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Sample records for anabaena sensory rhodopsin

  1. Ultrafast photochemistry of anabaena sensory rhodopsin: experiment and theory.

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    Schapiro, Igor; Ruhman, Sanford

    2014-05-01

    Light induced isomerization of the retinal chromophore activates biological function in all retinal protein (RP) driving processes such as ion-pumping, vertebrate vision and phototaxis in organisms as primitive as archea, or as complex as mammals. This process and its consecutive reactions have been the focus of experimental and theoretical research for decades. The aim of this review is to demonstrate how the experimental and theoretical research efforts can now be combined to reach a more comprehensive understanding of the excited state process on the molecular level. Using the Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin as an example we will show how contemporary time-resolved spectroscopy and recently implemented excited state QM/MM methods consistently describe photochemistry in retinal proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Retinal Proteins - You can teach an old dog new tricks.

  2. Photoreactions and Structural Changes of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin

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    Akira Kawanabe

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR is an archaeal-type rhodopsin found in eubacteria. The gene encoding ASR forms a single operon with ASRT (ASR transducer which is a 14 kDa soluble protein, suggesting that ASR functions as a photochromic sensor by activating the soluble transducer. This article reviews the detailed photoreaction processes of ASR, which were studied by low-temperature Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR and UV-visible spectroscopy. The former research reveals that the retinal isomerization is similar to bacteriorhodopsin (BR, but the hydrogen-bonding network around the Schiff base and cytoplasmic region is different. The latter study shows the stable photoproduct of the all-trans form is 100% 13-cis, and that of the 13-cis form is 100% all-trans. These results suggest that the structural changes of ASR in the cytoplasmic domain play important roles in the activation of the transducer protein, and photochromic reaction is optimized for its sensor function.

  3. Quantum yields for the light adaptations in Anabaena sensory rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin

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    Wada, Yoichiro; Kawanabe, Akira; Furutani, Yuji; Kandori, Hideki; Ohtani, Hiroyuki

    2008-02-01

    Archael-type rhodopsin has an all- trans or a 13- cis retinal. The light-induced interconversion between these two forms has been found in Anabaena sensory rhodopsin, even though only the photoreaction from the 13- cis form to the all- trans form exists in bacteriorhodopsin. In this study, we obtained the quantum yields for the 13- cis → all- trans and all- trans → 13- cis reactions of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (0.24 ± 0.03 and 0.38 ± 0.07, respectively) and concluded that these values were independent of the wavelength of the excitation light as well as bacteriorhodopsin. In other words, no excess energy effects can be found in these reactions.

  4. DNA binding activity of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer probed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

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    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, So Young; Jung, Kwang-Hwan; Kim, Doseok

    2015-01-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT) is believed to be a major player in the photo-signal transduction cascade, which is triggered by Anabaena sensory rhodopsin. Here, we characterized DNA binding activity of ASRT probed by using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We observed clear decrease of diffusion coefficient of DNA upon binding of ASRT. The dissociation constant, K(D), of ASRT to 20 bp-long DNA fragments lied in micro-molar range and varied moderately with DNA sequence. Our results suggest that ASRT may interact with several different regions of DNA with different binding affinity for global regulation of several genes that need to be activated depending on the light illumination.

  5. The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer defines a novel superfamily of prokaryotic small-molecule binding domains

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    De Souza Robson F

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT is a small protein that has been claimed to function as a signaling molecule downstream of the cyanobacterial sensory rhodopsin. However, orthologs of ASRT have been detected in several bacteria that lack rhodopsin, raising questions about the generality of this function. Using sequence profile searches we show that ASRT defines a novel superfamily of β-sandwich fold domains. Through contextual inference based on domain architectures and predicted operons and structural analysis we present strong evidence that these domains bind small molecules, most probably sugars. We propose that the intracellular versions like ASRT probably participate as sensors that regulate a diverse range of sugar metabolism operons or even the light sensory behavior in Anabaena by binding sugars or related metabolites. We also show that one of the extracellular versions define a predicted sugar-binding structure in a novel cell-surface lipoprotein found across actinobacteria, including several pathogens such as Tropheryma, Actinomyces and Thermobifida. The analysis of this superfamily also provides new data to investigate the evolution of carbohydrate binding modes in β-sandwich domains with very different topologies. Reviewers: This article was reviewed by M. Madan Babu and Mark A. Ragan.

  6. A role of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT) in photosensory transduction.

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    Kim, So Young; Yoon, Sa Ryong; Han, SongI; Yun, Yuna; Jung, Kwang-Hwan

    2014-08-01

    In 2003, Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR), a membrane-bound light sensor protein, was discovered in cyanobacteria. Since then, a large number of functions have been described for ASR, based on protein biochemical and biophysical studies. However, no study has determined the in vivo mechanism of photosensory transduction for ASR and its transducer protein (ASRT). Here, we aimed to determine the role of ASRT in physiological photo-regulation. ASRT is known to be related to photochromism, because it regulates the expression of phycocyanin (cpc-gene) and phycoerythrocyanin (pec gene), two major proteins of the phycobilisome in cyanobacteria. By examining wild type and knockout mutant Anabaena cells, we showed that ASRT repressed the expression of these two genes. We also demonstrated physical interactions between ASRT, ASR, and the promoter regions of cpc, pec, kaiABC (circadian clock gene) and the asr operon, both in vitro and in vivo. Binding assays indicated that ASRT had different sites of interaction for binding to ASR and DNA promoter regions. ASRT also influenced the retinal re-isomerization rate in dark through a physical interaction with ASR, and it regulated reporter gene expression in vivo. These results suggested that ASRT relayed the photosignal from ASR and directly regulated gene expression.

  7. Crystallization, X-ray diffraction analysis and SIRAS/molecular-replacenent phasing of three crystal forms of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer

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    Vogeley, Lutz; Luecke, Hartmut, E-mail: hudel@uci.edu [University of California, Irvine (United States)

    2006-04-01

    Crystals of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer, the transducer for the cyanobacterial photosensor Anabaena sensory rhodopsin, obtained in the space groups P4, C2 and P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} diffract to 1.8, 2.1 and 2.0 Å, respectively. Phases for these crystal forms were obtained by SIRAS phasing using an iodide quick-soak derivative (P4) and molecular replacement (C2 and P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}). Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT) is a 14.7 kDa soluble signaling protein associated with the membrane-embedded light receptor Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR) from Anabaena sp., a freshwater cyanobacterium. Crystals of ASRT were obtained in three different space groups, P4, C2 and P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, which diffract to 1.8, 2.1 and 2.0 Å, respectively. Phases for one of these crystal forms (P4) were obtained by SIRAS phasing using an iodide quick-soak derivative and a partial model was built. Phases for the remaining crystal forms were obtained by molecular replacement using the partial model from the P4 crystal form.

  8. Steady state emission of the fluorescent intermediate of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin as a function of light adaptation conditions

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    Cheminal, A.; Léonard, J.; Kim, S. Y.; Jung, K.-H.; Kandori, H.; Haacke, S.

    2013-11-01

    Steady-state fluorescence measurements of the first excited state of the anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR), and Bacteriorhodopsin are reported for different light stabilization conditions, including the dark-adapted state. We determine the fluorescence spectra of both all-trans (AT), and 13-cis (13C) protonated Schiff base of retinal, and compare the effect of the proteins. Referenced against the fluorescence quantum yield of AT-bR (2.5 × 10-4) we find for AT-ASR, 13C-ASR, and 13C-bR the values of 3.3 × 10-4, 0.8 × 10-4, and 1.7 × 10-4, respectively. Using reported excited state lifetimes, the radiative rates are deduced, and their differences discussed on the basis of a configuration-dependent oscillator strength.

  9. Primary structural response in tryptophan residues of Anabaena sensory rhodopsin to photochromic reactions of the retinal chromophore

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    Inada, Seisuke; Mizuno, Misao; Kato, Yoshitaka; Kawanabe, Akira; Kandori, Hideki; Wei, Zhengrong; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tahara, Tahei; Mizutani, Yasuhisa

    2013-06-01

    Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR) is a microbial rhodopsin found in eubacteria and functions as a photosensor. The photoreaction of ASR is photochromic between all-trans, 15-anti (ASRAT), and 13-cis, 15-syn (ASR13C) isomers. To understand primary protein dynamics in the photoreaction starting in ASRAT and ASR13C, picosecond time-resolved ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra were obtained. In the intermediate state appearing in the picosecond temporal region, spectral changes of Trp bands were observed. For both ASRAT and ASR13C, the intensities of the Trp bands were bleached within the instrumental response time and recovered with a time constant of 30 ps. This suggests that the rates of structural changes in the Trp residue in the vicinity of the chromophore do not depend on the direction of the isomerization of retinal. A comparison between spectra of the wild-type and Trp mutants indicates that the structures of Trp76 and Trp46 change upon the primary photoreaction of retinal.

  10. Advanced solid-state NMR techniques for characterization of membrane protein structure and dynamics: Application to Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin

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    Ward, Meaghan E.; Brown, Leonid S.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Studies of the structure, dynamics, and function of membrane proteins (MPs) have long been considered one of the main applications of solid-state NMR (SSNMR). Advances in instrumentation, and the plethora of new SSNMR methodologies developed over the past decade have resulted in a number of high-resolution structures and structural models of both bitopic and polytopic α-helical MPs. The necessity to retain lipids in the sample, the high proportion of one type of secondary structure, differential dynamics, and the possibility of local disorder in the loop regions all create challenges for structure determination. In this Perspective article we describe our recent efforts directed at determining the structure and functional dynamics of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin, a heptahelical transmembrane (7TM) protein. We review some of the established and emerging methods which can be utilized for SSNMR-based structure determination, with a particular focus on those used for ASR, a bacterial protein which shares its 7TM architecture with G-protein coupled receptors.

  11. Advanced solid-state NMR techniques for characterization of membrane protein structure and dynamics: application to Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Meaghan E; Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Studies of the structure, dynamics, and function of membrane proteins (MPs) have long been considered one of the main applications of solid-state NMR (SSNMR). Advances in instrumentation, and the plethora of new SSNMR methodologies developed over the past decade have resulted in a number of high-resolution structures and structural models of both bitopic and polytopic α-helical MPs. The necessity to retain lipids in the sample, the high proportion of one type of secondary structure, differential dynamics, and the possibility of local disorder in the loop regions all create challenges for structure determination. In this Perspective article we describe our recent efforts directed at determining the structure and functional dynamics of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin, a heptahelical transmembrane (7TM) protein. We review some of the established and emerging methods which can be utilized for SSNMR-based structure determination, with a particular focus on those used for ASR, a bacterial protein which shares its 7TM architecture with G-protein coupled receptors.

  12. The photochemical reaction cycle and photoinduced proton transfer of sensory rhodopsin II (Phoborhodopsin) from Halobacterium salinarum.

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    Tamogami, Jun; Kikukawa, Takashi; Ikeda, Yoichi; Takemura, Ayaka; Demura, Makoto; Kamo, Naoki

    2010-04-07

    Sensory rhodopsin II (HsSRII, also called phoborhodopsin) is a negative phototaxis receptor of Halobacterium salinarum, a bacterium that avoids blue-green light. In this study, we expressed the protein in Escherichia coli cells, and reconstituted the purified protein with phosphatidylcholine. The reconstituted HsSRII was stable. We examined the photocycle by flash-photolysis spectroscopy in the time range of milliseconds to seconds, and measured proton uptake/release using a transparent indium-tin oxide electrode. The pKa of the counterion of the Schiff base, Asp(73), was 3.0. Below pH 3, the depleted band was observed on flash illumination, but the positive band in the difference spectra was not found. Above pH 3, the basic photocycle was HsSRII (490) --> M (350) --> O (520) --> Y (490) --> HsSRII, where the numbers in parentheses are the maximum wavelengths. The decay rate of O-intermediate and Y-intermediate were pH-independent, whereas the M-intermediate decay was pH-dependent. For 3 decay was one phase, and the rate decreased with an increase in pH. For 4.5 decay was one phase with pH-independent rates, and azide markedly accelerated the M-decay. These findings suggest the existence of a protonated amino acid residue (X-H) that may serve as a proton relay to reprotonate the Schiff base. Above pH 6.5, the M-decay showed two phases. The fast M-decay was pH-independent and originated from the molecule having a protonated X-H, and the slow M-decay originated from the molecule having a deprotonated X, in which the proton came directly from the outside. The analysis yielded a value of 7.5 for the pKa of X-H. The proton uptake and release occurred during M-decay and O-decay, respectively.

  13. Xenorhodopsins, an enigmatic new class of microbial rhodopsins horizontally transferred between archaea and bacteria

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    Ugalde Juan A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Based on unique, coherent properties of phylogenetic analysis, key amino acid substitutions and structural modeling, we have identified a new class of unusual microbial rhodopsins related to the Anabaena sensory rhodopsin (ASR protein, including multiple homologs not previously recognized. We propose the name xenorhodopsin for this class, reflecting a taxonomically diverse membership spanning five different Bacterial phyla as well as the Euryarchaeotal class Nanohaloarchaea. The patchy phylogenetic distribution of xenorhodopsin homologs is consistent with historical dissemination through horizontal gene transfer. Shared characteristics of xenorhodopsin-containing microbes include the absence of flagellar motility and isolation from high light habitats. Reviewers: This article was reviewed by Dr. Michael Galperin and Dr. Rob Knight.

  14. Dead Sea rhodopsins revisited.

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    Bodaker, Idan; Suzuki, Marcelino T; Oren, Aharon; Béjà, Oded

    2012-12-01

    The Dead Sea is a unique hypersaline ecosystem with near toxic magnesium levels (∼2 M), dominance of divalent cations and a slightly acidic pH. Previously, we reported a haloarchaeon related to Halobacterium salinarum to dominate in a microbial bloom that developed in 1992 in the upper water layers of the lake following massive freshwater runoff. Whether this clade also dominated an earlier bloom in 1980-1982 cannot be ascertained as no samples for cultivation-independent analysis were preserved. The presence of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin was reported in the 1980-1982 bloom of prokaryotes that had developed in the Dead Sea. To test the hypothesis that bacteriorhodopsin proton pumping may play a major role in determining what type of haloarchaea may dominate in specific bloom conditions, we compared rhodopsin genes recovered from Dead Sea biomass collected in different periods with genes coding for retinal proteins in isolated haloarchaea. Novel bacteriorhodopsin and sensory rhodopsin genes were found in samples collected in 2007 and 2010. The fact that no rhodopsin genes were recovered from samples collected during the 1992 bloom, which was dominated by a single species, suggests that different clades were present in the 1980-1982 and 1992 blooms, and that bacteriorhodopsin proton pumping did not necessarily play a determinative role in the dominance of specific halophiles in the blooms.

  15. Rhodopsin 7–The unusual Rhodopsin in Drosophila

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    2016-01-01

    Rhodopsins are the major photopigments in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila express six well-characterized Rhodopsins (Rh1–Rh6) with distinct absorption maxima and expression pattern. In 2000, when the Drosophila genome was published, a novel Rhodopsin gene was discovered: Rhodopsin 7 (Rh7). Rh7 is highly conserved among the Drosophila genus and is also found in other arthropods. Phylogenetic trees based on protein sequences suggest that the seven Drosophila Rhodopsins cluster in three different groups. While Rh1, Rh2 and Rh6 form a “vertebrate-melanopsin-type”–cluster, and Rh3, Rh4 and Rh5 form an “insect-type”-Rhodopsin cluster, Rh7 seem to form its own cluster. Although Rh7 has nearly all important features of a functional Rhodopsin, it differs from other Rhodopsins in its genomic and structural properties, suggesting it might have an overall different role than other known Rhodopsins. PMID:27651995

  16. Rhodopsin 7–The unusual Rhodopsin in Drosophila

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    Pingkalai R. Senthilan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rhodopsins are the major photopigments in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila express six well-characterized Rhodopsins (Rh1–Rh6 with distinct absorption maxima and expression pattern. In 2000, when the Drosophila genome was published, a novel Rhodopsin gene was discovered: Rhodopsin 7 (Rh7. Rh7 is highly conserved among the Drosophila genus and is also found in other arthropods. Phylogenetic trees based on protein sequences suggest that the seven Drosophila Rhodopsins cluster in three different groups. While Rh1, Rh2 and Rh6 form a “vertebrate-melanopsin-type”–cluster, and Rh3, Rh4 and Rh5 form an “insect-type”-Rhodopsin cluster, Rh7 seem to form its own cluster. Although Rh7 has nearly all important features of a functional Rhodopsin, it differs from other Rhodopsins in its genomic and structural properties, suggesting it might have an overall different role than other known Rhodopsins.

  17. The Evolutionary Relationship between Microbial Rhodopsins and Metazoan Rhodopsins

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    Libing Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhodopsins are photoreceptive proteins with seven-transmembrane alpha-helices and a covalently bound retinal. Based on their protein sequences, rhodopsins can be classified into microbial rhodopsins and metazoan rhodopsins. Because there is no clearly detectable sequence identity between these two groups, their evolutionary relationship was difficult to decide. Through ancestral state inference, we found that microbial rhodopsins and metazoan rhodopsins are divergently related in their seven-transmembrane domains. Our result proposes that they are homologous proteins and metazoan rhodopsins originated from microbial rhodopsins. Structure alignment shows that microbial rhodopsins and metazoan rhodopsins share a remarkable structural homology while the position of retinal-binding lysine is different between them. It suggests that the function of photoreception was once lost during the evolution of rhodopsin genes. This result explains why there is no clearly detectable sequence similarity between the two rhodopsin groups: after losing the photoreception function, rhodopsin gene was freed from the functional constraint and the process of divergence could quickly change its original sequence beyond recognition.

  18. Binding of rhodopsin and rhodopsin analogues to transducin, rhodopsin kinase and arrestin-1

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    Nelson; A; Araujo; Carlos; E; Sanz-Rodríguez; José; Bubis

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the interaction of reconstituted rhodopsin, 9-cis-retinal-rhodopsin and 13-cis-retinal-rhodopsin with transducin, rhodopsin kinase and arrestin-1. METHODS: Rod outer segments(ROS) were isolated from bovine retinas. Following bleaching of ROS membranes with hydroxylamine, rhodopsin and rhodopsin analogues were generated with the different retinal isomers and the concentration of the reconstituted pigments was calculated from their UV/visible absorption spectra. Transducin and arrestin-1 were purified to homogeneity by column chromatography, and an enriched-fraction of rhodopsin kinase was obtainedby extracting freshly prepared ROS in the dark. The guanine nucleotide binding activity of transducin was determined by Millipore filtration using β,γ-imido-(3H)-guanosine 5’-triphosphate. Recognition of the reconstituted pigments by rhodopsin kinase was determined by autoradiography following incubation of ROS membranes containing the various regenerated pigments with partially purified rhodopsin kinase in the presence of(γ-32P) ATP. Binding of arrestin-1 to the various pigments in ROS membranes was determined by a sedimentation assay analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulphatepolyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. RESULTS: Reconstituted rhodopsin and rhodopsin analogues containing 9-cis-retinal and 13-cis-retinal rendered an absorption spectrum showing a maximum peak at 498 nm, 486 nm and about 467 nm, respectively, in the dark; which was shifted to 380 nm, 404 nm and about 425 nm, respectively, after illumination. The percentage of reconstitution of rhodopsin and the rhodopsin analogues containing 9-cis-retinal and 13-cis-retinal was estimated to be 88%, 81% and 24%, respectively. Although only residual activation of transducin was observed in the dark when reconstituted rhodopsin and 9-cis-retinal-rhodopsin was used, the rhodopsin analogue containing the 13-cis isomer of retinal was capable of activating transducin independently of light. Moreover, only a

  19. Ion-Pumping Microbial Rhodopsins

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    Hideki eKandori

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rhodopsins are light-sensing proteins used in optogenetics. The word rhodopsin originates from the Greek words rhodo and opsis, indicating rose and sight, respectively. Although the classical meaning of rhodopsin is the red-colored pigment in our eyes, the modern meaning of rhodopsin encompasses photoactive proteins containing a retinal chromophore in animals and microbes. Animal and microbial rhodopsins possess 11-cis and all-trans retinal, respectively, to capture light in seven transmembrane α-helices, and photoisomerizations into all-trans and 13-cis forms, respectively, initiate each function. Ion-transporting proteins can be found in microbial rhodopsins, such as light-gated channels and light-driven pumps, which are the main tools in optogenetics. Light-driven pumps, such as archaeal H+ pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR and Cl- pump halorhodopsin (HR, were discovered in the 1970s, and their mechanism has been extensively studied. On the other hand, different kinds of H+ and Cl- pumps have been found in marine bacteria, such as proteorhodopsin (PR and Fulvimarina pelagi rhodopsin (FR, respectively. In addition, a light-driven Na+ pump was found, Krokinobacter eikastus rhodopsin 2 (KR2. These light-driven ion-pumping microbial rhodopsins are classified as DTD, TSA, DTE, NTQ and NDQ rhodopsins for BR, HR, PR, FR and KR2, respectively. Recent understanding of ion-pumping microbial rhodopsins is reviewed in this paper.

  20. The rhodopsins: structure and function. Introduction

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    Lanyi, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    Nature makes use of the propensity of retinal for light-dependent double-bond isomerization in a number of systems and in a variety of ways. The common theme for light receptors based on this kind of chemistry is that (1) the retinal is bound in most cases to a small membrane protein via a protonated lysine-retinal Schiff base, (2) the absorption maximum in the visible is tuned to a suitable wavelength largely by electrostatic interaction with polar protein residues, and (3) the light-induced bond rotations and strains in the retinal set off reaction chains during which at least part of the excess free energy acquired is transferred to the protein and causes pK shifts of acidic residues and/or backbone conformational changes. The physiological consequence of the process initiated by absorption of light is either the activation of an information transfer chain (sensory and visual rhodopsins) or energy transduction which drives the electrogenic movement of ions across the membrane (ion-motive rhodopsins). Rhodopsins with these functions occur in bacteria and in higher organisms; from an evolutionary standpoint they are not related to one another. Nevertheless, all of these proteins are remarkably similar and form a distinct family.

  1. Structure and activation of rhodopsin

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    X Edward ZHOU; Karsten MELCHER; H Eric XU

    2012-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the first G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) with its three-dimensional structure solved by X-ray crystallography.The crystal structure of rhodopsin has revealed the molecular mechanism of photoreception and signal transduction in the visual system.Although several other GPCR crystal structures have been reported over the past few years,the rhodopsin structure remains an important model for understanding the structural and functional characteristics of other GPCRs.This review summarizes the structural features,the photoactivation,and the G protein signal transduction of rhodopsin.

  2. Rhodopsin expression level affects rod outer segment morphology and photoresponse kinetics.

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    Clint L Makino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The retinal rod outer segment is a sensory cilium that is specialized for the conversion of light into an electrical signal. Within the cilium, up to several thousand membranous disks contain as many as a billion copies of rhodopsin for efficient photon capture. Disks are continually turned over, requiring the daily synthesis of a prodigious amount of rhodopsin. To promote axial diffusion in the aqueous cytoplasm, the disks have one or more incisures. Across vertebrates, the range of disk diameters spans an order of magnitude, and the number and length of the incisures vary considerably, but the mechanisms controlling disk architecture are not well understood. The finding that transgenic mice overexpressing rhodopsin have enlarged disks lacking an incisure prompted us to test whether lowered rhodopsin levels constrain disk assembly. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The structure and function of rods from hemizygous rhodopsin knockout (R+/- mice with decreased rhodopsin expression were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and single cell recording. R+/- rods were structurally altered in three ways: disk shape changed from circular to elliptical, disk surface area decreased, and the single incisure lengthened to divide the disk into two sections. Photocurrent responses to flashes recovered more rapidly than normal. A spatially resolved model of phototransduction indicated that changes in the packing densities of rhodopsin and other transduction proteins were responsible. The decrease in aqueous outer segment volume and the lengthened incisure had only minor effects on photon response amplitude and kinetics. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Rhodopsin availability limits disk assembly and outer segment girth in normal rods. The incisure may buffer the supply of structural proteins needed to form larger disks. Decreased rhodopsin level accelerated photoresponse kinetics by increasing the rates of molecular collisions on the membrane

  3. Evolution of rhodopsin ion pumps in haloarchaea

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    Ford Doolittle W

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The type 1 (microbial rhodopsins are a diverse group of photochemically reactive proteins that display a broad yet patchy distribution among the three domains of life. Recent work indicates that this pattern is likely the result of lateral gene transfer (LGT of rhodopsin genes between major lineages, and even across domain boundaries. Within the lineage in which the microbial rhodopsins were initially discovered, the haloarchaea, a similar patchy distribution is observed. In this initial study, we assess the roles of LGT and gene loss in the evolution of haloarchaeal rhodopsin ion pump genes, using phylogenetics and comparative genomics approaches. Results Mapping presence/absence of rhodopsins onto the phylogeny of the RNA polymerase B' subunit (RpoB' of the haloarchaea supports previous notions that rhodopsins are patchily distributed. The phylogeny for the bacteriorhodopsin (BR protein revealed two discrepancies in comparison to the RpoB' marker, while the halorhodopsin (HR tree showed incongruence to both markers. Comparative analyses of bacteriorhodopsin-linked regions of five haloarchaeal genomes supported relationships observed in the BR tree, and also identified two open reading frames (ORFs that were more frequently linked to the bacteriorhodopsin gene than those genes previously shown to be important to the function and expression of BR. Conclusion The evidence presented here reveals a complex evolutionary history for the haloarchaeal rhodopsins, with both LGT and gene loss contributing to the patchy distribution of rhodopsins within this group. Similarities between the BR and RpoB' phylogenies provide supportive evidence for the presence of bacteriorhodopsin in the last common ancestor of haloarchaea. Furthermore, two loci that we have designated bacterio-opsin associated chaperone (bac and bacterio-opsin associated protein (bap are inferred to have important roles in BR biogenesis based on frequent linkage and co

  4. The rice field cyanobacteria Anabaena azotica and Anabaena sp. CH1 express vanadium-dependent nitrogenase

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    Boison, G.; Steingen, C.; Stal, L.J.; Bothe, H.

    2006-01-01

    Anabaena azotica FACHB-118 and Anabaena sp. CH1, heterocystous cyanobacteria isolated from Chinese and Taiwanese rice fields, expressed vanadium-containing nitrogenase when under molybdenum deficiency. This is the second direct observation of an alternative nitrogenase in cyanobacteria. The vanadium

  5. FTIR difference and resonance Raman spectroscopy of rhodopsins with applications to optogenetics

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    Saint Clair, Erica C.

    The major aim of this thesis is to investigate the molecular basis for the function of several types of rhodopsins with special emphasis on their application to the new field of optogenetics. Rhodopsins are transmembrane biophotonic proteins with 7 alpha-helices and a retinal chromophore. Studies included Archaerhodopsin 3 (AR3), a light driven proton pump similar to the extensively studied bacteriorhodopsin (BR); channelrhodopsins 1 and 2, light-activated ion channels; sensory rhodopsin II (SRII), a light-sensing protein that modulates phototaxis used in archaebacteria; and squid rhodopsins (sRho), the major photopigment in squid vision and a model for human melanopsin, which controls circadian rhythms. The primary techniques used in these studies were FTIR difference spectroscopy and resonance Raman spectroscopy. These techniques, in combination with site directed mutagenesis and other biochemical methodologies produced new knowledge regarding the structural changes of the retinal chromophore, the location and function of internal water molecules as well as specific amino acids and peptide backbone. Specialized techniques were developed that allowed rhodopsins to be studied in intact membrane environments and in some cases in vivo measurements were made on rhodopsin heterologously expressed in E. coli thus allowing the effects of interacting proteins and membrane potential to be investigated. Evidence was found that the local environment of one or more internal water molecules in SRII is altered by interaction with its cognate transducer, HtrII, and is also affected by the local lipid environment. In the case of AR3, many of the broad IR continuum absorption changes below 3000 cm -1, assigned to networks of water molecules involved in proton transport through cytoplasmic and extracellular portions in BR, were found to be very similar to BR. Bands assigned to water molecules near the Schiff base postulated to be involved in proton transport were, however, shifted

  6. Carboxyl terminal of rhodopsin kinase is required for the phosphorylation of photo—activated rhodopsin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUQINGMING; LANMA; 等

    1998-01-01

    Human rhodopsin kinase (RK) and a carboxyl terminus-truncated mutant RK lacking the last 59 amino acids (RKC) were expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells to investigate the role of the carboxyl terminus of RK in recognition and phosphorylation of rhodopsin.RKC,like the wild-type RK,was detected in both plasma membranes and cytosolic fractions.The Cterminal truncated rhodopsin kinase was unable to phosphorylate photo-activated rhodopsin,but possesses kinase activity similar to the wild-type RK in phosphorylation of small peptide substrate.It suggests that the truncation did not disturb the gross structures of RK catalytic domain.Our results also show that RKC failed to translocate to photo-activated rod out segments.Taken together,our study demonstrate the carboxyl terminus of RK is required for phosphorylation of photo-activated rhodopsin and strongly indicate that carboxyl-terminus of RK may be involved in interaction with photo-activated rhodopsin.

  7. Spectral Tuning of Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Rhodopsin: Evidence for Positive Selection and Functional Adaptation in a Cetacean Visual Pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungan, Sarah Z; Kosyakov, Alexander; Chang, Belinda S W

    2016-02-01

    Cetaceans have undergone a remarkable evolutionary transition that was accompanied by many sensory adaptations, including modification of the visual system for underwater environments. Recent sequencing of cetacean genomes has made it possible to begin exploring the molecular basis of these adaptations. In this study we use in vitro expression methods to experimentally characterize the first step of the visual transduction cascade, the light activation of rhodopsin, for the killer whale. To investigate the spectral effects of amino acid substitutions thought to correspond with absorbance shifts relative to terrestrial mammals, we used the orca gene as a background for the first site-directed mutagenesis experiments in a cetacean rhodopsin. The S292A mutation had the largest effect, and was responsible for the majority of the spectral difference between killer whale and bovine (terrestrial) rhodopsin. Using codon-based likelihood models, we also found significant evidence for positive selection in cetacean rhodopsin sequences, including on spectral tuning sites we experimentally mutated. We then investigated patterns of ecological divergence that may be correlated with rhodopsin functional variation by using a series of clade models that partitioned the data set according to phylogeny, habitat, and foraging depth zone. Only the model partitioning according to depth was significant. This suggests that foraging dives might be a selective regime influencing cetacean rhodopsin divergence, and our experimental results indicate that spectral tuning may be playing an adaptive role in this process. Our study demonstrates that combining computational and experimental methods is crucial for gaining insight into the selection pressures underlying molecular evolution.

  8. Influence of arrestin on the photodecay of bovine rhodopsin**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Deep; Eckert, Carl Elias; Slavov, Chavdar; Saxena, Krishna; Fürtig, Boris; Sanders, Charles R.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.; Wachtveitl, Josef; Schwalbe, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Continued activation of the photocycle of the dim-light receptor rhodopsin leads to accumulation of all-trans-retinal in rod outer segments (ROS). This accumulation can damage the photoreceptor cell. For retinal homeostasis, deactivation processes are initiated in which the release of retinal is delayed. One of the processes involves binding of arrestin to rhodopsin. Here, we investigate the interaction of pre-activated truncated bovine visual arrestin (Tr) with rhodopsin in 1,2-diheptanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC) micelles by solution NMR techniques and flash photolysis spectroscopy. Our results show that formation of the rhodopsin-arrestin complex markedly influences partitioning in the decay kinetics of rhodopsin that involves the simultaneous formation of meta II state and meta III state from the meta I state. Binding of Tr leads to an increase of meta III state population and consequently to a ~2-fold slower release of all-trans-retinal from rhodopsin. PMID:26383645

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. 33047

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the complete nucleotide sequence of Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047 (Anabaena CA), a filamentous, nitrogen-fixing marine cyanobacterium, which under salt stress conditions accumulates sucrose internally. The elucidation of the genome will contribute to the understanding of cyanobacterial diversity. PMID:27516507

  10. Archaebacterial rhodopsin sequences: Implications for evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1991-01-01

    It was proposed over 10 years ago that the archaebacteria represent a separate kingdom which diverged very early from the eubacteria and eukaryotes. It follows that investigations of archaebacterial characteristics might reveal features of early evolution. So far, two genes, one for bacteriorhodopsin and another for halorhodopsin, both from Halobacterium halobium, have been sequenced. We cloned and sequenced the gene coding for the polypeptide of another one of these rhodopsins, a halorhodopsin in Natronobacterium pharaonis. Peptide sequencing of cyanogen bromide fragments, and immuno-reactions of the protein and synthetic peptides derived from the C-terminal gene sequence, confirmed that the open reading frame was the structural gene for the pharaonis halorhodopsin polypeptide. The flanking DNA sequences of this gene, as well as those of other bacterial rhodopsins, were compared to previously proposed archaebacterial consensus sequences. In pairwise comparisons of the open reading frame with DNA sequences for bacterio-opsin and halo-opsin from Halobacterium halobium, silent divergences were calculated. These indicate very considerable evolutionary distance between each pair of genes, even in the dame organism. In spite of this, three protein sequences show extensive similarities, indicating strong selective pressures.

  11. Recent advances in engineering microbial rhodopsins for optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIsaac, R Scott; Bedbrook, Claire N; Arnold, Frances H

    2015-08-01

    Protein engineering of microbial rhodopsins has been successful in generating variants with improved properties for applications in optogenetics. Members of this membrane protein family can act as both actuators and sensors of neuronal activity. Chimeragenesis, structure-guided mutagenesis, and directed evolution have proven effective strategies for tuning absorption wavelength, altering ion specificity and increasing fluorescence. These approaches facilitate the development of useful optogenetic tools and, in some cases, have yielded insights into rhodopsin structure-function relationships.

  12. Unusual radioresistance of nitrogen-fixing cultures of Anabaena strains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Harinder Singh; Tonina Fernandes; Shree Kumar Apte

    2010-09-01

    Nitrogen-fixing cultures of two species of the filamentous, heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena, namely Anabaena sp. strain L-31 and Anabaena torulosa were found to be highly tolerant to 60Co gamma radiation. No adverse effect on diazotrophic growth and metabolism were observed up to a dose of 5 kGy. At higher doses, radiation tolerance showed a correspondence with the inherent osmotolerance, with Anabaena L-31 being the more radiation tolerant as well as osmotolerant strain. In Anabaena L-31, exposure to 6 kGy of gamma rays resulted in genome disintegration, but did not reduce viability. Irradiation delayed heterocyst differentiation and nitrogen fixation, and marginally affected diazotrophic growth. All the affected parameters recovered after a short lag, without any discernible post-irradiation phenotype. The radiation tolerance of these Gram-negative photoautodiazotrophs is comparable with that of the adiazotrophic photoautotrophic cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis or adiazotrophic heterotroph Deinococcus radiodurans. This is the first report of extreme radioresistance in nitrogen-fixing Anabaena cultures.

  13. Dimerization deficiency of enigmatic retinitis pigmentosa-linked rhodopsin mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploier, Birgit; Caro, Lydia N.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Pandey, Kalpana; Pearring, Jillian N.; Goren, Michael A.; Finnemann, Silvia C.; Graumann, Johannes; Arshavsky, Vadim Y.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-10-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a blinding disease often associated with mutations in rhodopsin, a light-sensing G protein-coupled receptor and phospholipid scramblase. Most RP-associated mutations affect rhodopsin's activity or transport to disc membranes. Intriguingly, some mutations produce apparently normal rhodopsins that nevertheless cause disease. Here we show that three such enigmatic mutations--F45L, V209M and F220C--yield fully functional visual pigments that bind the 11-cis retinal chromophore, activate the G protein transducin, traffic to the light-sensitive photoreceptor compartment and scramble phospholipids. However, tests of scramblase activity show that unlike wild-type rhodopsin that functionally reconstitutes into liposomes as dimers or multimers, F45L, V209M and F220C rhodopsins behave as monomers. This result was confirmed in pull-down experiments. Our data suggest that the photoreceptor pathology associated with expression of these enigmatic RP-associated pigments arises from their unexpected inability to dimerize via transmembrane helices 1 and 5.

  14. A Novel Rhodopsin Gene from Octopus vulgaris for Optobioelectronics Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zhgun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The unique photochromic retinal protein from rhabdomeric octopus membranes – octopus rhodopsin (OctR has emerged as promising material for biomolecular photonic applications due to its unique properties and advantages. Here we report isolation of the novel full length octR gene from retina cDNA of Octopus vulgaris eyes and its sequence comparison with rhodopsins of other cephalopods and vertebrates. The isolated gene can be used to develop various expression systems for production of recombinant OctR for structural studies and novel optobioelectronic applications. The alignment of amino acid (a.a. sequence with different opsins revealed similarity to cephalopoda rhodopsins (Rho and to human melanopsin from intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. The alingment of OctR a.a. sequence with mammalian and cephalopoda Rho with known 3D structures revealed promising substitutions V2C and W292C for developing stable and functionally active recombinant OctR after heterologous expression.

  15. On the origins of arrestin and rhodopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez Carlos E

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are the most numerous proteins in mammalian genomes, and the most common targets of clinical drugs. However, their evolution remains enigmatic. GPCRs are intimately associated with trimeric G proteins, G protein receptor kinases, and arrestins. We conducted phylogenetic studies to reconstruct the history of arrestins. Those findings, in turn, led us to investigate the origin of the photosensory GPCR rhodopsin. Results We found that the arrestin clan is comprised of the Spo0M protein family in archaea and bacteria, and the arrestin and Vps26 families in eukaryotes. The previously known animal arrestins are members of the visual/beta subfamily, which branched from the founding "alpha" arrestins relatively recently. Curiously, we identified both the oldest visual/beta arrestin and opsin genes in Cnidaria (but not in sponges. The arrestin clan has 14 human members: 6 alphas, 4 visual/betas, and 4 Vps26 genes. Others recently showed that the 3D structure of mammalian Vps26 and the biochemical function of the yeast alpha arrestin PalF are similar to those of beta arrestins. We note that only alpha arrestins have PY motifs (known to bind WW domains in their C-terminal tails, and only visual/betas have helix I in the Arrestin N domain. Conclusion We identified ciliary opsins in Cnidaria and propose this subfamily is ancestral to all previously known animal opsins. That finding is consistent with Darwin's theory that eyes evolved once, and lends some support to Parker's hypothesis that vision triggered the Cambrian explosion of life forms. Our arrestin findings have implications on the evolution of GPCR signaling, and on the biological roles of human alpha arrestins.

  16. Electronic and spatial characteristics of the retinylidene chromophore in rhodopsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Michiel Adriaan

    2005-01-01

    The G protein coupled receptor rhodopsin was characterised by physical chemical methods like solid-state NMR, FTIR and UV/Vis spectroscopy. Goal of the research was to determine the impact of steric and electronic properties of the retinal ligand on the rate and efficiency of the photochemical react

  17. Structure of plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager; Harris, Pernille

    2006-01-01

    Plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis was heterologously produced in E. coli and purified. Plate-like crystals were obtained by crystallisation in 1.15 M trisodium citrate and 7.67 mM sodium borate buffer pH 8.5. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P212121...

  18. Rhodopsin kinase and arrestin binding control the decay of photoactivated rhodopsin and dark adaptation of mouse rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Rikard; Nymark, Soile; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Berry, Justin D; Adler, Leopold; Koutalos, Yiannis; Kefalov, Vladimir J; Cornwall, M Carter

    2016-07-01

    Photoactivation of vertebrate rhodopsin converts it to the physiologically active Meta II (R*) state, which triggers the rod light response. Meta II is rapidly inactivated by the phosphorylation of C-terminal serine and threonine residues by G-protein receptor kinase (Grk1) and subsequent binding of arrestin 1 (Arr1). Meta II exists in equilibrium with the more stable inactive form of rhodopsin, Meta III. Dark adaptation of rods requires the complete thermal decay of Meta II/Meta III into opsin and all-trans retinal and the subsequent regeneration of rhodopsin with 11-cis retinal chromophore. In this study, we examine the regulation of Meta III decay by Grk1 and Arr1 in intact mouse rods and their effect on rod dark adaptation. We measure the rates of Meta III decay in isolated retinas of wild-type (WT), Grk1-deficient (Grk1(-/-)), Arr1-deficient (Arr1(-/-)), and Arr1-overexpressing (Arr1(ox)) mice. We find that in WT mouse rods, Meta III peaks ∼6 min after rhodopsin activation and decays with a time constant (τ) of 17 min. Meta III decay slows in Arr1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼27 min), whereas it accelerates in Arr1(ox) rods (τ of ∼8 min) and Grk1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼13 min). In all cases, regeneration of rhodopsin with exogenous 11-cis retinal is rate limited by the decay of Meta III. Notably, the kinetics of rod dark adaptation in vivo is also modulated by the levels of Arr1 and Grk1. We conclude that, in addition to their well-established roles in Meta II inactivation, Grk1 and Arr1 can modulate the kinetics of Meta III decay and rod dark adaptation in vivo.

  19. Marine Bacterial and Archaeal Ion-Pumping Rhodopsins: Genetic Diversity, Physiology, and Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhassi, Jarone; DeLong, Edward F; Béjà, Oded; González, José M; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    The recognition of a new family of rhodopsins in marine planktonic bacteria, proton-pumping proteorhodopsin, expanded the known phylogenetic range, environmental distribution, and sequence diversity of retinylidene photoproteins. At the time of this discovery, microbial ion-pumping rhodopsins were known solely in haloarchaea inhabiting extreme hypersaline environments. Shortly thereafter, proteorhodopsins and other light-activated energy-generating rhodopsins were recognized to be widespread among marine bacteria. The ubiquity of marine rhodopsin photosystems now challenges prior understanding of the nature and contributions of "heterotrophic" bacteria to biogeochemical carbon cycling and energy fluxes. Subsequent investigations have focused on the biophysics and biochemistry of these novel microbial rhodopsins, their distribution across the tree of life, evolutionary trajectories, and functional expression in nature. Later discoveries included the identification of proteorhodopsin genes in all three domains of life, the spectral tuning of rhodopsin variants to wavelengths prevailing in the sea, variable light-activated ion-pumping specificities among bacterial rhodopsin variants, and the widespread lateral gene transfer of biosynthetic genes for bacterial rhodopsins and their associated photopigments. Heterologous expression experiments with marine rhodopsin genes (and associated retinal chromophore genes) provided early evidence that light energy harvested by rhodopsins could be harnessed to provide biochemical energy. Importantly, some studies with native marine bacteria show that rhodopsin-containing bacteria use light to enhance growth or promote survival during starvation. We infer from the distribution of rhodopsin genes in diverse genomic contexts that different marine bacteria probably use rhodopsins to support light-dependent fitness strategies somewhere between these two extremes.

  20. Rhodopsin Forms Nanodomains in Rod Outer Segment Disc Membranes of the Cold-Blooded Xenopus laevis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatini Rakshit

    Full Text Available Rhodopsin forms nanoscale domains (i.e., nanodomains in rod outer segment disc membranes from mammalian species. It is unclear whether rhodopsin arranges in a similar manner in amphibian species, which are often used as a model system to investigate the function of rhodopsin and the structure of photoreceptor cells. Moreover, since samples are routinely prepared at low temperatures, it is unclear whether lipid phase separation effects in the membrane promote the observed nanodomain organization of rhodopsin from mammalian species. Rod outer segment disc membranes prepared from the cold-blooded frog Xenopus laevis were investigated by atomic force microscopy to visualize the organization of rhodopsin in the absence of lipid phase separation effects. Atomic force microscopy revealed that rhodopsin nanodomains form similarly as that observed previously in mammalian membranes. Formation of nanodomains in ROS disc membranes is independent of lipid phase separation and conserved among vertebrates.

  1. A Photoisomerizing Rhodopsin Mimic Observed at Atomic Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Meisam; Berbasova, Tetyana; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak; Geiger, James H

    2016-07-20

    The members of the rhodopsin family of proteins are involved in many essential light-dependent processes in biology. Specific photoisomerization of the protein-bound retinylidene PSB at a specified wavelength range of light is at the heart of all of these systems. Nonetheless, it has been difficult to reproduce in an engineered system. We have developed rhodopsin mimics, using intracellular lipid binding protein family members as scaffolds, to study fundamental aspects of protein/chromophore interactions. Herein we describe a system that specifically isomerizes the retinylidene protonated Schiff base both thermally and photochemically. This isomerization has been characterized at atomic resolution by quantitatively interconverting the isomers in the crystal both thermally and photochemically. This event is accompanied by a large pKa change of the imine similar to the pKa changes observed in bacteriorhodopsin and visual opsins during isomerization.

  2. Origin of Fluorescence in 11-cis Locked Bovine Rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laricheva, Elena N; Gozem, Samer; Rinaldi, Silvia; Melaccio, Federico; Valentini, Alessio; Olivucci, Massimo

    2012-08-14

    The excited state lifetime of bovine rhodopsin (Rh) increases from ca. 100 fs to 85 ps when the C11═C12 bond of its chromophore is locked by a cyclopentene moiety (Rh5). To explain such an increase, we employed ab initio multiconfigurational quantum chemistry to construct computer models of Rh and Rh5 and to investigate the shape of their excited state potential energy surfaces in a comparative way. Our results show that the observed Rh5 fluorescence (λmax(f) = 620 nm) is due to a previously unreported locally excited intermediate whose lifetime is controlled by a small energy barrier. The analysis of the properties and decay path of such an intermediate provides useful information for engineering rhodopsin variants with augmented fluorescence efficiencies.

  3. Rhodopsin Kinase Activity in the Mammalian Pineal Gland and Other Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Robert L.; Klein, David C.

    1984-10-01

    Rhodopsin kinase, an enzyme involved in photochemical transduction in the retina, has been found in the mammalian pineal gland in amounts equal to those in the retina; other tissues had 7 percent of this amount, or less. This finding suggests that, in mammals, rhodopsin kinase functions in the pineal gland and other tissues to phosphorylate rhodopsin-like integral membrane receptors and is thereby involved in signal transduction.

  4. Mass genetics study of rhodopsin point mutations in retinitis pigmentosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-li; YIN Zheng-qin; ZHANG Xue; FU Wei-ling

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the incidence and pattern of rhodopsin (RHO) mutations in Chinese patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods: Conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) and direct DNA sequencing were applied to detect point mutations that occurred in the five coding exous and splice sites of RHO gene in 98 index patients with RP. Results: Four patients of one ADRP family were found to have a missense mutation at codon 347, Pro347Leu. One late-onset RP patient and her daughter, without clinical expression at present, were discovered to have a novel frameshift mutation at codon 327, Pro327 ( 1-bp del). Neither of the two mutations was found in 100 normal controls. Ala299Ser was found in one RP patient. Two control subjects also had Ala299Ser, suggesting its nonpathogenicity and just single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Conclusion: Two RP patients had rhodopsin mutations, thus the expected frequency of RHO mutations in RP is about 2.0% (95% confidence interval: 0.3% - 4.4% ). A highly conserved C-terminal sequence QVS (A)PA was altered due to Pro347Leu and thereby misdirecting rhodopsin to incorrect subcellular location. Loss of all phosphorylation sites at the C-terminus and a highly conserved sequence QVS(A)PA may occur because of Pro327( 1-bp del). To elucidate the predominant biochemical defects in such mutant, transgenic mice and transfected culture cells carrying Pro327( 1-bp del) would be of great value.

  5. Complete genome sequence of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiel, Teresa [University of Missouri, St. Louis; Pratte, Brenda S. [University of Missouri, St. Louis; Zhong, Jinshun [University of Missouri, St. Louis; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2013-01-01

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium that has served as a model organism, with an extensive literature extending over 40 years. The strain has three distinct nitrogenases that function under different environmental conditions and is capable of photoautotrophic growth in the light and true heterotrophic growth in the dark using fructose as both carbon and energy source. While this strain was first isolated in 1964 in Mississippi and named Ana-baena flos-aquae MSU A-37, it clusters phylogenetically with cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc. The strain is a moderate thermophile, growing well at approximately 40 C. Here we provide some additional characteristics of the strain, and an analysis of the complete genome sequence.

  6. UV-inducible DNA repair in the cyanobacteria Anabaena spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, E.; Thiel, T

    1987-01-01

    Strains of the filamentous cyanobacteria Anabaena spp. were capable of very efficient photoreactivation of UV irradiation-induced damage to DNA. Cells were resistant to several hundred joules of UV irradiation per square meter under conditions that allowed photoreactivation, and they also photoreactivated UV-damaged cyanophage efficiently. Reactivation of UV-irradiated cyanophage (Weigle reactivation) also occurred; UV irradiation of host cells greatly enhanced the plaque-forming ability of i...

  7. Competition for phosphorus between the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria Anabaena and Aphanizomenon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeNobel, WT; Snoep, JL; Mur, LR

    1997-01-01

    The influence of Na fixation on the P-limited growth of two strains of Anabaena and Aphanizomenon was investigated using continuous cultures. Under N-2-fixing conditions Anabaena had a higher maximum growth rate, a greater affinity for P, a higher yield on P and a higher N-2 fixation activity than A

  8. Production of cyanopeptolins, anabaenopeptins, and microcystins by the harmful cyanobacteria Anabaena 90 and Microcystis PCC 7806

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Tonk; M. Welker; J. Huisman; P.M. Visser

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of light intensity, temperature, and phosphorus limitation on the peptide production of the cyanobacteria Microcystis PCC 7806 and Anabaena 90. Microcystis PCC 7806 produced two microcystin variants and three cyanopeptolins, whereas Anabaena 90 produced four micro

  9. 中国鱼腥藻属的八个新记录种%EIGHT NEWLY RECORDED SPECIES OF ANABAENA BORY (NOSTOCACEAE, CYANOPHYTA) FROM CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丽; 虞功亮; 李仁辉

    2009-01-01

    menioides Forti 1912、伯氏鱼腥藻Anabaena bergii Ostenfeld 1908、乌克兰鱼腥藻Anabaena ucrainica(Schkorb.)Watanabe 1996、大湖鱼腥藻Anabaena oumiana Watanabe 1996和真紧密鱼腥藻Anabaena eucompacta Li et Watanabe 1999.

  10. Optical control of a rhodopsin-based switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovryn, Ben; Li, Xiang; Chiel, Hillel; Herlitze, Stefan

    2004-07-01

    A preliminary result supports the feasibility of using visible light to modulate the membrane potential of a cell. Human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) were transfected with vertebrate rhodopsin and a gradient inward rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel. Whole cell patch clamp recordings of HEK293 cells exposed to 9-cis retinal showed that illumination increases the potassium current compared with recordings obtained in the dark. When combined with a rapid scanning device, this approach has the potential to control the activity of many neurons.

  11. Rhodopsin 7 and Cryptochrome - circadian photoreception in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Kistenpfennig, Christa

    2012-01-01

    Many organisms evolved an endogenous clock to adapt to the daily environmental changes caused by the earth’s rotation. Light is the primary time cue (“Zeitgeber”) for entrainment of circadian clocks to the external 24-h day. In Drosophila, several visual pigments are known to mediate synchronization to light: The blue-light photopigment Cryptochrome (CRY) and six well-described rhodopsins (Rh1-Rh6). CRY is present in the majority of clock neurons as well as in the compound eyes, whereas the l...

  12. Biodegradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by the novel identified cyanobacterium Anabaena PD-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hangjun; Jiang, Xiaojun; Lu, Liping; Xiao, Wenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a class of hazardous pollutants, are difficult to dissipate in the natural environment. In this study, a cyanobacterial strain Anabaena PD-1 showed good resistance against PCB congeners. Compared to a control group, chlorophyll a content decreased 3.7% and 11.7% when Anabaena PD-1 was exposed to 2 and 5 mg/L PCBs for 7 d. This cyanobacterial strain was capable of decomposing PCB congeners which was conclusively proved by determination of chloride ion concentrations in chlorine-free medium. After 7 d, the chloride ion concentrations in PCB-treated groups (1, 2, 5 mg/L) were 3.55, 3.05, and 2.25 mg/L, respectively. The genetic information of strain PD-1 was obtained through 16S rRNA sequencing analysis. The GenBank accession number of 16S rRNA of Anabaena PD-1 was KF201693.1. Phylogenetic tree analysis clearly indicated that Anabaena PD-1 belonged to the genus Anabaena. The degradation half-life of Aroclor 1254 by Anabaena PD-1 was 11.36 d; the total degradation rate for Aroclor 1254 was 84.4% after 25 d. Less chlorinated PCB congeners were more likely to be degraded by Anabaena PD-1 in comparison with highly chlorinated congeners. Meta- and para-chlorines in trichlorodiphenyls and tetrachlorobiphenyls were more susceptible to dechlorination than ortho-chlorines during the PCB-degradation process by Anabaena PD-1. Furthermore, Anabaena PD-1 can decompose dioxin-like PCBs. The percent biodegradation of 12 dioxin-like PCBs by strain PD-1 ranged from 37.4% to 68.4% after 25 days. Results above demonstrate that Anabaena PD-1 is a PCB-degrader with great potential for the in situ bioremediation of PCB-contaminated paddy soils.

  13. Biodegradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs by the novel identified cyanobacterium Anabaena PD-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangjun Zhang

    Full Text Available Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, a class of hazardous pollutants, are difficult to dissipate in the natural environment. In this study, a cyanobacterial strain Anabaena PD-1 showed good resistance against PCB congeners. Compared to a control group, chlorophyll a content decreased 3.7% and 11.7% when Anabaena PD-1 was exposed to 2 and 5 mg/L PCBs for 7 d. This cyanobacterial strain was capable of decomposing PCB congeners which was conclusively proved by determination of chloride ion concentrations in chlorine-free medium. After 7 d, the chloride ion concentrations in PCB-treated groups (1, 2, 5 mg/L were 3.55, 3.05, and 2.25 mg/L, respectively. The genetic information of strain PD-1 was obtained through 16S rRNA sequencing analysis. The GenBank accession number of 16S rRNA of Anabaena PD-1 was KF201693.1. Phylogenetic tree analysis clearly indicated that Anabaena PD-1 belonged to the genus Anabaena. The degradation half-life of Aroclor 1254 by Anabaena PD-1 was 11.36 d; the total degradation rate for Aroclor 1254 was 84.4% after 25 d. Less chlorinated PCB congeners were more likely to be degraded by Anabaena PD-1 in comparison with highly chlorinated congeners. Meta- and para-chlorines in trichlorodiphenyls and tetrachlorobiphenyls were more susceptible to dechlorination than ortho-chlorines during the PCB-degradation process by Anabaena PD-1. Furthermore, Anabaena PD-1 can decompose dioxin-like PCBs. The percent biodegradation of 12 dioxin-like PCBs by strain PD-1 ranged from 37.4% to 68.4% after 25 days. Results above demonstrate that Anabaena PD-1 is a PCB-degrader with great potential for the in situ bioremediation of PCB-contaminated paddy soils.

  14. Femtosecond Laser Spectroscopy of the Rhodopsin Photochromic Reaction: A Concept for Ultrafast Optical Molecular Switch Creation (Ultrafast Reversible Photoreaction of Rhodopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Smitienko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast reverse photoreaction of visual pigment rhodopsin in the femtosecond time range at room temperature is demonstrated. Femtosecond two-pump probe experiments with a time resolution of 25 fs have been performed. The first рump pulse at 500 nm initiated cis-trans photoisomerization of rhodopsin chromophore, 11-cis retinal, which resulted in the formation of the primary ground-state photoproduct within a mere 200 fs. The second pump pulse at 620 nm with a varying delay of 200 to 3750 fs relative to the first рump pulse, initiated the reverse phototransition of the primary photoproduct to rhodopsin. The results of this photoconversion have been observed on the differential spectra obtained after the action of two pump pulses at a time delay of 100 ps. It was found that optical density decreased at 560 nm in the spectral region of bathorhodopsin absorption and increased at 480 nm, where rhodopsin absorbs. Rhodopsin photoswitching efficiency shows oscillations as a function of the time delay between two рump pulses. The quantum yield of reverse photoreaction initiated by the second pump pulse falls within the range 15% ± 1%. The molecular mechanism of the ultrafast reversible photoreaction of visual pigment rhodopsin may be used as a concept for the development of an ultrafast optical molecular switch.

  15. Nuclear Wavepacket Propogation Model for the Retinal Chromophore in Rhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn, Brittany; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2009-05-01

    Rhodopsin, consisting of a retinal chromophore and a protein opsin, is responsible for the first steps in the vision process through a cis to trans photoisomerization, which is completed within 200 fs[1]. Efforts to control the ultrafast dynamics of this molecule have been carried out experimentally[2] as well as through quantum mechanical modeling of nuclear wave packet propagation[3]. We propose a two state model in which the ground electronic Potential Energy Surface (PES) is made up of two adjacent harmonic potentials, representing the cis and trans retinal saddle points, as well as an excited PES, characterized by the Morse potential, which meets the ground PES at a conical intersection. We explore the achievement of a high quantum yield of the trans retinal configuration by varying parameters of the external field and choosing the most adequate shape. Another investigation is presented in which we compare the charge distribution of cis and trans retinal in order to reveal a charge transfer mechanism behind the isomerization of rhodopsin. The results of the Lowdin and Natural Population Analyses demonstrate a significant transfer of charge in and around the isomerization region. [1] RW Schoenlein, LA Peteanu, RA Mathies, CV Shank, Science 254, 412 (1991) [2] VI Prokhorenko, AM Nagy, SA Waschuk, LS Brown, RR Birge, RJD Miller, Science 313, 1257 (2006) [3] S Hahn, G Stock, Chem Phys 259, 297-312 (2000)

  16. Environmental and nutritional factors affecting geosmin synthesis by Anabaena sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadoun, I M; Schrader, K K; Blevins, W T

    2001-04-01

    A cyanobacterium isolated from a source-water reservoir during a spring odor and taste episode and identified as Anabaena sp. consistently produced geosmin during laboratory culture on modified BG-11 liquid medium. Maximal geosmin/biomass occurred at 20 degrees C and a light intensity of 17 microE/m2/s; geosmin/chla values directly correlated with increasing light intensity (r2 = 0.95, P geosmin synthesis; at 17 microE/m2/s, increasing temperature stimulates chla production (to 25 degrees C) while repressing geosmin synthesis (above 20 degrees C). Nutritional factors promoting biomass, chla, and geosmin synthesis by Anabaena sp. were also investigated. For cultures grown at 17 microE/m2/s and 20 degrees C for 20 days, both ammonium-N and nitrate-N generally enhanced the growth of Anabaena sp. Nitrate-N promoted more chla production (r2 = 0.99) than ammonium-N. Geosmin synthesis was directly correlated with ammonium-N concentrations (r2 = 0.89), with low nitrate-N (123.5 micrograms/l) favoring maximal geosmin production (2.8 micrograms/l). Increasing nitrate-N concentrations promoted a three-fold increase in chla content with geosmin synthesis decreased by two-fold. Geosmin/mg biomass was directly related to ammonium-N concentration; high nitrate-N levels suppressed geosmin production. No geosmin was detected at or below 118 micrograms phosphate-phosphorus/l. Geosmin, dry weight biomass, and chla production were correlated with increasing phosphorus (P) concentration (r2 = 0.76, 0.96 and 0.98, respectively). No geosmin was detected when copper was present in growth media at or above 6.92 micrograms Cu2+/l (CuSO4.5H2O). Dry weight biomass and chla production were negatively correlated with Cu2+ ion concentrations.

  17. New Anabaena and Nostoc cyanophages from sewage settling ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, N.; Thiel, T.; Giddings, T.H., Jr.; Wolk, C.P.

    1981-10-15

    We have isolated, from sewage settling ponds, 16 cyanophages for heterocyst forming, filamentous cyanobacteria of the genera Anabaena and Nostoc. These phages fall into three groups based on morphology, host range, one-step growth curves, and restriction digests. On the basis of these criteria they can be distinguished from cyanophages A-1(L), A-4(L), N-1, and AN-10 which we received from other laboratories. Certain of the newly described phages are similar in morphology to the short-tailed LPP cyanophages, and others to the long-tailed AS cyanophages.

  18. Regulation of Development and Nitrogen Fixation in Anabaena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James W. Golden

    2008-10-17

    The regulation of development and cellular differentiation is important for all multicellular organisms. The nitrogen-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena (also Nostoc) sp. PCC 7120 (hereafter Anabaena) provides a model of multicellular microbial development and pattern formation. Anabaena reduces N2 to ammonia in specialized terminally differentiated cells called heterocysts. A one-dimensional developmental pattern of single heterocysts regularly spaced along filaments of photosynthetic vegetative cells is established to form a multicellular organism composed of these two interdependent cell types. This multicellular growth pattern, the distinct phylogeny of cyanobacteria, and the suspected antiquity of heterocyst development make this an important model system. Our long-term goal is to understand the regulatory network required for heterocyst development and nitrogen fixation. This project is focused on two key aspects of heterocyst regulation: one, the mechanism by which HetR controls the initiation of differentiation, and two, the cis and trans acting factors required for expression of the nitrogen-fixation (nif) genes. HetR is thought to be a central regulator of heterocyst development but the partners and mechanisms involved in this regulation are unknown. Our recent results indicate that PatS and other signals that regulate heterocyst pattern cannot interact, directly or indirectly, with a R223W mutant of HetR. We plan to use biochemical and genetic approaches to identify proteins that interact with the HetR protein, which will help reveal the mechanisms underlying its regulation of development. Our second goal is to determine how the nif genes are expressed. It is important to understand the mechanisms controlling nif genes since they represent the culmination of the differentiation process and the essence of heterocyst function. The Anabaena genome lacks the genes required for expression of nif genes present in other organisms such as rpoN (sigma 54

  19. Fluorapatite as Inorganic Phosphate Source for the Cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaperdoth, I.; Brantley, S.

    2003-12-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120 is able to use fluorapatite (FAP) as sole phosphate source for growth. In the experimental setup the dissolution of FAP was tested in a phosphate free growth medium in the presence and absence of the Anabaena, as well as the cell free supernatant of an Anabaena culture. The results were compared with that of an Anabaena culture grown without fluorapatite. Parameters measured were pH, dissolved P and Ca, as well as cell density. The FAP grains were analyzed using SEM and XPS. Additionally, the differential expression of secreted proteins in cultures with and without dissolved phosphate was examined. P-limited Anabaena cultures tend to aggregate and in the presence of FAP the cells attached themselves to the mineral grains. The cultures benefit from the presence of FAP. The cells have a very effective P-uptake system that is able to take up dissolved phosphate very efficiently and draw the concentrations down to very low levels. Furthermore, the SEM analysis of FAP showed an etching of the mineral grains in the samples from the Anabaena cultures. The mechanism of apatite dissolution with and without Anabaena will be discussed in terms of these experimental observations.

  20. Coexpression of spectrally distinct rhodopsins in Aedes aegypti R7 photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobang Hu

    Full Text Available The retina of the mosquito Aedes aegypti can be divided into four regions based on the non-overlapping expression of a UV sensitive Aaop8 rhodopsin and a long wavelength sensitive Aaop2 type rhodopsin in the R7 photoreceptors. We show here that another rhodopsin, Aaop9, is expressed in all R7 photoreceptors and a subset of R8 photoreceptors. In the dorsal region, Aaop9 is expressed in both the cell body and rhabdomere of R7 and R8 cells. In other retinal regions Aaop9 is expressed only in R7 cells, being localized to the R7 rhabdomere in the central and ventral regions and in both the cell body and rhabdomere within the ventral stripe. Within the dorsal-central transition area ommatidia do not show a strict pairing of R7-R8 cell types. Thus, Aaop9 is coexpressed in the two classes of R7 photoreceptors previously distinguished by the non-overlapping expression of Aaop8 and Aaop2 rhodopsins. Electroretinogram analysis of transgenic Drosophila shows that Aaop9 is a short wavelength rhodopsin with an optimal response to 400-450 nm light. The coexpressed Aaop2 rhodopsin has dual wavelength sensitivity of 500-550 nm and near 350 nm in the UV region. As predicted by the spectral properties of each rhodopsin, Drosophila photoreceptors expressing both Aaop9 and Aaop2 rhodopsins exhibit a uniform sensitivity across the broad 350-550 nm light range. We propose that rhodopsin coexpression is an adaptation within the R7 cells to improve visual function in the low-light environments in which Ae. aegypti is active.

  1. Anabaenolysins, novel cytolytic lipopeptides from benthic Anabaena cyanobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouni Jokela

    Full Text Available Two novel cyclic lipopeptides, anabaenolysin A and anabaenolysin B, were isolated from two benthic cyanobacterial strains of the genus Anabaena. This novel class of cyanobacterial lipopeptides has a general structure of a small peptide ring consisting of four amino acids from which two are proteinogenic and two unusual; glycine(1, glycine(2, 2-(3-amino-5-oxytetrahydrofuran-2-yl-2-hydroxyacetic acid(3 and a long unsaturated C(18 β-amino acid(4 with a conjugated triene structure. They are distinguished by the presence of a conjugated dienic structure in the C18 β-amino acid present in anabaenolysin A but not in anabaenolysin B. Conjugated triene structure generates a typical UV spectrum for anabaenolysins for easy recognition. Anabaenolysin A constituted up to 400 ppm of the cyanobacterial dry weight. We found evidence of thirteen variants of anabaenolysins in one cyanobacterial strain. This suggests that the anabaenolysins are an important class of secondary metabolites in benthic Anabaena cyanobacteria. Both anabaenolysin A and B had cytolytic activity on a number of mammalian cell lines.

  2. BIODEGRADATION OF TEXTILE DYES BY Anabaena flos-aqual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigida Pimentel Villar de Queiroz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The pollution caused by dumping of toxic waste into the environment has resulted in impairment of essential natural resources such as water. With population growth and industries, the generation of waste increases substantially. Specifically, about 3,000 were commercial dyes to be carcinogenic and have no longer been manufactured, but in third world countries such as Brazil, some of these dyes high commercial value, are still in use. This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of biodegradation of dyes technical Drim CL 2 R Yellow and Blue Drim CL R. We tested the ability of degradation of these dyes by the cyanobacteria blue-green algae Anabaena flos-aqual. For this, their effectiveness in the degradation was evaluated in terms of discoloration spectrophotometrically. The blue dye was greater than R Drim CL degradation rate compared to the yellow dye Drim CL 2R. The species Anabaena flos-aqual achieved high degradation efficiency compared to blue dye, revealing a high potential applicability in processes of textile biodegradations in the county of Americana.

  3. Novel surface associated polyphosphate bodies sequester uranium in the filamentous, marine cyanobacterium, Anabaena torulosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Celin; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2013-12-01

    A filamentous, heterocystous, nitrogen-fixing marine cyanobacterium, Anabaena torulosa, has been shown to harbour surface associated, acid soluble polyphosphate bodies. Uranium immobilization by such polyphosphate bodies, reported in cyanobacteria for the first time, demonstrates a novel uranium sequestration phenomenon.

  4. Untersuchung der Rolle von Rhodopsin 7 und Cryptochrom im Sehprozess von Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Grebler, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    Ausgangspunkt für die Detektion von Licht ist im gesamten Tierreich die Absorption von Photonen durch photorezeptive Proteine, die sogenannten Opsine und in geringerem Ausmaß die Typ 1 Cryptochrome. Die Taufliege Drosophila melanogaster besitzt sechs eingehend charakterisierte, auch als Rhodopsine bezeichnete Opsine (Rh1-Rh6) und ein Cryptochrom (CRY). Neben den Ocellen und den Hofbauer-Buchner Äuglein werden die Rhodopsine in erster Linie in den Photorezeptorzellen der Komplexaugen, den Haup...

  5. Epistatic interactions influence terrestrial-marine functional shifts in cetacean rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungan, Sarah Z; Chang, Belinda S W

    2017-03-15

    Like many aquatic vertebrates, whales have blue-shifting spectral tuning substitutions in the dim-light visual pigment, rhodopsin, that are thought to increase photosensitivity in underwater environments. We have discovered that known spectral tuning substitutions also have surprising epistatic effects on another function of rhodopsin, the kinetic rates associated with light-activated intermediates. By using absorbance spectroscopy and fluorescence-based retinal release assays on heterologously expressed rhodopsin, we assessed both spectral and kinetic differences between cetaceans (killer whale) and terrestrial outgroups (hippo, bovine). Mutation experiments revealed that killer whale rhodopsin is unusually resilient to pleiotropic effects on retinal release from key blue-shifting substitutions (D83N and A292S), largely due to a surprisingly specific epistatic interaction between D83N and the background residue, S299. Ancestral sequence reconstruction indicated that S299 is an ancestral residue that predates the evolution of blue-shifting substitutions at the origins of Cetacea. Based on these results, we hypothesize that intramolecular epistasis helped to conserve rhodopsin's kinetic properties while enabling blue-shifting spectral tuning substitutions as cetaceans adapted to aquatic environments. Trade-offs between different aspects of molecular function are rarely considered in protein evolution, but in cetacean and other vertebrate rhodopsins, may underlie multiple evolutionary scenarios for the selection of specific amino acid substitutions.

