WorldWideScience

Sample records for amyloid shoulder nodulesin

  1. Shoulder replacement - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Endoprosthetic shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder replacement - discharge; Partial shoulder arthroplasty - discharge; Replacement - shoulder - discharge; ...

  2. Shoulder arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cuff repair Shoulder CT scan Shoulder MRI scan Shoulder pain Patient Instructions Rotator cuff exercises Rotator cuff - self-care Shoulder surgery - discharge Surgical wound care - open Using your ...

  3. Shoulder Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risk Factors Is shoulder instability the same as shoulder dislocation? No. The signs of dislocation and instability might ... the same to you--weakness and pain. However, dislocation occurs when your shoulder goes completely out of place. The shoulder ligaments ...

  4. Frozen shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a frozen shoulder are: Decreased motion of the shoulder Pain Stiffness Frozen shoulder without any known cause starts ... If you have shoulder pain and stiffness and think you have a frozen shoulder, contact your health care provider for referral and treatment.

  5. Shoulder arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repair; SLAP lesion; Acromioplasty; Bankart repair; Bankart lesion; Shoulder repair; Shoulder surgery; Rotator cuff repair ... their tendons that form a cuff over the shoulder joint. These muscles and tendons hold the arm ...

  6. Shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - shoulder ... The shoulder is the most movable joint in the human body. A group of 4 muscles and their tendons, called the rotator cuff, give the shoulder its wide range of motion. Swelling, damage, or ...

  7. Shoulder MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... finding on an x-ray or bone scan Shoulder pain and fever Decreased motion of the shoulder joint ... of the shoulder joint Shoulder instability Shoulder weakness Shoulder pain and a history of cancer Shoulder pain that ...

  8. Shoulder Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Shoulder Fractures Email to a friend * required fields From * ... can create difficulty with its function. Types of Shoulder Fractures The type of fracture varies by age. ...

  9. Shoulder pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - shoulder ... changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain when lifting the arm above your head or ... The most common cause of shoulder pain occurs when rotator cuff tendons ... The tendons become inflamed or damaged. This condition ...

  10. Shoulder Impingement Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Shoulder Impingement Treatment Page Content Article Body Shoulder impingement ... goals for shoulder impingement. Phases and Goals of Shoulder Impingement Treatment Treating shoulder impingement involves limiting activities ...

  11. Shoulder CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAT scan - shoulder; Computed axial tomography scan - shoulder; Computed tomography scan - shoulder; CT scan - shoulder ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the shoulder area. These are called slices. These images can ...

  12. Painful shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benno Ejnismann

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Many factors can be involved in the painful shoulder. Beyond articularcauses other pathologies such as artrosis, periarticular diseases as rotadorcuff tears, long head of the biceps tendinitis, adhesive capsulitis, calcifyingtendinitis, degenerative arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint, cervicalradiculopathy and nervous injuries can cause pain in the shoulder.

  13. Shoulder Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inflamed tissue or loose cartilage • Repair for recurrent shoulder dislocation Less common procedures such as nerve release, fracture repair, and cyst excision can also be performed using an arthroscope. ... as shoulder replacement, still require open surgery with more extensive ...

  14. Shoulder instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the shoulder, the advantages of range of motion are traded for the disadvantages of vulnerability to injury and the development of instability. Shoulder instability and the lesion it produces represent one of the main causes of shoulder discomfort and pain. Shoulder instability is defined as a symptomatic abnormal motion of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active shoulder motion. Glenohumeral instabilities are classified according to their causative factors as the pathogenesis of instability plays an important role with respect to treatment options: instabilities are classified in traumatic and atraumatic instabilities as part of a multidirectional instability syndrome, and in microtraumatic instabilities. Plain radiographs ('trauma series') are performed to document shoulder dislocation and its successful reposition. Direct MR arthrography is the most important imaging modality for delineation the different injury patterns on the labral-ligamentous complex and bony structures. Monocontrast CT-arthrography with use of multidetector CT scanners may be an alternative imaging modality, however, regarding the younger patient age, MR imaging should be preferred in the diagnostic work-up of shoulder instabilities. (orig.)

  15. Shoulder reflexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise; Krogsgaard, Michael; Voigt, Michael;

    2002-01-01

    long latency (300 ms) excitatory reflex has been found when nerves in the capsule were stimulated electrically during shoulder surgery. In addition, when the anterior-inferior capsule was excited in conscious humans with modest amplitude electrical stimuli during muscle activity, a strong inhibition...... likely that the joint receptors have a more distinct role for the kinaestethic sense than muscle receptors. In cats a direct reflex from the afferents innervating the shoulder to the muscles around the shoulder has been presented. The reflex had an extremely short latency (2.7-3.1 ms). In man, a very...... was found with an average latency of 33 ms. Stimulation of the sensory nerves in the coracoacromial ligament has also been found to modify muscle activity strongly. Even though our understanding of the control of shoulder motion is incomplete, it is clear that sensory inputs can strongly modify muscle...

  16. Shoulder replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are able to return to sports such as golf, swimming, gardening, bowling, and others. Your new shoulder ... important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy , ...

  17. Shoulder Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ibuprofen, for pain. No 11. Do you feel pain when you move your shoulder but there's no swelling or redness? Yes You may have BURSITIS or ROTATOR CUFF SYNDROME. Use an anti-inflammatory medicine, such as ibuprofen, ...

  18. Dislocated shoulder - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulder dislocation - aftercare; Shoulder subluxation - aftercare; Shoulder reduction - aftercare ... You most likely dislocated your shoulder from a sports injury or accident, such as a fall. You have likely injured (stretched or torn) some of the muscles, ...

  19. Shoulder surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    SLAP repair - discharge; Acromioplasty - discharge; Bankart - discharge; Shoulder repair - discharge; Shoulder arthroscopy - discharge ... You had shoulder surgery to repair the tissues inside or around your shoulder joint. The surgeon may have used a tiny ...

  20. Shoulder biomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo, Roberto; Kung, Peter; Ma, C. Benjamin [Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, University of California, San Francisco, 500 Parnassus Avenue, MU 320W-0728 San Francisco, CA 914143 (United States)], E-mail: maben@orthosurg.ucsf.edu

    2008-10-15

    The biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint depend on the interaction of both static and dynamic-stabilizing structures. Static stabilizers include the bony anatomy, negative intra-articular pressure, the glenoid labrum, and the glenohumeral ligaments along with the joint capsule. The dynamic-stabilizing structures include the rotator cuff muscles and the other muscular structures surrounding the shoulder joint. The combined effect of these stabilizers is to support the multiple degrees of motion within the glenohumeral joint. The goal of this article is to review how these structures interact to provide optimal stability and how failure of some of these mechanisms can lead to shoulder joint pathology.

  1. Shoulder instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoulder instability is a common clinical feature leading to recurrent pain and limitated range of motion within the glenohumeral joint. Instability can be due a single traumatic event, general joint laxity or repeated episodes of microtrauma. Differentiation between traumatic and atraumatic forms of shoulder instability requires careful history and a systemic clinical examination. Shoulder laxity has to be differentiated from true instability followed by the clinical assessment of direction and degree of glenohumeral translation. Conventional radiography and CT are used for the diagnosis of bony lesions. MR imaging and MR arthrography help in the detection of soft tissue affection, especially of the glenoid labrum and the capsuloligamentous complex. The most common lesion involving the labrum is the anterior labral tear, associated with capsuloperiostal stripping (Bankart lesion). A number of variants of the Bankart lesion have been described, such as ALPSA, SLAP or HAGL lesions. The purpose of this review is to highlight different forms of shoulder instability and its associated radiological findings with a focus on MR imaging. (orig.)

  2. A Shoulder Health Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, Steven; Conus, Sean; Haltom, Douglas; Hirshorn, Kurt; Pak, Youngju; Vigdorchik, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Shoulder pain and loss of shoulder function are common complaints reported by a variety of patients. This article suggests that shoulder pain and loss of function are directly proportional to lifestyle choices, including smoking and obesity. To investigate possible relationships between lifestyle choices and shoulder health, the authors conducted an online survey combining the Oxford Shoulder Questionnaire, the Shoulder Rating Questionnaire, and the Subjective Shoulder Rating System. Data wer...

  3. Shoulder pain

    OpenAIRE

    Dorinson, S. Malvern

    2010-01-01

    “Topics in Primary Care Medicine” presents articles on common diagnostic or therapeutic problems (such as dizziness, pruritus, insomnia, shoulder pain and urinary tract infections) encountered in primary care practice that generally do not fall into well-defined subspecialty areas and are rarely discussed thoroughly in medical school, house staff training, textbooks and journals. Often the pathophysiology is poorly understood and clinical trials to assess the effectiveness of diagnostic tests...

  4. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by almost ten years, is shoulders. So by definition, the average shoulder-replacement patient is almost ten ... DOUGLAS BOARDMAN III, MD: Exactly. Choices -- selection of primary versus reverse shoulder arthroplasty. 00:51:24 GERALD ...

  5. Dislocated shoulder - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulder dislocation - aftercare; Shoulder subluxation - aftercare; Shoulder reduction - aftercare ... Horn AE, Ufberg JW. Management of common dislocations. In: ... Extremity 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ElsevierMosby; 2011:chap 92.

  6. Shoulder separation - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Separated shoulder - aftercare; Acromioclavicular joint separation - aftercare; A/C separation - aftercare ... Shoulder separation is not an injury to the main shoulder joint itself. It is an injury to ...

  7. Bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation

    OpenAIRE

    Meena, Sanjay; Saini, Pramod; Singh, Vivek; Kumar, Ramakant; Trikha, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    Shoulder dislocations are the most common major joint dislocations encountered in the emergency departments. Bilateral shoulder dislocations are rare and of these, bilateral posterior shoulder dislocations are more prevalent than bilateral anterior shoulder dislocations. Bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation is very rare. We present a case of 24-year-old male who sustained bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation following minor trauma, with associated greater tuberosity fracture on one side...

  8. Milwaukee shoulder syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Somashekar SA

    1991-01-01

    Milwaukee shoulder syndrome or rapid destructive arthritis of the shoulder is a very rare rheumatological condition characterized by the deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals. The figure 1 shows the shoulder image of a 67-year-old female with a history of bilateral shoulder pain and swelling since 2 years and knee pain since 6 months. Physical examination revealed restriction in shoulder movements. No neurological deficit was reported. X-ray of the right shoulder indicated rotator cuff disrup...

  9. Shoulder Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of many common problems. They include sprains, strains, dislocations, separations, tendinitis, bursitis, torn rotator cuffs, frozen shoulder, fractures and arthritis. Usually shoulder problems are treated ...

  10. Floating shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. de Pablo Márquez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available La fractura concomitante de clavícula y escápula es una entidad poco frecuente que puede ser una de las causas de afectación del complejo suspensorio del hombro también denominado hombro flotante (floating shoulder. Se relaciona frecuentemente con traumatismos de alta energía. Presentamos un caso de esta patología en un paciente varón de 28 años que consultó por caída en bicicleta con contusión sobre hombro izquierdo. Se describen las diferentes opciones terapéuticas planteadas, las imágenes radiológicas y una revisión de la literatura.

  11. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by almost ten years, is shoulders. So by definition, the average shoulder-replacement patient is almost ten ... Anatomic Total Shoulder surgery, which featured the latest innovation in shoulder surgery from DePuy Orthopedics. OR-Live ...

  12. Evaluating shoulder instability treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Linde, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder instability common occurs. When treated nonoperatively, the resulting societal costs based on health care utilization and productivity losses are significant. Shoulder function can be evaluated using patient reported outcome measurements (PROMs). For shoulder instability, these include the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI) and the Oxford Shoulder Instability Score (OSIS). When translated and validated for the dutch population, both have good measurment properties. Sco...

  13. Using your shoulder after surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulder surgery - using your shoulder; Shoulder surgery - after ... You had surgery on your shoulder to repair a muscle, tendon, or cartilage tear. The surgeon may have removed damaged tissue. You will need to know how ...

  14. What Are Shoulder Problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tears are severe. Rotator Cuff Disease: Tendinitis and Bursitis In tendinitis of the shoulder, tendons become inflamed ( ... from being pinched by parts around the shoulder. Bursitis occurs when the bursa—a small fluid-filled ...

  15. Frozen shoulder - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shoulder level. Store food in cupboards, drawers, and refrigerator shelves that are between your waist and shoulder level. Get help with housecleaning, taking out the garbage, gardening, and other household tasks.

  16. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 10 ANNOUNCER: DePuy Orthopedics is continually advancing the standard of orthopedic patient care. In a few moments, ... by almost ten years, is shoulders. So by definition, the average shoulder-replacement patient is almost ten ...

  17. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available GLOBAL AP ANATOMIC TOTAL SHOULDER SYSTEM METHODIST HOSPITAL PHILADELPHIA, PA April 17, 2008 00:00:10 ANNOUNCER: ... you'll be able to watch a live global AP anatomic total shoulder surgery from Methodist Hospital ...

  18. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... case of reverse shoulder arthroplasty for cuff deficient arthritis. You should be aware that I helped design ... in the last decade for cuff deficient shoulder arthritis in the United States. The indications are a ...

  19. Inflamed shoulder tendons (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tearing and inflammation of the tendons of the shoulder muscles can occur in sports which require the ... pitching, swimming, and lifting weights. Most often the shoulder will heal if a break is taken from ...

  20. Shoulder Problems in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, William G., Jr.

    A description is given of typical sport-related injuries to the shoulder area. These include: (1) brachial plexus injuries; (2) peripheral nerve injuries about the shoulder; (3) acromioclavicular injuries; (4) sternoclavicular injuries; (5) shoulder dislocations; (6) recurrent traumatic subluxation/dislocations; and (7) overuse injuries.…

  1. "Floating shoulder" injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Kenneth

    2016-12-01

    "Floating shoulder" is a rare injury complex resulting from high-energy blunt force trauma to the shoulder, resulting in scapulothoracic dissociation. It is commonly associated with catastrophic neurovascular injury. Two cases of motorcyclists with floating shoulder injuries are described. PMID:26961729

  2. The painful shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The painful shoulder syndrome is very common. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis may be difficult. Shoulder pain may be caused by local processes or systemic diseases or can be referred. Periarthritis humeroscapularis (frozen shoulder) is the most common cause of painful shoulder syndrome. Biomechanical factors concerning the rotator cuff are involved in the etiopathogenesis of these pain syndromes. The therapy of frozen shoulder includes physical treatment, antirheumatic drugs, or X-ray treatment. Surgical measures may become necessary. In the course of rheumatoid arthritis the shoulder may be involved. Milwaukee-shoulder-syndrome has been described recently in crystal deposit diseases. Shoulder pain may be referred by mechanical irritations of nerve roots in the course of degenerative lesions of the cervical spine and also in the course of internal diseases of the heart, the lungs, or the gastrointestinal tract. In cases of shoulder pain without pathological data from arthrological, radiological or laboratory studies, one should always consider localized fibromyalgia in the shoulder-neck-region. The precise diagnosis of shoulder pain is an important prerequisite for treatment, the success of which should not be judged as pessimistic as it has been commonly done in the past. (orig.)

  3. Shoulder pain in primary care: frozen shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadogan, Angela; Mohammed, Khalid D

    2016-03-01

    BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT Frozen shoulder is a painful condition that follows a protracted clinical course. We aim to review the management of patients with a diagnosis of frozen shoulder who are referred for specialist orthopaedic evaluation against existing guidelines in primary care. ASSESSMENT OF PROBLEM Referrals and clinical records were reviewed for all patients referred for orthopaedic specialist assessment who received a specialist diagnosis of frozen shoulder. Diagnostic, investigation and management practices from a regional primary health care setting in New Zealand were compared with guideline-recommended management. RESULTS Eighty patients with frozen shoulder were referred for orthopaedic evaluation in the 13 month study period, mostly from general practice. Fifteen patients (19%) were identified as having a frozen shoulder in their medical referral. Most (99%) had received previous imaging. Seven patients (12%) had received guideline recommended treatment. STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVEMENT Education of all clinicians involved in patient management is important to ensure an understanding of the long natural history of frozen shoulder and provide reassurance that outcomes are generally excellent. HealthPathways now include more information regarding diagnosis, imaging and evidence-based management for frozen shoulder. LESSONS Frozen shoulder may be under-diagnosed among patients referred for orthopaedic review. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used and may identify occult and unrelated pathology in this age-group. When managed according to clinical guidelines, patients report significant clinical and functional improvement with most reporting 80% function compared with normal after 1 year. KEYWORDS Adhesive capsulitis; bursitis; injections; practice guideline; primary health care; ultrasound. PMID:27477374

  4. US of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty five healty people and 25 patients with shoulder pain underwent US control over a 12-month period: 24 patients with shoulder pain had rotator cuff and/or biceps tendon lesions. The US findings on rotator cuff and biceps tendon lesions are compared with those of arthrography and/or surgery (96% sensitivity). US is rapid, safe, non invasive, inexpensive and often more accurate, and its use is recommended for the routine examination of the shoulder joint insteat of arthrography

  5. Using your shoulder after surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rotator cuff problems Rotator cuff repair Shoulder arthroscopy Shoulder pain Patient Instructions Rotator cuff exercises Rotator cuff - self-care Shoulder surgery - discharge Update Date 11/26/2014 Updated ...

  6. Imaging of dialysis-related amyloid (AB-amyloid) deposits with 131I-beta 2-microglobulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of dialysis-related amyloid (AB-amyloid) has been based usually on clinical and radiological criteria. Following the discovery that beta 2-microglobulin was the major protein of this amyloid, we isolated and radiolabelled uremic plasma beta 2-microglobulin. After intravenous injection, gamma-camera images of selected joint areas were obtained from 42 patients who were on regular hemodialysis therapy. Positive scans involving the shoulder, hip, knee and carpal regions were found in 13 of 14 patients treated for more than 10 years and 10 of 16 patients treated for 5 to 10 years. Patients treated for less time had negative scans. Specificity was indicated by negative scans in non-amyloid inflammatory lesions in control hemodialysis patients. Up to 48-fold tracer enrichment was detected in excised AB-amyloid containing tissue as compared to amyloid-free tissue. These findings suggest that circulating radiolabelled beta 2-microglobulin is taken up by the amyloid deposits. This method may non-invasively detect tissue infiltrates of amyloid. It may also permit prospective evaluation of the efficacy of prophylactic dialysis strategies which are designed to prevent or delay the onset of this complication of long-term dialysis

  7. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anatomic Total Shoulder surgery, which featured the latest innovation in shoulder surgery from DePuy Orthopedics. OR-Live makes it easy for you to learn more. Just click on the "Request Information" button on your webcast screen and open the door to informed medical care. 01:21: ...

  8. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... advancing the standard of orthopedic patient care. In a few moments, you'll be able to watch a live global AP anatomic total shoulder surgery from Methodist Hospital in Philadelphia. A revolution in shoulder orthopedics, the Global AP gives ...

  9. MRI of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging has become available at a time in which shoulder pathology is more frequently seen. It is a noninvasive procedure that does not use ionizing radiation. It provides detailed visualization of soft-tissue structures that is not possible with other imaging modalities. Though not as widely available as conventional radiographs or computed tomography scanning, the number of MRI units worldwide is increasing steadily. The main features of the present book are as follows: The physical basis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), normal shoulder anatomy and MRI, diagnosis of shoulder disorders, MRI of patients with shoulder pain or instability, case studies as well as treatment of shoulder disorders. (orig./MG) With 145 figs

  10. Shoulder instability; Schulterinstabilitaeten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Mainiz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2014-06-15

    In the shoulder, the advantages of range of motion are traded for the disadvantages of vulnerability to injury and the development of instability. Shoulder instability and the lesion it produces represent one of the main causes of shoulder discomfort and pain. Shoulder instability is defined as a symptomatic abnormal motion of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active shoulder motion. Glenohumeral instabilities are classified according to their causative factors as the pathogenesis of instability plays an important role with respect to treatment options: instabilities are classified in traumatic and atraumatic instabilities as part of a multidirectional instability syndrome, and in microtraumatic instabilities. Plain radiographs ('trauma series') are performed to document shoulder dislocation and its successful reposition. Direct MR arthrography is the most important imaging modality for delineation the different injury patterns on the labral-ligamentous complex and bony structures. Monocontrast CT-arthrography with use of multidetector CT scanners may be an alternative imaging modality, however, regarding the younger patient age, MR imaging should be preferred in the diagnostic work-up of shoulder instabilities. (orig.)

  11. The Shoulder Gradient in Patients with Unilateral Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hee-Sang; Lee, Jong Ha; Yun, Dong Hwan; Yun, Jee-Sang; Shin, Yong Won; Chon, Jinmann; Hwang, Dae Gyu

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the shoulder gradient and acromiohumeral interval of both shoulders in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome. Method Using the angulometer, we measured the shoulder gradient in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome in a standing position. Using the radiography, we measured the acromiohumeral interval and the angle between a vertical line and a line connecting a superior angle with an inferior angle of the scap...

  12. Painful/unstable shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the diagnostic performance of CT-arthrography of the painful/unstable shoulder that was evaluated in more than 300 patients. We have encountered a great variety of painful shoulder pathology, including impingement syndrome, cuff tear arthropathy, lesions of the long head of the biceps tendon, calcifying tendinitis, adhesive capsulitis, dead arm syndrome, and degenerative joint disease. Lesions related to instability include cases of capsular avulsions, disruption of the glenohumeral ligaments, labral pathology, glenoid fractures, Hill-Sachs lesions, and changes in glenoid angulation. CT-arthrography is an accurate exploration for both unstable and painful shoulders

  13. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... March 17, 2010 Welcome to this OR Live presentation, brought to you by Zimmer. Hi. I'm ... learn about shoulder replacement. You can do a skills course at the learning center that the academy ...

  14. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with regard to longevity of total shoulders versus hips and knees. 00:46:20 GERALD WILLIAMS, MD: ... is almost ten years younger than the average hip or knee replacement patient. But if you look ...

  15. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... N. DOUGLAS BOARDMAN III, MD: That's an occupational hazard of shoulder surgery. 00:50:53 GERALD WILLIAMS, MD: That's an occupational hazard. I'm going to become disabled at some ...

  16. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... replacement. There are two basic approaches you can use for reverse shoulder replacement. The standard delto-pectoral ... surgery or a deltoid defect because you can use the same incision and repair any deltoid defects ...

  17. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available GLOBAL AP ANATOMIC TOTAL SHOULDER SYSTEM METHODIST HOSPITAL PHILADELPHIA, PA April 17, 2008 00:00:10 ANNOUNCER: DePuy Orthopedics is continually advancing the standard of orthopedic patient care. In a few ...

  18. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MD: This is Doug Boardman from Richmond, Virginia. We're here at Methodist Hospital in Philadelphia, where ... will be performing a total shoulder arthroplasty. Before we go to Dr. Williams, I'd like to ...

  19. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with an intact cuff, we would consider a traditional shoulder replacement. There are two basic approaches you ... less limited with the superior reverse versus the traditional. And I assume the question means the approach: ...

  20. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... reverse shoulder arthroplasty for cuff deficient arthritis. You should be aware that I helped design the system ... the delto- pectoral approach. The three features you should watch for in this video are the things ...

  1. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... do to give yourself a big break as far as glenoid exposure is concerned is to narrow ... for joint replacement in the United States by far, by almost ten years, is shoulders. So by ...

  2. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is tight, in terms of tension? What's your thinking on that? Well, when we originally started doing ... learn about shoulder replacement. You can do a skills course at the learning center that the academy ...

  3. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient is a 78-year-old male who has osteoarthritis of his left shoulder. If you look ... does not have a really big inferior osteophyte. Has a little bit of proximal migration and even ...

  4. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... We had a question with regard to physical therapy after total shoulder arthroplasty: expectations and limitations. 00: ... opposite. We don't -- we do hardly any therapy at all to reverse. With reverse patients, they ...

  5. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to a patient's unique anatomical makeup. Dr. Gerald R. Williams, Jr., a shoulder specialist from the Rothman ... That might help. Could you raise the O.R. table, please? 00:28:35 WOMAN: Can you ...

