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Sample records for amyloid shoulder nodulesin

  1. Shoulder replacement - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Endoprosthetic shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Replacement - shoulder - discharge; Arthroplasty - shoulder - discharge

  2. Separated Shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ligaments that hold your collarbone (clavicle) to your shoulder blade. In a mild separated shoulder, the ligaments might ... the ligaments that hold your collarbone to your shoulder blade. Risk factors Participating in contact sports, such as ...

  3. Shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This condition is called rotator cuff tendinitis or bursitis. Shoulder pain may also be caused by: Arthritis ... shoulder joint Bone spurs in the shoulder area Bursitis , which is inflammation of a fluid-filled sac ( ...

  4. Shoulder arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bankart lesion; Shoulder repair; Shoulder surgery; Rotator cuff repair ... tissues include the cartilage, bones, tendons, and ligaments. ... in a muscle, tendon, or cartilage is fixed. Any damaged tissue ...

  5. Dislocated Shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... seek prompt medical attention. Most people regain full shoulder function within a few weeks. However, once you've ... in your neck or down your arm. The muscles in your shoulder may spasm from the disruption, often increasing the ...

  6. Shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2011-01-01

    Shoulder pain is a frequent complaint encountered in the emergency setting. A brief review of shoulder anatomy and physical examination sets the foundation for evaluation of shoulder pain. Considerations of patient's age are helpful to predict injuries. Fractured clavicles are often seen in traumatic injuries in children and young adults, whereas fractures of the humeral head are more often seen in the elderly from traumatic injuries. Shoulder dislocations are more common in teens to fourth decade. This article reviews specific acute injuries, chronic conditions, and radiologic considerations of patients with shoulder complaints encountered in emergency settings.

  7. Shoulder reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.; Krogsgaard, M.; Voigt, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic shoulder stability is dependent on muscular coordination and sensory inputs. In the shoulder, mechanoreceptors are found in the coracoacromial ligament, the rotator cuff tendons, the musculotendinous junctions of the rotator cuff and in the capsule. The number of receptors in the capsule...

  8. Painful shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benno Ejnismann

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Many factors can be involved in the painful shoulder. Beyond articularcauses other pathologies such as artrosis, periarticular diseases as rotadorcuff tears, long head of the biceps tendinitis, adhesive capsulitis, calcifyingtendinitis, degenerative arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint, cervicalradiculopathy and nervous injuries can cause pain in the shoulder.

  9. Shoulder Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as shown on an x-ray. Selection of treatment depends upon the patient’s activity level, the location of the fracture and the severity of the fracture. Recovery Shoulder fractures may leave a patient with permanent shoulder stiffness, regardless of ...

  10. Shoulder surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repair Shoulder arthroscopy Shoulder CT scan Shoulder MRI scan Shoulder ... by: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. ...

  11. Shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobman, William

    2013-03-01

    The frequency of shoulder dystocia in different reports has varied, ranging 0.2-3% of all vaginal deliveries. Once a shoulder dystocia occurs, even if all actions are appropriately taken, there is an increased frequency of complications, including third- or fourth-degree perineal lacerations, postpartum hemorrhage, and neonatal brachial plexus palsies. Health care providers have a poor ability to predict shoulder dystocia for most patients and there remains no commonly accepted model to accurately predict this obstetric emergency. Consequently, optimal management of shoulder dystocia requires appropriate management at the time it occurs. Multiple investigators have attempted to enhance care of shoulder dystocia by utilizing protocols and simulation training. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dislocated Shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to pull the bones out of place. Extreme rotation of your shoulder joint can pop the ball ... have discussed for your injury. By Mayo Clinic Staff . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms Any ...

  13. Shoulder replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem. Many people are able to return to sports such as golf, swimming, gardening, bowling, and others. Your new shoulder joint will last longer if less stress is placed on it. With normal use, a ...

  14. Shoulder Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your doctor might want you to have a magnetic resonance image (MRI) scan. An MRI lets your ... doctor if you can do resistance and weight-lifting exercises to help your shoulder muscles grow stronger. ...

  15. Frozen shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 35. Harris JD, Griesser MJ, Jones GL. Stiff shoulder. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  16. [Amyloid goiter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrívó, A; Péter, I; Bánkúti, B; Péley, G; Baska, F; Besznyák, I

    1999-03-21

    Amyloid goitre is at an extremely rare occurrence. Authors review the origin of disease and its symptoms, diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The disease may be due to either primary or secondary systemic or local amyloidosis. Diagnosis may be made even before surgery on anamnestic data, on very rapid growth of thyroid glands, on diffuse appearance, on other symptoms of systemic amyloidosis, on findings of iconographic procedures and on detection of amyloid in aspirates. Final diagnosis is based on histology. Surgical therapy is aiming at avoidance of the existing and the threatening consequences of expanding mass. The outcome is independent from thyroid surgery, it is related to other manifestations of amyloidosis. Concerning with the present case the chronic superior vena cava syndrome and chylous pleural effusion as first described symptoms and asymptomatic hyperthyroxinaemia is emphasised. Neither other organ involvement, nor primary amyloidogenous molecula was found during the 18 months follow up, so patient has secondary and localised amyloidosis.

  17. Shoulder biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo, Roberto; Kung, Peter; Ma, C. Benjamin [Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, University of California, San Francisco, 500 Parnassus Avenue, MU 320W-0728 San Francisco, CA 914143 (United States)], E-mail: maben@orthosurg.ucsf.edu

    2008-10-15

    The biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint depend on the interaction of both static and dynamic-stabilizing structures. Static stabilizers include the bony anatomy, negative intra-articular pressure, the glenoid labrum, and the glenohumeral ligaments along with the joint capsule. The dynamic-stabilizing structures include the rotator cuff muscles and the other muscular structures surrounding the shoulder joint. The combined effect of these stabilizers is to support the multiple degrees of motion within the glenohumeral joint. The goal of this article is to review how these structures interact to provide optimal stability and how failure of some of these mechanisms can lead to shoulder joint pathology.

  18. Shoulder separation - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the collarbone (clavicle) meets the top of the shoulder blade (acromion of the scapula). It is not the same as a shoulder ... that connects the collarbone and top of the shoulder blade. These tears can also come from car accidents ...

  19. Pregnancy Complications: Shoulder Dystocia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Shoulder dystocia Shoulder dystocia Now playing: E-mail to a friend Please ... some women more likely than others to have shoulder dystocia? A pregnant woman may be at risk for ...

  20. Radiological findings of amyloid arthropathy in long-term haemodialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios Camacho, C. [Dept. of Nephrology, Hospital Universitario ``Virgen del Rocio``, Sevilla (Spain); Talegon Melendez, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Universitario ``Virgen del Rocio``, Sevilla (Spain); Valenzuela, A. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Hospital Universitario ``Virgen del Rocio``, Sevilla (Spain); Gonzalez Guirao, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Universitario ``Virgen del Rocio``, Sevilla (Spain); Gomez Benitez, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Universitario ``Virgen del Rocio``, Sevilla (Spain); Gil, L. [Dept. of Nephrology, Hospital Universitario ``Virgen del Rocio``, Sevilla (Spain); Palma Alvarez, A. [Dept. of Nephrology, Hospital Universitario ``Virgen Macarena``, Sevilla (Spain); Mateos Aguilar, J. [Dept. of Nephrology, Hospital Universitario ``Virgen del Rocio``, Sevilla (Spain)

    1992-08-01

    Radiological features of cystic lesions due to beta-2-microglobulin-related amyloidosis have been studied in 88 patients receiving haemodialysis for more than 4 years. Amyloid arthropathy was confirmed by demonstration of amyloid-beta-2-microglobulin deposition on different substrates. Plain radiographs of shoulder, spine, pelvis, hands and knees revealed cystic lesions in 31 patients (35.2%), the distribution being: 71% shoulder, 56.7% carpal bones, 25.8% pelvis, 16.5% femur and 13.3% knees. Discitis was found in 34 patients (38.6%). The ocurrence of geodes was frequent in patients suffering from amyloid arthropathy (63% vs. 23%, P = 0.0001). No significant differences were found in the frequency of discitis or erosive arthropathy in the hands of both groups. The former was related to age and the latter to secondary hyperparathyroidism. We stress the radiographic appearance and the high incidence of these lesions in patients on long-term haemodialysis. (orig.)

  1. Functional Amyloids in Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewetson, Aveline; Do, Hoa Quynh; Myers, Caitlyn; Muthusubramanian, Archana; Sutton, Roger Bryan; Wylie, Benjamin J; Cornwall, Gail A

    2017-06-29

    Amyloids are traditionally considered pathological protein aggregates that play causative roles in neurodegenerative disease, diabetes and prionopathies. However, increasing evidence indicates that in many biological systems nonpathological amyloids are formed for functional purposes. In this review, we will specifically describe amyloids that carry out biological roles in sexual reproduction including the processes of gametogenesis, germline specification, sperm maturation and fertilization. Several of these functional amyloids are evolutionarily conserved across several taxa, including human, emphasizing the critical role amyloids perform in reproduction. Evidence will also be presented suggesting that, if altered, some functional amyloids may become pathological.

  2. Imaging of dialysis-related amyloid (AB-amyloid) deposits with 131I-beta 2-microglobulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floege, J.; Burchert, W.; Brandis, A.; Gielow, P.; Nonnast-Daniel, B.; Spindler, E.; Hundeshagen, H.; Shaldon, S.; Koch, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of dialysis-related amyloid (AB-amyloid) has been based usually on clinical and radiological criteria. Following the discovery that beta 2-microglobulin was the major protein of this amyloid, we isolated and radiolabelled uremic plasma beta 2-microglobulin. After intravenous injection, gamma-camera images of selected joint areas were obtained from 42 patients who were on regular hemodialysis therapy. Positive scans involving the shoulder, hip, knee and carpal regions were found in 13 of 14 patients treated for more than 10 years and 10 of 16 patients treated for 5 to 10 years. Patients treated for less time had negative scans. Specificity was indicated by negative scans in non-amyloid inflammatory lesions in control hemodialysis patients. Up to 48-fold tracer enrichment was detected in excised AB-amyloid containing tissue as compared to amyloid-free tissue. These findings suggest that circulating radiolabelled beta 2-microglobulin is taken up by the amyloid deposits. This method may non-invasively detect tissue infiltrates of amyloid. It may also permit prospective evaluation of the efficacy of prophylactic dialysis strategies which are designed to prevent or delay the onset of this complication of long-term dialysis

  3. Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Richard D; Chae, John

    2015-11-01

    Hemiplegic shoulder pain is a common complaint for stroke survivors. Many pathologies are included in the diagnosis of hemiplegic shoulder pain, and many with shoulder pain have a multifactorial cause. This article provides rehabilitation specialists with an approach to evaluation and management of those with hemiplegic shoulder pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Amyloid and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2018-03-01

    Extracellular amyloid deposition defines a range of amyloidosis and amyloid-related disease. Addition to primary and secondary amyloidosis, amyloid-related disease can be observed in different tissue/organ that sharing the common pathogenesis based on the formation of amyloid deposition. Currently, both Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes can be diagnosed with certainly only based on the autopsy results, by which amyloidosis of the associative tissue/organ is observed. Intriguingly, since it demonstrated that amyloid deposits trigger inflammatory reaction through the activation of cascaded immune response, wherein several lines of evidence implies a protective role of amyloid in preventing autoimmunity. Furthermore, attempts for preventing amyloid formation and/or removing amyloid deposits from the brain have caused meningoencephalitis and consequent deaths among the subjects. Hence, it is important to note that amyloid positively participates in maintaining immune homeostasis and contributes to irreversible inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the interactive relationship between amyloid and the immune system, discussing the potential functional roles of amyloid in immune tolerance and homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. 9. Painful shoulder complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huygen, Frank; Patijn, Jacob; Rohof, Olav; Lataster, Arno; Mekhail, Nagy; van Kleef, Maarten; Van Zundert, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Painful shoulder complaints have a high incidence and prevalence. The etiology is not always clear. Clinical history and the active and passive motion examination of the shoulder are the cornerstones of the diagnostic process. Three shoulder tests are important for the examination of shoulder complaints: shoulder abduction, shoulder external rotation, and horizontal shoulder adduction. These tests can guide the examiner to the correct diagnosis. Based on this diagnosis, in most cases, primarily a conservative treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs possibly in combination with manual and/or exercise therapy can be started. When conservative treatment fails, injection with local anesthetics and corticosteroids can be considered. In the case of frozen shoulder, a continuous cervical epidural infusion of local anesthetic and small doses of opioids or a pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the nervus suprascapularis can be considered.

  6. Shoulder pain in primary care: frozen shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadogan, Angela; Mohammed, Khalid D

    2016-03-01

    BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Frozen shoulder is a painful condition that follows a protracted clinical course. We aim to review the management of patients with a diagnosis of frozen shoulder who are referred for specialist orthopaedic evaluation against existing guidelines in primary care. ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEM Referrals and clinical records were reviewed for all patients referred for orthopaedic specialist assessment who received a specialist diagnosis of frozen shoulder. Diagnostic, investigation and management practices from a regional primary health care setting in New Zealand were compared with guideline-recommended management. RESULTS Eighty patients with frozen shoulder were referred for orthopaedic evaluation in the 13 month study period, mostly from general practice. Fifteen patients (19%) were identified as having a frozen shoulder in their medical referral. Most (99%) had received previous imaging. Seven patients (12%) had received guideline recommended treatment. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT Education of all clinicians involved in patient management is important to ensure an understanding of the long natural history of frozen shoulder and provide reassurance that outcomes are generally excellent. HealthPathways now include more information regarding diagnosis, imaging and evidence-based management for frozen shoulder. LESSONS Frozen shoulder may be under-diagnosed among patients referred for orthopaedic review. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used and may identify occult and unrelated pathology in this age-group. When managed according to clinical guidelines, patients report significant clinical and functional improvement with most reporting 80% function compared with normal after 1 year. KEYWORDS Adhesive capsulitis; bursitis; injections; practice guideline; primary health care; ultrasound.

  7. Shoulder Problems in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, William G., Jr.

    A description is given of typical sport-related injuries to the shoulder area. These include: (1) brachial plexus injuries; (2) peripheral nerve injuries about the shoulder; (3) acromioclavicular injuries; (4) sternoclavicular injuries; (5) shoulder dislocations; (6) recurrent traumatic subluxation/dislocations; and (7) overuse injuries.…

  8. The painful shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartl, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    The painful shoulder syndrome is very common. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis may be difficult. Shoulder pain may be caused by local processes or systemic diseases or can be referred. Periarthritis humeroscapularis (frozen shoulder) is the most common cause of painful shoulder syndrome. Biomechanical factors concerning the rotator cuff are involved in the etiopathogenesis of these pain syndromes. The therapy of frozen shoulder includes physical treatment, antirheumatic drugs, or X-ray treatment. Surgical measures may become necessary. In the course of rheumatoid arthritis the shoulder may be involved. Milwaukee-shoulder-syndrome has been described recently in crystal deposit diseases. Shoulder pain may be referred by mechanical irritations of nerve roots in the course of degenerative lesions of the cervical spine and also in the course of internal diseases of the heart, the lungs, or the gastrointestinal tract. In cases of shoulder pain without pathological data from arthrological, radiological or laboratory studies, one should always consider localized fibromyalgia in the shoulder-neck-region. The precise diagnosis of shoulder pain is an important prerequisite for treatment, the success of which should not be judged as pessimistic as it has been commonly done in the past. (orig.) [de

  9. Amyloid osteoarthropathy in long term hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orzincolo, C.; Cardona, P.; Vita, G.; Bedani, P.L.; Farinelli, A.; Scutellari, P.N.

    1988-01-01

    The accumulation of amyloid in the bone and joint system has recently been recognized as a peculiar disease in patients undergoing long-term hemodialysis (5 years at least), especially in those who use cuprophan membranes. The pathology of amyloidosis is characterized by deposits of amyloid (β microglobulin mainly) in the bone, in the synovia, and in pericapsular soft tissues. The skeleton of 46 long-term hemodialysis patients (19 males and 27 females) was studied by X-ray; bone and joint abnormalities due to amyloid deposition were observed in 45% of cases. The shoulder, hip, and wrist were the most frequently involved joints. Destructive spondyloarthorapathy was present in 15% of cases. The radiographic patterns of AOD are generally divided into axial and peripheral lesions. In the appendicular skeleton abnormalities include: well-defined lytic areas (geodes), pathologic fractures, marginal erosions, and particular soft tissue swelling. Destructive spondyloarthropathy is frequently present in the cervical spine (85% of our cases) and is characterized by narrowing of the invertebral space, marginal erosion, and subchondral bone sclerosis of the vertebral body

  10. The Shoulder Gradient in Patients with Unilateral Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Sang; Lee, Jong Ha; Yun, Dong Hwan; Yun, Jee-Sang; Shin, Yong Won; Chon, Jinmann

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the shoulder gradient and acromiohumeral interval of both shoulders in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome. Method Using the angulometer, we measured the shoulder gradient in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome in a standing position. Using the radiography, we measured the acromiohumeral interval and the angle between a vertical line and a line connecting a superior angle with an inferior angle of the scapula. Results In patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome, the frequency of shoulder impingement syndrome was 76.2% (16 of 21) on the side of the relatively lower shoulder. The mean acromiohumeral interval on the side of the lower shoulder was 10.03±1.28 mm, compared with 10.46±1.50 mm for the higher shoulder. The angle between a vertical line and a line connecting a superior angle with an inferior angle of the scapular of the side of the lower shoulder was -0.31±3.73 degrees, compared with 3.85±4.42 degrees for the higher shoulder. Conclusion The frequency of shoulder impingement syndrome was significantly higher on the side of the relatively lower shoulder, and there is no significant difference in the acromiohumeral interval between the side of the lower shoulder and that of the higher shoulder. In patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome, the scapular on the side of lower shoulder was more rotated downward than on the side of the higher shoulder. PMID:22506196

  11. The shoulder gradient in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Sang; Lee, Jong Ha; Yun, Dong Hwan; Yun, Jee-Sang; Shin, Yong Won; Chon, Jinmann; Hwang, Dae Gyu

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between the shoulder gradient and acromiohumeral interval of both shoulders in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome. Using the angulometer, we measured the shoulder gradient in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome in a standing position. Using the radiography, we measured the acromiohumeral interval and the angle between a vertical line and a line connecting a superior angle with an inferior angle of the scapula. In patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome, the frequency of shoulder impingement syndrome was 76.2% (16 of 21) on the side of the relatively lower shoulder. The mean acromiohumeral interval on the side of the lower shoulder was 10.03±1.28 mm, compared with 10.46±1.50 mm for the higher shoulder. The angle between a vertical line and a line connecting a superior angle with an inferior angle of the scapular of the side of the lower shoulder was -0.31±3.73 degrees, compared with 3.85±4.42 degrees for the higher shoulder. The frequency of shoulder impingement syndrome was significantly higher on the side of the relatively lower shoulder, and there is no significant difference in the acromiohumeral interval between the side of the lower shoulder and that of the higher shoulder. In patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome, the scapular on the side of lower shoulder was more rotated downward than on the side of the higher shoulder.

  12. Complications of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajani, Nafisa K; Magann, Everett F

    2014-06-01

    Complications of shoulder dystocia are divided into fetal and maternal. Fetal brachial plexus injury (BPI) is the most common fetal complication occurring in 4-40% of cases. BPI has also been reported in abdominal deliveries and in deliveries not complicated by shoulder dystocia. Fractures of the fetal humerus and clavicle occur in about 10.6% of cases of shoulder dystocia and usually heal with no sequel. Hypoxic ischemic brain injury is reported in 0.5-23% of cases of shoulder dystocia. The risk correlates with the duration of head-to-body delivery and is especially increased when the duration is >5 min. Fetal death is rare and is reported in 0.4% of cases. Maternal complications of shoulder dystocia include post-partum hemorrhage, vaginal lacerations, anal tears, and uterine rupture. The psychological stress impact of shoulder dystocia is under-recognized and deserves counseling prior to home discharge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. SHOULDER DYSTOCIA : OBSTETRICIAN'S NIGHTMARE

    OpenAIRE

    KUMAR, SUSHIL; ANTHONY, ZK

    2002-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an uncommon complication of delivery. 12 cases of shoulder dystocia are presented. The study suggests that prediction of shoulder dystocia on the basis of clinical profile is difficult A high index of suspicion is to be maintained in the presence of certain risk factors such as multigravida with large baby having prolonged 1st (decelarative phase) and 2nd stage of labour necessitating instrumental delivery. High neonatal morbidity (brachial palsy 44% and low Apgar score 4...

  14. Shoulder Impingement Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Pediatrician Health Issues Conditions Injuries & Emergencies Sports Injuries Vaccine Preventable Diseases Healthy Children > Health Issues > Injuries & Emergencies > Sports Injuries > Shoulder Impingement ...

  15. Painful shoulder post fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Alistair Iw; Jariwala, Arpit

    2018-03-03

    CLINICAL INTRODUCTION: A 32-year-old man presented to the ED after a heavy fall on his left shoulder. He presented the following day with pain and gross limitation of movement in the left shoulder. There was no history of previous injury to the left shoulder. This was his non-dominant limb and he worked in a manual occupation. He was neurovascularly intact. His initial radiographs are shown in figures 1 and 2.emermed;emermed-2017-207003v1/F1F1F1Figure 1Anteroposterior radiograph (AP) radiograph of left shoulder.emermed;emermed-2017-207003v1/F2F2F2Figure 2Lateral radiograph of left shoulder.  QUESTION: Management options:Anterior shoulder dislocation - closed reductionAnterior shoulder dislocation - CT scanPosterior shoulder dislocation - closed reductionPosterior shoulder dislocation - CT scan. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosicka, Iga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type II is a metabolic disease affecting millions of people worldwide. The disease is associated with occurence of insoluble, fibrillar, protein aggregates in islets of Langerhans in the pancreas - islet amyloid. The main constituent of these protein fibers is the human islet...... of diabetes type II, while revealing the structure(s) of islet amyloid fibrils is necessary for potential design of therapeutic agents....

  17. Amyloid Fibril Solubility

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzi, L. G.; Auer, S.

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactio...

  18. Shoulder Blade Squeeze (Posture Exercise)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Exercise & Weight Exercise at Home Shoulder Blade Squeeze Shoulder Blade Squeeze Make an Appointment Ask a Question Find ... do it: Stand straight and tall. Pull your shoulder blades back and slightly downward to bring your elbows ...

  19. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  20. Amyloid Beta Mediates Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Osta, Ana; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes sequential cleavages to generate various polypeptides, including the amyloid [beta] (1-42) peptide (A[beta][1-42]), which is believed to play a major role in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide evidence that, in contrast with its pathological role when accumulated,…

  1. The Shoulder Gradient in Patients with Unilateral Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hee-Sang; Lee, Jong Ha; Yun, Dong Hwan; Yun, Jee-Sang; Shin, Yong Won; Chon, Jinmann; Hwang, Dae Gyu

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the shoulder gradient and acromiohumeral interval of both shoulders in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome. Method Using the angulometer, we measured the shoulder gradient in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome in a standing position. Using the radiography, we measured the acromiohumeral interval and the angle between a vertical line and a line connecting a superior angle with an inferior angle of the scap...

  2. Painful/unstable shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez, F.; Negueruela, J.; Martin, J.C.; Elizagaray, E.; Pena, J.M.; Merino, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the diagnostic performance of CT-arthrography of the painful/unstable shoulder that was evaluated in more than 300 patients. We have encountered a great variety of painful shoulder pathology, including impingement syndrome, cuff tear arthropathy, lesions of the long head of the biceps tendon, calcifying tendinitis, adhesive capsulitis, dead arm syndrome, and degenerative joint disease. Lesions related to instability include cases of capsular avulsions, disruption of the glenohumeral ligaments, labral pathology, glenoid fractures, Hill-Sachs lesions, and changes in glenoid angulation. CT-arthrography is an accurate exploration for both unstable and painful shoulders

  3. Simulation and Shoulder Dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaddeau, Angela K; Deering, Shad

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an unpredictable obstetric emergency that requires prompt interventions to ensure optimal outcomes. Proper technique is important but difficult to train given the urgent and critical clinical situation. Simulation training for shoulder dystocia allows providers at all levels to practice technical and teamwork skills in a no-risk environment. Programs utilizing simulation training for this emergency have consistently demonstrated improved performance both during practice drills and in actual patients with significantly decreased risks of fetal injury. Given the evidence, simulation training for shoulder dystocia should be conducted at all institutions that provide delivery services.

  4. Frozen shoulder - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris JD, Griesser MJ, Jones GL. Stiff shoulder. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 55. Kelley MJ, Shaffer MA, ...

  5. Normal shoulder: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieft, G.J.; Bloem, J.L.; Obermann, W.R.; Verbout, A.J.; Rozing, P.M.; Doornbos, J.

    1986-06-01

    Relatively poor spatial resolution has been obtained in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the shoulder because the shoulder can only be placed in the periphery of the magnetic field. The authors have devised an anatomically shaped surface coil that enables MR to demonstrate normal shoulder anatomy in different planes with high spatial resolution. In the axial plane anatomy analogous to that seen on computed tomographic (CT) scans can be demonstrated. Variations in scapular position (produced by patient positioning) may make reproducibility of sagittal and coronal plane images difficult by changing the relationship of the plane to the shoulder anatomy. Oblique planes, for which the angle is chosen from the axial image, have the advantage of easy reproducibility. Obliquely oriented structures and relationships are best seen in oblique plane images and can be evaluated in detail.

  6. Radiotherapy for shoulder impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamietz, B.; Sauer, R.; Keilholz, L.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Up to now, degenerative shoulder diseases were summarized by the term ''periarthritis humeroscapularis''. Actual shoulder diseases can be differentiated etiopathologically according to a primary and secondary impingement syndrome. Narrowing of the subacromial space, which is caused by an osseous shape variant, leads to primary impingement. Secondary impingement develops, when the subacromial space is reduced by swelling tissue below the osseous shoulder roof. This study aimed for the exact diagnosis to indicate therapy and to classify the results according to the Constant score. Patients and Methods: From August 1999 to September 2002, 102 patients with 115 shoulder joint conditions underwent radiation therapy (RT). All joints received two RT series (6 x 0.5 Gy/series) applied in two to three weekly fractions, totaling a dosage of 6.0 Gy (250 kV, 15 mAs, 1-mm Cu filter). The second RT course started 6 weeks after the end of the first. 115 shoulders were examined before RT, 6 weeks after the second RT course and, finally, during the follow-up from January to May 2003. Results: Pain relief was achieved in 94/115 shoulder joints (82%) after 18-month follow-up (median). A significant difference existed between secondary impingement and primary/non-impingement according to response. Tendinosis calcarea, bursitis subdeltoidea, tendovaginitis of the long biceps tendon, and capsulitis adhaesiva responded well to therapy. Conclusion: Shoulder diseases of secondary impingement demonstrate a good response to RT. Less or no benefit was found in primary impingement syndrome or complete rotator cuff disruption and acute shoulder injuries, respectively. (orig.)

  7. Shoulder impingement syndrome in relation to shoulder intensive work

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, P.; Andersen, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse the risk of shoulder impingement syndrome relative to shoulder intensive work. METHODS: A cross sectional study of a historical cohort of 1591 workers employed between 1986 and 1993 at a slaughterhouse or a chemical factory. Workers not doing tasks in slaughtering or meat processing constituted the reference group. Intensity of shoulder work in meat processing tasks was assessed by video based observations. Information on shoulder disorders was collected by quest...

  8. Shoulder impingement syndrome in relation to shoulder intensive work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, P; Andersen, J H

    1999-07-01

    To analyse the risk of shoulder impingement syndrome relative to shoulder intensive work. A cross sectional study of a historical cohort of 1591 workers employed between 1986 and 1993 at a slaughterhouse or a chemical factory. Workers not doing tasks in slaughtering or meat processing constituted the reference group. Intensity of shoulder work in meat processing tasks was assessed by video based observations. Information on shoulder disorders was collected by questionnaire and by physical examinations. Impingement syndrome was diagnosed when shoulder symptoms had been present for at least 3 months during the past year and there were signs of subacromial impingement in the corresponding shoulder at physical examination. Shoulder function was assessed at the same occasion with the Constant scoring technique. Prevalence of shoulder impingement syndrome was analysed according to job title and cumulative exposure. Prevalence ratio for shoulder impingement syndrome was 5.27 (95% confidence interval (95% CI), 2.09 to 12.26) among currently working and 7.90 (95% CI, 2.94 to 21.18) among former slaughterhouse workers. Transformed model based prevalence ratios according to years in slaughterhouse work showed an overall association between cumulative exposure and risk for shoulder impingement syndrome. This study supports the hypothesis that shoulder intensive work is a risk factor for impingement syndrome of the shoulder. Despite the historical cohort design healthy worker selection may have influenced the exposure-response relation found.

  9. [Management of shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ray, C; Oury, J-F

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this review is to propose recommendations on the management of shoulder dystocia. The PubMed database, the Cochrane Library and the recommendations from the foreign obstetrical societies or colleges have been consulted. In case of shoulder dystocia, if the obstetrician is not present at delivery, he should be systematically informed as quickly as possible (professional consensus). A third person should also be called for help in order to realize McRoberts maneuver (professional consensus). The patient has to be properly installed in gynecological position (professional consensus). It is recommended not to pull excessively on the fetal head (grade C), do not perform uterine expression (grade C) and do not realize inverse rotation of the fetal head (professional consensus). McRoberts maneuver, with or without a suprapubic pressure, is simple to perform, effective and associated with low morbidity, thus, it is recommended in the first line (grade C). Regarding the maneuvers of the second line, the available data do not suggest the superiority of one maneuver in relation to another (grade C). We proposed an algorithm; however, management should be adapted to the experience of the operator. If the posterior shoulder is engaged, Wood's maneuver should be performed preferentially; if the posterior shoulder is not engaged, delivery of the posterior arm should be performed preferentially (professional consensus). Routine episiotomy is not recommended in shoulder dystocia (professional consensus). Other second intention maneuvers are described. It seems necessary to know at least two maneuvers to perform in case of shoulder dystocia unresolved by the maneuver McRoberts (professional consensus). All physicians and midwives should know and perform obstetric maneuvers if needed quickly but without precipitation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Mortality after shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amundsen, Alexander; Rasmussen, Jeppe Vejlgaard; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The primary aim was to quantify the 30-day, 90-day, and 1-year mortality rates after primary shoulder replacement. The secondary aims were to assess the association between mortality and diagnoses and to compare the mortality rate with that of the general population. METHODS: The study...... included 5853 primary operations reported to the Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry between 2006 and 2012. Information about deaths was obtained from the Danish Cause of Death Register and the Danish Civil Registration System. Age- and sex-adjusted control groups were retrieved from Statistics Denmark...... common, and for fracture patients in particular, close postoperative monitoring of pulmonary, cardiac, and abdominal conditions seems important....

  11. Robotics in shoulder rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicuri, Chiara; Porcellini, Giuseppe; Merolla, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Summary In the last few decades, several researches have been conducted in the field of robotic rehabilitation to meet the intensive, repetitive and task-oriented training, with the goal to recover the motor function. Up to now, robotic rehabilitation studies of the upper extremity have generally focused on stroke survivors leaving less explored the field of orthopaedic shoulder rehabilitation. In this review we analyse the present status of robotic technologies, in order to understand which are the current indications and which may be the future perspective for their application in both neurological and orthopaedic shoulder rehabilitation. PMID:25332937

  12. Paraplegia and the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Jennifer; Goldstein, Barry

    2004-08-01

    Among consumers, families, therapists, physicians, and other rehabilitation professionals, there has been an increasing interest in shoulder pain associated with spinal cord injury. These disorders primarily affect the soft tissues, including the tendons (eg, rotator cuff tendonitis and bicipital tendinitis), muscles (eg, myalgias and myofascial pain syndromes), and bursae. Disorders of bone and joints also have been of interest (eg, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints). This article addresses the historical context, epidemiology, pathophysiology,diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of shoulder pain as it relates to patients with spinal cord injury.

  13. Sleep position and shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenian, John

    2010-04-01

    The overuse theory for musculoskeletal joint pain cannot explain adequately the occurrence of shoulder pain in those who do not engage in activities that involve repeated and stressful use of the shoulder since the percentage of the painful right shoulders usually does not match the percentage of dominant right arms in such individuals. An alternative hypothesis is presented to propose that shoulder pain is caused by postural immobility in the decubitus or side position during sleep. Prolonged pressure on the shoulder caused by the weight of the thorax can produce enough damage to cause subsequent shoulder pain. In order to test this hypothesis, a preliminary study was carried out to compare the laterality of shoulder pain with the laterality of sleep position. The calculated laterality ratios for sleep position and shoulder pain were found to be strikingly similar, suggesting a causal relationship between the two phenomena. However, the prevalence of shoulder pain in the general population was found to be smaller than the percentage of the time people would spend sleeping in the decubitus position. This discrepancy could be explained by the idea that in order for shoulder pain to develop subjects may have to spend longer times in the same decubitus position before changing to another position than the average person would. Additional evidence from published clinical studies also supports the postural theory of shoulder pain. More studies can be done to test this hypothesis by focusing on the sleep habits of patients with shoulder pain. According to the present hypothesis shoulder pain should for the most part occur on the side that the patient preferred to sleep on before the onset of shoulder pain. The postural theory of shoulder pain provides the possibility for a new and noninvasive method to treat shoulder pain by the modification of posture during sleep. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fluid collections and juxta-articular cystic lesions of the shoulder: spectrum of MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellado, J.M.; Salvado, E.; Camins, A.; Ramos, A.; Sauri, A. [Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge, Hospital Joan XXIII, Tarragona (Spain); Merino, X. [Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge, Hospital Vall' Ebron, Barcelona (Spain); Calmet, J. [Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital Joan XXIII, Carrer Doctor Mallafre Guasch, Tarragona (Spain)

    2002-03-01

    The MR imaging features of fluid collections and juxta-articular cystic lesions of the shoulder are discussed, with special focus on those related to subacromial impingement and rotator cuff tears. Other more unusual fluid collections and cystic lesions are described, including rice-bodies bursitis, idiopathic synovial osteochondromatosis, dialysis-related amyloid arthropathy, hemophilic arthropathy, infectious conditions, non-infectious inflammatory arthritis, and paralabral cysts. (orig.)

  15. Swimmer's Shoulder: Painful Shoulder in the Competitive Swimmer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzkin, Elizabeth; Suslavich, Kaytelin; Wes, David

    2016-08-01

    Swimmer's shoulder is a broad term often used to diagnose shoulder injury in swimmers. However, research has elucidated several specific shoulder injuries that often are incurred by the competitive swimmer. Hyperlaxity, scapular dyskinesis, subacromial impingement, labral damage, os acromiale, suprascapular nerve entrapment, and glenohumeral rotational imbalances all may be included within a differential diagnosis for shoulder pain in the competitive swimmer. An understanding of the mechanics of the swim stroke, in combination with the complex static and dynamic properties of the shoulder, is essential to the comprehension and identification of the painful swimmer's shoulder. It is important for the athlete, coach, and clinician to be aware of the discerning characteristics among these different injuries to ensure a proper diagnosis and treatment plan to aid the swimmer in his or her return to competition.

  16. MRI evaluation of amyloid myopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzler, J.P.; Fleckenstein, J.L.; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX; White, C.L. III; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX; Haller, R.G.; Greenlee, R.G. Jr.; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX; Frenkel, E.P.; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX

    1992-01-01

    Amyloid myopathy is a rare complication of primary amyloidosis. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of two patients with amyloid myopathy were studied. Slight prolongation of muscle T1 and T2 relaxation times was evident but the striking abnormality was marked reticulation of the subcutaneous fat. The clinical findings of indurated extremities far exceeds the minimal signal intenisty alteration seen in the muscles. The MR appearance of amyloid myopathy differs from that of other neuromuscular conditions in the minimal changes found in muscle, but the striking abnormality seen in subcutaneous fat makes it distinct from many neuromuscular conditions. (orig.)

  17. The shoulder in competitive swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A B; Jobe, F W; Collins, H R

    1980-01-01

    Shoulder pain is the most common orthopaedic problem in competitive swimming. In a group of 137 of this country's best swimmers, 58 had had symptoms of "swimmer's shoulder." Population characteristics of this group indicated that symptoms increased with the caliber of the athlete, were slightly more common in men, and were related to sprint rather than distance swimming. The use of hand-paddle training exacerbated symptoms, which were more common during the early and middle season. Consideration of shoulder mechanics in swimming reveals that freestyle, butterfly, and backstroke require similar motions; a swimmer using any of these strokes is susceptible to developing shoulder pain. Swimmer's shoulder represents chronic irritation of the humeral head and rotator cuff on the coracoacromial arch during abduction of the shoulder, the so-called impingement syndrome. Treatment included stretching, rest, ice therapy, oral antiinflammatory agents, judicious use of injectable steroids, and surgery as a last resort.

  18. Shoulder Dystocia: Prediction and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Meghan G; Cohen, Wayne R

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is a complication of vaginal delivery and the primary factor associated with brachial plexus injury. In this review, we discuss the risk factors for shoulder dystocia and propose a framework for the prediction and prevention of the complication. A recommended approach to management when shoulder dystocia occurs is outlined, with review of the maneuvers used to relieve the obstruction with minimal risk of fetal and maternal injury.

  19. Shoulder dystocia: prediction and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Meghan G; Cohen, Wayne R

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is a complication of vaginal delivery and the primary factor associated with brachial plexus injury. In this review, we discuss the risk factors for shoulder dystocia and propose a framework for the prediction and prevention of the complication. A recommended approach to management when shoulder dystocia occurs is outlined, with review of the maneuvers used to relieve the obstruction with minimal risk of fetal and maternal injury.

  20. Shoulder dystocia: management and documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitely, Michael L; Gherman, Robert B

    2014-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency that occurs when the fetal shoulders become impacted at the pelvic inlet. Management is based on performing maneuvers to alleviate this impaction. A number of protocols and training mnemonics have been developed to assist in managing shoulder dystocia when it occurs. This article reviews the evidence regarding the performance, timing, and sequence of these maneuvers; reviews the mechanism of fetal injury in relation to shoulder dystocia; and discusses issues concerning documentation of the care provided during this obstetric emergency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Protein Polymers and Amyloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Michael Wulff

    2014-01-01

    Several human disorders are caused by a common general disease mechanism arising from abnormal folding and aggregation of the underlying protein. These include the prevalent dementias like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, where accumulation of protein fibrillar structures, known as amyloid fibrils...... that inhibits its target protease through a large conformational change but mutations compromise this function and cause premature structural collapse into hyperstable polymers. Understanding the conformational disorders at a molecular level is not only important for our general knowledge on protein folding......, underlining the importance of understanding this relationship. The monomeric C-36 peptide was investigated by liquid-state NMR spectroscopy and found to be intrinsically disordered with minor propensities towards β-sheet structure. The plasticity of such a peptide makes it suitable for a whole range...

  2. Structural Analysis and Design of PCC Shoulders

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    A structural evaluation of PCC highway shoulders has been conducted and a comprehensive design procedure for plain jointed concrete shoulders developed. The procedure can be used to provide PCC shoulders either for rehabilitation of existing pavement...

  3. [Epidemiology of shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneux-Tharaux, C; Delorme, P

    2015-12-01

    To synthetize the available evidence regarding the incidence and risk factors of shoulder dystocia (SD). Consultation of the Medline database, and of national guidelines. Shoulder dystocia is defined as a vaginal delivery that requires additional obstetric manoeuvres to deliver the foetus after the head has delivered and gentle traction has failed. With this definition, the incidence of SD in population-based studies is about 0.5-1% of vaginal deliveries. Many risk factors have been described but most associations are not independent, or have not been constantly found. The 2 characteristics consistently found as independent risk factors for SD in the literature are previous SD (incidence of SD of about 10% in parturients with previous SD) and foetal macrosomia. Maternal diabetes and obesity also are associated with a higher risk of SD (2 to 4 folds) but these associations may be completely explained by foetal macrosomia. However, even factors independently and constantly associated with SD do not allow a valid prediction of SD because they are not discriminant; 50 to 70% of SD cases occur in their absence, and the great majority of deliveries when they are present is not associated with SD. Shoulder dystocia is defined by the need for additional obstetric manoeuvres to deliver the foetus after the head has delivered and gentle traction has failed, and complicates 0.5-1% of vaginal deliveries. Its main risk factors are previous SD and macrosomia, but they are poorly predictive. SD remains a non-predictable obstetrics emergency. Knowledge of SD risk factors should increase the vigilance of clinicians in at-risk contexts. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Can we predict shoulder dystocia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revicky, Vladimir; Mukhopadhyay, Sambit; Morris, Edward P; Nieto, Jose J

    2012-02-01

    To analyse the significance of risk factors and the possibility of prediction of shoulder dystocia. This was a retrospective cohort study. There were 9,767 vaginal deliveries at 37 and more weeks of gestation analysed during 2005-2007. Studied population included 234 deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia. Shoulder dystocia was defined as a delivery that required additional obstetric manoeuvres to release the shoulders after gentle downward traction has failed. First, a univariate analysis was done to identify the factors that had a significant association with shoulder dystocia. Parity, age, gestation, induction of labour, epidural analgesia, birth weight, duration of second stage of labour and mode of delivery were studied factors. All factors were then combined in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Adjusted odds ratios (Adj. OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. The incidence of shoulder dystocia was 2.4% (234/9,767). Only mode of delivery and birth weight were independent risk factors for shoulder dystocia. Parity, age, gestation, induction of labour, epidural analgesia and duration of second stage of labour were not independent risk factors. Ventouse delivery increases the risk of shoulder dystocia almost 3 times, forceps delivery comparing to the ventouse delivery increases risk almost 3.4 times. Risk of shoulder dystocia is minimal with the birth weight of 3,000 g or less. It is difficult to foretell the exact birth weight and the mode of delivery, therefore occurrence of shoulder dystocia is highly unpredictable. Regular drills for shoulder dystocia and awareness of increased incidence with instrumental deliveries are important to reduce fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality.

  5. Recurrent shoulder dystocia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Jemel; Chauhan, Suneet P; Hayes, Edward; Gherman, Robert; Lewis, David

    2010-03-01

    The goals of this review were to determine the incidence of recurrent shoulder dystocia and the incidence of brachial plexus injury in such cases. A search of PubMed was conducted between 1980 and March 2009. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. The search yielded 191 publications, of which 9 provided complete data; these were used to calculate the incidence of recurrent shoulder dystocia. The rate of shoulder dystocia in the prior pregnancies was 1.64% (31,311/1,911,014). Among 10,591 known subsequent vaginal births, the rate of recurrent shoulder dystocia was 12% (OR, 8.25; 95% CI, 7.77, 8.76). Brachial plexus injury occurred significantly more often during recurrent shoulder dystocia than during the first shoulder dystocia (4% vs. 1%; OR, 3.59; 95% CI, 2.44, 5.29; or 45/1000 vs. 13/1000 births). About 12% of parturients with a history of shoulder dystocia have a recurrent dystocia in the subsequent pregnancy, a risk of about 1 in 8. Brachial plexus injury occurs in 19/1000 vaginal births during the first episode of shoulder dystocia, and in 45/1000 vaginal births after recurrent dystocia. Obstetricians & Gynecologist, Family Physicians. After completion of this educational activity, the reader will be able to compare the risk of primary versus recurrent shoulder dystocia. Formulate counseling and treatment strategies for pregnant women who have had a prior pregnancy complicated by shoulder dystocia. Assess the strength of the evidence suggesting the risk of recurrent shoulder dystocia.

  6. Imaging shoulder impingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, R.H. (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Seeger, L.L. (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Yao, L. (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1993-11-01

    Appropriate imaging and clinical examinations may lead to early diagnosis and treatment of the shoulder impingement syndrome, thus preventing progression to a complete tear of the rotator cuff. In this article, we discuss the anatomic and pathophysiologic bases of the syndrome, and the rationale for certain imaging tests to evaluate it. Special radiographic projections to show the supraspinatus outlet and inferior surface of the anterior third of the acromion, combined with magnetic resonance images, usually provide the most useful information regarding the causes of impingement. (orig.)

  7. Imaging shoulder impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.H.; Seeger, L.L.; Yao, L.

    1993-01-01

    Appropriate imaging and clinical examinations may lead to early diagnosis and treatment of the shoulder impingement syndrome, thus preventing progression to a complete tear of the rotator cuff. In this article, we discuss the anatomic and pathophysiologic bases of the syndrome, and the rationale for certain imaging tests to evaluate it. Special radiographic projections to show the supraspinatus outlet and inferior surface of the anterior third of the acromion, combined with magnetic resonance images, usually provide the most useful information regarding the causes of impingement. (orig.)

  8. MRI of shoulder instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Lynne S. [University of California San Francisco, 505 Parnassus, Suite M392, San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States)], E-mail: lynne.steinbach@radiology.ucsf.edu

    2008-10-15

    The most unstable joint in the body, the glenohumeral joint is subject to many insults including microinstability, subluxation and dislocation. During the last two decades, MRI has allowed for direct visualization of many of the lesions related to instability, aiding in diagnosis as well as therapeutic planning and follow-up. This article reviews the use of MRI for shoulder instability and describes the different types of lesions associated with this disorder. Topics include technical considerations, the use of MR arthrography, normal anatomy and variants, labral and glenohumeral ligament pathology, and osseous lesions related to instability.

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid β40 Is Decreased in Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Marcel M.; Kremer, Berry P. H.; Rikkert, Marcel Olde; van Domburg, Peter H. M. F.; Skehan, Maureen E.; Greenberg, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is caused by deposition of the amyloid β protein in the cerebral vasculature. In analogy to previous observations in Alzheimer disease, we hypothesized that analysis of amyloid β40 and β42 proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid might serve as a molecular biomarker. We observed strongly decreased cerebrospinal fluid amyloid β40 (p < 0.01 vs controls or Alzheimer disease) and amyloid β42 concentrations (p < 0.001 vs controls and p < 0.05 vs Alzheimer disease) in cerebral amyloid angiopathy patients. The combination of amyloid β42 and total tau discriminated cerebral amyloid angiopathy from controls, with an area under the receiver operator curve of 0.98. Our data are consistent with neuropathological evidence that amyloid β40 as well as amyloid β42 protein are selectively trapped in the cerebral vasculature from interstitial fluid drainage pathways that otherwise transport amyloid β proteins toward the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:19743453

  10. [Symphysiotomy to relieve shoulder dystocia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourad, S.M.; Nieuwenhof, H.P. van de; Biert, J.; Heidema, W.M.; Bekker, M.N.

    2014-01-01

    Symphysiotomy to manage shoulder dystocia is seldom used in the western world. For this reason, in well-resourced countries knowledge of its recuperation rate and the management of physical discomfort in the post-partum period is scarce. We describe two cases of symphysiotomy for shoulder dystocia.

  11. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a

  12. [The total shoulder prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazas, F; Gagey, O

    1990-04-11

    Prosthetic shoulder replacement is impeded by two main obstacles: the articular cavity is very shallow, and the small glenoid surface rests on a narrow neck to which prosthetic pieces are difficult to attach. The principal, currently used prostheses are non-retentive models which reproduce the anatomy of the joint. They differ from each other mainly in the glenoid piece pattern which may be sealed only to the glenoid cavity or also fixed onto the acromion. On the whole, the clinical results reported are encouraging, particularly as regards the absence of pain, but the radiological course of the glenoidal sealing is a source of concern. Obvious unsealing is rare, but cracks between bone and cement are very frequent and some of them become wider as time goes by. In addition, there is still no satisfactory solution to the problem of big rotator cuff tears. This type of prosthesis must be envisaged with caution and should be reserved to very painful shoulders, but it would be wise not to wait until the rotator cuff is destroyed. The best indications are glenohumeral osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and necrosis of the tumoral head.

  13. Shoulder Pain After Thoracic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blichfeldt-Eckhardt, Morten R; Andersen, Claus; Ørding, Helle

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the time course of ipsilateral shoulder pain after thoracic surgery with respect to incidence, pain intensity, type of pain (referred versus musculoskeletal), and surgical approach. DESIGN: Prospective, observational cohort study. SETTING: Odense University Hospital, Denmark....... PARTICIPANTS: Sixty patients for major lung resection. INTERVENTIONS: Postoperative observation of ipsilateral shoulder pain. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Postoperative numeric rating scale score of shoulder pain and thoracic pain and postoperative examination of the sites of shoulder pain...... for musculoskeletal involvement (muscle tenderness on palpation and movement) with follow-up 12 months after surgery. Clinically relevant pain was defined as a numeric rating scale score>3. Of the 60 patients included, 47 (78%) experienced ipsilateral shoulder pain, but only 25 (42%) reported clinically relevant...

  14. The Weight-Bearing Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ronak M; Gelber, Jonathan D; Schickendantz, Mark S

    2018-01-01

    The shoulder achieves a wide spectrum of motion, and in a subset of patients, including those who use manual wheelchairs and upper extremity walking aids, the shoulder also serves as the primary weight-bearing joint. Because the weight-bearing shoulder is subject to considerable joint reaction forces and overuse, a broad spectrum of pathology can affect the joint. The combination of muscle imbalance and repetitive trauma presents most commonly as subacromial impingement syndrome but can progress to other pathology. Patients with high-level spinal cord injury, leading to quadriplegia and motor deficits, have an increased incidence of shoulder pain. Understanding the needs of patients who use manual wheelchairs or walking aids can help the physician to better comprehend the pathology of and better manage the weight-bearing shoulder.

  15. Contemporary management of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittens-Williams, Lisa

    2010-11-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an uncommon but potentially catastrophic intrapartum event. Although risk factors such as maternal diabetes, obesity and macrosomia can be identified, shoulder dystocia most frequently occurs in patients who lack risk factors. Many maneuvers have been described to assist the operator in the safe release of the shoulder and subsequent delivery; however, no prospective trials have compared these maneuvers in such a way to suggest that one maneuver is superior to another. This article describes the identification of patients at risk for shoulder dystocia, clinical management of the shoulder dystocia, event documentation and the contemporary use of drills and simulation training to improve team preparedness for this unpredictable and usually unavoidable event.

  16. Proteomic screening for amyloid proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton A Nizhnikov

    Full Text Available Despite extensive study, progress in elucidation of biological functions of amyloids and their role in pathology is largely restrained due to the lack of universal and reliable biochemical methods for their discovery. All biochemical methods developed so far allowed only identification of glutamine/asparagine-rich amyloid-forming proteins or proteins comprising amyloids that form large deposits. In this article we present a proteomic approach which may enable identification of a broad range of amyloid-forming proteins independently of specific features of their sequences or levels of expression. This approach is based on the isolation of protein fractions enriched with amyloid aggregates via sedimentation by ultracentrifugation in the presence of strong ionic detergents, such as sarkosyl or SDS. Sedimented proteins are then separated either by 2D difference gel electrophoresis or by SDS-PAGE, if they are insoluble in the buffer used for 2D difference gel electrophoresis, after which they are identified by mass-spectrometry. We validated this approach by detection of known yeast prions and mammalian proteins with established capacity for amyloid formation and also revealed yeast proteins forming detergent-insoluble aggregates in the presence of human huntingtin with expanded polyglutamine domain. Notably, with one exception, all these proteins contained glutamine/asparagine-rich stretches suggesting that their aggregates arose due to polymerization cross-seeding by human huntingtin. Importantly, though the approach was developed in a yeast model, it can easily be applied to any organism thus representing an efficient and universal tool for screening for amyloid proteins.

  17. Clinical picture of the amyloid arthropathy in patients with chronic renal failure maintained on haemodialysis using cellulose membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Gómez, J; Gómez-Pérez, R; Llopart-Buisán, E; Solé-Arqués, M

    1987-08-01

    The clinical picture of 15 patients (10 male, five female) with amyloid arthropathy secondary to chronic renal failure treated with haemodialysis has been studied. The average period of haemodialysis was 10.8 years. Joint symptoms appeared between three and 13 years after starting haemodialysis. No patient had renal amyloidosis. Early symptoms were varied and often overlapped: knee swelling (seven patients), painful and stiff shoulders (seven), and carpal tunnel syndrome (six) were the most prominent. Follow up showed extension to other joints. Joint effusions were generally of the non-inflammatory type. Radiologically, geodes and erosions of variable sizes were seen in the affected joints, which can develop into a destructive arthropathy. Amyloid was found in abdominal fat in three of the 12 patients on whom a needle aspiration was performed. Four of 12 patients showed changes compatible with amyloid infiltration in the echocardiogram. One patient had amyloid in the gastric muscular layer, another in the colon mucus, and two of four in rectal biopsy specimens. Amyloid deposits showed the presence of beta 2 microglobulin in 10 patients. The clinical and radiological picture was similar to the amyloid arthropathy associated with multiple myeloma. These patients can develop systemic amyloidosis.