  6. Rhodopsin expression in the zebrafish pineal gland from larval to adult stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnoli, Domenico; Zichichi, Rosalia; Laurà, Rosaria; Guerrera, Maria Cristina; Campo, Salvatore; de Carlos, Felix; Suárez, Alberto Álvarez; Abbate, Francesco; Ciriaco, Emilia; Vega, Jose Antonio; Germanà, Antonino

    2012-03-09

    The zebrafish pineal gland plays an important role in different physiological functions including the regulation of the circadian clock. In the fish pineal gland the pinealocytes are made up of different segments: outer segment, inner segment and basal pole. Particularly, in the outer segment the rhodopsin participates in the external environment light reception that represents the first biochemical step in the melatonin production. It is well known that the rhodopsin in the adult zebrafish is well expressed in the pineal gland but both the expression and the cellular localization of this protein during development remain still unclear. In this study using qRT-PCR, sequencing and immunohistochemistry the expression as well as the protein localization of the rhodopsin in the zebrafish from larval (10 dpf) to adult stage (90 dpf) were demonstrated. The rhodopsin mRNA expression presents a peak of expression at 10 dpf, a further reduction to 50 dpf before increasing again in the adult stage. Moreover, the cellular localization of the rhodopsin-like protein was always localized in the pinealocyte at all ages examined. Our results demonstrated the involvement of the rhodopsin in the zebrafish pineal gland physiology particularly in the light capture during the zebrafish lifespan.

  7. Femtosecond spectroscopic study of photochromic reactions of bacteriorhodopsin and visual rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Tatiana B; Smitienko, Olga A; Shelaev, Ivan V; Gostev, Fedor E; Nekrasova, Oksana V; Dolgikh, Dmitriy A; Nadtochenko, Victor A; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Ostrovsky, Mikhail A

    2016-11-01

    Photochromic ultrafast reactions of bacteriorhodopsin (H. salinarum) and bovine rhodopsin were conducted with a femtosecond two-pump probe pulse setup with the time resolution of 20-25fs. The dynamics of the forward and reverse photochemical reactions for both retinal-containing proteins was compared. It is demonstrated that when retinal-containing proteins are excited by femtosecond pulses, dynamics pattern of the vibrational coherent wave packets in the course of the reaction is different for bacteriorhodopsin and visual rhodopsin. As shown in these studies, the low-frequencies that form a wave packets experimentally observed in the dynamics of primary products formation as a result of retinal photoisomerization have different intensities and are clearer for bovine rhodopsin. Photo-reversible reactions for both retinal proteins were performed from the stage of the relatively stable photointermediates that appear within 3-5ps after the light pulse impact. It is demonstrated that the efficiency of the reverse phototransition K-form→bacteriorhodopsin is almost five-fold higher than that of the Batho-intermediate→visual rhodopsin phototransition. The results obtained indicate that in the course of evolution the intramolecular mechanism of the chromophore-protein interaction in visual rhodopsin becomes more perfect and specific. The decrease in the probability of the reverse chromophore photoisomerization (all-trans→11-cis retinal) in primary photo-induced rhodopsin products causes an increase in the efficiency of the photoreception process.

  8. [Effect of light and temperature on growth kinetics of Anabaena flosaquae under phosphorus limitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhi-Kun; Li, Zhe; Wang, Sheng; Guo, Jin-Song; Xiao, Yan; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Ping

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorus, light and temperature are the key environmental factors leading to algae growth. But the effects of interaction between light and temperature on the growth of Anabaena flosaquae under phosphorus limitation were not well documented in literature. Anabaena flosaquae was selected for the study and lab-scale experiment and simulation were carried out. The results showed that the optimal temperature of Anabaena flosaquae was 20 degrees C under phosphorus limitation when the light intensity was constant, and the optimal light intensity (illuminance) of Anabaena flosaquae was 3 000 lx under phosphorus limitation when the temperature was constant. Based on model fitting and parameter calibration, the optimal temperature and light intensity of Anabaena flosaquae were 21.03 degress C ± 1.55 degrees C and 2 675.12 lx ± 262.93 lx, respectively. These data were close to the actual water environmental condition at the end of spring. Results of this study will provide important foundation for prediction of Anabaena blooms.

  9. A novel potassium deficiency-induced stimulon in Anabaena torulosa

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anuradha Alahari; Shree Kumar Apte

    2004-06-01

    Potassium deficiency enhanced the synthesis of fifteen proteins in the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena torulosa and of nine proteins in Escherichia coli. These were termed potassium deficiency-induced proteins or PDPs and constitute hitherto unknown potassium deficiency–induced stimulons. Potassium deficiency also enhanced the synthesis of certain osmotic stress-induced proteins. Addition of K+ repressed the synthesis of a majority of the osmotic stress-induced proteins and of PDPs in these bacteria. These proteins contrast with the dinitrogenase reductase of A. torulosa and the glycine betaine-binding protein of E. coli, both of which were osmo-induced to a higher level in potassium-supplemented conditions. The data demonstrate the occurrence of novel potassium deficiency-induced stimulons and a wider role of K+ in regulation of gene expression and stress responses in bacteria.

  10. UV-inducible DNA repair in the cyanobacteria Anabaena spp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, E.; Thiel, T.

    1987-09-01

    Strains of the filamentous cyanobacteria Anabaena spp. were capable of very efficient photoreactivation of UV irradiation-induced damage to DNA. Cells were resistant to several hundred joules of UV irradiation per square meter under conditions that allowed photoreactivation, and they also photoreactivated UV-damaged cyanophage efficiently. Reactivation of UV-irradiated cyanophage (Weigle reactivation) also occurred; UV irradiation of host cells greatly enhanced the plaque-forming ability of irradiated phage under nonphotoreactivating conditions. Postirradiation incubation of the host cells under conditions that allowed photoreactivation abolished the ability of the cells to perform Weigle reactivation of cyanophage N-1. Mitomycin C also induced Weigle reactivation of cyanophage N-1, but nalidixic acid did not. The inducible repair system (defined as the ability to perform Weigle reactivation of cyanophages) was relatively slow and inefficient compared with photoreactivation.

  11. Three-dimensional structure of an invertebrate rhodopsin and basis for ordered alignment in the photoreceptor membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A; Gowen, B E; Krebs, A M; Schertler, G F; Saibil, H R

    2001-11-30

    Invertebrate rhodopsins activate a G-protein signalling pathway in microvillar photoreceptors. In contrast to the transducin-cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase pathway found in vertebrate rods and cones, visual transduction in cephalopod (squid, octopus, cuttlefish) invertebrates is signalled via Gq and phospholipase C. Squid rhodopsin contains the conserved residues of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family, but has only 35% identity with mammalian rhodopsins. Unlike vertebrate rhodopsins, cephalopod rhodopsin is arranged in an ordered lattice in the photoreceptor membranes. This organization confers sensitivity to the plane of polarized light and also provides the optimal orientation of the linear retinal chromophores in the cylindrical microvillar membranes for light capture. Two-dimensional crystals of squid rhodopsin show a rectilinear arrangement that is likely to be related to the alignment of rhodopsins in vivo.Here, we present a three-dimensional structure of squid rhodopsin determined by cryo-electron microscopy of two-dimensional crystals. Docking the atomic structure of bovine rhodopsin into the squid density map shows that the helix packing and extracellular plug structure are conserved. In addition, there are two novel structural features revealed by our map. The linear lattice contact appears to be made by the transverse C-terminal helix lying on the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane. Also at the cytoplasmic surface, additional density may correspond to a helix 5-6 loop insertion found in most GPCRs relative to vertebrate rhodopsins. The similarity supports the conservation in structure of rhodopsins (and other G-protein-coupled receptors) from phylogenetically distant organisms. The map provides the first indication of the structural basis for rhodopsin alignment in the microvillar membrane.

  12. Stochastic de-repression of Rhodopsins in single photoreceptors of the fly retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranidhi Sood

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The photoreceptors of the Drosophila compound eye are a classical model for studying cell fate specification. Photoreceptors (PRs are organized in bundles of eight cells with two major types - inner PRs involved in color vision and outer PRs involved in motion detection. In wild type flies, most PRs express a single type of Rhodopsin (Rh: inner PRs express either Rh3, Rh4, Rh5 or Rh6 and outer PRs express Rh1. In outer PRs, the K(50 homeodomain protein Dve is a key repressor that acts to ensure exclusive Rh expression. Loss of Dve results in de-repression of Rhodopsins in outer PRs, and leads to a wide distribution of expression levels. To quantify these effects, we introduce an automated image analysis method to measure Rhodopsin levels at the single cell level in 3D confocal stacks. Our sensitive methodology reveals cell-specific differences in Rhodopsin distributions among the outer PRs, observed over a developmental time course. We show that Rhodopsin distributions are consistent with a two-state model of gene expression, in which cells can be in either high or basal states of Rhodopsin production. Our model identifies a significant role of post-transcriptional regulation in establishing the two distinct states. The timescale for interconversion between basal and high states is shown to be on the order of days. Our results indicate that even in the absence of Dve, the Rhodopsin regulatory network can maintain highly stable states. We propose that the role of Dve in outer PRs is to buffer against rare fluctuations in this network.

  13. Four of the six Drosophila rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors can mediate circadian entrainment in low light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Charles, Alexandra; Michard-Vanhée, Christine; Alejevski, Faredin; Chélot, Elisabeth; Boivin, Antoine; Rouyer, François

    2016-10-01

    Light is the major stimulus for the synchronization of circadian clocks with day-night cycles. The light-driven entrainment of the clock that controls rest-activity rhythms in Drosophila relies on different photoreceptive molecules. Cryptochrome (CRY) is expressed in most brain clock neurons, whereas six different rhodopsins (RH) are present in the light-sensing organs. The compound eye includes outer photoreceptors that express RH1 and inner photoreceptors that each express one of the four rhodopsins RH3-RH6. RH6 is also expressed in the extraretinal Hofbauer-Buchner eyelet, whereas RH2 is only found in the ocelli. In low light, the synchronization of behavioral rhythms relies on either CRY or the canonical rhodopsin phototransduction pathway, which requires the phospholipase C-β encoded by norpA (no receptor potential A). We used norpA(P24) cry(02) double mutants that are circadianly blind in low light and restored NORPA function in each of the six types of photoreceptors, defined as expressing a particular rhodopsin. We first show that the NORPA pathway is less efficient than CRY for synchronizing rest-activity rhythms with delayed light-dark cycles but is important for proper phasing, whereas the two light-sensing pathways can mediate efficient adjustments to phase advances. Four of the six rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors can mediate circadian entrainment, and all are more efficient for advancing than for delaying the behavioral clock. In contrast, neither RH5-expressing retinal photoreceptors nor RH2-expressing ocellar photoreceptors are sufficient to mediate synchronization through the NORPA pathway. Our results thus reveal different contributions of rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors and suggest the existence of several circuits for rhodopsin-dependent circadian entrainment. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2828-2844, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Nanoparticle-mediated rhodopsin cDNA but not intron-containing DNA delivery causes transgene silencing in a rhodopsin knockout model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Min; Mitra, Rajendra N; Filonov, Nazar A; Han, Zongchao

    2016-03-01

    Previously, we compared the efficacy of nanoparticle (NP)-mediated intron-containing rhodopsin (sgRho) vs. intronless cDNA in ameliorating retinal disease phenotypes in a rhodopsin knockout (RKO) mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa. We showed that NP-mediated sgRho delivery achieved long-term expression and phenotypic improvement in RKO mice, but not NP housing cDNA. However, the protein level of the NP-sgRho construct was only 5-10% of wild-type at 8 mo postinjection. To have a better understanding of the reduced levels of long-term expression of the vectors, in the present study, we evaluated the epigenetic changes of subretinal delivering NP-cDNA vs. NP-sgRho in the RKO mouse eyes. Following the administration, DNA methylation and histone status of specific regions (bacteria plasmid backbone, promoter, rhodopsin gene, and scaffold/matrix attachment region) of the vectors were evaluated at various time points. We documented that epigenetic transgene silencing occurred in vector-mediated gene transfer, which were caused by the plasmid backbone and the cDNA of the transgene, but not the intron-containing transgene. No toxicity or inflammation was found in the treated eyes. Our results suggest that cDNA of the rhodopsin transgene and bacteria backbone interfered with the host defense mechanism of DNA methylation-mediated transgene silencing through heterochromatin-associated modifications.

  15. Evolutionary Dynamics of Rhodopsin Type 2 Opsins in Vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Tada, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Among the five groups of visual pigments in vertebrates, the rhodopsin type 2 (RH2) group shows the largest number of gene duplication events. We have isolated three intact and one nonfunctional RH2 opsin genes each from Northern lampfish (Stenobrachius leucopsarus) and scabbardfish (Lepidopus fitchi). Using the deduced amino acid sequences of these and other representative RH2 opsin genes in vertebrates, we have estimated the divergence times and evolutionary rates of amino acid substitution at various stages of RH2 opsin evolution. The results show that the duplications of the lampfish and scabbardfish RH2 opsins have occurred ∼60 and ∼30 million years ago (Ma), respectively. The evolutionary rates of RH2 opsins in the early vertebrate ancestors were ∼0.25 × 10−9/site/year, which increased to ∼1 × 10−9 to 3 × 10−9/site/year in euteleost lineages and to ∼0.3 × 10−9 to 0.5 × 10−9/site/year in coelacanth and tetrapods. PMID:19759234

  16. A single gene all3940 (Dps) overexpression in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 confers multiple abiotic stress tolerance via proteomic alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Om Prakash; Kumari, Nidhi; Bhargava, Poonam; Rajaram, Hema; Rai, Lal Chand

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins (Dps) induced during starvation play an important role in gene regulation and maintaining homeostasis in bacteria. The nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena PCC7120, has four genes annotated as coding for Dps; however, the information on their physiological roles is limiting. One of the genes coding for Dps, 'all3940' was found to be induced under different abiotic stresses in Anabaena and upon overexpression enhanced the tolerance of Anabaena to a multitude of stresses, which included salinity, heat, heavy metals, pesticide, and nutrient starvation. On the other hand, mutation in the gene resulted in decreased growth of Anabaena. The modulation in the levels of All3940 in Anabaena, achieved either by overexpression of the protein or mutation of the gene, resulted in changes in the proteome, which correlated well with the physiological changes observed. Proteins required for varied physiological activities, such as photosynthesis, carbon-metabolism, oxidative stress alleviation, exhibited change in protein profile upon modulation of All3940 levels in Anabaena. This suggested a direct or an indirect effect of All3940 on the expression of the above stress-responsive proteins, thereby enhancing tolerance in Anabaena PCC7120. Thus, All3940, though categorized as a Dps, is possibly a general stress protein having a global role in regulating tolerance to multitude of stresses in Anabaena.

  17. UV-B stress induced metabolic rearrangements explored with comparative proteomics in three Anabaena species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Alok Kumar; Chatterjee, Antra; Yadav, Shivam; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Singh, Shilpi; Rai, L C

    2015-09-01

    Comparative proteomics together with physiological variables revealed different responses among three species of diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena exposed to UV-B stress at the same time points. Perceptible decline in PSII activity, ATP pool, nitrogenase activity and respiration rate was observed for all the three species; this being maximum in Anabaena doliolum, followed by Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and minimum in Anabaena L31. Statistical analysis of the protein abundance divided majority of them as early accumulated in A. L31, late accumulated in A. sp. PCC 7120 and downregulated in A. doliolum. Tolerance of A. L31 may be ascribed to post-translational modification reflected through the highest number of protein isoforms in its proteome followed by A. PCC 7120 and A. doliolum. Furthermore, increase in abundance of cyanophycinase, glutamine synthetase and succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase in A. L31 suggests operation of an alternate pathway for assimilation of nitrogen and carbon under UV-B stress. An early accumulation of four proteins viz., glutamate ammonia ligase (Alr2328), transketolase (Alr3344), inorganic pyrophosphatase (All3570), and trigger protein (Alr3681) involved respectively in amino acid metabolism, energy metabolism, biosynthesis of cofactor and trigger protein and chaperone like activity across three species, suggests them to be marker of UV-B stress in Anabaena spp. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India.

  18. Rhodopsin gene expression determines rod outer segment size and rod cell resistance to a dominant-negative neurodegeneration mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandee A Price

    Full Text Available Two outstanding unknowns in the biology of photoreceptors are the molecular determinants of cell size, which is remarkably uniform among mammalian species, and the mechanisms of rod cell death associated with inherited neurodegenerative blinding diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. We have addressed both questions by performing an in vivo titration with rhodopsin gene copies in genetically engineered mice that express only normal rhodopsin or an autosomal dominant allele, encoding rhodopsin with a disease-causing P23H substitution. The results reveal that the volume of the rod outer segment is proportional to rhodopsin gene expression; that P23H-rhodopsin, the most common rhodopsin gene disease allele, causes cell death via a dominant-negative mechanism; and that long term survival of rod cells carrying P23H-rhodopsin can be achieved by increasing the levels of wild type rhodopsin. These results point to promising directions in gene therapy for autosomal dominant neurodegenerative diseases caused by dominant-negative mutations.

  19. Proteomic analysis reveals contrasting stress response to uranium in two nitrogen-fixing Anabaena strains, differentially tolerant to uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Bandita; Basu, Bhakti; Acharya, Celin; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Two strains of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena, native to Indian paddy fields, displayed differential sensitivity to exposure to uranyl carbonate at neutral pH. Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 and Anabaena sp. strain L-31 displayed 50% reduction in survival (LD50 dose), following 3h exposure to 75μM and 200μM uranyl carbonate, respectively. Uranium responsive proteome alterations were visualized by 2D gel electrophoresis, followed by protein identification by MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. The two strains displayed significant differences in levels of proteins associated with photosynthesis, carbon metabolism, and oxidative stress alleviation, commensurate with their uranium tolerance. Higher uranium tolerance of Anabaena sp. strain L-31 could be attributed to sustained photosynthesis and carbon metabolism and superior oxidative stress defense, as compared to the uranium sensitive Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

  20. A rhodopsin-like protein in Cyanophora paradoxa: gene sequence and protein immunolocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassanito, Anna Maria; Barsanti, Laura; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Evangelista, Valtere; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2010-03-01

    Here, we report the DNA sequence of the rhodopsin gene in the alga Cyanophora paradoxa (Glaucophyta). The primers were designed according to the conserved regions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic rhodopsin-like proteins deposited in the GenBank. The sequence consists of 1,272 bp comprised of 5 introns. The correspondent protein, named Cyanophopsin, showed high identity to rhodopsin-like proteins of Archea, Bacteria, Fungi, and Algae. At the N-terminal, the protein is characterized by a region with no transmembrane alpha-helices (80 aa), followed by a region with 7alpha-helices (219 aa) and a shorter 35-aa C-terminal region. The DNA sequence of the N-terminal region was expressed in E. coli and the recombinant purified peptide was used as antigen in hens to obtain polyclonal antibodies. Indirect immunofluorescence in C. paradoxa cells showed a marked labeling of the muroplast (aka cyanelle) membrane.

  1. MODELLING THE P2Y PURINOCEPTOR USING RHODOPSIN AS TEMPLATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rhee, A. Michiel; Fischer, Bilha; Van Galen, Philip J. M.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The P2Y1 purinoceptor cloned from chick brain (Webb, T. et al. (1993) FEBS Lett., 324, 219–225) is a 362 amino acid, 41 kDa protein. To locate residues tentatively involved in ligand recognition a molecular model of the P2Y purinoceptor has been constructed. The model was based on the primary sequence and structural homology with the G-protein coupled photoreceptor rhodopsin, in analogy to the method proposed by Ballesteros and Weinstein ((1995) Meth. Neurosci. 25, 366–428). Transmembrane helices were constructed from the amino acid sequence, minimized individually, and positioned in a helical bundle. The helical bundle was then minimized using the Amber forcefield in Discover (BIOSYM Technologies) to obtain the final model. Several residues that have been shown to be critical in ligand binding in other GPCRs are conserved in the P2Y1 purinoceptor. According to our model the side chains of these conserved residues are facing the internal cleft in which ligand binding likely occurs. The model also suggests four basic residues (H121 in TM3, H266 and K269 in TM6 and R299 in TM7) near the extracellular surface that might be involved in ligand binding. These basic residues might be essential in coordinating the triphosphate chain of the endogenous ligand adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP). Potential binding sites for agonists have been explored by docking several derivatives (including newly synthesized N6-derivatives) into the model. The N6-phenylethyl substituent is tolerated pharmacologically, and in our model this substituent occupies a region predominantly defined by aromatic residues such as F51 (TM1), Y100 (TM2) and F120 (TM3). The dimethylated analogue of ATP, N6,N6-dimethyl-adenosine 5′-triphosphate, is less well tolerated pharmacologically, and our model predicts that the attenuated activity is due to interference with hydrogen bonding capacity to Q296 (TM7). PMID:8872457

  2. Enduring toxicity of transgenic Anabaena PCC 7120 expressing mosquito larvicidal genes from Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasherob, Robert; Otieno-Ayayo, Zachariah Ngalo; Ben-Dov, Eitan; Miaskovsky, Rina; Boussiba, Sammy; Zaritsky, Arieh

    2003-10-01

    Persistence of biological control agents against mosquito larvae was tested under simulated field conditions. Mosquito larvicidal activity of transgenic Anabaena PCC 7120 expressing cry4Aa, cry11Aa and p20 from Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis was greater than B. thuringiensis ssp. israelensis primary powder (fun 89C06D) or wettable powder (WP) (Bactimos products) when either mixed with silt or exposed to sunlight outdoors. Reduction of Bactimos primary powder toxicity was at least 10-fold higher than Anabaena's after mixing with silt. In outdoors experiments, Bactimos WP remained toxic (over 30% mortality of 3rd instar Aedes aegypti larvae) for 2-4 days only, while transgenic Anabaena's toxicity endured 8-21 days.

  3. Methyl viologen responsive proteome dynamics of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Bandita; Basu, Bhakti; Rajaram, Hema; Kumar Apte, Shree

    2014-08-01

    A proteomic approach was employed to elucidate the response of an agriculturally important microbe, Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120, to methyl viologen (MV). Exposure to 2 μM MV caused 50% lethality (LD50 ) within 6 h and modified the cellular levels of several proteins. About 31 proteins increased in abundance and 24 proteins decreased in abundance, while 55 proteins showed only a minor change in abundance. Of these, 103 proteins were identified by MS. Levels of proteins involved in ROS detoxification and chaperoning activities were enhanced but that of crucial proteins involved in light and dark reactions of photosynthesis declined or constitutive. The abundance of proteins involved in carbon and energy biogenesis were altered. The study elaborated the oxidative stress defense mechanism deployed by Anabaena, identified carbon metabolism and energy biogenesis as possible major targets of MV sensitivity, and suggested potential biotechnological interventions for improved stress tolerance in Anabaena 7120.

  4. Enhanced resistance to UV-B radiation in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 (Cyanophyceae) by repeated exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hongjie; Li, Dunhai

    2014-07-01

    In natural habitats, organisms especially phytoplankton are not always continuously subjected to ultraviolet-B radiation (UVBR). By simulation of the natural situation, the N2-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was subjected to UV-B exposure and recovery cycles. A series of morphological and physiological changes were observed in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 under repeated UVBR when compared with controls. Such as the breakage of filaments, intervals between heterocysts, heterocyst frequency, total carbohydrate, and carotenoids were increased, while the nitrogenase activity and photosynthetic activity were inhibited by repeated UVBR; however, these activities could recover when UV-B stress was removed. Unexpectedly, the over-compensatory growth was observed at the end of the second round of exposure and recovery cycle. Our results showed that discontinuous UVBR could increase the growth rate and the tolerance as well as repair capacity of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. These results indicate that moderate UVBR may increase the growth of cyanobacteria in natural habitats.

  5. Low-Temperature Trapping of Photointermediates of the Rhodopsin E181Q Mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Megan N.; Greco, Jordan A.; Wagner, Nicole L.; Amora, Tabitha L.; Ramos, Lavoisier A.; Chen, Min-Hsuan; Knox, Barry E.; Birge, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Three active-site components in rhodopsin play a key role in the stability and function of the protein: 1) the counter-ion residues which stabilize the protonated Schiff base, 2) water molecules, and 3) the hydrogen-bonding network. The ionizable residue Glu-181, which is involved in an extended hydrogen-bonding network with Ser-186, Tyr-268, Tyr-192, and key water molecules within the active site of rhodopsin, has been shown to be involved in a complex counter-ion switch mechanism with Glu-113 during the photobleaching sequence of the protein. Herein, we examine the photobleaching sequence of the E181Q rhodopsin mutant by using cryogenic UV-visible spectroscopy to further elucidate the role of Glu-181 during photoactivation of the protein. We find that lower temperatures are required to trap the early photostationary states of the E181Q mutant compared to native rhodopsin. Additionally, a Blue Shifted Intermediate (BSI, λmax = 498 nm, 100 K) is observed after the formation of E181Q Bathorhodopsin (Batho, λmax = 556 nm, 10 K) but prior to formation of E181Q Lumirhodopsin (Lumi, λmax = 506 nm, 220 K). A potential energy diagram of the observed photointermediates suggests the E181Q Batho intermediate has an enthalpy value 7.99 KJ/mol higher than E181Q BSI, whereas in rhodopsin, the BSI is 10.02 KJ/mol higher in enthalpy than Batho. Thus, the Batho to BSI transition is enthalpically driven in E181Q and entropically driven in native rhodopsin. We conclude that the substitution of Glu-181 with Gln-181 results in a significant perturbation of the hydrogen-bonding network within the active site of rhodopsin. In addition, the removal of a key electrostatic interaction between the chromophore and the protein destabilizes the protein in both the dark state and Batho intermediate conformations while having a stabilizing effect on the BSI conformation. The observed destabilization upon this substitution further supports that Glu-181 is negatively charged in the early

  6. Efficient Gene Induction and Endogenous Gene Repression Systems for the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higo, Akiyoshi; Isu, Atsuko; Fukaya, Yuki; Hisabori, Toru

    2016-02-01

    In the last decade, many studies have been conducted to employ genetically engineered cyanobacteria in the production of various metabolites. However, the lack of a strict gene regulation system in cyanobacteria has hampered these attempts. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 performs both nitrogen and carbon fixation and is, therefore, a good candidate organism for such production. To employ Anabaena cells for this purpose, we intended to develop artificial gene regulation systems to alter the cell metabolic pathways efficiently. We introduced into Anabaena a transcriptional repressor TetR, widely used in diverse organisms, and green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. We found that anhydrotetracycline (aTc) substantially induced GFP fluorescence in a concentration-dependent manner. By expressing tetR under the nitrate-specific promoter nirA, we successfully reduced the concentration of aTc required for the induction of gfp under nitrogen fixation conditions (to 10% of the concentration needed under nitrate-replete conditions). Further, we succeeded in the overexpression of GFP by depletion of nitrate without the inducer by means of promoter engineering of the nirA promoter. Moreover, we applied these gene regulation systems to a metabolic enzyme in Anabaena and successfully repressed glnA, the gene encoding glutamine synthetase that is essential for nitrogen assimilation in cyanobacteria, by expressing the small antisense RNA for glnA. Consequently, the ammonium production of an ammonium-excreting Anabaena mutant was significantly enhanced. We therefore conclude that the gene regulation systems developed in this study are useful tools for the regulation of metabolic enzymes and will help to increase the production of desired substances in Anabaena.

  7. An ecophysiological study of the Azolla filiculoides- Anabaena azollae association

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kempen, Monique; Smolders, Fons; Speelman, Eveline; Reichart, Gert Jan; Barke, Judith; Brinkhuis, Henk; Lotter, Andy; Roelofs, Jan

    2010-05-01

    The long term effects of salinity stress on the growth, nutrient content and amino acid composition of the Azolla filiculoides - Anabaena azollae association was studied in a laboratory experiment. It was demonstrated that the symbiosis could tolerate salt stress up to 90 mM NaCl, even after a 100 day period of preconditioning at salt concentrations that were 30 mM NaCl lower. In the 120 mM NaCl treatment the Azolla filiculoides survived, but hardly any new biomass was produced. It was shown that during the experiment, A. filiculoides became increasingly efficient in excluding salt ions from the plant tissue and was thus able to increase its salt tolerance. The amino acid analysis revealed that the naturally occurring high glutamine concentration in the plants was strongly reduced at salt concentrations of 120 mM NaCl and higher. This was the result of the reduced nitrogenase activity at these salt concentrations, as was demonstrated in an acetylene reduction assay. We suggest that the high glutamine concentration in the plants might play a role in the osmoregulatory response against salt stress, enabling growth of the A. filiculoides -Anabaena azollae association up to 90 mM NaCl. In a mesocosm experiment it furthermore was demonstrated that Azolla might manipulate its own microenvironment when grown at elevated salt concentration (up to ~50 mmol•L-1) by promoting salinity stratification, especially when it has formed a dense cover at the water surface. Beside salt stress, we also studied the growth of Azolla filiculoides in response to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, in combination with different light intensities and different pH of the nutrient solution. The results demonstrated that as compared to the control (ambient pCO2 concentrations), Azolla filiculoides was able to produce twice as much biomass at carbon dioxide concentrations that were five times as high as the ambient pCO2 concentration. However, it was also shown that this

  8. Characterization of a DUF820 family protein Alr3200 of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRASHANTH S RAGHAVAN; GAGAN D GUPTA; HEMA RAJARAM; VINAY KUMAR

    2016-12-01

    The hypothetical protein ‘Alr3200’ of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 is highly conserved among cyanobacterialspecies. It is a member of the DUF820 (Domain of Unknown Function) protein family, and is predicted to have aDNase domain. Biochemical analysis revealed a Mg(II)-dependent DNase activity for Alr3200 with a specific activityof 8.62×104 Kunitz Units (KU) mg−1 protein. Circular dichroism analysis predicted Alr3200 to have ~40% β-strandsand ~9% α-helical structures. Anabaena PCC7120 inherently expressed Alr3200 at very low levels, and its overexpressionhad no significant effect on growth of Anabaena under control conditions. However, Analr3200+, therecombinant Anabaena strain overexpressing Alr3200, exhibited zero survival upon exposure to 6 kGy of γ-radiation,which is the LD50 for wild type Anabaena PCC7120 as well as the vector control recombinant strain, AnpAM.Comparative analysis of the two recombinant Anabaena strains suggested that it is not the accumulated Alr3200 perse, but its possible interactions with the radiation-induced unidentified DNA repair proteins of Anabaena, whichhampers DNA repair resulting in radiosensitivity.

  9. Anabaena bergii Ostenf. [f. minor (Kisselev Kossinsk.] (Cyanoprokaryota: The first record in Serbia, its taxonomic status, and that of the genus Anabaena Bory ex Born. & Flah.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvijan M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of a detailed survey of the algal community in salt marshes of the Vojvodina Province (Northern Serbia, we rather unexpectedly found the blue-green alga Anabaena bergii Ostenf. [forma minor (Kisselev Kossinsk.] in water samples from Slatina Pond near Opovo. Our finding represents its first record in Serbia. The present paper gives general characteristics of this alga and of the habitat in which it was found. Based on analysis of a large number of works dealing with characteristics and the taxonomic status of the genus Anabaena, the species A. bergii, and its forma minor, it is concluded that there are numerous problems in taxonomy of the given genus, with no consensus among researchers. In light of the available data, the authors retain the name of the species A. bergii, but accept forma minor with some reserve.

  10. Photosynthetic vesicles with bound phycobilisomes from Anabaena variabilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, T.; Gantt, E.

    1979-01-01

    Photosynthetically active vesicles with attached phycobilisomes from Anabaena variabilis, were isolated and shown to transfer excitation energy from phycobiliproteins to F696 chlorophyll (Photosystem II). The best results were obtained when cells were disrupted in a sucrose/phosphate/citrate mixture (0.3:0.5:0.3 M, respectively) containing 1.5% serum albumin. The vesicles showed a phycocyanin/chlorophyll ratio essentially identical to that of whole cells, and oxygen evolution rates of 250 ..mu..mol; O/sub 2//h per mg chlorophyll (with 4 mM ferricyanide added as oxidant), whereas whole cells had rates of up to 450. Excitation of the vesicles by 600 nm light produced fluorescence peaks (-196/sup 0/C) at 644, 662, 685, 695, and 730 nm. On aging of the vesicles, or upon dilution, the fluorescence yield of the 695 nm emission peak gradually decreased with an accompanying increase and final predominant peak at 685 nm. This shift was accompanied by a decrease in the quantum efficiency of Photosystem II activity from an initial 0.05 to as low as 0.01 mol O/sub 2//einstein (605 nm), with a lesser change in the V/sub max/ values. The decrease in the quantum efficiency is mainly attributed to excitation uncoupling between phycobilisomes and Photosystem II. It is concluded that the F685 nm emission peak, often exclusively attributed to Photosystem II chlorophyll, arises from more than one component with phycobilisome emission being a major contributor. Vesicles from which phycobilisomes had been removed, as verified by electron microscopy and spectroscopy, had an almost negligible emission at 685 nm.

  11. Photosynthetic vesicles with bound phycobilisomes from Anabaena variabilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, T.; Gantt, E.

    1979-01-01

    Photosynthetically active vesicles with attached phycobilisomes from Anabaena variabilis, were isolated and shown to transfer excitation energy from phycobiliproteins to F696 chlorophyll (Photosystem II). The best results were obtained when cells were disrupted in a sucrose/phosphate/citrate mixture (0.3:0.5:0.3 M, respectively) containing 1.5% serum albumin. The vesicles showed a phycocyanin/chlorophyll ratio essentially identical to that of whole cells, and oxygen evolution rates of 250 ..mu..mol O/sub 2//h per mg chlorophyll (with 4 mM ferricyanide added as oxidant), whereas whole cells had rates of up to 450. Excitation of the vesicles by 600 nm light produced fluorescence peaks (-196/sup 0/C) at 644, 662, 685, 695, and 730 nm. On aging of the vesicles, or upon dilution, the fluorescence yield of the 695 nm emission peak gradually decreased with an accompanying increase and final predominant peak at 685 nm. This shift was accompanied by a decrease in the quantum efficiency of Photosystem II activity from an initial 0.05 to as low as 0.01 mol O/sub 2//einstein (605 nm), with a lesser change in the V/sub max/ values. The decrease in the quantum efficiency is mainly attributed to excitation uncoupling between phycobilisomes and Photosystem II. It is concluded that the F685 nm emission peak, often exclusively attributed to Photosystem II chlorophyll, arises from more than one component with phycobilisome emission being a major contributor. Vesicles from which phycobilisomes had been removed, as verified by electron microscopy and spectroscopy, had an almost negligible emission at 685 nm.

  12. Salt Effects on the Conformational Stability of the Visual G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Rhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Alcaraz, Arfaxad; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Ramon, Eva; Garriga, Pere

    2011-01-01

    Membrane protein stability is a key parameter with important physiological and practical implications. Inorganic salts affect protein stability, but the mechanisms of their interactions with membrane proteins are not completely understood. We have undertaken the study of a prototypical G-protein-coupled receptor, the α-helical membrane protein rhodopsin from vertebrate retina, and explored the effects of inorganic salts on the thermal decay properties of both its inactive and photoactivated states. Under high salt concentrations, rhodopsin significantly increased its activation enthalpy change for thermal bleaching, whereas acid denaturation affected the formation of a denatured loose-bundle state for both the active and inactive conformations. This behavior seems to correlate with changes in protonated Schiff-base hydrolysis. However, chromophore regeneration with the 11-cis-retinal chromophore and MetarhodopsinII decay kinetics were slower only in the presence of sodium chloride, suggesting that in this case, the underlying phenomenon may be linked to the activation of rhodopsin and the retinal release processes. Furthermore, the melting temperature, determined by means of circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry measurements, was increased in the presence of high salt concentrations. The observed effects on rhodopsin could indicate that salts favor electrostatic interactions in the retinal binding pocket and indirectly favor hydrophobic interactions at the membrane protein receptor core. These effects can be exploited in applications where the stability of membrane proteins in solution is highly desirable. PMID:22261069

  13. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M.; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie, E-mail: valerie.panneels@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, OFLC/103, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-06-27

    A new batch preparation method is presented for high-density micrometre-sized crystals of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin for use in time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free-electron laser using a liquid jet. Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  14. Structural basis for calcium-induced inhibition of rhodopsin kinase by recoverin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, James B; Levay, Konstantin; Wingard, Jennifer N; Lusin, Jacqueline D; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2006-12-01

    Recoverin, a member of the neuronal calcium sensor branch of the EF-hand superfamily, serves as a calcium sensor that regulates rhodopsin kinase (RK) activity in retinal rod cells. We report here the NMR structure of Ca(2+)-bound recoverin bound to a functional N-terminal fragment of rhodopsin kinase (residues 1-25, called RK25). The overall main-chain structure of recoverin in the complex is similar to structures of Ca(2+)-bound recoverin in the absence of target (<1.8A root-mean-square deviation). The first eight residues of recoverin at the N terminus are solvent-exposed, enabling the N-terminal myristoyl group to interact with target membranes, and Ca(2+) is bound at the second and third EF-hands of the protein. RK25 in the complex forms an amphipathic helix (residues 4-16). The hydrophobic face of the RK25 helix (Val-9, Val-10, Ala-11, Ala-14, and Phe-15) interacts with an exposed hydrophobic groove on the surface of recoverin lined by side-chain atoms of Trp-31, Phe-35, Phe-49, Ile-52, Tyr-53, Phe-56, Phe-57, Tyr-86, and Leu-90. Residues of recoverin that contact RK25 are highly conserved, suggesting a similar target binding site structure in all neuronal calcium sensor proteins. Site-specific mutagenesis and deletion analysis confirm that the hydrophobic residues at the interface are necessary and sufficient for binding. The recoverin-RK25 complex exhibits Ca(2+)-induced binding to rhodopsin immobilized on concanavalin-A resin. We propose that Ca(2+)-bound recoverin is bound between rhodopsin and RK in a ternary complex on rod outer segment disk membranes, thereby blocking RK interaction with rhodopsin at high Ca(2+).

  15. Solution Structure of Reduced Plastocyanin from the Blue-Green Alga Anabaena Variabilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Led, J.J.; Badsberg, U.; Jørgensen, A.M.;

    1996-01-01

    The three-dimensional solution structure of plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis (A.v. PCu) has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Sixty structures were calculated by distance geometry from 1141 distance restraints and 46 dihedral angle restraints. The distance geometry ...

  16. Solution structure of reduced plastocyanin from the blue-green alga Anabaena variabilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badsberg, U; Jørgensen, A.M.; Gesmar, H;

    1996-01-01

    The three-dimensional solution structure of plastocyanin from Anabaena variabilis (A.v.PCu) has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Sixty structures were calculated by distance geometry from 1141 distance restraints and 46 dihedral angle restraints. The distance geometry s...

  17. In silico characterization and transcriptomic analysis of nif family genes from Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shilpi; Shrivastava, Alok Kumar

    2017-03-14

    In silico approaches in conjunction with morphology, nitrogenase activity, and qRT-PCR explore the impact of selected abiotic stressor such as arsenic, salt, cadmium, copper, and butachlor on nitrogen fixing (nif family) genes of diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. A total of 19 nif genes are present within the Anabaena genome that is involved in the process of nitrogen fixation. Docking studies revealed the interaction between these nif gene-encoded proteins and the selected abiotic stressors which were further validated through decreased heterocyst frequency, fragmentation of filaments, and downregulation of nitrogenase activity under these stresses indicating towards their toxic impact on nitrogen fixation potential of filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Another appealing finding of this study is even though having similar binding energy and similar interacting residues between arsenic/salt and copper/cadmium to nif-encoded proteins, arsenic and cadmium are more toxic than salt and copper for nitrogenase activity of Anabaena which is crucial for growth and yield of rice paddy and soil reclamation.

  18. Effect of butachlor on growth and nitrogen fixation by Anabaena sphaerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suseela, M R

    2001-07-01

    Present study was carried out to examine the effect of Butachlor on growth and nitrogen fixation by Anabaena sphaerica. The increased concentration of the pesticide did not have any adverse effect on the alga. Rather it accelerated the algal contribution in terms of biomass and nitrogen fixation.

  19. Role of manganese in protection against oxidative stress under iron starvation in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Manish Singh; Srivastava, Meenakshi; Verma, Ekta; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2015-06-01

    The cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was grown in presence and absence of iron to decipher the role of manganese in protection against the oxidative stress under iron starvation and growth, manganese uptake kinetics, antioxidative enzymes, lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage, thiol content, total peroxide, proline and NADH content was investigated. Manganese supported the growth of cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120 under iron deprived conditions where maximum uptake rate of manganese was observed with lower K(m) and higher V(max) values. Antioxidative enzymes were also found to be elevated in iron-starved conditions. Estimation of lipid peroxidation and electrolyte leakage depicted the role of manganese in stabilizing the integrity of the membrane which was considered as the prime target of oxygen free radicals in oxidative stress. The levels of total peroxide, thiol, proline and NADH content, which are the representative of oxidative stress response in Anabaena 7120, were also showed increasing trends in iron starvation. Hence, the results discerned, clearly suggested the role of manganese in protection against the oxidative stress in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120 under iron starvation either due to its antioxidative properties or involvement as cofactor in a number of antioxidative enzymes.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Strain of Cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. 4-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowa, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence of Anabaena sp. 4-3, an efficient producer of sucrose. It was isolated from salt flats near the University of Texas Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas, Texas. The genome may provide insight into the utilization of cyanobacteria as a source for biofuels. PMID:27540066

  1. Multiple modes of iron uptake by the filamentous, siderophore-producing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Mareike; Kranzler, Chana; Lis, Hagar; Margulis, Ketty; Stevanovic, Mara; Keren, Nir; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-08-01

    Iron is a member of a small group of nutrients that limits aquatic primary production. Mechanisms for utilizing iron have to be efficient and adapted according to the ecological niche. In respect to iron acquisition cyanobacteria, prokaryotic oxygen evolving photosynthetic organisms can be divided into siderophore- and non-siderophore-producing strains. The results presented in this paper suggest that the situation is far more complex. To understand the bioavailability of different iron substrates and the advantages of various uptake strategies, we examined iron uptake mechanisms in the siderophore-producing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Comparison of the uptake of iron complexed with exogenous (desferrioxamine B, DFB) or to self-secreted (schizokinen) siderophores by Anabaena sp. revealed that uptake of the endogenous produced siderophore complexed to iron is more efficient. In addition, Anabaena sp. is able to take up dissolved, ferric iron hydroxide species (Fe') via a reductive mechanism. Thus, Anabaena sp. exhibits both, siderophore- and non-siderophore-mediated iron uptake. While assimilation of Fe' and FeDFB are not induced by iron starvation, FeSchizokinen uptake rates increase with increasing iron starvation. Consequently, we suggest that Fe' reduction and uptake is advantageous for low-density cultures, while at higher densities siderophore uptake is preferred.

  2. Classification and phylogeny of the cyanobiont Anabaena azollae Strasburger: an answered question?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana L; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2014-06-01

    The symbiosis Azolla-Anabaena azollae, with a worldwide distribution in pantropical and temperate regions, is one of the most studied, because of its potential application as a biofertilizer, especially in rice fields, but also as an animal food and in phytoremediation. The cyanobiont is a filamentous, heterocystic cyanobacterium that inhabits the foliar cavities of the pteridophyte and the indusium on the megasporocarp (female reproductive structure). The classification and phylogeny of the cyanobiont is very controversial: from its morphology, it has been named Nostoc azollae, Anabaena azollae, Anabaena variabilis status azollae and recently Trichormus azollae, but, from its 16S rRNA gene sequence, it has been assigned to Nostoc and/or Anabaena, and from its phycocyanin gene sequence, it has been assigned as non-Nostoc and non-Anabaena. The literature also points to a possible co-evolution between the cyanobiont and the Azolla host, since dendrograms and phylogenetic trees of fatty acids, short tandemly repeated repetitive (STRR) analysis and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of nif genes and the 16S rRNA gene give a two-cluster association that matches the two-section ranking of the host (Azolla). Another controversy surrounds the possible existence of more than one genus or more than one species strain. The use of freshly isolated or cultured cyanobionts is an additional problem, since their morphology and protein profiles are different. This review gives an overview of how morphological, chemical and genetic analyses influence the classification and phylogeny of the cyanobiont and future research.

  3. Upstream factors affecting Tualatin River algae—Tracking the 2008 Anabaena algae bloom to Wapato Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, Stewart A.; Carpenter, Kurt D.; Fesler, Kristel J.; Dorsey, Jessica L.

    2015-12-17

    Significant Findings A large bloom that included floating mats of the blue-green algae Anabaena flos-aquae occurred in the lower 20 miles of the Tualatin River in northwestern Oregon between July 7 and July 17, 2008.

  4. Molecular mechanism of long-range synergetic color tuning between multiple amino acid residues in conger rhodopsin

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Hiroshi C.; Mori, Yoshiharu; Tada, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shozo; Yamato, Takahisa

    2010-01-01

    The synergetic effects of multiple rhodopsin mutations on color tuning need to be completely elucidated. Systematic genetic studies and spectroscopy have demonstrated an interesting example of synergetic color tuning between two amino acid residues in conger rhodopsin's ancestral pigment (p501): —a double mutation at one nearby and one distant residue led to a significant λmax blue shift of 13 nm, whereas neither of the single mutations at these two sites led to meaningful shifts.

  5. Noninvasive optical inhibition with a red-shifted microbial rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuong, Amy S; Miri, Mitra L; Busskamp, Volker; Matthews, Gillian A C; Acker, Leah C; Sørensen, Andreas T; Young, Andrew; Klapoetke, Nathan C; Henninger, Mike A; Kodandaramaiah, Suhasa B; Ogawa, Masaaki; Ramanlal, Shreshtha B; Bandler, Rachel C; Allen, Brian D; Forest, Craig R; Chow, Brian Y; Han, Xue; Lin, Yingxi; Tye, Kay M; Roska, Botond; Cardin, Jessica A; Boyden, Edward S

    2014-08-01

    Optogenetic inhibition of the electrical activity of neurons enables the causal assessment of their contributions to brain functions. Red light penetrates deeper into tissue than other visible wavelengths. We present a red-shifted cruxhalorhodopsin, Jaws, derived from Haloarcula (Halobacterium) salinarum (strain Shark) and engineered to result in red light-induced photocurrents three times those of earlier silencers. Jaws exhibits robust inhibition of sensory-evoked neural activity in the cortex and results in strong light responses when used in retinas of retinitis pigmentosa model mice. We also demonstrate that Jaws can noninvasively mediate transcranial optical inhibition of neurons deep in the brains of awake mice. The noninvasive optogenetic inhibition opened up by Jaws enables a variety of important neuroscience experiments and offers a powerful general-use chloride pump for basic and applied neuroscience.

  6. Physiological and proteomic analysis of salinity tolerance of the halotolerant cyanobacterium Anabaena sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ravindra Kumar; Thagela, Preeti; Tripathi, Keshawanand; Abraham, G

    2016-09-01

    The halotolerant cyanobacterium Anabaena sp was grown under NaCl concentration of 0, 170 and 515 mM and physiological and proteomic analysis was performed. At 515 mM NaCl the cyanobacterium showed reduced photosynthetic activities and significant increase in soluble sugar content, proline and SOD activity. On the other hand Anabaena sp grown at 170 mM NaCl showed optimal growth, photosynthetic activities and comparatively low soluble sugar content, proline accumulation and SOD activity. The intracellular Na(+) content of the cells increased both at 170 and 515 mM NaCl. In contrast, the K(+) content of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp remained stable in response to growth at identical concentration of NaCl. While cells grown at 170 mM NaCl showed highest intracellular K(+)/Na(+) ratio, salinity level of 515 mM NaCl resulted in reduced ratio of K(+)/Na(+). Proteomic analysis revealed 50 salt-responsive proteins in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp under salt treatment compared with control. Ten protein spots were subjected to MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis and the identified proteins are involved in photosynthesis, protein folding, cell organization and energy metabolism. Differential expression of proteins related to photosynthesis, energy metabolism was observed in Anabaena sp grown at 170 mM NaCl. At 170 mM NaCl increased expression of photosynthesis related proteins and effective osmotic adjustment through increased antioxidant enzymes and modulation of intracellular ions contributed to better salinity tolerance and optimal growth. On the contrary, increased intracellular Na(+) content coupled with down regulation of photosynthetic and energy related proteins resulted in reduced growth at 515 mM NaCl. Therefore reduced growth at 515 mM NaCl could be due to accumulation of Na(+) ions and requirement to maintain higher organic osmolytes and antioxidants which is energy intensive. The results thus show that the basis of salt tolerance is different when the

  7. Mutation analysis of codons 345 and 347 of rhodopsin gene in Indian retinitis pigmentosa patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhurima Dikshit; Rakhi Agarwal

    2001-08-01

    More than 100 mutations have been reported till date in the rhodopsin gene in patients with retinitis pigmentosa. The present study was undertaken to detect the reported rhodopsin gene point mutations in Indian retinitis pigmentosa patients. We looked for presence or absence of codon 345 and 347 mutations in exon 5 of the gene using the technique of allele-specific polymerase chain reaction by designing primers for each mutation. We have examined 100 patients from 76 families irrespective of genetic categories. Surprisingly, in our sample the very widely reported highly frequent mutations of codon 347 (P → S/A/R/Q/L/T) were absent while the codon 345 mutation V → M was seen in three cases in one family (autosomal dominant form) and in one sporadic case (total two families). This is the first report on codon 345 and 347 mutation in Indian retinitis pigmentosa subjects.

  8. NEUROSCIENCE. Natural light-gated anion channels: A family of microbial rhodopsins for advanced optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govorunova, Elena G; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Janz, Roger; Liu, Xiaoqin; Spudich, John L

    2015-08-01

    Light-gated rhodopsin cation channels from chlorophyte algae have transformed neuroscience research through their use as membrane-depolarizing optogenetic tools for targeted photoactivation of neuron firing. Photosuppression of neuronal action potentials has been limited by the lack of equally efficient tools for membrane hyperpolarization. We describe anion channel rhodopsins (ACRs), a family of light-gated anion channels from cryptophyte algae that provide highly sensitive and efficient membrane hyperpolarization and neuronal silencing through light-gated chloride conduction. ACRs strictly conducted anions, completely excluding protons and larger cations, and hyperpolarized the membrane of cultured animal cells with much faster kinetics at less than one-thousandth of the light intensity required by the most efficient currently available optogenetic proteins. Natural ACRs provide optogenetic inhibition tools with unprecedented light sensitivity and temporal precision.

  9. Cation-Specific Conformations in a Dual-Function Ion-Pumping Microbial Rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Giordano F Z; Goblirsch, Brandon R; Tsai, Ah-Lim; Spudich, John L

    2015-06-30

    A recently discovered rhodopsin ion pump (DeNaR, also known as KR2) in the marine bacterium Dokdonia eikasta uses light to pump protons or sodium ions from the cell depending on the ionic composition of the medium. In cells suspended in a KCl solution, DeNaR functions as a light-driven proton pump, whereas in a NaCl solution, DeNaR conducts light-driven sodium ion pumping, a novel activity within the rhodopsin family. These two distinct functions raise the questions of whether the conformations of the protein differ in the presence of K(+) or Na(+) and whether the helical movements that result in the canonical E → C conformational change in other microbial rhodopsins are conserved in DeNaR. Visible absorption maxima of DeNaR in its unphotolyzed (dark) state show an 8 nm difference between Na(+) and K(+) in decyl maltopyranoside micelles, indicating an influence of the cations on the retinylidene photoactive site. In addition, electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of the dark states reveal repositioning of helices F and G when K(+) is replaced with Na(+). Furthermore, the conformational changes assessed by EPR spin-spin dipolar coupling show that the light-induced transmembrane helix movements are very similar to those found in bacteriorhodopsin but are altered by the presence of Na(+), resulting in a new feature, the clockwise rotation of helix F. The results establish the first observation of a cation switch controlling the conformations of a microbial rhodopsin and indicate specific interactions of Na(+) with the half-channels of DeNaR to open an appropriate path for ion translocation.

  10. Rhodopsin-like immunoreactivity in the 'all cone' retina of the chameleon (Chameleo chameleo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, Mohamed; Molday, Robert S; Versaux-Botteri, Claudine; Repérant, Jacques; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; McDevitt, David S

    2005-05-01

    Chameleons (Order, Reptilia: Family, Lacertilia) are unique among vertebrates in being able to make independent eye movements. The organisation of their retina, however, closely ressembles that of other diurnal lizards; based on morphological studies, it is typically described as containing only cone photoreceptors. We show here that a subpopulation of the photoreceptors are immunolabelled by an antibody directed against rhodopsin, suggesting the presence of rods. We conclude that in the nonmammalian retina, rods and cones cannot be exclusively distinguished on purely morphological grounds.

  11. Crystal structure of rhodopsin bound to arrestin by femtosecond X-ray laser

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signaling to numerous G protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveal...

  12. Modulation of thermal noise and spectral sensitivity in Lake Baikal cottoid fish rhodopsins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Montisci, Fabio; Morrow, James M.; Melaccio, Federico; Wada, Akimori; Sheves, Mudi; Fanelli, Francesca; Chang, Belinda S. W.; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-12-01

    Lake Baikal is the deepest and one of the most ancient lakes in the world. Its unique ecology has resulted in the colonization of a diversity of depth habitats by a unique fauna that includes a group of teleost fish of the sub-order Cottoidei. This relatively recent radiation of cottoid fishes shows a gradual blue-shift in the wavelength of the absorption maximum of their visual pigments with increasing habitat depth. Here we combine homology modeling and quantum chemical calculations with experimental in vitro measurements of rhodopsins to investigate dim-light adaptation. The calculations, which were able to reproduce the trend of observed absorption maxima in both A1 and A2 rhodopsins, reveal a Barlow-type relationship between the absorption maxima and the thermal isomerization rate suggesting a link between the observed blue-shift and a thermal noise decrease. A Nakanishi point-charge analysis of the electrostatic effects of non-conserved and conserved amino acid residues surrounding the rhodopsin chromophore identified both close and distant sites affecting simultaneously spectral tuning and visual sensitivity. We propose that natural variation at these sites modulate both the thermal noise and spectral shifting in Baikal cottoid visual pigments resulting in adaptations that enable vision in deep water light environments.

  13. Batch crystallization of rhodopsin for structural dynamics using an X-ray free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenting; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Rheinberger, Jan; Kick, Leonhard M; Gati, Cornelius; Nelson, Garrett; Deupi, Xavier; Standfuss, Jörg; Schertler, Gebhard; Panneels, Valérie

    2015-07-01

    Rhodopsin is a membrane protein from the G protein-coupled receptor family. Together with its ligand retinal, it forms the visual pigment responsible for night vision. In order to perform ultrafast dynamics studies, a time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography method is required owing to the nonreversible activation of rhodopsin. In such an approach, microcrystals in suspension are delivered into the X-ray pulses of an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) after a precise photoactivation delay. Here, a millilitre batch production of high-density microcrystals was developed by four methodical conversion steps starting from known vapour-diffusion crystallization protocols: (i) screening the low-salt crystallization conditions preferred for serial crystallography by vapour diffusion, (ii) optimization of batch crystallization, (iii) testing the crystal size and quality using second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and X-ray powder diffraction and (iv) production of millilitres of rhodopsin crystal suspension in batches for serial crystallography tests; these crystals diffracted at an XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source using a liquid-jet setup.

  14. The effect of phosphorylation on arrestin-rhodopsin interaction in the squid visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kelly A; Ou, Wei-Lin; Guan, Xinyu; Sugamori, Kim S; Bandyopadhyay, Abhishek; Ernst, Oliver P; Mitchell, Jane

    2015-12-01

    Invertebrate visual opsins are G protein-coupled receptors coupled to retinoid chromophores that isomerize reversibly between inactive rhodopsin and active metarhodopsin upon absorption of photons of light. The squid visual system has an arrestin protein that binds to metarhodopsin to block signaling to Gq and activation of phospholipase C. Squid rhodopsin kinase (SQRK) can phosphorylate both metarhodopsin and arrestin, a dual role that is unique among the G protein-coupled receptor kinases. The sites and role of arrestin phosphorylation by SQRK were investigated here using recombinant proteins. Arrestin was phosphorylated on serine 392 and serine 397 in the C-terminus. Unphosphorylated arrestin bound to metarhodopsin and phosphorylated metarhodopsin with similar high affinities (Kd 33 and 21 nM respectively), while phosphorylation of arrestin reduced the affinity 3- to 5-fold (Kd 104 nM). Phosphorylation of metarhodopsin slightly increased the dissociation of arrestin observed during a 1 hour incubation. Together these studies suggest a unique role for SQRK in phosphorylating both receptor and arrestin and inhibiting the binding of these two proteins in the squid visual system. Invertebrate visual systems are inactivated by arrestin binding to metarhodopsin that does not require receptor phosphorylation. Here we show that squid rhodopsin kinase phosphorylates arrestin on two serines (S392,S397) in the C-terminus and phosphorylation decreases the affinity of arrestin for squid metarhodopsin. Metarhodopsin phosphorylation has very little effect on arrestin binding but does increase arrestin dissociation.

  15. Isotope labeling of mammalian GPCRs in HEK293 cells and characterization of the C-terminus of bovine rhodopsin by high resolution liquid NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Karla; Richter, Christian; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith, E-mail: jks33@pitt.edu; Schwalbe, Harald [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Institute for Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (Germany)], E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de

    2008-01-15

    High amino acid coverage labeling of the mammalian G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) rhodopsin was established with {sup 15}N and {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C isotopes. Rhodopsin was expressed at preparative scale in HEK293S cells and studied in full-length by NMR spectroscopy in detergent micelle solution. This resulted in the assignment and detailed study of the dynamic properties of the C-terminus of rhodopsin. The rhodopsin C-terminus is immobilized until Ala333, after which it becomes unstructured.

  16. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of zinc oxide nanoparticles synthesized using phycobilins of Anabaena variabilis NTSS17

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangaraj Ramasamy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of zinc oxide nanoparticles synthesized using phycobilins of Anabaena variabilis NTSS17. Methods: The cyanobacterial isolate was collected from paddy field and morphologically identified as Anabaena variabilis NTSS17, that produces a pigment i.e. phycobiliproteins. The biosynthesized zinc nanoparticles were characterized by different spectroscopic and analytical techniques such as UV-visible spectrophotometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction which confirmed the formation of zinc nanoparticles. Results: Antibacterial activity of zinc oxide nanoparticles was examined against Escherichia coli, Rhodococcus rhodochrous and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The maximum zone of inhibition occurred at 5 mg/1000 mL concentration of zinc oxide nanoparticles. Conclusions: Due to potent antimicrobial and intrinsic properties of zinc oxide, it can be actively used for biomedical applications.

  17. Energetics of primary processes in visula escitation: photocalorimetry of rhodopsin in rod outer segment membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A; Converse, C A

    1976-07-13

    A sensitive technique for the direct calorimetric determination of the energetics of photochemical reactions under low levels of illumination, and its application to the study of primary processes in visula excitation, are described. Enthlpies are reported for various steps in the bleaching of rhodopsin in intact rod outer segment membranes, together with the heats of appropriate model reactions. Protonation changes are also determined calorimetrically by use of buffers with differing heats of proton ionization. Bleaching of rhodopsin is accompanied by significant uptake of heat energy, vastly in excess of the energy required for simple isomerization of the retinal chromophore. Metarhodopsin I formation involves the uptake of about 17 kcal/mol and no net change in proton ionization of the system. Formation of metarhodopsin II requires an additional energy of about 10 kcal/mol and involves the uptake on one hydrogen ion from solution. The energetics of the overall photolysis reaction, rhodopsin leads to opsin + all-trans-retinal, are pH dependent and involve the exposure of an additional titrating group on opsin. This group has a heat of proton ionization of about 12 kcal/mal, characteristic of a primary amine, but a pKa in the region of neutrality. We suggest that this group is the Schiff base lysine of the chromophore binding site of rhodopsin which becomes exposed on photolysis. The low pKa for this active lysine would result in a more stable retinal-opsin linkage, and might be induced by a nearby positively charged group on the protein (either arginine or a second lysine residue). This leads to a model involving intramolecular protonation of the Schiff base nitrogen in the retinal-opsin linkage of rhodopsin, which is consistent with the thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties of the system. We further propose that the metarhodopsin I leads to metarhodopsin II step in the bleaching sequence involves reversible hydrolysis of the Schiff base linkage in the

  18. The heat-shock response co-inducer arimoclomol protects against retinal degeneration in rhodopsin retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, D A; Aguila, M; McCulley, C H; Bevilacqua, D; Mendes, H F; Athanasiou, D; Novoselov, S S; Kanuga, N; Munro, P M; Coffey, P J; Kalmar, B; Greensmith, L; Cheetham, M E

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited diseases that cause blindness due to the progressive death of rod and cone photoreceptors in the retina. There are currently no effective treatments for RP. Inherited mutations in rhodopsin, the light-sensing protein of rod photoreceptor cells, are the most common cause of autosomal-dominant RP. The majority of mutations in rhodopsin, including the common P23H substitution, lead to protein misfolding, which is a feature in many neurodegenerative disorders. Previous studies have shown that upregulating molecular chaperone expression can delay disease progression in models of neurodegeneration. Here, we have explored the potential of the heat-shock protein co-inducer arimoclomol to ameliorate rhodopsin RP. In a cell model of P23H rod opsin RP, arimoclomol reduced P23H rod opsin aggregation and improved viability of mutant rhodopsin-expressing cells. In P23H rhodopsin transgenic rat models, pharmacological potentiation of the stress response with arimoclomol improved electroretinogram responses and prolonged photoreceptor survival, as assessed by measuring outer nuclear layer thickness in the retina. Furthermore, treated animal retinae showed improved photoreceptor outer segment structure and reduced rhodopsin aggregation compared with vehicle-treated controls. The heat-shock response (HSR) was activated in P23H retinae, and this was enhanced with arimoclomol treatment. Furthermore, the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is induced in P23H transgenic rats, was also enhanced in the retinae of arimoclomol-treated animals, suggesting that arimoclomol can potentiate the UPR as well as the HSR. These data suggest that pharmacological enhancement of cellular stress responses may be a potential treatment for rhodopsin RP and that arimoclomol could benefit diseases where ER stress is a factor. PMID:24853414

  19. Characteristics of Anabaena variabilis influencing plaque formation by cyanophage N-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Currier, T.C.; Wolk, C.P.

    1979-07-01

    Phage N-1 grown in Anabaena strain 7120 (N-1 . 7120) forms plaques on A. variabilis about 10/sup -7/ to 10/sup -6/ as efficiently as on Anabaena 7120. By manipulating different characteristics of the interaction between phage and host, it was possible to increase the relative efficiency of plaque formation to 0.38. Growth of A. variabilis at 40/sup 0/C for at least three generations resulted in an increase in the rate of phage adsorption and a 10-fold increase in the efficiency of plaque formation. The efficiency of plaque formation was further increased about 42-fold, with little or no further increase in rate of adsorption, in a variant strain, A. variabilis strain FD, isolated from a culture of A. variabilis which had grown for more than 30 generations at 40/sup 0/C. The low relative efficiency of plaque formation by N-1 . 7120 on A. variabilis could be partially accounted for if A. variabilis contains a deoxyribonucleic acid restriction endonuclease which is absent from Anabaena 7120. Indirect evidence for such an endonuclease included the following: (i) phage N-1 grown in A. variabilis (N-1 . Av) had approximately a 7 x 10/sup 3/-fold higher relative efficiency of plaque formation on A. variabilis than had N-1 . 7120; and (ii) the efficiency of plaque formation by N-1 . 7120 on A. variabilis strain FD was increased by up to 146-fold after heating the latter organism at 51/sup 0/C.

  20. All1371 is a polyphosphate-dependent glucokinase in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemke, Friederike; Beyer, Gabriele; Sawade, Linda; Saitov, Ali; Korte, Thomas; Maldener, Iris; Lockau, Wolfgang; Nürnberg, Dennis J; Volkmer, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    The polyphosphate glucokinases can phosphorylate glucose to glucose 6-phosphate using polyphosphate as the substrate. ORF all1371 encodes a putative polyphosphate glucokinase in the filamentous heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Here, ORF all1371 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and its purified product was characterized. Enzyme activity assays revealed that All1371 is an active polyphosphate glucokinase that can phosphorylate both glucose and mannose in the presence of divalent cations in vitro. Unlike many other polyphosphate glucokinases, for which nucleoside triphosphates (e.g. ATP or GTP) act as phosphoryl group donors, All1371 required polyphosphate to confer its enzymic activity. The enzymic reaction catalysed by All1371 followed classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with kcat = 48.2 s(-1) at pH 7.5 and 28 °C and KM = 1.76 µM and 0.118 mM for polyphosphate and glucose, respectively. Its reaction mechanism was identified as a particular multi-substrate mechanism called the 'bi-bi ping-pong mechanism'. Bioinformatic analyses revealed numerous polyphosphate-dependent glucokinases in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria. Viability of an Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 mutant strain lacking all1371 was impaired under nitrogen-fixing conditions. GFP promoter studies indicate expression of all1371 under combined nitrogen deprivation. All1371 might play a substantial role in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 under these conditions.

  1. Utilization of the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp CH1 in biological carbon dioxide mitigation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, C.L.; Lee, C.M.; Chen, P.C. [Hungkuang University, Taichung (Taiwan)

    2011-05-15

    Before switching totally to alternative fuel stage, CO{sub 2} mitigation process has considered a transitional strategy for combustion of fossil fuels inevitably. In comparison to other CO{sub 2} mitigation options, such as oceanic or geologic injection, the biological photosynthetic process would present a far superior and sustainable solution under both environmental and social considerations. The utilization of the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. CH1 in carbon dioxide mitigation processes is analyzed in our research. It was found that an original developed photobioreactor with internal light source exhibits high light utilization. Anabaena sp. CH1 demonstrates excellent CO{sub 2} tolerance even at 15% CO{sub 2} level. This enables flue gas from power plant to be directly introduced to Anabaena sp. CH1 culture. Double light intensity and increased 47% CO{sub 2} bubble retention time could enhance CO{sub 2} removal efficiencies by 79% and 67%, respectively. A maximum CO{sub 2} fixation rate of 1.01 g CO{sub 2} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} was measured experimentally.

  2. Functional properties of LptA and LptD in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Yi-Ching; Brouwer, Eva-M; Marzi, Julian; Mirus, Oliver; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-09-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are central components of the outer membrane and consist of Lipid A, the core polysaccharide, and the O-antigen. The synthesis of LPS is initiated at the cytosolic face of the cytoplasmic membrane. The subsequent transport to and across the outer membrane involves multiple lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) proteins. Among those proteins, the periplasmic-localized LptA and the outer membrane-embedded LptD participate in the last steps of transfer and insertion of LPS into the outer membrane. While the process is described for proteobacterial model systems, not much is known about the machinery in cyanobacteria. We demonstrate that anaLptD (alr1278) of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is important for cell wall function and its pore domain shows a Lipid A sensitive cation-selective gating behavior. The N-terminal domain of anaLptD recognizes anaLptA (alr4067), but not ecLptA. Furthermore, anaLptA specifically interacts with the Lipid A from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 only, while anaLptD binds to Lipid A isolated from Escherichia coli as well. Based on the comparative analysis of proteins from E. coli and Anabaena sp. we discuss the properties of the cyanobacterial Lpt system.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Experimental Studies on the Visual Pigment Rhodopsin: Multiple Conformational States and Structural Changes

    CERN Document Server

    Kholmurodov, Kh T; Ostrovsky, M A; Biochemical Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia

    2005-01-01

    Based on the MD simulations with a supercomputer and the special-purposes MDGRAPE-2 machine we have performed 3-ns MD calculations on the rhodopsin molecule and presented the structure analysis data for its dark-adapted state. We have fulfilled the RMSD (root-mean-square deviation) and structural analysis for the rhodopsin (with 11-\\textit{cis} retinal), generated the pictures of the atomic-scale processes for the binding pocket, surrounding the chromophore retinal, and compared the helical deviations for the beta-ionone ring and Schiff base linkage regions of the protein. The most remarkable point of our observations is that the rhodopsin helical distortions in the dark state are accompanied with the transformation of the retinal chromophore, viz. with the rotation of the beta-ionone ring inside the protein binding pocket. The low-temperature absorption spectroscopy technique has been used to study the primary stages of rhodopsin photolysis. The structural transformation properties of rhodopsin were discusse...