  6. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 52 N. DOUGLAS BOARDMAN III, MD: That's an occupational hazard of shoulder surgery. 00:50:53 GERALD WILLIAMS, MD: That's an occupational hazard. I'm going to become disabled at ...

  7. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... shoulder arthroplasty. Before we go to Dr. Williams, I'd like to encourage viewers to feel free ... utilizing the buttons on your screen. And now I'll turn it over to Dr. Williams. 00: ...

  8. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you can use for reverse shoulder replacement. The standard delto-pectoral approach, or the superior approach, which ... that are different between a reverse and a standard total is, first of all, we don't ...

  9. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Korea. This patient is a 78-year-old male who has osteoarthritis of his left shoulder. If ... you another example: 40-year-old really muscular male weight lifter. That person's going to go back ...

  10. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pennsylvania, will perform the procedure, as shoulder and elbow reconstruction specialist, Dr. Douglas Boardman III will moderate. ... two weeks and don't do anything except elbow, wrist, and hand activities. At around two weeks, ...

  11. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be performing a total shoulder arthroplasty. Before we go to Dr. Williams, I'd like to encourage ... It's always a question about how deep we go with this osteotomy. I tend to go almost ...

  12. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available GLOBAL AP ANATOMIC TOTAL SHOULDER SYSTEM METHODIST HOSPITAL PHILADELPHIA, PA April 17, 2008 00:00:10 ANNOUNCER: DePuy Orthopedics is continually advancing the standard of orthopedic patient ...

  13. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... WILLIAMS, MD: The patients that have a total shoulder replacement will come in on their first postoperative visit and tell you their pain's gone. The hemi arthroplasty without interposition will come ...

  14. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... option in the last decade for cuff deficient shoulder arthritis in the United States. The indications are a patient with painful arthritis, absent rotator cuff, a less demanding occupation ...

  15. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to longevity of total shoulders versus hips and knees. 00:46:20 GERALD WILLIAMS, MD: Well, obviously, ... ten years younger than the average hip or knee replacement patient. But if you look at the ...

  16. Shoulder Joint Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... en because of implant loosening, wear, infection, and dislocation. When this occurs, a second joint replacement surgery — called a revision surgery — may be necessary. Is Shoulder Joint Replacement for You? The decision to have ...

  17. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here in New York to bring you a video of a recent case of reverse shoulder arthroplasty ... helped design the system that's shown in this video, so I receive royalties and therefore have a ...

  18. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... residents and do receive compensation for that, as well. Now, reverse shoulder arthroplasty is a new option ... t see the neck of the humerus as well, but on the other hand, you have a ...

  19. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... learned that this anterior soft tissue repair is critical for the stability of the implant. And certainly, ... learn about shoulder replacement. You can do a skills course at the learning center that the academy ...

  20. Normal shoulder: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relatively poor spatial resolution has been obtained in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the shoulder because the shoulder can only be placed in the periphery of the magnetic field. The authors have devised an anatomically shaped surface coil that enables MR to demonstrate normal shoulder anatomy in different planes with high spatial resolution. In the axial plane anatomy analogous to that seen on computed tomographic (CT) scans can be demonstrated. Variations in scapular position (produced by patient positioning) may make reproducibility of sagittal and coronal plane images difficult by changing the relationship of the plane to the shoulder anatomy. Oblique planes, for which the angle is chosen from the axial image, have the advantage of easy reproducibility. Obliquely oriented structures and relationships are best seen in oblique plane images and can be evaluated in detail

  1. Systematics of shoulder instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoulder instability is defined as a symptomatic abnormal motion of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active shoulder motion. Glenohumeral instabilities are classified according to the causative factors as the pathogenesis of instability plays an important role with respect to treatment options. Instabilities are classified into traumatic and atraumatic instabilities as part of a multidirectional instability syndrome and into microtraumatic instabilities. For diagnostics plain radiographs (''trauma series'') are performed to document shoulder dislocation and its successful repositioning. Direct magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is the most important imaging modality for delineation of the different injury patterns of the labral-ligamentous complex and bony structures. Monocontrast computed tomography (CT) arthrography with the use of multidetector CT scanners represents an alternative imaging modality; however, MR imaging should be preferred in the work-up of shoulder instabilities due to the mostly younger age of patients. (orig.)

  2. Radiotherapy for shoulder impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Purpose: Up to now, degenerative shoulder diseases were summarized by the term ''periarthritis humeroscapularis''. Actual shoulder diseases can be differentiated etiopathologically according to a primary and secondary impingement syndrome. Narrowing of the subacromial space, which is caused by an osseous shape variant, leads to primary impingement. Secondary impingement develops, when the subacromial space is reduced by swelling tissue below the osseous shoulder roof. This study aimed for the exact diagnosis to indicate therapy and to classify the results according to the Constant score. Patients and Methods: From August 1999 to September 2002, 102 patients with 115 shoulder joint conditions underwent radiation therapy (RT). All joints received two RT series (6 x 0.5 Gy/series) applied in two to three weekly fractions, totaling a dosage of 6.0 Gy (250 kV, 15 mAs, 1-mm Cu filter). The second RT course started 6 weeks after the end of the first. 115 shoulders were examined before RT, 6 weeks after the second RT course and, finally, during the follow-up from January to May 2003. Results: Pain relief was achieved in 94/115 shoulder joints (82%) after 18-month follow-up (median). A significant difference existed between secondary impingement and primary/non-impingement according to response. Tendinosis calcarea, bursitis subdeltoidea, tendovaginitis of the long biceps tendon, and capsulitis adhaesiva responded well to therapy. Conclusion: Shoulder diseases of secondary impingement demonstrate a good response to RT. Less or no benefit was found in primary impingement syndrome or complete rotator cuff disruption and acute shoulder injuries, respectively. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of Shoulder Muscles Activation for Shoulder Abduction between Forward Shoulder Posture and Asymptomatic Persons

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the differences in shoulder muscles activities during shoulder abduction between a forward shoulder posture group and asymptomatic group. [Subjects] Seven males with forward shoulder posture (FHS) and seven asymptomatic males were recruited. [Methods] We measured the upper and middle trapezius (UT and MT), serratus anterior (SA), and clavicle portion of the pectoralis major (cPM) in the right side during shoulder abduction. [Results] The activities of the UT ...

  4. The Painful Shoulder: Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Yousaf; Nagy, Mathias Thomas; Malal, Joby; Waseem, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff disorders are considered to be among the most common causes of shoulder pain and disability encountered in both primary and secondary care. The general pathology of subacromial impingment generally relates to a chronic repetitive process in which the conjoint tendon of the rotator cuff undergoes repetitive compression and micro trauma as it passes under the coracoacromial arch. However acute traumatic injuries may also lead to this condition. Diagnosis remains a clinical one, how...

  5. Using your shoulder after replacement surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joint replacement surgery - using your shoulder; Shoulder replacement surgery - after ... You have had shoulder replacement surgery to replace the bones of your shoulder joint with artificial parts. The parts include a stem made ...

  6. Shoulder impingement syndrome in relation to shoulder intensive work

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, P.; Andersen, J H

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To analyse the risk of shoulder impingement syndrome relative to shoulder intensive work. METHODS: A cross sectional study of a historical cohort of 1591 workers employed between 1986 and 1993 at a slaughterhouse or a chemical factory. Workers not doing tasks in slaughtering or meat processing constituted the reference group. Intensity of shoulder work in meat processing tasks was assessed by video based observations. Information on shoulder disorders was collected by quest...

  7. Shoulder proprioception in baseball pitchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, M R; Borsa, P A; Lephart, S M; Fu, F H; Warner, J J

    2001-01-01

    We examined proprioceptive differences between the dominant and nondominant shoulders of 21 collegiate baseball pitchers without a history of shoulder instability or surgery. A proprioceptive testing device was used to measure kinesthesia and joint position sense. Joint position sense was significantly (P =.05) more accurate in the nondominant shoulder than in the dominant shoulder when starting at 75% of maximal external rotation and moving into internal rotation. There were no significant differences for proprioception in the other measured positions or with kinesthesia testing. Six pitchers with recent shoulder pain had a significant (P =.04) kinesthetic deficit in the symptomatic dominant shoulder compared with the asymptomatic shoulder, as measured in neutral rotation moving into internal rotation. The net effect of training, exercise-induced laxity, and increased external rotation in baseball pitchers does not affect proprioception, although shoulder pain, possibly due to rotator cuff inflammation or tendinitis, is associated with reduced kinesthetic sensation. PMID:11641701

  8. Arthroscopic findings after shoulder dislocation

    OpenAIRE

    Medenica Ivica; Radunović Aleksandar; Madžarac Dragan; Zorić Miodrag; Bokonjić Dubravko; Stojković Bratislav

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aim. Recurrent instability of the shoulder joint is frequently difficult to differentiate from diseased or injured rotator cuff or tendon of the forearm flexor (m. biceps brachii). Shoulder joint arthroscopy has been only recently introduced into instable shoulder joint lesion examination. The aim of this study was to present and analyze an arthroscopic finding on instable shoulder joint in order to determine causes and mechanisms of instability, as well as principles of surgical t...

  9. The Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe; Jakobsen, John; Brorson, Stig;

    2012-01-01

    The Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry (DSR) was established in 2004. Data are reported electronically by the surgeons. Patient-reported outcome is collected 10-14 months postoperatively using the Western Ontario osteoarthritis of the shoulder index (WOOS). 2,137 primary shoulder arthroplasties...

  10. COMPARING EFFECT OF SHOULDER CUFF SUPPORT VERSUS SHOULDER STRAPPING IN PREVENTING POST STROKE SHOULDER PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Parvinder kaur; Shiv Kumar Verma; Ravinder Narwal

    2013-01-01

    Aims and Objectives:The aim of research is to compare the effectiveness of shoulder cuff support versusshoulder strapping.Methodology:A sample of 20 strokesubjects was recruited for the study. The subjectwere randomly dividedin to 2 groups Group A ( shoulder cuff group) and Group B (shoulder strapping group).Pre test assessment was done by Visual analogue scale & pain free range of motion to 900degree. A receivedshoulder cuff and group B received shoulder strapping in their rehabilitation pro...

  11. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... AP ANATOMIC TOTAL SHOULDER SYSTEM METHODIST HOSPITAL PHILADELPHIA, PA April 17, 2008 00:00:10 ANNOUNCER: DePuy ... you don't make a bunch of small passes at the lesser tuberosity and make it a ...

  12. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... April 17, 2008 00:00:10 ANNOUNCER: DePuy Orthopedics is continually advancing the standard of orthopedic patient care. In a few moments, you'll ... Methodist Hospital in Philadelphia. A revolution in shoulder orthopedics, the Global AP gives surgeons a wide array ...

  13. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to longevity of total shoulders versus hips and knees. 00:46:20 GERALD WILLIAMS, MD: Well, obviously, if you look at -- it depends upon who you put them in. First of all, the young-- the youngest patient population for joint replacement in the United States by far, by ...

  14. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from South Korea. This patient is a 78-year-old male who has osteoarthritis of his left shoulder. If ... some pain relief. Give you another example: 40-year-old really muscular male weight lifter. That person's going to go back ...

  15. Exercise and Shoulder Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and disability • Fractures: A break in a bone • Dislocations/subluxations: Complete or partial separation of bones within the joint • Sprains: Stretch/damage to ligaments and connective tissue within the joint • Frozen Shoulder: Stiffness & loss of movement; a tight connective joint ...

  16. Anatomic Total Shoulder System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Erika, she must've left. She got scared. Kevin from DePuy. And we have Dr. Song visiting us from South Korea. This patient is a 78-year-old male who has osteoarthritis of his left shoulder. If you look at his AP view here, what we can see is that he doesn't have quite the ...

  17. Mortality after shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amundsen, Alexander; Rasmussen, Jeppe Vejlgaard; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The primary aim was to quantify the 30-day, 90-day, and 1-year mortality rates after primary shoulder replacement. The secondary aims were to assess the association between mortality and diagnoses and to compare the mortality rate with that of the general population. METHODS: The stud...

  18. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty Zimmer, Inc. New York City, New York March 17, 2010 Welcome to this OR Live presentation, brought to you by Zimmer. Hi. I'm ... my partner, Brad Parsons. We're here in New York to bring you a video of a ...

  19. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a good result, but you also run the risk of getting a very stiff, or a flail shoulder that can't be lifted, although the re-operation rate is low. What's come out the studies by ...

  20. Adhesive Capsulitis (Frozen Shoulder)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reaching: Put things you use every day (shoes, coffee cup, toothbrush) on a high shelf. This way you have to reach up for things more often. The reaching is a good stretch for your shoulder. Do the exercises once or twice a day even after your ...

  1. COMPARING EFFECT OF SHOULDER CUFF SUPPORT VERSUS SHOULDER STRAPPING IN PREVENTING POST STROKE SHOULDER PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvinder kaur

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives:The aim of research is to compare the effectiveness of shoulder cuff support versusshoulder strapping.Methodology:A sample of 20 strokesubjects was recruited for the study. The subjectwere randomly dividedin to 2 groups Group A ( shoulder cuff group and Group B (shoulder strapping group.Pre test assessment was done by Visual analogue scale & pain free range of motion to 900degree. A receivedshoulder cuff and group B received shoulder strapping in their rehabilitation protocol. Both groupwere treatedfor 7 days . on seventh day reading were taken for both groups.Results:Development of pain and restrictionof shoulder range is significantly less in group A- shoulder cuff group as compare to group B -shoulder strappinggroup on 7thtreatment day.Discussion:Use of shoulder cuff support with stroke patients particularly in theearly flaccid stage useful in preventing shoulder pain. Support of the flaccid shoulder early in management canreduce the incidence of subluxation.Strapping would not ensure support to the soft tissueall thetime, and itmay encourage some abnormal synergy pattern.Conclusions:Shoulder cuff support significantly decrease theonsetand intensity of pain in affected upper extremity and prevent restriction of range of motion .ascomparedto shoulder strapping.

  2. Work related shoulder disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Bonde, Jens Peter; Mathiassen, S.E.;

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To determine quantitative exposure-response relations between work with highly elevated arms and supraspinatus tendinitis, shoulder pain with disability, and shoulder pain without disability. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in a historical cohort of 1886 males from three...... occupational groups. Exposure measurements were performed for four consecutive working days in a random sample of 72 currently employed subjects. Individual work histories were obtained by questionnaire and register data. Health status was ascertained by physical examination blinded towards exposure...... and symptoms. Data were analysed by generalised estimating equation and multiple logistic regression with adjustment for potential confounders. Results: For current upper arm elevation above 90°, a duration increment of 1% of the daily working hours was associated with odds ratios of 1.23 (95% CI 1.10 to 1...

  3. Acupuncture Treatment of Shoulder Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Case History Mr. Wen Senting, an Italian of 41 years old, paid his first visit on Mar. 17, 2004, with a chief complaint of the left shoulder pain for over a year. The patient stated that the pain resulted from an injury in his left shoulder one year before while playing the tennis. It was then diagnosed as soft tissue injury of the shoulder. The pain had been alleviated by massage treatment, but it would appear upon tiredness or exposure to cold, and had gradually impaired the shoulder movement. In recent half a year, the pain had gone worse, with obvious motor impairment.

  4. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... al. Course of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation. Neurology. 2007;68:1411-1416. PMID: 17452586 www.ncbi. ...

  5. Fluid collections and juxta-articular cystic lesions of the shoulder: spectrum of MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellado, J.M.; Salvado, E.; Camins, A.; Ramos, A.; Sauri, A. [Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge, Hospital Joan XXIII, Tarragona (Spain); Merino, X. [Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge, Hospital Vall' Ebron, Barcelona (Spain); Calmet, J. [Orthopaedic Surgery, Hospital Joan XXIII, Carrer Doctor Mallafre Guasch, Tarragona (Spain)

    2002-03-01

    The MR imaging features of fluid collections and juxta-articular cystic lesions of the shoulder are discussed, with special focus on those related to subacromial impingement and rotator cuff tears. Other more unusual fluid collections and cystic lesions are described, including rice-bodies bursitis, idiopathic synovial osteochondromatosis, dialysis-related amyloid arthropathy, hemophilic arthropathy, infectious conditions, non-infectious inflammatory arthritis, and paralabral cysts. (orig.)

  6. Fluid collections and juxta-articular cystic lesions of the shoulder: spectrum of MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MR imaging features of fluid collections and juxta-articular cystic lesions of the shoulder are discussed, with special focus on those related to subacromial impingement and rotator cuff tears. Other more unusual fluid collections and cystic lesions are described, including rice-bodies bursitis, idiopathic synovial osteochondromatosis, dialysis-related amyloid arthropathy, hemophilic arthropathy, infectious conditions, non-infectious inflammatory arthritis, and paralabral cysts. (orig.)

  7. Shoulder instability; Schultergelenkinstabilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, J.; Imhof, H. [Abteilung Osteoradiologie, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik Wien (Austria)

    2004-06-01

    Shoulder instability is a common clinical feature leading to recurrent pain and limitated range of motion within the glenohumeral joint. Instability can be due a single traumatic event, general joint laxity or repeated episodes of microtrauma. Differentiation between traumatic and atraumatic forms of shoulder instability requires careful history and a systemic clinical examination. Shoulder laxity has to be differentiated from true instability followed by the clinical assessment of direction and degree of glenohumeral translation. Conventional radiography and CT are used for the diagnosis of bony lesions. MR imaging and MR arthrography help in the detection of soft tissue affection, especially of the glenoid labrum and the capsuloligamentous complex. The most common lesion involving the labrum is the anterior labral tear, associated with capsuloperiostal stripping (Bankart lesion). A number of variants of the Bankart lesion have been described, such as ALPSA, SLAP or HAGL lesions. The purpose of this review is to highlight different forms of shoulder instability and its associated radiological findings with a focus on MR imaging. (orig.) [German] Die Schultergelenkinstabilitaet ist haeufig fuer wiederholt auftretende Schmerzen sowie eine eingeschraenkte Beweglichkeit im Glenohumeralgelenk verantwortlich. Sie kann als Folge eines vorangegangenen Traumas, einer generellen Hyperlaxitaet oder infolge wiederholter Mikrotraumen entstehen. Die Differenzierung zwischen traumatischer und atraumatischer Form der Gelenkinstabilitaet erfordert eine sorgfaeltige Anamnese und eine genaue klinische Untersuchung. Die Gelelenklaxitaet als Differenzialdiagnose muss von der echten Instabilitaet unterschieden werden, die Instabilitaet wird dann im Rahmen des klinischen Status nach Grad und Richtung der glenohumeralen Translation unterteilt. Zur Diagnose knoecherner Laesionen werden das konventionelle Roentgen sowie die CT herangezogen. MRT sowie MR-Arthrographie dienen zur Detektion

  8. Give Someone the Cold Shoulder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程炜

    2002-01-01

    The snowman in this illustration is happy to allow a bird to rest on its cold shoulder.., but that's not what this idiom means.To give someone the cold shoulder is to be un-friendly, usually by ignoring them.

  9. Shoulder joint tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the fact that joint tuberculosis is one of the most common forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, it is a disease entity that is very rare in Poland (less than 100 cases a year in the last 10 years). The symptoms are non-specific, and thus the disease is rarely taken into account in preliminary differential diagnosis. A 68-year-old female patient was admitted to the Internal Diseases Clinic due to oedema and pain of the right shoulder joint. The pain has been increasing for about 8 months. Physical examination revealed increased circumference and elevated temperature of the right shoulder joint. Limb function was retained. The full range of radiological and laboratory diagnostic examinations was performed, including the biopsy of the affected tissue which revealed the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the bacterial culture. Clinical improvement was obtained after introduction of TB drugs. Radiological diagnostic methods (X-ray, CT scans, MRI scans) provide high precision monitoring of articular lesions. However, the decisive diagnosis requires additional laboratory tests as well as histopathological and bacteriological assays

  10. Impact of shoulder complaints after neck dissection on shoulder disability and quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Stuiver, Martijn M.; van Wilgen, Cornelis P.; de Boer, Erlijn M.; de Goede, Cees J. T.; Koolstra, Muriel; van Opzeeland, Anita; Venema, Piet; Sterken, Margriet W.; Vincent, Andrew; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore relationships between shoulder complaints after neck dissection, shoulder disability, and quality of life. To find clinical predictors for mid- to long-term shoulder disability. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Shoulder pain, shoulder mobility, and shoulder droop, as well as scores on shoulder disability questionnaire and RAND-36 (quality of life), were measured at baseline, discharge (T1), and 4 months postoperatively (T2) on 139 patients admitted for ne...

  11. MRI of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-02-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  12. MRI of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  13. Amyloid Fibril Solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S

    2015-11-19

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain-side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding, and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove to be a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general. PMID:26496385

  14. Amyloid Fibril Solubility

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzi, L G

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  15. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the shoulder comes in is a group of muscles behind the shoulder. That group of muscles is known as the scapular stabilizers, and we ... time working very hard to get those shoulder muscles strong so that when that shoulder is in ...

  16. MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates the occurrence, frequency, and significance of increased signal intensity (SI) in the rotator cuff (RC) of normal volunteers suggestive of pathologic findings such as partial tears and tendinitis. Shoulders of 30 volunteers without evidence of prior shoulder disease or trauma were studied. MR imaging at 1.5 T included T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) and T2*-weighted gradient-echo sequences in axial, oblique coronal, and sagittal planes. Shoulders of 30 cadavers were dissected and studied for correlation with MR findings, five of them after MR examination

  17. Ultrasonography of the painful shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thorough knowledge of the normal anatomy was applied in the study of 132 patients with painful shoulder to establish the ultrasonographic findings that indicate the diagnosis of lesions of the rotator cuff of the shoulder (tendentious, tendons degeneration and the different types of fracture) as well as bursitis, lesions of the tendon of the long head of the biceps, joint effusions, lesions of the humeral head, etc. As an initial method of studying painful shoulder using standard plain radiography, this techniques is considered a reliable diagnostic procedure. (Author)

  18. Soft tissue balancing in total shoulder replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Maike; Hoy, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Total shoulder arthroplasty is now capable of recreating near anatomic reproduction of native bony shoulder anatomy, but the function and longevity of anatomic shoulder replacement is dependent on a competent soft tissue envelope and adequate motoring of all musculo-tendinous units about the shoulder. Balancing the soft tissues requires understanding of the anatomy and pathology, as well as technical skills. The advent of reverse shoulder biomechanics has brought with it special requirements ...

  19. Shoulder disorders in the elderly (a hospital study).

    OpenAIRE

    Chard, M D; Hazleman, B L

    1987-01-01

    One hundred acute geriatric inpatients were assessed to investigate the prevalence of shoulder disorders; 21 had symptoms due to shoulder disease. Conditions included supraspinatus tendinitis (five), chronic rotator cuff rupture (seven), frozen shoulder (two), glenohumeral osteoarthritis (two), apatite related shoulder arthritis (one), stroke related shoulder disease (six). (Some patients had more than one shoulder condition.) The last group included painful stiff shoulders (three), glenohume...

  20. Shoulder injuries in overhead sports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overhead sport places great demands on the shoulder joint. Shoulder pain in overhead athletes and throwers can in the majority of cases be attributed to lesions resulting from chronic overuse of tendons and capsuloligamentous structures or to sequels of microinstability and secondary impingement. Due to its great impact on therapeutic decisions, imaging in athletes with unclear shoulder pain is a challenge. In this connection, magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography represents the cross-sectional imaging modality of first choice, as it allows depiction and exclusion of pathologic alterations of all relevant joint structures with sufficient confidence. This article reviews the biomechanical and clinical aspects and MR arthrographic features of the most common shoulder pathologies in overhead athletes, including biceps tendinopathy, superior labral anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions, rotator cuff lesions, as well as extrinsic and intrinsic impingement syndromes. (orig.)

