectly from human activities, which can strongly affect the structure and functioning of the aquatic foodweb. The biological oxidation of NH4+ to nitrite, and then nitrate is a key part of the complex nitrogen cycle and a fundamental process in aquatic environments, having a profound influence on ecosystem stability and functionality. Environmental studies have shown that our current knowledge of physical and chemical factors that control this process and the abundance and function of involved microorganisms are not entirely understood. In this paper, the efficiency and the transformation velocity of ammonium into oxidised compounds in 14 south-alpine lakes in northern Italy, with a similar origin, but different trophic levels, are compared with lab-scale experimentations (20 °C, dark, oxygen saturation that are performed in artificial microcosms (4 L. The water samples were collected in different months to highlight the possible effect of seasonality on the development of the ammonium oxidation process. In four-liter microcosms, concentrations were increased by 1 mg/L NH4+ and the process of ammonium oxidation was constantly monitored. The time elapsed for the decrease of 25% and 95% of the initial ion ammonium concentration and the rate for that ammonium oxidation were evaluated. Principal Component Analysis and General Linear Model, performed on 56 observations and several chemical and physical parameters, highlighted the important roles of total phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations on the commencement of the oxidation process. Meanwhile, the natural concentration of ammonium influenced the rate of nitrification (µg NH4+/L day. Seasonality did not seem to significantly affect the ammonium transformation. The results highlight the different vulnerabilities of lakes with different trophic statuses.

  3. Heterogeneous reactions of alkylamines with ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chong; Wang, Lin; Lal, Vinita; Khalizov, Alexei F; Zhang, Renyi

    2011-06-01

    The heterogeneous reactions between alkylamines and ammonium salts (ammonium sulfate and ammonium bisulfate) have been studied using a low-pressure fast flow reactor coupled to an ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ID-CIMS) at 293 ± 2 K. The uptake of three alkylamines, i.e., monomethylamine, dimethylamine, and trimethylamine, on ammonium sulfate shows a displacement reaction of ammonium by aminium, evidenced by the release of ammonia monitored using protonated acetone dimer as the reagent ion. For the three alkylamines, the initial uptake coefficients (γ(0)) range from 2.6 × 10(-2) to 3.4 × 10(-2) and the steady-state uptake coefficients (γ(ss)) range from 6.0 × 10(-3) to 2.3 × 10(-4) and decrease as the number of methyl groups on the alkylamine increases. A different reaction mechanism is observed for the uptake of the three alkylamines on ammonium bisulfate, which is featured by an acid-base reaction (neutralization) with irreversible alkylamine loss and no ammonia generation and occurs at a rate limited by diffusion of gaseous alkylamines to the ammonium bisulfate surface. Our results reveal that the reactions between alkylamines and ammonium salts contribute to particle growth and alter the composition of ammonium sulfate and bisulfate aerosols in the atmosphere.

  4. Ammonium on Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammannito, E.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Carrorro, F. G.; Ciarniello, M.; Combe, J. P.; De Angelis, S.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Frigeri, A.; Longobardo, A.; Mugnuolo, R.; Marchi, S.; Palomba, E.; Raymond, C. A.; Salatti, M.; Tosi, F.; Zambon, F.; Russell, C. T.

    2017-12-01

    Since January 2015, the surface of Ceres has been studied by the Dawn spacecraft through the measurements from the three instruments on board (1). The VIR imaging spectrometer, sensitive to the spectral range 0.25 -5.0 μm, provided information on the surficial composition of Ceres at resolutions ranging from few kilometers to about one hundred meters (2). Analysis of VIR reflectance data revealed that the average spectrum of Ceres is compatible with a mixture of low-albedo minerals, Mg- phyllosilicates, ammoniated clays, and Mg- carbonates, (3) confirming previous studies based on ground based spectra (4, 5). Mineralogical maps of the surface at about 1 km/px show that the components identified in the average spectrum are present all across the surface with variations in their relative abundance and chemical composition (6, 7). While the ammoniated clays have been already studied (6), the presence nature and distribution of additional ammoniated species has never been investigated in detail, although the spectral analysis of the bright faculae within Occator crater already revealed the potential presence of ammonium salts (8). Since the position and shape of the ammonium absorption in the VIS-NIR region are function of the hosting mineral specie (8), we did an inventory and characterization of the ammonium-rich regions, in order to analyze their spectral properties. In addition to the presence of ammonium, also the identification of the hosting species has implication for the evolution of Ceres. Our study, therefore, is a step forward in understanding of evolutionary pathway of Ceres. References: (1) Russell, C. T. et al., Science, 2016. (2) De Sanctis M.C. et al., Space Science Reviews, 2011. (3) De Sanctis M.C. et al., Nature, 2015. (4) King T. et al. Science, 1992. (5) Rivkin A.S. et al. Icarus, 2006. (6) Ammannito E. et al., Science, 2016. (7) Carrozzo F.G. et al., Science Advances, in revision. (8) De Sanctis et al., Nature, 2016. (9) Berg et al., Icarus

  5. Detonation Properties of Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wätterstam, A.; Östmark, H.; Helte, A.; Karlsson, S.

    1999-06-01

    Ammonium Dinitramide, ADN, has a potential as an oxidizer for underwater high explosives. Pure ADN has a large reaction-zone length and shows a strong non-ideal behaviour. The work presented here is an extension of previous work.(Sensitivity and Performance Characterization of Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN). Presented at 11th International Detonation Symposium, Snowmass, CO, 1998.) Experiments for determining the detonation velocity as a function of inverse charge radius and density, reaction-zone length and curvature, and the detonation pressure are presented. Measurements of pressure indicates that no, or weak von-Neumann spike exists, suggesting an immediate chemical decomposition. Experimental data are compared with predicted using thermochemical codes and ZND-theory.

  6. Crystallisation of mixtures of ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulphate and soot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dougle, P.G.; Veefkind, J.P.; Brink, H.M. ten

    1998-01-01

    Crystallisation of laboratory aerosols of ammonium nitrate and of internal mixtures of this salt with ammonium sulphate were investigated using humidity controlled nephelometry. The aerosol was produced via nebulizing of solutions and then dried to 25% RH, which is a realistic minimum value for

  7. Anaerobic Digestion: Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Batstone, Damien J.

    2011-01-01

    Organic waste may degrade anaerobically in nature as well as in engineered systems. The latter is called anaerobic digestion or biogasification. Anaerobic digestion produces two main outputs: An energy-rich gas called biogas and an effluent. The effluent, which may be a solid as well as liquid...... with very little dry matter may also be called a digest. The digest should not be termed compost unless it specifically has been composted in an aerated step. This chapter describes the basic processes of anaerobic digestion. Chapter 9.5 describes the anaerobic treatment technologies, and Chapter 9.......6 addresses the mass balances and environmental aspects of anaerobic digestion....

  8. Ammonium diphosphitoindate(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Hamchaoui

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, NH4[In(HPO32], is built up from InIII cations (site symmetry 3m. adopting an octahedral environment and two different phosphite anions (each with site symmetry 3m. exhibiting a triangular–pyramidal geometry. Each InO6 octahedron shares its six apices with hydrogen phosphite groups. Reciprocally, each HPO3 group shares all its O atoms with three different metal cations, leading to [In(HPO32]− layers which propagate in the ab plane. The ammonium cation likewise has site symmetry 3m.. In the structure, the cations are located between the [In(HPO32]− layers of the host framework. The sheets are held together by hydrogen bonds formed between the NH4+ cations and the O atoms of the framework.

  9. Protein Precipitation Using Ammonium Sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The basic theory of protein precipitation by addition of ammonium sulfate is presented, and the most common applications are listed. Tables are provided for calculating the appropriate amount of ammonium sulfate to add to a particular protein solution. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Modeling the effect of heat fluxes on ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from an anaerobic swine waste treatment lagoon using artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding factors that affect ammonia and nitrous emissions from anaerobic swine waste treatment lagoons or any animal waste receptacles is a necessary first step in deploying potential remediation options. In this study, we examined the various meteorological factors (i.e., air temperatures, s...

  11. Solid anaerobic digestion batch with liquid digestate recirculation and wet anaerobic digestion of organic waste: Comparison of system performances and identification of microbial guilds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maria, Francesco; Barratta, Martino; Bianconi, Francesco; Placidi, Pisana; Passeri, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Solid anaerobic digestion batch (SADB) with liquid digestate recirculation and wet anaerobic digestion of organic waste were experimentally investigated. SADB was operated at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 4.55kgVS/m 3 day, generating about 252NL CH 4 /kgVS, whereas the wet digester was operated at an OLR of 0.9kgVS/m 3 day, generating about 320NL CH 4 /kgVS. The initial total volatile fatty acids concentrations for SADB and wet digestion were about 12,500mg/L and 4500mg/L, respectively. There were higher concentrations of ammonium and COD for the SADB compared to the wet one. The genomic analysis performed by high throughput sequencing returned a number of sequences for each sample ranging from 110,619 to 373,307. More than 93% were assigned to the Bacteria domain. Seven and nine major phyla were sequenced for the SADB and wet digestion, respectively, with Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria being the dominant phyla in both digesters. Taxonomic profiles suggested a methanogenic pathway characterized by a relevant syntrophic acetate-oxidizing metabolism mainly in the liquid digestate of the SADB. This result also confirms the benefits of liquid digestate recirculation for improving the efficiency of AD performed with high solids (>30%w/w) content. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Livestock Anaerobic Digester Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Anaerobic Digester Database provides basic information about anaerobic digesters on livestock farms in the United States, organized in Excel spreadsheets. It includes projects that are under construction, operating, or shut down.

  13. Comprehensive study for Anammox process via multistage anaerobic baffled reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Sherif; Tawfik, Ahmed

    2017-11-01

    Continuous anaerobic ammonia oxidation (Anammox) process in multistage anaerobic baffled (MABR) reactor was investigated. The reactor was operated for approximately 150 days at constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 48 h and was fed with synthetic wastewater containing nitrite and ammonium as main substrates. The MABR was inoculated with mixed culture bacteria collected from activated sludge plant (41.6 g MLSS/L and 19.1 g MLVSS/L). The MABR reactor exhibited excellent performance for the start-up of Anammox process within a period of 35 days. The start-up period was divided into four successive phases; cell lysis, lag, activity elevation and steady state. Total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) removal efficiency of 96.8± 0.9% was achieved at steady state conditions, corresponding to nitrogen removal rate (NRR) of 50.2±1.7 mg N/L·d. Moreover, the effect of HRT on the Anammox process was assessed with applying five different HRTs of (48, 38.4, 28.8, 19.2 and 9.6 h). Decreasing HRT from 48 to 9.6 h reduced the removal efficiencies of NH4-N, NO2-N and TIN from 97.7±2.2 to 49.0±9.8%, from 95.7±1.9 to 71.0±8.5% and from 96.8±0.9 to 57.9±9.1%, respectively, that corresponding to reduction in NRR from 50.8±1.2 mg N/L·d at HRT of 48 h to 32.5±5.0 mg N/L·d at HRT of 9.6 h.

  14. Comprehensive study for Anammox process via multistage anaerobic baffled reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Sherif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous anaerobic ammonia oxidation (Anammox process in multistage anaerobic baffled (MABR reactor was investigated. The reactor was operated for approximately 150 days at constant hydraulic retention time (HRT of 48 h and was fed with synthetic wastewater containing nitrite and ammonium as main substrates. The MABR was inoculated with mixed culture bacteria collected from activated sludge plant (41.6 g MLSS/L and 19.1 g MLVSS/L. The MABR reactor exhibited excellent performance for the start-up of Anammox process within a period of 35 days. The start-up period was divided into four successive phases; cell lysis, lag, activity elevation and steady state. Total inorganic nitrogen (TIN removal efficiency of 96.8± 0.9% was achieved at steady state conditions, corresponding to nitrogen removal rate (NRR of 50.2±1.7 mg N/L·d. Moreover, the effect of HRT on the Anammox process was assessed with applying five different HRTs of (48, 38.4, 28.8, 19.2 and 9.6 h. Decreasing HRT from 48 to 9.6 h reduced the removal efficiencies of NH4-N, NO2-N and TIN from 97.7±2.2 to 49.0±9.8%, from 95.7±1.9 to 71.0±8.5% and from 96.8±0.9 to 57.9±9.1%, respectively, that corresponding to reduction in NRR from 50.8±1.2 mg N/L·d at HRT of 48 h to 32.5±5.0 mg N/L·d at HRT of 9.6 h.

  15. Ammonium Perchlorate and Ammonium Perchlorate- Hydroxyl Terminated Polybutadiene Simulated Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Francisco Boschi Gonçalves

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The combustion simulation of ammonium perchlorate was carried out with the software Chemkin, in two steps: the burning behavior of pure ammonium perchlorate and the one of formulated ammonium perchlorate with hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene binder. In both cases, the room pressure varied in order to verify its influence in the system. The burning environment conditions were diverse. During the combustion process, the data obtained from the kinetic chemistry simulation software were compiled. The flame structure can be described by the molar fraction of the burning products and the temperature evolution from the surface of the material.

  16. Microbial monitoring of ammonia removal in a UASB reactor treating pre-digested chicken manure with anaerobic granular inoculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangin-Gomec, Cigdem; Pekyavas, Goksen; Sapmaz, Tugba; Aydin, Sevcan; Ince, Bahar; Akyol, Çağrı; Ince, Orhan

    2017-10-01

    Performance and microbial community dynamics in an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor coupled with anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (Anammox) treating diluted chicken manure digestate (Total ammonia nitrogen; TAN=123±10mg/L) were investigated for a 120-d operating period in the presence of anaerobic granular inoculum. Maximum TAN removal efficiency reached to above 80% with as low as 20mg/L TAN concentrations in the effluent. Moreover, total COD (tCOD) with 807±215mg/L in the influent was removed by 60-80%. High-throughput sequencing revealed that Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes were dominant phyla followed by Euryarchaeota and Bacteroidetes. The relative abundance of Planctomycetes significantly increased from 4% to 8-9% during the late days of the operation with decreased tCOD concentration, which indicated a more optimum condition to favor ammonia removal through anammox route. There was also significant association between the hzsA gene and ammonia removal in the UASB reactor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Phosphate limitation in biological rapid sand filters used to remove ammonium from drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Carson Odell; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Smets, Barth F.

    2013-01-01

    Removing ammonium from drinking water is important for maintaining biological stability in distribution systems. This is especially important in regions that do not use disinfectants in the treatment process or keep a disinfectant residual in the distribution system. Problems with nitrification can...... occur with increased ammonium loads caused by seasonal or operational changes and can lead to extensive periods of elevated ammonium and nitrite concentrations in the effluent. One possible cause of nitrification problems in these filters maybe due to phosphate limitation. This was investigated using...... the total number of ammonium oxidizing bacteria in the column. © 2013 American Water Works Association AWWA WQTC Conference Proceedings All Rights Reserved....

  18. The effects of theaflavin-enriched black tea extract on muscle soreness, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endocrine responses to acute anaerobic interval training: a randomized, double-blind, crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golem Devon L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle soreness and decreased performance often follow a bout of high-intensity exercise. By reducing these effects, an athlete can train more frequently and increase long-term performance. The purpose of this study is to examine whether a high-potency, black tea extract (BTE alters the delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS, oxidative stress, inflammation, and cortisol (CORT responses to high-intensity anaerobic exercise. Methods College-age males (N = 18 with 1+ yrs of weight training experience completed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Subjects consumed the BTE (1,760 mg BTE·d-1 or placebo (PLA for 9 days. Each subject completed two testing sessions (T1 & T2, which occurred on day 7 of the intervention. T1 & T2 consisted of a 30 s Wingate Test plus eight 10 s intervals. Blood samples were obtained before, 0, 30 & 60 min following the interval sessions and were used to analyze the total to oxidized glutathione ratio (GSH:GSSG, 8-isoprostane (8-iso, CORT, and interleukin 6 (IL-6 secretion. DOMS was recorded at 24 & 48 h post-test using a visual analog scale while BTE or PLA continued to be administered. Significance was set at P . Results Compared to PLA, BTE produced significantly higher average peak power (P = 0.013 and higher average mean power (P = 0.067 across nine WAnT intervals. BTE produced significantly lower DOMS compared to PLA at 24 h post test (P and 48 h post test (P . Compared to PLA, BTE had a slightly higher GSH:GSSG ratio at baseline which became significantly higher at 30 and 60 min post test (P . AUC analysis revealed BTE to elicit significantly lower GSSG secretion (P = 0.009, significantly higher GSH:GSSG ratio (P = 0.001, and lower CORT secretion (P = 0.078 than PLA. AUC analysis did not reveal a significant difference in total IL-6 response (P = 0.145 between conditions. Conclusions Consumption of theaflavin-enriched black tea extract led to improved recovery and a reduction in

  19. 21 CFR 184.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium sulfate. 184.1143 Section 184.1143 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4, CAS Reg... is prepared by the neutralization of sulfuric acid with ammonium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient meets...

  20. Extraction Factor Of Pure Ammonium Paratungstate From Tungsten Scraps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pee J.-H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Typical oxidation process of tungsten scraps was modified by the rotary kiln with oxygen burner to increase the oxidation rate of tungsten scraps. Also to accelerate the solubility of solid oxidized products, the hydrothermal reflux method was adapted. By heating tungsten scraps in rotary kiln with oxygen burner at around 900° for 2hrs, the scraps was oxidized completely. Then oxidized products (WO3 and CoWO4 was fully dissolved in the solution of NaOH by hydrothermal reflux method at 150° for 2hrs. The dissolution rate of oxidized products was increased with increasing the reaction temperature and concentration of NaOH. And then CaWO4 and H2WO4 could be generated from the aqueous sodium tungstate solution. Ammonium paratungstate (APT also could be produced from tungstic acid using by aqueous ammonium solution. The morphologies (cubic and plate types of APT was controlled by the stirring process of purified solution of ammonium paratungstate.

  1. Hydrogen as clean fuel via continuous fermentation by anaerobic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    free and oxidized to water as a combustion product. Bioconversion of synthesis gas to hydrogen was demonstrated in a continuous fermentation utilizing malate as a carbon source. Rhodospirillum rubrum, an anaerobic photosynthetic bacterium ...

  2. Anaerobe Reinigung von Abwasser

    OpenAIRE

    Sternad, W.; Mohr, M.; Spork, C.; Troesch, W.; Trick, I.; Krischke, W.

    2007-01-01

    WO 2007076953 A1 UPAB: 20070822 NOVELTY - The municipal wastewater purification comprises anaerobic biological purification of the wastewater by using a biomass (15-100 g/l) from psychrophilic microorganisms, concentrating the sludge by separating the wastewater and feeding back the sludge into the anaerobic biological purification. The psychrophilic microorganisms exhibit an optimum temperature of less than 25degreesC. The anaerobic purification takes place as single- or two-step methanizati...

  3. Reactive Uptake of Dimethylamine by Ammonium Sulfate and Ammonium Sulfate-Sucrose Mixed Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yangxi; Chan, Chak K

    2017-01-12

    Short-chain alkyl amines can undergo gas-to-particle partitioning via reactive uptake by ammonium salts, whose phases have been thought to largely influence the extent of amine uptake. Previous studies mainly focused on particles of single ammonium salt at either dry or wet conditions without any addition of organic compounds. Here we report the uptake of dimethylamine (DMA) by ammonium sulfate (AS) and AS-sucrose mixed particles at different relative humidities (RHs) using an electrodynamic balance coupled with in situ Raman spectroscopy. DMA is selected as a representative of short-chain alkyl amines, and sucrose is used as a surrogate of viscous and hydrophilic organics. Effective DMA uptake was observed for most cases, except for the water-limiting scenario at <5% RH and the formation of an ultraviscous sucrose coating at 10% RH and below. DMA uptake coefficients (γ) were estimated using the particle mass measurements during DMA uptake. Addition of sucrose can increase γ by absorbing water or inhibiting AS crystallization and decrease γ by elevating the particle viscosity and forming a coating layer. DMA uptake can be facilitated for crystalline AS or retarded for aqueous AS with hydrophilic viscous organics (e.g., secondary organic material formed via the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds) present in aerosol particles.

  4. NOx and ammonium isotopic fingerprints of anammox in natural and engineered systems: Implications for N isotope budgets and the use of NOx isotopes to diagnose process stability in wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, M. F.; Stöcklin, N.; Brunner, B.; Frame, C. H.; Joss, A.; Kipf, M.; Kuhn, T.; Wunderlin, P.

    2014-12-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of ammonium with nitrite (anammox) has been identified as a very important fixed nitrogen (N) sink, accounting for a large fraction of global fixed N loss in marine, freshwater, and semi-terrestrial environments. In engineered systems, combined nitritation-anammox is an efficient process to remove N from ammonium-rich wastewater, with nitrite as the central intermediate. During the anammox process, nitrate is being produced, providing reducing equivalents for carbon fixation. Measuring the N isotope ratios in fixed N species (i.e., ammonium, nitrite, nitrate) has proven to be a valuable tool to track N cycling in freshwater and marine ecosystems, yet its application in wastewater treatment as a tool to diagnose nitrate production pathways is novel. In this presentation we will elucidate, and compare, the N isotope effects associated with anammox 1) in vitro, 2) in a lacustrine setting, and 3) in a small-scale batch reactor for wastewater treatment. We demonstrate that the anammox nitrite/nitrate isotopic signatures are modulated by the superposition of strong kinetic (normal and inverse) and equilibrium (nitrite-nitrate) N isotope fractionation. The ammonium N isotope effect is driven by kinetic N isotope fractionation, and is similar to that of nitrification. We will discuss the possible controls on the expression of the anammox N isotope effects in the natural environment. We will also evaluate the use of nitrate/nitrite N (and O) isotope signatures to distinguish between nitrate production by anammox versus nitrite oxidation, which is important for optimizing process efficiency during wastewater treatment.

  5. Using graphene oxide to enhance the activity of anammox bacteria for nitrogen removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Wang, Guowen; Zhang, Guoquan; Xu, Xiaochen; Yang, Fenglin

    2013-03-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was applied in this study to enhance the activity of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria for nitrogen removal. A GO dose-dependent effect on anammox bacteria was observed through batch tests. The results showed that the activity increased as the GO dose was varied within 0.05-0.1gL(-1). A maximum 10.26% increase of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing activity was achieved at 0.1gL(-1) GO. Analysis of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) indicated that the highest carbohydrate, protein, and total EPS contents (42.5, 125.7, and 168.2mg (g volatile suspended solids)(-1), respectively) were obtained with 0.1gL(-1) GO. Appropriate GO dose stimulated EPS production to promote the activity of anammox bacteria. Transmission electron microscopy showed the large surface area of GO benefited cell attachment. These findings proved that the application of GO was an effective approach to enhancing the activity of anammox bacteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Anaerobic sludge granulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Castro Lopes, de S.I.; Lettinga, G.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews different theories on anaerobic sludge granulation in UASB-reactors that have been proposed during the past two decades
    This paper reviews different theories on anaerobic sludge granulation in UASB-reactors that have been proposed during the past two decades. The initial

  7. Relations of ammonium minerals at several hydrothermal systems in the western U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, M.D.; Kendall, C.; Evans, J.R.; Fries, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    Ammonium bound to silicate and sulfate minerals has recently been located at several major hydrothermal systems in the western U.S. utilizing newly-discovered near-infrared spectral properties. Knowledge of the origin and mineralogic relations of ammonium minerals at known hydrothermal systems is critical for the proper interpretation of remote sensing data and for testing of possible links to mineralization. Submicroscopic analysis of ammonium minerals from two mercury- and gold-bearing hot-springs deposits at Ivanhoe, Nevada and McLaughlin, California shows that the ammonium feldspar, buddingtonite, occurs as fine-grained euhedral crystals coating larger sulfide and quartz crystals. Ammonium feldspar seems to precipitate relatively late in the crystallization sequence and shows evidence for replacement of NH4+ by K+ or other monovalent cations. Some buddingtonite is observed in close association with mercury, but not with gold. Ammonioalunite is found in a variety of isolated crystal forms at both deposits. Nitrogen isotopic values for ammonium-bearing minerals show a 14??? range in composition, precluding assignment of a specific provenance to the nitrogen. The correlations of nitrogen isotopic values with depth and ammonium content suggest some loss of nitrogen in the oxidizing supergene environment, possibly as a metastable mineral. The high ammonium content in these hydrothermal systems, the close association to mercury, and the small crystal size of the ammonium-bearing minerals all suggest that ammonium may be transported in a late-stage vapor phase or as an organic volatile. Such a process could lead to the formation of a non-carbonaceous organic aureole above a buried geothermal source. The discovery of a 10-km outcrop of ammonium minerals confirms that significant substitution of ammonium in minerals is possible over an extensive area and that remote sensing is a feasible means to detect such aureoles. ?? 1993.