  4. Assessment of Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120 as a Heterologous Expression Host for Cyanobacterial Natural Products: Production of Lyngbyatoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videau, Patrick; Wells, Kaitlyn N; Singh, Arun J; Gerwick, William H; Philmus, Benjamin

    2016-09-16

    Cyanobacteria are well-known producers of natural products of highly varied structure and biological properties. However, the long doubling times, difficulty in establishing genetic methods for marine cyanobacteria, and low compound titers have hindered research into the biosynthesis of their secondary metabolites. While a few attempts to heterologously express cyanobacterial natural products have occurred, the results have been of varied success. Here, we report the first steps in developing the model freshwater cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 (Anabaena 7120) as a general heterologous expression host for cyanobacterial secondary metabolites. We show that Anabaena 7120 can heterologously synthesize lyngbyatoxin A in yields comparable to those of the native producer, Moorea producens, and detail the design and use of replicative plasmids for compound production. We also demonstrate that Anabaena 7120 recognizes promoters from various biosynthetic gene clusters from both free-living and obligate symbiotic marine cyanobacteria. Through simple genetic manipulations, the titer of lyngbyatoxin A can be improved up to 13-fold. The development of Anabaena 7120 as a general heterologous expression host enables investigation of interesting cyanobacterial biosynthetic reactions and genetic engineering of their biosynthetic pathways.

  5. Rhodopsin in the Dark Hot Sea: Molecular Analysis of Rhodopsin in a Snailfish, Careproctus rhodomelas, Living near the Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Sakata

    Full Text Available Visual systems in deep-sea fishes have been previously studied from a photobiological aspect; however, those of deep-sea fish inhabiting the hydrothermal vents are far less understood due to sampling difficulties. In this study, we analyzed the visual pigment of a deep-sea snailfish, Careproctus rhodomelas, discovered and collected only near the hydrothermal vents of oceans around Japan. Proteins were solubilized from the C. rhodomelas eyeball and subjected to spectroscopic analysis, which revealed the presence of a pigment characterized by an absorption maximum (λmax at 480 nm. Immunoblot analysis of the ocular protein showed a rhodopsin-like immunoreactivity. We also isolated a retinal cDNA encoding the entire coding sequence of putative C. rhodomelas rhodopsin (CrRh. HEK293EBNA cells were transfected with the CrRh cDNA and the proteins extracted from the cells were subjected to spectroscopic analysis. The recombinant CrRh showed the absorption maximum at 480 nm in the presence of 11-cis retinal. Comparison of the results from the eyeball extract and the recombinant CrRh strongly suggests that CrRh has an A1-based 11-cis-retinal chromophore and works as a photoreceptor in the C. rhodomelas retina, and hence that C. rhodomelas responds to dim blue light much the same as other deep-sea fishes. Because hydrothermal vent is a huge supply of viable food, C. rhodomelas likely do not need to participate diel vertical migration and may recognize the bioluminescence produced by aquatic animals living near the hydrothermal vents.

  6. Report sensory analyses veal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldman, M.; Schelvis-Smit, A.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    On behalf of a client of Animal Sciences Group, different varieties of veal were analyzed by both instrumental and sensory analyses. The sensory evaluation was performed with a sensory analytical panel in the period of 13th of May and 31st of May, 2005. The three varieties of veal were: young bull,

  7. Ultra-high vacuum surface analysis study of rhodopsin incorporation into supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Roger; Subramaniam, Varuni; McArthur, Sally L; Bondurant, Bruce; D'Ambruoso, Gemma D; Hall, Henry K; Brown, Michael F; Ross, Eric E; Saavedra, S Scott; Castner, David G

    2008-05-06

    Planar supported lipid bilayers that are stable under ambient atmospheric and ultra-high-vacuum conditions were prepared by cross-linking polymerization of bis-sorbylphosphatidylcholine (bis-SorbPC). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were employed to investigate bilayers that were cross-linked using either redox-initiated radical polymerization or ultraviolet photopolymerization. The redox method yields a more structurally intact bilayer; however, the UV method is more compatible with incorporation of transmembrane proteins. UV polymerization was therefore used to prepare cross-linked bilayers with incorporated bovine rhodopsin, a light-activated, G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). A previous study (Subramaniam, V.; Alves, I. D.; Salgado, G. F. J.; Lau, P. W.; Wysocki, R. J.; Salamon, Z.; Tollin, G.; Hruby, V. J.; Brown, M. F.; Saavedra, S. S. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 5320-5321) showed that rhodopsin retains photoactivity after incorporation into UV-polymerized bis-SorbPC, but did not address how the protein is associated with the bilayer. In this study, we show that rhodopsin is retained in supported bilayers of poly(bis-SorbPC) under ultra-high-vacuum conditions, on the basis of the increase in the XPS nitrogen concentration and the presence of characteristic amino acid peaks in the ToF-SIMS data. Angle-resolved XPS data show that the protein is inserted into the bilayer, rather than adsorbed on the bilayer surface. This is the first study to demonstrate the use of ultra-high-vacuum techniques for structural studies of supported proteolipid bilayers.

  8. Selection and characterization of Euglena anabaena var. minor as a new candidate Euglena species for industrial application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kengo; Mitra, Sharbanee; Iwata, Osamu; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Kato, Sueo; Yamada, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Euglena gracilis is a microalgae used as a model organism. Recently, mass cultivation of this species has been achieved for industrial applications. The genus Euglena includes more than 200 species that share common useful features, but the potential industrial applications of other Euglena species have not been evaluated. Thus, we conducted a pilot screening study to identify other species that proliferate at a sufficiently rapid rate to be used for mass cultivation; we found that Euglena anabaena var. minor had a rapid growth rate. In addition, its cells accumulated more than 40% weight of carbohydrate, most of which is considered to be a euglenoid specific type of beta-1-3-glucan, paramylon. Carbohydrate is stored in E. anabaena var. minor cells during normal culture, whereas E. gracilis requires nitrogen limitation to facilitate paramylon accumulation. These results suggest the potential industrial application of E. anabaena var. minor.

  9. Quantum-classical model of retinal photoisomerization reaction in visual pigment rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhno, V D; Shigaev, A S; Feldman, T B; Nadtochenko, V A; Ostrovsky, M A

    2016-11-01

    A quantum-classical model of photoisomerization of the visual pigment rhodopsin chromophore is proposed. At certain (and more realistic) parameter value combinations, the model is shown to accurately reproduce a number of independent experimental data on the photoreaction dynamics: the quantum yield, the time to reach the point of conical intersection of potential energy surfaces, the termination time of the evolution of quantum subsystem, as well as the characteristic low frequencies of retinal molecular lattice fluctuations during photoisomerization. In addition, the model behavior is in good accordance with experimental data about coherence and local character of quantum transition.

  10. Accessibility and sensory experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryhl, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a new design concept; sensory accessibility. While acknowledging the importance of sensory experiences in architectural quality, as well as the importance of accommodating user needs the concept combines three equally important factors; architecture, the senses and accessi......This article introduces a new design concept; sensory accessibility. While acknowledging the importance of sensory experiences in architectural quality, as well as the importance of accommodating user needs the concept combines three equally important factors; architecture, the senses...... and accessibility. Sensory accessibility accommodates aspects of a sensory disability and describes architectural design requirements needed to ensure access to architectural experiences. In the context of architecture accessibility has become a design concept of its own. It is generally described as ensuring...... physical access to the built environment by accommodating physical disabilities. While the existing concept of accessibility ensures the physical access of everyone to a given space, sensory accessibility ensures the choice of everyone to stay and be able to participate and experience....

  11. Backbone dynamics of reduced plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis: Regions involved in electron transfer have enhanced mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, L.X.; Hass, M.A.S.; Vierick, N.;

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of the backbone of the electron-transfer protein plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis were determined from the N-15 and C-13(alpha) R-1 and R-2) relaxation rates and steady-state [H-1]-N-15 and [H-1]-C-13 nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) using the model-free appr......The dynamics of the backbone of the electron-transfer protein plastocyanin from the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis were determined from the N-15 and C-13(alpha) R-1 and R-2) relaxation rates and steady-state [H-1]-N-15 and [H-1]-C-13 nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) using the model...

  12. Regulation of Nitrogenase Gene Expression by Transcript Stability in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis

    OpenAIRE

    Pratte, Brenda S.; Thiel, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The nitrogenase gene cluster in cyanobacteria has been thought to comprise multiple operons; however, in Anabaena variabilis, the promoter for the first gene in the cluster, nifB1, appeared to be the primary promoter for the entire nif cluster. The structural genes nifHDK1 were the most abundant transcripts; however, their abundance was not controlled by an independent nifH1 promoter, but rather, by RNA processing, which produced a very stable nifH1 transcript and a moderately stable nifD1 tr...

  13. Bacterial Anabaena variabilis phenylalanine ammonia lyase: a biocatalyst with broad substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Sarah L; Turner, Nicholas J

    2014-10-15

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyases (PALs) catalyse the regio- and stereoselective hydroamination of cinnamic acid analogues to yield optically enriched α-amino acids. Herein, we demonstrate that a bacterial PAL from Anabaena variabilis (AvPAL) displays significantly higher activity towards a series of non-natural substrates than previously described eukaryotic PALs. Biotransformations performed on a preparative scale led to the synthesis of the 2-chloro- and 4-trifluoromethyl-phenylalanine derivatives in excellent ee, highlighting the enormous potential of bacterial PALs as biocatalysts for the synthesis of high value, non-natural amino acids.

  14. Cloning and sequencing of the ferredoxin gene of blue-green alga Anabaena siamensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shou-Dong; Song, Li-Rong; Liu, Yong-Ding; Zhao, Jin-Dong

    1998-03-01

    The structure gene for ferredoxin, petFI, from Anabaena siamensis has been amplified by polymerase chain reaction(PCR) and cloned into cloning vector pGEM-3zf(+). The nucleotide sequence of petFI has been determined with silver staining sequencing method. There is 96.8% homology between coding region of petFI from A. siamensis and that of petFI from A. sp. 7120. Amino acid sequences of seven strains of blue-green algae are compared.

  15. INFLUENCE OF HIGH LIGHT INTENSITY ON THE CELLS OF CYANOBACTERIA ANABAENA VARIABILIS SP. ATCC 29413

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OPRIŞ SANDA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article is presented the result of research regardind the effect of high light intensity on the cells of Anabaena variabilis sp. ATCC 29413, the main objective is to study the adaptation of photosynthetic apparatus to light stress. Samples were analyzed in the present of herbicide diuron (DCMU which blocks electron flow from photosystem II and without diuron. During treatment maximum fluorescence and photosystems efficiency are significantly reduced, reaching very low values compared with the blank, as a result of photoinhibition installation. Also by this treatment is shown the importance of the mechanisms by which cells detect the presence of light stress and react accordingly.

  16. Vibrational resonance, allostery, and activation in rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Kristina N.; Pfeffer, Jürgen; Dutta, Arpana; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2016-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are a large family of membrane proteins activated by a variety of structurally diverse ligands making them highly adaptable signaling molecules. Despite recent advances in the structural biology of this protein family, the mechanism by which ligands induce allosteric changes in protein structure and dynamics for its signaling function remains a mystery. Here, we propose the use of terahertz spectroscopy combined with molecular dynamics simulation and protein evolutionary network modeling to address the mechanism of activation by directly probing the concerted fluctuations of retinal ligand and transmembrane helices in rhodopsin. This approach allows us to examine the role of conformational heterogeneity in the selection and stabilization of specific signaling pathways in the photo-activation of the receptor. We demonstrate that ligand-induced shifts in the conformational equilibrium prompt vibrational resonances in the protein structure that link the dynamics of conserved interactions with fluctuations of the active-state ligand. The connection of vibrational modes creates an allosteric association of coupled fluctuations that forms a coherent signaling pathway from the receptor ligand-binding pocket to the G-protein activation region. Our evolutionary analysis of rhodopsin-like GPCRs suggest that specific allosteric sites play a pivotal role in activating structural fluctuations that allosterically modulate functional signals.

  17. Evolution of eye morphology and rhodopsin expression in the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Posnien

    Full Text Available A striking diversity of compound eye size and shape has evolved among insects. The number of ommatidia and their size are major determinants of the visual sensitivity and acuity of the compound eye. Each ommatidium is composed of eight photoreceptor cells that facilitate the discrimination of different colours via the expression of various light sensitive Rhodopsin proteins. It follows that variation in eye size, shape, and opsin composition is likely to directly influence vision. We analyzed variation in these three traits in D. melanogaster, D. simulans and D. mauritiana. We show that D. mauritiana generally has larger eyes than its sibling species, which is due to a combination of larger ommatidia and more ommatidia. In addition, intra- and inter-specific differences in eye size among D. simulans and D. melanogaster strains are mainly caused by variation in ommatidia number. By applying a geometric morphometrics approach to assess whether the formation of larger eyes influences other parts of the head capsule, we found that an increase in eye size is associated with a reduction in the adjacent face cuticle. Our shape analysis also demonstrates that D. mauritiana eyes are specifically enlarged in the dorsal region. Intriguingly, this dorsal enlargement is associated with enhanced expression of rhodopsin 3 in D. mauritiana. In summary, our data suggests that the morphology and functional properties of the compound eyes vary considerably within and among these closely related Drosophila species and may be part of coordinated morphological changes affecting the head capsule.

  18. Detection of rhodopsin dimerization in situ by PIE-FCCS, a time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam W

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin self-associates in the plasma membrane. At low concentrations, the interactions are consistent with a monomer-dimer equilibrium (Comar et al., J Am Chem Soc 136(23):8342-8349, 2014). At high concentrations in native tissue, higher-order clusters have been observed (Fotiadis et al., Nature 421:127-128, 2003). The physiological role of rhodopsin dimerization is still being investigated, but it is clear that a quantitative assessment is essential to determining the function of rhodopsin clusters in vision. To quantify rhodopsin interactions, I will outline the theory and methodology of a specialized time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for measuring membrane protein-protein interactions called pulsed-interleaved excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (PIE-FCCS). The strength of this technique is its ability to quantify rhodopsin interactions in situ (i.e., a live cell plasma membrane). There are two reasons for restricting the scope to live cell membranes. First, the compositional heterogeneity of the plasma membrane creates a complex milieu with thousands of lipid, protein, and carbohydrate species. This makes it difficult to infer quaternary interactions from detergent solubilized samples or construct a model phospholipid bilayer that recapitulates all of the interactions present in native membranes. Second, organizational structure and dynamics is a key feature of the plasma membrane, and fixation techniques like formaldehyde cross-linking and vitrification will modulate the interactions. PIE-FCCS is based on two-color fluorescence imaging with time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) (Becker et al., Rev Sci Instrum 70:1835-1841, 1999). By time-tagging every detected photon, the data can be analyzed as a fluorescence intensity distribution, fluorescence lifetime histogram, or fluorescence (cross-)correlation spectra (FCS/FCCS) (Becker, Advanced time-correlated single-photon counting techniques, Springer, Berlin, 2005). These

  19. Opsin cDNA sequences of a UV and green rhodopsin of the satyrine butterfly Bicyclus anynana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhoutte, Kürt; Eggen, BJL; Janssen, JJM; Stavenga, DG

    2002-01-01

    The cDNAs of an ultraviolet (UV) and long-wavelength (LW) (green) absorbing rhodopsin of the bush brown Bicyclus anynana were partially identified. The UV sequence, encoding 377 amino acids, is 76-79% identical to the UV sequences of the papilionids Papilio glaucus and Papilio xuthus and the moth Ma

  20. The Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 Exoproteome: Taking a Peek outside the Box

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interest in examining the subset of proteins present in the extracellular milieu, the exoproteome, has been growing due to novel insights highlighting their role on extracellular matrix organization and biofilm formation, but also on homeostasis and development. The cyanobacterial exoproteome is poorly studied, and the role of cyanobacterial exoproteins on cell wall biogenesis, morphology and even physiology is largely unknown. Here, we present a comprehensive examination of the Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 exoproteome under various growth conditions. Altogether, 139 proteins belonging to 16 different functional categories have been identified. A large fraction (48% of the identified proteins is classified as “hypothetical”, falls into the “other categories” set or presents no similarity to other proteins. The evidence presented here shows that Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is capable of outer membrane vesicle formation and that these vesicles are likely to contribute to the exoproteome profile. Furthermore, the activity of selected exoproteins associated with oxidative stress has been assessed, suggesting their involvement in redox homeostasis mechanisms in the extracellular space. Finally, we discuss our results in light of other cyanobacterial exoproteome studies and focus on the potential of exploring cyanobacteria as cell factories to produce and secrete selected proteins.

  1. Effects of lead accumulation on the Azolla caroliniana-Anabaena association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Anne E; Boylen, Charles W; Nierzwicki-Bauer, Sandra A

    2014-04-01

    The effect of lead accumulation on photopigment production, mineral nutrition, and Anabaena vegetative cell size and heterocyst formation in Azolla caroliniana was investigated. Plants were exposed to 0, 1, 5, 10, and 20 mg L(-1) lead acetate for ten days. Lead accumulation increased when plants were treated with higher lead concentrations. Results revealed a statistically significant decline in total chlorophyll, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and carotenoids in 5, 10, and 20 mg Pb L(-1) treatment groups as compared to plants with 0 or 1 mg Pb L(-1) treatments. No statistically significant change in anthocyanin production was observed. Calcium, magnesium, and zinc concentrations in plants decreased in increasing treatment groups, whereas sodium and potassium concentrations increased. Nitrogen and carbon were also found to decrease in plant tissue. Anabaena vegetative cells decreased in size and heterocyst frequency declined rapidly in a Pb dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that, while A. caroliniana removes lead from aqueous solution, the heavy metal causes physiological and biochemical changes by impairing photosynthesis, changing mineral nutrition, and impeding the growth and formation of heterocysts of the symbiotic cyanobacteria that live within leaf cavities of the fronds.

  2. Paired cloning vectors for complementation of mutations in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolk, C. Peter Wolk [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Fan, Qing [Northwestern University, Evanston; Zhou, Ruanbao [Anhui Normal University, People' s Republic of China; Huang, Guocun [University of Texas Southwestern Medical; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Kuritz, Tanya [ORNL; Wojciuch, Elizabeth [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2007-01-01

    The clones generated in a sequencing project represent a resource for subsequent analysis of the organism whose genome has been sequenced. We describe an interrelated group of cloning vectors that either integrate into the genome or replicate, and that enhance the utility, for developmental and other studies, of the clones used to determine the genomic sequence of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. One integrating vector is a mobilizable BAC vector that was used both to generate bridging clones and to complement transposon mutations. Upon addition of a cassette that permits mobilization and selection, pUC-based sequencing clones can also integrate into the genome and thereupon complement transposon mutations. The replicating vectors are based on cyanobacterial plasmid pDU1, whose sequence we report, and on broad-host-range plasmid RSF1010. The RSF1010- and pDU1-based vectors provide the opportunity to express different genes from either cell-type-specific or -generalist promoters, simultaneously from different plasmids in the same cyanobacterial cells. We show that pDU1 ORF4 and its upstream region play an essential role in the replication and copy number of pDU1, and that ORFs alr2887 and alr3546 (hetF{sub A}) of Anabaena sp. are required specifically for fixation of dinitrogen under oxic conditions.

  3. Utilization of the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047 in CO2 removal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González López, C V; Acién Fernández, F G; Fernández Sevilla, J M; Sánchez Fernández, J F; Cerón García, M C; Molina Grima, E

    2009-12-01

    In this paper the utilization of the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. in carbon dioxide removal processes is evaluated. For this, continuous cultures of this strain were performed at different dilution rates; alternatives for the recovery of the organic matter produced being also studied. A maximum CO(2) fixation rate of 1.45 g CO(2) L(-1) day(-1) was measured experimentally, but it can be increased up to 3.0 g CO(2) L(-1) day(-1) outdoors. The CO(2) is mainly transformed into exopolysaccharides, biomass representing one third of the total organic matter produced. Organic matter can be recovered by sedimentation with efficiencies higher than 90%, the velocity of sedimentation being 2.10(-4) s(-1). The major compounds were carbohydrates and proteins with productivities of 0.70 and 0.12 g L(-1) day(-1), respectively. The behaviour of the cultures of Anabaena sp. has been modelized, also the characteristics parameters requested to design separation units being reported. Finally, to valorizate the organic matter as biofertilizers and biofuels is proposed.

  4. BIOTRANSFORMATION OF 2,4,6-TRINITROTOLUENE IN A CONTINUOUS-FLOW ANABAENA SP. SYSTEM. (R825513C013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reductive transformation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) was observed in a continuous-flow system of Anabaena sp. operated for 33 d with a 5.7 d hydraulic retention time and a range of influent TNT concentrations of 1–58 mg/l. The TNT removal effici...

  5. Amino Acid Transporters and Release of Hydrophobic Amino Acids in the Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pernil

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that can use inorganic compounds such as nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources. In the absence of combined nitrogen, it can fix N2 in differentiated cells called heterocysts. Anabaena also shows substantial activities of amino acid uptake, and three ABC-type transporters for amino acids have been previously characterized. Seven new loci encoding predicted amino acid transporters were identified in the Anabaena genomic sequence and inactivated. Two of them were involved in amino acid uptake. Locus alr2535-alr2541 encodes the elements of a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter that is mainly involved in the uptake of glycine. ORF all0342 encodes a putative transporter from the dicarboxylate/amino acid:cation symporter (DAACS family whose inactivation resulted in an increased uptake of a broad range of amino acids. An assay to study amino acid release from Anabaena filaments to the external medium was set up. Net release of the alanine analogue α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB was observed when transport system N-I (a hydrophobic amino acid ABC-type transporter was engaged in the uptake of a specific substrate. The rate of AIB release was directly proportional to the intracellular AIB concentration, suggesting leakage from the cells by diffusion.

  6. HIV Associated Sensory Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    G, Amruth; S, Praveen-kumar; B, Nataraju; BS, Nagaraja

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy, sensory neuropathies have increased in prevalence. We have documented the frequency and profile of the two most common forms of sensory neuropathies associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and looked into clinicoelectrophysiological correlates to differentiate the two entities.

  7. COMPARATIVE GROWTH AND BIOCHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF FOUR STRAINS OF Nostoc AND Anabaena (CYANOBACTERIA, NOSTOCALES IN RELATION TO SODIUM NITRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Rosales Loaiza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTNitrogen concentration is an essential parameter in cyanobacterial cultures to produce enriched biomass with biotechnological purposes. Growth and biochemical composition of Nostoc LAUN0015, Nostoc UAM206, Anabaena sp.1 and Anabaena sp.2 were compared at 0, 4.25, 8.5 and 17 mM NaNO3. Cultures under laboratory conditions were maintained for 30 days at a volume of 500 mL. Anabaena sp.1 yielded the highest value of dry mass of 0.26 ± 2.49 mg mL-1 at 8.5 mM NaNO3. For chlorophyll, phycocyanin and phycoerythrin, maximum values were achieved at 17 mM NaNO3 with 18.09 ± 1.74, 102.90 ± 6.73 and 53.47 ± 2.40 μg mL-1, respectively. Nostoc LAUN0015 produced its maximum value of protein 644.86 ± 19.77 μg mL-1, and 890 mg mL-1 of carbohydrates in the absence of nitrogen. This comparative study shows that the most efficient strain for the production of protein, carbohydrates and lipids in diazotrophic conditions corresponded to Nostoc LAUN0015. However, Anabaena sp.1 and Anabaena sp.2 required high nitrogen concentrations to achieve higher values of metabolites, comparing with Nostoc strains. Nitrogen dependence for the production of pigments and high protein production in strains of Anabaena and in diazotrophic conditions for Nostoc was demonstrated. Nostoc can be cultured under nitrogen deficiency and Anabaena in sufficiency, for biomass production enriched with proteins and carbohydrates.Comparación del crecimiento y Composición Bioquímica de cuatro cepas de Nostoc y Anabaena (Cyanobacteria, Nostocales en relación con el nitrato de sodioRESUMENLa concentración de nitrógeno constituye un parámetro esencial en cultivos de cianobacterias para la producción de biomasa enriquecida con fines biotecnológicos. Se comparó el crecimiento y composición bioquímica de las cepas Nostoc LAUN0015, Nostoc UAM206, Anabaena sp.1 y Anabaena sp.2 a 0, 4,25; 8,5 y 17 mM NaNO3. Los cultivos en condiciones de laboratorio fueron mantenidos durante 30 d

  8. Modulation of the Absorption Maximum of Rhodopsin by Amino Acids in the C-terminus†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Tada, Takashi; Yamato, Takahisa

    2008-01-01

    Vision begins when light is absorbed by visual pigments. It is commonly believed that the absorption spectra of visual pigments are modulated by interactions between the retinal and amino acids within or near 4.5 Å of the retinal in the transmembrane (TM) segments. However, this dogma has not been rigorously tested. In this study, we show that the retinal-opsin interactions extend well beyond the retinal binding pocket. We found that, although it is positioned outside of TM segments, the C-terminus of the rhodopsin in the rockfish longspine thornyhead (Sebastolobus altivelis) modulates its λmax by interacting mainly with the last TM segment. Our results illustrate how amino acids in the C-terminus are likely to interact with the retinal. We anticipate our analyses to be a starting point for viewing the spectral tuning of visual pigments as interactions between the retinal and key amino acids that are distributed throughout the entire pigment. PMID:16922606

  9. Photochemical reactivity of polyenes: from dienes to rhodopsin, from microseconds to femtoseconds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Robert S H; Hammond, George S

    2003-08-01

    In reviewing the photochemistry of polyenes (from dienes and trienes to the visual retinyl chromophore), we categorize condensed-phase photochemical reactivity of molecules into two groups: those from thermally equilibrated excited species and those from unequilibrated excited species. Classical theories on radiationless transitions are useful for rationalizing the reactivity of molecules belonging to the first set only. The second group includes many of the exciting ultrafast photochemical reactions reported recently for polyenes (including dienes and trienes), in some cases with rates faster than vibrational relaxation. Much of the excited singlet-state reactions of polyenes, including the Hula-twist mechanism of photoisomerization, have been integrated with concepts introduced in other ultrafast spectroscopic/photochemical studies. Taking into consideration the special environment of the retinyl chromophore in rhodopsin, we propose a new mechanism for the phototrigger that accounts for its unusually fast rate of isomerization.

  10. In silico and wet-lab study revealed cadmium is the potent inhibitor of HupL in Anabaena sp. PC C 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shilpi; Shrivastava, Alok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The hupL of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 encodes the large subunit of uptake hydrogenase found in all diazotrophic cyanobacteria and boosts up the nitrogen-fixing potential by catalyzing the removal of the molecular hydrogen produced as a by-product of dinitrogen fixation. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that HupL from Anabaena sp. PCC7120 is a 60.2 kDa, thermostable, glycine-rich protein having highest structural similarity with NiFeSe hydrogenase of Desulfomicrobium baculatumis. Toxicity of selected abiotic stresses like arsenic, cadmium, copper, and salt with HupL was further reconciled by wet-lab approaches like qRT-PCR, hydrogenase and nitrogenase activity assay as hydrogenases unintendedly affect the nitrogenase activity in Anabaena. Down-regulated transcript along with highly inhibited hydrogenase and nitrogenase activities under cadmium stress revealed that cadmium is a potent inhibitor of hydrogenases in Anabaena which indirectly affects its nitrogen-fixing capabilities

  11. Role of the all1549 (ana-rsh) gene, a relA/spoT homolog, of the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Degang; Qian, Yaru; Miao, Xiaogang; Wen, Chongwei

    2011-06-01

    The role of a single relA/spoT homolog all1549 (designated hereafter as ana-rsh) of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120 was investigated. The complementation test in Escherichia coli showed that the protein encoded by ana-rsh possesses guanosine tetraphosphate (p)ppGpp-synthase/hydrolase activity. Under laboratory growth conditions, a low level of ppGpp was detected in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and the loss of ana-rsh was lethal. Amino acid starvation induced ppGpp accumulation to an appropriate level, and nitrogen deficiency did not alter the ppGpp concentration in Anabaena cells. These data suggest that ana-rsh is required for cell viability under normal growth conditions and involved in the (p)ppGpp-related stringent response to amino acid deprivation, but not related to heterocyst formation and nitrogen fixation of Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

  12. Kinetics of rhodopsin deactivation and its role in regulating recovery and reproducibility of rod photoresponse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Caruso

    Full Text Available The single photon response (SPR in vertebrate phototransduction is regulated by the dynamics of R* during its lifetime, including the random number of phosphorylations, the catalytic activity and the random sojourn time at each phosphorylation level. Because of this randomness the electrical responses are expected to be inherently variable. However the SPR is highly reproducible. The mechanisms that confer to the SPR such a low variability are not completely understood. The kinetics of rhodopsin deactivation is investigated by a Continuous Time Markov Chain (CTMC based on the biochemistry of rhodopsin activation and deactivation, interfaced with a spatio-temporal model of phototransduction. The model parameters are extracted from the photoresponse data of both wild type and mutant mice, having variable numbers of phosphorylation sites and, with the same set of parameters, the model reproduces both WT and mutant responses. The sources of variability are dissected into its components, by asking whether a random number of turnoff steps, a random sojourn time between steps, or both, give rise to the known variability. The model shows that only the randomness of the sojourn times in each of the phosphorylated states contributes to the Coefficient of Variation (CV of the response, whereas the randomness of the number of R* turnoff steps has a negligible effect. These results counter the view that the larger the number of decay steps of R*, the more stable the photoresponse is. Our results indicate that R* shutoff is responsible for the variability of the photoresponse, while the diffusion of the second messengers acts as a variability suppressor.

  13. Phospholipid Bicelles Improve the Conformational Stability of Rhodopsin Mutants Associated with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoyun; Ramon, Eva; Herrera-Hernández, María Guadalupe; Garriga, Pere

    2015-08-11

    Mutations in the visual photoreceptor rhodopsin are the cause of the retinal degenerative disease retinitis pigmentosa. Some naturally occurring mutations can lead to protein conformational instability. Two such mutations, N55K and G90V, in the first and second transmembrane helices of the receptor, have been associated with sector and classical retinitis pigmentosa, respectively, and showed enhanced thermal sensitivity. We have carefully analyzed the effect of phospholipid bicelles on the stability and ligand binding properties of these two mutants and compared it with those of the detergent-solubilized samples. We have used a phospholipid bilayer consisting of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC). We find that DMPC/DHPC bicelles dramatically increase the thermal stability of the rhodopsin mutants G90V and N55K. The chromophore stability and regeneration of the mutants were also increased in bicelles when compared to their behavior in a dodecyl maltoside detergent solution. The retinal release process was slowed in bicelles, and chromophore entry, after illumination, was improved for the G90V mutant but not for N55K. Furthermore, fluorescence spectroscopy measurements showed that bicelles allowed more exogenous retinal binding to the photoactivated G90V mutant than in a detergent solution. In contrast, N55K could not reposition any chromophore either in the detergent or in bicelles. The results demonstrate that DMPC/DHPC bicelles can counteract the destabilizing effect of the disease-causing mutations and can modulate the structural changes in the ensuing receptor photoactivation in a distinct specific manner for different retinitis pigmentosa mutant phenotypes.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide dependence of cyanophage sensitivity and aerobic nitrogen fixation in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X; Khudyakov, I; Wolk, C P

    1997-05-01

    Fox- mutants of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 are unable to fix dinitrogen in the presence of oxygen. A fragment of the DNA of Anabaena sp. was cloned by complementation of a spontaneous Fox-, cyanophage-resistant mutant, R56, and characterized. Random insertion of transposon Tn5 delimited the complementing DNA to a 0.6-kb portion of the cloned fragment. Sequencing of this region and flanking DNA showed one complete open reading frame (ORF) similar to the gene rfbP (undecaprenyl-phosphate galactosephosphotransferase) and two partial ORFs similar to genes rfbD (GDP-D-mannose dehydratase) and rfbZ (first mannosyl transferase), all of which are active in the synthesis of the O antigen unit of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. In a transposon (Tn5-1087b)-induced, Fox-, cyanophage-resistant mutant, B14, the transposon was found within the same rfbP-like ORF. The three ORFs were insertionally inactivated with the omega cassette (P. Prentki and H. M. Krisch, Gene 29:303-313, 1984) or with Tn5::omega. Only the insertions in the rfbZ- and rfbP-like ORFs led to resistance to cyanophages A-1(L) and A-4(L) and to a Fox- phenotype. Electrophoretic analysis showed that interruption of the rfbZ- and rfbP-like ORFs resulted in a change in or loss of the characteristic pattern of the lengths of the LPS, whereas interruption of the rfbD-like ORF merely changed the distribution of the lengths of the LPS to one with a greater prevalence of low molecular weights. According to electron microscopy, interruption of the rfbP-like ORF may have led to aberrant deposition of the layers of the heterocyst envelope, resulting in increased leakage of oxygen into the heterocyst. The results suggest that modified LPS may prevent cyanophage infection of Anabaena sp. vegetative cells and the formation of a functional heterocyst envelope.

  15. Mixotrophic Cultures of Anabaena sp. PCC7120%鱼腥藻 Anabaena sp. PCC7120的混合营养生长

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻国策; 辛晓峰; 蔡昭铃; 施定基; 欧阳藩

    2000-01-01

    在高光强为160 μE/(m2.s)、低光强为16 μE/(m2.s)、葡萄糖浓度030g/L范围内,进行了鱼腥藻 Anabaena sp. PCC7120的摇瓶光自养和混合营养培养.在高光强下最大藻细胞密度(0.923.1g/L)明显高于低光强(0.110.58g/L),而且高光强使混合营养培养的对数期缩短.在不同光强下,葡萄糖浓度在018g/L范围内提高显著促进了细胞的生长,在1830g/L范围内变化对细胞生长不再有更大的影响.高光强促进了藻细胞对葡萄糖的利用.在高光强下随着葡萄糖浓度的提高,细胞得率逐渐变小.

  16. 中国鱼腥藻属的两个新记录种%Two newly recorded species of Anabaena(Nostocales, Cyanobacteria) in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李守淳; 柴文波; 郑洪萍; 耿军灵; 李仁辉

    2012-01-01

    迄今为止,全球范围共报道出100多种鱼腥藻,中国记录报道的仅有50余种,但有些种类的描述仍较模糊.最近在福建、浙江等地进行野外调查时,发现了多种丝状蓝藻.其中就有2种鱼腥藻在中国尚未报道:威格鱼腥藻( Anabaena viguieri Denis et Frémy 1923)和史密斯鱼腥藻(Anabaena smithii( Komárek)Watanabe 1992).%So far, more than 100 species of genus Anabaena have been recorded in the world, and about 50 taxa were described in China. During our recent field investigations for water-bloom forming cyanobacteria in China, several filamentous cyanobacterial species were examined in the samples. In this study, we demonstrated that two Anabaena species as Anabaena viguieri Denis et Fremy 1923 and Anabaena smithii (Komdrek) Watanabe 1992, had never been reported in China, and they are newly described and discussed in the present study.

  17. Hydrogen production by Anabaena sp. CH1 with 2-stage process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, C.L.; Lee, C.M. [National Chung Hsing Univ., Taiwan (China). Dept. of Environmental Engineering; Chen, P.C. [Hungkuang Univ., Taiwan (China). Dept. of Biomedical Nutrition

    2009-07-01

    While hydrogen can be produced by cyanobacteria under anoxic conditions, chlorophylls can break down and provide the nitrogen needed for cell material synthesis. The breakdown of chlorophylls is unfavorable for the long-term production of hydrogen. This study provided details of a 2-stage operation designed to prevent chlorophyll breakdown. Anabaena sp. CH1 was used in both the hydrogen production and recovery stages. Nitrogenase activity, chlorophyll concentrations, and hydrogen production rates decreased to 54 per cent after argon gases were used for a 3-day period. Growth conditions than shifted to normal conditions after 3 to 5 days. Cells recovered their nitrogenase activities, biomass, and chlorophyll concentrations within 4 days. The recovery stage then shifted to the hydrogen production stage, where hydrogen production rates were as high as previous observed rates. It was concluded that the effects of nitrogen deprivation on photosynthetic mechanisms are reversible.

  18. Outer membrane proteins induced by iron deficiency in Anabaena sp.PCC 7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanling Dong; Xudong Xu

    2009-01-01

    Iron deficiency can induce cyanobacteria to synthesize siderophore receptor proteins on the outer membrane to enhance the uptake of iron. In this study, an outer membrane of high purity was prepared from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 based on aqueous polymer two-phase partitioning and discontinuous sucrose density ultra-centrifugation, and the induction of outer membrane proteins by iron deficiency was investigated using 2-D gel electrophoresis. At least five outer membrane proteins were newly synthesized or significantly up-regulated in cells transferred to iron-deficient conditions, which were all identified to be siderophore receptor proteins according to MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. Bacterial luciferase reporter genes luxAB were employed to monitor the transcription of the encoding genes. The genes were induced by iron deficiency at the transcriptional level in different responsive modes. Luciferase activity expressed from an iron-regulated promoter may be used as a bioreporter for utilizable iron in natural water samples.

  19. Genetic Basis for Geosmin Production by the Water Bloom-Forming Cyanobacterium, Anabaena ucrainica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongjie Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Geosmin is a common, musty-smelling sesquiterpene, principally produced by cyanobacteria. Anabaena ucrainica (Schhorb. Watanabe, a water bloom-forming cyanobacterium, is the geosmin producer responsible for odor problems in Dianchi and Erhai lakes in China. In this study, the geosmin synthase gene (geo of A. ucrainica and its flanking regions were identified and cloned by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and genome walking. The geo gene was found to be located in a transcription unit with two cyclic nucleotide-binding protein genes (cnb. The two cnb genes were highly similar and were predicted members of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP receptor protein/fumarate nitrate reductase regulator (Crp–Fnr family. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analyses implied that the evolution of the geosmin genes involved a horizontal gene transfer process in cyanobacteria. These genes showed a close relationship to 2-methylisoborneol genes in origin and evolution.

  20. Na(+) regulation by combined nitrogen in Azolla pinnata-Anabaena azollae symbiotic association during salt toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satya S; Singh, Santosh K; Mishra, Arun K

    2008-01-01

    To study the regulation of Na(+) ion by combined-N sources in Azolla pinnata-Anabaena azollae, Na(+) influx, intracellular Na(+) and Na(+) efflux were investigated in the presence of different N-sources (N(2), NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-) and urea) and various NaCl concentrations. Sodium influx by Azolla pinnata fronds was minimum in the presence of NO(3)(-). Almost identical levels of intracellular sodium, although less than N(2) and NH(4)(+) incubated fronds were observed in the presence of NO(3)(-) and urea. Efflux of sodium was minimum in urea and NO(3)(-) grown fronds. A low residual sodium was observed in the fronds incubated in NO(3)(-) and urea supplemented media. Results suggest that nitrate and urea curtailed the entry of sodium, reduced salt toxicity maximally by maintaining the minimum level of sodium and also conserved energy due to slow influx and efflux of Na(+) within the fronds during salt shock and the process of adaptation.

  1. EXPRESSION OF THE GEOSMIN SYNTHASE GENE IN THE CYANOBACTERIUM ANABAENA CIRCINALIS AWQC318(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglio, Steven; Saint, Christopher P; Monis, Paul T

    2011-12-01

    The occurrence of taste and odor episodes attributed to geosmin continues to trouble water utilities worldwide, and only recently have advances been made in our fundamental understanding of the biochemical and genetic mechanisms responsible for the production of geosmin in microorganisms. For the first time, we have examined the expression of the geosmin synthase gene and corresponding geosmin production by Anabaena circinalis Rabenh. ex Bornet et Flahault AWQC318 under conditions of continuous light illumination and the removal of light as a stimulus and demonstrate that the expression of geosmin synthase appears to be constitutive under these conditions. The decrease in geosmin synthase transcription post maximum cell numbers and stationary phase suggests that a decrease in isoprenoid synthesis may occur before a decrease in the transcription of ribosomal units as the process of cell death is initiated.

  2. Purification and some properties of Fe protein of nitrogenase from. Anabaena cylindrica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Daixian; Lin, Huimin; He, Zhenrong; Dai, Lingfen; Xin, Wusheng; Li, Shanghao

    1990-12-01

    The Fe protein of Anabaena cylindrica was first separated and purified by chromatography through DEAE-cellulose columns then by gel electrophoresis. The specific activity was up to 142.46 nmol C2H4/mg protein · min. It was homogeneous as shown by 1) a single band in the gel electrophorogram; 2) absence of Mo and tryptophan; 3) content of about 3.4 atoms of Fe per mole protein. The molecular weight of the Fe protein of A. cylindrica was about 61,000 daltons as estimated by SDS-gel electrophoresis and calculated from the amino acid composition. The residues of aspartate and glutamate were about 2.6 times that of arginine and lysine in the Fe protein. Crossing Fe protein of A. cylindrica with Mo-Fe protein of Azotobacter vinelandii gave positive result. The reciprocal crossing also showed activity.

  3. The electronic structure of the neutral isoalloxazine semiquinone within Anabaena flavodoxin: New insights from HYSCORE experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Jesús I.; Alonso, Pablo J.; Medina, Milagros

    2012-05-01

    A complete study of Anabaena flavodoxin in the neutral semiquinone state by means of the EPR pulse technique HYSCORE is here presented. The results provide new information about the hyperfine interactions of the unpaired electronic spin and the nuclei in the isoalloxazine ring. This allows a better knowledge of the electronic structure of the neutral flavin radical within the protein. Combination of these results with other previously obtained by using other EPR related techniques allowed producing a very precise mapping of the flavin spin distribution in the neutral semiquinone state. This information can be very useful for determining the relationship between the electronic structure and mechanisms in flavoproteins. An experimental protocol for measuring the electronic structure details available to date is suggested.

  4. The regulation of HanA during heterocyst development in cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing-Jing; Shi, Lei; Chen, Wen-Li; Wang, Li

    2014-10-01

    In response to deprivation of combined nitrogen, the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 develops heterocyst, which is specifically involved in the nitrogen fixation. In this study, we focused on the regulation of HanA, a histone-like protein, in heterocyst development. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay results showed that NtcA, a global nitrogen regulator necessary for heterocyst differentiation, could bind to two NtcA-binding motifs in the hanA promoter region. qPCR results also showed that NtcA may regulate the expression of hanA. By using the hanA promoter-controlled gfp as a reporter gene and performing western blot we found that the amount of HanA in mature heterocysts was decreased gradually.

  5. Enhanced biohydrogen production by the N{sub 2}-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis strain TISTR 8012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khetkorn, Wanthanee [Program of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, 10330 (Thailand); Laboratory of Cyanobacterial Biotechnology, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Bangkok, 10330 (Thailand); Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Uppsala University, Box 523, SE-75120, Uppsala (Sweden); Lindblad, Peter [Department of Photochemistry and Molecular Science, Uppsala University, Box 523, SE-75120, Uppsala (Sweden); Incharoensakdi, Aran [Laboratory of Cyanobacterial Biotechnology, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Bangkok, 10330 (Thailand)

    2010-12-15

    The efficiency of hydrogen production depends on several factors. We focused on external conditions leading to enhanced hydrogen production when using the N{sub 2}-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012, a novel strain isolated from a rice paddy field in Thailand. In this study, we controlled key factors affecting hydrogen production such as cell age, light intensity, time of light incubation and source of carbon. Our results showed an enhanced hydrogen production when cells, at log phase, were adapted under N{sub 2}-fixing condition using 0.5% fructose as carbon source and a continuous illumination of 200 {mu}E m{sup -2} s{sup -1} for 12 h under anaerobic incubation. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 32 {mu}mol H{sub 2} mg chl a{sup -1} h{sup -1}. This rate was higher than that observed in the model organisms Anabaena PCC 7120, Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 and Synechocystis PCC 6803. This higher production was likely caused by a higher nitrogenase activity since we observed an upregulation of nifD. The production did not increase after 12 h which was probably due to an increased activity of the uptake hydrogenase as evidenced by an increased hupL transcript level. Interestingly, a proper adjustment of light conditions such as intensity and duration is important to minimize both the photodamage of the cells and the uptake hydrogenase activity. Our results indicate that A. siamensis TISTR 8012 has a high potential for hydrogen production with the ability to utilize sugars as substrate to produce hydrogen. (author)

  6. Expanding the direct HetR regulon in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videau, Patrick; Ni, Shuisong; Rivers, Orion S; Ushijima, Blake; Feldmann, Erik A; Cozy, Loralyn M; Kennedy, Michael A; Callahan, Sean M

    2014-03-01

    In response to a lack of environmental combined nitrogen, the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 differentiates nitrogen-fixing heterocyst cells in a periodic pattern. HetR is a transcription factor that coordinates the regulation of this developmental program. An inverted repeat-containing sequence in the hepA promoter required for proheterocyst-specific transcription was identified based on sequence similarity to a previously characterized binding site for HetR in the promoter of hetP. The binding affinity of HetR for the hepA site is roughly an order of magnitude lower than that for the hetP binding site. A BLAST search of the Anabaena genome identified 166 hepA-like sites that occur as single or tandem sites (two binding sites separated by 13 bp). The vast majority of these sites are present in predicted intergenic regions. HetR bound five representative single binding sites in vitro, and binding was abrogated by transversions in the binding sites that conserved the inverted repeat nature of the sites. Binding to four representative tandem sites was not observed. Transcriptional fusions of the green fluorescent protein gene gfp with putative promoter regions associated with the representative binding sites indicated that HetR could function as either an activator or repressor and that activation was cell-type specific. Taken together, we have expanded the direct HetR regulon and propose a model in which three categories of HetR binding sites, based on binding affinity and nucleotide sequence, contribute to three of the four phases of differentiation.

  7. Rhodopsin gene expression regulated by the light dark cycle, light spectrum and light intensity in the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xinguo; Li, Ling; Guo, Chentao; Lin, Xin; Li, Meizhen; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    The proton pump rhodopsin is widely found in marine bacteria and archaea, where it functions to capture light energy and convert it to ATP. While found in several lineages of dinoflagellates, this gene has not been studied in Prorocentrales species and whether it functionally tunes to light spectra and intensities as in bacteria remains unclear. Here we identified and characterized this gene in the bloom-forming Prorocentrum donghaiense. It is a 7-helix transmembrane polypeptide containing conserved domains and critical amino acid residues of PPR. This gene is phylogenetically affiliated to the xanthorhodopsin clade, but seems to have a distinct evolutionary origin. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR showed that in regular cultures, the transcript abundance of the gene exhibited a clear diel pattern, high abundance in the light period and low in the dark. The same diel pattern was observed for protein abundance with a Western blot using specific antiserum. The rhythm was dampened when the cultures were shifted to continuous dark or light condition, suggesting that this gene is not under circadian clock control. Rhodopsin transcript and protein abundances varied with light intensity, both being highest at a moderate illumination level. Furthermore, the expression of this gene responded to different light spectra, with slightly higher transcript abundance under green than blue light, and lowest abundance under red light. Transformed Escherichia coli over-expressing this rhodopsin gene also exhibited an absorption maximum in the blue-green region with slightly higher absorption in the green. These rhodopsin-promoting light conditions are similar to the relatively turbid marine habitat where the species forms blooms, suggesting that this gene may function to compensate for the light-limited photosynthesis in the dim environment.

  8. Rhodopsin gene expression regulated by the light dark cycle, light spectrum and light intensity in the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinguo eShi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The proton pump rhodopsin (PPR is widely found in marine bacteria and archaea, where it functions to capture light energy and convert it to ATP. While found in several lineages of dinoflagellates, this gene has not been studied in Prorocentrales species and whether it functionally tunes to light spectra and intensities as in bacteria remains unclear. Here we identified and characterized this gene in the bloom-forming Prorocentrum donghaiense. It is a 7-helix transmembrane polypeptide containing conserved domains and critical amino acid residues of PPR. This gene is phylogenetically affiliated to the xanthorhodopsin clade, but seems to have a distinct evolutionary origin. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR showed that in regular cultures, the transcript abundance of the gene exhibited a clear diel pattern, high abundance in the light period and low in the dark. The same diel pattern was observed for protein abundance with a Western blot using specific antiserum. The rhythm was dampened when the cultures were shifted to continuous dark or light condition, suggesting that this gene is not under circadian clock control. Rhodopsin transcript and protein abundances varied with light intensity, both being highest at a moderate illumination level. Furthermore, the expression of this gene responded to different light spectra, with slightly higher transcript abundance under green than blue light, and lowest abundance under red light. Transformed E. coli over-expressing this rhodopsin gene also exhibited an absorption maximum in the blue-green region with slightly higher absorption in the green. These rhodopsin-promoting light conditions are similar to the relatively turbid marine habitat where the species forms blooms, suggesting that this gene may function to compensate for the light-limited photosynthesis in the dim environment.

  9. Rhodopsin gene expression regulated by the light dark cycle, light spectrum and light intensity in the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Xinguo; Li, Ling; Guo, Chentao; Lin, Xin; Li, Meizhen; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    The proton pump rhodopsin is widely found in marine bacteria and archaea, where it functions to capture light energy and convert it to ATP. While found in several lineages of dinoflagellates, this gene has not been studied in Prorocentrales species and whether it functionally tunes to light spectra and intensities as in bacteria remains unclear. Here we identified and characterized this gene in the bloom-forming Prorocentrum donghaiense. It is a 7-helix transmembrane polypeptide containing co...

  10. Spectral methods for study of the G-protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin: I. Vibrational and electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struts, A. V.; Barmasov, A. V.; Brown, M. F.

    2015-05-01

    Here we review the application of modern spectral methods for the study of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) using rhodopsin as a prototype. Because X-ray analysis gives us immobile snapshots of protein conformations, it is imperative to apply spectroscopic methods for elucidating their function: vibrational (Raman, FTIR), electronic (UV-visible absorption, fluorescence) spectroscopies, and magnetic resonance (electron paramagnetic resonance, EPR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In the first of the two companion articles, we discuss the application of optical spectroscopy for studying rhodopsin in a membrane environment. Information is obtained regarding the time-ordered sequence of events in rhodopsin activation. Isomerization of the chromophore and deprotonation of the retinal Schiff base leads to a structural change of the protein involving the motion of helices H5 and H6 in a pH-dependent process. Information is obtained that is unavailable from X-ray crystallography, which can be combined with spectroscopic studies to achieve a more complete understanding of GPCR function.

  11. A second rhodopsin-like protein in Cyanophora paradoxa: gene sequence and protein expression in a cell-free system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassanito, Anna Maria; Barsanti, Laura; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Evangelista, Valtere; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2013-08-05

    Here we report the identification and expression of a second rhodopsin-like protein in the alga Cyanophora paradoxa (Glaucophyta), named Cyanophopsin_2. This new protein was identified due to a serendipity event, since the RACE reaction performed to complete the sequence of Cyanophopsin_1, (the first rhodopsin-like protein of C. paradoxa identified in 2009 by our group), amplified a 619 bp sequence corresponding to a portion of a new gene of the same protein family. The full sequence consists of 1175 bp consisting of 849 bp coding DNA sequence and 4 introns of 326 bp. The protein is characterized by an N-terminal region of 47 amino acids, followed by a region with 7 α-helices of 213 amino acids and a C-terminal region of 22 amino acids. This protein showed high identity with Cyanophopsin_1 and other rhodopsin-like proteins of Archea, Bacteria, Fungi and Algae. Cyanophosin_2 (CpR2) was expressed in a cell-free expression system, and characterized by means of absorption spectroscopy.

  12. FurA from Anabaena PCC 7120: New insights on its regulation and the interaction with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, J. A.; López-Gomollón, S.; Pellicer, S.; Martín, B.; Sevilla, E.; Bes, M. T.; Peleato, M. L.; Fillat, M. F.

    2006-08-01

    Fur (ferric uptake regulator) proteins are global regulatory proteins involved in the maintenance of iron homeostasis. They recognize specific DNA sequences denoted iron boxes. It is assumed that Fur proteins act as classical repressors. Under iron-rich conditions, Fur dimers complexed with ferrous ions bind to iron boxes, preventing transcription. In addition to iron homeostasis, Fur proteins control the concerted response to oxidative and acidic stresses in heterotrophic prokaryotes. Our group studies the interaction between Fur proteins and target DNA sequences. Moreover, the regulation of FurA in the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, whose genome codes for three fur homologues has been investigated. We present an overview about the different factors involved in the regulation of FurA and analyze the parameters that influence FurA-DNA interaction in the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120.

  13. Characterization of two naturally truncated, Ssb-like proteins from the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirti, Anurag; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding (Ssb) proteins are vital for all DNA metabolic processes and are characterized by an N-terminal OB-fold followed by P/G-rich spacer region and a C-terminal tail. In the genome of the heterocystous, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, two genes alr0088 and alr7579 are annotated as ssb, but the corresponding proteins have only the N-terminal OB-fold and no P/G-rich region or acidic tail, thereby rendering them unable to interact with genome maintenance proteins. Both the proteins were expressed under normal growth conditions in Anabaena PCC7120 and regulated differentially under abiotic stresses which induce DNA damage, indicating that these are functional genes. Constitutive overexpression of Alr0088 in Anabaena enhanced the tolerance to DNA-damaging stresses which caused formation of DNA adducts such as UV and MitomycinC, but significantly decreased the tolerance to γ-irradiation, which causes single- and double-stranded DNA breaks. On the other hand, overexpression of Alr7579 had no significant effect on normal growth or stress tolerance of Anabaena. Thus, of the two truncated Ssb-like proteins, Alr0088 may be involved in protection of ssDNA from damage, but due to the absence of acidic tail, it may not aid in repair of damaged DNA. These two proteins are present across cyanobacterial genera and unique to them. These initial studies pave the way to the understanding of DNA repair in cyanobacteria, which is not very well documented.

  14. NADPH-Thioredoxin Reductase C Mediates the Response to Oxidative Stress and Thermotolerance in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Riego, Ana M; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro; Galmozzi, Carla V; Florencio, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) is a bimodular enzyme composed of an NADPH-thioredoxin reductase and a thiioredoxin domain extension in the same protein. In plants, NTRC has been described to be involved in the protection of the chloroplast against oxidative stress damage through reduction of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx) as well as through other functions related to redox enzyme regulation. In cyanobacteria, the Anabaena NTRC has been characterized in vitro, however, nothing was known about its in vivo function. In order to study that, we have generated the first knockout mutant strain (ΔntrC), apart from the previously described in Arabidopsis. Detailed characterization of this strain reveals a differential sensitivity to oxidative stress treatments with respect to the wild-type Anabaena strain, including a higher level of ROS (reactive oxygen species) in normal growth conditions. In the mutant strain, different oxidative stress treatments such as hydrogen peroxide, methyl-viologen or high light irradiance provoke an increase in the expression of genes related to ROS detoxification, including AnNTRC and peroxiredoxin genes, with a concomitant increase in the amount of AnNTRC and 2-Cys Prx. Moreover, the role of AnNTRC in the antioxidant response is confirmed by the observation of a pronounced overoxidation of the 2-Cys Prx and a time-delay recovery of the reduced form of this protein upon oxidative stress treatments. Our results suggest the participation of this enzyme in the peroxide detoxification in Anabaena. In addition, we describe the role of Anabaena NTRC in thermotolerance, by the appearance of high molecular mass AnNTRC complexes, showing that the mutant strain is more sensitive to high temperature treatments.

  15. The interaction of boron with glycolipids is required to increase tolerance to stresses in Anabaena PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Isidro; Orús, Isabel; Bolaños, Luis; Bonilla, Ildefonso

    2014-10-01

    Boron (B) is an essential nutrient for heterocystous cyanobacteria growing under diazotrophic conditions. Under B-deficient conditions, the heterocyst envelope is highly disorganized, and the glycolipid layer is predominantly lost. Therefore, we examined whether B is implicated in the regulation of synthesis or processing and/or stability of glycolipids in Anabaena PCC 7120. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the expression of hglE was not significantly changed under B deficiency, suggesting that the synthesis of glycolipids during heterocyst formation was not compromised. In contrast, the overexpression of devB and hepA, encoding a glycolipid and a carbohydrate transporter, respectively, results in the instability of the envelope under B-deficient conditions. The capacity of borate to bind and stabilize molecules is considered the basis of any B biological function. Using a borate-binding-specific resin and thin layer chromatography, we detected the glycolipids that interact with B. Several heterocyst-specific glycolipids were detected as putative B ligands, suggesting a role for B in stabilizing the heterocyst envelope. Moreover, the glycolipids of Anabaena growing in non-diazotrophic conditions were also detected as putative B ligands. Although B is not essential for Anabaena under non-N2-fixing conditions, the presence of this micronutrient increased the tolerance of Anabaena to detergent treatment, salinity and hyperosmotic conditions. Taken together, the results of the present experiment suggest a beneficial role for B in environmental adaptation. Furthermore, we discuss the nutrient requirement for living organisms growing in nature and not under laboratory conditions.

  16. NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C mediates the response to oxidative stress and thermotolerance in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARÍA SÁNCHEZ-RIEGO

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available NTRC (NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C is a bimodular enzyme composed of an NADPH-thioredoxin reductase and a thioredoxin domain extension in the same protein. In plants, NTRC has been described to be involved in the protection of the chloroplast against oxidative stress damage through reduction of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx as well as through other functions related to redox enzyme regulation. In cyanobacteria, the Anabaena NTRC has been characterized in vitro, however nothing was known about its in vivo function. In order to study that, we have generated the first knockout mutant strain (∆ntrC, apart from the previously described in Arabidopsis. Detailed characterization of this strain reveals a differential sensitivity to oxidative stress treatments with respect to the wild-type Anabaena strain, including a higher level of ROS (reactive oxygen species in normal growth conditions. In the mutant strain, different oxidative stress treatments such as hydrogen peroxide, methyl-viologen or high light irradiance provoke an increase in the expression of genes related to ROS detoxification, including AnNTRC and peroxiredoxin genes, with a concomitant increase in the amount of AnNTRC and 2-Cys Prx. Moreover, the role of AnNTRC in the antioxidant response is confirmed by the observation of a pronounced overoxidation of the 2-Cys Prx and a time-delay recovery of the reduced form of this protein upon oxidative stress treatments. Our results suggest the participation of this enzyme in the peroxide detoxification in Anabaena. In addition, we describe the role of Anabaena NTRC in thermotolerance, by the appearance of high molecular mass AnNTRC complexes, showing that the mutant strain is more sensitive to high temperature treatments.

  17. Overexpression of SepJ alters septal morphology and heterocyst pattern regulated by diffusible signals in Anabaena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariscal, Vicente; Nürnberg, Dennis J; Herrero, Antonia; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Flores, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    Filamentous, N2 -fixing, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria grow as chains of cells that are connected by septal junctions. In the model organism Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the septal protein SepJ is required for filament integrity, normal intercellular molecular exchange, heterocyst differentiation, and diazotrophic growth. An Anabaena strain overexpressing SepJ made wider septa between vegetative cells than the wild type, which correlated with a more spread location of SepJ in the septa as observed with a SepJ-GFP fusion, and contained an increased number of nanopores, the septal peptidoglycan perforations that likely accommodate septal junctions. The septa between heterocysts and vegetative cells, which are narrow in wild-type Anabaena, were notably enlarged in the SepJ-overexpressing mutant. Intercellular molecular exchange tested with fluorescent tracers was increased for the SepJ-overexpressing strain specifically in the case of calcein transfer between vegetative cells and heterocysts. These results support an association between calcein transfer, SepJ-related septal junctions, and septal peptidoglycan nanopores. Under nitrogen deprivation, the SepJ-overexpressing strain produced an increased number of contiguous heterocysts but a decreased percentage of total heterocysts. These effects were lost or altered in patS and hetN mutant backgrounds, supporting a role of SepJ in the intercellular transfer of regulatory signals for heterocyst differentiation.

  18. Establishment of quantitative PCR methods for the quantification of geosmin-producing potential and Anabaena sp. in freshwater systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ming; Gaget, Virginie; Giglio, Steven; Burch, Michael; An, Wei; Yang, Min

    2013-06-15

    Geosmin has often been associated with off-flavor problems in drinking water with Anabaena sp. as the major producer. Rapid on-site detection of geosmin-producers as well as geosmin is important for a timely management response to potential off-flavor events. In this study, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methods were developed to detect the levels of Anabaena sp. and geosmin, respectively, by designing two PCR primer sets to quantify the rpoC1 gene (ARG) and geosmin synthase one (GSG) in Anabaena sp. in freshwater systems. The ARG density determined by qPCR assay is highly related to microscopic cell count (r(2) = 0.726, p geosmin concentrations measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GSG copies was also established (r(2) = 0.742, p < 0.001) with similar LOD and LOQ values. Using the two qPCR protocols, we succeeded in measuring different levels of ARG and GSG copies in different freshwater systems with high incidence environmental substrata and diverse ecological conditions, showing that the methods developed could be applied for environmental monitoring. Moreover, comparing to the microscopic count and GC-MS analytical methods, the qPCR methods can reduce the time-to-results from several days to a few hours and require considerably less traditional algal identification and taxonomic expertise.

  19. In vitro antibacterial evaluation of Anabaena sp. against several clinically significant microflora and HPTLC analysis of its active crude extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauhan Abhishek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to evaluate the possible antibacterial activity of Anabaena extracts. Anabaena was isolated from a natural source and cultured in vitro. after suitable growth, cyanobacterial culture was harvested using different solvents. Extracts, thus prepared, were evaluated for their antibacterial potential by agar-well diffusion assay against bacterial species of clinical significance. MIC values were determined further to check the concentration ranges for significant inhibition. HPTLC analysis was done to separate the components of active crude extract in an attempt to identify the bio-active chemical entity. Methanol extract exhibited more potent activity than that of hexane and ethyl acetate extracts. No inhibitory effect was found against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Staphylococcus aureus required about 256 μg/ml of the crude methanol extract for effective inhibition. HPTLC evaluation at λ 254 nm was performed for the separation of a complex mixture of the methanol extract. The results provide evidence that Anabaena sp. extracts might indeed be potential sources of new antibacterial agents.

  20. Assessment of the CO2 fixation capacity of Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047 outdoor cultures in vertical flat-panel reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clares, Marta E; Moreno, José; Guerrero, Miguel G; García-González, Mercedes

    2014-10-10

    The extent of biological CO2 fixation was evaluated for outdoor cultures of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047. Culture conditions were optimized indoors in bubble-column photochemostats operating in continuous mode, subjected to irradiance cycles mimicking the light regime outdoors. Highest values achieved for CO2 fixation rate and biomass productivity were 1 and 0.6 g L(-1) day(-1), respectively. The comparison among different reactors operating simultaneously - open pond, horizontal tubular reactor and vertical flat-panel - allowed to assess their relative efficiency for the outdoor development of Anabaena cultures. Despite the higher volumetric CO2 fixation capacity (and biomass productivity) exhibited by the tubular photobioreactor, yield of the flat-panel reactor was 50% higher than that of the tubular option on a per area basis, reaching values over 35 g CO2 fixed m(-2) d(-1). The flat-panel reactor actually represents a most suitable system for CO2 capture coupled to the generation of valuable biomass by Anabaena cultures.

  1. The influence of humic acid on the toxicity of nano-ZnO and Zn2+ to the Anabaena sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yulin; Li, Shuyan; Lu, Yao; Li, Qian; Yu, Shuili

    2015-07-01

    This study explored the effects of humic acid (HA) on the toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles (nano-ZnO) and Zn(2+) to Anabaena sp. Typical chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, including effective quantum yield, photosynthetic efficiency and maximal electron transport rate, were measured by a pulse-amplitude modulated fluorometer. Results showed that nano-ZnO and Zn(2+) could inhibit Anabaena sp. growth with the EC50 (concentration for 50% of maximal effect) of 0.74 ± 0.01 and 0.3 ± 0.01 mg/L, respectively. In the presence of 3.0 mg/L of HA, EC50 of nano-ZnO increased to 1.15 ± 0.04 mg/L and EC50 of Zn(2+) was still 0.3 ± 0.01 mg/L. Scanning electron microscopy observation revealed that HA prevented the adhesion of nano-ZnO on the algae cells due to the increased electrostatic repulsion. The generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and cellular lipid peroxidation were significantly limited by HA. Nano-ZnO had more damage to the cell membrane than Zn(2+) did, which could be proven by the malondialdehyde content in Anabaena sp. cells. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 30: 895-903, 2015.

  2. A novel alkyl hydroperoxidase (AhpD) of Anabaena PCC7120 confers abiotic stress tolerance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Alok Kumar; Singh, Shilpi; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Pandey, Sarita; Rai, L C

    2015-01-01

    In silico analysis together with cloning, molecular characterization and heterologous expression reports that the hypothetical protein All5371 of Anabaena sp. PCC7120 is a novel hydroperoxide scavenging protein similar to AhpD of bacteria. The presence of E(X)11CX HC(X)3H motif in All5371 confers peroxidase activity and closeness to bacterial AhpD which is also reflected by its highest 3D structure homology with Rhodospirillum rubrum AhpD. Heterologous expression of all5371 complimented for ahpC and conferred resistance in MJF178 strain (ahpCF::Km) of Escherichia coli. All5371 reduced the organic peroxide more efficiently than inorganic peroxide and the recombinant E. coli strain following exposure to H2O2, CdCl2, CuCl2, heat, UV-B and carbofuron registered increased growth over wild-type and mutant E. coli transformed with empty vector. Appreciable expression of all5371 in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 as measured by qRT-PCR under selected stresses and their tolerance against H2O2, tBOOH, CuOOH and menadione attested its role in stress tolerance. In view of the above, All5371 of Anabaena PCC7120 emerged as a new hydroperoxide detoxifying protein.

  3. Photoisomerization dynamics of a rhodopsin-based molecule (potential molecular switch) with high quantum yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Roland; Jiang, Chen-Wei; Zhang, Xiu-Xing; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Hong-Rong; Xie, Rui-Hua; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-03-01

    It is worthwhile to explore the detailed reaction dynamics of various candidates for molecular switches, in order to understand, e.g., the differences in quantum yields and switching times. Here we report density-functional-based simulations for the rhodopsin-based molecule 4-[4-Methylbenzylidene]-5-p-tolyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole (MDP), synthesized by Sampedro et al. We find that the photoisomerization quantum yields are remarkably high: 82% for cis-to-trans, and 68% for trans-to-cis. The lifetimes of the S1 excited state in cis-MDP in our calculations are in the range of 900-1800 fs, with a mean value of 1270 fs, while the range of times required for full cis-to-trans isomerization are 1100-2000 fs, with a mean value of 1530 fs. In trans-MDP, the calculated S1 excited state lifetimes are 860-2140 fs, with a mean value of 1330 fs, and with the full trans-to-cis isomerization completed about 200 fs later. In both cases, the dominant reaction mechanism is rotation around the central C =C bond (connected to the pyrroline ring), and de-excitation occurs at an avoided crossing between the ground state and the lowest singlet state, near the midpoint of the rotational pathway. Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China; Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities; Robert A. Welch Foundation; National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  4. Reconstitution of rhodopsin into polymerizable planar supported lipid bilayers: influence of dienoyl monomer structure on photoactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Varuni; D'Ambruoso, Gemma D; Hall, H K; Wysocki, Ronald J; Brown, Michael F; Saavedra, S Scott

    2008-10-07

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play key roles in cellular signal transduction and many are pharmacologically important targets for drug discovery. GPCRs can be reconstituted in planar supported lipid bilayers (PSLBs) with retention of activity, which has led to development of GPCR-based biosensors and biochips. However, PSLBs composed of natural lipids lack the high stability desired for many technological applications. One strategy is to use synthetic lipid monomers that can be polymerized to form robust bilayers. A key question is how lipid polymerization affects GPCR structure and activity. Here we have investigated the photochemical activity of bovine rhodopsin (Rho), a model GPCR, reconstituted into PSLBs composed of lipids having one or two polymerizable dienoyl moieties located in different regions of the acyl chains. Plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopy was used to compare the degree of Rho photoactivation in fluid and poly(lipid) PSLBs. The position of the dienoyl moiety was found to have a significant effect: polymerization near the glycerol backbone significantly attenuates Rho activity whereas polymerization near the acyl chain termini does not. Differences in cross-link density near the acyl chain termini also do not affect Rho activity. In unpolymerized PSLBs, an equimolar mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipids enhances activity relative to pure PC; however after polymerization, the enhancement is eliminated which is attributed to stabilization of the membrane lamellar phase. These results should provide guidance for the design of robust lipid bilayers functionalized with transmembrane proteins for use in membrane-based biochips and biosensors.