  1. Simultaneous shoulder and elbow dislocation

    OpenAIRE

    Çobanoğlu, Mutlu; Yumrukcal, Feridun; KARATAŞ, Cengiz; Duygun, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Ipsilateral shoulder and elbow dislocation is very rare and only six articles are present in the literature mentioning this kind of a complex injury. With this presentation we aim to emphasise the importance of assessing the adjacent joints in patients with trauma in order not to miss any accompanying pathologies. We report a case of a 43-year-old female patient with ipsilateral right shoulder and elbow dislocation treated conservatively. The patient reported elbow pain when first admitted to...

  2. Management of the frozen shoulder

    OpenAIRE

    van de Laar SM; van der Zwaal P

    2014-01-01

    Suzanne Margaretha van de Laar, Peer van der Zwaal Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Trauma, Medical Center Haaglanden, The Hague, the Netherlands Abstract: Frozen shoulder is a very common condition with a prevalence of 2%–5% in the general population. Decrease in joint volume as a result of fibrosis and hyperplasia of the joint capsule leads to painful and restricted glenohumeral motion. Frozen shoulder is a self-limiting disease with a chronic character, and is mostly treated in...

  3. Management of the frozen shoulder

    OpenAIRE

    van der Zwaal, Peer

    2014-01-01

    Suzanne Margaretha van de Laar, Peer van der Zwaal Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Trauma, Medical Center Haaglanden, The Hague, the Netherlands Abstract: Frozen shoulder is a very common condition with a prevalence of 2%–5% in the general population. Decrease in joint volume as a result of fibrosis and hyperplasia of the joint capsule leads to painful and restricted glenohumeral motion. Frozen shoulder is a self-limiting disease with a chronic character, and is mostly treate...

  4. Arthroscopic findings after shoulder dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medenica Ivica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Recurrent instability of the shoulder joint is frequently difficult to differentiate from diseased or injured rotator cuff or tendon of the forearm flexor (m. biceps brachii. Shoulder joint arthroscopy has been only recently introduced into instable shoulder joint lesion examination. The aim of this study was to present and analyze an arthroscopic finding on instable shoulder joint in order to determine causes and mechanisms of instability, as well as principles of surgical treatment. Methods. Arthroscopy of the shoulder joint was performed in 158 patients with at least one documented shoulder joint dislocation. These patients were divided into two groups. The group I included the patients with one to three dislocations, while the group II those with more than three dislocations. Preoperative diagnosis was based on anamnestic data and clinical examination using specific tests, and on the diagnosis of shoulder joint using radiography or computed tomography. Results. Out of the total number of the patients 138 (87.34% had injury of the anterior patellar brim, 119 (75.32% had failure of the anterior capsule, 126 (79.75% had compressive cartilage injury of the posterior part of the head of the upper arm bone (Hill-Sachs lesion, 102 (64.56% had insufficiency of glenohumeral tendon, 11 (6.96 had complete cut of the rotator cuff, 23 (14.56% had injury of the posterior patellar brim, 12 (7.59% had injury of the upper anterior-posterior patellar brim (SLAP. Conclusion. According to the obtained results it could be concluded that there is no a unique injury that leads to shoulder joint instability. It is necessary to point out to the significance of anamnesis and clinical examination in making diagnosis. Arthroscopic diagnostics is indicated in clinically unreliable findings as an additional method for determining operative treatment.

  5. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosicka, Iga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type II is a metabolic disease affecting millions of people worldwide. The disease is associated with occurence of insoluble, fibrillar, protein aggregates in islets of Langerhans in the pancreas - islet amyloid. The main constituent of these protein fibers is the human islet...

  6. Frozen shoulder: a sympathetic dystrophy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, L P; Müller, L A; Happ, J; Kerschbaumer, F

    2000-01-01

    Diagnostic and clinical features of the frozen shoulder syndrome and the Sudeck syndrome are similar in many aspects. Radioisotope bone scan shows an increased uptake in affected areas in both diseases, while native radiographs show a progressive demineralisation. Measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) by quantitative digital radiography objectified these local decalcification processes in an early stage of the frozen shoulder syndrome; 10 of 12 patients with primary frozen shoulder had BMD decreases greater 21% in the humeral head of the affected shoulder compared to the non-affected side. In the immobilised control group with degenerative changes of the rotator cuff, calcifying tendinitis and shoulder instability (n = 12) and in the group of healthy probands (n = 20), the difference between the affected and non-affected side (left and right humerus of the healthy probands) was only more than 21% in one case each. There are several references in the literature that assume frozen shoulder to be an algoneurodystrophic process; our observations support this hypothesis, possibly leading to earlier diagnoses and extended therapeutic management. PMID:10653111

  7. Amyloids here, amyloids there…What’s wrong with them?

    OpenAIRE

    Gharibyan, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid formation is inherent property of proteins which under certain circumstances can become a pathologic feature of a group of diseases called amyloidosis. There are about 30 known human amyloidosis and more than 27 identified proteins involved in these pathologies.  Besides these proteins, there are a growing number of proteins non-related to diseases shown to form amyloid-like structures in vitro, which make them excellent tools for studying amyloid formation mechanisms, physicochemical...

  8. Shoulder Injuries in US Astronauts Related to EVA Suit Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuring, Rick; McCulloch, Pat; Van Baalen, Mary; Watson, Richard; Bowen, Steve; Blatt, Terri

    2012-01-01

    There are multiple factors associated with the mechanism of injury that leads to shoulder injury requiring surgical repair. Despite the injury prevention measures taken from the 2003 Shoulder Tiger Team recommendations, shoulder injuries and subsequent shoulder surgeries remain relatively unchanged.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of dialysis-related amyloidosis of the shoulder and hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of MRI in identifying abnormalities of the periarticular structures in patients with symptoms of dialysis-related amyloid arthropathy. Design and patients. MR images of shoulders and hips in 5 dialysis patients with symptoms of amyloid arthropathy were compared to images of shoulders and hips in 4 asymptomatic dialysis patients, shoulders in 9 nondialysis patients, and hips in 12 nondialysis patients. These were evaluated for the presence of focal periarticular osseous lesions, tendinous and capsular thickening, and periarticular fluid. Results. Increased thickness of the supraspinatus tendon was found in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Capsular thickening at the hip was present in all symptomatic patients, and in 3 of 8 asymptomatic hips. Joint and bursal fluid was common in the symptomatic group, and was present in some asymptomatic individuals. Osseous lesions were detected in the absence of plain film findings, and demonstrated variable signal intensity. Conclusions. MRI is useful in detecting signs of dialysis-related amyloidosis. Findings of a milder degree in asymptomatic dialysis patients suggests that MRI may also be valuable in the early diagnosis of this syndrome. (orig.)

  10. Simultaneous shoulder and elbow dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çobanoğlu, Mutlu; Yumrukcal, Feridun; Karataş, Cengiz; Duygun, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Ipsilateral shoulder and elbow dislocation is very rare and only six articles are present in the literature mentioning this kind of a complex injury. With this presentation we aim to emphasise the importance of assessing the adjacent joints in patients with trauma in order not to miss any accompanying pathologies. We report a case of a 43-year-old female patient with ipsilateral right shoulder and elbow dislocation treated conservatively. The patient reported elbow pain when first admitted to emergency service but she was diagnosed with simultaneous ipsilateral shoulder and elbow injury and treated conservatively. As a more painful pathology may mask the additional ones, one should hasten to help before performing a complete evaluation. Any harm caused to the patient due to this reason would not be a complication but a malpractice. PMID:24859563

  11. MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (1.5-T unit) was performed in over 600 shoulders to evaluate shoulder pain. Ultrasound (US) and arthrography were performed in over 100 patients. Surgery was performed in over 75 patients. MR imaging offers information not well evaluated with other modalities, including bony impingement, tendinitis, bursitis, and osseous abnormalities, such as primary arthritis, avascular necrosis, occult fractures, and tumors. US and MR findings correlate well with surgical findings for medium to large rotator cuff tears. MR imaging with T2 weighting is superior for differentiating small tears from associated tendinitis. An algorithm for cost-effective shoulder imaging integrating US, MR imaging, arthrography, and computed tomographic arthrography are presented

  12. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here. This is a pretty restrictive harness that athletes wear. And you can see that it wraps ... stiff shoulder. And a stiff shoulder for an athlete isn't exactly a great thing. So, I ...

  13. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... shoulder – how do you approach those two as far as treatment recommendations and your expectations for success ... it holds the shoulder from going up too far into that risky position, or too far back ...

  14. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 13:23 Now we're moving into the space between that ball and cup that Joe so… ... glenoid socket for the shoulder. There's a wide space in this boy's shoulder, which is partially due ...

  15. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that when that shoulder is in that at risk position…The shoulder's pretty darn stable down here ... do this procedure without putting the patient at risk? Is it a question of seeing one, assisting ...

  16. Heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersgaard-Andersen, P.; Frich, Lars Henrik; Sjøbjerg, J.O.;

    1989-01-01

    the glenohumeral and/or the glenoacromial space. There was no correlation between shoulder pain and the development of ossification. Shoulders with grade III heterotopic bone formation had a limited range of active elevation compared with shoulders without or with only a milder lesion. Men and......The incidence and location of heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty were evaluated in 58 Neer Mark-II total shoulder replacements. One year after surgery, 45% had developed some ectopic ossification. In six shoulders (10%) the ossifications roentgenographically bridged...... patients with osteoarthritis of the shoulder joint were significantly disposed to the development of heterotopic bone. Heterotopic bone formation following total shoulder arthroplasty is frequent, but disabling heterotopic ossifications seem to be rare....

  17. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... So there are two of what we call plastic cannulas that actually go into the shoulder and ... of the shoulder joints we have several different plastic cannulas that we used, as I mentioned, to ...

  18. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... type device that utilizes tiny one quarter inch holes around the shoulder joint in order to tighten ... we're trying to do is establish other holes in the shoulder to actually work through. So ...

  19. Painful Shoulder in Swimmers: A Diagnostic Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, William C.

    1986-01-01

    This article discusses the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of painful shoulder in swimmers, including: regional problems that can cause shoulder pain; physical, clinical, and laboratory tests for diagnostic use; and approaches to management of the problem. (Author/CB)

  20. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... what we hear in a patient that has disability from an unstable shoulder. And I think we' ... inside of the shoulder joint with quite good visual acuity. We can really tell with great detail ...

  1. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the glenoid socket for the shoulder. There's a wide space in this boy's shoulder, which is partially ... the cartilage that are torn, but also the wide spaces due to the fact that the ligaments ...

  2. An investigation of shoulder forces in active shoulder tackles in rugby union football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Juliana; McIntosh, Andrew S; Fréchède, Bertrand

    2011-11-01

    In rugby union football the tackle is the most frequently executed skill and one most associated with injury, including shoulder injury to the tackler. Despite the importance of the tackle, little is known about the magnitude of shoulder forces in the tackle and influencing factors. The objectives of the study were to measure the shoulder force in the tackle, as well as the effects of shoulder padding, skill level, side of body, player size, and experimental setting on shoulder force. Experiments were conducted in laboratory and field settings using a repeated measures design. Thirty-five participants were recruited to the laboratory and 98 to the field setting. All were male aged over 18 years with rugby experience. The maximum force applied to the shoulder in an active shoulder tackle was measured with a custom built forceplate incorporated into a 45 kg tackle bag. The overall average maximum shoulder force was 1660 N in the laboratory and 1997 N in the field. This difference was significant. The shoulder force for tackling without shoulder pads was 1684 N compared to 1635 N with shoulder pads. There was no difference between the shoulder forces on the dominant and non-dominant sides. Shoulder force reduced with tackle repetition. No relationship was observed between player skill level and size. A substantial force can be applied to the shoulder and to an opponent in the tackle. This force is within the shoulder's injury tolerance range and is unaffected by shoulder pads. PMID:21689986

  3. 21 CFR 888.3690 - Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... uncemented prosthesis. 888.3690 Section 888.3690 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint humeral (hemi-shoulder) metallic uncemented prosthesis is a device made of alloys, such as...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3680 - Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cemented prosthesis. 888.3680 Section 888.3680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A shoulder joint glenoid (hemi-shoulder) metallic cemented prosthesis is a device that has a glenoid (socket)...

  5. Shoulder arthography in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoulder arthrography in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is performed to differentiate between a rheumatoid flare and limitation of motion secondary to tear in the rotator cuff. Accurate diagnosis is important because of the therapeutic implications. The arthrographic findings characteristic of rheumatoid involvement of the shoulder joint are nodular filling defects of the joint, the subacromial and subdeltoideal bursa in case of rotator cuff tear, irregular capsular attachment, contracted joint space and visualized lymphatic drainage. A dilatation of the biceps tendon sheath has not been shown. (orig.)

  6. The arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main reason for making an arthrography of the shoulder is to confirm, or exclude, a rupture of the rotator cuff. In the years 1978 to 1987, 650 arthrographies of the shoulder joint have been made in the radiological center of Freiburg University, Department for X-ray diagnostics, and in 75.1% of the cases the reason was clinically suspected rupture of the rotator cuff. In 74 cases, (i.e. 11.4%), surgical treatment was confirmed to be necessary by the arthrography. (orig./GDG)

  7. 49 CFR 572.184 - Shoulder assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shoulder assembly. 572.184 Section 572.184... Dummy, 50th Percentile Adult Male § 572.184 Shoulder assembly. (a) The shoulder (175-3000) is part of the body assembly shown in drawing 175-0000. When subjected to impact tests specified in paragraph...

  8. Periarthritis of the shoulder-MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Mako; Nomura, Kazutoshi; Hashimoto, Noburo; Fukumoto, Tetsuya; Oshima, Suguru; Katahira, Kazuhiro [Kumamoto National Hospital (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    We examined MRI findings in patients with periarthritis of the shoulder. We excluded cuff tears, calcified tendinitis, instability of the shoulder, fracture and impingement syndrome of young patients. Subjects comprised 36 cases, 38 shoulders (25 men and 11 women), with an average age of 59.1 years (42-75). Scanning was performed on a Gyroscan T5-II 0.5-T (Philips). T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal oblique plane, T2-weighted sequences in the coronal sagittal plane and horizontal plane were taken. Twelve shoulders showed some change in the humeral heads. Degeneration of the rotator cuff was observed in 15 shoulders. Joint fluid collection was observed in the gleno-humeral joints of 15 shoulders, in the subacromial bursa of 11 shoulders and in the acromio-clavicular joints of 7 shoulders. Twenty four shoulders had fluid collection in the sheath of the long head of the biceps long tendon. Localized high signal area was observed around the inferior pouch in 11 shoulders. We studied the relationship between MRI findings and clinical symptoms. There was no significant relationship but the shoulders with night pain and severe contractures had a higher positive rate of joint fluid collection on MRI than the shoulders without night pain and with less contractures. (author)

  9. Periarthritis of the shoulder-MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined MRI findings in patients with periarthritis of the shoulder. We excluded cuff tears, calcified tendinitis, instability of the shoulder, fracture and impingement syndrome of young patients. Subjects comprised 36 cases, 38 shoulders (25 men and 11 women), with an average age of 59.1 years (42-75). Scanning was performed on a Gyroscan T5-II 0.5-T (Philips). T1-weighted and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal oblique plane, T2-weighted sequences in the coronal sagittal plane and horizontal plane were taken. Twelve shoulders showed some change in the humeral heads. Degeneration of the rotator cuff was observed in 15 shoulders. Joint fluid collection was observed in the gleno-humeral joints of 15 shoulders, in the subacromial bursa of 11 shoulders and in the acromio-clavicular joints of 7 shoulders. Twenty four shoulders had fluid collection in the sheath of the long head of the biceps long tendon. Localized high signal area was observed around the inferior pouch in 11 shoulders. We studied the relationship between MRI findings and clinical symptoms. There was no significant relationship but the shoulders with night pain and severe contractures had a higher positive rate of joint fluid collection on MRI than the shoulders without night pain and with less contractures. (author)

  10. Shoulder Osteoarthritis Treatment (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shoulder to the point of tension but not pain. SHOULDER-STRENTGTHENING EXERCISES — Muscle-toning exercises should be performed ... diagnosis of rotator cuff tears Rotator cuff tendinopathy Shoulder impingement syndrome The following organizations also provide reliable health information. ● ...

  11. Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis Page ( 1 ) One of the most common physical complaints is shoulder pain. Your shoulder is made up of several ... is vulnerable to many different problems. The rotator cuff is a frequent source of pain in the ...

  12. Gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Lawless, Kirby G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gimbaled-shoulder friction stir welding tool includes a pin and first and second annular shoulders coupled to the pin. At least one of the annular shoulders is coupled to the pin for gimbaled motion with respect thereto as the tool is rotated by a friction stir welding apparatus.

  13. 14 CFR 91.521 - Shoulder harness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shoulder harness. 91.521 Section 91.521... Airplanes and Fractional Ownership Program Aircraft § 91.521 Shoulder harness. (a) No person may operate a... seat at a flight deck station with a combined safety belt and shoulder harness that meets...

  14. Musculoskeletal amyloid disease: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of arthropathy and soft tissue masses due to amyloid deposition in a patient with myeloma is reported. The radiologic and magnetic resonance findings of musculoskeletal amyloidosis are described. The amyloid masses show heterogeneous signal intensity, with a signal lower than muscle and intermingled areas of marked hyperintensity on T 2-weighted images. (authors). 7 refs., 2 figs

  15. Musculoskeletal amyloid disease: MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Castillo, M.; Guerra, J.L. [Hospital Arquitecto Marcide, Ferrol (Spain); Comesana, L.; Martin, R. [Hospital Arquitecto Marcide, Ferrol (Spain)]|[Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain); Rodriguez, E.; Soler, R. [Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    A case of arthropathy and soft tissue masses due to amyloid deposition in a patient with myeloma is reported. The radiologic and magnetic resonance findings of musculoskeletal amyloidosis are described. The amyloid masses show heterogeneous signal intensity, with a signal lower than muscle and intermingled areas of marked hyperintensity on T 2-weighted images. (authors). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  16. MRI of Little Leaguer's shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MRI appearance of 'Little Leaguer's shoulder' has not been previously reported in the radiology literature. Purported etiologies include proximal humeral epiphyseolysis, osteochondrosis of the proximal humeral epiphysis, stress fracture of the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate, and rotational stress fracture of the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate. We describe magnetic resonance imaging findings in four patients and review the literature. (orig.)

  17. Shoulder pain in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Vassallo, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Case scenario A 65 year old gentleman presented with a 1 week history of pain in the left shoulder. Pain started after spending 2 days painting his house. He was taking paracetamol regularly yet it only gave him minor relief. On examination he had a painful arch and was tender under the acromium.

  18. MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: MR arthrography is a minimal invasive method, where first contrast media (CM) is applied intraarticular under fluoroscopic guidance and then MR examination is performed. the well-distended joint and the CM entering through the damaged structures enhance greatly the diagnostic capabilities of the method. Learning objectives: to present the technical aspects of performing MR arthrography of the shoulder; to outline the advantages and indications of the method; to demonstrate the normal variants and some of the most common pathological findings seen on MR arthrography of the shoulder. The shoulder joint pathologies are very heterogeneous in nature. Rotatory cuff and labral tears present major portion of the pathology seen in athletes and elderly people with degenerative changes. MR arthrography significantly improves the depiction of complete and partial tears of the rotatory cuff and damages to the capsular ligamentous complex and the glenoid labrum. The method also helps differentiating some normal variants from traumatic injuries. MR arthrography is affirming as golden standard for the investigation of patients with shoulder instability and surpasses conventional MRI examination in the diagnosis of partial rotatory cuff tears and labral tears

  19. [Classification of periprosthetic shoulder fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhoff, C; Kirchhoff, S; Biberthaler, P

    2016-04-01

    The key targets in the treatment of periprosthetic humeral fractures (PHF) are the preservation of bone, successful bony consolidation and provision of a stable anchoring of the prosthesis with the major goal of restoring the shoulder-arm function. A substantial problem of periprosthetic shoulder fractures is the fact that treatment is determined not only by the fracture itself but also by the implanted prosthesis and its function. Consequently, the exact preoperative shoulder function and, in the case of an implanted anatomical prosthesis, the status and function of the rotator cuff need to be assessed in order to clarify the possibility of a secondarily occurring malfunction. Of equal importance in this context is the type of implanted prosthesis. The existing classification systems of Wright and Cofield, Campbell et al., Groh et al. and Worland et al. have several drawbacks from a shoulder surgeon's point of view, such as a missing reference to the great variability of the available prostheses and the lack of an evaluation of rotator cuff function. The presented 6‑stage classification for the evaluation of periprosthetic fractures of the shoulder can be considered just as simple or complex to understand as the classification of the working group for osteosynthesis problems (AO, Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen), depending on the viewpoint. From our point of view the classification presented here encompasses the essential points of the existing classification systems and also covers the otherwise missing points, which should be considered in the assessment of such periprosthetic fractures. The classification presented here should provide helpful assistance in the daily routine to find the most convenient form of therapy. PMID:26992712

  20. Acute Shoulder Injuries in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monica, James; Vredenburgh, Zachary; Korsh, Jeremy; Gatt, Charles

    2016-07-15

    Acute shoulder injuries in adults are often initially managed by family physicians. Common acute shoulder injuries include acromioclavicular joint injuries, clavicle fractures, glenohumeral dislocations, proximal humerus fractures, and rotator cuff tears. Acromioclavicular joint injuries and clavicle fractures mostly occur in young adults as the result of a sports injury or direct trauma. Most nondisplaced or minimally displaced injuries can be treated conservatively. Treatment includes pain management, short-term use of a sling for comfort, and physical therapy as needed. Glenohumeral dislocations can result from contact sports, falls, bicycle accidents, and similar high-impact trauma. Patients will usually hold the affected arm in their contralateral hand and have pain with motion and decreased motion at the shoulder. Physical findings may include a palpable humeral head in the axilla or a dimple inferior to the acromion laterally. Reduction maneuvers usually require intra-articular lidocaine or intravenous analgesia. Proximal humerus fractures often occur in older patients after a low-energy fall. Radiography of the shoulder should include a true anteroposterior view of the glenoid, scapular Y view, and axillary view. Most of these fractures can be managed nonoperatively, using a sling, early range-of-motion exercises, and strength training. Rotator cuff tears can cause difficulty with overhead activities or pain that awakens the patient from sleep. On physical examination, patients may be unable to hold the affected arm in an elevated position. It is important to recognize the sometimes subtle signs and symptoms of acute shoulder injuries to ensure proper management and timely referral if necessary. PMID:27419328

  1. Management of the frozen shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Laar SM

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Suzanne Margaretha van de Laar, Peer van der Zwaal Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Trauma, Medical Center Haaglanden, The Hague, the Netherlands Abstract: Frozen shoulder is a very common condition with a prevalence of 2%–5% in the general population. Decrease in joint volume as a result of fibrosis and hyperplasia of the joint capsule leads to painful and restricted glenohumeral motion. Frozen shoulder is a self-limiting disease with a chronic character, and is mostly treated in a primary care setting. In this review, we set out to address the current evidence-based literature on management of this disabling disease using a PubMed search. Many non-surgical and surgical therapeutic options are described, including supervised neglect, intra-articular corticosteroid injections, physical therapy, manipulation under anesthesia, capsular distension, and arthroscopic capsular release. In the literature, the long-term outcome shows a significant decrease in pain and improvement of shoulder function for all treatment modalities without clear evidence of superiority of one over the other. This possibly indicates that a self-limiting character is the most important factor in the course of the disease. Management of frozen shoulder is primarily conservative. Supervised neglect is combined with analgesia and stretching exercises as the pain subsides. In the early painful phase, intra-articular corticosteroid injections are recommended for pain relief. When the patient has persistent pain and glenohumeral stiffness after adequate conservative treatment, invasive options can be considered, like arthroscopic capsular release, manipulation under anesthesia, or capsular distension. Keywords: frozen shoulder, adhesive capsulitis, treatment, pathophysiology

  2. Serum amyloid P component scintigraphy in familial amyloid polyneuropathy: regression of visceral amyloid following liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) associated with transthyretin (TTR) mutations is the commonest type of hereditary amyloidosis. Plasma TTR is produced almost exclusively in the liver and orthotopic liver transplantation is the only available treatment, although the clinical outcome varies. Serum amyloid P component (SAP) scintigraphy is a method for identifying and quantitatively monitoring amyloid deposits in vivo, but it has not previously been used to study the outcome of visceral amyloid deposits in FAP following liver transplantation. Whole body scintigraphy following injection of iodine-123 labelled SAP was performed in 17 patients with FAP associated with TTR Met30 and in five asymptomatic gene carriers. Follow-up studies were performed in ten patients, eight of whom had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation 1-5 years beforehand. There was abnormal uptake of 123I-SAP in all FAP patients, including the kidneys in each case, the spleen in five cases and the adrenal glands in three cases. Renal amyloid deposits were also present in three of the asymptomatic carriers. Follow-up studies 1-5 years after liver transplantation showed that there had been substantial regression of the visceral amyloid deposits in two patients and modest improvement in three cases. The amyloid deposits were unchanged in two patients. In conclusion, 123I-SAP scintigraphy identified unsuspected visceral amyloid in each patient with FAP due to TTR Met30. The universal presence of renal amyloid probably underlies the high frequency of renal failure that occurs in FAP following liver transplantation. The variable capacity of patients to mobilise amyloid deposits following liver transplantation may contribute to their long-term clinical outcome. (orig.)