  18. Shoulder dystocia: definitions and incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Alexandra; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2014-06-01

    Though subjective in nature, both the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists practice bulletin and the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists green guideline are in agreement on the descriptor of shoulder dystocia: requirement of additional obstetric maneuvers when gentle downward traction has failed to affect the delivery of the shoulders. The rate of shoulder dystocia is about 1.4% of all deliveries and 0.7% for vaginal births. Compared to non-diabetics (0.6%), among diabetics, the rate of impacted shoulders is 201% higher (1.9%); newborns delivered by vacuum or forceps have 254% higher likelihood of shoulder dystocia than those born spontaneously (2.0% vs. 0.6%, respectively). When the birthweight is categorized as 4500 g, the likelihood of shoulder dystocia in the US vs. other countries varies significantly. Future studies should focus on lowering the rate of shoulder dystocia and its associated morbidities, without concomitantly increasing the rate of cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Shoulder arthrodesis in 14 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Noel; Yeadon, Russell; Smith, Thomas J; Johnson, Jacqueline; Baltzer, Wendy I; Amils, Raquel; Farrell, Michael; Frost, Alasdair O; Frost, Alastair; Holsworth, Ian G

    2012-08-01

    To report surgical technique and clinical outcome of shoulder arthrodesis in dogs. Multicenter clinical case series. Dogs (n = 14). Shoulder arthrodesis featured craniolateral plate and screw application, with application of a 2nd plate and screws craniolaterally or caudolaterally in 5 shoulders. Implants included the locking string of pearls (SOP)™ plate in 7 shoulders. Subjective preoperative, 5-8 weeks postoperative, and 11-16 weeks postoperative clinical and radiographic findings were documented. Owner questionnaire evaluation of outcome was performed 6-20 months postoperatively. Mean angle of arthrodesis was 114° (range 102°-122°). Progression of arthrodesis was noted in 13/14 cases at both the 5-8 and 11-16 weeks postoperative radiographic assessments. Nine complications occurred in 7/14 dogs, graded as catastrophic in 2/9, major in 2/9, and minor in 5/9. Where morbidity was successfully managed, 11-16-week and 6-10-month postoperative limb function was positive on both veterinary and owner evaluations in almost all cases, and in several, functional lameness was considered sufficiently mild as to be imperceptible on subjective veterinary evaluation. Where present, limb circumduction was noted as the major feature of persistent lameness. Shoulder arthrodesis in dogs results in acceptable limb function and should be considered for the management of debilitating shoulder pathology despite a high incidence of complications. Application of the SOP plate to aid shoulder arthrodesis warrants further study. © Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  20. MRI of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-02-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  1. MRI of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-01-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  2. Shoulder Stiffness : Current Concepts and Concerns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itoi, Eiji; Arce, Guillermo; Bain, Gregory I.; Diercks, Ronald L.; Guttmann, Dan; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Sugaya, Hiroyuki; Yoo, Yon-Sik

    Shoulder stiffness can be caused by various etiologies such as immobilization, trauma, or surgical interventions. The Upper Extremity Committee of ISAKOS defined the term "frozen shoulder" as idiopathic stiff shoulder, that is, without a known cause. Secondary stiff shoulder is a term that should be

  3. Shoulder injuries in soccer players

    OpenAIRE

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Berton, Alessandra; Martinelli, Nicolò; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Even though soccer is the most popular sport of the world, no review is available at present to resume the available data on shoulder injuries in soccer. The aim of this review is to report the available epidemiological data on shoulder specific injuries in soccer players and to describe the common mechanisms of shoulder injuries in soccer. Studies published through September 15, 2011, were identified by using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Pre-CINAHL, Pub-Med, Web of Science, and the full Cochr...

  4. Ultrasonography of the painful shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terriza, M.D.; Manzanares, R.

    1995-01-01

    A thorough knowledge of the normal anatomy was applied in the study of 132 patients with painful shoulder to establish the ultrasonographic findings that indicate the diagnosis of lesions of the rotator cuff of the shoulder (tendentious, tendons degeneration and the different types of fracture) as well as bursitis, lesions of the tendon of the long head of the biceps, joint effusions, lesions of the humeral head, etc. As an initial method of studying painful shoulder using standard plain radiography, this techniques is considered a reliable diagnostic procedure. (Author)

  5. Vaccination-related shoulder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodor, Marko; Montalvo, Enoch

    2007-01-08

    We present two cases of shoulder pain and weakness following influenza and pneumococcal vaccine injections provided high into the deltoid muscle. Based on ultrasound measurements, we hypothesize that vaccine injected into the subdeltoid bursa caused a periarticular inflammatory response, subacromial bursitis, bicipital tendonitis and adhesive capsulitis. Resolution of symptoms followed corticosteroid injections to the subacromial space, bicipital tendon sheath and glenohumeral joint, followed by physical therapy. We conclude that the upper third of the deltoid muscle should not be used for vaccine injections, and the diagnosis of vaccination-related shoulder dysfunction should be considered in patients presenting with shoulder pain following a vaccination.

  6. Shoulder proprioception - lessons we learned from idiopathic frozen shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabis, Jaroslaw; Rzepka, Remigiusz; Fabis, Anna; Zwierzchowski, Jacek; Kubiak, Grzegorz; Stanula, Arkadiusz; Polguj, Michal; Maciej, Radek

    2016-03-12

    Of all the most frequent soft tissue disorders of the shoulder, idiopathic frozen shoulder (IFS) offers the greatest potential for studying proprioception. Studies concerning the presence of proprioception dysfunctions have failed to determine the potential for spontaneous healing of passive shoulder stabilizers (anterior and posterior capsule, middle and inferior gleno-humeral ligaments), its relationship with passive (PJPS) and active (AJPS) shoulder proprioception for internal and external rotation (IR, ER), as well as the isokinetic muscle performance of the internal and external rotators. This study investigates these dependencies in the case of arthroscopic release of IFS. The study group comprised 23 patients (average aged 54.2) who underwent arthroscopic release due to IFS and 20 healthy volunteers. The average follow-up time was 29.2 months. The Biodex system was used for proprioception measurement in a modified neutral arm position and isokinetic evaluation. The results were analysed using the T-test, Wilcoxon and interclass correlation coefficient. P-values lower than 0.05 were considered significant. Statistically significant differences were found between involved (I) and uninvolved (U) shoulders only in the cases of PJPS and AJPS, peak torque, time to peak torque and acceleration time for ER (p  0.05) for the U shoulders. The anatomical structure of anterior (capsule, middle and anterior band of inferior gleno-humeral ligament) and posterior (capsule and posterior band of inferior gleno-humeral ligament) passive shoulder restraints has no impact on the difference in PJPS values between ER and IR in a modified neutral shoulder position. The potential for spontaneous healing of the anterior and posterior passive shoulder restraints influences PJPS recovery after arthroscopic release of IFS. ER peak torque deficits negatively affect AJPS values. PJPS and AJPS of ER and IR can be measured with a high level of reproducibility using an isokinetic

  7. Using your shoulder after surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... home. Use the information below as a reminder. Self-care Wear the sling or immobilizer at all times, ... Your surgeon will refer you to a physical therapist to learn exercises for your shoulder. You will ...

  8. Shoulder injuries in overhead sports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woertler, K.

    2010-01-01

    Overhead sport places great demands on the shoulder joint. Shoulder pain in overhead athletes and throwers can in the majority of cases be attributed to lesions resulting from chronic overuse of tendons and capsuloligamentous structures or to sequels of microinstability and secondary impingement. Due to its great impact on therapeutic decisions, imaging in athletes with unclear shoulder pain is a challenge. In this connection, magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography represents the cross-sectional imaging modality of first choice, as it allows depiction and exclusion of pathologic alterations of all relevant joint structures with sufficient confidence. This article reviews the biomechanical and clinical aspects and MR arthrographic features of the most common shoulder pathologies in overhead athletes, including biceps tendinopathy, superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, rotator cuff lesions, as well as extrinsic and intrinsic impingement syndromes. (orig.) [de

  9. [Shoulder injuries in overhead sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörtler, K

    2010-05-01

    Overhead sport places great demands on the shoulder joint. Shoulder pain in overhead athletes and throwers can in the majority of cases be attributed to lesions resulting from chronic overuse of tendons and capsuloligamentous structures or to sequels of microinstability and secondary impingement. Due to its great impact on therapeutic decisions, imaging in athletes with unclear shoulder pain is a challenge. In this connection, magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography represents the cross-sectional imaging modality of first choice, as it allows depiction and exclusion of pathologic alterations of all relevant joint structures with sufficient confidence.This article reviews the biomechanical and clinical aspects and MR arthrographic features of the most common shoulder pathologies in overhead athletes, including biceps tendinopathy, superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, rotator cuff lesions, as well as extrinsic and intrinsic impingement syndromes.

  10. [Impingement syndromes of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirer, M; Imhoff, A B; Braun, S

    2017-04-01

    In addition to tears of the rotator cuff, isolated impingement syndrome of the shoulder is the most common diagnosis in shoulder disorders. This is of high relevance in orthopedic sports medicine. In fact, impingement of the shoulder is not the diagnosis but rather a symptom of a functional or even a structural pathology. Detailed knowledge about the different types of impingement and the underlying causes is essential to provide adequate treatment. Primarily, impingement of the shoulder should be treated nonoperatively. However, if there is no clinical improve despite adequate conservative treatment, there is usually a structural pathology which cannot be adequately compensated for and surgical treatment may be necessary. In the case of severe structural pathologies, such as a full-thickness tear of the rotator cuff, a subsequent surgical treatment may be indicated.

  11. [Symphysiotomy to relieve shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourad, Selma M; van de Nieuwenhof, Hedwig P; Biert, Jan; Heidema, Wieteke M; Bekker, Mireille N

    2014-01-01

    Symphysiotomy to manage shoulder dystocia is seldom used in the western world. For this reason, in well-resourced countries knowledge of its recuperation rate and the management of physical discomfort in the post-partum period is scarce. We describe two cases of symphysiotomy for shoulder dystocia. Both babies did very well in the postpartum period. The short-term 6-week and 6-month follow-up of both mothers is described. Short-term maternal complications were minor and based on prolonged immobilization. In accordance with the international literature, the short-term and long-term follow-up after symphysiotomy for shoulder dystocia was good and there were no major maternal or neonatal complications. We therefore wish to advocate symphysiotomy as a good and safe option to deliver a baby in cases of severe shoulder dystocia, when all other manoeuvres fail.

  12. Irreducible Traumatic Posterior Shoulder Dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake Collier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 22-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department complaining of right shoulder pain after a motocross accident. He was traveling at approximately 10 mph around a turn when he lost control and was thrown over the handlebars, landing directly on his right shoulder. On arrival, he was holding his arm in adduction and internal rotation. An area of swelling was noted over his anterior shoulder. He was unable to abduct his shoulder. No humeral gapping was noted. He had normal neuro-vascular status distal to the injury. Significant findings: Radiographs demonstrated posterior displacement of the humeral head on the “Y” view (see white arrow and widening of the glenohumeral joint space on anterior-posterior view (see red arrow. The findings were consistent with posterior dislocation and a Hill-Sachs type deformity. Sedation was performed and reduction was attempted using external rotation, traction counter-traction. An immediate “pop” was felt during the procedure. Post-procedure radiographs revealed a persistent posterior subluxation with interlocking at posterior glenoid. CT revealed posterior dislocation with acute depressed impaction deformity medial to the biceps groove with the humeral head perched on the posterior glenoid, interlocked at reverse Hill-Sachs deformity (see blue arrow. Discussion: Posterior shoulder dislocations are rare and represent only 2% of all shoulder dislocations. Posterior shoulder dislocations are missed on initial diagnosis in more than 60% of cases.1 Posterior shoulder dislocations result from axial loading of the adducted and internally rotated shoulder, violent muscle contractions (resulting from seizures or electrocution, a direct posterior force applied to the anterior shoulder.1 Physical findings include decreased anterior prominence of the humeral head, increased palpable posterior prominence of the humeral head below the acromion, increased palpable prominence of the

  13. DIABETES AND SHOULDER ADHESIVE CAPSULITIS

    OpenAIRE

    J. Mohanakrishnan; Bhanumathy Mohanakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adhesive capsulitis (AC) of shoulder is a common condition encountered by physical therapists in their routine outpatient care services; AC of shoulder is as by itself being a self limiting disorder lasts from months to years causing pain and discomfort to the patients. The condition is commonly associated with Diabetes mellitus or other co morbidities. The incidence of AC is high among diabetic individuals and it becomes mandatory on the part of physical therapists and other heal...

  14. Stemless shoulder arthroplasty: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, R Sean

    2014-09-01

    Since the original Neer humeral replacement in the 1950s, the standard primary anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty design has slowly evolved. Most recently, the humeral stem has become progressively shorter to help combat stem-related complications. Currently, there are several companies who have developed and marketed a stemless humeral arthroplasty component. Manufacturers' data for 5 stemless shoulder arthroplasty components currently on the market were analyzed and reviewed. A literature review of short-term results for stemless shoulder arthroplasty was completed. Of the stemless shoulder arthroplasty systems available on the market, 3 are currently undergoing clinical trials in the United States. The Tornier Simpliciti (Tornier, Edina, MN, USA) clinical trial began in 2011. The study with 2-year minimum follow-up results is scheduled for completion in November 2014. The Arthrex Eclipse (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) clinical trial was started in January 2013. The tentative study completion date is 2017. The Biomet Nano (Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA) clinical trial began in October 2013 and also has a tentative completion date of 2017. No other clinical trial is currently under way in the United States. Early results for stemless shoulder arthroplasty indicate clinical results similar to standard stemmed shoulder arthroplasty. Radiographic analysis indicates implant stability without migration or subsidence at 2- to 3-year minimum follow-up.. Several stemless shoulder arthroplasty implants are available outside the United States. Early clinical and radiographic results are promising, but well-designed clinical studies and midterm results are lacking. Three clinical trials are currently under way in the United States with initial availability for use anticipated in 2015. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Nathalie J

    2013-02-01

    This review article presents the current knowledge on the epidemiology and the pathogenesis of calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder and discusses the clinical presentation in relation to the stage of the disease process and the appearance of the calcific deposits. The outcome and the available treatment modalities for this common shoulder disorder are also examined, emphasizing the technique of percutaneous lavage and aspiration under ultrasound guidance. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. New concepts in restoring shoulder elevation in a stiff and painful shoulder patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donatelli, Robert; Ruivo, R M; Thurner, Michael; Ibrahim, Mahmoud Ibrahim

    2014-02-01

    The treatment and evaluation of a stiff and painful shoulder, characteristic of adhesive capsulitis and "frozen" shoulders, is a dilemma for orthopedic rehabilitation specialists. A stiff and painful shoulder is all-inclusive of Adhesive capsulitis and Frozen Shoulder diagnoses. Adhesive capsulitis and frozen shoulder will be referred to as a stiff and painful shoulder, throughout this paper. Shoulder motion occurs in multiple planes of movement. Loss of shoulder mobility can result in significant functional impairment. The traditional treatment approach to restore shoulder mobility emphasizes mobilization of the shoulder overhead. Forced elevation in a stiff and painful shoulder can be painful and potentially destructive to the glenohumeral joint. This manuscript will introduce a new biomechanical approach to evaluate and treat patients with stiff and painful shoulders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nanomechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweers, K K M; Bennink, M L; Subramaniam, V

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are traditionally associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the ability to form amyloid fibrils appears to be a more generic property of proteins. While disease-related, or pathological, amyloid fibrils are relevant for understanding the pathology and course of the disease, functional amyloids are involved, for example, in the exceptionally strong adhesive properties of natural adhesives. Amyloid fibrils are thus becoming increasingly interesting as versatile nanobiomaterials for applications in biotechnology. In the last decade a number of studies have reported on the intriguing mechanical characteristics of amyloid fibrils. In most of these studies atomic force microscopy (AFM) and atomic force spectroscopy play a central role. AFM techniques make it possible to probe, at nanometer length scales, and with exquisite control over the applied forces, biological samples in different environmental conditions. In this review we describe the different AFM techniques used for probing mechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils on the nanoscale. An overview is given of the existing mechanical studies on amyloid. We discuss the difficulties encountered with respect to the small fibril sizes and polymorphic behavior of amyloid fibrils. In particular, the different conformational packing of monomers within the fibrils leads to a heterogeneity in mechanical properties. We conclude with a brief outlook on how our knowledge of these mechanical properties of the amyloid fibrils can be exploited in the construction of nanomaterials from amyloid fibrils. (topical review)

  18. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  19. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Fowler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  20. Terapeutika amyloidóz

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, Monika; Hrubý, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 12 (2016), s. 851-859 ISSN 0009-2770 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : amyloidosis * amyloid * Alzheimer's disease Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.387, year: 2016 http://www.chemicke-listy.cz/common/article-vol_110-issue_12-page_851.html

  1. Anterior shoulder dislocations in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronen, J G

    1986-01-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocations, primary and recurrent, are among the most disabling injuries to the shoulder that can plague the athlete. The diagnosis is easily made by the following: the physical appearance of the shoulder; loss of capability by the athlete to internally and externally rotate the shoulder with the elbow at his side; by evaluating the mechanism of injury; and x-rays. Anterior shoulder dislocations should be reduced as soon as possible after diagnosis, to minimise the stretching effect on the neurovascular structures while the humeral head is dislocated. The reduction is not done to allow the athlete to return immediately to sport. Use of a simple traction method in the first 10 to 15 minutes following the injury will result in a successful reduction in the vast majority of dislocations. Reduction of the humeral head can be confirmed by the athlete regaining the capability to internally and externally rotate his shoulder with his elbow at his side. Following reduction, the athlete should begin a treatment regimen which includes a restrengthening programme emphasising the muscles of internal rotation and adduction plus rigid restrictions of activities until the goals of the rehabilitation programme are satisfied. The author's experience with this treatment regimen with athletes at the United States Naval Academy, has shown a decrease of the recurrence rate of primary anterior shoulder dislocations to 25% versus the 80% recurrence rate we have become familiar with from studies done which did not stress specific rehabilitation programmes. The athlete should also be instructed in a self-performed traction method for reduction should a redislocation occur, to minimise the stretching effect on the neurovascular structures and allow relief from discomfort. Surgery for primary and recurrent anterior dislocations should only be considered when the athlete fails to achieve the desired goals after participating in a specific, progressive, adequate

  2. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunyamin Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn’s disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis.

  3. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neviaser, Andrew S; Neviaser, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is characterized by painful, gradual loss of active and passive shoulder motion resulting from fibrosis and contracture of the joint capsule. Other shoulder pathology can produce a similar clinical picture, however, and must be considered. Management is based on the underlying cause of pain and stiffness, and determination of the etiology is essential. Subtle clues in the history and physical examination can help differentiate adhesive capsulitis from other conditions that cause a stiff, painful shoulder. The natural history of adhesive capsulitis is a matter of controversy. Management of true capsular restriction of motion (ie, true adhesive capsulitis) begins with gentle, progressive stretching exercises. Most patients improve with nonsurgical treatment. Indications for surgery should be individualized. Failure to obtain symptomatic improvement and continued functional disability following ≥6 months of physical therapy is a general guideline for surgical intervention. Diligent postoperative therapy to maintain motion is required to minimize recurrence of adhesive capsulitis.

  4. MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritts, H.M.; Craig, E.; Kyle, R.; Strefling, M.; Miller, D.; Heithoff, K.; Schellhas, K.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (1.5-T unit) was performed in over 600 shoulders to evaluate shoulder pain. Ultrasound (US) and arthrography were performed in over 100 patients. Surgery was performed in over 75 patients. MR imaging offers information not well evaluated with other modalities, including bony impingement, tendinitis, bursitis, and osseous abnormalities, such as primary arthritis, avascular necrosis, occult fractures, and tumors. US and MR findings correlate well with surgical findings for medium to large rotator cuff tears. MR imaging with T2 weighting is superior for differentiating small tears from associated tendinitis. An algorithm for cost-effective shoulder imaging integrating US, MR imaging, arthrography, and computed tomographic arthrography are presented

  5. Amyloid myopathy: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Tuomaala

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid myopathy (AM is a rare manifestation of primary systemic amyloidosis (AL. Like inflammatory myopathies, it presents with proximal muscle weakness and an increased creatine kinase level. We describe a case of AL with severe, rapidly progressive myopathy as the initial symptom. The clinical manifestation and muscle biopsy were suggestive of inclusion body myositis. AM was not suspected until amyloidosis was seen in the gastric mucosal biopsy. The muscle biopsy was then re-examined more specifically, and Congo red staining eventually showed vascular and interstitial amyloid accumulation, which led to a diagnosis of AM. The present case illustrates the fact that the clinical picture of AM can mimic that of inclusion body myositis.

  6. Shoulder Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Elbows, Forearms, and Shoulders - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Exercises to Strengthen Your Shoulder - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified ( ...

  7. Heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgaard-Andersen, P.; Frich, Lars Henrik; Sjøbjerg, J.O.

    1989-01-01

    the glenohumeral and/or the glenoacromial space. There was no correlation between shoulder pain and the development of ossification. Shoulders with grade III heterotopic bone formation had a limited range of active elevation compared with shoulders without or with only a milder lesion. Men and patients......The incidence and location of heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty were evaluated in 58 Neer Mark-II total shoulder replacements. One year after surgery, 45% had developed some ectopic ossification. In six shoulders (10%) the ossifications roentgenographically bridged...... with osteoarthritis of the shoulder joint were significantly disposed to the development of heterotopic bone. Heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty is frequent, but disabling heterotopic ossifications seem to be rare....

  8. Painful Shoulder in Swimmers: A Diagnostic Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, William C.

    1986-01-01

    This article discusses the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of painful shoulder in swimmers, including: regional problems that can cause shoulder pain; physical, clinical, and laboratory tests for diagnostic use; and approaches to management of the problem. (Author/CB)

  9. Shoulder Dystocia: Incidence and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounian, Joseph G

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia complicates ∼1% of vaginal births. Although fetal macrosomia and maternal diabetes are risk factors for shoulder dystocia, for the most part its occurrence remains largely unpredictable and unpreventable.

  10. 21 CFR 888.3690 - Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3690 Section 888.3690 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as cobalt-chromium...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3680 - Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3680 Section 888.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis is a device that has a glenoid (socket) component...

  12. Kinematics of the contralateral and ipsilateral shoulder: A possible relationship with post-stroke shoulder pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Koppe, P.; Konijnenbelt, M.; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Post-stroke shoulder pain is a common phenomenon in hemiplegia and impedes rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to identify a possible relationship between post-stroke shoulder pain, scapula resting position and shoulder motion. Methods: Shoulder kinematics of 27 patients after

  13. Shoulder Taping and Neuromuscular Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Farrell, Scott F; Tsao, Henry; Osmotherly, Peter G; Rivett, Darren A; Chipchase, Lucy S; Schabrun, Siobhan M

    2018-03-23

      Scapular taping can offer clinical benefit to some patients with shoulder pain; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Understanding these mechanisms may guide the development of treatment strategies for managing neuromusculoskeletal shoulder conditions.   To examine the mechanisms underpinning the benefits of scapular taping.   Descriptive laboratory study.   University laboratory.   A total of 15 individuals (8 men, 7 women; age = 31.0 ± 12.4 years, height = 170.9 ± 7.6 cm, mass = 73.8 ± 14.4 kg) with no history of shoulder pain.   Scapular taping.   Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to assess the (1) magnitude and onset of contraction of the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), and serratus anterior relative to the contraction of the middle deltoid during active shoulder flexion and abduction and (2) corticomotor excitability (amplitude of motor-evoked potentials from transcranial magnetic stimulation) of these muscles at rest and during isometric abduction. Active shoulder-flexion and shoulder-abduction range of motion were also evaluated. All outcomes were measured before taping, immediately after taping, 24 hours after taping with the original tape on, and 24 hours after taping with the tape removed.   Onset of contractions occurred earlier immediately after taping than before taping during abduction for the UT (34.18 ± 118.91 milliseconds and 93.95 ± 106.33 milliseconds, respectively, after middle deltoid contraction; P = .02) and during flexion for the LT (110.02 ± 109.83 milliseconds and 5.94 ± 92.35 milliseconds, respectively, before middle deltoid contraction; P = .06). These changes were not maintained 24 hours after taping. Mean motor-evoked potential onset of the middle deltoid was earlier at 24 hours after taping (tape on = 7.20 ± 4.33 milliseconds) than before taping (8.71 ± 5.24 milliseconds, P = .008). We observed no differences in peak root mean square EMG activity or corticomotor excitability of

  14. MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.G.; Neumann, C.H.; Petersen, S.; Steinbach, L.S.; Jahnke, A.H.; Morgan, F.W.; Heuck, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper defines the MR appearance of the supraspinatus tendon and associated structures in asymptomatic individuals in order to assist in the differentiation of normal aging from rotator cuff pathology as seen in shoulder impingement syndrome. Proton-density and T2-weighted oblique coronal spin-echo images were obtained at 1.5 T. Images of 48 shoulders from asymptomatic volunteers, aged 22-25 years, were evaluated for signal intensity and distribution in the supraspinatus tendon (SST) and for the appearance of the subacromial-subdeltoid (peribursal) fat plane and acromial outlet

  15. Diagnostic Injections About the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Edward; Bernard, Johnathan; Dein, Eric; Johnson, Alex

    2017-12-01

    Injections about the shoulder serve diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes. Diagnosis of shoulder conditions, such as rotator cuff tears, acromioclavicular joint pathology, subacromial impingement or anterolateral pain syndrome, glenohumeral joint pathology, suprascapular nerve entrapment, and biceps tendon pathologies, is often complicated by concomitant conditions with overlapping symptoms and by inconclusive physical examination and imaging results. Injections of anesthetic agents can often help clinicians locate the source of pain. However, technique and accuracy of needle placement can vary by route. Accuracy is often improved with the use of ultrasonography guidance, although studies differ on the benefits of guided versus unguided injection.

  16. Shoulder arthography in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinbold, W.D.; Hehne, H.J.; Rau, W.S.; Freiburg Univ.

    1983-01-01

    Shoulder arthrography in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is performed to differentiate between a rheumatoid flare and limitation of motion secondary to tear in the rotator cuff. Accurate diagnosis is important because of the therapeutic implications. The arthrographic findings characteristic of rheumatoid involvement of the shoulder joint are nodular filling defects of the joint, the subacromial and subdeltoideal bursa in case of rotator cuff tear, irregular capsular attachment, contracted joint space and visualized lymphatic drainage. A dilatation of the biceps tendon sheath has not been shown. (orig.) [de

  17. Amyloid imaging: the court of public opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Alan J

    2013-09-24

    Human amyloid imaging is one of the great recent translational medicine stories. Beginning with the recognition that Thioflavin T derivatives could be used as PET tracers, through development of Pittsburgh compound B, to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of Florbetapir in 2012, human amyloid imaging has held great promise to allow in vivo inclusive diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD), even though the first principle of amyloid PET is that it functions as a surrogate for β-amyloid pathology, and not necessarily as a surrogate for the diagnosis of AD.(1,2.)

  18. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  19. Periarthritis of the shoulder-MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Mako; Nomura, Kazutoshi; Hashimoto, Noburo; Fukumoto, Tetsuya; Oshima, Suguru; Katahira, Kazuhiro [Kumamoto National Hospital (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    We examined MRI findings in patients with periarthritis of the shoulder. We excluded cuff tears, calcified tendinitis, instability of the shoulder, fracture and impingement syndrome of young patients. Subjects comprised 36 cases, 38 shoulders (25 men and 11 women), with an average age of 59.1 years (42-75). Scanning was performed on a Gyroscan T5-II 0.5-T (Philips). T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal oblique plane, T2-weighted sequences in the coronal sagittal plane and horizontal plane were taken. Twelve shoulders showed some change in the humeral heads. Degeneration of the rotator cuff was observed in 15 shoulders. Joint fluid collection was observed in the gleno-humeral joints of 15 shoulders, in the subacromial bursa of 11 shoulders and in the acromio-clavicular joints of 7 shoulders. Twenty four shoulders had fluid collection in the sheath of the long head of the biceps long tendon. Localized high signal area was observed around the inferior pouch in 11 shoulders. We studied the relationship between MRI findings and clinical symptoms. There was no significant relationship but the shoulders with night pain and severe contractures had a higher positive rate of joint fluid collection on MRI than the shoulders without night pain and with less contractures. (author)

  20. Frozen shoulder and risk of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Alma B; Horváth-Puhó, Erzsébet; Ehrenstein, Vera

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Frozen shoulder might be a complication or a presenting symptom of cancer. We examined the risk of a cancer diagnosis after an incident diagnosis of frozen shoulder. METHODS: We used prospectively collected data from Danish registries to identify patients with frozen shoulder during 1...

  1. Periarthritis of the shoulder-MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Mako; Nomura, Kazutoshi; Hashimoto, Noburo; Fukumoto, Tetsuya; Oshima, Suguru; Katahira, Kazuhiro

    1997-01-01

    We examined MRI findings in patients with periarthritis of the shoulder. We excluded cuff tears, calcified tendinitis, instability of the shoulder, fracture and impingement syndrome of young patients. Subjects comprised 36 cases, 38 shoulders (25 men and 11 women), with an average age of 59.1 years (42-75). Scanning was performed on a Gyroscan T5-II 0.5-T (Philips). T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal oblique plane, T2-weighted sequences in the coronal sagittal plane and horizontal plane were taken. Twelve shoulders showed some change in the humeral heads. Degeneration of the rotator cuff was observed in 15 shoulders. Joint fluid collection was observed in the gleno-humeral joints of 15 shoulders, in the subacromial bursa of 11 shoulders and in the acromio-clavicular joints of 7 shoulders. Twenty four shoulders had fluid collection in the sheath of the long head of the biceps long tendon. Localized high signal area was observed around the inferior pouch in 11 shoulders. We studied the relationship between MRI findings and clinical symptoms. There was no significant relationship but the shoulders with night pain and severe contractures had a higher positive rate of joint fluid collection on MRI than the shoulders without night pain and with less contractures. (author)

  2. Shoulder complaints after nerve sparing neck dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, CP; Dijkstra, PU; van der Laan, BFAM; Plukker, JTM; Roodenburg, JLN

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the prevalence of shoulder complaints after nerve sparing neck dissection at least I year after surgery, and to analyse the influence of radiation therapy on shoulder complaints. Patients were interviewed for shoulder complaints, and patients filled out the

  3. DIABETES AND SHOULDER ADHESIVE CAPSULITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mohanakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adhesive capsulitis (AC of shoulder is a common condition encountered by physical therapists in their routine outpatient care services; AC of shoulder is as by itself being a self limiting disorder lasts from months to years causing pain and discomfort to the patients. The condition is commonly associated with Diabetes mellitus or other co morbidities. The incidence of AC is high among diabetic individuals and it becomes mandatory on the part of physical therapists and other health professionals to approach this issue on a holistic manner. This paper deals with the importance of a physiotherapist role in prevention and dealing with the causative factors of AC and not merely its symptom. Methods: Extensive literature review was done from the electronic data bases, Systematic reviews and critical reviews from Pub med indexed journals and other peer reviewed publications across the globe. Results: It was not the type of diabetes but the duration of the disease and the glycemic index, marking the causative factor for adhesive capsulitis of shoulder. Conclusion: It may be concluded that physiotherapist play a vital role in identifying the pre-diabetic or a diabetic state of an individual reporting in a multi disciplinary set up with a AC of shoulder, and also has a role in the prevention of AC by helping the individual to maintain a good glycemic control with a holistic approach which includes aerobic exercises, General Flexibility exercises, Weight management and Yoga therapy.

  4. Throwing Injuries of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Frank C., III; and Others

    The majority of shoulder injuries occurring in throwing sports involve the soft tissue structures. Injuries often occur when the unit is overstretched to a point near its greatest length, involving the elastic tissues. The other injury mechanism involves the contractural unit of the muscle, which occurs near the midpoint of contractions, involving…

  5. MRI of Little Leaguer's shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatem, Stephen F.; Recht, Michael P.; Profitt, Brad

    2006-01-01

    The MRI appearance of 'Little Leaguer's shoulder' has not been previously reported in the radiology literature. Purported etiologies include proximal humeral epiphyseolysis, osteochondrosis of the proximal humeral epiphysis, stress fracture of the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate, and rotational stress fracture of the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate. We describe magnetic resonance imaging findings in four patients and review the literature. (orig.)

  6. History of shoulder instability surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, Pietro; Cucchi, Davide; Butt, Usman

    2016-02-01

    The surgical management of shoulder instability is an expanding and increasingly complex area of study within orthopaedics. This article describes the history and evolution of shoulder instability surgery, examining the development of its key principles, the currently accepted concepts and available surgical interventions. A comprehensive review of the available literature was performed using PubMed. The reference lists of reviewed articles were also scrutinised to ensure relevant information was included. The various types of shoulder instability including anterior, posterior and multidirectional instability are discussed, focussing on the history of surgical management of these topics, the current concepts and the results of available surgical interventions. The last century has seen important advancements in the understanding and treatment of shoulder instability. The transition from open to arthroscopic surgery has allowed the discovery of previously unrecognised pathologic entities and facilitated techniques to treat these. Nevertheless, open surgery still produces comparable results in the treatment of many instability-related conditions and is often required in complex or revision cases, particularly in the presence of bone loss. More high-quality research is required to better understand and characterise this spectrum of conditions so that successful evidence-based management algorithms can be developed. IV.

  7. [Shoulder dystocia: an obstetrical emergency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Joana Borges; Reynolds, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is one of the most feared obstetric emergencies due to related maternal and neonatal complications and therefore, the growing of medico-legal litigation that it entails. Although associated with risk factors such as fetal macrossomia, gestacional diabetes and instrumented delivery, the majority of cases are unpredictable. The lack of a consensus on shoulder dystocia diagnosis causes variations on its incidence and hampers a more comprehensive analysis. Management guidelines described for its resolution include several manoeuvres but the ideal sequence of procedures is not clearly defined in more severe cases. Hands-on and team training, through simulation-based techniques applied to medicine, seems to be a promising method to learn how to deal with shoulder dystocia having in mind a reduction in related maternal or neonatal morbidity and mortality. The main goal of this paper is to provide a comprehensive revision of shoulder dystocia highlighting its relevance as an obstetric emergency. A reflection on the management is presented emphasising the importance of simulation-based training.

  8. [Screw arthrodesis of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, S; Berndt, T; Lipka, W; Rühmann, O

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the procedure is arthrodesis of the shoulder by osteosynthesis of the glenohumeral and the acromiohumeral joint each with three screws, which results in preservation of scapulothoracic motion and pain relief. Traumatic brachial plexus lesions, palsy in infancy, poliomyelitis with preserved or restorable function of the elbow and the hand. Paralysis of the deltoid muscle and the rotator cuff. Nonrestorable vast defect of the rotator cuff with pseudoparalysis. Chronic infectious arthritis resistant to therapy. Unsuccessful attempts to treat glenohumeral instability. Alternative procedure to shoulder arthroplasty in young patients with omarthrosis, who perform hard physical work. Insufficient strength of the scapular muscles (Weaning from the splint after the end of the week 6 postoperatively, full range of motion allowed. In a prospective study from January 2007 to September 2008, 4 patients with a medium age of 35.7 years underwent screw arthrodesis of the shoulder with a follow-up of 1.0 (0.6-1.5) year. Primary fusion of all arthrodesis surfaces was achieved in all patients; no revision surgery was necessary. All patients improved in shoulder function with an average range of motion of 60° abduction and 40° anteversion.

  9. Interscalene block for shoulder surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... Fracture dislocation of the shoulder is a common musculoskeletal injury following road traffic accident. Peripheral ... Fracture luxation de l'épaule est une commune blessures musculo-squelettiques suite route trafic accident. Périphériques nerf .... vertebral artery injection, pneumothorax, Horner's syndrome ...

  10. Complications of labor and delivery: shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jane E

    2012-03-01

    This article reviews one of the less common but most dreaded complications of labor and delivery, shoulder dystocia, an infrequent but potentially devastating event that results from impaction of the fetal shoulders in the maternal pelvis. Shoulder dystocia occurs most commonly in patients without identified risk factors, and can result in both maternal and fetal morbidity. Because the vast majority of cases of shoulder dystocia are unpredictable, obstetric care providers must be prepared to recognize dystocia and respond appropriately in every delivery. Detailed documentation is essential after any delivery complicated by shoulder dystocia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Recurrent Shoulder Dystocia: Risk Factors and Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurewitsch Allen, Edith D

    2016-12-01

    A prior history of delivery complicated by shoulder dystocia confers a 6-fold to nearly 30-fold increased risk of shoulder dystocia recurrence in a subsequent vaginal delivery, with most reported rates between 12% and 17%. Whereas prevention of shoulder dystocia in the general population is neither feasible nor cost-effective, directing intervention efforts at the particular subgroup of women with a prior history of shoulder dystocia has merit. Potentially modifiable risk factors and individualized management strategies that may reduce shoulder dystocia recurrence and its associated significant morbidities are reviewed.

  12. [Classification of periprosthetic shoulder fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, C; Kirchhoff, S; Biberthaler, P

    2016-04-01

    The key targets in the treatment of periprosthetic humeral fractures (PHF) are the preservation of bone, successful bony consolidation and provision of a stable anchoring of the prosthesis with the major goal of restoring the shoulder-arm function. A substantial problem of periprosthetic shoulder fractures is the fact that treatment is determined not only by the fracture itself but also by the implanted prosthesis and its function. Consequently, the exact preoperative shoulder function and, in the case of an implanted anatomical prosthesis, the status and function of the rotator cuff need to be assessed in order to clarify the possibility of a secondarily occurring malfunction. Of equal importance in this context is the type of implanted prosthesis. The existing classification systems of Wright and Cofield, Campbell et al., Groh et al. and Worland et al. have several drawbacks from a shoulder surgeon's point of view, such as a missing reference to the great variability of the available prostheses and the lack of an evaluation of rotator cuff function. The presented 6‑stage classification for the evaluation of periprosthetic fractures of the shoulder can be considered just as simple or complex to understand as the classification of the working group for osteosynthesis problems (AO, Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen), depending on the viewpoint. From our point of view the classification presented here encompasses the essential points of the existing classification systems and also covers the otherwise missing points, which should be considered in the assessment of such periprosthetic fractures. The classification presented here should provide helpful assistance in the daily routine to find the most convenient form of therapy.

  13. Management of the frozen shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Laar SM

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Suzanne Margaretha van de Laar, Peer van der Zwaal Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Trauma, Medical Center Haaglanden, The Hague, the Netherlands Abstract: Frozen shoulder is a very common condition with a prevalence of 2%–5% in the general population. Decrease in joint volume as a result of fibrosis and hyperplasia of the joint capsule leads to painful and restricted glenohumeral motion. Frozen shoulder is a self-limiting disease with a chronic character, and is mostly treated in a primary care setting. In this review, we set out to address the current evidence-based literature on management of this disabling disease using a PubMed search. Many non-surgical and surgical therapeutic options are described, including supervised neglect, intra-articular corticosteroid injections, physical therapy, manipulation under anesthesia, capsular distension, and arthroscopic capsular release. In the literature, the long-term outcome shows a significant decrease in pain and improvement of shoulder function for all treatment modalities without clear evidence of superiority of one over the other. This possibly indicates that a self-limiting character is the most important factor in the course of the disease. Management of frozen shoulder is primarily conservative. Supervised neglect is combined with analgesia and stretching exercises as the pain subsides. In the early painful phase, intra-articular corticosteroid injections are recommended for pain relief. When the patient has persistent pain and glenohumeral stiffness after adequate conservative treatment, invasive options can be considered, like arthroscopic capsular release, manipulation under anesthesia, or capsular distension. Keywords: frozen shoulder, adhesive capsulitis, treatment, pathophysiology

  14. Why are Functional Amyloids Non-Toxic in Humans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Jackson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Amyloids were first identified in association with amyloidoses, human diseases in which proteins and peptides misfold into amyloid fibrils. Subsequent studies have identified an array of functional amyloid fibrils that perform physiological roles in humans. Given the potential for the production of toxic species in amyloid assembly reactions, it is remarkable that cells can produce these functional amyloids without suffering any obvious ill effect. Although the precise mechanisms are unclear, there are a number of ways in which amyloid toxicity may be prevented. These include regulating the level of the amyloidogenic peptides and proteins, minimising the production of prefibrillar oligomers in amyloid assembly reactions, sequestrating amyloids within membrane bound organelles, controlling amyloid assembly by other molecules, and disassembling the fibrils under physiological conditions. Crucially, a better understanding of how toxicity is avoided in the production of functional amyloids may provide insights into the prevention of amyloid toxicity in amyloidoses.

  15. Recurrent shoulder dystocia: is it predictable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleitman, Vered; Feldman, Roi; Walfisch, Asnat; Toledano, Ronen; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-11-01

    To examine the course and outcome of deliveries occurring in women who previously experienced shoulder dystocia. In addition, recurrent shoulder dystocia risk factors were assessed. A retrospective cohort analysis comparing all singleton deliveries with and without shoulder dystocia in their preceding delivery was conducted. Independent predictors of recurrent shoulder dystocia were investigated using a multiple logistic regression model. Of the 201,422 deliveries included in the analysis, 307 occurred in women with a previous shoulder dystocia (0.015 %). Women with a history of shoulder dystocia were more likely to be older, experienced higher rates of gestational diabetes mellitus, polyhydramnios, prolonged second stage, operative delivery and macrosomia (>4000 g) in the following delivery. Previous shoulder dystocia was found to be an independent risk factor for recurrent shoulder dystocia (OR = 6.1, 95 % CI 3.2-11.8, p value Shoulder dystocia is an independent risk factor for recurrent shoulder dystocia. Deliveries in women with a history of shoulder dystocia are characterized by higher rates of operative delivery, prolonged second stage of labor and macrosomia.

  16. Antibodies to human serum amyloid P component eliminate visceral amyloid deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Karl; Ellmerich, Stephan; Kahan, Melvyn C; Tennent, Glenys A; Loesch, Andrzej; Gilbertson, Janet A; Hutchinson, Winston L; Mangione, Palma P; Gallimore, J Ruth; Millar, David J; Minogue, Shane; Dhillon, Amar P; Taylor, Graham W; Bradwell, Arthur R; Petrie, Aviva; Gillmore, Julian D; Bellotti, Vittorio; Botto, Marina; Hawkins, Philip N; Pepys, Mark B

    2010-11-04

    Accumulation of amyloid fibrils in the viscera and connective tissues causes systemic amyloidosis, which is responsible for about one in a thousand deaths in developed countries. Localized amyloid can also have serious consequences; for example, cerebral amyloid angiopathy is an important cause of haemorrhagic stroke. The clinical presentations of amyloidosis are extremely diverse and the diagnosis is rarely made before significant organ damage is present. There is therefore a major unmet need for therapy that safely promotes the clearance of established amyloid deposits. Over 20 different amyloid fibril proteins are responsible for different forms of clinically significant amyloidosis and treatments that substantially reduce the abundance of the respective amyloid fibril precursor proteins can arrest amyloid accumulation. Unfortunately, control of fibril-protein production is not possible in some forms of amyloidosis and in others it is often slow and hazardous. There is no therapy that directly targets amyloid deposits for enhanced clearance. However, all amyloid deposits contain the normal, non-fibrillar plasma glycoprotein, serum amyloid P component (SAP). Here we show that administration of anti-human-SAP antibodies to mice with amyloid deposits containing human SAP triggers a potent, complement-dependent, macrophage-derived giant cell reaction that swiftly removes massive visceral amyloid deposits without adverse effects. Anti-SAP-antibody treatment is clinically feasible because circulating human SAP can be depleted in patients by the bis-d-proline compound CPHPC, thereby enabling injected anti-SAP antibodies to reach residual SAP in the amyloid deposits. The unprecedented capacity of this novel combined therapy to eliminate amyloid deposits should be applicable to all forms of systemic and local amyloidosis.

  17. Anti-amyloid treatments in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, Mamta; Kim, Kye Y

    2009-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most challenging threats to the healthcare system in society. One of the main characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology is formation of amyloid plaques from accumulation of amyloid beta peptide. The therapeutic agents that are currently available for AD including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AchEIs) and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist are focused on improving the symptoms and do not revert the progression of the disease. This limitation coupled with the burgeoning increase in the prevalence of AD and resultant impact on healthcare economics calls for more substantial treatments for AD. According to the leading amyloid hypothesis, cleavage of amyloid precursor protein to release amyloid beta peptide is the critical event in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recently treatment strategies have been focused on modifying the formation, clearance and accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid beta peptide. This article reviews different therapeutic approaches that have been investigated to target amyloid beta ranging from secretase modulators, antiaggregation agents to amyloid immunotherapy. Authors review the different novel drugs which are in clinical trials.

  18. Molecular biology of frozen shoulder-induced limitation of shoulder joint movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiaming; Lu, Wei; He, Yong; Jiang, Luoyong; Li, Kuokuo; Zhu, Weimin; Wang, Daping

    2017-01-01

    Frozen shoulder is a chronic condition characterized by pain in the shoulder and restriction of movements in all directions. Some patients are left with long-term limitation of shoulder joint activity with various severities, which results in reduced quality of life. Currently, there is a paucity of literature on the molecular biology of frozen shoulder, and the molecular biological mechanism for periarthritis-induced limitation of shoulder joint movements remains unclear. Research in this field is focused on inflammation and cytokines associated with fibrosis. Repeated investigations confirmed alterations of specified inflammatory mediators and fibrosis-associated cytokines, which might be involved in the pathogenesis of frozen shoulder by causing structural changes of the shoulder joint and eventually the limitation of shoulder movements. The aim of this article is to review studies on molecular biology of frozen shoulder and provide a reference for subsequent research, treatment, and development of new drugs.

  19. Carbon nanospecies affecting amyloid formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, Monika; Konefal, Rafal; Morávková, Zuzana; Zhigunov, Alexander; Svoboda, Jan; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Hromádková, Jiřina; Groborz, Ondřej; Štěpánek, Petr; Hrubý, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 85 (2017), s. 53887-53898 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-30544A; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03156S; GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Grant - others:OPPK(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21545 Program:OPPK Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : amyloid fibril * nanodiamond * fullerene Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  20. Chiral recognition in amyloid fiber growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbeev, Vladimir; Grogg, Marcel; Ruiz, Jérémy; Boehringer, Régis; Schirer, Alicia; Hellwig, Petra; Jeschke, Gunnar; Hilvert, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Insoluble amyloid fibers represent a pathological signature of many human diseases. To treat such diseases, inhibition of amyloid formation has been proposed as a possible therapeutic strategy. d-Peptides, which possess high proteolytic stability and lessened immunogenicity, are attractive candidates in this context. However, a molecular understanding of chiral recognition phenomena for d-peptides and l-amyloids is currently incomplete. Here we report experiments on amyloid growth of individual enantiomers and their mixtures for two distinct polypeptide systems of different length and structural organization: a 44-residue covalently-linked dimer derived from a peptide corresponding to the [20-41]-fragment of human β2-microglobulin (β2m) and the 99-residue full-length protein. For the dimeric [20-41]β2m construct, a combination of electron paramagnetic resonance of nitroxide-labeled constructs and (13) C-isotope edited FT-IR spectroscopy of (13) C-labeled preparations was used to show that racemic mixtures precipitate as intact homochiral fibers, i.e. undergo spontaneous Pasteur-like resolution into a mixture of left- and right-handed amyloids. In the case of full-length β2m, the presence of the mirror-image d-protein affords morphologically distinct amyloids that are composed largely of enantiopure domains. Removal of the l-component from hybrid amyloids by proteolytic digestion results in their rapid transformation into characteristic long straight d-β2m amyloids. Furthermore, the full-length d-enantiomer of β2m was found to be an efficient inhibitor of l-β2m amyloid growth. This observation highlights the potential of longer d-polypeptides for future development into inhibitors of amyloid propagation. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Risk of shoulder tendinitis in relation to shoulder loads in monotonous repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, P.; Bonde, J. P.; Mikkelsen, S.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies relate the occurrence of shoulder disorders to quantified ergonomic exposures. This study evaluates the hypothesis that shoulder loads in repetitive work might contribute to the occurrence of shoulder tendinitis. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 1961 workers...... in repetitive work and 782 referents. Shoulder loads were quantified at task level and measures of exposures were assigned based on task distribution. Symptoms in combination with clinical criteria defined shoulder tendinitis. RESULTS: The prevalence of shoulder tendinitis was higher among exposed workers...

  3. General amyloid inhibitors? A critical examination of the inhibition of IAPP amyloid formation by inositol stereoisomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin forms amyloid deposits in the islets of Langerhans; a process that is believed to contribute to the progression of type 2 diabetes and to the failure of islet transplants. An emerging theme in amyloid research is the hypothesis that the toxic species produced during amyloid formation by different polypeptides share common features and exert their effects by common mechanisms. If correct, this suggests that inhibitors of amyloid formation by one polypeptide might be effective against other amyloidogenic sequences. IAPP and Aβ, the peptide responsible for amyloid formation in Alzheimer's disease, are particularly interesting in this regard as they are both natively unfolded in their monomeric states and share some common characteristics. Comparatively little effort has been expended on the design of IAPP amyloid inhibitors, thus it is natural to inquire if Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP, especially since no IAPP inhibitors have been clinically approved. A range of compounds inhibit Aβ amyloid formation, including various stereoisomers of inositol. Myo-, scyllo-, and epi-inositol have been shown to induce conformational changes in Aβ and prevent Aβ amyloid fibril formation by stabilizing non-fibrillar β-sheet structures. We investigate the ability of inositol stereoisomers to inhibit amyloid formation by IAPP. The compounds do not induce a conformational change in IAPP and are ineffective inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation, although some do lead to modest apparent changes in IAPP amyloid fibril morphology. Thus not all classes of Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP. This work provides a basis of comparison to work on polyphenol based inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation and helps provide clues as to the features which render them effective. The study also helps provide information for further efforts in rational inhibitor design.

  4. General Amyloid Inhibitors? A Critical Examination of the Inhibition of IAPP Amyloid Formation by Inositol Stereoisomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Raleigh, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin) forms amyloid deposits in the islets of Langerhans; a process that is believed to contribute to the progression of type 2 diabetes and to the failure of islet transplants. An emerging theme in amyloid research is the hypothesis that the toxic species produced during amyloid formation by different polypeptides share common features and exert their effects by common mechanisms. If correct, this suggests that inhibitors of amyloid formation by one polypeptide might be effective against other amyloidogenic sequences. IAPP and Aβ, the peptide responsible for amyloid formation in Alzheimer's disease, are particularly interesting in this regard as they are both natively unfolded in their monomeric states and share some common characteristics. Comparatively little effort has been expended on the design of IAPP amyloid inhibitors, thus it is natural to inquire if Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP, especially since no IAPP inhibitors have been clinically approved. A range of compounds inhibit Aβ amyloid formation, including various stereoisomers of inositol. Myo-, scyllo-, and epi-inositol have been shown to induce conformational changes in Aβ and prevent Aβ amyloid fibril formation by stabilizing non-fibrillar β-sheet structures. We investigate the ability of inositol stereoisomers to inhibit amyloid formation by IAPP. The compounds do not induce a conformational change in IAPP and are ineffective inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation, although some do lead to modest apparent changes in IAPP amyloid fibril morphology. Thus not all classes of Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP. This work provides a basis of comparison to work on polyphenol based inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation and helps provide clues as to the features which render them effective. The study also helps provide information for further efforts in rational inhibitor design. PMID:25260075

  5. Calcitonin effects on shoulder adhesive capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhani, Alireza; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Bazavar, Mohammadreza; Barzgar, Mahmood; Tabrizi, Ali; Hashemi-Motlagh, Keyvan; Saheb-Ekhtiari, Khashayar

    2016-08-01

    Adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder) is a relatively prevalent disease of shoulder and affects soft tissue of glenohumeral joint. Signs include painful restricted motion and disability of the patient in daily activities. Calcitonin is a thyroid hormone, and its effectiveness has been demonstrated in painful conditions. The presents study aims to evaluate the effect of calcitonin in treating shoulder adhesive capsulitis. This double-blinded randomized clinical trial was conducted on 64 patients suffering from shoulder adhesive capsulitis. The intervention and control groups were given intranasal calcitonin and placebo for 6 weeks, respectively. For both groups, physiotherapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were administered correspondingly. The patients were evaluated pre- and post-treatment for shoulder pain and shoulder range of motion (ROM). Shoulder functional outcome (secondary outcome) was evaluated using Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, and Health Assessment Questionnaire disability criteria. The mean age of patients in calcitonin and control group was 52.4 ± 4.6 and 53.2 ± 4.9, respectively. Demographic characteristics and pre-treatment scores were similar in both groups (all P > 0.05). In post-treatment follow-up, shoulder pain, ROM, and the patients' functional scores were significantly improved in both groups (P adhesive capsulitis with regard to the efficiency in alleviating pain and improving functional outcome. II.

  6. The nerves around the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Alain, E-mail: alain.blum@gmail.com [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Wassel, Johnny; Moisei, Andreea; Teixeira, Pedro [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France)

    2013-01-15

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan.