  5. New Nano- and Biotechnological Applications of Bacterial and Animal Photoreceptor Pigments  Bacteriorhodopsin, Rhodopsin and Iodopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignat Ignatov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper views predominately the structure and function of animal and bacterial photoreceptor pigments (rhodopsin, iodopsin, bacteriorhodopsin and new aspects of their nano- and biotechnological usage. On an example of bacteriorhodopsin was described the method of its isolation from purple membranes of photo-organotrophic halobacterium Halobacterium halobium by cellular autolysis by distilled water, processing of bacterial biomass by ultrasound at 22 KHz, alcohol extraction of low and high-weight molecular impurities, cellular RNA, carotenoids and lipids, the solubilization with 0,5 % (w/v SDS-Na and subsequent fractionation by methanol and gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-200 Column balanced with 0.09 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH = 6,76 with 0,1 % (w/v SDS-Na and 2,5 mM EDTA. Within the framework of the research the mechanism of color perception by the visual analyzer having the ability to analyze certain ranges of the optical spectrum, as colors was studied along with an analysis of the additive mixing of two colors. It was shown that at the mixing of electromagnetic waves with different wavelengths, the visual analyzer perceive them as separate or average wave length corresponding to mix color.

  6. Studying of Phototransformation of Light Signal by Photoreceptor Pigments - Rhodopsin, Iodopsin and Bacteriorhodopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignat Ignatov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This review article views predominately the structure and function of animal and bacterial photoreceptor pigments (rhodopsin, iodopsin, bacteriorhodopsin and their aspects of nano- and biotechnological usage. On an example of bacteriorhodopsin is described the method of its isolation from purple membranes of photo-organotrophic halobacterium Halobacterium halobium by cellular autolysis by distilled water, processing of bacterial biomass by ultrasound at 22 KHz, alcohol extraction of low and high-weight molecular impurities, cellular RNA, carotenoids and lipids, the solubilization with 0,5 % (w/v SDS-Na and subsequent fractionation by methanol and gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-200 Column balanced with 0.09 M Tris-borate buffer (pH = 8,35 with 0,1 % (w/v SDS-Na and 2,5 mM EDTA. Within the framework of the research the mechanism of color perception by the visual analyzer having the ability to analyze certain ranges of the optical spectrum, as colors was studied along with an analysis of the additive mixing of two colors. It was shown that at the mixing of electromagnetic waves with different wavelengths, the visual analyzer perceive them as separate or average wave length corresponding to mix color.

  7. [Pathophysiology of sensory ataxic neuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobue, G

    1996-12-01

    The main lesions of sensory ataxic neuropathy such as chronic idiopathic sensory ataxic neuropathy, (ISAN), carcinomatous neuropathy, Sjögren syndrome-associated neuropathy and acute autonomic and sensory neuropathy (AASN) are the large-diameter sensory neurons and dosal column of the spinal cord and the large myelinated fibers in the peripheral nerve trunks. In addition, afferent fibers to the Clarke's nuclei are also severely involved, suggesting Ia fibers being involved in these neuropathies. In NT-3 knockout mouse, an animal model of sensory ataxia, large-sized la neurons as well as muscle spindle and Golgi tendon organs are depleted, and are causative for sensory ataxia. Thus, the proprioceptive Ia neurons would play a role in pathogenesis of sensory ataxia in human sensory ataxic neuropathies, but the significance of dorsal column involvement in human sensory ataxia is still needed to evaluate.

  8. Cryptogenic sensory polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Barohn, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Chronic sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy is a common cause for referral to neurologists. Despite extensive diagnostic testing, up to one-third of these patients remain without a known cause, and are referred to as having cryptogenic sensory peripheral neuropathy. Symptoms progress slowly. On examination, there may be additional mild toe flexion and extension weakness. Electrophysiologic testing and histology reveals axonal neuropathy. Prognosis is usually favorable, as most patients maintain independent ambulation. Besides patient education and reassurance, management is focused on pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain and physical therapy for balance training, and, occasionally, assistive devices.

  9. LexA protein of cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 exhibits in vitro pH-dependent and RecA-independent autoproteolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Kirti, Anurag; Rajaram, Hema

    2015-02-01

    The LexA protein of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 exhibits a RecA-independent and alkaline pH-dependent autoproteolytic cleavage. The autoproteolytic cleavage of Anabaena LexA occurs at pH 8.5 and above, stimulated by the addition of Ca(2+) and in the temperature range of 30-57°C. Mutational analysis of Anabaena LexA protein indicated that the cleavage occurred at the peptide bond between Ala-84 and Gly-85, and optimal cleavage required the presence of Ser-118 and Lys-159, as also observed for LexA protein of Escherichia coli. Cleavage of Anabaena LexA was affected upon deletion of three amino acids, (86)GLI. These three amino acids are unique to all cyanobacterial LexA proteins predicted to be cleavable. The absence of RecA-dependent cleavage at physiological pH, which has not been reported for other bacterial LexA proteins, is possibly due to the absence of RecA interacting sites on Anabaena LexA protein, corresponding to the residues identified in E. coli LexA, and low cellular levels of RecA in Anabaena. Exposure to SOS-response inducing stresses, such as UV-B and mitomycin C neither affected the expression of LexA in Anabaena nor induced cleavage of LexA in either Anabaena 7120 or E. coli overexpressing Anabaena LexA protein. Though the LexA may be acting as a repressor by binding to the LexA box in the vicinity of the promoter region of specific gene, their derepression may not be via proteolytic cleavage during SOS-inducing stresses, unless the stress induces increase in cytoplasmic pH. This could account for the regulation of several carbon metabolism genes rather than DNA-repair genes under the regulation of LexA in cyanobacteria especially during high light induced oxidative stress.

  10. Assessment of the effect of azo dye RP2B on the growth of a nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium--Anabaena sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, T L; Wu, S C

    2001-03-01

    Certain nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria are diazotrophic, which profoundly impacts the aquatic ecosystem chemically and biologically. Although certain types are banned due to their carcinogenicity, azo dyes are commonly used in the dyeing or textile industry. This work investigates the effect of azo dye on the growth of cyanobacteria. Anabaena sp. isolated from the Da Jia Brook is an odor producing, nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium. The growth rates of Anabaena sp. in the media with or without nitrogen source were 3.56 x 10(-2) mg/ml day and 2.44 x 10(-2) mg/ml day, respectively. Anabaena sp. could not use azo dye RP2B as the nitrogen source. Experimental results indicated that the growth of Anabaena sp. was inhibited in the medium containing RP2B. The degree of inhibition increased from 50% to 81% with an increasing concentration of RP2B (0-50 mg/l). The IC-50 (inhibitory concentration) of RP2B on the growth of Anabaena sp. was 5 mg/l (as based on dry weight) or 7 mg/l (as measured by chlorophyll a).

  11. Transcendence and Sensoriness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Protestant theology and culture are known for a reserved, at times skeptical, attitude to the use of art and aesthetic forms of expression in a religious context. In Transcendence and Sensoriness, this attitude is analysed and discussed both theoretically and through case studies considered...

  12. Biosorption of cadmium and lead from aqueous solution by fresh water alga Anabaena sphaerica biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza M. Abdel -Aty

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The present work represents the biosorption of Cd(II and Pb(II from aqueous solution onto the biomass of the blue green alga Anabaena sphaerica as a function of pH, biosorbent dosage, contact time, and initial metal ion concentrations. Freundlich, Langmuir, and Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R models were applied to describe the biosorption isotherm of both metals by A. sphaerica biomass. The biosorption isotherms studies indicated that the biosorption of Cd(II and Pb(II follows the Langmuir and Freundlish models. The maximum biosorption capacities (qmax were 111.1 and 121.95 mg/g, respectively, at the optimum conditions for each metal. From the D–R isotherm model, the mean free energy was calculated to be 11.7 and 14.3 kJ/mol indicating that the biosorption mechanism of Cd(II and Pb(II by A. sphaerica was chemisorption. The FTIR analysis for surface function group of algal biomass revealed the existence of amino, carboxyl, hydroxyl, and carbonyl groups, which are responsible for the biosorption of Cd(II and Pb(II. The results suggested that the biomass of A. sphaerica is an extremely efficient biosorbent for the removal of Cd(II and Pb(II from aqueous solutions.

  13. Modeling culture profiles of the heterocystous N2-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena flos-aquae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Neissa M; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2006-01-01

    Heterocyst differentiation is a unique feature of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria, potentially important for photobiological hydrogen production. Despite the significant advances in genetic investigation on heterocyst differentiation, there were no quantitative culture-level models that describe the effects of cellular activities and cultivation conditions on the heterocyst differentiation. Such a model was developed in this study, incorporating photosynthetic growth of vegetative cells, heterocyst differentiation, self-shading effect on light penetration, and nitrogen fixation. The model parameters were determined by fitting experimental results from the growth of the heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena flos-aquae CCAP 1403/13f in media without and with different nitrate concentrations and under continuous illumination of white light at different light intensities (2, 5, 10, 17, 20 and 50 microE m-2 s-1). The model describes the experimental profiles well and gives reasonable predictions even for the transition of growth from that on external N source to that via nitrogen fixation, responding to the change in external N concentrations. The significance and implications of the best-fit values of the model parameters are discussed.

  14. Characterization of Anabaena cylindrica Solution System Using Synchronous- Scan Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xian-li; DENG Nan-sheng; TAO Shu

    2005-01-01

    The characterization of the algae Anabaena cylindrica solu tion with Fe (Ⅲ) was investigated using fluorescence emission and syn chronous-scan spectroscopy. The ranges of concentrations of algae and Fe (Ⅲ) in aqueous solutions were 5. 0 × 107-2. 5 × 108 cell/L and 10-60μmol/L, respectively. The effective characterization method used was synchronous-scan fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS). The wavelength difference (△λ) of 90 nm was maintained between excitation wavelength (λex) and emission wavelength(λem ). The peak was observed at about λex 236 nm/λem 326 nm for synchronous-scan fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence quenching in system of algae-Fe( Ⅲ)-HA was studied using synchronous-scan spectroscopy for the first time. Fe(Ⅲ) was clearly the effective quencher. The relationship between I0 / I (quenching efficiency)and c (concentration of Fe (Ⅲ) added) was a linear correlation for the al gae solution with Fe(Ⅲ). Also, Aldrich humic acid (HA) was found to be an effective quencher.

  15. Accelerating of Pink Pigment Excretion from Cyanobacterium Oscillatoria by Co-Cultivation with Anabaena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DWI SUSILANINGSIH

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The freshwater cyanobacterium Oscillatoria BTCC/A 0004 excretes pink pigment containing lipoproteins with molecular weights of about 10 kDa. This pigment has surfactant properties with strong emulsification activity toward several hydrocarbons. This extracellular metabolite was suspected as toxin or allelochemical in their habitat. In this study, I investigated the effect of co-cultivation of Oscillatoria with Anabaena variabilis on the pigment excretion to explore the physiological roles of this pigment in its natural environment. The dead or viable cells and medium of A. variabilis were added into Oscillatoria cultures. Results showed that co-cultivation of free viable cells of A. variabilis enhanced the excretion of pigment without effect on the cell growth. Co-cultivation with viable cells in separated method and dead cells did not influenced the pigment production. The addition of A. variabilis medium was slightly increased the excretion of the pigment. Those results indicated that direct contact with A. variabilis caused Oscillatoria released a certain signaling compound.

  16. Effect of growth conditions on the hydrogen production with cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain CH3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Pei-Chung [Institute of Clinical Nutrition, Hungkuang University, 34, Chung-Chie Road, Sha Lu, Taichung 433 (China); Fan, Shin-Huei; Chiang, Char-Lin; Lee, Chi-Mei [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, 250, Kuo-Kuang Road, Taichung 402 (China)

    2008-03-15

    Cyanobacteria could use sugars as carbon source and reductant to produce hydrogen by nitrogenase. However, oxygen is also produced during photosynthesis and it is an inhibitor of the enzyme nitrogenase. Filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. CH{sub 3} could use sugars as substrate to produce molecular hydrogen anaerobically. The production activity was dependent on growth phases. It was found that the cells at sub-stage of late-log phase had better ability to produce hydrogen than at log phase. In such case, oxygen content was too low to be detected to inhibit hydrogen production. Among different kinds of sugar, fructose and glucose had the best performance for producing hydrogen. Hydrogen could be accumulated to 0.6 mmol (in 40 ml head space) in 100 h from 1000 ppm fructose. Increasing light intensities from 65 to 130{mu}molm{sup -2}s{sup -1} would enhance hydrogen production to 0.8 mmol. Under illumination of 130{mu}molm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and 2000 ppm fructose, 1.7 mmol of hydrogen could be accumulated. When fructose content was higher than 2000 ppm, cells could not produce more hydrogen at all. (author)

  17. Anabaena sp. DyP-type peroxidase is a tetramer consisting of two asymmetric dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Toru; Ogola, Henry Joseph Oduor; Amano, Yoshimi; Hisabori, Toru; Ashida, Hiroyuki; Sawa, Yoshihiro; Tsuge, Hideaki; Sugano, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    DyP-type peroxidases are a newly discovered family of heme peroxidases distributed from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Recently, using a structure-based sequence alignment, we proposed the new classes, P, I and V, as substitutes for classes A, B, C, and D [Arch Biochem Biophys 2015;574:49-55]. Although many class V enzymes from eukaryotes have been characterized, only two from prokaryotes have been reported. Here, we show the crystal structure of one of these two enzymes, Anabaena sp. DyP-type peroxidase (AnaPX). AnaPX is tetramer formed from Cys224-Cys224 disulfide-linked dimers. The tetramer of wild-type AnaPX was stable at all salt concentrations tested. In contrast, the C224A mutant showed salt concentration-dependent oligomeric states: in 600 mM NaCl, it maintained a tetrameric structure, whereas in the absence of salt, it dissociated into monomers, leading to a reduction in thermostability. Although the tetramer exhibits non-crystallographic, 2-fold symmetry in the asymmetric unit, two subunits forming the Cys224-Cys224 disulfide-linked dimer are related by 165° rotation. This asymmetry creates an opening to cavities facing the inside of the tetramer, providing a pathway for hydrogen peroxide access. Finally, a phylogenetic analysis using structure-based sequence alignments showed that class V enzymes from prokaryotes, including AnaPX, are phylogenetically closely related to class V enzymes from eukaryotes.

  18. HesF, an exoprotein required for filament adhesion and aggregation in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Paulo; Pinto, Filipe; Pacheco, Catarina C; Mota, Rita; Tamagnini, Paula

    2015-05-01

    Here, we report on the identification and characterization of a protein (Alr0267) named HesF, found in the extracellular milieu of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 grown diazotrophically. hesF was found to be highly upregulated upon transition from non-nitrogen-fixing to nitrogen-fixing conditions, and the highest transcript levels were detected towards the end of the heterocyst differentiation process. The hesF promoter drives transcription of the gene in heterocysts only, and both NtcA and HetR are essential for the gene's in vivo activation. An examination of HesF's translocation showed that the secretion system is neither heterocyst-specific nor dependent on nitrogen-fixing conditions. Furthermore, HesF was found to be a type I secretion system substrate, since an HgdD mutant failed to secrete HesF. Several analyses revealed that a HesF minus mutant strain lacks the heterocyst-specific polysaccharide fibrous layer, accumulates high amounts of polysaccharides in the medium and that HesF is essential for the typical aggregation phenotype in diazotrophic conditions. Thus, we propose that HesF is a carbohydrate-binding exoprotein that plays a role in maintaining the heterocyst cell wall structure. A combination of and possibly interaction between HesF and heterocyst-specific polysaccharides seems to be responsible for filament adhesion and culture aggregation in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria.

  19. Cryo-imaging of photosystems and phycobilisomes in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Gábor; Schubert, Félix; Kaňa, Radek

    2015-11-01

    Primary photosynthetic reactions take place inside thylakoid membrane where light-to-chemical energy conversion is catalyzed by two pigment-protein complexes, photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). Light absorption in cyanobacteria is increased by pigment-protein supercomplexes--phycobilisomes (PBSs) situated on thylakoid membrane surfaces that transfer excitation energy into both photosystems. We have explored the localization of PSI, PSII and PBSs in thylakoid membrane of native cyanobacteria cell Anabaena sp. 7120 by means of cryogenic confocal microscopy. We have adapted a conventional temperature controlling stage to an Olympus FV1000 confocal microscope. The presence of red shifted emission of chlorophylls from PSI has been confirmed by spectral measurements. Confocal fluorescence images of PSI (in a spectral range 710-750 nm), PSII (in a spectral range 690-705 nm) and PBSs (in a spectral range 650-680 nm) were recorded at low temperature. Co-localization of images showed spatial heterogeneity of PSI, PSII and PBSs over the thylakoid membrane, and three dominant areas were identified: PSI-PSII-PBS supercomplex area, PSII-PBS supercomplex area and PSI area. The observed results were discussed with regard to light-harvesting regulation in cyanobacteria.

  20. Effects of recombinated Anabaena sp. lipoxygenase on the protein component and dough property of wheat flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Lu, Fengxia; Zhang, Chong; Lu, Yingjian; Bie, Xiaomei; Xie, Yajuan; Lu, Zhaoxin

    2014-10-08

    The improvement effect of recombinated Anabaena sp. lipoxygenase (ana-rLOX) on the rheological property of dough was investigated with a farinograph and an extensograph. When 30 U/g ana-rLOX was added to wheat flour, the dough stability time extended from 7 to 9.5 min, the degree of softening increased about 31.1%, and the farinograph index also ascended. The dough with added ana-rLOX showed stronger resistance to extension throughout 135 min of resting time as compared to the dough without ana-rLOX. In addition, the protein component in the dough was varied with ana-rLOX. The glutenin in the dough was increased, whereas the gliadin, albumin, and globulin were decreased after the additino of ana-rLOX to the flours. Ana-rLOX could make globulin-3A, globulin 1a, and S48186 grain softness protein cross-link with gliadin and low-molecular-weight (LMW) glutenin, leading to the formation of the protein polymer. These results based on proteomic analysis might provide evidence that ana-rLOX could affect the gluten protein component and explain why it improved the farinograph and extensograph parameters of wheat flour.

  1. Nitrate assimilation gene cluster from the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías, J E; Flores, E; Herrero, A

    1997-01-01

    A region of the genome of the filamentous, nitrogen-fixing, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 that contains a cluster of genes involved in nitrate assimilation has been identified. The genes nir, encoding nitrite reductase, and nrtABC, encoding elements of a nitrate permease, have been cloned. Insertion of a gene cassette into the nir-nrtA region impaired expression of narB, the nitrate reductase structural gene which together with nrtD is found downstream from nrtC in the gene cluster. This indicates that the nir-nrtABCD-narB genes are cotranscribed, thus constituting an operon. Expression of the nir operon in strain PCC 7120 is subjected to ammonium-promoted repression and takes place from an NtcA-activated promoter located 460 bp upstream from the start of the nir gene. In the absence of ammonium, cellular levels of the products of the nir operon are higher in the presence of nitrate than in the absence of combined nitrogen.

  2. The cultivation of Anabaena variabilis in a bubble column operating under bubbly and slug flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jong Hyun; Choi, Shin Sik; Park, Tai Hyun

    2012-04-01

    In a bubble column reactor with an inner diameter of 6cm and a height of 63cm for the culture of cyanobacteria two different shapes of bubbles can be generated, resulting in bubbly flow or slug flow. Growth of Anabaena variabilis under slug flow (1.9g/l/day) was 1.73 times higher than that under bubbly flow (1.1g/l/day) when the specific irradiation rate was maintained above 10μmol/s/g dry cell. Although a stepwise increase in superficial gas velocity enhanced the average cell growth rate under bubbly flow by 1.57 times, the average cell growth rate during the deceleration phase under bubbly flow (1.98g/l/day) was 0.61 times smaller than that under slug flow (3.22g/l/day). These results demonstrate that the bubble shape in the slug flow was advantageous in regards to the radial circulation of cells.

  3. Effect of light on the content of photosynthetically active pigments in plants. Pt. 4. Chromatic adaption in blue-green algae Anabaena cylindrica and A. variabilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czeczuga, B.

    1986-07-15

    The photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a, carotenoids and phycobiliprotein pigments) of two species of the genus Anabaena grown in white, red, yellow, green and blue light were examined. The highest concentration of the cells was observed in the sample with red light in case of the both species, and the smallest with blue light. The biggest amounts of chlorophyll a and carotenoids were included in the cells of samples with the yellow and the smallest in case of the red light. The ratio of two phycobiliproteins is as follows: - in Anabaena cylindrica: the highest amount of C-phycocyanin in the cells was observed in the case of the red light, and C-phycoerytherin was found in the blue light; - in Anabaena variabiles: the highest amount of C-phycocyanien in the cells was found in case of the yellow light, and allophycocyanin was found in the blue light.

  4. The alr2505 (osiS) gene from Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 encodes a cysteine desulfurase induced by oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Marion; Bettache, Azzeddine; Janicki, Annick; Vinella, Daniel; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Latifi, Amel

    2010-09-01

    NifS-like cysteine desulfurases are widespread enzymes involved in the mobilization of sulfur from cysteine. The genome of the filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120 contains four open reading frames potentially encoding NifS-like proteins. One of them, alr2505, belongs to the pkn22 operon, which enables Anabaena to cope with oxidative stress. The Alr2505 protein was purified and found to share all the features characteristic of cysteine desufurases. This is the first NifS-like enzyme to be functionally characterized in this bacterium. On the basis of the transcriptional profiling of all nifS-like genes in Anabaena, it is concluded that alr2505 is the only cysteine desulfurase-encoding gene induced by oxidative stress. The function of Alr2505, which was termed OsiS, is discussed.

  5. Spectral Tuning in Visual Pigments: An ONIOM(QM:MM) Study on Bovine Rhodopsin and its Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Ahmet; Yokoyama, Shozo; Morokuma, Keiji

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated geometries and excitation energies of bovine rhodopsin and some of its mutants by hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations in ONIOM scheme, employing B3LYP and BLYP density functionals as well as DFTB method for the QM part and AMBER force field for the MM part. QM/MM geometries of the protonated Schiff-base 11-cis-retinal with B3LYP and DFTB are very similar to each other. TD-B3LYP/MM excitation energy calculations reproduce the experimental absorption maximum of 500 nm in the presence of native rhodopsin environment and predict spectral shifts due to mutations within 10 nm, whereas TD-BLYP/MM excitation energies have red-shift error of at least 50 nm. In the wild-type rhodopsin, Glu113 shifts the first excitation energy to blue and accounts for most of the shift found. Other amino acids individually contribute to the first excitation energy but their net effect is small. The electronic polarization effect is essential for reproducing experimental bond length alternation along the polyene chain in protonated Schiff-base retinal, which correlates with the computed first excitation energy. It also corrects the excitation energies and spectral shifts in mutants, more effectively for deprotonated Schiff-base retinal than for the protonated form. The protonation state and conformation of mutated residues affect electronic spectrum significantly. The present QM/MM calculations estimate not only the experimental excitation energies but also the source of spectral shifts in mutants. PMID:18473437

  6. Study on the Salt tolerance and Mechanism of Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacteria Nostoc Commune and Anabaena Azotica Ley%固氮蓝藻Nostoc commune和Anabaena azotica Ley耐盐性及机理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张巍; 冯玉杰

    2008-01-01

    文章考察了两种固氮蓝藻Nostoc commune(地木耳)和Anabaena azotica Ley(固氮鱼腥藻)在不同浓度Na2CO3(0.2×10-4~1.8×10-4 g/ml)的BG11o培养基中的耐盐性.分别测定了两种固氮蓝藻在不同培养阶段的叶绿素a含量、胞外多糖含量、氨基酸含量和固氮酶活性的变化.研究结果表明两种固氮蓝藻都能在Na2CO3盐胁迫条件下生长,且随着Na2CO3盐胁迫性增加,两种蓝藻的叶绿素a含量、胞外多糖含量、氨基酸含量和固氮酶活性都呈现先增加后减少的趋势;而随着培养天数的增加,两种藻类叶绿素a的变化曲线与微生物的生长曲线很相似,胞外多糖和氨基酸的增长和叶绿素a的增长是同步的,其中,Anabaena azotica Ley的固氮酶活性在培养到21天时达到最大值,Nostoc commune的固氮酶活性在培养到28天时达到最大值;比较而言Anabaena azotica Ley的耐盐性好于Nostoc commune的耐盐性,固氮能力也高于Nostoc commune.

  7. Cadmium toxicity in diazotrophic Anabaena spp. adjudged by hasty up-accumulation of transporter and signaling and severe down-accumulation of nitrogen metabolism proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Shrivastava, Alok Kumar; Chatterjee, Antra; Pandey, Sarita; Rai, Snigdha; Singh, Shilpi; Rai, L C

    2015-09-01

    Present study demonstrates interspecies variation in proteome and survival strategy of three Anabaena species i.e., Anabaena L31, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and Anabaena doliolum subjected to respective LC50 doses of Cd at 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7day intervals. The proteome coverage with 452 differentially accumulated proteins unveiled species and time specific expression and interaction network of proteins involved in important cellular functions. Statistical analysis of protein abundance across Cd-treated proteomes clustered their co-expression pattern into four groups viz., (i) early (days 1 and 3) accumulated proteins, (ii) proteins up-accumulated for longer duration, (iii) late (days 5 and 7) accumulated proteins, and (iv) mostly down-accumulated proteins. Appreciable growth of Cd treated A L31 over other two species may be ascribed to proteins contained in the first and second groups (belonging to energy and carbohydrate metabolism (TK, G6-PI, PGD, FBA, PPA, ATP synthase)), sulfur metabolism (GR, GST, PGDH, PAPS reductase, GDC-P, and SAM synthetase), fatty acid metabolism (AspD, PspA, SQD-1), phosphorous metabolism (PhoD, PstB and SQD1), molecular chaperones (Gro-EL, FKBP-type peptidylprolyl isomerase), and antioxidative defense enzymes (SOD-A, catalase). Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 harboring proteins largely from the third group qualified as a late accumulator and A. doliolum housing majority of proteins from the fourth group emerged as the most sensitive species. Thus early up-accumulation of transporter and signaling category proteins and drastic reduction of nitrogen assimilation proteins could be taken as a vital indicator of cadmium toxicity in Anabaena spp. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India.

  8. From the ultrasonic to the infrared: molecular evolution and the sensory biology of bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth; Teeling, Emma C; Rossiter, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Great advances have been made recently in understanding the genetic basis of the sensory biology of bats. Research has focused on the molecular evolution of candidate sensory genes, genes with known functions [e.g., olfactory receptor (OR) genes] and genes identified from mutations associated with sensory deficits (e.g., blindness and deafness). For example, the FoxP2 gene, underpinning vocal behavior and sensorimotor coordination, has undergone diversification in bats, while several genes associated with audition show parallel amino acid substitutions in unrelated lineages of echolocating bats and, in some cases, in echolocating dolphins, representing a classic case of convergent molecular evolution. Vision genes encoding the photopigments rhodopsin and the long-wave sensitive opsin are functional in bats, while that encoding the short-wave sensitive opsin has lost functionality in rhinolophoid bats using high-duty cycle laryngeal echolocation, suggesting a sensory trade-off between investment in vision and echolocation. In terms of olfaction, bats appear to have a distinctive OR repertoire compared with other mammals, and a gene involved in signal transduction in the vomeronasal system has become non-functional in most bat species. Bitter taste receptors appear to have undergone a "birth-and death" evolution involving extensive gene duplication and loss, unlike genes coding for sweet and umami tastes that show conservation across most lineages but loss in vampire bats. Common vampire bats have also undergone adaptations for thermoperception, via alternative splicing resulting in the evolution of a novel heat-sensitive channel. The future for understanding the molecular basis of sensory biology is promising, with great potential for comparative genomic analyses, studies on gene regulation and expression, exploration of the role of alternative splicing in the generation of proteomic diversity, and linking genetic mechanisms to behavioral consequences.

  9. From the ultrasonic to the infrared: molecular evolution and the sensory biology of bats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth eJones

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Great advances have been made recently in understanding the genetic basis of the sensory biology of bats. Research has focused on the molecular evolution of candidate sensory genes, genes with known functions (e.g. olfactory receptor genes and genes identified from mutations associated with sensory deficits (e.g. blindness and deafness. For example, the FoxP2 gene, underpinning vocal behaviour and sensorimotor coordination, has undergone diversification in bats, while several genes associated with audition show parallel amino acid substitutions in unrelated lineages of echolocating bats and, in some cases, in echolocating dolphins, representing a classic case of convergent molecular evolution. Vision genes encoding the photopigments rhodopsin and the long-wave sensitive opsin are functional in bats, while that encoding the short-wave sensitive opsin has lost functionality in rhinolophoid bats using high-duty cycle laryngeal echolocation, suggesting a sensory trade-off between investment in vision and echolocation. In terms of olfaction, bats appear to have a distinctive olfactory receptor repertoire compared with other mammals, and a gene involved in signal transduction in the vomeronasal system has become non-functional in most bat species. Bitter taste receptors appear to have undergone a ‘birth-and death’ evolution involving extensive gene duplication and loss, unlike genes coding for sweet and umami tastes that show conservation across most lineages but loss in vampire bats. Common vampire bats have also undergone adaptations for thermoperception, via alternative splicing resulting in the evolution of a novel heat-sensitive channel. The future for understanding the molecular basis of sensory biology is promising, with great potential for comparative genomic analyses, studies on gene regulation and expression, exploration of the role of alternative splicing in the generation of proteomic diversity, and linking genetic mechanisms to

  10. Identification and characterization of the nifV-nifZ-nifT gene region from the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    The nifV and leuA genes, which encode homocitrate synthase and alpha-isopropylmalate synthase, respectively, were cloned from the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 by a PCR-based strategy. Since the N-terminal parts of NifV and LeuA from other bacteria are highly similar to each other, a single pair of PCR primers was used to amplify internal fragments of both Anabaena strain 7120 genes. Sequence analysis of cloned PCR products confirmed the presence of two different nif...

  11. Instabilities in sensory processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, J.

    2014-07-01

    In any organism there are different kinds of sensory receptors for detecting the various, distinct stimuli through which its external environment may impinge upon it. These receptors convey these stimuli in different ways to an organism's information processing region enabling it to distinctly perceive the varied sensations and to respond to them. The behavior of cells and their response to stimuli may be captured through simple mathematical models employing regulatory feedback mechanisms. We argue that the sensory processes such as olfaction function optimally by operating in the close proximity of dynamical instabilities. In the case of coupled neurons, we point out that random disturbances and fluctuations can move their operating point close to certain dynamical instabilities triggering synchronous activity.

  12. Overexpression of AhpC enhances stress tolerance and N2-fixation in Anabaena by upregulating stress responsive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Alok Kumar; Pandey, Sarita; Dietz, Karl Josef; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Singh, Shilpi; Rai, Ruchi; Rai, Lal Chand

    2016-11-01

    The study explores the significance of peroxides in regulating the CO2- and N2-fixation capacities in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. To this end Anabaena strains were generated carrying an extra copy of ahpC (An+ahpC) or by deleting from their endogenous functional ahpC (AnΔahpC). AhpC levels were 2.2- to 6.0-fold higher in An+ahpC than in wild type. An+ahpC revealed 1.4- to 2-fold upregulation of photosystems I and II, nitrogenase, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities while same activities were 1.3- to 2.5-fold downregulated in the insertional mutant (AnΔahpC) compared to the wild type. Peroxide, superoxide and malondialdehyde contents were low in An+ahpC and high in AnΔahpC. Growth was inhibited in AnΔahpC by approximately 40-60% compared to a 33-40% enhanced growth in An+ahpC under selected stresses. Most interestingly, heterocyst frequency was increased in An+ahpC. In order to address transcriptional and posttranscriptional effects, transcripts of genes including groEL, fld, kat, gor, gst, dps, bfr, tf, sodA, dnaK, prx, uspA, pcs and apx were quantified and found to be increased 1.33- to 7.70-fold in unstressed and 1.76- to 13.80-fold in stressed An+ahpC. In a converse manner, they were downregulated by 1.20- to 7.50-fold in unstressed and 1.23 to 10.20-fold in stressed AnΔahpC. It is concluded that the level of AhpC controls a major set of metabolic and developmental genes in normal and stress conditions and thus likely is in the core of the redox regulatory system of Anabaena.

  13. ppGpp metabolism is involved in heterocyst development in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Ran; Lin, Gui-Ming; Chen, Wen-Li; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai

    2013-10-01

    When deprived of a combined-nitrogen source in the growth medium, the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 (Anabaena) can form heterocysts capable of nitrogen fixation. The process of heterocyst differentiation takes about 20 to 24 h, during which extensive metabolic and morphological changes take place. Guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) is the signal of the stringent response that ensures cell survival by adjusting major cellular activities in response to nutrient starvation in bacteria, and ppGpp accumulates at the early stage of heterocyst differentiation (J. Akinyanju, R. J. Smith, FEBS Lett. 107:173-176, 1979; J Akinyanju, R. J. Smith, New Phytol. 105:117-122, 1987). Here we show that all1549 (here designated relana) in Anabaena, homologous to relA/spoT, is upregulated in response to nitrogen deprivation and predominantly localized in vegetative cells. The disruption of relana strongly affects the synthesis of ppGpp, and the resulting mutant, all1549Ωsp/sm, fails to form heterocysts and to grow in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This phenotype can be complemented by a wild-type copy of relana. Although the upregulation of hetR is affected in the mutant, ectopic overexpression of hetR cannot rescue the phenotype. However, we found that the mutant rapidly loses its viability, within a time window of 3 to 6 h, following the deprivation of combined nitrogen. We propose that ppGpp plays a major role in rebalancing the metabolic activities of the cells in the absence of the nitrogen source supply and that this regulation is necessary for filament survival and consequently for the success of heterocyst differentiation.

  14. Characterization of three putative xylulose 5-phosphate/fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolases in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Takashi; Tajima, Naoyuki; Sekine, Kohsuke; Sato, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Xylulose 5-phosphate/fructose 6-phosphate phosphoketolase (Xfp) is a key enzyme in the central carbohydrate metabolism in heterofermentative bacteria, in which enzymatic property of Xfps is well characterized. This is not the case in other microbes. The cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 possesses three putative genes encoding Xfp, all1483, all2567, and alr1850. We purified three putative Xfps as recombinant proteins. The results of gel filtration indicated that these proteins form homomultimer complex. All1483 and All2567 showed phosphoketolase activity, whereas Alr1850 did not show the activity. Kinetic analyses demonstrated that substrates, fructose 6-phosphate and inorganic phosphate, are cooperatively bound to enzymes positively and negatively, respectively.

  15. dPob/EMC is essential for biosynthesis of rhodopsin and other multi-pass membrane proteins in Drosophila photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Takunori; Ohba, Aya; Liu, Ziguang; Inagaki, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Akiko K

    2015-02-26

    In eukaryotes, most integral membrane proteins are synthesized, integrated into the membrane, and folded properly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We screened the mutants affecting rhabdomeric expression of rhodopsin 1 (Rh1) in the Drosophila photoreceptors and found that dPob/EMC3, EMC1, and EMC8/9, Drosophila homologs of subunits of ER membrane protein complex (EMC), are essential for stabilization of immature Rh1 in an earlier step than that at which another Rh1-specific chaperone (NinaA) acts. dPob/EMC3 localizes to the ER and associates with EMC1 and calnexin. Moreover, EMC is required for the stable expression of other multi-pass transmembrane proteins such as minor rhodopsins Rh3 and Rh4, transient receptor potential, and Na(+)K(+)-ATPase, but not for a secreted protein or type I single-pass transmembrane proteins. Furthermore, we found that dPob/EMC3 deficiency induces rhabdomere degeneration in a light-independent manner. These results collectively indicate that EMC is a key factor in the biogenesis of multi-pass transmembrane proteins, including Rh1, and its loss causes retinal degeneration.

  16. Bioremoval of heavy metals and nutrients from sewage plant by Anabaena oryzae and Cyanosarcina fontana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, Mustafa A; Issa, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrated the growth of two species of cyanobacteria on wastewater isolated from sewage plant in Aswan, Egypt. We evaluated their efficiency for eliminating nitrogen, phosphorus, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and heavy metals (Fe(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Mn(2+)). The growth of Cyanosarcina fontana has supported wastewater as a growth medium than Anabaena oryzae compared to standard medium. The nutrients concentration such as COD, NO3-N and PO4-P were decreased by the growth of A. oryzae and C. fontana in the wastewater after primary settling and centrate. However, the reduction of COD was less efficient than the other nutrients. The reduction percentage of COD, NO3-N and PO4-P reached 39.3, 84.1 and 90.7% as well as 54.6, 83.1, and 89.8%, in cultures of A. oryzae and C. fontana grown in the wastewater after primary settling, respectively. The reduction amounted to 10.1, 76.8, and 63.0% by A. oryzae and 43.2, 62.1, and 74.8% by C. fontana, grown in the centrate, respectively. Cyanobacteria species have the ability to accumulate the heavy metals from the wastewater to level far than the exceeding metal level in the water. Whereas, the heavy metals biosorption performance of C. fontana was higher in accumulating Fe(2+) (93.95%), Pb(2+) (81.21%), Cu(2+) (63.9%), and Mn(2+) (48.49%) compared to A. oryzae. The biosorption ability is dependent on the nature of the adsorbent studied and the type of wastewater treated. Therefore, removal of heavy metals and nutrients by the tested algae is strongly recommended as a powerful technique for the removal of pollutants from wastewater.

  17. Determination of 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin produced by Streptomyces sp. and Anabaena PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuqun; He, Jin; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Jibin; Yu, Ziniu

    2007-08-22

    A new sample preparation and enrichment technique, headspace liquid-phase microextraction (HS-LPME) linked to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), was developed for the determination of the off-flavor odorants, 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin, produced by Streptomyces sp. and Anabaena PCC7120. Some of the factors that influence the extraction efficiency of HS-LPME, such as the type of extraction solvent, ionic strength of sample solution, and sample agitation rate, were studied and optimized by a single factor test. Other factors, including extraction temperature, extraction time, microdrop volume, and headspace volume were optimized by orthogonal array design. Extraction of 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin was conducted by exposing 2.5 microL of 1-hexanol for 9 min at 50 degrees C in the headspace of a 20 mL vial with a 10 mL of sample solution saturated by NaCl and stirred at 800 rpm. The developed protocol demonstrated good repeatability (relative standard deviations (RSDs) 0.999), and low limits of detection (LODs) for 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin (0.05 ng/L for both analytes). Subsequently, the method was successfully applied to extract the analytes in bacterial cultures with high recoveries (from 94% to 98%). Compared with headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME), HS-LPME demonstrates better linearity, precision, and recovery. Importantly, the sensitivity is about 1 order of magnitude higher than that of most HS-SPME. The results showed that HS-LPME coupled with GC-MS is a simple, convenient, rapid, sensitive, and effective method for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin.

  18. Evaluation of conversion efficiency of light to hydrogen energy by Anabaena variabilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jong Hyun; Hae Shin, Ji; Park, Tai Hyun [School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi-Sun [Biomass Research Team, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Jun Sim, Sang [Department of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-05-15

    Cyanobacteria provide an efficient system for producing H{sub 2} from water using solar energy. The energy conversion efficiency can be defined by the ratio of H{sub 2} produced to the light energy absorbed. An IR and opalescent plate method was used to measure the light energy absorbed. Since cyanobacteria absorb light in the visible range but not in the infrared range, the net amount of light energy absorbed by the cells can be estimated by measuring the IR and visible light intensities transmitted through the biochamber. A rectangular biochamber was used for measuring the conversion efficiency from light energy to H{sub 2} energy. A quantum meter and radiometer were used to measure the light intensity transmitted through the chamber. Anabaena variabilis was cultured in a BG11 medium with 3.6mM NaNO{sub 3} and the light intensity was 40-50{mu}mol/m{sup 2}/s in the growth phase and 120-140{mu}mol/m{sup 2}/s in the H{sub 2} production phase. The maximum H{sub 2} production was 50ml for 40h and cell density was 1.2g/l. The H{sub 2} production rate was 4.1ml H{sub 2}/g dry cell weight/h. Based on the light absorbed in the H{sub 2} production phase, the energy conversion efficiency from light to H{sub 2} was 1.5% on average and 3.9% at the maximum. Based on the light energy absorbed in the cell growth and H{sub 2} production phases, the energy conversion efficiency was 1.1% on average. (author)

  19. Whole Cell Biosensor Using Anabaena torulosa with Optical Transduction for Environmental Toxicity Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Shing Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A whole cell-based biosensor using Anabaena torulosa for the detection of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, and Cd, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D, and chlorpyrifos was constructed. The cyanobacteria were entrapped on a cellulose membrane through filtration. Then, the membrane was dried and fixed into a cylindrical well, which was designed to be attached to an optical probe. The probe was connected to fluorescence spectrometer with optical fibre. The presence of the toxicants was indicated by the change of fluorescence emission, before and after the exposure. The linear detection ranges for Cu, Pb, and Cd were 2.5–10.0 µg/L, 0.5–5.0 µg/L, and 0.5–10.0 µg/L, respectively, while 2,4-D and chlorpyrifos shared similar linear ranges of 0.05–0.75 µg/L. The biosensor showed good sensitivity with the lowest limits of detection (LLD for Cu, Pb, Cd, 2,4-D and chlorpyrifos determined at 1.195 µg/L, 0.100 µg/L, 0.027 µg/L, 0.025 µg/L, and 0.025 µg/L, respectively. The overall reproducibility of the biosensor (n=3 was <±6.35%. The biosensor had been tested with different combinations of toxicants, with the results showing predominantly antagonistic responses. The results confirmed that the biosensor constructed in this report is suitable to be used in quantitative and qualitative detections of heavy metals and pesticides.

  20. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Profiling of Anabaena sp. Strain 90 under Inorganic Phosphorus Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teikari, Jonna; Österholm, Julia; Kopf, Matthias; Battchikova, Natalia; Wahlsten, Matti; Aro, Eva-Mari; Hess, Wolfgang R; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2015-08-01

    Inorganic phosphorus (Pi) is one of the main growth-limiting factors of diazotrophic cyanobacteria. Due to human activity, the availability of Pi has increased in water bodies, resulting in eutrophication and the formation of massive cyanobacterial blooms. In this study, we examined the molecular responses of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 90 to phosphorus deprivation, aiming at the identification of candidate genes to monitor the Pi status in cyanobacteria. Furthermore, this study increased the basic understanding of how phosphorus affects diazotrophic and bloom-forming cyanobacteria as a major growth-limiting factor. Based on RNA sequencing data, we identified 246 differentially expressed genes after phosphorus starvation and 823 differentially expressed genes after prolonged Pi limitation, most of them related to central metabolism and cellular growth. The transcripts of the genes related to phosphorus transport and assimilation (pho regulon) were most upregulated during phosphorus depletion. One of the most increased transcripts encodes a giant protein of 1,869 amino acid residues, which contains, among others, a phytase-like domain. Our findings predict its crucial role in phosphorus starvation, but future studies are still needed. Using two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we found 43 proteins that were differentially expressed after prolonged phosphorus stress. However, correlation analysis unraveled an association only to some extent between the transcriptomic and proteomic abundances. Based on the present results, we suggest that the method used for monitoring the Pi status in cyanobacterial bloom should contain wider combinations of pho regulon genes (e.g., PstABCS transport systems) in addition to the commonly used alkaline phosphatase gene alone.

  1. Identification and characterization of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Yusuke; Sekine, Midori; Ihara, Masaki

    2014-05-01

    Exopolysaccharides produced by photosynthetic cyanobacteria have received considerable attention in recent years for their potential applications in the production of renewable biofuels. Particularly, cyanobacterial cellulose is one of the most promising products because it is extracellularly secreted as a non-crystalline form, which can be easily harvested from the media and converted into glucose units. In cyanobacteria, the production of UDP-glucose, the cellulose precursor, is a key step in the cellulose synthesis pathway. UDP-glucose is synthesized from UTP and glucose-1-phosphate (Glc-1P) by UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase), but this pathway in cyanobacteria has not been well characterized. Therefore, to elucidate the overall cellulose biosynthesis pathway in cyanobacteria, we studied the putative UGPase All3274 and seven other putative NDP-sugar pyrophosphorylases (NSPases), All4645, Alr2825, Alr4491, Alr0188, Alr3400, Alr2361, and Alr3921 of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Assays using the purified recombinant proteins revealed that All3274 exhibited UGPase activity, All4645, Alr2825, Alr4491, Alr0188, and Alr3921 exhibited pyrophosphorylase activities on ADP-glucose, CDP-glucose, dTDP-glucose, GDP-mannose, and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, respectively. Further characterization of All3274 revealed that the kcat for UDP-glucose formation was one or two orders lower than those of other known UGPases. The activity and dimerization tendency of All3274 increased at higher enzyme concentrations, implying catalytic activation by dimerization. However, most interestingly, All3274 dimerization was inhibited by UTP and Glc-1P, but not by UDP-glucose. This study presents the first in vitro characterization of a cyanobacterial UGPase, and provides insights into biotechnological attempts to utilize the photosynthetic production of cellulose from cyanobacteria.

  2. Sensory syndromes in parietal stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, C; Bogousslavsky, J; Regli, F

    1993-10-01

    We studied 20 patients with an acute parietal stroke with hemisensory disturbances but no visual field deficit and no or only slight motor weakness, without thalamic involvement on CT or MRI and found three main sensory syndromes. (1) The pseudothalamic sensory syndrome consists of a faciobrachiocrural impairment of elementary sensation (touch, pain, temperature, vibration). All patients have an inferior-anterior parietal stroke involving the parietal operculum, posterior insula, and, in all but one patient, underlying white matter. (2) The cortical sensory syndrome consists of an isolated loss of discriminative sensation (stereognosis, graphesthesia, position sense) involving one or two parts of the body. These patients show a superior-posterior parietal stroke. (3) The atypical sensory syndrome consists of a sensory loss involving all modalities of sensation in a partial distribution. Parietal lesions of different topography are responsible for this clinical picture, which probably represents a minor variant of the two previous sensory syndromes. Neuropsychological dysfunction was present in 17 patients. The only constant association was between conduction aphasia and right-sided pseudothalamic sensory deficit. We conclude that parietal stroke can cause different sensory syndromes depending on the topography of the underlying lesion. Sensory deficits can be monosymptomatic but never present as a "pure sensory stroke" involving face, arm, leg, and trunk together.

  3. Fourier transform infrared studies of active-site-methylated rhodopsin. Implications for chromophore-protein interaction, transducin activation, and the reaction pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganter, U.M.; Longstaff, C.; Pajares, M.A.; Rando, R.R.; Siebert, F. (Institut fuer Biophysik Und Strahlenbiologie, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet Freiburg (West Germany))

    1991-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared studies of active-site-methylated rhodopsin (ASMR) show that, as compared to unmodified rhodopsin, the photoreaction is almost unchanged up to the formation of lumirhodopsin. Especially, the deviations are much smaller than those observed for the corresponding intermediates of 13-desmethyl-rhodopsin. In metarhodopsin-I, larger alterations are present with respect to the three internal carboxyl groups. Similar deviations have been observed in meta-I of 13-desmethyl-rhodopsin. This indicates that, in agreement with our previous investigations, these carboxyl groups are located in close proximity to the chromophore. Because this latter pigment is capable, when bleached, of activating transducin, our data provide support for the earlier conclusion that deprotonation of the Schiff base is a prerequisite for transducin activation. The positions of the C = C and C - C stretching modes of the retinal suggest that the redshift observed in ASMR and its photoproducts can be explained by an increased distance of the Schiff base from the counterion(s). It is further shown that the photoreaction does not stop at metarhodopsin-I, but that this intermediate directly decays to a metarhodopsin-III-like species.

  4. Fourier transform infrared studies of active-site-methylated rhodopsin. Implications for chromophore-protein interaction, transducin activation, and the reaction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganter, U M; Longstaff, C; Pajares, M A; Rando, R R; Siebert, F

    1991-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared studies of active-site-methylated rhodopsin (ASMR) show that, as compared to unmodified rhodopsin, the photoreaction is almost unchanged up to the formation of lumirhodopsin. Especially, the deviations are much smaller than those observed for the corresponding intermediates of 13-desmethyl-rhodopsin. In metarhodopsin-I, larger alterations are present with respect to the three internal carboxyl groups. Similar deviations have been observed in meta-I of 13-desmethyl-rhodopsin. This indicates that, in agreement with our previous investigations, these carboxyl groups are located in close proximity to the chromophore. Because this latter pigment is capable, when bleached, of activating transducin, our data provide support for the earlier conclusion that deprotonation of the Schiff base is a prerequisite for transducin activation. The positions of the C = C and C - C stretching modes of the retinal suggest that the redshift observed in ASMR and its photoproducts can be explained by an increased distance of the Schiff base from the counterion(s). It is further shown that the photoreaction does not stop at metarhodopsin-I, but that this intermediate directly decays to a metarhodopsin-III-like species.

  5. Repair of rhodopsin mRNA by spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing: a new approach for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Adeline; Lorain, Stéphanie; Joséphine, Charlène; Desrosiers, Melissa; Peccate, Cécile; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2015-05-01

    The promising clinical results obtained for ocular gene therapy in recent years have paved the way for gene supplementation to treat recessively inherited forms of retinal degeneration. The situation is more complex for dominant mutations, as the toxic mutant gene product must be removed. We used spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a strategy for repairing the transcript of the rhodopsin gene, the gene most frequently mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We tested 17 different molecules targeting the pre-mRNA intron 1, by transient transfection of HEK-293T cells, with subsequent trans-splicing quantification at the transcript level. We found that the targeting of some parts of the intron promoted trans-splicing more efficiently than the targeting of other areas, and that trans-splicing rate could be increased by modifying the replacement sequence. We then developed cell lines stably expressing the rhodopsin gene, for the assessment of phenotypic criteria relevant to the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Using this model, we showed that trans-splicing restored the correct localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. Finally, we tested our best candidate by AAV gene transfer in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa that expresses a mutant allele of the human rhodopsin gene, and demonstrated the feasibility of trans-splicing in vivo. This work paves the way for trans-splicing gene therapy to treat retinitis pigmentosa due to rhodopsin gene mutation and, more generally, for the treatment of genetic diseases with dominant transmission.

  6. Primers and polymerase chain reaction conditions for DNA barcoding teleost fish based on the mitochondrial cytochrome b and nuclear rhodopsin genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevilla, R.G.; Diez, A.; Noren, M.; Mouchel, O.; Jerome, M.; Verrez-Bagnis, V.; Pelt-Heerschap, van H.M.L.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes a set of 21 polymerase chain reaction primers and amplification conditions developed to barcode practically any teleost fish species according to their mitochondrial cytochrome b and nuclear rhodopsin gene sequences. The method was successfully tested in more than 200 marine fi

  7. PHOTOSYNTHETIC, BIOCHEMICAL AND ENZYMATIC INVESTIGATION OF Anabaena fertilissima IN RESPONSE TO AN INSECTICIDE-HEXACHLORO-HEXAHYDRO-METHANOBENZODIOXATHIEPINE- OXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar, Nirmal J.I

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A study on the heterocystous, nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena fertilissima was carried out to investigate the effect of an organochlorine insecticide (hexachloro-hexahydro-methano-benzodioxathiepineoxide, called as endosulfan at different concentrations of 3, 6 and 12 μgml-1 on the photosynthetic pigments-Chl-a, Carotenoids and Phycobiliproteins-phycocyanin, allophycocyanin and phycoerythrin, stress metabolites such as carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids, phenols and enzyme activities-nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase. The insecticide- Endosulfan showed to be deleteriously affecting the activities in the cyanobacterium. As early as the 4th day, chl-a and carotenoids reduced by 38% and 20% respectively. The phycobiliproteins declined by 60%, 64% and 28% with respect to Phycocyanin, Allophycocyanin and Phycoerythrin. Moreover, Endosulfan adversely depleted the cellular activities, leading to a marked decrease in the carbohydrates, proteins, phenols and amino acids and enzymes-nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase. Despite of deleterious effects of Endosulfan on the cyanobacterium Anabaena fertilissima, a unique regenerating ability in presence of the insecticide was observed by the end of 12 days in the lower doses of insecticide.

  8. The Sakaguchi reaction product quenches phycobilisome fluorescence, allowing determination of the arginine concentration in cells of Anabaena strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Shan; Haselkorn, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena fixes nitrogen in specialized cells called heterocysts. The immediate product of fixation, ammonia, is known to be assimilated by addition to glutamate to make glutamine. How fixed nitrogen is transported along the filament to the 10 to 20 vegetative cells that separate heterocysts is unknown. N-fixing heterocysts accumulate an insoluble polymer containing aspartate and arginine at the cell poles. Lockau's group has proposed that the polymer is degraded at the poles to provide a mobile carrier, arginine, to the vegetative cells (R. Richter, M. Hejazi, R. Kraft, K. Ziegler, and W. Lockau, Eur. J. Biochem. 263:163-169, 1999). We wished to use the Sakaguchi reaction for arginine to determine the relative cellular concentration of arginine along the filament. At present, the methods for measuring absorption of the Sakaguchi reaction product at 520 nm are insufficiently sensitive for that purpose. However, that product quenches the fluorescence of phycobiliproteins, which we have adapted to a determination of arginine. Our results are consistent with the proposal that arginine is a principal nitrogen carrier from heterocysts to vegetative cells in Anabaena.

  9. A Comprehensively Curated Genome-Scale Two-Cell Model for the Heterocystous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malatinszky, David; Steuer, Ralf; Jones, Patrik R

    2017-01-01

    Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is a nitrogen-fixing filamentous cyanobacterium. Under nitrogen-limiting conditions, a fraction of the vegetative cells in each filament terminally differentiate to nongrowing heterocysts. Heterocysts are metabolically and structurally specialized to enable O2-sensitive nitrogen fixation. The functionality of the filament, as an association of vegetative cells and heterocysts, is postulated to depend on metabolic exchange of electrons, carbon, and fixed nitrogen. In this study, we compile and evaluate a comprehensive curated stoichiometric model of this two-cell system, with the objective function based on the growth of the filament under diazotrophic conditions. The predicted growth rate under nitrogen-replete and -deplete conditions, as well as the effect of external carbon and nitrogen sources, was thereafter verified. Furthermore, the model was utilized to comprehensively evaluate the optimality of putative metabolic exchange reactions between heterocysts and vegetative cells. The model suggested that optimal growth requires at least four exchange metabolites. Several combinations of exchange metabolites resulted in predicted growth rates that are higher than growth rates achieved by only considering exchange of metabolites previously suggested in the literature. The curated model of the metabolic network of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 enhances our ability to understand the metabolic organization of multicellular cyanobacteria and provides a platform for further study and engineering of their metabolism.

  10. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of KatB, a manganese catalase from Anabaena PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihani, Subhash Chandra; Chakravarty, Dhiman; Ballal, Anand

    2013-11-01

    Catalases are enzymes that play an important role in the detoxification of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in aerobic organisms. Among catalases, haem-containing catalases are ubiquitously distributed and their enzymatic mechanism is very well understood. On the other hand, manganese catalases that contain a bimanganese core in the active site have been less well characterized and their mode of action is not fully understood. The genome of Anabaena PCC 7120 does not show the presence of a haem catalase-like gene; instead, two ORFs encoding manganese catalases (Mn-catalases) are present. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of KatB, one of the two Mn-catalases from Anabaena, are reported. KatB was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 400 as a precipitant and calcium acetate as an additive. Diffraction data were collected in-house on an Agilent SuperNova system using a microfocus sealed-tube X-ray source. The crystal diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution at 100 K. The tetragonal crystal belonged to space group P4(1)2(1)2 (or enantiomer), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 101.87, c = 138.86 Å. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis using the Matthews coefficient and self-rotation function suggests the presence of a trimer in the asymmetric unit.

  11. Peroxidation radical formation and regiospecificity of recombinated Anabaena sp. lipoxygenase and its effect on modifying wheat proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Lu, Fengxia; Zhang, Chong; Lu, Yingjian; Bie, Xiaomei; Ren, Di; Lu, Zhaoxin

    2014-02-19

    Peroxidation radical formation and the regiospecificity of recombinated lipoxygenase from Anabaena sp. PCC7120 (ana-rLOX) were characterized by using ESR and HPLC-MS. It was found that ana-rLOX oxygenated at the C-13 position of the substrate linoleic acid (LA); at C-13 and C-16 of α-linolenic acid (ALA); at C-9, C-12, and C-15 of arachidonic acid (AA); at C-12, C-15, and C-18 of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA); and at C-14 and C-16 of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), respectively. A total of 7, 14, 30, 28, and 18 radical adducts for LA, ALA, AA, EPA, and DHA were respectively identified by HPLC-MS. The functional characteristics of wheat protein, such as foaming capacity (FC), foam stability (FS), emulsifying activity index (EAI), emulsifying stability index (ESI), increased with enzymatic reactions. However, the average particle size of wheat proteins decreased with addition of ana-rLOX/LA. The ana-rLOX was also positivele effective in improving dough properties. These results provided clear evidence that ana-rLOX from Anabaena sp. could effectively improve the quality of wheat flour, which suggested that the enzyme could be applied as flour improver.

  12. Divisome-dependent subcellular localization of cell-cell joining protein SepJ in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-León, Félix; Mariscal, Vicente; Frías, José E; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2015-05-01

    Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria are multicellular organisms that grow as filaments that can be hundreds of cells long. Septal junction complexes, of which SepJ is a possible component, appear to join the cells in the filament. SepJ is a cytoplasmic membrane protein that contains a long predicted periplasmic section and localizes not only to the cell poles in the intercellular septa but also to a position similar to a Z ring when cell division starts suggesting a relation with the divisome. Here, we created a mutant of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 in which the essential divisome gene ftsZ is expressed from a synthetic NtcA-dependent promoter, whose activity depends on the nitrogen source. In the presence of ammonium, low levels of FtsZ were produced, and the subcellular localization of SepJ, which was investigated by immunofluorescence, was impaired. Possible interactions of SepJ with itself and with divisome proteins FtsZ, FtsQ and FtsW were investigated using the bacterial two-hybrid system. We found SepJ self-interaction and a specific interaction with FtsQ, confirmed by co-purification and involving parts of the SepJ and FtsQ periplasmic sections. Therefore, SepJ can form multimers, and in Anabaena, the divisome has a role beyond cell division, localizing a septal protein essential for multicellularity.

  13. On-water remote monitoring robotic system for estimating the patch coverage of Anabaena sp. filaments in shallow water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Vivas, E; Von Borstel, F D; Pérez-Estrada, C J; Torres-Ariño, D; Villa-Medina, J F; Gutiérrez, J

    2015-06-01

    An on-water remote monitoring robotic system was developed for indirectly estimating the relative density of marine cyanobacteria blooms at the subtidal sandy-rocky beach in Balandra Cove, Baja California Sur, Mexico. The system is based on an unmanned surface vehicle to gather underwater videos of the seafloor for avoiding physical damage on Anabaena sp. cyanobacteria colonies, which grow in tufts of filaments weakly attached to rocks, seagrass, and macroalgae. An on-axis image stabilization mechanism was developed to support a camcorder and minimize wave perturbation while recording underwater digital images of the seafloor. Color image processing algorithms were applied to estimate the patch coverage area and density, since Anabaena sp. filaments exhibit a characteristic green tone. Results of field tests showed the feasibility of the robotic system to estimate the relative density, distribution, and coverage area of cyanobacteria blooms, preventing the possible impact of direct observation. The robotic system could also be used in surveys of other benthos in the sublittoral zone.

  14. The LysR-type transcription factor PacR is a global regulator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation in Anabaena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picossi, Silvia; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2015-09-01

    Cyanobacteria perform water-splitting photosynthesis and are important primary producers impacting the carbon and nitrogen cycles at global scale. They fix CO2 through ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCo) and have evolved a distinct CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) that builds high CO2 concentrations in the vicinity of RuBisCo favouring its carboxylase activity. Filamentous cyanobacteria such as Anabaena fix CO2 in photosynthetic vegetative cells, which donate photosynthate to heterocysts that rely on a heterotrophic metabolism to fix N2 . CCM elements are induced in response to inorganic carbon limitation, a cue that exposes the photosynthetic apparatus to photodamage by over-reduction. An Anabaena mutant lacking the LysR-type transcription factor All3953 grew poorly and dies under high light. The rbcL operon encoding RuBisCo was induced upon carbon limitation in the wild type but not in the mutant. ChIP-Seq analysis was used to globally identify All3953 targets under carbon limitation. Targets include, besides rbcL, genes encoding CCM elements, photorespiratory pathway- photosystem- and electron transport-related components, and factors, including flavodiiron proteins, with a demonstrated or putative function in photoprotection. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of selected All3953 targets showed regulation in the wild type but not in the mutant. All3953 (PacR) is a global regulator of carbon assimilation in an oxygenic photoautotroph.

  15. Inactivation of a heterocyst-specific invertase indicates a principal role of sucrose catabolism in heterocysts of Anabaena sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Igual, Rocío; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2010-10-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that carries out N(2) fixation in specialized cells called heterocysts, which exchange nutrients and regulators with the filament's vegetative cells that perform the photosynthetic fixation of CO(2). The Anabaena genome carries two genes coding for alkaline/neutral invertases, invA and invB. As shown by Northern analysis, both genes were expressed monocistronically and induced under nitrogen deprivation, although induction was stronger for invB than for invA. Whereas expression of an InvA-N-GFP fusion (green fluorescent protein [GFP] fused to the N terminus of the InvA protein [InvA-N]) was homogeneous along the cyanobacterial filament, consistent with the lack of dependence on HetR, expression of an InvB-N-GFP fusion upon combined nitrogen deprivation took place mainly in differentiating and mature heterocysts. In an hetR genetic background, the InvB-N-GFP fusion was strongly expressed all along the filament. An insertional mutant of invA could grow diazotrophically but was impaired in nifHDK induction and exhibited an increased frequency of heterocysts, suggesting a regulatory role of the invertase-mediated carbon flux in vegetative cells. In contrast, an invB mutant was strongly impaired in diazotrophic growth, showing a crucial role of sucrose catabolism mediated by the InvB invertase in the heterocysts.

  16. GroEL of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain L-31 exhibits GroES and ATP-independent refolding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potnis, Akhilesh A; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree K

    2016-03-01

    The nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena L-31 has two Hsp60 proteins, 59 kDa GroEL coded by the second gene of groESL operon and 61 kDa Cpn60 coded by cpn60 gene. Anabaena GroEL formed stable higher oligomer (>12-mer) in the presence of K(+) and prevented thermal aggregation of malate dehydrogenase (MDH). Using three protein substrates (MDH, All1541 and green fluorescent protein), it was found that the refolding activity of Anabaena GroEL was lower than that of Escherichia coli GroEL, but independent of both GroES and ATP. This correlated with in vivo data. GroEL exhibited ATPase activity which was enhanced in the presence of GroES and absence of a denatured protein, contrary to that observed for bacterial GroEL. However, a significant role for ATP could not be ascertained during in vitro folding assays. The monomeric Cpn60 exhibited much lower refolding activity than GroEL, unaffected by GroES and ATP. In vitro studies revealed inhibition of the refolding activity of Anabaena GroEL by Cpn60, which could be due to their different oligomeric status. The role of GroES and ATP may have been added during the course of evolution from the ancient cyanobacteria to modern day bacteria enhancing the refolding ability and ensuring wider scope of substrates for GroEL.

  17. Alr5068, a Low-Molecular-Weight protein tyrosine phosphatase, is involved in formation of the heterocysts polysaccharide layer in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hui; Wan, Shuang; Liu, Pi-Qiong; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2013-10-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 forms nitrogen-fixing heterocysts after deprivation of combined nitrogen. Under such conditions, vegetative cells provide heterocysts with photosynthate and receive fixed nitrogen from the latter. Heterocyst envelope contains a glycolipid layer and a polysaccharide layer to restrict the diffusion of oxygen into heterocysts. Low-Molecular-Weight protein tyrosine phosphatases (LMW-PTPs) are involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides in bacteria. Alr5068, a protein from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, shows significant sequence similarity with LMW-PTPs. In this study we characterized the enzymatic properties of Alr5068 and showed that it can dephosphorylate several autophosphorylated tyrosine kinases (Alr2856, Alr3059 and All4432) of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 in vitro. Several conserved residues among LMW-PTPs are shown to be essential for the phosphatase activity of Alr5068. Overexpression of alr5068 results in a strain unable to survive under diazotrophic conditions, with the formation of morphologically mature heterocysts detached from the filaments. Overexpression of an alr5068 allele that lost phosphatase activity led to the formation of heterocyst with an impaired polysaccharide layer. The alr5068 gene was upregulated after nitrogen step-down and its mutation affected the expression of hepA and hepC, two genes necessary for the formation of the heterocyst envelope polysaccharide (HEP) layer. Our results suggest that Alr5068 is associated with the production of HEP in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

  18. Characterization and Optimization of Bioflocculant Exopolysaccharide Production by Cyanobacteria Nostoc sp. BTA97 and Anabaena sp. BTA990 in Culture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Onkar Nath; Khangembam, Romi; Shamjetshabam, Minerva; Sharma, Aribam Subhalaxmi; Oinam, Gunapati; Brand, Jerry J

    2015-08-01

    Bioflocculant exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by 40 cyanobacterial strains during their photoautotrophic growth was investigated. Highest levels of EPS were produced by Nostoc sp. BTA97 and Anabaena sp. BTA990. EPS production was maximum during stationary growth phase, when nitrogenase activity was very low. Maximum EPS production occurred at pH 8.0 in the absence of any combined nitrogen source. The cyanobacterial EPS consisted of soluble protein and polysaccharide that included substantial amounts of neutral sugars and uronic acid. The EPS isolated from Anabaena sp. BTA990 and Nostoc sp. BTA97 demonstrated high flocculation capacity. There was a positive correlation between uronic acid content and flocculation activity. The flocculant bound a cationic dye, Alcian Blue, indicating it to be polyanionic. The 16S rRNA gene sequences for Nostoc sp. BTA97 and Anabaena sp. BTA990 were deposited at NCBI GenBank, and accession numbers were obtained as KJ830951 and KJ830948, respectively. The results of these experiments indicate that strains Anabaena sp. BTA990 and Nostoc sp. BTA97 are good candidates for the commercial production of EPS and might be utilized in industrial applications as an alternative to synthetic and abiotic flocculants.

  19. Sensory Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin STEVENS; Guest Editor

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Sensory ecology deals with how animals capture in formation from their environment, and the sensory sys tems involved in doing so (Hailman, 1977; Lythgoe, 1979; Dusenbery, 1992; Mappes and Stevens 2010). Although the term sensory ecology itself is compara tively recent, its basis has a long history, in part due to numerous links with subjects such as neurobiology, physiology, ethology, and evolutionary behavioral ecology.

  20. Directional RNA deep sequencing sheds new light on the transcriptional response of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 to combined-nitrogen deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Head Steven R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria are potential sources of renewable chemicals and biofuels and serve as model organisms for bacterial photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation, and responses to environmental changes. Anabaena (Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 (hereafter Anabaena is a multicellular filamentous cyanobacterium that can "fix" atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia when grown in the absence of a source of combined nitrogen. Because the nitrogenase enzyme is oxygen sensitive, Anabaena forms specialized cells called heterocysts that create a microoxic environment for nitrogen fixation. We have employed directional RNA-seq to map the Anabaena transcriptome during vegetative cell growth and in response to combined-nitrogen deprivation, which induces filaments to undergo heterocyst development. Our data provide an unprecedented view of transcriptional changes in Anabaena filaments during the induction of heterocyst development and transition to diazotrophic growth. Results Using the Illumina short read platform and a directional RNA-seq protocol, we obtained deep sequencing data for RNA extracted from filaments at 0, 6, 12, and 21 hours after the removal of combined nitrogen. The RNA-seq data provided information on transcript abundance and boundaries for the entire transcriptome. From these data, we detected novel antisense transcripts within the UTRs (untranslated regions and coding regions of key genes involved in heterocyst development, suggesting that antisense RNAs may be important regulators of the nitrogen response. In addition, many 5' UTRs were longer than anticipated, sometimes extending into upstream open reading frames (ORFs, and operons often showed complex structure and regulation. Finally, many genes that had not been previously identified as being involved in heterocyst development showed regulation, providing new candidates for future studies in this model organism. Conclusions Directional RNA-seq data were obtained that provide

  1. SENSORY AND CONSUMER TESTING LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — These laboratories conduct a wide range of studies to characterize the sensory properties of and consumer responses to foods, beverages, and other consumer products....