  3. Shoulder impingement syndrome: MR findings in 53 shoulders

    OpenAIRE

    Seeger, LL; Gold, RH; Bassett, LW; Ellman, H

    1988-01-01

    The shoulder impingement syndrome refers to a condition in which the supraspinatus tendon and subacromial bursa are chronically entrapped between the humeral head inferiorly and either the anterior acromion itself, spurs of the anterior acromion or acromioclavicular joint, or the coracoacromial ligament superiorly. As a result, the space for the bursa and tendon is reduced, and repeated trauma to these structures leads to burstitis and rotator cuff injury. Although pain and limitation of moti...

  4. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impingement syndrome is a clinical entity characterized by shoulder pain due to primary or secondary mechanical irritation of the rotator cuff. The primary factors for the development of impingement are a curved or hook-shaped anterior acromion as well as subacromial osteophytes, which may lead to tearing of the supraspinatus tendon. Secondary impingement is mainly caused by calcific tendinopathy, glenohumeral instability, os acromiale and degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint. Conventional radiographs are initially obtained, mainly for evaluation of the bony structures of the shoulder. If available, sonography can be used for detection of lesions and tears of the rotator cuff. Finally, MR-imaging provides detailed information about the relationship of the acromion and the acromioclavicular joint to the rotator cuff itself. In many cases however, no morphologic cause for impingement syndrome can be found. While patients are initially treated conservatively, chronic disease usually requires surgical intervention. (orig.)

  5. The nerves around the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan

  6. Diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical and imaging findings in shoulder impingement syndrome. Different stages of impingement syndrome are described. Stage I relates to edema and hemorrhage of the supraspinatus tendon. Stage II is characterized by bursal inflammation and fibrosis, as well as tendinopathy. In stage III there is a tear of the rotator cuff. Clinical signs many overlap. Moreover, calcifying tendinitis, fractures and pain originating from the cervical spine may mimic shoulder impingement syndrome. Imaging is important for the exact diagnosis. Standard radiographs are the basis of imaging in shoulder impingement syndrome. They may demonstrate subchondral sclerosis of the major tuberosity, subacromial spurs, and form anomalies of the acromion. They are also important in the differential diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome and demonstrate calcifying tendinitis, fractures and neoplasm. Ultrasonography has found acceptance as a screening tool and even as a final diagnostic method by many authors. However, there is a high interobserver variability in the demonstration of rotator cuff tears. Its usefulness has therefore been questioned. MR imaging is probably the method of choice in the evaluation of the rotator cuff and surrounding structures. Several investigations have demonstrated that differentiation of early findings, such as tendinopathy versus partial tears, may be difficult with MR imaging. However, reproducibility for fullthickness tears appears to be higher than for sonography. Moreover, specificity appears to be superior to sonography. MR arthrography is not universally accepted. However, it allows for more exact differentiation of discrete findings and may be indicated in preoperative planning. Standard arthrography and CT have a limited role in the current assessment of the rotator cuff. (orig.)

  7. Lessons learnt from the painful shoulder; a case series of malignant shoulder girdle tumours misdiagnosed as frozen shoulder

    OpenAIRE

    Quan, Gerald MY; Carr, Derek; Schlicht, Steven; Powell, Gerard; Choong, Peter FM

    2005-01-01

    Adhesive capsulitis or frozen shoulder is a common condition characterized by shoulder pain and stiffness. In patients in whom conservative measures have failed, more invasive interventions such as arthrographic or arthroscopic distension can be very effective in relieving symptoms and improving range of movement. However, absolute contraindications to these procedures include the presence of neoplasia around the shoulder girdle. We present five cases referred to our institution where the dia...

  8. Kinematics of chiropteran shoulder girdle in flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyutina, A A; Kuznetsov, A N; Korzun, L P

    2013-03-01

    New data on the mechanisms of movements of the shoulder girdle and humerus of bats are described; potential mobility is compared to the movements actually used in flight. The study was performed on the basis of morphological and functional analysis of anatomical specimens of 15 species, high speed and high definition filming of two species and X-ray survey of Rousettus aegyptiacus flight. Our observations indicate that any excursions of the shoulder girdle in bats have relatively small input in the wing amplitude. Shoulder girdle movements resemble kinematics of a crank mechanism: clavicle plays the role of crank, and scapula-the role of connecting rod. Previously described osseous "locking mechanisms" in shoulder joint of advanced bats do not affect the movements, actually used in flight. The wing beats in bats are performed predominantly by movements of humerus relative to shoulder girdle, although these movements occupy the caudal-most sector of available shoulder mobility. PMID:23381941

  9. FROZEN SHOULDER TREATMENT: TRIAMCENALONE OR METHYLPREDNISOLONE INJECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjib; Prabin Ch

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of Triamcinolone acetonide [40mg] and Methylprednisolone acetate [40mg] in 210 patients attending the Outpatient Department of Orthopedics of FAAMCH Barpeta with primary and secondary frozen shoulder. METHODS: A total number o f 210 patients with frozen shoulder who attended the Outpatient clinic of Orthopedics at FAAMCH from Jan 2013 to Jan 2015 were enrolled in our study. The diagnosis of frozen shoulder was made using...

  10. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta)

    OpenAIRE

    Hakan Cift; Salih Soylemez; Murat Demiroglu; Korhan Ozkan; Vahit Emre Ozden; Ozkut, Afsar T.

    2015-01-01

    Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients’ ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients’ reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitat...

  11. Gimballed Shoulders for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Robert; Lawless, Kirby

    2008-01-01

    In a proposed improvement of tooling for friction stir welding, gimballed shoulders would supplant shoulders that, heretofore, have been fixedly aligned with pins. The proposal is especially relevant to self-reacting friction stir welding. Some definitions of terms, recapitulated from related prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, are prerequisite to a meaningful description of the proposed improvement. In friction stir welding, one uses a tool that includes (1) a rotating shoulder on top (or front) of the workpiece and (2) a pin that rotates with the shoulder and protrudes from the shoulder into the depth of the workpiece. In conventional friction stir welding, the main axial force exerted by the tool on the workpiece is reacted through a ridged backing anvil under (behind) the workpiece. When conventional friction stir welding is augmented with an auto-adjustable pin-tool (APT) capability, the depth of penetration of the pin into the workpiece is varied in real time by a position- or forcecontrol system that extends or retracts the pin as needed to obtain the desired effect. In self-reacting (also known as self-reacted) friction stir welding as practiced heretofore, there are two shoulders: one on top (or front) and one on the bottom (or back) of the workpiece. In this case, a threaded shaft protrudes from the tip of the pin to beyond the back surface of the workpiece. The back shoulder is held axially in place against tension by a nut on the threaded shaft. Both shoulders rotate with the pin and remain aligned coaxially with the pin. The main axial force exerted on the workpiece by the tool and front shoulder is reacted through the back shoulder and the threaded shaft into the friction-stir-welding machine head, so that a backing anvil is no longer needed. A key transmits torque between the bottom shoulder and the threaded shaft, so that the bottom shoulder rotates with the shaft. This concludes the prerequisite definitions of terms.

  12. Shoulder Injury Incidence Rates in NASA Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Mitzi S.; Murray, Jocelyn D.; Foy, Millennia; Wear, Mary L.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the astronaut shoulder injury rates began with an operational concern at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) training. An astronaut suffered a shoulder injury during an NBL training run and commented that it was possibly due to a hardware issue. During the subsequent investigation, questions arose regarding the rate of shoulder injuries in recent years and over the entire history of the astronaut corps.

  13. Posterior shoulder tightness and rotator cuff strength assessments in painful shoulders of amateur tennis players

    OpenAIRE

    Marcondes, Freddy B.; Julio F. Jesus; Flavio F. Bryk; Vasconcelos, Rodrigo A.; Thiago Y. Fukuda

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown a relationship between shoulder posterior capsule tightness and shoulder pain in overhead athletes. However, this relationship has not been studied in tennis players. OBJECTIVES: Assessment of the shoulder range of motion (ROM), strength and posterior capsule tightness of skilled amateur tennis players who had complaints of dominant shoulder pain in comparison with tennis players without pain. METHOD: Forty-nine skilled amateur tennis players we...

  14. Reducing Shoulder by Vertical Traction: A One-Man Method for Shoulder Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Hayat Ahmad Khan; Younis Kamal; Mohammad Ashraf Khan; Munir Farooq; Naseemul Gani; Nazia Hassan; Adil Bashir Shah; Mohammad Shahid Bhat

    2016-01-01

    Fifty percent of joint dislocations reported to the emergency department are of shoulder joint. Various techniques are used to reduce the shoulder and Spaso technique is the least known to the orthopaedic residents which is a simple one-man vertical traction method of shoulder reduction. We evaluated the effectiveness of vertical traction method for anterior shoulder dislocation by orthopaedic residents. Sixty consecutive patients of anterior glenohumeral dislocation attending the emergency d...

  15. Shoulder distention arthrography as a treatment modality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    18 patients with painful stiff shoulder joint were underwent shoulder distension arthrography as a treatment modality, followed by physical therapy. Range of motion of shoulder joint was evaluated at 1 week and 4 weeks after arthrography. The results were as follows; 1. Arthrographic findings were decreased volume of joint cavity, obliteration of axillary recess, small subscapularis bursa, serrated capsular margin and non-filling of biceps tendon sheath. In 3 cases, rotator cuff tear was found. 2. Range of motion of shoulder joint was improved after distension arthrography. 3. In 3 patients have rotator cuff tear, range of motion was not improved

  16. FROZEN SHOULDER TREATMENT: TRIAMCENALONE OR METHYLPREDNISOLONE INJECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of Triamcinolone acetonide [40mg] and Methylprednisolone acetate [40mg] in 210 patients attending the Outpatient Department of Orthopedics of FAAMCH Barpeta with primary and secondary frozen shoulder. METHODS: A total number o f 210 patients with frozen shoulder who attended the Outpatient clinic of Orthopedics at FAAMCH from Jan 2013 to Jan 2015 were enrolled in our study. The diagnosis of frozen shoulder was made using the guidelines for shoulder complain issued by the Dutch C ollege of General Practitioners. Intra - articular injections of Triamcinolone acetonide [40mg] was used in 110 patients [ M ale - 50, female - 60] and 40mg Methylprednisolone was given to 100 patients [M ale - 35, female 65]. Injection was repeated every 3 weeks [ N o t more than 3 injections] by the posterior route. RESULTS: Triamcinolone acetonide was found to be more effective in diabetic patients with frozen shoulder in comparison to Methyprednisolone acetate. Triamcinolone acetonide was found to be more effective i n those patients presenting with severe grades of frozen shoulder and also these patients required lesser number of injections compared to Methylprednisolone acetate. However both Triamcinolone acatonide and Methyprednisolone were equally effective in prim ary frozen shoulder. CONCLUSION: We conclude that Triamcinolone acetonide and Methylprednisolone acetate are effective in the treatment of painful stiff shoulder; however injection Triamcinolone acetonide is a superior alternative in the treatment of diabe tics with frozen shoulder & resistant cases, with less number of injections.

  17. Posttraumatic focal dystonia of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileiadis, Georgios I; Sakellariou, Vasileios I; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Zoubos, Aristeides B

    2012-06-01

    Focal posttraumatic shoulder dystonia is a rare and not easily identifiable entity. Its true pathophysiologic nature, predisposing factors, and disease course remain debatable.This article describes a rare case of a 40-year-old man with late symptoms of focal shoulder dystonia after peripheral trauma of his left shoulder girdle. The shoulder was indirectly injured from the impact of a fall off his motorbike 3 years earlier. He was referred to the authors' institution because remarkable reduction of arm abduction, muscle spasms, and circumscribed hypertrophy of the trapezius muscle were noted while his head and neck were in neutral position and had a full range of motion. The left shoulder had a fixed elevated posture compared with the contralateral shoulder. A continuous burning pain was localized over the area of the hypertrophied trapezius muscle, radiating to the ipsilateral side of the head and neck. Dystonic movements of the trapezius, rhomboid, and supraspinatus muscles were observed. The abduction of the shoulder was significantly decreased, and any repetitive effort for arm abduction induced an exaggeration of his movement disorder, leading to a more pronounced shoulder elevation.Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging of the left shoulder revealed a suprascapular tendinitis with no other abnormalities. Repeated needle electromyography of the left trapezius muscle and neurography of the accessory nerve on both sides were normal. Injections of botulinum toxin A were effective in the resolution of muscle hypertrophy and abnormal posture. PMID:22691679

  18. MRI of the pediatric shoulder: nontraumatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an established technique for imaging the shoulder because it demonstrates clearly the articular surfaces, medullary canal and the extra-articular soft tissues which can be affected in shoulder disorders. The value of MR imaging in the evaluation of the traumatized shoulder has been described [1[; however, few cases of MR imaging in nontraumatic disorders in children have been reported. We reviewed the findings in 55 children undergoing MRI of the shoulder for nontraumatic conditions and included selected cases showing a broad range of imaging findings. (orig.). With 11 figs

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of the own method of shoulder examination was presented. Anatomy and the most common diseases of the shoulder are discussed. The diseases of the shoulder diagnosed on the basis of the MR are: rotator cuff disease, impingement syndrome and instability. MR findings occurred in these entities were demonstrated. The most common MR finding of the rotator cuff disease was higher signal intensity within the supraspinatus tendon, while in shoulder instability was labral abnormality. Impingement syndrome is the previous syndrome of the full MR imaging of the rotator cuff disease. (author)

  20. Risk of shoulder tendinitis in relation to shoulder loads in monotonous repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, P.; Bonde, J. P.; Mikkelsen, S.;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies relate the occurrence of shoulder disorders to quantified ergonomic exposures. This study evaluates the hypothesis that shoulder loads in repetitive work might contribute to the occurrence of shoulder tendinitis. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study of 1961 workers in ...

  1. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a

  2. The effect of shoulder supporting banding and shoulder pulling banding using elastic bands on shoulder pain and scapular position of a scapular dyskinesis patient with shoulder depression and scapular downward rotation

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed methods of shoulder supporting banding and shoulder pulling banding using elastic bands for scapular dyskinesis patients with shoulder depression and scapular downward rotation and investigated the effect on shoulder pain and scapular position. [Subject] The subject was a scapular dyskinesis patient with shoulder depression and scapular downward rotation and shoulder pain. [Methods] This study compared the scapular position and upper trapezius pressure pain betw...

  3. Ultrasonography of the equine shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six horses with shoulder injuries were presented in this report with emphasis on the use of ultrasonography vs. radiography in diagnosis. The two imaging modalities represented valuable and complementary diagnostic procedures. Two horses had fracture fragments of the lateral humeral tuberosity, the accurate ultrasonographic findings encouraging clearer radiographic identification by oblique projections. In one horseultrasonography enabled more accurate localization of calcification within the supraspinatus muscle. In the remaining three cases ultrasonography visualized distension of the bicipital bursa due to aseptic bursitis, bursal hemorrhage, or associated with injury of the biceps brachii muscle and the underlying intermediate humeral tubercle, the bony involvement more clearly demonstrated radiographically

  4. Low-Cost Alternative External Rotation Shoulder Brace and Review of Treatment in Acute Shoulder Dislocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacy, Kyle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic dislocations of the shoulder commonly present to emergency departments (EDs. Immediate closed reduction of both anterior and posterior glenohumeral dislocations is recommended and is frequently performed in the ED. Recurrence of dislocation is common, as anteroinferior labral tears (Bankart lesions are present in many anterior shoulder dislocations.14,15,18,23 Immobilization of the shoulder following closed reduction is therefore recommended; previous studies support the use of immobilization with the shoulder in a position of external rotation, for both anterior and posterior shoulder dislocations.7-11,19 In this study, we present a technique for assembling a low-cost external rotation shoulder brace using materials found in most hospitals: cotton roll, stockinette, and shoulder immobilizers. This brace is particularly suited for the uninsured patient, who lacks the financial resources to pay for a pre-fabricated brace out of pocket. We also performed a cost analysis for our low-cost external rotation shoulder brace, and a cost comparison with pre-fabricated brand name braces. At our institution, the total materials cost for our brace was $19.15. The cost of a pre-fabricated shoulder brace at our institution is $150 with markup, which is reimbursed on average at $50.40 according to our hospital billing data. The low-cost external rotation shoulder brace is therefore a more affordable option for the uninsured patient presenting with acute shoulder dislocation. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:114–120.

  5. Shoulder deformities from obstetrical brachial plexus paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abnormalities are described in the shoulders of 11 patients up to 17 years of age who have chronic brachial plexus paralyses from birth injuries. These abnormalities include a poorly formed and hypoplastic humeral head, a short abnormally formed clavicle, and a hypoplastic elevated scapula with a shallow glenoid fossa, inferiorly directed coracoid process, and abnormally tapered acromion. Four also had subluxated shoulders. (orig.)

  6. Avoiding Shoulder Injury from Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durall, Chris J.; Manske, Robert C.; Davies, George J.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies shoulder exercises commonly performed in fitness centers that may contribute to or exacerbate glenohumeral joint (shoulder) injury, describing alternative exercises that may be substituted and a offering rationale for the variations. The article focuses on anterior and posterior glenohumeral instability, subacromial impingement (primary…

  7. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... strength of the shoulder comes in is a group of muscles behind the shoulder. That group of muscles is known as the scapular stabilizers, ... actually, the rotator cuff is one in the group of muscles that we strengthened that give the ...

  8. Concept of healing of recurrent shoulder dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Donato

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the main surgical techniques applied in the treatment of anterior recurrent shoulder dislocation, aiming the achievement of the normality of articulate movements. This was obtained by combining distinct surgical procedures, which allowed the recovery of a complete functional capacity of the shoulder, without jeopardizing the normality of movement, something that has not been recorded in the case of the tense sutures of the surgical procedures of Putti-Platt, Bankart, Latarjet, Dickson-O'Dell and others. The careful review of the methods applied supports the conclusion that recurrent shoulder dislocation can be cured, since cure has been obtained in 97% of the treated cases. However, some degree of limitation in the shoulder movement has been observed in most of the treated cases. Our main goal was to achieve a complete shoulder functional recovery, by treating simultaneously all of the anatomical-pathological lesions, without considering the so-called essential lesions. The period of post-operatory immobilization only last for the healing of soft parts; this takes place in a position of neutral shoulder rotation, since the use of vascular bone graft eliminates the need for long time immobilization, due to the shoulder stabilization provided by rigid fixation of the coracoid at the glenoid edge, as in the Latarjet's technique. Our procedure, used since 1959, comprises the association of several techniques, which has permitted shoulder healing without movement limitation. That was because of the tension reduction in the sutures of the subescapularis, capsule, and coracobraquialis muscles. PMID:26229839

  9. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... taking down any muscles in front of the shoulder, and I think yielding less pain for the patient pos-top, potentially less scar ... that he had an open shift. Now the shoulder is maybe too tight and leading to pain, but if you could talk about that issue ...

  10. Shoulder Ultrasonography: Performance and Common Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gaitini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US of the shoulder is the most commonly requested examination in musculoskeletal US diagnosis. Sports injuries and degenerative and inflammatory processes are the main sources of shoulder pain and functional limitations. Because of its availability, low cost, dynamic examination process, absence of radiation exposure, and ease of patient compliance, US is the preferred mode for shoulder imaging over other, more sophisticated, and expensive methods. Operator dependence is the main disadvantage of US examinations. Use of high range equipment with high resolution transducers, adhering to a strict examination protocol, good knowledge of normal anatomy and pathological processes and an awareness of common pitfalls are essential for the optimal performance and interpretation of shoulder US. This article addresses examination techniques, the normal sonographic appearance of tendons, bursae and joints, and the main pathological conditions found in shoulder ultrasonography.

  11. Frozen shoulder--an algoneurodystrophic process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, L P; Rittmeister, M; John, J; Happ, J; Kerschbaumer, F

    1998-12-01

    The frozen shoulder syndrome and the Sudeck syndrome are clinically in many aspects similar. Radioisotope bone scan shows an increased uptake in the affected areas in both diseases, while standard radiographs show a progressive demineralization. With measurement of bone-mineral density by quantitative digital radiography these local decalcification processes were diagnosed in an early stage of the frozen shoulder syndrome: of 12 patients with primary frozen shoulder 10 had a bone-mineral density decrease of more than 21% in the humeral head of the affected shoulder compared to the unaffected side. In the control groups (n = 32) the difference between affected and unaffected side (left and right humerus of the healthy probands) was in only one case each above 21%. There are several indications in the literature assuming the frozen shoulder to be an algoneurodystrophic process. Our observation supports this hypothesis, and may possibly lead to earlier diagnosis and improved therapeutic management. PMID:9922549

  12. Postoperative pectoral swelling after shoulder arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ERCIN, ERSIN; BILGILI, MUSTAFA GOKHAN; ONES, HALIL NADIR; KURAL, CEMAL

    2015-01-01

    Fluid extravasation is possibly the most common complication of shoulder arthroscopy. Shoulder arthroscopy can lead to major increases in the compartment pressure of adjacent muscles and this phenomenon is significant when an infusion pump is used. This article describes a case of pectoral swelling due to fluid extravasation after shoulder arthroscopy. A 24-year-old male underwent an arthroscopic Bankart repair for recurrent shoulder dislocation. The surgery was performed in the beach chair position and lasted two hours. At the end of the procedure, the patient was found to have left pectoral swelling. A chest radiography showed no abnormality. Pectoral swelling due to fluid extravasation after shoulder arthroscopy has not previously been documented. PMID:26889473

  13. Double contrast CT diagnosis of shoulder instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study clinical importance of double contrast CT arthrography in the diagnosis of shoulder instability. Materials and methods: Eight patients were diagnosed as having shoulder instability with double contrast CT. The technique involved injection of 4 ml, 76% urografin and 10 ml of room air through an anterior shoulder puncture. The CT images were obtained with the patients supine and prone position. Results: The results of the CT arthrography were confirmed during the surgical operation afterward. The characteristics of abnormal double contrast CT arthrograms. They included anterior labral tear: the rounded anterior glenoid labrum, detached anterior labrum and anterior labral fragment; anterior capsular stripping off the anterior scapular glenoid neck; and enlargement of anterior and posterior capsular stripping off the anterior scapular glenoid neck; and enlargement of anterior and posterior capsular cavity. Conclusion: The current CT arthrography provides important X-ray information for both diagnosis of shoulder instability and anatomical repair of shoulder instability

  14. Arthrography of the dog's shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different volumes with varying concentrations of meglumine-sodium diatrizoate were injected to study positive contrast shoulder arthrograms in six experimental dogs weighing 23-37 kg. The best delineation of the articular cartilage was obtained following injection of 1.5 ml of a 25% solution (185 mg iodine/joint). To visualize the bicipital tendon sheet and the different pouches of the shoulder joint, 6 ml of a 25% solution (750 mg iodine/joint) should be used. If no definite lesions are previewed, 6 ml of a 19% solution (550 mg iodine/joint) offers an acceptable compromise since with this volume and concentration no pooling of contrast medium overlapping the caudal area of the humeral head was seen. Radiographs should be obtained within 5 minutes after injection of the contrast medium. After that period the delineation of the joint structures is vaguening by absorption of the contrast medium. Repeated contrast examination with meglumine-sodium diatrizoate should be avoided. After four procedures at weekly intervals, the necropsy performed on two dogs showed inflammatory changes of the synovial membrane

  15. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a method that has been advancing in the last few years to the modality of choice for diagnostic evaluation of the bone joints, as the method is capable of imaging not only the ossous but also the soft tissue components of the joint. MRI likewise has become an accepted method for diagnostic evaluation of syndromes of the shoulder, with high diagnostic accuracy in detecting rotator cuff lesions, or as an efficient MRI arthrography for evaluation of the instability or lesions of the labrocapsular complex. In the evaluation of early stages of shoulder impingement, the conventional MRI technique as a static technique yields indirect signs which in many cases do not provide the diagnostic certainty required in order to do justice to the functional nature of the syndrome. In these cases, functional MRI for imaging of the arm in abducted position and in rotational movement may offer a chance to early detect impingement and thus identify patients who will profit from treatment at an early stage

  16. Shoulder posture and median nerve sliding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilley Andrew

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with upper limb pain often have a slumped sitting position and poor shoulder posture. Pain could be due to poor posture causing mechanical changes (stretch; local pressure that in turn affect the function of major limb nerves (e.g. median nerve. This study examines (1 whether the individual components of slumped sitting (forward head position, trunk flexion and shoulder protraction cause median nerve stretch and (2 whether shoulder protraction restricts normal nerve movements. Methods Longitudinal nerve movement was measured using frame-by-frame cross-correlation analysis from high frequency ultrasound images during individual components of slumped sitting. The effects of protraction on nerve movement through the shoulder region were investigated by examining nerve movement in the arm in response to contralateral neck side flexion. Results Neither moving the head forward or trunk flexion caused significant movement of the median nerve. In contrast, 4.3 mm of movement, adding 0.7% strain, occurred in the forearm during shoulder protraction. A delay in movement at the start of protraction and straightening of the nerve trunk provided evidence of unloading with the shoulder flexed and elbow extended and the scapulothoracic joint in neutral. There was a 60% reduction in nerve movement in the arm during contralateral neck side flexion when the shoulder was protracted compared to scapulothoracic neutral. Conclusion Slumped sitting is unlikely to increase nerve strain sufficient to cause changes to nerve function. However, shoulder protraction may place the median nerve at risk of injury, since nerve movement is reduced through the shoulder region when the shoulder is protracted and other joints are moved. Both altered nerve dynamics in response to moving other joints and local changes to blood supply may adversely affect nerve function and increase the risk of developing upper quadrant pain.