  7. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E.; Breitenseher, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    The impingement syndrome is a clinical entity characterized by shoulder pain due to primary or secondary mechanical irritation of the rotator cuff. The primary factors for the development of impingement are a curved or hook-shaped anterior acromion as well as subacromial osteophytes, which may lead to tearing of the supraspinatus tendon. Secondary impingement is mainly caused by calcific tendinopathy, glenohumeral instability, os acromiale and degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint. Conventional radiographs are initially obtained, mainly for evaluation of the bony structures of the shoulder. If available, sonography can be used for detection of lesions and tears of the rotator cuff. Finally, MR-imaging provides detailed information about the relationship of the acromion and the acromioclavicular joint to the rotator cuff itself. In many cases however, no morphologic cause for impingement syndrome can be found. While patients are initially treated conservatively, chronic disease usually requires surgical intervention. (orig.) [de

  8. Diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodler, J.

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical and imaging findings in shoulder impingement syndrome. Different stages of impingement syndrome are described. Stage I relates to edema and hemorrhage of the supraspinatus tendon. Stage II is characterized by bursal inflammation and fibrosis, as well as tendinopathy. In stage III there is a tear of the rotator cuff. Clinical signs many overlap. Moreover, calcifying tendinitis, fractures and pain originating from the cervical spine may mimic shoulder impingement syndrome. Imaging is important for the exact diagnosis. Standard radiographs are the basis of imaging in shoulder impingement syndrome. They may demonstrate subchondral sclerosis of the major tuberosity, subacromial spurs, and form anomalies of the acromion. They are also important in the differential diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome and demonstrate calcifying tendinitis, fractures and neoplasm. Ultrasonography has found acceptance as a screening tool and even as a final diagnostic method by many authors. However, there is a high interobserver variability in the demonstration of rotator cuff tears. Its usefulness has therefore been questioned. MR imaging is probably the method of choice in the evaluation of the rotator cuff and surrounding structures. Several investigations have demonstrated that differentiation of early findings, such as tendinopathy versus partial tears, may be difficult with MR imaging. However, reproducibility for fullthickness tears appears to be higher than for sonography. Moreover, specificity appears to be superior to sonography. MR arthrography is not universally accepted. However, it allows for more exact differentiation of discrete findings and may be indicated in preoperative planning. Standard arthrography and CT have a limited role in the current assessment of the rotator cuff. (orig.) [de

  9. Neuroinflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis affects amyloid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anckarsäter Henrik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP and β-amyloid (Aβ is widely studied in Alzheimer's disease, where Aβ deposition and plaque development are essential components of the pathogenesis. However, the physiological role of amyloid in the adult nervous system remains largely unknown. We have previously found altered cerebral amyloid metabolism in other neuroinflammatory conditions. To further elucidate this, we investigated amyloid metabolism in patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB. Methods The first part of the study was a cross-sectional cohort study in 61 patients with acute facial palsy (19 with LNB and 42 with idiopathic facial paresis, Bell's palsy and 22 healthy controls. CSF was analysed for the β-amyloid peptides Aβ38, Aβ40 and Aβ42, and the amyloid precursor protein (APP isoforms α-sAPP and β-sAPP. CSF total-tau (T-tau, phosphorylated tau (P-tau and neurofilament protein (NFL were measured to monitor neural cell damage. The second part of the study was a prospective cohort-study in 26 LNB patients undergoing consecutive lumbar punctures before and after antibiotic treatment to study time-dependent dynamics of the biomarkers. Results In the cross-sectional study, LNB patients had lower levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau, and higher levels of CSF NFL than healthy controls and patients with Bell's palsy. In the prospective study, LNB patients had low levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau at baseline, which all increased towards normal at follow-up. Conclusions Amyloid metabolism is altered in LNB. CSF levels of α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau are decreased in acute infection and increase after treatment. In combination with earlier findings in multiple sclerosis, cerebral SLE and HIV with cerebral engagement, this points to an influence of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism.

  10. Magnetic Fluids Have Ability to Decrease Amyloid Aggregation Associated with Amyloid-Related Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosova, Andrea; Koneracka, Martina; Siposova, Katarina; Zavisova, Vlasta; Daxnerova, Zuzana; Vavra, Ivo; Fabian, Martin; Kopcansky, Peter; Gazova, Zuzana

    2010-12-01

    At least twenty human proteins can fold abnormally to form pathological deposits that are associated with several amyloid-related diseases. We have investigated the effect of four magnetic fluids (MFs)—electrostatically stabilized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MF1) and sterically stabilized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles by sodium oleate (MF2, MF3 and MF4) with adsorbed BSA (MF2) or dextran (MF4)—on amyloid aggregation of two proteins, human insulin and chicken egg lysozyme. The morphology, particle size and size distribution of the prepared magnetic fluids were characterized. We have found that MFs are able to decrease amyloid aggregation of both studied proteins and the extent of depolymerization depended on the MF properties. The most effective reduction was observed for MF4 as 90% decrease of amyloids was detected for insulin and lysozyme amyloid aggregates. Our findings indicate that MFs have potential to be used for treatment of amyloid diseases.

  11. Risk of shoulder dystocia in second delivery: does a history of shoulder dystocia matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overland, Eva A; Spydslaug, Anny; Nielsen, Christopher S; Eskild, Anne

    2009-05-01

    Our aim was to estimate the relative and absolute risk of shoulder dystocia in the second delivery according to history of shoulder dystocia and offspring birthweight. A retrospective cohort study including all women in Norway with 2 consecutive singleton vaginal deliveries with fetus in cephalic presentation, during the period 1967-2005 (n = 537,316). In the second delivery shoulder dystocia occurred in 0.8% of all women. In women with a prior shoulder dystocia the recurrence risk was 7.3%. Most cases of shoulder dystocia in second delivery were in women without such history (96.2%). Offspring birthweight was the most important risk factor for shoulder dystocia in second delivery: crude odds ratio, 292.9 (95% confidence interval, 237.8-360.7) comparing birthweight > 5000 g with 3000-3499 g. Prior shoulder dystocia increased the risk of shoulder dystocia in the second delivery. However, offspring birthweight was by far the most important risk factor.

  12. Gimballed Shoulders for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert; Lawless, Kirby

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement of tooling for friction stir welding, gimballed shoulders would supplant shoulders that, heretofore, have been fixedly aligned with pins. The proposal is especially relevant to self-reacting friction stir welding. Some definitions of terms, recapitulated from related prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed improvement. In friction stir welding, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a pin that rotates with the shoulder and protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. In conventional friction stir welding, the main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional friction stir welding is augmented with an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or forcecontrol system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding as practiced heretofore, there are two shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. Both shoulders rotate with the pin and remain aligned coaxially with the pin. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft into the friction-stir-welding machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. This concludes the prerequisite definitions of terms.

  13. Rugby and Shoulder Trauma: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Papalia, R.; Tecame, A.; Torre, G.; Narbona, P.; Maffulli, N.; Denaro, V.

    2014-01-01

    Rugby is a popular contact sport worldwide. Collisions and tackles during matches and practices often lead to traumatic injuries of the shoulder. This review reports on the epidemiology of injuries, type of lesions and treatment of shoulder injuries, risk factors, such as player position, and return to sport activities. Electronic searches through PubMed (Medline), EMBASE, and Cochrane Library retrieved studies concerning shoulder injuries in rugby players. Data regarding incidence, type and ...

  14. Studies in shoulder disorders and tendinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ostor, Andrew James Knowles

    2017-01-01

    The human shoulder is the most complex of any peripheral synovial joint. Despite the high incidence and prevalence of symptomatic shoulder disorders, particularly of the rotator cuff, a paucity of robust research exists into this area. Lack of consensus on the most appropriate clinical method of assessing the shoulder and lack of adequate diagnostic criteria has inhibited the development of effective management strategies. This has substantial implications for individuals, heal...

  15. Athletes’ Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Sykhorychko

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The examination of 60 athletes, aged 18-30, suffering from chronic pains in shoulder joints was conducted. So, 20 women and 20 men were engaged in track and field and team sports, 15 in weightlifting and strength sports, 5 women in strength sports. Shoulder Joints Traumas Manual Therapy enables to reduce pain syndrome, restore shoulder joint flexibility, normalize trophism after trauma and normalize cervicothoracic transition biomechanics.

  16. Problem of painful shoulder in hemiparetics patients

    OpenAIRE

    Daumann, Pavla

    2013-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is focused on a painful hemiparetic shoulder as a frequently observed complication in patients suffering from stroke. Basic information about stroke, anatomy and kinematics of shoulder joint is included in a theoretical part of the thesis. The largest portion describes a pathogenesis of painful hemiparetic shoulder, its prevention and commonly used physiotherapeutic approaches. The practical part of the thesis consists of two case reports of patients with stroke suffering...

  17. Shoulder arthroplasty for sequelae of poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werthel, Jean-David; Schoch, Bradley; Sperling, John W; Cofield, Robert; Elhassan, Bassem T

    2016-05-01

    Polio infection can often lead to orthopedic complications such as arthritis, osteoporosis, muscle weakness, skeletal deformation, and chronic instability of the joints. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcomes and associated complications of arthroplasty in shoulders with sequelae of poliomyelitis. Seven patients (average age, 70 years) were treated between 1976 and 2013 with shoulder arthroplasty for the sequelae of polio. One patient underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty, 2 had a hemiarthroplasty, and 4 had total shoulder arthroplasty. Average follow-up was 87 months. Outcome measures included pain, range of motion, and postoperative modified Neer ratings. Overall pain scores improved from 5 to 1.6 points (on a 5-point scale) after shoulder arthroplasty. Six shoulders had no or mild pain at latest follow-up, and 6 shoulders rated the result as much better or better. Mean shoulder elevation improved from 72° to 129°, and external rotation improved from 11° to 56°. Average strength in elevation decreased from 3.9 to 3.4 postoperatively, and external rotation strength decreased from 3.9 to 3.3. This, however, did not reach significance. Evidence of muscle imbalance with radiographic instability was found in 4 shoulders that demonstrated superior subluxation, anterior subluxation, or both. This remained asymptomatic. No shoulder required revision or reoperation. Shoulder arthroplasty provides significant pain relief and improved motion in patients with sequelae of poliomyelitis. Muscle weakness may be responsible for postoperative instability, and careful selection of the patient with good upper extremity muscles must be made. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Shoulder dystocia: impacts, prevention, prognosis, troubleshooting

    OpenAIRE

    G. Kontopoulos; S. Kouvelas

    2017-01-01

    Shoulder dystocia is one of the most dramatic complications encountered in obstetrics. When this complication occurs, it can result in increased maternal morbidity rate and increased incidence of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Although several risk factors are clearly associated with dystocia shoulder. The recognition of individual cases of shoulder dystocia has proven impossible in practice, before they occur during labor. Several guidelines have been published concerning the treatment...

  19. An investigation of shoulder forces in active shoulder tackles in rugby union football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Juliana; McIntosh, Andrew S; Fréchède, Bertrand

    2011-11-01

    In rugby union football the tackle is the most frequently executed skill and one most associated with injury, including shoulder injury to the tackler. Despite the importance of the tackle, little is known about the magnitude of shoulder forces in the tackle and influencing factors. The objectives of the study were to measure the shoulder force in the tackle, as well as the effects of shoulder padding, skill level, side of body, player size, and experimental setting on shoulder force. Experiments were conducted in laboratory and field settings using a repeated measures design. Thirty-five participants were recruited to the laboratory and 98 to the field setting. All were male aged over 18 years with rugby experience. The maximum force applied to the shoulder in an active shoulder tackle was measured with a custom built forceplate incorporated into a 45 kg tackle bag. The overall average maximum shoulder force was 1660 N in the laboratory and 1997 N in the field. This difference was significant. The shoulder force for tackling without shoulder pads was 1684 N compared to 1635 N with shoulder pads. There was no difference between the shoulder forces on the dominant and non-dominant sides. Shoulder force reduced with tackle repetition. No relationship was observed between player skill level and size. A substantial force can be applied to the shoulder and to an opponent in the tackle. This force is within the shoulder's injury tolerance range and is unaffected by shoulder pads. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Kinematics of the contralateral and ipsilateral shoulder: A possible relationship with post-stroke shoulder pain

    OpenAIRE

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Koppe, P.; Konijnenbelt, M.; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Post-stroke shoulder pain is a common phenomenon in hemiplegia and impedes rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to identify a possible relationship between post-stroke shoulder pain, scapula resting position and shoulder motion. Methods: Shoulder kinematics of 27 patients after stroke (17 men) were compared with 10 healthy age-matched control subjects. Using an electromagnetic tracking device, the kinematics of both the contralateral and ipsilateral (i.e. paretic and non-paret...

  1. Shoulder muscle activity and function in common shoulder rehabilitation exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Yamashiro, Kyle; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2009-01-01

    The rotator cuff performs multiple functions during shoulder exercises, including glenohumeral abduction, external rotation (ER) and internal rotation (IR). The rotator cuff also stabilizes the glenohumeral joint and controls humeral head translations. The infraspinatus and subscapularis have significant roles in scapular plane abduction (scaption), generating forces that are two to three times greater than supraspinatus force. However, the supraspinatus still remains a more effective shoulder abductor because of its more effective moment arm. Both the deltoids and rotator cuff provide significant abduction torque, with an estimated contribution up to 35-65% by the middle deltoid, 30% by the subscapularis, 25% by the supraspinatus, 10% by the infraspinatus and 2% by the anterior deltoid. During abduction, middle deltoid force has been estimated to be 434 N, followed by 323 N from the anterior deltoid, 283 N from the subscapularis, 205 N from the infraspinatus, and 117 N from the supraspinatus. These forces are generated not only to abduct the shoulder but also to stabilize the joint and neutralize the antagonistic effects of undesirable actions. Relatively high force from the rotator cuff not only helps abduct the shoulder but also neutralizes the superior directed force generated by the deltoids at lower abduction angles. Even though anterior deltoid force is relatively high, its ability to abduct the shoulder is low due to a very small moment arm, especially at low abduction angles. The deltoids are more effective abductors at higher abduction angles while the rotator cuff muscles are more effective abductors at lower abduction angles. During maximum humeral elevation the scapula normally upwardly rotates 45-55 degrees, posterior tilts 20-40 degrees and externally rotates 15-35 degrees. The scapular muscles are important during humeral elevation because they cause these motions, especially the serratus anterior, which contributes to scapular upward rotation

  2. Amyloid Imaging in Aging and Dementia: Testing the Amyloid Hypothesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Rabinovici

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging represents a major advance in neuroscience, enabling the detection and quantification of pathologic protein aggregations in the brain. In this review we survey current amyloid imaging techniques, focusing on positron emission tomography (PET with ^{11}carbon-labelled Pittsburgh Compound-B (11C-PIB, the most extensively studied and best validated tracer. PIB binds specifically to fibrillar beta-amyloid (Aβ deposits, and is a sensitive marker for Aβ pathology in cognitively normal older individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. PIB-PET provides us with a powerful tool to examine in vivo the relationship between amyloid deposition, clinical symptoms, and structural and functional brain changes in the continuum between normal aging and AD. Amyloid imaging studies support a model in which amyloid deposition is an early event on the path to dementia, beginning insidiously in cognitively normal individuals, and accompanied by subtle cognitive decline and functional and structural brain changes suggestive of incipient AD. As patients progress to dementia, clinical decline and neurodegeneration accelerate and proceed independently of amyloid accumulation. In the future, amyloid imaging is likely to supplement clinical evaluation in selecting patients for anti-amyloid therapies, while MRI and FDG-PET may be more appropriate markers of clinical progression.

  3. Rehabilitation of the shoulder in tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancher, K D; Litchfield, R; Hawkins, R J

    1995-01-01

    The tennis player places unique demands on the shoulder by creating a high risk for overuse and overloading of the soft tissues. Tennis requires concentric work to position and move the arm, eccentric work to stabilize the shoulder, effective depression of the humeral head to avoid impingement in the overhead position, and normal stability to prevent secondary impingement. The tennis serve produces enormous angular velocities about the shoulder joint. A comprehensive rehabilitation program has been described in which the therapist, trainer, player, and physician alike need to have an understanding of the basic biomechanics of this sport. This program can be used to treat the painful shoulder, prevent injury, and enhance performance.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemianski, A.; Romanowski, L.

    1994-01-01

    The technique of the own method of shoulder examination was presented. Anatomy and the most common diseases of the shoulder are discussed. The diseases of the shoulder diagnosed on the basis of the MR are: rotator cuff disease, impingement syndrome and instability. MR findings occurred in these entities were demonstrated. The most common MR finding of the rotator cuff disease was higher signal intensity within the supraspinatus tendon, while in shoulder instability was labral abnormality. Impingement syndrome is the previous syndrome of the full MR imaging of the rotator cuff disease. (author)

  5. Shoulder dystocia: impacts, prevention, prognosis, troubleshooting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kontopoulos

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder dystocia is one of the most dramatic complications encountered in obstetrics. When this complication occurs, it can result in increased maternal morbidity rate and increased incidence of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Although several risk factors are clearly associated with dystocia shoulder. The recognition of individual cases of shoulder dystocia has proven impossible in practice, before they occur during labor. Several guidelines have been published concerning the treatment of shoulder dystocia, aiming to instruct obstetricians to a maneuver sequence to reduce maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality.

  6. Shoulder dystocia: risk factors, predictability, and preventability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shobha H; Sokol, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia remains an unpredictable obstetric emergency, striking fear in the hearts of obstetricians both novice and experienced. While outcomes that lead to permanent injury are rare, almost all obstetricians with enough years of practice have participated in a birth with a severe shoulder dystocia and are at least aware of cases that have resulted in significant neurologic injury or even neonatal death. This is despite many years of research trying to understand the risk factors associated with it, all in an attempt primarily to characterize when the risk is high enough to avoid vaginal delivery altogether and prevent a shoulder dystocia, whose attendant morbidities are estimated to be at a rate as high as 16-48%. The study of shoulder dystocia remains challenging due to its generally retrospective nature, as well as dependence on proper identification and documentation. As a result, the prediction of shoulder dystocia remains elusive, and the cost of trying to prevent one by performing a cesarean delivery remains high. While ultimately it is the injury that is the key concern, rather than the shoulder dystocia itself, it is in the presence of an identified shoulder dystocia that occurrence of injury is most common. The majority of shoulder dystocia cases occur without major risk factors. Moreover, even the best antenatal predictors have a low positive predictive value. Shoulder dystocia therefore cannot be reliably predicted, and the only preventative measure is cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Emergency department management of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Portal, Daniel A; Horn, Amanda E; Vilke, Gary M; Chan, Theodore C; Ufberg, Jacob W

    2014-03-01

    Precipitous obstetric deliveries can occur outside of the labor and delivery suite, often in the emergency department (ED). Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency with significant risk of adverse outcome. To review multiple techniques for managing a shoulder dystocia in the ED. We review various techniques and approaches for achieving delivery in the setting of shoulder dystocia. These include common maneuvers, controversial interventions, and interventions of last resort. Emergency physicians should be familiar with multiple techniques for managing a shoulder dystocia to reduce the chances of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Can shoulder dystocia be reliably predicted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Jodie M; Catcheside, Britt; Scheil, Wendy

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate factors reported to increase the risk of shoulder dystocia, and to evaluate their predictive value at a population level. The South Australian Pregnancy Outcome Unit's population database from 2005 to 2010 was accessed to determine the occurrence of shoulder dystocia in addition to reported risk factors, including age, parity, self-reported ethnicity, presence of diabetes and infant birth weight. Odds ratios (and 95% confidence interval) of shoulder dystocia was calculated for each risk factor, which were then incorporated into a logistic regression model. Test characteristics for each variable in predicting shoulder dystocia were calculated. As a proportion of all births, the reported rate of shoulder dystocia increased significantly from 0.95% in 2005 to 1.38% in 2010 (P = 0.0002). Using a logistic regression model, induction of labour and infant birth weight greater than both 4000 and 4500 g were identified as significant independent predictors of shoulder dystocia. The value of risk factors alone and when incorporated into the logistic regression model was poorly predictive of the occurrence of shoulder dystocia. While there are a number of factors associated with an increased risk of shoulder dystocia, none are of sufficient sensitivity or positive predictive value to allow their use clinically to reliably and accurately identify the occurrence of shoulder dystocia. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  9. Obstetric Emergencies: Shoulder Dystocia and Postpartum Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, Joshua D; Bhalwal, Asha; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2017-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage represent two of the most common emergencies faced in obstetric clinical practice, both requiring prompt recognition and management to avoid significant morbidity or mortality. Shoulder dystocia is an uncommon, unpredictable, and unpreventable obstetric emergency and can be managed with appropriate intervention. Postpartum hemorrhage occurs more commonly and carries significant risk of maternal morbidity. Institutional protocols and algorithms for the prevention and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage have become mainstays for clinicians. The goal of this review is to summarize the diagnosis, incidence, risk factors, and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Incidence and prognostic factors for postoperative frozen shoulder after shoulder surgery : a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorevaar, Rinco C. T.; van't Riet, Esther; Ipskamp, Marcel; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.

    Frozen shoulder is a potential complication after shoulder surgery. It is a clinical condition that is often associated with marked disability and can have a profound effect on the patient's quality of life. The incidence, etiology, pathology and prognostic factors of postoperative frozen shoulder

  11. Critical shoulder angle combined with age predict five shoulder pathologies: a retrospective analysis of 1000 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberer, Philipp R; Plachel, Fabian; Willinger, Lukas; Moroder, Philipp; Laky, Brenda; Pauzenberger, Leo; Lomoschitz, Fritz; Anderl, Werner

    2017-06-15

    Acromial morphology has previously been defined as a risk factor for some shoulder pathologies. Yet, study results are inconclusive and not all major shoulder diseases have been sufficiently investigated. Thus, the aim of the present study was to analyze predictive value of three radiological parameters including the critical shoulder angle, acromion index, and lateral acromion angle in relationship to symptomatic patients with either cuff tear arthropathy, glenohumeral osteoarthritis, rotator cuff tear, impingement, and tendinitis calcarea. A total of 1000 patients' standardized true-anteroposterior radiographs were retrospectively assessed. Receiver-operating curve analyses and multinomial logistic regression were used to examine the association between shoulder pathologies and acromion morphology. The prediction model was derived from a development cohort and applied to a validation cohort. Prediction model's performance was statistically evaluated. The majority of radiological measurements were significantly different between shoulder pathologies, but the critical shoulder angle was an overall better parameter to predict and distinguish between the different pathologies than the acromion index or lateral acromion angle. Typical critical shoulder angle-age patterns for the different shoulder pathologies could be detected. Patients diagnosed with rotator cuff tears had the highest, whereas patients with osteoarthritis had the lowest critical shoulder angle. The youngest patients were in the tendinitis calcarea and the oldest in the cuff tear arthropathy group. The present study showed that critical shoulder angle and age, two easily assessable variables, adequately predict different shoulder pathologies in patients with shoulder complaints.

  12. Relationship among shoulder proprioception, kinematics, and pain after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Koppe, P.A.; Konijnenbelt, M.H.; Janssen, T.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Niessen MH, Veeger DH, Meskers CG, Koppe PA, Konijnenbelt MH, Janssen TW. Relationship among shoulder proprioception, kinematics, and pain after stroke. Objective: To identify a possible relationship among chronic poststroke shoulder pain (PSSP), scapular resting pose, and shoulder proprioception.

  13. Calumenin interacts with serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Jacobsen, Christian; Honoré, Bent

    2000-01-01

    with calumenin in the presence of Ca(2+). Amino acid sequencing identified this protein as serum amyloid P component (SAP). Furthermore, we verified and characterized the calumenin-SAP interaction by the surface plasmon resonance technique. The findings indicate that calumenin may participate...... in the immunological defense system and could be involved in the pathological process of amyloidosis that leads to formation of amyloid deposits seen in different types of tissues. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Jan-14...

  14. Ultrasonography of the equine shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dik, K.J.

    1996-01-01

    Six horses with shoulder injuries were presented in this report with emphasis on the use of ultrasonography vs. radiography in diagnosis. The two imaging modalities represented valuable and complementary diagnostic procedures. Two horses had fracture fragments of the lateral humeral tuberosity, the accurate ultrasonographic findings encouraging clearer radiographic identification by oblique projections. In one horseultrasonography enabled more accurate localization of calcification within the supraspinatus muscle. In the remaining three cases ultrasonography visualized distension of the bicipital bursa due to aseptic bursitis, bursal hemorrhage, or associated with injury of the biceps brachii muscle and the underlying intermediate humeral tubercle, the bony involvement more clearly demonstrated radiographically

  15. Shoulder arthropathy in primary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaum, A.J.; Doppman, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    An erosive arthropathy of the hands and wrists has been recognized in patients with primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Recently, intra-articular erosions of the humeral head were described in six patients who had been on chronic long-term hemodialysis with secondary hyperparathyroidism. We would like to present the finding of shoulder erosions in four patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and one patient with renal osteodystrophy and suggest that the humeral erosion can occur in both an intra-articular and peri-articular location. (orig.)

  16. Natural product-based amyloid inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velander, Paul; Wu, Ling; Henderson, Frances; Zhang, Shijun; Bevan, David R; Xu, Bin

    2017-09-01

    Many chronic human diseases, including multiple neurodegenerative diseases, are associated with deleterious protein aggregates, also called protein amyloids. One common therapeutic strategy is to develop protein aggregation inhibitors that can slow down, prevent, or remodel toxic amyloids. Natural products are a major class of amyloid inhibitors, and several dozens of natural product-based amyloid inhibitors have been identified and characterized in recent years. These plant- or microorganism-extracted compounds have shown significant therapeutic potential from in vitro studies as well as in vivo animal tests. Despite the technical challenges of intrinsic disordered or partially unfolded amyloid proteins that are less amenable to characterizations by structural biology, a significant amount of research has been performed, yielding biochemical and pharmacological insights into how inhibitors function. This review aims to summarize recent progress in natural product-based amyloid inhibitors and to analyze their mechanisms of inhibition in vitro. Major classes of natural product inhibitors and how they were identified are described. Our analyses comprehensively address the molecular interactions between the inhibitors and relevant amyloidogenic proteins. These interactions are delineated at molecular and atomic levels, which include covalent, non-covalent, and metal-mediated mechanisms. In vivo animal studies and clinical trials have been summarized as an extension. To enhance natural product bioavailability in vivo, emerging work using nanocarriers for delivery has also been described. Finally, issues and challenges as well as future development of such inhibitors are envisioned. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane.

  18. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide: Structure, Function, and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehana Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hormone islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, or amylin plays a role in glucose homeostasis but aggregates to form islet amyloid in type-2 diabetes. Islet amyloid formation contributes to β-cell dysfunction and death in the disease and to the failure of islet transplants. Recent work suggests a role for IAPP aggregation in cardiovascular complications of type-2 diabetes and hints at a possible role in type-1 diabetes. The mechanisms of IAPP amyloid formation in vivo or in vitro are not understood and the mechanisms of IAPP induced β-cell death are not fully defined. Activation of the inflammasome, defects in autophagy, ER stress, generation of reactive oxygen species, membrane disruption, and receptor mediated mechanisms have all been proposed to play a role. Open questions in the field include the relative importance of the various mechanisms of β-cell death, the relevance of reductionist biophysical studies to the situation in vivo, the molecular mechanism of amyloid formation in vitro and in vivo, the factors which trigger amyloid formation in type-2 diabetes, the potential role of IAPP in type-1 diabetes, the development of clinically relevant inhibitors of islet amyloidosis toxicity, and the design of soluble, bioactive variants of IAPP for use as adjuncts to insulin therapy.

  19. EFFECT OF GONG'S MOBILIZATION VERSUS MULLIGAN'S MOBILIZATION ON SHOULDER PAIN AND SHOULDER MEDIAL ROTATION MOBILITY IN FROZEN SHOULDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Rinku Dilip

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Frozen shoulder is a painful condition with gradual restriction of all planes of movement in the shoulder joint. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effect of Gong’s Mobilization versus Mulligan’s Mobilization on Shoulder pain and Shoulder Medial Rotation mobility in subjects with Frozen shoulder. Methods: An Experimental study design, 40 subjects with unilateral frozen shoulder were selected and randomized 20 subjects into each of two groups- Gong’s mobilization and Mulligan’s mobilization respectively. Gong’s group received the Gong’s mobilization technique with conventional therapy while Mulligan’s group received Mulligan’s mobilization along with conventional therapy. The duration of intervention was 5 treatment sessions per week for two weeks. Outcome measures such as shoulder medial rotation was measured using a Goniometer and pain was measured using a VAS scale before and after two weeks of intervention. Results: Analysis using Independent ‘t’ test and Mann Whitney U test found that there is statistically significant difference p<0.000 when pre to post interventions means were compared within the groups. When post intervention means were compared between the Gong’s and Mulligan’s groups there was no statistically significant difference in Active and Passive Range of Shoulder Medial Rotation but there was statistically significant difference in VAS when compared between the groups. Conclusion: It is concluded that both Gong’s mobilization with conventional therapy and Mulligan’s mobilization with conventional therapy are effective in improving Shoulder Medial Rotation Mobility in Frozen Shoulder. However Gong’s mobilization shown greater percentage of effect in reducing pain and Mulligan’s Mobilization shown greater percentage in improving ROM.

  20. Low-Cost Alternative External Rotation Shoulder Brace and Review of Treatment in Acute Shoulder Dislocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacy, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic dislocations of the shoulder commonly present to emergency departments (EDs. Immediate closed reduction of both anterior and posterior glenohumeral dislocations is recommended and is frequently performed in the ED. Recurrence of dislocation is common, as anteroinferior labral tears (Bankart lesions are present in many anterior shoulder dislocations.14,15,18,23 Immobilization of the shoulder following closed reduction is therefore recommended; previous studies support the use of immobilization with the shoulder in a position of external rotation, for both anterior and posterior shoulder dislocations.7-11,19 In this study, we present a technique for assembling a low-cost external rotation shoulder brace using materials found in most hospitals: cotton roll, stockinette, and shoulder immobilizers. This brace is particularly suited for the uninsured patient, who lacks the financial resources to pay for a pre-fabricated brace out of pocket. We also performed a cost analysis for our low-cost external rotation shoulder brace, and a cost comparison with pre-fabricated brand name braces. At our institution, the total materials cost for our brace was $19.15. The cost of a pre-fabricated shoulder brace at our institution is $150 with markup, which is reimbursed on average at $50.40 according to our hospital billing data. The low-cost external rotation shoulder brace is therefore a more affordable option for the uninsured patient presenting with acute shoulder dislocation. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:114–120.

  1. Consensus for physiotherapy for shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klintberg, Ingrid Hultenheim; Cools, Ann M J; Holmgren, Theresa M; Holzhausen, Ann-Christine Gunnarsson; Johansson, Kajsa; Maenhout, Annelies G; Moser, Jane S; Spunton, Valentina; Ginn, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Shoulder pain is a common disorder. Despite growing evidence of the importance of physiotherapy, in particular active exercise therapy, little data is available to guide treatment. The aim of this project was to contribute to the development of an internationally accepted assessment and treatment algorithm for patients with shoulder pain. Nine physiotherapists with expertise in the treatment of shoulder dysfunction met in Sweden 2012 to begin the process of developing a treatment algorithm. A questionnaire was completed prior to the meeting to guide discussions. Virtual conferences were thereafter the platform to reach consensus. Consensus was achieved on a clinical reasoning algorithm to guide the assessment and treatment for patients presenting with local shoulder pain, without significant passive range of motion deficits and no symptoms or signs of instability. The algorithm emphasises that physiotherapy treatment decisions should be based on physical assessment findings and not structural pathology, that active exercises should be the primary treatment approach, and that regular re-assessment is performed to ensure that all clinical features contributing to the presenting shoulder pain are addressed. Consensus was also achieved on a set of guiding principles for implementing exercise therapy for shoulder pain, namely, a limited number of exercises, performed with appropriate scapulo-humeral coordination and humeral head alignment, in a graduated manner without provoking the presenting shoulder pain. The assessment and treatment algorithm presented could contribute to a more formal, extensive process aimed at achieving international agreement on an algorithm to guide physiotherapy treatment for shoulder pain.

  2. Return to sports after shoulder arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christine C; Johnson, Daniel J; Liu, Joseph N; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M; Gulotta, Lawrence V; Garcia, Grant H

    2016-01-01

    Many patients prioritize the ability to return to sports following shoulder replacement surgeries, including total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), and hemiarthroplasty (HA). While activity levels after hip and knee replacements have been well-established in the literature, studies on this topic in the field of shoulder arthroplasty are relatively limited. A review of the literature regarding athletic activity after shoulder arthroplasty was performed using the PubMed database. All studies relevant to shoulder arthroplasty and return to sport were included. The majority of patients returned to their prior level of activity within six months following TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA. Noncontact, low demand activities are permitted by most surgeons postoperatively and generally have higher return rates than contact sports or high-demand activities. In some series, patients reported an improvement in their ability to participate in sports following the arthroplasty procedure. The rates of return to sports following TSA (75%-100%) are slightly higher than those reported for HA (67%-76%) and RTSA (75%-85%). Patients undergoing TSA, RTSA, and shoulder HA should be counseled that there is a high probability that they will be able to return to their preoperative activity level within six months postoperatively. TSA has been associated with higher rates of return to sports than RTSA and HA, although this may reflect differences in patient population or surgical indication. PMID:27672564

  3. MRI findings in the painful poststroke shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rajiv R; Haghpanah, Sepideh; Elovic, Elie P; Flanagan, Steven R; Behnegar, Anousheh; Nguyen, Vu; Page, Stephen J; Fang, Zi-Ping; Chae, John

    2008-06-01

    We describe the structural abnormalities in the painful shoulder of stroke survivors and their relationships to clinical characteristics. Method- Eighty-nine chronic stroke survivors with poststroke shoulder pain underwent T1- and T2-weighted multiplanar, multisequence MRI of the painful paretic shoulder. All scans were reviewed by one radiologist for the following abnormalities: rotator cuff, biceps and deltoid tears, tendinopathies and atrophy, subacromial bursa fluid, labral ligamentous complex abnormalities, and acromioclavicular capsular hypertrophy. Clinical variables included subject demographics, stroke characteristics, and the Brief Pain Inventory Questions 12. The relationship between MRI findings and clinical characteristics was assessed through logistic regression. Thirty-five percent of subjects exhibited a tear of at least one rotator cuff, biceps or deltoid muscle. Fifty-three percent of subjects exhibited tendinopathy of at least one rotator cuff, bicep or deltoid muscle. The prevalence of rotator cuff tears increased with age. However, rotator cuff tears and rotator cuff and deltoid tendinopathies were not related to severity of poststroke shoulder pain. In approximately 20% of cases, rotator cuff and deltoid muscles exhibited evidence of atrophy. Atrophy was associated with reduced motor strength and reduced severity of shoulder pain. Rotator cuff tears and rotator cuff and deltoid tendinopathies are highly prevalent in poststroke shoulder pain. However, their relationship to shoulder pain is uncertain. Atrophy is less common but is associated with less severe shoulder pain.

  4. Eponymous terms in anterior shoulder stabilization surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Somford, M. P.; van der Linde, J. A.; Wiegerinck, J. I.; Hoornenborg, D.; van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; van Deurzen, D. F. P.

    2017-01-01

    Shoulder dislocation and its treatment are probably as old as time. Surgical treatment has gained acceptance recently, especially in recurrent cases. Within roughly the last 100 years, numerous treatment strategies have been developed and questions elucidated regarding the entity of shoulder

  5. MRI of impingement syndromes of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulyadi, E.; Harish, S.; O'Neill, J.; Rebello, R.

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis of shoulder impingement is primarily a clinical one. Imaging has a role in assisting clinicians in developing a treatment strategy by identifying and characterizing the cause of shoulder impingement. In this review, the relevant anatomy, cause/pathomechanics, clinical features, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the different types of impingement syndromes are presented

  6. Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M.H.M.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Koppe, P.A.; Konijnenbelt, M.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Niessen MH, Veeger DH, Koppe PA, Konijnenbelt MH, van Dieën J, Janssen TW. Proprioception of the shoulder after stroke. Objective: To investigate position sense and kinesthesia of the shoulders of stroke patients. Design: Case-control study. Setting: A rehabilitation center. Participants: A total of

  7. Avoiding Shoulder Injury from Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durall, Chris J.; Manske, Robert C.; Davies, George J.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies shoulder exercises commonly performed in fitness centers that may contribute to or exacerbate glenohumeral joint (shoulder) injury, describing alternative exercises that may be substituted and a offering rationale for the variations. The article focuses on anterior and posterior glenohumeral instability, subacromial impingement (primary…

  8. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the canine shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, C D; Nyland, T G

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the normal ultrasonographic anatomy of the canine shoulder. Fourteen shoulders from 7 clinically normal mid-sized dogs were radiographed and imaged using high frequency ultrasound. Each shoulder was isolated postmortem, and the ultrasonographic and gross anatomy was studied during dissection. The ultrasonographic appearance of the shoulder specimens was similar to that found in the live dogs. Twenty-four shoulders isolated postmortem from 12 variably sized dogs were also used to characterize the normal ultrasound anatomy over a range of sizes. Important anatomic structures that could be consistently evaluated were the biceps tendon and bursa, the bicipital groove surface, the supraspinatous tendon, the infraspinatous tendon, the teres minor tendon, and the caudal aspect of the humeral head. Results of ultrasonographic examination of 4 dogs with shoulder lameness are described to illustrate some applications of canine shoulder ultrasonography in the evaluation of the canine shoulder. In these dogs, ultrasound was a valuable tool to evaluate effusion and synovial proliferation within the bicipital bursa, supraspinatous and biceps tendinitis, biceps tendon strain, and dystrophic calcification.

  9. [Prediction, prevention and management of shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csorba, Roland

    2012-05-20

    Shoulder dystocia is one of the most tragic, fatal and unexpected obstetrical events, which is mostly unpredictable and unpreventable. This clinical picture is defined as a delivery that requires additional obstetric maneuvers to release the shoulders after gentle downward traction has failed. Shoulder dystocia occurs when the fetal shoulder impacts on the maternal symphysis or sacral promontory. The incidence of shoulder dystocia is 0.2-0.6%. High perinatal mortality and morbidity is associated with the condition, even when it is managed appropriately. Obstetricians should be aware of the existing risk factors, but should always be alert to the possibility of shoulder dystocia in all labors. Maternal morbidity is also increased, particularly postpartum hemorrhage, rupture of the uterus, injury of the bladder, urethra and the bowels and fourth-degree perineal tears. Complications of the newborn include asphyxia, perinatal mortality, fracture of the clavicula and the humerus. Brachial plexus injuries are one of the most important fetal complications of shoulder dystocia, complicating 4-16% of such deliveries. The purpose of this article is to review the current evidence regarding the possible prediction, prevention and management of shoulder dystocia.

  10. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merl, T.; Weinhardt, H.; Oettl, G.; Lenz, M.; Riel, K.A.

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a method that has been advancing in the last few years to the modality of choice for diagnostic evaluation of the bone joints, as the method is capable of imaging not only the ossous but also the soft tissue components of the joint. MRI likewise has become an accepted method for diagnostic evaluation of syndromes of the shoulder, with high diagnostic accuracy in detecting rotator cuff lesions, or as an efficient MRI arthrography for evaluation of the instability or lesions of the labrocapsular complex. In the evaluation of early stages of shoulder impingement, the conventional MRI technique as a static technique yields indirect signs which in many cases do not provide the diagnostic certainty required in order to do justice to the functional nature of the syndrome. In these cases, functional MRI for imaging of the arm in abducted position and in rotational movement may offer a chance to early detect impingement and thus identify patients who will profit from treatment at an early stage [de

  11. Impingement Syndrome of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garving, Christina; Jakob, Sascha; Bauer, Isabel; Nadjar, Rudolph; Brunner, Ulrich H

    2017-11-10

    Shoulder pain is the third most common musculoskeletal complaint in orthopedic practice. It is usually due to a defect of the rotator cuff and/or an impingement syndrome. This review is based on pertinent literature retrieved by a selective search of the Medline database. Patients with shoulder impingement syndrome suffer from painful entrapment of soft tissue whenever they elevate the arm. The pathological mechanism is a structural narrowing in the subacromial space. A multiplicity of potential etiologies makes the diagnosis more difficult; it is established by the history and physical examination and can be confirmed with x-ray, ultra - sonography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The initial treatment is conservative, e.g., with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, infiltrations, and patient exercises. Conservative treatment yields satisfactory results within 2 years in 60% of cases. If symptoms persist, decompressive surgery is performed as long as the continuity of the rotator cuff is preserved and there is a pathological abnormality of the bursa. The correct etiologic diagnosis and choice of treatment are essential for a good outcome. The formal evidence level regarding the best treatment strategy is low, and it has not yet been determined whether surgical or conservative treatment is better. Randomized controlled therapeutic trials are needed so that a standardized treatment regimen can be established.

  12. Shoulder Ultrasonography: Performance and Common Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gaitini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US of the shoulder is the most commonly requested examination in musculoskeletal US diagnosis. Sports injuries and degenerative and inflammatory processes are the main sources of shoulder pain and functional limitations. Because of its availability, low cost, dynamic examination process, absence of radiation exposure, and ease of patient compliance, US is the preferred mode for shoulder imaging over other, more sophisticated, and expensive methods. Operator dependence is the main disadvantage of US examinations. Use of high range equipment with high resolution transducers, adhering to a strict examination protocol, good knowledge of normal anatomy and pathological processes and an awareness of common pitfalls are essential for the optimal performance and interpretation of shoulder US. This article addresses examination techniques, the normal sonographic appearance of tendons, bursae and joints, and the main pathological conditions found in shoulder ultrasonography.

  13. Immunoprecipitation of amyloid fibrils by the use of an antibody that recognizes a generic epitope common to amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin R Greiner

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils are associated with many maladies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. The isolation of amyloids from natural materials is very challenging because the extreme structural stability of amyloid fibrils makes it difficult to apply conventional protein science protocols to their purification. A protocol to isolate and detect amyloids is desired for the diagnosis of amyloid diseases and for the identification of new functional amyloids. Our aim was to develop a protocol to purify amyloid from organisms, based on the particular characteristics of the amyloid fold, such as its resistance to proteolysis and its capacity to be recognized by specific conformational antibodies. We used a two-step strategy with proteolytic digestion as the first step followed by immunoprecipitation using the amyloid conformational antibody LOC. We tested the efficacy of this method using as models amyloid fibrils produced in vitro, tissue extracts from C. elegans that overexpress Aβ peptide, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients diagnosed with AD. We were able to immunoprecipitate Aβ(1-40 amyloid fibrils, produced in vitro and then added to complex biological extracts, but not α-synuclein and gelsolin fibrils. This method was useful for isolating amyloid fibrils from tissue homogenates from a C. elegans AD model, especially from aged worms. Although we were able to capture picogram quantities of Aβ(1-40 amyloid fibrils produced in vitro when added to complex biological solutions, we could not detect any Aβ amyloid aggregates in CSF from AD patients. Our results show that although immunoprecipitation using the LOC antibody is useful for isolating Aβ(1-40 amyloid fibrils, it fails to capture fibrils of other amyloidogenic proteins, such as α-synuclein and gelsolin. Additional research might be needed to improve the affinity of these amyloid conformational antibodies for an array of amyloid fibrils without compromising their selectivity before

  14. MRI of the posttraumatic shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, N.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Abnormalities of the shoulder are common but still unclear for both GPs and the orthopedic surgeon in our community. Difficult and late these patients are directed to a specialist for diagnosis and treatment. Our goal is to address some of the key and most common problem conditions related to the complaints in this area. Incidence of symptomatic ruptures of the shoulder’s rotator cuff is difficult to be evaluated. But it is by no means rare, concerning the research in the world - historically and today. It is also known that ruptures can be asymptomatic. Despite the large percentage of them, many of them are at risk for progression of the symptoms. While, on the world, the authors explicitly state that dealing with a rotator cuff rupture is one of the top 10 issues that are most important for orthopedic surgeons, in our country the most common diagnosis for shoulder complaints is still periarthritis, without specifying of individual muscles pathology. Another major concern is shoulder instability associated with multiple incidents of luxation started either in adolescence with minor traumatic incident, such as recurrent dislocation, or started after severe trauma in older ages. It has to be specified diagnostic type of instability: front, rear or multidirection. Especially it is important to make the initial stabilization period of unavoidable long series of repeated dislocations in adolescents and young people, whether actively practicing sports or not. This point is often missed, and later for large lesions it leads to more invasive surgery. Not infrequently this condition is characterized by pain and limited movement without true dislocation. Then it is mandatory to assess the diagnostic changes in labrum, ligaments and muscles, not to leave the patient to reach first dislocation. Impingement syndrome (IC) is a common suffering, engaging soft tissues in the subacromial bursitis. IC characterizes by pain during the upper limb removal and the

  15. Posterior shoulder tightness and rotator cuff strength assessments in painful shoulders of amateur tennis players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddy B. Marcondes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown a relationship between shoulder posterior capsule tightness and shoulder pain in overhead athletes. However, this relationship has not been studied in tennis players. OBJECTIVES: Assessment of the shoulder range of motion (ROM, strength and posterior capsule tightness of skilled amateur tennis players who had complaints of dominant shoulder pain in comparison with tennis players without pain. METHOD: Forty-nine skilled amateur tennis players were distributed in 2 groups: Control Group (n=22 and Painful Group (n=27. The first group was composed of asymptomatic subjects, and the second was composed of subjects with shoulder pain on the dominant side. These groups were evaluated to determine the dominant and non-dominant shoulder ROM (internal and external rotation, isometric shoulder strength (internal and external rotation and posterior shoulder tightness by blind evaluators. RESULTS: The ANOVA results indicated significant differences between the groups in the dominant shoulder ROM, posterior capsule tightness, external rotation strength and strength ratio (p<0.05. The intragroup analysis (dominant versus non-dominant in the Painful Group displayed a significant difference for ROM, posterior capsule tightness and external rotation strength (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The tennis players with pain in the dominant shoulder presented greater posterior capsule tightness, internal rotation deficit (ROM, external rotation gain (ROM and deficits in external rotation strength than the tennis players without pain.

  16. Posterior shoulder tightness and rotator cuff strength assessments in painful shoulders of amateur tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcondes, Freddy B; de Jesus, Julio F; Bryk, Flavio F; de Vasconcelos, Rodrigo A; Fukuda, Thiago Y

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a relationship between shoulder posterior capsule tightness and shoulder pain in overhead athletes. However, this relationship has not been studied in tennis players. Assessment of the shoulder range of motion (ROM), strength and posterior capsule tightness of skilled amateur tennis players who had complaints of dominant shoulder pain in comparison with tennis players without pain. Forty-nine skilled amateur tennis players were distributed in 2 groups: Control Group (n=22) and Painful Group (n=27). The first group was composed of asymptomatic subjects, and the second was composed of subjects with shoulder pain on the dominant side. These groups were evaluated to determine the dominant and non-dominant shoulder ROM (internal and external rotation), isometric shoulder strength (internal and external rotation) and posterior shoulder tightness by blind evaluators. The ANOVA results indicated significant differences between the groups in the dominant shoulder ROM, posterior capsule tightness, external rotation strength and strength ratio (pPainful Group displayed a significant difference for ROM, posterior capsule tightness and external rotation strength (ppain in the dominant shoulder presented greater posterior capsule tightness, internal rotation deficit (ROM), external rotation gain (ROM) and deficits in external rotation strength than the tennis players without pain.

  17. The relationships between shoulder pain, range of motion, and disability in patients with shoulder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad H; Al-Eisa, Einas S; Iqbal, Zaheen Ahmad

    2018-02-06

    Shoulder dysfunction is a major cause of musculoskeletal pain in general population. A variety of shoulder disorders can cause a reduction in shoulder range of motion and subsequent disability. To investigate the relationship between the shoulder pain, range of motion, and disability in patients with shoulder dysfunction. Sixty-four patients (49 men and 15 women) with shoulder disorders with a varying diagnosis including, adhesive capsulitis, rotator cuff injury, impingement syndrome, acromio-clavicular pain, and instability, participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were asked to report the shoulder pain intensity and level of disability on a numerical rating scale (NRS) and the shoulder pain and disability index (SPADI), respectively. In addition, the active shoulder range of motion was evaluated. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient was used to investigate the association between the shoulder pain, range of motion, and disability. A good negative correlation found between the shoulder abduction, flexion, and rotation range of motion with the NRS score (rho =-0.710 to -0.747). A moderate negative correlation found between the extension and the NRS score (rho =-0.643). A good negative correlation found between abduction and the SPADI total score (rho =-0.714). A moderate negative correlation found between the shoulder flexion and rotation range of motion with the SPADI total score (rho =-0.547 to -0.694). A fair negative correlation found between the extension and the SPADI total score (rho =-0.495). A moderated positive correlation found between the NRS and the SPADI total score (rho = 0.667). The flexion, abduction, and rotation ROMs were most significantly associated with severity of pain and the physical disability in patients with shoulder dysfunction. Further, longitudinal studies are required to confirm these results.

  18. Computational Modelling of the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby

    2014-01-01

    of a specific protein into amyloid fibrils. During this process, a cytotoxic event occurs which can be a serious actor in the evolvement of the disease. This thesis is concerned with elucidating the biological processes concerning amyloid proteins, more specifically, the peptide hormone human islet amyloid...... setup. We have exploited these strengths to study the interactions between an amyloid fibril and amyloid imaging agents. Imaging agents are promising tools for the detection of amyloid deposits in the brain of AD patients. This could aid in the early diagnosis as well as evaluation of new treatments......When proteins do not fold correctly, it can lead to very serious diseases. One such group of diseases is the amyloid diseases, of which Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are members. The amyloid diseases are characterized by the aggregation...

  19. Interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdovinová, Veronika; Tomašovičová, Natália; Batko, Ivan; Batková, Marianna; Balejčíková, Lucia; Garamus, Vasyl M.; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Kopčanský, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This work is devoted to the structural study of complex solutions of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils due to possible ordering of such system by applying the external magnetic field. The interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with amyloid fibrils has been followed by atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. It has been observed that magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. It was found that MNPs alter amyloids structures, namely the diameter of lysozyme amyloid fibrils is increased whereas the length of fibrils is decreased. In the same time MNPs do not change the helical pitch significantly. - Highlights: • Solution of MNPs with lysozyme amyloid fibrils was characterized by AFM and SAXS. • MNPs adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. • Diameter and size of lysozyme amyloid fibrils change due to doping with MNPs.

  20. Interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdovinová, Veronika [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Tomašovičová, Natália, E-mail: nhudak@saske.sk [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Batko, Ivan; Batková, Marianna; Balejčíková, Lucia [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Garamus, Vasyl M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht: Zentrum fr Material, und Kstenforschung GmbH, Max-Plank-Strae 1, Geesthacht 216502 (Germany); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Physics Department, Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kopčanský, Peter [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia)

    2017-06-01

    This work is devoted to the structural study of complex solutions of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils due to possible ordering of such system by applying the external magnetic field. The interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with amyloid fibrils has been followed by atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. It has been observed that magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. It was found that MNPs alter amyloids structures, namely the diameter of lysozyme amyloid fibrils is increased whereas the length of fibrils is decreased. In the same time MNPs do not change the helical pitch significantly. - Highlights: • Solution of MNPs with lysozyme amyloid fibrils was characterized by AFM and SAXS. • MNPs adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. • Diameter and size of lysozyme amyloid fibrils change due to doping with MNPs.

  1. An entropy-assisted musculoskeletal shoulder model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xu; Lin, Jia-Hua; McGorry, Raymond W

    2017-04-01

    Optimization combined with a musculoskeletal shoulder model has been used to estimate mechanical loading of musculoskeletal elements around the shoulder. Traditionally, the objective function is to minimize the summation of the total activities of the muscles with forces, moments, and stability constraints. Such an objective function, however, tends to neglect the antagonist muscle co-contraction. In this study, an objective function including an entropy term is proposed to address muscle co-contractions. A musculoskeletal shoulder model is developed to apply the proposed objective function. To find the optimal weight for the entropy term, an experiment was conducted. In the experiment, participants generated various 3-D shoulder moments in six shoulder postures. The surface EMG of 8 shoulder muscles was measured and compared with the predicted muscle activities based on the proposed objective function using Bhattacharyya distance and concordance ratio under different weight of the entropy term. The results show that a small weight of the entropy term can improve the predictability of the model in terms of muscle activities. Such a result suggests that the concept of entropy could be helpful for further understanding the mechanism of muscle co-contractions as well as developing a shoulder biomechanical model with greater validity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Antenatal and intrapartum prediction of shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manish; Hockley, Christine; Quigley, Maria A; Yeh, Peter; Impey, Lawrence

    2010-08-01

    To (1) develop algorithms to calculate the risk of shoulder dystocia at individual deliveries; (2) evaluate screening for shoulder dystocia. Retrospective analysis of 40284 consecutive term cephalic singleton pregnancies using a 'train and test' method. Four models were derived using logistic regression and tested (birthweight alone; birthweight and other independent antenatal variables; birthweight and all independent antenatal and intrapartum variables; and all independent variables excluding birthweight). Shoulder dystocia occurred in 240 deliveries (0.6%). Birthweight was the most important risk factor although 98 cases (41%) occurred in babies weighing shoulder dystocia of >10%. Although the antenatal model had high predictability (area under curve 0.89), it was no better than birthweight alone and had a sensitivity of 52.4%. Where birthweight was excluded, prediction of shoulder dystocia was poor. Antepartum and labour calculation of the risk of shoulder dystocia is possible. Whilst greatly hindered by the inaccuracy of estimating weight, it allows due weight to be given to factors which may already be influencing clinical practice. However, shoulder dystocia cannot be predicted with sufficient accuracy to allow universal screening. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Amyloid formation via supramolecular peptide assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Roger A; Hayes, Stanley F; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Priola, Suzette A

    2007-06-19

    Amyloid fibrils have been classically defined as linear, nonbranched polymeric proteins with a cross beta-sheet structure and the ability to alter the optical properties of the amyloid-specific dye Congo Red. Mounting evidence suggests that soluble oligomeric peptide assemblies approximately 2-20 nm in diameter are critical intermediates in amyloid formation. Using a pathogenic prion protein peptide comprised of residues 23-144, we demonstrate that, under quiescent but not agitated conditions, much larger globular assemblies up to 1 mum in diameter are made. These globules precede fibril formation and directly interact with growing fibril bundles. Fibrils made via these large spherical peptide assemblies displayed a remarkable diversity of ultrastructural features. Fibrillization of the Abeta1-40 peptide under similar conditions yielded similar results, suggesting a mechanism of general amyloid formation that can proceed through intermediates much larger than those previously described. Our data suggest that simply changing the physical microenvironment can profoundly influence the mechanism of amyloid formation and yield fibrils with novel ultrastructural properties.

  4. Halogenation dictates the architecture of amyloid peptide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Andrea; Pigliacelli, Claudia; Gori, Alessandro; Nonappa; Ikkala, Olli; Demitri, Nicola; Terraneo, Giancarlo; Castelletto, Valeria; Hamley, Ian W; Baldelli Bombelli, Francesca; Metrangolo, Pierangelo

    2017-07-20

    Amyloid peptides yield a plethora of interesting nanostructures though difficult to control. Here we report that depending on the number, position, and nature of the halogen atoms introduced into either one or both phenylalanine benzene rings of the amyloid β peptide-derived core-sequence KLVFF, four different architectures were obtained in a controlled manner. Our findings demonstrate that halogenation may develop as a general strategy to engineer amyloidal peptide self-assembly and obtain new amyloidal nanostructures.