  8. Solubility of ammonium metavanadate in ammonium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate solutions at 25 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, P.I.; Andreev, V.K.; Slotvinskij-Sidak, N.P.

    1978-01-01

    Solubility at 25 deg C has been studied in the system ammonium metavanadate - sodium bicarbonate - water which is a stable section of the corresponding quaternary mutual system. In the eutonic point the content of ammonium metavanadate is 4.95% and of sodium bicarbonate 12.1%. The crystallization branch of ammonium metavanadate has been studied in the system ammonium metavanadate - ammonium carbonate - water at 25 deg C. Metavanadate solubility attains minimum (0.14%) at ammonium carbonate concentration 2.6%. Three sections have been studied of the quaternary system ammonium - metavanadate - ammonium carbonate - sodium bicarbonate-water at 25 deg C in the crystallization region of ammonium metavanadate at a ratio of sodium bicarbonate to ammonium carbonate 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3. A region of minimum solubility of ammonium metavanadate has been detected (0.1%)

  9. Ammonium photo-production by heterocytous cyanobacteria: potentials and constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizeau, Dominique; Bui, Lan Anh; Dupré, Catherine; Legrand, Jack

    2016-08-01

    Over the last decades, production of microalgae and cyanobacteria has been developed for several applications, including novel foods, cosmetic ingredients and more recently biofuel. The sustainability of these promising developments can be hindered by some constraints, such as water and nutrient footprints. This review surveys data on N2-fixing cyanobacteria for biomass production and ways to induce and improve the excretion of ammonium within cultures under aerobic conditions. The nitrogenase complex is oxygen sensitive. Nevertheless, nitrogen fixation occurs under oxic conditions due to cyanobacteria-specific characteristics. For instance, in some cyanobacteria, the vegetative cell differentiation in heterocyts provides a well-adapted anaerobic microenvironment for nitrogenase protection. Therefore, cell cultures of oxygenic cyanobacteria have been grown in laboratory and pilot photobioreactors (Dasgupta et al., 2010; Fontes et al., 1987; Moreno et al., 2003; Nayak & Das, 2013). Biomass production under diazotrophic conditions has been shown to be controlled by environmental factors such as light intensity, temperature, aeration rate, and inorganic carbon concentration, also, more specifically, by the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the culture medium. Currently, there is little information regarding the production of extracellular ammonium by heterocytous cyanobacteria. This review compares the available data on maximum ammonium concentrations and analyses the specific rate production in cultures grown as free or immobilized filamentous cyanobacteria. Extracellular production of ammonium could be coupled, as suggested by recent research on non-diazotrophic cyanobacteria, to that of other high value metabolites. There is little information available regarding the possibility for using diazotrophic cyanobacteria as cellular factories may be in regard of the constraints due to nitrogen fixation.

  10. Stabilization of fine fraction from landfill mining in anaerobic and aerobic laboratory leach bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönkäre, Tiina J; Palmroth, Marja R T; Rintala, Jukka A

    2015-11-01

    Fine fraction (FF, mined landfill was stabilized in four laboratory-scale leach bed reactors (LBR) over 180 days. The aim was to study feasibility of biotechnological methods to treat FF and if further stabilization of FF is possible. Four different stabilization methods were compared and their effects upon quality of FF were evaluated. Also during the stabilization experiment, leachate quality as well as gas composition and quantity were analyzed. The methods studied included three anaerobic LBRs (one without water addition, one with water addition, and one with leachate recirculation) and one aerobic LBR (with water addition). During the experiment, the most methane was produced in anaerobic LBR without water addition (18.0 L CH4/kg VS), while water addition and leachate recirculation depressed methane production slightly, to 16.1 and 16.4 L CH4/kg VS, respectively. Organic matter was also removed via the leachate and was measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD). Calculated removal of organic matter in gas and leachate was highest in LBR with water addition (59 g COD/kg VS), compared with LBR without water addition or with leachate recirculation (51 g COD/kg VS). Concentrations of COD, ammonium nitrogen and anions in leachate decreased during the experiment, indicating washout mechanism caused by water additions. Aeration increased sulfate and nitrate concentrations in leachate due to oxidized sulfide and ammonium. Molecular weight distributions of leachates showed that all the size categories decreased, especially low molecular weight compounds, which were reduced the most. Aerobic stabilization resulted in the lowest final VS/TS (13.1%), lowest respiration activity (0.9-1.2 mg O2/g TS), and lowest methane production after treatment (0.0-0.8 L CH4/kg VS), with 29% of VS being removed from FF. Anaerobic stabilization methods also reduced organic matter by 9-20% compared with the initial amount. Stabilization reduced the quantity of soluble nitrogen in FF and did

  11. Study of ammonium sulfates electric conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrynin, D.V.; Tulegulov, A.D.

    2006-01-01

    In the work results of research of ammonium sulfate electroconductivity are given. The influence effecting on ammonium sulfate conductivity is investigated. The various circuits of inclusion tetra ohmmeter are given. (author)

  12. Removal of ammonium ions from wastewater: A short review in development of efficient methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K. Gupta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium ions wastewater pollution has become one of the most serious environmental problems today. The treatment of ammonium ions is a special concern due to their recalcitrance and persistence in the environment. In recent years, various methods for ammonium ion removal from wastewater have been extensively studied. This paper reviews the current methods that have been used to treat ammonium ion wastewater and evaluates these techniques. These technologies include ion exchange, adsorption, biosorption, wet air oxidation, biofiltration, diffused aeration, nitrification and denitrification methods. About 75 published studies (1979-2015 are reviewed in this paper. It is evident from the literature survey articles that ion exchange, adsorption and biological technology are the most frequently studied for the treatment of ammonium ion wastewater.

  13. 21 CFR 184.1133 - Ammonium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium alginate. 184.1133 Section 184.1133 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1133 Ammonium alginate. (a) Ammonium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005... accordance with § 184.1(b)(2), the ingredient is used in food only within the following specific limitations...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1141 - Ammonium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate. 582.1141 Section 582.1141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1141 Ammonium phosphate. (a) Product. Ammonium phosphate (mono- and dibasic). (b) Conditions...

  15. 76 FR 47238 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4249 (August 2011), entitled Ammonium Nitrate from Russia...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium sulfate. 582.1143 Section 582.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1143 Ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  17. Anaerobic Digestion and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaerobic digestion is a natural biological process. The initials "AD" may refer to the process of anaerobic digestion, or the built systems of anaerobic digesters. While there are many kinds of digesters, the biology is basically the same for all. Anaerobic digesters are built...

  18. Preparation of nanodispersed titania using stabilized ammonium nitrate melts

    KAUST Repository

    Raciulete, Monica

    2010-10-01

    An expedite one-step approach using simple precursors has been proposed to obtain metallic oxide compounds and exemplified by preparation of highly dispersed TiO2. The technique consists in heating to 400500 °C of molten ammonium nitrate stabilized with an organic nitrogen-containing compound (urea, melamine, ammonium oxalate) and containing dissolved metal salt precursor (TiOCl2). The crystallites of the resulting TiO2 demonstrated variable size and shape as a function of stabilizer used. Their activity in photocatalytic oxidation of formic acid also depends on the nature of the stabilizer. The catalysts as-prepared showed high photocatalytic performance, superior to that of the Degussa P25 reference. Nitrogen containing stabilizers play a double role of increasing the process safety and modifying the properties of the solid products. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Feasibility and interest of the anammox process as treatment alternative for anaerobic digester supernatants in manure processing--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrí, Albert; Béline, Fabrice; Dabert, Patrick

    2013-12-15

    Completely autotrophic nitrogen removal (ANR) is based on the combination of partial nitritation (PN) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). It is a promising alternative for the subsequent treatment of biogas digester supernatants in livestock manure processing and nitrogen surplus scenarios. However, as no full-scale experiences in the treatment of manure digestates by ANR have been published to date, future field studies addressing treatment of this kind of effluent would be of great interest. Some topics to be considered in these studies would be coupling anaerobic digestion and ANR, analysis of the factors that affect the process, comparing reactor configurations, microbial ecology, gas emissions, and achieving robust performance. This paper provides an overview of published studies on ANR. Specific issues related to the applicability of the process for treating manure digestates are discussed. The energy requirements of ANR are compared with those of other technological alternatives aimed at recovering nitrogen from digester supernatants. The results of the assessment were shown to depend on the composition of the supernatant. In this regard, the PN-anammox process was shown to be more competitive than other alternatives particularly at concentrations of up to 2 kg NH4(+)-N m(-3). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Membrane controlled anaerobic digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omstead, D. R.

    In response to general shortages of energy, examination of the anaerboic digestion process as a potential source of a combustible, methane-rich fuel has intensified in recent years. It has been suggested that orgaic intermediates (such as fatty acids), produced during digestion, might also be recovered for use as chemical feedstocks. This investigation has been concerned with combining ultrafiltration separation techniques with anaerobic digestion for the development of a process in which the total production of acetic acid (the most valuable intermediate in anaerobic digestion) and methane are optimized. Enrichment cultures, able to utilize glucose as a sole carbon source, were adapted from sewage digesting cultures using conventional techniques. An ultrafiltration system was constructed and coupled to an anaerobic digester culture vessel which contained the glucose enrichment. The membrane controlled anaerobic digester appears to show promise as a means of producing high rates of both methane gas and acetic acid.

  1. Selection of suitable fertilizer draw solute for a novel fertilizer-drawn forward osmosis-anaerobic membrane bioreactor hybrid system

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Youngjin

    2016-02-09

    In this study, a protocol for selecting suitable fertilizer draw solute for anaerobic fertilizer-drawn forward osmosis membrane bioreactor (AnFDFOMBR) was proposed. Among eleven commercial fertilizer candidates, six fertilizers were screened further for their FO performance tests and evaluated in terms of water flux and reverse salt flux. Using selected fertilizers, bio-methane potential experiments were conducted to examine the effect of fertilizers on anaerobic activity due to reverse diffusion. Mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP) showed the highest biogas production while other fertilizers exhibited an inhibition effect on anaerobic activity with solute accumulation. Salt accumulation in the bioreactor was also simulated using mass balance simulation models. Results showed that ammonium sulphate and MAP were the most appropriate for AnFDFOMBR since they demonstrated less salt accumulation, relatively higher water flux, and higher dilution capacity of draw solution. Given toxicity of sulphate to anaerobic microorganisms, MAP appears to be the most suitable draw solution for AnFDFOMBR.

  2. Anaerobic Digestion Foaming Causes

    OpenAIRE

    Ganidi, Nafsika

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion foaming has been encountered in several sewage treatment plants in the UK. Foaming has raised major concerns for the water utilities due to significant impacts on process efficiency and operational costs. Several foaming causes have been suggested over the past few years by researchers. However, the supporting experimental information is limited and in some cases site specific. The present report aimed to provide a better understanding of the anaerobic di...

  3. Phosphate limitation in biological rapid sand filters used to remove ammonium from drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Carson Odell; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Smets, Barth F.

    2013-01-01

    Removing ammonium from drinking water is important for maintaining biological stability in distribution systems. This is especially important in regions that do not use disinfectants in the treatment process or keep a disinfectant residual in the distribution system. Problems with nitrification can...... the total number of ammonium oxidizing bacteria in the column. © 2013 American Water Works Association AWWA WQTC Conference Proceedings All Rights Reserved....

  4. Treating ammonium-rich wastewater with sludge from water treatment plant to produce ammonium alum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Po Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study applies a process to treat ammonium-rich wastewater using alum-generated sludge form water purification plant, and gain economic benefit by producing ammonium alum (Al(NH4(SO42·12H2O. The factors affecting production of ammonium alum include molar ratio of ammonium to aluminum concentration, sulfuric acid concentration, mixing speed, mixing time, standing time, and temperature. According to the equation for the ammonium removal reaction, the theoretical quantity of ammonium alum was calculated based on initial and final concentrations of ammonium. Then, the weight of ammonium alum crystal was divided by the theoretical weight to derive the recovery ratio. The optimum sludge and sulfuric acid dosage to treat about 17 g L−1 ammonium wastewater are 300 g L−1 and 100 mL L−1, respectively. The optimal dosage for wastewater is molar ratio of ammonium to aluminum of about 1 due to the aluminum dissolving in acidified wastewater. The ammonium removal efficiency is roughly 70% and the maximum recovery ratio for ammonium alum is 93% when the wastewater is mixed for 10 min at the mixing velocity gradient of 100 s−1. Ammonium alum production or ammonium removal can be enhanced by controlling the reaction at low temperatures.

  5. Ammonium-tungstate-promoted growth of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Songfeng; Li, Chaowei; Li, Taotao; Geng, Renjie; Li, Qiulong; Lu, Weibang; Yao, Yagang

    2018-05-01

    Ammonium tungstate ((NH4)10W12O41 · xH2O) is a kind of oxygen-containing ammonium salt. The following study proves that it can be successfully used as a metal oxide alternative to produce boron oxide (B2O2) by oxidizing boron (B) in a traditional boron oxide chemical vapor deposition (BOCVD) process. This special oxidant promotes the simplistic fabrication of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in a conventional horizontal tube furnace, an outcome which may have resulted from its strong oxidizability. The experimental results demonstrate that the mole ratio of B and (NH4)10W12O41 · xH2O is a key parameter in determining the formation, quality and quantity of BNNTs when stainless steel is employed as a catalyst. We also found that Mg(NO3)2 and MgO nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as catalysts to grow BNNTs with the same precursor. The BNNTs obtained from the Mg(NO3)2 catalyst were straighter than those obtained from the MgO NP catalyst. This could have been due to the different physical forms of the catalysts that were used.

  6. Ammonium azide under hydrostatic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landerville, A. C.; Steele, B. A.; Oleynik, I. I.

    2014-05-01

    The properties of ammonium azide NH4N3 upon compression were investigated using first-principles density functional theory. The equation of state was calculated and the mechanism of a phase transition experimentally observed at 3.3 GPa is elucidated. Novel polymorphs of NH4N3 were found using a simple structure search algorithm employing random atomic displacements upon static compression. The structures of three new polymorphs, labelled as B, C, and D, are similar to those of other metal azides.

  7. Isolation and stable nitrogen isotope analysis of ammonium ions in ammonium nitrate prills using sodium tetraphenylborate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howa, John D; Lott, Michael J; Ehleringer, James R

    2014-07-15

    Because of the threat of bombings using improvised explosives containing ammonium nitrate (AN), law enforcement and intelligence communities have been interested in stable isotope techniques for tracking and discriminating AN sources. Separate analysis of the AN component ions ammonium and nitrate would add discriminatory power to these techniques. Ammonium ions in dissolved AN solution were isolated from samples by precipitation using sodium tetraphenylborate solution. We tested the isolation of ammonium from nitrates using solutions of ammonium and nitrate salts with different (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios. Ammonium tetraphenylborate and AN were separately analyzed for their (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios using EA-ConFlo-IRMS, and the (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios of the nitrate ions were calculated using mass balance. Ammonium and nitrate nitrogen isotope ratios were plotted as two separate variables. Isolation of ammonium precipitate from solutions containing dissolved nitrates did not influence the nitrogen isotope ratios of test ammonium salts. A survey set of 42 AN samples showed that the ammonium and nitrate (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios were not significantly correlated, and the paired mean differences were not statistically significant. Both ammonium and nitrate were depleted in (15)N relative to their theoretical atmospheric sources. Isolation of the ammonium ion from AN adds another dimension for the discrimination of forensic AN samples. This technique using sodium tetraphenylborate is robust and does not require specialized equipment. Our observations indicated that ammonium nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen have independent sources of isotopic variation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  9. Review of Options for Ammonia/Ammonium Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-06

    This report is a review of literature supporting practical ammonia/ammonium destruction processes. Melter research supporting Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass production has shown that significant amounts of ammonia will be in the melter offgas condensate. Further work with secondary waste forms indicates the potential need to remove the ammonia, perhaps by an oxidative process. This review finds likely practical chemical methods to oxidize ammonia in aqueous solution at moderate temperatures and atmospheric pressure, using easily obtained reagents. Leading candidates include nitrite oxidation to produce nitrogen gas, various peroxide oxidative processes, and air stripping. This work reviews many other processes and provides reasoning to not consider those processes further for this application.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1138 - Ammonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium chloride. 184.1138 Section 184.1138 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1138 Ammonium chloride. (a) Ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, CAS Reg..._locations.html. (c) In accordance with § 184.1(b)(1), the ingredient is used in food with no limitation...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium carbonate. 184.1137 Section 184.1137 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1137 Ammonium carbonate. (a) Ammonium carbonate ((NH4)2CO3, CAS.../code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. (c) In accordance with § 184.1(b)(1), the ingredient is...

  12. Contribution of anaerobic energy expenditure to whole body thermogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Christopher B

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Heat production serves as the standard measurement for the determination of energy expenditure and efficiency in animals. Estimations of metabolic heat production have traditionally focused on gas exchange (oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production although direct heat measurements may include an anaerobic component particularly when carbohydrate is oxidized. Stoichiometric interpretations of the ratio of carbon dioxide production to oxygen uptake suggest that both anaerobic and aerobic heat production and, by inference, all energy expenditure – can be accounted for with a measurement of oxygen uptake as 21.1 kJ per liter of oxygen. This manuscript incorporates contemporary bioenergetic interpretations of anaerobic and aerobic ATP turnover to promote the independence of these disparate types of metabolic energy transfer: each has different reactants and products, uses dissimilar enzymes, involves different types of biochemical reactions, takes place in separate cellular compartments, exploits different types of gradients and ultimately each operates with distinct efficiency. The 21.1 kJ per liter of oxygen for carbohydrate oxidation includes a small anaerobic heat component as part of anaerobic energy transfer. Faster rates of ATP turnover that exceed mitochondrial respiration and that are supported by rapid glycolytic phosphorylation with lactate production result in heat production that is independent of oxygen uptake. Simultaneous direct and indirect calorimetry has revealed that this anaerobic heat does not disappear when lactate is later oxidized and so oxygen uptake does not adequately measure anaerobic efficiency or energy expenditure (as was suggested by the "oxygen debt" hypothesis. An estimate of anaerobic energy transfer supplements the measurement of oxygen uptake and may improve the interpretation of whole-body energy expenditure.

  13. Anaerobic and aerobic acetylene hydratase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Acetaldehyde is the first metabolite produced during acetylene degradation by bacteria either aerobically or anaerobically. Conversion of acetylene into acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetate, and biomass occurs in anaerobic cultures of Palobacter acetylinicus or aerobically with Mycobacterium lacticola, Nocardia rhodochrous, ...

  14. Producing ammonium uranate in spherical particulate form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugua, J.

    1984-01-01

    A novel easily handled substantially particulate ammonium uranate with a mean diameter between 30 and 150 micrometers, an apparent untamped bulk density of 2 to 2.8 g/cm 3 , and a flowability measured on the Carr scale equal to or greater than 95, with a low sulfate ion content between 0.5 and 1%, is calimed together with a fluidized bed process for preparing such ammonium uranate by precipitation of a super-saturated solution of ammonium uranate. The ammonium uranate is obtained by reacting a uranium sulfate solution and an ammoniacal solution, operating at a pH of about 6.6 to 7.2

  15. Glufosinate ammonium selection of transformed Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Detlef; Glazebrook, Jane

    2006-12-01

    INTRODUCTIONOne of the most commonly used markers for the selection of transgenic Arabidopsis is resistance to glufosinate ammonium, an herbicide that is sold under a variety of trade names including Basta and Finale. Resistance to glufosinate ammonium is conferred by the bacterial bialophos resistance gene (BAR) encoding the enzyme phosphinotricin acetyl transferase (PAT). This protocol describes the use of glufosinate ammonium to select transformed Arabidopsis plants. The major advantage of glufosinate ammonium selection is that it can be performed on plants growing in soil and does not require the use of sterile techniques.

  16. Exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stams, Alfons J M; de Bok, Frank A M; Plugge, Caroline M; van Eekert, Miriam H A; Dolfing, Jan; Schraa, Gosse

    2006-03-01

    Exocellular electron transfer plays an important role in anaerobic microbial communities that degrade organic matter. Interspecies hydrogen transfer between microorganisms is the driving force for complete biodegradation in methanogenic environments. Many organic compounds are degraded by obligatory syntrophic consortia of proton-reducing acetogenic bacteria and hydrogen-consuming methanogenic archaea. Anaerobic microorganisms that use insoluble electron acceptors for growth, such as iron- and manganese-oxide as well as inert graphite electrodes in microbial fuel cells, also transfer electrons exocellularly. Soluble compounds, like humic substances, quinones, phenazines and riboflavin, can function as exocellular electron mediators enhancing this type of anaerobic respiration. However, direct electron transfer by cell-cell contact is important as well. This review addresses the mechanisms of exocellular electron transfer in anaerobic microbial communities. There are fundamental differences but also similarities between electron transfer to another microorganism or to an insoluble electron acceptor. The physical separation of the electron donor and electron acceptor metabolism allows energy conservation in compounds as methane and hydrogen or as electricity. Furthermore, this separation is essential in the donation or acceptance of electrons in some environmental technological processes, e.g. soil remediation, wastewater purification and corrosion.

  17. Synthesis of cerous ammonium nitrate using ceric ammonium nitrate and anhydrous ammonia as a reducing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourleaux, G.; Colombet, P.; Rouxel, J.; Gradeff, P.S.; Mauermann, H.