  17. MRI of the posttraumatic shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Abnormalities of the shoulder are common but still unclear for both GPs and the orthopedic surgeon in our community. Difficult and late these patients are directed to a specialist for diagnosis and treatment. Our goal is to address some of the key and most common problem conditions related to the complaints in this area. Incidence of symptomatic ruptures of the shoulder’s rotator cuff is difficult to be evaluated. But it is by no means rare, concerning the research in the world - historically and today. It is also known that ruptures can be asymptomatic. Despite the large percentage of them, many of them are at risk for progression of the symptoms. While, on the world, the authors explicitly state that dealing with a rotator cuff rupture is one of the top 10 issues that are most important for orthopedic surgeons, in our country the most common diagnosis for shoulder complaints is still periarthritis, without specifying of individual muscles pathology. Another major concern is shoulder instability associated with multiple incidents of luxation started either in adolescence with minor traumatic incident, such as recurrent dislocation, or started after severe trauma in older ages. It has to be specified diagnostic type of instability: front, rear or multidirection. Especially it is important to make the initial stabilization period of unavoidable long series of repeated dislocations in adolescents and young people, whether actively practicing sports or not. This point is often missed, and later for large lesions it leads to more invasive surgery. Not infrequently this condition is characterized by pain and limited movement without true dislocation. Then it is mandatory to assess the diagnostic changes in labrum, ligaments and muscles, not to leave the patient to reach first dislocation. Impingement syndrome (IC) is a common suffering, engaging soft tissues in the subacromial bursitis. IC characterizes by pain during the upper limb removal and the

  18. Posterior shoulder tightness and rotator cuff strength assessments in painful shoulders of amateur tennis players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddy B. Marcondes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown a relationship between shoulder posterior capsule tightness and shoulder pain in overhead athletes. However, this relationship has not been studied in tennis players. OBJECTIVES: Assessment of the shoulder range of motion (ROM, strength and posterior capsule tightness of skilled amateur tennis players who had complaints of dominant shoulder pain in comparison with tennis players without pain. METHOD: Forty-nine skilled amateur tennis players were distributed in 2 groups: Control Group (n=22 and Painful Group (n=27. The first group was composed of asymptomatic subjects, and the second was composed of subjects with shoulder pain on the dominant side. These groups were evaluated to determine the dominant and non-dominant shoulder ROM (internal and external rotation, isometric shoulder strength (internal and external rotation and posterior shoulder tightness by blind evaluators. RESULTS: The ANOVA results indicated significant differences between the groups in the dominant shoulder ROM, posterior capsule tightness, external rotation strength and strength ratio (p<0.05. The intragroup analysis (dominant versus non-dominant in the Painful Group displayed a significant difference for ROM, posterior capsule tightness and external rotation strength (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The tennis players with pain in the dominant shoulder presented greater posterior capsule tightness, internal rotation deficit (ROM, external rotation gain (ROM and deficits in external rotation strength than the tennis players without pain.

  19. UnconStrained ShoUlder arthroplasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results of 36unconstrained shoulder arthroplasties. Methods: In the series, 24 total and 12 hemiarthroplasties of the shoulders were performed with unconstrained shoulder prostheses in 29 patients who suffered from glenohumeral degenerative arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, avascular necrosis and proximal fracture of humerus, respectively. Follow-up averaged 6.2years. All patients were evaluated pre- and post-operatively using the rating system of the Society of American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons which assesses the severity of pain,strength of muscles around shoulder, stability, range of motion and functional activities of daily living. Radiolucent line and migration of prostheses were observed postoperatively on X-rays. Results: Postoperatively, the rate of pain relief was 91.3%, and active range of motion increased by 47° inforward flexion, 43° in abduction , 30° in external rotation,and 4 segments in internal rotation. Preoperatively the average points of 6 functional activities patients could perform was 0.8, and postoperatively 3.1. On postoperative X-ray, proximal migration of the humerus was seen in 8 shoulders, 6 of which had either a torn or absent rotator cuff. Radiolucent lines were seen around 1humeral component and 9 glenoid components. Onehumeral and 2 glenoid components loosened. Conclusions: These results suggest that unconstrained shoulder arthroplasty is a satisfactory and safe technique.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent non-invasive imaging tool that can complement the physical examination in the evaluation of traumatic and non-traumatic injuries of the shoulder. The superb soft tissue contrast and multiplanar capabilities of MRI make it a preferred modality to provide a global assessment of the soft tissue and osseous structures of the shoulder. Learning objectives: to review briefly the anatomy of the shoulder and the specificity of sequences and planes for MRI; to demonstrate the characteristic MR findings of some of the most common shoulder disorders; to indicate how MR arthrography (MRA) of the shoulder can add extra value to the diagnostic process; to outline a systematic approach to the interpretation of the shoulder MR examination. Choosing the most suitable sequences and planes as well as the thorough knowledge of the anatomic structures assist the correct diagnosis of the pathologic disorders of the shoulder which is of great importance for the precise treatment management, surgical versus conservative, as well as for the appropriate surgical approach, open versus arthroscopic

  1. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  2. Nanomechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweers, K. K. M.; Bennink, M. L.; Subramaniam, V.

    2012-06-01

    Amyloid fibrils are traditionally associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the ability to form amyloid fibrils appears to be a more generic property of proteins. While disease-related, or pathological, amyloid fibrils are relevant for understanding the pathology and course of the disease, functional amyloids are involved, for example, in the exceptionally strong adhesive properties of natural adhesives. Amyloid fibrils are thus becoming increasingly interesting as versatile nanobiomaterials for applications in biotechnology. In the last decade a number of studies have reported on the intriguing mechanical characteristics of amyloid fibrils. In most of these studies atomic force microscopy (AFM) and atomic force spectroscopy play a central role. AFM techniques make it possible to probe, at nanometer length scales, and with exquisite control over the applied forces, biological samples in different environmental conditions. In this review we describe the different AFM techniques used for probing mechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils on the nanoscale. An overview is given of the existing mechanical studies on amyloid. We discuss the difficulties encountered with respect to the small fibril sizes and polymorphic behavior of amyloid fibrils. In particular, the different conformational packing of monomers within the fibrils leads to a heterogeneity in mechanical properties. We conclude with a brief outlook on how our knowledge of these mechanical properties of the amyloid fibrils can be exploited in the construction of nanomaterials from amyloid fibrils.

  3. Navigating the Alphabet Soup of Labroligamentous Pathology of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Darren; Grubin, Jeremy

    2016-02-01

    Because of the widespread use of eponyms and acronyms to describe labroligamentous findings in the shoulder, interpreting shoulder magnetic resonance imaging reports can be challenging. A summary of the appearance of these lesions on shoulder magnetic resonance images can help the orthopedic surgeon to understand these entities as imaging findings and to determine the appropriate treatment for patients with shoulder injuries. PMID:26866313

  4. Imaging of bursae around the shoulder joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bureau, N.J. [Department of Radiology, Hotel-Dieu de Montreal Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dussault, R.G. [Department of Radiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Keats, T.E. [Department of Radiology, Health Sciences Center, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The authors present a review of the anatomy of the major bursae around the shoulder joint and discuss the use of the different imaging modalities which demonstrate their radiologic features. The calcified subacromial-subdeltoid bursa has a characteristic appearance on plain radiographs. When inflamed it can be visualized by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Calcific bursitis may involve the subcoracoid bursa. This bursa may mimic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder or complete rotator cuff tear when injected inadvertently during shoulder arthrography. Less well known are three coracoclavicular ligament bursae. These are also subject to calcific bursitis and have a typical radiologic appearance. (orig.). With 6 figs.

  5. MRI findings in little leaguer's shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little leaguer's shoulder, a stress injury of the proximal humeral physis, should be considered in the differential diagnosis for an adolescent baseball player with shoulder pain, especially if the player is pitching regularly in a competitive environment. While roentgenographs may or may not be helpful, depending on the duration and severity of the injury, we report the MRI appearance of a case of little leaguer's shoulder. We found MRI helpful in diagnosing injury to the growth plate that was radiographically occult; furthermore, we were able to document the patient's progress with a follow-up MRI examination, which showed improvement with treatment. (orig.)

  6. Soft Tissue Aspects of the Shoulder Joint

    OpenAIRE

    Khoschnau, Shwan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to study different aspects of the soft tissues of the shoulder joint. The variation in the quality of the tendons and ligaments can be explained by genetic factors. To test the hypothesis that collagen 1 α1 Sp1 polymorphism is related to the occurrence of cruciate ligament ruptures and shoulder dislocations, a total of 358 patients (233 patients with cruciate ligament ruptures and 126 with shoulder dislocations) were included in the study. We found a decreased risk ...

  7. Imaging of bursae around the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present a review of the anatomy of the major bursae around the shoulder joint and discuss the use of the different imaging modalities which demonstrate their radiologic features. The calcified subacromial-subdeltoid bursa has a characteristic appearance on plain radiographs. When inflamed it can be visualized by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Calcific bursitis may involve the subcoracoid bursa. This bursa may mimic adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder or complete rotator cuff tear when injected inadvertently during shoulder arthrography. Less well known are three coracoclavicular ligament bursae. These are also subject to calcific bursitis and have a typical radiologic appearance. (orig.). With 6 figs

  8. Shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers: review and development of a FIFA 11+ shoulder injury prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejnisman, Benno; Barbosa, Gisele; Andreoli, Carlos V; de Castro Pochini, A; Lobo, Thiago; Zogaib, Rodrigo; Cohen, Moises; Bizzini, Mario; Dvorak, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, shoulder injuries have represented an increasing health problem in soccer players. The goalkeepers are more exposed to shoulder disorders than other field players. Injury prevention exercises for upper limbs were cited in few studies involving throwing athletes, but we know that goalkeepers need a specific program. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of an adapted Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) 11+ program, namely the FIFA 11+ shoulder, which targets the prevention of shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers. The FIFA 11+ shoulder program is structured into three parts: general warming-up exercises, exercises to improve strength and balance of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and finger muscles, and advanced exercises for core stability and muscle control. The exercises were selected based on recommendations from studies demonstrating high electromyographic activity. PMID:27563262

  9. Stemless shoulder prosthesis versus conventional anatomic shoulder prosthesis in patients with osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Berth, Alexander; Pap, Géza

    2012-01-01

    Background The stemless shoulder prosthesis is a new concept in shoulder arthroplasty. To date, only a few studies have investigated the results of this prosthesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and radiological midterm results of this implant in comparison with a standard anatomic stemmed shoulder prosthesis. Materials and methods The Constant score, the DASH score, the active range of motion (abduction, anteversion, external rotation), and the radiological results we...

  10. Low-Cost Alternative External Rotation Shoulder Brace and Review of Treatment in Acute Shoulder Dislocations

    OpenAIRE

    Lacy, Kyle; Cooke, Chris; Cooke, Pat; Schupbach, Justin; Vaidya, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic dislocations of the shoulder commonly present to emergency departments (EDs). Immediate closed reduction of both anterior and posterior glenohumeral dislocations is recommended and is frequently performed in the ED. Recurrence of dislocation is common, as anteroinferior labral tears (Bankart lesions) are present in many anterior shoulder dislocations.14,15,18,23 Immobilization of the shoulder following closed reduction is therefore recommended; previous studies support the use of im...

  11. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through the shoulder joint in order to, one, clean it out, but also just to keep it ... you can see we're going to gently clean back some of the excess cartilage there. Try ...

  12. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that kid's going to have arthritis in the future. It's a surgery that's done to change a ... of my goals, in the not too distant future, is to work on a shoulder dislocation prevention ...

  13. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... inside of the shoulder joint with quite good visual acuity. We can really tell with great detail ... that suture anchor. You can see I can control how tight it is by, number one, where ...

  14. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lead to shoulder ligaments that were loose to self-tighten? So, can therapy…can strengthening the cuff ... the future. It's a surgery that's done to change a lifestyle. So if the patient wants to ...

  15. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and the people who are sitting at home right now watching it's difficult for them to understand. ... an incision over the front of their shoulder, right there, that measures about five inches in length. ...

  16. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the false sense the shoulder's perfectly fine and return too soon. So, they're held out for ... Is the person going to be able to return to their sport? And we have to realistically ...

  17. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 34:32 MEAGAN: At first I started doing gravity assisted exercises like Codman's which are…I laid ... hang off and just did circles with the gravity taking my shoulder, just to gain some of ...

  18. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... there. And as you'll see, there's constantly water being pushed through the shoulder joint. Most of ... a bit here, so it's a very tight space. And even getting three sutures in there is ...

  19. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the young girl who says, you know, over time my shoulder just starts to feel loose and ... where it just slowly starts to develop over time, that kid needs extensive physical therapy, because most ...

  20. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stronger; often four, six, eight weeks of a strengthening program for those muscles behind the shoulder to support ... a harness type brace may, along with a strengthening program, help to try to keep that ball back ...

  1. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the tear, the dislocation injury, they have a real loss of motion. They have a lot of ... to rehabilitate, to strengthen the shoulder. And the real key part of where the strength of the ...

  2. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Meagan. I mean, she's pretty much of a dream because she in herself is an athletic trainer ... are more forceful. There's more energy placed, more stress placed across that shoulder joint. And I know ...

  3. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for perhaps some other things you do in life a stiff shoulder isn't so bad. But ... were interested in getting me back to normal life. I wouldn't go to anyplace different. I ...

  4. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that comes under a lot of load and stress to it and is injured not infrequently. The ... are more forceful. There's more energy placed, more stress placed across that shoulder joint. And I know ...

  5. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of how we first approach that. 00:02:42 JOE CONGENI, MD: Yeah. The shoulder's a really ... capsule. JOE CONGENI, MD: Um hmm. 00:04:42 KERWYN JONES, MD: It's a tough concept to ...

  6. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... there. And as you'll see, there's constantly water being pushed through the shoulder joint. Most of ... care. And the lastly, we can complete the cycle as we saw with Meagan, with really state ...

  7. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... By strengthening the rotator cuff muscles can this lead to shoulder ligaments that were loose to self- ... patient and her experience. And it's going to lead well into what we've had a lot ...

  8. Candida infection of a prosthetic shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A heroin addict developed a Candida parapsilosis infection in a prosthetic shoulder joint. Radiographs showed loose fragments of cement with prosthetic loosening. The patient was treated with removal of the prosthesis and intravenous amphotericin B followed by oral ketoconazole. (orig.)

  9. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... instability, or the shoulder dislocating again with other activities. Nonetheless, we always approach these patients first with physical therapy and rehab. So, Joe, maybe if you ...

  10. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... weeks of time trying to get that shoulder stronger; often four, six, eight weeks of a strengthening ... suture anchor? And which do you feel is stronger? I think this is a good time as ...

  11. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hospital. Over the next hour you'll see a Bankart repair to correct shoulder instability. Bankart lesions ... three small incisions. You'll also hear from a patient who has undergone the surgery, and meet ...

  12. MRI findings in the painful hemiplegic shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in painful hemiplegic shoulder (PHS) in hemiplegic post-stroke patients. Materials and methods: Patients with hemiplegia following their first cerebrovascular accident who were admitted to the Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation were studied. Forty-five patients with pain in the hemiplegic shoulder and 23 post-stroke patients without shoulder pain were investigated. MRI and radiographic findings of the hemiplegic and contralateral asymptomatic shoulders were evaluated. Results: Some MRI findings were more frequent in PHS group, including synovial capsule thickening, synovial capsule enhancement, and enhancement in the rotator cuff interval. Conclusions: Adhesive capsulitis was found to be a possible cause of PHS.

  13. MRI findings in the painful hemiplegic shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavora, D.G.F., E-mail: danielgurgel@sarah.b [Department of Radiology, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil); Gama, R.L.; Bomfim, R.C. [Department of Radiology, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil); Nakayama, M. [Department of Radiology, Federal University of Grande Dourados, Dourados (Brazil); Silva, C.E.P. [Department of Statistics, Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation, Fortaleza (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    Aim: To evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in painful hemiplegic shoulder (PHS) in hemiplegic post-stroke patients. Materials and methods: Patients with hemiplegia following their first cerebrovascular accident who were admitted to the Sarah Network of Hospitals for Rehabilitation were studied. Forty-five patients with pain in the hemiplegic shoulder and 23 post-stroke patients without shoulder pain were investigated. MRI and radiographic findings of the hemiplegic and contralateral asymptomatic shoulders were evaluated. Results: Some MRI findings were more frequent in PHS group, including synovial capsule thickening, synovial capsule enhancement, and enhancement in the rotator cuff interval. Conclusions: Adhesive capsulitis was found to be a possible cause of PHS.

  14. Rare Inferior Shoulder Dislocation (Luxatio Erecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Cift

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although shoulder dislocations have been seen very frequently, inferior dislocation of shoulder constitutes only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. We share our 4 patients with luxatio erecta and present their last clinical control. 2 male and 2 female Caucasian patients were diagnosed as luxatio erecta. Patients’ ages were 78, 62, 65, and 76. All patients’ reduction was done by traction-abduction and contour traction maneuver in the operating room. The patients had no symptoms and no limitation of range of motion of their shoulder at their last control. Luxatio erecta is seen rarely, and these patients may have neurovascular injury. These patients should be carefully examined and treated by the orthopaedic and traumatology surgeons.

  15. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that comes under a lot of load and stress to it and is injured not infrequently. The way the joint ... there's constantly water being pushed through the shoulder joint. Most of ...

  16. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of get some of their competitiveness and their energy into the rehabilitation and then a lot of ... JOE CONGENI, MD: ---are more forceful. There's more energy placed, more stress placed across that shoulder joint. ...

  17. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... shoulder. The rest of the device, including the metal and the plastic tip there will come out. ... patient's body over time. Some people would use metal suture anchors, which work just as well. 00: ...

  18. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available BANKART REPAIR TO CORRECT SHOULDER INSTABILITY AKRON CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL AKRON, OHIO February 21, 2008 00:00:11 NARRATOR: Welcome to Akron Children's Hospital. Over the next hour you'll see a ...

  19. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... made, it's kind of a…you know, we call it a ball and socket joint, but it's ... the cup, or the socket; what we commonly call the glenoid socket for the shoulder. There's a ...

  20. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in just getting their motion back and their function back in the shoulder to some extent. But, ... and we work strength. And then we work function. And when we get to that functional stage, ...

  1. Amyloid formation: functional friend or fearful foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, P; Roan, N R; Römling, U; Bevins, C L; Münch, J

    2016-08-01

    Amyloid formation has been most studied in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, as well as in amyloidosis. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that amyloid is also present in the healthy setting; for example nontoxic amyloid formation is important for melanin synthesis and in innate immunity. Furthermore, bacteria have mechanisms to produce functional amyloid structures with important roles in bacterial physiology and interaction with host cells. Here, we will discuss some novel aspects of fibril-forming proteins in humans and bacteria. First, the amyloid-forming properties of the antimicrobial peptide human defensin 6 (HD6) will be considered. Intriguingly, unlike other antimicrobial peptides, HD6 does not kill bacteria. However, recent data show that HD6 can form amyloid structures at the gut mucosa with strong affinity for bacterial surfaces. These so-called nanonets block bacterial invasion by entangling the bacteria in net-like structures. Next, the role of functional amyloid fibrils in human semen will be discussed. These fibrils were discovered through their property to enhance HIV infection but they may also have other yet unknown functions. Finally, the role of amyloid formation in bacteria will be reviewed. The recent finding that bacteria can make amyloid in a controlled fashion without toxic effects is of particular interest and may have implications for human disease. The role of amyloid in health and disease is beginning to be unravelled, and here, we will review some of the most recent findings in this exciting area. PMID:27151743

  2. Concept of healing of recurrent shoulder dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato D'Angelo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the main surgical techniques applied in the treatment of anterior recurrent shoulder dislocation, aiming the achievement of the normality of articulate movements. This was obtained by combining distinct surgical procedures, which allowed the recovery of a complete functional capacity of the shoulder, without jeopardizing the normality of movement, something that has not been recorded in the case of the tense sutures of the surgical procedures of Putti-Platt, Bankart, Latarjet, Dickson-O'Dell and others.The careful review of the methods applied supports the conclusion that recurrent shoulder dislocation can be cured, since cure has been obtained in 97% of the treated cases. However, some degree of limitation in the shoulder movement has been observed in most of the treated cases.Our main goal was to achieve a complete shoulder functional recovery, by treating simultaneously all of the anatomical–pathological lesions, without considering the so-called essential lesions.The period of post-operatory immobilization only last for the healing of soft parts; this takes place in a position of neutral shoulder rotation, since the use of vascular bone graft eliminates the need for long time immobilization, due to the shoulder stabilization provided by rigid fixation of the coracoid at the glenoid edge, as in the Latarjet's technique.Our procedure, used since 1959, comprises the association of several techniques, which has permitted shoulder healing without movement limitation. That was because of the tension reduction in the sutures of the subescapularis, capsule, and coracobraquialis muscles.

  3. Management of complications after total shoulder arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Josef K Eichinger; Galvin, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    The outcomes of total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) for painful arthritis of the glenohumeral joint are excellent with significant improvement in pain and function. Increased use of total shoulder arthroplasty over the past decade has led to identification of common complications. Although the complication rate is low, accurate and timely diagnosis, appropriate management, and implementation of methods for prevention are critical to a successful long-term outcome. The most common complications ...