  5. AL amyloid imaging and therapy with a monoclonal antibody to a cryptic epitope on amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Wall

    Full Text Available The monoclonal antibody 2A4 binds an epitope derived from a cleavage site of serum amyloid protein A (sAA containing a -Glu-Asp- amino acid pairing. In addition to its reactivity with sAA amyloid deposits, the antibody was also found to bind amyloid fibrils composed of immunoglobulin light chains. The antibody binds to synthetic fibrils and human light chain (AL amyloid extracts with high affinity even in the presence of soluble light chain proteins. Immunohistochemistry with biotinylated 2A4 demonstrated positive reaction with ALκ and ALλ human amyloid deposits in various organs. Surface plasmon resonance analyses using synthetic AL fibrils as a substrate revealed that 2A4 bound with a K(D of ∼10 nM. Binding was inhibited in the presence of the -Glu-Asp- containing immunogen peptide. Radiolabeled 2A4 specifically localized with human AL amyloid extracts implanted in mice (amyloidomas as evidenced by single photon emission (SPECT imaging. Furthermore, co-localization of the radiolabeled mAb with amyloid was shown in biodistribution and micro-autoradiography studies. Treatment with 2A4 expedited regression of ALκ amyloidomas in mice, likely mediated by the action of macrophages and neutrophils, relative to animals that received a control antibody. These data indicate that the 2A4 mAb might be of interest for potential imaging and immunotherapy in patients with AL amyloidosis.

  6. Imaging of bursae around the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bureau, N.J.; Dussault, R.G.; Keats, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    The authors present a review of the anatomy of the major bursae around the shoulder joint and discuss the use of the different imaging modalities which demonstrate their radiologic features. The calcified subacromial-subdeltoid bursa has a characteristic appearance on plain radiographs. When inflamed it can be visualized by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Calcific bursitis may involve the subcoracoid bursa. This bursa may mimic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder or complete rotator cuff tear when injected inadvertently during shoulder arthrography. Less well known are three coracoclavicular ligament bursae. These are also subject to calcific bursitis and have a typical radiologic appearance. (orig.). With 6 figs

  7. Imaging of bursae around the shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau, N.J. [Department of Radiology, Hotel-Dieu de Montreal Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dussault, R.G. [Department of Radiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Keats, T.E. [Department of Radiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The authors present a review of the anatomy of the major bursae around the shoulder joint and discuss the use of the different imaging modalities which demonstrate their radiologic features. The calcified subacromial-subdeltoid bursa has a characteristic appearance on plain radiographs. When inflamed it can be visualized by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Calcific bursitis may involve the subcoracoid bursa. This bursa may mimic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder or complete rotator cuff tear when injected inadvertently during shoulder arthrography. Less well known are three coracoclavicular ligament bursae. These are also subject to calcific bursitis and have a typical radiologic appearance. (orig.). With 6 figs.

  8. CT diagnosis with shoulder joint injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, B.; Hoerl, M.; Schindler, G.

    1986-01-01

    With recidivistic shoulder luxation the CT examination makes possible the objective comprehension of predisposable anatomical evidence as well as the proof of posttraumatic changes. Changes in the acetabular margin (Bankart lesion) as well as in the humerus head (Hills-Sachs lesion) are depicted with recidivistic shoulder luxation as the morphological substrate of the posttraumatic damage. Individual examinations of 83 patients with recidivistic shoulder luxations showed that the mentioned changes often appear in combinations. With the CT examination the Hills-Sachs lesion can be comprehended and its location, extension and depth can be judged as well. (orig./MG) [de

  9. The prion protein as a receptor for amyloid-beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, Helmut W.; Nguyen, Louis N.; Nabavi, Sadegh; Malinow, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Increased levels of brain amyloid-beta, a secreted peptide cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP), is believed to be critical in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease. Increased amyloid-beta can cause synaptic depression, reduce the number of spine protrusions (that is, sites of synaptic

  10. Brazilin inhibits amyloid β-protein fibrillogenesis, remodels amyloid fibrils and reduces amyloid cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wen-Jie; Guo, Jing-Jing; Gao, Ming-Tao; Hu, Sheng-Quan; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Han, Yi-Fan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Jiang, Shaoyi; Sun, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Soluble amyloid β-protein (Aβ) oligomers, the main neurotoxic species, are predominantly formed from monomers through a fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Herein, we virtually screened an in-house library of natural compounds and discovered brazilin as a dual functional compound in both Aβ42 fibrillogenesis inhibition and mature fibril remodeling, leading to significant reduction in Aβ42 cytotoxicity. The potent inhibitory effect of brazilin was proven by an IC50 of 1.5 +/- 0.3 μM, which was smaller than that of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate in Phase III clinical trials and about one order of magnitude smaller than those of curcumin and resveratrol. Most importantly, it was found that brazilin redirected Aβ42 monomers and its mature fibrils into unstructured Aβ aggregates with some β-sheet structures, which could prevent both the primary nucleation and the fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Molecular simulations demonstrated that brazilin inhibited Aβ42 fibrillogenesis by directly binding to Aβ42 species via hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding and remodeled mature fibrils by disrupting the intermolecular salt bridge Asp23-Lys28 via hydrogen bonding. Both experimental and computational studies revealed a different working mechanism of brazilin from that of known inhibitors. These findings indicate that brazilin is of great potential as a neuroprotective and therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); de Pablo, Juan J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  12. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Tomonaga, Masanori; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Shimada, Hiroyuki.

    1985-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy was studied clinicopathologically, with special attention given to the CT images. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy is characterized, by a lobar-type hemorrhage involving the cortex, with direct extension into the subarachnoid space. Multiple hemorrhages are frequent, and cortical infarctions are present as complications in elderly patients without risk factors. CT scans taken in 5 cases demonstrated lobar hemorrhages in superficial locations, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently, with surrounding edema and mass effect. A subarachnoid extension of the hemorrhage through the superficial cortex, proven pathologically in all cases, was noted by CT in 4 of the 5 cases. However, cortical infarction was not detected by CT in any case. Therefore, CT is of value in the diagnosis of cerebral hemorrhage due to amyloid angiopathy based on distinctive findings such as a lobar hemorrhage in superficial regions, with extension into the subarachnoid space, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently. (author)

  13. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 - 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 - 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of human islet amyloid polypeptides: an insight into amyloid peptides' connection with antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Liu, Qian; Chen, Jin-Chun; Cui, Yi-Xian; Zhou, Bing; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Li, Yan-Mei

    2012-07-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) shows an antimicrobial activity towards two types of clinically relevant bacteria. The potency of hIAPP varies with its aggregation states. Circular dichroism was employed to determine the interaction between hIAPP and bacteria lipid membrane mimic. The antimicrobial activity of each aggregate species is associated with their ability to induce membrane disruption. Our findings provide new evidence revealing the antimicrobial activity of amyloid peptide, which suggest a possible connection between amyloid peptides and antimicrobial peptides.

  15. Influence of shoulder pain on muscle function: implications for the assessment and therapy of shoulder disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyf, Filip; Lluch, Enrique; Falla, Deborah; Meeus, Mira; Noten, Suzie; Nijs, Jo

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder pain is often a challenging clinical phenomenon because of the potential mismatch between pathology and the perception of pain. Current evidence clearly emphasizes an incomplete understanding of the nature of shoulder pain. Indeed, the effective diagnosis and treatment of shoulder pain should not only rely upon a detailed knowledge of the peripheral pathologies that may be present in the shoulder, but also on current knowledge of pain neurophysiology. To assess and treat shoulder pain, a comprehensive understanding of the way in which pain is processed is essential. This review reflects modern pain neurophysiology to the shoulder and aims to answer the following questions: why does my shoulder hurt? What is the impact of shoulder pain on muscle function? What are the implications for the clinical examination of the shoulder? And finally, what are the clinical implications for therapy? Despite the increasing amount of research in this area, an in-depth understanding of the bidirectional nociception-motor interaction is still far from being achieved. Many questions remain, especially related to the treatment of nociception-motor interactions.

  16. Case report 480: Periosteal amyloid tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, S.O.; Karjoo, R.; Johnstone, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    In summary, a 66-year-old woman presented with an asymptomatic left pretibial tumor of 7 years duration. Serial radiographs over this period demonstrated a slowly enlarging periosteal tumor with focal and increasing calcifications/ossifications. No involvement of the underlying medullary bone, as demonstrated by computed tomography was noted. Following the diagnosis by biopsy of an amyloid tumor, serum and urine electrophoreses, complete blood count, SMAC panel, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and serum rheumatoid factor level were found to be within reference ranges. A needle biopsy of the abdominal wall failed to reveal amyloid in the fat by Congo-red staining. (orig.)

  17. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cift, Hakan; Soylemez, Salih; Demiroglu, Murat; Ozkan, Korhan; Ozden, Vahit Emre; Ozkut, Afsar T.

    2015-01-01

    Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients' ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients' reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitation of range of motion of their shoulder at their last control. Luxatio erecta is seen rarely, and these patients may have neurovascular injury. These patients should be carefully examined and treated by the orthopaedic and traumatology surgeons. PMID:25883820

  18. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Cift

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients’ ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients’ reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitation of range of motion of their shoulder at their last control. Luxatio erecta is seen rarely, and these patients may have neurovascular injury. These patients should be carefully examined and treated by the orthopaedic and traumatology surgeons.

  19. Candida infection of a prosthetic shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtman, E.A.; Veterans Administration Medical Center, New York

    1983-01-01

    A heroin addict developed a Candida parapsilosis infection in a prosthetic shoulder joint. Radiographs showed loose fragments of cement with prosthetic loosening. The patient was treated with removal of the prosthesis and intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral ketoconazole. (orig.)

  20. Questions and Answers About Shoulder Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Muscle and Bone Diseases Joint Replacement Surgery Bursitis Fibromyalgia Fibrous Dysplasia Growth Plate Injuries Marfan Syndrome ... tear. Rotator cuff disease, such as tendinitis and bursitis, happens when tendons in the shoulder inflame or ...

  1. Handball load and shoulder injury rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M.; Nielsen, R.O.; Attermann, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Knowledge of injury patterns, an essential step towards injury prevention, is lacking in youth handball. Aim To investigate if an increase in handball load is associated with increased shoulder injury rates compared with a minor increase or decrease, and if an association is influenced...... by scapular control, isometric shoulder strength or glenohumeral range of motion (ROM). Methods 679 players (14-18 years) provided weekly reports on shoulder injury and handball load (training and competition hours) over 31 weeks using the SMS, phone and medical examination system. Handball load in a given...... was performed at baseline and midseason. Results An increase in handball load by >60% was associated with greater shoulder injury rate (HR 1.91; 95% CI 1.00 to 3.70, p=0.05) compared with the reference group. The effect of an increase in handball load between 20% and 60% was exacerbated among players...

  2. MRI findings in the painful hemiplegic shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Távora, D G F; Gama, R L; Bomfim, R C; Nakayama, M; Silva, C E P

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in painful hemiplegic shoulder (PHS) in hemiplegic post-stroke patients. Patients with hemiplegia following their first cerebrovascular accident who were admitted to the Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation were studied. Forty-five patients with pain in the hemiplegic shoulder and 23 post-stroke patients without shoulder pain were investigated. MRI and radiographic findings of the hemiplegic and contralateral asymptomatic shoulders were evaluated. Some MRI findings were more frequent in PHS group, including synovial capsule thickening, synovial capsule enhancement, and enhancement in the rotator cuff interval. Adhesive capsulitis was found to be a possible cause of PHS. Copyright (c) 2010 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. MRI findings in the painful hemiplegic shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavora, D.G.F., E-mail: danielgurgel@sarah.b [Department of Radiology, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil); Gama, R.L.; Bomfim, R.C. [Department of Radiology, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil); Nakayama, M. [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Grande Dourados, Dourados (Brazil); Silva, C.E.P. [Department of Statistics, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    Aim: To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in painful hemiplegic shoulder (PHS) in hemiplegic post-stroke patients. Materials and methods: Patients with hemiplegia following their first cerebrovascular accident who were admitted to the Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation were studied. Forty-five patients with pain in the hemiplegic shoulder and 23 post-stroke patients without shoulder pain were investigated. MRI and radiographic findings of the hemiplegic and contralateral asymptomatic shoulders were evaluated. Results: Some MRI findings were more frequent in PHS group, including synovial capsule thickening, synovial capsule enhancement, and enhancement in the rotator cuff interval. Conclusions: Adhesive capsulitis was found to be a possible cause of PHS.

  4. Candida infection of a prosthetic shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtman, E.A.

    1983-09-01

    A heroin addict developed a Candida parapsilosis infection in a prosthetic shoulder joint. Radiographs showed loose fragments of cement with prosthetic loosening. The patient was treated with removal of the prosthesis and intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral ketoconazole.

  5. Subacromial shoulder disorders among baggage handlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the influence of cumulative employment as baggage handler on the risk of incident subacromial shoulder disorders. Baggage handling is characterized by repetitive work primarily consisting of heavy lifting in awkward positions and time pressure. METHODS: This cohort study is based...... increased incidence of subacromial shoulder disorders for workers with longer cumulative years of employment. These results support that long-term lifting in awkward positions and time pressure influences the risk of subacromial shoulder disorders....... System. The primary exposure was cumulative years of employment as a baggage handler, and the primary outcome was diagnoses and surgical treatment of subacromial shoulder disorders. RESULTS: The cohort contained 3396 baggage handlers and 63,909 workers in the reference group. Baggage handlers with longer...

  6. 'Drooping shoulder' - nontraumatic causes of glenohumeral subluxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lev-Toaff, A.S.; Karasick, D.; Rao, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Nontraumatic glenohumeral subluxation can occur in patients with hemiplegia or brachial plexus involvement by tumor. Two cases of inferior subluxation of the humeral head are presented and nontraumatic etiologies of the ''drooping shoulder'' are discussed. (orig.)

  7. [Neonatal complications related to shoulder dystocia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, E; de Courtivron, B; Saliba, E

    2015-12-01

    To describe neonatal complications related to shoulder dystocia. This systematic evidence review is based on PubMed search, Cochrane library and experts' recommendations. The risks of brachial plexus birth injury, clavicle and humeral fracture, perinatal asphyxia, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and perinatal mortality are increased after shoulder dystocia. The medical team should be able to provide neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room in case of perinatal asphyxia following shoulder dystocia, according to national and international guidelines. The initial clinical examination should search for complications such as brachial plexus birth injury or clavicle fracture. The risk of perinatal complications is increased in newborn after shoulder dystocia. The medical team should be able to manage these complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Concept of healing of recurrent shoulder dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato D'Angelo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the main surgical techniques applied in the treatment of anterior recurrent shoulder dislocation, aiming the achievement of the normality of articulate movements. This was obtained by combining distinct surgical procedures, which allowed the recovery of a complete functional capacity of the shoulder, without jeopardizing the normality of movement, something that has not been recorded in the case of the tense sutures of the surgical procedures of Putti-Platt, Bankart, Latarjet, Dickson-O'Dell and others.The careful review of the methods applied supports the conclusion that recurrent shoulder dislocation can be cured, since cure has been obtained in 97% of the treated cases. However, some degree of limitation in the shoulder movement has been observed in most of the treated cases.Our main goal was to achieve a complete shoulder functional recovery, by treating simultaneously all of the anatomical–pathological lesions, without considering the so-called essential lesions.The period of post-operatory immobilization only last for the healing of soft parts; this takes place in a position of neutral shoulder rotation, since the use of vascular bone graft eliminates the need for long time immobilization, due to the shoulder stabilization provided by rigid fixation of the coracoid at the glenoid edge, as in the Latarjet's technique.Our procedure, used since 1959, comprises the association of several techniques, which has permitted shoulder healing without movement limitation. That was because of the tension reduction in the sutures of the subescapularis, capsule, and coracobraquialis muscles.

  9. High Fidelity In Situ Shoulder Dystocia Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Pelikan, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Audience: Resident physicians, emergency department (ED staff Introduction: Precipitous deliveries are high acuity, low occurrence in most emergency departments. Shoulder dystocia is a rare but potentially fatal complication of labor that can be relieved by specific maneuvers that must be implemented in a timely manner. This simulation is designed to educate resident learners on the critical management steps in a shoulder dystocia presenting to the emergency department. A special aspect of this simulation is the unique utilization of the “Noelle” model with an instructing physician at bedside maneuvering the fetus through the stations of labor and providing subtle adjustments to fetal positioning not possible though a mechanized model. A literature search of “shoulder dystocia simulation” consists primarily of obstetrics and mid-wife journals, many of which utilize various mannequin models. None of the reviewed articles utilized a bedside provider maneuvering the fetus with the Noelle model, making this method unique. While the Noelle model is equipped with a remote-controlled motor that automatically rotates and delivers the baby either to the head or to the shoulders and can produce a turtle sign and which will prevent delivery of the baby until signaled to do so by the instructor, using the bedside instructor method allows this simulation to be reproduced with less mechanistically advanced and lower cost models.1-5 Objectives: At the end of this simulation, learners will: 1 Recognize impending delivery and mobilize appropriate resources (ie, both obstetrics [OB] and NICU/pediatrics; 2 Identify risk factors for shoulder dystocia based on history and physical; 3 Recognize shoulder dystocia during delivery; 4 Demonstrate maneuvers to relieve shoulder dystocia; 5 Communicate with team members and nursing staff during resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: High-fidelity simulation. Topics: High fidelity, in situ, Noelle model

  10. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia

    OpenAIRE

    Menticoglou, Savas; Schneider, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 m...

  11. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-01-07

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture.

  12. Amyloid in basal cell carcinoma and seborrheic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, K E; Westermark, Per

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of amyloid substance was studied in two different types of skin tumours: basal cell carcinoma and seborrheic keratosis. In 9 out of 49 cases of seborrheic keratosis amyloid substance was found. In the basal cell carcinomas, 194 out of 260 cases showed amyloid deposits, a rate...... that is higher than that previously reported. The basal cell carcinoma material was further studied regarding the amount of amyloid, mitotic rate, degree of apoptosis and the age of the patients. There was no correlation between the amount of amyloid and the mitotic rate, or the degree of apoptosis...

  13. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation of shoulder problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paternostro-Sluga, T.; Zoech, C.

    2004-01-01

    The shoulder joint has an important influence on arm- and handfunction. Therefore, activities of daily living, working and leisure time can be negatively influenced by diseases of the shoulder joint. Problems of the shoulder joint can be induced by muscular dysbalance and poor body posture. There is a strong relationship between shoulder function and body posture. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation of the shoulder joint aims at improving the local dysfunction of the shoulder joint as well as at improving function and social participation. Antiinflammatory and pain medication, exercise, occupational, electro-, ultrasound and shock wave therapy, massage, thermotherapy and pulsed electromagnetic fields are used as conservative treatments. Exercise therapy aims at improving muscular performance, joint mobility and body posture. Occupational therapy aims at improving functional movements for daily living and work. Electrotherapy is primarily used to relieve pain. Shock wave and ultrasound therapy proved to be an effective treatment for patients with calcific tendinitis. The subacromial impingement syndrome can be effectively treated by conservative therapy. (orig.) [de

  14. Anterior Shoulder Instability in the Military Athlete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Brian; Owens, Brett D.; Tokish, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Given its young, predominately male demographics and intense physical demands, the US military remains an ideal cohort for the study of anterior shoulder instability. Evidence Acquisition: A literature search of PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Database was performed to identify all peer-reviewed publications from 1950 to 2016 from US military orthopaedic surgeons focusing on the management of anterior shoulder instability. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The incidence of anterior shoulder instability events in the military occurs at an order of magnitude greater than in civilian populations, with rates as high as 3% per year among high-risk groups. With more than 90% risk of a Bankart lesion and high risk for instability recurrence, the military has advocated for early intervention of first-time shoulder instability while documenting up to 76% relative risk reduction versus nonoperative treatment. Preoperative evaluation with advanced radiographic imaging should be used to evaluate for attritional bone loss or “off-track” engaging defects to guide comprehensive surgical management. With complex recurrent shoulder instability and/or cases of clinically significant osseous lesions, potential options such as remplissage, anterior open capsular procedures, or bone augmentation procedures may be preferentially considered. Conclusion: Careful risk stratification, clinical evaluation, and selective surgical management for at-risk military patients with anterior shoulder instability can optimize the recurrence risk and functional outcome in this population. PMID:27694151

  15. Rugby and Shoulder Trauma: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, R; Tecame, A; Torre, G; Narbona, P; Maffulli, N; Denaro, V

    2015-01-01

    Rugby is a popular contact sport worldwide. Collisions and tackles during matches and practices often lead to traumatic injuries of the shoulder. This review reports on the epidemiology of injuries, type of lesions and treatment of shoulder injuries, risk factors, such as player position, and return to sport activities. Electronic searches through PubMed (Medline), EMBASE, and Cochrane Library retrieved studies concerning shoulder injuries in rugby players. Data regarding incidence, type and mechanisms of lesion, risk factors and return to sport were extracted and analyzed. The main reported data were incidence, mechanism of injury and type of lesion. Most of the studies report tackle as the main event responsible for shoulder trauma (between 50% and 85%), while the main lesions reported were Bankart lesions, Superior Labral tear from Anterior to Posterior (SLAP tears), anterior dislocation and rotator cuff tears. Open or arthroscopic repair improve clinical outcomes. Shoulder lesions are common injuries in rugby players. Surgical treatment seems to be effective in for rotator cuff tears and shoulder instability. More and better designed studies are needed for a higher Level of Evidence analysis of this topic.

  16. Neonatal morbidity associated with shoulder dystocia maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Janine E; Frey, Heather A; Tuuli, Methodius G; Colvin, Ryan; Macones, George A; Cahill, Alison G

    2015-03-01

    We sought to examine neonatal morbidity associated with different maneuvers used among term patients who experience a shoulder dystocia. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all women who experienced a clinically diagnosed shoulder dystocia at term requiring obstetric maneuvers at a single tertiary care hospital from 2005 through 2008. We excluded women with major fetal anomaly, intrauterine death, multiple gestation, and preterm. Women exposed to Rubin maneuver, Wood's screw maneuver, or delivery of the posterior arm were compared to women delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure only, which served as the reference group. The primary outcome was a composite morbidity of neonatal injury (defined as clavicular or humeral fracture or brachial plexus injury) and neonatal depression (defined as Apgar shoulder dystocia, defined as time from delivery of fetal head to delivery of shoulders. Among the 231 women who met inclusion criteria, 135 were delivered by McRoberts/suprapubic pressure alone (57.9%), 83 women were exposed to Rubin maneuver, 53 women were exposed to Wood's screw, and 36 women were exposed to delivery of posterior arm. Individual maneuvers were not associated with composite morbidity, neonatal injury, or neonatal depression after adjusting for nulliparity and duration of shoulder dystocia. We found no association between shoulder dystocia maneuvers and neonatal morbidity after adjusting for duration, a surrogate for severity. Our results demonstrate that clinicians should utilize the maneuver most likely to result in successful delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiologically Isolated Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy-Related Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Dimitri; Wacongne, Anne; Thouvenot, Eric

    2017-11-01

    In amyloid β-related angiitis of the central nervous system (also called cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation), cerebral amyloid angiopathy occurs in association with primary vasculitis of small- and medium-sized leptomeningeal and cortical arteries. To avoid brain biopsy, clinicoradiological criteria (including clinical features due to inflammation-related uni/multifocal white matter hyperintensities) for the diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation have been validated recently. We report 3 cases with acute symptoms directly related to cerebral amyloid angiopathy in the presence of asymptomatic cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation hyperintensities on initial magnetic resonance imaging. Recognizing radiological features of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation in patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy is important because radiological isolated cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation may become symptomatic and immunosuppressive treatment is often effective in cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation, although optimal treatment regimen is yet unknown. In contrast, apart from hypertension treatment, few therapeutic options exist in cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nonpathological extracellular amyloid is present during normal epididymal sperm maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Whelly

    Full Text Available Amyloids are aggregated proteins characterized by a specific cross-β-sheet structure and are typically associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease. Recently, however, several nonpathological amyloids have been found in intracellular organelles of normal mammalian tissues suggesting that amyloid may also carry out biological functions. We previously have shown that the epididymal cystatin CRES (cystatin-related epididymal spermatogenic, cst8, a reproductive-specific member of the cystatin superfamily of cysteine protease inhibitors, forms amyloid in vitro suggesting that CRES amyloid may also form in vivo within the epididymal lumen. Here we show that amyloid structures containing CRES are a component of the normal mouse epididymal lumen without any apparent cytotoxic effects on spermatozoa and that these structures change along the length of the tubule. These studies suggest the presence of a functional amyloid structure that may carry out roles in sperm maturation or maintenance of the luminal milieu and which itself may undergo maturational changes along the epididymis. In contrast to previous examples of functional amyloid which were intracellular, our studies now show that nonpathological/functional amyloid can also be extracellular. The presence of an extracellular and nonpathological amyloid in the epididymis suggests that similar amyloid structures may be present in other organ systems and may carry out distinctive tissue-specific functions.

  19. Comprehensive Shoulder US Examination: A Standardized Approach with Multimodality Correlation for Common Shoulder Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Scott E.; Orwin, John F.; Lee, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal conditions encountered in primary care and specialty orthopedic clinic settings. Although magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is typically the modality of choice for evaluating the soft-tissue structures of the shoulder, ultrasonography (US) is becoming an important complementary imaging tool in the evaluation of superficial soft-tissue structures such as the rotator cuff, subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, and biceps tendon. The advantages of US driving its recent increased use include low cost, accessibility, and capability for real-time high-resolution imaging that enables dynamic assessment and needle guidance. As more radiologists are considering incorporating shoulder US into their practices, the development of a standardized approach to performing shoulder US should be a priority to facilitate the delivery of high-quality patient care. Familiarity with and comfort in performing a standardized shoulder US examination, as well as knowledge of the types of anomalies that can be evaluated well with US, will enhance the expertise of those working in musculoskeletal radiology practices and add value in the form of increased patient and health care provider satisfaction. This review describes the utility and benefits of shoulder US as a tool that complements MR imaging in the assessment of shoulder pain. A standardized approach to the shoulder US examination is also described, with a review of the basic technique of this examination, normal anatomy of the shoulder, common indications for shoulder US, and characteristic US findings of common shoulder diseases—with select MR imaging and arthroscopic correlation. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2016 PMID:27726738

  20. Stabilization of a β-hairpin in monomeric Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide inhibits amyloid formation

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyer, Wolfgang; Grönwall, Caroline; Jonsson, Andreas; Ståhl, Stefan; Härd, Torleif

    2008-01-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is triggered by the oligomerization and aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into protein plaques. Formation of the potentially toxic oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ assemblies is accompanied by a conformational change toward a high content of β-structure. Here, we report the solution structure of Aβ(1–40) in complex with the phage-display selected affibody protein ZAβ3, a binding protein of nanomolar affinity. Boun...

  1. Genetic Dissection of the Amyloid Precursor Protein in Developmental Function and Amyloid Pathogenesis*♦

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hongmei; Wang, Zilai; Wang, Baiping; Guo, Qinxi; Dolios, Georgia; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko; Hammer, Robert E.; Südhof, Thomas C.; Wang, Rong; Zheng, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) generates large soluble APP derivatives, β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, and APP intracellular domain. Expression of the extracellular sequences of APP or its Caenorhabditis elegans counterpart has been shown to be sufficient in partially rescuing the CNS phenotypes of the APP-deficient mice and the lethality of the apl-1 null C. elegans, respectively, leaving open the question as what is the role of the highly conserved APP intracellular...

  2. Formation of amyloid fibers by monomeric light chain variable domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumshtein, Boris; Esswein, Shannon R; Landau, Meytal; Ryan, Christopher M; Whitelegge, Julian P; Phillips, Martin L; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-10-03

    Systemic light chain amyloidosis is a lethal disease characterized by excess immunoglobulin light chains and light chain fragments composed of variable domains, which aggregate into amyloid fibers. These fibers accumulate and damage organs. Some light chains induce formation of amyloid fibers, whereas others do not, making it unclear what distinguishes amyloid formers from non-formers. One mechanism by which sequence variation may reduce propensity to form amyloid fibers is by shifting the equilibrium toward an amyloid-resistant quaternary structure. Here we identify the monomeric form of the Mcg immunoglobulin light chain variable domain as the quaternary unit required for amyloid fiber assembly. Dimers of Mcg variable domains remain stable and soluble, yet become prone to assemble into amyloid fibers upon disassociation into monomers. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the genes associated with hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy APP CST3 ITM2B Related Information What is a gene? What is a gene mutation ... a disorder seems to run in my family? What are the different ways in which a genetic condition can be inherited? More about ... APP-related Genetic Testing Registry: Dementia familial British Genetic ...

  4. Amyloid plaque formation precedes dendritic spine loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Tobias; Burgold, Steffen; Dorostkar, Mario M; Fuhrmann, Martin; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M; Schmidt, Boris; Kretzschmar, Hans; Herms, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    Amyloid-beta plaque deposition represents a major neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. While numerous studies have described dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques, much less is known about the kinetics of these processes. In particular, the question as to whether synapse loss precedes or follows plaque formation remains unanswered. To address this question, and to learn more about the underlying kinetics, we simultaneously imaged amyloid plaque deposition and dendritic spine loss by applying two-photon in vivo microscopy through a cranial window in double transgenic APPPS1 mice. As a result, we first observed that the rate of dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques is the same in both young and aged animals. However, plaque size only increased significantly in the young cohort, indicating that spine loss persists even many months after initial plaque appearance. Tracking the fate of individual spines revealed that net spine loss is caused by increased spine elimination, with the rate of spine formation remaining constant. Imaging of dendritic spines before and during plaque formation demonstrated that spine loss around plaques commences at least 4 weeks after initial plaque formation. In conclusion, spine loss occurs, shortly but with a significant time delay, after the birth of new plaques, and persists in the vicinity of amyloid plaques over many months. These findings hence give further hope to the possibility that there is a therapeutic window between initial amyloid plaque deposition and the onset of structural damage at spines.

  5. Fibrillar amyloid plaque formation precedes microglial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christian K E; Keppler, Kevin; Steinbach, Sonja; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Herms, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), hallmark β-amyloid deposits are characterized by the presence of activated microglia around them. Despite an extensive characterization of the relation of amyloid plaques with microglia, little is known about the initiation of this interaction. In this study, the detailed investigation of very small plaques in brain slices in AD transgenic mice of the line APP-PS1(dE9) revealed different levels of microglia recruitment. Analysing plaques with a diameter of up to 10 μm we find that only the half are associated with clear morphologically activated microglia. Utilizing in vivo imaging of new appearing amyloid plaques in double-transgenic APP-PS1(dE9)xCX3CR1+/- mice further characterized the dynamic of morphological microglia activation. We observed no correlation of morphological microglia activation and plaque volume or plaque lifetime. Taken together, our results demonstrate a very prominent variation in size as well as in lifetime of new plaques relative to the state of microglia reaction. These observations might question the existing view that amyloid deposits by themselves are sufficient to attract and activate microglia in vivo.

  6. Infectious particles, stress, and induced prion amyloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible encephalopathies (TSEs) are believed by many to arise by spontaneous conversion of host prion protein (PrP) into an infectious amyloid (PrP-res, PrPSc) without nucleic acid. Many TSE agents reside in the environment, with infection controlled by public health measures. These include the disappearance of kuru with the cessation of ritual cannibalism, the dramatic reduction of epidemic bovine encephalopathy (BSE) by removal of contaminated feed, and the lack of endemic scrapie in geographically isolated Australian sheep with susceptible PrP genotypes. While prion protein modeling has engendered an intense focus on common types of protein misfolding and amyloid formation in diverse organisms and diseases, the biological characteristics of infectious TSE agents, and their recognition by the host as foreign entities, raises several fundamental new directions for fruitful investigation such as: (1) unrecognized microbial agents in the environmental metagenome that may cause latent neurodegenerative disease, (2) the evolutionary social and protective functions of different amyloid proteins in diverse organisms from bacteria to mammals, and (3) amyloid formation as a beneficial innate immune response to stress (infectious and non-infectious). This innate process however, once initiated, can become unstoppable in accelerated neuronal aging. PMID:23633671

  7. Energetics Underlying Twist Polymorphisms in Amyloid Fibrils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Periole, Xavier; Huber, Thomas; Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Aberg, Karina C; van der Wel, Patrick C A; Sakmar, Thomas P; Marrink, Siewert J

    2018-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are highly ordered protein aggregates associated with more than 40 human diseases. The exact conditions in which the fibrils are grown determine many types of reported fibril polymorphism, including different twist patterns. Twist-based polymorphs display unique mechanical properties

  8. Amyloid positron emission tomography in sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy: A systematic critical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Farid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA is a very common small vessel disease of the brain, showing preferential and progressive amyloid-βdeposition in the wall of small arterioles and capillaries of the leptomeninges and cerebral cortex. CAA now encompasses not only a specific cerebrovascular pathological trait, but also different clinical syndromes - including spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH, dementia and ‘amyloid spells’ - an expanding spectrum of brain parenchymal MRI lesions and a set of diagnostic criteria – the Boston criteria, which have resulted in increasingly detecting CAA during life. Although currently available validated diagnostic criteria perform well in multiple lobar ICH, a formal diagnosis is currently lacking unless a brain biopsy is performed. This is partly because in practice CAA MRI biomarkers provide only indirect evidence for the disease. An accurate diagnosis of CAA in different clinical settings would have substantial impact for ICH risk stratification and antithrombotic drug use in elderly people, but also for sample homogeneity in drug trials. It has recently been demonstrated that vascular (in addition to parenchymal amyloid-βdeposition can be detected and quantified in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET amyloid tracers. This non-invasive approach has the potential to provide a molecular signature of CAA, and could in turn have major clinical impact. However, several issues around amyloid-PET in CAA remain unsettled and hence its diagnostic utility is limited. In this article we systematically review and critically appraise the published literature on amyloid-PET (PiB and other tracers in sporadic CAA. We focus on two key areas: (a the diagnostic utility of amyloid-PET in CAA and (b the use of amyloid-PET as a window to understand pathophysiological mechanism of the disease. Key issues around amyloid-PET imaging in CAA, including relevant technical aspects are also covered in depth

  9. The critical shoulder angle is associated with osteoarthritis in the shoulder but not rotator cuff tears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnison, Arnar O; Sørensen, Thomas J; Kallemose, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2013 Moor et al introduced the concept of the critical shoulder angle (CSA) and suggested that an abnormal CSA was a leading factor in development of rotator cuff tear (RCT) and osteoarthritis (OA) of the shoulder. This study assessed whether the CSA was associated with RCT and OA...

  10. Muscular imbalance and shoulder pain in volleyball attackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugler, A; Krüger-Franke, M; Reininger, S; Trouillier, H H; Rosemeyer, B

    1996-09-01

    In overhead sports such as volleyball, baseball, or tennis shoulder problems are very common. The aim of this study was to identify features which may correlate with shoulder problems in volleyball attackers. 30 competitive volleyball attackers (mean age 25 years) were included in the study; 15 were suffering from shoulder pain and 15 had no history of shoulder pain. The results were compared with those of a control group of 15 recreational athletes without any overhead sports activities. Volleyball attackers have a different muscular and capsular pattern at the playing shoulder compared to the opposite shoulder. Their playing shoulder is depressed, the scapula lateralised, and the dorsal muscles and the posterior and inferior part of the shoulder capsule shortened. These differences were of more significance in volleyball attackers with shoulder pain than in volleyball players without shoulder pain. In contrast to recreational athletes without any overhead sports activity, there were no significant difference in the comparison of the two shoulders. The histories, clinical and sonographic findings did not reveal further typical features for volleyball attackers with shoulder pain. Muscular balance of the shoulder girdle is very important in this sport. It is therefore imperative to include adequate stretching and muscular training programme for the prevention, as well as for therapy, of shoulder pain in volleyball attackers.

  11. EVALUATION OF PAINFUL SHOULDER IN BASEBALL PLAYERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Junior, Adriano Fernando Mendes; Soares, André Lopes; Aihara, Leandro Jun; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2011-01-01

    To assess the relationship between shoulder mobility and strength and the presence of pain among baseball players. Between April and July 2009, 55 baseball players were assessed by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the School of Medical Sciences, Santa Casa de Misericórdia, São Paulo. They were all males, aged between 15 and 33 years (mean of 21); they attended an average of three training sessions per week and had been doing this sport for a mean of 10 years. 14 of the 55 players evaluated were pitchers, and 20 reported pain during the pitching motion. The mean values for lateral and medial rotation and range of motion (ROM) in the dominant shoulder were, respectively, 110 °, 61 ° and 171 °, with a statistically significant difference in relation to the non-dominant limb. Pitchers had greater gains in lateral rotation and deficits in medial rotation than did non-pitchers. Pain presented a statistically significant correlation with diminished ROM, greater length of time playing the sport and situations of "shoulder at risk". Statistically significant differences in dominant shoulder mobility were found, with increased lateral rotation, diminished medial rotation and smaller ROM, in relation to the contralateral limb. There was a statistically significant relationship between the pitcher's position and greater gain in lateral rotation and diminished medial rotation. There were statistically significant correlations between pain and diminished ROM, greater length of time playing the sport and situations of "shoulder at risk". There was a statistical tendency suggesting that players with diminished medial rotation of the dominant shoulder presented a relationship with pain.

  12. Aesthetic Shoulder Augmentation with Silicone Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yoon Jae; Jang, Hyun

    2014-02-01

    Men with narrower shoulders may appear less muscular than other men. Deltoid muscle underdevelopment or atrophy, a condition commonly linked to narrow shoulder issues, may be associated with congenital deformity, trauma, or neoplasm. For some people, regular exercise does not effectively develop the deltoid muscle region. Some people naturally have a smaller build than others. Even with developed deltoid muscles, these people still appear to be small. The authors have performed lateral shoulder augmentation with silicone implants for 4 years. Based on their experience, this procedure stands as a reliable solution for men with narrow shoulders. Lateral shoulder augmentation with silicone implants was developed and used for 81 patients between April 2009 and April 2013. None of the patients had shoulder deformities except for two patients (one patient with Poland's syndrome and one patient with Sprengel's deformity). The implants were placed through a horizontal axillary crease incision in a plane dissected between the deltoid fascia and muscle. All augmentation or correction procedures have been met with complete patient approval. Five patients had minor complications such as hematoma and implement displacement. However, all these complications were resolved to the satisfaction of the patients. When silicone implants are used to achieve purely aesthetic improvements, successful shoulder augmentation procedures are observed. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each submission to which Evidence-Based Medicine rankings are applicable. This excludes Review Articles, Book Reviews, and manuscripts that concern Basic Science, Animal Studies, Cadaver Studies, and Experimental Studies. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors http://www.springer.com/00266 .

  13. The evidenced-based shoulder evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kane, John W; Toresdahl, Brett G

    2014-01-01

    The physical examination of the shoulder has been studied extensively, but the quality and statistical power of the published research often is lacking. The initial reports of new shoulder examination techniques commonly describe impressive performance. However recent meta-analyses have found that when the majority of these tests are used in isolation, they lack the ability to rule in or rule out the pathology in question, with few exceptions. The diagnostic accuracy of the physical examination improves when the shoulder tests are evaluated in combination, such as positive passive distraction and active compression identifying a superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesion. The accuracy also can be improved when the shoulder tests are evaluated in conjunction with specific historical findings, such as age greater than 39 years, history of popping or clicking, and a positive painful arc (pain experienced between 60° and 120° of abduction) identifying rotator cuff tendinopathy. The literature on shoulder imaging demonstrates that rotator cuff tears can be ruled in or ruled out by both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. For SLAP lesions, magnetic resonance arthrography can be used to rule out a tear but may not be as accurate as combined physical examinations to rule in a tear.

  14. Effect of isokinetic training on shoulder impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T L; Fu, B M; Ngai, G; Yung, P

    2014-01-31

    The aim of this study was to review the literature evaluating the effect of isokinetic training in patients suffering from shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). Studies published up to March 2011 were located from the Pubmed, Scopus, Lilacs, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and Cochrane Library databases using "isokinetic", "shoulder", and "impingement" as key words. Referenced studies were also checked. Studies were included if isokinetic training was employed as at least one of the treatments in the therapeutic program to treat shoulder impingement or other shoulder pathologies leading to impingement-related pain. All eligible studies described the level of evidence, patient characteristics, interventions, outcome evaluation, results, complications, and return to work. There were 2 randomized control trials (RCTs) and 4 studies with level 4 evidence that met the inclusion criteria. All of the studies included showed a statistically or clinically significant outcome after isokinetic training. However, most of the studies could not identify the isolated effect of isokinetic training. There was not enough evidence to support or refute the effectiveness of isokinetic training for SIS. This result does not reflect a true lack of effect, but rather a lack of RCTs. A consensus definition of the different types and stages of SIS is urgently needed. More RCTs are also essential to clarify the value of this technique. The homogeneity of treatment interventions, study populations, and outcome measures should be prioritized. Further studies are also needed to clarify the differences in isokinetic data across different types and stages of shoulder impingement.

  15. Sleep Disturbance and Anatomic Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Brent J; Sciascia, Aaron D; Jacobs, Cale A; Edwards, T Bradley

    2017-05-01

    Sleep disturbance is commonly encountered in patients with glenohumeral joint arthritis and can be a factor that drives patients to consider surgery. The prevalence of sleep disturbance before or after anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty has not been reported. The authors identified 232 eligible patients in a prospective shoulder arthroplasty registry following total shoulder arthroplasty for primary glenohumeral joint arthritis with 2- to 5-year follow-up. Sleep disturbance secondary to the affected shoulder was characterized preoperatively and postoperatively as no sleep disturbance, frequent sleep disturbance, or nightly sleep disturbance. A total of 211 patients (91%) reported sleep disturbance prior to surgery. Patients with nightly sleep disturbance had significantly worse (Psleep disturbance, with 186 patients (80%) reporting no sleep disturbance (Psleep disturbance group had significantly greater patient-reported outcome scores and range of motion following surgery compared with the other sleep disturbance groups for nearly all outcome measures (P≤.01). Patients have significant improvements in sleep after anatomic shoulder arthroplasty. There was a high prevalence of sleep disturbance preoperatively (211 patients, 91%) compared with postoperatively (46 patients, 20%). [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(3):e450-e454.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. The Effect of Fatigued External Rotator Muscles of the Shoulder on the Shoulder Position Sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Iida

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effect of fatigue in shoulder external rotator muscles on position sense of shoulder abduction, internal rotation, and external rotation. The study included 10 healthy subjects. Shoulder position sense was measured before and after a fatigue task involving shoulder external rotator muscles. The fatigue task was performed using an isokinetic machine. To confirm the muscle fatigue, electromyography (EMG was recorded, and an integrated EMG and median power frequency (MDF during 3 sec performed target torque were calculated. After the fatigue task, the MDF of the infraspinatus muscle significantly decreased. This indicates that the infraspinatus muscle was involved in the fatigue task. In addition, the shoulder position sense of internal and external rotation significantly decreased after the fatigue task. These results suggest that the fatigue reduced the accuracy of sensory input from muscle spindles. However, no significant difference was observed in shoulder position sense of abduction before and after the fatigue task. This may be due to the fact that infraspinatus muscle did not act as prime movers in shoulder abduction. These results suggest that muscle fatigue decreased position sense during movements in which the affected muscles acted as prime movers.

  17. Shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers: review and development of a FIFA 11+ shoulder injury prevention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ejnisman B

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Benno Ejnisman,1 Gisele Barbosa,1 Carlos V Andreoli,1 A de Castro Pochini,1 Thiago Lobo,2 Rodrigo Zogaib,2 Moises Cohen,1 Mario Bizzini,3 Jiri Dvorak3 1Department of Orthopaedics, Federal University of São Paulo, 2Sports Medicine Department, Santos FC, São Paulo, Brazil; 3FIFA-Medical Assessment and Research Centre, Schulthess Clinic, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: In the last years, shoulder injuries have represented an increasing health problem in soccer players. The goalkeepers are more exposed to shoulder disorders than other field players. Injury prevention exercises for upper limbs were cited in few studies involving throwing athletes, but we know that goalkeepers need a specific program. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of an adapted Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA 11+ program, namely the FIFA 11+ shoulder, which targets the prevention of shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers. The FIFA 11+ shoulder program is structured into three parts: general warming-up exercises, exercises to improve strength and balance of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and finger muscles, and advanced exercises for core stability and muscle control. The exercises were selected based on recommendations from studies demonstrating high electromyographic activity. Keywords: goalkeeper, shoulder, injury prevention, prevention program

  18. Effects of shoulder stabilization exercise on pain and functional recovery of shoulder impingement syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-In; Choi, Yong-Kyu; Lee, Jung-Ho; Kim, Young-Min

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of scapular stabilization exercises immediately after surgery on pain and function in patients diagnosed with shoulder impingement syndrome. [Subjects] The subjects were assigned by random sampling to an experimental group (n=15) to which stabilization exercise was applied and a control group (n=15) to which ordinary physical treatment was applied. [Methods] To evaluate the degree of pain, a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) was used. The Constant-Murley Scale (CMS) was used to evaluate the functions of the shoulder joints. To determine the range of motion, a goniometer was used to measure range of shoulder motion. The simple shoulder test (SST) was used to determine the condition of the shoulder joints of the subjects. [Results] There were significant differences in all the items of the experimental group. The results of comparison of the therapeutic effect in the experimental and control groups revealed significant differences in active abduction, passive abduction, VAS, SST, and the CMS, except for pain. [Conclusion] The results suggest that shoulder stabilization exercise positively affects pain alleviation and functional recovery in shoulder impingement patients.

  19. Electromyographical Comparison of Four Common Shoulder Exercises in Unstable and Stable Shoulders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Sciascia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines if electromyographic (EMG amplitude differences exist between patients with shoulder instability and healthy controls performing scaption, prone horizontal abduction, prone external rotation, and push-up plus shoulder rehabilitation exercises. Thirty nine subjects were categorized by a single orthopedic surgeon as having multidirectional instability (n=10, anterior instability (n=9, generalized laxity (n=10, or a healthy shoulder (n=10. Indwelling and surface electrodes were utilized to measure EMG activity (reported as a % of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC in various shoulder muscles during 4 common shoulder exercises. The exercises studied effectively activated the primary musculature targeted in each exercise equally among all groups. The serratus anterior generated high activity (50–80% MVIC during a push-up plus, while the infraspinatus and teres major generated moderate-to-high activity (30–80% MVIC during both the prone horizontal and prone external rotation exercises. Scaption exercise generated moderate activity (20–50% MVIC in both rotator cuff and scapular musculature. Clinicians should feel confident in prescribing these shoulder-strengthening exercises in patients with shoulder instability as the activation levels are comparable to previous findings regarding EMG amplitudes and should improve the dynamic stabilization capability of both rotator cuff and scapular muscles using exercises designed to address glenohumeral joint instability.

  20. Evaluation and treatment of shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Deborah L

    2014-05-01

    Shoulder pain is a common symptom in the adult population. The most common cause of shoulder pain is SIS, reflecting a problem with the rotator cuff or subacromial bursa. Determining the cause of a patient’s pain is usually a clinical diagnosis based on careful history taking and physical examination. Limited use of imaging studies will be needed in the setting of trauma, possible glenohumeral arthritis, or when a complete tendon tear is suspected. Therapy is based on pain control and therapeutic exercises in almost all cases. Despite the prevalence of shoulder pain, there is no consensus on the best way to achieve pain control or on the type of exercise most likely to achieve speedy recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Shoulder Arthroscopy in the Beach Chair Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, John D; Frank, Rachel M; Hamamoto, Jason T; Provencher, Matthew T; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-08-01

    Arthroscopic shoulder surgery can be performed in both the beach chair and lateral decubitus positions. The beach chair position is a reliable, safe, and effective position to perform nearly all types of shoulder arthroscopic procedures. The advantages of the beach chair position include the ease of setup, limited brachial plexus stress, increased glenohumeral and subacromial visualization, anesthesia flexibility, and the ability to easily convert to an open procedure. This position is most commonly used for rotator cuff repair, subacromial decompression, and superior labrum anterior-to-posterior repair procedures. To perform arthroscopy surgery in the beach chair position successfully, meticulous care during patient positioning and setup must be taken. In this Technical Note, we describe the necessary steps to safely and efficiently prepare patients in the beach chair position for arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

  2. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savas Menticoglou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 minutes in the second. After volume resuscitation circulation was restored, there was profound brain damage and the babies died. Conclusion. Unsuspected hypovolemic shock may explain some cases of failed resuscitation after shoulder dystocia. This may require a change in clinical practice. Rather than immediately clamping the cord after the baby is delivered, it is proposed that (1 the obstetrician delay cord clamping to allow autotransfusion of the baby from the placenta and (2 the neonatal resuscitators give volume much sooner.

  3. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 minutes in the second. After volume resuscitation circulation was restored, there was profound brain damage and the babies died. Conclusion. Unsuspected hypovolemic shock may explain some cases of failed resuscitation after shoulder dystocia. This may require a change in clinical practice. Rather than immediately clamping the cord after the baby is delivered, it is proposed that (1) the obstetrician delay cord clamping to allow autotransfusion of the baby from the placenta and (2) the neonatal resuscitators give volume much sooner. PMID:27493815

  4. Shoulder Strength and Physical Activity Predictors of Shoulder Pain in People With Paraplegia From Spinal Injury: Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatchett, Patricia; Eberly, Valerie J.; Lighthall Haubert, Lisa; Conners, Sandy; Requejo, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Shoulder joint pain is a frequent secondary complaint for people following spinal cord injury (SCI). Objective The purpose of this study was to determine predictors of shoulder joint pain in people with paraplegia. Methods/Design A 3-year longitudinal study was conducted. Participants were people with paraplegia who used a manual wheelchair for at least 50% of their mobility and were asymptomatic for shoulder pain at study entry. Participants were classified as having developed shoulder pain if they experienced an increase of ≥10 points on the Wheelchair User's Shoulder Pain Index in the 3-year follow-up period. Measurements of maximal isometric shoulder torques were collected at study entry (baseline), 18 months, and 3 years. Daily activity was measured using a wheelchair odometer, and self-reported daily transfer and raise frequency data were collected by telephone every 6 weeks. Results Two hundred twenty-three participants were enrolled in the study; 39.8% developed shoulder pain over the 3-year follow-up period. Demographic variables and higher activity levels were not associated with shoulder pain onset. Baseline maximal isometric torque (normalized by body weight) in all shoulder muscle groups was 10% to 15% lower in participants who developed shoulder pain compared with those who remained pain-free. Lower shoulder adduction torque was a significant predictor of shoulder pain development (log-likelihood test=11.38), but the model explained only 7.5% of shoulder pain onset and consequently is of limited clinical utility. Limitations Time since SCI varied widely among participants, and transfer and raise activity was measured by participant recall. Conclusions Participants who developed shoulder pain had decreased muscle strength, particularly in the shoulder adductors, and lower levels of physical activity prior to the onset of shoulder pain. Neither factor was a strong predictor of shoulder pain onset. PMID:25721123

  5. Changes in sitting posture affect shoulder range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanlayanaphotporn, Rotsalai

    2014-04-01

    To assess the effect of slouched sitting on shoulder range of motion (ROM). 30 asymptomatic males aged between 18 and 35 years with no history of shoulder problems within the last 6 months. Shoulder ROMs in flexion and abduction as well as external rotation and internal rotation in 90° of shoulder abduction were measured while the subjects sat in 3 different sitting postures. There were statistically significant mean differences among the 3 sitting postures regarding thoracic kyphosis and shoulder ROMs (p sitting posture affect shoulder ROMs in all directions tested. Greater changes in shoulder ROMs were associated with greater increase in thoracic kyphosis. These findings suggest that even subtle changes in thoracic kyphosis need to be considered during shoulder evaluation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.P.; Winther, A.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven...... healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0A degrees...... that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation...

  7. Diagnosis and Management of Periprosthetic Shoulder Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mook, William R; Garrigues, Grant E

    2014-06-04

    ➤ The unique bacterial flora of the shoulder present diagnostic and treatment challenges that are distinct from those seen with failed hip and knee arthroplasties.➤ The presentation, diagnosis, and management of suppurative periprosthetic joint infections of the shoulder are similar to those of the hip and the knee.➤ Failed arthroplasties with positive cultures (FAPCs) are poorly performing shoulder reconstructions associated with low-virulence microorganisms that do not evoke a suppurative inflammatory response. Propionibacterium acnes is the predominant bacterium isolated from these cases.➤ With improved surgeon awareness and the addition of longer tissue-culture incubation times, detection of FAPCs has become more common. However, management is hampered by the lack of reliable, timely tests that can determine the presence of less virulent organisms in the preoperative or intraoperative settings.➤ The implications of positive culture results in FAPCs are unclear. Key test characteristics such as the false-positive rate and the prevalence of positive cultures in well-performing shoulders are unknown as there is no useful confirmatory test to validate the culture data and no reliable way to detect the presence of less virulent microorganisms without reoperation.➤ Soft-tissue and osseous deficits are frequently encountered when revising previously infected shoulders. The rate of complications in these scenarios is high, and the outcomes are the least favorable compared with revisions for any other indication.➤ The development of a consensus definition of a periprosthetic shoulder infection is critical to future investigations of these devastating complications. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  8. Chemical Methods to Knock Down the Amyloid Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Gao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid proteins are closely related with amyloid diseases and do tremendous harm to human health. However, there is still a lack of effective strategies to treat these amyloid diseases, so it is important to develop novel methods. Accelerating the clearance of amyloid proteins is a favorable method for amyloid disease treatment. Recently, chemical methods for protein reduction have been developed and have attracted much attention. In this review, we focus on the latest progress of chemical methods that knock down amyloid proteins, including the proteolysis-targeting chimera (PROTAC strategy, the “recognition-cleavage” strategy, the chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA strategy, the selectively light-activatable organic and inorganic molecules strategy and other chemical strategies.