  2. Multi-sensory Sculpting (MSS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Wallpach, Sylvia; Kreuzer, Maria

    2013-01-01

    -conscious and modality-specific level and use multi-sensory metaphors to express embodied knowledge. Retrieving embodied brand knowledge requires methods that (a) stimulate various senses that have been involved in brand knowledge formation and (b) give consumers the opportunity to express themselves metaphorically...... in a format similar to their cognitive representations. This article introduces multi-sensory sculpting (MSS) as a method that allows retrieving embodied brand knowledge via multi-sensory metaphors and proposes a multi-layered metaphor analysis procedure to interpret these multi-sensory data. The paper...

  3. Inactivation of agmatinase expressed in vegetative cells alters arginine catabolism and prevents diazotrophic growth in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnat, Mireia; Flores, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    Arginine decarboxylase produces agmatine, and arginase and agmatinase are ureohydrolases that catalyze the production of ornithine and putrescine from arginine and agmatine, respectively, releasing urea. In the genome of the filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, ORF alr2310 putatively encodes an ureohydrolase. Cells of Anabaena supplemented with [(14) C]arginine took up and catabolized this amino acid generating a set of labeled amino acids that included ornithine, proline, and glutamate. In an alr2310 deletion mutant, an agmatine spot appeared and labeled glutamate increased with respect to the wild type, suggesting that Alr2310 is an agmatinase rather than an arginase. As determined in cell-free extracts, agmatinase activity could be detected in the wild type but not in the mutant. Thus, alr2310 is the Anabaena speB gene encoding agmatinase. The ∆alr2310 mutant accumulated large amounts of cyanophycin granule polypeptide, lacked nitrogenase activity, and did not grow diazotrophically. Growth tests in solid media showed that agmatine is inhibitory for Anabaena, especially under diazotrophic conditions, suggesting that growth of the mutant is inhibited by non-metabolized agmatine. Measurements of incorporation of radioactivity from [(14) C]leucine into macromolecules showed, however, a limited inhibition of protein synthesis in the ∆alr2310 mutant. Analysis of an Anabaena strain producing an Alr2310-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion showed expression in vegetative cells but much less in heterocysts, implying compartmentalization of the arginine decarboxylation pathway in the diazotrophic filaments of this heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium.

  4. Visual sensorial impairments in neurodevelopmental disorders: evidence for a retinal phenotype in Fragile X Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaëlle Rossignol

    Full Text Available Visual sensory impairments are common in Mental Deficiency (MD and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD. These defects are linked to cerebral dysfunction in the visual cortical area characterized by the deregulation of axon growth/guidance and dendrite spine immaturity of neurons. However, visual perception had not been addressed, although the retina is part of the central nervous system with a common embryonic origin. Therefore, we investigated retinal perception, the first event of vision, in a murine model of MD with autistic features. We document that retinal function is altered in Fmr1 KO mice, a model of human Fragile X Syndrome. Indeed, In Fmr1 KO mice had a lower retinal function characterized by a decreased photoreceptors neuron response, due to a 40% decrease in Rhodopsin content and to Rod Outer Segment destabilization. In addition, we observed an alteration of the visual signal transmission between photoreceptors and the inner retina which could be attributed to deregulations of pre- and post- synaptic proteins resulting in retinal neurons synaptic destabilization and to retinal neurons immaturity. Thus, for the first time, we demonstrated that retinal perception is altered in a murine model of MD with autistic features and that there are strong similarities between cerebral and retinal cellular and molecular defects. Our results suggest that both visual perception and integration must be taken into account in assessing visual sensory impairments in MD and ASD.

  5. Spatial fluctuations in expression of the heterocyst differentiation regulatory gene hetR in Anabaena filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Tal, Asaf; Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Mariscal, Vicente; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia; Stavans, Joel

    2015-04-01

    Under nitrogen deprivation, filaments of the cyanobacterium Anabaena undergo a process of development, resulting in a one-dimensional pattern of nitrogen-fixing heterocysts separated by about ten photosynthetic vegetative cells. Many aspects of gene expression before nitrogen deprivation and during the developmental process remain to be elucidated. Furthermore, the coupling of gene expression fluctuations between cells along a multicellular filament is unknown. We studied the statistics of fluctuations of gene expression of HetR, a transcription factor essential for heterocyst differentiation, both under steady-state growth in nitrogen-rich conditions and at different times following nitrogen deprivation, using a chromosomally-encoded translational hetR-gfp fusion. Statistical analysis of fluorescence at the individual cell level in wild-type and mutant filaments demonstrates that expression fluctuations of hetR in nearby cells are coupled, with a characteristic spatial range of circa two to three cells, setting the scale for cellular interactions along a filament. Correlations between cells predominantly arise from intercellular molecular transfer and less from cell division. Fluctuations after nitrogen step-down can build up on those under nitrogen-replete conditions. We found that under nitrogen-rich conditions, basal, steady-state expression of the HetR inhibitor PatS, cell-cell communication influenced by the septal protein SepJ and positive HetR auto-regulation are essential determinants of fluctuations in hetR expression and its distribution along filaments. A comparison between the expression of hetR-gfp under nitrogen-rich and nitrogen-poor conditions highlights the differences between the two HetR inhibitors PatS and HetN, as well as the differences in specificity between the septal proteins SepJ and FraC/FraD. Activation, inhibition and cell-cell communication lie at the heart of developmental processes. Our results show that proteins involved in these

  6. Spatial fluctuations in expression of the heterocyst differentiation regulatory gene hetR in Anabaena filaments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Corrales-Guerrero

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Under nitrogen deprivation, filaments of the cyanobacterium Anabaena undergo a process of development, resulting in a one-dimensional pattern of nitrogen-fixing heterocysts separated by about ten photosynthetic vegetative cells. Many aspects of gene expression before nitrogen deprivation and during the developmental process remain to be elucidated. Furthermore, the coupling of gene expression fluctuations between cells along a multicellular filament is unknown. We studied the statistics of fluctuations of gene expression of HetR, a transcription factor essential for heterocyst differentiation, both under steady-state growth in nitrogen-rich conditions and at different times following nitrogen deprivation, using a chromosomally-encoded translational hetR-gfp fusion. Statistical analysis of fluorescence at the individual cell level in wild-type and mutant filaments demonstrates that expression fluctuations of hetR in nearby cells are coupled, with a characteristic spatial range of circa two to three cells, setting the scale for cellular interactions along a filament. Correlations between cells predominantly arise from intercellular molecular transfer and less from cell division. Fluctuations after nitrogen step-down can build up on those under nitrogen-replete conditions. We found that under nitrogen-rich conditions, basal, steady-state expression of the HetR inhibitor PatS, cell-cell communication influenced by the septal protein SepJ and positive HetR auto-regulation are essential determinants of fluctuations in hetR expression and its distribution along filaments. A comparison between the expression of hetR-gfp under nitrogen-rich and nitrogen-poor conditions highlights the differences between the two HetR inhibitors PatS and HetN, as well as the differences in specificity between the septal proteins SepJ and FraC/FraD. Activation, inhibition and cell-cell communication lie at the heart of developmental processes. Our results show that proteins

  7. Quantitative modeling of the molecular steps underlying shut-off of rhodopsin activity in rod phototransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Timothy W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the predictions of alternative models for the stochastic shut-off of activated rhodopsin (R*) and their implications for the interpretation of experimentally recorded single-photon responses (SPRs) in mammalian rods. Theory We analyze the transitions that an activated R* molecule undergoes as a result of successive phosphorylation steps and arrestin binding. We consider certain simplifying cases for the relative magnitudes of the reaction rate constants and derive the probability distributions for the time to arrestin binding. In addition to the conventional model in which R* catalytic activity declines in a graded manner with successive phosphorylations, we analyze two cases in which the activity is assumed to occur not via multiple small steps upon each phosphorylation but via a single large step. We refer to these latter two cases as the binary R* shut-off and three-state R* shut-off models. Methods We simulate R*’s stochastic reactions numerically for the three models. In the simplifying cases for the ratio of rate constants in the binary and three-state models, we show that the probability distribution of the time to arrestin binding is accurately predicted. To simulate SPRs, we then integrate the differential equations for the downstream reactions using a standard model of the rod outer segment that includes longitudinal diffusion of cGMP and Ca2+. Results Our simulations of SPRs in the conventional model of graded shut-off of R* conform closely to the simulations in a recent study. However, the gain factor required to account for the observed mean SPR amplitude is higher than can be accounted for from biochemical experiments. In addition, a substantial minority of the simulated SPRs exhibit features that have not been reported in published experiments. Our simulations of SPRs using the model of binary R* shut-off appear to conform closely to experimental results for wild type (WT) mouse rods, and the required gain factor conforms to

  8. Sensory Dominance in Product Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fenko, A.B.

    2010-01-01

    People perceive the material world around them with their five senses. Information from different sensory modalities is integrated in the brain to create a stable and meaningful experience of objects, including industrial products that accompany us in our everyday life. Some of the sensory systems p

  9. Photoreceptor Differentiation following Transplantation of Allogeneic Retinal Progenitor Cells to the Dystrophic Rhodopsin Pro347Leu Transgenic Pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klassen, H; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Warfvinge, K;

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Transplantation of stem, progenitor, or precursor cells has resulted in photoreceptor replacement and evidence of functional efficacy in rodent models of retinal degeneration. Ongoing work has been directed toward the replication of these results in a large animal model, namely, the pig....... Methods. Retinal progenitor cells were derived from the neural retina of GFP-transgenic pigs and transplanted to the subretinal space of rhodopsin Pro347Leu-transgenic allorecipients, in the early stage of the degeneration and the absence of immune suppression. Results. Results confirm the survival...... of allogeneic porcine RPCs without immune suppression in the setting of photoreceptor dystrophy. The expression of multiple photoreceptor markers by grafted cells included the rod outer segment-specific marker ROM-1. Further evidence of photoreceptor differentiation included the presence of numerous...

  10. Sensory aspects of movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neepa; Jankovic, Joseph; Hallett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Movement disorders, which include disorders such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia, Tourette's syndrome, restless legs syndrome, and akathisia, have traditionally been considered to be disorders of impaired motor control resulting predominantly from dysfunction of the basal ganglia. This notion has been revised largely because of increasing recognition of associated behavioural, psychiatric, autonomic, and other non-motor symptoms. The sensory aspects of movement disorders include intrinsic sensory abnormalities and the effects of external sensory input on the underlying motor abnormality. The basal ganglia, cerebellum, thalamus, and their connections, coupled with altered sensory input, seem to play a key part in abnormal sensorimotor integration. However, more investigation into the phenomenology and physiological basis of sensory abnormalities, and about the role of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and related structures in somatosensory processing, and its effect on motor control, is needed.

  11. The Evolution of Sensory Placodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francoise Mazet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate cranial sensory placodes are ectodermal embryonic patches that give rise to sensory receptor cells of the peripheral paired sense organs and to neurons in the cranial sensory ganglia. Their differentiation and the genetic pathways that underlay their development are now well understood. Their evolutionary history, however, has remained obscure. Recent molecular work, performed on close relatives of the vertebrates, demonstrated that some sensory placodes (namely the adenohypophysis, the olfactory, and accoustico-lateralis placodes first evolved at the base of the chordate lineage, while others might be specific to vertebrates. Combined with morphological and cellular fate data, these results also suggest that the sensory placodes of the ancestor of all chordates differentiated into a wide range of structures, most likely to fit the lifestyle and environment of each species.

  12. Sensory analysis of pet foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Kadri

    2014-08-01

    Pet food palatability depends first and foremost on the pet and is related to the pet food sensory properties such as aroma, texture and flavor. Sensory analysis of pet foods may be conducted by humans via descriptive or hedonic analysis, pets via acceptance or preference tests, and through a number of instrumental analysis methods. Sensory analysis of pet foods provides additional information on reasons behind palatable and unpalatable foods as pets lack linguistic capabilities. Furthermore, sensory analysis may be combined with other types of information such as personality and environment factors to increase understanding of acceptable pet foods. Most pet food flavor research is proprietary and, thus, there are a limited number of publications available. Funding opportunities for pet food studies would increase research and publications and this would help raise public awareness of pet food related issues. This mini-review addresses current pet food sensory analysis literature and discusses future challenges and possibilities.

  13. 具异型胞蓝细菌Anabaena sp. PCC 71 20 质膜和%Isolation of Plasma and Thylakoid Membranes from the Heterocystous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李斌; 徐冬一; 赵进东

    2001-01-01

    利用水溶性多聚体双相法分离蓝细菌Anabaena sp. PCC 7120质膜和类囊体膜两种膜系统.吸收光谱分析表明,质膜相和类囊体膜相的主要色素分别为类胡萝卜素和叶绿素.SDS_ 凝胶电泳显示这两种膜系统蛋白组成有很大差别.这种分离方法容易操作,对研究蓝细菌的膜蛋白和膜脂非常有用.

  14. 碳氮源对转基因鱼腥藻Anabaena sp.PCC7120培养的影响%Effects of carbon and nitrogen sources on the culture of recombinant Anabaena sp. PCC7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志伟; 郭勇; 张晨

    2001-01-01

    对碳源、氮源种类和用量对转rhTNF-α基因鱼腥藻7120( Anabaena sp. PCC7120)培养的影响进行了研究,发现最适碳源为蔗糖,最适氮源为NaNO3,最佳用量分别为9 g/L和2.25 g/L,此时生物量远高于自养方式,达2.52g/L,比相同条件下在BG-11培养基培养高71.66%,TNF-α表达量为16%~22%,生物活性为105U/mg.

  15. H2 production by Anabaena variabilis mutant in computer controlled two-stage air-lift tubular photobioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Hall, D. O.; Rao, K. K.; Tsygankov, A. A.; Sveshnikov, D. A.

    2000-06-01

    A 4.34 liter two-stage air-lift photobioreactor incorporating Anabaena variabilis ATCC29413 mutant PK84 was used to study H2 production. Results showed that H2 production increased with increasing light intensity from 47 μE/(m2·s) up to 190 μE/(m2·s), but that further increase of light intensity decreased the H2 production because of the inhibition due to the high pO2. The data also indicated that longer argon gas charge resulted in more H2 produced due to the increase of nitrogenase activities and heterocyst frequency, and that more than 1.3 L net H2 was produced from this computer controlled photobioreactor.

  16. Direct measurement of excitation transfer dynamics between two trimers in C-phycocyanin hexamer from cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingmin; Zhao, Fuli; Zheng, Xiguang; Wang, Hezhou

    1999-05-01

    We provide the first experimental evidence for the excitation transfers between two trimers of an isolated C-phycocyanin hexamer (αβ) 6PCL RC27, at the end of the rod proximal to the core of PBS in cyanobacterium of Anabaena variabilis, with picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Our results strongly suggest that the observed fluorescence decay constants around 20 and 10 ps time scales, shown in anisotropy decay, not in isotropic decay experiments arose from the excitation transfers between two trimers via two types of transfer pathways such as 1β 155↔6β 155 (2β 155↔5β 155 and 3β 155↔4β 155) and 2α 84↔5α 84 (3α 84↔6α 84 and 1α 84↔4α 84) channels and these could be described by Föster dipole-dipole resonance mechanism.

  17. Requirement of Fra proteins for communication channels between cells in the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omairi-Nasser, Amin; Mariscal, Vicente; Austin, Jotham R; Haselkorn, Robert

    2015-08-11

    The filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 differentiates specialized cells, heterocysts, that fix atmospheric nitrogen and transfer the fixed nitrogen to adjacent vegetative cells. Reciprocally, vegetative cells transfer fixed carbon to heterocysts. Several routes have been described for metabolite exchange within the filament, one of which involves communicating channels that penetrate the septum between adjacent cells. Several fra gene mutants were isolated 25 y ago on the basis of their phenotypes: inability to fix nitrogen and fragmentation of filaments upon transfer from N+ to N- media. Cryopreservation combined with electron tomography were used to investigate the role of three fra gene products in channel formation. FraC and FraG are clearly involved in channel formation, whereas FraD has a minor part. Additionally, FraG was located close to the cytoplasmic membrane and in the heterocyst neck, using immunogold labeling with antibody raised to the N-terminal domain of the FraG protein.

  18. H2 PRODUCTION BY ANABAENA VARIABILIS MUTANT IN COMPUTER CONTROLLED TWO-STAGE AIR-LIFT TUBULAR PHOTOBIOREACTOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A 4.34 liter two-stage air-lift photobioreactor incorporating Anabaena variabilis ATCC29413 mutant PK84 was used to study H2 production. Results showed that H2 production increased with increasing light intensity from 47 μE/(m2·s) up to 190 μE/(m2·s), but that further increase of light intensity decreased the H2 production because of the inhibition due to the high pO2. The data also indicated that longer argon gas charge resulted in more H2 produced due to the increase of nitrogenase activities and heterocyst frequency, and that more than 1.3 L net H2 was produced from this computer controlled photobioreactor.

  19. Proteomic strategy for the analysis of the polychlorobiphenyl-degrading cyanobacterium Anabaena PD-1 exposed to Aroclor 1254.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangjun Zhang

    Full Text Available The cyanobacterium Anabaena PD-1, which was originally isolated from polychlorobiphenyl (PCB-contaminated paddy soils, has capabilities for dechlorinatin and for degrading the commercial PCB mixture Aroclor 1254. In this study, 25 upregulated proteins were identified using 2D electrophoresis (2-DE coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. These proteins were involved in (i PCB degradation (i.e., 3-chlorobenzoate-3,4-dioxygenase; (ii transport processes [e.g., ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, peptide ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, putrescine-binding protein, periplasmic solute-binding protein, branched-chain amino acid uptake periplasmic solute-binding protein, periplasmic phosphate-binding protein, phosphonate ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, and xylose ABC transporter substrate-binding protein]; (iii energetic metabolism (e.g., methanol/ethanol family pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ-dependent dehydrogenase, malate-CoA ligase subunit beta, enolase, ATP synthase β subunit, FOF1 ATP synthase subunit beta, ATP synthase α subunit, and IMP cyclohydrolase; (iv electron transport (cytochrome b6f complex Fe-S protein; (v general stress response (e.g., molecular chaperone DnaK, elongation factor G, and translation elongation factor thermostable; (vi carbon metabolism (methanol dehydrogenase and malate-CoA ligase subunit beta; and (vii nitrogen reductase (nitrous oxide reductase. The results of real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the genes encoding for dioxygenase, ABC transporters, transmembrane proteins, electron transporter, and energetic metabolism proteins were significantly upregulated during PCB degradation. These genes upregulated by 1.26- to 8.98-fold. These findings reveal the resistance and adaptation of cyanobacterium to the presence of PCBs, shedding light on the

  20. Genome-derived insights into the biology of the hepatotoxic bloom-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 90

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hao

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyanobacteria can form massive toxic blooms in fresh and brackish bodies of water and are frequently responsible for the poisoning of animals and pose a health risk for humans. Anabaena is a genus of filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacteria commonly implicated as a toxin producer in blooms in aquatic ecosystems throughout the world. The biology of bloom-forming cyanobacteria is poorly understood at the genome level. Results Here, we report the complete sequence and comprehensive annotation of the bloom-forming Anabaena sp. strain 90 genome. It comprises two circular chromosomes and three plasmids with a total size of 5.3 Mb, encoding a total of 4,738 genes. The genome is replete with mobile genetic elements. Detailed manual annotation demonstrated that almost 5% of the gene repertoire consists of pseudogenes. A further 5% of the genome is dedicated to the synthesis of small peptides that are the products of both ribosomal and nonribosomal biosynthetic pathways. Inactivation of the hassallidin (an antifungal cyclic peptide biosynthetic gene cluster through a deletion event and a natural mutation of the buoyancy-permitting gvpG gas vesicle gene were documented. The genome contains a large number of genes encoding restriction-modification systems. Two novel excision elements were found in the nifH gene that is required for nitrogen fixation. Conclusions Genome analysis demonstrated that this strain invests heavily in the production of bioactive compounds and restriction-modification systems. This well-annotated genome provides a platform for future studies on the ecology and biology of these important bloom-forming cyanobacteria.

  1. Modulation of fatty acids and hydrocarbons in Anabaena 7120 and its ntcA mutant under calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Savita; Verma, Ekta; Tiwari, Balkrishna; Niveshika; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Calcium being a signaling molecule and mediator of cell response, we examined the modulation in fatty acid and hydrocarbon profiles of wild type cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and its ntcA mutant under the influence of different calcium chloride concentrations (0-10 mM). Dynamic modifications in fatty acid and hydrocarbon profile were evident through GC-FID analysis of extracted lipids. In the wild type, increase in CaCl2 (10 mM) resulted in unsaturation of fatty acids (observed in terms of high MUFA/PUFA ratio) while hydrocarbon production was distinctly high in the mutant strain compared to wild type at all tested concentrations. The synthesis of short chain hydrocarbons (C5-C8) were dominated at inhibitory concentration (10 mM CaCl2) in mutant strain. Results suggest that the increase in MUFA/PUFA ratio at inhibitory concentration in wild type, and higher percentage of hydrocarbons in mutant strain, may be attributed to the survival and acclimation strategies under altered calcium environment. Our results also suggest the involvement of the ntcA gene (master regulator of N2 metabolism) in regulation of carbon metabolism; specifically fatty acid, hydrocarbon, and other metabolic compounds essential for maintenance and sustenance of growth under stress condition. Thus, our study outlines basic acclimation response along with possibilities of production of fatty acid and hydrocarbon derived biofuel and other bioactive compounds in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 under altered calcium levels which could be of biotechnological interest.

  2. Proteomic strategy for the analysis of the polychlorobiphenyl-degrading cyanobacterium Anabaena PD-1 exposed to Aroclor 1254.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hangjun; Jiang, Xiaojun; Xiao, Wenfeng; Lu, Liping

    2014-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Anabaena PD-1, which was originally isolated from polychlorobiphenyl (PCB)-contaminated paddy soils, has capabilities for dechlorinatin and for degrading the commercial PCB mixture Aroclor 1254. In this study, 25 upregulated proteins were identified using 2D electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). These proteins were involved in (i) PCB degradation (i.e., 3-chlorobenzoate-3,4-dioxygenase); (ii) transport processes [e.g., ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter substrate-binding protein, amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, peptide ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, putrescine-binding protein, periplasmic solute-binding protein, branched-chain amino acid uptake periplasmic solute-binding protein, periplasmic phosphate-binding protein, phosphonate ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, and xylose ABC transporter substrate-binding protein]; (iii) energetic metabolism (e.g., methanol/ethanol family pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent dehydrogenase, malate-CoA ligase subunit beta, enolase, ATP synthase β subunit, FOF1 ATP synthase subunit beta, ATP synthase α subunit, and IMP cyclohydrolase); (iv) electron transport (cytochrome b6f complex Fe-S protein); (v) general stress response (e.g., molecular chaperone DnaK, elongation factor G, and translation elongation factor thermostable); (vi) carbon metabolism (methanol dehydrogenase and malate-CoA ligase subunit beta); and (vii) nitrogen reductase (nitrous oxide reductase). The results of real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the genes encoding for dioxygenase, ABC transporters, transmembrane proteins, electron transporter, and energetic metabolism proteins were significantly upregulated during PCB degradation. These genes upregulated by 1.26- to 8.98-fold. These findings reveal the resistance and adaptation of cyanobacterium to the presence of PCBs, shedding light on the

  3. Characterisation of the paralytic shellfish toxin biosynthesis gene clusters in Anabaena circinalis AWQC131C and Aphanizomenon sp. NH-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neilan Brett A

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Saxitoxin and its analogues collectively known as the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs are neurotoxic alkaloids and are the cause of the syndrome named paralytic shellfish poisoning. PSTs are produced by a unique biosynthetic pathway, which involves reactions that are rare in microbial metabolic pathways. Nevertheless, distantly related organisms such as dinoflagellates and cyanobacteria appear to produce these toxins using the same pathway. Hypothesised explanations for such an unusual phylogenetic distribution of this shared uncommon metabolic pathway, include a polyphyletic origin, an involvement of symbiotic bacteria, and horizontal gene transfer. Results We describe the identification, annotation and bioinformatic characterisation of the putative paralytic shellfish toxin biosynthesis clusters in an Australian isolate of Anabaena circinalis and an American isolate of Aphanizomenon sp., both members of the Nostocales. These putative PST gene clusters span approximately 28 kb and contain genes coding for the biosynthesis and export of the toxin. A putative insertion/excision site in the Australian Anabaena circinalis AWQC131C was identified, and the organization and evolution of the gene clusters are discussed. A biosynthetic pathway leading to the formation of saxitoxin and its analogues in these organisms is proposed. Conclusion The PST biosynthesis gene cluster presents a mosaic structure, whereby genes have apparently transposed in segments of varying size, resulting in different gene arrangements in all three sxt clusters sequenced so far. The gene cluster organizational structure and sequence similarity seems to reflect the phylogeny of the producer organisms, indicating that the gene clusters have an ancient origin, or that their lateral transfer was also an ancient event. The knowledge we gain from the characterisation of the PST biosynthesis gene clusters, including the identity and sequence of the genes involved

  4. Induction and differential expression of certain novel proteins in Anabaena L31 under UV-B radiation stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyoosh Kumar Babele

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available For examining how UV-B radiation alters the proteome of the N2-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena L31, we extracted proteins from cultures irradiated with UV-B + white light and controls (white light irradiated and analyzed the proteins using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS. Twenty one proteins, including 2 hypothetical proteins were identified and placed in 8 functional categories. However several of the proteins were housekeeping proteins involved in key metabolic processes such as carbon, amino acid biosynthesis and energy metabolism, certain proteins seem to have a role in stress (antioxidative enzymes, translation, cellular processes and reductases. Two novel hypothetical proteins (all3797 and all4050 were characterized in detail. These two were over-expressed after UV-B irradiation and characterized as FAS 1 (all3797 and PRC barrel-like (all4050 proteins. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the genes of both the hypothetical proteins have promoter regions as well as transcription binding sites in their upstream region (UTR. Promoters present in all3797 genes suggest their crucial role against UV-B and certain other abiotic stresses. To our knowledge these novel proteins have not been previously reported in any Anabaena strains subjected to UV-B stress. Although we have focused our study on a limited number of proteins, results obtained shed light on the highly complicated but poorly studied aspect of UV-B radiation-mediated changes in the proteome and expression of proteins in cyanobacteria.

  5. Effect of nutrient media on photobiological hydrogen production by Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berberoglu, Halil; Pilon, Laurent [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jay, Jenny [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    This study reports a factor 5.5 increase in hydrogen production by Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 using Allen-Arnon medium compared with BG-11 and BG-11{sub 0} media. The results were obtained with a flat panel photobioreactor made of acrylic and operated in two stages at 30 C. Stage 1 aims at converting carbon dioxide into biomass by photosynthesis while Stage 2 aims at producing hydrogen. During Stage 1, the photobioreactor was irradiated with 65{mu}mol/m{sup 2}/s (14W/m{sup 2}) of light and sparged with a mixture of air (95% by volume) and carbon dioxide (5% by volume). During Stage 2, irradiance was increased to 150{mu}mol/m{sup 2}/s (32W/m{sup 2}) and the photobioreactor was sparged with pure argon. The parameters continuously monitored were (1) the cyanobacteria concentration, (2) the pH, (3) the dissolved oxygen concentration, (4) the nitrate and (5) the ammonia concentrations in the medium, and (6) the hydrogen concentration in the effluent gas. The three media BG-11, BG-11{sub 0}, and Allen-Arnon were tested under otherwise similar conditions. The maximum cyanobacteria concentrations during Stage 2 were 1.10 and 1.17kg drycell/m{sup 3} with BG-11 and Allen-Arnon media, respectively, while it could not exceed 0.76kg drycell/m{sup 3} with medium BG-11{sub 0}. Moreover, the heterocyst frequency was 5%, 4%, and 9% for A.variabilis grown in BG-11, BG-11{sub 0}, and Allen-Arnon media. The average specific hydrogen production rates were about 8.0 x 10{sup -5} and 7.2 x 10{sup -5}kgH{sub 2}/kgdrycell/h (1 and 0.9LH{sub 2}/kgdrycell/h at 1 atm and 30 {sup o}C) in media BG-11 and BG-11{sub 0}, respectively. In contrast, it was about 4.5 x 10{sup -4}kgH{sub 2}/kgdrycell/h (5.6LH{sub 2}/kgdrycell/h at 1 atm and 30 {sup o}C) in Allen-Arnon medium. The maximum light to hydrogen energy conversion efficiencies achieved were 0.26%, 0.16%, and 1.32% for BG-11, BG-11{sub 0}, and Allen-Arnon media, respectively. The larger heterocyst frequency, specific hydrogen production

  6. Analyzing sensory data with R

    CERN Document Server

    Le, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative Descriptive Approaches When panelists rate products according to one single list of attributes Data, sensory issues, notations In practice For experienced users: Measuring the impact of the experimental design on the perception of the products? When products are rated according to one single list of attributesData, sensory issues, notations In practice For experienced users: Adding supplementary information to the product space When products are rated according to several lists

  7. Spinal sensory circuits in motion

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The role of sensory feedback in shaping locomotion has been long debated. Recent advances in genetics and behavior analysis revealed the importance of proprioceptive pathways in spinal circuits. The mechanisms underlying peripheral mechanosensation enabled to unravel the networks that feedback to spinal circuits in order to modulate locomotion. Sensory inputs to the vertebrate spinal cord were long thought to originate from the periphery. Recent studies challenge this ...

  8. Cloning and Characterization of the fecC Gene Necessary for Optimal Growth under Iron-Deficiency Conditions in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp.PCC 7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Wen-liang; LIU Yong-ding; ZHANG Cheng-cai; LI Juan

    2004-01-01

    The fecC gene encoding a putative iron (Ⅲ) dicitrate transporter was cloned from nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, and inactivated. The mutant grows normally in medium with NO-3, NH+4 or without combined nitrogen. But in iron-deficient medium, the mutant grows slowly. Photosynthetic properties were compared between the mutant and the wild-type strain, the content of photosynthetic pigments in the mutant is lower than that of the wild-type. The results of RT-PCR experiments show that the fecC gene is expressed under iron-deficient conditions, but is not expressed under iron-replete conditions. These results revealed that fecC gene product is required for optimal growth under iron-deficient conditions in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

  9. Involvement of thioredoxin on the scaffold activity of NifU in heterocyst cells of the diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomata, Jiro; Maeda, Maki; Isu, Atsuko; Inoue, Kazuhito; Hisabori, Toru

    2015-09-01

    The diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 (A.7120) differentiates into specialized heterocyst cells that fix nitrogen under nitrogen starvation conditions. Although reducing equivalents are essential for nitrogen fixation, little is known about redox systems in heterocyst cells. In this study, we investigated thioredoxin (Trx) networks in Anabaena using TrxM, and identified 16 and 38 candidate target proteins in heterocysts and vegetative cells, respectively, by Trx affinity chromatography (Motohashi et al. (Comprehensive survey of proteins targeted by chloroplast thioredoxin. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA, 2001; 98: , 11224-11229)). Among these, the Fe-S cluster scaffold protein NifU that facilitates functional expression of nitrogenase in heterocysts was found to be a potential TrxM target. Subsequently, we observed that the scaffold activity of N-terminal catalytic domain of NifU is enhanced in the presence of Trx-system, suggesting that TrxM is involved in the Fe-S cluster biogenesis.

  10. Detection of anatoxin-a and three analogs in Anabaena spp. cultures: new fluorescence polarization assay and toxin profile by LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jon A; Otero, Paz; Alfonso, Amparo; Ramos, Vitor; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Aráoz, Romulo; Molgó, Jordi; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luis M

    2014-01-24

    Anatoxin-a (ATX) is a potent neurotoxin produced by several species of Anabaena spp. Cyanobacteria blooms around the world have been increasing in recent years; therefore, it is urgent to develop sensitive techniques that unequivocally confirm the presence of these toxins in fresh water and cyanobacterial samples. In addition, the identification of different ATX analogues is essential to later determine its toxicity. In this paper we designed a fluorescent polarization (FP) method to detect ATXs in water samples. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) labeled with a fluorescein derivative was used to develop this assay. Data showed a direct relationship between the amount of toxin in a sample and the changes in the polarization degree of the emitted light by the labeled nAChR, indicating an interaction between the two molecules. This method was used to measure the amount of ATX in three Anabaena spp. cultures. Results indicate that it is a good method to show ATXs presence in algal samples. In order to check the toxin profile of Anabaena cultures a LC-MS/MS method was also developed. Within this new method, ATX-a, retention time (RT) 5 min, and three other molecules with a mass m/z 180.1 eluting at 4.14 min, 5.90 min and 7.14 min with MS/MS spectra characteristic of ATX toxin group not previously identified were detected in the Anabaena spp. cultures. These ATX analogues may have an important role in the toxicity of the sample.

  11. An Introduction to Intelligent Sensory Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾宪奕; 丁永生

    2004-01-01

    Sensory evaluation is the evaluation of signals that a buman receives via its sensory organs. Nowadays sensory evaluation is widely used in quality inspection and quality control of products. and many other fields. Actually sensory evaluation always give. uncertain and inprecise results, therefore it derivates many problems. we reviews in detail these problem and give some cumputing methods to resolve them.

  12. Microbial Rhodopsin Optogenetic Tools: Application for Analyses of Synaptic Transmission and of Neuronal Network Activity in Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glock, Caspar; Nagpal, Jatin; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics was introduced as a new technology in the neurosciences about a decade ago (Zemelman et al., Neuron 33:15-22, 2002; Boyden et al., Nat Neurosci 8:1263-1268, 2005; Nagel et al., Curr Biol 15:2279-2284, 2005; Zemelman et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100:1352-1357, 2003). It combines optics, genetics, and bioengineering to render neurons sensitive to light, in order to achieve a precise, exogenous, and noninvasive control of membrane potential, intracellular signaling, network activity, or behavior (Rein and Deussing, Mol Genet Genomics 287:95-109, 2012; Yizhar et al., Neuron 71:9-34, 2011). As C. elegans is transparent, genetically amenable, has a small nervous system mapped with synapse resolution, and exhibits a rich behavioral repertoire, it is especially open to optogenetic methods (White et al., Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 314:1-340, 1986; De Bono et al., Optogenetic actuation, inhibition, modulation and readout for neuronal networks generating behavior in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, In: Hegemann P, Sigrist SJ (eds) Optogenetics, De Gruyter, Berlin, 2013; Husson et al., Biol Cell 105:235-250, 2013; Xu and Kim, Nat Rev Genet 12:793-801, 2011). Optogenetics, by now an "exploding" field, comprises a repertoire of different tools ranging from transgenically expressed photo-sensor proteins (Boyden et al., Nat Neurosci 8:1263-1268, 2005; Nagel et al., Curr Biol 15:2279-2284, 2005) or cascades (Zemelman et al., Neuron 33:15-22, 2002) to chemical biology approaches, using photochromic ligands of endogenous channels (Szobota et al., Neuron 54:535-545, 2007). Here, we will focus only on optogenetics utilizing microbial rhodopsins, as these are most easily and most widely applied in C. elegans. For other optogenetic tools, for example the photoactivated adenylyl cyclases (PACs, that drive neuronal activity by increasing synaptic vesicle priming, thus exaggerating rather than overriding the intrinsic activity of a neuron, as occurs with

  13. Zur (FurB) is a key factor in the control of the oxidative stress response in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sein-Echaluce, Violeta C; González, Andrés; Napolitano, Mauro; Luque, Ignacio; Barja, Francisco; Peleato, M Luisa; Fillat, María F

    2015-06-01

    Iron and zinc are necessary nutrients whose homeostasis is tightly controlled by members of the ferric uptake regulator (FUR) superfamily in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Although the link between iron metabolism and oxidative stress management is well documented, little is known about the connection between zinc homeostasis and the oxidative stress response in cyanobacteria. Zinc homeostasis in Anabaena is controlled by Zur, also named FurB. When overexpressed in Escherichia coli, Zur (FurB) improved cell survival during oxidative stress. In order to investigate the possible correlation between Zur and the oxidative stress response in Anabaena, zur deletion and zur-overexpressing strains have been constructed, and the consequences of Zur imbalance evaluated. The lack of Zur increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), whereas an excess of Zur enhanced oxidative stress resistance. Both mutants displayed pleiotropic phenotypes, including alterations on the filament surfaces observable by scanning electron microscopy, reduced content of endogenous H2 O2 and altered expression of sodA, catalases and several peroxiredoxins. Transcriptional and biochemical analyses unveiled that the appropriate level of Zur is required for proper control of the oxidative stress response and allowed us to identify major antioxidant enzymes as novel members of the Zur regulon.

  14. Sensory Transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Austin L.; Ramot, Daniel; Goodman, Miriam B.

    The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has a well-defined and comparatively simple repertoire of sensory-guided behaviors, all of which rely on its ability to detect chemical, mechanical or thermal stimuli. In this chapter, we review what is known about the ion channels that mediate sensation in this remarkable model organism. Genetic screens for mutants defective in sensory-guided behaviors have identified genes encoding channel proteins, which are likely transducers of chemical, thermal, and mechanical stimuli. Such classical genetic approaches are now being coupled with molecular genetics and in vivo cellular physiology to elucidate how these channels are activated in specific sensory neurons. The ion channel superfamilies implicated in sensory transduction in C. elegans - CNG, TRP, and DEG/ENaC - are conserved across phyla and also appear to contribute to sensory transduction in other organisms, including vertebrates. What we learn about the role of these ion channels in C. elegans sensation is likely to illuminate analogous processes in other animals, including humans.

  15. pH-dependent absorption spectra of rhodopsin mutant E113Q: On the role of counterions and protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Peng; Zhou, Panwang; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Zhang, Yan

    2017-03-01

    The absorption spectra of bovine rhodopsin mutant E113Q in solutions were investigated at the molecular level by using a hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method. The calculations suggest the mechanism of the absorption variations of E113Q at different pH values. The results indicate that the polarizations of the counterions in the vicinity of Schiff base under protonation and unprotonation states of the mutant E113Q would be a crucial factor to change the energy gap of the retinal to tune the absorption spectra. Glu-181 residue, which is close to the chromophore, cannot serve as the counterion of the protonated Schiff base of E113Q in dark state. Moreover, the results of the absorption maximum in mutant E113Q with the various anions (Cl-, Br-, I- and NO3-) manifested that the mutant E113Q could have the potential for use as a template of anion biosensors at visible wavelength.

  16. The Gos28 SNARE protein mediates intra-Golgi transport of rhodopsin and is required for photoreceptor survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Erica E; Vasiljevic, Eva; Cleland, Spencer C; Flores, Carlos; Colley, Nansi Jo

    2014-11-21

    SNARE proteins play indispensable roles in membrane fusion events in many cellular processes, including synaptic transmission and protein trafficking. Here, we characterize the Golgi SNARE protein, Gos28, and its role in rhodopsin (Rh1) transport through Drosophila photoreceptors. Mutations in gos28 lead to defective Rh1 trafficking and retinal degeneration. We have pinpointed a role for Gos28 in the intra-Golgi transport of Rh1, downstream from α-mannosidase-II in the medial- Golgi. We have confirmed the necessity of key residues in Gos28's SNARE motif and demonstrate that its transmembrane domain is not required for vesicle fusion, consistent with Gos28 functioning as a t-SNARE for Rh1 transport. Finally, we show that human Gos28 rescues both the Rh1 trafficking defects and retinal degeneration in Drosophila gos28 mutants, demonstrating the functional conservation of these proteins. Our results identify Gos28 as an essential SNARE protein in Drosophila photoreceptors and provide mechanistic insights into the role of SNAREs in neurodegenerative disease.

  17. Molecular mechanism of long-range synergetic color tuning between multiple amino acid residues in conger rhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi C.; Mori, Yoshiharu; Tada, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shozo; Yamato, Takahisa

    2010-01-01

    The synergetic effects of multiple rhodopsin mutations on color tuning need to be completely elucidated. Systematic genetic studies and spectroscopy have demonstrated an interesting example of synergetic color tuning between two amino acid residues in conger rhodopsin’s ancestral pigment (p501): — a double mutation at one nearby and one distant residue led to a significant λmax blue shift of 13 nm, whereas neither of the single mutations at these two sites led to meaningful shifts. To analyze the molecular mechanisms of this synergetic color tuning, we performed homology modeling, molecular simulations, and electronic state calculations. For the double mutant, N195A/A292S, in silico mutation analysis demonstrated conspicuous structural changes in the retinal chromophore, whereas that of the single mutant, A292S, was almost unchanged. Using statistical ensembles of QM/MM optimized structures, the excitation energy of retinal chromophore was evaluated for the three visual pigments. As a result, the λmax shift of double mutant (DM) from p501 was −8 nm, while that of single mutant (SM) from p501 was +1 nm. Molecular dynamics simulation for DM demonstrated frequent isomerization between 6-s-cis and 6-s-trans conformers. Unexpectedly, however, the two conformers exhibited almost identical excitation energy, whereas principal component analysis (PCA) identified the retinal-counterion cooperative change of BLA (bond length alternation) and retinal-counterion interaction lead to the shift. PMID:21297892

  18. Signature of selection on the rhodopsin gene in the marine radiation of American seven-spined gobies (Gobiidae, Gobiosomatini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmuseau, M H D; Vanhove, M P M; Huyse, T; Volckaert, F A M; Decorte, R

    2011-07-01

    In comparison with terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems, information about speciation modes and the role of selection in marine environments is scarce. Recent studies have indicated that spectral adaptation could play an important role in the diversification of marine species flocks. Natural selection influences specific amino acids (AAs) that are involved in the spectral tuning mechanism of visual pigment genes. To study the wider occurrence and the characteristics of spectral adaptation in marine radiations, a reinterpretation of the rhodopsin (RH1) data of American seven-spined gobies (genus Elacatinus; Gobiidae; Teleostei) was carried out. Reanalysis revealed that some AAs, which are well known in the literature as spectral tuning sites, are variable in Elacatinus. Those crucial AA substitutions originated polyphyletically, indicating convergent evolution within the genus Elacatinus. Moreover, statistical tests based on the d(N)/d(S) ratio detected selection in several phylogenetic lineages and at specific AAs. Many of these AAs were previously shown to be under selection in other marine radiations. Therefore, the current phylogenetic approach provided an extended list of AAs that are probably involved in spectral tuning, and which should be validated by mutagenic experiments.

  19. Studying the Mechanism of Phototransformation of Light Signal by Various Mammal and Bacterial Photoreceptor Pigments  Rhodopsin, Iodopsin and Bacteriorhodopsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignat Ignatov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review article outlines the structure and function of mammal and bacterial photoreceptor pigments (rhodopsin, iodopsin, bacteriorhodopsin and their aspects of bio-nanotechnological usage. On an example of bacteriorhodopsin is described the method of its isolation from purple membranes of photo-organotrophic halobacterium Halobacterium halobium ET 1001 by cellular autolysis by distilled water, processing of bacterial biomass by ultrasound at 22 KHz, alcohol extraction of low and high-weight molecular impurities, cellular RNA, carotenoids and lipids, the solubilization with 0,5 % (w/v SDS-Na and subsequent fractionation by methanol and gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-200 Column balanced with 0,09 M Tris-buffer (pH = 8,35 with 0,1 % (w/v SDS-Na and 2,5 mM EDTA. Within the framework of the research the mechanism of color perception by the visual retina analyzer having the ability to analyze certain ranges of the optical spectrum as colors, was studied along with an analysis of the additive mixing of two or more colors. It was shown that at the mixing of electromagnetic waves with different wavelengths, the visual analyzer perceives them as the separate or average wave length corresponding to the mixing color.

  20. Light-sensitive coupling of rhodopsin and melanopsin to Gi/o and Gq signal transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Pengxiu; Sun, Wenyu; Kramp, Kristopher; Zheng, Maohua; Salom, David; Jastrzebska, Beata; Jin, Hui; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Feng, Zhaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) initiates signal transduction cascades that affect many physiological responses. The worm Caenorhabditis elegans expresses >1000 of these receptors along with their cognate heterotrimeric G proteins. Here, we report properties of 9-cis-retinal regenerated bovine opsin [(b)isoRho] and human melanopsin [(h)Mo], two light-activated, heterologously expressed GPCRs in the nervous system of C. elegans with various genetically engineered alterations. Profound transient photoactivation of Gi/o signaling by (b)isoRho led to a sudden and transient loss of worm motility dependent on cyclic adenosine monophosphate, whereas transient photoactivation of Gq signaling by (h)Mo enhanced worm locomotion dependent on phospholipase Cβ. These transgenic C. elegans models provide a unique way to study the consequences of Gi/o and Gq signaling in vivo with temporal and spatial precision and, by analogy, their relationship to human neuromotor function.—Cao, P., Sun, W., Kramp, K., Zheng, M., Salom, D., Jastrzebska, B., Jin, H., Palczewski, K., Feng, Z. Light-sensitive coupling of rhodopsin and melanopsin to Gi/o and Gq signal transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:22090313

  1. Sensory analysis in grapes benitaka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santillo, Amanda G.; Rodrigues, Flavio T.; Arthur, Paula B.; Villavicencio, Ana Lucia C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Abstract Sensory analysis is considered one of the main techniques when you want to know the organoleptic qualities of foods. Marketing strategies, showing that some foods produced organically is more nutritious, flavorful than conventional ones are affecting some consumers. The advantages of using radiation in sensory analysis are not the formation of waste, the less nutritional loss and little change in taste of food. The possibility that the fruit is harvested at more advanced maturity, when all characteristics of flavor and external appearance are fully developed is another advantage. The possibility of fruits being packed irradiated prevents contamination after processing. This type of study, ionizing radiation associated with sensory evaluation scarce, making it necessary for future discoveries. The objective this paper was to evaluate the quality of grapes Benitaka after the irradiation process with doses 0,5; 1; 1,5 e 2 kGy. (author)

  2. Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSN/HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders of the peripheral nervous system that predominantly affect the sensory and autonomic neurons. Hallmark features comprise not only prominent sensory signs and symptoms and ulcerative mutilations but also variable autonomic and motor disturbances. Autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance has been reported. Molecular genetics studies have identified disease-causing mutations in 11 genes. Some of the affected proteins have nerve-specific roles but underlying mechanisms have also been shown to involve sphingolipid metabolism, vesicular transport, structural integrity, and transcription regulation. Genetic and functional studies have substantially improved the understanding of the pathogenesis of the HSN/HSAN and will help to find preventive and causative therapies in the future.

  3. Sensory nerve conduction studies in neuralgic amyotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Alfen, Nens; Huisman, Willem J; Overeem, S; van Engelen, B G M; Zwarts, M J

    2009-11-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy is a painful, episodic peripheral nerve disorder localized to the brachial plexus. Sensory symptoms occur in 80% of the patients. We assessed the frequency of abnormalities in sensory nerve conduction studies of the lateral and medial antebrachial cutaneous, radial sensory, median sensory, and ulnar sensory nerves in 112 patients. Sensory nerve conduction studies showed abnormalities in nerves, even when the nerve was clinically affected. The lateral and medial antebrachial cutaneous nerves were most often abnormal, in 15% and 17% of nerves. No correlation with the presence or localization of clinical deficits was found. Brachial plexus sensory nerve conduction studies seem to be of little diagnostic value in neuralgic amyotrophy. Our findings also indicate that some sensory lesions may be in the nerve roots instead of the plexus. An examination of normal sensory nerve conduction studies does not preclude neuralgic amyotrophy as a diagnosis.

  4. in-silico analysis suggests alterations in the function of XisA protein as a possible mechanism of butachlor toxicity in the nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shilpi; Singh, Prem Pal

    2013-01-01

    Butachlor, a commonly used herbicide adversely affects the nitrogen fixing capability of Anabaena, an acclaimed nitrogen fixer in the Indian paddy fields. The nitrogen fixation in Anabaena is triggered by the excision of nifD element by xisA gene leading to rearrangement of nifD forming nifHDK operon in the heterocyst of Anabaena sp. PCC7120. Functional elucidation adjudged through in-silico analysis revealed that xisA belongs to integrase family of tyrosine recombinase. The predicted functional partners with XisA protein that have shown cooccurence with this protein in a network are mainly hypothetical proteins with unknown functions except psaK1 whose exact function in photosystem I is not yet known. The focus of this study was to find out the relation between XisA and butachlor using in-silico approaches. The XisA protein was modeled and its active sites were identified. Docking studies revealed that butachlor binds at the active site of XisA protein hampering its excision ability vis-à-vis nif genes in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. This study reveals that butachlor is not directly involved in hampering the nitrogen fixing ability of Anabaena sp. PCC7120 but by arresting the excision ability of XisA protein necessary for the functioning of nif gene and nitrogen fixation.

  5. 无机盐诱导鱼腥藻 595 (Anabaena sp.595)的细胞学效应%The Cellular Effect of Anabaena sp.595 Induced by Inorganic Salts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴红艳; 赵以军; 郭厚良; 张婷; 吴涛

    2003-01-01

    鱼腥藻 595 (Anabaena sp. 595)在0.05 mol/L钾、钠、铵的盐酸盐、硝酸盐、硫酸盐和磷酸盐的诱导下,2 d后即出现显著的细胞学效应:细胞体积增大,明显液泡化;少数细胞发生横向和不均等分裂;藻丝片段化,异形胞分化率相对提高.其中,铵盐培养的藻丝细胞内出现特异的浓缩颗粒状区域.钙盐、镁盐也诱导类似细胞学变化,但作用较弱.在含0.1 mol/L NaCl的培养基中长期培养,细胞出现周期性分化行为,开始细胞膨大并液泡化,以后色素质重新充满细胞,液泡消失,然后细胞分裂至正常细胞大小,成为接近正常的藻丝,但接着又膨大液泡化,如此进入新的周期过程.

  6. Sensory imagination and narrative perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Thor

    2013-01-01

    I argue that we can clarify and explain an important form of focalization or narrative perspective by the structure of perspective in sensory imagination. Understanding focalization in this way enables us to see why one particular form of focalization has to do with the representation of perceptu...

  7. Sensory Dissonance Using Memory Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    Music may occur concurrently or in temporal sequences. Current machine-based methods for the estimation of qualities of the music are unable to take into account the influence of temporal context. A method for calculating dissonance from audio, called sensory dissonance is improved by the use...

  8. Pyridoxine-Induced Sensory Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    An 18-year-old man with seizures from birth was followed in the Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, and was found to have developed a sensory neuropathy by 2 years of age following treatment with pyridoxine in doses up to 2000 mg/day.

  9. Effect of Iron Deficiency on Heterocyst Differentiation and Physiology of the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Cheng-cai

    2003-01-01

    The effect of iron deficiency on heterocyst differentiation and some physiological properties of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120was investigated. Under moderate iron limitation conditions, achieved by addition of iron chelator 2,2′-Dipyridyl (<80 μmol/L) led to delayed heterocyst differentiation,no heterocyst differentiation was observed under severe iron limitation conditions,when the concentration of 2,2′-Dipyridyl in the medium was more than 100 μmol/L.It seemed that there are certain iron-regulated genes or operons whose function is to control heterocyst development. In addition, iron deficiency impaired the growth.Low-iron cells had a decrease in the quantities of pigment content (chlorophyll and phycocyanin content), the whole cell in vivo absorbance spectra confirmed the de crease, the protein electrophoretic profiles revealed that iron-deficient cells had less protein bands, with the increase of 2,2′ Dipyridyl , the protein bands was more and more less. And differently, iron deficiency also caused an increase of ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species)and SOD activity, it suggests that iron deficiency led to oxidative stress, which generally occured under high-iron conditions.

  10. Effect of Iron Deficiency on Heterocyst Differentiation and Physiology of the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuWen-liang; LiuYong-ding; ZhangCheng-cai

    2003-01-01

    The effect of iron deficiency on heterocyst differentiation and some physiological properties of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was investigated. Under moderate iron limitation conditions, achieved by addition of iron chelator 2,2′-Dipyridyl (<80 μmol/L) led to delayed heterocyst differentiation,no heterocyst differentiation was observed under severe iron limitation conditions,when the concentration of 2,2′-Dipyridyl in the medium was more than 100 μmol/L.It seemed that there are certain iron-regulated genes or operons whose function is to control heterocyst development. In addition, iron deficiency impaired the growth.Low-iron cells had a decrease in the quantities of pigment content (chlorophyll and phycocyanin content), the whole cell in vivo absorbance spectra confirmed the decrease, the protein electrophoretic profiles revealed that iron-deficient cells had less protein bands, with the increase of 2,2'-Dipyridyl , the protein bands was more and more less. And differently, iron deficiency also caused an increase of ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species)and SOD activity, it suggests that iron deficiency led to oxidative stress, which uenerallv occured under hiuh-iron conditions.

  11. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 nitrogenase active site to increase photobiological hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masukawa, Hajime; Inoue, Kazuhito; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Wolk, C Peter; Hausinger, Robert P

    2010-10-01

    Cyanobacteria use sunlight and water to produce hydrogen gas (H₂), which is potentially useful as a clean and renewable biofuel. Photobiological H₂ arises primarily as an inevitable by-product of N₂ fixation by nitrogenase, an oxygen-labile enzyme typically containing an iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) active site. In Anabaena sp. strain 7120, the enzyme is localized to the microaerobic environment of heterocysts, a highly differentiated subset of the filamentous cells. In an effort to increase H₂ production by this strain, six nitrogenase amino acid residues predicted to reside within 5 Å of the FeMo-co were mutated in an attempt to direct electron flow selectively toward proton reduction in the presence of N₂. Most of the 49 variants examined were deficient in N₂-fixing growth and exhibited decreases in their in vivo rates of acetylene reduction. Of greater interest, several variants examined under an N₂ atmosphere significantly increased their in vivo rates of H₂ production, approximating rates equivalent to those under an Ar atmosphere, and accumulated high levels of H₂ compared to the reference strains. These results demonstrate the feasibility of engineering cyanobacterial strains for enhanced photobiological production of H₂ in an aerobic, nitrogen-containing environment.

  12. Protection against salt toxicity in Azolla pinnata-Anabaena azollae symbiotic association by using combined-N sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A K; Singh, Satya S

    2006-09-01

    Protection from salt stress was observed in the terms of yield (fresh and dry weight, chlorophyll and protein) and nitrogenase activity. Azollapinnata appeared highly sensitive to 40 mM external NaCl stress. Fronds of Azolla unable to grow beyond a concentration of 30 mM NaCl and accordingly death was recorded at 40 mM NaCl on the 6th day of incubation. Yield was inhibited by various levels of NaCl (0, 10, 20 and 30 mM). Addition of combined-N to the growth medium protected the association partially from salt toxicity. Among the N-sources (NO3-, NH4+ and urea) tried, urea mitigated the salt-induced toxicity most efficiently. Reduction in nitrogenase activity was observed when intact Azolla was grown in nutrient medium either supplemented with different levels of NaCl or combined nitrogen. Only NO3- (5 mM) protected the enzymatic activity from salt toxicity while other concentrations of ammonium, nitrate and urea slowed down the salt-induced inhibition of enzyme activity in Azolla-Anabaena association. These results suggested that an optimum protection from salt stress could be obtained by using a combination of combined nitrogen sources. The reason for this protection might be due to the availability of combined nitrogen to the association, nitrogen is only available through the biological nitrogen fixation which is the most sensitive to salt stress.

  13. Optimising water treatment practices for the removal of Anabaena circinalis and its associated metabolites, geosmin and saxitoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Lionel; Tanis-Plant, Paul; Kayal, Nawal; Slyman, Najwa; Newcombe, Gayle

    2009-12-01

    The cyanobacterium Anabaena circinalis has the ability to co-produce geosmin and saxitoxins, compounds which can compromise the quality of drinking water. This study provides pertinent information in optimising water treatment practices for the removal of geosmin and saxitoxins. In particular, it demonstrates that pre-oxidation using potassium permanganate could be applied at the head of water treatment plants without releasing intracellular geosmin and saxitoxins from A. circinalis. Furthermore, powdered activated carbon (PAC) was shown to be an effective treatment barrier for the removal of extracellular (dissolved) geosmin and saxitoxins, with similar adsorption trends of both compounds. The relative removal of the saxitoxins compared with geosmin was determined to be 0.84 +/- 0.27, which implies that saxitoxin removal with PAC can be estimated to be approximately 60 to 100% of the removal of geosmin under equivalent conditions. Chlorine was shown to be effective for the oxidation of the saxitoxins with CT values of approximately 30 mg min l(-1) required for greater than 90% destruction of the saxitoxins.

  14. Light energy conversion into H{sub 2} by Anabaena variabilis mutant PK84 dense cultures exposed to nitrogen limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jianguo [Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 7 Nanhai Road, Qingdao 266071 (China); Bukatin, Vyacheslav E.; Tsygankov, Anatoly A. [Institute of Basic Biological Problem, Russia Academy of Sciences, Pushchino, Moscow Region 142292 (Russian Federation)

    2006-09-15

    Concentrated cultures (25-86mgChl al{sup -1}) of Anabaena variabilis PK84 were incubated under 99% Ar+1% CO{sub 2} atmosphere in the photobioreactor made of coaxial cylinders. Under illumination equal to 353{mu}Em{sup -2}s{sup -1} they produced hydrogen with the rate more than 20mll{sup -1}h{sup -1} for several days. The efficiency of light energy conversion into H{sub 2} was approx. 1% and did not depend significantly on initial Chl a concentration. H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} ratio reached 41.5% of theoretical value for water photolysis. Data indicate that dense cultures might be used for outdoor systems under direct sun light. Supra-optimal temperatures 36{sup |}C were not harmful for cultures even for 2 days period. Short-term incubation of cultures under 36{sup |}C even increased H{sub 2} production rate and efficiency of light energy bioconversion by 1.25 times. (author)

  15. AhpC (alkyl hydroperoxide reductase) from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 protects Escherichia coli from multiple abiotic stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Yogesh; Chaurasia, Neha [Molecular Biology Section, Laboratory of Algal Biology, Center of Advanced Study in Botany, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005 (India); Rai, Lal Chand, E-mail: lcraibhu@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Section, Laboratory of Algal Biology, Center of Advanced Study in Botany, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005 (India)

    2009-04-17

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC) is known to detoxify peroxides and reactive sulfur species (RSS). However, the relationship between its expression and combating of abiotic stresses is still not clear. To investigate this relationship, the genes encoding the alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (ahpC) from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 were introduced into E. coli using pGEX-5X-2 vector and their possible functions against heat, salt, carbofuron, cadmium, copper and UV-B were analyzed. The transformed E. coli cells registered significantly increase in growth than the control cells under temperature (47 {sup o}C), NaCl (6% w/v), carbofuron (0.025 mg ml{sup -1}), CdCl{sub 2} (4 mM), CuCl{sub 2} (1 mM), and UV-B (10 min) exposure. Enhanced expression of ahpC gene as measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR under aforementioned stresses at different time points demonstrated its role in offering tolerance against multiple abiotic stresses.

  16. In silico analysis and experimental validation of lipoprotein and novel Tat signal peptides processing in Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sonika; Chaurasia, Akhilesh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Signal peptide (SP) plays a pivotal role in protein translocation. Lipoprotein- and twin arginine translocase (Tat) dependent signal peptides were studied in All3087, a homolog of competence protein of Synechocystis PCC6803 and in two putative alkaline phosphatases (ALPs, Alr2234 and Alr4976), respectively. In silico analysis of All3087 is shown to possess the characteristics feature of competence proteins such as helix-hairpin-helix, N and C-terminal HKD endonuclease domain, calcium binding domain and N-terminal lipoprotein signal peptide. The SP recognition-cleavage site in All3087 was predicted (AIA-AC) using SignalP while further in-depth analysis using Pred-Lipo and WebLogo analysis for consensus sequence showed it as IAA-C. Activities of putative ALPs were confirmed by heterologous overexpression, activity assessment and zymogram analysis. ALP activity in Anabaena remains cell bound in log-phase, but during late log/stationary phase, an enhanced ALP activity was detected in extracellular milieu. The enhancement of ALP activity during stationary phase was not only due to inorganic phosphate limitation but also contributed by the presence of novel bipartite Tat-SP. The Tat signal transported the folded active ALPs to the membrane, followed by anchoring into the membrane and successive cleavage enabling transportation of the ALPs to the extracellular milieu, because of bipartite architecture and processing of transit Tat-SP.

  17. The FurA regulon in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120: in silico prediction and experimental validation of novel target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Andrés; Angarica, Vladimir Espinosa; Sancho, Javier; Fillat, María F

    2014-04-01

    In the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the ferric uptake regulator FurA functions as a global transcriptional regulator. Despite several analyses have focused on elucidating the FurA-regulatory network, the number of target genes described for this essential transcription factor is limited to a handful of examples. In this article, we combine an in silico genome-wide predictive approach with experimental determinations to better define the FurA regulon. Predicted FurA-binding sites were identified upstream of 215 genes belonging to diverse functional categories including iron homeostasis, photosynthesis and respiration, heterocyst differentiation, oxidative stress defence and light-dependent signal transduction mechanisms, among others. The probabilistic model proved to be effective at discerning FurA boxes from non-cognate sequences, while subsequent electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments confirmed the in vitro specific binding of FurA to at least 20 selected predicted targets. Gene-expression analyses further supported the dual role of FurA as transcriptional modulator that can act both as repressor and as activator. In either role, the in vitro affinity of the protein to its target sequences is strongly dependent on metal co-regulator and reducing conditions, suggesting that FurA couples in vivo iron homeostasis and the response to oxidative stress to major physiological processes in cyanobacteria.

  18. Responses of a rice-field cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis TISTR-8012 upon exposure to PAR and UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Rajesh P; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Madamwar, Datta

    2014-10-15

    The effects of PAR and UV radiation and subsequent responses of certain antioxidant enzymatic and non-enzymatic defense systems were studied in a rice field cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012. UV radiation resulted in a decline in growth accompanied by a decrease in chlorophyll a and photosynthetic efficiency. Exposure of cells to UV radiation significantly affected the differentiation of vegetative cells into heterocysts or akinetes. UV-B radiation caused the fragmentation of the cyanobacterial filaments conceivably due to the observed oxidative stress. A significant increase of reactive oxygen species in vivo and DNA strand breaks were observed in UV-B exposed cells followed by those under UV-A and PAR radiation, respectively. The UV-induced oxidative damage was alleviated due to an induction of antioxidant enzymatic/non-enzymatic defense systems. In response to UV irradiation, the studied cyanobacterium exhibited a significant increase in antioxidative enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase. Moreover, the cyanobacterium also synthesized some UV-absorbing/screening substances. HPLC coupled with a PDA detector revealed the presence of three compounds with UV-absorption maxima at 326, 331 and 345 nm. The induction of the biosynthesis of these UV-absorbing compounds was found under both PAR and UV radiation, thus suggesting their possible function as an active photoprotectant.

  19. Experimental measurements of the radiation characteristics of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413-U and Rhodobacter sphaeroides ATCC 49419

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berberoglu, Halil; Pilon, Laurent [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    The objective of this study is to experimentally measure the radiation characteristics of hydrogen producing microorganisms. Special attention is paid to the filamentous cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413-U and the unicellular purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides ATCC 49419 two of the widely studied photobiological hydrogen producers. The extinction and absorption coefficients are measured in the spectral range from 300 to 1300 nm using a spectrophotometer with and without an integrating sphere. Moreover, a nephelometer has been constructed to measure the scattering phase function of the microorganisms at 632.8 nm. The data are used to recover the mass specific absorption, scattering, and extinction cross-sections, the single scattering albedo, and the scattering phase function of the microorganisms. The scattering phase functions of both microorganisms were peaked strongly in the forward direction as expected from their size parameter and shape. The results reported in this study can be used with the radiative transport equation (RTE) to accurately predict and optimize light transport in photobioreactors for photobiological hydrogen production. Finally, the results show that absorption cross-sections of A. variabilis and R. sphaeroides have peaks that do not overlap but rather enlarge the spectral width of the absorption cross-section of a potential symbiotic culture promising more efficient utilization of solar radiation from light transfer point of view. (author)

  20. Comparative proteomics reveals that a saxitoxin-producing and a nontoxic strain of Anabaena circinalis are two different ecotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Paul M; Song, Xiaomin; Neilan, Brett A; Moffitt, Michelle C

    2014-03-01

    In Australia, saxitoxin production is restricted to the cyanobacterial species Anabaena circinalis and is strain-dependent. We aimed to characterize a saxitoxin-producing and nontoxic strain of A. circinalis at the proteomic level using iTRAQ. Seven proteins putatively involved in saxitoxin biosynthesis were identified within our iTRAQ experiment for the first time. The proteomic profile of the toxic A. circinalis was significantly different from the nontoxic strain, indicating that each is likely to inhabit a unique ecological niche. Under control growth conditions, the saxitoxin-producing A. circinalis displayed a higher abundance of photosynthetic, carbon fixation and nitrogen metabolic proteins. Differential abundance of these proteins suggests a higher intracellular C:N ratio and a higher concentration of intracellular 2-oxoglutarate in our toxic strain compared with the nontoxic strain. This may be a novel site for posttranslational regulation because saxitoxin biosynthesis putatively requires a 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase. The nontoxic A. circinalis was more abundant in proteins, indicating cellular stress. Overall, our study has provided the first insight into fundamental differences between a toxic and nontoxic strain of A. circinalis, indicating that they are distinct ecotypes.

  1. Cell envelope components influencing filament length in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnat, Mireia; Schleiff, Enrico; Flores, Enrique

    2014-12-01

    Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria grow as chains of cells (known as trichomes or filaments) that can be hundreds of cells long. The filament consists of individual cells surrounded by a cytoplasmic membrane and peptidoglycan layers. The cells, however, share a continuous outer membrane, and septal proteins, such as SepJ, are important for cell-cell contact and filament formation. Here, we addressed a possible role of cell envelope components in filamentation, the process of producing and maintaining filaments, in the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. We studied filament length and the response of the filaments to mechanical fragmentation in a number of strains with mutations in genes encoding cell envelope components. Previously published peptidoglycan- and outer membrane-related gene mutants and strains with mutations in two genes (all5045 and alr0718) encoding class B penicillin-binding proteins isolated in this work were used. Our results show that filament length is affected in most cell envelope mutants, but the filaments of alr5045 and alr2270 gene mutants were particularly fragmented. All5045 is a dd-transpeptidase involved in peptidoglycan elongation during cell growth, and Alr2270 is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of lipid A, a key component of lipopolysaccharide. These results indicate that both components of the cell envelope, the murein sacculus and the outer membrane, influence filamentation. As deduced from the filament fragmentation phenotypes of their mutants, however, none of these elements is as important for filamentation as the septal protein SepJ.

  2. Heterocyst-specific flavodiiron protein Flv3B enables oxic diazotrophic growth of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakova, Maria; Battchikova, Natalia; Richaud, Pierre; Leino, Hannu; Kosourov, Sergey; Isojärvi, Janne; Peltier, Gilles; Flores, Enrique; Cournac, Laurent; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2014-07-29

    Flavodiiron proteins are known to have crucial and specific roles in photoprotection of photosystems I and II in cyanobacteria. The filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 contains, besides the four flavodiiron proteins Flv1A, Flv2, Flv3A, and Flv4 present in vegetative cells, two heterocyst-specific flavodiiron proteins, Flv1B and Flv3B. Here, we demonstrate that Flv3B is responsible for light-induced O2 uptake in heterocysts, and that the absence of the Flv3B protein severely compromises the growth of filaments in oxic, but not in microoxic, conditions. It is further demonstrated that Flv3B-mediated photosynthetic O2 uptake has a distinct role in heterocysts which cannot be substituted by respiratory O2 uptake in the protection of nitrogenase from oxidative damage and, thus, in an efficient provision of nitrogen to filaments. In line with this conclusion, the Δflv3B strain has reduced amounts of nitrogenase NifHDK subunits and shows multiple symptoms of nitrogen deficiency in the filaments. The apparent imbalance of cytosolic redox state in Δflv3B heterocysts also has a pronounced influence on the amounts of different transcripts and proteins. Therefore, an O2-related mechanism for control of gene expression is suggested to take place in heterocysts.