  4. The epidemiology of shoulder dislocations in Oslo

    OpenAIRE

    Liavaag, S; Svenningsen, S; Reikerås, O.; Enger, M; Fjalestad, T; Pripp, A H; Brox, J I

    2011-01-01

    There are few previous studies on the incidence of shoulder dislocation in the general population. The aim of the study was to report the incidence of acute shoulder dislocations in the capital of Norway (Oslo) in 2009. Patients of all ages living in Oslo, sustaining a dislocation of the glenohumeral joint, were identified using electronic diagnosis registers, patient protocols, radiological registers of the hospitals, and the Norwegian Patient Register (NPR). The overall incidence rate was 5...

  5. Electromyographic analysis of the infraspinatus and scapular stabilizing muscles during isometric shoulder external rotation at various shoulder elevation angles

    OpenAIRE

    Uga, Daisuke; Endo, Yasuhiro; Nakazawa, Rie; Sakamoto, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify activation of the infraspinatus and scapular stabilizing muscles during shoulder external rotation at various shoulder elevation angles. [Subjects] Twenty subjects participated in this study and all measurements were performed on the right shoulder. [Methods] Isometric shoulder external rotation strength and surface electromyographic data were measured with the shoulder at 0°, 45°, 90°, and 135° elevation in the scapular plane. The electromyographic data ...

  6. Rugby and Shoulder Trauma: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, R; Tecame, A; Torre, G; Narbona, P; Maffulli, N; Denaro, V

    2015-01-01

    Rugby is a popular contact sport worldwide. Collisions and tackles during matches and practices often lead to traumatic injuries of the shoulder. This review reports on the epidemiology of injuries, type of lesions and treatment of shoulder injuries, risk factors, such as player position, and return to sport activities. Electronic searches through PubMed (Medline), EMBASE, and Cochrane Library retrieved studies concerning shoulder injuries in rugby players. Data regarding incidence, type and mechanisms of lesion, risk factors and return to sport were extracted and analyzed. The main reported data were incidence, mechanism of injury and type of lesion. Most of the studies report tackle as the main event responsible for shoulder trauma (between 50% and 85%), while the main lesions reported were Bankart lesions, Superior Labral tear from Anterior to Posterior (SLAP tears), anterior dislocation and rotator cuff tears. Open or arthroscopic repair improve clinical outcomes. Shoulder lesions are common injuries in rugby players. Surgical treatment seems to be effective in for rotator cuff tears and shoulder instability. More and better designed studies are needed for a higher Level of Evidence analysis of this topic. PMID:26535182

  7. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation of shoulder problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shoulder joint has an important influence on arm- and handfunction. Therefore, activities of daily living, working and leisure time can be negatively influenced by diseases of the shoulder joint. Problems of the shoulder joint can be induced by muscular dysbalance and poor body posture. There is a strong relationship between shoulder function and body posture. Conservative treatment and rehabilitation of the shoulder joint aims at improving the local dysfunction of the shoulder joint as well as at improving function and social participation. Antiinflammatory and pain medication, exercise, occupational, electro-, ultrasound and shock wave therapy, massage, thermotherapy and pulsed electromagnetic fields are used as conservative treatments. Exercise therapy aims at improving muscular performance, joint mobility and body posture. Occupational therapy aims at improving functional movements for daily living and work. Electrotherapy is primarily used to relieve pain. Shock wave and ultrasound therapy proved to be an effective treatment for patients with calcific tendinitis. The subacromial impingement syndrome can be effectively treated by conservative therapy. (orig.)

  8. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunyamin Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn’s disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis.

  9. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Bunyamin; Koca, Yavuz Savas; Koca, Tugba; Yildiz, Ihsan; Gerek Celikden, Sevda; Ciris, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG) is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn's disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis. PMID:27051538

  10. Reducing Shoulder by Vertical Traction: A One-Man Method for Shoulder Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayat Ahmad Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty percent of joint dislocations reported to the emergency department are of shoulder joint. Various techniques are used to reduce the shoulder and Spaso technique is the least known to the orthopaedic residents which is a simple one-man vertical traction method of shoulder reduction. We evaluated the effectiveness of vertical traction method for anterior shoulder dislocation by orthopaedic residents. Sixty consecutive patients of anterior glenohumeral dislocation attending the emergency department of our hospital were taken up for the study. The reduction was done using Spaso technique. Right shoulder was dislocated in 40 patients and 31 patients had recurrent shoulder dislocation. In 55 patients, shoulder was reduced without the use of any anaesthesia. In patients where no anaesthesia was used, the time of traction ranged from 45 seconds to 5 minutes, while under anaesthesia the time of traction ranged from 1 to 4 minutes. Twenty-one patients had associated greater tuberosity fracture which did not affect the method of reduction and all of them were reducible. No complication was reported, and all the patients were satisfied with the method. In conclusion vertical traction method is a good technique for reducing anterior shoulder dislocation with an easy learning curve among the residents and no complication has been reported so far.

  11. Shoulder-to-Shoulder Research "with" Children: Methodological and Ethical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Krista M.; Lahman, Maria K. E.; Opitz, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a methodological study with children where two different interview methods were utilized: the "walk-around" (a form of mobile interview) and the "shoulder-to-shoulder." The paper reviews the methodological aspects of the study then provides a brief review of the history of methods employed in research with…

  12. DNA aptamers detecting generic amyloid epitopes

    OpenAIRE

    Mitkevich, Olga V.; Kochneva-Pervukhova, Natalia V; Surina, Elizaveta R.; Benevolensky, Sergei V.; Kushnirov, Vitaly V.; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloids are fibrillar protein aggregates resulting from non-covalent autocatalytic polymerization of various structurally and functionally unrelated proteins. Previously we have selected DNA aptamers, which bind specifically to the in vitro assembled amyloid fibrils of the yeast prionogenic protein Sup35. Here we show that such DNA aptamers can be used to detect SDS-insoluble amyloid aggregates of the Sup35 protein, and of some other amyloidogenic proteins, including mouse PrP, formed in yea...

  13. Amyloid myopathy: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Tuomaala

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid myopathy (AM is a rare manifestation of primary systemic amyloidosis (AL. Like inflammatory myopathies, it presents with proximal muscle weakness and an increased creatine kinase level. We describe a case of AL with severe, rapidly progressive myopathy as the initial symptom. The clinical manifestation and muscle biopsy were suggestive of inclusion body myositis. AM was not suspected until amyloidosis was seen in the gastric mucosal biopsy. The muscle biopsy was then re-examined more specifically, and Congo red staining eventually showed vascular and interstitial amyloid accumulation, which led to a diagnosis of AM. The present case illustrates the fact that the clinical picture of AM can mimic that of inclusion body myositis.

  14. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David

    2011-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of β-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. PMID:21695112

  15. The primer for sports medicine professionals on imaging: the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshad-Amacker, Nadja A; Jain Palrecha, Sapna; Farshad, Mazda

    2013-01-01

    Because of its inherent superior soft tissue contrast and lack of ionizing radiation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is highly suited to study the complex anatomy of the shoulder joint, particularly when assessing the relatively high incidence of shoulder injuries in young, athletic patients. This review aims to serve as a primer for understanding shoulder MRI in an algorithmical approach, including MRI protocol and technique, normal anatomy and anatomical variations of the shoulder, pathologic conditions of the rotator cuff tendons and muscles, the long head of the biceps tendon, shoulder impingement, labral and glenohumeral ligament pathology, MR findings in shoulder instability, adhesive capsulitis, and osteoarthritis. PMID:24381700

  16. Primary Frozen Shoulder Syndrome: Arthroscopic Capsular Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    Idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, or primary frozen shoulder syndrome, is a fairly common orthopaedic problem characterized by shoulder pain and loss of motion. In most cases, conservative treatment (6-month physical therapy program and intra-articular steroid injections) improves symptoms and restores shoulder motion. In refractory cases, arthroscopic capsular release is indicated. This surgical procedure carries several advantages over other treatment modalities. First, it provides precise and controlled release of the capsule and ligaments, reducing the risk of traumatic complications observed after forceful shoulder manipulation. Second, release of the capsule and the involved structures with a radiofrequency device delays healing, which prevents adhesion formation. Third, the technique is straightforward, and an oral postoperative steroid program decreases pain and allows for a pleasant early rehabilitation program. Fourth, the procedure is performed with the patient fully awake under an interscalene block, which boosts the patient's confidence and adherence to the physical therapy protocol. In patients with refractory primary frozen shoulder syndrome, arthroscopic capsular release emerges as a suitable option that leads to a faster and long-lasting recovery. PMID:26870652

  17. The amyloid in familial amyloid cardiomyopathy of Danish origin is related to pre-albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husby, G; Ranløv, P J; Sletten, K; Marhaug, G

    1985-04-01

    Amyloid obtained from the myocardium of a patient (Han) with familial amyloid cardiomyopathy of Danish origin was studied. Gel filtration and electrophoresis of purified and denatured amyloid fibrils Han revealed various fractions ranging in mol. wt from 40,000 to 8,000 daltons. Amyloid Han and fractions reacted with an antiserum against amyloid Han showing a reaction of identity with each other; partial identity between Han and human pre-albumin was observed, while no reaction was seen with AA or AL proteins. Cardiac tissue sections from Han showed reactivity with antisera to amyloid Han, pre-albumin and protein AP, but not with anti-AA or anti-AL in indirect immunofluorescence. Amino acid composition and sequence studies of a protein fraction of amyloid Han with mol. wt 15,000 daltons confirmed the structural relationship with pre-albumin. PMID:3924450

  18. Shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers: review and development of a FIFA 11+ shoulder injury prevention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ejnisman B

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Benno Ejnisman,1 Gisele Barbosa,1 Carlos V Andreoli,1 A de Castro Pochini,1 Thiago Lobo,2 Rodrigo Zogaib,2 Moises Cohen,1 Mario Bizzini,3 Jiri Dvorak3 1Department of Orthopaedics, Federal University of São Paulo, 2Sports Medicine Department, Santos FC, São Paulo, Brazil; 3FIFA-Medical Assessment and Research Centre, Schulthess Clinic, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: In the last years, shoulder injuries have represented an increasing health problem in soccer players. The goalkeepers are more exposed to shoulder disorders than other field players. Injury prevention exercises for upper limbs were cited in few studies involving throwing athletes, but we know that goalkeepers need a specific program. The purpose of this study is to describe the development of an adapted Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA 11+ program, namely the FIFA 11+ shoulder, which targets the prevention of shoulder injuries in soccer goalkeepers. The FIFA 11+ shoulder program is structured into three parts: general warming-up exercises, exercises to improve strength and balance of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and finger muscles, and advanced exercises for core stability and muscle control. The exercises were selected based on recommendations from studies demonstrating high electromyographic activity. Keywords: goalkeeper, shoulder, injury prevention, prevention program

  19. Cost Analysis in Shoulder Arthroplasty Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Teusink

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cost in shoulder surgery has taken on a new focus with passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. As part of this law, there is a provision for Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs and the bundled payment initiative. In this model, one entity would receive a single payment for an episode of care and distribute funds to all other parties involved. Given its reproducible nature, shoulder arthroplasty is ideally situated to become a model for an episode of care. Currently, there is little research into cost in shoulder arthroplasty surgery. The current analyses do not provide surgeons with a method for determining the cost and outcomes of their interventions, which is necessary to the success of bundled payment. Surgeons are ideally positioned to become leaders in ACOs, but in order for them to do so a methodology must be developed where accurate costs and outcomes can be determined for the episode of care.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to test the criteria for abnormalities of the shoulder as seen on MR, 30 normal shoulders were examined. The examination included T1, proton and T2-weighted SE sequences and T2*-weighted FE sequences, using transverse, oblique coronary and oblique sagittal planes. In 57% there was increased signal intensity in the tendon of the rotator cuff; this might have been interpreted as a rupture of the cuff or tendinitis. Anatomical examination suggests that the finding is due to a normal layer between the long head of the biceps and the tendon joint complex. The anterior glenoid labrum could not be clearly delineated in 57% and the posterior labrum in 5%. In two cases there was a superior, postero-lateral defect in the head of the humerus. The currently accepted criteria for the MRT diagnosis of shoulder abnormalities need to be critically re-evaluated. (orig.)

  1. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savas Menticoglou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 minutes in the second. After volume resuscitation circulation was restored, there was profound brain damage and the babies died. Conclusion. Unsuspected hypovolemic shock may explain some cases of failed resuscitation after shoulder dystocia. This may require a change in clinical practice. Rather than immediately clamping the cord after the baby is delivered, it is proposed that (1 the obstetrician delay cord clamping to allow autotransfusion of the baby from the placenta and (2 the neonatal resuscitators give volume much sooner.

  2. Treatments for Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei; Goost, Hans; Lin, Xiang-Bo; Burger, Christof; Paul, Christian; Wang, Zeng-Li; Zhang, Tian-Yi; Jiang, Zhi-Chao; Welle, Kristian; Kabir, Koroush

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many treatments for shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) are available in clinical practice; some of which have already been compared with other treatments by various investigators. However, a comprehensive treatment comparison is lacking. Several widely used electronic databases were searched for eligible studies. The outcome measurements were the pain score and the Constant–Murley score (CMS). Direct comparisons were performed using the conventional pair-wise meta-analysis method, while a network meta-analysis based on the Bayesian model was used to calculate the results of all potentially possible comparisons and rank probabilities. Included in the meta-analysis procedure were 33 randomized controlled trials involving 2300 patients. Good agreement was demonstrated between the results of the pair-wise meta-analyses and the network meta-analyses. Regarding nonoperative treatments, with respect to the pain score, combined treatments composed of exercise and other therapies tended to yield better effects than single-intervention therapies. Localized drug injections that were combined with exercise showed better treatment effects than any other treatments, whereas worse effects were observed when such injections were used alone. Regarding the CMS, most combined treatments based on exercise also demonstrated better effects than exercise alone. Regarding surgical treatments, according to the pain score and the CMS, arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) together with treatments derived from it, such as ASD combined with radiofrequency and arthroscopic bursectomy, showed better effects than open subacromial decompression (OSD) and OSD combined with the injection of platelet-leukocyte gel. Exercise therapy also demonstrated good performance. Results for inconsistency, sensitivity analysis, and meta-regression all supported the robustness and reliability of these network meta-analyses. Exercise and other exercise-based therapies, such as kinesio taping

  3. Upper arm elevation and repetitive shoulder movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalbøge, Annett; Hansson, Gert-Åke; Frost, Poul;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We recently constructed a general population job exposure matrix (JEM), The Shoulder JEM, based on expert ratings. The overall aim of this study was to convert expert-rated job exposures for upper arm elevation and repetitive shoulder movements to measurement scales. METHODS: The...... Spearman rank correlations and the explained variance[Formula: see text] according to linear regression analyses (36 job groups). We used the linear regression equations to convert the expert-rated job exposures for all 172 job groups into predicted measured job exposures. Bland-Altman analyses were used...

  4. EVALUATION OF PAINFUL SHOULDER IN BASEBALL PLAYERS

    OpenAIRE

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Junior, Adriano Fernando Mendes; Soares, André Lopes; Aihara, Leandro Jun; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the relationship between shoulder mobility and strength and the presence of pain among baseball players. Methods: Between April and July 2009, 55 baseball players were assessed by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the School of Medical Sciences, Santa Casa de Misericórdia, São Paulo. They were all males, aged between 15 and 33 years (mean of 21); they attended an average of three training sessions per week and had been doing this sport for a mean of 10 years. Results: 14 of...

  5. Functional MR imaging study of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a functional MR study of the shoulder performed with the positioning in which patients were about to complain of shoulder pain. A 0.064-T permanent MR system was used. The effectiveness of this study was evaluated in the diagnosis of rotator cuff impingement syndrome. Thirteen patients (11 males and two female) were examined prospectively. Three-dimensional Fourier transformation coronal images were obtained with patients' arms at the maximal abduction. They were compared with images obtained while patients' arms were at their sides, chiefly from the viewpoint of severity of impingement and intensity change of the supraspinatus muscle

  6. Bilateral posterior shoulder dislocation after electrical shock: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail Emre Ketenci; Tahir Mutlu Duymus; Ayhan Ulusoy; Hakan Serhat Yanik; Serhat Mutlu; Mehmet Oguz Durakbasa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Posterior dislocation of the shoulder is a rare and commonly missed injury. Unilateral dislocations occur mostly due to trauma. Bilateral posterior shoulder dislocations are even more rare and result mainly from epileptic seizures. Electrical injury is a rare cause of posterior shoulder dislocation. Injury mechanism in electrical injury is similar to epileptic seizures, where the shoulder is forced to internal rotation, flexion and adduction. Presentation of case: This report...

  7. Outcome evaluation in shoulder surgery using 3D kinematics sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Coley, B.; Jolles, B.; Farron, A.; Bourgeois, A; Nussbaumer, F.; Pichonnaz, C.; Aminian, K.

    2007-01-01

    A new method of scoring systems for the functional assessment of the shoulder is presented. 3D accelerometers and gyroscopes attached on the humerus were used to differentiate a healthy from a painful shoulder. The method was first tested on 10 healthy volunteer subjects without any shoulder pathologies. Then, the system was tested on 10 patients with unilateral shoulder pathology (rotator cuff disease, osteoarthritis) before and after surgery (3, 6 months). To evalua...

  8. Shoulder Impingement Syndromes: Implications on Physical Therapy Examination and Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Lazaro, Rolando

    2005-01-01

    A painful shoulder presents challenges in examination, diagnosis and intervention for the physical therapist because of the complexity of the structures involved. A common cause of shoulder pain is shoulder impingement syndrome. This was first described as a condition in which the soft tissues of the subacromial space were chronically entrapped and compressed between the humeral head and the subacromial arch. This definition does not account for the myriad potential causes of shoulder impinge...

  9. Posterior Shoulder Dislocation Due to an Atypical Trauma Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Güzel, Şevket Ergun; Baysal, Özgür; Eceviz, Engin; Elmalı, Nurzat

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: A 32 year old man who was admitted to the emergency department with serious pain and absent movement of the right upper extremity due to passing the ball in a basketball game. He had no shoulder dislocation in his medical history. The right shoulder position was flexion and adduction. The shoulder range of motion was restricted and the neurovascular examination was intact. Posterior shoulder dislocation was diagnosed in radiographs.The aim of the study is pointed out an unusual me...

  10. Bilateral locked posterior shoulder dislocation in a footballer.

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, J; Whitten, M

    1997-01-01

    Posterior dislocation of the shoulder is an uncommon injury, accounting for between 2% and 4% of all shoulder dislocations. It occurs most frequently in patients following convulsions or direct anterior force to the shoulder. It is a particularly uncommon injury in sport. This paper reports an unusual case of bilateal locked posteriorly dislocated shoulders in a previously healthy young man who fell while playing football.

  11. Midterm results after operatively stabilised shoulder dislocations in elderly patients

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, Marcus; Geiger, Emanuel V.; Ilius, Christine; FRANK, JOHANNES; Marzi, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocation is frequently seen in young patients. The therapeutic regime in elderly patients after shoulder dislocation is less clearly defined. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical benefit of operative stabilisation following anterior shoulder dislocation in young versus elderly patients. Seventy-two patients with anterior shoulder dislocations were allocated into two groups. Group 1 (> 40 years of age) consisted of 23 patients, and group 2 (

  12. Muscular imbalance and shoulder pain in volleyball attackers.

    OpenAIRE

    Kugler, A.; Krüger-Franke, M; Reininger, S; Trouillier, H H; Rosemeyer, B

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In overhead sports such as volleyball, baseball, or tennis shoulder problems are very common. The aim of this study was to identify features which may correlate with shoulder problems in volleyball attackers. METHODS: 30 competitive volleyball attackers (mean age 25 years) were included in the study; 15 were suffering from shoulder pain and 15 had no history of shoulder pain. The results were compared with those of a control group of 15 recreational athletes without any overhead sp...

  13. Shoulder disorders in general practice: prognostic indicators of outcome.

    OpenAIRE

    Windt, van der, D.A.W.M.; Koes, B.W.; Boeke, A J P; Deville, W.L.J.M.; De, Jong; Bouter, L.M.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Shoulder pain is common in primary health care. Nevertheless, information on the outcome of shoulder disorders is scarce, especially for patients encountered in general practice. AIM: To study the course of shoulder disorders in general practice and to determine prognostic indicators of outcome. METHOD: For this prospective follow-up study, 11 Dutch general practitioners recruited 349 patients with new episodes of shoulder pain. The participants filled out a questionnaire at prese...

  14. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation. PMID:25459121

  15. Nocturnal seizure and simultaneous bilateral shoulder fracture-dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahbudin, Ilfita; Filer, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    An otherwise fit and well 27-year-old man presented with acute onset unexplained bilateral shoulder pain, and was found to have bilateral shoulder fractures and dislocations on imaging. Although features were atypical, a nocturnal seizure causing the bilateral shoulder fractures was suspected and EEG showed features compatible with epilepsy. PMID:26838296

  16. Shoulder instability : A clinical and MRI-based analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Salomonsson, Björn

    2009-01-01

    Shoulder instability is a common but complex and challenging area of shoulder pathology, and new diagnostic methods and treatments are continuously developed. We conducted this study to evaluate the clinical outcome of shoulder instability with respect to different diagnostic possibilities and surgical treatments. We have studied the patient material from our department, consisting of atraumatic instability, posttraumatic recurrent anterior instability, and primary shoul...

  17. Interobserver reliability of physical examination of shoulder girdle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nomden, Jettie G.; Slagers, Anton J.; Bergman, Geert; Winters, Jan C.; Kropmans, Thomas J. B.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2009-01-01

    The object of this study was to assess interobserver reliability in 23 tests concerning physical examination of the shoulder girdle. A physical therapist and a physical therapist/manual therapist independently performed a physical examination of the shoulder girdle in 91 patients with shoulder compl

  18. The Effect of the Modified Lateral Suprascapular Block on Shoulder Function in Patients With Chronic Shoulder Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Dorn, Christian; Rumpold-Seitlinger, Gudrun; Farzi, Sylvia; Auer, Johann; Bornemann-Cimenti, Helmar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) is commonly used in pain therapy for patients with chronic shoulder pain. The effect of SSNB on shoulder function has, however, not been investigated so far. If in shoulder function, i.e. the range of motion is increased after application of the nerve block, it can be expected that subsequent physiotherapy, besides being less painful, is also more effective in terms of restoring shoulder mobility. Objectives: Our aim was to evaluate the effect of S...

  19. Effect of the Push-up Plus (PUP) Exercise at Different Shoulder Rotation Angles on Shoulder Muscle Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Baek, Il-hun; Cheon, Ju Young; Cho, Min Jung; Choi, Mi Young; JUNG, DA HYE

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Although the Push-Up Plus is a useful exercise method for shoulder stabilization, few studies have examined its effects at different angles of shoulder rotation. Therefore, the present study investigated the most effective exercise method for shoulder stabilization by analyzing muscle activities of the rotator cuff muscles at different angles of shoulder rotation. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy university students in their 20s were the subjects of this study. [Methods] Changes in muscle...

  20. General amyloid inhibitors? A critical examination of the inhibition of IAPP amyloid formation by inositol stereoisomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin forms amyloid deposits in the islets of Langerhans; a process that is believed to contribute to the progression of type 2 diabetes and to the failure of islet transplants. An emerging theme in amyloid research is the hypothesis that the toxic species produced during amyloid formation by different polypeptides share common features and exert their effects by common mechanisms. If correct, this suggests that inhibitors of amyloid formation by one polypeptide might be effective against other amyloidogenic sequences. IAPP and Aβ, the peptide responsible for amyloid formation in Alzheimer's disease, are particularly interesting in this regard as they are both natively unfolded in their monomeric states and share some common characteristics. Comparatively little effort has been expended on the design of IAPP amyloid inhibitors, thus it is natural to inquire if Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP, especially since no IAPP inhibitors have been clinically approved. A range of compounds inhibit Aβ amyloid formation, including various stereoisomers of inositol. Myo-, scyllo-, and epi-inositol have been shown to induce conformational changes in Aβ and prevent Aβ amyloid fibril formation by stabilizing non-fibrillar β-sheet structures. We investigate the ability of inositol stereoisomers to inhibit amyloid formation by IAPP. The compounds do not induce a conformational change in IAPP and are ineffective inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation, although some do lead to modest apparent changes in IAPP amyloid fibril morphology. Thus not all classes of Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP. This work provides a basis of comparison to work on polyphenol based inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation and helps provide clues as to the features which render them effective. The study also helps provide information for further efforts in rational inhibitor design.