  9. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian S; Dueholm, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    The success of Pseudomonas species as opportunistic pathogens derives in great part from their ability to form stable biofilms that offer protection against chemical and mechanical attack. The extracellular matrix of biofilms contains numerous biomolecules, and it has recently been discovered...... that in Pseudomonas one of the components includes β-sheet rich amyloid fibrils (functional amyloid) produced by the fap operon. However, the role of the functional amyloid within the biofilm has not yet been investigated in detail. Here we investigate how the fap-based amyloid produced by Pseudomonas affects biofilm...... hydrophobicity and mechanical properties. Using atomic force microscopy imaging and force spectroscopy, we show that the amyloid renders individual cells more resistant to drying and alters their interactions with hydrophobic probes. Importantly, amyloid makes Pseudomonas more hydrophobic and increases biofilm...

  10. Treatments for Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei; Goost, Hans; Lin, Xiang-Bo; Burger, Christof; Paul, Christian; Wang, Zeng-Li; Zhang, Tian-Yi; Jiang, Zhi-Chao; Welle, Kristian; Kabir, Koroush

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many treatments for shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) are available in clinical practice; some of which have already been compared with other treatments by various investigators. However, a comprehensive treatment comparison is lacking. Several widely used electronic databases were searched for eligible studies. The outcome measurements were the pain score and the Constant–Murley score (CMS). Direct comparisons were performed using the conventional pair-wise meta-analysis method, while a network meta-analysis based on the Bayesian model was used to calculate the results of all potentially possible comparisons and rank probabilities. Included in the meta-analysis procedure were 33 randomized controlled trials involving 2300 patients. Good agreement was demonstrated between the results of the pair-wise meta-analyses and the network meta-analyses. Regarding nonoperative treatments, with respect to the pain score, combined treatments composed of exercise and other therapies tended to yield better effects than single-intervention therapies. Localized drug injections that were combined with exercise showed better treatment effects than any other treatments, whereas worse effects were observed when such injections were used alone. Regarding the CMS, most combined treatments based on exercise also demonstrated better effects than exercise alone. Regarding surgical treatments, according to the pain score and the CMS, arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) together with treatments derived from it, such as ASD combined with radiofrequency and arthroscopic bursectomy, showed better effects than open subacromial decompression (OSD) and OSD combined with the injection of platelet-leukocyte gel. Exercise therapy also demonstrated good performance. Results for inconsistency, sensitivity analysis, and meta-regression all supported the robustness and reliability of these network meta-analyses. Exercise and other exercise-based therapies, such as kinesio taping

  11. Calumenin interacts with serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Jacobsen, Christian; Honoré, Bent

    2000-01-01

    We recently reported the identification of human calumenin, a novel Ca(2+) binding, transformation-sensitive and secreted protein [Vorum et al. (1998) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1386, 121-131; Vorum et al. (1999) Exp. Cell Res. 248, 473-481] belonging to the family of multiple EF-hand proteins...... with calumenin in the presence of Ca(2+). Amino acid sequencing identified this protein as serum amyloid P component (SAP). Furthermore, we verified and characterized the calumenin-SAP interaction by the surface plasmon resonance technique. The findings indicate that calumenin may participate...... in the immunological defense system and could be involved in the pathological process of amyloidosis that leads to formation of amyloid deposits seen in different types of tissues. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Jan-14...

  12. Recurrent Syncope, a Clue in Amyloid Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian A. Marin-Acevedo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Infiltrative cardiomyopathies include a variety of disorders that lead to myocardial thickening resulting in a constellation of clinical manifestations and eventually heart failure that could be the first clue to reach the diagnosis. Among the more described infiltrative diseases of the heart is amyloid cardiomyopathy. The disease usually presents with subtle, nonspecific symptoms. Herein, we illustrate a case of recurrent syncope as the initial presenting symptom for systemic amyloid with polyneuropathy and cardiomyopathy as a cause of syncope. The article illustrates the role of advanced cardiac imaging in the diagnosis of the disease with a focused literature review. We also highlight the role of early, shared decision-making between patient, family, and medical team in the management of cardiac amyloidosis.

  13. EVALUATION OF PAINFUL SHOULDER IN BASEBALL PLAYERS

    OpenAIRE

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Junior, Adriano Fernando Mendes; Soares, André Lopes; Aihara, Leandro Jun; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the relationship between shoulder mobility and strength and the presence of pain among baseball players. Methods: Between April and July 2009, 55 baseball players were assessed by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the School of Medical Sciences, Santa Casa de Miseric?rdia, S?o Paulo. They were all males, aged between 15 and 33 years (mean of 21); they attended an average of three training sessions per week and had been doing this sport for a mean of 10 years. Results: 14 of...

  14. Functional MR imaging study of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, M.; Yoshikawa, K.; Shibuta, H.; Kokubo, T.; Itai, Y.; Iio, M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a functional MR study of the shoulder performed with the positioning in which patients were about to complain of shoulder pain. A 0.064-T permanent MR system was used. The effectiveness of this study was evaluated in the diagnosis of rotator cuff impingement syndrome. Thirteen patients (11 males and two female) were examined prospectively. Three-dimensional Fourier transformation coronal images were obtained with patients' arms at the maximal abduction. They were compared with images obtained while patients' arms were at their sides, chiefly from the viewpoint of severity of impingement and intensity change of the supraspinatus muscle

  15. Shoulder pain: the role of diagnostic injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, H M; O'Connor, F G; Nirschl, R P

    1996-04-01

    Many different shoulder disorders cause similar symptoms and pain patterns. An accurate diagnosis can generally be made by obtaining a detailed history, performing a comprehensive, directed physical examination and obtaining selected radiographs. Occasionally, shoulder injections can be of great assistance in establishing a clear diagnosis and providing relief of symptoms. Subacromial space injection, acromioclavicular joint injection, intra-articular injection and injection of the biceps tendon are helpful in identifying such disorders as subacromial bursitis, acromioclavicular arthritis, injury to the glenohumeral joint and bicipital tendinitis.

  16. Soft tissue disorders of the shoulder. Frozen shoulder, calcific tendintis, and bicipital tendinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, W H

    1975-04-01

    The painful periarticular conditions about the shoulder joint-calcific tendinitis, bicipital tendinitis, and frozen shoulder syndrome-are seen commonly in the general practice of medicine or in the practice of orthopedic surgery. Their etiologies are unknown. Their treatment is relatively simple and depends upon a knowledge of the anatomic structures involved and the proper use of rest and exercise. Operative intervention is rarely necessary in any of these conditions. The frozen shoulder syndrome, however, in our experience is best treated in the subacute or chronic stages by infiltration brisement under general anesthesia.

  17. Frozen shoulder and the Big Five personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debeer, Philippe; Franssens, Fien; Roosen, Isabelle; Dankaerts, Wim; Claes, Laurence

    2014-02-01

    In the past, several studies have suggested the existence of a "periarthritic personality" in patients with frozen shoulder. We conducted a study to determine differences in personality traits in patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulders. We prospectively evaluated 118 patients (84 women and 34 men; mean age, 53.8 years; SD 7.56) with a frozen shoulder. Of these patients, 48 had an idiopathic frozen shoulder and 70 had a secondary frozen shoulder. Personality traits were determined by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) scale. This questionnaire measures the 5 major personality traits and is based on the norms determined in a neutral test situation for 2415 controls. Compared with healthy controls, no differences in personality traits were found in patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulder, except for Conscientiousness and Extraversion, for which patients with secondary frozen shoulder scored significantly higher than healthy controls. Patients with primary frozen shoulder scored significantly higher on Openness to Experience than did patients with secondary frozen shoulder; on the other 4 Big Five personality traits, no significant differences were found between patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulder. More specifically, patients with idiopathic frozen shoulder did not score higher on the trait Neuroticism as would be expected from previous publications. Our study results do not indicate that patients with an idiopathic frozen shoulder have a specific personality compared with healthy controls. Only a few differences were found in personality traits when the entire frozen shoulder group was compared with healthy controls and between patients with primary and secondary frozen shoulders. The results of this study suggest that these differences are not sufficient to speak about a specific "frozen shoulder personality." Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  18. Outcome evaluation in shoulder surgery using 3D kinematics sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Coley, B.; Jolles, B.; Farron, A.; Bourgeois, A.; Nussbaumer, F.; Pichonnaz, C.; Aminian, K.

    2007-01-01

    A new method of scoring systems for the functional assessment of the shoulder is presented. 3D accelerometers and gyroscopes attached on the humerus were used to differentiate a healthy from a painful shoulder. The method was first tested on 10 healthy volunteer subjects without any shoulder pathologies. Then, the system was tested on 10 patients with unilateral shoulder pathology (rotator cuff disease, osteoarthritis) before and after surgery (3, 6 months). To evalua...

  19. Muscular imbalance and shoulder pain in volleyball attackers.

    OpenAIRE

    Kugler, A; Krüger-Franke, M; Reininger, S; Trouillier, H H; Rosemeyer, B

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In overhead sports such as volleyball, baseball, or tennis shoulder problems are very common. The aim of this study was to identify features which may correlate with shoulder problems in volleyball attackers. METHODS: 30 competitive volleyball attackers (mean age 25 years) were included in the study; 15 were suffering from shoulder pain and 15 had no history of shoulder pain. The results were compared with those of a control group of 15 recreational athletes without any overhead sp...

  20. What is the role of amyloid precursor protein dimerization?

    OpenAIRE

    Khalifa, Naouel Ben; Van Hees, Joanne; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Huysseune, Sandra; Smith, Steven O.; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Octave, Jean-Noël; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Extensive research efforts have been conducted over the past decades to understand the processing of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP). APP cleavage leads to the production of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta), which is the major constituent of the amyloid core of senile plaques found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Abeta is produced by the sequential cleavage of APP by beta- and gamma-secretases. Cleavage of APP by gamma-secretase also generates the APP Intracellula...

  1. Strong transthyretin immunostaining: potential pitfall in cardiac amyloid typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoskar, Anjali A; Efebera, Yvonne; Hasan, Ayesha; Brodsky, Sergey; Nadasdy, Gyongyi; Dogan, Ahmet; Nadasdy, Tibor

    2011-11-01

    Although systemic amyloidosis commonly presents with renal disease, cardiac involvement usually determines the patient's prognosis. Cardiac involvement is seen in light chain amyloid and transthyretin amyloidosis. Distinguishing between these two is critical because prognosis and treatment differ. Our study demonstrates the unreliability of transthyretin immunostaining in subtyping cardiac amyloid. Between January 2003 and August 2010, we retrieved 229 native endomyocardial biopsies, of which 24 had amyloid. Immunohistochemistry for κ, λ, transthyretin, and serum amyloid A protein was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections. Staining was graded as weak (trace to 1+) or strong (2 to 3+). Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic typing of microdissected amyloid material was performed on selected cases. Fifteen patients had monoclonal gammopathy/plasma cell dyscrasia with cardiac amyloid. Eight of them (53%) showed strong transthyretin staining in the cardiac amyloid deposits. MS was performed in 5 of these 8 biopsies, and all 5 biopsies revealed light chain amyloid-type amyloid. Two of these 5 light chain amyloid biopsies did not even have concomitant strong staining for the appropriate light chain. Among the 15 cases with plasma cell dyscrasia, only 7 biopsies showed strong staining for the corresponding monoclonal light chain. Strong, false-positive immunostaining for transthyretin in cardiac amyloid is a potential pitfall, augmented by the frequent lack of staining for immunoglobulin light chains. Therefore, the presence of amyloid in the cardiac biopsy should prompt a search for plasma cell dyscrasia irrespective of transthyretin staining. Confirmation with MS should be sought, particularly if there is any discrepancy between κ/λ staining and serum immunofixation results.

  2. Generation of amyloid-β is reduced by the interaction of calreticulin with amyloid precursor protein, presenilin and nicastrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Stemmer

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein by γ-secretase and the ensuing generation of amyloid-β is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the identification of amyloid precursor protein binding proteins involved in regulating processing of amyloid precursor protein by the γ-secretase complex is essential for understanding the mechanisms underlying the molecular pathology of the disease. We identified calreticulin as novel amyloid precursor protein interaction partner that binds to the γ-secretase cleavage site within amyloid precursor protein and showed that this Ca(2+- and N-glycan-independent interaction is mediated by amino acids 330-344 in the C-terminal C-domain of calreticulin. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed that calreticulin is not only associated with amyloid precursor protein but also with the γ-secretase complex members presenilin and nicastrin. Calreticulin was detected at the cell surface by surface biotinylation of cells overexpressing amyloid precursor protein and was co-localized by immunostaining with amyloid precursor protein and presenilin at the cell surface of hippocampal neurons. The P-domain of calreticulin located between the N-terminal N-domain and the C-domain interacts with presenilin, the catalytic subunit of the γ-secretase complex. The P- and C-domains also interact with nicastrin, another functionally important subunit of this complex. Transfection of amyloid precursor protein overexpressing cells with full-length calreticulin leads to a decrease in amyloid-β42 levels in culture supernatants, while transfection with the P-domain increases amyloid-β40 levels. Similarly, application of the recombinant P- or C-domains and of a synthetic calreticulin peptide comprising amino acid 330-344 to amyloid precursor protein overexpressing cells result in elevated amyloid-β40 and amyloid-β42 levels, respectively. These findings indicate that the interaction of

  3. Amyloid-hydroxyapatite bone biomimetic composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaoxu; Born, Anne-Kathrin; Schweizer, Thomas; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy; Cerruti, Marta; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2014-05-28

    A "bottom up" strategy is proposed to synthesize high aspect ratio hydroxyapatite (and brushite) platelets, and combine them with amyloid fibrils into layered hybrid nanocomposites. Their hierarchical structure, despite the differences from natural bone, confers to the nanocomposites a density and elastic modulus matching those of cancellous bone. Evidence of good adhesion and spreading of human trabecular bone-derived pre-osteoblasts cells on these nanocomposites is provided. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Amyloid PET in pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Cabrera-Martín, María Nieves; Cortés-Martínez, Ana; Pytel, Vanesa; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Carreras, José Luis; Matías-Guiu, Jorge

    2017-07-01

    Pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis is a rare form of demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Positron emission tomography (PET) using amyloid-tracers has also been suggested as a marker of damage in white matter lesions in multiple sclerosis due to the nonspecific uptake of these tracers in white matter. We present the case of a 59 year-old woman with a pathological-confirmed pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis, who was studied with the amyloid tracer 18 F-florbetaben. The patient had developed word-finding difficulties and right hemianopia twelve years ago. In that time, MRI showed a lesion on the left hemisphere with an infiltrating aspect in frontotemporal lobes. Brain biopsy showed demyelinating areas and inflammation. During the following years, two new clinical relapses occurred. 18 F-florbetaben PET showed lower uptake in the white matter lesion visualized in the CT and MRI images. Decreased tracer uptake was also observed in a larger area of the left hemisphere beyond the lesions observed on MRI or CT. White matter lesion volume on FLAIR was 44.2mL, and tracer uptake change between damaged white matter and normal appearing white matter was - 40.5%. Standardized uptake value was inferior in the pseudotumoral lesion than in the other white matter lesions. We report the findings of amyloid PET in a patient with pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis. This case provides further evidence on the role of amyloid PET in the assessment of white matter and demyelinating diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Beta-amyloid and cholinergic neurons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležal, Vladimír; Kašparová, Jana

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 28, 3-4 (2003), s. 499-506 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/01/0283; GA AV ČR IAA5011206 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cholinergic neurons * AlzheimerŽs disease * beta-amyloid Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.511, year: 2003

  6. Amyloid Beta Peptide Folding in Reverse Micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskici, Gözde; Axelsen, Paul H

    2017-07-19

    Previously published experimental studies have suggested that when the 40-residue amyloid beta peptide is encapsulated in a reverse micelle, it folds into a structure that may nucleate amyloid fibril formation (Yeung, P. S.-W.; Axelsen, P. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 6061 ). The factors that induce the formation of this structure have now been identified in a multi-microsecond simulation of the same reverse micelle system that was studied experimentally. Key features of the polypeptide-micelle interaction include the anchoring of a hydrophobic residue cluster into gaps in the reverse micelle surface, the formation of a beta turn at the anchor point that brings N- and C-terminal segments of the polypeptide into proximity, high ionic strength that promotes intramolecular hydrogen bond formation, and deformation of the reverse micelle surface to facilitate interactions with the surface along the entire length of the polypeptide. Together, these features cause the simulation-derived vibrational spectrum to red shift in a manner that reproduces the red-shift previously reported experimentally. On the basis of these findings, a new mechanism is proposed whereby membranes nucleate fibril formation and facilitate the in-register alignment of polypeptide strands that is characteristic of amyloid fibrils.

  7. Design and Construction of Large Amyloid Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin M. Ridgley

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mixtures of “template” and “adder” proteins self-assemble into large amyloid fibers of varying morphology and modulus. Fibers range from low modulus, rectangular cross-sectioned tapes to high modulus, circular cross-sectioned cylinders. Varying the proteins in the mixture can elicit “in-between” morphologies, such as elliptical cross-sectioned fibers and twisted tapes, both of which have moduli in-between rectangular tapes and cylindrical fibers. Experiments on mixtures of proteins of known amino acid sequence show that control of the large amyloid fiber morphology is dependent on the amount of glutamine repeats or “Q-blocks” relative to hydrophobic side chained amino acids such as alanine, isoleucine, leucine, and valine in the adder protein. Adder proteins with only hydrophobic groups form low modulus rectangular cross-sections and increasing the Q-block content allows excess hydrogen bonding on amide groups that results in twist and higher modulus. The experimental results show that large amyloid fibers of specific shape and modulus can be designed and controlled at the molecular level.

  8. Amyloid goiter: two cases and a review of the Literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildiz, Levent; Kefeli, Mehmet; Kose, Behiye; Baris, Sancar

    2007-01-01

    Although involvement of the thyroid gland by amyloid is a relatively common phenomenon, clinically significant enlargement of the thyroid owing to amyloid deposition is an extremely rare occurrence. We describe two cases of amyloid goiter and review the relevant literature. The first case was systemic amylloidosis secondary to familial Mediterranean fever. The second case was a chronic renal failure patient who presented with an enlarged thyroid and upper airway obstructive symptoms. To date, true amyloid goiter secondary to amyloidosis associated with familial Mediterranean fever has only been reported in twelve patients. (author)

  9. SHOULDER JOINT PAIN: APPROACHES TO DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents main approaches to the differential diagnosis of shoulder joint pathology and describes the major nosological entities of shoulder diseases. It gives data on the possibility of using nanotechnologies in optimizing the management of a patient with chronic shoulder joint pain syndrome.

  10. Incidence of shoulder injuries and related risk factors among master ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Swimmers engaging in strength training (OR = 0.78) showed a reduced incidence of shoulder pain. The calculated incidence of shoulder pain over the three-year period among the master swimmers was 62.4%. Significant statistical associations between shoulder pain and the risk factors of osteoporosis, volume of training ...

  11. A case of posterior shoulder dislocation with ipsilateral humeral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of posterior shoulder dislocation with ipsilateral humeral shaft fracture. P Sharma, S Meena, D Rastogi, B Chowdhury. Abstract. Posterior shoulder dislocations are rare and represent 2–5% of all traumatic shoulder dislocation. A combination of this injury with ipsilateral humeral shaft fracture is extremely rare event.

  12. Humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament of the shoulder

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    impo

    Skeletal Radiol 2001;30:661-6. 5. Habermeyer P, Gleyze P, Rickert M. Evolution of lesions of the labrum-lig- ament complex in posttraumatic anterior shoulder instability: a prospective study. J Shoulder Elbow Surg 1999;8:66-74. 6. Hintermann B, Gachter A. Arthroscopic findings after shoulder dislocation. Am J Sports Med ...

  13. Interobserver reliability of physical examination of shoulder girdle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nomden, Jettie G.; Slagers, Anton J.; Bergman, Geert; Winters, Jan C.; Kropmans, Thomas J. B.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    The object of this study was to assess interobserver reliability in 23 tests concerning physical examination of the shoulder girdle. A physical therapist and a physical therapist/manual therapist independently performed a physical examination of the shoulder girdle in 91 patients with shoulder

  14. Relation between shoulder proprioception, kinematics and pain after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, M. H M; Veeger, H. E J; Meskers, C.G.; Koppe, P.A.; Konijnenbelt, M.H.; Janssen, T. W J

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify a possible relationship between chronic Post-Stroke Shoulder Pain (PSSP), scapular resting pose and shoulder proprioception. Methods: A total of 21 inpatients with stroke and 10 healthy control subjects were included and kinematics and proprioception of both shoulders were

  15. Homocysteine metabolism is associated with cerebrospinal fluid levels of soluble amyloid precursor protein and amyloid beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomidi, Aikaterini; Lewczuk, Piotr; Kornhuber, Johannes; Smulders, Yvo; Linnebank, Michael; Semmler, Alexander; Popp, Julius

    2016-10-01

    Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may contribute to amyloidogenesis by modulating the amyloid precursor protein (APP) production and processing. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between cerebral amyloid production and both blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of the homocysteine metabolism. We assessed CSF concentrations of soluble APPα, soluble APPβ, and amyloid β1-42 (Aβ1-42), as well as plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcys), total vitamin B12, and folate, and CSF concentrations of homocysteine (Hcys-CSF), 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF), S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) in 59 subjects with normal cognition. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess associations between homocysteine metabolism parameters and amyloid production. The study was approved by the Ethical Committee of the University of Bonn. After controlling for age, gender, APOEe4 status, and albumin ratio (Qalb), higher Aβ1-42 CSF levels were associated with high Hcys and low vitamin B12 plasma levels as well as with high Hcys, high SAH, and low 5-MTHF CSF levels. Higher CSF concentrations of sAPPα and sAPPβ were associated with high SAH levels. The results suggest that disturbed homocysteine metabolism is related to increased CSF levels of sAPP forms and Aβ1-42, and may contribute to the accumulation of amyloid pathology in the brain. Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may contribute to amyloidogenesis by modulating the amyloid precursor protein (APP) production and processing. We found associations between CSF levels of soluble APP forms and Aβ1-42, and markers of the homocysteine metabolism in both plasma and CSF in adults with normal cognition. Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may represent a target for preventive and early disease-modifying interventions in Alzheimer's disease. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. Arthroscopic Repair of Recurrent Posterior Shoulder Subluxation After Total Shoulder Arthroplasty: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieshaber-Bouyer, Ricardo; Gerber, Christian

    2017-01-01

    A 53-year-old man presented with osteoarthritis (Walch biconcave [B2] glenoid retroversion, 22°; glenohumeral subluxation index, 65%) and a partial rupture of the supraspinatus tendon in the left shoulder. Following anatomic total joint replacement, he developed disabling recurrent posterior subluxation despite a stable prosthesis and a correctly centered glenoid head, as observed with postoperative radiography and computed tomography. In order to avoid bone loss and the complications associated with revision arthroplasty, we performed arthroscopic reefing of the posterior capsule as an experimental minimally invasive treatment. The reduction in capsular volume successfully stabilized the shoulder for approximately 9 years; thereafter, the recurrence of instability ultimately required the conversion to a reverse prosthesis. Arthroscopic capsular reefing proved to be an effective treatment for posterior shoulder subluxations after total shoulder arthroplasty, and can be considered to avoid revision arthroplasty in young patients with a stable and correctly centered prosthesis.

  17. Clavicular eosinophilic granuloma causing adult shoulder pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence R. Menendez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Though rarely reported, neoplasms of the clavicle occur, and their symptoms can be mistaken for more common shoulder conditions. We present the case of a benign clavicular neoplasm, rarely seen in adults, presenting with pain, and eventual pathologic fracture in a 49 year-old. A 49 year-old male firefighter underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for shoulder pain after magnetic resonance imaging revealed supraspinatus tendon tear. The patient’s pain persisted after surgery, and was described as routine until he developed severe pain after minor blunt trauma. A local Emergency Room performed the first x-rays, which revealed a pathologic fracture of the distal clavicle through a destructive lesion. The patient was referred to an orthopedic oncologist, who performed incisional biopsy, which initially diagnosed osteomyelitis. The patient was subsequently taken to surgery for debridement. Pathology then yielded the diagnosis of eosinophilic granuloma. The patient was taken back to surgery for formal curettage with open reduction and internal fixation. The patient’s pain resolved, the pathologic fracture fully healed, and the patient returned to full time work as a firefighter. Though workup for common shoulder conditions often identifies incidental benign lesions of bone, the converse can be true. Persistent pain despite intervention should raise concern for further investigation. An x-ray alone can reveal a destructive bone lesion as the source of shoulder pain.

  18. sprengels shoulder at the kenyatta national hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abnormalities, anal stenosis and cleft palate may coexist. (4,6,15). It has been noted that these abnormalities may be more significant to the child's general health than the obvious scapula deformity (18). Developmental defects of the Shoulder musculature may exist. These may affect the trapezius,the rhomboids, the levator.

  19. Effectiveness of Biologic Factors in Shoulder Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giotis, Dimitrios; Aryaei, Ashkan; Vasilakakos, Theofanis; Paschos, Nikolaos K

    2017-01-01

    Shoulder pathology can cause significant pain, discomfort, and loss of function that all interfere with activities of daily living and may lead to poor quality of life. Primary osteoarthritis and rotator cuff diseases with its sequalae are the main culprits. Management of shoulder disorders using biological factors gained an increasing interest over the last years. This interest reveals the need of effective treatments for shoulder degenerative disorders, and highlights the importance of a comprehensive and detailed understanding of the rapidly increasing knowledge in the field. This study will describe most of the available biology-based strategies that have been recently developed, focusing on their effectiveness in animal and clinical studies. Data from in vitro work will also be briefly presented; in order to further elucidate newly acquired knowledge regarding mechanisms of tissue degeneration and repair that would probably drive translational work in the next decade. The role of platelet rich-plasma, growth factors, stem cells and other alternative treatments will be described in an evidence-based approach, in an attempt to provide guidelines for their clinical application. Finally, certain challenges that biologic treatments face today will be described as an initiative for future strategies. The application of different growth factors and mesenchymal stem cells appears as promising approaches for enhancing biologic repair. However, data from clinical studies are still limited, and future studies need to improve understanding of the repair process in cellular and molecular level and evaluate the effectiveness of biologic factors in the management of shoulder disorders.

  20. Total shoulder replacement in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, O; Fruensgaard, S; Johannsen, Hans Viggo

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study of 62 Neer mark II total shoulder arthroplasties performed during the period from 1981 to 1990 on 51 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was undertaken to evaluate factors associated with component loosening and proximal humeral migration. Thirty-two (51%) showed proximal migra...

  1. Frozen shoulder or missed posterior dislocation?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    capsule and the posterior band of the inferior GH ligament. Dynamic structures are the shoulder girdle muscles and the rotator cuff. Traumatic PSD occurs when ... and subscapularis contractures, an insertion of the prosthesis is made in relatively anteverted orientation, or normal prosthetic retroversion with anterior capsular ...

  2. Reading on the Shoulders of Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Chaim, Michael; Riendeau, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Reflecting on his successful scientific career, Isaac Newton highlighted his intellectual debt to his predecessors. "If I have seen further," he wrote, "it was "only" by standing on the shoulders of giants." The authors have chosen the title of their article as a token of recognition of their debt to the teachings of…

  3. Radiographic analysis of shoulder anatomical arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merolla, Giovanni [Unit of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, ' D. Cervesi' Hospital, L. Van Beethoven 46 Street, 47841 Cattolica (Italy)], E-mail: gmerolla@shouldertech.it; Di Pietto, Francesco; Romano, Stefania [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, ' A. Cardarelli' Hospital, Naples (Italy); Paladini, Paolo; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe [Unit of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, ' D. Cervesi' Hospital, L. Van Beethoven 46 Street, 47841 Cattolica (Italy)

    2008-10-15

    Arthroplasty is the standard treatment for advanced shoulder osteoarthritis. Modern prostheses designs have modular features whose size, shaft/head and body morphology can be adjusted. Total Shoulder Arthroplasty (TSA) provides better results. A complete X-ray follow-up is essential to assess the results and evaluate the survival rates of a shoulder prosthesis. Antero-posterior at 40 deg. in both internal and external rotation (true AP view) and axillary view are recommended to assess the following parameters: orientation and translation of the humeral component, offset, size and height of the humeral head, acromio-humeral distance, distribution and fixation of the cement, stress shielding and cortical resorption, radiolucent lines, subsidence and tilt, glenoid wear and 'bone stock', prostheses instability, glenoid component shift. Shoulder hemiarthroplasty can lead to glenoid wear; the true AP film at 40 deg. of internal rotation provides the best profile of gleno-humeral joint to depict glenoid erosion. Shift of the glenoid component in TSA is identified as tilting or medial migration on true AP and axillary views in the early postoperative period (1-2 months) and at minimum of 2 years. An exhaustive radiographic analysis remains essential to monitor the prosthetic implant and detect early and late complications or risk factors of prosthetic loosening.

  4. Imaging of the shoulder after surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMenamin, Drew [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Box 354755, 4245 Roosevelt Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States)], E-mail: drewmcm@u.washington.edu; Koulouris, George [Gold Coast Medical Imaging, 123 Nerang Street, Southport, QLD 4215 (Australia); Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 132 South 10th Street, Suite 1079a, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Postoperative imaging of the shoulder is challenging. This article reviews the radiologic evaluation following surgery for subacromial impingment, rotator cuff lesions and glenohumeral instability, including the common surgical procedures, the expected postoperative findings and potential complications. A specific emphasis is made on magnetic resonance imaging.

  5. The Painful Shoulder | Roche | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The painful shoulder is commonly managed by the non-specialist. Continuing Medical Education Vol. 26 (8) 2008: pp. 398-402. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News.

  6. Relationship Between Stretch Duration And Shoulder Musculature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To date, studies focussing on the effect of stretching on flexibility have focused almost solely on the effect of chronic stretching rather than the effects of acute stretching performed immediately prior to physical activity. The effects of different static stretches were assessed on passive shoulder range of motion (ROM).

  7. ultrasound-guided shoulder arthrogram injection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-10-15

    Oct 15, 2008 ... Anterior approach ultrasound-guided arthrogram injections are a quick and reliable way of injecting contrast medium prior to a shoulder. MRI scan. A retrospective study on patients who we had previously injected and scanned at our clinic was undertaken, to compare the more documented posterior ...

  8. Looking Over the Shoulders of Researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt; Autzen, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    The Galathea 3 Expedition from 2006 to 2007 combined research and online news media, allowing journalists literally to “look over the shoulders of researchers.” The authors analyze 781 news articles published online by three media partners of the expedition, all well-established media companies...

  9. Protocol for Shoulder function training reducing musculoskeletal pain in shoulder and neck: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortensen Ole S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck and shoulder complaints are common among employees in sedentary occupations characterized by intensive computer use. Such musculoskeletal pain - which is often associated with restricted range of motion and loss of muscle strength - is one of the most common conditions treated by physical therapists. The exact mechanism of neck pain is rarely revealed by clinical examination and the treatment has varied from passive rest to active treatments. Active treatments have often been divided into either training of the painful area or the surrounding musculature avoiding direct training of the painful area. Our study investigates the effect of the latter approach. Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial of 10 weeks duration is currently being conducted. Employed office workers with severe neck-shoulder pain are randomized to 3 × 20 min shoulder function training with training supervision or to a reference group receiving advice to stay physically active. Shoulder function training primarily focuses on the serratus anterior and lower trapezius muscle with only minimal activation the upper trapezius. An announcement was sent to the administrative section of the university including jobs characterized by intensive computer work. The first 100 positive replies entered the study. Among these inclusion criteria were pain intensity in the neck/shoulder of at least 3 on a 0-9 scale. Exclusion criteria were cardiovascular disease, trauma, hypertension, or serious chronic disease. Before and after the intervention period the participants replied to a questionnaire about musculoskeletal disorders and work disability, and underwent a standardized clinical examination of the neck and shoulder girdle. Further, on a weekly basis the participants log pain intensity of the neck and shoulder during the previous week. The primary outcome measure is pain in the neck and shoulders at week 10 based on the weekly pain registration and results

  10. Regional brain hypometabolism is unrelated to regional amyloid plaque burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Andre; Ng, Bernard; Landau, Susan M; Jagust, William J; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-12-01

    In its original form, the amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease holds that fibrillar deposits of amyloid are an early, driving force in pathological events leading ultimately to neuronal death. Early clinicopathological investigations highlighted a number of inconsistencies leading to an updated hypothesis in which amyloid plaques give way to amyloid oligomers as the driving force in pathogenesis. Rather than focusing on the inconsistencies, amyloid imaging studies have tended to highlight the overlap between regions that show early amyloid plaque signal on positron emission tomography and that also happen to be affected early in Alzheimer's disease. Recent imaging studies investigating the regional dependency between metabolism and amyloid plaque deposition have arrived at conflicting results, with some showing regional associations and other not. We extracted multimodal neuroimaging data from the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging database for 227 healthy controls and 434 subjects with mild cognitive impairment. We analysed regional patterns of amyloid deposition, regional glucose metabolism and regional atrophy using florbetapir ((18)F) positron emission tomography, (18)F-fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Specifically, we derived grey matter density and standardized uptake value ratios for both positron emission tomography tracers in 404 functionally defined regions of interest. We examined the relation between regional glucose metabolism and amyloid plaques using linear models. For each region of interest, correcting for regional grey matter density, age, education and disease status, we tested the association of regional glucose metabolism with (i) cortex-wide florbetapir uptake; (ii) regional (i.e. in the same region of interest) florbetapir uptake; and (iii) regional florbetapir uptake while correcting in addition for cortex-wide florbetapir uptake. P-values for each setting

  11. Amyloid cascade in Alzheimer's disease: Recent advances in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Tarek; Shakeri, Arash; Rao, Praveen P N

    2016-05-04

    Alzheimer's disease is of major concern all over the world due to a number of factors including (i) an aging population (ii) increasing life span and (iii) lack of effective pharmacotherapy options. The past decade has seen intense research in discovering disease-modifying multitargeting small molecules as therapeutic options. The pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease is attributed to a number of factors such as the cholinergic dysfunction, amyloid/tau toxicity and oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction. In recent years, targeting the amyloid cascade has emerged as an attractive strategy to discover novel neurotherapeutics. Formation of beta-amyloid species, with different degrees of solubility and neurotoxicity is associated with the gradual decline in cognition leading to dementia. The two commonly used approaches to prevent beta-amyloid accumulation in the brain include (i) development of beta-secretase inhibitors and (ii) designing direct inhibitors of beta-amyloid (self-induced) aggregation. This review highlights the amyloid cascade hypothesis and the key chemical features required to design small molecules that inhibit lower and higher order beta-amyloid aggregates. Several recent examples of small synthetic molecules with disease-modifying properties were considered and their molecular docking studies were conducted using either a dimer or steric-zipper assembly of beta-amyloid. These investigations provide a mechanistic understanding on the structural requirements needed to design novel small molecules with anti-amyloid aggregation properties. Significantly, this work also demonstrates that the structural requirements to prevent aggregation of various amyloid species differs considerably, which explains the fact that many small molecules do not exhibit similar inhibition profile toward diverse amyloid species such as dimers, trimers, tetramers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation and management of shoulder pain in skeletally immature athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip R; Breisach, Stephen

    2017-07-01

    Shoulder pain in young athletes generally is a result of poor sports technique and overuse. A number intrinsic causes of shoulder pain have been identified. Pain may also be referred to shoulder area from cervical spine, neck and chest pathology. Overuse stress injury of the proximal humeral physis is important to recognize early in order to prevent later complications. Shoulder impingement syndrome is a general term used to describe multiple underlying lesions and relatively uncommon in young athletes. In adolescent athletes, glenohumeral instability is an important underlying pathomechanical basis for shoulder pain. Other less frequent causes reviewed here include atraumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle, long thoracic and suprascapular neuropathies.

  13. Evaluation and management of shoulder pain in skeletally immature athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breisach, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Shoulder pain in young athletes generally is a result of poor sports technique and overuse. A number intrinsic causes of shoulder pain have been identified. Pain may also be referred to shoulder area from cervical spine, neck and chest pathology. Overuse stress injury of the proximal humeral physis is important to recognize early in order to prevent later complications. Shoulder impingement syndrome is a general term used to describe multiple underlying lesions and relatively uncommon in young athletes. In adolescent athletes, glenohumeral instability is an important underlying pathomechanical basis for shoulder pain. Other less frequent causes reviewed here include atraumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle, long thoracic and suprascapular neuropathies. PMID:28795009

  14. Shoulder Dystocia: Quality, Safety, and Risk Management Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Saila; Lee, Colleen; Goffman, Dena

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia is a term that evokes terror and fear among many physicians, midwives, and health care providers as they recollect at least 1 episode of shoulder dystocia in their careers. Shoulder dystocia can result in significant maternal and neonatal complications. Because shoulder dystocia is an urgent, unanticipated, and uncommon event with potentially catastrophic consequences, all practitioners and health care teams must be well-trained to manage this obstetric emergency. Preparation for shoulder dystocia in a systematic way, through standardization of process, practicing team-training and communication, along with technical skills, through simulation education and ongoing quality improvement initiatives will result in improved outcomes.

  15. Radiography of the acutely injured shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neep, M.J.; Aziz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Routine radiological examination of the acute shoulder has been unchanged in radiology departments for many years. At UCLH (University College London Hospitals, UK) this examination consists of two projections, an AP (antero-posterior) and an LS (lateral scapula). Following a review of the related literature and the possible advantages of an axial style projection, a study was performed to evaluate whether a new projection named modified trauma axial (MTA) shoulder projection could replace the existing LS projection in the routine examination of the acute shoulder. A retrospective analysis of 244 acute shoulder examinations over a 5-month period was performed. AP, LS and MTA projections were taken with paired AP and LS, and AP and MTA radiographs were reported separately. 97 traumatic abnormalities were reported using AP and MTA whilst only 64 abnormalities were reported using AP and LS views. The MTA projection demonstrated it was significant for evaluating articular surfaces of the humeral head and glenoid, defects in the humeral head, greater tuberosity fractures, glenoid fractures and fractures of the acromion. It was established that if the LS projection was replaced with the MTA view no traumatic pathologies would have been overlooked and in fact there was a 52% increase in traumatic abnormalities detected. Use of a chi-squared test demonstrated a highly significant difference in the number of traumatic abnormalities detected between the two pairs of projection combinations (p = 0.0004). Based on this study and the examined literature the routine examination of the acutely injured shoulder is recommended to include the AP and MTA projections only.

  16. Arthroscopic capsular release for refractory shoulder stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Rassi Fernandes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results of the arthroscopic treatment of refractory adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder with two to nine years of follow-up, comparing the pre-and postoperative range of motion. METHODS: This was an observational study (case series of 18 patients who underwent arthroscopic capsular release for refractory shoulder stiffness. The mean age was of 53.6 years (range: 39 to 68, with female predominance (77.77% and nine cases left shoulders. There were 6 primary (33.33% and 12 secondary cases (66.67%. Arthroscopic capsular release was performed in all patients after a mean of 9.33 months of physical therapy (range: 6 to 20 months with a minimum follow-up of two years (range: 26 to 110 months. RESULTS: The mean active and passive forward flexion, external rotation and internal rotation increased from 94.4º/103.3º, 11.9º/21.9º, and S1/L5 vertebral level, respectively, to 151.1º/153.8º, 57.2º/64.4º, and T12/T10 vertebral level, respectively. There was a significant difference between the pre-and postoperative range of motion (p < 0.001. according to the constant-murley functional score (rom, the value increased from 14 (preoperative mean to 30 points (postoperative mean. postoperatively, all patients showed diminished shoulder pain (none or mild/15 or 10 points in the constant-murley score. CONCLUSION: arthroscopic treatment is an effective treatment for refractory shoulder stiffness.

  17. Painful shoulder. Introduction into fundamental facts and problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartl, P.W.

    1987-10-19

    The painful shoulder syndrome is very common. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis may be difficult. Shoulder pain may be caused by local processes or systemic diseases or can be referred. Periarthritis humeroscapularis (frozen shoulder) is the most common cause of painful shoulder syndrome. Biomechanical factors concerning the rotator cuff are involved in the etiopathogenesis of these pain syndromes. The therapy of frozen shoulder includes physical treatment, antirheumatic drugs, or X-ray treatment. Surgical measures may become necessary. In the course of rheumatoid arthritis the shoulder may be involved. Milwaukee-shoulder-syndrome has been described recently in crystal deposit diseases. Shoulder pain may be referred by mechanical irritations of nerve roots in the course of degenerative lesions of the cervical spine and also in the course of internal diseases of the heart, the lungs, or the gastrointestinal tract. In cases of shoulder pain without pathological data from arthrological, radiological or laboratory studies, one should always consider localized fibromyalgia in the shoulder-neck-region. The precise diagnosis of shoulder pain is an important prerequisite for treatment, the success of which should not be judged as pessimistic as it has been commonly done in the past.

  18. Optimal Design of a Bio-Inspired Anthropocentric Shoulder Rehabilitator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a bio-inspired anthropocentric 7-DOF wearable robotic arm for the purpose of stroke rehabilitation. The proposed arm rehabilitator synergistically utilizes the human arm structure with non-invasive kinematically under-deterministic cable-driven mechanisms to form a completely deterministic structure. It offers the advantages of being lightweight and having high dexterity. Adopting an anthropocentric design concept also allows it to conform to the human anatomical structure. The focus of this paper is on the analysis and design of the 3-DOF-shoulder module, called the shoulder rehabilitator. The design methodology is divided into three main steps: (1 performance evaluation of the cable-driven shoulder rehabilitator, (2 performance requirements of the shoulder joint based on its physiological characteristics and (3 design optimization of the shoulder rehabilitator based on shoulder joint physiological limitations. The aim is to determine a suitable configuration for the development of a shoulder rehabilitator prototype.

  19. Bone mineral density measurement over the shoulder region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, A M; Faber, J; Lynnerup, N

    2002-01-01

    values decreased with age (P shoulder BMD levels increased significantly with increased body mass index (BMI) (P positive relationship between the increased hip/shoulder BMD differential with BMI supports the conclusion that the shoulder is subject......The purpose of this study was to (1). establish a method for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) over the shoulder region; (2). compare the relationship between shoulder BMD levels with hip BMD and body mass index (BMI); and (3). discuss the relevance of the shoulder scan as an early indicator...... of osteoporosis compared with hip scans, the latter representing a weight-bearing part of the skeleton. We developed a scanning procedure, including a shoulder fixation device, and determined the most appropriate software in order to establish a reference material with the highest possible precision. Duplicate...

  20. A Peptide-Fc Opsonin with Pan-Amyloid Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S. Foster

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a continuing need for therapeutic interventions for patients with the protein misfolding disorders that result in systemic amyloidosis. Recently, specific antibodies have been employed to treat AL amyloidosis by opsonizing tissue amyloid deposits thereby inducing cell-mediated dissolution and organ improvement. To develop a pan-amyloid therapeutic agent, we have produced an Fc-fusion product incorporating a peptide, p5, which binds many if not all forms of amyloid. This protein, designated Fcp5, expressed in mammalian cells, forms the desired bivalent dimer structure and retains pan-amyloid reactivity similar to the p5 peptide as measured by immunosorbent assays, immunohistochemistry, surface plasmon resonance, and pulldown assays using radioiodinated Fcp5. Additionally, Fcp5 was capable of opsonizing amyloid fibrils in vitro using a pH-sensitive fluorescence assay of phagocytosis. In mice,125 I-labeled Fcp5 exhibited an extended serum circulation time, relative to the p5 peptide. It specifically bound AA amyloid deposits in diseased mice, as evidenced by biodistribution and microautoradiographic methods, which coincided with an increase in active, Iba-1-positive macrophages in the liver at 48 h postinjection of Fcp5. In healthy mice, no specific tissue accumulation was observed. The data indicate that polybasic, pan-amyloid-targeting peptides, in the context of an Fc fusion, can yield amyloid reactive, opsonizing reagents that may serve as next-generation immunotherapeutics.

  1. Native human serum amyloid P component is a single pentamer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Inge Juul; Andersen, Ove; Nielsen, EH

    1995-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are members of the pentraxin protein family. SAP is the precursor protein to amyloid P component present in all forms of amyloidosis. The prevailing notion is that SAP in circulation has the form of a double pentameric molecule (decamer...

  2. Beyond Amyloid - Widening the View on Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Christian; Ziegler, Christine

    2017-11-01

    For 25 years, the amyloid cascade hypothesis, based on the finding that mutations in the amyloid precursor protein are closely linked to familial forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), dominated the research on this disease. Recent failures of clinical anti-amyloidogenic trials, however, substantially support the reasoning (i) that the pathomechanisms that trigger familial AD, namely the generation, aggregation, and deposition of amyloid beta, cannot necessarily be extrapolated to sporadic cases and (ii) that amyloid beta represents a prominent histopathological feature in AD but not its exclusive causative factor. In autumn 2016, the Volkswagen Foundation hosted the Herrenhausen Symposium 'Beyond Amyloid - Widening the View on Alzheimer's Disease' in Hannover, Germany, to bring together current knowledge on cellular and molecular processes that contribute to AD pathogenesis independent of or alongside with the amyloid biochemistry. The following mini review series was authored by key speakers at the meeting, and highlights some of the mechanisms potentially involved in AD etiology that provide alternative viewpoints and mechanisms beyond the amyloid cascade hypothesis. This article is part of the series "Beyond Amyloid". © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. Amyloid goitre following chronic osteomyelitis: case report and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amyloid goitre following chronic osteomyelitis: case report and review of literature. AZ Mohammed, ST Edino, O Ochicha. Abstract. Amyloid Goitre is a rare clinical entity associated with systemic amyloidosis. It poses a significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenge and may be confused with a neoplastic goiter. We present ...

  4. Effects of diet-induced hypercholesterolemia on amyloid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-27

    Oct 27, 2012 ... To test the above hypothesis, we used ovariectomized with diet-induced hypercholesterolemia (OVX) and hypercholesterolemia (HCL) diet alone mouse models. HPLC analysis reveals the presence of beta amyloid in the OVX and HCL mice brain. Congo red staining analysis revealed the extent of amyloid ...

  5. Collapsed state of polyglutamic acid results in amyloid spherulite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehli, Daniel; Mulaj, Mentor; Miti, Tatiana; Traina, Joshua; Foley, Joseph; Muschol, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of proteins and peptides into amyloid fibrils involves multiple distinct intermediates and late-stage fibrillar polymorphs. Understanding the conditions and mechanisms that promote the formation of one type of intermediate and polymorph over the other represents a fundamental challenge. Answers to this question are also of immediate biomedical relevance since different amyloid aggregate species have been shown to have distinct pathogenic potencies. One amyloid polymorph that has received comparatively little attention are amyloid spherulites. Here we report that self-assembly of the intrinsically disordered polymer poly(L-glutamic) acid (PLE) can generate amyloid spherulites. We characterize spherulite growth kinetics, as well as the morphological, optical and tinctorial features of this amyloid polymorph previously unreported for PLE. We find that PLE spherulites share both tinctorial and structural characteristics with their amyloid fibril counterparts. Differences in PLE's molecular weight, polydispersity or chemistry could not explain the selective propensity toward either fibril or spherulite formation. Instead, we provide evidence that PLE polymers can exist in either a collapsed globule or an extended random coil conformation. The collapsed globule consistently produces spherulites while the extended coil assembles into disordered fibril bundles. This results suggests that these 2 PLE conformers directly affect the morphology of the resulting macroscopic amyloid assembly. PMID:28232889

  6. Prevalence of amyloid PET positivity in dementia syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Jansen, Willemijn J; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Amyloid-β positron emission tomography (PET) imaging allows in vivo detection of fibrillar plaques, a core neuropathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Its diagnostic utility is still unclear because amyloid plaques also occur in patients with non-AD dementia. OBJECTIVE: To us...

  7. Specific Triazine Herbicides Induce Amyloid-beta(42) Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portelius, Erik; Durieu, Emilie; Bodin, Marion; Cam, Morgane; Pannee, Josef; Leuxe, Charlotte; Mabondzo, Aloise; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Herve; Lee, Jung Yeol; Chang, Young-Tae; Stuber, Kathrin; Koch, Philipp; Fontaine, Gaelle; Potier, Marie-Claude; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Garbis, Spiros D.; Covaci, Adrian; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter; Karg, Frank; Flajolet, Marc; Omori, Chiori; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Meijer, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid-beta protein precursor (A beta PP) ecretases leads to extracellular release of amyloid-beta (A beta) peptides. Increased production of A beta(42) over A beta(40) and aggregation into oligomers and plaques constitute an Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmark.

  8. Ligand-binding sites in human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Roepstorff, P.

    1996-01-01

    Amyloid P component (AP) is a naturally occurring glycoprotein that is found in serum and basement membranes, AP is also a component of all types of amyloid, including that found in individuals who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Because AP has been found to bind strongly...

  9. Shoulder activity level in patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamplot, Joseph D; Lillegraven, Olivia; Brophy, Robert H

    2017-09-01

    Idiopathic adhesive capsulitis is a common condition resulting in painful multidirectional restriction of motion. Adhesive capsulitis may inhibit shoulder activity level, but this relationship has not been previously studied. This study tested the hypothesis that patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis have lower shoulder activity than sex- and age-matched controls. Seventy-two eligible patients (37 men and 35 women) with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis completed a validated shoulder activity scale that was compared with sex- and age-matched norms from a healthy population with no history of shoulder disorders. The association of shoulder activity level with patient age, sex, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores was evaluated. Overall, 58% of patients actually had higher shoulder activity scores than sex- and age-matched controls. Among patients aged 51 to 70 years, 68% of patients (73% of men and 63% of women) demonstrated higher Shoulder Activity Scale scores compared with controls. The activity level was higher among all patients aged 51 to 70 years compared with controls (10.3 ± 1.48 vs. 8 ± 0.52, P = .0067). The difference was significant for men in this age group (12.2 ± 1.7 vs. 9 ± 0.75, P = .0042). There was a statistically significant positive correlation of the Shoulder Activity Scale score with the SST score (r = 0.31, P = .009). Patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis do not have a lower shoulder activity level than sex- and age-matched controls, and older men may actually have a higher level of shoulder activity than controls. Shoulder activity level is correlated with the SST score in patients with idiopathic adhesive capsulitis. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Strength Asymmetry of the Shoulders in Elite Volleyball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzic, Vedran; Sattler, Tine; Veselko, Matjaž; Markovic, Goran; Dervisevic, Edvin

    2014-01-01

    Context: Volleyball players are reported to have shoulder strength imbalances. Previous authors have primarily investigated small samples of male players at a single skill level, without considering playing position, and with inconsistent findings. Objective: To evaluate shoulder strength asymmetry and a history of shoulder injury in a large sample of professional volleyball players of both sexes across different playing positions and skill levels. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Patients or Other Participants: A sample of 183 volleyball players (99 men, 84 women). Main Outcome Measure(s): We assessed shoulder internal-rotator and external-rotator concentric strength at 60°/s using an isokinetic dynamometer and dominant-nondominant differences in shoulder strength and strength ratios using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Peak torque was normalized for body mass and external-rotation/internal-rotation concentric strength. Results: Internal-rotation strength was asymmetric in favor of the dominant side in both sexes, regardless of previous shoulder injury status. Male volleyball players had a lower shoulder strength ratio on the dominant side, regardless of previous shoulder injury status. However, this finding was valid only when hand dominance was taken into account. Female volleyball players playing at a higher level (ie, first versus second division) were 3.43 times more likely to have an abnormal strength ratio. Playing position was not associated with an abnormal shoulder strength ratio or strength asymmetry. Conclusions: In male volleyball players, the external-rotation/internal-rotation strength ratio of the dominant shoulder was lower, regardless of playing position, skill level, or a previous shoulder injury. In female players, the ratio was less only in those at a higher skill level. Although speculative, these findings generally suggest that female volleyball players could have a lower risk of developing shoulder-related problems than male

  11. Strength asymmetry of the shoulders in elite volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzic, Vedran; Sattler, Tine; Veselko, Matjaž; Markovic, Goran; Dervisevic, Edvin

    2014-01-01

    Volleyball players are reported to have shoulder strength imbalances. Previous authors have primarily investigated small samples of male players at a single skill level, without considering playing position, and with inconsistent findings. To evaluate shoulder strength asymmetry and a history of shoulder injury in a large sample of professional volleyball players of both sexes across different playing positions and skill levels. Descriptive laboratory study. A sample of 183 volleyball players (99 men, 84 women). We assessed shoulder internal-rotator and external-rotator concentric strength at 60°/s using an isokinetic dynamometer and dominant-nondominant differences in shoulder strength and strength ratios using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Peak torque was normalized for body mass and external-rotation/internal-rotation concentric strength. Internal-rotation strength was asymmetric in favor of the dominant side in both sexes, regardless of previous shoulder injury status. Male volleyball players had a lower shoulder strength ratio on the dominant side, regardless of previous shoulder injury status. However, this finding was valid only when hand dominance was taken into account. Female volleyball players playing at a higher level (ie, first versus second division) were 3.43 times more likely to have an abnormal strength ratio. Playing position was not associated with an abnormal shoulder strength ratio or strength asymmetry. In male volleyball players, the external-rotation/internal-rotation strength ratio of the dominant shoulder was lower, regardless of playing position, skill level, or a previous shoulder injury. In female players, the ratio was less only in those at a higher skill level. Although speculative, these findings generally suggest that female volleyball players could have a lower risk of developing shoulder-related problems than male volleyball players. Isokinetic shoulder testing may reveal important information about the possible risk

  12. Bilateral Traumatic Anterior Dislocation of Shoulder – a rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashavantha Kumar C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bilateral shoulder dislocation are most commonly posterior type. These are most commonly due to seizure disorder and electrocution. Anterior shoulder dislocations occurring bilaterally without any predisposing factors are very rare. These types of injuries are due to trauma with a unique mechanism of injury. To best of our knowledge there are only few cases of similar kind are reported in literature. We hereby report a interesting case of posttraumatic, bilateral anterior dislocation of shoulder without associated fracture in a 45 old women without any predisposing pathoanatomy.Case Report: A 45-year-old women presented to casualty with sudden onset of pain and restriction of movement in both shoulders fallowing trauma. Immediately post trauma she had severe pain and restriction of both shoulders. On examination arms were abducted and externally rotated. Bilateral shoulder movements were painful and restricted . There was loss of round contour of shoulder with increased vertical diameter of axilla anteriorly. Radiological examination revealed bilateral anterior dislocation of the shoulders without any associated fractures. Closed reduction done by Milch technique after intraraticular lignocaine injection. MRI of bilateral shoulder showed no pathological lesion. Both shoulders were immobilized with a shoulder immobilizer for three weeks.Conclusion: Most of the bilateral shoulder dislocations are posterior type seen in seizure disorders. Bilateral traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations are rare and are seen as a result of unique mechanism of injury. In our case patient had a fall on her elbows causing forced extension. If diagnosed and treated promptly completely normal function of the shoulders can be restored.