  3. HetF and PatA control levels of HetR in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Douglas D; Callahan, Sean M

    2008-12-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that differentiates heterocysts in response to deprivation of combined nitrogen. A hetF deletion strain lacked heterocysts and had aberrant cell morphology. Site-directed mutagenesis of the predicted active-site histidine and cysteine residues of this putative caspase-hemoglobinase fold protease abolished HetF function, supporting the hypothesis that HetF is a protease. Deletion of patA, which is necessary for the formation of most intercalary heterocysts, or hetF resulted in an increase in HetR protein, and extra copies of hetF on a plasmid functionally bypassed the deletion of patA. A hetR-gfp translational fusion expressed from an inducible promoter demonstrated that hetF-dependent downregulation of HetR levels occurs rapidly in vegetative cells, as well as developing heterocysts. "Mosaic" filaments in which only one cell of a filament had a copy of hetR or hetF indicated that hetF is required for differentiation only in cells that will become heterocysts. hetF was required for transcription from a hetR-dependent transcription start point of the hetR promoter and induction of transcription from the patS promoter. The inverse correlation between the level of HetR protein and transcription from hetR-dependent promoters suggests that the transcriptional activity of HetR is regulated by HetF and PatA.

  4. Validity of Sensory Systems as Distinct Constructs

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis testing whether sensory questionnaire items represented distinct sensory system constructs found, using data from two age groups, that such constructs can be measured validly using questionnaire data.

  5. A review on intelligent sensory modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, H. J.; Tang, S. Y.; Teo, K. T. K.; Loh, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    Sensory evaluation plays an important role in the quality control of food productions. Sensory data obtained through sensory evaluation are generally subjective, vague and uncertain. Classically, factorial multivariate methods such as Principle Component Analysis (PCA), Partial Least Square (PLS) method, Multiple Regression (MLR) method and Response Surface Method (RSM) are the common tools used to analyse sensory data. These methods can model some of the sensory data but may not be robust enough to analyse nonlinear data. In these situations, intelligent modelling techniques such as Fuzzy Logic and Artificial neural network (ANNs) emerged to solve the vagueness and uncertainty of sensory data. This paper outlines literature of intelligent sensory modelling on sensory data analysis.

  6. Subclinical sensory involvement in monomelic amyotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jenny P; Waclawik, Andrew J; Lotz, Barend P

    2005-12-01

    An 18-year-old woman presented with weakness and atrophy in her hand without associated sensory symptoms, preceding events, or structural abnormalities on neuroimaging. No sensory deficits were detected on neurologic examination. Electrophysiological studies showed not only the expected motor findings for monomelic amyotrophy (MA) in the affected limb, but also markedly reduced sensory nerve action potentials when compared with the unaffected side. These findings suggest that subclinical sensory involvement can exist in patients with otherwise classic presentations of MA.

  7. Motor-sensory confluence in tactile perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saig, Avraham; Gordon, Goren; Assa, Eldad; Arieli, Amos; Ahissar, Ehud

    2012-10-03

    Perception involves motor control of sensory organs. However, the dynamics underlying emergence of perception from motor-sensory interactions are not yet known. Two extreme possibilities are as follows: (1) motor and sensory signals interact within an open-loop scheme in which motor signals determine sensory sampling but are not affected by sensory processing and (2) motor and sensory signals are affected by each other within a closed-loop scheme. We studied the scheme of motor-sensory interactions in humans using a novel object localization task that enabled monitoring the relevant overt motor and sensory variables. We found that motor variables were dynamically controlled within each perceptual trial, such that they gradually converged to steady values. Training on this task resulted in improvement in perceptual acuity, which was achieved solely by changes in motor variables, without any change in the acuity of sensory readout. The within-trial dynamics is captured by a hierarchical closed-loop model in which lower loops actively maintain constant sensory coding, and higher loops maintain constant sensory update flow. These findings demonstrate interchangeability of motor and sensory variables in perception, motor convergence during perception, and a consistent hierarchical closed-loop perceptual model.

  8. Sensory nerve conduction studies in neuralgic amyotrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alfen, N. van; Huisman, W.J.; Overeem, S.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Zwarts, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy is a painful, episodic peripheral nerve disorder localized to the brachial plexus. Sensory symptoms occur in 80% of the patients. We assessed the frequency of abnormalities in sensory nerve conduction studies of the lateral and medial antebrachial cutaneous, radial sensory, medi

  9. 鱼腥藻PCC7120ntcA基因研究进展%Research Progress of ntcA Gene in Anabaena sp.PCC 7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡雁; 高宏

    2012-01-01

    Since the first identification of the coded protein by ntcA gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 in 1990, the study had obtained a great achievement, the research achievements mainly focused on the structure, function and mechanism of ntcA gene and its encoding proteins, which provided clues for comprehensively knowing nitrogen metabolism and heterocyst differentiation in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. The study reviewed the advances of ntcA gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 from the following four aspects: the structure of ntcA gene, the function of its encoding proteins, the mechanism of action and the action range.%自1990年鱼腥藻PCC 7120中ntcA基因编码的蛋白被发现和鉴定以来,对其研究已取得一系列重要进展,其研究成果主要集中于ntcA基因及其编码蛋白的结构、功能及作用机制等方面,为更全面的了解鱼腥藻PCC 7120中的氮代谢和异形胞分化提供了线索.该研究分别从ntcA基因结构、其编码蛋白的功能、作用机制及作用范围等4个方面对鱼腥藻PCC 7120 ntcA基因的研究进展进行了简要综述.

  10. Anabaena sp. mediated bio-oxidation of arsenite to arsenate in synthetic arsenic (III) solution: Process optimization by response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Animesh; Bhattacharya, Priyankari; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Majumdar, Swachchha; Ghosh, Sourja

    2015-11-01

    Blue green algae Anabaena sp. was cultivated in synthetic arsenite solution to investigate its bio-oxidation potential for arsenic species. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed based on a 3-level full factorial design considering four factors, viz. initial arsenic (III) concentration, algal dose, temperature and time. Bio-oxidation (%) of arsenic (III) was considered as response for the design. The study revealed that about 100% conversion of As (III) to As (V) was obtained for initial As (III) concentration of 2.5-7.5 mg/L at 30 °C for 72 h of exposure using 3 g/L of algal dose signifying a unique bio-oxidation potential of Anabaena sp. The dissolved CO2 (DCO2) and oxygen (DO) concentration in solution was monitored during the process and based on the data, a probable mechanism was proposed wherein algal cell acts like a catalytic membrane surface and expedites the bio-oxidation process. Bioaccumulation of arsenic, as well as, surface adsorption on algal cell was found considerably low. Lipid content of algal biomass grown in arsenite solution was found slightly lower than that of algae grown in synthetic media. Toxicity effects on algal cells due to arsenic exposure were evaluated in terms of comet assay and chlorophyll a content which indicated DNA damage to some extent along with very little decrease in chlorophyll a content. In summary, the present study explored the potential application of Anabaena sp. as an ecofriendly and sustainable option for detoxification of arsenic contaminated natural water with value-added product generation.

  11. The nuiA gene from Anabaena sp. encoding an inhibitor of the NucA sugar-non-specific nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro-Pastor, A M; Herrero, A; Flores, E

    1997-05-01

    Many filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria express a sugar-non-specific nuclease of about 29 kDa that can be detected in DNA-containing SDS-PAGE gels. The nucA gene encoding this nuclease has previously been cloned from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. The NucA protein bears a putative signal peptide close to its N-terminal end and, in Anabaena cultures, is present in both the cells and the extracellular medium. Cell-free extracts of different cyanobacteria producing NucA-like nucleases exhibited an inhibitory activity on NucA. In Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, this inhibition was exerted by protein(s) or protein-containing molecule(s) that were heat resistant. Immediately downstream from the nucA gene, in the complementary strand, we have identified an open reading frame composed of 135 codons, that we have named nuiA, whose expression in E. coli conferred heat-resistant NucA-inhibitory activity to cell-free extracts. The NuiA protein was purified to homogeneity, and purified NuiA inhibited the nuclease activity of NucA. Sequences hybridizing with the nuiA gene have been found in all the tested cyanobacterial strains that express a NucA-like nuclease. Whereas the NucA protein is homologous to endonuclease G from vertebrates and to nucleases from Serratia marcescens and yeast, no protein homologous to NuiA was found in the available databases. Therefore, nuiA represents a novel gene encoding a nuclease inhibitor.

  12. Variations of Anabaena in the transition levels between river-and lake-type of Lake Poyang%鄱阳湖河湖转换期间鱼腥藻(Anabaena)的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱奎梅; 刘霞; 齐凌艳; 陈宇炜

    2016-01-01

    鄱阳湖作为我国长江目前仅存的两个通江湖泊之一,年内水位变幅巨大.通过在鄱阳湖2013年河湖转换期间(5-11月)对鄱阳湖主航道都昌段进行每月3~4次的高频监测,以考察鄱阳湖水体中鱼腥藻(Anabaena)的动态变化,分析鄱阳湖中鱼腥藻生长并占优势的影响因素.结果表明,蓝藻为鄱阳湖浮游植物的次级优势种,8月蓝藻生物量平均占浮游植物生物量的57%,蓝藻取代硅藻成为暂时的优势种.夏、秋季水华蓝藻以固氮鱼腥藻为主,主要与夏、秋季水温较高以及适宜的营养盐条件等有关.研究期间鄱阳湖水体氮磷比平均在15左右,鱼腥藻能够产生有固氮能力的异形胞,并在水华蓝藻中成为优势种,也反映了鄱阳湖某些湖区存在氮相对缺乏的阶段.

  13. Effects of Zinc Ion on Photosynthetic System of Anabaena azotica Ley%Zn2+浓度对固氮鱼腥藻(Anabaena azotica Ley)光能转化特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王山杉; 刘永定; 金传荫; 李敦海

    2002-01-01

    本实验对在不同Zn2+浓度条件下培养的固氮鱼腥藻(Anabaena azotica Ley)的生长、光合放氧速率和叶绿素荧光参数Fv/Fm进行了测定.结果表明,当Zn2+浓度为1.0μmol/L时,其比生长速率(Specific growth rate)最大,光合放氧速率和Fv/Fm值最高.当Zn2+浓度大于等于5.0μmol/L时会抑制A.azotica Ley的生长和光合作用.对在0μmol/L和5.0μmol/L Zn2+浓度下生长的藻细胞藻胆体-类囊体膜复合物吸收光谱的比较和对与5.0μmol/L Zn2+发生反应的藻蓝蛋白溶液的可见光吸收光谱的分析,发现前者624nm处藻胆体的吸收峰和后者620nm处藻蓝蛋白的吸收峰都因Zn2+的作用而下降,推测藻蓝蛋白为Zn2+影响光合作用的位点之一.碳酸酐酶活性的测定表明Zn2+的浓度水平会影响其活性大小,推测是Zn2+影响光合作用的另一途径.

  14. High radiation and desiccation tolerance of nitrogen-fixing cultures of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 emanates from genome/proteome repair capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harinder; Anurag, Kirti; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2013-10-12

    The filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 was found to tolerate very high doses of (60)Co-gamma radiation or prolonged desiccation. Post-stress, cells remained intact and revived all the vital functions. A remarkable capacity to repair highly disintegrated genome and recycle the damaged proteome appeared to underlie such high radioresistance and desiccation tolerance. The close similarity observed between the cellular response to irradiation or desiccation stress lends strong support to the notion that tolerance to these stresses may involve similar mechanisms.

  15. Cysteine Mutational Studies Provide Insight into a Thiol-Based Redox Switch Mechanism of Metal and DNA Binding in FurA from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    OpenAIRE

    Botello-Morte, Laura; Pellicer, Silvia; Sein-Echaluce, Violeta C.; Contreras, Lellys M.; Neira, José Luis; Abián, Olga; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Peleato, María Luisa; Fillat, María F; Bes, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is the main transcriptional regulator of genes involved in iron homeostasis in most prokaryotes. FurA from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 contains five cysteine residues, four of them arranged in two redox-active CXXC motifs. The protein needs not only metal but also reducing conditions to remain fully active in vitro. Through a mutational study of the cysteine residues present in FurA, we have investigated their involvement in metal and DNA binding. Results: Re...

  16. 可见分光光度法测定水华鱼腥藻%The Measurement of Anabaena flos-aquae with Visible Spectrophotography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡先文; 董元彦; 张新萍; 叶发兵

    2002-01-01

    采用可见分光光度法测定水华鱼腥藻(Anabaena flos-aquae)藻液的吸光度A.这种方法与细胞计数法、叶绿素a含量测定法和荧光分光光度法相比较,既简便又准确,且可获得十分理想的线性相关性,其测得的A值可以作为水华鱼腥藻现存量的指标.

  17. Role of RNA Secondary Structure and Processing in Stability of the nifH1 Transcript in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis

    OpenAIRE

    Pratte, Brenda S.; Ungerer, Justin; Thiel, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    In the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413, aerobic nitrogen fixation occurs in micro-oxic cells called heterocysts. Synthesis of nitrogenase in heterocysts requires expression of the large nif1 gene cluster, which is primarily under the control of the promoter for the first gene, nifB1. Strong expression of nifH1 requires the nifB1 promoter but is also controlled by RNA processing, which leads to increased nifH1 transcript stability. The processing of the primary nifH1 transcript o...

  18. Sigma factor genes sigC, sigE, and sigG are upregulated in heterocysts of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, M Ramona; Mella-Herrera, Rodrigo A; Golden, James W

    2007-11-01

    We used gfp transcriptional fusions to investigate the regulation of eight sigma factor genes during heterocyst development in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. Reporter strains containing gfp fusions with the upstream regions of sigB2, sigD, sigI, and sigJ did not show developmental regulation. Time-lapse microscopy of sigC, sigE, and sigG reporter strains showed increased green fluorescent protein fluorescence in differentiating cells at 4 h, 16 h, and 9 h, respectively, after nitrogen step down.

  19. CONGENITAL SENSORY NEUROPATHY (HSAN II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Chalam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A 5 year old girl having hereditary sensory neuropathy, type II manifesting as congenital absence of pain sensation and trophic changes in the skin is reported. This child presented with presented with multiple ulcers over hands and feet since 2 years of age. The ulcers were non - healing type with serosanguineous discharge. There is abnormal gait and weakness in upper and lower limbs. On examination there are deep ulcers measuring 5x7x2cms over left feet. Fingers of both hands and feet were mutilated with loss of phalanges, sensations to fine touch, pain and temperature are decreased bilaterally below the mid arm and feet, vibration sensations were normal, proprioception could not be tested due to deformities. Sensory and motor nerve conduction studies showed evidence of sensorimotor axonal neuropathy.

  20. Sensory feedback in interlimb coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gervasio, Sabata; Voigt, Michael; Kersting, Uwe G.

    2017-01-01

    direct communication between the two sides without the need for the involvement of higher centers. These may also exist in humans since sensory feedback elicited by tibial nerve stimulation on one side (ipsilateral) can affect the muscles activation in the opposite side (contralateral), provoking short......-latency crossed responses (SLCRs). The current study investigated whether contralateral afferent feedback contributes to the mechanism controlling the SLCR in human gastrocnemius muscle. Surface electromyogram, kinematic and kinetic data were recorded from subjects during normal walking and hybrid walking (with.......04). Moreover, estimated spindle secondary afferent and Golgi tendon organ activity were significantly different (P ≤ 0.01) when opposite responses have been observed, that is during normal (facilitation) and hybrid walking (inhibition) conditions. Contralateral sensory feedback, specifically spindle secondary...

  1. Sensory evaluation of buffalo butter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C.S. Carneiro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Butter obtained from buffalo milk was compared with commercial products obtained from cow milk. One buffalo butter and two cow butters were subjected to sensory analysis using non-trained panelists. The acceptance related to sensorial characteristics (color, flavor, and firmness was evaluated through a 9 point structured hedonic scale varying from “I displeased extremely” to “I liked extremely”. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was performed to evaluate the sensory characteristics and the means were compared by Tukey’s Test at 5% of significance. The buffalo butter received lower scores than the others for all attributes. The greatest difference was observed for color, as the buffalo butter exhibited a white color contrasting with the yellow color of commercial butters, which is the pattern expected by the consumers. For flavor and firmness attributes, the buffalo butter received scores similar to the commercial products. These results show. These results shows that the buffalo’s butter has a good acceptance on local market, and this could be improved through the correction of product’s color, what can be obtained by adding a dye.

  2. Methodology of oral sensory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, R; Wu, C-H; Van Loven, K; Desnyder, M; Kolenaar, B; Van Steenberghed, D

    2002-08-01

    Different methods of oral sensory tests including light touch sensation, two-point discrimination, vibrotactile function and thermal sensation were compared. Healthy subjects were tested to assess the results obtained from two psychophysical approaches, namely the staircase and the ascending & descending method of limits for light touch sensation and two-point discrimination. Both methods appeared to be reliable for examining oral sensory function. The effect of topical anaesthesia was also evaluated but no conclusion could be drawn as too few subjects were involved. Newly developed simple testing tools for two-point discrimination and thermal sensation in a clinical situation were developed prior to this study and tested for their reproducibility. Thermal sensation could be reliably detected in repeated trials. Although the hand-held instruments have some drawbacks, the outcome of these instruments in a clinical environment is suitable for assessing oral sensory function. Three different frequencies (32, 128 and 256 Hz) were used to estimate the vibrotactile function. Different threshold levels were found at different frequencies.

  3. Bioinspired Sensory Systems for Shear Flow Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvert, Brendan; Chen, Kevin K.; Kanso, Eva

    2017-03-01

    Aquatic organisms such as copepods exhibit remarkable responses to changes in ambient flows, especially shear gradients, when foraging, mating and escaping. To accomplish these tasks, the sensory system of the organism must decode the local sensory measurements to detect the flow properties. Evidence suggests that organisms sense differences in the hydrodynamic signal rather than absolute values of the ambient flow. In this paper, we develop a mathematical framework for shear flow detection using a bioinspired sensory system that measures only differences in velocity. We show that the sensory system is capable of reconstructing the properties of the ambient shear flow under certain conditions on the flow sensors. We discuss these conditions and provide explicit expressions for processing the sensory measurements and extracting the flow properties. These findings suggest that by combining suitable velocity sensors and physics-based methods for decoding sensory measurements, we obtain a powerful approach for understanding and developing underwater sensory systems.

  4. The susceptibility of five African Anopheles species to Anabaena PCC 7120 expressing Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis mosquitocidal cry genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketseoglou Irene

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria, one of the leading causes of death in Africa, is transmitted by the bite of an infected female Anopheles mosquito. Problems associated with the development of resistance to chemical insecticides and concerns about the non-target effects and persistence of chemical insecticides have prompted the development of environmentally friendly mosquito control agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the larvicidal activity of a genetically engineered cyanobacterium, Anabaena PCC 7120#11, against five African Anopheles species in laboratory bioassays. Findings There were significant differences in the susceptibility of the anopheline species to PCC 7120#11. The ranking of the larvicidal activity of PCC 7120#11 against species in the An. gambiae complex was: An. merus An. arabiensis An. gambiae An. quadriannulatus, where 50. The LC50 of PCC 7120#11 against the important malaria vectors An. gambiae and An. arabiensis was 12.3 × 105 cells/ml and 8.10 × 105 cells/ml, respectively. PCC 7120#11 was not effective against An. funestus, with less than 50% mortality obtained at concentrations as high as 3.20 × 107 cells/ml. Conclusions PCC 7120#11 exhibited good larvicidal activity against larvae of the An. gambiae complex, but relatively weak larvicidal activity against An. funestus. The study has highlighted the importance of evaluating a novel mosquitocidal agent against a range of malaria vectors so as to obtain a clear understanding of the agent’s spectrum of activity and potential as a vector control agent.

  5. Influence of Various Levels of Iron and Other Abiotic Factors on Siderophorogenesis in Paddy Field Cyanobacterium Anabaena oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anumeha; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Siderophore production in Anabaena oryzae was investigated under the influence of various levels of iron and other abiotic factors such as pH, temperature, light and different nitrogen sources. Optimization of culture conditions under controlled mechanisms of these abiotic factors lead to the siderophore production in significant amount. Under iron-starved condition, A. oryzae extracellularly releases 89.17% hydroxymate-type siderophore. Slightly alkaline pH and 30 °C temperature was found stimulatory for the cyanobacterial growth and siderophorogenesis (88.52% SU and 83.87% SU, respectively). Excess iron loading had a negative impact on siderophore production along with the alterations in the morphology and growth. Further, scanning electron microphotographs signified that higher concentrations of iron lead to complete damage of the cells and alterations in membrane proteins possibly transporters responsible for exchange of siderophore complex from environment to the cell. SDS-PAGE analysis of whole cell proteins showed overexpression of low molecular weight proteins ranges between 20.1 to 29.0 kDa up to 100-μM iron concentrations. These polypeptides/proteins might be involved in maintaining iron homeostasis by regulating siderophore production. Results suggest that lower concentrations of iron ≤ 50 μM along with other abiotic factors are stimulatory, whereas higher concentrations (>50 μM) are toxic. Data further suggested that cyanobacterium A. oryzae can serve as a potential biofertilizer especially in iron-rich soil through sequestration by the power of natural Fe(III)-siderophore complex formation.

  6. Cyclic nucleotide binding and structural changes in the isolated GAF domain of Anabaena adenylyl cyclase, CyaB2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabir Hassan Biswas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available GAF domains are a large family of regulatory domains, and a subset are found associated with enzymes involved in cyclic nucleotide (cNMP metabolism such as adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases. CyaB2, an adenylyl cyclase from Anabaena, contains two GAF domains in tandem at the N-terminus and an adenylyl cyclase domain at the C-terminus. Cyclic AMP, but not cGMP, binding to the GAF domains of CyaB2 increases the activity of the cyclase domain leading to enhanced synthesis of cAMP. Here we show that the isolated GAFb domain of CyaB2 can bind both cAMP and cGMP, and enhanced specificity for cAMP is observed only when both the GAFa and the GAFb domains are present in tandem (GAFab domain. In silico docking and mutational analysis identified distinct residues important for interaction with either cAMP or cGMP in the GAFb domain. Structural changes associated with ligand binding to the GAF domains could not be detected by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET experiments. However, amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS experiments provided insights into the structural basis for cAMP-induced allosteric regulation of the GAF domains, and differences in the changes induced by cAMP and cGMP binding to the GAF domain. Thus, our findings could allow the development of molecules that modulate the allosteric regulation by GAF domains present in pharmacologically relevant proteins.

  7. Characterization of five putative aspartate aminotransferase genes in the N2-fixing heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinyi; Gu, Liping; He, Ping; Zhou, Ruanbao

    2015-06-01

    Aspartate and glutamate are two key amino acids used in biosynthesis of many amino acids that play vital role in cellular metabolism. Aspartate aminotransferases (AspATs) are required for channelling nitrogen (N(2)) between Glu and Asp in all life forms. Biochemical and genetic characterization of AspATs have been lacking in N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria. In this report, five putative AspAT genes (alr1039, all2340, alr2765, all4327 and alr4853) were identified in the N(2)-fixing heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Five recombinant C-terminal hexahistidine-tagged AspATs (AspAT-H(6)) were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that these five putative AspATs have authentic AspAT activity in vitro using aspartate as an amino donor. However, the enzymic activities of the five AspATs differed in vitro. Alr4853-H(6) showed the highest AspAT activity, while the enzymic activity for the other four AspATs ranged from 6.5 to 53.7 % activity compared to Alr4853 (100 %). Genetic characterization of the five AspAT genes was also performed by inactivating each individual gene. All of the five AspAT knockout mutants exhibited reduced diazotrophic growth, and alr4853 was further identified to be a Fox gene (requiring fixed N(2) for growth in the presence of oxygen). Four out of five P(aspAT)-gfp transcriptional fusions were constitutively expressed in both diazotrophic and nitrate-dependent growth conditions. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that alr4853 expression was increased by 2.3-fold after 24 h of N(2) deprivation. Taken together, these findings add to our understanding of the role of AspATs in N(2)-fixing within heterocystous cyanobacteria.

  8. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using cell extracts of Anabaena doliolum and screening of its antibacterial and antitumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Garvita; Babele, Piyoosh K; Shahi, Shailesh K; Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Tyagi, Madhu B; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-10-01

    In the present work, we describe a simple, cheap, and unexplored method for "green" synthesis of silver nanoparticles using cell extracts of the cyanobacterium Anabaena doliolum. An attempt was also made to test the antimicrobial and antitumor activities of the synthesized nanoparticles. Analytical techniques, namely UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and TEMselected area electron diffraction, were used to elucidate the formation and characterization of silver-cyanobacterial nanoparticles (Ag-CNPs). Results showed that the original color of the cell extract changed from reddish blue to dark brown after addition of silver nitrate solution (1 mM) within 1 h, suggesting the synthesis of Ag-CNPs. That the formation Ag-CNPs indeed occurred was also evident from the spectroscopic analysis of the reaction mixture, wherein a prominent peak at 420 nm was noted. TEM images revealed well-dispersed, spherical Ag- CNPs with a particle size in the range of 10-50 nm. The X-ray diffraction spectrum suggested a crystalline nature of the Ag-CNPs. FTIR analysis indicated the utilization of a hydroxyl (-OH) group in the formation of Ag-CNPs. Ag-CNPs exhibited strong antibacterial activity against three multidrug-resistant bacteria. Additionally, Ag-CNPs strongly affected the survival of Dalton's lymphoma and human carcinoma colo205 cells at a very low concentration. The Ag-CNPs-induced loss of survival of both cell types may be due to the induction of reactive oxygen species generation and DNA fragmentation, resulting in apoptosis. Properties exhibited by the Ag-CNP suggest that it may be used as a potential antibacterial and antitumor agent.

  9. Excess copper induces anoxygenic photosynthesis in Anabaena doliolum: a homology based proteomic assessment of its survival strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Poonam; Mishra, Yogesh; Srivastava, Ashish Kumar; Narayan, Om Prakash; Rai, Lal Chand

    2008-04-01

    This study is the first to demonstrate operation of anoxygenic photosynthesis in copper acclimated Anabaena doliolum and to offer proteomic comparison with the control cells. The Cu-treated control strain showed a negative correlation in growth and intracellular Cu, partial inhibition of O(2)-evolution, PS II, PS I, whole chain, chlorophyll absorption, and nitrogenase activity. However, the acclimated strain growing in 250-fold excess Cu exhibited near normal growth, ATP content, PS I activity, carbon fixation, and almost complete inhibition of O(2)-evolution, PS II and chlorophyll absorption, but increased nitrogenase activity as compared to control. Proteomic decoding of the survival strategy of Cu-treated control and the acclimated strain using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF MS analysis of proteins displaying significant and reproducible changes demonstrated involvement of transketolase, phycoerythrocyanin alpha-chain, iron superoxide dismutase (Fe-SOD), hypothetical protein alr 0803, manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), phosphoribulokinase, and plastocyanin (PLC). Expression pattern of these proteins was attested at the transcriptional level using RT-PCR. Time course analysis of proteins of Cu-treated control strain revealed almost no change in PLC level, and a minor accumulation of transketolase, phycoerythrocyanin alpha-chain and both isoforms of SOD after 7 and recovery after 10 days. Acclimated strain under excess Cu, however, exhibited significant accumulation of both isoforms of SOD, plastocyanin, phosphoribulokinase and transketolase, which seem to counteract oxidative damage, serve as an alternate electron carrier from cytochrome b6/f complex to photosystem I and meet the NADPH and ATP requirements, respectively, under anoxygenic photosynthesis. In view of the kinetics of the hypothetical protein alr0803 (no change in expression level for 7, maximum after 10 and decline after 15 days) its involvement in metal homeostasis is

  10. Growth and cellular ion content of a salt-sensitive symbiotic system Azolla pinnata-Anabaena azollae under NaCl stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Vandna; Sharma, Naveen Kumar; Rai, Ashwani K

    2006-09-01

    Salinity, at a concentration of 10 mM NaCl affected the growth of Azolla pinnata-Anabaena azollae association and became lethal at 40 mM. Plants exposed up to 30 mM NaCl exhibited longer roots than the control, especially during the beginning of incubation. Average root number in plants exposed to 10 and 20 mM NaCl remained almost the same as in control. A further rise in NaCl concentration to 30 mM reduced the root number, and roots shed off at 40 mM NaCl. Presence of NaCl in the nutrient solution increased the cellular Na+ of the intact association exhibiting differential accumulation by individual partners, while it reduced the cellular Ca2+ level. However, cellular K+ content did not show significant change. Cellular Na+ based on fresh weight of respective individual partners (host tissues and cyanobiont) remained higher in the host tissues than the cyanobiont, while reverse was true for K+ and Ca2+ contents. The contribution of A. azollae in the total cellular ion content of the association was a little because of meagre contribution of the cyanobiont mass (19-21%). High salt sensitivity of Azolla-Anabaena complex is due to an inability of the association to maintain low Na+ and high Ca2+ cellular level.

  11. Regulation of pepc gene expression in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and its effects on cyclic electron flow around photosystem I and tolerances to environmental stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Hui Jia; Peng-Peng Zhang; Ding-Ji Shi; Hua-Ling Mi; Jia-Cheng Zhu; Xi-Wen Huang; Pei-Min He

    2015-01-01

    Since pepc gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) has been cloned from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and other cyanobacteria, the effects of pepc gene expression on photosynthesis have not been reported yet. In this study, we constructed mutants containing either upregu-lated (forward) or downregulated (reverse) pepc gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Results from real‐time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‐qPCR), Western blot and enzymatic analysis showed that PEPCase activity was signifi-cantly reduced in the reverse mutant compared with the wild type, and that of the forward mutant was obviously increased. Interestingly, the net photosynthesis in both the reverse mutant and the forward mutant were higher than that of the wild type, but dark respiration was decreased only in the reverse mutant. The absorbance changes of P700 upon saturation pulse showed the photosystem I (PSI) activity was inhibited, as reflected by Y(I), and Y(NA) was elevated, and dark reduction of P700þ was stimulated, indicating enhanced cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI in the reverse mutant. Additional y, the reverse mutant photosynthesis was higher than that of the wild type in low temperature, low and high pH, and high salinity, and this implies increased tolerance in the reverse mutant through downregulated pepc gene.

  12. Construction of shuttle, expression vector of human tumor necrosis factor alpha (hTNF-α) gene and its expression in a cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘凤龙; 施定基; 商之狄; 邵宁; 徐旭东; 钟泽璞; 张宏斌; 吴锦银; 王捷; 江悦华; 赵树进; 林晨; 张雪艳; 吴旻; 彭国宏; 张海霞; 曾呈奎

    1999-01-01

    The construction of the shuttle, expression vector of human tumor necrosis factor alpha (hTNF-a) gene and its expression in a cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 was reported. The 700-bp hTNF cDNA fragments have been recovered from plasmid pRL-rhTNF, then inserted downstream of the promoter PpsbA in the plasmid pRL439. The resultant intermediary plasmid pRL-TC has further been combined with the shuttle vector pDC-8 to get the shuttle, expression vector pDC-TNF. The expression of the rhTNF gene in Escherichia coli has been analyzed by SDS-PAGE and thin-layer scanning, and the results show that the expressed TNF protein with these two vectors is 16.9 percent (pRL-TC) and 15.0 percent (pDC-TNF) of the total proteins in the cells, respectively, while the expression level of TNF gene in plasmid pRL-rhTNF is only 11.8 percent. Combined with the participation of the conjugal and helper plasmids, pDC-TNF has been introduced into Anabaena sp PCC 7120 by triparental conjugative transfer, and the stable transgenic

  13. Regulation of pepc gene expression in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and its effects on cyclic electron flow around photosystem I and tolerances to environmental stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Peng-Peng; Shi, Ding-Ji; Mi, Hua-Ling; Zhu, Jia-Cheng; Huang, Xi-Wen; He, Pei-Min

    2015-05-01

    Since pepc gene encoding phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) has been cloned from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and other cyanobacteria, the effects of pepc gene expression on photosynthesis have not been reported yet. In this study, we constructed mutants containing either upregulated (forward) or downregulated (reverse) pepc gene in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Results from real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), Western blot and enzymatic analysis showed that PEPCase activity was significantly reduced in the reverse mutant compared with the wild type, and that of the forward mutant was obviously increased. Interestingly, the net photosynthesis in both the reverse mutant and the forward mutant were higher than that of the wild type, but dark respiration was decreased only in the reverse mutant. The absorbance changes of P700 upon saturation pulse showed the photosystem I (PSI) activity was inhibited, as reflected by Y(I), and Y(NA) was elevated, and dark reduction of P700(+) was stimulated, indicating enhanced cyclic electron flow (CEF) around PSI in the reverse mutant. Additionally, the reverse mutant photosynthesis was higher than that of the wild type in low temperature, low and high pH, and high salinity, and this implies increased tolerance in the reverse mutant through downregulated pepc gene.

  14. Secretome analysis of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and the involvement of the TolC-homologue HgdD in protein secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Alexander; Stevanovic, Mara; Brouwer, Eva; Bublak, Daniela; Tripp, Joanna; Schorge, Tobias; Karas, Michael; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-03-01

    Secretion of proteins is a central strategy of bacteria to influence and respond to their environment. Until now, there has been very few discoveries regarding the cyanobacterial secrotome or the secretion machineries involved. For a mutant of the outer membrane channel TolC-homologue HgdD of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, a filamentous and heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium, an altered secretome profile was reported. To define the role of HgdD in protein secretion, we have developed a method to isolate extracellular proteins of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 wild type and an hgdD loss-of-function mutant. We identified 51 proteins of which the majority is predicted to have an extracellular secretion signal, while few seem to be localized in the periplasmic space. Eight proteins were exclusively identified in the secretome of wild-type cells, which coincides with the distribution of type I secretion signal. We selected three candidates and generated hemagglutinin-tagged fusion proteins which could be exclusively detected in the extracellular protein fraction. However, these proteins are not secreted in the hgdD-mutant background, where they are rapidly degraded. This confirms a direct function of HgdD in protein secretion and points to the existence of a quality control mechanism at least for proteins secreted in an HgdD-dependent pathway.

  15. Photodegradation of 17α-ethynylestradiol in Aqueous Solution with Anabaena HB101%含鱼腥藻水溶液中17α-乙炔雌二醇光降解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘先利; 邓南圣; 徐栋; 邓琳

    2003-01-01

    研究了含鱼腥藻Anabaena HB101水溶液中17α-乙炔雌二醇在250W高压汞灯光照下的光降解,并进行了动力学分析,研究结果表明,水溶液中鱼腥藻Anabaena HB101能促进17α-乙炔雌二醇光降解,随着水溶液中鱼腥藻Anabaena HB101的浓度增大,其光降解效率也增大,表明了鱼腥藻对17α-乙炔雌二醇光降解有明显的催化作用.同时也研究了在紫外光下的光降解情况,结果表明其光降解效率比高压汞灯光照下的光降解效率高,总体上讲,藻具有催化光降解作用.探讨分析了鱼腥藻Anabaena HB101催化17α-乙炔雌二醇光降解的作用与机理.

  16. Study on Molecular Cloning and Enzyme Kinetics of Anabaena α-Phycocyanin Lyase%藻蓝蛋白α亚基裂合酶的分子克隆和酶动力学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏平; 周明

    2012-01-01

    To comparatively study the differences on structures and functions of phycocyanin lyase CpcE/F from different cyanobacteria, CpcE/F from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 were cloned and expressed greatly. The reconstitution of PCB and CpcA from Mastigocladus laminosus PCC 7603 in vitro using the overexpressed lyase Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 CpcE/F showed that CpcE/F from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is the specific enzyme for biosynthesis of α-PC, furthermore, the enzyme kinetics of PcE/F lyase were studied preliminarily.%为了比较研究不同藻种中藻蓝蛋白裂合酶CpcE/F的结构与功能的差异,对Anabaena sp.PCC 7120中的CpcE/F进行克隆,并进行大量表达,将表达的裂合酶CpcE/F用于藻蓝胆素(PCB)与Mastigocladus laminosus PCC 7603藻蓝蛋白α-亚基(α-PC)脱辅基蛋白(CpcA)的体外重组,得到天然活性的α-PC,从而表明CpcE/F所编码的蛋白质是α-PC生物合成的裂合酶,并对CpcE/F的酶动力学进行了初步研究.

  17. 致乏库蚊幼虫摄食和消化鱼腥藻的观察%THE OBSERVATION OF FEEDING ABILITY OF CULEX PIPIEN FATIGANS LARVAE ON ANABAENA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张世萍; 王方雨; 朱艳芳; 但丽; 喻子牛

    2005-01-01

    Under the laboratory condition, the larvae of Culex pipens fatigans may feed mainly on Anabaena sp and complete their life cycle. The retention time of Anabaena sp. in larval intestine is about 6 hours while that of Saccharomyces sp. is about 5hours, meaning that Anabaena sp. is not so digestible for the larvae. From hatching to pupation, the larvae fed with Anabaena sp. lasted 194 hours and those fed with Saccharomyces sp were 142 hours, showing that the duration for completing larval stage of the former is 52 hours, which is longer than those fed on Saccharomyces.%在实验室条件下,致乏库蚊幼虫可大量摄食鱼腥藻,并能消化利用,完成生活史.鱼腥藻在蚊幼虫肠道中滞留时间约6h,酵母约5h,鱼腥藻比酵母稍难消化.蚊幼虫至化蛹时期相比,饲喂鱼腥藻为194h,而饲喂酵母的为142h,饲喂鱼腥藻比饲喂酵母延缓了蚊幼虫期52h.

  18. 磷限制下光照和温度对水华鱼腥藻生长动力学的影响%Effect of Light and Temperature on Growth Kinetics of Anabaena flosaquae Under Phosphorus Limitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷志坤; 李哲; 王胜; 郭劲松; 肖艳; 刘静; 张萍

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus, light and temperature are the key environmental factors leading to algae growth. But the effects of interaction between light and temperature on the growth of Anabaena flosaquae under phosphorus limitation were not well documented in literature. Anabaena flosaquae was selected for the study and lab-scale experiment and simulation were carried out. The results showed that the optimal temperature of Anabaena flosaquae was 20℃ under phosphorus limitation when the light intensity was constant, and the optimal light intensity ( illuminance) of Anabaena flosaquae was 3 000 lx under phosphorus limitation when the temperature was constant. Based on model fitting and parameter calibration, the optimal temperature and light intensity of Anabaena flosaquae were 21. 03℃ ± 1. 55℃ and 2 675. 12 lx ± 262. 93 lx, respectively. These data were close to the actual water environmental condition at the end of spring. Results of this study will provide important foundation for prediction of Anabaena blooms.%磷、光照和温度是淡水水体藻类生长的关键环境因素,但磷限制下光照、温度交互对藻类生长动力学的影响鲜有报道.以水华鱼腥藻( Anabaena flosaquae)为研究对象,通过机制实验与模拟分析,发现光照条件恒定,磷限制下水华鱼腥藻的最适生长温度为20℃;温度条件恒定,磷限制下水华鱼腥藻的最适生长光照度为3000 lx;但光照度过高,超过水华鱼腥藻光饱和点会抑制鱼腥藻的生长,生物积累量显著减少.通过拟合模型可知光热交互作用下水华鱼腥藻最适温度、光照度分别为21.03℃±1.55℃、2675.12 lx ±262.93 lx,该参数值接近春末夏初水体实际的光热条件.模型将为进一步预测水华鱼腥藻水华提供重要基础.

  19. Análisis Sensorial

    OpenAIRE

    Barris Vilor, Jacinto

    2010-01-01

    En nuestro caso queremos desarrollar un programa que nos facilite la labor de preparar las pruebas de los alimentos y su recogida de datos para el Laboratorio de la Fundación Miquel Agustí. En el laboratorio actualmente el análisis sensorial de los datos se obtiene a partir de análisis realizados por catadores entrenados en una sala especialmente diseñada para este tipo de análisis. Actualmente la toma de datos se realiza a través de unas fichas de cata en formato papel. ...

  20. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  1. Cognitive mechanisms associated with auditory sensory gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L A; Hills, P J; Dick, K M; Jones, S P; Bright, P

    2016-02-01

    Sensory gating is a neurophysiological measure of inhibition that is characterised by a reduction in the P50 event-related potential to a repeated identical stimulus. The objective of this work was to determine the cognitive mechanisms that relate to the neurological phenomenon of auditory sensory gating. Sixty participants underwent a battery of 10 cognitive tasks, including qualitatively different measures of attentional inhibition, working memory, and fluid intelligence. Participants additionally completed a paired-stimulus paradigm as a measure of auditory sensory gating. A correlational analysis revealed that several tasks correlated significantly with sensory gating. However once fluid intelligence and working memory were accounted for, only a measure of latent inhibition and accuracy scores on the continuous performance task showed significant sensitivity to sensory gating. We conclude that sensory gating reflects the identification of goal-irrelevant information at the encoding (input) stage and the subsequent ability to selectively attend to goal-relevant information based on that previous identification.

  2. Sensory quality criteria for five fish species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warm, Karin; Nielsen, Jette; Hyldig, Grethe;

    2000-01-01

    Sensory profiling has been used to develop one sensory vocabulary for five fish species: cod (Gadus morhua), saithe (Pollachius virens), rainbow trout (Salmo gardineri), herring (Clupea harengus) and flounder (Platichthys flessus). A nine- member trained panel assessed 18 samples with variation...... variation and by presenting references, panel discussions and interpreting plots from multivariate data analysis. The developed profile can be used as a sensory wheel for these species, and with minor changes it may be adapted to similar species...

  3. Experienced Sensory Modalities in Dream Recall

    OpenAIRE

    岡田, 斉

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to survey the frequency of visual, auditory, kinaesthetic, cutaneous, organic, gustatory, and olfactory experience in dream recall. A total of 1267 undergraduate students completed a dream recall frequency questionnaire, which contained a question about dream recall frequency and about recall frequency of seven sensory modalities. Results showed that seven sensory modalities were divided into two groups; normally perceived sensory modalities in dreaming, wh...

  4. The hypothetical protein 'All4779', and not the annotated 'Alr0088' and 'Alr7579' proteins, is the major typical single-stranded DNA binding protein of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirti, Anurag; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) proteins are essential for all DNA-dependent cellular processes. Typical SSB proteins have an N-terminal Oligonucleotide-Binding (OB) fold, a Proline/Glycine rich region, followed by a C-terminal acidic tail. In the genome of the heterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120, alr0088 and alr7579 are annotated as coding for SSB, but are truncated and have only the OB-fold. In silico analysis of whole genome of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 revealed the presence of another ORF 'all4779', annotated as a hypothetical protein, but having an N-terminal OB-fold, a P/G-rich region and a C-terminal acidic tail. Biochemical characterisation of all three purified recombinant proteins revealed that they exist either as monomer or dimer and bind ssDNA, but differently. The All4779 bound ssDNA in two binding modes i.e. (All4779)35 and (All4779)66 depending on salt concentration and with a binding affinity similar to that of Escherichia coli SSB. On the other hand, Alr0088 bound in a single binding mode of 50-mer and Alr7579 only to large stretches of ssDNA, suggesting that All4779, in all likelihood, is the major typical bacterial SSB in Anabaena. Overexpression of All4779 in Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 led to enhancement of tolerance to DNA-damaging stresses, such as γ-rays, UV-irradiation, desiccation and mitomycinC exposure. The tolerance appears to be a consequence of reduced DNA damage or efficient DNA repair due to increased availability of All4779. The ORF all4779 is proposed to be re-annotated as Anabaena ssb gene.

  5. EXPRESSION OF HUMAN TUMOR NECROSIS FACTORαIN ANABAENA SP. PCC7120%人肿瘤坏死因子α在鱼腥藻7120中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王捷; 郭勇

    1999-01-01

    Anabaena-E.coli shuttle plasmid PDC-TNF containing the coding region of the human TNF-α and psbA promoter was transformed to unicellular filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120 by triparent conjugation. Southern hybridization results show that human TNF-α cDNA is capable of autonomous replication as PDC-TNF plasmid in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 cells. It is shown that Anabaena sp. PCC7120 harboring PDC-TNF plasmid expresses human TNF-α at a high level (about 16% of total cyanobacterial proteins) with apparent molecular mass of 17ku by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis. The specific activity of TNF is about 2.5×104u/mg in the crude extract of Anabaena sp. PCC7120 harboring PDC-TNF plasmid.%通过三亲结合转移方式,将含人肿瘤坏死因子α(TNF-α) cDNA和psbA启动子的鱼腥藻-大肠杆菌穿梭质粒PDC-TNF导入单细胞丝状鱼腥藻7120中.Southern杂交结果表明,人肿瘤坏死因子α cDNA在鱼腥藻7120细胞中能以自主复制形式存在于PDC-TNF质粒上.SDS-PAGE和免疫印迹分析结果显示,转PDC-TNF的鱼腥藻7120可表达分子量约为17ku的人TNF-α,其表达量约占藻体蛋白的16%左右.转PDC-TNF的鱼腥藻7120粗提液的TNF生物学比活性约为2.5×104 u/mg.

  6. Sensorial evaluation of irradiated mangoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broisler, Paula Olhe; Cruz, Juliana Nunes da; Sabato, Susy Frey [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: paulabroisler@hotmail.com; juliananc@ig.com.br; sfsabato@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a tropical fruit of great economical relevance in the world, mainly for tropical countries like Brazil. It consists in the second tropical fruit more important grown in the world. On the other hand it is a very perishable fruit and its delivery to distant points is restricted due to short shelf life at environmental temperature. Food irradiation process is applied to fruits for their preservation, once it promotes disinfestation and even maturation retard, among other mechanisms. The Brazilian legislation permits the food irradiation and does not restrict the doses to be delivered. In order to verify eventual changes, sensorial evaluation is very important to study how irradiation affects the quality of the fruit and its acceptability. Mangoes were irradiated in a Cobalto-60 source, from the Radiation Technology Center, CTR, of IPEN/CNEN-SP at doses 0,5 kGy e 0,75 kGy. The sensorial evaluation was measured through Acceptance Test where irradiated samples were offered together with control sample to the tasters who answered their perception through hedonic scale. The parameters Color, Odor, Flavor and Texture were analyzed. Statistical analysis showed that only Odor parameter was different from control (sample irradiated at 0.5 kGy). Few tasters indicated that irradiated mangoes had fewer odors in relation to non-irradiated samples. (author)

  7. PBN (Phenyl-N-Tert-Butylnitrone-Derivatives Are Effective in Slowing the Visual Cycle and Rhodopsin Regeneration and in Protecting the Retina from Light-Induced Damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Stiles

    Full Text Available A2E and related toxic molecules are part of lipofuscin found in the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells in eyes affected by Stargardt's disease, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, and other retinal degenerations. A novel therapeutic approach for treating such degenerations involves slowing down the visual cycle, which could reduce the amount of A2E in the RPE. This can be accomplished by inhibiting RPE65, which produces 11-cis-retinol from all-trans-retinyl esters. We recently showed that phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN inhibits RPE65 enzyme activity in RPE cells. In this study we show that like PBN, certain PBN-derivatives (PBNDs such as 4-F-PBN, 4-CF3-PBN, 3,4-di-F-PBN, and 4-CH3-PBN can inhibit RPE65 and synthesis of 11-cis-retinol in in vitro assays using bovine RPE microsomes. We further demonstrate that systemic (intraperitoneal, IP administration of these PBNDs protect the rat retina from light damage. Electroretinography (ERG and histological analysis showed that rats treated with PBNDs retained ~90% of their photoreceptor cells compared to a complete loss of function and 90% loss of photoreceptors in the central retina in rats treated with vehicle/control injections. Topically applied PBN and PBNDs also significantly slowed the rate of the visual cycle in mouse and baboon eyes. One hour dark adaptation resulted in 75-80% recovery of bleachable rhodopsin in control/vehicle treated mice. Eye drops of 5% 4-CH3-PBN were most effective, inhibiting the regeneration of bleachable rhodopsin significantly (60% compared to vehicle control. In addition, a 10% concentration of PBN and 5% concentration of 4-CH3-PBN in baboon eyes inhibited the visual cycle by 60% and by 30%, respectively. We have identified a group of PBN related nitrones that can reach the target tissue (RPE by systemic and topical application and slow the rate of rhodopsin regeneration and therefore the visual cycle in mouse and baboon eyes. PBNDs can also protect the rat

  8. Hereditary motor-sensory, motor, and sensory neuropathies in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrieu, Pierre; Baets, Jonathan; De Jonghe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathies (HN) are categorized according to clinical presentation, pathogenic mechanism based on electrophysiology, genetic transmission, age of occurrence, and, in selected cases, pathological findings. The combination of these parameters frequently orients towards specific genetic disorders. Ruling out a neuropathy secondary to a generalized metabolic disorder remains the first pediatric concern. Primary, motor-sensory are the most frequent HN and are dominated by demyelinating AD forms (CMT1). Others are demyelinating AR forms, axonal AD/AR forms, and forms with "intermediate" electrophysiological phenotype. Pure motor HN represent40 genes with various biological functions have been found responsible for HN. Many are responsible for various phenotypes, including some without the polyneuropathic trait: for the pediatric neurologist, phenotype/genotype correlations constitute a permanent bidirectional exercise.

  9. Sensory Sensitivities and Performance on Sensory Perceptual Tasks in High-Functioning Individuals with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshew, Nancy J.; Hobson, Jessica A.

    2008-01-01

    Most reports of sensory symptoms in autism are second hand or observational, and there is little evidence of a neurological basis. Sixty individuals with high-functioning autism and 61 matched typical participants were administered a sensory questionnaire and neuropsychological tests of elementary and higher cortical sensory perception. Thirty-two…

  10. Membrane Protein Incorporation into Nano-Bioelectronics: An insight into Rhodopsin Controlled SiNW-FET Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunuguntla, Ramya

    that the manipulation of lipid composition can indeed control orientation of an asymmetrically charged membrane protein, proteorhodopsin, in liposomes. One-dimensional inorganic nanostructures, which have critical dimensions comparable to the sizes of biological molecules, form an excellent materials platform for building such integrated structures. Researchers already use silicon nanowire-based field effect transistors functionalized with molecular recognition sites in a diverse array of biosensors. In our group, we have been developing a platform for integration of membrane protein functionality and electronic devices using a 1-D phospholipid bilayer device architecture. In these devices, the membrane proteins reside within the lipid bilayer that covers a nanowire channel of a field-effect transistor. This lipid bilayer performs several functions: it shields the nanowire from the solution species; it serves as a native-like environment for membrane proteins and preserves their functionality, integrity, and even vectorality. In this work, we show that a 1-D bilayer device incorporating a rhodopsin proton pump allows us to couple light-driven proton transport to a bioelectronic circuit. We also report that we were able to adapt another distinctive feature of biological signal processing---their widespread use of modifiers, co-factors, and mediator molecules---to regulate and fine-tune the operational characteristics of the bioelectronic device. In our example, we use co-assembly of protein channels and ionophores in the 1-D bilayer to modify the device output levels and response time.

  11. Utilization of Anabaena sp. in CO{sub 2} removal processes. Modelling of biomass, exopolysaccharides productivities and CO{sub 2} fixation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Fernandez, J.F.; Gonzalez-Lopez, C.V.; Acien Fernandez, F.G.; Fernandez Sevilla, J.M.; Molina Grima, E. [Almeria Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2012-05-15

    This paper focuses on modelling the growth rate and exopolysaccharides production of Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047, to be used in carbon dioxide removal and biofuels production. For this, the influence of dilution rate, irradiance and aeration rate on the biomass and exopolysaccharides productivity, as well as on the CO{sub 2} fixation rate, have been studied. The productivity of the cultures was maximum at the highest irradiance and dilution rate assayed, resulting to 0.5 g{sub bio} l{sup -1} day{sup -1} and 0.2 g{sub eps} l{sup -1} day{sup -1}, and the CO{sub 2} fixation rate measured was 1.0 gCO{sub 2} l{sup -1} day{sup -1}. The results showed that although Anabaena sp. was partially photo-inhibited at irradiances higher than 1,300 {mu}E m-2 s{sup -1}, its growth rate increases hyperbolically with the average irradiance inside the culture, and so does the specific exopolysaccharides production rate. The latter, on the other hand, decreases under high external irradiances, indicating that the exopolysaccharides metabolism hindered by photo-damage. Mathematical models that consider these phenomena have been proposed. Regarding aeration, the yield of the cultures decreased at rates over 0.5 v/v/min or when shear rates were higher than 60 s{sup -1}, demonstrating the existence of thus existence of stress damage by aeration. The behaviour of the cultures has been verified outdoors in a pilot-scale airlift tubular photobioreactor. From this study it is concluded that Anabaena sp. is highly recommended to transform CO{sub 2} into valuable products as has been proved capable of metabolizing carbon dioxide at rates of 1.2 gCO{sub 2} l{sup -1} day{sup -1} outdoors. The adequacy of the proposed equations is demonstrated, resulting to a useful tool in the design and operation of photobioreactors using this strain. (orig.)

  12. Sensory Discrimination as Related to General Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, G. Scott; Schroeder, David H.

    2001-01-01

    Attempted to replicate the pitch discrimination findings of previous research and expand them to the modality of color discrimination in a sample of 899 teenagers and adults by correlating 2 sensory discrimination measures with the general factor from a battery of 13 cognitive ability tests. Results suggest that sensory discrimination is…

  13. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Sensory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metherate, Raju

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholine release in sensory neocortex contributes to higher-order sensory function, in part by activating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Molecular studies have revealed a bewildering array of nAChR subtypes and cellular actions; however, there is some consensus emerging about the major nAChR subtypes and their functions in…

  14. Sensory testing of the human gastrointestinal tract.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brock, C.; Arendt-Nielsen, L.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Drewes, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this appraisal is to shed light on the various approaches to screen sensory information in the human gut. Understanding and characterization of sensory symptoms in gastrointestinal disorders is poor. Experimental methods allowing the investigator to control stimulus intensity and mo

  15. Multisensory integration, sensory substitution and visual rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proulx, Michael J; Ptito, Maurice; Amedi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Sensory substitution has advanced remarkably over the past 35 years since first introduced to the scientific literature by Paul Bach-y-Rita. In this issue dedicated to his memory, we describe a collection of reviews that assess the current state of neuroscience research on sensory substitution...

  16. WHAT IS LACKING, STATEMENT ON SENSORY DEPRIVATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    REGAN, J.

    THIS PAPER, WHICH ANNOUNCES THE THEME OF A SEMINAR ON THEORIES OF LANGUAGE AND LEARNING, QUESTIONS THE VIEW THAT A CHILD'S POOR SCHOOL PERFORMANCE DERIVES FROM AN IMPOVERISHED SENSORY EXPERIENCE. A DEPRIVED TROPICAL ENVIRONMENT IS DEPICTED TO CAST DOUBTS ON THIS THEORY. A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE EFFECTS OF SENSORY DEPRIVATION IS INCLUDED. THIS…

  17. Sensory characteristics of different cod products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sveinsdottir, K.; Martinsdottir, E.; Hyldig, Grethe;

    2010-01-01

    to be more applicable for studying results of extensive data sets by handling missing values and estimating the significance of sensory attributes. The practical use of the paper is also a quantitative descriptive analysis vocabulary, which may be used as a basis for other studies with cod. It may also...... atmosphere) were evaluated with quantitative descriptive analysis by a trained sensory panel. Signal-to-noise analysis, p*MSE (discrimination and repeatability) and line plots proved to be very useful in studying panelists' performance. Most sensory attributes described significant differences between...... storage methods had minor influence on sensory characteristics of cod fillets after short storage time, but after extended storage, the groups were different with regard to most attributes. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS This paper presents different ways of analyzing sensory data. The process of analysis...

  18. Sensory extinction and sensory reinforcement principles for programming multiple adaptive behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincover, A; Cook, R; Peoples, A; Packard, D

    1979-01-01

    The role of sensory reinforcement was examined in programming multiple treatment gains in self-stimulation and spontaneous play for developmentally disabled children. Two phases were planned. First, we attempted to identify reinforcers maintaining self-stimulation. Sensory Extinction procedures were implemented in which auditory, proprioceptive, or visual sensory consequences of self-stimulatory behavior were systematically removed and reintroduced in a reversal design. When self-stimulation was decreased or eliminated as a result of removing one of these sensory consequences, the functional sensory consequence was designated as a child's preferred sensory reinforcer. In Phase 2, we assessed whether children would play selectively with toys producing the preferred kind of sensory stimulation. The results showed the following. (1) Self-stimulatory behavior was found to be maintained by sensory reinforcement. When the sensory reinforcer was removed, self-stimulation extinguished. (2) The sensory reinforcers identified for self-stimulatory behavior also served as reinforcers for new, appropriate toy play. (3) The multiple treatment gains observed appeared to be relatively durable in the absence of external reinforcers for play or restraints on self-stimulation. These results illustrate one instance in which multiple behavior change may be programmed in a predictable, lawful fashion by using "natural communities of sensory reinforcement."

  19. Physiological Effects of Lanthanum on Cyanobacterium Anabaena azollae%稀土元素镧对满江红鱼腥藻的生理影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋凌云; 胡文月; 赵继贞; 邵宏翔; 张昀

    2000-01-01

    对稀土元素镧(La)对满江红鱼腥藻(Anabaena azollae)的生理影响和满江红鱼腥藻对镧的富集作用进行了研究.结果显示低浓度镧对满江红鱼腥藻生长表现出促进作用,高浓度则表现出抑制作用.镧对满江红鱼腥藻的叶绿素a的合成、光合放氧活性也有影响,同样表现为低浓度促进,高浓度抑制.满江红鱼腥藻对镧的富集作用可能与其光合作用电子传递和能量合成有关.

  20. Copper—Induced Changes in the Urea Uptake and Urease Activity in the Cyanobacteria Anabaena doliolum and Anacystis Nidulans:Interaction With Sulphur Containing Amino Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.SINGH; B.B.SINGH; 等

    1995-01-01

    Copper-induced changes in the urea uptake and urease activity have been investigated in the cyanobacteria Anabaena doliolum and Anacystis nidulans.Copper,at and above 5μmol/L concentration,inhibited urea uptake and urease activity systems in both the cyanobacteria in a concentration dependent manner,However,the urea uptake and urease activity systems in A.nidulans apeared slightly more tolerant to copper than that of A.doliolum.The inhibitory effect of copeer on urea uptake and urease activity was mitigated by sulphur containing amino acids(cystine and cysteine),however,methionine could not do so,indicating the involvement of sulfhydryl(-SH) groups in the assimilation of urea in cyanobacteria.

  1. Nitrogen fixation (nif) genes of the cyanobacterium Anabaena species strain PCC 7120. The nifB-fdxN-nifS-nifU operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, M E; Haselkorn, R

    1989-11-15

    A second nitrogen fixation (nif) operon in the cyanobacterium (blue-green alga) Anabaena (Nostoc) sp. strain PCC 7120 has been identified and sequenced. It is located just upstream of the nifHDK operon and consists of four genes in the order nifB, fdxN, nifS, and nifU. The three nif genes were identified on the basis of their similarity with the corresponding genes from other diazotrophs. The fourth gene, fdxN, codes for a bacterial type ferredoxin (Mulligan, M. E., Buikema, W. J., and Haselkorn, R. (1988) J. Bacteriol. 167, 4406-4410). The four genes are probably transcribed as a single operon, but are expressed at a lower level than the nifHDK operon, and only after a developmentally induced DNA rearrangement occurs that excises a 55-kilobase pair element from within the fdxN gene (Golden, J. W., Mulligan, M. E., and Haselkorn, R. (1987) Nature 327, 526-529; Golden, J. W., Carrasco, C. D., Mulligan, M. E., Schneider, G. J., and Haselkorn, R. (1988) J. Bacteriol. 170, 5034-5041). The promoter for the nifB operon was located by primer extension. Comparison of the nifB 5'-flanking sequence with the nifH 5'-flanking sequence did not reveal any consensus base pairs that would define a nif promoter for Anabaena. The operon contains two instances of 7-base pair directly repeated sequences: seven copies of the repeated sequence are found between the nifB and fdxN genes and six copies are found between the nifS and nifU genes. The function of these repeats is unknown.

  2. Subcellular localization and clues for the function of the HetN factor influencing heterocyst distribution in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Mariscal, Vicente; Nürnberg, Dennis J; Elhai, Jeff; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2014-10-01

    In the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, heterocysts are formed in the absence of combined nitrogen, following a specific distribution pattern along the filament. The PatS and HetN factors contribute to the heterocyst pattern by inhibiting the formation of consecutive heterocysts. Thus, inactivation of any of these factors produces the multiple contiguous heterocyst (Mch) phenotype. Upon N stepdown, a HetN protein with its C terminus fused to a superfolder version of green fluorescent protein (sf-GFP) or to GFP-mut2 was observed, localized first throughout the whole area of differentiating cells and later specifically on the peripheries and in the polar regions of mature heterocysts, coinciding with the location of the thylakoids. Polar localization required an N-terminal stretch comprising residues 2 to 27 that may represent an unconventional signal peptide. Anabaena strains expressing a version of HetN lacking this fragment from a mutant gene placed at the native hetN locus exhibited a mild Mch phenotype. In agreement with previous results, deletion of an internal ERGSGR sequence, which is identical to the C-terminal sequence of PatS, also led to the Mch phenotype. The subcellular localization in heterocysts of fluorescence resulting from the fusion of GFP to the C terminus of HetN suggests that a full HetN protein is present in these cells. Furthermore, the full HetN protein is more conserved among cyanobacteria than the internal ERGSGR sequence. These observations suggest that HetN anchored to thylakoid membranes in heterocysts may serve a function besides that of generating a regulatory (ERGSGR) peptide.

  3. Synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles using the cell extract of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena strain L31 and its conjugation with UV-B absorbing compound shinorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Garvita; Babele, Piyoosh K; Kumar, Ashok; Srivastava, Anup; Sinha, Rajeshwar P; Tyagi, Madhu B

    2014-09-01

    In the present work, we describe a cheap, unexplored and simple procedure for the synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) using the cell extract of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena strain L31. An attempt was also made to conjugate synthesized ZnONPs with a UV-absorbing water soluble compound shinorine. UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and TEM-selected area electron diffraction (SAED) analyses were made to elucidate the formation and characterization of ZnONPs and ZnONPs-shinorine conjugate. The synthesized ZnONPs were characterized by a sharp peak at 370 nm in UV-vis spectrum. TEM images showed the formation of spherical shaped nanoparticles with an average size of 80 nm. Results of selective area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern showed a set of rings which suggested uniform shape with hexagonal structure of ZnONPs. XRD spectra confirmed the crystalline structure of particles. Conjugation of ZnONPs with shinorine was successfully achieved at pH 7.0 and 10mM concentration of shinorine. The conjugate showed a zeta potential value of -3.75 mV as compared to +30.25 mV of ZnONPs. The change in zeta potential value of ZnONPs-shinorine conjugate was attributed to the changes in the surface functionalities after conjugation. The generation of in vivo reactive oxygen species (ROS) by Anabaena strain L31 with treatment of ZnONPs-shinorine conjugate showed approximately 75% less ROS generation as compared to ZnONPs. Properties exhibited by the ZnONPs-shinorine conjugate suggest that it may be used as a potential agent in developing environmental-friendly sunscreen filters of biological origin.

  4. 蓝藻Anabaena sp.strain PCC7120中一种可诱导的CO2浓缩机制(CCM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴天福; 宋立荣; 刘永定

    1999-01-01

    为了探讨蓝藻Anabaena sp.strain PCC7120在外源无机碳浓度变化时,其光合作用对CO2和HCO-3的利用特性,制备了高CO2适应细胞(High-CO2-growing cells,HCG细胞).Anabaena sp.strain PCC7120 HCG细胞的生长速率高于LCG细胞(Low-CO2-Growing Cells),即在空气中生长的细胞.当HCG细胞从5% CO2转移到空气中时,其碳酸酐酶活性升高;它对外源无机碳的表观光合作用亲合力明显提高,说明它的CCM活性被诱导.HCG细胞与LCG细胞一样,当环境中pH值从6升高到9时,对外源无机碳的表观光合作用亲合力都降低,而对外源CO2的表观光合作用亲合力则升高.当HCG细胞从5% CO2转移到空气中时,作为CCM重要元件的羧体数目明显增加.以上结果表明:这种可诱导的CCM,为水体环境中光合自养生物无机碳利用特性的研究提供了一个很好的模型.

  5. Membrane targeting of MnSOD is essential for oxidative stress tolerance of nitrogen-fixing cultures of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Prashanth S; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-07-01

    The nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena PCC7120 encodes for a membrane-targeted 30 kDa Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and a cytosolic FeSOD. The MnSOD is post-translationally processed to 27 and 24 kDa forms in the cytosol and periplasm/thylakoid lumen. The extent of cleavage of signal and linker peptides at the N-terminus is dependent on the availability of combined nitrogen during growth. While the 24 and 27 kDa forms are present in near equal proportions under nitrogen-fixing conditions, the 24 kDa form is predominant under nitrogen-supplemented conditions. Individual contribution of these forms of MnSOD to total oxidative stress tolerance was analysed using recombinant Anabaena strains overexpressing either different molecular forms of MnSOD or MnSOD defective in the cleavage of signal/linker peptide. Targeting of MnSOD to the membrane and subsequent cleavage to release both the 24 and 27 kDa forms was essential for oxidative stress tolerance under nitrogen-fixing conditions. On the other hand, the cleavage of linker peptide was absolutely essential and the release of cytosolic 24 kDa form of MnSOD was obligatory for developing oxidative stress tolerance under nitrogen-supplemented conditions. Thus, a single MnSOD caters to the reduction of superoxide radical in both cytosol and thylakoid lumen/periplasm irrespective of the N-status of growth by regulating its cleavage. This is the first report on the physiological advantage of membrane-targeting and processing of MnSOD in either bacteria or plants. The higher oxidative stress tolerance offered by the cytosolic form of MnSOD has possibly resulted in retention of only the cytosolic form in bacterial non-nitrogen-fixers during evolution.

  6. Mutagenesis of hetR reveals amino acids necessary for HetR function in the heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Douglas D; Callahan, Sean M

    2007-03-01

    HetR is the master regulator of heterocyst differentiation in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. Genetic selection was used to identify 33 amino acid substitutions in HetR that reduced the proportion of cells undergoing heterocyst differentiation to less than 2%. Conservative substitutions in the wild-type HetR protein revealed three mutations that dramatically reduced the amount of heterocyst differentiation when the mutant allele was present in place of the wild-type allele on a replicating plasmid in a mutant lacking hetR on the chromosome. An H69Y substitution resulted in heterocyst formation among less than 0.1% of cells, and D17E and G36A substitutions resulted in a Het- phenotype, compared to heterocyst formation among approximately 25% of cells with the wild-type hetR under the same conditions. The D17E substitution prevented DNA binding activity exhibited by wild-type HetR in mobility shift assays, whereas G36A and H69Y substitutions had no affect on DNA binding. D17E, G36A, and H69Y substitutions also resulted in higher levels of the corresponding HetR protein than of the wild-type protein when each was expressed from an inducible promoter in a hetR deletion strain, suggesting an effect on HetR protein turnover. Surprisingly, C48A and S152A substitutions, which were previously reported to result in a Het- phenotype, were found to have no effect on heterocyst differentiation or patterning when the corresponding mutations were introduced into an otherwise wild-type genetic background in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. The clustering of mutations that satisfied the positive selection near the amino terminus suggests an important role for this part of the protein in HetR function.

  7. Inactivation of uptake hydrogenase leads to enhanced and sustained hydrogen production with high nitrogenase activity under high light exposure in the cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khetkorn Wanthanee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biohydrogen from cyanobacteria has attracted public interest due to its potential as a renewable energy carrier produced from solar energy and water. Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012, a novel strain isolated from rice paddy field in Thailand, has been identified as a promising cyanobacterial strain for use as a high-yield hydrogen producer attributed to the activities of two enzymes, nitrogenase and bidirectional hydrogenase. One main obstacle for high hydrogen production by A. siamensis is a light-driven hydrogen consumption catalyzed by the uptake hydrogenase. To overcome this and in order to enhance the potential for nitrogenase based hydrogen production, we engineered a hydrogen uptake deficient strain by interrupting hupS encoding the small subunit of the uptake hydrogenase. Results An engineered strain lacking a functional uptake hydrogenase (∆hupS produced about 4-folds more hydrogen than the wild type strain. Moreover, the ∆hupS strain showed long term, sustained hydrogen production under light exposure with 2–3 folds higher nitrogenase activity compared to the wild type. In addition, HupS inactivation had no major effects on cell growth and heterocyst differentiation. Gene expression analysis using RT-PCR indicates that electrons and ATP molecules required for hydrogen production in the ∆hupS strain may be obtained from the electron transport chain associated with the photosynthetic oxidation of water in the vegetative cells. The ∆hupS strain was found to compete well with the wild type up to 50 h in a mixed culture, thereafter the wild type started to grow on the relative expense of the ∆hupS strain. Conclusions Inactivation of hupS is an effective strategy for improving biohydrogen production, in rates and specifically in total yield, in nitrogen-fixing cultures of the cyanobacterium Anabaena siamensis TISTR 8012.