  1. Protocol for Shoulder function training reducing musculoskeletal pain in shoulder and neck: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortensen Ole S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neck and shoulder complaints are common among employees in sedentary occupations characterized by intensive computer use. Such musculoskeletal pain - which is often associated with restricted range of motion and loss of muscle strength - is one of the most common conditions treated by physical therapists. The exact mechanism of neck pain is rarely revealed by clinical examination and the treatment has varied from passive rest to active treatments. Active treatments have often been divided into either training of the painful area or the surrounding musculature avoiding direct training of the painful area. Our study investigates the effect of the latter approach. Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial of 10 weeks duration is currently being conducted. Employed office workers with severe neck-shoulder pain are randomized to 3 × 20 min shoulder function training with training supervision or to a reference group receiving advice to stay physically active. Shoulder function training primarily focuses on the serratus anterior and lower trapezius muscle with only minimal activation the upper trapezius. An announcement was sent to the administrative section of the university including jobs characterized by intensive computer work. The first 100 positive replies entered the study. Among these inclusion criteria were pain intensity in the neck/shoulder of at least 3 on a 0-9 scale. Exclusion criteria were cardiovascular disease, trauma, hypertension, or serious chronic disease. Before and after the intervention period the participants replied to a questionnaire about musculoskeletal disorders and work disability, and underwent a standardized clinical examination of the neck and shoulder girdle. Further, on a weekly basis the participants log pain intensity of the neck and shoulder during the previous week. The primary outcome measure is pain in the neck and shoulders at week 10 based on the weekly pain registration and results

  2. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CONGENI, MD: Yeah. The shoulder's a really unique joint. And so in sports it's a joint that comes under a lot of load and ... and is injured not infrequently. The way the joint is made, it's kind of a…you know, ...

  3. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... very excellent conservative care, non-operative care for sports injuries, shoulder injuries. If necessary, we can communicate with ... to get you through from the day of injury to that six or nine month point post-op where you're ready to get back to your sport. 00:50:07 This webcast will be archived ...

  4. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... very excellent conservative care, non-operative care for sports injuries, shoulder injuries. If necessary, we can communicate with ... to get you through from the day of injury to that six or nine month point post-op where you're ready to get back to your sport. 00:50:07 This webcast will be archived ...

  5. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the shoulder pops out of place from an injury. Oftentimes those kids may fail physical therapy and end up requiring surgery. 00:06:19 ... we know that the patient with the traumatic injury, that had a dislocation that ... first with physical therapy and rehab. So, Joe, maybe if you could ...

  6. Shoulder Impingement Syndrome (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... activities: ● Swim ● Throw ● Play tennis ● Lift weights ● Play golf ● Play volleyball ● Do gymnastics ● Paint ● Stock shelves SHOULDER ... impingement, your healthcare provider will examine you to learn what movements elicit symptoms. As part of the ...

  7. Clavicular eosinophilic granuloma causing adult shoulder pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence R. Menendez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Though rarely reported, neoplasms of the clavicle occur, and their symptoms can be mistaken for more common shoulder conditions. We present the case of a benign clavicular neoplasm, rarely seen in adults, presenting with pain, and eventual pathologic fracture in a 49 year-old. A 49 year-old male firefighter underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for shoulder pain after magnetic resonance imaging revealed supraspinatus tendon tear. The patient’s pain persisted after surgery, and was described as routine until he developed severe pain after minor blunt trauma. A local Emergency Room performed the first x-rays, which revealed a pathologic fracture of the distal clavicle through a destructive lesion. The patient was referred to an orthopedic oncologist, who performed incisional biopsy, which initially diagnosed osteomyelitis. The patient was subsequently taken to surgery for debridement. Pathology then yielded the diagnosis of eosinophilic granuloma. The patient was taken back to surgery for formal curettage with open reduction and internal fixation. The patient’s pain resolved, the pathologic fracture fully healed, and the patient returned to full time work as a firefighter. Though workup for common shoulder conditions often identifies incidental benign lesions of bone, the converse can be true. Persistent pain despite intervention should raise concern for further investigation. An x-ray alone can reveal a destructive bone lesion as the source of shoulder pain.

  8. [A strong man with a weak shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henket, Marjolijn; Lycklama á Nijeholt, Geert J; van der Zwaal, Peer

    2013-01-01

    A 47-year-old former olympic athlete had pain and weakness of his left shoulder. There was no prior trauma. He had full range-of-motion and a scapular dyskinesia. There was atrophy of the trapezius and sternocleidomastoideus muscles. He was diagnosed with 'idiopathic neuritis of the accessorius nerve'. PMID:24326139

  9. Shoulder complaints : the occurence, course and diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Luime (Jolanda)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractShoulder complaints are expressed in a variety of symptoms. In many cases, the prominent symptom is pain. In some cases, pain is present most of the day and frequently also at night. In other cases, it is provoked primarily by physical activities. Often it is accompanied by restricted ra

  10. Bankart Repair to Correct Shoulder Instability

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... future, is to work on a shoulder dislocation prevention program. 00:46:35 TODD RITZMAN, MD: Sure. That's a good point. I think when talking about new things in the frontier, also maybe could you comment on after the injury occurs some of the new things that are ...

  11. A Simple Technique for Shoulder Arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present a systematic approach to teaching a technique for arthrography of the shoulder. Using an adhesive marker-plate with radiopaque coordinates, precise sites for puncture can be identified and the need for fluoroscopic guidance obviated. Material and Methods: Forty-six glenohumeral arthrograms were performed in 45 patients; in 1 case involving examination of both shoulders. The stages of the technique are described in detail, as are the fundamental aspects of achieving an effective glenohumeral injection. Pain intensity was measured in all patients using a verbal description scale. Results: Shoulder arthrography was successful in all cases. Average time taken for the procedure was 7 min, with no difference in the respective times required by an experienced radiologist and a resident. The procedure was well tolerated by most patients, with slight discomfort being observed in a very few cases. Conclusion: The arthrographic technique used in this study is simple, safe, rapid, and reproducible, and has the advantage of precise localization of the site for puncture without need for fluoroscopic guidance. The procedure described in this study can be of help in teaching residents and can reduce the learning curve for radiologists with no experience in arthrographic methods. It also reduces the time of exposure to fluoroscopy Keywords: Arthrography, joint, shoulder

  12. Unexplained Shoulder Pain in a Weightlifter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Lawrence E.; Michael, Roger H.

    1988-01-01

    This case report describes how a weightlifter's shoulder pain was diagnosed using radionuclide imaging. This technique is valuable because it detects increased vascularity or metabolic activity of lesions long before such changes can be seen on plain radiographs or other imaging modalities. (Author/JL)

  13. Radiography of the acutely injured shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routine radiological examination of the acute shoulder has been unchanged in radiology departments for many years. At UCLH (University College London Hospitals, UK) this examination consists of two projections, an AP (antero-posterior) and an LS (lateral scapula). Following a review of the related literature and the possible advantages of an axial style projection, a study was performed to evaluate whether a new projection named modified trauma axial (MTA) shoulder projection could replace the existing LS projection in the routine examination of the acute shoulder. A retrospective analysis of 244 acute shoulder examinations over a 5-month period was performed. AP, LS and MTA projections were taken with paired AP and LS, and AP and MTA radiographs were reported separately. 97 traumatic abnormalities were reported using AP and MTA whilst only 64 abnormalities were reported using AP and LS views. The MTA projection demonstrated it was significant for evaluating articular surfaces of the humeral head and glenoid, defects in the humeral head, greater tuberosity fractures, glenoid fractures and fractures of the acromion. It was established that if the LS projection was replaced with the MTA view no traumatic pathologies would have been overlooked and in fact there was a 52% increase in traumatic abnormalities detected. Use of a chi-squared test demonstrated a highly significant difference in the number of traumatic abnormalities detected between the two pairs of projection combinations (p = 0.0004). Based on this study and the examined literature the routine examination of the acutely injured shoulder is recommended to include the AP and MTA projections only.

  14. Neuroinflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis affects amyloid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anckarsäter Henrik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP and β-amyloid (Aβ is widely studied in Alzheimer's disease, where Aβ deposition and plaque development are essential components of the pathogenesis. However, the physiological role of amyloid in the adult nervous system remains largely unknown. We have previously found altered cerebral amyloid metabolism in other neuroinflammatory conditions. To further elucidate this, we investigated amyloid metabolism in patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB. Methods The first part of the study was a cross-sectional cohort study in 61 patients with acute facial palsy (19 with LNB and 42 with idiopathic facial paresis, Bell's palsy and 22 healthy controls. CSF was analysed for the β-amyloid peptides Aβ38, Aβ40 and Aβ42, and the amyloid precursor protein (APP isoforms α-sAPP and β-sAPP. CSF total-tau (T-tau, phosphorylated tau (P-tau and neurofilament protein (NFL were measured to monitor neural cell damage. The second part of the study was a prospective cohort-study in 26 LNB patients undergoing consecutive lumbar punctures before and after antibiotic treatment to study time-dependent dynamics of the biomarkers. Results In the cross-sectional study, LNB patients had lower levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau, and higher levels of CSF NFL than healthy controls and patients with Bell's palsy. In the prospective study, LNB patients had low levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau at baseline, which all increased towards normal at follow-up. Conclusions Amyloid metabolism is altered in LNB. CSF levels of α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau are decreased in acute infection and increase after treatment. In combination with earlier findings in multiple sclerosis, cerebral SLE and HIV with cerebral engagement, this points to an influence of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism.

  15. Painful shoulder. Introduction into fundamental facts and problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartl, P.W.

    1987-10-19

    The painful shoulder syndrome is very common. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis may be difficult. Shoulder pain may be caused by local processes or systemic diseases or can be referred. Periarthritis humeroscapularis (frozen shoulder) is the most common cause of painful shoulder syndrome. Biomechanical factors concerning the rotator cuff are involved in the etiopathogenesis of these pain syndromes. The therapy of frozen shoulder includes physical treatment, antirheumatic drugs, or X-ray treatment. Surgical measures may become necessary. In the course of rheumatoid arthritis the shoulder may be involved. Milwaukee-shoulder-syndrome has been described recently in crystal deposit diseases. Shoulder pain may be referred by mechanical irritations of nerve roots in the course of degenerative lesions of the cervical spine and also in the course of internal diseases of the heart, the lungs, or the gastrointestinal tract. In cases of shoulder pain without pathological data from arthrological, radiological or laboratory studies, one should always consider localized fibromyalgia in the shoulder-neck-region. The precise diagnosis of shoulder pain is an important prerequisite for treatment, the success of which should not be judged as pessimistic as it has been commonly done in the past.

  16. Synovial cutaneous fistula complicating a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letter, Haley P; Limback, Joseph; Wasyliw, Christopher; Bancroft, Laura; Scherer, Kurt

    2016-06-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is becoming a common form of shoulder arthroplasty that is often performed in the setting of rotator cuff pathology. Infection is a rare complication but is more common in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty than in hemiarthroplasty or anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty. We present the case of a 69-year-old patient with a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty who presented with purulent drainage from the skin of his anterior shoulder. Computed tomography arthrogram confirmed the presence of a synovial cutaneous fistula. Synovial cutaneous fistula is a rare variant of periprosthetic infection that, to our knowledge, has not been described previously in the setting of a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Computed tomography arthrogram proved to be a reliable method for confirming the diagnosis and was used for operative planning to remove the hardware. PMID:27257460

  17. Optimal Design of a Bio-Inspired Anthropocentric Shoulder Rehabilitator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a bio-inspired anthropocentric 7-DOF wearable robotic arm for the purpose of stroke rehabilitation. The proposed arm rehabilitator synergistically utilizes the human arm structure with non-invasive kinematically under-deterministic cable-driven mechanisms to form a completely deterministic structure. It offers the advantages of being lightweight and having high dexterity. Adopting an anthropocentric design concept also allows it to conform to the human anatomical structure. The focus of this paper is on the analysis and design of the 3-DOF-shoulder module, called the shoulder rehabilitator. The design methodology is divided into three main steps: (1 performance evaluation of the cable-driven shoulder rehabilitator, (2 performance requirements of the shoulder joint based on its physiological characteristics and (3 design optimization of the shoulder rehabilitator based on shoulder joint physiological limitations. The aim is to determine a suitable configuration for the development of a shoulder rehabilitator prototype.

  18. Bilateral Traumatic Anterior Dislocation of Shoulder – a rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashavantha Kumar C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bilateral shoulder dislocation are most commonly posterior type. These are most commonly due to seizure disorder and electrocution. Anterior shoulder dislocations occurring bilaterally without any predisposing factors are very rare. These types of injuries are due to trauma with a unique mechanism of injury. To best of our knowledge there are only few cases of similar kind are reported in literature. We hereby report a interesting case of posttraumatic, bilateral anterior dislocation of shoulder without associated fracture in a 45 old women without any predisposing pathoanatomy.Case Report: A 45-year-old women presented to casualty with sudden onset of pain and restriction of movement in both shoulders fallowing trauma. Immediately post trauma she had severe pain and restriction of both shoulders. On examination arms were abducted and externally rotated. Bilateral shoulder movements were painful and restricted . There was loss of round contour of shoulder with increased vertical diameter of axilla anteriorly. Radiological examination revealed bilateral anterior dislocation of the shoulders without any associated fractures. Closed reduction done by Milch technique after intraraticular lignocaine injection. MRI of bilateral shoulder showed no pathological lesion. Both shoulders were immobilized with a shoulder immobilizer for three weeks.Conclusion: Most of the bilateral shoulder dislocations are posterior type seen in seizure disorders. Bilateral traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations are rare and are seen as a result of unique mechanism of injury. In our case patient had a fall on her elbows causing forced extension. If diagnosed and treated promptly completely normal function of the shoulders can be restored.

  19. Double contrast CT arthrographic findings of shoulder instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenno-humeral joint is a ball and socket joint. It has the greatest range of movement among all the joints of the body. The greatest range of movement is inevitably accompanied by a considerable loss in stability. Thirty three persons underwent Double Contrast CT arthrography of the shoulder for the evaluation of suspected shoulder derangement. We performed 62 shoulder arthrography(33 abnormal shoulders and 29 normal shoulders) and reviewed their findings retrospectively. They had recurrent shoulder dislocation(30 shoulders) or nonspecific shoulder pain(3 shoulders). Injury of the glenoid labrum was seen in 28 shoulders at double contrast CT arthrography. Among 28 cases of the labral injury, labral detachment was seen in 15 cases, labral tear in 5 cases, and labral erosion in 8 cases. Double contrast CT arthrography also showed Hill-Sachs defection in 20 shoulders. The numbers of type 1, type 2, and type 3 capsulolabral attachment in 33 shoulder instability cases were 10, 16,and 7, respectivity, while, 16, 12, and , 1 in 29 normal controls. Type 2 and 3 are more common in shoulder instability group than normal control group. Operation was done in 18 shoulders. Comparing with operation findings, the sensitivity of double contrast CT arthrography in the detection of Hill-Sachs defect was 100% with the specificity of 71% and the accuracy of 89%. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of double contrast CT arthrography in the detection of labral injury were 94%, 100%, and 95%, respectively. Double contrast CT arthrography is a minimally invasive and highly accurate technique for in the evaluation of glenohumeral instability

  20. Amyloid Imaging in Aging and Dementia: Testing the Amyloid Hypothesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Rabinovici

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging represents a major advance in neuroscience, enabling the detection and quantification of pathologic protein aggregations in the brain. In this review we survey current amyloid imaging techniques, focusing on positron emission tomography (PET with ^{11}carbon-labelled Pittsburgh Compound-B (11C-PIB, the most extensively studied and best validated tracer. PIB binds specifically to fibrillar beta-amyloid (Aβ deposits, and is a sensitive marker for Aβ pathology in cognitively normal older individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. PIB-PET provides us with a powerful tool to examine in vivo the relationship between amyloid deposition, clinical symptoms, and structural and functional brain changes in the continuum between normal aging and AD. Amyloid imaging studies support a model in which amyloid deposition is an early event on the path to dementia, beginning insidiously in cognitively normal individuals, and accompanied by subtle cognitive decline and functional and structural brain changes suggestive of incipient AD. As patients progress to dementia, clinical decline and neurodegeneration accelerate and proceed independently of amyloid accumulation. In the future, amyloid imaging is likely to supplement clinical evaluation in selecting patients for anti-amyloid therapies, while MRI and FDG-PET may be more appropriate markers of clinical progression.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency The prevalence of hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy is unknown. The Dutch type is the most common, with over 200 ...

  2. Molecular mechanisms of amyloid self-regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Landreh, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid is associated with both pathological protein deposits and the formation of functional protein structures. Therefore, several strategies have evolved to control the formation or inhibition of amyloid in vivo. In this thesis, three separate systems were investigated in which amyloidogenic protein segments are coupled to regulatory elements that prevent or promote fibrillation. We describe the molecular mechanism for how (a) a propeptide segment prevents the uncontrolled a...

  3. Amyloid myopathy presenting with respiratory failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Ashe, J.; Borel, C O; Hart, G.; Humphrey, R L; Derrick, D A; Kuncl, R W

    1992-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a rare cause of myopathy. Its prominent or presenting feature may be respiratory failure. Physiological measurement of transdiaphragmatic pressure and biopsy specimens of muscle show the pathological mechanism to be diaphragm weakness due to amyloid infiltration of the diaphragm rather than parenchymal lung involvement. Thus amyloid myopathy even without the typical macroglossia and muscle pseudohypertrophy should be considered as one of the neurological causes of respiratory f...

  4. Posterior glenoid rim deficiency in recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To assess the shape of the posterior glenoid rim in patients with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability.Design and patients. CT examinations of 15 shoulders with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability were reviewed in masked fashion with regard to abnormalities of the glenoid shape, specifically of its posterior rim. The glenoid version was also assessed. The findings were compared with the findings in 15 shoulders with recurrent anterior shoulder instability and 15 shoulders without instability. For all patients, surgical correlation was available.Results. Fourteen of the 15 (93%) shoulders with recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability had a deficiency of the posteroinferior glenoid rim. In patients with recurrent anterior instability or stable shoulders such deficiencies were less common (60% and 73%, respectively). The craniocaudal length of the deficiencies was largest in patients with posterior instability. When a posteroinferior deficiency with a craniocaudal length of 12 mm or more was defined as abnormal, sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing recurrent (atraumatic) posterior instability were 86.7% and 83.3%, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in glenoid version between shoulders with posterior instability and stable shoulders (P=0.01).Conclusion. Recurrent (atraumatic) posterior shoulder instability should be considered in patients with a bony deficiency of the posteroinferior glenoid rim with a craniocaudal length of more than 12 mm. (orig.)

  5. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Hippocrate Avenue 10/2942, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: frederic.lecouvet@uclouvain.be; Simoni, Paolo; Koutaissoff, Sophie; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Malghem, Jacques; Dubuc, Jean-Emile [Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Hippocrate Avenue 10/2942, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-10-15

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings.

  6. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings

  7. Dexamethasone for pain after outpatient shoulder surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnholdt, K. T.; Mønsted, P. N.; Søballe, Kjeld;

    2014-01-01

    Background Dexamethasone has analgesic properties when given intravenously before surgery, but the optimal dose has not been determined. We hypothesised that a dose of 40 mg dexamethasone would improve analgesia after outpatient shoulder surgery compared with 8 mg. Methods A randomised, double......-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted at Horsens Regional Hospital, Denmark. Patients scheduled for arthroscopic subacromial decompression and/or acromioclavicular joint resection as an outpatient procedure (n = 101) were randomised to receive intravenous dexamethasone 40 mg (D40), 8 mg (D8) or...... a dose–response relationship, increasing the dexamethasone dose from 8 to 40 mg did not improve analgesia significantly after outpatient shoulder surgery....

  8. Common Shoulder Injuries in American Football Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Daniel B; Lynch, T Sean; Nuber, Erika D; Nuber, Gordon W

    2015-01-01

    American football is a collision sport played by athletes at high speeds. Despite the padding and conditioning in these athletes, the shoulder is a vulnerable joint, and injuries to the shoulder girdle are common at all levels of competitive football. Some of the most common injuries in these athletes include anterior and posterior glenohumeral instability, acromioclavicular pathology (including separation, osteolysis, and osteoarthritis), rotator cuff pathology (including contusions, partial thickness, and full thickness tears), and pectoralis major and minor tears. In this article, we will review the epidemiology and clinical and radiographic workup of these injuries. We also will evaluate the effectiveness of surgical and nonsurgical management specifically related to high school, collegiate, and professional football athletes. PMID:26359844

  9. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane. PMID:26673736

  10. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide: Structure, Function, and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehana Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hormone islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, or amylin plays a role in glucose homeostasis but aggregates to form islet amyloid in type-2 diabetes. Islet amyloid formation contributes to β-cell dysfunction and death in the disease and to the failure of islet transplants. Recent work suggests a role for IAPP aggregation in cardiovascular complications of type-2 diabetes and hints at a possible role in type-1 diabetes. The mechanisms of IAPP amyloid formation in vivo or in vitro are not understood and the mechanisms of IAPP induced β-cell death are not fully defined. Activation of the inflammasome, defects in autophagy, ER stress, generation of reactive oxygen species, membrane disruption, and receptor mediated mechanisms have all been proposed to play a role. Open questions in the field include the relative importance of the various mechanisms of β-cell death, the relevance of reductionist biophysical studies to the situation in vivo, the molecular mechanism of amyloid formation in vitro and in vivo, the factors which trigger amyloid formation in type-2 diabetes, the potential role of IAPP in type-1 diabetes, the development of clinically relevant inhibitors of islet amyloidosis toxicity, and the design of soluble, bioactive variants of IAPP for use as adjuncts to insulin therapy.

  11. Detailed Shoulder MRI Findings in Manual Wheelchair Users with Shoulder Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa M. B. Morrow

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder pain and pathology are common in manual wheelchair (MWC users with paraplegia, and the biomechanical mechanism of injury is largely unknown. Establishing patterns of MRI characteristics in MWC users would help advance understanding of the mechanical etiology of rotator cuff disease, thus improving the logic for prescribed interventions. The purpose of this study was to report detailed shoulder MRI findings in a sample of 10 MWC users with anterolateral shoulder pain. The imaging assessments were performed using our standardized MRI Assessment of the Shoulder (MAS guide. The tendon most commonly torn was the supraspinatus at the insertion site in the anterior portion in either the intrasubstance or articular region. Additionally, widespread tendinopathy, CA ligament thickening, subacromial bursitis, labral tears, and AC joint degenerative arthrosis and edema were common. Further reporting of detailed shoulder imaging findings is needed to confirm patterns of tears in MWC users regarding probable tendon tear zone, region, and portion. This investigation was a small sample observational study and did not yield data that can define patterns of pathology. However, synthesis of detailed findings from multiple studies could define patterns of pathological MRI findings allowing for associations of imaging findings to risk factors including specific activities.

  12. Severe shoulder tendinopathy associated with levofloxacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter de Araujo Eyer-Silva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolone (FQ-associated tendinopathy and myopathy are uncommon but well recognized complications of the use of this class of antibacterial agents. The case of a 63-year-old previously asymptomatic female patient who developed severe left shoulder tendinopathy after surreptitiously doubling the prescribed dose of levofloxacin for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia is reported here. Surgical stabilization with suture anchors and subacromial decompression were needed.