  13. Effect of a worktable position on head and shoulder posture and shoulder muscles in manual material handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Hee; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-06-05

    According to a recent research, manual working with high levels of static contraction, repetitive loads, or extreme working postures involving the neck and shoulder muscles causes an increased risk of neck and shoulder musculoskeletal disorders. We investigated the effects of the forwardly worktable position on head and shoulder angles and shoulder muscle activity in manual material handling tasks. The forward head and shoulder angles and the activity of upper trapezius, levator scapulae, and middle deltoid muscle activities of 15 workers were measured during performing of manual material handling in two tasks that required different forward head and shoulder angles. The second manual material task required a significantly increased forward head and shoulder angle. The upper trapezius and levator scapulae muscle activity in second manual material task was increased significantly compared with first manual material task. The middle deltoid muscle activity in second manual material task was not significantly different compared with first manual material task. Based on this result, the forward head and shoulder angles while performing manual work need to be considered in selection of the forward distance of a worktable form the body. The high level contractions of the neck and shoulder muscles correlated with neck and shoulder pain. Therefore, the forward distance of a worktable can be an important factor in preventing neck and shoulder pain in manual material handling workers.

  14. Effects of Messages Delivered by Mobile Phone on Increasing Compliance With Shoulder Exercises Among Patients With a Frozen Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Chun; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Lin, Pi-Chu; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Chuang, Yeu-Hui

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of reminders, encouragement, and educational messages delivered by mobile phone on shoulder exercise compliance and improvements in shoulder function among patients with a frozen shoulder. A randomized controlled trial design was used. A convenience sample of patients with a frozen shoulder in an orthopedic outpatient clinic was recruited. All participants were instructed on how to do shoulder exercises and were provided with a printed pamphlet about shoulder exercises. Then, the intervention group received reminders, encouragement, and educational messages by mobile phone daily for the next 2 weeks, while the comparison group did not. The intervention group had higher compliance with shoulder exercises than did the comparison group (t = 2.263, p = .03) and had significant improvements in shoulder forward flexion (F = 12.067, p = .001), external rotation (F = 13.61, p = .001), and internal rotation (F = 5.903, p = .018) compared to those in the comparison group after the 2-week intervention. The text messages significantly increased patient compliance with shoulder exercises and thus improved patients' shoulder range of motion. Hospital or clinics can send appropriate messages to patients via text message platforms in order to remind and encourage them to do shoulder exercises. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  15. Dominant vs. non-dominant shoulder morphology in volleyball players and associations with shoulder pain and spike speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challoumas, Dimitrios; Artemiou, Andreas; Dimitrakakis, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    The aims of our study were to compare the dominant (DOM) and non-dominant (NDOM) shoulders of high-level volleyball athletes and identify possible associations of shoulder adaptations with spike speed (SS) and shoulder pathology. A total of 22 male volleyball players from two teams participating in the first division of the Cypriot championship underwent clinical shoulder tests and simple measurements around their shoulder girdle joints bilaterally. SS was measured with the use of a sports speed radar. Compared with the NDOM side, the DOM scapula was more lateralised, the DOM dorsal capsule demonstrated greater laxity, the DOM dorsal muscles stretching ability was compromised, and the DOM pectoralis muscle was more lengthened. Players with present or past DOM shoulder pain demonstrated greater laxity in their DOM dorsal capsule, tightening of their DOM inferior capsule, and lower SS compared with those without shoulder pain. Dorsal capsule measurements bilaterally were significant predictors of SS. None of the shoulder measurements was associated with team roles or infraspinatus atrophy, while scapular lateralisation was more pronounced with increasing years of experience, and scapular antetilting was greater with increasing age. Adaptations of the DOM shoulder may be linked to pathology and performance. We describe simple shoulder measurements that may have the potential to predict chronic shoulder injury and become part of injury prevention programmes. Detailed biomechanical and large prospective studies are warranted to assess the validity of our findings and reach more definitive conclusions.

  16. Shoulder strengthening exercises adapted to specific shoulder pathologies can be selected using new simulation techniques: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnier, Caecilia; Lädermann, Alexandre; Kevelham, Bart; Chagué, Sylvain; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Holzer, Nicolas

    2018-02-01

    Shoulder strength training exercises represent a major component of rehabilitation protocols designed for conservative or postsurgical management of shoulder pathologies. Numerous methods are described for exercising each shoulder muscle or muscle group. Limited information is available to assess potential deleterious effects of individual methods with respect to specific shoulder pathologies. Thus, the goal of this pilot study was to use a patient-specific 3D measurement technique coupling medical imaging and optical motion capture for evaluation of a set of shoulder strength training exercises regarding glenohumeral, labral and subacromial compression, as well as elongation of the rotator cuff muscles. One volunteer underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and motion capture of the shoulder. Motion data from the volunteer were recorded during three passive rehabilitation exercises and twenty-nine strengthening exercises targeting eleven of the most frequently trained shoulder muscles or muscle groups and using four different techniques when available. For each exercise, glenohumeral and labral compression, subacromial space height and rotator cuff muscles elongation were measured on the entire range of motion. Significant differences in glenohumeral, subacromial and labral compressions were observed between sets of exercises targeting individual shoulder muscles. Muscle lengths computed by simulation compared to MRI measurements showed differences of 0-5%. This study represents the first screening of shoulder strengthening exercises to identify potential deleterious effects on the shoulder joint. Motion capture combined with medical imaging allows for reliable assessment of glenohumeral, labral and subacromial compression, as well as muscle-tendon elongation during shoulder strength training exercises.

  17. Conformational dynamics of amyloid proteins at the aqueous interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Matthew; Horst, Nathan; Aoki, Brendy; Malik, Saad; Soto, Patricia

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid proteins is a class of proteins that exhibit distinct monomeric and oligomeric conformational states hallmark of deleterious neurological diseases for which there are not yet cures. Our goal is to examine the extent of which the aqueous/membrane interface modulates the folding energy landscape of amyloid proteins. To this end, we probe the dynamic conformational ensemble of amyloids (monomer prion protein and Alzheimer's Ab protofilaments) interacting with model bilayers. We will present the results of our coarse grain molecular modeling study in terms of the existence of preferential binding spots of the amyloid to the bilayer and the response of the bilayer to the interaction with the amyloid. NSF Nebraska EPSCoR First Award

  18. Inhibition of Toxic IAPP Amyloid by Extracts of Common Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Pei-Yu; Green, Evangeline; Pereira, Catalina; Ekimura, Shauna; Juarez, Dennis; Whyte, Travis; Arhar, Taylor; Malaspina, Bianca; Nogaj, Luiza A; Moffet, David A

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of the 37-amino acid polypeptide islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, amylin), as either insoluble amyloid or as small oligomers, appears to play a direct role in the death of pancreatic β-islet cells in type 2 diabetes. It is believed that inhibiting the aggregation of IAPP may slow down, if not prevent entirely, the progression of this disease. Extracts of thirteen different common fruits were analyzed for their ability to prevent the aggregation of amyloidogenic IAPP. Thioflavin T binding, immuno-detection and circular dichroism assays were performed to test the in vitro inhibitory potential of each extract. Atomic force microscopy was used to visualize the formation of amyloid fibrils with and without each fruit extract. Finally, extracts were tested for their ability to protect living mammalian cells from the toxic effects of amyloid IAPP. Several fruits showed substantial ability to inhibit IAPP aggregation and protect living cells from toxic IAPP amyloid.

  19. Long-term activity restrictions after shoulder arthroplasty: an international survey of experienced shoulder surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Robert A; Mallon, William J; Willems, W Jaap; Moorman, Claude T

    2011-03-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty is being performed with increasing frequency, and patients' athletic participation after shoulder arthroplasty is on the rise. However, little data exist regarding appropriate long-term activity restrictions. We hypothesize that European and North American surgeons both recommend increasing long-term activity restrictions, moving from hemiarthroplasty to total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA), and that both groups impose similar restrictions on their patients. An online survey was sent to members of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and the European Society for Surgery of the Shoulder and Elbow (SECEC). Participants received a list of 37 activities and classified their postoperative recommendations for each activity as allowed, allowed with experience, not allowed, or undecided. The participation rate was 18%, including 47 North American surgeons and 52 European surgeons. All patients were allowed to participate in nonimpact activities, including jogging/running, walking, stationary bicycling, and ballroom dancing. Sports requiring light upper extremity involvement, including low-impact aerobics, golf, swimming, and table tennis, were allowed after hemiarthroplasty and TSA, and were allowed with experience after RTSA. Sports with fall potential, including downhill skiing, tennis, basketball, and soccer, were allowed with experience after hemiarthroplasty and TSA, and undecided or not allowed after RTSA. Higher-impact sports, such as weightlifting, waterskiing, and volleyball, were undecided after hemiarthroplasty and TSA and were not allowed after RTSA. European surgeons were more conservative than American surgeons in their recommendations after hemiarthroplasty and TSA, but good agreement between the 2 groups was noted regarding restrictions after RTSA. Restrictions should be based on the type of arthroplasty performed and patients' preoperative experience. Copyright © 2011 Journal of

  20. Functional Analysis of the Primate Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuschoft, Holger; Hohn, Bianca; Scherf, Heike; Schmidt, Manuela; Krause, Cornelia; Witzel, Ulrich

    2010-04-01

    Studies of the shoulder girdle are in most cases restricted to morphological comparisons and rarely aim at elucidating function in a strictly biomechanical sense. To fill this gap, we investigated the basic functional conditions that occur in the shoulder joint and shoulder girdle of primates by means of mechanics. Because most of nonhuman primate locomotion is essentially quadrupedal walking-although on very variable substrates-our analysis started with quadrupedal postures. We identified the mechanical situation at the beginning, middle, and end of the load-bearing stance phase by constructing force parallelograms in the shoulder joint and the scapulo-thoracal connection. The resulting postulates concerning muscle activities are in agreement with electromyographical data in the literature. We determined the magnitude and directions of the internal forces and explored mechanically optimal shapes of proximal humerus, scapula, and clavicula using the Finite Element Method. Next we considered mechanical functions other than quadrupedal walking, such as suspension and brachiation. Quadrupedal walking entails muscle activities and joint forces that require a long scapula, the cranial margin of which has about the same length as the axillary margin. Loading of the hand in positions above the head and suspensory behaviors lead to force flows along the axillary margin and so necessitate a scapula with an extended axillary and a shorter cranial margin. In all cases, the facies glenoidalis is nearly normal to the calculated joint forces. In anterior view, terrestrial monkeys chose a direction of the ground reaction force requiring (moderate) activity of the abductors of the shoulder joint, whereas more arboreal monkeys prefer postures that necessitate activity of the adductors of the forelimb even when walking along branches. The same adducting and retracting muscles are recruited in various forms of suspension. As a mechanical consequence, the scapula is in a more frontal

  1. Design and Construction of Large Amyloid Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Ridgley, Devin M.; Rippner, Caitlin M. W.; Barone, Justin R.

    2015-01-01

    Mixtures of “template” and “adder” proteins self-assemble into large amyloid fibers of varying morphology and modulus. Fibers range from low modulus, rectangular cross-sectioned tapes to high modulus, circular cross-sectioned cylinders. Varying the proteins in the mixture can elicit “in-between” morphologies, such as elliptical cross-sectioned fibers and twisted tapes, both of which have moduli in-between rectangular tapes and cylindrical fibers. Experiments on mixtures of proteins of known a...

  2. Multimodal assessment of sensorimotor shoulder function in patients with untreated anterior shoulder instability and asymptomatic handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mornieux, Guillaume; Hirschmüller, Anja; Gollhofer, Albert; Südkamp, Norbert P; Maier, Dirk

    2018-04-01

    Functional evaluation of sensorimotor function of the shoulder joint is important for guidance of sports-specific training, prevention and rehabilitation of shoulder instability. Such assessment should be multimodal and comprise all qualities of sensorimotor shoulder function. This study evaluates feasibility of such multimodal assessment of glenohumeral sensorimotor function in patients with shoulder instability and handball players. Nine patients with untreated anterior instability of their dominant shoulder and 15 asymptomatic recreational handball players performed proprioceptive joint position sense and dynamic stabilization evaluations on an isokinetic device, as well as a functional throwing performance task. Outcome measures were analysed individually and equally weighted in a Shoulder-Specific Sensorimotor Index (S-SMI). Finally, isokinetic strength evaluations were conducted. We observed comparable sensorimotor functions of unstable dominant shoulders compared to healthy, contralateral shoulders (e.g. P=0.59 for S-SMI). Handball players demonstrated superior sensorimotor function of their dominant shoulders exhibiting a significantly higher throwing performance and S-SMI (Pshoulders (P>0.22). The present study proves feasibility of multimodal assessment of shoulder sensorimotor function in overhead athletes and patients with symptomatic anterior shoulder instability. Untreated shoulder instability led to a loss of dominance-related sensorimotor superiority indicating functional internal rotation deficiency. Dominant shoulders of handball players showed a superior overall sensorimotor function but weakness of dominant internal rotation constituting a risk factor for occurrence of posterior superior impingement syndrome. The S-SMI could serve as a diagnostic tool for guidance of sports-specific training, prevention and rehabilitation of shoulder instability.

  3. Amyloid-related imaging abnormalities in amyloid-modifying therapeutic trials: Recommendations from the Alzheimer's Association Research Roundtable Workgroup

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sperling, R.A.; Jack, C.R.; Black, S.E.; Frosch, M.P.; Greenberg, S.M.; Hyman, B.T.; Scheltens, P.; Carrillo, M.C.; Thies, W.; Bednar, M.M.; Black, R.S.; Brashear, H.R.; Grundman, M.; Siemers, E.R.; Feldman, H.H.; Schindler, R.J.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid imaging related abnormalities (ARIA) have now been reported in clinical trials with multiple therapeutic avenues to lower amyloid-β burden in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In response to concerns raised by the Food and Drug Administration, the Alzheimer's Association Research Roundtable convened

  4. High prevalence of shoulder girdle muscles with myofascial trigger points in patients with shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain is reported to be highly prevalent and tends to be recurrent or persistent despite medical treatment. The pathophysiological mechanisms of shoulder pain are poorly understood. Furthermore, there is little evidence supporting the effectiveness of current treatment protocols. Although myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are rarely mentioned in relation to shoulder pain, they may present an alternative underlying mechanism, which would provide new treatment targets through MTrP inactivation. While previous research has demonstrated that trained physiotherapists can reliably identify MTrPs in patients with shoulder pain, the percentage of patients who actually have MTrPs remains unclear. The aim of this observational study was to assess the prevalence of muscles with MTrPs and the association between MTrPs and the severity of pain and functioning in patients with chronic non-traumatic unilateral shoulder pain. Methods An observational study was conducted. Subjects were recruited from patients participating in a controlled trial studying the effectiveness of physical therapy on patients with unilateral non-traumatic shoulder pain. Sociodemographic and patient-reported symptom scores, including the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Questionnaire, and Visual Analogue Scales for Pain were compared with other studies. To test for differences in age, gender distribution, and education level between the current study population and the populations from Dutch shoulder studies, the one sample T-test was used. One observer examined all subjects (n = 72) for the presence of MTrPs. Frequency distributions, means, medians, standard deviations, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for descriptive purposes. The Spearman's rank-order correlation (ρ) was used to test for association between variables. Results MTrPs were identified in all subjects. The median number of muscles with MTrPs per subject was 6 (active MTrPs) and 4 (latent MTr

  5. Anal sphincter injury in vaginal deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehir, Mark P; Rubeo, Zachary; Flood, Karen; Mardy, Anne H; O'Herlihy, Colm; Boylan, Peter C; D'Alton, Mary E

    2018-03-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an obstetric emergency that occurs in 0.2-3% of all cephalic vaginal deliveries. We hypothesized that because of the difficult nature of deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia, the condition may be associated with anal sphincter injury. We sought to identify risk factors for obstetric anal sphincter injury in women with shoulder dystocia. This retrospective analysis included all cases of shoulder dystocia from 2007 to 2011 at two large tertiary referral centers, in the USA and Ireland. Details of maternal demographics, intrapartum characteristics, and delivery outcomes in cases of shoulder dystocia were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to describe the association between shoulder dystocia and anal sphincter injury. There were 685 cases of shoulder dystocia, and the rate of shoulder dystocia was similar at both institutions. The incidence of anal sphincter injury was 8.8% (60 out of 685). The rate was 14% (45 out of 324) in nulliparas and 4.2% (15 out of 361) in multiparas. Women with sphincter injury were more likely to be nulliparous (75% [45 out of 60] vs 45% [279 out of 625]; p shoulder dystocia, the risk of anal sphincter injury is 9%. Risk factors include nulliparity, operative vaginal delivery, and use of internal maneuvers, whereas episiotomy was found to have a protective effect against anal sphincter injury during cases of shoulder dystocia.

  6. Common Shoulder Injuries in American Football Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Daniel B; Lynch, T Sean; Nuber, Erika D; Nuber, Gordon W

    2015-01-01

    American football is a collision sport played by athletes at high speeds. Despite the padding and conditioning in these athletes, the shoulder is a vulnerable joint, and injuries to the shoulder girdle are common at all levels of competitive football. Some of the most common injuries in these athletes include anterior and posterior glenohumeral instability, acromioclavicular pathology (including separation, osteolysis, and osteoarthritis), rotator cuff pathology (including contusions, partial thickness, and full thickness tears), and pectoralis major and minor tears. In this article, we will review the epidemiology and clinical and radiographic workup of these injuries. We also will evaluate the effectiveness of surgical and nonsurgical management specifically related to high school, collegiate, and professional football athletes.

  7. Imaging Evaluation of Nonacute Shoulder Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuite, Michael J; Small, Kirstin M

    2017-09-01

    A variety of radiographic views have been described in the literature for the initial imaging of nonacute shoulder pain. Multiple articles have also discussed the best next imaging test if radiographs do not show the diagnosis, especially the use of unenhanced MRI, MR arthrography, CT arthrography, and ultrasound. The purpose of this article is to examine the evidence for the most helpful radiographic views and the best imaging test after radiographs for different clinical presentations of chronic shoulder pain. The recommended radiographic views and best next imaging test after the radiograph depends on the clinical diagnosis. Ultrasound is generally preferred over MRI for evaluating chronic rotator cuff pain, whereas MR arthrography, preferably with abducted and externally rotated images, is most accurate for imaging chronic symptoms from a suspected labral tear or instability.

  8. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Hippocrate Avenue 10/2942, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: frederic.lecouvet@uclouvain.be; Simoni, Paolo; Koutaissoff, Sophie; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Malghem, Jacques; Dubuc, Jean-Emile [Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Hippocrate Avenue 10/2942, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-10-15

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings.

  9. Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder includes radiography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR arthrography, computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, and ultrasound. Target-oriented evaluation of the postoperative shoulder necessitates familiarity with surgical techniques, their typical complications and sources of failure, knowledge of normal and abnormal postoperative findings, awareness of the advantages and weaknesses with the different radiologic techniques, and clinical information on current symptoms and function. This article reviews the most commonly used surgical procedures for treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability, lesions of the labral-bicipital complex, subacromial impingement, and rotator cuff lesions and highlights the significance of imaging findings with a view to detection of recurrent lesions and postoperative complications in a multimodality approach. (orig.)

  10. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terazaki, Carlos Renato Ticianelli; Trippia, Carlos Henrique; Caboclo, Maria Fernanda Sales Ferreira; Medaglia, Carla Regina Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head), and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder. (author)

  11. Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder: imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Ticianelli Terazaki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is a benign condition characterized by synovial proliferation and metaplasia, with development of cartilaginous or osteocartilaginous nodules within a joint, bursa or tendon sheath. In the shoulder, synovial osteochondromatosis may occur within the glenohumeral joint and its recesses (including the tendon sheath of the biceps long head, and in the subacromial-deltoid bursa. Such condition can be identified either by radiography, ultrasonography or magnetic resonance imaging, showing typical features according to each method. Radiography commonly shows ring-shaped calcified cartilages and periarticular soft tissues swelling with erosion of joint margins. Ultrasonography demonstrates hypoechogenic cartilaginous nodules with progressive increase in echogenicity as they become calcified, with development of posterior acoustic shadow in case of ossification. Besides identifying cartilaginous nodules, magnetic resonance imaging can also demonstrate the degree of synovial proliferation. The present study is aimed at describing the imaging findings of this entity in the shoulder.

  12. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecouvet, Frederic E.; Simoni, Paolo; Koutaissoff, Sophie; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Malghem, Jacques; Dubuc, Jean-Emile

    2008-01-01

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings

  13. Detailed Shoulder MRI Findings in Manual Wheelchair Users with Shoulder Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. B. Morrow

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder pain and pathology are common in manual wheelchair (MWC users with paraplegia, and the biomechanical mechanism of injury is largely unknown. Establishing patterns of MRI characteristics in MWC users would help advance understanding of the mechanical etiology of rotator cuff disease, thus improving the logic for prescribed interventions. The purpose of this study was to report detailed shoulder MRI findings in a sample of 10 MWC users with anterolateral shoulder pain. The imaging assessments were performed using our standardized MRI Assessment of the Shoulder (MAS guide. The tendon most commonly torn was the supraspinatus at the insertion site in the anterior portion in either the intrasubstance or articular region. Additionally, widespread tendinopathy, CA ligament thickening, subacromial bursitis, labral tears, and AC joint degenerative arthrosis and edema were common. Further reporting of detailed shoulder imaging findings is needed to confirm patterns of tears in MWC users regarding probable tendon tear zone, region, and portion. This investigation was a small sample observational study and did not yield data that can define patterns of pathology. However, synthesis of detailed findings from multiple studies could define patterns of pathological MRI findings allowing for associations of imaging findings to risk factors including specific activities.

  14. Detailed Shoulder MRI Findings in Manual Wheelchair Users with Shoulder Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Melissa M. B.; Van Straaten, Meegan G.; Murthy, Naveen S.; Braman, Jonathan P.; Zanella, Elia; Zhao, Kristin D.

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder pain and pathology are common in manual wheelchair (MWC) users with paraplegia, and the biomechanical mechanism of injury is largely unknown. Establishing patterns of MRI characteristics in MWC users would help advance understanding of the mechanical etiology of rotator cuff disease, thus improving the logic for prescribed interventions. The purpose of this study was to report detailed shoulder MRI findings in a sample of 10 MWC users with anterolateral shoulder pain. The imaging assessments were performed using our standardized MRI Assessment of the Shoulder (MAS) guide. The tendon most commonly torn was the supraspinatus at the insertion site in the anterior portion in either the intrasubstance or articular region. Additionally, widespread tendinopathy, CA ligament thickening, subacromial bursitis, labral tears, and AC joint degenerative arthrosis and edema were common. Further reporting of detailed shoulder imaging findings is needed to confirm patterns of tears in MWC users regarding probable tendon tear zone, region, and portion. This investigation was a small sample observational study and did not yield data that can define patterns of pathology. However, synthesis of detailed findings from multiple studies could define patterns of pathological MRI findings allowing for associations of imaging findings to risk factors including specific activities. PMID:25180192

  15. Geometrical analysis of stemless shoulder arthroplasty: a radiological study of seventy TESS total shoulder prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadum, Bakir; Hassany, Hamid; Wadsten, Mats; Sayed-Noor, Arkan; Sjödén, Göran

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a stemless shoulder prosthesis to restore shoulder anatomy in relation to premorbid anatomy. This prospective study was performed between May 2007 and December 2013. The inclusion criteria were patients with primary osteoarthritis (OA) who had undergone stemless total anatomic shoulder arthroplasty. Radiographic measurements were done on anteroposterior X-ray views of the glenohumeral joint. Sixty-nine patients (70 shoulders) were included in the study. The mean difference between premorbid centre of rotation (COR) and post-operative COR was 1 ± 2 mm (range -3 to 5.8 mm). The mean difference between premorbid humeral head height (HH) and post-operative HH was -1 ± 3 mm (range -9.7 to 8.5 mm). The mean difference between premorbid neck-shaft angle (NSA) and post-operative NSA was -3 ± 12° (range -26 to 20°). Stemless implants could be of help to reconstruct the shoulder anatomy. This study shows that there are some challenges to be addressed when attempting to ensure optimal implant positioning. The critical step is to determine the correct level of bone cut to avoid varus or valgus humeral head inclination and ensure correct head size.

  16. Severe shoulder tendinopathy associated with levofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyer-Silva, Walter de Araujo; Netto, Henrique de Barros Pinto; Pinto, Jorge Francisco da Cunha; Ferry, Fernando Raphael de Almeida; Neves-Motta, Rogério

    2012-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ)-associated tendinopathy and myopathy are uncommon but well recognized complications of the use of this class of antibacterial agents. The case of a 63-year-old previously asymptomatic female patient who developed severe left shoulder tendinopathy after surreptitiously doubling the prescribed dose of levofloxacin for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia is reported here. Surgical stabilization with suture anchors and subacromial decompression were needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Severe shoulder tendinopathy associated with levofloxacin

    OpenAIRE

    Eyer-Silva,Walter de Araujo; Pinto Netto,Henrique de Barros; Pinto,Jorge Francisco da Cunha; Ferry,Fernando Raphael de Almeida; Neves-Motta,Rogério

    2012-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ)-associated tendinopathy and myopathy are uncommon but well recognized complications of the use of this class of antibacterial agents. The case of a 63-year-old previously asymptomatic female patient who developed severe left shoulder tendinopathy after surreptitiously doubling the prescribed dose of levofloxacin for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia is reported here. Surgical stabilization with suture anchors and subacromial decompression were needed.

  18. Optimal management of shoulder impingement syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Escamilla, Rafael; Hooks,Todd; Wilk,Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Rafael F Escamilla,1,2 Todd R Hooks,3 Kevin E Wilk4 1Department of Physical Therapy, California State University, Sacramento, CA, USA; 2Andrews Research and Education Institute, Gulf Breeze, FL, USA; 3Drayer Physical Therapy Institute, Columbus, MS, USA; 4Champion Sports Medicine, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: Shoulder impingement is a progressive orthopedic condition that occurs as a result of altered biomechanics and/or structural abnormalities. An effective nonoperative treatment for impi...

  19. Severe shoulder tendinopathy associated with levofloxacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter de Araujo Eyer-Silva

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolone (FQ-associated tendinopathy and myopathy are uncommon but well recognized complications of the use of this class of antibacterial agents. The case of a 63-year-old previously asymptomatic female patient who developed severe left shoulder tendinopathy after surreptitiously doubling the prescribed dose of levofloxacin for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia is reported here. Surgical stabilization with suture anchors and subacromial decompression were needed.

  20. Ironman triathletes: MRI assessment of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, W.D.; Dierenfield, Laura [North Hawaii Community Hospital, Kamuela, HI (United States); Ainge, George R.; Brown, David W. [North Hawaii Community Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kamuela, HI (United States); Shellock, Frank G. [University of Southern California, Education and Research, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Crues, John V. [Radnet Inc., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Reuter, Robert M.

    2008-08-15

    The objective of this paper was to demonstrate the prevalence of shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities, including abnormal bone marrow signal at the acromioclavicular (AC) joint in symptomatic and asymptomatic Ironman Triathletes. The shoulders of 23 Ironman Triathletes, seven asymptomatic (group I) and 16 symptomatic (group II), were studied by MRI. A separate, non-triathlete group was evaluated specifically for AC joint marrow signal abnormalities to compare with the Ironman Triathletes. Partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and AC joint arthrosis were common findings in both groups of triathletes. Tendinopathy was the only finding that was more prevalent in the symptomatic group, but this was not a statistically significant difference (p=0.35). There were no tears of the glenoid labrum seen in group I or II subjects. Of note is that 71% (5/7) of group I subjects and 62% (10/16) of group II subjects had increased signal changes in the marrow of the AC joint (p=0.68). The comparison group showed a lower prevalence (35%, p=0.06) of this finding. No statistically significant difference was found among the findings for group 1, group 2, or the comparison group, although the difference between the comparison group and Ironman Triathletes approached statistical significance when evaluating for AC joint abnormal signal. Shoulder MRI of Ironman Triathletes should be interpreted with an appreciation of the commonly seen findings in asymptomatic subjects. (orig.)

  1. Arthrography of the equine shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, A.J.; Spencer, C.P.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques and normal radiographic anatomy for positive and double contrast shoulder arthrography in horses were evaluated. General anaesthesia was used for most radiographic projections of the shoulder. The mediolateral projection provided the most information during arthrography, although the supinated mediolateral view occasionally allowed better definition of the cartilage surfaces on the medial aspects of the humeral head. The craniocaudal mediolateral oblique and caudocranial projections provided limited additional information. Water soluble non-ionic contrast agents, such as metrizamide and iohexol, were suitable for shoulder arthrography; iohexol resulted in less synovitis and lameness. Arthrography in cases of osteochondrosis and osteochondritis dissecans allowed better evaluation of cartilage attachment to subchondral bone, better evaluation of the length and depth of cartilage lesions and more accurately defined the site and shape of osteocartilaginous free bodies. Cartilage thickening without detachment from the subchondral bone could only be determined by arthrography. Although these thick cartilage regions may later dissect from the subchondral bone, most cases where the cartilage was firmly adherent were not candidates for surgical debridement and carried a favourable prognosis. The determination of a free flap by arthrography indicated the need for surgery. Extensive humeral and glenoid cavity lesions were better defined by arthrography, allowing a rational decision between surgical debridement or euthanasia. Using arthrography, evaluation of the size and patency of the communicating canal to a subchondral cystic defect better separated cases with long, narrow and poorly patent canals for conservative rather than surgical therapy

  2. Shoulder MRI after surgical treatment of instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, Martin; Lang, Philipp; Wagner, Ulli; Moeller, Frank; Deimling, Urs van; Genant, H.K.; Schild, Hans H.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the shoulder after an instability operation. Materials and methods: Physical examinations, radiographs and MRI of 10 patients after anterior glenoid bone block insertion for ventral instability were compared. MRI included T 1 -weighted spin-echo (TR=600, TE=20 ms) and T 2 *-weighted gradient-echo sequences (TE=600, TE=18, Flip=30 deg.) in the axial, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal planes. Results: No patient suffered from recurrent subluxation. We found fusion of the bone block with the anterior glenoid in seven cases, dislocation of the bone block without contact to the glenoid in one case, and no visible bone block in two cases. On MRI, the bone block showed either signal intensity equivalent to fatty bone marrow (n=4) or was devoid of signal consistent with cortical bone or bone sclerosis (n=4). In all patients, a low signal intensity mass, 2-4 cm in diameter, was visible next to the glenoid insertion site. Conclusion: Insertion of a bone block onto the anterior glenoid induces formation of scar tissue, increasing the stability of the shoulder joint. This scar is well visible on MRI and forms independently of the behavior of the bone block itself. MRI is ideally suited for evaluating postoperative shoulder joints after bone-grafting procedures

  3. Cine-MR imaging of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allmann, K.H.; Uhl, M.; Gufler, H.; Kotter, E.; Langer, M. [Univ. Hospital, Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Biebow, N.; Hauer, M.P.; Reichelt, A. [Univ. Hospital, Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery

    1997-11-01

    Purpose: Shoulder lesions are usually examined with the joint in only one or two positions. We examined the shoulder with the joint in a variety of positions. We also assessed the application of cine-MR to the detection of instability and impingement. Material and Methods: The cine-MR examinations were performed in 30 patients and 15 healthy volunteers. We used an open 0.2 T system and a closed 1.0 T system. Spoiled gradient echo 2D T1-weighted images and turbo spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained with a field of view of 180 mm. The examinations were videotaped and evaluated later. Results: Normal variations of the glenohumeral joint were easy to recognize. Subluxations and luxations of the humeral head as well as rupture of the labrum were identified. It was also possible to identify the labrum with a signal change after arthroscopic refixation. And we were able to objectively assess distances between the osseous structures during dynamic movement. Conclusion: Unlike static MR, cine-MR would appear to be useful in visualizing the capsular ligament complex of the gleno-humeral joint in impingement and instability. It also provides information on dynamic changes and may thus prove to be an important tool for shoulder diagnostics. The method may provide an early diagnosis in the subacromial impingement syndrome. (orig.).

  4. Cine-MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allmann, K.H.; Uhl, M.; Gufler, H.; Kotter, E.; Langer, M.; Biebow, N.; Hauer, M.P.; Reichelt, A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Shoulder lesions are usually examined with the joint in only one or two positions. We examined the shoulder with the joint in a variety of positions. We also assessed the application of cine-MR to the detection of instability and impingement. Material and Methods: The cine-MR examinations were performed in 30 patients and 15 healthy volunteers. We used an open 0.2 T system and a closed 1.0 T system. Spoiled gradient echo 2D T1-weighted images and turbo spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained with a field of view of 180 mm. The examinations were videotaped and evaluated later. Results: Normal variations of the glenohumeral joint were easy to recognize. Subluxations and luxations of the humeral head as well as rupture of the labrum were identified. It was also possible to identify the labrum with a signal change after arthroscopic refixation. And we were able to objectively assess distances between the osseous structures during dynamic movement. Conclusion: Unlike static MR, cine-MR would appear to be useful in visualizing the capsular ligament complex of the gleno-humeral joint in impingement and instability. It also provides information on dynamic changes and may thus prove to be an important tool for shoulder diagnostics. The method may provide an early diagnosis in the subacromial impingement syndrome. (orig.)

  5. The epidemiology of shoulder dislocations in Oslo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liavaag, S; Svenningsen, S; Reikerås, O; Enger, M; Fjalestad, T; Pripp, A H; Brox, J I

    2011-12-01

    There are few previous studies on the incidence of shoulder dislocation in the general population. The aim of the study was to report the incidence of acute shoulder dislocations in the capital of Norway (Oslo) in 2009. Patients of all ages living in Oslo, sustaining a dislocation of the glenohumeral joint, were identified using electronic diagnosis registers, patient protocols, radiological registers of the hospitals, and the Norwegian Patient Register (NPR). The overall incidence rate was 56.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 50.2-62.4] per 100,000 person-years, with rates of 82.2 (95% CI 71.7-92.8) and 30.9 (95% CI 24.5-37.3) in men and women, respectively. The incidence of primary dislocations was 26.2 (95% CI 22.1-30.4). The overall incidence of shoulder dislocations in Oslo was higher than previously reported incidences. The incidence of primary dislocations was also higher than that in previously reported studies for the general population but it was close to the incidence reported in Malmø, Sweden. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Shoulder MRI after surgical treatment of instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, Martin [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Lang, Philipp [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, 505 Pamassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Wagner, Ulli [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Moeller, Frank [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Deimling, Urs van [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Genant, H.K. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, 505 Pamassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Schild, Hans H. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    Objective: To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the shoulder after an instability operation. Materials and methods: Physical examinations, radiographs and MRI of 10 patients after anterior glenoid bone block insertion for ventral instability were compared. MRI included T{sub 1}-weighted spin-echo (TR=600, TE=20 ms) and T{sub 2}*-weighted gradient-echo sequences (TE=600, TE=18, Flip=30 deg.) in the axial, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal planes. Results: No patient suffered from recurrent subluxation. We found fusion of the bone block with the anterior glenoid in seven cases, dislocation of the bone block without contact to the glenoid in one case, and no visible bone block in two cases. On MRI, the bone block showed either signal intensity equivalent to fatty bone marrow (n=4) or was devoid of signal consistent with cortical bone or bone sclerosis (n=4). In all patients, a low signal intensity mass, 2-4 cm in diameter, was visible next to the glenoid insertion site. Conclusion: Insertion of a bone block onto the anterior glenoid induces formation of scar tissue, increasing the stability of the shoulder joint. This scar is well visible on MRI and forms independently of the behavior of the bone block itself. MRI is ideally suited for evaluating postoperative shoulder joints after bone-grafting procedures.

  7. Ironman triathletes: MRI assessment of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiller, W.D.; Dierenfield, Laura; Ainge, George R.; Brown, David W.; Shellock, Frank G.; Crues, John V.; Reuter, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to demonstrate the prevalence of shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities, including abnormal bone marrow signal at the acromioclavicular (AC) joint in symptomatic and asymptomatic Ironman Triathletes. The shoulders of 23 Ironman Triathletes, seven asymptomatic (group I) and 16 symptomatic (group II), were studied by MRI. A separate, non-triathlete group was evaluated specifically for AC joint marrow signal abnormalities to compare with the Ironman Triathletes. Partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and AC joint arthrosis were common findings in both groups of triathletes. Tendinopathy was the only finding that was more prevalent in the symptomatic group, but this was not a statistically significant difference (p=0.35). There were no tears of the glenoid labrum seen in group I or II subjects. Of note is that 71% (5/7) of group I subjects and 62% (10/16) of group II subjects had increased signal changes in the marrow of the AC joint (p=0.68). The comparison group showed a lower prevalence (35%, p=0.06) of this finding. No statistically significant difference was found among the findings for group 1, group 2, or the comparison group, although the difference between the comparison group and Ironman Triathletes approached statistical significance when evaluating for AC joint abnormal signal. Shoulder MRI of Ironman Triathletes should be interpreted with an appreciation of the commonly seen findings in asymptomatic subjects. (orig.)

  8. Animal models of cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäkel, Lieke; Van Nostrand, William E; Nicoll, James A R; Werring, David J; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2017-10-15

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), due to vascular amyloid β (Aβ) deposition, is a risk factor for intracerebral haemorrhage and dementia. CAA can occur in sporadic or rare hereditary forms, and is almost invariably associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Experimental (animal) models are of great interest in studying mechanisms and potential treatments for CAA. Naturally occurring animal models of CAA exist, including cats, dogs and non-human primates, which can be used for longitudinal studies. However, due to ethical considerations and low throughput of these models, other animal models are more favourable for research. In the past two decades, a variety of transgenic mouse models expressing the human Aβ precursor protein (APP) has been developed. Many of these mouse models develop CAA in addition to senile plaques, whereas some of these models were generated specifically to study CAA. In addition, other animal models make use of a second stimulus, such as hypoperfusion or hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), to accelerate CAA. In this manuscript, we provide a comprehensive review of existing animal models for CAA, which can aid in understanding the pathophysiology of CAA and explore the response to potential therapies. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Human serum amyloid genes--molecular characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sack, G.H.; Lease, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Three clones containing human genes for serum amyloid A protein (SAA) have been isolated and characterized. Each of two clones, GSAA 1 and 2 (of 12.8 and 15.9 kilobases, respectively), contains two exons, accouting for amino acids 12-58 and 58-103 of mature SAA; the extreme 5' termini and 5' untranslated regions have not yet been defined but are anticipated to be close based on studies of murine SAA genes. Initial amino acid sequence comparisons show 78/89 identical residues. At 4 of the 11 discrepant residues, the amino acid specified by the codon is the same as the corresponding residue in murine SAA. Identification of regions containing coding regions has permitted use of selected subclones for blot hybridization studies of larger human SAA chromosomal gene organization. The third clone, GSAA 3 also contains SAA coding information by DNA sequence analysis but has a different organization which has not yet been fully described. We have reported the isolation of clones of human DNA hybridizing with pRS48 - a plasmid containing a complementary DNA (cDNA) clone for murine serum amyloid A (SAA; 1, 2). We now present more detailed data confirming the identity and defining some of the organizational features of these clones

  10. Protocol for Shoulder function training reducing musculoskeletal pain in shoulder and neck: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christoffer H; Andersen, Lars L; Mortensen, Ole S

    2011-01-01

    treated by physical therapists. The exact mechanism of neck pain is rarely revealed by clinical examination and the treatment has varied from passive rest to active treatments. Active treatments have often been divided into either training of the painful area or the surrounding musculature avoiding direct...... training of the painful area. Our study investigates the effect of the latter approach. METHODS/DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial of 10 weeks duration is currently being conducted. Employed office workers with severe neck-shoulder pain are randomized to 3 × 20 min shoulder function training...... with training supervision or to a reference group receiving advice to stay physically active. Shoulder function training primarily focuses on the serratus anterior and lower trapezius muscle with only minimal activation the upper trapezius.An announcement was sent to the administrative section of the university...

  11. Using bacterial inclusion bodies to screen for amyloid aggregation inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42) is the main component of the inter-neuronal amyloid plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The mechanism by which Aβ42 and other amyloid peptides assemble into insoluble neurotoxic deposits is still not completely understood and multiple factors have been reported to trigger their formation. In particular, the presence of endogenous metal ions has been linked to the pathogenesis of AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. Results Here we describe a rapid and high-throughput screening method to identify molecules able to modulate amyloid aggregation. The approach exploits the inclusion bodies (IBs) formed by Aβ42 when expressed in bacteria. We have shown previously that these aggregates retain amyloid structural and functional properties. In the present work, we demonstrate that their in vitro refolding is selectively sensitive to the presence of aggregation-promoting metal ions, allowing the detection of inhibitors of metal-promoted amyloid aggregation with potential therapeutic interest. Conclusions Because IBs can be produced at high levels and easily purified, the method overcomes one of the main limitations in screens to detect amyloid modulators: the use of expensive and usually highly insoluble synthetic peptides. PMID:22553999

  12. Amyloid plaque imaging in vivo: current achievement and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-03-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a very complex neurodegenerative disorder, the exact cause of which is still not known. The major histopathological features, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, already described by Alois Alzheimer, have been the focus in research for decades. Despite a probable whole cascade of events in the brain leading to impairment of cognition, amyloid is still the target for diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development of molecular imaging techniques now allows imaging of amyloid plaques in vivo in Alzheimer patients by PET amyloid ligands such as Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Studies so far have revealed high {sup 11}C-PIB retention in brain at prodromal stages of AD and a possibility to discriminate AD from other dementia disorders by {sup 11}C-PIB. Ongoing studies are focussing to understand the relationship between brain and CSF amyloid processes and cognitive processes. In vivo imaging of amyloid will be important for early diagnosis and evaluation of new anti-amyloid therapies in AD. (orig.)

  13. Kinetically controlled thermal response of beta2-microglobulin amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Kenji; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2005-09-23

    Calorimetric measurements were carried out using a differential scanning calorimeter in the temperature range from 10 to 120 degrees C for characterizing the thermal response of beta2-microglobulin amyloid fibrils. The thermograms of amyloid fibril solution showed a remarkably large decrease in heat capacity that was essentially released upon the thermal unfolding of the fibrils, in which the magnitude of negative heat capacity change was not explicable in terms of the current accessible surface area model of protein structural thermodynamics. The heat capacity-temperature curve of amyloid fibrils prior to the fibril unfolding exhibited an unusual dependence on the fibril concentration and the heating rate. Particularly, the heat needed to induce the thermal response was found to be linearly dependent on the heating rate, indicating that its thermal response is under a kinetic control and precluding the interpretation in terms of equilibrium thermodynamics. Furthermore, amyloid fibrils of amyloid beta peptides also exhibited a heating rate-dependent exothermic process before the fibril unfolding, indicating that the kinetically controlled thermal response may be a common phenomenon to amyloid fibrils. We suggest that the heating rate-dependent negative change in heat capacity is coupled to the association of amyloid fibrils with characteristic hydration pattern.

  14. Fish β-parvalbumin acquires allergenic properties by amyloid assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Javier; Sánchez, Rosa; Castellanos, Milagros; Fernández-Escamilla, Ana M; Vázquez-Cortés, Sonia; Fernández-Rivas, Montserrat; Gasset, María

    2015-01-01

    Amyloids are highly cross-β-sheet-rich aggregated states that confer protease resistance, membrane activity and multivalence properties to proteins, all essential features for the undesired preservation of food proteins transiting the gastrointestinal tract and causing type I allergy. Amyloid propensity of β-parvalbumin, the major fish allergen, was theoretically analysed and assayed under gastrointestinal-relevant conditions using the binding of thioflavin T, the formation of sodium dodecyl sulphate- (SDS-) resistant aggregates, circular dichroism spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy fibril imaging. Impact of amyloid aggregates on allergenicity was assessed with dot blot. Sequences of β-parvalbumin from species with commercial value contain several adhesive hexapeptides capable of driving amyloid formation. Using Atlantic cod β-parvalbumin (rGad m 1) displaying high IgE cross-reactivity, we found that formation of amyloid fibres under simulated gastrointestinal conditions accounts for the resistance to acid and neutral proteases, for the presence of membrane active species under gastrointestinal relevant conditions and for the IgE-recognition in the sera of allergic patients. Incorporation of the anti-amyloid compound epigallocatechin gallate prevents rGad m 1 fibrillation, facilitates its protease digestion and impairs its recognition by IgE. the formation of amyloid by rGad m 1 explains its degradation resistance, its facilitated passage across the intestinal epithelial barrier and its epitope architecture as allergen.

  15. Amyloid plaque imaging in vivo: current achievement and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordberg, Agneta

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a very complex neurodegenerative disorder, the exact cause of which is still not known. The major histopathological features, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, already described by Alois Alzheimer, have been the focus in research for decades. Despite a probable whole cascade of events in the brain leading to impairment of cognition, amyloid is still the target for diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development of molecular imaging techniques now allows imaging of amyloid plaques in vivo in Alzheimer patients by PET amyloid ligands such as Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Studies so far have revealed high 11 C-PIB retention in brain at prodromal stages of AD and a possibility to discriminate AD from other dementia disorders by 11 C-PIB. Ongoing studies are focussing to understand the relationship between brain and CSF amyloid processes and cognitive processes. In vivo imaging of amyloid will be important for early diagnosis and evaluation of new anti-amyloid therapies in AD. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation and management of shoulder pain in primary care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Jeff; Mooradian, Arshag

    2010-11-01

    Shoulder pain is a frequent clinical problem facing primary care physicians. Despite its common occurrence, many clinicians are unfamiliar with the diagnosis and treatment of many common shoulder ailments. Because therapy for most shoulder disorders can be made at the initial consultation, a good history and physical remain paramount. The purpose of this paper is to review the basic approach to diagnosis and management of shoulder pain. It will summarize a pragmatic approach to the initial history, with particular attention to differentiating extrinsic and intrinsic etiologies. Physical exam techniques for evaluating shoulder pain will be reviewed, including provocation testing for specific disorders. Specific disorders covered include supraspinatus tendonitis, subdeltoid bursitis, frozen shoulder, biceps tendonitis, and acromioclavicular (AC) joint arthritis.

  17. Shoulder Impingement Syndromes: Implications on Physical Therapy Examination and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A painful shoulder presents challenges in examination, diagnosis and intervention for the physical therapist because of the complexity of the structures involved. A common cause of shoulder pain is shoulder impingement syndrome. This was first described as a condition in which the soft tissues of the subacromial space were chronically entrapped and compressed between the humeral head and the subacromial arch. This definition does not account for the myriad potential causes of shoulder impingement conditions, as forms of impingement other than subacromial soft tissue compression may explain different symptomatic shoulder injuries. This paper describes shoulder impingement syndromes that have been hypothesized, identified and analyzed in the literature. Physical Therapy examination and intervention for these syndromes are also discussed. PMID:25792938

  18. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, L.P.; Winther, A.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2009-01-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven...... that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation...... in a way that protects the painful structure. Further, the changes in muscle activity following subacromial pain induction tend to expand the subacromial space and thereby decrease the load on the painful structures Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4...

  19. Association of head circumference and shoulder dystocia in macrosomic neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Austin; Mandelbaum, David E

    2013-04-01

    To determine whether asymmetric macrosomia (disproportionately large body size in comparison to head circumference) could be demonstrated in a population of infants suffering shoulder dystocia during delivery relative to those that did not suffer from shoulder dystocia. A case-control study was conducted as a retrospective chart review over 3 years at a large maternity hospital in an urban setting. Among infants over 4,000 g, those that suffered from shoulder dystocia during delivery had a smaller mean head circumference than infants of a similar size that did not suffer from shoulder dystocia. A statistically significant difference was also present when cases of documented gestational diabetes were excluded. Asymmetric macrosomia is more likely to be present in a population of infants who suffered shoulder dystocia during delivery. This knowledge could be used in designing tools to predict which pregnancies are at highest risk for shoulder dystocia during delivery.

  20. Does shoulder impingement syndrome affect the shoulder kinematics and associated muscle activity in archers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, H; Urabe, Y; Maeda, N; Xie, D; Sasadai, J; Fujii, E

    2014-12-01

    Archery related injuries, such as shoulder impingement syndrome are caused by repeated motion of the shoulder. The aim of this study was to analyze differences in the shoulder kinematics and the associated muscle activity between archers with shoulder impingement and uninjured archery players. Thirty male archers, who were divided into an impingement group and an uninjured group, were included in this study. The angle of scapular elevation, shoulder joint abduction, horizontal extension, and elbow joint flexion as well as the electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius, lower trapezius, deltoid middle, deltoid posterior, biceps brachii, and triceps brachii muscles at the point of stabilization during shooting were measured. Variables differing between impingement and uninjured groups were identified, and a stepwise regression analysis was performed to identify a combination of variables that effectively impingement syndrome. The results indicated that the angle of scapular elevation was significantly greater than that uninjured group (Pimpingement group was significantly smaller than that in the uninjured group (Pimpingement group was significantly smaller than that in the uninjured group (Pimpingement group, while the level of lower trapezius muscle activity was significantly lower (Pimpingement group had a greater angle of scapular elevation, smaller angle of horizontal extension, smaller angle of elbow flexion, higher the levels of upper trapezius, lower the levels of lower trapezius, higher deltoid middle muscle activity and higher UT/LT ratio (all differences were significant). A logistic model for predicting impingement syndrome showed that UT/LT ratio was significantly related impingement syndrome (Pshoulder impingement syndrome exhibit different kinematics and muscle activity compared to uninjured archers. Therefore, in order to prevent shoulder joint impingement during archery, training is necessary what can make lower trapezius muscle activity

  1. mri evaluation of patients with shoulder pain at three imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    shoulder 104(86.7%) compared to the left which had only 16(13.3%) lesions. Different lesions were picked on MRI. Table 1 shows the lesions seen. Table 1. Lesions seen at MR imaging (n=120). Type of lesions. Right shoulder. Left shoulder. Total. Tendinitis. 31 (25.8). 3 (2.5). 34 (28.3). Bursitis. 11 (9.7). 1 (0.8). 12 (10.0).

  2. ANALYSIS OF LEVEL OF BOTH SHOULDERS IN PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazala Noor Nizami

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: During lectures, usually students sit in an awkward position, for prolonged period of time and that may cause postural instability. For a good posture, bilateral landmarks should be on same level, when viewed from front or behind. Therefore, both shoulders should also be on same level as well. Any alteration in level of shoulders in healthy individual may lead to deformity in spine or extremity. The objective of this study was to analyze the level of both shoulders in the physical therapy students and to find its correlation with the perception of students about their shoulder balance. Methods: An observational (cross – sectional study was conducted on students of Doctor in Physical Therapy (DPT from colleges of Physical Therapy, Karachi. 100 Students were selected by Simple Random Sampling technique. Data from students was collected by administering a questionnaire. It includes close-ended questions. Afterwards, the level of both shoulders of the students, were assessed by using Scoliosis Meter. Results: Response from students showed that 79% of them assumed that both shoulders are in same level. When level of shoulder of students was assessed by scoliosis meter, it showed that 37% students have absolute level shoulder. Spearman’s Correlation coefficient (r = 0.046, p= 0.65 showed a weak, positive correlation between perception of the students about shoulder level and assessment of shoulder tilt. Conclusion: This showed that the perception of students about level of both shoulders was not correlated to the actual levels of the shoulders. Hence, as they were not assuming it uneven, so they may not pay any attention to keep themselves straight.

  3. Video Analysis of Primary Shoulder Dislocations in Rugby Tackles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Nobukazu; Kawasaki, Takayuki; Mochizuki, Tomoyuki; Ota, Chihiro; Yoneda, Takeshi; Urayama, Shingo; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2017-06-01

    Characteristics of rugby tackles that lead to primary anterior shoulder dislocation remain unclear. To clarify the characteristics of tackling that lead to shoulder dislocation and to assess the correlation between the mechanism of injury and morphological damage of the glenoid. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Eleven elite rugby players who sustained primary anterior shoulder dislocation due to one-on-one tackling between 2001 and 2014 were included. Using an assessment system, the tackler's movement, posture, and shoulder and head position were evaluated in each phase of tackling. Based on 3-dimensional computed tomography, the glenoid of the affected shoulder was classified into 3 types: intact, erosion, and bone defect. Orientation of the glenoid defect and presence of Hill-Sachs lesion were also evaluated. Eleven tackles that led to primary shoulder dislocation were divided into hand, arm, and shoulder tackle types based on the site at which the tackler contacted the ball carrier initially. In hand and arm tackles, the tackler's shoulder joint was forcibly moved to horizontal abduction by the impact of his upper limb, which appeared to result from an inappropriate approach to the ball carrier. In shoulder tackles, the tackler's head was lowered and was in front of the ball carrier at impact. There was no significant correlation between tackle types and the characteristics of bony lesions of the shoulder. Although the precise mechanism of primary anterior shoulder dislocation could not be estimated from this single-view analysis, failure of individual tackling leading to injury is not uniform and can be caused by 2 main factors: failure of approach followed by an extended arm position or inappropriate posture of the tackler at impact, such as a lowered head in front of the opponent. These findings indicate that injury mechanisms should be assessed for each type of tackle, as it is unknown whether external force to the glenoid is different in each mechanism

  4. Shoulder injuries in professional rugby: a retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Horsley, Ian G; Fowler, Elizabeth M; Rolf, Christer G

    2013-01-01

    Background In the literature, little is known about the level and pattern of rugby injuries. Of the shoulder injuries reported, 51% of these are caused during a tackle, and 65% of all match injuries affected the shoulder. Objective The study aims to describe a sport-specific unique intra-articular shoulder pathology of professional rugby players, who presented with persistent pain and dysfunction despite physiotherapeutic treatment and rest. Method This study is a retrospective analysis set a...