  8. Multisensory perceptual learning and sensory substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, Michael J; Brown, David J; Pasqualotto, Achille; Meijer, Peter

    2014-04-01

    One of the most exciting recent findings in neuroscience has been the capacity for neural plasticity in adult humans and animals. Studies of perceptual learning have provided key insights into the mechanisms of neural plasticity and the changes in functional neuroanatomy that it affords. Key questions in this field of research concern how practice of a task leads to specific or general improvement. Although much of this work has been carried out with a focus on a single sensory modality, primarily visual, there is increasing interest in multisensory perceptual learning. Here we will examine how advances in perceptual learning research both inform and can be informed by the development and advancement of sensory substitution devices for blind persons. To allow 'sight' to occur in the absence of visual input through the eyes, visual information can be transformed by a sensory substitution device into a representation that can be processed as sound or touch, and thus give one the potential to 'see' through the ears or tongue. Investigations of auditory, visual and multisensory perceptual learning can have key benefits for the advancement of sensory substitution, and the study of sensory deprivation and sensory substitution likewise will further the understanding of perceptual learning in general and the reverse hierarchy theory in particular. It also has significant importance for the developing understanding of the brain in metamodal terms, where functional brain areas might be best defined by the computations they carry out rather than by their sensory-specific processing role.

  9. Electromagnetic Characterization Of Metallic Sensory Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Simpson, John; Wallace, Terryl A.; Newman, John A.; Leser, Paul; Lahue, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy (FSMA) particles undergo changes in both electromagnetic properties and crystallographic structure when strained. When embedded in a structural material, these attributes can provide sensory output of the strain state of the structure. In this work, a detailed characterization of the electromagnetic properties of a FSMA under development for sensory applications is performed. In addition, a new eddy current probe is used to interrogate the electromagnetic properties of individual FSMA particles embedded in the sensory alloy during controlled fatigue tests on the multifunctional material.

  10. Sensory Marketing:Designing Pleasurable Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lageat Thierry

    2004-01-01

    Luxury products, household appliances, cosmetics and products for the general public all use the techniques of sensory marketing in the very first phases of conception to specify or give a distinct character to the way they are perceived. Creating the visio-tactile qualities of a mobile phone or dashboard, designing the acoustics used in a lipstick tube closure: these considerations offer industry a way of managing and mastering the sensorial identity which will set their products apart from those of their competitors. Sensory marketing is based upon the objective definition, the analysis and the mastering of the qualitative characteristics of the object to be conceived.

  11. Heterogeneous sensory processing in persistent postherniotomy pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Brandsborg, Birgitte; Jensen, Troels Staehelin;

    2010-01-01

    hinders evaluation of potential subgroups for further investigation and/or treatment allocation. Thus we used a standardized QST protocol to evaluate sensory functions in PPP and pain-free control patients, to allow individual sensory characterization of pain patients from calculated Z-values. Seventy PPP...... subpopulations in PPP, which may be used in selecting surgical and/or pharmacological treatment strategies.......Previous studies on sensory function in persistent postherniotomy pain (PPP) have only identified pressure pain threshold to be significantly different from pain-free patients despite several patients reporting cutaneous pain and wind-up phenomena. However the limited number of patients studied...

  12. 洱海螺旋鱼腥藻生长生理特性的初步研究%A STUDY ON THE GROWTH AND SOME PHYSIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ANABAENA SPIROIDES ISOLATED FROM LAKE ERHAI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常锋毅; 潘晓洁; 康丽娟; 沈银武; 李敦海; 刘永定

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, Lake Erhai is experiencing a transition from the mesotrophic to eutrophic condition and cya-nobacterial blooms have a rapid increase in the lake. In this study, the dominant species from the bloom of Lake Erhai, Anabaena spiroides, was isolated and purified. The growth and physiological characteristics of an Anabaena spiroides strain under different environmental conditions were studied to evaluate the influence of environmental factors on Anabaena bloom formation, and the growth was determined by cell biomass and relative growth rate. The results showed that the Anabaena the contents of nitrogen 1.5mmol/L and phosphorus 12μmol/L. The activities of nitrate reductase (NR) and alkaline phophatase (APA), which indicate metabolism of nitrogen and phosphorus, were measured with different concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus. NR activity of the Anabaena spiroicles strain increased with the raising of nitrogen concentration when nitrogen supply level was low (0-0.36 mmol/L). But the activity of NR was related to the growth under the condi-tion of rich nitrogen supply (0.36-6 mmol/L), i.e. the better strain's growth, the higher NR activity. APA activity of the Anabaena spiroides strain largely depended on the concentration of phosphorus. APA activity was lower with more phos-phorus supply. And Nitrogen did not play an important role in the activity change of APA when phosphorus supply was rich. In addition, it was observed that the Anabaena spiroides strain could grow with low concentration of nitrogen or phos-phorus. This may be related to special regulatory mechanism of nitrogen fixing and phosphorus utilizing of Anabaena.%近年来,洱海正处于中营养水平向富营养湖泊的过渡阶段,蓝藻水华也频繁发生.本文作者在洱海大规模水华暴发期间,分离、纯化了水华优势种螺旋鱼腥藻,并对其生长生理特性进行了初步研究,以期为探讨洱海鱼腥藻水华发生的环境影响因素提供基础的参

  13. MreB在鱼腥蓝细菌PCC 7120细胞分裂过程中的功能%Role of MreB on cell division of Anabaena sp.PCC 7120

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李东霞; 王莉; 陈雯莉

    2012-01-01

    为研究Anabaena sp.PCC 7120中的细胞形态决定蛋白MreB的亚细胞定位和功能,构建了由mreB自身启动子驱动的mreB-gfp融合载体,通过接合转移的方法将其转化到野生型Anabaena sp.PCC 7120中,获得绿色荧光蛋白标记的MreB的鱼腥蓝细菌菌株,同时用MreB的抑制剂A22处理菌株.结果显示,MreB的亚细胞定位随着细胞周期的进程而发生变化,A22处理可导致MreB无法正确聚合定位.

  14. Sensory feedback synchronizes motor and sensory neuronal networks in the neonatal rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, Ana R; Nasretdinov, Azat; Lebedeva, Julia; Khazipov, Roustem

    2016-10-07

    Early stages of sensorimotor system development in mammals are characterized by the occurrence of spontaneous movements. Whether and how these movements support correlated activity in developing sensorimotor spinal cord circuits remains unknown. Here we show highly correlated activity in sensory and motor zones in the spinal cord of neonatal rats in vivo. Both during twitches and complex movements, movement-generating bursts in motor zones are followed by bursts in sensory zones. Deafferentation does not affect activity in motor zones and movements, but profoundly suppresses activity bursts in sensory laminae and results in sensorimotor uncoupling, implying a primary role of sensory feedback in sensorimotor synchronization. This is further supported by largely dissociated activity in sensory and motor zones observed in the isolated spinal cord in vitro. Thus, sensory feedback resulting from spontaneous movements is instrumental for coordination of activity in developing sensorimotor spinal cord circuits.

  15. Positive Effect of Noises on Sensory Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Liu; Guang Li

    2004-01-01

    Stochastic resonance phenomenon in the biological sensory systems has been studied through the signal detection theories and the psychophysical experiments. In this paper, sensory systems are considered as a threshold detector including the receiver part and the classifier part. Compared with conventional models regarding the receiver part of sensory system as a linear or single non-linear system, a summing network was constructed by MacCulloch-Pitts neurons to simulate the receiver part. The simulation results show that the relevant index of the detectability of signal exhibit the stochastic resonance behaviours. The psychophysical experiments were carried out through the 2IFC (two interval two alternative forced choice) method. The experimental results qualitatively verify the conclusion in accordance with the theoretical model.These works give a proof that stochastic resonance is not only epiphenonmenon in sensory systems.

  16. [Sensory illusions in hang-gliding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, F; Bizeau, A; Resche-Rigon, P; Taillemite, J P; De Rotalier

    1997-01-01

    Sensory illusions in hang-gliding and para-gliding. Hang-gliding and para-gliding are at the moment booming sports. Sensory illusions are physiological phenomena sharing the wrong perception of the pilote's real position in space. These phenomena are very familiar to aeroplane pilotes, they can also be noticed on certain conditions with hang-gliding pilotes. There are many and various sensory illusions, but only illusions of vestibular origin will be dealt with in this article. Vestibular physiology is reminded with the working principle of a semicircular canal. Physiology and laws of physics explain several sensory illusions, especially when the pilote loses his visual landmarks: flying through a cloud, coriolis effect. Also some specific stages of hang-gliding foster those phenomena: spiraling downwards, self-rotation, following an asymetric closing of the parachute, spin on oneself. Therefore a previous briefing for the pilotes seems necessary.

  17. Sensory properties of menthol and smoking topography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffman Allison C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although there is a great deal known about menthol as a flavoring agent in foods and confections, less is known about the particular sensory properties of menthol cigarette smoke. Similarly, although smoking topography (the unique way an individual smokes a cigarette has been well studied using non-menthol cigarettes, there is relatively less known about how menthol affects smoking behavior. The objective of this review is to assess the sensory properties of menthol tobacco smoke, and smoking topography associated with menthol cigarettes. The cooling, analgesic, taste, and respiratory effects of menthol are well established, and studies have indicated that menthol’s sensory attributes can have an influence on the positive, or rewarding, properties associated smoking, including ratings of satisfaction, taste, perceived smoothness, and perceived irritation. Despite these sensory properties, the data regarding menthol’s effect on smoking topography are inconsistent. Many of the topography studies have limitations due to various methodological issues.

  18. N-terminal processing of membrane-targeted MnSOD and formation of multiple active superoxide dismutase dimers in the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Prashanth S; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree K

    2013-10-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 expresses a 30 kDa manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) comprising a hydrophobic region (signal peptide + linker peptide) attached to a catalytic unit. Bioinformatics predicted cleavage of the signal peptide at (25)CQPQ by signal peptidase and of the linker peptide by an Arg-C-like protease at the Arg52/Arg59 residue. The three predicted forms of MnSOD were immunodetected in Anabaena, with the 30 kDa MnSOD found exclusively in the membrane and the shorter 27 and 24 kDa forms found both in the membrane and soluble fractions. The corresponding sodA gene was truncated for (a) the first eight residues, or, (b) the signal peptide, or (c) the entire hydrophobic region, or (d) the Arg52/Arg59 residues were modified to serine. Overexpression of these MnSOD variants in recombinant Anabaena strains revealed that (a) the 30 kDa membrane-targeted MnSOD was cleaved by membrane-localized signal peptidase either during or after its transport through the membrane to release the 27 kDa form, either in the cytosol or in the periplasmic/thylakoid lumen, (b) the 27 kDa form was further cleaved to the 24 kDa form by Arg-C-like protease, both in the cytosol and in the periplasmic/thylakoid lumen, (c) deletion of signal peptide localized the MnSOD forms in the cytosol, and (d) alteration of the signal/linker peptide cleavage sites interfered with MnSOD localization and processing. Homo/heterodimerization of the 24 and 27 kDa forms of MnSOD and the cytosolic iron-dependent SOD results in multiple SOD activities, from a single MnSOD gene (sodA), in different cellular compartments of Anabaena.

  19. P50 sensory gating in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Anne Spencer; Hunter, Sharon Kay; Groth, Mark A; Ross, Randal Glenn

    2013-12-26

    Attentional deficits are common in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders including attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, autism, bipolar mood disorder, and schizophrenia. There has been increasing interest in the neurodevelopmental components of these attentional deficits; neurodevelopmental meaning that while the deficits become clinically prominent in childhood or adulthood, the deficits are the results of problems in brain development that begin in infancy or even prenatally. Despite this interest, there are few methods for assessing attention very early in infancy. This report focuses on one method, infant auditory P50 sensory gating. Attention has several components. One of the earliest components of attention, termed sensory gating, allows the brain to tune out repetitive, noninformative sensory information. Auditory P50 sensory gating refers to one task designed to measure sensory gating using changes in EEG. When identical auditory stimuli are presented 500 ms apart, the evoked response (change in the EEG associated with the processing of the click) to the second stimulus is generally reduced relative to the response to the first stimulus (i.e. the response is "gated"). When response to the second stimulus is not reduced, this is considered a poor sensory gating, is reflective of impaired cerebral inhibition, and is correlated with attentional deficits. Because the auditory P50 sensory gating task is passive, it is of potential utility in the study of young infants and may provide a window into the developmental time course of attentional deficits in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. The goal of this presentation is to describe the methodology for assessing infant auditory P50 sensory gating, a methodology adapted from those used in studies of adult populations.

  20. Pyridoxine dependent epilepsy with iatrogenic sensory neuronopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, R S; Brown, W F

    1995-02-01

    An 18-year-old man was treated from birth with chronic high dose pyridoxine (vitamin B6) up to 2000 mg per day for pyridoxine-dependent seizures. Within two years of onset of treatment, he developed a sensory neuropathy which did not progress over the following 16 years. Electrophysiological studies were consistent with a pure sensory neuronopathy expressed as centripetal degeneration of processes of the dorsal root ganglion cells.

  1. Cognitive mechanisms associated with auditory sensory gating

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, L. A.; Hills, P.J.; Dick, K.M.; Jones, S. P.; Bright, P

    2015-01-01

    Sensory gating is a neurophysiological measure of inhibition that is characterised by a reduction in the P50 event-related potential to a repeated identical stimulus. The objective of this work was to determine the cognitive mechanisms that relate to the neurological phenomenon of auditory sensory gating. Sixty participants underwent a battery of 10 cognitive tasks, including qualitatively different measures of attentional inhibition, working memory, and fluid intelligence. Participants addit...

  2. Neonatal sensory nerve injury-induced synaptic plasticity in the trigeminal principal sensory nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Fu-Sun; Erzurumlu, Reha S

    2016-01-01

    Sensory deprivation studies in neonatal mammals, such as monocular eye closure, whisker trimming, and chemical blockade of the olfactory epithelium have revealed the importance of sensory inputs in brain wiring during distinct critical periods. But very few studies have paid attention to the effects of neonatal peripheral sensory nerve damage on synaptic wiring of the central nervous system (CNS) circuits. Peripheral somatosensory nerves differ from other special sensory afferents in that they are more prone to crush or severance because of their locations in the body. Unlike the visual and auditory afferents, these nerves show regenerative capabilities after damage. Uniquely, damage to a somatosensory peripheral nerve does not only block activity incoming from the sensory receptors but also mediates injury-induced neuro- and glial chemical signals to the brain through the uninjured central axons of the primary sensory neurons. These chemical signals can have both far more and longer lasting effects than sensory blockade alone. Here we review studies which focus on the consequences of neonatal peripheral sensory nerve damage in the principal sensory nucleus of the brainstem trigeminal complex.

  3. Neuropathic pain: is quantitative sensory testing helpful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumova, Elena K; Geber, Christian; Westermann, Andrea; Maier, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    Neuropathic pain arises as a consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system and is characterised by a combination of positive and negative sensory symptoms. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) examines the sensory perception after application of different mechanical and thermal stimuli of controlled intensity and the function of both large (A-beta) and small (A-delta and C) nerve fibres, including the corresponding central pathways. QST can be used to determine detection, pain thresholds and stimulus-response curves and can thus detect both negative and positive sensory signs, the second ones not being assessed by other methods. Similarly to all other psychophysical tests QST requires standardised examination, instructions and data evaluation to receive valid and reliable results. Since normative data are available, QST can contribute also to the individual diagnosis of neuropathy, especially in the case of isolated small-fibre neuropathy, in contrast to the conventional electrophysiology which assesses only large myelinated fibres. For example, detection of early stages of subclinical neuropathy in symptomatic or asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus can be helpful to optimise treatment and identify diabetic foot at risk of ulceration. QST assessed the individual's sensory profile and thus can be valuable to evaluate the underlying pain mechanisms which occur in different frequencies even in the same neuropathic pain syndromes. Furthermore, assessing the exact sensory phenotype by QST might be useful in the future to identify responders to certain treatments in accordance to the underlying pain mechanisms.

  4. Bioinspired sensory systems for local flow characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvert, Brendan; Chen, Kevin; Kanso, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Empirical evidence suggests that many aquatic organisms sense differential hydrodynamic signals.This sensory information is decoded to extract relevant flow properties. This task is challenging because it relies on local and partial measurements, whereas classical flow characterization methods depend on an external observer to reconstruct global flow fields. Here, we introduce a mathematical model in which a bioinspired sensory array measuring differences in local flow velocities characterizes the flow type and intensity. We linearize the flow field around the sensory array and express the velocity gradient tensor in terms of frame-independent parameters. We develop decoding algorithms that allow the sensory system to characterize the local flow and discuss the conditions under which this is possible. We apply this framework to the canonical problem of a circular cylinder in uniform flow, finding excellent agreement between sensed and actual properties. Our results imply that combining suitable velocity sensors with physics-based methods for decoding sensory measurements leads to a powerful approach for understanding and developing underwater sensory systems.

  5. Sensory processing disorders among substance dependents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batya Engel-Yeger

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: (1 To compare sensory processing patterns as expressed in daily life between substance dependents and typical controls; (2 profile the prevalence of sensory processing disorders (SPD among substance dependents; and (3 examine gender effect on SPD within and between groups. Methods: Two hundred ninety people aged 19-64 participated in this study. The study group included 145 individuals who lived in the community or took part in an outpatient program because of addiction to drugs/alcohol and had been clean for over three months. The control group included 145 individuals who were not exposed to drugs or alcohol on a regular basis and did not suffer from addictive behavior. All participants filled a demographic questionnaire. Those who met the inclusion criteria completed the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile (AASP so that their sensory processing patterns could be assessed. Results: When comparing both groups, the study group showed greater sensory sensitivity and significantly higher prevalence of SPD. Significant group/gender interaction was found in regard to sensation seeking. Discussion: SPD among substance dependents may be expressed in daily life by either hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity. The behavioral outcomes reflected by the AASP support neurophysiological manifestations about SPD of substance dependents. The evaluation process of substance dependents should refer to their sensory processing abilities. In case SPD is diagnosed, Occupational Therapy and specific sensory–based interventions should be considered in order to fit the specific needs of individuals and enhance their performance, meaningful participation, and quality of life.

  6. 38 CFR 17.149 - Sensori-neural aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sensori-neural aids. 17... Prosthetic, Sensory, and Rehabilitative Aids § 17.149 Sensori-neural aids. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this part, VA will furnish needed sensori-neural aids (i.e., eyeglasses, contact...

  7. Proficiency testing for sensory profile panels : measuring panel performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mcewan, J.A.; Hunter, E.A.; Gemert, L.J. van; Lea, P.

    2002-01-01

    Proficiency testing in sensory analysis is an important step towards demonstrating that results from one sensory panel are consistent with the results of other sensory panels. The uniqueness of sensory analysis poses some specific problems for measuring the proficiency of the human instrument (panel

  8. Human dental pulp stem cells respond to cues from the rat retina and differentiate to express the retinal neuronal marker rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, A F; Cevallos, R R; Gazarian, K; Lamas, M

    2014-11-07

    Human adult dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are self-renewing stem cells that originate from the neural crest during development and remain within the dental pulp niche through adulthood. Due to their multi-lineage differentiation potential and their relative ease of access they represent an exciting alternative for autologous stem cell-based therapies in neurodegenerative diseases. In animal models, DPSCs transplanted into the brain differentiate into functional neurons or astrocytes in response to local environmental cues that appear to influence the fate of the surviving cells. Here we tested the hypothesis that DPSCs might be able to respond to factors present in the retina enabling the regenerative potential of these cells. We evaluated the response of DPSCs to conditioned media from organotypic explants from control and chemically damaged rat retinas. To evaluate cell differentiation, we analyzed the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), early neuronal and retinal markers (polysialic acid-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM); Pax6; Ascl1; NeuroD1) and the late photoreceptor marker rhodopsin, by immunofluorescence and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Exposure of DPSC cultures to conditioned media from control retinas induced a 39% reduction on the number of DPSCs that expressed GFAP; the expression of Pax6, Ascl1, PSA-NCAM or NeuroD1 was undetectable or did not change significantly. Expression of rhodopsin was not detectable in control or after exposure of the cultures with retinal conditioned media. By contrast, 44% of DPSCs exposed to conditioned media from damaged retinas were immunopositive to this protein. This response could not be reproduced when conditioned media from Müller-enriched primary cultures was used. Finally, quantitative RT-PCR was performed to compare the relative expression of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and brain

  9. The Efficiency of Sensory Integration Interventions in Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekçetin, Serkan; Akı, Esra; Üstünyurt, Zeynep; Kayıhan, Hülya

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of individualized sensory integration interventions on the sensory processing functions of preterm infants. Thirty-four preterm infants (intervention group) at a corrected age of seven months and 34 term infants (control group) were included. The preterm infants underwent an eight-week sensory integration intervention. Before and after the intervention, the preterm infants' sensory processing functions were evaluated using the Test of Sensory Functions in Infants and compared with those of term infants. Preterm infants had significantly poorer sensory processing function preintervention when compared with term infants. There was a significant improvement in preterm infants' sensory processing functions after the sensory integration intervention. In conclusion, preterm infants should be evaluated for sensory processing disorders and individualized sensory integration interventions should be implemented.

  10. Peripheral sensory cells in the cephalic sensory organs of Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyeth, Russell C; Croll, Roger P

    2011-07-01

    The peripheral nervous system in gastropods plays a key role in the neural control of behaviors, but is poorly studied in comparison with the central nervous system. Peripheral sensory neurons, although known to be widespread, have been studied in a patchwork fashion across several species, with no comprehensive treatment in any one species. We attempted to remedy this limitation by cataloging peripheral sensory cells in the cephalic sensory organs of Lymnaea stagnalis employing backfills, vital stains, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry. By using at least two independent methods to corroborate observations, we mapped four different cell types. We have found two different populations of bipolar sensory cells that appear to contain catecholamines(s) and histamine, respectively. Each cell had a peripheral soma, an epithelial process bearing cilia, and a second process projecting to the central nervous system. We also found evidence for two populations of nitric oxide-producing sensory cells, one bipolar, probably projecting centrally, and the second unipolar, with only a single epithelial process and no axon. The various cell types are presumably either mechanosensory or chemosensory, but the complexity of their distributions does not allow formation of hypotheses regarding modality. In addition, our observations indicate that yet more peripheral sensory cell types are present in the cephalic sensory organs of L. stagnalis. These results are an important step toward linking sensory cell morphology to modality. Moreover, our observations emphasize the size of the peripheral nervous system in gastropods, and we suggest that greater emphasis be placed on understanding its role in gastropod neuroethology.

  11. Influence of Nutrient Sources on Anabaena spiroides Growth and Odorous Compounds Production Characteristics%不同营养源条件下螺旋鱼腥藻生长与产嗅特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于建伟; 陈克云; 苏命; 杨敏; 刘代成

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of taste and odors,produced by secondary metabolites of cyanobacteria,has been one of the major water quality problems in drinking water.However,the odorous compounds produced by cyanobacteria usually differ significantly with different species.One cyanobacterium isolated from Yanghe reservoir was identified as Anabaena sp.,which can produce high level of geosmin consistently during laboratory culture.By culture expanding experiments,the algal growth and geosmin production characteristics of the Anabaena sp.were studied on different conditions of nitrogen and phosphorus sources.The results indicated that geosmin mainly remained in the intracellular algal cells regardless of the nutrient sources,and the extracellular content was only in the range of 0.2%-9.6%.Compared with ammonia nitrogen conditions,the growth of Anabaena sp.in nitrate nitrogen conditions was much higher,with a 1.4-fold variation in geosmin production.While ammonia nitrogen concentration was 0.5 mg/L,the algal biomass and geosmin production achieved the highest level of 3.8×104cells·mL-1 and 1.1×104 ng·L-1,respectively.When the nitrate nitrogen concentration was 2.0 mg/L,the algal biomass and geosmin production achieved the highest level of 6.6×104 cells·mL-1 and 1.3×104ng·L-1,respectively.Compared with nitrogen sources,the growth of Anabaena sp.could be promoted significantly until phosphorus level attained 0.12 mg/L,indicating that phosphorus is the main limiting nutrient source for Anabaena sp..For Yanghe reservoir,the nutrient level has already been enough for the growth of Anabaena sp..Therefore,the nutrient source content,especially phosphorus,should be reduced effectively to control the cyanobacterium bloom and taste and odor problems.%蓝藻次生代谢产物所导致的嗅味问题已成为饮用水的主要水质问题之一,然而不同种属蓝藻的产嗅特征往往差别明显.本研究将从洋河水库中分离得到的可高产土

  12. 温度对普通小球藻和鱼腥藻生长竞争的影响%EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON GROWTH AND COMPETITION OF CHLORELLA VULGARISRIS AND ANABAENA SP. STRAIN PCC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王菁; 裘丽萍; 孟顺龙; 范立民; 宋超; 陈家长

    2014-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris is a common freshwater alga. Anabaena sp. strain PCC is one of the most common blue-green alga in eutrophic lakes. To better understand the growth of water bloom blue-green alga in eutrophic lakes and the relationship between alga growth and temperature, we investigate the interspecies competition between C. vul-garis and Anabaena sp. strain PCC at different temperatures. The results showed that in both uni-culture and co-culture systems, C. vulgaris and Anabaena sp. strain PCC reached the maximum growth rates at 35℃ and 30-35℃ respec-tively. We also found that the inhibition parameters of interspecies competition could be significantly influenced by the temperature. The maximum inhibition parameter of Anabaena sp. strain PCC against C. vulgaris, 0.9111, was observed at 15℃. This value was 1.24, 1.14, and 1.12 times higher than the parameters at 25, 30℃, and 35℃ respectively. The maximum inhibition parameter of C. vulgaris against Anabaena sp. strain PCC, 18.38, was observed at 30℃, which was 4.25, 2.03, and 1.20 times higher than those at 15℃, 25℃, and 35℃ respectively. According to the Lotka-Volterra model, we deducted that the coexistence of Anabaena sp. strain PCC and C. vulgaris was unstable in the co-culture system at these four temperatures.%通过室内实验研究了不同温度条件下主要水华藻类--鱼腥藻(Anabaena sp. strain PCC)和常见淡水藻类--普通小球藻(Chlorella vulgaris)的生长和种间竞争,结果表明在单种培养和共同培养体系中,普通小球藻的最大藻细胞浓度随着温度的升高而增加;鱼腥藻生长最适温度为30-35℃。温度对藻类种间竞争抑制参数能够产生明显影响,鱼腥藻在温度为15℃时对普通小球藻的竞争抑制参数最大,分别是25℃、30℃、35℃时的1.24倍、1.14倍和1.12倍;而普通小球藻在30℃时对鱼腥藻的竞争抑制参数最大,分别是15℃、25℃、35℃条件下的4.25倍、2.03

  13. Sensory profiling: a method for describing the sensory characteristics of virgin olive oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyon, David H.

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available Sensory profiling is an objective, descriptive technique which uses a panel of trained assessors. It was used at Campden to differentiate olive oil which differed in terms of the country of origin, variety, ripeness and extraction techniques. The data were related to similar results from the Netherlands and Italy. The results indicated that all three sensory panels perceived the samples in the same way, however, the differed in the way the oils were described.
    The new European legislation on olive oil is partially concerned with the sensory aspects of the oil. The sensory grading takes into account the 'positive' and 'negative' attributes in the oil before giving an overall quality grade. These attributes do not reflect the consumer requirements, therefore, the grading should be restricted to the assessment of the presence or absence of sensory defects.

  14. Molecular characterization of Alr1105 a novel arsenate reductase of the diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and decoding its role in abiotic stress management in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sarita; Shrivastava, Alok K; Rai, Rashmi; Rai, Lal Chand

    2013-11-01

    This paper constitutes the first report on the Alr1105 of Anabaena sp. PCC7120 which functions as arsenate reductase and phosphatase and offers tolerance against oxidative and other abiotic stresses in the alr1105 transformed Escherichia coli. The bonafide of 40.8 kDa recombinant GST+Alr1105 fusion protein was confirmed by immunoblotting. The purified Alr1105 protein (mw 14.8 kDa) possessed strong arsenate reductase (Km 16.0 ± 1.2 mM and Vmax 5.6 ± 0.31 μmol min⁻¹ mg protein⁻¹) and phosphatase activity (Km 27.38 ± 3.1 mM and Vmax 0.077 ± 0.005 μmol min⁻¹ mg protein⁻¹) at an optimum temperature 37 °C and 6.5 pH. Native Alr1105 was found as a monomeric protein in contrast to its homologous Synechocystis ArsC protein. Expression of Alr1105 enhanced the arsenic tolerance in the arsenate reductase mutant E. coli WC3110 (∆arsC) and rendered better growth than the wild type W3110 up to 40 mM As (V). Notwithstanding above, the recombinant E. coli strain when exposed to CdCl₂, ZnSO₄, NiCl₂, CoCl₂, CuCl₂, heat, UV-B and carbofuron showed increase in growth over the wild type and mutant E. coli transformed with the empty vector. Furthermore, an enhanced growth of the recombinant E. coli in the presence of oxidative stress producing chemicals (MV, PMS and H₂O₂), suggested its protective role against these stresses. Appreciable expression of alr1105 gene as measured by qRT-PCR at different time points under selected stresses reconfirmed its role in stress tolerance. Thus the Alr1105 of Anabaena sp. PCC7120 functions as an arsenate reductase and possess novel properties different from the arsenate reductases known so far.

  15. The mutation p.E113K in the Schiff base counterion of rhodopsin is associated with two distinct retinal phenotypes within the same family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiff, Charlotte; Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Spital, Georg; Röger, Carsten; Hinz, Hebke; Jüschke, Christoph; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Da Costa, Romain; Neidhardt, John

    2016-01-01

    The diagnoses of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and stationary night blindness (CSNB) are two distinct clinical entities belonging to a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous retinal diseases. The current study focused on the identification of causative mutations in the RP-affected index patient and in several members of the same family that reported a phenotype resembling CSNB. Ophthalmological examinations of the index patient confirmed a typical form of RP. In contrast, clinical characterizations and ERGs of another affected family member showed the Riggs-type CSNB lacking signs of RP. Applying whole exome sequencing we detected the non-synonymous substitution c.337G > A, p.E113 K in the rhodopsin (RHO) gene. The mutation co-segregated with the diseases. The identification of the pathogenic variant p.E113 K is the first description of a naturally-occurring mutation in the Schiff base counterion of RHO in human patients. The heterozygous mutation c.337G > A in exon 1 was confirmed in the index patient as well as in five CSNB-affected relatives. This pathogenic sequence change was excluded in a healthy family member and in 199 ethnically matched controls. Our findings suggest that a mutation in the biochemically well-characterized counterion p.E113 in RHO can be associated with RP or Riggs-type CSNB, even within the same family. PMID:27812022

  16. CNDOL: A fast and reliable method for the calculation of electronic properties of very large systems. Applications to retinal binding pocket in rhodopsin and gas phase porphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Cabrera, Luis Alberto; Röhrig, Ute; Padrón-Garcia, Juan A; Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Montero-Alejo, Ana L; Garcia de la Vega, José M; Chergui, Majed; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2007-10-14

    Very large molecular systems can be calculated with the so called CNDOL approximate Hamiltonians that have been developed by avoiding oversimplifications and only using a priori parameters and formulas from the simpler NDO methods. A new diagonal monoelectronic term named CNDOL/21 shows great consistency and easier SCF convergence when used together with an appropriate function for charge repulsion energies that is derived from traditional formulas. It is possible to obtain a priori molecular orbitals and electron excitation properties after the configuration interaction of single excited determinants with reliability, maintaining interpretative possibilities even being a simplified Hamiltonian. Tests with some unequivocal gas phase maxima of simple molecules (benzene, furfural, acetaldehyde, hexyl alcohol, methyl amine, 2,5 dimethyl 2,4 hexadiene, and ethyl sulfide) ratify the general quality of this approach in comparison with other methods. The calculation of large systems as porphine in gas phase and a model of the complete retinal binding pocket in rhodopsin with 622 basis functions on 280 atoms at the quantum mechanical level show reliability leading to a resulting first allowed transition in 483 nm, very similar to the known experimental value of 500 nm of "dark state." In this very important case, our model gives a central role in this excitation to a charge transfer from the neighboring Glu(-) counterion to the retinaldehyde polyene chain. Tests with gas phase maxima of some important molecules corroborate the reliability of CNDOL/2 Hamiltonians.

  17. The Chemical Background for Sensory Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shujuan

    of information about food flavour but correlate to each other. The exploration of relationships between sensory and instrumental data is one important aspect for fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of sensory perception. This thesis has investigated the importance and limitation of aroma analysis...... or consumer panels. Sensory evaluation is a primary measurement for providing immediate information of human perception on the products. Instrumental methods give objective analysis of compounds that potentially contribute to food flavour. These two kinds of analysis, basically, give different types...... separately. Study 1 has investigated the application of volatile analysis and difference from control test in winemaking practices as an example of a situation where the relationship cannot be estimated by multivariate techniques. Volatile compound analysis revealed that some oxidative compounds increased...

  18. STDP in the developing sensory neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rylan S Larsen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP has been proposed as a mechanism for optimizing the tuning of neurons to sensory inputs, a process that underlies the formation of receptive field properties and associative memories. The properties of STDP must adjust during development to enable neurons to optimally tune their selectivity for environmental stimuli, but these changes are poorly understood. Here we review the properties of STDP and how these may change during development in primary sensory cortical layers 2/3 and 4, initial sites for intracortical processing. We provide a primer discussing postnatal developmental changes in synaptic proteins and neuromodulators that are thought to influence STDP induction and expression. We propose that STDP is shaped by, but also modifies, synapses to produce refinements in neuronal responses to sensory inputs.

  19. [Sensory disturbances caused by multivitamin preparations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kruijk, J R; Notermans, N C

    2005-11-12

    2 patients, men aged 60 and 65 years, presented with symptoms of chronic sensory polyneuropathy. Symptoms in the first patient were bilateral numbness in the hands and leg pain and, in the second patient, painful tingling in the legs. Pyridoxine (vitamin B6) toxicity due to daily use of multivitamin supplements was diagnosed. The patients were taking 24 and 40 mg per day, respectively. Neurotoxic syndromes due to pyridoxine overdose have been described before in patients taking high-dose vitamin B. These patients mostly developed progressive sersory neuronopathy with sensory ataxia. Chronic sensory polyneuropathy has not been associated with the use of vitamin supplements, which have previously been considered harmless. Both patients recovered after discontinuation of supplement intake.

  20. Sensory Synergy as Environmental Input Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fady eAlnajjar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a method to feed proper environmental inputs back to the central nervous system (CNS remains one of the challenges in achieving natural movement when part of the body is replaced with an artificial device. Muscle synergies are widely accepted as a biologically plausible interpretation of the neural dynamics between the CNS and the muscular system. Yet the sensorineural dynamics of environmental feedback to the CNS has not been investigated in detail. In this study, we address this issue by exploring the concept of sensory synergy. In contrast to muscle synergy, we hypothesize that sensory synergy plays an essential role in integrating the overall environmental inputs to provide low-dimensional information to the CNS. We assume that sensor synergy and muscle synergy communicate using these low-dimensional signals. To examine our hypothesis, we conducted posture control experiments involving lateral disturbance with 9 healthy participants. Proprioceptive information represented by the changes on muscle lengths were estimated by using the musculoskeletal model analysis software SIMM. Changes on muscles lengths were then used to compute sensory synergies. The experimental results indicate that the environmental inputs were translated into the two dimensional signals and used to move the upper limb to the desired position immediately after the lateral disturbance. Participants who showed high skill in posture control were found to be likely to have a strong correlation between sensory and muscle signaling as well as high coordination between the utilized sensory synergies. These results suggest the importance of integrating environmental inputs into suitable low-dimensional signals before providing them to the CNS. This mechanism should be essential when designing the prosthesis’ sensory system to make the controller simpler

  1. Dorsal and ventral streams across sensory modalities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Sedda; Federica Scarpina

    2012-01-01

    In this review,we describe the current models of dorsal and ventral streams in vision,audition and touch.Available theories take their first steps from the model of Milner and Goodale,which was developed to explain how human actions can be efficiently carried out using visual information.Since then,similar concepts have also been applied to other sensory modalities.We propose that advances in the knowledge of brain functioning can be achieved through models explaining action and perception patterns independently from sensory modalities.

  2. Sensory neuropeptide effects in human skin.

    OpenAIRE

    Fuller, R W; Conradson, T. B.; Dixon, C M; Crossman, D.C.; Barnes, P. J.

    1987-01-01

    1 Neuropeptides released from sensory nerves may account for cutaneous flare and wheal following local trauma. In 28 normal subjects we have studied the effects of four sensory neuropeptides given by intradermal injection on the forearm or back. 2 All peptides caused a flare distant from the site of injection, presumably due to an axon reflex. Substance P (SP) was the most potent (geometric mean dose causing 50% of maximum flare, 4.2 pmol). Neurokinin A (NKA) was the next most potent with neu...

  3. Sensory exotropia subsequent to senile cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOU Ding-hua; XU Ye-sheng; LI Yu-min

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation in patients with sensory exotropia subsequent to senile cataract. The authors prospectively studied the role of phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation on 25 patients by observing visual acuity, ocular alignment, binocular vision and diplopia pre-, 1 month post- and 3 months post-operation. The patients underwent follow-up for three months. Postoperatively, one patient had a corrected visual acuity of 20/50, and 24 patients had 20/40 or better. The ocular alignment, binocular vision and diplopia were resolved spontaneously. Phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation performed together is effective on sensory exotropia subsequent to senile cataract.

  4. Enhanced Thermostability of Lipoxygenase from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 by Site-Directed Mutagenesis Based on Computer-Aided Rational Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Hanwen; Zhang, Chong; Wang, Shuicheng; Lu, Fengxia; Lu, Zhaoxin

    2016-04-01

    Lipoxygenase from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 (Ana-LOX) was thermally unstable. So, improving the thermostability of the enzyme was quite essential. The target site of Ana-LOX selected for site-directed mutagenesis was based on computer-aided rational design. The thermostability and specific activity of Ana-LOX were improved with replacing valine with alanine at the target site 421 and the site 40. Compared to the wild-type enzyme which has a half-life (T 1/2) of inactivation of 3.8 min at 50 °C, the T 1/2 of mutant enzymes with V421A and V40A substitution increased to 4.4 and 7.0 min, respectively. The double mutant V421A/V40A showed a synergistic effect with a T 1/2 value of 8.3 min, resulting in a 1.18-fold improvement compared to the original Ana-LOX. V421A, V40A, and V421A/V40A also obtained 4.83, 41.58, and 80.07 % increase in specific activity, respectively. This study provides useful theoretical reference for enzyme molecular modification and computer-aided rational design.

  5. Removal of Anabaena flos-aquae in water treatment process using Moringa oleifera and assessment of fatty acid profile of generated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreti, Livia O R; Coldebella, Priscila Ferri; Camacho, Franciele P; Carvalho Bongiovani, Milene; Pereira de Souza, Aloisio Henrique; Kirie Gohara, Aline; Matsushita, Makoto; Fernandes Silva, Marcela; Nishi, Letícia; Bergamasco, Rosângela

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of the coagulation/flocculation/dissolved air flotation (C/F/DAF) process using the coagulant Moringa oleifera (MO) seed powder, and to analyse the profile of fatty acids present in the generated sludge after treatment. For the tests, deionized water artificially contaminated with cell cultures of Anabaena flos-aquae was used, with a cell density in the order of 10(4) cells mL(-1). C/F/DAF tests were conducted using 'Flotest' equipment. For fatty acid profile analyses, a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector was used. It was seen that the optimal dosage (100 mg L(-1)) of MO used in the C/F/DAF process was efficient at removing nearly all A. flos-aquae cells (96.4%). The sludge obtained after treatment contained oleic acid (61.7%) and palmitic acid (10.8%). Thus, a water treatment process using C/F/DAF linked to integral MO powder seed was found to be efficient in removing cells of cyanobacteria, and produced a sludge rich in oleic acid that is a precursor favourable for obtaining quality biodiesel, thus becoming an alternative application for the recycling of such biomass.

  6. Preparation of Calibration Standards of N1-H Paralytic Shellfish Toxin Analogues by Large-Scale Culture of Cyanobacterium Anabaena circinalis (TA04

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Suzuki

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Mouse bioassay is the official testing method to quantify paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs in bivalves. A number of alternative analytical methods have been reported. Some methods have been evaluated by a single laboratory validation. Among the different types of methods, chemical analyses are capable of identifying and quantifying the toxins, however a shortage of the necessary calibration standards hampers implementation of the chemical analyses in routine monitoring of PSTs in bivalves. In our present study, we studied preparation of major PST analogues as calibrants by large-scale cultivation of toxic freshwater cyanobacteria Anabaena circinalis TA04. The cells were steadily grown in 10 L bottle for 28 days. The primary N1-H toxins, C1/C2, were produced at a concentration of 1.3 ± 0.1 µmol/L. The intracellular and extracellular toxins occupied 80% and 20%, respectively. Over 220 µmol of the toxins was obtained from approximately 200 L of the culture over six months, demonstrating that it is sufficient to prepare saxitoxin analogues. The toxins were chemically converted to six N1-H analogues. Preparation of the analogues was carried out at relatively high yields (50–90%. The results indicate that our preparation method is useful to produce N1-H toxins. In our present study, detailed conditions for preparation of one of the rare N1-H analogues, gonyautoxin-5, were investigated.

  7. Cysteine Mutational Studies Provide Insight into a Thiol-Based Redox Switch Mechanism of Metal and DNA Binding in FurA from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botello-Morte, Laura; Pellicer, Silvia; Sein-Echaluce, Violeta C.; Contreras, Lellys M.; Neira, José Luis; Abián, Olga; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Peleato, María Luisa; Fillat, María F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is the main transcriptional regulator of genes involved in iron homeostasis in most prokaryotes. FurA from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 contains five cysteine residues, four of them arranged in two redox-active CXXC motifs. The protein needs not only metal but also reducing conditions to remain fully active in vitro. Through a mutational study of the cysteine residues present in FurA, we have investigated their involvement in metal and DNA binding. Results: Residue C101 that belongs to a conserved CXXC motif plays an essential role in both metal and DNA binding activities in vitro. Substitution of C101 by serine impairs DNA and metal binding abilities of FurA. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements show that the redox state of C101 is responsible for the protein ability to coordinate the metal corepressor. Moreover, the redox state of C101 varies with the presence or absence of C104 or C133, suggesting that the environments of these cysteines are mutually interdependent. Innovation: We propose that C101 is part of a thiol/disulfide redox switch that determines FurA ability to bind the metal corepressor. Conclusion: This mechanism supports a novel feature of a Fur protein that emerges as a regulator, which connects the response to changes in the intracellular redox state and iron management in cyanobacteria. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 173–185. PMID:26414804

  8. Crystal structure of NblA from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, a small protein playing a key role in phycobilisome degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Ralf; Baier, Kerstin; Volkmer, Rudolf; Lockau, Wolfgang; Heinemann, Udo

    2006-02-24

    Cyanobacterial light-harvesting complexes, the phycobilisomes, are proteolytically degraded when the organisms are starved for combined nitrogen, a process referred to as chlorosis or bleaching. Gene nblA, present in all phycobilisome-containing organisms, encodes a protein of about 7 kDa that plays a key role in phycobilisome degradation. The mode of action of NblA in this degradation process is poorly understood. Here we presented the 1.8-A crystal structure of NblA from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. In the crystal, NblA is present as a four-helix bundle formed by dimers, the basic structural units. By using pull-down assays with immobilized NblA and peptide scanning, we showed that NblA specifically binds to the alpha-subunits of phycocyanin and phycoerythrocyanin, the main building blocks of the phycobilisome rod structure. By site-directed mutagenesis, we identified amino acid residues in NblA that are involved in phycobilisome binding. The results provided evidence that NblA is directly involved in phycobilisome degradation, and the results allowed us to present a model that gives insight into the interaction of this small protein with the phycobilisomes.

  9. Energy transfer in Anabaena variabilis filaments adapted to nitrogen-depleted and nitrogen-enriched conditions studied by time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Aya; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2017-02-16

    Nitrogen is among the most important nutritious elements for photosynthetic organisms such as plants, algae, and cyanobacteria. Therefore, nitrogen depletion severely compromises the growth, development, and photosynthesis of these organisms. To preserve their integrity under nitrogen-depleted conditions, filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria reduce atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia, and self-adapt by regulating their light-harvesting and excitation energy-transfer processes. To investigate the changes in the primary processes of photosynthesis, we measured the steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra and time-resolved fluorescence spectra (TRFS) of whole filaments of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis at 77 K. The filaments were grown in standard and nitrogen-free media for 6 months. The TRFS were measured with a picosecond time-correlated single photon counting system. Despite the phycobilisome degradation, the energy-transfer paths within phycobilisome and from phycobilisome to both photosystems were maintained. However, the energy transfer from photosystem II to photosystem I was suppressed and a specific red chlorophyll band appeared under the nitrogen-depleted condition.

  10. Treatment with moderate concentrations of NaHSO{sub 3} enhances photobiological H{sub 2} production in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lianjun; Chen, Ming; Wei, Lanzhen; Gao, Fudan; Lv, Zhongxian; Wang, Quanxi; Ma, Weimin [College of Life and Environment Sciences, Shanghai Normal University, Guilin Road 100, Shanghai 200234 (China)

    2010-12-15

    In cyanobacteria, treatment with low concentrations of NaHSO{sub 3} can enhance photosynthetic efficiency, whereas NaHSO{sub 3} in high amounts often inhibits cell growth and photosynthesis may even cause death. In the present study, our results showed that treatment with moderate concentrations of NaHSO{sub 3} considerably improved the yield of photobiological H{sub 2} production in the filamentous N{sub 2}-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. Under steady state conditions, the accumulated H{sub 2} levels in cells treated with 1 mM NaHSO{sub 3} were approximately 10 times higher than that in untreated cells. Such improvement occurred in heterocysts and was most likely caused by increases in the expression and activity of nitrogenase. The effects of treatment with low, moderate, and high concentrations of NaHSO{sub 3} in cyanobacteria were proposed on the basis of the results obtained in the present study and from previous knowledge. (author)

  11. Exploring the size limit of protein diffusion through the periplasm in cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 using the 13 kDa iLOV fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Chen; Risoul, Véronique; Latifi, Amel; Christie, John M; Zhang, Cheng-Cai

    2013-09-01

    In the filamentous heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120, vegetative cells and heterocysts are interdependent on each other and engaged in exchanges of metabolites for survival when grown under diazotrophic conditions. In this organism, the periplasm appears to be continuous along each filament, with a shared outer membrane; however, barriers exist preventing free diffusion of the fluorescent protein GFP (27 kDa) targeted into the periplasmic space. Here we expressed a smaller fluorescent protein iLOV (≈ 13 kDa) fused to the All3333 (a putative homologue of NrtA) signal sequence corresponding to those recognized by the TAT protein translocation system, which exports iLOV to the periplasm of either heterocysts or vegetative cells. Fluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis indicated that the iLOV protein is translocated into the periplasm of the producing cell and properly processed, but does not diffuse to neighboring cells via the periplasm. Thus, periplasmic barriers appear to block diffusion of molecules with a size of 13 kDa, the minimum size tested thus far. Assuming that the physical barrier is the peptidoglycan sacculus, its pores might allow diffusion of molecules within the size range between the PatS pentapeptide and iLOV, thus between 0.53 kDa and 13 kDa.

  12. 单嘧磺隆对水华鱼腥藻生长的影响%Effects of monosulfuron on growth of Anabaena flosaquae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀红; 沈健英; 陆贻通

    2006-01-01

    研究单嘧磺隆对水华鱼腥藻(Anabaena flosaquae)生长的影响.结果表明,单嘧磺隆在低浓度(0.75 mg·L-1以下)时,对水华鱼腥藻细胞数、干重和生长速率的影响不大,仍能持续合成生长;而当单嘧磺隆浓度为7.5 mg·L-1以上时,则显著抑制水华鱼腥藻的生长,且高浓度时对水华鱼腥藻产生较强毒性,处理72 h时的EC50值为0.99 mg·L-1.可见选择对固氮蓝藻安全的除草剂单嘧磺隆,对维护稻田生态、促进农业可持续发展具有重要意义.

  13. The trpE gene negatively regulates differentiation of heterocysts at the level of induction in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videau, Patrick; Cozy, Loralyn M; Young, Jasmine E; Ushijima, Blake; Oshiro, Reid T; Rivers, Orion S; Burger, Andrew H; Callahan, Sean M

    2015-01-01

    Levels of 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) reflect nitrogen status in many bacteria. In heterocystous cyanobacteria, a spike in the 2-OG level occurs shortly after the removal of combined nitrogen from cultures and is an integral part of the induction of heterocyst differentiation. In this work, deletion of one of the two annotated trpE genes in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 resulted in a spike in the 2-OG level and subsequent differentiation of a wild-type pattern of heterocysts when filaments of the mutant were transferred from growth on ammonia to growth on nitrate. In contrast, 2-OG levels were unaffected in the wild type, which did not differentiate under the same conditions. An inverted-repeat sequence located upstream of trpE bound a central regulator of differentiation, HetR, in vitro and was necessary for HetR-dependent transcription of a reporter fusion and complementation of the mutant phenotype in vivo. Functional complementation of the mutant phenotype with the addition of tryptophan suggested that levels of tryptophan, rather than the demonstrated anthranilate synthase activity of TrpE, mediated the developmental response of the wild type to nitrate. A model is presented for the observed increase in 2-OG in the trpE mutant.

  14. Alterations in proteins and amino acids of the Nile cyanobacteria Pseudanabaena limnetica and Anabaena wisconsinense in response to industrial wastewater pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Mohamed El-Sheekh

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of industrial wastewater on the Nile cyanobacteria Pseudanabaena limnetica and Anabaena wisconsinense was investigated. The data showed that P. limnetica was more sensitive to pollution than A. wisconsinense. The treatments with different levels of wastewater exerted pronounced reductions in protein and amino acids content. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the cyanobacteria grown in the industrial wastewater showed induction in the synthesis of certain polypeptides and repression of others. The treatments of P. limnetica with wastewater stimulated the appearance of six protein bands with molecular masses of 28, 30, 31, 32, 58 and 97 kDa. The same treatments caused the disappearance of 20, 38 and 56 kDa. The structural protein pattern of the treated A. wisconsinense showed appearance of 16, 30, 170 and 230 kDa and disappearance of 56 kDa. The treatment of the two investigated cyanobacteria with different levels of wastewater stimulated the biosyntheses of different amino acids and inhibited others.

  15. Characterization and responses to environmental cues of a photosynthetic antenna-deficient mutant of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leganés, Francisco; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Muñoz-Martín, M Ángeles; Marco, Eduardo; Jorge, Alberto; Carvajal, Laura; Vida, Teresa; González-Pleiter, Miguel; Fernández-Piñas, Francisca

    2014-07-01

    The cyanobacterial phycobilisome (PBS) is a giant pigment-protein complex which harvests light energy for photosynthesis and comprises two structures: a core and peripheral rods. Most studies on PBS structure and function are based on mutants of unicellular strains. In this report, we describe the phenotypic and genetic characterization of a transposon mutant of the filamentous Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, denoted LC1, which cannot synthesize the phycobiliprotein phycocyanin (PC), the main component of the rods; in this mutant, the transposon had inserted into the cpcB gene (orf alr0528) which putatively encodes PC-β chain. Mutant LC1 was able to synthesize phycoerythrocyanin (PEC), a phycobiliprotein (PBP) located at the terminal region of the rods; but in the absence of PC, PEC did not attach to the PBSs that only retained the allophycocyanin (APC) core; ferredoxin: NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) that is associated with the PBS in the wild type, was not found in isolated PBSs from LC1. The performance of the mutant exposed to different environmental conditions was evaluated. The mutant phenotype was successfully complemented by cloning and transfer of the wild type complete cpc operon to mutant LC1. Interestingly, LC1 compensated its mutation by significantly increasing the number of its core-PBS and the effective quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry; this feature suggests a more efficient energy conversion in the mutant which may be useful for biotechnological applications.

  16. Sucrose synthesis in the nitrogen-fixing Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is controlled by the two-component response regulator OrrA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehira, Shigeki; Kimura, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Shogo; Ohmori, Masayuki

    2014-09-01

    The filamentous, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 accumulates sucrose as a compatible solute against salt stress. Sucrose-phosphate synthase activity, which is responsible for the sucrose synthesis, is increased by salt stress, but the mechanism underlying the regulation of sucrose synthesis remains unknown. In the present study, a response regulator, OrrA, was shown to control sucrose synthesis. Expression of spsA, which encodes a sucrose-phosphate synthase, and susA and susB, which encode sucrose synthases, was induced by salt stress. In the orrA disruptant, salt induction of these genes was completely abolished. The cellular sucrose level of the orrA disruptant was reduced to 40% of that in the wild type under salt stress conditions. Moreover, overexpression of orrA resulted in enhanced expression of spsA, susA, and susB, followed by accumulation of sucrose, without the addition of NaCl. We also found that SigB2, a group 2 sigma factor of RNA polymerase, regulated the early response to salt stress under the control of OrrA. It is concluded that OrrA controls sucrose synthesis in collaboration with SigB2.

  17. Anabaena mucosa, a newly recorded species of Cyanophyta from China%我国鱼腥藻的新记录种——粘质鱼腥藻

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡韧; 雷腊梅; 张成武

    2009-01-01

    蓝藻是淡水水体的重要组成类群,而鱼腥藻又是水华蓝藻的一个重要种属.但由于该属种类较多,国内文献报导的不到世界分布的四分之一.该文利用染色和显微镜镜检方法对采自广东省高州水库蓝藻水华的样品进行观察,经鉴定,确认一个我国鱼腥藻属的新记录种--粘质鱼腥藻Anabaena mucosa, J. Komarkova-Legnerova & P. Eloranta ,1992 .对该属及该属一个新记录种的主要形态学特征进行了描述,提供了相应的形态照片,并对相似种进行了形态学比较研究.

  18. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Hu

    Full Text Available DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells.

  19. Heterologous expression of Anabaena PCC 7120 all3940 (a Dps family gene) protects Escherichia coli from nutrient limitation and abiotic stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, Om Prakash; Kumari, Nidhi [Molecular Biology Section, Laboratory of Algal Biology, Center of Advanced Study in Botany, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-22 1005 (India); Rai, Lal Chand, E-mail: lcraibhu@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Section, Laboratory of Algal Biology, Center of Advanced Study in Botany, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-22 1005 (India)

    2010-03-26

    This study presents first hand data on the cloning and heterologous expression of Anabaena PCC 7120 all3940 (a dps family gene) in combating nutrients limitation and multiple abiotic stresses. The Escherichia coli transformed with pGEX-5X-2-all3940 construct when subjected to iron, carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus limitation and carbofuron, copper, UV-B, heat, salt and cadmium stress registered significant increase in growth over the cells transformed with empty vector under iron (0%), carbon (0.05%), nitrogen (3.7 mM) and phosphorus (2 mM) limitation and carbofuron (0.025 mg ml{sup -1}), CuCl{sub 2} (1 mM), UV-B (10 min), heat (47 {sup o}C), NaCl (6% w/v) and CdCl{sub 2} (4 mM) stress. Enhanced expression of all3940 gene measured by semi-quantitative RT-PCR at different time points under above mentioned treatments clearly demonstrates its role in tolerance against aforesaid abiotic stresses. This study opens the gate for developing transgenic cyanobacteria capable of growing successfully under above mentioned stresses.

  20. Detecting the Anti-oxidative Effect of Anabaena Phycocyanin%鱼腥藻藻蓝蛋白的抗氧化作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨立红; 王晓洁; 钟旭升; 冯培勇; 李小青

    2006-01-01

    目的:探讨鱼腥藻藻蓝蛋白(Anabaena Phycocyanin APC)的体外抗氧化作用.方法:采用化学比色法测定APC在体外的(1)总抗氧化能力;(2)抑制活性超氧阴离子自由基(O2-·)的能力;(3)清除羟自由基(·OH)的能力;(4)在其作用下的小鼠肝组织中脂质过氧化产物丙二醛(MDA)含量的变化.结果:一定浓度范围内不同纯度的APC均有总抗氧化能力,能清除O2-·和·OH及抑制MDA的生成,且呈现一定剂量关系.结论:APC在一定浓度范围内具有抗氧化作用.

  1. Dynamics and Cell-Type Specificity of the DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Protein RecN in the Developmental Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sheng; Wang, Jinglan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and repair are two fundamental processes required in life proliferation and cellular defense and some common proteins are involved in both processes. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is capable of forming heterocysts for N2 fixation in the absence of a combined-nitrogen source. This developmental process is intimately linked to cell cycle control. In this study, we investigated the localization of the DNA double-strand break repair protein RecN during key cellular events, such as chromosome damaging, cell division, and heterocyst differentiation. Treatment by a drug causing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced reorganization of the RecN focus preferentially towards the mid-cell position. RecN-GFP was absent in most mature heterocysts. Furthermore, our results showed that HetR, a central player in heterocyst development, was involved in the proper positioning and distribution of RecN-GFP. These results showed the dynamics of RecN in DSB repair and suggested a differential regulation of DNA DSB repair in vegetative cell and heterocysts. The absence of RecN in mature heterocysts is compatible with the terminal nature of these cells.

  2. The freshwater cyanobacterium Anabaena doliolum transformed with ApGSMT-DMT exhibited enhanced salt tolerance and protection to nitrogenase activity, but became halophilic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Meenakshi; Sharma, Naveen K; Prasad, Shyam Babu; Yadav, Suresh Singh; Narayan, Gopeshwar; Rai, Ashwani K

    2013-03-01

    Glycine betaine (GB) is an important osmolyte synthesized in response to different abiotic stresses, including salinity. The two known pathways of GB synthesis involve: 1) two step oxidation of choline (choline → betaine aldehyde → GB), generally found in plants, microbes and animals; and 2) three step methylation of glycine (glycine → sarcosine → dimethylglycine → GB), mainly found in halophilic archaea, sulphur bacteria and the cyanobacterium Aphanothece (Ap.) halophytica. Here, we transformed a salt-sensitive freshwater diazotrophic filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena (An.) doliolum with N-methyltransferase genes (ApGSMT-DMT) from Ap. halophytica using the triparental conjugation method. The transformed An. doliolum synthesized and accumulated GB in cells, and showed increased salt tolerance and protection to nitrogenase activity. The salt responsiveness of the transformant was also apparent as GB synthesis increased with increasing concentrations of NaCl in the nutrient solution, and maximal [12.92 µmol (g dry weight)(-1)] in cells growing at 0.5 M NaCl. Therefore, the transformed cyanobacterium has changed its behaviour from preferring freshwater to halophily. This study may have important biotechnological implications for the development of stress tolerant nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria as biofertilizers for sustainable agriculture.

  3. FAD semiquinone stability regulates single- and two-electron reduction of quinones by Anabaena PCC7119 ferredoxin:NADP+ reductase and its Glu301Ala mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusevicius, Zilvinas; Miseviciene, Lina; Medina, Milagros; Martinez-Julvez, Marta; Gomez-Moreno, Carlos; Cenas, Narimantas

    2005-05-15

    Flavoenzymes may reduce quinones in a single-electron, mixed single- and two-electron, and two-electron way. The mechanisms of two-electron reduction of quinones are insufficiently understood. To get an insight into the role of flavin semiquinone stability in the regulation of single- vs. two-electron reduction of quinones, we studied the reactions of wild type Anabaena ferredoxin:NADP(+)reductase (FNR) with 48% FAD semiquinone (FADH*) stabilized at the equilibrium (pH 7.0), and its Glu301Ala mutant (8% FADH* at the equilibrium). We found that Glu301Ala substitution does not change the quinone substrate specificity of FNR. However, it confers the mixed single- and two-electron mechanism of quinone reduction (50% single-electron flux), whereas the wild type FNR reduces quinones in a single-electron way. During the oxidation of fully reduced wild type FNR by tetramethyl-1,4-benzoquinone, the first electron transfer (formation of FADH*) is about 40 times faster than the second one (oxidation of FADH*). In contrast, the first and second electron transfer proceeded at similar rates in Glu301Ala FNR. Thus, the change in the quinone reduction mechanism may be explained by the relative increase in the rate of second electron transfer. This enabled us to propose the unified scheme of single-, two- and mixed single- and two-electron reduction of quinones by flavoenzymes with the central role of the stability of flavin/quinone ion-radical pair.

  4. Clinical neurophysiology and quantitative sensory testing in the investigation of orofacial pain and sensory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, Satu K

    2004-01-01

    Chronic orofacial pain represents a diagnostic and treatment challenge for the clinician. Some conditions, such as atypical facial pain, still lack proper diagnostic criteria, and their etiology is not known. The recent development of neurophysiological methods and quantitative sensory testing for the examination of the trigeminal somatosensory system offers several tools for diagnostic and etiological investigation of orofacial pain. This review presents some of these techniques and the results of their application in studies on orofacial pain and sensory dysfunction. Clinical neurophysiological investigation has greater diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity than clinical examination in the detection of the neurogenic abnormalities of either peripheral or central origin that may underlie symptoms of orofacial pain and sensory dysfunction. Neurophysiological testing may also reveal trigeminal pathology when magnetic resonance imaging has failed to detect it, so these methods should be considered complementary to each other in the investigation of orofacial pain patients. The blink reflex, corneal reflex, jaw jerk, sensory neurography of the inferior alveolar nerve, and the recording of trigeminal somatosensory-evoked potentials with near-nerve stimulation have all proved to be sensitive and reliable in the detection of dysfunction of the myelinated sensory fibers of the trigeminal nerve or its central connections within the brainstem. With appropriately small thermodes, thermal quantitative sensory testing is useful for the detection of trigeminal small-fiber dysfunction (Adelta and C). In neuropathic conditions, it is most sensitive to lesions causing axonal injury. By combining different techniques for investigation of the trigeminal system, an accurate topographical diagnosis and profile of sensory fiber pathology can be determined. Neurophysiological and quantitative sensory tests have already highlighted some similarities among various orofacial pain conditions

  5. A Housefly Sensory-Motor Integration Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griff, Edwin R; Kane, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    Insects have many interesting behaviors that can be observed in an introductory biology laboratory setting. In the present article, we describe several reflexes using the housefly "Musca domestica" that can be used to introduce students to sensory and motor responses and encourage them to think about the underlying neural circuits and integration…

  6. Improving Maladaptive Behaviors Using Sensory Integration Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, Theresa

    A study examined the use of sensory integration techniques to reduce the maladaptive behaviors that interfered with the learning of nine high school students with mental impairments attending a special school. Maladaptive behaviors identified included rocking, toe walking, echolalia, resistance to change, compulsive behaviors, aggression,…

  7. Migration and sensory evaluation of irradiated polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffers, N.H.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Franz, R.; Welle, F.

    2004-01-01

    The effects on ionising irradiation on polymer additives, monomers and polymers themselves have been investigated. Changes of initial concentrations of certain additives and monomers, a change in their specific migration as well as sensory changes of the polymers were examined. Polymer stabilizers s

  8. Sensory source strength of used ventilation filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Geo; Alm, Ole Martin; Fanger, Povl Ole

    2002-01-01

    A two-year-old filter was placed in a ventilation system recirculating the air in an experimental space. Via glass tubes supplied with a small fan it was possible to extract air upstream and downstream of the filter to an adjacent room. A panel could thus perform sensory assessments of the air from...

  9. Fidget Blankets: A Sensory Stimulation Outreach Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroustos, Kelly Reilly; Trautwein, Heidi; Kerns, Rachel; Sobota, Kristen Finley

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) include behaviors such as aberrant motor behavior, agitation, anxiety, apathy, delusions, depression, disinhibition, elation, hallucinations, irritability, and sleep or appetite changes. A student-led project to provide sensory stimulation in the form of "fidget blankets" developed into a community outreach program. The goal was to decrease the use of antipsychotics used for BPSD.

  10. Communication shapes sensory response in multicellular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Garrett D; Byrd, Tommy A; Mugler, Andrew; Sun, Bo

    2016-09-13

    Collective sensing by interacting cells is observed in a variety of biological systems, and yet, a quantitative understanding of how sensory information is collectively encoded is lacking. Here, we investigate the ATP-induced calcium dynamics of monolayers of fibroblast cells that communicate via gap junctions. Combining experiments and stochastic modeling, we find that increasing the ATP stimulus increases the propensity for calcium oscillations, despite large cell-to-cell variability. The model further predicts that the oscillation propensity increases with not only the stimulus, but also the cell density due to increased communication. Experiments confirm this prediction, showing that cell density modulates the collective sensory response. We further implicate cell-cell communication by coculturing the fibroblasts with cancer cells, which we show act as "defects" in the communication network, thereby reducing the oscillation propensity. These results suggest that multicellular networks sit at a point in parameter space where cell-cell communication has a significant effect on the sensory response, allowing cells to simultaneously respond to a sensory input and the presence of neighbors.

  11. Temporal structure in audiovisual sensory selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kösem

    Full Text Available In natural environments, sensory information is embedded in temporally contiguous streams of events. This is typically the case when seeing and listening to a speaker or when engaged in scene analysis. In such contexts, two mechanisms are needed to single out and build a reliable representation of an event (or object: the temporal parsing of information and the selection of relevant information in the stream. It has previously been shown that rhythmic events naturally build temporal expectations that improve sensory processing at predictable points in time. Here, we asked to which extent temporal regularities can improve the detection and identification of events across sensory modalities. To do so, we used a dynamic visual conjunction search task accompanied by auditory cues synchronized or not with the color change of the target (horizontal or vertical bar. Sounds synchronized with the visual target improved search efficiency for temporal rates below 1.4 Hz but did not affect efficiency above that stimulation rate. Desynchronized auditory cues consistently impaired visual search below 3.3 Hz. Our results are interpreted in the context of the Dynamic Attending Theory: specifically, we suggest that a cognitive operation structures events in time irrespective of the sensory modality of input. Our results further support and specify recent neurophysiological findings by showing strong temporal selectivity for audiovisual integration in the auditory-driven improvement of visual search efficiency.

  12. Sensory Evaluation in Characterization of Fabric Hand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ludovic Koehl; Zhou Bin(周斌); Zeng Xian-yi; Ding Yong-sheng(丁永生)

    2004-01-01

    This paper is divided in two parts. The first part presents optimized methods for formalizing and analyzing sensory data provided by different panels on fabric hand evaluation. For achieving this challenge, we first transform each evaluation into fuzzy sets and we submit criteria for assessing the fabric hand evaluation given by experts as well as criteria for computing the distances between different panels and the employed linguistic terms in different evaluation spaces. This sensory data analysis allows us to check expert's and customer's behaviors on fabric hand.Based on this first procedure about formalization and sensory data analysis, we can study the relationships between sensory evaluation given by different experts for a fabric set and the objective data set provided by appropriate measurements. From a set of fabric samples, a database with nearly 10 parameters characterizing the touch handle is built. This way of evaluation is performed by measuring a set of physical parameters on fabrics. Those parameters constitute the input variables of our model. For the textile industry, the major difficulty lies in the fact that the performed measurements on fabrics lead to precise numerical data describing indirectly fabric hand but their relationships with the evaluation given by experts should be exploited. We implement a fuzzy model which predicts the marks reached for a set of linguistic terms.The effectiveness of these methods and criteria is shown through a number of knitted cotton fabrics.

  13. Molecular genetics of hereditary sensory neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Mauko, Barbara; Auer-Grumbach, Piet; Pieber, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), also known as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. They are caused by neuronal atrophy and degeneration, predominantly affecting peripheral sensory and autonomic neurons. Both congenital and juvenile to adulthood onset is possible. Currently, the classification of the HSN depends on the mode of inheritance, age at onset, and clinical presentation. Hallmark features are progressive sensory loss, chronic skin ulcers, and other skin abnormalities. Spontaneous fractures and neuropathic arthropathy are frequent complications and often necessitate amputations. Autonomic features vary between different subgroups. Distal muscle weakness and wasting may be present and is sometimes so prominent that it becomes difficult to distinguish HSN from Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome. Recent major advances in molecular genetics have led to the identification of seven gene loci and six-disease causing genes for autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive HSN. These genes have been shown to play roles in lipid metabolism and the regulation of intracellular vesicular transport, but also a presumptive transcriptional regulator, a nerve growth factor receptor, and a nerve growth factor have been described among the causative genes in HSN. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how mutations in the known genes lead to the phenotype of HSN. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of the molecular genetics of the HSN and the implicated genes.