    1988-01-01

    The reduction of ceric ammonium nitrate by anhydrous ammonia has been studied. The reaction yields cerous ammonium nitrate complex. This is an easy method to prepare an anhydrous Ce (III) salt, suitable for synthesis of organo cerium (III) derivatives [fr

  18. Syntrophic interactions and mechanisms underpinning anaerobic methane oxidation: targeted metaproteogenomics, single-cell protein detection and quantitative isotope imaging of microbial consortia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orphan, Victoria Jeanne [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences

    2014-11-26

    Syntrophy and mutualism play a central role in carbon and nutrient cycling by microorganisms. Yet, our ability to effectively study symbionts in culture has been hindered by the inherent interdependence of syntrophic associations, their dynamic behavior, and their frequent existence at thermodynamic limits. Now solutions to these challenges are emerging in the form of new methodologies. Developing strategies that establish links between the identity of microorganisms and their metabolic potential, as well as techniques that can probe metabolic networks on a scale that captures individual molecule exchange and processing, is at the forefront of microbial ecology. Understanding the interactions between microorganisms on this level, at a resolution previously intractable, will lead to our greater understanding of carbon turnover and microbial community resilience to environmental perturbations. In this project, we studied an enigmatic syntrophic association between uncultured methane-oxidizing archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria. This environmental archaeal-bacterial partnership represents a globally important sink for methane in anoxic environments. The specific goals of this project were organized into 3 major tasks designed to address questions relating to the ecophysiology of these syntrophic organisms under changing environmental conditions (e.g. different electron acceptors and nutrients), primarily through the development of microanalytical imaging methods which enable the visualization of the spatial distribution of the partners within aggregates, consumption and exchange of isotopically labeled substrates, and expression of targeted proteins identified via metaproteomics. The advanced tool set developed here to collect, correlate, and analyze these high resolution image and isotope-based datasets from methane-oxidizing consortia has the potential to be widely applicable for studying and modeling patterns of activity and interactions across a broad range of

  19. Facile synthesis of ammonium vanadate nanofibers by using reflux in aqueous V{sub 2}O{sub 5} solution with ammonium persulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Se Hun [Department of Convergence Nanoscience, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Jun Mo [Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seong Geun, E-mail: seongoh@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Seung Soon, E-mail: imss007@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Convergence Nanoscience, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Ammonium vanadate nanofibers were synthesized by simple reflux method in aqueous V{sub 2}O{sub 5} solution with ammonium persulfate without relying on surfactants, catalysts, harmful solvents and autoclave. The degree of intercalation by cationic ammonium ions into the crystal structure of vanadium oxide along with its change in chemical composition were analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared spectroscopy (IR). The morphological changes toward nanofiber structure, having diameter of 20–30 nm and a few μm length, were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The influences of synthetic conditions, such as reaction time and concentration of sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), on the crystal structures and morphologies of the resulting products have investigated. As a result, the ammonium vanadate nanofiber was formed in a short reaction time through a simple reflux method and yielded comparable electrical conductivity 1.47 × 10{sup -2} S/cm. - Highlights: • Ammonium vanadate nanofiber (AVFr) was prepared by simple reflux method. • AVFr yielded comparable electrical conductivity 1.47 × 10{sup -2} S/cm. • The electrical conductivity was improved by the increased amount of ammonium ion. • Sulfate ions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) play a crucial role in controlling the morphology of nanofiber.

  20. Light enhances biogas production from thermophilic anaerobic digester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, C.; Sawayama, S. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki (Japan). Biomass Research Group, Inst. for Energy Utilization

    2004-07-01

    The effect of light on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of cattle waste and sewage sludge was studied. Light was used to produce methane during anaerobic digestion of the sludge at 55 degrees C. Two reactors were tested. A dark reactor was wrapped in aluminum foil, and a light reactor was illuminated at 1500 lux with 60 watt incandescent bulbs. After an incubation of 35 days, the volume of methane produced from the light bulb reactor was 3.7 times higher than that from the dark reactor. Neither ammonium and phosphorous concentrations, nor the pH were not substantially different between the two types of reactors. The key methanogens in both reactors were Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicum. This paper presents the results of the phylogenetic analysis. The results indicate that thermophilic methanogenesis can be enhanced by light. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  1. Anaerobic carbon metabolism by the tricarboxylic acid cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanlerberghe, G.C.; Horsey, A.K.; Weger, H.G.; Turpin, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    Nitrogen-limited cells of Selenastrum minutum (Naeg.) Collins are able to assimilate NH 4 + in the dark under anaerobic conditions. Addition of NH 4 + to anaerobic cells results in a threefold increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCAC) CO 2 efflux and an eightfold increase in the rate of anaplerotic carbon fixation via phosphoenspyruvate carboxylase. Both of these observations are consistent with increased TCAC carbon flow to supply intermediates for amino acid biosynthesis. Addition of H 14 CO 3 - to anaerobic cells assimilating NH 4 + results in the incorporation of radiolabel into the α-carboxyl carbon of glutamic acid. Incorporation of radiolabel into glutamic acid is not simply a short-term phenomenon following NH 4 + addition as the specific activity of glutamic acid increases over time. This indicates that this alga is able to maintain partial oxidative TCAC carbon flow while under anoxia to supply αketoglutarate for glutamate production. During dark aerobic NH 4 + assimilation, no radiolabel appears in fumarate or succinate and only a small amount occurs in malate. During anaerobic NH 4 + assimilation, these metabolites contain a large proportion of the total radiolabel and radiolabel accumulates in succinate over time. Also, the ratio of dark carbon fixation to NH 4 + assimilation is much higher under anaerobic than aerobic conditions. These observations suggest the operation of a partial reductive TCAC from oxaloacetic acid to malate, fumarate, and succinate. Such a pathway might contribute to redox balance in an anaerobic cell maintaining partial oxidative TCAC activity

  2. The anaerobic digestion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, C.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Boone, D.R. [Oregon Graduate Inst., Portland, OR (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The microbial process of converting organic matter into methane and carbon dioxide is so complex that anaerobic digesters have long been treated as {open_quotes}black boxes.{close_quotes} Research into this process during the past few decades has gradually unraveled this complexity, but many questions remain. The major biochemical reactions for forming methane by methanogens are largely understood, and evolutionary studies indicate that these microbes are as different from bacteria as they are from plants and animals. In anaerobic digesters, methanogens are at the terminus of a metabolic web, in which the reactions of myriads of other microbes produce a very limited range of compounds - mainly acetate, hydrogen, and formate - on which the methanogens grow and from which they form methane. {open_quotes}Interspecies hydrogen-transfer{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}interspecies formate-transfer{close_quotes} are major mechanisms by which methanogens obtain their substrates and by which volatile fatty acids are degraded. Present understanding of these reactions and other complex interactions among the bacteria involved in anaerobic digestion is only now to the point where anaerobic digesters need no longer be treated as black boxes.

  3. Hydroponic system for the treatment of anaerobic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnasamy, K; Nair, J; Bäuml, B

    2012-01-01

    The effluent from anaerobic digestion process has high concentrations of nutrients, particularly nitrogen, essential for plant growth but is not suitable for direct disposal or application due to high chemical oxygen demand (COD), low dissolved oxygen (DO), odour issues and is potentially phytotoxic. This research explored the optimum conditions of anaerobic effluent for application and dilutions of the effluent required to obtain better plant growth. A small-scale hydroponic system was constructed in a glasshouse to test different concentrations of anaerobic effluent against a commercial hydroponic medium as the control for the growth of silverbeet. It was found that the survival of silverbeet was negatively affected at 50% concentration due to low DO and NH(4) toxicity. The concentration of 20% anaerobic liquid was found to be the most efficient with highest foliage yield and plant growth. The hydroponic system with 20% concentrated effluent had better utilisation of nutrients for plant growth and a COD reduction of 95% was achieved during the 50-day growth period. This preliminary evaluation revealed that the growth and development of silverbeet was significantly lower in anaerobic effluent compared with a commercial hydroponic plant growth solution. The nutrient quality of anaerobic effluent could be highly variable with the process and the waste material used and dilution may depend on the nutrient content of the effluent. It is recommended that, a pre-treatment of the effluent to increase DO and reduce ammonium content is required before plant application, and simple dilution by itself is not suitable for optimum plant growth in a hydroponic system.

  4. Application of ion chromatography to batchwise activated sludge process for simultaneous removal of thiosulfate, acetate and ammonium ions.

    OpenAIRE

    田中, 一彦; 黒川, 利一; 中島, 良三

    1988-01-01

    Ion chromatography (IC) with conductivity detection for determining anions and ion-exclusion chromatography (IEC) with conductivity detection for determining cations were investigated. Both techniques were applied to the establishment of the optimal conditions for the simultaneous removal of thiosulfate, acetate, and ammonium ions by a batchwise activated sludge process. The process consists of the combination of aerobic and anaerobic biological treatment processes by a sequential automatic p...

  5. Anaerobic biological treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speece, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The Enso-Fenox process has been very successfully used to remove chlorinated phenolic compounds from pulp bleaching effluents. It is a two-stage anaerobic/aerobic process consisting of a nonmethanogenic anaerobic fluidized bed followed by a trickling filter. Studies have been conducted on reductive dechlorination of chlorinated aromatic compounds under anaerobic conditions with chlorinated phenols as the sole carbon and energy source. Approximately 40% of the added chlorophenols was converted to CH 4 and CO 2 . Substrate loading rates were 20 mg/L/d at hydraulic detention times of 2-4 days with 90% substrate conversion efficiency. Reductive dechlorination of mono, di-, tri-, and pentachlorophenols has been demonstrated in anaerobic sewage sludge. The following constituents were tested in the laboratory at their approximate concentrations in coal conversion wastewater (CCWW) and were anaerobically degraded in serum bottles: 1,000 mg/L phenol; 500 mg/L resorcinol; 1,000 mg/L benzoic acid; 500 mg/L p-cresol; 200 mg/L pyridine; 2,000 mg/L benzoic acid; 250 mg/L 40 methylcatechol; 500 mg/L 4-ethylpyridine; and 2,000 mg/L hexanoic acid. A petrochemical may initially exhibit toxicity to an unacclimated population of methane-fermenting bacteria, but with acclimation the toxicity may be greatly reduced or disappear. In addition, the microorganisms may develop the capacity to actually degrade compounds which showed initial toxicity. Since biomass digestion requires a complete consortium of bacteria, it is relevant to study the effect of a given process as well as to individual steps within the process. A toxicant can inhibit the rate-limiting step and/or change the step that is rate-limiting. Both manifestations of toxicity can severely affect the overall process

  6. Atmospheric behaviour of ammonia and ammonium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asman, W.A.H.

    1987-01-01

    1.4.1 Scope of this thesis

    A few models for ammonia and ammonium exist. Russell et al. (1983) made a multi-layer Lagrangian transport model describing the transport and formation of ammonium nitrate aerosol for California. They did not take reactions of ammonia and sulphuric acid

  7. 21 CFR 582.1135 - Ammonium bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium bicarbonate. 582.1135 Section 582.1135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE General Purpose Food Additives § 582.1135 Ammonium bicarbonate. (a)...

  8. Optimization of nutritional requirements and ammonium feeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tounukarin

    2011-09-07

    Sep 7, 2011 ... defined medium and to develop an ammonium control strategy to optimize the specific vitamin B12 production rate (Yp) ... Key words: Statistical designs, Pseudomonas denitrificans, chemically defined medium, ammonium controlling strategy ... analysis provides a powerful tool for effective quanti- fication of ...

  9. 76 FR 46907 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... located in, under, or adjacent to any waters subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. Through its..., marking, labeling, placarding, security plans, emergency response information, training, etc.). f... ``solid ammonium nitrate that is chiefly the ammonium salt of nitric acid and contains not less than 33...

  10. Key geochemical factors regulating Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in coastal marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Taillefert, Martial

    2014-05-01

    The reduction of Mn(IV) oxides coupled to the anaerobic oxidation of NH4+ has been proposed for more than a decade to contribute to the fixed nitrogen pool in marine sediments, yet the existence of this process is still under debate. In this study, surface sediments from an intertidal salt marsh were incubated with MnO2 in the presence of elevated concentrations of NH4+ to test the hypothesis that the reduction of Mn(IV) oxides catalyzes anaerobic NH4+ oxidation to NO2- or NO3-. Geochemical factors such as the ratio of Mn(IV) to NH4+, the type of Mn(IV) oxides (amorphous or colloidal MnO2), and the redox potential of the sediment significantly affect the activity of anaerobic nitrification. Incubations show that the net production of NO3- is stimulated under anaerobic conditions with external addition of colloidal but not amorphous MnO2 and is facilitated by the presence of high concentrations of NH4+. Mass balance calculations demonstrate that anaerobic NH4+ oxidation contributes to the net consumption of NH4+, providing another piece of evidence for the occurrence of Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in coastal marine sediments. Finally, anaerobic nitrification is stimulated by the amendment of small concentrations of NO3- or the absence of sulfate reduction, suggesting that moderately reducing conditions favor anaerobic NH4+ oxidation. Overall, these findings suggest that Mn(IV)-catalyzed anaerobic nitrification in suboxic sediments with high N/Mn concentration ratios and highly reactive manganese oxides may be an important source of NO2- and NO3- for subsequent marine nitrogen loss via denitrification or anammox.

  11. Effects of ammonium concentration and charge exchange on ammonium recovery from high strength wastewater using a microbial fuel cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuntke, P.; Geleij, M.; Bruning, H.; Zeeman, G.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonium recovery using a 2 chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) was investigated at high ammonium concentration. Increasing the ammonium concentration (from 0.07 g to 4 g ammonium-nitrogen/L) by addition of ammonium chloride did not affect the performance of the MFC. The obtained current densities by

  12. The effects of salinization on aerobic and anaerobic decomposition and mineralization in peat meadows: the roles of peat type and land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouns, Karlijn; Verhoeven, Jos T A; Hefting, Mariet M

    2014-10-01

    Peat soils comprise a large part of the western and northern Netherlands. Drainage for agriculture has caused increased soil aeration which has stimulated decomposition and, hence, soil subsidence, currently amounting to 1-2 cm/yr. River water is supplied to these peat areas in summer to prevent drying out of the peat soils. Saltwater intrusion and evaporation make this surface water slightly brackish during drought periods. In addition, brackish seepage can surface more easily during such dry periods. We performed an incubation experiment in which the effects of salinization on aerobic decomposition and mineralization of shallow peat samples and anaerobic decomposition and mineralization of deep peat samples were studied. We considered four different types of peat samples: peat sampled in agricultural peat meadows and in nature reserves, originally formed under either eutrophic or oligotrophic conditions. The aerobic decomposition was approximately reduced by 50% after salinization, whereas the anaerobic decomposition rates remained unchanged. Remarkably, the response to salinization did not differ between the peat types and land uses. Ammonium concentrations increased while nitrate concentrations decreased after salinization, probably as a result of reduced nitrification. Especially in the oligotrophic peat, ammonium concentrations increased substantially. Phosphate concentrations increased, possibly caused by changes in desorption and adsorption processes due to higher ion concentrations. DOC concentrations decreased in the brackish samples due to precipitation. Furthermore, the eutrophic peat samples showed increasing sulfate concentrations, both in oxic and anoxic incubations, which was attributed to pyrite oxidation. Independently of salinization, nitrification rates were higher in the agricultural, fertilized, peat soils. In conclusion, while salinization might reduce subsidence rates, it will have adverse effects on water quality. Copyright © 2014

  13. Application of titration methods for measuring the contents of ammonium nitrogen and volatile fatty acids in agricultural biogas plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piątek, Michał; Lisowski, Aleksander; Lisowska, Barbara

    2017-12-20

    The aim of our research was to assess a relatively new method of estimating ammonium nitrogen concentration in anaerobic digestion of plant substrates. We analysed our own data, received from the anaerobic digestion of maize silage (PM), as well as data published by Purser et al. (2014) who measured energy crops and slurry (ECS), and food waste (FW). In our study, the process was monitored for VFA content that was determined by gas chromatography, and for the content of ammonium nitrogen determined using the HACH LANGE LCK 303 cuvette test. We created polynomial regression models that bind the content of ammonium nitrogen with the volume of H 2 SO 4 used to titrate the sample from initial pH to pH 5. To estimate parameters of model, the PM dataset was used. The obtained models were positively validated using ECS and FW datasets. Our results confirmed the effectiveness of the Purser et al. method with an average absolute error of less than 223mgl -1 of the VFA concentration, which was approximately 20-times less than the level that caused inhibition. In conclusion, we can affirm the suitability of using titration methods to assess the ammonium nitrogen content of bioreactors with a stable composition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Properties of Ammonium Dinitramine (ADN): Part 2: Melt Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahma, A.; Edvinsson, H.; Östmark, H.

    2010-04-01

    A melt casting technique for ammonium dinitramine (ADN) and ADN/aluminum was developed. ADN proved relatively easy to cast, when 1% of magnesium oxide was used as a stabilizer and crystallization kernels. Densities of ADN/MgO 99/1 were 92 to 97% of theoretical mean density (TMD) and those of ADN/Al/MgO 64/35/1 were between 95 and 99% of TMD. Sedimentation of Al in the melt was prevented and the particle wetting was ensured by selecting a suitable particle size for Al. No gelling agents or other additives were used. The casting process and factors influencing it are discussed.

  15. Structure and activity of thermophilic methanogenic microbial communities exposed to quaternary ammonium sanitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Bayo, Jesus D; Toniato, Juliano; Simmons, Blake A; Simmons, Christopher W

    2017-06-01

    Food processing facilities often use antimicrobial quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) sanitizers to maintain cleanliness. These QACs can end up in wastewaters used as feedstock for anaerobic digestion. The aim of this study was to measure the effect of QAC contamination on biogas production and structure of microbial communities in thermophilic digester sludge. Methane production and biogas quality data were analyzed in batch anaerobic digesters containing QAC at 0, 15, 50, 100 and 150mg/L. Increasing sanitizer concentration in the bioreactors negatively impacted methane production rate and biogas quality. Microbial community composition data was obtained through 16S rRNA gene sequencing from the QAC-contaminated sludges. Sequencing data showed no significant restructuring of the bacterial communities. However, significant restructuring was observed within the archaeal communities as QAC concentration increased. Further studies to confirm these effects on a larger scale and with a longer retention time are necessary. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Early anaerobic metabolisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Rosing, Minik T; Bjerrum, Christian

    2006-01-01

    probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity......Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were...... of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent...

  17. Ammonium sulfate preparation from phosphogypsum waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Hakim T. Kandil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Egyptian phosphogypsum waste is treated using sulfuric acid prior the ammonium sulfate production. The relevant factors that would affect the removal efficiencies of some impurities are studied. The optimum conditions of the treatment are 8 M sulfuric acid solution and 1/4 solid/liquid ratio for 30 min contact time at 80 °C. Moreover, the optimum conditions of the ammonium sulfate preparation are 10 g of the suspended impure or purified phosphogypsum in 40 ml of 3% ammonium sulfate solution (as initiator, 1/4 solid/liquid ratio at pH7 at an addition of an excess ammonium carbonate, and 150 rpm stirring speed for 4.0 h contact time at 55 °C as well as the 5 mg of barium chloride is added to remove the radium in the ammonium sulfate product. Finally, the ammonium sulfate is crystallized and the chemical analysis of the product shows 20% nitrogen and 23.6% sulfur. Therefore, the purity of the obtained ammonium sulfate is 95% from the purified phosphogypsum.

  18. Early anaerobic metabolisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Don E; Rosing, Minik T; Bjerrum, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Before the advent of oxygenic photosynthesis, the biosphere was driven by anaerobic metabolisms. We catalogue and quantify the source strengths of the most probable electron donors and electron acceptors that would have been available to fuel early-Earth ecosystems. The most active ecosystems were probably driven by the cycling of H2 and Fe2+ through primary production conducted by anoxygenic phototrophs. Interesting and dynamic ecosystems would have also been driven by the microbial cycling of sulphur and nitrogen species, but their activity levels were probably not so great. Despite the diversity of potential early ecosystems, rates of primary production in the early-Earth anaerobic biosphere were probably well below those rates observed in the marine environment. We shift our attention to the Earth environment at 3.8 Gyr ago, where the earliest marine sediments are preserved. We calculate, consistent with the carbon isotope record and other considerations of the carbon cycle, that marine rates of primary production at this time were probably an order of magnitude (or more) less than today. We conclude that the flux of reduced species to the Earth surface at this time may have been sufficient to drive anaerobic ecosystems of sufficient activity to be consistent with the carbon isotope record. Conversely, an ecosystem based on oxygenic photosynthesis was also possible with complete removal of the oxygen by reaction with reduced species from the mantle. PMID:17008221

  19. Ammonium sulfate preparation from phosphogypsum waste

    OpenAIRE

    Kandil, Abdel-Hakim T.; Cheira, Mohamed F.; Gado, Hady S.; Soliman, Madiha H.; Akl, Hesham M.

    2017-01-01

    The Egyptian phosphogypsum waste is treated using sulfuric acid prior the ammonium sulfate production. The relevant factors that would affect the removal efficiencies of some impurities are studied. The optimum conditions of the treatment are 8 M sulfuric acid solution and 1/4 solid/liquid ratio for 30 min contact time at 80 °C. Moreover, the optimum conditions of the ammonium sulfate preparation are 10 g of the suspended impure or purified phosphogypsum in 40 ml of 3% ammonium sulfate soluti...