  5. Normal anatomy, variants and pitfalls on shoulder MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudez, Jasna [University Hospital Balgrist, Radiology, University of Zurich Switzerland, Forchstrasse 340, CH-8008 Zurich (Switzerland); Zanetti, Marco [University Hospital Balgrist, Radiology, University of Zurich Switzerland, Forchstrasse 340, CH-8008 Zurich (Switzerland)], E-mail: marco.zanetti@balgrist.ch

    2008-10-15

    MR imaging of the shoulder is widely used for assessment of impingement and instability-related clinical conditions. The following review article demonstrates the normal anatomy, variations and classical pitfalls. In addition to classical pitfalls (sublabral hole, sublabral recess, Buford complex) the authors focus on a number of normal, bony, cartilaginous, ligamentous and tendinous structures that can simulate disease at the shoulder. In addition, ways to distinguish these pitfalls from true shoulder abnormalities are shown.

  6. Shoulder disorders in an outpatient clinic: an epidemiological study

    OpenAIRE

    Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Assunção, Jorge Henrique; Pinto, Gustavo de Mello Ribeiro; Silveira, Arthur Zorzi Freire da; Ferreira Neto, Arnaldo Amado

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To describe shoulder disorders in patients evaluated by two shoulder and elbow surgeons. METHODS: This cross-sectional study analyzed patients evaluated by two authors, excluding acute fractures and dislocations and patients with symptoms not involving the shoulder. Age and sex distribution was determined for the different diagnoses. RESULTS: We evaluated 1001 patients. Mean age was 51.43±15.15 years and 51.0% were female. Disorders of the rotator cuff occurred in 64...

  7. Effectiveness of Maitland Techniques in Idiopathic Shoulder Adhesive Capsulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Abhay; Kumar, Suraj; Aggarwal, Anoop; Kumar, Ratnesh; Das, Pooja Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To study the effectiveness of Maitland techniques in the treatment of idiopathic shoulder adhesive capsulitis. Methods. total of 40 patients diagnosed with idiopathic shoulder adhesive capsulitis were recruited and randomly allocated into two groups. In Group A ( ) subjects were treated with Maitland mobilization technique and common supervised exercises, whereas subjects in Group B ( ) only received common supervised exercises. Variables. Shoulder pain and disability index (SPADI)...

  8. Patterns of Age-Associated Degeneration Differ in Shoulder Muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Raz, Yotam; Henseler, Jan F.; Kolk, Arjen; Riaz, Muhammad; van der Zwaal, Peer; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Raz, Vered

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder complaints are common in the elderly and hamper daily functioning. These complaints are often caused by tears in the muscle-tendon units of the rotator cuff (RC). The four RC muscles stabilize the shoulder joint. While some RC muscles are frequently torn in shoulder complaints others remain intact. The pathological changes in RC muscles are poorly understood. We investigated changes in RC muscle pathology combining radiological and histological procedures. We measured cross sectional...

  9. Patterns of age-associated degeneration differ in shoulder muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Yotam eRaz; Yotam eRaz; Jan Ferdinand eHenseler; Arjen eKolk; Muhammad eRiaz; Peer evan der Zwaal; Jochem eNagels; Rob G.H.H. Nelissen; Vered eRaz

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder complaints are common in the elderly and hamper daily functioning. These complaints are often caused by tears in the muscle-tendon units of the rotator cuff (RC). The four RC muscles stabilize the shoulder joint. While some RC muscles are frequently torn in shoulder complaints others remain intact. The pathological changes in RC muscles are poorly understood. We investigated changes in RC muscle pathology combining radiological and histological procedures. We measured cross sectional...

  10. [Management of the worker affected by shoulder pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotini, Roberto; Bonfiglioli, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder disorders due to overexertion include joint and soft tissues chronic conditions and are an important cause of disability. Shoulder pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders and has been associated to manual handling of heavy loads, high repetition jobs, exposure to hand-arm vibration and to overhead activities. Diagnosis of shoulder disorders is primarily based on clinical examination; selected cases should be referred to an orthopedic specialist and to imaging. Return to normal activities should be encouraged.

  11. The Research and Development on Shoulder Beam of CFST

    OpenAIRE

    Lan Tao; Hu Weizhong; Gao Ruixiang; Wang Yu

    2016-01-01

    This paper elaborates the research on mechanical behavior of shoulder beam joint of CFST column in China based on the experimental research, finite element analysis and theoretical calculation. Besides, this paper summarizes and analyses the design approaches of shoulder beam joint of CFST column, which is instructive for the further related studies and applications. Finally, this paper presents some existing problems which occurred in current researches on shoulder beam joint of CFST column.

  12. The Research and Development on Shoulder Beam of CFST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Tao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates the research on mechanical behavior of shoulder beam joint of CFST column in China based on the experimental research, finite element analysis and theoretical calculation. Besides, this paper summarizes and analyses the design approaches of shoulder beam joint of CFST column, which is instructive for the further related studies and applications. Finally, this paper presents some existing problems which occurred in current researches on shoulder beam joint of CFST column.

  13. Amyloid-β and Astrocytes Interplay in Amyloid-β Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazan S. Batarseh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-β (Aβ pathology is known to promote chronic inflammatory responses in the brain. It was thought previously that Aβ is only associated with Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome. However, studies have shown its involvement in many other neurological disorders. The role of astrocytes in handling the excess levels of Aβ has been highlighted in the literature. Astrocytes have a distinctive function in both neuronal support and protection, thus its involvement in Aβ pathological process may tip the balance toward chronic inflammation and neuronal death. In this review we describe the involvement of astrocytes in Aβ related disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, Down syndrome, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and frontotemporal dementia.

  14. Evidence of amyloid-β cerebral amyloid angiopathy transmission through neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaunmuktane, Zane; Quaegebeur, Annelies; Taipa, Ricardo; Viana-Baptista, Miguel; Barbosa, Raquel; Koriath, Carolin; Sciot, Raf; Mead, Simon; Brandner, Sebastian

    2018-02-15

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a peptide deposited in the brain parenchyma in Alzheimer's disease and in cerebral blood vessels, causing cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Aβ pathology is transmissible experimentally in animals and through medical procedures in humans, such as contaminated growth hormone or dura mater transplantation in the context of iatrogenic prion disease. Here, we present four patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures during childhood or teenage years and presented with intracerebral haemorrhage approximately three decades later, caused by severe CAA. None of these patients carried pathogenic mutations associated with early Aβ pathology development. In addition, we identified in the literature four patients with a history of neurosurgical intervention and subsequent development of CAA. These findings raise the possibility that Aβ pathology may be transmissible, as prion disease is, through neurosurgical procedures.

  15. Overexpression of heparanase lowers the amyloid burden in amyloid-β precursor protein transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendresen, Charlotte B; Cui, Hao; Zhang, Xiao; Vlodavsky, Israel; Nilsson, Lars N G; Li, Jin-Ping

    2015-02-20

    Heparan sulfate (HS) and HS proteoglycans (HSPGs) colocalize with amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits in Alzheimer disease brain and in Aβ precursor protein (AβPP) transgenic mouse models. Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that specifically degrades the unbranched glycosaminoglycan side chains of HSPGs. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that HS and HSPGs are active participators of Aβ pathogenesis in vivo. We therefore generated a double-transgenic mouse model overexpressing both human heparanase and human AβPP harboring the Swedish mutation (tgHpa*Swe). Overexpression of heparanase did not affect AβPP processing because the steady-state levels of Aβ1-40, Aβ1-42, and soluble AβPP β were the same in 2- to 3-month-old double-transgenic tgHpa*Swe and single-transgenic tgSwe mice. In contrast, the Congo red-positive amyloid burden was significantly lower in 15-month-old tgHpa*Swe brain than in tgSwe brain. Likewise, the Aβ burden, measured by Aβx-40 and Aβx-42 immunohistochemistry, was reduced significantly in tgHpa*Swe brain. The intensity of HS-stained plaques correlated with the Aβx-42 burden and was reduced in tgHpa*Swe mice. Moreover, the HS-like molecule heparin facilitated Aβ1-42-aggregation in an in vitro Thioflavin T assay. The findings suggest that HSPGs contribute to amyloid deposition in tgSwe mice by increasing Aβ fibril formation because heparanase-induced fragmentation of HS led to a reduced amyloid burden. Therefore, drugs interfering with Aβ-HSPG interactions might be a potential strategy for Alzheimer disease treatment. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Silver ions as em marker of congo red ligation sites in amyloids and amyloid-like aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybarska, Janina; Konieczny, Leszek; Jagusiak, Anna; Chłopaś, Katarzyna; Zemanek, Grzegorz; Piekarska, Barbara; Stopa, Barbara; Piwowar, Piotr; Woźnicka, Olga; Roterman, Irena

    2017-01-01

    Congo red (CR) is a known selective amyloid ligand. The focus of our work is identification (by EM imaging) of dye binding sites and their distribution in amyloids and amyloid-like aggregates formed in vitro. In order to produce the required contrast, CR has been indirectly combined with metal via including Titan yellow (TY) by intercalation which exhibits a relatively strong affinity for silver ions. The resulting combined ligand retains its ability to bind to proteins (which it owes to CR) and can easily be detected in EM studies thanks to TY. We have found, however, that in protein aggregates where unfolding is stabilized by aggregation and therefore is irreversible, TY alone may serve as both, the ligand and the metal carrier. The formation of ordered structures in amyloids was studied using IgG light chains with amyloidogenic properties, converted into amyloids by shaking. The resulting EM images were subjected to interpretation on the basis of the authors' earlier research on the CR/light chain complexation process. Our results indicate that dimeric light chains, which are the subject of our study, produce amyloids or amyloid-like complexes with chain-like properties and strong helicalization tendencies. Cursory analysis suggests that the edge polypeptide loops belonging to unstable light chains form intermolecular bridges which promote creation of loose gel deposits, or are otherwise engaged in the swapping processes leading to higher structural ordering.

  17. The volleyball athlete's shoulder: biomechanical adaptations and injury associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challoumas, Dimitrios; Stavrou, Antonio; Dimitrakakis, Georgios

    2017-06-01

    In volleyball, the dominant shoulder of the athlete undergoes biomechanical and morphological adaptations; however, definitive conclusions about their exact nature, aetiology, purpose and associations with shoulder injury have not been reached. We present a systematic review of the existing literature describing biomechanical adaptations in the dominant shoulders of volleyball players and factors that may predispose to shoulder pain/injury. A thorough literature search via Medline, EMBASE and SCOPUS was conducted for original studies of volleyball players and 15 eligible articles were identified. Assessment of study quality was performed using the STROBE statement. The reviewed literature supports the existence of a glenohumeral internal rotation deficit (GIRD) and a possible (and less pronounced) external rotation gain in the dominant vs. the non-dominant shoulder of volleyball athletes. Unlike other overhead sports, the GIRD in volleyball athletes appears to be anatomical as a response to the repetitive overhead movements and not to be associated with shoulder pain/injury. Additionally, the dominant shoulder exhibits muscular imbalance, which appears to be a significant risk factor for shoulder pain. Strengthening of the external rotators should be used alongside shoulder stretching and joint mobilisations, core strengthening and optimisation of spike technique as part of injury management and prevention programmes.

  18. Role of radiographs in shoulder pathology: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hershkovich O

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oded Hershkovich,1–3,* Shachar Shapira,1–3,* Yaron Sela,1,3 Itamar B Botser1,31Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, 2Medical Corps, Israeli Defense Forces, Tel Hashomer, 3Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel*SS and OH contributed equally to this workAbstract: Shoulder pain is a very common complaint, and affects as many as 20% of all people at some point during their lives. Despite the availability of more advanced imaging modalities, X-ray remains the first imaging test to be performed in the investigation of any shoulder pain. However, with their increasing availability, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging have in recent years become first-line techniques for the diagnostic imaging of the shoulder. Moreover, ultrasound of the shoulder is increasingly performed in lieu of radiography. Nevertheless, many patients who visit a shoulder specialist for their pain are referred by a family physician or community orthopedist without an X-ray having ever been performed. Shoulder pain can be caused by many conditions, including rotator cuff tears, calcification within the tendons of the rotator cuff, stiff shoulder, subacromial impingement, space-occupying lesions, degenerative changes, and rheumatoid arthritis. This paper reviews various types of shoulder injury and the radiographic symptomatology of each, with the goal of encouraging the use of radiography by demonstrating the importance of this basic tool in the diagnostic process for these injuries.Keywords: shoulder, pain, pathology, imaging, radiographs

  19. Chronic shoulder pain: part I. Evaluation and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Kelton M; Stevenson, J Herbert; Czarnecki, Gregory R; Dorfman, Justin

    2008-02-15

    Shoulder pain is defined as chronic when it has been present for longer than six months. Common conditions that can result in chronic shoulder pain include rotator cuff disorders, adhesive capsulitis, shoulder instability, and shoulder arthritis. Rotator cuff disorders include tendinopathy, partial tears, and complete tears. A clinical decision rule that is helpful in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears includes pain with overhead activity, weakness on empty can and external rotation tests, and a positive impingement sign. Adhesive capsulitis can be associated with diabetes and thyroid disorders. Clinical presentation includes diffuse shoulder pain with restricted passive range of motion on examination. Acromioclavicular osteoarthritis presents with superior shoulder pain, acromioclavicular joint tenderness, and a painful cross-body adduction test. In patients who are older than 50 years, glenohumeral osteoarthritis usually presents as gradual pain and loss of motion. In patients younger than 40 years, glenohumeral instability generally presents with a history of dislocation or subluxation events. Positive apprehension and relocation are consistent with the diagnosis. Imaging studies, indicated when diagnosis remains unclear or management would be altered, include plain radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, and computed tomography scans. Plain radiographs may help diagnose massive rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, and shoulder arthritis. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography are preferred for rotator cuff disorders. For shoulder instability, magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram is preferred over magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. Validation of the Danish version of Oxford Shoulder Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, Lars Henrik; Noergaard, Peter Moensted; Brorson, Stig

    2011-01-01

    The Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) is a patient-administered condition-specific questionnaire for patients with degenerative or inflammatory shoulder disease. The purpose of this study was to validate a Danish translation of the OSS and to compare it with the Constant Score (CS).......The Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) is a patient-administered condition-specific questionnaire for patients with degenerative or inflammatory shoulder disease. The purpose of this study was to validate a Danish translation of the OSS and to compare it with the Constant Score (CS)....

  1. Clinical forms of shoulder instability in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaroslav N. Proshchenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The recurrence rate of adolescent chronic shoulder instability is approximately 56%–68%. However, this pathology is often missed in childhood and adolescence. Aim. To identify the clinical forms of shoulder joint instability in pediatric patients. Materials and methods. The authors present the data from 57 pediatric patients aged 3−17 years with a total of 61 unstable shoulder joints. All patients were divided into groups according to the form of instability. Traumatic chronic shoulder instability was identified in 40 patients (Bankart and Hill–Sachs injuries. Of these, non-traumatic shoulder instability was diagnose in 17, including five with recurrent dislocation, and spontaneous shoulder dislocation due to dysplasia of glenoid and labrum was diagnosed in 12. Of the 57 patients in the study cohort, 53 underwent surgery. Postoperatively, two patients developed recurrent shoulder dislocation (Andreev–Boichev technique due type III shoulder dysplasia in the first patient and multidirectional injury in the second. Conclusions. Shoulder joint instability should be considered as the traumatic or non-traumatic form. Treatment decisions should be based on anatomical characteristics that predispose to recurrent dislocation.

  2. Shoulder Duplication in Constriction Band Syndrome: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davod Jafari

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A 2.5 year old girl is presented with both hands constriction bands leading to distal amputations and the rare deformity of shoulder duplication in the right side accompanying constriction skin marking over the affected shoulder. The cephalomedial scapula articulated with the clavicle and the caudolateral scapula articulated with humeral head. The most important physical finding which could explain the pathophysiology of this rare anomaly, was constriction band marking over the right shoulder. Shoulder range of motion was limited but still functional and no surgical intervention was required for the scapular duplication.

  3. Stabilization of a β-hairpin in monomeric Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide inhibits amyloid formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Wolfgang; Grönwall, Caroline; Jonsson, Andreas; Ståhl, Stefan; Härd, Torleif

    2008-01-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is triggered by the oligomerization and aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into protein plaques. Formation of the potentially toxic oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ assemblies is accompanied by a conformational change toward a high content of β-structure. Here, we report the solution structure of Aβ(1–40) in complex with the phage-display selected affibody protein ZAβ3, a binding protein of nanomolar affinity. Bound Aβ(1–40) features a β-hairpin comprising residues 17–36, providing the first high-resolution structure of Aβ in β conformation. The positions of the secondary structure elements strongly resemble those observed for fibrillar Aβ. ZAβ3 stabilizes the β-sheet by extending it intermolecularly and by burying both of the mostly nonpolar faces of the Aβ hairpin within a large hydrophobic tunnel-like cavity. Consequently, ZAβ3 acts as a stoichiometric inhibitor of Aβ fibrillation. The selected Aβ conformation allows us to suggest a structural mechanism for amyloid formation based on soluble oligomeric hairpin intermediates. PMID:18375754

  4. Interaction of amyloid inhibitor proteins with amyloid beta peptides: insight from molecular dynamics simulations.

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    Payel Das

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the detailed mechanism by which proteins such as human αB- crystallin and human lysozyme inhibit amyloid beta (Aβ peptide aggregation is crucial for designing treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Thus, unconstrained, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent have been performed to characterize the Aβ17-42 assembly in presence of the αB-crystallin core domain and of lysozyme. Simulations reveal that both inhibitor proteins compete with inter-peptide interaction by binding to the peptides during the early stage of aggregation, which is consistent with their inhibitory action reported in experiments. However, the Aβ binding dynamics appear different for each inhibitor. The binding between crystallin and the peptide monomer, dominated by electrostatics, is relatively weak and transient due to the heterogeneous amino acid distribution of the inhibitor surface. The crystallin-bound Aβ oligomers are relatively long-lived, as they form more extensive contact surface with the inhibitor protein. In contrast, a high local density of arginines from lysozyme allows strong binding with Aβ peptide monomers, resulting in stable complexes. Our findings not only illustrate, in atomic detail, how the amyloid inhibitory mechanism of human αB-crystallin, a natural chaperone, is different from that of human lysozyme, but also may aid de novo design of amyloid inhibitors.

  5. Amyloid β Oligomeric Species Present in the Lag Phase of Amyloid Formation.

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    Martin Wolff

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD-associated amyloid β peptide (Aβ is one of the main actors in AD pathogenesis. Aβ is characterized by its high tendency to self-associate, leading to the generation of oligomers and amyloid fibrils. The elucidation of pathways and intermediates is crucial for the understanding of protein assembly mechanisms in general and in conjunction with neurodegenerative diseases, e.g., for the identification of new therapeutic targets. Our study focused on Aβ42 and its oligomeric assemblies in the lag phase of amyloid formation, as studied by sedimentation velocity (SV centrifugation. The assembly state of Aβ during the lag phase, the time required by an Aβ solution to reach the exponential growth phase of aggregation, was characterized by a dominant monomer fraction below 1 S and a population of oligomeric species between 4 and 16 S. From the oligomer population, two major species close to a 12-mer and an 18-mer with a globular shape were identified. The recurrence of these two species at different initial concentrations and experimental conditions as the smallest assemblies present in solution supports the existence of distinct, energetically favored assemblies in solution. The sizes of the two species suggest an Aβ42 aggregation pathway that is based on a basic hexameric building block. The study demonstrates the potential of SV analysis for the evaluation of protein aggregation pathways.

  6. Painful shoulder? Remote clinical management of a Field Guide with shoulder pain and loss of shoulder function in Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Jones

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a female Field Guide based at the British Antarctic Survey’s Rothera Science Research Station on Adelaide Island, Antarctica who independently contacted a physiotherapist specialising in climbing related injuries (GJ located in the UK. for a second opinion. The Field Guide was experiencing significant work difficulties due to shoulder pain and subsequent loss of function particularly in overhead activities. The case raises important issues about the medical management of Field Guides operating in extreme environments and remote locations

  7. Kinematic evaluation of patients with total and reverse shoulder arthroplasty during rehabilitation exercises with different loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Toledo, Joelly Mahnic; Loss, Jefferson Fagundes; Janssen, Thomas W.; van der Scheer, Jan W.; Alta, Tjarco D.; Willems, W. Jaap; Veeger, DirkJan (H. E. J)

    2012-01-01

    Background: Following shoulder arthroplasty, any well-planned rehabilitation program should include muscle strengthening. However, it is not always clear how different external loads influence shoulder kinematics in patients with shoulder prostheses. The objective of this study was to describe

  8. The active and passive kinematic difference between primary reverse and total shoulder prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alta, T.D.; de Toledo, J.S.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Willems, W.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) and total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) effectively decrease pain and improve clinical outcome. However, indications and biomechanical properties vary greatly. Our aim was to analyze both active and passive shoulder motion (thoracohumeral [TH],

  9. Validity of an Alternate Hand Behind Back Shoulder Range of Motion Measurement in Patients With Shoulder Pain and Movement Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpute, Kiran H; Hall, Toby; Adanani, Aditi

    2018-02-23

    The purpose of this study was to determine the criterion-related validity of a novel method of measuring hand behind back (HBB) shoulder range of motion (ROM) for evaluating pain and disability in people with shoulder pain and movement impairment. This cross-sectional study design evaluated shoulder ROM, pain, fear-avoidance beliefs, and disability in 60 people (aged 35-70 years, 31 male) with chronic unilateral shoulder dysfunction (mean duration 15.73 weeks). Shoulder HBB ROM was measured with a bubble inclinometer in a manner that did not require the patient to disrobe. Correlations were sought between HBB ROM and other shoulder movements, as well as scores recorded on the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), visual analogue scale for pain, Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ), and duration of symptoms. Restriction of HBB movement was significantly correlated with SPADI total disability score (r = 0.39, P shoulder movements. These findings suggest that this novel method of measuring HBB ROM could be used as a functional outcome measure in the evaluation of patients with shoulder disorders. This method could be considered as an additional or alternative where there are challenges in measuring HBB because of restrictions in undressing a patient, such as for cultural reasons. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Electrochemistry of Alzheimer disease amyloid beta peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiorcea-Paquim, Ana-Maria; Enache, Teodor Adrian; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2018-02-13

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a widespread form of dementia that is estimated to affect 44.4 million people worldwide. AD pathology is closely related to the accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides in fibrils and plagues, the small oligomeric intermediate species formed during the Aβ peptides aggregation presenting the highest neurotoxicity. This review discusses the recent advances on the Aβ peptides electrochemical characterisation. The Aβ peptides oxidation at a glassy carbon electrode occurs in one or two steps, depending on the amino acid sequence, length and content. The first electron transfer reaction corresponds to the tyrosine Tyr10 amino acid residue oxidation, and the second to all three histidine (His6, His13 and His14) and one methionine (Met35) amino acid residues. The Aβ peptides aggregation and amyloid fibril formation is electrochemically detected via the electroactive amino acids oxidation peak currents decrease that occurs in a time dependent manner. The Aβ peptides redox behaviour is correlated with changes in the adsorption morphology from initially random coiled structures, corresponding to the Aβ peptide monomers in random coil or in α-helix conformations, to aggregates and protofibrils and two types of fibrils, corresponding to the Aβ peptides in a β-sheet configuration, observed by atomic force microscopy. Electrochemical studies of Aβ peptides aggregation, mediated by the interaction with metal ions, in particular zinc, copper, and iron, and different methodologies concerning the detection of Aβ peptide biomarkers of AD in biological fluids, using electrochemical biosensors, are also discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. The proton-pump inhibitor lansoprazole enhances amyloid beta production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiola, Nahuai; Alcalde, Victor; Pujol, Albert; Münter, Lisa-Marie; Multhaup, Gerd; Lleó, Alberto; Coma, Mireia; Soler-López, Montserrat; Aloy, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    A key event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) species in the brain, derived from the sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. Based on a systems biology study to repurpose drugs for AD, we explore the effect of lansoprazole, and other proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), on Aβ production in AD cellular and animal models. We found that lansoprazole enhances Aβ37, Aβ40 and Aβ42 production and lowers Aβ38 levels on amyloid cell models. Interestingly, acute lansoprazole treatment in wild type and AD transgenic mice promoted higher Aβ40 levels in brain, indicating that lansoprazole may also exacerbate Aβ production in vivo. Overall, our data presents for the first time that PPIs can affect amyloid metabolism, both in vitro and in vivo.

  12. The effect of tachykinin neuropeptides on amyloid β aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flashner, Efrat; Raviv, Uri; Friedler, Assaf

    2011-04-01

    A hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is production of amyloid β peptides resulting from aberrant cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. Amyloid β assembles into fibrils under physiological conditions, through formation of neurotoxic intermediate oligomers. Tachykinin peptides are known to affect amyloid β neurotoxicity in cells. To understand the mechanism of this effect, we studied how tachykinins affect Aβ(1-40) aggregation in vitro. Fibrils grown in the presence of tachykinins exhibited reduced thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, while their morphology, observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), did not alter. Cross linking studies revealed that the distribution of low molecular weight species was not affected by tachykinins. Our results suggest that there may be a specific interaction between tachykinins and Aβ(1-40) that allows them to co-assemble. This effect may explain the reduction of Aβ(1-40) neurotoxicity in cells treated with tachykinins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence of cerebral amyloid pathology in persons without dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Willemijn J; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Knol, Dirk L

    2015-01-01

    or in cerebrospinal fluid according to AD risk factors (age, apolipoprotein E [APOE] genotype, sex, and education) estimated by generalized estimating equations. RESULTS: The prevalence of amyloid pathology increased from age 50 to 90 years from 10% (95% CI, 8%-13%) to 44% (95% CI, 37%-51%) among participants...... with normal cognition were amyloid positive was approximately 40 years for APOE ε4ε4 carriers, 50 years for ε2ε4 carriers, 55 years for ε3ε4 carriers, 65 years for ε3ε3 carriers, and 95 years for ε2ε3 carriers. Amyloid positivity was more common in highly educated participants but not associated with sex....... OBJECTIVE: To use individual participant data meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of amyloid pathology as measured with biomarkers in participants with normal cognition, subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). DATA SOURCES: Relevant biomarker studies identified...

  14. Mechanism of prion propagation: amyloid growth occurs by monomer addition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean R Collins

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abundant nonfibrillar oligomeric intermediates are a common feature of amyloid formation, and these oligomers, rather than the final fibers, have been suggested to be the toxic species in some amyloid diseases. Whether such oligomers are critical intermediates for fiber assembly or form in an alternate, potentially separable pathway, however, remains unclear. Here we study the polymerization of the amyloidogenic yeast prion protein Sup35. Rapid polymerization occurs in the absence of observable intermediates, and both targeted kinetic and direct single-molecule fluorescence measurements indicate that fibers grow by monomer addition. A three-step model (nucleation, monomer addition, and fiber fragmentation accurately accounts for the distinctive kinetic features of amyloid formation, including weak concentration dependence, acceleration by agitation, and sigmoidal shape of the polymerization time course. Thus, amyloid growth can occur by monomer addition in a reaction distinct from and competitive with formation of potentially toxic oligomeric intermediates.

  15. Imaging amyloid beta peptide oligomeric particles in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jijun; Apkarian, Robert P; Lynn, David G

    2005-09-01

    While all protein misfolding diseases are characterized by fibrous amyloid deposits, the favorable free energy and strongly cooperative nature of the self-assembly have complicated the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at preventing their formation. As structural models for the amyloid fibrils approach atomic resolution, increasing evidence suggests that early folding intermediates, rather than the final structure, are more strongly associated with the loss of neuronal function. For that reason we now demonstrate the use of cryo-etch high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (cryo-HRSEM) for the direct observation of pathway intermediates in amyloid assembly. A congener of the Abeta peptide of Alzheimer's disease, Abeta(13-21), samples a variety of time-dependent self-assembles in a manner similar to those seen for larger proteins. A morphological description of these intermediates is the first step towards their structural characterization and the definition of their role in both amyloid assembly and neurotoxicity.

  16. Avulsive axillary artery injury in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingert, Nathaniel C; Beck, John D; Harter, G Dean

    2014-01-01

    In addition to neurologic injuries such as peripheral nerve palsy, axillary vessel injury should be recognized as a possible complication of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Limb lengthening associated with Grammont-type reverse total shoulder arthroplasty places tension across the brachial plexus and axillary vessels and may contribute to observed injuries. The Grammont-type reverse total shoulder arthroplasty prosthesis reverses the shoulder ball and socket, shifts the shoulder center of rotation distal and medial, and lengthens the arm. This alteration of native anatomy converts shearing to compressive glenohumeral joint forces while augmenting and tensioning the deltoid lever arm. Joint stability is enhanced; shoulder elevation is enabled in the rotator cuff–deficient shoulder. Arm lengthening associated with reverse total shoulder arthroplasty places a longitudinal strain on the brachial plexus and axillary vessels. Peripheral nerve palsies and other neurologic complications of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty have been documented. The authors describe a patient with rotator cuff tear arthropathy and a history of radioulnar synostosis who underwent reverse total shoulder arthroplasty complicated by intraoperative injury to the axillary artery and postoperative radial, ulnar, and musculocutaneous nerve palsies. Following a seemingly unremarkable placement of reverse shoulder components, brisk arterial bleeding was encountered while approximating the incised subscapularis tendon in preparation for wound closure. Further exploration revealed an avulsive-type injury of the axillary artery. After an unsuccessful attempt at primary repair, a synthetic arterial bypass graft was placed. Reperfusion of the right upper extremity was achieved and has been maintained to date. Postoperative clinical examination and electromyographic studies confirmed ongoing radial, ulnar, and musculocutaneous neuropathies.

  17. Interactions driving the collapse of islet amyloid polypeptide: Implications for amyloid aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Stephanie M.

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), also known as amylin, is a 37-residue intrinsically disordered hormone involved in glucose regulation and gastric emptying. The aggregation of hIAPP into amyloid fibrils is believed to play a causal role in type 2 diabetes. To date, not much is known about the monomeric state of hIAPP or how it undergoes an irreversible transformation from disordered peptide to insoluble aggregate. IAPP contains a highly conserved disulfide bond that restricts hIAPP(1-8) into a short ring-like structure: N_loop. Removal or chemical reduction of N_loop not only prevents cell response upon binding to the CGRP receptor, but also alters the mass per length distribution of hIAPP fibers and the kinetics of fibril formation. The mechanism by which N_loop affects hIAPP aggregation is not yet understood, but is important for rationalizing kinetics and developing potential inhibitors. By measuring end-to-end contact formation rates, Vaiana et al. showed that N_loop induces collapsed states in IAPP monomers, implying attractive interactions between N_loop and other regions of the disordered polypeptide chain . We show that in addition to being involved in intra-protein interactions, the N_loop is involved in inter-protein interactions, which lead to the formation of extremely long and stable beta-turn fibers. These non-amyloid fibers are present in the 10 muM concentration range, under the same solution conditions in which hIAPP forms amyloid fibers. We discuss the effect of peptide cyclization on both intra- and inter-protein interactions, and its possible implications for aggregation. Our findings indicate a potential role of N_loop-N_loop interactions in hIAPP aggregation, which has not previously been explored. Though our findings suggest that N_loop plays an important role in the pathway of amyloid formation, other naturally occurring IAPP variants that contain this structural feature are incapable of forming amyloids. For example, hIAPP readily

  18. Shoulder instability in professional football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclere, Lance E; Asnis, Peter D; Griffith, Matthew H; Granito, David; Berkson, Eric M; Gill, Thomas J

    2013-09-01

    Shoulder instability is a common problem in American football players entering the National Football League (NFL). Treatment options include nonoperative and surgical stabilization. This study evaluated how the method of treatment of pre-NFL shoulder instability affects the rate of recurrence and the time elapsed until recurrence in players on 1 NFL team. Retrospective cohort. Medical records from 1980 to 2008 for 1 NFL team were reviewed. There were 328 players included in the study who started their career on the team and remained on the team for at least 2 years (mean, 3.9 years; range, 2-14 years). The history of instability prior to entering the NFL and the method of treatment were collected. Data on the occurrence of instability while in the NFL were recorded to determine the rate and timing of recurrence. Thirty-one players (9.5%) had a history of instability prior to entering the NFL. Of the 297 players with no history of instability, 39 (13.1%) had a primary event at a mean of 18.4 ± 22.2 months (range, 0-102 months) after joining the team. In the group of players with prior instability treated with surgical stabilization, there was no statistical difference in the rate of recurrence (10.5%) or the timing to the instability episode (mean, 26 months) compared with players with no history of instability. Twelve players had shoulder instability treated nonoperatively prior to the NFL. Five of these players (41.7%) had recurrent instability at a mean of 4.4 ± 7.0 months (range, 0-16 months). The patients treated nonoperatively had a significantly higher rate of recurrence (P = 0.02) and an earlier time of recurrence (P = 0.04). The rate of contralateral instability was 25.8%, occurring at a mean of 8.6 months. Recurrent shoulder instability is more common in NFL players with a history of nonoperative treatment. Surgical stabilization appears to restore the rate and timing of instability to that of players with no prior history of instability.

  19. Pain Management Strategies in Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codding, Jason L; Getz, Charles L

    2018-01-01

    Pain control in total shoulder arthroplasty demands a multidisciplinary approach with collaboration between patients, surgeon, and anesthetist. A multimodal approach with preemptive medication, regional blockade, local anesthetics, and a combination of acetaminophen, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, tramadol, and gabapentinoids postoperatively leads to pain control and patient satisfaction. Assessment of patients' expectations constitutes a vital aspect of the preoperative patient evaluation. Educating and psychologically preparing patients reduces postoperative pain. Patients with anxiety and depression, preoperative narcotic use, and medical comorbidities are at an increased risk for suboptimal pain control. Minimizing narcotic use decreases opioid-related adverse effects and facilitates productive rehabilitation efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimal management of shoulder impingement syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Hooks, Todd R; Wilk, Kevin E

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder impingement is a progressive orthopedic condition that occurs as a result of altered biomechanics and/or structural abnormalities. An effective nonoperative treatment for impingement syndrome is aimed at addressing the underlying causative factor or factors that are identified after a complete and thorough evaluation. The clinician devises an effective rehabilitation program to regain full glenohumeral range of motion, reestablish dynamic rotator cuff stability, and implement a progression of resistive exercises to fully restore strength and local muscular endurance in the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers. The clinician can introduce stresses and forces via sport-specific drills and functional activities to allow a return to activity. PMID:24648778

  1. Subacromial lipoma causing shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucuoglu, Hamza; Akgun, Kenan

    2017-01-01

    Subacromial lipoma represents a rare cause of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). A 49-year-old male patient presented to clinic with progressive right shoulder pain and limited movement, ongoing for approximately 1 month. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a lesion, compatible with lipoma, extending through subacromial space and pressing on supraspinatus muscle. After histopathological verification of lipoma, mass was excised. Postoperatively, patient completed 1 month physical therapy and rehabilitation program. Patient was free of pain at 4-month follow-up. Subacromial lipoma should be included in differential diagnosis of SIS for patients unresponsive to conservative treatment; MRI is very useful to determine precise etiology and inform surgical treatment.

  2. Shoulder-elbow exoskeleton as rehabilitation exerciser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianoşi, A.; Dimitrova, A.; Noveanu, S.; Tătar, O. M.; Mândru, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a 2 degree of freedom exoskeleton designed for the rehabilitation of the shoulder and elbow movement in the sagittal plane; a semi-portable design strategy was chosen, which enables an easy attachment to a standard medical chair as well as the patient upper limb. A dedicated driver enables the control from a graphical user interface, which also provides the option of customized rehabilitation exercises. The potential of future improvements is assessed, and recommendations of research direction are made in order to broaden the usability of the proposed device.

  3. Humeral shaft fracture with ipsilateral shoulder dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behera Prateek

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Although fracture of the humeral shaft or dislocation of the shoulder joint is a common injury, a simutaneous injury is rare. We present such a case combined with head injury which took precedence over the skeletal injuries. The postoperative rehabilitation was slowed down by the head injury. This case report makes us aware of some problems when managing the patient with this rare injury and helps us understand the management options better. Also the need for proper follow-up and rehabilitation is emphasized.

  4. Maternal Endogenous Forces and Shoulder Dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Michele J

    2016-12-01

    Childbirth is a complicated biomechanical process that many take for granted. However, the delivery forces generated by a mother (uterine contractions and maternal pushing) are strong and have a significant effect on the body and tissues of the fetus, especially during the second stage of labor. Although most infants are born without negative, force-related outcomes, in some infants the normal forces of labor cause an injury that can have either temporary or permanent sequelae. The biomechanical situation is further complicated when an infant's shoulder impacts the maternal pelvis, which provides increased resistance and creates added stresses within the neonatal body and tissues.

  5. A RHIM with a View: FLYing with Functional Amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sunny; Cherry, Sara

    2017-10-17

    Recognition of bacterial peptidoglycan by the Drosophila IMD pathway triggers NF-κB activation and an associated immune response. In this issue of Immunity, Kleino et al. (2017) show that proteins in the IMD pathway form functional amyloids via a cryptic motif resembling the RHIM motif found in mammalian RIPK proteins. Amyloid formation can be negatively regulated, suggesting that it presents a regulatory point in multiple biological processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen P McWilliams-Koeppen

    Full Text Available Light chain (AL amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(PH-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. These data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.

  7. Thermal Stability Threshold for Amyloid Formation in Light Chain Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya L. Poshusta

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Light chain (AL amyloidosis is a devastating disease characterized by amyloid deposits formed by immunoglobulin light chains. Current available treatments involve conventional chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. We have recently concluded a phase III trial comparing these two treatments. AL amyloidosis patients who achieve hematological complete response (CR do not necessarily achieve organ response regardless of the treatment they received. In order to investigate the possible correlation between amyloid formation kinetics and organ response, we selected AL amyloidosis patients from the trial with kidney involvement and CR after treatment. Six patients were selected and their monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains were characterized. The proteins showed differences in their stability and their kinetics of amyloid formation. A correlation was detected at pH 7.4, showing that less stable proteins are more likely to form amyloid fibrils. AL-T03 is too unstable to form amyloid fibrils at pH 7.4. This protein was found in the only patient in the study that had organ response, suggesting that partially folded species are required for amyloid formation to occur in AL amyloidosis.

  8. PMEL Amyloid Fibril Formation: The Bright Steps of Pigmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christin Bissig

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In pigment cells, melanin synthesis takes place in specialized organelles, called melanosomes. The biogenesis and maturation of melanosomes is initiated by an unpigmented step that takes place prior to the initiation of melanin synthesis and leads to the formation of luminal fibrils deriving from the pigment cell-specific pre-melanosomal protein (PMEL. In the lumen of melanosomes, PMEL fibrils optimize sequestration and condensation of the pigment melanin. Interestingly, PMEL fibrils have been described to adopt a typical amyloid-like structure. In contrast to pathological amyloids often associated with neurodegenerative diseases, PMEL fibrils represent an emergent category of physiological amyloids due to their beneficial cellular functions. The formation of PMEL fibrils within melanosomes is tightly regulated by diverse mechanisms, such as PMEL traffic, cleavage and sorting. These mechanisms revealed increasing analogies between the formation of physiological PMEL fibrils and pathological amyloid fibrils. In this review we summarize the known mechanisms of PMEL fibrillation and discuss how the recent understanding of physiological PMEL amyloid formation may help to shed light on processes involved in pathological amyloid formation.

  9. Toxic species in amyloid disorders: Oligomers or mature fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative disorders. These protein aggregation (fibrillization disorders are also known as amyloid disorders. The mechanism of protein aggregation involves conformation switch of the native protein, oligomer formation leading to protofibrils and finally mature fibrils. Mature fibrils have long been considered as the cause of disease pathogenesis; however, recent evidences suggest oligomeric intermediates formed during fibrillization to be toxic. In this review, we have tried to address the ongoing debate for these toxic amyloid species. We did an extensive literature search and collated information from Pubmed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov and Google search using various permutations and combinations of the following keywords: Neurodegeneration, amyloid disorders, protein aggregation, fibrils, oligomers, toxicity, Alzheimer′s Disease, Parkinson′s Disease. We describe different instances showing the toxicity of mature fibrils as well as oligomers in Alzheimer′s Disease and Parkinson′s Disease. Distinct structural framework and morphology of amyloid oligomers suggests difference in toxic effect between oligomers and fibrils. We highlight the difference in structure and proposed toxicity pathways for fibrils and oligomers. We also highlight the evidences indicating that intermediary oligomeric species can act as potential diagnostic biomarker. Since the formation of these toxic species follow a common structural switch among various amyloid disorders, the protein aggregation events can be targeted for developing broad-range therapeutics. The therapeutic trials based on the understanding of different protein conformers (monomers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils in amyloid cascade are also described.

  10. Amyloid Imaging: Poised for Integration into Medical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Keshav; Sabbagh, Marwan

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid imaging represents a significant advance as an adjunct in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) because it is the first imaging modality that identifies in vivo changes known to be associated with the pathogenesis. Initially, 11 C-PIB was developed, which was the prototype for many 18 F compounds, including florbetapir, florbetaben, and flutemetamol, among others. Despite the high sensitivity and specificity of amyloid imaging, it is not commonly used in clinical practice, mainly because it is not reimbursed under current Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services guidelines in the USA. To guide the field in who would be most appropriate for the utility of amyloid positron emission tomography, current studies are underway [Imaging Dementia Evidence for Amyloid Scanning (IDEAS) Study] that will inform the field on the utilization of amyloid positron emission tomography in clinical practice. With the advent of monoclonal antibodies that specifically target amyloid antibody, there is an interest, possibly a mandate, to screen potential treatment recipients to ensure that they are suitable for treatment. In this review, we summarize progress in the field to date.

  11. Detection of amyloid fibrils in Parkinson's disease using plasmonic chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jatish; Eraña, Hasier; López-Martínez, Elena; Claes, Nathalie; Martín, Víctor F; Solís, Diego M; Bals, Sara; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Castilla, Joaquín; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2018-03-27

    Amyloid fibrils, which are closely associated with various neurodegenerative diseases, are the final products in many protein aggregation pathways. The identification of fibrils at low concentration is, therefore, pivotal in disease diagnosis and development of therapeutic strategies. We report a methodology for the specific identification of amyloid fibrils using chiroptical effects in plasmonic nanoparticles. The formation of amyloid fibrils based on α-synuclein was probed using gold nanorods, which showed no apparent interaction with monomeric proteins but effective adsorption onto fibril structures via noncovalent interactions. The amyloid structure drives a helical nanorod arrangement, resulting in intense optical activity at the surface plasmon resonance wavelengths. This sensing technique was successfully applied to human brain homogenates of patients affected by Parkinson's disease, wherein protein fibrils related to the disease were identified through chiral signals from Au nanorods in the visible and near IR, whereas healthy brain samples did not exhibit any meaningful optical activity. The technique was additionally extended to the specific detection of infectious amyloids formed by prion proteins, thereby confirming the wide potential of the technique. The intense chiral response driven by strong dipolar coupling in helical Au nanorod arrangements allowed us to detect amyloid fibrils down to nanomolar concentrations.

  12. Posterior axilla sling traction for shoulder dystocia: case review and a new method of shoulder rotation with the sling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluver, Catherine Anne; Hofmeyr, G Justus

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to report on all cases in which posterior axilla sling traction (PAST) has been used to deliver cases of intractable shoulder dystocia and to describe a new method of shoulder rotation with the sling. A record of all published and known cases was collected that included information on preliminary obstetric techniques that were used and how the PAST technique was performed. Maternal outcomes that included maternal injury and length of hospital stay and fetal outcomes, which included birthweight, Apgar scores, nerve injuries, fractures, hospital stay, and outcome, were documented. We have recorded 19 cases where PAST has been used. In 5 cases, the babies had died in utero. Ten were assisted deliveries. PAST was successful in 18 cases. In one case, it was partially successful because it enabled delivery of the posterior shoulder with digital axillary traction. The most commonly used material was suction tubing. Once the posterior shoulder was delivered, the shoulder dystocia was resolved in all cases. Time from insertion to delivery was shoulder was difficult because of very severe impaction, the sling could be used to rotate the shoulders easily through 180 degrees assisted by counter pressure on the back of the anterior shoulder. This new method was used in 5 cases and may reduce fetal trauma further during difficult shoulder delivery. This review confirms that PAST can be a lifesaving technique when all another techniques for shoulder dystocia fail. Advantages are that it is easy to use (even by someone who has not seen it used previously), that the sling material is readily available, and that it is inserted quickly with 2 fingers. This is the first report of its use to rotate the posterior shoulder to the anterior position for delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Shoulder arthroplasty with the Neer Mark-II prosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, Lars Henrik; Møller, B.N.; Sneppen, O.

    1988-01-01

    Total shoulder joint replacement was used as primary intervention in 50 shoulders--35 with rheumatoid arthritis, eight with osteoarthritis, and seven with traumatic arthritis. Follow-up time was 27 (12-42) months. The primary indication for the operation was chronic severe pain; improvements in m...

  14. Shoulder injuries in provincial male fast bowlers — predisposing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Fast bowlers with a front-on bowl- ing action are more susceptible to an injury of the shoulder.10. The presence of an imbalance between the agonist and antagonist groups is one of the major risk factors for devel-. ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE. Shoulder injuries in provincial male fast bowlers — predisposing factors.

  15. Open capsular shift for multi directional shoulder instability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tankeren, E. van; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de; Loon, C. van

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the outcome of open antero-inferior capsular shift in 17 patients with multidirectional instability of the shoulder who failed to respond to conservative treatment. Six shoulders presented with secondary impingement syndrome and 11 with involuntary instability. The mean duration of

  16. Protecting Commercial Aviation Against the Shoulder-Fired Missile Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Protecting Commercial Aviation Against the Shoulder-Fired Missile in the economy, such as fewer stays at hotels and decreased business travel . Aircraft...Protecting Commercial Aviation Against the Shoulder-Fired Missile Table A.2 (continued) Business Travel Airline Time cost: $34.50 Cost per mile: $0.134

  17. ANALYSIS OF LONG-TERM RESULTS OF SHOULDER ARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Nenashev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The retrospective analysis of 97 shoulder arthroplasties during 1998 to 2009 was performed. The hemiarthroplasty were fulfilled in 92 patients and total shoulder replacement in 5 patients. Total rate good and satisfactory results consists 32,0%, poor results - 68,0% (66 patients, include 5 patients with total shoulder arthroplasty. The lower level of good results was revealed in patients with chronic fractures and fracture-dislocations of shoulder. It related with changes bones of shoulder and muscles of shoulder (rotator cuff. In the studied group of patients there was no proper pre-operative diagnostics of the rotator cuff, articular surface of the scapula, which shows the need for careful preoperative examination to determine the indications for shoulder arthroplasty and select the type of prosthesis. Unsatisfactory results of total arthroplasty related to screw migration (in case of the transacromion approach and to the development of subacromial impingement. The conclusion about the need to narrow the indications for use of the scapular component «Ortho-P». The authors showed preference to cemented implants without a metal base. It is necessary to introduce in practice the anatomic implants of the third generation allowing the fullest play the anatomy and biomechanics of the shoulder joint.

  18. Ipsilateral dislocation of the shoulder and elbow: A case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pr KODO

    There was deformity and painful swelling of the right shoulder and elbow. No neurovascular deficit was found and other clinical. findings were normal. Plain radiograph revealed ipsilateral anterior shoulder and posterior elbow dislocations (Fig 1). Under general anesthesia, the dislocations were readily reduced by closed.

  19. Myofascial origin of shoulder pain: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergienko, Stanislav; Kalichman, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder pain is a common problem imposing a considerable burden on the affected person and society. Since interventions targeting traditional musculoskeletal conditions are usually only moderately effective, myofascial origin can be suggested as an alternative possible source of shoulder pain. To examine current evidence associated with myofascial origin of shoulder pain, with emphasis on diagnosis, prevalence and treatment efficacy. PubMed, Google Scholar and PEDro databases were searched from inception until December 2013 for terms relating to myofascial pain in the shoulder area. Two studies showed a high reliability of the following diagnostic characteristics during palpation: presence or absence of the taut band, spot tenderness, jump sign, pain recognition and referred pain sensation. Three prevalence studies showed a significant greater number of active myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) on the painful shoulder side. Reduced muscle strength, accelerated muscle fatigue, inconsistent muscle activation pattern under load and reduced antagonist reciprocal inhibition were found in subjects with latent MTrPs in four observational studies. Six interventional studies demonstrated the effectiveness of dry needling, myofascial manipulation, ischemic compression, laser therapy and multimodal treatment. MTrPs in shoulder muscles is a common condition among patients with shoulder complaints and can be reliably diagnosed by palpation. The reviewed interventions seem to be effective in reducing pain, increasing range of motion and improving function of the painful shoulder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. MR arthrogram for shoulder microinstability and hidden lesions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shoulder joint pain due to anterior microinstability is not an unusual complaint of young active individuals. Different etiologies of such shoulder microinstability are encountered, mainly affecting the anterior–inferior labro-ligamentous capsular structures. These injuries include Perthes lesion, ALPSA, GLAD, RIT, SLAP and ...

  1. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: pain intensity and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, V; Giannicola, G; Passaretti, D; Venditto, T; Gumina, S

    2017-12-01

    Papers regarding adhesive capsulitis (AC) of the shoulder focused on etiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment; until now, information on shoulder pain characteristics is still scarce. Our aim was to analyze pain intensity and distribution in patients with AC. The study group was composed of 278 (133M-145F) consecutive patients with AC. After diagnosis, shoulder pain distribution was assessed through an upper limb pain map and pain intensity through a visual analog scale. Patients were distinguished on the basis of gender, age, time elapsed from onset of symptoms, and severity of functional limitation. Data were submitted to statistical analysis. Intensity of shoulder pain caused by AC was higher in females (p pain arose from more than 3 months suffered a lower intensity of shoulder pain. Furthermore, pain intensity was higher in the most severe form of AC (active forward flexion Pain was localized predominantly on the anterior aspect of the shoulder (dermatomes C5-C6) and rarely extended beyond the distal third of the arm. No differences were found in pain distribution between male and female, between patients with pain from less or more than 3 months and between different levels of AC severity (p > 0.05). Shoulder pain due to AC may be influenced by gender and severity of functional limitation. AC pain distribution principally involves anterior aspect of the shoulder with downward extension of the arm until its distal third. Level IV.

  2. Does scapular positioning predict shoulder pain in recreational overhead athletes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyf, F; Nijs, J; Meeus, M; Roussel, N A; Mottram, S; Truijen, S; Meeusen, R

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this prospective study is to investigate possible scapular related risk factors for developing shoulder pain. Therefore, a 2-year follow-up study in a general community sports centre setting was conducted. A sample of convenience of 113 recreational overhead athletes (59 women and 54 men) with a mean age of 34 (17-64; SD 12) years were recruited. At baseline, visual observation for scapular dyskinesis, measured scapular protraction, upward scapular rotation and dynamic scapular control were evaluated. 22% (n=25) of all athletes developed shoulder pain during the 24 months following baseline assessment. The Mean Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ) score for the painful shoulders was 34.8 (6.3-62.5; SD 17.4). None of the scapular characteristics predicted the development of shoulder pain. However, the athletes that developed shoulder pain demonstrated significantly less upward scapular rotation at 45° (p=0.010) and 90° (p=0.016) of shoulder abduction in the frontal plane at baseline in comparison to the athletes that remained pain-free. In conclusion, although these scapular characteristics are not of predictive value for the development of shoulder pain, this study increases our understanding of the importance of a scapular upward rotation assessment among recreational overhead athletes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Shouldering the blame for impingement: the rotator cuff continuum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article was to summarise recent research on shoulder impingement and rotator cuff pathology. A continuum model of rotator cuff pathology is described, and the challenges of accurate clinical diagnosis, imaging and best management discussed. Keywords: shoulder impingement syndrome, subacromial ...

  4. Risk of subacromial shoulder disorder in airport baggage handlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Sanne Pagh; Brauer, Charlotte; Mikkelsen, Sigurd

    2017-01-01

    Musculoskeletal shoulder-load among baggage handlers measured by combining duration and intensity based on biomechanical and epidemiological information may be a stronger predictor of subacromial shoulder disordersthanbaggage handler seniority.In 2012, a cohort of baggage handlers employed at Cop...

  5. Association of fetal cranial shape with shoulder dystocia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfort, M. A.; White, G. L.; Vermeulen, F. M.