  14. Sensory testing of the human gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christina Brock; Lars Arendt-Nielsen; Oliver Wilder-Smith; Asbjφrn Mohr Drewes

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this appraisal is to shed light on the various approaches to screen sensory information in the human gut. Understanding and characterization of sensory symptoms in gastrointestinal disorders is poor. Experimental methods allowing the investigator to control stimulus intensity and modality, as well as using validated methods for assessing sensory response have contributed to the understanding of pain mechanisms. Mechanical stimulation based on impedance planimetry allows direct recordings of luminal cross-sectional areas, and combined with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, the contribution of different gut layers can be estimated. Electrical stimulation depolarizes free nerve endings non-selectively. Consequently, the stimulation paradigm (single, train, tetanic) influences the involved sensory nerves. Visual controlled electrical stimulation combines the probes with an endoscopic approach, which allows the investigator to inspect and obtain small biopsies from the stimulation site. Thermal stimulation (cold or warm) activates selectively mucosal receptors, and chemical substances such as acid and capsaicin (either alone or in combination) are used to evoke pain and sensitization. The possibility of multimodal (e.g. mechanical, electrical, thermal and chemical) stimulation in different gut segments has developed visceral pain research. The major advantage is involvement of distinctive receptors, various sensory nerves and different pain pathways mimicking clinical pain that favors investigation of central pain mechanisms involved in allodynia, hyperalgesia and referred pain. As impairment of descending control mechanisms partly underlies the pathogenesis in chronic pain, a cold pressor test that indirectly stimulates such control mechanisms can be added. Hence, the methods undoubtedly represent a major step forward in the future characterization and treatment of patients with various diseases of the gut, which provides knowledge to

  15. Sensory and non-sensory factors and the concept of externality in obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, R M; Brake, S J; Reyes, B; Maestas, D

    1983-08-01

    9 obese and 9 normal subjects performed a psychophysical task in which food- or non-food-related stimuli were briefly flashed tachistoscopically at a speed and intensity near the visual threshold. A signal was presented on one-half the trials and noise only on the other one-half of the trials. Using signal detection theory methodology, separate measures of sensory sensitivity (d') and response bias (beta) were calculated. No differences were noted between obese and normal subjects on measures of sensory sensitivity but significant differences on response bias. Obese subjects had consistently lower response criteria than normal ones. Analysis for subjects categorized by whether they were restrained or unrestrained eaters gave findings identical to those for obese and normal. The importance of using a methodology that separates sensory and non-sensory factors in research on obesity is discussed.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions MEMSA myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Myoclonic epilepsy myopathy sensory ataxia , commonly called MEMSA , is part of a group ...

  17. Sensory integration: neuronal filters for polarized light patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapp, Holger G

    2014-09-22

    Animal and human behaviour relies on local sensory signals that are often ambiguous. A new study shows how tuning neuronal responses to celestial cues helps locust navigation, demonstrating a common principle of sensory information processing: the use of matched filters.

  18. Sensory perception during sleep and meditation: common features and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveen, K V; Telles, Shirley

    2003-06-01

    Sleep and meditation are both physiological conditions in which peripheral sensory input is voluntarily reduced, but sensory perception of internally generated information continues. However, the two conditions differ in the level of awareness retained.

  19. Sensory integration therapy for autism spectrum disorders: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lang, R.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Healy, O.; Rispoli, M.; Lydon, H.; Streusand, W.; Davis, T.; Kang, S.Y.; Sigafoos, J.; Lancioni, G.E.; Didden, H.C.M.; Giesbers, S.A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Intervention studies involving the use of sensory integration therapy (SIT) were systematically identified and analyzed. Twenty-five studies were described in terms of: (a) participant characteristics, (b) assessments used to identify sensory deficits or behavioral functions, (c) dependent variables

  20. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions HSAN5 hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Description Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type V ( HSAN5 ) is a condition that primarily affects the ...

  1. Comment entrainer la memoire sensorielle (How to Train Sensory Memory).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorca, Regine

    1993-01-01

    At the University of Queensland (Australia), second-language instruction techniques involving principles of sensory training are being used experimentally. The method promotes sensory integration of speech events through auditory, visual, and kinesthetic memory. (MSE)

  2. Identification of an Algae-lysing Bacterium of Anabaena flosaquae and Primary Research on Their Relationship%一株水华鱼腥藻溶藻菌的分离鉴定及菌藻关系初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶姜瑜; 钟以蓉; 俞岚; 李文娟

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to explore the relationship between alage-lysing bacterium and Anabaena flosaquae so as to provide reference for the control of bloom. [Method] An algae-lysing bacterium strain named S7 was isolated from eutrophic river. The lytic efficiency and performing mode of S7 strain to Anabaena flosaquae was studied. Influence of different environmental factors and the relationship between S7 strain and Anabaena flosaquae was also studied, and then the bacterium strain was physiologically identified. [ Result] More than 90% of Anabaena flosaquae had been removed by 7 d when the volume ratio of medium to algae solution was 30% , the pH was 9 and the temperature was 35 ℃. These results also showed that a mutual inhibit relationship existed between S7 strain and Anabaena flosaquae. The S7 strain killed the algae by indirectly through certain lytic agents in absence of direct contact with the target but by secreting metabolites. Moreover, these lytic agents also had the thermostability. 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that S7 strain belonged to Chryseobactenum sp.. [Conclusion] The examine Poly-p proved that S7 strain was polyphosphate accumulating bacteria(PAOs) and produced better lytic efficiency.%[目的]研究溶藻特性及菌藻关系,为进一步研究溶藻细菌对水华的治理作用提供帮助.[方法]从富营养化水体中分离得到一株有高效溶藻效果的菌株(S7),研究了其对水华鱼腥藻(Anabaena flosaquae)的抑制效果、作用方式和不同环境因子对溶藻效果的影响,以及菌藻关系,并对菌株进行了菌体Poly-p染色、革兰氏染色和分子鉴定.[结果]菌株投加量为藻波量的30%时,7d叶绿素a的去除率达到90%以上.pH为9、温度35℃下藻的去除率最高.S7菌株与水华鱼腥藻形成竞争共栖的生态关系,并通过分泌溶藻物质间接抑制水华鱼腥藻生长,且该物质具有一定的热稳定性.根据生理生化及16S rDNA序列分析鉴定,S7

  3. Sensory Neuron-Specific Deletion of TRPA1 Results in Mechanical Cutaneous Sensory Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The nonselective cation channel transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is known to be a key contributor to both somatosensation and pain. Recent studies have implicated TRPA1 in additional physiologic functions and have also suggested that TRPA1 is expressed in nonneuronal tissues. Thus, it has become necessary to resolve the importance of TRPA1 expressed in primary sensory neurons, particularly since previous research has largely used global knock-out animals and chemical TRPA1 antagonists. We therefore sought to isolate the physiological relevance of TRPA1 specifically within sensory neurons. To accomplish this, we used Advillin-Cre mice, in which the promoter for Advillin is used to drive expression of Cre recombinase specifically within sensory neurons. These Advillin-Cre mice were crossed with Trpa1fl/fl mice to generate sensory neuron-specific Trpa1 knock-out mice. Here, we show that tissue-specific deletion of TRPA1 from sensory neurons produced strong deficits in behavioral sensitivity to mechanical stimulation, while sensitivity to cold and heat stimuli remained intact. The mechanical sensory deficit was incomplete compared to the mechanosensory impairment of TRPA1 global knock-out mice, in line with the incomplete (∼80%) elimination of TRPA1 from sensory neurons in the tissue-specific Advillin-Cre knock-out mice. Equivalent findings were observed in tissue-specific knock-out animals originating from two independently-generated Advillin-Cre lines. As such, our results show that sensory neuron TRPA1 is required for mechanical, but not cold, responsiveness in noninjured skin.

  4. Mechanism of Spectral Tuning Going from Retinal in Vacuo to Bovine Rhodopsin and its Mutants: Multireference ab initio Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Ahmet; Yokoyama, Shozo

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated photoabsorption spectra of bovine rhodopsin and its mutants (E122Q and E113Q) by hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations as well as retinal in vacuo by pure QM calculations, employing multireference (MR) ab initio and TD-B3LYP methods. The sophisticated MR-SORCI+Q and MRCISD+Q methods extrapolated with respect to adopted approximations can reproduce the experimental absorption maxima of retinal very well. The relatively inexpensive MR-DDCI2+Q method gives absorption maxima blue-shifted by ca. 65 nm from experimental values; however, this error is systematic and thus MR-DDCI2+Q can be used to estimate spectral shifts. In MR calculations, the ground state energy of retinal at B3LYP geometry is significantly lower than that at CASSCF geometry. Therefore, B3LYP geometry is more reliable than CASSCF geometry, which has blue-shift error as large as 100 nm in the gas phase. The effect of ground state geometry on the excitation energies is less critical in the polarizing field of protein environments. At the B3LYP geometry, there is no significant charge transfer upon vertical excitation to the S1 excited state either from Glu113 to retinal or from Schiff-base terminal to β-ionone ring through the polyene chain. All-trans to 11-cis isomerization of retinal in the gas phase has no influence on the calculated S1 absorbing state, in agreement with experiment. The shoulder of the experimental absorption spectrum of retinal in vacuo at the S1 absorbing band appears to be the second electronic transition (S2) in our calculations, contrary to previous tentative assignment to vibrational state of S1 or to the S1 band of a retinal isomer. PMID:19367945

  5. Glia Are Essential for Sensory Organ Function in C. elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Bacaj, Taulant; Tevlin, Maya; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai

    2008-01-01

    Sensory organs are composed of neurons, which convert environmental stimuli to electrical signals, and glia-like cells, whose functions are not well-understood. To decipher glial roles in sensory organs, we ablated the sheath glial cell of the major sensory organ of Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that glia-ablated animals exhibit profound sensory deficits and that glia provide activities that affect neuronal morphology, behavior generation, and neuronal uptake of lipophilic dyes. To underst...

  6. Haptic wearables as sensory replacement, sensory augmentation and trainer - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Peter B; Damian, Dana D

    2015-07-20

    Sensory impairments decrease quality of life and can slow or hinder rehabilitation. Small, computationally powerful electronics have enabled the recent development of wearable systems aimed to improve function for individuals with sensory impairments. The purpose of this review is to synthesize current haptic wearable research for clinical applications involving sensory impairments. We define haptic wearables as untethered, ungrounded body worn devices that interact with skin directly or through clothing and can be used in natural environments outside a laboratory. Results of this review are categorized by degree of sensory impairment. Total impairment, such as in an amputee, blind, or deaf individual, involves haptics acting as sensory replacement; partial impairment, as is common in rehabilitation, involves haptics as sensory augmentation; and no impairment involves haptics as trainer. This review found that wearable haptic devices improved function for a variety of clinical applications including: rehabilitation, prosthetics, vestibular loss, osteoarthritis, vision loss and hearing loss. Future haptic wearables development should focus on clinical needs, intuitive and multimodal haptic displays, low energy demands, and biomechanical compliance for long-term usage.

  7. Effect of commonly used herbicide bensulfuron methyl on the growth of Anabaena azotica%常用除草剂苄嘧磺隆对固氮鱼腥藻的生长效应研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭利利; 陈侠桦; 黄荣松; 沈健英

    2015-01-01

    Effects of 10% bensulfuron methyl WP on the growth and photosynthetic pigment of Anabaena azotica were determined to explore its ecological toxicity.The results indicated that under low concentration (<0.1 mg/L),bensulfuron methyl could stimulate the growth of Anabaena azotica,the dry weight and cell num-ber showed a steady growth trend,but there was no significant effect on the content of photosynthetic pigment. High concentration of bensulfuron methyl (1 mg/L and 10 mg/L)inhibited the growth of Anabaena azotica signifi-cantly,and they had a clear effect on the growth rate,dry weight,cell number and photosynthetic pigment.%测定了10%苄嘧磺隆可湿性粉剂对固氮鱼腥藻的生长效应以及光合色素的影响,探究其生态毒性。结果表明:低质量浓度处理下(<0.1 mg/L),苄嘧磺隆刺激固氮鱼腥藻的生长,使其干重和细胞数呈现稳步增长趋势,对光合色素含量影响不显著。高质量浓度苄嘧磺隆(1 mg/L 和10 mg/L)显著抑制固氮鱼腥藻的生长,对其生长速率、干重、细胞数及光合色素等产生明显的影响。

  8. Sensory Pedagogy: Understanding and Encountering Children through the Senses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Eva; Løkken, Gunvor

    2014-01-01

    In the present article we aim to explore the link between Merleau-Pontyan phenomenology and what we call sensory pedagogy. The latter connects to recent sensory ethnography as presented by S. Pink ("Sensory ethnography." London: Sage; 2009). We discuss how these thoughts can be put to work in toddler pedagogy. This kind of sensory…

  9. ONE CASE REPORT OF PURE SENSORY GUILLAIN-BARRE SYNDROME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨咏梅; 夏中信; 魏岗之

    2004-01-01

    @@ The existence of purely sensory form of GuillianBarre syndrome is still subject to controversy. We report the case of patient who was admitted in our hospital in October, 1999 and had acute sensory neuropathy which, due to its clinicial, cerebrospinal fluid and electrophysiological characteristics, may be considered a sensory form of Guillain-Barre syndrome.

  10. Sensory Processing Subtypes in Autism: Association with Adaptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Alison E.; Young, Robyn L.; Baker, Amy E. Z.; Angley, Manya T.

    2010-01-01

    Children with autism are frequently observed to experience difficulties in sensory processing. This study examined specific patterns of sensory processing in 54 children with autistic disorder and their association with adaptive behavior. Model-based cluster analysis revealed three distinct sensory processing subtypes in autism. These subtypes…

  11. Brief Report: Further Evidence of Sensory Subtypes in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Alison E.; Dennis, Simon J.; Geraghty, Maureen E.

    2011-01-01

    Distinct sensory processing (SP) subtypes in autism have been reported previously. This study sought to replicate the previous findings in an independent sample of thirty children diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. Model-based cluster analysis of parent-reported sensory functioning (measured using the Short Sensory Profile) confirmed the…

  12. Describing the Sensory Abnormalities of Children and Adults with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leekam, Susan R.; Nieto, Carmen; Libby, Sarah J.; Wing, Lorna; Gould, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Patterns of sensory abnormalities in children and adults with autism were examined using the Diagnostic Interview for Social and Communication Disorders (DISCO). This interview elicits detailed information about responsiveness to a wide range of sensory stimuli. Study 1 showed that over 90% of children with autism had sensory abnormalities and had…

  13. Characterization of nifB, nifS, and nifU genes in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis: NifB is required for the vanadium-dependent nitrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, E M; Thiel, T.

    1995-01-01

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a heterotrophic, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium containing both a Mo-dependent nitrogenase encoded by the nif genes and V-dependent nitrogenase encoded by the vnf genes. The nifB, nifS, and nifU genes of A. variabilis were cloned, mapped, and partially sequenced. The fdxN gene was between nifB and nifS. Growth and acetylene reduction assays using wild-type and mutant strains indicated that the nifB product (NifB) was required for nitrogen fixation not only by...

  14. 转人粒细胞集落刺激因子(hG-CSF)基因的鱼腥藻的构建%Construction of Anabaena Transferred the Gene Encoding the Human Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈翠丽; 施定基

    2005-01-01

    本研究目的是构建转G-CSF基因的工程鱼腥藻Anabaena sp..首先将b型G-CSF克隆于中间载体pRL 439和穿梭表达载体pDC-8上.通过三亲接合转移将穿梭表达载体pDCG-CSF转入鱼腥藻内.通过PCR扩增的方法在转基因鱼腥藻中检测到G-CSF基因的存在.

  15. Sensory deprivation disrupts homeostatic regeneration of newly generated olfactory sensory neurons after injury in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuta, Shu; Sakamoto, Takashi; Nagayama, Shin; Kanaya, Kaori; Kinoshita, Makoto; Kondo, Kenji; Tsunoda, Koichi; Mori, Kensaku; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-02-11

    Although it is well known that injury induces the generation of a substantial number of new olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the adult olfactory epithelium (OE), it is not well understood whether olfactory sensory input influences the survival and maturation of these injury-induced OSNs in adults. Here, we investigated whether olfactory sensory deprivation affected the dynamic incorporation of newly generated OSNs 3, 7, 14, and 28 d after injury in adult mice. Mice were unilaterally deprived of olfactory sensory input by inserting a silicone tube into their nostrils. Methimazole, an olfactotoxic drug, was also injected intraperitoneally to bilaterally ablate OSNs. The OE was restored to its preinjury condition with new OSNs by day 28. No significant differences in the numbers of olfactory marker protein-positive mature OSNs or apoptotic OSNs were observed between the deprived and nondeprived sides 0-7 d after injury. However, between days 7 and 28, the sensory-deprived side showed markedly fewer OSNs and mature OSNs, but more apoptotic OSNs, than the nondeprived side. Intrinsic functional imaging of the dorsal surface of the olfactory bulb at day 28 revealed that responses to odor stimulation were weaker in the deprived side compared with those in the nondeprived side. Furthermore, prevention of cell death in new neurons 7-14 d after injury promoted the recovery of the OE. These results indicate that, in the adult OE, sensory deprivation disrupts compensatory OSN regeneration after injury and that newly generated OSNs have a critical time window for sensory-input-dependent survival 7-14 d after injury.

  16. Persistent Pain and Sensory Abnormalities after Abdominoplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Presman, Benjamin; Finnerup, Kenneth; Andresen, Sven Robert

    2015-01-01

    University Hospital, Denmark. The questionnaire included questions about pain and sensory abnormalities located to the abdominal skin, and physical and psychological function; patient satisfaction with surgery was rated on a 4-point scale. RESULTS: One hundred seventy patients answered the questionnaire......%) patients. The majority of patients reported improvement on all physical and psychological factors. Patients with pain were more often disappointed with the surgery and unwilling to recommend the surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, patients were satisfied with the procedure, although abnormal abdominal skin....... Fourteen patients (8.2%) reported pain within the past 7 days related to the abdominoplasty. Abnormal abdominal skin sensation was common and reported by 138 patients (81%). Sensory hypersensitivity was associated with the presence of persistent pain. Satisfaction with the procedure was reported by 149 (88...

  17. Overlapping Structures in Sensory-Motor Mappings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earland, Kevin; Lee, Mark; Shaw, Patricia; Law, James

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a biologically-inspired representation technique designed for the support of sensory-motor learning in developmental robotics. An interesting feature of the many topographic neural sheets in the brain is that closely packed receptive fields must overlap in order to fully cover a spatial region. This raises interesting scientific questions with engineering implications: e.g. is overlap detrimental? does it have any benefits? This paper examines the effects and properties of overlap between elements arranged in arrays or maps. In particular we investigate how overlap affects the representation and transmission of spatial location information on and between topographic maps. Through a series of experiments we determine the conditions under which overlap offers advantages and identify useful ranges of overlap for building mappings in cognitive robotic systems. Our motivation is to understand the phenomena of overlap in order to provide guidance for application in sensory-motor learning robots. PMID:24392118

  18. Size structures sensory hierarchy in ocean life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Erik Andreas; Wadhwa, Navish; Jacobsen, Nis Sand

    2015-01-01

    the use of remote sensing. In this study, we explore how sensing mode and range depend on body size. We reveal a hierarchy of sensing modes (chemosensing, mechanosensing, vision, hearing, and echolocation) where body size determines the available battery of sensing modes and where larger body size means...... a longer sensing range. The size-dependent hierarchy and the transitions between primary sensory modes are explained on the grounds of limiting factors set by physiology and the physical laws governing signal generation, transmission and reception. We characterize the governing mechanisms and theoretically...... predict the body size limits for various sensory modes, which align very well with size ranges found in literature. The treatise of all ocean life, from unicellular organisms to whales, demonstrates how body size determines available sensing modes, and thereby acts as a major structuring factor of aquatic...

  19. The role of sensory cortex in behavioral flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lan; Ponvert, Nicholas D; Jaramillo, Santiago

    2017-03-14

    To thrive in a changing environment, organisms evolved strategies for rapidly modifying their behavioral responses to sensory stimuli. In this review, we investigate the role of sensory cortical circuits in these flexible behaviors. First, we provide a framework for classifying tasks in which flexibility is required. We then present studies in animal models which demonstrate that responses of sensory cortical neurons depend on the expected outcome associated with a stimulus. Last, we discuss inactivation studies which indicate that sensory cortex facilitates behavioral flexibility, but is not always required for adapting to changes in environmental conditions. This analysis provides insights into the contributions of cortical and subcortical sensory circuits to flexibility in behavior.

  20. Formation of glutamine from [13n]ammonia, [13n]dinitrogen, and [14C]glutamate by heterocysts isolated from Anabaena cylindrica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J; Meeks, J C; Wolk, C P; Shaffer, P W; Austin, S M

    1977-03-01

    A method is described for the isolation of metabolically active heterocysts from Anabaena cylindrica. These isolated heterocysts accounted for up to 34% of the acetylene-reducing activity of whole filaments and had a specific activity of up to 1,560 nmol of C2H4 formed per mg of heterocyst chlorphyll per min. Activity of glutamine synthetase was coupled to activity of nitrogenase in isolated heterocysts as shown by acetylene-inhibitable formation of [13N]NH3 and of amidelabeled [13N]glutamine form [13N]N2. A method is also described for the production of 6-mCi amounts of [13N]NH3. Isolated heterocysts formed [13N]glutamine from [13N]NH3 and glutamate, and [14C]glutamine from NH3 and [14C]glutamate, in the presence of magnesium adenosine 5'-triphosphate. Methionine sulfoximine strongly inhibited these syntheses. Glutamate synthase is, after nitrogenase and glutamine synthetase, the third sequential enzyme involved in the assimilation of N2 by intact filaments. However, the kinetics of solubilization of the activity of glutamate synthase during cavitation of suspensions of A. cylindrica indicated that very little, if any, of the activity of that enzyme was located in heterocysts. Concordantly, isolated heterocysts failed to form substantial amounts of radioactive glutamate from either [13N]glutamine or alph-[14C]ketoglutarate in the presence of other substrates and cofactors of the glutamate synthase reaction. However, they formed [14C]glutamate rapidly from alpha-[14C]ketoglutarate by aminotransferase reactions, with various amino acids as the nitrogen donor. The implication of these findings with regard to the identities of the substances moving between heterocysts and vegetative cells are discussed.

  1. Increased heterocyst frequency by patN disruption in Anabaena leads to enhanced photobiological hydrogen production at high light intensity and high cell density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masukawa, Hajime; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Hausinger, Robert P; Inoue, Kazuhito

    2017-03-01

    The effects of increasing the heterocyst-to-vegetative cell ratio on the nitrogenase-based photobiological hydrogen production by the filamentous heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 were studied. Using the uptake hydrogenase-disrupted mutant (ΔHup) as the parent, a deletion-insertion mutant (PN1) was created in patN, known to be involved in heterocyst pattern formation and leading to multiple singular heterocysts (MSH) in Nostoc punctiforme strain ATCC 29133. The PN1 strain showed heterocyst differentiation but failed to grow in medium free of combined-nitrogen; however, a spontaneous mutant (PN22) was obtained on prolonged incubation of PN1 liquid cultures and was able to grow robustly on N2. The disruption of patN was confirmed in both PN1 and PN22 by PCR and whole genome resequencing. Under combined-nitrogen limitation, the percentage of heterocysts to total cells in the PN22 filaments was 13-15 and 16-18% under air and 1% CO2-enriched air, respectively, in contrast to the parent ΔHup which formed 6.5-11 and 9.7-13% heterocysts in these conditions. The PN22 strain exhibited a MSH phenotype, normal diazotrophic growth, and higher H2 productivity at high cell concentrations, and was less susceptible to photoinhibition by strong light than the parent ΔHup strain, resulting in greater light energy utilization efficiency in H2 production on a per unit area basis under high light conditions. The increase in MSH frequency shown here appears to be a viable strategy for enhancing H2 productivity by outdoor cultures of cyanobacteria in high-light environments.

  2. Transcriptional dynamics of developmental genes assessed with an FMN-dependent fluorophore in mature heterocysts of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videau, Patrick; Oshiro, Reid T; Cozy, Loralyn M; Callahan, Sean M

    2014-09-01

    Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is a filamentous cyanobacterium that differentiates nitrogen-fixing heterocysts when available combined nitrogen is limiting. Growth under diazotrophic conditions results in a mixture of 'new' (recently differentiated) and 'old' (mature) heterocysts. The microoxic environment present in heterocysts makes the interpretation of gene expression using oxygen-dependent fluorophores, including GFP, difficult. The work presented here evaluates the transcriptional dynamics of three developmental genes in mature heterocysts utilizing EcFbFP, a flavin mononucleotide-dependent fluorophore, as the reporter. Expression of both GFP and EcFbFP from the heterologous petE promoter showed that, although GFP and EcFbFP fluoresced in both vegetative cells and new heterocysts, only EcFbFP fluoresced in old heterocysts. A transcriptional fusion of EcFbFP to the late-stage heterocyst-specific nifB promoter displayed continued expression beyond the cessation of GFP fluorescence in heterocysts. Promoter fusions of the master regulator of differentiation, hetR, and its inhibitors, patS and hetN, to GFP and EcFbFP were visualized to determine their role(s) in heterocyst function after morphogenesis. The expression of hetR and hetN was found to persist beyond the completion of development in most heterocysts, whereas patS expression ceased. These data are consistent with a model of heterocyst patterning in which patS is involved in de novo pattern formation, hetN is required for pattern maintenance, and hetR is needed for all stages of development.

  3. Relationships between the ABC-exporter HetC and peptides that regulate the spatiotemporal pattern of heterocyst distribution in Anabaena.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Corrales-Guerrero

    Full Text Available In the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, cells called heterocysts that are specialized in the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen differentiate from vegetative cells of the filament in the absence of combined nitrogen. Heterocysts follow a specific distribution pattern along the filament, and a number of regulators have been identified that influence the heterocyst pattern. PatS and HetN, expressed in the differentiating cells, inhibit the differentiation of neighboring cells. At least PatS appears to be processed and transferred from cell to cell. HetC is similar to ABC exporters and is required for differentiation. We present an epistasis analysis of these regulatory genes and of genes, hetP and asr2819, successively downstream from hetC, and we have studied the localization of HetC and HetP by use of GFP fusions. Inactivation of patS, but not of hetN, allowed differentiation to proceed in a hetC background, whereas inactivation of hetC in patS or patS hetN backgrounds decreased the frequency of contiguous proheterocysts. A HetC-GFP protein is localized to the heterocysts and especially near their cell poles, and a putative HetC peptidase domain was required for heterocyst differentiation but not for HetC-GFP localization. hetP is also required for heterocyst differentiation. A HetP-GFP protein localized mostly near the heterocyst poles. ORF asr2819, which we denote patC, encodes an 84-residue peptide and is induced upon nitrogen step-down. Inactivation of patC led to a late spreading of the heterocyst pattern. Whereas HetC and HetP appear to have linked functions that allow heterocyst differentiation to progress, PatC may have a role in selecting sites of differentiation, suggesting that these closely positioned genes may be functionally related.

  4. Detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the oxidant-sensing probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Rajesh P. [Department of Biology, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Staudtstrasse 5, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Laboratory of Photobiology and Molecular Microbiology, Centre of Advanced Study in Botany, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Singh, Shailendra P.; Haeder, Donat-P. [Department of Biology, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Staudtstrasse 5, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Sinha, Rajeshwar P., E-mail: r.p.sinha@gmx.net [Laboratory of Photobiology and Molecular Microbiology, Centre of Advanced Study in Botany, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2010-07-02

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under simulated solar radiation (UV-B: 0.30 Wm{sup -2}, UV-A: 25.70 Wm{sup -2} and PAR: 118.06 Wm{sup -2}) was studied in the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis PCC 7937 using the oxidant-sensing fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). DCFH-DA is a nonpolar dye, converted into the polar derivative DCFH by cellular esterases that are nonfluorescent but switched to highly fluorescent DCF when oxidized by intracellular ROS and other peroxides. The images obtained from the fluorescence microscope after 12 h of irradiation showed green fluorescence from cells covered with 295, 320 or 395 nm cut-off filters, indicating the generation of ROS in all treatments. However, the green/red fluorescence ratio obtained from fluorescence microscopic analysis showed the highest generation of ROS after UV-B radiation in comparison to PAR or UV-A radiation. Production of ROS was also measured by a spectrofluorophotometer and results obtained supported the results of fluorescence microscopy. Low levels of ROS were detected at the start (0 h) of the experiment showing that they are generated even during normal metabolism. This study also showed that UV-B radiation causes the fragmentation of the cyanobacterial filaments which could be due to the observed oxidative stress. This is the first report for the detection of intracellular ROS in a cyanobacterium by fluorescence microscopy using DCFH-DA and thereby suggesting the applicability of this method in the study of in vivo generation of ROS.

  5. Origins of the sensory examination in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Cassiopeia; Okun, Michael S

    2002-12-01

    Formal testing of sensation as part of the neurological examination followed the improvements in examination techniques as well as advances in neuroscience. By the 1890s, the observation that temperature sense was frequently impaired at the same time that pain was appreciated led to the supposition that the two paths traveled closely. Through the works of Brown-Séquard and Edinger the existence of a crossed afferent tract was verified. The distinction between two sensory pathways was clear by 1898, when van Gehuchten reported a case of syringomyelia and suggested that the pain and temperature fibers were carried anterolaterally and the position sense fibers carried posteriorly in the spinal cord. Many authors describing patients with tabes dorsalis suspected the posterior columns of the spinal cord played a key role in position sense. It is difficult to determine in the 19th century who first employed the use of movements of joints as a test for proprioceptive function; however, Bell in 1826 recognized what he termed a sixth sense, which later was characterized as proprioceptive function. Goldscheider went on to report the degrees of movement that were considered normal for each joint. Although vibratory sense had been described by Cardano and Ingrassia in the 16th century and tests had been developed by Rinne and Rumpf by the 19th century, it was not until 1903 that Rydel and Seiffer found that vibratory sense and proprioceptive sense were closely related and that both senses were carried in the posterior columns of the spinal cord. By 1955, the sensory examination included tests for light-touch, superficial pain, temperature, position sense, vibration, muscle (deep pain), and two-point discrimination. Tests for these sensibilities still remain in use. We will review the origins of the understanding of sensation, which ultimately led to the development of the sensory examination. We will highlight individuals who made important discoveries and observations, as

  6. Modeling diabetic sensory neuropathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Nigel A

    2004-01-01

    The procedures to induce insulin-deficient diabetes in rats using streptozotocin are described along with a number of insulin treatment regimes that can be used to maintain these animals at different degrees of glycemia for periods of weeks to months. Streptozotocin-diabetic rats develop tactile allodynia, hyperalgesia following paw formalin injection and abnormal responses to thermal stimulation and the detailed methods used to evaluate these behavioral indices of abnormal sensory function are provided.

  7. Sensory evaluation of rice fortified with iron

    OpenAIRE

    Beinner,Mark Anthony; Soares,Anne Danieli Nascimento; Barros,Ana Laura Antunes; Monteiro,Marlene Azevedo Magalhães

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine sensory differences between conventional rice and iron-fortified Ultra Rice rice (UR) and determine consumer acceptance. Differences between both types of rice were analyzed using the Duo-Trio Test on 37 non-trained judges. The Acceptance Test evaluated general rice appearance, color, aroma and taste by 43 non-trained judges, using a 7-point hedonic scale with extremes ranging from "really disliked" and "really liked." There were no significant diffe...

  8. Pure Sensory Stroke due to Lenticulocapsular Hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨益阶; 王国瑾; 潘松青

    2003-01-01

    @@ Pure sensory stroke (PSS) caused by lenticulo-capsular hemorrhage is rare. In this article, we re-ported 4 patients with PSS due to lenticulocapsularhemorrhage, including 3 men and 1 woman (mean age,58 years; range, 54 to 65 years), whose lesions couldbe identified by head computed tomographic (CT)scan and clinical findings correlated with the radio-logical lesions. All patients except 1 had hyperten-sion.

  9. Sensory neuropathy with low-dose pyridoxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, G J; Bredesen, D E

    1985-10-01

    We describe 16 patients with neuropathy associated with pyridoxine abuse. The clinical picture of a pure sensory central-peripheral distal axonopathy was consistent. Pyridoxine dose was 0.2 to 5 g/d, and duration of consumption before symptoms was inversely proportional to the daily intake. In all patients with adequate follow-up, improvement followed discontinuation of pyridoxine. The ready availability of up to 1-gram tablets makes it likely that this neuropathy will continue to be seen.

  10. Sensory shelf life of dulce de leche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garitta, L; Hough, G; Sánchez, R

    2004-06-01

    The objectives of this research were to determine the sensory cutoff points for dulce de leche (DL) critical descriptors, both for defective off-flavors and for storage changes in desirable attributes, and to estimate the shelf life of DL as a function of storage temperature. The critical descriptors used to determine the cutoff points were plastic flavor, burnt flavor, dark color, and spreadability. Linear correlations between sensory acceptability and trained panel scores were used to determine the sensory failure cutoff point for each descriptor. To estimate shelf life, DL samples were stored at 25, 37, and 45 degrees C. Plastic flavor was the first descriptor to reach its cutoff point at 25 degrees C and was used for shelf-life calculations. Plastic flavor vs. storage time followed zero-order reaction rate. Shelf-life estimations at different temperatures were 109 d at 25 degrees C, 53 d at 37 degrees C, and 9 d at 45 degrees C. The activation energy, necessary to calculate shelf lives at different temperatures, was 14,370 +/- 2080 cal/mol.

  11. Sensory brain areas in mesopelagic fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, H J

    2001-03-01

    Four areas of the brain that receive primary projections from chemical senses ([1] olfactory bulb, [2] facial and vagal lobes), the eye ([3] optic tectum), and somato- and mechanosensory systems such as the lateral line, vestibular and auditory systems ([4] trigeminal and octavolateral regions) have been studied and relative size differences used to deduce the sensory specializations of 67 species of mesopelagic fishes. One type of analysis used the average relative volumes of brain areas and identified 'specialists' with only one brain area above-average (36%), species 'dominated' by two sensory brain regions (49%), and generalists (15%), with three areas above-average. In addition, a cluster analysis was performed that separated 49 species which were mostly visually oriented from 18 non-visual species, among which 16 were characterized by an association of above-average trigeminal/octavolateral and gustatory areas, and a single species with a dominant olfactory bulb. The results support the idea that these species occupy a rich sensory environment for which the absence of sunlight is compensated by chemical and mechanosensory stimuli as well as by bioluminescent signals. This has lead to the development of specializations for the perception of single stimulus-modes, most notably for the visual system, as well as for combinations of various receptors and central processing areas, with a preference for associating either the chemical senses, including the olfactory and facial/vagal systems, or the trigeminal/octavolateral systems.

  12. Desynchronizing Electrical and Sensory Coordinated Reset Neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr V. Popovych

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Coordinated reset (CR stimulation is a desynchronizing stimulation technique based on timely coordinated phase resets of sub-populations of a synchronized neuronal ensemble. It has initially been computationally developed for electrical deep brain stimulation (DBS,to enable an effective desynchronization and unlearning of pathological synchrony and connectivity (anti-kindling. Here we computationally show for ensembles of spiking and bursting model neurons interacting via excitatory and inhibitory adaptive synapses that a phase reset of neuronal populations as well as a desynchronization and an anti-kindling can robustly be achieved by direct electrical stimulation or indirect (synaptically-mediated excitatory and inhibitory stimulation.Our findings are relevant for DBS as well as for sensory stimulation in neurological disorders characterized by pathological neuronalsynchrony. Based on the obtained results, we may expect that the local effects in the vicinity of a depth electrode (realized by direct stimulation of the neurons' somata or stimulation of axon terminals and the non-local CR effects (realized by stimulation of excitatory or inhibitory efferent fibers of deep brain CR neuromodulation may be similar or even identical. Furthermore, ourresults indicate that an effective desynchronization and anti-kindlingcan even be achieved by non-invasive, sensory CR neuromodulation. We discuss the concept of sensory CR neuromodulation in the context of neurological disorders.

  13. Influence of Sensory Dependence on Postural Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Patricia A.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Fiedler, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    The current project is part of an NSBRI funded project, "Development of Countermeasures to Aid Functional Egress from the Crew Exploration Vehicle Following Long-Duration Spaceflight." The development of this countermeasure is based on the use of imperceptible levels of electrical stimulation to the balance organs of the inner ear to assist and enhance the response of a person s sensorimotor function. These countermeasures could be used to increase an astronaut s re-adaptation rate to Earth s gravity following long-duration space flight. The focus of my project is to evaluate and examine the correlation of sensory preferences for vision and vestibular systems. Disruption of the sensorimotor functions following space flight affects posture, locomotion and spatial orientation tasks in astronauts. The Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT), the Rod and Frame Test (RFT) and the Computerized Dynamic Posturography Test (CDP) are measurements used to examine subjects visual and vestibular sensory preferences. The analysis of data from these tasks will assist in relating the visual dependence measures recognized in the GEFT and RFT with vestibular dependence measures recognized in the stability measures obtained during CDP. Studying the impact of sensory dependence on the performance in varied tasks will help in the development of targeted countermeasures to help astronauts readapt to gravitational changes after long duration space flight.

  14. Cross-modal synaptic plasticity in adult primary sensory cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hey-Kyoung; Whitt, Jessica L

    2015-12-01

    Sensory loss leads to widespread adaptation of brain circuits to allow an organism to navigate its environment with its remaining senses, which is broadly referred to as cross-modal plasticity. Such adaptation can be observed even in the primary sensory cortices, and falls into two distinct categories: recruitment of the deprived sensory cortex for processing the remaining senses, which we term 'cross-modal recruitment', and experience-dependent refinement of the spared sensory cortices referred to as 'compensatory plasticity.' Here we will review recent studies demonstrating that cortical adaptation to sensory loss involves LTP/LTD and homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Cross-modal synaptic plasticity is observed in adults, hence cross-modal sensory deprivation may be an effective way to promote plasticity in adult primary sensory cortices.

  15. What is Sensory about Multi-Sensory Enhancement of Vision by Sounds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Pérez-Bellido

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Can auditory input influence the sensory processing of visual information? Many studies have reported cross-modal enhancement in visual tasks, but the nature of such gain is still unclear. Some authors argue for ‘high-order’ expectancy or attention effects, whereas others propose ‘low-order’ stimulus-driven multisensory integration. The present study applies a psychophysical analysis of reaction time distributions in order to disentangle sensory changes from other kind of high-order (not sensory-specific effects. Observers performed a speeded simple detection task on Gabor patches of different spatial frequencies and contrasts, with and without accompanying sounds. The data were adjusted using chronometric functions in order to separate changes is sensory evidence from changes in decision or motor times. The results supported the existence of a stimulus unspecific auditory-induced enhancement in RTs across all types of visual stimuli, probably mediated by higher-order effects (eg, reduction of temporal uncertainty. Critically, we also singled out a sensory gain that was selective to low spatial frequency stimuli, highlighting the role of the magno-cellular visual pathway in multisensory integration for fast detection. The present findings help clarify previous mixed findings in the area, and introduce a novel form to evaluate cross-modal enhancement.

  16. Probing how initial retinal configuration controls photochemical dynamics in retinal proteins

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    Sheves M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the initial retinal configuration and the active isomerization coordinate on the photochemistry of retinal proteins (RPs are assessed by comparing photochemical dynamics of two stable retinal ground state configurations (all-trans,15-anti vs. 13-cis,15-syn, within two RPs: Bacteriorhodopsin (BR and Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin (ASR. Hyperspectral pump-probe spectroscopy shows that photochemistry starting from 13-cis retinal in both proteins is 3-10 times faster than when started in the all-trans state, suggesting that the hastening is ubiquitous to microbial RPs, regardless of their different biological functions and origin. This may also relate to the known disparity of photochemical rates between microbial RPs and visual pigments. Importance and possible underlying mechanisms are discussed as well.

  17. Evolution of a polymodal sensory response network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sternberg Paul W

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Avoidance of noxious stimuli is essential for the survival of an animal in its natural habitat. Some avoidance responses require polymodal sensory neurons, which sense a range of diverse stimuli, whereas other stimuli require a unimodal sensory neuron, which senses a single stimulus. Polymodality might have evolved to help animals quickly detect and respond to diverse noxious stimuli. Nematodes inhabit diverse habitats and most nematode nervous systems are composed of a small number of neurons, despite a wide assortment in nematode sizes. Given this observation, we speculated that cellular contribution to stereotyped avoidance behaviors would also be conserved between nematode species. The ASH neuron mediates avoidance of three classes of noxious stimuli in Caenorhabditis elegans. Two species of parasitic nematodes also utilize the ASH neuron to avoid certain stimuli. We wanted to extend our knowledge of avoidance behaviors by comparing multiple stimuli in a set of free-living nematode species. Results We used comparative behavioral analysis and laser microsurgery to examine three avoidance behaviors in six diverse species of free-living nematodes. We found that all species tested exhibit avoidance of chemo-, mechano- and osmosensory stimuli. In C. elegans, the bilaterally symmetric polymodal ASH neurons detect all three classes of repellant. We identified the putative ASH neurons in different nematode species by their anatomical positions and showed that in all six species ablation of the ASH neurons resulted in an inability to avoid noxious stimuli. However, in the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, the ADL neuron in addition to the ASH neuron contributed to osmosensation. In the species Caenorhabditis sp. 3, only the ASH neuron was required to mediate nose touch avoidance instead of three neurons in C. elegans. These data suggest that different species can increase or decrease the contribution of additional, non-ASH sensory

  18. Evidence that the hanA gene coding for HU protein is essential for heterocyst differentiation in, and cyanophage A-4(L) sensitivity of, Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudyakov, I; Wolk, C P

    1996-06-01

    The highly pleiotropic, transposon-generated mutant AB22 of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 exhibits slow growth, altered pigmentation, cellular fragility, resistance to phage A-4(L), and the inability to differentiate heterocysts. Reconstruction of the transposon mutation in the wild-type strain reproduced the phenotype of the original mutant. Sequencing of the flanking DNA showed that the transposon had inserted at the beginning of a gene, which we call hanA, that encodes Anabaena HU protein (R. Nagaraja and R. Haselkorn, Biochimie 76:1082-1089, 1994). Mapping of the transposon insertion by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that hanA is located at ca. 4.76 Mb on the physical map of the chromosome and is transcribed clockwise. Repeated subculturing of AB22 resulted in improved growth and loss of filament fragmentation, presumably because of one or more compensatory mutations; however, the mutant retained its A-4(L)r Het- phenotype. The mutation in strain AB22 could be complemented by a fragment of wild-type DNA bearing hanA as its only open reading frame.

  19. NrrA directly regulates expression of the fraF gene and antisense RNAs for fraE in the heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehira, Shigeki; Ohmori, Masayuki

    2014-05-01

    The heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 grows as linear multicellular filaments that can contain hundreds of cells. Heterocysts, which are specialized cells for nitrogen fixation, are regularly intercalated among photosynthetic vegetative cells, and these cells are metabolically dependent on each other. Thus, multicellularity is essential for diazotrophic growth of heterocystous cyanobacteria. In Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the fraF gene, which is required to limit filament length, is induced by nitrogen deprivation. The fraF transcripts extend to the fraE gene, which lies on the opposite DNA strand and could possess dual functionality, mRNAs for fraF and antisense RNAs for fraE. In the present study, we found that NrrA, a nitrogen-regulated response regulator, directly regulated expression of fraF. Induction of fraF by nitrogen deprivation was abolished by the nrrA disruption. NrrA specifically bound to the promoter region of fraF, and recognized an inverted repeat sequence. Thus, it is concluded that NrrA controls expression of mRNAs for fraF and antisense RNAs for fraE in response to nitrogen deprivation.

  20. Mutation of sepJ reduces the intercellular signal range of a hetN-dependent paracrine signal, but not of a patS-dependent signal, in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Orion S; Videau, Patrick; Callahan, Sean M

    2014-12-01

    Formation and maintenance of a periodic pattern of nitrogen-fixing cells called heterocysts by the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is dependent on regulators encoded by patS and hetN. In this study, genetic mosaic filaments that consisted of cells engineered to produce one of the developmental regulators flanked by target cells capable of reporting the activity of the developmental regulator were used to investigate the intercellular movement of patS- and hetN-dependent activity. We provide evidence that hetN encodes a paracrine signal with a signal range of several cells. The signal that moved between cells did not include the C-terminus of the annotated HetN protein as indicated by similar signal ranges from source cells expressing either hetN-YFP or hetN alone, despite a lack of intercellular exchange of the HetN-YFP fusion protein. Deletion of sepJ, which has been shown to encode a component of intercellular channels, caused a significant decrease in the signal range of hetN expressed from source cells but not of patS. These results are consistent with symplastic transport of a paracrine hetN-dependent signal between vegetative cells of Anabaena.

  1. Pyridoxine megavitaminosis produces degeneration of peripheral sensory neurons (sensory neuronopathy) in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinke, G; Schaumburg, H H; Spencer, P S; Suter, J; Thomann, P; Hess, R

    1981-01-01

    Pyridoxine, a water-soluble vitamin, produces a sensory neuronopathy when administered in high doses to dogs. Beagles who received a daily oral dose of 300 mg/kg of pyridoxol hydrochloride developed a swaying gait within 9 days. They eventually became unable to walk, but were not weak. Animals were sacrificed at intervals up to 78 days. Morphological examination revealed widespread neuronal degeneration in the dorsal root ganglia and the Gasserian ganglia. Cytoplasmic changes were first observed after 8 days and consisted of small, electronlucent vacuoles that subsequently coalesced leading to death of the cells. Degeneration of sensory nerve fibers in peripheral nerves, dorsal columns of the spinal cord and the descending spinal tract of the trigeminal nerve was apparent. The pathogenesis of these changes is unclear, but may, in part, reflect the selective permeability of blood vessels in the peripheral ganglia. It is apparent that the peripheral neuropathy previously attributed to pyridoxine actually represents a toxic, peripheral sensory neuronopathy.

  2. 底泥对洋河水库微囊藻和鱼腥藻生长影响的研究%Effects of Sediment on the Growth of Microcystis and Anabaena in Yanghe Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    储昭升; 张玉宝; 金相灿; 徐颖; 杨红君

    2012-01-01

    Batch culture experiments were used to study the effect of leachate from sediment of Yanghe reservoir on the growth of Microcystis and Anabaena isolated from Yanghe reservoir.The results showed that the growth of Microcystis was significantly inhibited when the addition of anaerobic leachate from sediment in M11 culture medium was high(≥20% V/V).The maximum biomass of Microcystis was lower than that grown in pure M11 culture medium.But there was an obvious promotion on the growth of Anabaena when anaerobic leachate from sediment was added.The growth rate of Anabaena increased 36.6%,47.2% and 36.0%,respectively,compared to M11 culture medium when adding 2%,20% and 50%(V/V) anaerobic leachate.Compared to adding anaerobic leachate,aerobic leachate had no influence on the growth of Microcystis,while the growth rate of Anabaena was promoted by aerobic leachate.The growth rate of Anabaena increased 37.2% compared with M11 when adding 20%(V/V) of aerobic leachate.But after addition of Fe-citrate to the mixed culture medium(50% M11 culture medium +50% anaerobic leachate),the maximum biomass of Microcystis significantly increased.The results suggest that high organic matter concentration decreases iron availability for Microcystis.%采用批量培养的方法研究洋河水库底泥浸出液对洋河水库微囊藻和鱼腥藻生长的影响.结果表明,厌氧条件底泥浸出液对鱼腥藻生长速率有促进作用,添加2%、20%、50%的厌氧底泥浸出液的鱼腥藻生长速率比M11培养基中分别高出36.6%、47.2%、36.0%;而添加厌氧底泥浸出液对微囊藻生长有抑制作用,微囊藻最大生物量随底泥浸出液的添加量增加而减小.与添加厌氧底泥浸出液相比,添加好氧条件的底泥浸出液对鱼腥藻生长速率也有一定的促进作用,添加20%的好氧底泥浸出液的鱼腥藻生长速率比M11培养基中高出37.2%;而添加好氧底泥浸出液对微囊藻生长影响不明显.

  3. Identification of an Algae-lysing Bacterium of Anabaena flosaquae and Primary Research on Their Relationship%一株水华鱼腥藻溶藻菌的分离鉴定及菌藻关系初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶姜瑜; 钟以蓉; 俞岚; 李文娟

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The aim was to explore the relationship between alage-lysing bacterium and Anabaena flosaquae so as to provide reference for the control of bloom. [Method] An algae-lysing bacterium strain named S7 was isolated from eu- trophic river. The lyric efficiency and performing mode of S7 strain to Anabaena flos- aquae was studied. Influence of different environmental factors and the relationship between S7 strain and Anabaena flosaquae was also studied, and then the bacteri- um strain was physiologically identified. [Result] More than 90% of Anabaena flos- aquae had been removed by 7 d when the volume ratio of medium to algae solu- tion was 30%, the pH was 9 and the temperature was 35 ℃. These results also showed that a mutual inhibit relationship existed between S7 strain and Anabaena flos-aquae. The S7 strain killed the algae by indirectly through certain lyric agents in absence of direct contact with the target but by secreting metabolites. Moreover, these lyric agents also had the thermostability. 16SrDNA sequence analysis showed that S7 strain belonged to Chryseobacterium sp. [Conclusion] The examined Poly-p proved that S7 strain is polyphosphate accumulating bacteria (PAOs) and has better lyric efficiency.%[目的]研究溶藻特性及菌藻关系,为进一步研究溶藻细菌对水华的治理作用提供帮助。[方法]从富营养化水体中分离得到一株有高效溶藻效果的菌株(S7),研究了其对水华鱼腥藻(Anabaenaflosaquae)的抑制效果、作用方式和不同环境因子对溶藻效果的影响,以及菌藻关系,并对菌株进行了菌体Poly—P的染色、革兰氏染色和分子鉴定。【结果]菌株投加量为藻液量的30%时,7d叶绿素a的去除率达到90%以上。pH为9,温度35℃下藻的去除率最高。S7菌株与水华鱼腥藻形成竞争共栖的生态关系,并通过分泌溶藻物质间接抑制水华鱼腥藻生长,且该物质具有一定的热稳定性。根据生

  4. Sensory modulation in preterm children: Theoretical perspective and systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostrom, Kim J.; Lafeber, Harrie N.; Jansma, Elise P.; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2017-01-01

    Background Neurodevelopmental sequelae in preterm born children are generally considered to result from cerebral white matter damage and noxious effects of environmental factors in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Cerebral white matter damage is associated with sensory processing problems in terms of registration, integration and modulation. However, research into sensory processing problems and, in particular, sensory modulation problems, is scarce in preterm children. Aim This review aims to integrate available evidence on sensory modulation problems in preterm infants and children (<37 weeks of gestation) and their association with neurocognitive and behavioral problems. Method Relevant studies were extracted from PubMed, EMBASE.com and PsycINFO following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Selection criteria included assessment of sensory modulation in preterm born children (<37 weeks of gestation) or with prematurity as a risk factor. Results Eighteen studies were included. Results of this review support the presence of sensory modulation problems in preterm children. Although prematurity may distort various aspects of sensory modulation, the nature and severity of sensory modulation problems differ widely between studies. Conclusions Sensory modulation problems may play a key role in understanding neurocognitive and behavioral sequelae in preterm children. Some support is found for a dose-response relationship between both white matter brain injury and length of NICU stay and sensory modulation problems. PMID:28182680

  5. Hierarchical sparse coding in the sensory system of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslaver, Alon; Liani, Idan; Shtangel, Oshrat; Ginzburg, Shira; Yee, Lisa; Sternberg, Paul W

    2015-01-27

    Animals with compact sensory systems face an encoding problem where a small number of sensory neurons are required to encode information about its surrounding complex environment. Using Caenorhabditis elegans worms as a model, we ask how chemical stimuli are encoded by a small and highly connected sensory system. We first generated a comprehensive library of transgenic worms where each animal expresses a genetically encoded calcium indicator in individual sensory neurons. This library includes the vast majority of the sensory system in C. elegans. Imaging from individual sensory neurons while subjecting the worms to various stimuli allowed us to compile a comprehensive functional map of the sensory system at single neuron resolution. The functional map reveals that despite the dense wiring, chemosensory neurons represent the environment using sparse codes. Moreover, although anatomically closely connected, chemo- and mechano-sensory neurons are functionally segregated. In addition, the code is hierarchical, where few neurons participate in encoding multiple cues, whereas other sensory neurons are stimulus specific. This encoding strategy may have evolved to mitigate the constraints of a compact sensory system.

  6. Sensory characterization of bowel cleansing solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ala I Sharara; Hamza Daroub; Camille Georges; Rani Shayto; Ralph Nader; Jean Chalhoub; Ammar Olabi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the sensory characteristics of commercial bowel cleansing preparations.METHODS: Samples of 4 commercially available bowel cleansing preparations, namely polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution(PEG), PEG + ascorbic acid(PEG-Asc), sodium picosulfate(SPS), and oral sodium sulfate(OSS) were prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Descriptive analysis was conducted(n = 14) using a 15-cm line scale with the Compusense at-hand? sensory evaluation software. Acceptability testing(n = 80) was conducted using the 9-point hedonic scale. In addition, a Just-About-Right(JAR) scale was included for the four basic tastes to determine their intensity compatibility with acceptability levels in the products.RESULTS: Samples were significantly different, in descriptive analysis, for all attributes(P < 0.05) except for sweetness. SPS received the highest ratings for turbidity, viscosity appearance, orange odor and orange flavor; PEG-Asc for citrus odor and citrus flavor; OSS for sweetener taste, sweet aftertaste, bitterness, astringency, mouthcoating, bitter aftertaste and throatburn, and along with PEG-Asc, the highest ratings for saltiness, sourness and adhesiveness. Acceptability results showedsignificant differences between the various samples(P < 0.05). SPS received significantly higher ratings for overall acceptability, acceptability of taste, odor and mouthfeel(P < 0.05). JAR ratings showed that PEG and PEG-Asc were perceived as slightly too salty; SPS and OSS were slightly too sweet, while SPS, PEG-Asc and OSS were slightly too sour and OSS slightly too bitter. While using small sample volumes was necessary to avoid unwanted purgative effects, acceptability ratings do not reflect the true effect of large volumes intake thus limiting the generalization of the results.CONCLUSION: Further improvements are needed to enhance the sensory profile and to optimize the acceptability for better compliance with these bowel cleansing solutions.

  7. Building sensory receptors on the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Bruce; Witt, Martin

    2004-12-01

    Neurotrophins, neurotrophin receptors and sensory neurons are required for the development of lingual sense organs. For example, neurotrophin 3 sustains lingual somatosensory neurons. In the traditional view, sensory axons will terminate where neurotrophin expression is most pronounced. Yet, lingual somatosensory axons characteristically terminate in each filiform papilla and in each somatosensory prominence within a cluster of cells expressing the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), rather than terminating among the adjacent cells that secrete neurotrophin 3. The p75NTR on special specialized clusters of epithelial cells may promote axonal arborization in vivo since its over-expression by fibroblasts enhances neurite outgrowth from overlying somatosensory neurons in vitro. Two classical observations have implicated gustatory neurons in the development and maintenance of mammalian taste buds--the early arrival times of embryonic innervation and the loss of taste buds after their denervation in adults. In the modern era more than a dozen experimental studies have used early denervation or neurotrophin gene mutations to evaluate mammalian gustatory organ development. Necessary for taste organ development, brain-derived neurotrophic factor sustains developing gustatory neurons. The cardinal conclusion is readily summarized: taste buds in the palate and tongue are induced by innervation. Taste buds are unstable: the death and birth of taste receptor cells relentlessly remodels synaptic connections. As receptor cells turn over, the sensory code for taste quality is probably stabilized by selective synapse formation between each type of gustatory axon and its matching taste receptor cell. We anticipate important new discoveries of molecular interactions among the epithelium, the underlying mesenchyme and gustatory innervation that build the gustatory papillae, their specialized epithelial cells, and the resulting taste buds.

  8. Sensory-motor problems in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eWhyatt

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite being largely characterised as a social and cognitive disorder, strong evidence indicates the presence of significant sensory-motor problems in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD. This paper outlines our progression from initial, broad assessment using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (M-ABC2 to subsequent targeted kinematic assessment. In particular, pronounced ASD impairment seen in the broad categories of manual dexterity and ball skills was found to be routed in specific difficulties on isolated tasks, which were translated into focused experimental assessment. Kinematic results from both subsequent studies highlight impaired use of perception-action coupling to guide, adapt and tailor movement to task demands, resulting in inflexible and rigid motor profiles. In particular difficulties with the use of temporal adaption are shown, with hyperdexterity witnessed in ballistic movement profiles, often at the cost of spatial accuracy and task performance. By linearly progressing from the use of a standardised assessment tool to targeted kinematic assessment, clear and defined links are drawn between measureable difficulties and underlying sensory-motor assessment. Results are specifically viewed in-light of perception-action coupling and its role in early infant development suggesting that rather than being secondary level impairment, sensory-motor problems may be fundamental in the progression of ASD. This logical and systematic process thus allows a further understanding into the potential route of observable motor problems in ASD; a vital step if underlying motor problems are to be considered a fundamental aspect of autism and allow a route of non-invasive preliminary diagnosis.

  9. Sensory-motor problems in Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyatt, Caroline; Craig, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    Despite being largely characterized as a social and cognitive disorder, strong evidence indicates the presence of significant sensory-motor problems in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This paper outlines our progression from initial, broad assessment using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (M-ABC2) to subsequent targeted kinematic assessment. In particular, pronounced ASD impairment seen in the broad categories of manual dexterity and ball skills was found to be routed in specific difficulties on isolated tasks, which were translated into focused experimental assessment. Kinematic results from both subsequent studies highlight impaired use of perception-action coupling to guide, adapt and tailor movement to task demands, resulting in inflexible and rigid motor profiles. In particular difficulties with the use of temporal adaption are shown, with "hyperdexterity" witnessed in ballistic movement profiles, often at the cost of spatial accuracy and task performance. By linearly progressing from the use of a standardized assessment tool to targeted kinematic assessment, clear and defined links are drawn between measureable difficulties and underlying sensory-motor assessment. Results are specifically viewed in-light of perception-action coupling and its role in early infant development suggesting that rather than being "secondary" level impairment, sensory-motor problems may be fundamental in the progression of ASD. This logical and systematic process thus allows a further understanding into the potential root of observable motor problems in ASD; a vital step if underlying motor problems are to be considered a fundamental aspect of autism and allow a route of non-invasive preliminary diagnosis.

  10. Adaptive stimulus optimization for sensory systems neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMattina, Christopher; Zhang, Kechen

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we review several lines of recent work aimed at developing practical methods for adaptive on-line stimulus generation for sensory neurophysiology. We consider various experimental paradigms where on-line stimulus optimization is utilized, including the classical optimal stimulus paradigm where the goal of experiments is to identify a stimulus which maximizes neural responses, the iso-response paradigm which finds sets of stimuli giving rise to constant responses, and the system identification paradigm where the experimental goal is to estimate and possibly compare sensory processing models. We discuss various theoretical and practical aspects of adaptive firing rate optimization, including optimization with stimulus space constraints, firing rate adaptation, and possible network constraints on the optimal stimulus. We consider the problem of system identification, and show how accurate estimation of non-linear models can be highly dependent on the stimulus set used to probe the network. We suggest that optimizing stimuli for accurate model estimation may make it possible to successfully identify non-linear models which are otherwise intractable, and summarize several recent studies of this type. Finally, we present a two-stage stimulus design procedure which combines the dual goals of model estimation and model comparison and may be especially useful for system identification experiments where the appropriate model is unknown beforehand. We propose that fast, on-line stimulus optimization enabled by increasing computer power can make it practical to move sensory neuroscience away from a descriptive paradigm and toward a new paradigm of real-time model estimation and comparison.

  11. Sensory analysis of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz-Calvo M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of sensory profiling constitutes the basis of a descriptive quantitative analysis, defining a product with the minimum number of words and with maximum efficiency, using a precise tasting sheet, which can be reproduced and is understood by all. In this work, the texture profiling for different bean varieties that are characteristic of the Spanish market was carried out. Optimum conditions for samples and a tasting card were established, and a panel was trained. The texture profile results show significant differences amongst varieties and even amongst different origins for the same variety.

  12. Palm to Finger Ulnar Sensory Nerve Conduction

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist (UNW) is rare, and always challenging to localize. To increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of UNW many authors advocate the stimulation of the ulnar nerve (UN) in the segment of the wrist and palm. The focus of this paper is to present a modified and simplified technique of sensory nerve conduction (SNC) of the UN in the wrist and palm segments and demonstrate the validity of this technique in the study of five cases of type III UNW. The SNC ...

  13. Surgical Results in Cases of Sensory Strabismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayfle Yeflim Oral

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine horizontal deviation type and to evaluate the correlation between deviation type/etiology and surgical results for sensory strabismus. Patients and Methods: The reports of 29 patients operated for sensory strabismus (12 female, 17 male whose mean age was 22.17±11.52 (range: 4-57 years were evaluated retrospectively. Sixteen cases (55.2% had exotropia (XT and 13 cases (44.8% had esotropia (ET. Etiologies, ages during surgeries, and preoperative/postoperative deviation amounts were noted for the total of the patients as well as for ET and XT groups separately. The results for ET and XT groups were compared statistically using t test. The mean follow-up time was 4.27±3.5 years (range: 4 months-12 years and deviation in ±10 prism diopters (PD in the last visit was considered as success. Results: Etiologies in all cases examined were as follows: anisometropia in 13 (44.8%, trauma in 10 (34.5%, congenital cataracts in 2, and congenital glaucoma, keratoconus, choroidal coloboma, and hypoplastic optic disc in one case each. The visual acuity of the squinting eyes ranged from no light perception to 0.8 logMAR. The mean preoperative deviation was 46.24±19.29 PD, and the mean postoperative deviation decreased to 9.55±11.86 PD in the last visit. When the ET and XT groups were compared, the congenital causes were more common in the ET group (30.75% compared to the XT group (6.25%, otherwise, there was no statistically significant difference in terms of mean age, preoperative and postoperative deviation amounts and follow-up time between the two groups (p>0.05. In contrast, while the surgical success rate was found to be 75.9 % for all cases and 87.5% for the XT group, it was 61.5% for the ET group. Discussion: Despite the deep amblyopia in sensory strabismus, satisfactory surgical results are achieved; nevertheless, the success may be more limited in sensory esotropia particularly due to congenital causes. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2011

  14. Dermatomal sensory manifestations in lateral medullary infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Hiroki; Tanaka, Yasutaka; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Ryota; Hattori, Nobutaka; Urabe, Takao

    2014-01-01

    A 61-year-old man who experienced a sudden onset of unstable gait followed by nuchal pain was admitted to our department. The neurologic examination revealed right-sided limb ataxia, right partial ptosis, and decreased sensation to 50% of the normal side to pinprick and temperature stimuli on the left side below the level of the T-6 dermatome. A lateral medullary infarction caused by spontaneous vertebral artery dissection was diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography angiography. In conclusion, lateral medullary infarction is an important entity to consider in the differential diagnosis of dermatomal sensory manifestations.

  15. Postural Stability of Patients with Schizophrenia during Challenging Sensory Conditions: Implication of Sensory Integration for Postural Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ling Teng

    Full Text Available Postural dysfunctions are prevalent in patients with schizophrenia and affect their daily life and ability to work. In addition, sensory functions and sensory integration that are crucial for postural control are also compromised. This study intended to examine how patients with schizophrenia coordinate multiple sensory systems to maintain postural stability in dynamic sensory conditions. Twenty-nine patients with schizophrenia and 32 control subjects were recruited. Postural stability of the participants was examined in six sensory conditions of different level of congruency of multiple sensory information, which was based on combinations of correct, removed, or conflicting sensory inputs from visual, somatosensory, and vestibular systems. The excursion of the center of pressure was measured by posturography. Equilibrium scores were derived to indicate the range of anterior-posterior (AP postural sway, and sensory ratios were calculated to explore ability to use sensory information to maintain balance. The overall AP postural sway was significantly larger for patients with schizophrenia compared to the controls [patients (69.62±8.99; controls (76.53±7.47; t1,59 = -3.28, p<0.001]. The results of mixed-model ANOVAs showed a significant interaction between the group and sensory conditions [F5,295 = 5.55, p<0.001]. Further analysis indicated that AP postural sway was significantly larger for patients compared to the controls in conditions containing unreliable somatosensory information either with visual deprivation or with conflicting visual information. Sensory ratios were not significantly different between groups, although small and non-significant difference in inefficiency to utilize vestibular information was also noted. No significant correlations were found between postural stability and clinical characteristics. To sum up, patients with schizophrenia showed increased postural sway and a higher rate of falls during challenging sensory

  16. Breach of sensory integration in children and youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radziyevska Mariya.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available From the first moments of life, the child acquires the experience of being in the world around him through the senses such as touch, balance, proprioception, taste, sight, hearing and smell. The development of sensory integration of individual processes helps to effectively carry out every activity and function in society. Changes in the quality and quantity of sensory information may lead to sensory integration disorder child, which is immediately reflected in his behavior. In this paper we have presented information on the levels of sensory integration and testing of samples with a simple touch of activities that can be done without special equipment, both at home and in child care. Dissemination of knowledge about the processes of sensory integration, both among doctors, teachers, physiotherapists, occupational therapists and psychology as well as parents can contribute to early diagnosis of problems in children sensory-social development, further impeding the normal functioning of the child in society.

  17. Upper gastrointestinal sensory-motor dysfunction in diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingbo Zhao; Jens Br(φ)ndum Fr(φ)kjaer; Asbj(φ)rn Mohr Drewes; Niels Ejskjaer

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) sensory-motor abnormalities are common in patients with diabetes mellitus and may involve any part of the GI tract. Abnormalities are frequently sub-clinical, and fortunately only rarely do severe and life-threatening problems occur. The pathogenesis of abnormal upper GI sensory-motor function in diabetes is incompletely understood and is most likely multi-factorial of origin. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy as well as acute suboptimal control of diabetes has been shown to impair GI motor and sensory function. Morphological and biomechanical remodeling of the GI wall develops during the duration of diabetes,and may contribute to motor and sensory dysfunction. In this review sensory and motility disorders of the upper GI tract in diabetes is discussed; and the morphological changes and biomechanical remodeling related to the sensory-motor dysfunction is also addressed.

  18. Just do it: action-dependent learning allows sensory prediction.

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    Itai Novick

    Full Text Available Sensory-motor learning is commonly considered as a mapping process, whereby sensory information is transformed into the motor commands that drive actions. However, this directional mapping, from inputs to outputs, is part of a loop; sensory stimuli cause actions and vice versa. Here, we explore whether actions affect the understanding of the sensory input that they cause. Using a visuo-motor task in humans, we demonstrate two types of learning-related behavioral effects. Stimulus-dependent effects reflect stimulus-response learning, while action-dependent effects reflect a distinct learning component, allowing the brain to predict the forthcoming sensory outcome of actions. Together, the stimulus-dependent and the action-dependent learning components allow the brain to construct a complete internal representation of the sensory-motor loop.

  19. Adaptation to sensory input tunes visual cortex to criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shew, Woodrow L.; Clawson, Wesley P.; Pobst, Jeff; Karimipanah, Yahya; Wright, Nathaniel C.; Wessel, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    A long-standing hypothesis at the interface of physics and neuroscience is that neural networks self-organize to the critical point of a phase transition, thereby optimizing aspects of sensory information processing. This idea is partially supported by strong evidence for critical dynamics observed in the cerebral cortex, but the impact of sensory input on these dynamics is largely unknown. Thus, the foundations of this hypothesis--the self-organization process and how it manifests during strong sensory input--remain unstudied experimentally. Here we show in visual cortex and in a computational model that strong sensory input initially elicits cortical network dynamics that are not critical, but adaptive changes in the network rapidly tune the system to criticality. This conclusion is based on observations of multifaceted scaling laws predicted to occur at criticality. Our findings establish sensory adaptation as a self-organizing mechanism that maintains criticality in visual cortex during sensory information processing.

  20. Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) and Frisson: Mindfully Induced Sensory Phenomena That Promote Happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Campo, Marisa A.; Kehle, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    There are many important phenomena involved in human functioning that are unnoticed, misunderstood, not applied, or do not pique the interest of the scientific community. Among these, "autonomous sensory meridian response" ("ASMR") and "frisson" are two very noteworthy instances that may prove to be therapeutically…