  20. Nitrification-driven forms of nitrogen metabolism in microbial mat communities thriving along an ammonium-enriched subsurface geothermal stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Manabu; Koba, Keisuke; Makabe, Akiko; Yoshida, Naohiro; Kaneko, Masanori; Hirao, Shingo; Ishibashi, Jun-ichiro; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Shibuya, Takazo; Kikuchi, Tohru; Hirai, Miho; Miyazaki, Junichi; Nunoura, Takuro; Takai, Ken

    2013-07-01

    We report here the concurrence and interaction among forms of nitrogen metabolism in thermophilic microbial mat communities that developed in an ammonium-abundant subsurface geothermal stream. First, the physical and chemical conditions of the stream water at several representative microbial mat habitats (including upper, middle and downstream sites) were characterized. A thermodynamic calculation using these physical and chemical conditions predicted that nitrification consisting of ammonia and nitrite oxidations would provide one of the largest energy yields of chemolithotrophic metabolisms. Second, near-complete prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene clone analysis was conducted for representative microbial mat communities at the upper, middle and downstream sites. The results indicated a dynamic shift in the 16S rRNA gene phylotype composition through physical and chemical variations of the stream water. The predominant prokaryotic components varied from phylotypes related to hydrogeno (H2)- and thio (S)-trophic Aquificales, thermophilic methanotrophs and putative ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) located upstream (72 °C) to the phylotypes affiliated with putative AOA and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) located at the middle and downstream sites (65 and 57 °C, respectively). In addition, the potential in situ metabolic activities of different forms of nitrogen metabolism were estimated through laboratory experiments using bulk microbial mat communities. Finally, the compositional and isotopic variation in nitrogen compounds was investigated in the stream water flowing over the microbial mats and in the interstitial water inside the mats. Although the stream water was characterized by a gradual decrease in the total ammonia concentration (ΣNH3: the sum of ammonia and ammonium concentrations) and a gradual increase in the total concentration of nitrite and nitrate (NO2- + NO3-), the total inorganic nitrogen concentration (TIN: the sum of ΣNH3, NO2- and NO3- concentrations

  1. The pressure effects on two-phase anaerobic digestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yuling; Rößler, Benjamin; Zielonka, Simon; Lemmer, Andreas; Wonneberger, Anna-Maria; Jungbluth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The pressure effect on anaerobic digestion up to 9 bar was examined. • Increasing pressure decreased pH value in the anaerobic filter. • Increasing pressure increased methane content. • Increasing pressure decreased specific methane yield slightly. • The pressurized methane reactor was very stable and performed well. - Abstract: Two-phase pressurized anaerobic digestion is a novel process aimed at facilitating injection of the produced biogas into the natural gas grid by integrating the fermentative biogas production and upgrading it to substitute natural gas. In order to understand the mechanisms, knowledge of pressure effects on anaerobic digestion is required. To examine the effects of pressure on the anaerobic digestion process, a two-phase anaerobic digestion system was built up in laboratory scale, including three acidogenesis-leach-bed-reactors and one pressure-resistant anaerobic filter. Four different pressure levels (the absolute pressure of 1 bar, 3 bar, 6 bar and 9 bar) were applied to the methane reactor in sequence, with the organic loading rate maintained at approximately 5.1 kgCOD m −3 d −1 . Gas production, gas quality, pH value, volatile fatty acids, alcohol, ammonium-nitrogen, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and alkaline buffer capacity were analyzed. No additional caustic chemicals were added for pH adjustment throughout the experiment. With the pressure increasing from 1.07 bar to 8.91 bar, the pH value decreased from 7.2 to 6.5, the methane content increased from 66% to 75%, and the specific methane yield was slightly reduced from 0.33 l N g −1 COD to 0.31 l N g −1 COD. There was almost no acid-accumulation during the entire experiment. The average COD-degradation grade was always more than 93%, and the average alkaline buffering capacity (VFA/TIC ratio) did not exceed 0.2 at any pressure level. The anaerobic filter showed a very stable performance, regardless of the pressure variation

  2. Inhibitory effects of ammonia on methanogen mcrA transcripts in anaerobic digester sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Yuan, Quan; Lu, Yahai

    2014-02-01

    Methanogens in anaerobic ammonia-rich digesters show differential responses to ammonia stress. The mechanism for this is poorly understood. In the present study, we determined the rates of methane production, the composition of methanogen mcrA (the gene coding for the alpha subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase) and their transcripts in response to ammonium addition in the anaerobic sludge retrieved from a full-scale digester treating swine manure. The rate of CH4 production substantially reduced with increased addition of ammonium. The analysis of natural (13)C abundances of CH4 and CO2 indicated that the aceticlastic methanogenesis was more sensitive than hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that mcrA copy number decreased by one order of magnitude in the treatment with a large amount of ammonium (10 g NH4+-N L(-1)) but did not change much with treatments of smaller amounts (3 and 7 g NH4+-N L(-1)) compared with the control. T-RFLP analysis of mcrA compositions showed that the structure of the methanogen community remained highly stable, with Methanosaetaceae dominating the methanogen community in all incubations. The composition of mcrA transcripts, however, showed a substantial response to the addition of ammonium. The relative abundance of Methanosaetaceae transcripts declined with increasing amounts of ammonium, whereas the transcript level of Methanobacteriales mcrA was relatively resistant. The differential responses corresponded to the shift of methanogenic pathway inferred from (13)C isotope fractionation. Our study suggests that methanogens in anaerobic sludge have a strong mcrA transcriptional response to ammonia stress without a change in the community structure. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. New perspectives in anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lier, J.B.; Tilche, A.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2001-01-01

    The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern...... requirements. In fact, most advances were achieved during the last three decades, when high-rate reactor systems were developed and a profound insight was obtained in the microbiology of the anaerobic communities. This insight led to a better understanding of anaerobic treatment and, subsequently, to a broader...

  4. New perspectives in anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lier, J.B.; Tilche, A.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2001-01-01

    The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern requireme......The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern...

  5. Biogeochemistry of anaerobic crude oil biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Ian; Gray, Neil; Aitken, Caroline; Sherry, Angela; Jones, Martin; Larter, Stephen

    2010-05-01

    Anaerobic degradation of crude oil and petroleum hydrocarbons is widely recognized as a globally significant process both in the formation of the world's vast heavy oil deposits and for the dissipation of hydrocarbon pollution in anoxic contaminated environments. Comparative analysis of crude oil biodegradation under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions has revealed differences not only in the patterns of compound class removal but also in the microbial communities responsible. Under methanogenic conditions syntrophic associations dominated by bacteria from the Syntropheaceae are prevalent and these are likely key players in the initial anaerobic degradation of crude oil alkanes to intermediates such as hydrogen and acetate. Syntrophic acetate oxidation plays an important role in these systems and often results in methanogenesis dominated by CO2 reduction by members of the Methanomicrobiales. By contrast the bacterial communities from sulfate-reducing crude oil-degrading systems were more diverse and no single taxon dominated the oil-degrading sulfate-reducing systems. All five proteobacterial subdivisions were represented with Delta- and Gammaproteobacteria being detected most consistently. In sediments which were pasteurized hydrocarbon degradation continued at a relatively low rate. Nevertheless, alkylsuccinates characteristic of anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation accumulated to high concentrations. This suggested that the sediments harbour heat resistant, possibly spore-forming alkane degrading sulfate-reducers. This is particularly interesting since it has been proposed recently, that spore-forming sulfate-reducing bacteria found in cold arctic sediments may have originated from seepage of geofluids from deep subsurface hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  6. Electrochemically and Bioelectrochemically Induced Ammonium Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildemyn, Sylvia; Luther, Amanda K.; Andersen, Stephen J.; Desloover, Joachim; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-01-01

    Streams such as urine and manure can contain high levels of ammonium, which could be recovered for reuse in agriculture or chemistry. The extraction of ammonium from an ammonium-rich stream is demonstrated using an electrochemical and a bioelectrochemical system. Both systems are controlled by a potentiostat to either fix the current (for the electrochemical cell) or fix the potential of the working electrode (for the bioelectrochemical cell). In the bioelectrochemical cell, electroactive bacteria catalyze the anodic reaction, whereas in the electrochemical cell the potentiostat applies a higher voltage to produce a current. The current and consequent restoration of the charge balance across the cell allow the transport of cations, such as ammonium, across a cation exchange membrane from the anolyte to the catholyte. The high pH of the catholyte leads to formation of ammonia, which can be stripped from the medium and captured in an acid solution, thus enabling the recovery of a valuable nutrient. The flux of ammonium across the membrane is characterized at different anolyte ammonium concentrations and currents for both the abiotic and biotic reactor systems. Both systems are compared based on current and removal efficiencies for ammonium, as well as the energy input required to drive ammonium transfer across the cation exchange membrane. Finally, a comparative analysis considering key aspects such as reliability, electrode cost, and rate is made. This video article and protocol provide the necessary information to conduct electrochemical and bioelectrochemical ammonia recovery experiments. The reactor setup for the two cases is explained, as well as the reactor operation. We elaborate on data analysis for both reactor types and on the advantages and disadvantages of bioelectrochemical and electrochemical systems. PMID:25651406

  7. 33 CFR 126.28 - Ammonium nitrate, ammonium nitrate fertilizers, fertilizer mixtures, or nitro carbo nitrate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., combustible liquids, corrosive liquids, chlorates, permanganates, finely divided metals, caustic soda... molten ammonium nitrate if a fire occurred (and thus become potential detonators for the storage piles...

  8. Metatranscriptomic and metagenomic description of the bacterial nitrogen metabolism in waste water wet oxidation effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Crovadore

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion is a common method for reducing the amount of sludge solids in used waters and enabling biogas production. The wet oxidation process (WOX improves anaerobic digestion by converting carbon into methane through oxidation of organic compounds. WOX produces effluents rich in ammonia, which must be removed to maintain the activity of methanogens. Ammonia removal from WOX could be biologically operated by aerobic granules. To this end, granulation experiments were conducted in 2 bioreactors containing an activated sludge (AS. For the first time, the dynamics of the microbial community structure and the expression levels of 7 enzymes of the nitrogen metabolism in such active microbial communities were followed in regard to time by metagenomics and metatranscriptomics. It was shown that bacterial communities adapt to the wet oxidation effluent by increasing the expression level of the nitrogen metabolism, suggesting that these biological activities could be a less costly alternative for the elimination of ammonia, resulting in a reduction of the use of chemicals and energy consumption in sewage plants. This study reached a strong sequencing depth (from 4.4 to 7.6 Gb and enlightened a yet unknown diversity of the microorganisms involved in the nitrogen pathway. Moreover, this approach revealed the abundance and expression levels of specialised enzymes involved in nitrification, denitrification, ammonification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA and nitrogen fixation processes in AS. Keywords: Applied sciences, Biological sciences, Environmental science, Genetics, Microbiology

  9. High-pressure structural study of Ammonium Perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, Elissaios; Zaug, Joseph; Bastea, Sorin; Grivickas, Paulius; Greenberg, Eran; Kunz, Martin

    Ammonium perchlorate (AP) with the chemical formula NH4ClO4 is a powerful energetic oxidizer used as an ingredient in rocket propellants and explosive formulations. For this reason, its structural properties under extreme conditions have attracted considerable attention (M. Dunuwille et al., S. Hunter et al.). However, its structural properties under pressure are not completely understood. In addition to its importance as an energetic oxidizer, AP is one of the simplest supramolecular systems. Thus, a structural study of AP under pressure can provide crucial information in the context of the emerging field of high pressure supramolecular chemistry. Ammonium perchlorate has been studied using x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy up to the record pressure of 40 GPa. The results reveal a pressure-induced first order phase transition at 4 GPa, in agreement with previous studies. However, preliminary analysis of our results contradicts with the previously proposed high-pressure phase, as determined by neutron diffraction. No further structural phase transitions have been observed up to the highest pressure of this study. Intermolecular bonding between NH4 and ClO4 ions will be discussed based on Raman spectroscopy measurements. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Anaerobic organic acid metabolism of Candida zemplinina in comparison with Saccharomyces wine yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Ildikó; Nyitrai-Sárdy, Diána; Leskó, Annamária; Pomázi, Andrea; Kállay, Miklós

    2014-05-16

    Organic acid production under oxygen-limited conditions has been thoroughly studied in the Saccharomyces species, but practically never investigated in Candida zemplinina, which seems to be an acidogenic species under oxidative laboratory conditions. In this study, several strains of C. zemplinina were tested for organic acid metabolism, in comparison with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces uvarum and Candida stellata, under fermentative conditions. Only C. stellata produced significantly higher acidity in simple minimal media (SM) with low sugar content and two different nitrogen sources (ammonia or glutamic acid) at low level. However, the acid profile differed largely between the Saccharomyces and Candida species and showed inverse types of N-dependence in some cases. Succinic acid production was strongly enhanced on glutamic acid in Saccharomyces species, but not in Candida species. 2-oxoglutarate production was strongly supported on ammonium nitrogen in Candida species, but remained low in Saccharomyces. Candida species, C. stellata in particular, produced more pyruvic acid regardless of N-sources. From the results, we concluded that the anaerobic organic acid metabolisms of C. zemplinina and C. stellata are different from each other and also from that of the Saccharomyces species. In the formation of succinic acid, the oxidative pathway from glutamic acid seems to play little or no role in C. zemplinina. The reductive branch of the TCA cycle, however, produces acidic intermediates (malic, fumaric, and succinic acid) in a level comparable with the production of the Saccharomyces species. An unidentified organic acid, which was produced on glutamic acid only by the Candida species, needs further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Enhancing anaerobic digestion of poultry blood using activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Cuetos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The potential of using anaerobic digestion for the treatment of poultry blood has been evaluated in batch assays at the laboratory scale and in a mesophilic semi-continuous reactor. The biodegradability test performed on residual poultry blood was carried out in spite of high inhibitory levels of acid intermediaries. The use of activated carbon as a way to prevent inhibitory conditions demonstrated the feasibility of attaining anaerobic digestion under extreme ammonium and acid conditions. Batch assays with higher carbon content presented higher methane production rates, although the difference in the final cumulative biogas production was not as sharp. The digestion of residual blood was also studied under semi-continuous operation using granular and powdered activated carbon. The average specific methane production was 216 ± 12 mL CH4/g VS. This result was obtained in spite of a strong volatile fatty acid (VFA accumulation, reaching values around 6 g/L, along with high ammonium concentrations (in the range of 6–8 g/L. The use of powdered activated carbon resulted in a better assimilation of C3-C5 acid forms, indicating that an enhancement in syntrophic metabolism may have taken place. Thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were applied as analytical tools for measuring the presence of organic material in the final digestate and evidencing modifications on the carbon surface. The addition of activated carbon for the digestion of residual blood highly improved the digestion process. The adsorption capacity of ammonium, the protection this carrier may offer by limiting mass transfer of toxic compounds, and its capacity to act as a conductive material may explain the successful digestion of residual blood as the sole substrate.

  12. 21 CFR 184.1545 - Nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Nitrous oxide. 184.1545 Section 184.1545 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1545 Nitrous oxide. (a) Nitrous oxide (empirical formula N2O, CAS Reg. No.... Nitrous oxide is manufactured by the thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate. Higher oxides of nitrogen...

  13. New perspectives in anaerobic digestion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lier, van J.B.; Tilche, A.; Ahring, B.K.; Macarie, H.; Moletta, R.; Dohanyos, M.; Hulshoff Pol, L.W.; Lens, P.N.L.; Verstraete, W.

    2001-01-01

    The IWA specialised group on anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the oldest working groups of the former IAWQ organisation. Despite the fact that anaerobic technology dates back more than 100 years, the technology is still under development, adapting novel treatment systems to the modern

  14. Anaerobic digestion of piggery waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velsen, van A.F.M.

    1981-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a biological process by which organic matter is converted to methane and carbon dioxide by microbes in the absence of air (oxygen). In nature, anaerobic conversions occur at all places where organic material accumulates and the supply of oxygen is deficient, e.g. in marshes

  15. Economic viability of anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellinger, A. [INFOENERGIE, Ettenhausen (Switzerland)

    1996-01-01

    The industrial application of anaerobic digestion is a relatively new, yet proven waste treatment technology. Anaerobic digestion reduces and upgrades organic waste, and is a good way to control air pollution as it reduces methane and nitrous gas emissions. For environmental and energy considerations, anaerobic digestion is a nearly perfect waste treatment process. However, its economic viability is still in question. A number of parameters - type of waste (solid or liquid), digester system, facility size, product quality and end use, environmental requirements, cost of alternative treatments (including labor), and interest rates - define the investment and operating costs of an anaerobic digestion facility. Therefore, identical facilities that treat the same amount and type of waste may, depending on location, legislation, and end product characteristics, reveal radically different costs. A good approach for evaluating the economics of anaerobic digestion is to compare it to treatment techniques such as aeration or conventional sewage treatment (for industrial wastewater), or composting and incineration (for solid organic waste). For example, the cost (per ton of waste) of in-vessel composting with biofilters is somewhat higher than that of anaerobic digestion, but the investment costs 1 1/2 to 2 times more than either composting or anaerobic digestion. Two distinct advantages of anaerobic digestion are: (1) it requires less land than either composting or incinerating, which translates into lower costs and milder environmental and community impacts (especially in densely populated areas); and (2) it produces net energy, which can be used to operate the facility or sold to nearby industries.

  16. Uncertainty evaluation on the determination of uranium ores by volumetry of ammonium vanadate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Likui; Wang Yao; Luo Yuanyuan; Li Jinbiao; Zhu Lejie

    2012-01-01

    Uncertainty evaluation on the criteria of 'ferrous sulfate deoxidization/ammonium vanadate oxidation titrimetry to measure uranium' (EJ 267.2-84) issued by Ministry of Nuclear Industry was analyzed. The uncertainty brought by the method itself was obtained through the identification of uncertainty sources, quantification of uncertainty components and determination of uranium content by titration with calibrated ammonium vanadate solution. With the analytical study to uncertainty sources of entire process and components, and the application of statistical treatment based on scientific data, the combined standard uncertainty and expanded uncertainty about different levels of uranium content was reported. (authors)

  17. Development of an efficient process for the treatment of residual sludge discharged from an anaerobic digester in a sewage treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Naoki; Tang, Yue-Qin; Iwamura, Makoto; Ohta, Hiroto; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji

    2011-09-01

    In order to reduce the discharge of residual sludge from an anaerobic digester, pre-treatment methods including low-pressure wet-oxidation, Fenton oxidation, alkali treatment, ozone oxidation, mechanical destruction and enzymatic treatment were evaluated and compared. VSS removal efficiencies of greater than 50% were achieved in cases of low-pressure wet-oxidation, Fenton oxidation and alkali treatment. Residual sludge from an anaerobic digester was pre-treated and subjected to thermophilic anaerobic digestion. As a result, the process of low-pressure wet-oxidation followed by anaerobic digestion achieved the highest VSS removal efficiency of 83%. The total efficiency of VSS removal of sewage sludge consisting of primary and surplus sludge would be approximately 92%, assuming that the VSS removal efficiency of sewage sludge is 50% in the anaerobic digester of the sewage treatment plant. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Alanine synthesis from glyceraldehyde and ammonium ion in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    The formation of alanine (ala) form C(14)-glyceraldehyde and ammonium phosphate in the presence or absence of a thiol is reported. At ambient temperature, ala synthesis was six times more rapid in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid than in its absence (0.6 and 0.1 percent, respectively, after 60 days). Similarly, the presence of another thiol, N-acetylcysteinate, increased the production of ala, as well as of lactate. The reaction pathway of thiol-catalyzed synthesis of ala, with the lactic acid formed in a bypath, is suggested. In this, dehydration of glyceraldehyde is followed by the formation of hemithioacetal. In the presence of ammonia, an imine is formed, which eventually yields ala. This pathway is consistent with the observation that the rate ratio of ala/lactate remains constant throughout the process. The fact that the reaction takes place under anaerobic conditions in the presence of H2O and with the low concentrations of simple substrates and catalysts makes it an attractive model prebiotic reaction in the process of molecular evolution.

  19. Comparison of different ecological remediation methods for removing nitrate and ammonium in Qinshui River, Gonghu Bay, Taihu Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Li, Zhengkui; Han, Huayang

    2017-01-01

    Ecological remediation is one of the most practical methods for removing nutrients from river ecosystems. In this study, transformation and fate of nitrate and ammonium among four different ecological restoration treatments were investigated by stable 15 N isotope pairing technique combined with quantitative polymerase chain reaction and high-throughput sequencing technology. The results of 15 N mass-balance model showed that there were three ways to the fate of nitrogen: precipitated in the sediment, absorbed by Elodea nuttallii (E. nuttallii), and consumed by microbial processes (denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox)). The results shown that the storage of 15 NH 4 + in sediments was about 1.5 times as much as that of 15 NO 3 - . And much more 15 NH 4 + was assimilated by E. nuttallii, about 2 times as much as 15 NO 3 - . Contrarily, the rate of microbial consuming 15 NO 3 - was higher than converting 15 NH 4 + . As for the group with 15 NO 3 - added, 29.61, 45.26, 30.66, and 51.95 % were accounted for 15 N-labeled gas emission. The proportions of 15 NH 4 + loss as 15 N-labeled gas were 16.06, 28.86, 16.93, and 33.09 % in four different treatments, respectively. Denitrification and anammox were the bacterial primary processes in N 2 and N 2 O production. The abundances of denitrifying and anammox functional genes were relatively higher in the treatment with E. nuttallii-immobilized nitrogen cycling bacteria (E-INCB) assemblage technology applied. Besides, microbial diversity increased in the treatment with E. nuttallii and INCB added. The 15 NO 3 - removal rates were 35.27, 49.42, 50.02, and 65.46 % in four different treatments. And the removal rates of 15 NH 4 + were 24, 34.38, 48.84, and 57.74 % in treatments A, B, C, and D, respectively. The results indicated that E-INCB assemblage technology could significantly promote the nitrogen cycling and improve nitrogen removal efficiency.

  20. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed with..., blasting, type B, and Explosives, blasting, type E, Division 1.5 compatibility group D. (f) No mixture...

  1. ANAEROBIC ENDOGENOUS METABOLISM IN STREPTOCOCCUS FAECALIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WALKER, D J; FORREST, W W

    1964-02-01

    Walker, D. J. (CSIRO, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia), and W. W. Forrest. Endogenous metabolism in Streptococcus faecalis. J. Bacteriol. 87:256-262. 1964.-Washed suspensions of Streptococcus faecalis incubated in phosphate buffer (pH 6.0) under anaerobic conditions released amino acids into the suspending medium. Little or no carbohydrate was released in soluble form, and no acid production could be detected. Cell lipid was stable, and only a small amount of nucleotide (material absorbing at 260 mmu) was released. Estimates of total carbon produced in soluble form showed that this could be almost entirely accounted for as amino acid. Over the short period during which amino acid was produced (up to 5 hr), the glycolytic activity of the cells remained fairly constant, and fell slowly thereafter to low values in 24 to 48 hr; the rate of fall depended on cell concentration. Whereas exogenous sources of energy protected against loss of glycolytic activity, arsenate, hydroxylamine, or replacement of phosphate by other buffers accelerated loss of glycolytic activity. Restoration of glycolytic activity in aged cells could be achieved by incubation with amino acids plus an energy source, with concurrent synthesis of protein but no apparent growth. Ammonium ion was not effective in protecting or restoring glycolytic activity. The nature of changes which took place during endogenous metabolism are discussed.

  2. Energy positive domestic wastewater treatment: the roles of anaerobic and phototrophic technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoener, B D; Bradley, I M; Cusick, R D; Guest, J S

    2014-05-01

    The negative energy balance of wastewater treatment could be reversed if anaerobic technologies were implemented for organic carbon oxidation and phototrophic technologies were utilized for nutrient recovery. To characterize the potential for energy positive wastewater treatment by anaerobic and phototrophic biotechnologies we performed a comprehensive literature review and analysis, focusing on energy production (as kJ per capita per day and as kJ m(-3) of wastewater treated), energy consumption, and treatment efficacy. Anaerobic technologies included in this review were the anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR), anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR), anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFB), upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), and microbial fuel cell (MFC). Phototrophic technologies included were the high rate algal pond (HRAP), photobioreactor (PBR), stirred tank reactor, waste stabilization pond (WSP), and algal turf scrubber (ATS). Average energy recovery efficiencies for anaerobic technologies ranged from 1.6% (MFC) to 47.5% (ABR). When including typical percent chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals by each technology, this range would equate to roughly 40-1200 kJ per capita per day or 110-3300 kJ m(-3) of treated wastewater. The average bioenergy feedstock production by phototrophic technologies ranged from 1200-4700 kJ per capita per day or 3400-13 000 kJ m(-3) (exceeding anaerobic technologies and, at times, the energetic content of the influent organic carbon), with usable energy production dependent upon downstream conversion to fuels. Energy consumption analysis showed that energy positive anaerobic wastewater treatment by emerging technologies would require significant reductions of parasitic losses from mechanical mixing and gas sparging. Technology targets and critical barriers for energy-producing technologies are identified, and the role of integrated anaerobic and

  3. Energy positive domestic wastewater treatment: the roles of anaerobic and phototrophic technologies

    KAUST Repository

    Shoener, B. D.