    Objective To evaluate whether fetal cranial shape is related to shoulder dystocia. Methods We compared shoulder dystocia cases (n = 18) with controls (normal vaginal deliveries, n = 18) in a retrospective matched- pairs observational study. Subjects were matched for known maternal and fetal risk

  6. MRI findings in Painful Post-stroke Shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Rajiv R; Haghpanah, Sepideh; Elovic, Elie P.; Flanagan, Steven R.; Behnegar, Anousheh; Nguyen, Vu; Page, Stephen J.; Fang, Zi-Ping; Chae, John

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose Describe the structural abnormalities in the painful shoulder of stroke survivors and their relationships to clinical characteristics. Method Eight-nine chronic stroke survivors with post-stroke shoulder pain underwent T1 and T2 weighed multiplanar, multisequence magnetic resonance imaging of the painful paretic shoulder. All scans were reviewed by one radiologist for the following abnormalities: rotator cuff, biceps and deltoid tears, tendonopathies and atrophy, subacromial bursa fluid, labral ligamentous complex abnormalities, and acromio-clavicular capsular hypertrophy. Clinical variables included subject demographics, stroke characteristics and the Brief Pain Inventory Questions 12 (BPI 12). The relationship between MRI findings and clinical characteristics were assessed via logistic regression. Results Thirty-five percent of subjects exhibited a tear of at least 1 rotator cuff, biceps or deltoid muscle. Fifty-three percent of subjects exhibited tendonopathy of at least 1 rotator cuff, bicep or deltoid muscle. The prevalence of rotator cuff tears increased with age. However, rotator cuff tears and rotator cuff and deltoid tendonopathies were not related to severity of post-stroke shoulder pain. In approximately 20% of cases, rotator cuff and deltoid muscles exhibited evidence of atrophy. Atrophy was associated with reduced motor strength and reduced severity of shoulder pain. Conclusions Rotator cuff tears and rotator cuff and deltoid tendonopathies are highly prevalent in post-stroke shoulder pain. However, their relationship to shoulder pain is uncertain. Atrophy is less common, but is associated with less severe shoulder pain. PMID:18388345

  7. Mini-Open Latarjet Procedure for Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Numa Mercier; Dominique Saragaglia

    2011-01-01

    Anterior shoulder instability is a common problem. The Latarjet procedure has been advocated as an option for the treatment of anteroinferior shoulder instability. The purpose of this paper is to explain our surgical procedure titled ?Mini-open Latarjet Procedure.? We detailed patient positioning, skin incision, subscapularis approach, and coracoid fixation. Then, we reviewed the literature to evaluate the clinical outcomes of this procedure.

  8. Ultrasound diagnosis of impingement syndrome of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullajev, R.Ya.; Dudnik, T.A.

    2010-01-01

    The finding of ultrasound investigation of shoulder joints of 62 patients with complains of a prolonged (over 1 year) pain in the shoulder area, limited movement in the joint without obvious trauma in the history were analyzed. The ultrasound finding were compared with those of MRI and radiography.

  9. Shoulder injuries in competitive swimmers in KwaZulu- | Puckree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shoulder injuries in competitive swimmers in KwaZulu-. T Puckree, KJ Thomas ... Conclusion. The incidence of shoulder injuries in competitive swimmers is high. This study shows the need for more research into swimming injuries, and the conditioning and rehabilitation of athletes in South Africa. South African Journal of ...

  10. shoulder injuries in competitive swimmers in KwaZulu- natal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fatigue of the supraspinatus muscle predisposes the shoulder to injury due to abnormal humeral movement.11 Resistance training to increase strength of the rotator cuff and the scapular stabilising muscles has been suggested to control the risk of .... Birrer P. The shoulder, EMG and the swimming stroke. J Swim Res 1986;.

  11. Muscular load characterization during isometric shoulder abductions with varying force

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iridiastadi, H.; Nussbaum, M.A.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    This study sought to characterize muscle loading and fatigue during static shoulder abductions with varying force. In a supine posture, participants maintained fixed shoulder abductions against a time-varying external resistance, generated by a dynamometer-spring mechanism. Patterns (cumulative

  12. Shoulder morbidity after non-surgical treatment of the neck.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wouwe, V.; de Bree, R.; Kuik, D.J.; de Goede, C.J.T.; de Leeuw, I.M.; Leemans, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Reports on shoulder function after non-surgical treatment are not available. In the present study shoulder morbidity after surgical and non-surgical treatment of the neck is determined and compared. Materials and methods: In 100 head and neck cancer patients 174 neck sides

  13. Shoulder dystocia: An update and review of new techniques | Cluver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The definition of shoulder dystocia and the incidence vary. Worldwide, shoulder dystocia may be increasing. In this update we look at the complications for both mother and fetus, and review the risk factors and strategies for possible prevention. Management options include the McRoberts position, techniques to deliver the ...

  14. Geometry parameters for musculoskeletal modelling of the shoulder system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Helm, F C; Veeger, DirkJan (H. E. J.); Pronk, G M; Van der Woude, L H; Rozendal, R H

    A dynamical finite-element model of the shoulder mechanism consisting of thorax, clavicula, scapula and humerus is outlined. The parameters needed for the model are obtained in a cadaver experiment consisting of both shoulders of seven cadavers. In this paper, in particular, the derivation of

  15. Posture and isokinetic shoulder strength in female water polo players

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Being overhead athletes, water polo players can present with muscular imbalances of the shoulder, between the internal rotators (IR) and external rotators (ER), leading to changes in posture and an increased risk of injury. Objectives: To assess posture and isokinetic shoulder strength of female club-level ...

  16. A comparison of shoulder pressure among different patient stabilization techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suozzi, Brent A; Brazell, Hema D; O'Sullivan, David M; Tulikangas, Paul K

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pressure placed on the shoulders as a function of varying degrees of head-down tilt (the Trendelenburg position) and to compare these pressures among 3 different patient-positioning systems. Participants were placed in the dorsal-lithotomy position with arms tucked and tilted at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 degrees of head-down tilt. Using a manometer, we measured the pressure (centimeters of water) on the shoulders at each angle for 3 support devices: the Skytron shoulder support (Skytron, Grand Rapids, MI), the Allen shoulder support (Allen Medical Systems, Acton, MA), and the Allen Hug-u-Vac. Among 23 participants, body mass index (mean ± SD) was 24.5 ± 4.3 kg/m(2). As the tilt angle increased, so did the shoulder pressure for all support systems. At a 30-degree Trendelenburg position, the Allen Hug-u-Vac transmitted less pressure to the shoulders than the Skytron (right and left, P pressure increases as tilt angle increases. Of the 3 support systems that were tested, the Allen Hug-u-Vac transmitted less pressure to the shoulders at a 30-degree Trendelenburg position than the Skytron and the Allen shoulder support systems. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Shoulder dystocia: An update and review of new techniques

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-09-18

    Sep 18, 2009 ... The American Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists defines shoulder dystocia as a 'delivery that requires additional obstetric maneuvers following failure of gentle downward traction on the fetal head to effect delivery of the shoulders'.1 The Royal College of Obstetricians and. Gynaecologists defines ...

  18. Cervical epidural anaesthesia for shoulder arthroscopy and effective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shoulder arthroscopy is used to treat various diseases of the shoulder, including refractory adhesive capsulitis. Effective postoperative pain relief is critical for these patients, as the success of surgery largely depends on early and regular physiotherapy. Although traditionally, various methods of postoperative analgesia have ...

  19. CT diagnosis of recurrent subluxation of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, B.M.; Kramps, H.A.; Laumann, U.; Fischedick, A.R.

    1982-01-01

    CT provides a clear, unobstructed and reproducible view of the shoulder joint. This permits, unlike conventional methods, for the first time a complete view of the anatomy and of the factors which predispose to a recurrent subluxation of the shoulder. In addition it is possible to see bone lesions resulting from the subluxation. (orig.) [de

  20. Intrauterine fetal death and risk of shoulder dystocia at delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sandra; Dobbin, Joanna; McCallion, Oliver; Eskild, Anne

    2016-12-01

    Vaginal delivery is recommended after intrauterine fetal death. However, little is known about the risk of shoulder dystocia in these deliveries. We studied whether intrauterine fetal death increases the risk of shoulder dystocia at delivery. In this population-based register study using the Medical Birth Registry of Norway, we included all singleton pregnancies with vaginal delivery of offspring in cephalic presentation in Norway during the period 1967-2012 (n = 2 266 118). Risk of shoulder dystocia was estimated as absolute risk (%) and odds ratio with 95% confidence interval. Adjustment was made for offspring birthweight (in grams). We performed sub-analyses within categories of birthweight (Shoulder dystocia occurred in 1.1% of pregnancies with intrauterine fetal death and in 0.8% of pregnancies without intrauterine fetal death (p shoulder dystocia occurred in 14.6% of pregnancies with intrauterine fetal death and in 2.8% of pregnancies without intrauterine fetal death (p shoulder dystocia occurred in 57.1% of pregnancies with intrauterine fetal death and 9.6% of pregnancies without intrauterine fetal death (p shoulder dystocia at delivery, and the absolute risk of shoulder dystocia was particularly high if offspring birthweight was high and the mother had diabetes. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Nasal administration of amyloid-beta peptide decreases cerebral amyloid burden in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner, H L; Lemere, C A; Maron, R

    2000-01-01

    Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease-implicated ......Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease...

  2. Isolated Pulmonary Embolism following Shoulder Arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole H. Goldhaber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism (PE following shoulder arthroscopy is a rare complication. We present a unique case report of a 43-year-old right-hand dominant female who developed a PE 41 days postoperatively with no associated upper or lower extremity DVT. The patient had minimal preoperative and intraoperative risk factors. Additionally, she had no thromboembolic symptoms postoperatively until 41 days following surgery when she developed sudden right-hand swelling, labored breathing, and abdominal pain. A stat pulmonary computed tomography (CT angiogram of the chest revealed an acute PE in the right lower lobe, and subsequent extremity ultrasounds showed no upper or lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. After a thorough review of the literature, we present the first documented isolated PE following shoulder arthroscopy. Although rare, sudden development of an isolated PE is possible, and symptoms such as sudden hand swelling, trouble breathing, and systemic symptoms should be evaluated aggressively with a pulmonary CT angiogram given the fact that an extremity ultrasound may be negative for deep vein thrombosis.

  3. Optimal management of shoulder impingement syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escamilla RF

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rafael F Escamilla,1,2 Todd R Hooks,3 Kevin E Wilk4 1Department of Physical Therapy, California State University, Sacramento, CA, USA; 2Andrews Research and Education Institute, Gulf Breeze, FL, USA; 3Drayer Physical Therapy Institute, Columbus, MS, USA; 4Champion Sports Medicine, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: Shoulder impingement is a progressive orthopedic condition that occurs as a result of altered biomechanics and/or structural abnormalities. An effective nonoperative treatment for impingement syndrome is aimed at addressing the underlying causative factor or factors that are identified after a complete and thorough evaluation. The clinician devises an effective rehabilitation program to regain full glenohumeral range of motion, reestablish dynamic rotator cuff stability, and implement a progression of resistive exercises to fully restore strength and local muscular endurance in the rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers. The clinician can introduce stresses and forces via sport-specific drills and functional activities to allow a return to activity. Keywords: rotator cuff impingement, internal impingement, overhead athlete, shoulder, rehabilitation

  4. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder rotator cuff lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira-Barbosa Marcello Henrique

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder rotator cuff tendon tears were evaluated with ultrasonography (US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Surgical or arthroscopical correlation were available in 25 cases. Overall costs were also considered. Shoulder impingement syndrome diagnosis was done on a clinical basis. Surgery or arthroscopy was considered when conservative treatment failure for 6 months, or when rotator cuff repair was indicated. Ultrasound was performed in 22 patients and MRI in 17 of the 25 patients. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 80%, 100% and 90.9% for US and 90%, 100% and 94.12% for MRI, respectively. In 16 cases both US and MRI were obtained and in this subgroup statistical correlation was excellent (p< 0.001. We concluded that both methods are reliable for rotator cuff full thickness tear evaluation. Since US is less expensive, it could be considered as the screening method when rotator cuff integrity is the main question, and when well trained radiologists and high resolution equipment are available.

  5. EMU Shoulder Injury Tiger Team Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David R.; Johnson, Brian J.

    2003-01-01

    The number and complexity of extravehicular activities required for the completion and maintenance of the International Space Station is unprecedented. It is not surprising that training to perform these space walks presents a risk of overuse musculoskeletal injuries. The goal of this tiger team, created in December 2002, was to identify the different factors contributing to the risk of EVA training-related shoulder injury in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab at the Sonny Carter Training Facility and to make recommendations that would either significantly reduce or eliminate those risks. Since 1999, concerns have been expressed about the risk of shoulder injury associated with EVA training at the NBL, particularly in inverted body positions (McMonigal, 1999). A survey was developed and administered to 42 astronauts and astronaut candidates; the results suggest a causal relationship between EVA training at the NBL and the observed injuries. Also, during the tiger team review, it became evident that training in the extravehicular mobility unit may also result in other types of injuries, including fingernail delamination, elbow pain, knee pain, foot pain, and nerve compression leading to transient loss of sensation in certain areas of the upper or lower extremity. A multi-directorate team to detect, evaluate and respond to the medical issues associated with EVA training should be implemented immediately and given the appropriate resources and authority to reduce the risk of injury to crew during training to a level as low as reasonably achievable.

  6. Treating Postlaparoscopic Surgery Shoulder Pain with Acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gur Kreindler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of acupuncture on postlaparoscopic shoulder pain (PLSP which is a common side effect in patients undergoing abdominal laparoscopic surgery. Methods. Patients with moderate to severe PLSP in spite of analgesic treatment, which were referred by the medical staff to the Complementary-Integrative Surgery Service (CISS at our institution, were provided with acupuncture treatment. The severity of PLSP and of general pain was assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS from 0 to 10. Pain assessment was conducted prior to and two hours following acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture treatment was individualized based on traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis. Results. A total of 25 patients were evaluated during a 14-month period, from March 2011 to May 2012. A significant reduction in PLSP (mean reduction of 6.4±2.3  P<0.0001 and general pain (mean reduction 6.4±2.1  P<0.0001 were observed, and no significant side effects were reported. Conclusion. Individualized acupuncture treatments according to traditional Chinese medicine principles may improve postlaparoscopic shoulder pain and general pain when used in conjunction with conventional therapy. The primary findings of this study warrant verification in controlled studies.

  7. Current concepts and recent advances in the athlete's shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliman, J F; Hawkins, R J

    1991-10-01

    The demands placed on the shoulder girdle during athletics can often exceed its physiologic limits and result in significant injury. The goal of orthopedists, therapists, trainers, and ancillary personnel who care for athletes involved in sports which require extreme demands of the shoulder is to enhance athletic performance, extend their longevity, and prevent injury. With the new concepts available from basic science and clinical research, a clear understanding of normal architecture and biomechanical function of the shoulder girdle is better appreciated. A greater understanding of sporting activities and their physiologic demands on the shoulder are also more clear. The future of all this research seems to be pointing toward maintenance and restoration of normal anatomy and physiology about the shoulder girdle.

  8. Resurfacing shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of severe rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voorde, Pia C Ten; Rasmussen, Jeppe V; Olsen, Bo S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There is no consensus on which type of shoulder prosthesis should be used in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We describe patients with RA who were treated with shoulder replacement, regarding patient-reported outcome, prosthesis survival, and causes of revision......, and we compare outcome after resurfacing hemi-arthroplasty (RHA) and stemmed hemi-arthroplasty (SHA). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used data from the national Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry and included patients with RA who underwent shoulder arthroplasty in Denmark between 2006 and 2010. Patient-reported...... outcome was obtained 1-year postoperatively using the Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder index (WOOS), and rates of revision were calculated by checking revisions reported until December 2011. The patient-reported outcome of RHA was compared to that of SHA using regression analysis...

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder: Rationale and current applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.G.; Helms, C.A.; Steinbach, L.; Neumann, C.; Munk, P.L.; Genant, H.K.

    1990-01-01

    Because it can demonstrate a wide range of tissue contrast with excellent resolution, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has revolutionized imaging in many areas of the musculoskeletal system and has generated excitement among those interested in the painful shoulder. Shoulder impingement syndrome and glenohumeral instability constitute the two major categories of shoulder derangements. Correct diagnosis requires the use of appropriate pulse sequences and imaging planes, proper patient positioning, and a satisfactory surface coil. In addition the imager must have a thorough understanding of shoulder anatomy and pathology. We present a summary of the current status of MR imaging of the shoulder including technical, anatomic, and pathologic considerations and a review of the pertinent literature. (orig.)

  10. The relationship between shoulder impingement syndrome and sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekeoglu, I; Ediz, L; Hiz, O; Toprak, M; Yazmalar, L; Karaaslan, G

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine potential relationship between subjective sleep quality and degree of pain in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). Fourty patients with shoulder impingement syndrome were evaluated using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ). Forty three of age and sex matched healthy subjects were included in the control group. There was a significant difference between the patient and control groups in terms of all PSQI global scores and subdivisions (p shoulder pain was found obviously in patients with SIS. For this reason, patients with shoulder pain due to SIS may benefit from the pain killers and cognitive-behavioral interventions that specifically target sleep disturbances. Further studies which contain polysomnographic assessments, as well as determine psychologic status are still needed to put forth sleep quality in patients with SIS.  

  11. Glenoid Dysplasia in the Recurrent Shoulder Dislocation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Sucuoglu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Glenoid dysplasia, which is often ignored, is a rare developmental anomaly. In most cases the patients remain asymptomatic. Although glenoid dysplasia has been diagnosed by incidentally on chest radiograph, also it has been described because of the developing instability of shoulder joint. Our young male patient who has recurrent dislocation of the shoulder-joint 4-5 times a year for last 5 years, dislocation has been reduced in the emergency department and he has been discharged from hospital with shoulder strap and rest. Finally when he admitted to our outpatient clinic with recurrent shoulder dislocation, the diagnosis of glenoid dysplasia is revealed by X-ray examination. We present the diagnose of glenoid dysplasia with clinical and radiological findings which should be kept in mind in patients with recurrent dislocations of shoulder as in our case.

  12. The rheumatoid shoulder: current consensus on diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Thierry; Noël, Eric; Goupille, Philippe; Duquesnoy, Bernard; Combe, Bernard

    2006-03-01

    Shoulder involvement is usually inconspicuous in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and the clinical manifestations are nonspecific. Nevertheless, shoulder involvement should be sought routinely and detected early. Range of motion at the shoulder should be evaluated. Although normal radiographic findings do not rule out shoulder involvement, radiographs are crucial for detecting micro- and macro-geodes during follow-up. The development of glenohumeral joint space narrowing is a turning point that indicates a risk of rapid joint destruction. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful for assessing the lesions and guiding the treatment strategy. Stepwise use of local interventions as indicated by imaging findings is recommended. Joint replacement should not be left too late, and surgical procedures on the shoulder should be built into the overall treatment plan.

  13. Lack of evidence for protein AA reactivity in amyloid deposits of lattice corneal dystrophy and amyloid corneal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorevic, P D; Rodrigues, M M; Krachmer, J H; Green, C; Fujihara, S; Glenner, G G

    1984-08-15

    Amyloid fibrils occurring in primary and myeloma-associated (AL), secondary (AA), and certain neuropathic hereditary forms of systemic amyloidosis can be distinguished biochemically or immunohistologically as being composed of immunoglobulin light chain, protein AA, or prealbumin respectively. All types of systemic and several localized forms of amyloidosis contain amyloid P component (protein AP). We studied formalin-fixed tissue from eight cases of lattice corneal dystrophy by the immunoperoxidase method using antisera to proteins AA and AP, to normal serum prealbumin and prealbumin isolated from a case of hereditary amyloidosis, and to light-chain determinants; additional cases were examined by indirect immunofluorescence of fresh-frozen material. We found weak (1:10 dilution) staining with anti-AP, but no reactivity with other antisera. Congo red staining was resistant to pretreatment of sections with potassium permanganate, a characteristic of non-AA amyloid. Two-dimensional gels of solubilized proteins from frozen tissue from two cases of lattice corneal dystrophy resembled those obtained from normal human cornea. Western blots of two cases of polymorphous amyloid degeneration and solubilized protein from normal cornea did not react with radioactive iodine-labeled anti-AA or anti-AP with purified protein AP and unfixed protein AA amyloid tissue as controls. We were unable to corroborate the presence of protein AA in the amyloid deposits of lattice corneal dystrophy. Although staining with antiserum to protein AP was demonstrable, the molecular configuration of this protein in stromal deposits remains to be defined.

  14. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Winther, Annika; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Nørregaard, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0 degrees -105 degrees) at a speed of approximately 120 degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation in a way that protects the painful structure. Further, the changes in muscle activity following subacromial pain induction tend to expand the subacromial space and thereby decrease the load

  15. Secondary shoulder reconstruction in patients with brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Barmpitsioti, Antonia

    2011-07-01

    Restoration of shoulder stability in post-traumatic plexopathy patients is very important because more distal functions depend on a stable and functioning shoulder. The purpose of this study is to present our experience with secondary surgeries in patients with devastating paralysis. Functional outcomes were analyzed in relation to age, severity score and type of reconstruction. The medical records of 55 post-traumatic plexopathy patients who underwent secondary shoulder reconstruction, by a single surgeon, between 1978 and 2006, were reviewed. 55 patients had 73 procedures, 44 for shoulder abduction and 29 for external rotation. 38 patients underwent secondary surgery to augment shoulder abduction. Trapezius advancement was performed in 14 patients, double free muscle transfer in 18, free latissimus dorsi in 4 and triceps muscle transfer in 2 patients. 26 patients had secondary procedures for enhancement of shoulder external rotation. Dynamic rerouting of latissimus dorsi and teres major was carried out in 18 patients and rotational humerus osteotomy in 11 patients. All patients had improvement of shoulder stability and function. Shoulder abduction reached 40.80 ± 15.93 and external rotation at 24.28 ± 17.90°. Trapezius advancement yielded 41.81 ± 9.02° of abduction. Latissimus dorsi yielded stronger shoulder abduction than adductor longus. Rerouting of latissimus dorsi and teres major attained 22.33 ± 20.31° of dynamic external rotation while humerus osteotomy produced 26.87 ± 10.32 of external rotation. Secondary procedures such as pedicle and free muscles transfers, tendon transfers, and rotational humerus osteotomy augment shoulder stability and function in patients with irreparable paralysis. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of a Shoulder Injury Prevention Program in Wheelchair Basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilroy, Jereme; Hibberd, Elizabeth

    2017-11-15

    Previous literature has theorized that alterations in shoulder physical characteristics are present in wheelchair athletes and contribute to shoulder pain and injury. Limited empirical evidence is present that evaluates the effectiveness of a shoulder injury prevention program focusing on improving these altered characteristics. To evaluate the effectiveness of a 6-week intervention program at improving characteristics that increases the risk of developing pain or shoulder injury. Pre and post-test. Home-based and controlled laboratory. Seven collegiate wheelchair athletes. Shoulder range of motion (ROM) and scapular muscle strength were assessed, and a 5-minute injury prevention program was taught to participants. Participants completed the intervention 3 times per week for 6 weeks. Following completion of the program, a post-intervention screening was performed. Internal/external rotation ROM, retraction strength, and internal/external rotation strength. Participants experienced a significant improvement in dominant limb shoulder internal rotation ROM (t6=3.56,p=0.012) with an average increase of 11.4° of IR ROM, and a significant improvement in dominant limb shoulder external rotation (ER) ROM (t6=2.79,p=0.032) with an average increase of 8.0° of ER ROM. There were no significant increases in shoulder IR or ER strength and scapular retraction strength (p>0.05). Improvements in ROM have previously been linked to decreases in shoulder pain and injury in other upper-extremity dominant sports by improving scapular kinematics. These results provide evidence that a 6-week strengthening and stretching intervention program may decrease risk factors for shoulder injury in wheelchair athletics.

  17. Corticospinal excitability of the biceps brachii is shoulder position dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Brandon Wayne; Cadigan, Edward W J; Stefanelli, Lucas; Button, Duane C

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of shoulder position on corticospinal excitability (CSE) of the biceps brachii during rest and a 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Participants ( n = 9) completed two experimental sessions with four conditions: 1 ) rest, 0° shoulder flexion; 2 ) 10% MVC, 0° shoulder flexion; 3 ) rest, 90° shoulder flexion; and 4 ) 10% MVC, 90° shoulder flexion. Transcranial magnetic, transmastoid electrical, and Erb's point stimulation were used to induce motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), cervicomedullary MEPs (CMEPs), and maximal muscle compound potentials (M max ), respectively, in the biceps brachii in each condition. At rest, MEP, CMEP, and M max amplitudes increased ( P rest and decreased ( P rest but decreased ( P rest and decreased ( P shoulder position, and the pattern of change was altered within the state in which it was measured. The position-dependent changes in M max amplitude, EMG, and CSE itself all contribute to the overall change in CSE of the biceps brachii. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We demonstrate that when the shoulder is placed into two common positions for determining elbow flexor force and activation, corticospinal excitability (CSE) of the biceps brachii is both shoulder position and state dependent. At rest, when the shoulder is flexed from 0° to 90°, supraspinal factors predominantly alter CSE, whereas during a slight contraction, spinal factors predominantly alter CSE. Finally, the normalization techniques frequently used by researchers to investigate CSE may under- and overestimate CSE when shoulder position is changed. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Shoulder orthoses for the prevention and reduction of hemiplegic shoulder pain and subluxation: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, M; Pauls, Mmh

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether shoulder orthoses prevent or reduce gleno-humeral subluxation and hemiplegic shoulder pain. OVID SP, MEDLINE, AMED, CINAHL, PEDro and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. We included: randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials, controlled before and after studies and observational studies. Two reviewers independently screened, critically appraised papers using the PEDro tool, and extracted data. A descriptive synthesis was performed as there were insufficient data for meta-analysis. Eight studies were included, totalling 186 participants: One randomised controlled trial with 41 participants, one quasi-randomised with 14 participants, one before and after controlled study with 40 participants and five observational studies with 91 participants met the inclusion criteria. Findings suggest that applying an orthosis to an already subluxed shoulder immediately reduced vertical subluxation on X-ray but improvements were not maintained when orthosis was removed. Orthoses with both proximal and distal attachments improved shoulder pain in the majority of stroke patients when worn for four weeks (starting several days or weeks post-stroke). There was no increase in adverse effects of contracture, spasticity or hand oedema when compared to no orthosis. Orthoses were generally well-tolerated and most patients rated the orthosis as comfortable to wear. Observational studies suggest that orthoses reduce vertical subluxation whilst in-situ. Available evidence from heterogeneous studies after stroke suggests that orthoses may reduce pain and are well-tolerated with prolonged use. No studies have tested whether subluxation and pain can be prevented by immediate post-stroke application of orthoses.

  19. [Shoulder dystocia: Guidelines for clinical practice--Short text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentilhes, L; Sénat, M-V; Boulogne, A-I; Deneux-Tharaux, C; Fuchs, F; Legendre, G; Le Ray, C; Lopez, E; Schmitz, T; Lejeune-Saada, V

    2015-12-01

    To determine the available evidence to prevent and treat shoulder dystocia to attempt to decrease its related neonatal and maternal morbidity. The PubMed database, the Cochrane Library and the recommendations from the French and foreign obstetrical societies or colleges have been consulted. Shoulder dystocia, defined as a vaginal delivery that requires additional obstetric maneuvers to deliver the fetus after the head has delivered and gentle traction has failed, complicates 0.5-1 % of vaginal deliveries. Risks of brachial plexus birth injury (LE3), clavicle and humeral fracture (LE3), perinatal asphyxia (LE2), hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (LE3) and perinatal mortality (LE2) are increased after shoulder dystocia. Its main risk factors are previous shoulder dystocia and macrosomia, but they are poorly predictive; 50 % to 70 % of shoulder dystocia cases occur in their absence, and the great majority of deliveries when they are present are not associated with shoulder dystocia. No study has proven that the correction of these risk factors (except gestational diabetes) would reduce the risk of shoulder dystocia (SD). Physical activity is recommended before and during pregnancy to reduce the occurrence of some risk factors for shoulder dystocia (grade C). In obese patients, physical activity should be coupled with dietary measures to reduce fetal macrosomia and weight gain during pregnancy (grade A). In case of gestational diabetes, diabetes care is recommended (diabetic diet, glucose monitoring, insulin if needed) (grade A) as it reduces the risk of macrosomia and shoulder dystocia (LE1). In order to avoid shoulder dystocia and its complications, only two measures are proposed. Induction of labor is recommended in case of impending macrosomia if the cervix is favourable and gestational age greater than 39 weeks of gestation (professional consensus). Cesarean delivery is recommended before labor in case of EFW greater than 4500g if associated with maternal

  20. Shoulder functionality after manual therapy in subjects with shoulder impingement syndrome: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia-Rizo, Alberto Marcos; López-Hervás, Antonia; Herrera-Monge, Patricia; Gutiérrez-Leonard, Ana; Piña-Pozo, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the differences in functionality of the upper limb in subjects suffering from shoulder impingement syndrome after intervention by two manual therapy protocols. Randomized, single-blind study with a sample of 22 subjects (58 ± 10.86 years old) divided into two groups. The conventional-group (n = 11) received mobilizations of the shoulder and the experimental-group (n = 11) was treated with soft tissue techniques in the cervical and upper thoracic regions. These two groups received electrotherapy and postural advices. The treatment lasted three weeks (15 daily sessions of 1 h and 30 min). Both active and passive range of motion (ROM) and self-perceived functionality of the upper limb (DASH questionnaire) were measured. The experimental group showed a significant improvement in the DASH scores and both groups improved mobility in the intra-group comparison pre-intervention versus post-intervention (p .05). Our results suggest that a combined treatment with electrotherapy, postural hygiene and manual therapy, regardless of the protocol, improves shoulder mobility and functionality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk factors for blood transfusion after shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padegimas, E M; Clyde, C T; Zmistowski, B M; Restrepo, C; Williams, G R; Namdari, S

    2016-02-01

    Currently, there is little information about the need for peri-operative blood transfusion in patients undergoing shoulder arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to identify the rate of transfusion and its predisposing factors, and to establish a blood conservation strategy. We identified all patients who had undergone shoulder arthroplasty at our hospital between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2013. The rate of transfusion was determined from the patient's records. While there were exceptions, patients typically underwent transfusion if they had a level of haemoglobin of transfusion. High- and low-risk cohorts for transfusion were identified from a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Of 1174 shoulder arthroplasties performed on 1081 patients, 53 cases (4.5%) required transfusion post-operatively. Predictors of blood transfusion were a lower pre-operative haematocrit (p transfusion. In total 48 of the 436 (11%) shoulder arthroplasties with a pre-operative haematocrit transfusion compared with five of the 738 (0.70%) shoulder arthroplasties with a haematocrit above this level. We found that transfusion was needed less frequently than previously described for shoulder arthroplasty. Patients with a pre-operative haematocrit blood transfusion, while those with a haematocrit above this level are unlikely to require transfusion. The rate of transfusion after shoulder arthroplasty is under 5%, and those with a pre-operative haematocrit greater than or equal to 39.6% have a very low likelihood (transfusion. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  2. Platelet-Rich Plasma for Frozen Shoulder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Aslani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Frozen shoulder is a glenohumeral joint disorder that perturbs movement because of adhesion and the existence of fibrosis in the shoulder capsule. Platelet-rich plasma can produce collagen and growth factors, which increases stem cells and consequently enhances the healing. To date, there is no evidence regarding the effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma in frozen shoulder. A 45-year-old man with shoulder adhesive capsulitis volunteered for this treatment. He underwent two consecutive platelet-rich plasma injections at the seventh and eighth month after initiation of symptoms. We measured pain, function, and ROM by the visual analogue scale (VAS, and scores from the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH questionnaire and goniometer; respectively. After the first injection, the patient reported 60% improvement regarding diurnal shoulder pain, and no night pains. Also, two-fold improvement for ROM and more than 70% improvement for function were reported. This study suggests the use of platelet-rich plasma in frozen shoulder to be tested in randomized trials.

  3. Deficient Pain Modulation in Patients with Chronic Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashi, Yafit; Ratmansky, Motti; Defrin, Ruth

    2017-11-14

    Hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) following stroke significantly affects the individual's function and quality of life. The mechanism of HSP is not clearly understood; hence, it is unclear why HSP resolves spontaneously or following routine care in some patients, while in others it becomes persistent. The aim was therefore to study whether HSP is associated with deficient pain modulation. Thirty post-stroke patients-16 with HSP and 14 without HSP-and 20 matched controls participated. Pain adaptation and conditioned pain modulation (CPM) were measured as indicators of pain modulation, in the affected (hemiplegic) and contralateral shoulder as well as in the affected shin among post-stroke patients, and in comparable body regions among controls. Post-stroke patients also underwent functional and physical evaluation of the shoulder. Pain adaptation was absent among HSP patients, in both the painful shoulder and the affected shin, but existed in the 2 control groups. In addition, the affected shoulder and shin among the HSP group had reduced thermal sensibility compared to the contralateral regions. CPM was similar across groups. Shoulder functional status and physical status were similar for the 2 post-stroke groups. The results suggest that HSP is associated with a lack of pain adaptation, characteristic not only of the painful shoulder but also of the affected side. Although we cannot determine whether lack of pain adaptation precedes the HSP or results from it, interventions that enhance descending pain inhibition may improve management and prevent HSP chronification. © 2017 World Institute of Pain.

  4. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Hisashi [Research Center for Computational Science, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); Department of Structural Molecular Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly.

  5. Identification of a Common Binding Mode for Imaging Agents to Amyloid Fibrils from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby; Sørensen, Jesper; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid diseases are characterized by the misfolding and deposition of proteins in the body in the form of insoluble amyloid fibrils. Alzheimer’s disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus are two examples of amyloid diseases which are closely related both with respect to the atomic structures of the a...... binding modes for imaging agents is proposed to originate from subtle differences in amino acid composition of the surface grooves on an amyloid fibril, resulting in fine tuning of the binding affinities for a specific amyloid fibril....... experimentally due to the insoluble nature of amyloid fibrils. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interactions between 13 aromatic amyloid imaging agents, entailing 4 different organic scaffolds, and a model of an amyloid fibril. Clustering analysis combined with free energy...

  6. [Osteo-articular ultrasonography of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, J; Montagnon, D; Hacquard, B; Tardieu, M

    2000-03-01

    The objective of this course is to present the normal and pathological aspects of the various periarticular structures of the shoulder, and the practical modalities of their analysis. The anatomy and pitfalls of tendon imaging is recalled, as well as the interest to detect intra and peri articular effusions. The semiological aspects of complete and partial tears of the rotator cuff and the various impingement syndromes, well demonstrated with dynamic sonography, are then studied. The examination requires time and knowledge but the diagnostic and therapeutic impact is very important regarding the low cost of this technique. The standardisation of the procedure and the production of normal reference images seems to guarantee a global increase in quality of the sonographic examinations.

  7. Key aromatic/hydrophobic amino acids controlling a cross-amyloid peptide interaction versus amyloid self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakou, Maria; Hille, Kathleen; Kracklauer, Michael; Spanopoulou, Anna; Frost, Christina V; Malideli, Eleni; Yan, Li-Mei; Caporale, Andrea; Zacharias, Martin; Kapurniotu, Aphrodite

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of the intrinsically disordered polypeptide islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), which is associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), with the Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide modulates their self-assembly into amyloid fibrils and may link the pathogeneses of these two cell-degenerative diseases. However, the molecular determinants of this interaction remain elusive. Using a systematic alanine scan approach, fluorescence spectroscopy, and other biophysical methods, including heterocomplex pulldown assays, far-UV CD spectroscopy, the thioflavin T binding assay, transmission EM, and molecular dynamics simulations, here we identified single aromatic/hydrophobic residues within the amyloid core IAPP region as hot spots or key residues of its cross-interaction with Aβ40(42) peptide. Importantly, we also find that none of these residues in isolation plays a key role in IAPP self-assembly, whereas simultaneous substitution of four aromatic/hydrophobic residues with Ala dramatically impairs both IAPP self-assembly and hetero-assembly with Aβ40(42). Furthermore, our experiments yielded several novel IAPP analogs, whose sequences are highly similar to that of IAPP but have distinct amyloid self- or cross-interaction potentials. The identified similarities and major differences controlling IAPP cross-peptide interaction with Aβ40(42) versus its amyloid self-assembly offer a molecular basis for understanding the underlying mechanisms. We propose that these insights will aid in designing intervention strategies and novel IAPP analogs for the management of type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, or other diseases related to IAPP dysfunction or cross-amyloid interactions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Amyloid PET in European and North American cohorts; and exploring age as a limit to clinical use of amyloid imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiotis, Konstantinos [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Carter, Stephen F. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); University of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Institute of Brain, Behaviour and Mental Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Farid, Karim [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); APHP, Hotel-Dieu Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Savitcheva, Irina [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Collaboration: for the Diagnostic Molecular Imaging (DiMI) network and the Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2015-09-15

    Several radiotracers that bind to fibrillar amyloid-beta in the brain have been developed and used in various patient cohorts. This study aimed to investigate the comparability of two amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) tracers as well as examine how age affects the discriminative properties of amyloid PET imaging. Fifty-one healthy controls (HCs), 72 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 90 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from a European cohort were scanned with [11C]Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB) and compared with an age-, sex- and disease severity-matched population of 51 HC, 72 MCI and 84 AD patients from a North American cohort who were scanned with [18F]Florbetapir. An additional North American population of 246 HC, 342 MCI and 138 AD patients with a Florbetapir scan was split by age (55-75 vs 76-93 y) into groups matched for gender and disease severity. PET template-based analyses were used to quantify regional tracer uptake. The mean regional uptake patterns were similar and strong correlations were found between the two tracers across the regions of interest in HC (ρ = 0.671, p = 0.02), amyloid-positive MCI (ρ = 0.902, p < 0.001) and AD patients (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001). The application of the Florbetapir cut-off point resulted in a higher proportion of amyloid-positive HC and a lower proportion of amyloid-positive AD patients in the older group (28 and 30 %, respectively) than in the younger group (19 and 20 %, respectively). These results illustrate the comparability of Florbetapir and PIB in unrelated but matched patient populations. The role of amyloid PET imaging becomes increasingly important with increasing age in the diagnostic assessment of clinically impaired patients. (orig.)

  9. Phenolsulfonphthalein, but not phenolphthalein, inhibits amyloid fibril formation: implications for the modulation of amyloid self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michal; Porat, Yair; Bacharach, Eran; Shalev, Deborah E; Gazit, Ehud

    2008-06-03

    The study of the mechanism of amyloid fibril formation and its inhibition is of key medical importance due to the lack of amyloid assembly inhibitors that are approved for clinical use. We have previously demonstrated the potent inhibitory potential of phenolsulfonphthalein, a nontoxic compound that was approved for diagnostic use in human subjects, on aggregation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) that is associated with type 2 diabetes. Here, we extend our studies on the mechanism of action of phenolsulfonphthalein by comparing its antiamyloidogenic effect to a very similar compound that is also approved for human use, phenolphthalein. While these compounds have very similar primary chemical structures, they significantly differ in their three-dimensional conformation. Our results clearly demonstrated that these two compounds had completely different inhibitory potencies: While phenolsulfonphthalein was a very potent inhibitor of amyloid fibril formation by IAPP, phenolphthalein did not show significant antiamyloidogenic activity. This behavior was observed with a short amyloid fragment of IAPP and also with the full-length polypeptide. The NMR spectrum of IAPP 20-29 in the presence of phenolsulfonphthalein showed chemical shift deviations that were different from the unbound or phenolphthalein-bound peptide. Differential activity was also observed in the inhibition of insulin amyloid formation by these two compounds, and density-gradient experiments clearly demonstrated the different inhibitory effect of the two compounds on the formation of prefibrillar assemblies. Taken together, our studies suggest that the three-dimensional arrangement of the polyphenol phenolsulfonphthalein has a central role in its amyloid formation inhibition activity.

  10. Amyloid PET in European and North American cohorts; and exploring age as a limit to clinical use of amyloid imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiotis, Konstantinos; Carter, Stephen F.; Farid, Karim; Savitcheva, Irina; Nordberg, Agneta

    2015-01-01

    Several radiotracers that bind to fibrillar amyloid-beta in the brain have been developed and used in various patient cohorts. This study aimed to investigate the comparability of two amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) tracers as well as examine how age affects the discriminative properties of amyloid PET imaging. Fifty-one healthy controls (HCs), 72 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 90 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from a European cohort were scanned with [11C]Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB) and compared with an age-, sex- and disease severity-matched population of 51 HC, 72 MCI and 84 AD patients from a North American cohort who were scanned with [18F]Florbetapir. An additional North American population of 246 HC, 342 MCI and 138 AD patients with a Florbetapir scan was split by age (55-75 vs 76-93 y) into groups matched for gender and disease severity. PET template-based analyses were used to quantify regional tracer uptake. The mean regional uptake patterns were similar and strong correlations were found between the two tracers across the regions of interest in HC (ρ = 0.671, p = 0.02), amyloid-positive MCI (ρ = 0.902, p < 0.001) and AD patients (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001). The application of the Florbetapir cut-off point resulted in a higher proportion of amyloid-positive HC and a lower proportion of amyloid-positive AD patients in the older group (28 and 30 %, respectively) than in the younger group (19 and 20 %, respectively). These results illustrate the comparability of Florbetapir and PIB in unrelated but matched patient populations. The role of amyloid PET imaging becomes increasingly important with increasing age in the diagnostic assessment of clinically impaired patients. (orig.)

  11. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder; Schulterimpingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E. [Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Klinische Abteilung Radiodiagnostik fuer chirurgische Faecher, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Wien (Austria); Breitenseher, M.J. [Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Waldviertelklinikum Horn (Austria)

    2004-06-01

    The impingement syndrome is a clinical entity characterized by shoulder pain due to primary or secondary mechanical irritation of the rotator cuff. The primary factors for the development of impingement are a curved or hook-shaped anterior acromion as well as subacromial osteophytes, which may lead to tearing of the supraspinatus tendon. Secondary impingement is mainly caused by calcific tendinopathy, glenohumeral instability, os acromiale and degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint. Conventional radiographs are initially obtained, mainly for evaluation of the bony structures of the shoulder. If available, sonography can be used for detection of lesions and tears of the rotator cuff. Finally, MR-imaging provides detailed information about the relationship of the acromion and the acromioclavicular joint to the rotator cuff itself. In many cases however, no morphologic cause for impingement syndrome can be found. While patients are initially treated conservatively, chronic disease usually requires surgical intervention. (orig.) [German] Das Impingementsyndrom ist ein klinisches Krankheitsbild multifaktorieller Genese, bei dem es primaer oder sekundaer zu einer schmerzhaften mechanischen Beeintraechtigung der Rotatorenmanschette kommt. Als primaere Faktoren gelten ein gebogener oder hakenfoermiger Vorderrand des Akromions oder von diesem entspringende Osteophyten, was zu Laesionen der Supraspinatussehne fuehren kann. Zu den sekundaeren Faktoren zaehlt man v. a. eine Tendinitis calcarea, eine glenohumerale Instabilitaet, ein Os acromiale sowie degenerative Veraenderungen im Bereich des Akromioklavikulargelenks. Bildgebend steht an erster Stelle ein Nativroentgen, mit dem sich die knoechernen Strukturen gut darstellen lassen. Falls vorhanden, kann in weiterer Folge die Sonographie Auskunft ueber den Zustand der Rotatorenmanschette geben. Mit der MRT schliesslich laesst sich die Beziehung von Akromion und gelenkassoziierten Strukturen zur Rotatorenmanschette

  12. Human Shoulder Response to High Velocity Lateral Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebarbé, Matthieu; Vezin, Philippe; Rongiéras, Frédéric; Lafont, Denis

    2017-11-01

    The armies of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization need a shoulder injury criterion for the EuroSID-2re dummy that must be reliable over a large range of loading conditions, from high velocity, short duration impacts (28 m/s - 3 ms) to low velocity long, duration impacts (4 m/s - 50 ms). In the literature, the human shoulder response to lateral impact was investigated at bounds of the loading condition spectrum as previously mentioned. For the low velocities, the injuries were mainly clavicle fractures and the maximum compression between the acromion and the sternum (Cmax) was proposed as an injury criterion. For the high velocities, the typical injury was humerus fractures, including a crushed humeral head. The present study investigates the human shoulder response at an intermediate loading condition (14 m/s - 9 ms). Six lateral shoulder impact tests have been performed with three Post Mortem Human Subjects using a rigid impactor. The duration of the impact was controlled by means of an aluminum honeycomb that decelerated the impactor during the impact. The shoulder external deflection (impactor-to-sternum) ranged between 40 to 64 mm and the applied forces ranged from 4.3 kN to 8 kN. Four shoulders out of six sustained AIS2 injuries. Two acromio-clavicular joint dislocations, one clavicle fracture, and one scapula fracture were observed. Though the shoulder force responses were closer to those induced by the high velocity, short duration impacts, the injury patterns resembled those observed for low velocity, long duration loading conditions. Furthermore, the estimated acromion-to-sternum deflection values were not inconsistent with the prediction of the shoulder injury risk curve of the literature. Despite the relatively high-velocity impact (14.3 m/s), the shoulder injury mechanism appeared to be similar to those observed in the automotive field.

  13. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty in patients with os acromiale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aibinder, William R; Schoch, Bradley S; Cofield, Robert H; Sperling, John W; Sánchez-Sotelo, Joaquin

    2017-09-01

    Os acromiale has been reported in up to 15% of the general population. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) increases deltoid tension, which could potentially lead to excessive stress on a pre-existent os acromiale. The purpose of this study was to determine the outcome and complications of primary RTSA in patients with radiographic evidence of an os acromiale. Between 2005 and 2013, 25 shoulders underwent primary RTSA with an associated os acromiale, which was classified preacromion (3), mesoacromion (20), and meta-acromion (2). All patients were observed for a minimum of 2 years or until reoperation. Mean follow-up time was 30.8 (range, 1-81.4) months. Outcomes included pain scores, range of motion, patient satisfaction, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores, and radiographic outcomes. RTSA led to an improvement in pain scores in 24 of 25 shoulders. Mean elevation, external rotation, and internal rotation were improved at final follow-up (124°, 46°, and L4, respectively). Three patients required reoperation, including revision surgery for dislocation (2) and excision of a painful os acromiale (1). Postoperative tilting of the os acromiale was noted in 7 shoulders (28%). There was no statistically significant difference in any outcome measures between shoulders with and shoulders without postoperative tilt of the os acromiale. The outcome of RTSA does not seem to be negatively affected by the presence of an os acromiale. Pain around an os acromiale after RTSA is rare. Inferior tilting is observed in approximately one-third of the shoulders after RTSA and does not seem to change the overall outcome. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Shoulder proprioception in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ebru; Dilek, Banu; Baydar, Meltem; Gundogdu, Mehtap; Ergin, Burcu; Manisali, Metin; Akalin, Elif; Gulbahar, Selmin

    2017-01-01

    Recently, proprioception deficits of the rotator cuff and the deltoid muscles have been suggested to play a pivotal role in the subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). To date, there are no study has been found where the kinesthesia and joint position senses have been evaluated together in SIS. To investigate the shoulder proprioception in patients with SIS. Sixty-one patients with SIS and 30 healthy controls, aging between 25 and 65 years, were included in the study. Main outcome measure was proprioception, assessed with an isokinetic dynamometer. Kinesthesia, active and passive joint repositioning senses were tested at 0° and 10° external rotation. All tests were repeated 4 times and the mean of angular errors were obtained. The mean age was 49.14 ± 10.27 and 48.80 ± 11.09 years in patient group and in control group respectively. No significant difference was found between two groups in terms of age, gender and dominance. When involved and uninvolved shoulders of the patient group were compared, kinesthesia, active and passive joint position senses were significantly impaired in involved shoulders at all angles (P shoulders of the patient group were compared to the control group, kinesthesia, active and passive joint position senses were significantly impaired in involved shoulders in patient group at all angles (P shoulders of the patient group were compared to the control group, kinesthesia at 10° was significantly impaired (P shoulder proprioception was impaired in patients with SIS. This proprioceptive impairment was found not only in involved shoulders but also in uninvolved shoulders in patients with SIS.

  15. POINT CLOUD ORIENTED SHOULDER LINE EXTRACTION IN LOESS HILLY AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Min

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder line is the significant line in hilly area of Loess Plateau in China, dividing the surface into positive and negative terrain (P-N terrains. Due to the point cloud vegetation removal methods of P-N terrains are different, there is an imperative need for shoulder line extraction. In this paper, we proposed an automatic shoulder line extraction method based on point cloud. The workflow is as below: (i ground points were selected by using a grid filter in order to remove most of noisy points. (ii Based on DEM interpolated by those ground points, slope was mapped and classified into two classes (P-N terrains, using Natural Break Classified method. (iii The common boundary between two slopes is extracted as shoulder line candidate. (iv Adjust the filter gird size and repeat step i-iii until the shoulder line candidate matches its real location. (v Generate shoulder line of the whole area. Test area locates in Madigou, Jingbian County of Shaanxi Province, China. A total of 600 million points are acquired in the test area of 0.23km2, using Riegl VZ400 3D Laser Scanner in August 2014. Due to the limit Granted computing performance, the test area is divided into 60 blocks and 13 of them around the shoulder line were selected for filter grid size optimizing. The experiment result shows that the optimal filter grid size varies in diverse sample area, and a power function relation exists between filter grid size and point density. The optimal grid size was determined by above relation and shoulder lines of 60 blocks were then extracted. Comparing with the manual interpretation results, the accuracy of the whole result reaches 85%. This method can be applied to shoulder line extraction in hilly area, which is crucial for point cloud denoising and high accuracy DEM generation.

  16. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  17. New Insights in the Amyloid-Beta Interaction with Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Spuch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Particularly, mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of amyloid-beta-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. The recent emphasis on the intracellular biology of amyloid-beta and its precursor protein (APP has led researchers to consider the possibility that mitochondria-associated and mitochondrial amyloid-beta may directly cause neurotoxicity. Both proteins are known to localize to mitochondrial membranes, block the transport of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to mitochondria, interact with mitochondrial proteins, disrupt the electron transport chain, increase reactive oxygen species production, cause mitochondrial damage, and prevent neurons from functioning normally. In this paper, we will outline current knowledge of the intracellular localization of amyloid-beta. Moreover, we summarize evidence from AD postmortem brain as well as animal AD models showing that amyloid-beta triggers mitochondrial dysfunction through a number of pathways such as impairment of oxidative phosphorylation, elevation of reactive oxygen species production, alteration of mitochondrial dynamics, and interaction with mitochondrial proteins. Thus, this paper supports the Alzheimer cascade mitochondrial hypothesis such as the most important early events in this disease, and probably one of the future strategies on the therapy of this neurodegenerative disease.

  18. Intracellular tracing of amyloid vaccines through direct fluorescent labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, Matthew; Kumar, Manpreet; Mirza, Ambreen; Shardlow, Emma; Exley, Christopher

    2018-02-05

    Alzheimer's disease is a debilitating neurodegenerative condition that progressively causes synaptic loss and major neuronal damage. Immunotherapy utilising Aβ as an active immunogen or via passive treatment utilising antibodies raised to amyloid have shown therapeutic promise. The migratory properties of peripheral blood-borne monocytes and their ability to enter the central nervous system, suggests a beneficial role in mediating tissue damage and neuroinflammation. However, the intrinsic phagocytic properties of such cells have pre-disposed them to internalise misfolded amyloidogenic peptides that could act as seeds capable of nucleating amyloid formation in the brain. Mechanisms governing the cellular fate of amyloid therefore, may prove to be key in the development of future vaccination regimes. Herein, we have developed unequivocal and direct conformation-sensitive fluorescent molecular probes that reveal the intracytoplasmic and intranuclear persistence of amyloid in a monocytic T helper 1 (THP-1) cell line. Use of the pathogenic Aβ 42 species as a model antigen in simulated vaccine formulations suggested differing mechanisms of cellular internalisation, in which fibrillar amyloid evaded lysosomal capture, even when co-deposited on particulate adjuvant materials. Taken collectively, direct fluorescent labelling of antigen-adjuvant complexes may serve as critical tools in understanding subsequent immunopotentiation in vaccines directed against amyloidosis and wider dementia.

  19. Amylin under examination. Fibrillogenic polypeptide of pancreatic amyloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Marszałek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In patients or animals affected by 2 type diabetes mellitus (diabetes mellitus type 2, DM2, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, NIDDM or pancreatic tumor disease e.g., insulinoma, some pathological deposits, called amyloid, are observed among cells of islets of Langerhans. Among other constituents, pancreatic deposits consist of an insoluble, fibrillar form of peptide neurohormone termed amylin, produced by pancreatic beta cells. It is thought that formation of fibrillar deposits of misfolded and aggregated peptide is highly toxic to beta cells and leads to cell dysfunction, cell loss, pancreas destruction and progress of the disease. This relatively small, 37-amino acid peptide constitutes a serious scientific, research and to some extent a medical problem. This article presents amylin as a fibrillating molecule which participates in formation of amyloid deposits in human and animal pancreas, Langerhans islets as a microenvironment of pancreatic amyloid formation, occurrence of amylin and amyloid in animals and humans, and physico-chemical requirements to meet to name amylin deposit as amyloid.

  20. Imaging and quantification of amyloid fibrillation in the cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnhold, Florian; Scharf, Andrea; von Mikecz, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Xenobiotics, as well as intrinsic processes such as cellular aging, contribute to an environment that constantly challenges nuclear organization and function. While it becomes increasingly clear that proteasome-dependent proteolysis is a major player, the topology and molecular mechanisms of nuclear protein homeostasis remain largely unknown. We have shown previously that (1) proteasome-dependent protein degradation is organized in focal microenvironments throughout the nucleoplasm and (2) heavy metals as well as nanoparticles induce nuclear protein fibrillation with amyloid characteristics. Here, we describe methods to characterize the landscape of intranuclear amyloid on the global and local level in different systems such as cultures of mammalian cells and the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Application of discrete mathematics to imaging data is introduced as a tool to develop pattern recognition of intracellular protein fibrillation. Since stepwise fibrillation of otherwise soluble proteins to insoluble amyloid-like protein aggregates is a hallmark of neurodegenerative protein-misfolding disorders including Alzheimer's disease, CAG repeat diseases, and the prion encephalopathies, investigation of intracellular amyloid may likewise aid to a better understanding of the pathomechanisms involved. We consider aggregate profiling as an important experimental approach to determine if nuclear amyloid has toxic or protective roles in various disease processes.