    2014-01-01

    The negative energy balance of wastewater treatment could be reversed if anaerobic technologies were implemented for organic carbon oxidation and phototrophic technologies were utilized for nutrient recovery. To characterize the potential for energy positive wastewater treatment by anaerobic and phototrophic biotechnologies we performed a comprehensive literature review and analysis, focusing on energy production (as kJ per capita per day and as kJ m-3 of wastewater treated), energy consumption, and treatment efficacy. Anaerobic technologies included in this review were the anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR), anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR), anaerobic fluidized bed reactor (AFB), upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB), anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR), microbial electrolysis cell (MEC), and microbial fuel cell (MFC). Phototrophic technologies included were the high rate algal pond (HRAP), photobioreactor (PBR), stirred tank reactor, waste stabilization pond (WSP), and algal turf scrubber (ATS). Average energy recovery efficiencies for anaerobic technologies ranged from 1.6% (MFC) to 47.5% (ABR). When including typical percent chemical oxygen demand (COD) removals by each technology, this range would equate to roughly 40-1200 kJ per capita per day or 110-3300 kJ m-3 of treated wastewater. The average bioenergy feedstock production by phototrophic technologies ranged from 1200-4700 kJ per capita per day or 3400-13000 kJ m-3 (exceeding anaerobic technologies and, at times, the energetic content of the influent organic carbon), with usable energy production dependent upon downstream conversion to fuels. Energy consumption analysis showed that energy positive anaerobic wastewater treatment by emerging technologies would require significant reductions of parasitic losses from mechanical mixing and gas sparging. Technology targets and critical barriers for energy-producing technologies are identified, and the role of integrated anaerobic and phototrophic

  4. Anaerobic fungal populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookman, J.L.; Nicholson, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    The development of molecular techniques has greatly broadened our view of microbial diversity and enabled a more complete detection and description of microbial communities. The application of these techniques provides a simple means of following community changes, for example, Ishii et al. described transient and more stable inhabitants in another dynamic microbial system, compost. Our present knowledge of anaerobic gut fungal population diversity within the gastrointestinal tract is based upon isolation, cultivation and observations in vivo. It is likely that there are many species yet to be described, some of which may be non-culturable. We have observed a distinct difference in the ease of cultivation between the different genera, for example, Caecomyes isolates are especially difficult to isolate and maintain in vitro, a feature that is likely to result in the under representation of this genera in culture-based enumerations. The anaerobic gut fungi are the only known obligately anaerobic fungi. For the majority of their life cycles, they are found tightly associated with solid digesta in the rumen and/or hindgut. They produce potent fibrolytic enzymes and grow invasively on and into the plant material they are digesting making them important contributors to fibre digestion. This close association with intestinal digesta has made it difficult to accurately determine the amount of fungal biomass present in the rumen, with Orpin suggesting 8% contribution to the total microbial biomass, whereas Rezaeian et al. more recently gave a value of approximately 20%. It is clear that the rumen microbial complement is affected by dietary changes, and that the fungi are more important in digestion in the rumens of animals fed with high-fibre diets. It seems likely that the gut fungi play an important role within the rumen as primary colonizers of plant fibre, and so we are particularly interested in being able to measure the appearance and diversity of fungi on the plant

  5. Reduction in Ammonium Ions in Sludge Liquor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglė Šlajūtė

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Liquor rejected from the centrifugation of the digested sludge can contain the concentrations of ammonium ions up to 1750 mg/L. These loads are usually returned to the intake of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP without additional treatment and can have a negative impact on biological wastewater and/or sludge treatment processes, e.g. phosphorus and nitrogen removal. This article deals with the use of naturally obtained sorbent, zeolite, in batch and column test procedure for removing ammonium from the rejected liquor. This research study was carried out using different sizes of zeolite particles: 0.8–1.6 mm and 1.6–2.5 mm. The highest efficiency of ammonium removal (up to 98 % was achieved by applying the zeolite particles of 0.8–1.6 mm.Article in Lithuanian

  6. The ammonium sulfate inhibition of human angiogenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzileontiadou, Demetra S M; Tsirkone, Vicky G; Dossi, Kyriaki; Kassouni, Aikaterini G; Liggri, Panagiota G V; Kantsadi, Anastassia L; Stravodimos, George A; Balatsos, Nikolaos A A; Skamnaki, Vassiliki T; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we investigate the inhibition of human angiogenin by ammonium sulfate. The inhibitory potency of ammonium sulfate for human angiogenin (IC50 = 123.5 ± 14.9 mm) is comparable to that previously reported for RNase A (119.0 ± 6.5 mm) and RNase 2 (95.7 ± 9.3 mm). However, analysis of two X-ray crystal structures of human angiogenin in complex with sulfate anions (in acidic and basic pH environments, respectively) indicates an entirely distinct mechanism of inhibition. While ammonium sulfate inhibits the ribonucleolytic activity of RNase A and RNase 2 by binding to the active site of these enzymes, sulfate anions bind only to peripheral substrate anion-binding subsites of human angiogenin, and not to the active site. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Gavala, Hariklia N.; Schmidt, Jens Ejbye

    2003-01-01

    -rate anaerobic treatment systems based on anaerobic granular sludge and biofilm are described in this chapter. Emphasis is given to a) the Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) systems, b) the main characteristics of the anaerobic granular sludge, and c) the factors that control the granulation process...

  8. Characteristics of residues from thermally treated anaerobic sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A.A.; Smith, J.E.; De Santis, J.; Ptak, T.; Ganley, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Sludge management and disposal are probably the most difficult and expensive operations involved in wastewater treatment today. To minimize final disposal costs many waste treatment facilities practice some form of anaerobic digestion and dewatering to reduce the volume and offensiveness of their by-product sludges. One potential alternative for reducing sludge volumes consists of high temperature, partial oxidation of these previously digested sludges (PDS) and subsequent anaerobic biological conversion of resulting soluble organics to methane. This paper describes solids destruction, residue characteristics and biodegradability factors that should be considered in the design of liquid thermal treatment processes for the management of anaerobic sludges. To date only very limited information is available concerning the suitability of thermally treated PDS to serve as a substrate for the generation of methane. The primary objective of this research was to determine the feasibility of producing methane efficiently from the residual VSS in anaerobically digested sludges. Secondary goals were to establish the ''best'' conditions for thermal treatment for solubilizing PDS, to observe the effect of the soluble products on methanogenesis and to evaluate process sidestreams for dewaterability and anaerobic biodegradability

  9. Isolation and Cultivation of Anaerobes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aragao Börner, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms play important roles in different biotechnological processes. Their complex metabolism and special cultivation requirements have led to less isolated representatives in comparison to their aerobic counterparts.In view of that, the isolation and cultivation of anaerobic...... microorganisms is still a promising venture, and conventional methodologies as well as considerations and modifications are presented here. An insight into new methodologies and devices as well as a discussion on future perspectives for the cultivation of anaerobes may open the prospects of the exploitation...... of these microorganisms as a source for biotechnology....

  10. On the evaporation of ammonium sulfate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drisdell, Walter S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2009-07-16

    Aqueous evaporation and condensation kinetics are poorly understood, and uncertainties in their rates affect predictions of cloud behavior and therefore climate. We measured the cooling rate of 3 M ammonium sulfate droplets undergoing free evaporation via Raman thermometry. Analysis of the measurements yields a value of 0.58 {+-} 0.05 for the evaporation coefficient, identical to that previously determined for pure water. These results imply that subsaturated aqueous ammonium sulfate, which is the most abundant inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol, does not affect the vapor-liquid exchange mechanism for cloud droplets, despite reducing the saturation vapor pressure of water significantly.

  11. On the evaporation of ammonium sulfate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drisdell, Walter S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous evaporation and condensation kinetics are poorly understood, and uncertainties in their rates affect predictions of cloud behavior and therefore climate. We measured the cooling rate of 3 M ammonium sulfate droplets undergoing free evaporation via Raman thermometry. Analysis of the measurements yields a value of 0.58 ± 0.05 for the evaporation coefficient, identical to that previously determined for pure water. These results imply that subsaturated aqueous ammonium sulfate, which is the most abundant inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol, does not affect the vapor-liquid exchange mechanism for cloud droplets, despite reducing the saturation vapor pressure of water significantly.

  12. Efficient ozone, sulfate, and ammonium free resist stripping process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattilo, Davide; Dietze, Uwe

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, photomask resist strip and cleaning technology development was substantially driven by the industry's need to prevent surface haze formation through the elimination of sulfuric acid and ammonium hydroxide from these processes. As a result, conventional SPM (H2SO4 + H2O2) was replaced with Ozone water (DIO3) for resist stripping and organic removal to eliminate chemical haze formation [1, 2]. However, it has been shown that DIO3 basted strip and clean process causes oxidative degradation of photomask materials [3, 4]. Such material damage can affect optical properties of funcitional mask layers, causeing CD line-width, phase, transmission and reflection changes, adversely affecting image transfer during the Lithography process. To overcome Ozone induced surface damage, SUSS MicroTec successfully developed a highly efficient strip process, where photolysis of DIO3 is leading to highly reactive hydroxyl radical formation, as the main contribution to hydrocarbon removal without surface damage [5]. This technology has been further extended to a final clean process, which is utilizing pure DI water for residual organic material removal during final clean [6]. Recently, SUS MicroTec did also successfully release strip and clean processes which completely remove NH4OH, eliminating any chemicals known today to induce haze [7]. In this paper we show the benefits of these new technologies for highly efficient sulfate and ammonium free stripping and cleaning processes.

  13. Anaerobic degradation of benzene by enriched consortia with humic acids as terminal electron acceptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes, Francisco J., E-mail: fjcervantes@ipicyt.edu.mx [Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4a. Seccion, San Luis Potosi, SLP, 78216 Mexico (Mexico); Mancilla, Ana Rosa; Toro, E. Emilia Rios-del [Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4a. Seccion, San Luis Potosi, SLP, 78216 Mexico (Mexico); Alpuche-Solis, Angel G.; Montoya-Lorenzana, Lilia [Division de Biologia Molecular, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4a. Seccion, San Luis Potosi, SLP, 78216 Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Enriched consortia were able to couple the anaerobic degradation of benzene to the reduction of humic acids. {yields} Electron-equivalents derived from anaerobic benzene oxidation were highly recovered as reduced humic acids. {yields} Several species from classes {beta}-, {delta}- and {gamma}-Proteobacteria were enriched during the anaerobic degradation of benzene. - Abstract: The anaerobic degradation of benzene coupled to the reduction of humic acids (HA) was demonstrated in two enriched consortia. Both inocula were able to oxidize benzene under strict anaerobic conditions when the humic model compound, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), was supplied as terminal electron acceptor. An enrichment culture originated from a contaminated soil was also able to oxidize benzene linked to the reduction of highly purified soil humic acids (HPSHA). In HPSHA-amended cultures, 9.3 {mu}M of benzene were degraded, which corresponds to 279 {+-} 27 micro-electron equivalents ({mu}Eq) L{sup -1}, linked to the reduction of 619 {+-} 81 {mu}Eq L{sup -1} of HPSHA. Neither anaerobic benzene oxidation nor reduction of HPSHA occurred in sterilized controls. Anaerobic benzene oxidation did not occur in soil incubations lacking HPSHA. Furthermore, negligible reduction of HPSHA occurred in the absence of benzene. The enrichment culture derived from this soil was dominated by two {gamma}-Proteobacteria phylotypes. A benzene-degrading AQDS-reducing enrichment originated from a sediment sample showed the prevalence of different species from classes {beta}-, {delta}- and {gamma}-Proteobacteria. The present study provides clear quantitative demonstration of anaerobic degradation of benzene coupled to the reduction of HA.

  14. Anaerobic degradation of benzene by enriched consortia with humic acids as terminal electron acceptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervantes, Francisco J.; Mancilla, Ana Rosa; Toro, E. Emilia Rios-del; Alpuche-Solis, Angel G.; Montoya-Lorenzana, Lilia

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Enriched consortia were able to couple the anaerobic degradation of benzene to the reduction of humic acids. → Electron-equivalents derived from anaerobic benzene oxidation were highly recovered as reduced humic acids. → Several species from classes β-, δ- and γ-Proteobacteria were enriched during the anaerobic degradation of benzene. - Abstract: The anaerobic degradation of benzene coupled to the reduction of humic acids (HA) was demonstrated in two enriched consortia. Both inocula were able to oxidize benzene under strict anaerobic conditions when the humic model compound, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), was supplied as terminal electron acceptor. An enrichment culture originated from a contaminated soil was also able to oxidize benzene linked to the reduction of highly purified soil humic acids (HPSHA). In HPSHA-amended cultures, 9.3 μM of benzene were degraded, which corresponds to 279 ± 27 micro-electron equivalents (μEq) L -1 , linked to the reduction of 619 ± 81 μEq L -1 of HPSHA. Neither anaerobic benzene oxidation nor reduction of HPSHA occurred in sterilized controls. Anaerobic benzene oxidation did not occur in soil incubations lacking HPSHA. Furthermore, negligible reduction of HPSHA occurred in the absence of benzene. The enrichment culture derived from this soil was dominated by two γ-Proteobacteria phylotypes. A benzene-degrading AQDS-reducing enrichment originated from a sediment sample showed the prevalence of different species from classes β-, δ- and γ-Proteobacteria. The present study provides clear quantitative demonstration of anaerobic degradation of benzene coupled to the reduction of HA.

  15. Relating dynamic conditions to the performance of biological rapid sand filters used to remove ammonium, iron, and manganese from drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Carson; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Smets, Barth F.

    ), nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOBs), and total bacteria with both depth and time. Similar analyses were performed in the full scale filters. The data is used to validate a mathematical model that can both predict process performance and is used to gain an understanding of how dynamic conditions can...... on the roles of both Ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOBs) and Ammonium oxidizing archea (AOAs) in the biological removal of ammonium in rapid sand filters and how varying substrate loadings and operating conditions can affect the biological performance of these filters....... consistently meeting regulatory guidelines for compounds like ammonium and reduced forms of iron and manganese. These compounds can cause biological instability in the distribution system and can lead to many problems including the growth of pathogens and aesthetic problems (taste, odor, and color...

  16. Effects of Aromatic Ammoniums on Methyl Ammonium Lead Iodide Hybrid Perovskite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of bulky ammoniums into methyl ammonium lead iodide hybrid perovskites (MAPbI3 has emerged as a promising strategy to improve the properties of these materials. In the present work, we studied the effects of several aromatic ammoniums onto the structural, electronic, and optical properties of MAPbI3. Although powder XRD data suggest that the bulky cations are not involved in the bulk phase of the MAPbI3, a surprisingly large effect of the bulky cations onto the photoluminescence properties was observed.

  17. Implementing Livestock Anaerobic Digestion Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page provides information to help make an informed decision about installing an anaerobic digester. Is it a good match for a farm’s organic waste, project financing, development guidelines and permit requirements?

  18. Oxidation by metal salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhon'kov, D.I.; Cheprakov, A.V.; Rodkin, M.A.; Mil'chenko, A.Yu.; Beletskaya, I.P.

    1986-01-01

    Oxidation of toluene and para-substituted toluenes containing electron acceptor groups: p-toluic acid, p-methyltoluylate and p-nitrotoluene by ammonium cerium (4) nitrate and ammonium cerium (4) sulfate in aqueous solutions of trifluoroacetic acid in the presence of chlorides and bromides of alkali metals is studied. The rate and selectivity of oxidative halogenation in side chain and/or aromatic ring under the conditions studied depend both on the nature of substrate and halogenide-ion and on the reaction conditions and ligand surrounding of cerium (4) atom

  19. 21 CFR 558.340 - Maduramicin ammonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Feed continuously as sole ration. Do not feed to laying hens. Withdraw 5 days before slaughter. (2... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR USE IN ANIMAL FEEDS Specific New Animal Drugs for Use in Animal Feeds § 558.340 Maduramicin ammonium. (a) Approvals. Type A medicated articles: 4.54...

  20. Lectin status, protein contents and ammonium assimilating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activity of the ammonium assimilatory enzyme glutamine synthetase. M. nigra and M. alba extracts contained potent phytoagglutinins in various tissues with highest contents in M. nigra. The leaves and roots of both species of mulberry were used to determine the glutamine synthetase activity and high level of activity was ...

  1. Ammonium conversion in liquid organic fertilisers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, C.; Streminska, M.; Vermeulen, T.

    2017-01-01

    Liquid organic fertilisers allow growers to abandon the use of conventional de novo (mined or synthesised) fertilisers without major technological adaptions to the cultivation system. In prior experiments the conversion by aerobic substrate born bacteria of ammonium into nitrate was plant growth

  2. Effects of ammonium nitrate, cesium chloride and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-12

    Oct 12, 2011 ... Key words: Potassium, high affinity transporters, channel blockers, ammonium. .... channel AtAKT1, indicating that channels may be involved in high-affinity. K+ uptake in a range of K+ concentrations (Hirsch et al.,. 1998; Spalding et al., ...... and tissue potassium concentrations by negative feedback effects.

  3. 21 CFR 184.1135 - Ammonium bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium bicarbonate. 184.1135 Section 184.1135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 18...

  4. Optimization of nutritional requirements and ammonium feeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Through Plackett-Burman design, the major factors of glucose, ammonium sulfate and KCl were selected as the significant factors affecting vitamin B12 biosynthesis and these were further optimized by central composite design with response surface methodology. The maximum Yp of 34.2 μg/gDCW/h was obtained in batch ...

  5. Effect of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid and Ammonium Oxalate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was carried out to investigate effect of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and ammonium oxalate on the prevalence of microorganisms and removal of aluminum in soil by bitter leaf plant (Vernonia amygdalina). The test plant was sown in aluminium-polluted soil (conc. = 150mg Al kg-1 soil). One gram of each ...

  6. Non-ammonium reduced nitrogen species in atmospheric aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dod, R.L.; Gundel, L.A.; Benner, W.H.; Novakov, T.

    1983-08-01

    The traditional belief that ambient aerosol particles contain nitrogen predominantly in the form of inorganic ionic species such as NH/sub 4//sup +/ and NO/sub 3//sup -/ was challenged about 10 years ago by results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis (ESCA) of California aerosol particles. A significant fraction (approx. 50%) of the reduced nitrogen was observed to have an oxidation state more reduced than ammonium, characteristic of organic nitrogen species. We have used a recently developed thermal evolved gas analysis method (NO/sub x/) in conjunction with ESCA to confirm the existence of these species in aerosol particles collected in both the United States and Europe. The agreement of EGA and ESCA analyses indicates that these species are found not only on the surface but also throughout the particles. 9 references, 6 figures.

  7. Anaerobic Metabolism in T4 Acanthamoeba Genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Daniella de Sousa Mendes Moreira; Alves, Luciano Moreira; da Costa, Tatiane Luiza; de Castro, Ana Maria; Vinaud, Marina Clare

    2017-06-01

    Members of the genus Acanthamoeba are of the most common protozoa that has been isolated from a variety of environment and affect immunocompromised individuals, causing granulomatous amoebic encephalitis and skin lesions. Acanthamoeba, in immunocompetent patients, may cause a keratitis related to corneal microtrauma. These free-living amoebas easily adapt to the host environment and wield metabolic pathways such as the energetic and respiratory ones in order to maintain viability for long periods. The energetic metabolism of cysts and trophozoites remains mostly unknown. There are a few reports on the energetic metabolism of these organisms as they are mitochondriate eukaryotes and some studies under aerobic conditions showing that Acanthamoeba hydrolyzes glucose into pyruvate via glycolysis. The aim of this study was to detect the energetic metabolic pathways with emphasis on anaerobic metabolism in trophozoites of three isolates of Acanthamoeba sp belonging to the T4 genotype. Two samples were collected in the environment and one was a clinical sample. The evaluation of these microorganisms proceeded as follows: rupture of trophozoites (7.5 × 10 3 parasites/ml) and biochemical analysis with high performance liquid chromatography and spectrophotometry. The anaerobic glycolysis was identified through the detection of glucose, pyruvate, and lactate. The protein catabolism was identified through the detection of fumarate, urea, and creatinine. The fatty acid oxidation was identified through the detection of acetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and propionate. The detected substances are the result of the consumption of energy reserves such as glycogen and lipids. The anaerobic glycolysis and protein catabolism pathways were observed in all three isolates: one clinical and two environmental. This study represents the first report of energetic pathways used by trophozoites from different isolates of the T4 genotype Acanthamoeba.

  8. Hydrogen production from diluted molasses by anaerobic hydrogen producing bacteria in an anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianzheng; Zhu, Gefu; Ren, Nanqi; Bo, Lixin; He, Junguo [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering; Li, Baikun [University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2007-10-15

    Hydrogen production from diluted molasses by anaerobic fermentation bacteria was investigated in a three-compartment anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) with an effective volume of 27.48 L. After being inoculated with aerobic activated sludge and operated at chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 5000 mg/L and temperature of 35 C for 26 days, the ABR achieved stable ethanol-type fermentation. The liquid fermentation products, including volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and ethanol, stabilized at 1254, 2053, and 2761 mg/L in the three compartments, respectively. Effluent pH, oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), and alkalinity ranged at 4.3-4.4, -241 to -249mV, and 306-334mgCaCO{sub 3}/L, respectively. The hydrogen yield of the ABR was 32.51 L/d at the stable operation status, specific hydrogen production rate of anaerobic activated sludge was 0.13 L/g MLVSS d, and the substrate conversion rate was 0.13 L/g COD. Hydrogen yields, fermentation types, and acclimatization durations varied in each compartment, with the 1st compartment having lowest hydrogen yield but longest acclimatization duration and the 2nd and 3rd compartments having higher hydrogen yields but shorter acclimatization durations. The study found that the individual compartment configuration in the ABR system provided a favorable environment for different types of anaerobic bacteria. Compared with complete stirring tank reactor (CSTR), the ABR system had a better operation stability and microbial activity, which led to higher substrate conversion rate and hydrogen production ability. (author)

  9. PRN 88-2: Clustering of Quaternary Ammonium Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Notice announces that EPA has clustered the Quaternary Ammonium Compounds into four groups for the purpose of testing chemicals to build a database that will support continued registration of the entire family of quaternary ammonium compounds

  10. Are elusive anaerobic pathways key methane sinks in eutrophic lakes and reservoirs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reed, D.C.; Deemer, B.R.; van Grinsven, S.; Harrison, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Collectively, freshwaters constitute a significant source of methane to the atmosphere, and both methane production and methane oxidation can strongly influence net emissions. Anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) is recognized as a strong regulator of marine methane emissions and appreciation of AOM’s

  11. Effects of ferric iron on the anaerobic treatment and microbial biodiversity in a coupled microbial electrolysis cell (MEC)--anaerobic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingxin; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo

    2013-10-01

    Adding Fe(III) into a MEC - anaerobic reactor enhanced the degradation of organic matters. To clarify the respective effects of combining Fe(III) dosage and a MEC and Fe(III) dosage only on strengthening anaerobic digestion, three anaerobic reactors were operated in parallel: a MEC - anaerobic reactor with dosing Fe(OH)3 (R1), an anaerobic reactor with dosing Fe(OH)3 (R2) and a common anaerobic reactor (R3). With increasing influent COD from 1500 to 4000 mg/L, the COD removal in R1 was maintained at 88.3% under a voltage of 0.8 V, which was higher than that in reactor R2 and R3. When the power was cut off, the COD removal in R1 decreased by 5.9%. The addition of Fe(OH)3 enhanced both anaerobic digestion and anodic oxidation, resulting in the effective mineralization of volatile fatty acids (VFAs). The reduced Fe(II) combined with electric field resulted more extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production. Quantitative real - time PCR showed a higher abundance of bacteria in the anodic biofilm and R1. Pyrosequencing and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis revealed that the dominant bacteria and archaea communities were richer and more abundant in the anode biofilm and R1. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Operational Performance of an AnaerobicAnoxic-Aerobic Treatment System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Luis Calado Araujo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An anaerobic (UASB – hybrid aerobic (suspended and attached growth activated sludge wastewater treatment system was evaluated on the removal of organic matter, solids and nitrogen following its pre-operational phase. Analysis were made weekly based on composite samples, prepared by grab samples taken every four hours, during 24-hour cycle, weighted by flow rate, on each monitoring point (raw sewage, UASB, anoxic chamber, aerobic reactors, return sludge from secondary decanters and final effluent. The plant presented an average flow rate of 908 m3/h with peaks from 10 to 14 h. BOD was removed by 86 % (310 to 41 mg/L being the highest parcel accounted by UASB reactors (70 % and removal of total suspended solids reached 63 % (190 to 94 mg/L. Mean removals of TKN (71 % and Ammonium (77 % were above the value predicted by design and, probably the nitrification-denitrification process was not the dominant route.

  13. Microbial stress mediated intercellular nanotubes in an anaerobic microbial consortium digesting cellulose

    OpenAIRE

    John, Martina; Trzcinski, Antoine Prandota; Zhou, Yan; Ng, Wun Jern

    2017-01-01

    The anaerobic digestion process is a multi - step reaction dependent on concerted activities such as exchange of metabolites among physiologically different microbial communities. This study investigated the impact of iron oxide nanoparticles on the anaerobic sludge microbiota. It was shown there were three distinct microbial phases following addition of the nanoparticles: microbial stress and cell death of approximately one log order of magnitude, followed by microbial rewiring, and recovery...

  14. Uptake and accumulation of ammonium by Alexandrium catenella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Following nitrogen exhaustion from the medium, ammonium pulses of varying magnitudes were induced, and measurements of extra- and intra-cellular ammonium were carried out for 24–72h along with measurements of ammonium incorporation (15N tracer) and inorganic carbon fixation (13C tracer). During vegetative ...

  15. Spectrometric determination of ammonium-nitrogen with quinol in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quinol is proposed as a reagent for the spectrometric determination of ammonium-nitrogen (NH4+-N) in aqueous medium. Quinol forms a pink complex with ammonium salt in aqueous medium. Hydrogen peroxide is needed for colour accentuation. The quinol/ammonium charge transfer complex has absorption maximum ...

  16. 21 CFR 582.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 582.1127 Section 582.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Additives § 582.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b) Conditions of...

  17. 21 CFR 182.1127 - Aluminum ammonium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Aluminum ammonium sulfate. 182.1127 Section 182.1127 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1127 Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (a) Product. Aluminum ammonium sulfate. (b...

  18. Anaerobic ammonia removal in presence of organic matter: A novel route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabumon, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    This study describes the feasibility of anaerobic ammonia removal process in presence of organic matter. Different sources of biomass collected from diverse eco-systems containing ammonia and organic matter (OM) were screened for potential anaerobic ammonia removal. Sequential batch studies confirmed the possibility of anaerobic ammonia removal in presence of OM, but ammonia was oxidized anoxically to nitrate (at oxidation reduction potential; ORP -248 ± 25 mV) by an unknown mechanism unlike in the reported anammox process. The oxygen required for oxidation of ammonia might have been generated through catalase enzymatic activity of facultative anaerobes in mixed culture. The oxygen generation possibility by catalase enzyme route was demonstrated. Among the inorganic electron acceptors (NO 2 - , NO 3 - and SO 4 2- ) studied, NO 2 - was found to be most effective in total nitrogen removal. Denitrification by the developed culture was much effective and faster compared to ammonia oxidation. The results of this study show that anaerobic ammonia removal is feasible in presence of OM. The novel nitrogen removal route is hypothesized as enzymatic anoxic oxidation of NH 4 + to NO 3 - , followed by denitrification via autotrophic and/or heterotrophic routes. The results of batch study were confirmed in continuous reactor operation

  19. Study and characterization of ammonium diuranate and uranium trioxide by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Thermogravimetry (TG), Differential Thermogravimetry (DTG) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) were used to characterize the thermal behavior of ammonium diuranate (ADU) and uranium trioxide (UO 3 ) produced at IPEN'S Chemical Enginnering Department. Compounds characterization was done using the molar ratios among the compounds and the oxides resulting from thermal decomposition. The TG and DTG curves registered for each sample were used for the determination of the following temperatures: - temperature of water evolution (free and crystallized water); - ammonia evolution and oxidation temperature; - ocluded ammonium nitrate decomposition temperature and - oxygen release temperature. The intermediate phases and their thermal stabilities were also identified by TG and DTG and confirmed by DSC curves, DSC curves showed also the exothermic and endothermic behavior of the processes involved. Finally, the great amount of data collected in this study can be handed as a guide by the professionals responsible for the operation of ADU,UO 3 and UF 4 pilot plants. (Author) [pt

  20. Anaerobic bioleaching of metals from waste activated sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meulepas, Roel J.W., E-mail: roel.meulepas@wetsus.nl [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Water Desalination and Reuse Center, Thuwal 13955-69000 (Saudi Arabia); Teshager, Fitfety Melese; Witharana, Ayoma [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); Saikaly, Pascal E. [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Water Desalination and Reuse Center, Thuwal 13955-69000 (Saudi Arabia); Lens, Piet N.L. [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination of anaerobically digested waste activated sludge hampers its reuse as fertilizer or soil conditioner. Conventional methods to leach metals require aeration or the addition of leaching agents. This paper investigates whether metals can be leached from waste activated sludge during the first, acidifying stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion without the supply of leaching agents. These leaching experiments were done with waste activated sludge from the Hoek van Holland municipal wastewater treatment plant (The Netherlands), which contained 342 μg g{sup −1} of copper, 487 μg g{sup −1} of lead, 793 μg g{sup −1} of zinc, 27 μg g{sup −1} of nickel and 2.3 μg g{sup −1} of cadmium. During the anaerobic acidification of 3 g{sub dry} {sub weight} L{sup −1} waste activated sludge, 80–85% of the copper, 66–69% of the lead, 87% of the zinc, 94–99% of the nickel and 73–83% of the cadmium were leached. The first stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion can thus be optimized as an anaerobic bioleaching process and produce a treated sludge (i.e., digestate) that meets the land-use standards in The Netherlands for copper, zinc, nickel and cadmium, but not for lead. - Highlights: • Heavy metals were leached during anaerobic acidification of waste activated sludge. • The process does not require the addition of chelating or oxidizing agents. • The metal leaching efficiencies (66 to 99%) were comparable to chemical leaching. • The produced leachate may be used for metal recovery and biogas production. • The produced digested sludge may be used as soil conditioner.

  1. Adaptation and Antibiotic Tolerance of Anaerobic Burkholderia pseudomallei ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Mohamad A.; Austin, Chad R.; Stewart, Amanda L.; Higgins, Mike; Vázquez-Torres, Andrés; Voskuil, Martin I.

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the etiological agent of melioidosis and is remarkably resistant to most classes of antibacterials. Even after months of treatment with antibacterials that are relatively effective in vitro, there is a high rate of treatment failure, indicating that this pathogen alters its patterns of antibacterial susceptibility in response to cues encountered in the host. The pathology of melioidosis indicates that B. pseudomallei encounters host microenvironments that limit aerobic respiration, including the lack of oxygen found in abscesses and in the presence of nitric oxide produced by macrophages. We investigated whether B. pseudomallei could survive in a nonreplicating, oxygen-deprived state and determined if this physiological state was tolerant of conventional antibacterials. B. pseudomallei survived initial anaerobiosis, especially under moderately acidic conditions similar to those found in abscesses. Microarray expression profiling indicated a major shift in the physiological state of hypoxic B. pseudomallei, including induction of a variety of typical anaerobic-environment-responsive genes and genes that appear specific to anaerobic B. pseudomallei. Interestingly, anaerobic B. pseudomallei was unaffected by antibacterials typically used in therapy. However, it was exquisitely sensitive to drugs used against anaerobic pathogens. After several weeks of anaerobic culture, a significant loss of viability was observed. However, a stable subpopulation that maintained complete viability for at least 1 year was established. Thus, during the course of human infection, if a minor subpopulation of bacteria inhabited an oxygen-restricted environment, it might be indifferent to traditional therapy but susceptible to antibiotics frequently used to treat anaerobic infections. PMID:21537012

  2. Characterizing the Performance of Gas-Permeable Membranes as an Ammonia Recovery Strategy from Anaerobically Digested Dairy Manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingham, Melanie; VanderZaag, Andrew; Singh, Jessica; Burtt, Stephen; Crolla, Anna; Kinsley, Chris; MacDonald, J Douglas

    2017-10-07

    Capturing ammonia from anaerobically digested manure could simultaneously decrease the adverse effects of ammonia inhibition on biogas production, reduce reactive nitrogen (N) loss to the environment, and produce mineral N fertilizer as a by-product. In this study, gas permeable membranes (GPM) were used to capture ammonia from dairy manure and digestate by the diffusion of gaseous ammonia across the membrane where ammonia is captured by diluted acid, forming an aqueous ammonium salt. A lab-scale prototype using tubular expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) GPM was used to (1) characterize the effect of total ammonium nitrogen (TAN) concentration, temperature, and pH on the ammonia capture rate using GPM, and (2) to evaluate the performance of a GPM system in conditions similar to a mesophilic anaerobic digester. The GPM captured ammonia at a rate between 2.2 to 6.3% of gaseous ammonia in the donor solution per day. Capture rate was faster in anaerobic digestate than raw manure. The ammonia capture rate could be predicted using non-linear regression based on the factors of total ammonium nitrogen concentration, temperature, and pH. This use of membranes shows promise in reducing the deleterious impacts of ammonia on both the efficiency of biogas production and the release of reactive N to the environment.

  3. Characterizing the Performance of Gas-Permeable Membranes as an Ammonia Recovery Strategy from Anaerobically Digested Dairy Manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Fillingham

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Capturing ammonia from anaerobically digested manure could simultaneously decrease the adverse effects of ammonia inhibition on biogas production, reduce reactive nitrogen (N loss to the environment, and produce mineral N fertilizer as a by-product. In this study, gas permeable membranes (GPM were used to capture ammonia from dairy manure and digestate by the diffusion of gaseous ammonia across the membrane where ammonia is captured by diluted acid, forming an aqueous ammonium salt. A lab-scale prototype using tubular expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE GPM was used to (1 characterize the effect of total ammonium nitrogen (TAN concentration, temperature, and pH on the ammonia capture rate using GPM, and (2 to evaluate the performance of a GPM system in conditions similar to a mesophilic anaerobic digester. The GPM captured ammonia at a rate between 2.2 to 6.3% of gaseous ammonia in the donor solution per day. Capture rate was faster in anaerobic digestate than raw manure. The ammonia capture rate could be predicted using non-linear regression based on the factors of total ammonium nitrogen concentration, temperature, and pH. This use of membranes shows promise in reducing the deleterious impacts of ammonia on both the efficiency of biogas production and the release of reactive N to the environment.

  4. Interactions between archaeal ammonia oxidizers, Nitrospira and methanotrophs modulate autotrophic nitrification in volcanic grasslands soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daebeler, A.; Bodelier, P.L.E.; Yan, Z; Hefting, Mariet|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/256197628; Laanbroek, Riks|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070378282

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium/ammonia is the sole energy substrate of ammonia oxidizers, and is also an essential nitrogen source for other microorganisms. Ammonia oxidizers therefore must compete with other soil microorganisms such as methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) in terrestrial ecosystems when ammonium

  5. Anaerobic degradation of alkylated benzenes in denitrifying laboratory aquifer columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, E.P.; Zeyer, J.; Eicher, P.; Schwarzenbach, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Toluene and m-xylene were rapidly mineralized in an anaerobic laboratory aquifer column operated under continuous-flow conditions with nitrate as an electron acceptor. The oxidation of toluene and m-xylene was coupled with the reduction of nitrate, and mineralization was confirmed by trapping 14 CO 2 evolved from 14 C-ring-labeled substrates. Substrate degradation also took place when nitrous oxide replaced nitrate as an electron acceptor, but decomposition was inhibited in the presence of molecular oxygen or after the substitution of nitrate by nitrite. The m-xylene-adapted microorganisms in the aquifer column degraded toluene, benzaldehyde, benzoate, m-toluylaldehyde, m-toluate, m-cresol, p-cresol, and p-hydroxybenzoate but were unable to metabolize benzene, naphthalene, methylcyclohexane, and 1,3-dimethylcyclohexane. Isotope-dilution experiments suggested benzoate as an intermediate formed during anaerobic toluene metabolism. The finding that the highly water-soluble nitrous oxide served as electron acceptor for the anaerobic mineralization of some aromatic hydrocarbons may offer attractive options for the in situ restoration of polluted aquifers

  6. Anaerobic benzene degradation by bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Carsten; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2011-11-01

    Benzene is a widespread and toxic contaminant. The fate of benzene in contaminated aquifers seems to be primarily controlled by the abundance of oxygen: benzene is aerobically degraded at high rates by ubiquitous microorganisms, and the oxygen-dependent pathways for its breakdown were elucidated more than 50 years ago. In contrast, benzene was thought to be persistent under anoxic conditions until 25 years ago. Nevertheless, within the last 15 years, several benzene-degrading cultures have been enriched under varying electron acceptor conditions in laboratories around the world, and organisms involved in anaerobic benzene degradation have been identified, indicating that anaerobic benzene degradation is a relevant environmental process. However, only a few benzene degraders have been isolated in pure culture so far, and they all use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In some highly enriched strictly anaerobic cultures, benzene has been described to be mineralized cooperatively by two or more different organisms. Despite great efforts, the biochemical mechanism by which the aromatic ring of benzene is activated in the absence of oxygen is still not fully elucidated; methylation, hydroxylation and carboxylation are discussed as likely reactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the 'key players' of anaerobic benzene degradation under different electron acceptor conditions and the possible pathway(s) of anaerobic benzene degradation. © 2011 The Authors; Journal compilation © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Anaerobic benzene degradation by bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Carsten; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Richnow, Hans‐Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Summary Benzene is a widespread and toxic contaminant. The fate of benzene in contaminated aquifers seems to be primarily controlled by the abundance of oxygen: benzene is aerobically degraded at high rates by ubiquitous microorganisms, and the oxygen‐dependent pathways for its breakdown were elucidated more than 50 years ago. In contrast, benzene was thought to be persistent under anoxic conditions until 25 years ago. Nevertheless, within the last 15 years, several benzene‐degrading cultures have been enriched under varying electron acceptor conditions in laboratories around the world, and organisms involved in anaerobic benzene degradation have been identified, indicating that anaerobic benzene degradation is a relevant environmental process. However, only a few benzene degraders have been isolated in pure culture so far, and they all use nitrate as an electron acceptor. In some highly enriched strictly anaerobic cultures, benzene has been described to be mineralized cooperatively by two or more different organisms. Despite great efforts, the biochemical mechanism by which the aromatic ring of benzene is activated in the absence of oxygen is still not fully elucidated; methylation, hydroxylation and carboxylation are discussed as likely reactions. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the ‘key players’ of anaerobic benzene degradation under different electron acceptor conditions and the possible pathway(s) of anaerobic benzene degradation. PMID:21450012

  8. Optical constants of concentrated aqueous ammonium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsberg, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    Using experimental data obtained from applying spectroscopy to a 39-wt-% aqueous ammonium sulfate solution, it is shown that, even though specific aerosol optical constants appear quite accurate, spectral variations may exist as functions of material composition or concentration or both. Prudent users of optical constant data must then include liberal data error estimates when performing calculations or in interpreting spectroscopic surveys of collected aerosol material.

  9. Proton dynamics investigation for dimethyl ammonium cation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pislewski, N.; Tritt-Goc, J.; Jakubas, R.

    1995-01-01

    Proton dynamics in dimethyl ammonium cation has been investigated by means of NMR and spin echo methods in polycrystalline salts [NH 2 (CH 3 ) 2 ] + Bi 2 J 9 - and [NH 2 (CH 3 ) 2 ] + SbJ 9 - . Spin-lattice relaxation time as well as second moment of NMR line have been measured for influence study of crystal structure changes on proton dynamics

  10. Habitat-associated phylogenetic community patterns of microbial ammonia oxidizers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Fernàndez-Guerra

    Full Text Available Microorganisms mediating ammonia oxidation play a fundamental role in the connection between biological nitrogen fixation and anaerobic nitrogen losses. Bacteria and Archaea ammonia oxidizers (AOB and AOA, respectively have colonized similar habitats worldwide. Ammonia oxidation is the rate-limiting step in nitrification, and the ammonia monooxygenase (Amo is the key enzyme involved. The molecular ecology of this process has been extensively explored by surveying the gene of the subunit A of the Amo (amoA gene. In the present study, we explored the phylogenetic community ecology of AOB and AOA, analyzing 5776 amoA gene sequences from >300 isolation sources, and clustering habitats by environmental ontologies. As a whole, phylogenetic richness was larger in AOA than in AOB, and sediments contained the highest phylogenetic richness whereas marine plankton the lowest. We also observed that freshwater ammonia oxidizers were phylogenetically richer than their marine counterparts. AOA communities were more dissimilar to each other than those of AOB, and consistent monophyletic lineages were observed for sediments, soils, and marine plankton in AOA but not in AOB. The diversification patterns showed a more constant cladogenesis through time for AOB whereas AOA apparently experienced two fast diversification events separated by a long steady-state episode. The diversification rate (γ statistic for most of the habitats indicated γ(AOA > γ(AOB. Soil and sediment experienced earlier bursts of diversification whereas habitats usually eutrophic and rich in ammonium such as wastewater and sludge showed accelerated diversification rates towards the present. Overall, this work shows for the first time a global picture of the phylogenetic community structure of both AOB and AOA assemblages following the strictest analytical standards, and provides an ecological view on the differential evolutionary paths experienced by widespread ammonia-oxidizing

  11. Equation of State of Ammonium Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, David L.; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Stahl, David B.

    2009-12-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) is a widely used fertilizer and mining explosive. AN is commonly used in ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO), which is a mixture of explosive-grade AN prills and fuel oil in a 94:6 ratio by weight. ANFO is a non-ideal explosive with measured detonation velocities around 4 km/s. The equation of state properties and known initiation behavior of neat AN are limited. We present the results of a series of gas gun-driven plate impact experiments on pressed neat ammonium nitrate at 1.72 g/cm3. No evidence of initiation was observed under shock loading to 22 GPa. High pressure x-ray diffraction experiments in diamond anvil cells provided insight into the high pressure phase behavior over the same pressure range (to 25 GPa), as well as a static isotherm at ambient temperature. From the isotherm and thermodynamic properties at ambient conditions, a preliminary unreacted equation of state (EOS) has been developed based on the Murnaghan isotherm and Helmholtz formalism [1], which compares favorably with the available experimental Hugoniot data on several densities of AN.

  12. Microbial electricity driven anoxic ammonium removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilajeliu-Pons, Anna; Koch, Christin; Balaguer, Maria D; Colprim, Jesús; Harnisch, Falk; Puig, Sebastià

    2018-03-01

    Removal of nitrogen, mainly in form of ammonium (NH 4 + ), in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is a highly energy demanding process, mainly due to aeration. It causes costs of about half a million Euros per year in an average European WWTP. Alternative, more economical technologies for the removal of nitrogen compounds from wastewater are required. This study proves the complete anoxic conversion of ammonium (NH 4 + ) to dinitrogen gas (N 2 ) in continuously operated bioelectrochemical systems at the litre-scale. The removal rate is comparable to conventional WWTPs with 35 ± 10 g N m -3 d -1 with low accumulation of NO 2 - , NO 3 - , N 2 O. In contrast to classical aerobic nitrification, the energy consumption is considerable lower (1.16 ± 0.21 kWh kg -1 N, being more than 35 times less than for the conventional wastewater treatment). Biotic and abiotic control experiments confirmed that the anoxic nitrification was an electrochemical biological process mainly performed by Nitrosomonas with hydroxylamine as the main substrate (mid-point potential, E ox  = +0.67 ± 0.08 V vs. SHE). This article proves the technical feasibility and reduction of costs for ammonium removal from wastewater, investigates the underlying mechanisms and discusses future engineering needs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Distinct and diverse anaerobic respiration of methanogenic community in response to MnO2nanoparticles in anaerobic digester sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Qiao, Sen; Yu, Cong; Tian, Yihui; Yang, Yue; Zhou, Jiti

    2017-10-15

    Recently, the influence of metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) on methanogenesis in anaerobic digestion has drawn much attention, however, the changes in NPs and functioning consortia within the methanogenic community are usually not investigated. Therefore, the methanogenesis performance, NPs transformation and methanogenic community development in anaerobic digester sludge under MnO 2 NP supplementation were demonstrated in this study. MnO 2 NPs (400 mg/gVSS) stimulated the methane (CH 4 ) yield by 42% for a final CH 4 proportion of 81.8% of the total gas production. Meanwhile, the coenzyme F 420 and INT-electron transport system activities showed positive correlation with MnO 2 concentration. Microbial Mn reduction and oxidation occurred in conjunction with methanogenesis, resulting in transformation of the shape of the MnO 2 NPs from wire-like to globular particles. Microbial community analysis indicated that the relative abundances of genera Methanobacterium, Methanosaeta, and Methanosarcina were higher in the presence of MnO 2 NPs. Moreover, a new and different crucial synergy within the methanogenic community was formed with low-abundance consortia driving Mn respiration coupled to methanogenesis in anaerobic digestion. To our knowledge, this is the first report on transformation of metal oxides NPs combined with syntrophic community development in studies focusing on methanogenesis in response to NPs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Anaerobic digestion of solid material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vavilin, V.A.; Lokshina, L.Y.; Flotats, X.

    2007-01-01

    A new multidimensional (3 and 2D) anaerobic digestion model for cylindrical reactor with non-uniform influent concentration distributions was developed to study the way in which mixing intensity affects the efficiency of continuous-flow anaerobic digestion. Batch experiments reported and simulated....... In the system, the threshold methanogenic biomass concentration existed because of inhibition by high VFA concentration. High methanogenic biomass concentration is required for efficient anaerobic digestion of MSW in order to avoid possible inhibition due to high VFA build-up. Thus, CSTR configuration might...... have unstable dynamics at high organic loading as shown in earlier experiments carried out by Stroot et al. (2001). A gradual increase of organic loading during the start up of a completely mixed digester causing an accumulation of methanogenic biomass is a solution to prevent a probable digester...

  15. The mechanism of water oxidation catalyzed by nanolayered manganese oxides: New insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Abbasi Isaloo, Mohsen

    2015-11-01

    Herein we consider the mechanism of water oxidation by nanolayered manganese oxide in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate. Based on membrane-inlet mass spectrometry results, the rate of H2((18))O exchange of μ-O groups on the surface of the nanolayered Mn-K oxide, and studies on water oxidation in the presence of different ratios of acetonitrile/water we propose a mechanism for water oxidation by nanolayered Mn oxides in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biochar-mediated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from soil amended with anaerobic digestates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Sarah L.; Clarke, Michèle L.; Othman, Mukhrizah; Ramsden, Stephen J.; West, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation examines nitrous oxide (N 2 O) fluxes from soil with simultaneous amendments of anaerobic digestates and biochar. The main source of anthropogenic emissions of N 2 O is agriculture and in particular, manure and slurry application to fields. Anaerobic digestates are increasingly used as a fertiliser and interest is growing in their potential as sources of N 2 O via nitrification and denitrification. Biochar is a stable product of pyrolysis and may affect soil properties such as cation exchange capacity and water holding capacity. Whilst work has been conducted on the effects of biochar amendment on N 2 O emissions in soils fertilised with mineral fertilisers and raw animal manures, little work to date has focused on the effects of biochar on nitrogen transformations within soil amended with anaerobic digestates. The aim of the current investigation was to quantify the effects of biochar application on ammonification, nitrification and N 2 O fluxes within soil amended with three anaerobic digestates derived from different feedstocks. A factorial experiment was undertaken in which a sandy loam soil (Dunnington Heath series) was either left untreated, or amended with three different anaerobic digestates and one of three biochar treatments; 0%, 1% or 3%. Nitrous oxide emissions were greatest from soil amended with anaerobic digestate originating from a maize feedstock. Biochar amendment reduced N 2 O emissions from all treatments, with the greatest effect observed in treatments with maximum emissions. The degree of N 2 O production and efficacy of biochar amelioration of gas emissions is discussed in context of soil microbial biomass and soil available carbon. - Highlights: • Nitrous oxide was emitted from anaerobic digestates applied to soil. • Simultaneous amendment of soil with biochar and anaerobic digestate reduced N 2 O emissions. • Soil nitrate accumulation occurred but was digestate dependent

  17. Oxygen sensitivity of various anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesche, W J

    1969-11-01

    Anaerobes differ in their sensitivity to oxygen, as two patterns were recognizable in the organisms included in this study. Strict anaerobes were species incapable of agar surface growth at pO(2) levels greater than 0.5%. Species that were found to be strict anaerobes were Treponema macrodentium, Treponema denticola, Treponema oralis n. sp., Clostridium haemolyticum, Selenomonas ruminatium, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens, and Lachnospira multiparus. Moderate anaerobes would include those species capable of growth in the presence of oxygen levels as high as 2 to 8%. The moderate anaerobes could be exposed to room atmosphere for 60 to 90 min without appreciable loss of viability. Species considered as moderate anaerobes were Bacteroides fragilis, B. melaninogenicus, B. oralis, Fusobacteria nucleatum, Clostridium novyi type A, and Peptostreptococcus elsdenii. The recognition of at least two general types of anaerobes would seem to have practical import in regard to the primary isolation of anaerobes from source material.

  18. Instrumentation in anaerobic treatment - research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjers, H.; Lier, van J.B.

    2006-01-01

    High rate anaerobic treatment reactors are able to uncouple solids and liquid retention time, resulting in high biomass concentrations. Principal advantages of anaerobic treatment include: energy efficiency, low biomass yield, low nutrient requirement and high volumetric organic loadings. In order

  19. RISK FACTORS IN NEONATAL ANAEROBIC INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Tabib

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic bacteria are well known causes of sepsis in adults but there are few studies regarding their role in neonatal sepsis. In an attempt to define the incidence of neonatal anaerobic infections a prospective study was performed during one year period. A total number of 400 neonates under sepsis study were entered this investigation. Anaerobic as well as aerobic cultures were sent. The patients were subjected to comparison in two groups: anaerobic culture positive and anaerobic culture negative and this comparison were analyzed statistically. There were 7 neonates with positive anaerobic culture and 35 neonates with positive aerobic culture. A significant statistical relationship was found between anaerobic infections and abdominal distention and pneumonia. It is recommended for those neonates with abdominal distention and pneumonia refractory to antibiotic treatment to be started on antibiotics with anaerobic coverage.

  20. Anaerobic bacterial meningitis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Jun; Lien, Chia-Yi; Chien, Chun-Chih; Huang, Chi-Ren; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chang, Wen-Neng

    2018-01-22

    Anaerobic infection is a very uncommon condition in adult bacterial meningitis (ABM), and its clinical characteristics have yet to be clarified. We enrolled 540 patients with culture-proven bacterial meningitis during a study period of 30 years (1986-2015), of whom 13 (2.4%) had anaerobic infections. These 13 patients were eight men and five women, aged 22-77 years. Among them, 53.8% (7/13) had a postneurosurgical state as the preceding event, and 79.6% (10/13) had underlying medical conditions including diabetes mellitus, malignancy, liver cirrhosis, cerebral infarct and alcoholism. Nosocomial and mixed infections were found in 15.5% (2/13) and 46.1% (6/13) of the patients, respectively. A total of 14 anaerobic strains were isolated from cerebrospinal fluid specimens, including nine Gram-negative (G(-)) strains: Fusobacterium nucleatum (3), Prevotella species (3) and Bacteroides fragilis (3), and five Gram-positive (G(+)) strains: Propionibacterium acnes (3) and Peptostreptococcus micros (also known as Parvimonas micra) (2). All of the implicated G(+) anaerobic bacteria were susceptible to penicillin, and no multiple drug-resistant strains were found among the implicated G(-) anaerobic bacteria. Despite treatment, 30.8% (4/13) of the patients died. Of the nine survivors, 22.2% (2/9) had a full recovery, while the other 77.8% (7/9) had varying degrees of neurological deficits. Compared with the good outcome group (n = 6, modified Rankin scale (mRS) scores: 0-2), the poor outcome group (n = 7, mRS scores ≧3) had higher incidence of seizure. These results may offer a preliminary view of the clinical characteristics of anaerobic ABM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of phosphate addition on methane fermentation in the batch and upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Sho; Shintani, Masaki; Sanchez, Zoe Kuizon; Kimura, Kohei; Numata, Mitsuru; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Kimbara, Kazuhide

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia inhibition of methane fermentation is one of the leading causes of failure of anaerobic digestion reactors. In a batch anaerobic digestion reactor with 429 mM NH3-N/L of ammonia, the addition of 25 mM phosphate resulted in an increase in methane production rate. Similar results were obtained with the addition of disodium phosphate in continuous anaerobic digestion using an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. While methane content and production rate decreased in the presence of more than 143 mM NH3-N/L of ammonium chloride in UASB, the addition of 5 mM disodium phosphate suppressed ammonia inhibition at 214 mM NH3-N/L of ammonium chloride. The addition prevented acetate/propionate accumulation, which might be one of the effects of the phosphate on the ammonia inhibition. The effects on the microbial community in the UASB reactor was also assessed, which was composed of Bacteria involved in hydrolysis, acidogenesis, acetogenesis, and dehydrogenation, as well as Archaea carrying out methanogenesis. The change in the microbial community was observed by ammonia inhibition and the addition of phosphate. The change indicates that the suppression of ammonia inhibition by disodium phosphate addition could stimulate the activity of methanogens, reduce shift in bacterial community, and enhance hydrogen-producing bacteria. The addition of phosphate will be an important treatment for future studies of methane fermentation.

  2. Microbial and nutritional regulation of high-solids anaerobic mono-digestion of fruit and vegetable wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Hui; Li, Yan; Zhao, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hua, Dongliang; Xu, Haipeng; Jin, Fuqiang

    2018-02-01

    The anaerobic digestion of single fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW) can be easily interrupted by rapid acidogenesis and inhibition of methanogen, and the digestion system tends to be particularly unstable at high solid content. In this study, the anaerobic digestion of FVW in batch experiments under mesophilic condition at a high solid concentration of 10% was successfully conducted to overcome the acidogenesis problem through several modifications. Firstly, compared with the conventional anaerobic sludge (CAS), the acclimated anaerobic granular sludge (AGS) was found to be a better inoculum due to its higher Archaea abundance. Secondly, waste activated sludge (WAS) was chosen to co-digest with FVW, because WAS had abundant proteins that could generate intermediate ammonium. The ammonium could neutralize the accumulated volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and prevent the pH value of the digestion system from rapidly decreasing. Co-digestion of FVW and WAS with TS ratio of 60:40 gave the highest biogas yield of 562 mL/g-VS and the highest methane yield of 362 mL/g-VS. Key parameters in the digestion process, including VFAs concentration, pH, enzyme activity, and microbial activity, were also examined.

  3. Anaerobic bioprocessing of organic wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, W; de Beer, D; Pena, M; Lettinga, G; Lens, P

    1996-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion of dissolved, suspended and solid organics has rapidly evolved in the last decades but nevertheless still faces several scientific unknowns. In this review, some fundamentals of bacterial conversions and adhesion are addressed initially. It is argued in the light of ΔG-values of reactions, and in view of the minimum energy quantum per mol, that anaerobic syntrophs must have special survival strategies in order to support their existence: redistributing the available energy between the partners, reduced end-product fermentation reactions and special cell-to-cell physiological interactions. In terms of kinetics, it appears that both reaction rates and residual substrate thresholds are strongly related to minimum ΔG-values. These new fundamental insights open perspectives for efficient design and operation of anaerobic bioprocesses. Subsequently, an overview is given of the current anaerobic biotechnology. For treating wastewaters, a novel and high performance new system has been introduced during the last decade; the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket system (UASB). This reactor concept requires anaerobic consortia to grow in a dense and eco-physiologically well-organized way. The microbial principles of such granular sludge growth are presented. Using a thermodynamic approach, the formation of different types of aggregates is explained. The application of this bioprocess in worldwide wastewater treatment is indicated. Due to the long retention times of the active biomass, the UASB is also suitable for the development of bacterial consortia capable of degrading xenobiotics. Operating granular sludge reactors at high upflow velocities (5-6 m/h) in expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) systems enlarges the application field to very low strength wastewaters (chemical oxygen demand system to the thermophilic configuration, as the latter permits higher conversion rates and easier sanitation. Integration of ultrafiltration in anaerobic slurry digestion

  4. Improved daily precipitation nitrate and ammonium concentration models for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, J.W. [Institutes of the Environment, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Lynch, J.A. [School of Forest Resources, Pennsylvania State University, 311 Forest Resources Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)]. E-mail: jal@psu.edu

    2005-06-15

    Daily precipitation nitrate and ammonium concentration models were developed for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (USA) using a linear least-squares regression approach and precipitation chemistry data from 29 National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) sites. Only weekly samples that comprised a single precipitation event were used in model development. The most significant variables in both ammonium and nitrate models included: precipitation volume, the number of days since the last event, a measure of seasonality, latitude, and the proportion of land within 8 km covered by forest or devoted to industry and transportation. Additional variables included in the nitrate model were the proportion of land within 0.8 km covered by water and/or forest. Local and regional ammonia and nitrogen oxide emissions were not as well correlated as land cover. Modeled concentrations compared very well with event chemistry data collected at six NADP/AirMoN sites within the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Wet deposition estimates were also consistent with observed deposition at selected sites. Accurately describing the spatial distribution of precipitation volume throughout the watershed is important in providing critical estimates of wet-fall deposition of ammonium and nitrate. - A linear least-squares regression approach was used to develop daily precipitation nitrate and ammonium concentration models for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

  5. Simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification by microwave reactor with ammonium bicarbonate and zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Zaishan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)], E-mail: weizaishan98@163.com; Lin Zhehang; Niu Hejingying; He Haiming; Ji Yongfeng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2009-03-15

    Microwave reactor with ammonium bicarbonate (NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}) and zeolite was set up to study the simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from flue gas. The results showed that the microwave reactor filled with NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3} and zeolite could reduce SO{sub 2} to sulfur with the best desulfurization efficiency of 99.1% and reduce NO{sub x} to nitrogen with the best NO{sub x} purifying efficiency of 86.5%. Microwave desulfurization and denitrification effect of the experiment using ammonium bicarbonate and zeolite together is much higher than that using ammonium bicarbonate or zeolite only. NO{sub x} concentration has little effect on denitrification but has no influence on desulfurization, SO{sub 2} concentration has no effect on denitrification. The optimal microwave power and empty bed residence time (EBRT) on simultaneous desulfurization and dentrification are 211-280 W and 0.315 s, respectively. The mechanism for microwave reduced desulfurization and denitrification can be described as the microwave-induced catalytic reduction reaction between SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and ammonium bicarbonate with zeolite being the catalyst and microwave absorbent.

  6. Potential substitution of ammonium chloride in Ruhr coal hydrogenation. (Previous test results)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassl

    1943-10-20

    The report related that ammonium chloride could be nearly totally replaced by equivalent amounts of elemental chlorine in the form of gas, chlorinated grinding oil, moderately chlorinated coal, as well as hydrogen chloride. Similar results were obtained using organic chloride compounds, such as carbon tetrachloride. Sulfur monochloride was also considered a substitute for ammonium chloride, since sulfuric acid and ammonium fluoride were considered unfavorable at the time. At a reaction temperature 1/2 mV higher than usual, phosphoric acid gave results similar to those of ammonium chloride except for splitting. By using metal powders (Fe, Al, Zn, Sn, etc.), the amount of chlorine could be reduced from 1/3 to 1/2, yet to attain a favorable reduction in asphalt as with NH/sub 4/Cl, a slight temperature increase was necessary. Tests with chlorine-containing water-soluble aluminum oxide as well as aqueous aluminum chloride appeared to be good prospects and were to be followed up. A number of summaries were referred to in relation to this report.

  7. Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria have lagged behind similar studies in aerobes. However, the current interest in biotechnology, the involvement of anaerobes in disease and the emergence of antibioticresistant strains have focused attention on the genetics of anaerobes. This article reviews molecular genetic studies in Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and methanogens. Certain genetic systems in some anaerobes differ from those in aerobes and illustrate the genetic diversity among bacteria

  8. Viscosity evolution of anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pevere, A.; Guibaud, G.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.; Baudu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of the apparent viscosity at steady shear rate of sieved anaerobic granular sludge (20¿315 ¿m diameter) sampled from different full-scale anaerobic reactors was recorded using rotation tests. The ¿limit viscosity¿ of sieved anaerobic granular sludge was determined from the apparent

  9. Kinetics and modeling of anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Angelidaki, Irini; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion modeling started in the early 1970s when the need for design and efficient operation of anaerobic systems became evident. At that time not only was the knowledge about the complex process of anaerobic digestion inadequate but also there were computational limitations. Thus...

  10. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber. (a) Identification. An anaerobic chamber is a device intended for medical purposes to maintain an anaerobic (oxygen...

  11. Intracellular nitrate of marine diatoms as a driver of anaerobic nitrogen cycling in sinking aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Stief, Peter; Bristow, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    Diatom-bacteria aggregates are key for the vertical transport of organic carbon in the ocean. Sinking aggregates also represent pelagic microniches with intensified microbial activity, oxygen depletion in the center, and anaerobic nitrogen cycling. Since some of the aggregate-forming diatom species......-bacteria aggregates. Stable 15N isotope incubations under dark and anoxic conditions revealed that axenic S. marinoi is able to reduce intracellular nitrate to ammonium that is immediately excreted by the cells. When exposed to a light:dark cycle and oxic conditions, S. marinoi stored nitrate intracellularly....... Thirty-one percent of the diatom-derived nitrate was converted to nitrogen gas, indicating that a substantial fraction of the intracellular nitrate pool of S. marinoi becomes available to the aggregate-associated bacterial community. Only 5% of the intracellular nitrate was reduced to ammonium, while 59...

  12. Copper enhances the activity and salt resistance of mixed methane-oxidizing communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ha, David; Hoefman, Sven; Boeckx, Pascal; Verstraete, Willy; Boon, Nico

    2010-08-01

    Effluents of anaerobic digesters are an underestimated source of greenhouse gases, as they are often saturated with methane. A post-treatment with methane-oxidizing bacterial consortia could mitigate diffuse emissions at such sites. Semi-continuously fed stirred reactors were used as model systems to characterize the influence of the key parameters on the activity of these mixed methanotrophic communities. The addition of 140 mg L(-1) NH (4) (+) -N had no significant influence on the activity nor did a temperature increase from 28 degrees C to 35 degrees C. On the other hand, addition of 0.64 mg L(-1) of copper(II) increased the methane removal rate by a factor of 1.5 to 1.7 since the activity of particulate methane monooxygenase was enhanced. The influence of different concentrations of NaCl was also tested, as effluents of anaerobic digesters often contain salt levels up to 10 g NaCl L(-1). At a concentration of 11 g NaCl L(-1), almost no methane-oxidizing activity was observed in the reactors without copper addition. Yet, reactors with copper addition exhibited a sustained activity in the presence of NaCl. A colorimetric test based on naphthalene oxidation showed that soluble methane monooxygenase was inhibited by copper, suggesting that the particulate methane monooxygenase was the active enzyme and thus more salt resistant. The results obtained demonstrate that the treatment of methane-saturated effluents, even those with increased ammonium (up to 140 mg L(-1) NH (4) (+) -N) and salt levels, can be mitigated by implementation of methane-oxidizing microbial consortia.

  13. Anaerobic Treatment of Methanolic Wastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettinga, G.; Geest, van der A.Th.; Hobma, S.W.; Laan, van der J.B.R.

    1979-01-01

    Although it is well known that methanol can be fermented directly by a specific species of methane bacteria, viz. Methanosarcina barkeri, until now little information was available about the effect of important environmental factors on the anaerobic fermentation of methanol. As methanol can be the

  14. Perspectives of Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, J.G.; Runia, W.T.; Molendijk, L.P.G.; Bleeker, P.O.

    2010-01-01

    Biological soil disinfestation is an environmentally friendly method to disinfest soil. From now on we refer to it as anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD). With ASD a green manure crop (40 t/ha) is homogeneously incorporated into the topsoil (0-30 cm) after which the field is lightly compacted and

  15. Fungal ammonia fermentation, a novel metabolic mechanism that couples the dissimilatory and assimilatory pathways of both nitrate and ethanol. Role of acetyl CoA synthetase in anaerobic ATP synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasaki, Kazuto; Shoun, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takeo, Kanji; Nakamura, Akira; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2004-03-26

    Fungal ammonia fermentation is a novel dissimilatory metabolic mechanism that supplies energy under anoxic conditions. The fungus Fusarium oxysporum reduces nitrate to ammonium and simultaneously oxidizes ethanol to acetate to generate ATP (Zhou, Z., Takaya, N., Nakamura, A., Yamaguchi, M., Takeo, K., and Shoun, H. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 1892-1896). We identified the Aspergillus nidulans genes involved in ammonia fermentation by analyzing fungal mutants. The results showed that assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases (the gene products of niaD and niiA) were essential for reducing nitrate and for anaerobic cell growth during ammonia fermentation. We also found that ethanol oxidation is coupled with nitrate reduction and catalyzed by alcohol dehydrogenase, coenzyme A (CoA)-acylating aldehyde dehydrogenase, and acetyl-CoA synthetase (Acs). This is similar to the mechanism suggested in F. oxysporum except A. nidulans uses Acs to produce ATP instead of the ADP-dependent acetate kinase of F. oxysporum. The production of Acs requires a functional facA gene that encodes Acs and that is involved in ethanol assimilation and other metabolic processes. We purified the gene product of facA (FacA) from the fungus to show that the fungus acetylates FacA on its lysine residue(s) specifically under conditions of ammonia fermentation to regulate its substrate affinity. Acetylated FacA had higher affinity for acetyl-CoA than for acetate, whereas non-acetylated FacA had more affinity for acetate. Thus, the acetylated variant of the FacA protein is responsible for ATP synthesis during fungal ammonia fermentation. These results showed that the fungus ferments ammonium via coupled dissimilatory and assimilatory mechanisms.

  16. Inhibition of Anaerobic Biological Treatment: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li; Ji, Dandan; Zang, Lihua

    2018-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a method for treating living and industrial wastewater by anaerobic degradation of organic compounds, which can produce biogas (carbon dioxide and methane mixture) and microbial biomass. And biogas as a renewable resource, can replace the use of ore fuel. In the process of anaerobic digestion, the problems of low methane yield and unstable reaction process are often encountered, which limits the widespread use of this technology. Various inhibitors are the main limiting factors for anaerobic digestion. In this paper, the main factors limiting anaerobic digestion are reviewed, and the latest research progress is introduced.

  17. Microbial stress mediated intercellular nanotubes in an anaerobic microbial consortium digesting cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Martina; Trzcinski, Antoine Prandota; Zhou, Yan; Ng, Wun Jern

    2017-12-21

    The anaerobic digestion process is a multi - step reaction dependent on concerted activities such as exchange of metabolites among physiologically different microbial communities. This study investigated the impact of iron oxide nanoparticles on the anaerobic sludge microbiota. It was shown there were three distinct microbial phases following addition of the nanoparticles: microbial stress and cell death of approximately one log order of magnitude, followed by microbial rewiring, and recovery. Furthermore, it was noted that cellular stress led to the establishment of intercellular nanotubes within the microbial biomass. Intercellular nanotube - mediated communication among genetically engineered microorganisms and ad hoc assembled co - cultures have been previously reported. This study presents evidence of intercellular nanotube formation within an environmental sample - i.e., anaerobic sludge microbiota subjected to stress. Our observations suggested a mode of microbial communication in the anaerobic digestion process not previously explored and which may have implications on bioreactor design and microbial functions.

  18. Present-day biogeochemical activities of anaerobic bacteria and their relevance to future exobiological investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    If the primordial atmosphere was reducing, then the first microbial ecosystem was probably composed of anaerobic bacteria. However, despite the presence of an oxygen-rich atmosphere, anaerobic habitats are important, commonplace components of the Earth's present biosphere. The geochemical activities displayed by these anaerobes impact the global cycling of certain elements (e.g., C, N, S, Fe, Mn, etc.). Methane provides an obvious example of how human-enhanced activities on a global scale can influence the content of a "radiative" (i.e., infrared absorbing) trace gas in the atmosphere. Methane can be oxidized by anaerobic bacteria, but this does not appear to support their growth. Acetylene, however, does support such growth. This may form the basis for future exobiological investigations of the atmospheres of anoxic, hydrocarbon-rich planets like Jupiter and Saturn, as well as the latter's satellite Titan. ?? 1989.

  19. Partial nitrification performance and mechanism of zeolite biological aerated filter for ammonium wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongyuan; Chen, Zhenguo; Wang, Xiaojun; Zheng, Lei; Gu, Xiaoyang

    2017-10-01

    A zeolite biological aerated filter (ZBAF) with continuous feeding was successfully applied for achieving stable partial nitrification. Excellent nitrite accumulation (higher than 98.0%) and high nitrite/nitrate production rate (NPR) (approximately 0.760kg/m 3 /d) were obtained with increase influent ammonium concentration from 250 to 550mg/L within a nitrogen loading rate (NLR) of 0.854-1.200kg/m 3 /d. Owning to the adsorption of zeolite to ammonium, free ammonia (FA) concentration could remain at an appropriate range for inhibition of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and dominance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), which should be responsible for the excellent partial nitrification realized in ZBAF. Kinetic study showed that the production of nitrite in ZBAF followed the zero-order kinetics model and high-throughput sequencing analysis further presented the enrichment of AOB and inhibition of NOB in ZBAF. All the results demonstrated that ZBAF hold a great potential in the application of partial nitrification for ammonium wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Anaerobic metabolism of pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, N.B.K.

    1980-01-01

    A manifold assembly system was used to study the metabolism of 14 C labelled PCNB in flooded and moist anaerobic soils. Soil respiration was generally enhanced by PCNB. More CO 2 was produced in moist anaerobic than in flooded anaerobic soil. Flooding reduced the volatilization of pesticide. The extractable radioactivity from the soil was same (70%) in the treatments. Nevertheless, differences were observed in distribution of PCNB and its degradation products. Pentachloroaniline (PCA) was the principal degradation product. Pentachlorothioanisole (PCTA) was more abundant in moist anaerobic than in flooded anaerobic soil. Pentachlorophenol (PCP) was formed from PCNB in anaerobic soil. Degradation of PCA, PCTA and PCP were further studied in soil and a possible pathway for anaerobic degradation of PCNB was proposed. (author)

  1. Determining anaerobic capacity in sporting activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordhof, Dionne A; Skiba, Philip F; de Koning, Jos J

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic capacity/anaerobically attributable power is an important parameter for athletic performance, not only for short high-intensity activities but also for breakaway efforts and end spurts during endurance events. Unlike aerobic capacity, anaerobic capacity cannot be easily quantified. The 3 most commonly used methodologies to quantify anaerobic capacity are the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit method, the critical power concept, and the gross efficiency method. This review describes these methods, evaluates if they result in similar estimates of anaerobic capacity, and highlights how anaerobic capacity is used during sporting activities. All 3 methods have their own strengths and weaknesses and result in more or less similar estimates of anaerobic capacity but cannot be used interchangeably. The method of choice depends on the research question or practical goal.

  2. Investigation of Ammonium and Nitrite Removal by Zeolite Material Synthesized on Red Mud Base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Thi Mai Huong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The zeolite with the unit formula of Na8(Al6Si6O24S.4H2O was synthesized directly on red mud base with addition of single silicon (signed as RH-ZeO-Si and both silicon and aluminum portions (signed as RM-ZeO-SiAl to original Tan Rai (Vietnam red mud. The structure of the zeolite was studied by X-Ray difration and FT-IR absorption spectra. The synthesized materials were studied on their adsorption ability of ammonium and nitrite ions. The results showed that, the adsorption of ammonium cation was mostly allowing ion-exchange mechanism and the zeolite crystaline forms played predominantly role besids minor one of single metal oxides. For nitrite anions, it is otherwise, the adsorption mechanism was mostly leant to electrostatic attraction between nitrite anions and electropositive effect of the hematite surface in light acidic condition. The adsorption isotherms of all ammonium and nitrite ions on both synthesized materials were nearly conformable with Freundlich model than Langmuir model. Those showed that, both materials have unhomogeneous adsorption surface. The maximum adsorption capacity of ammonium and nitrite on RM-ZeO-Si was 5.71 mg/g and 2.73 mg/g respectively, and on RM-ZeO-SiAl was 5.61 mg/g and 3.12 mg/g respectively. The initial test of competitive ions influencing on adsorption ability showed that, for all cases the competition of cations to ammonium ion was more significance than those of anions to nitrite ion in the same conditions.

  3. Anaerobic transformation of carbon monoxide by microbial communities of Kamchatka hot springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetkova, Tatiana V; Rusanov, Igor I; Pimenov, Nikolay V; Kolganova, Tatyana V; Lebedinsky, Alexander V; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Sokolova, Tatyana G

    2011-05-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is one of the common gaseous compounds found in hot volcanic environments. It is known to serve as the growth substrate for a number of thermophilic prokaryotes, both aerobic and anaerobic. The goal of this work was to study the process of anaerobic transformation of CO by microbial communities inhabiting natural thermal environments: hot springs of Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka. The anaerobic microbial community of Treshchinny Spring (80°C, pH 6.5) was found to exhibit two peaks of affinity for CO (K (S1) = 54 nM and K (S2) = 1 μM). The actual rate of anaerobic CO transformation by the microbial community of this spring, calculated after obtaining the concentration dependence curve and extrapolated to the natural concentration of CO dissolved in the hot spring water (20 nM), was found to be 120 μmol l(-1) of sediment day(-1). In all the hot springs studied, more than 90% of the carbon of (14)CO upon anaerobic incubation was recovered as (14)CO(2). From 1 to 5% of (14)CO was transformed to volatile fatty acids (VFA). The number of microorganisms capable of anaerobic CO oxidation determined by dilution-to-extinction method reached 10(6) cells ml(-1) of sediment. CO-transforming anaerobic thermophilic microorganisms isolated from the springs under study exhibited hydrogenogenic type of CO oxidation and belonged to the bacterial genera Carboxydocella and Dictyoglomus. These data suggest a significant role of hydrogenogenic carboxydotrophic prokaryotes in anaerobic CO transformation in Uzon Caldera hot springs.

  4. Deep sequencing-based analysis of the anaerobic stimulon in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Virginia L

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintenance of an anaerobic denitrification system in the obligate human pathogen, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, suggests that an anaerobic lifestyle may be important during the course of infection. Furthermore, mounting evidence suggests that reduction of host-produced nitric oxide has several immunomodulary effects on the host. However, at this point there have been no studies analyzing the complete gonococcal transcriptome response to anaerobiosis. Here we performed deep sequencing to compare the gonococcal transcriptomes of aerobically and anaerobically grown cells. Using the information derived from this sequencing, we discuss the implications of the robust transcriptional response to anaerobic growth. Results We determined that 198 chromosomal genes were differentially expressed (~10% of the genome in response to anaerobic conditions. We also observed a large induction of genes encoded within the cryptic plasmid, pJD1. Validation of RNA-seq data using translational-lacZ fusions or RT-PCR demonstrated the RNA-seq results to be very reproducible. Surprisingly, many genes of prophage origin were induced anaerobically, as well as several transcriptional regulators previously unknown to be involved in anaerobic growth. We also confirmed expression and regulation of a small RNA, likely a functional equivalent of fnrS in the Enterobacteriaceae family. We also determined that many genes found to be responsive to anaerobiosis have also been shown to be responsive to iron and/or oxidative stress. Conclusions Gonococci will be subject to many forms of environmental stress, including oxygen-limitation, during the course of infection. Here we determined that the anaerobic stimulon in gonococci was larger than previous studies would suggest. Many new targets for future research have been uncovered, and the results derived from this study may have helped to elucidate factors or mechanisms of virulence that may have otherwise been overlooked.

  5. Anaerobic toxicity of cationic silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitipour, Alireza; Thiel, Stephen W. [Biomedical, Chemical, and Environmental Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Scheckel, Kirk G. [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Tolaymat, Thabet, E-mail: tolaymat.thabet@epa.gov [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag{sup +} under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10–15 nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5 mg L{sup −1}, the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100 mg L{sup −1} as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag{sup +}. Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100 mg L{sup −1} as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • At concentrations -1 the anaerobic decomposition process was not impacted. • An impact on the microbial community at concentrations -1 were observed. • At high concentrations (100 mg L{sup −1}), the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity. • Toxicity was demonstrated without the presence of oxidative dissolution of silver. • A one size fits all approach for the evaluation of NPs may not be accurate.

  6. Quantification of ammonia oxidation rates and the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in marine sediment depth profiles from Catalina Island, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michael eBeman

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities present in marine sediments play a central role in nitrogen biogeochemistry at local to global scales. Along the oxidation-reduction gradients present in sediment profiles, multiple nitrogen cycling processes (such as nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation are active and actively coupled to one another—yet the microbial communities responsible for these transformations and the rates at which they occur are still poorly understood. We report pore water geochemical (O2, NH4+, NO3- profiles, quantitative profiles of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes, and ammonia oxidation rate measurements, from bioturbated marine sediments of Catalina Island, California. Across triplicate sediment cores collected offshore at Bird Rock and within Catalina Harbor, oxygen penetration (0.24-0.5 cm depth and the abundance of amoA genes (up to 9.30 x 107 genes g-1 varied with depth and between cores. Bacterial amoA genes were consistently present at depths of up to 10 cm, and archaeal amoA was readily detected in Bird Rock cores, and Catalina Harbor cores from 2008, but not 2007. Although detection of DNA is not necessarily indicative of active growth and metabolism, ammonia oxidation rate measurements made in 2008 (using isotope tracer demonstrated the production of oxidized nitrogen at depths where amoA was present. Rates varied with depth and between cores, but indicate that active ammonia oxidation occurs at up to 10 cm depth in bioturbated Catalina Harbor sediments, where it may be carried out by either or both ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria.

  7. Quantification of ammonia oxidation rates and the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in marine sediment depth profiles from Catalina Island, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J M; Bertics, Victoria J; Braunschweiler, Thomas; Wilson, Jesse M

    2012-01-01

    Microbial communities present in marine sediments play a central role in nitrogen biogeochemistry at local to global scales. Along the oxidation-reduction gradients present in sediment profiles, multiple nitrogen cycling processes (such as nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation) are active and actively coupled to one another - yet the microbial communities responsible for these transformations and the rates at which they occur are still poorly understood. We report pore water geochemical (O(2), [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]) profiles, quantitative profiles of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes, and ammonia oxidation rate measurements, from bioturbated marine sediments of Catalina Island, California. Across triplicate sediment cores collected offshore at Bird Rock (BR) and within Catalina Harbor (CH), oxygen penetration (0.24-0.5 cm depth) and the abundance of amoA genes (up to 9.30 × 10(7) genes g(-) (1)) varied with depth and between cores. Bacterial amoA genes were consistently present at depths of up to 10 cm, and archaeal amoA was readily detected in BR cores, and CH cores from 2008, but not 2007. Although detection of DNA is not necessarily indicative of active growth and metabolism, ammonia oxidation rate measurements made in 2008 (using isotope tracer) demonstrated the production of oxidized nitrogen at depths where amoA was present. Rates varied with depth and between cores, but indicate that active ammonia oxidation occurs at up to 10 cm depth in bioturbated CH sediments, where it may be carried out by either or both ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria.

  8. Mass spectrometric investigation into thermal decomposition of double hafnium and ammonium sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedoryako, L.I.; Sheka, I.A.; Vykhrestyuk, N.I.; Brodskij, E.S.

    1983-01-01

    The method of pyrolytic mass spectrometry has been used to investigate thermal decomposition doUble hafnium ammonium sulfate of the (Nr 4 ) 4 Hf(SO 4 ) 4 X4H 2 O composition during heating from 20 to 800 deg. In volatile destruction products the following ions are found: H 2 O + , NH 3 + , SO + , SO 2 + , O 2 + , H 2 S + , N 2 + , SO 3 + ion is practically absent. Removal of crystallization water occurs in the 85-285 deg range, that of ammonium and sulfur oxides - at 300-775 deg. Higher than 300 deg the ratios of intensities of peaks of SO 2 + :SO + :O 2 + ions do not exceed those standard for SO 2 , which proves a deeper destruction of sUlfUr dioxide under given conditions

  9. Quaternary Ammonium Polyethyleneimine: Antibacterial Activity Ira

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farber, Y.; Domb, A.G.; Golenser, J.; Beyth, N.; Weiss, E.I.

    2010-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine- (QA-PEI-) based nanoparticles were synthesized using two synthetic methods, reductive amination and N-alkylation. According to the first method, QA-PEI nanoparticles were synthesized by cross-linking with glutaraldehyde followed by reductive amination with octanal and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. The second method is based on crosslinking with dialkyl halide followed by N-alkylation with octyl halide and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. QA-PEI nanoparticles completely inhibited bacterial growth (>106 bacteria), including both Gram-positive, that is, Staphylococcus aureus at 80 μ/mL, and Gram-negative, that is, Escherichia coli at 320 μ/mL. Activity analysis revealed that the degree of alkylation and N-methylation of the QA-PEI nanoparticles plays a significant role in antibacterial activity of the reagent. The most potent compound was octyl alkylated QA-PEI alkylated at 1 : 1 mole ratio (primary amine of PEI monomer units/alkylating agent). Also, cytotoxicity studies on MAT-LyLu and MBT cell lines were performed with QA-PEI nanoparticles. These findings confirm previous reports that poly cations bearing quaternary ammonium moieties inhibit bacterial growth in vitro and have a potential use as additives in medical devices which need antibacterial properties.

  10. Glucose and Fat Oxidation: Bomb Calorimeter Be Damned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For both respiration and combustion, the energy loss difference between glucose and fat oxidation often is referenced to the efficiency of the fuel. Yet, the addition of anaerobic metabolism with ATP resynthesis to complete respiratory glucose oxidation further contributes to energy loss in the form of entropy changes that are not measured or quantified by calorimetry; combustion and respiratory fat/lactate oxidation lack this anaerobic component. Indeed, the presence or absence of an anaerobic energy expenditure component needs to be applied to the estimation of energy costs in regard to glucose, lactate, and fuel oxidation, especially when the measurement of oxygen uptake alone may incorrectly define energy expenditure.

  11. Ammonium Production in Sediments Inhibited with Molybdate: Implications for the Sources of Ammonium in Anoxic Marine Sediments †

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, Myrna E.; Mackin, James E.; Capone, Douglas G.

    1987-01-01

    Ammonium production in the presence of specific inhibitors of sulfate reduction and methanogenesis was investigated in six marine sediments which differed in bulk properties and organic matter input. In all cases, little effect of the inhibitors on ammonium production was observed, although sulfate reduction was suppressed by molybdate. This gives evidence that the processes of fermentation and hydrolysis are of primary importance in ammonium generation at the sites studied. Although sulfate ...

  12. Study of the reaction between ammonium thiocyanate and Fe (II or Fe (III using infrared spectroscopy: an experiment of prebiotic chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimas Augusto Morozin Zaia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The prebiotic chemistry studies the reactions that could be played an important role on origins of life on Earth. However, these reactions should be carried out under conditions that existed on the prebiotic Earth. The laboratory experiments of heating substances in solid state could be corresponding to the following prebiotic environments: cooling lava from volcanoes on the ground and impact of meteorites or comets on the earth. The present study examined the reaction in solid state between ammonium thiocyanate and Fe (II or Fe (III. The samples were heated at 220 ºC in several different times (6 hours, 24 hours, 7 days. The most important finding of this work is that a reaction of oxidation-reduction is occurring between Fe (II and ammonium thiocyanate, the infrared spectrum of the reaction product ammonium thiocyanate/Fe (II showed a band that it is characteristic of ferricyanate. The infrared spectra also showed bands that they are characteristics of guanidine thiocyanate. Thus, the heating of ammonium thiocyanate with Fe (II in solid state is synthesizing guanidine thiocyanate and at the same time oxidizing Fe (II to Fe (III. The product of reaction between Fe (III and ammonium thiocyanate is guanidine thiocyanate. Fe (II and Fe (III are reacting with ammonium thiocyanate in different way.

  13. Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by the Facultative Anaerobe Pantoea agglomerans SP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Chris A.; Obraztsova, Anna Y.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2000-01-01

    Anaerobic enrichments with acetate as the electron donor and Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor were obtained from sediments of Salt Pond, a coastal marine basin near Woods Hole, Mass. A pure culture of a facultatively anaerobic Fe(III) reducer was isolated, and 16S rRNA analysis demonstrated that this organism was most closely related to Pantoea (formerly Enterobacter) agglomerans, a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria. This organism, designated strain SP1, can grow by coupling the oxidation of acetate or H2 to the reduction of a variety of electron acceptors, including Fe(III), Mn(IV), Cr(VI), and the humic substance analog 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate, but not sulfate. To our knowledge, this is the first mesophilic facultative anaerobe reported to couple acetate oxidation to dissimilatory metal reduction. PMID:10653716

  14. Identification of genes specifically required for the anaerobic metabolism of benzene in Geobacter metallireducens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Tian; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Although the biochemical pathways for the anaerobic degradation of many of the hydrocarbon constituents in petroleum reservoirs have been elucidated, the mechanisms for anaerobic activation of benzene, a very stable molecule, are not known. Previous studies have demonstrated that Geobacter...... metallireducens can anaerobically oxidize benzene to carbon dioxide with Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor and that phenol is an intermediate in benzene oxidation. In an attempt to identify enzymes that might be involved in the conversion of benzene to phenol, whole-genome gene transcript abundance...... was compared in cells metabolizing benzene and cells metabolizing phenol. Eleven genes had significantly higher transcript abundance in benzene-metabolizing cells. Five of these genes had annotations suggesting that they did not encode proteins that could be involved in benzene metabolism and were not further...

  15. Microbial diversity of hydrothermal sediments in the Guaymas Basin: evidence for anaerobic methanotrophic communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Andreas; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Edgcomb, Virginia; de Vera Gomez, Alvin; Kysela, David; Sylva, Sean P; Sogin, Mitchell L; Jannasch, Holger W

    2002-04-01

    Microbial communities in hydrothermally active sediments of the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico) were studied by using 16S rRNA sequencing and carbon isotopic analysis of archaeal and bacterial lipids. The Guaymas sediments harbored uncultured euryarchaeota of two distinct phylogenetic lineages within the anaerobic methane oxidation 1 (ANME-1) group, ANME-1a and ANME-1b, and of the ANME-2c lineage within the Methanosarcinales, both previously assigned to the methanotrophic archaea. The archaeal lipids in the Guaymas Basin sediments included archaeol, diagnostic for nonthermophilic euryarchaeota, and sn-2-hydroxyarchaeol, with the latter compound being particularly abundant in cultured members of the Methanosarcinales. The concentrations of these compounds were among the highest observed so far in studies of methane seep environments. The delta-(13)C values of these lipids (delta-(13)C = -89 to -58 per thousand) indicate an origin from anaerobic methanotrophic archaea. This molecular-isotopic signature was found not only in samples that yielded predominantly ANME-2 clones but also in samples that yielded exclusively ANME-1 clones. ANME-1 archaea therefore remain strong candidates for mediation of the anaerobic oxidation of methane. Based on 16S rRNA data, the Guaymas sediments harbor phylogenetically diverse bacterial populations, which show considerable overlap with bacterial populations of geothermal habitats and natural or anthropogenic hydrocarbon-rich sites. Consistent with earlier observations, our combined evidence from bacterial phylogeny and molecular-isotopic data indicates an important role of some novel deeply branching bacteria in anaerobic methanotrophy. Anaerobic methane oxidation likely represents a significant and widely occurring process in the trophic ecology of methane-rich hydrothermal vents. This study stresses a high diversity among communities capable of anaerobic oxidation of methane.

  16. Toxic fumes from explosives: ammonium nitrate-fuel oil mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiken, R.F.; Cook, E.B.; Ruhe, T.C.

    1974-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines has carried out experimental and theoretical studies with prilled and pulverized ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (AN-FO) mixtures containing varying amounts of fuel oil in an attempt to quantify the effects of stoichiometric composition, nonideal detonation behavior, and expansion volume on the production of CO, NO, and NO/sub 2/ fumes. Experimental fume measurements were obtained in the Bureau's large closed gallery facility (7.2 x 10/sup 4/ liter expansion chamber) and in the standard Crawshaw-Jones apparatus (90-liter expansion chamber) using a prepackaged charge configuration containing about 450 g of explosives. The theoretical calculation of toxic fumes was achieved with an equilibrium detonation code called TIGER. Contrary to initial expectations, the NO/sub x/ (= NO + NO/sub 2/) fumes from the large gallery test were found to be in essential agreement with the Crawshaw-Jones results. It was also concluded that TIGER calculations offer a good approach to the prediction of toxic fumes; there is a basic problem in extrapolating laboratory measurements of CO fumes to mine conditions, this being due to postdetonation oxidation of CO to CO/sub 2/; and the detonation velocity decay rate of an explosive is a useful experimental parameter for correlating toxic fumes production with nonideal detonation behavior.

  17. Electrochemical properties of quaternary ammonium salts for electrochemical capacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ue, Makoto; Takeda, Masayuki; Takehara, Masahiro; Mori, Shoichiro [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Inashiki, Ibaraki (Japan). Tsukuba Research Center

    1997-08-01

    The limiting reduction and oxidation potentials and electrolytic conductivities of new quaternary ammonium salts were examined for electrochemical capacitor applications, whose anions have already been tested as lithium salts for lithium battery applications. The anodic stability was in the following order BR{sub 4}{sup {minus}} < ClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} {le} CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} < (CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}N{sup {minus}} {le} C{sub 4}F{sub 9}SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} < BF{sub 4}{sup {minus}} < PF{sub 6}{sup {minus}} {le} AsF{sub 6}{sup {minus}} < SbF{sub 6}{sup {minus}}. The electrolytic conductivities of Me{sub 4{minus}n}Et{sub n}N(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}N (n = 0--4) were examined in comparison with Me{sub 4{minus}n}Et{sub n}NBF{sub 4} counterparts. These imide salts showed good solubility, relatively high conductivity, and anodic stability in propylene carbonate. Et{sub 4}N(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}N was found to be a good supporting salt for low permittivity organic solvents, and it afforded a highly conductive electrolyte system based on the ethylene carbonate-dimethyl carbonate mixed solvent, which is useful for electrochemical capacitor applications.

  18. Application of dynamic membranes in anaerobic membranes in anaerobic membrane bioreactor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erşahin, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) physically ensure biomass retention by the application of a membrane filtration process. With growing application experiences from aerobic membrane bioreactors (MBRs), the combination of membrane and anaerobic processes has received much attention and become

  19. Upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, A S; Dhagat, N N

    2001-04-01

    Biological treatment of wastewater basically reduces the pollutant concentration through microbial coagulation and removal of non-settleable organic colloidal solids. Organic matter is biologically stabilized so that no further oxygen demand is exerted by it. The biological treatment requires contact of the biomass with the substrate. Various advances and improvements in anaerobic reactors to achieve variations in contact time and method of contact have resulted in development of in suspended growth systems, attached growth or fixed film systems or combinations thereof. Although anaerobic systems for waste treatment have been used since late 19th century, they were considered to have limited treatment efficiencies and were too slow to serve the needs of a quickly expanding wastewater volume, especially in industrialized and densely populated areas. At present aerobic treatment is the most commonly used process to reduce the organic pollution level of both domestic and industrial wastewaters. Aerobic techniques, such as activated sludge process, trickling filters, oxidation ponds and aerated lagoons, with more or less intense mixing devices, have been successfully installed for domestic wastewater as well as industrial wastewater treatment. Anaerobic digestion systems have undergone modifications in the last two decades, mainly as a result of the energy crisis. Major developments have been made with regard to anaerobic metabolism, physiological interactions among different microbial species, effects of toxic compounds and biomass accumulation. Recent developments however, have demonstrated that anaerobic processes might be an economically attractive alternative for the treatment of different types of industrial wastewaters and in (semi-) tropical areas also for domestic wastewaters. The anaerobic degradation of complex, particulate organic matter has been described as a multistep process of series and parallel reactions. It involves the decomposition of organic and

  20. Efficient cellulose solvent: quaternary ammonium chlorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostag, Marc; Liebert, Tim; El Seoud, Omar A; Heinze, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Pure quaternary tetraalkylammonium chlorides with one long alkyl chain dissolved in various organic solvents constitute a new class of cellulose solvents. The electrolytes are prepared in high yields and purity by Menshutkin quaternization, an inexpensive and easy synthesis route. The pure molten tetraalkylammonium chlorides dissolve up to 15 wt% of cellulose. Cosolvents, including N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), may be added in large excess, leading to a system of decreased viscosity. Contrary to the well-established solvent DMA/LiCl, cellulose dissolves in DMA/quaternary ammonium chlorides without any pretreatment. Thus, the use of the new solvent avoids some disadvantages of DMA/LiCl and ionic liquids, the most extensively employed solvents for homogeneous cellulose chemistry. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.