  13. Treating Postlaparoscopic Surgery Shoulder Pain with Acupuncture

    OpenAIRE

    Gur Kreindler; Samuel Attias; Anna Kreindler; Haim Hen; Bassel Haj; Ibrahim Matter; Eran Ben-Arye; Elad Schiff

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of acupuncture on postlaparoscopic shoulder pain (PLSP) which is a common side effect in patients undergoing abdominal laparoscopic surgery. Methods. Patients with moderate to severe PLSP in spite of analgesic treatment, which were referred by the medical staff to the Complementary-Integrative Surgery Service (CISS) at our institution, were provided with acupuncture treatment. The severity of PLSP and of general pain was assessed ...

  14. Humeral shaft fracture with ipsilateral shoulder dislocation

    OpenAIRE

    Behera Prateek; Kumar Vishal; Aggarwal Sameer

    2014-01-01

    【Abstract】Although fracture of the humeral shaft or dislocation of the shoulder joint is a common injury, a simutaneous injury is rare. We present such a case combined with head injury which took precedence over the skeletal injuries. The postoperative rehabilitation was slowed down by the head injury. This case report makes us aware of some problems when managing the patient with this rare injury and helps us understand the management options better. Also the need for proper follow-up ...

  15. On the pathogenesis of shoulder impingement syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hyvönen, P. (Pirkko)

    2003-01-01

    Abstract The pathomechanism of the shoulder impingement syndrome has been under debat. Two main theories of the pathogenesis of the disease exists; mechanical (extrinsic) and degenerative (intrinsic) theory. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the pathogenesis of impingement syndrome with five studies that consentrate to aspects related to ethiopathology as outcome and recovery after surgery, radiological diagnosis, immunohisto- and histopathology of subacromial bursa, and subacr...

  16. Systematics of shoulder instability; Systematik der Schulterinstabilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Maehringer-Kunz, A. [Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Mainz (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    Shoulder instability is defined as a symptomatic abnormal motion of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active shoulder motion. Glenohumeral instabilities are classified according to the causative factors as the pathogenesis of instability plays an important role with respect to treatment options. Instabilities are classified into traumatic and atraumatic instabilities as part of a multidirectional instability syndrome and into microtraumatic instabilities. For diagnostics plain radiographs (''trauma series'') are performed to document shoulder dislocation and its successful repositioning. Direct magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is the most important imaging modality for delineation of the different injury patterns of the labral-ligamentous complex and bony structures. Monocontrast computed tomography (CT) arthrography with the use of multidetector CT scanners represents an alternative imaging modality; however, MR imaging should be preferred in the work-up of shoulder instabilities due to the mostly younger age of patients. (orig.) [German] Unter einer Schulterinstabilitaet versteht man jede zu Beschwerden fuehrende Translation des Humeruskopfs in Relation zur Gelenkpfanne waehrend einer aktiven Bewegung der Schulter. Glenohumerale Instabilitaeten werden heute nach ihrer Aetiologie eingeteilt, da bei der Wahl der Therapie der Entstehungsmechanismus der Instabilitaet eine wichtige Rolle spielt. Danach unterscheidet man primaer traumatisch von atraumatisch entstandenen Instabilitaeten sowie Mikroinstabilitaeten. Bei der Diagnostik dienen konventionelle Roentgenuebersichtsaufnahmen nur noch zur Dokumentation einer Luxation und zur Beurteilung der Reposition. Die durch eine Instabilitaet hervorgerufenen Verletzungsfolgen am labroligamentaeren Komplex und den knoechernen Strukturen werden heute bevorzugt mit der direkten MR-Arthrographie dargestellt. Hierbei koennen unterschiedliche Verletzungsmuster dargestellt werden. Nach

  17. Shoulder Injuries in English Community Rugby Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, V R; Trewartha, G; Roberts, S P; England, M; Stokes, K A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, severity and type of shoulder injuries resulting from match play in adult community rugby union between 2009-2013. A total of 254 time-loss shoulder injuries were reported, an overall incidence of 2.2 per 1 000 h (95% CI: 1.9 to 2.4), and a mean injury severity of 9.5 weeks missed (95% CI: 8.2 to 10.8). The semi-professional group had an incidence of 2.8 injuries per 1 000 h (95% CI: 2.2 to 3.5), which was higher than the recreational group at 1.8 injuries per 1 000 h (95% CI: 1.4 to 2.2, p=0.004). The incidence of acromioclavicular joint injury for semi-professional players was 1.2 per 1 000 h (95% CI: 0.8 to 1.6); which was significantly higher than the incidence of this injury type in recreational players (0.5 per 1 000 h 95% CI: 0.3 to 0.7, p=0.002). Overall, back row players sustained the highest incidence of all shoulder injuries for a given playing position, 2.9 injuries per 1 000 h (95% CI: 2.2 to 3.6). The tackle was the main event associated with injury. Injury prevention programs and coaching strategies that consider tackle technique and physical conditioning of the shoulder region are therefore considered important. PMID:27176887

  18. Multimedia virtualized environment for shoulder pain rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chen

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Researchers imported games and virtual reality training to help participants train their shoulders in a relaxed environment. [Subjects and Methods] This study included the use of Kinect somatosensory device with Unity software to develop 3-dimensional situational games. The data collected from this training process can be uploaded via the Internet to a cloud or server for participants to perform self-inspection. The data can be a reference for the medical staff to assess training effectiveness for those with impairments and plan patient rehabilitation courses. [Results] In the training activities, 8 subjects with normal shoulder function demonstrated that the system has good stability and reproducibility. Six subjects with impaired shoulder underwent 6 weeks of training. During the third week of training, average performance stabilized. The t-test comparing 1–2 weeks to 3–4 weeks and 5–6 weeks showed significant differences. [Conclusion] Using games as training methods improved patient concentration, interest in participation and allowed patients to forget about their body discomfort. The equipment utilized in this study is inexpensive, easy to obtain, and the system is easy to install. People can perform simple self-training both at home or in the office. PMID:27190481

  19. Multimedia virtualized environment for shoulder pain rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chen

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] Researchers imported games and virtual reality training to help participants train their shoulders in a relaxed environment. [Subjects and Methods] This study included the use of Kinect somatosensory device with Unity software to develop 3-dimensional situational games. The data collected from this training process can be uploaded via the Internet to a cloud or server for participants to perform self-inspection. The data can be a reference for the medical staff to assess training effectiveness for those with impairments and plan patient rehabilitation courses. [Results] In the training activities, 8 subjects with normal shoulder function demonstrated that the system has good stability and reproducibility. Six subjects with impaired shoulder underwent 6 weeks of training. During the third week of training, average performance stabilized. The t-test comparing 1-2 weeks to 3-4 weeks and 5-6 weeks showed significant differences. [Conclusion] Using games as training methods improved patient concentration, interest in participation and allowed patients to forget about their body discomfort. The equipment utilized in this study is inexpensive, easy to obtain, and the system is easy to install. People can perform simple self-training both at home or in the office. PMID:27190481

  20. Conventional X-ray after shoulder prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three types of shoulder prostheses are commonly used to cover the different indications of shoulder joint replacements: classical modular, inverse and cup. The modular prosthesis can replace the glenoid as well as the humeral head components. Exact visualization of the interface between the glenoid component and bone (or cement-bone interface) is necessary to detect osteolysis, which is relatively common. Therefore, it is mandatory to make true AP and axial projections. When describing the humeral component, the interface between bone and implant must again be considered. Additionally, the position of the humeral head in relation to the glenoid has to be noted. The glenoid component is usually fixed by screws to the bone and an osteolysis is often present at the inferior pole of the glenoid component due to prosthesis bone notching. If the implants are modular devices (classic modular prosthesis, inverse shoulder prosthesis) there is the possibility of dissociation of components and any suspicion of this should be reported. In case of reporting the conventional x-ray of cup prosthesis, the bone implant interface should be mentioned. Again the position of the humeral head to the glenoid requires attention. In all types of prostheses, dislocation of the glenohumeral joint is obvious and has to be addressed in the medical report. (orig.)

  1. Ironman triathletes: MRI assessment of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, W.D.; Dierenfield, Laura [North Hawaii Community Hospital, Kamuela, HI (United States); Ainge, George R.; Brown, David W. [North Hawaii Community Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kamuela, HI (United States); Shellock, Frank G. [University of Southern California, Education and Research, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Crues, John V. [Radnet Inc., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Reuter, Robert M.

    2008-08-15

    The objective of this paper was to demonstrate the prevalence of shoulder magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities, including abnormal bone marrow signal at the acromioclavicular (AC) joint in symptomatic and asymptomatic Ironman Triathletes. The shoulders of 23 Ironman Triathletes, seven asymptomatic (group I) and 16 symptomatic (group II), were studied by MRI. A separate, non-triathlete group was evaluated specifically for AC joint marrow signal abnormalities to compare with the Ironman Triathletes. Partial thickness tears of the rotator cuff, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and AC joint arthrosis were common findings in both groups of triathletes. Tendinopathy was the only finding that was more prevalent in the symptomatic group, but this was not a statistically significant difference (p=0.35). There were no tears of the glenoid labrum seen in group I or II subjects. Of note is that 71% (5/7) of group I subjects and 62% (10/16) of group II subjects had increased signal changes in the marrow of the AC joint (p=0.68). The comparison group showed a lower prevalence (35%, p=0.06) of this finding. No statistically significant difference was found among the findings for group 1, group 2, or the comparison group, although the difference between the comparison group and Ironman Triathletes approached statistical significance when evaluating for AC joint abnormal signal. Shoulder MRI of Ironman Triathletes should be interpreted with an appreciation of the commonly seen findings in asymptomatic subjects. (orig.)

  2. Arthrography of the equine shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques and normal radiographic anatomy for positive and double contrast shoulder arthrography in horses were evaluated. General anaesthesia was used for most radiographic projections of the shoulder. The mediolateral projection provided the most information during arthrography, although the supinated mediolateral view occasionally allowed better definition of the cartilage surfaces on the medial aspects of the humeral head. The craniocaudal mediolateral oblique and caudocranial projections provided limited additional information. Water soluble non-ionic contrast agents, such as metrizamide and iohexol, were suitable for shoulder arthrography; iohexol resulted in less synovitis and lameness. Arthrography in cases of osteochondrosis and osteochondritis dissecans allowed better evaluation of cartilage attachment to subchondral bone, better evaluation of the length and depth of cartilage lesions and more accurately defined the site and shape of osteocartilaginous free bodies. Cartilage thickening without detachment from the subchondral bone could only be determined by arthrography. Although these thick cartilage regions may later dissect from the subchondral bone, most cases where the cartilage was firmly adherent were not candidates for surgical debridement and carried a favourable prognosis. The determination of a free flap by arthrography indicated the need for surgery. Extensive humeral and glenoid cavity lesions were better defined by arthrography, allowing a rational decision between surgical debridement or euthanasia. Using arthrography, evaluation of the size and patency of the communicating canal to a subchondral cystic defect better separated cases with long, narrow and poorly patent canals for conservative rather than surgical therapy

  3. Cine-MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Shoulder lesions are usually examined with the joint in only one or two positions. We examined the shoulder with the joint in a variety of positions. We also assessed the application of cine-MR to the detection of instability and impingement. Material and Methods: The cine-MR examinations were performed in 30 patients and 15 healthy volunteers. We used an open 0.2 T system and a closed 1.0 T system. Spoiled gradient echo 2D T1-weighted images and turbo spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained with a field of view of 180 mm. The examinations were videotaped and evaluated later. Results: Normal variations of the glenohumeral joint were easy to recognize. Subluxations and luxations of the humeral head as well as rupture of the labrum were identified. It was also possible to identify the labrum with a signal change after arthroscopic refixation. And we were able to objectively assess distances between the osseous structures during dynamic movement. Conclusion: Unlike static MR, cine-MR would appear to be useful in visualizing the capsular ligament complex of the gleno-humeral joint in impingement and instability. It also provides information on dynamic changes and may thus prove to be an important tool for shoulder diagnostics. The method may provide an early diagnosis in the subacromial impingement syndrome. (orig.)

  4. Posterior dislocation of the shoulder joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakker Tejas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Posterior dislocation of shoulder is a rather uncommon injury that is often not diagnosed at the initial examination. However certain constant clinical signs may lead the examiner to suspect the presence of this condition. Even the routine antero-posterior roentgenogram may provide a few clues to diagnosis but the axillary view is mandatory to verify diagnosis. Material and methods : We report a series of 15 shoulders (14 patients with a locked posterior dislocation. Electric shock (7 patients, vehicular accident (4 patients and epileptic seizure (3 patients was causes of dislocation in these patients. The diagnosis was missed initially in 10 cases. An axillary radiograph confirmed the diagnosis in all. Treatment consisted of closed reduction, which was successful in 5, Neer′s modification of McLaughlin procedure (transfer of subscapularis in 6, hemireplacement arthroplasty in one shoulder and tuberosity fixation in one patient. Results : Follow-up ranged from 1 year to 4 years. Five patients had excellent, five good, two poor and one had fair result. Conclusion : Key to diagnosis is a high index of suspicion. The prognosis became less favorable and the therapeutic difficulties were found to be increased in direct proportion to the length of time, these lesions remain undiagnosed. With early recognisition of dislocation, prompt reduction is relatively easy. Surgical intervention is necessary for old unreduced posterior dislocations.

  5. Shoulder MRI after surgical treatment of instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, Martin [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Lang, Philipp [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, 505 Pamassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Wagner, Ulli [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Moeller, Frank [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Deimling, Urs van [University of Bonn, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Genant, H.K. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, 505 Pamassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Schild, Hans H. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    Objective: To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the shoulder after an instability operation. Materials and methods: Physical examinations, radiographs and MRI of 10 patients after anterior glenoid bone block insertion for ventral instability were compared. MRI included T{sub 1}-weighted spin-echo (TR=600, TE=20 ms) and T{sub 2}*-weighted gradient-echo sequences (TE=600, TE=18, Flip=30 deg.) in the axial, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal planes. Results: No patient suffered from recurrent subluxation. We found fusion of the bone block with the anterior glenoid in seven cases, dislocation of the bone block without contact to the glenoid in one case, and no visible bone block in two cases. On MRI, the bone block showed either signal intensity equivalent to fatty bone marrow (n=4) or was devoid of signal consistent with cortical bone or bone sclerosis (n=4). In all patients, a low signal intensity mass, 2-4 cm in diameter, was visible next to the glenoid insertion site. Conclusion: Insertion of a bone block onto the anterior glenoid induces formation of scar tissue, increasing the stability of the shoulder joint. This scar is well visible on MRI and forms independently of the behavior of the bone block itself. MRI is ideally suited for evaluating postoperative shoulder joints after bone-grafting procedures.

  6. Shoulder MRI after surgical treatment of instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the shoulder after an instability operation. Materials and methods: Physical examinations, radiographs and MRI of 10 patients after anterior glenoid bone block insertion for ventral instability were compared. MRI included T1-weighted spin-echo (TR=600, TE=20 ms) and T2*-weighted gradient-echo sequences (TE=600, TE=18, Flip=30 deg.) in the axial, oblique-coronal and oblique-sagittal planes. Results: No patient suffered from recurrent subluxation. We found fusion of the bone block with the anterior glenoid in seven cases, dislocation of the bone block without contact to the glenoid in one case, and no visible bone block in two cases. On MRI, the bone block showed either signal intensity equivalent to fatty bone marrow (n=4) or was devoid of signal consistent with cortical bone or bone sclerosis (n=4). In all patients, a low signal intensity mass, 2-4 cm in diameter, was visible next to the glenoid insertion site. Conclusion: Insertion of a bone block onto the anterior glenoid induces formation of scar tissue, increasing the stability of the shoulder joint. This scar is well visible on MRI and forms independently of the behavior of the bone block itself. MRI is ideally suited for evaluating postoperative shoulder joints after bone-grafting procedures

  7. Postoperative MR arthography of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indications of MR arthrography were analyzed in this prospective study. The aim was to evaluate possible advantages over conventional MRI, establish diagnostic criteria and to analyze its meaning further for the therapeutic management of postoperative patients. MR arthrography was performed in eight patients who had undergone surgical repair of rotator cuff lesions (modified Neer acromioplasty) and in six patients who had undergone arthroscopic therapy of recurrent unidirectional dislocation of the shoulder by combined arthroscopic intra- and extracapsular repair. MR investigations were performed before and after application of a contrast solution (2 mmol Gd-DTPA). All patients suffered from chronic postoperative pain. In patients with rotator cuff lesions, a partial tear could be verified in one patient and excluded in all others. In patients after arthroscopic therapy by combined intra- and extracapsular repair, a radiologically patulous-appearing capsule correlated with clinically recurrent dislocations. In all other patients diagnostic criteria, such as distribution of the intra-articular contrast solution, proliferation of scar tissue, nodular appearance of the glenohumeral ligaments and capsule thickness, correlated with a regular postoperative status. MR arthrography of the shoulder represents a promising method in the evaluation of the postoperative shoulder. It might further improve the evaluation of reactive capsule alterations, scar tissue proliferation, and the labroligamentous complex, as well as the ability to differentiate partial and complete rerupture from degenerative changes of the rotator cuff. (orig.)

  8. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloid-β peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  9. Extravasation of joint fluid into the mediastinum and the deep neck during atthoscopic shoulder surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extravasation of shoulder joint fluid into the surrounding muscles during shoulder arthroscopic surgery is common and inevitable. Here, we report a case of massive extravasation of shoulder joint fluid leading to mediastinal and retrotracheal effusion after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. We will discuss the anatomical basis of fluid leakage from the shoulder to the mediastinum and to the deep neck on CT.

  10. Islet amyloid polypeptide-induced membrane leakage involves uptake of lipids by forming amyloid fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparr, Emma; Engel, Maarten F M; Sakharov, Dmitri V; Sprong, Mariette; Jacobs, Jet; de Kruijff, Ben; Höppener, Jo W M; Killian, J Antoinette

    2004-11-01

    Fibril formation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is associated with cell death of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells in patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. A likely cause for the cytotoxicity of human IAPP is that it destroys the barrier properties of the cell membrane. Here, we show by fluorescence confocal microscopy on lipid vesicles that the process of hIAPP amyloid formation is accompanied by a loss of barrier function, whereby lipids are extracted from the membrane and taken up in the forming amyloid deposits. No membrane interaction was observed when preformed fibrils were used. It is proposed that lipid uptake from the cell membrane is responsible for amyloid-induced membrane damage and that this represents a general mechanism underlying the cytotoxicity of amyloid forming proteins. PMID:15527771

  11. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty for Trauma: When, Where, and How.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szerlip, Benjamin W; Morris, Brent J; Edwards, T Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty has become increasingly popular for the treatment of complex shoulder injuries, including proximal humerus fractures and fixed glenohumeral dislocation, in the elderly population. The early to midterm results of reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of proximal humerus fractures are promising compared with the results of unconstrained humeral head replacement, and patients may have more predictable improvement with less dependence on bone healing and rehabilitation. However, long-term follow-up is needed, and surgeons must be familiar with various complications that are specific to reverse shoulder arthroplasty. To achieve optimal patient outcomes for the management of traumatic shoulder injuries, surgeons must have a comprehensive understanding of the current implant options, indications, and surgical techniques for reverse shoulder arthroplasty. PMID:27049189

  12. Effects and predictors of shoulder muscle massage for patients with posterior shoulder tightness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jing-lan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical approaches like mobilization, stretching, and/or massage may decrease shoulder tightness and improve symptoms in subjects with stiff shoulders. We investigated the effect and predictors of effectiveness of massage in the treatment of patients with posterior shoulder tightness. Methods A randomized controlled trial was conducted in a hospital-based outpatient practice (orthopedic and rehabilitation. Forty-three women and 17 men (mean age = 54 years, range 43-73 years with posterior shoulder tightness participated and were randomized into massage and control groups (n = 30 per group. A physical therapist provided the massage on the posterior deltoid, infraspinatus, and teres minor of the involved shoulder for 18 minutes [about 6 minutes for each muscle] two times a week for 4 weeks. For the control group, one therapist applied light hand touch on the muscles 10 minutes two times a week for 4 weeks. Glenohumeral internal rotation ROM, functional status, and muscle tightness were the main outcomes. Additionally, the potential factors on the effectiveness of massage were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. For this analysis, patients with functional score improvement at least 20% after massage were considered responsive, and the others were considered nonresponsive. Results Fifty-two patients completed the study (29 for the massage and 23 for the control. The overall mean internal rotation ROM increased significantly in the massage group compared to the control (54.9° v.s. 34.9°; P ≤ 0.001. There were 21 patients in the responsive group and 8 in the nonresponsive group. Among the factors, duration of symptoms, functional score, and posterior deltoid tightness were significant predictors of effectiveness of massage. Conclusions Massage was an effective treatment for patients with posterior shoulder tightness, but was less effective in patients with longer duration of symptoms, higher functional limitation

  13. Has the management of shoulder dislocation changed over time?

    OpenAIRE

    Chalidis, Byron; Sachinis, Nick; Dimitriou, Christos; Papadopoulos, Pericles; Samoladas, Efthimios; Pournaras, John

    2006-01-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocation is a disabling injury affecting all ages, young and old alike. Recently, the treatment of traumatic shoulder dislocation has included immobilisation for varying periods of time followed by physiotherapy. This study is the first in this country to address the demographic data and recurrence rates of shoulder dislocation. Three hundred and eight patients (170 men and 138 women) were followed up for an average of 5.9 years. The most frequent mechanism of injury was ...

  14. Shoulder injuries in professional rugby: a retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Horsley, Ian G; Fowler, Elizabeth M; Rolf, Christer G

    2013-01-01

    Background In the literature, little is known about the level and pattern of rugby injuries. Of the shoulder injuries reported, 51% of these are caused during a tackle, and 65% of all match injuries affected the shoulder. Objective The study aims to describe a sport-specific unique intra-articular shoulder pathology of professional rugby players, who presented with persistent pain and dysfunction despite physiotherapeutic treatment and rest. Method This study is a retrospective analysis set a...

  15. A little-known cause of painful shoulder: os acromiale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidental discovery of an 'os acromiale' might explain some cases of 'painful shoulder': this is what we have observed in three patients. The purpose of our article is to underline the relevance of the axillary roentgenogram of the shoulder for the correct diagnosis of this anomaly. In all patients the radiographic examination was performed using a computed radiography system; moreover we performed a computed tomographic examination of the acromioclavicular portion of the shoulders with three-dimensional reconstructions. (orig.)

  16. Frozen shoulder: an arthrographic and radionuclear scan assessment.

    OpenAIRE

    Binder, A I; Bulgen, D Y; Hazleman, B L; Tudor, J.; Wraight, P.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria and nomenclature used to describe the painful stiff shoulder remain confused. Arthrographic features of capsulitis have come to be accepted as characteristic of the frozen shoulder. Increased technetium uptake has also been noted. Both features have been considered to have possible prognostic and therapeutic importance. During a therapeutic study of strictly defined clinical frozen shoulder 35 of 38 patients showed increased technetium diphosphonate uptake in the affec...

  17. Intra-articular Lidocaine Injection for Shoulder Reductions

    OpenAIRE

    Waterbrook, Anna L; Paul, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Context: The shoulder is the most commonly dislocated joint, and shoulder dislocations are very common in sports. Many of these dislocations present to the office or training room for evaluation. Usual practice is an attempt at manual reduction without analgesia and then transfer to the emergency department if unsuccessful. The clinical efficacy of intra-articular lidocaine for reduction of anterior shoulder dislocations in the outpatient setting was examined. Evidence Acquisition: An OVID ME...

  18. Neglected Traumatic Locked Anterior Shoulder Fracture-Dislocation

    OpenAIRE

    Er, Mehmet Serhan; Eroglu, Mehmet; Erten, Recep Abdullah; Metineren, Hasan; Altinel, Levent

    2015-01-01

    Anterior shoulder dislocations are the most common major joint dislocations encountered in the emergency departments and fractures of proximal humerus can accompany with dislocations. Although the treatment of acute isolated traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation is generally simple, the treatment of neglected fracture-dislocations becomes more complicated. In this report, a 22-year-old male patient who had posttraumatic locked, shoulder fracture-dislocation is presented. Open reduction and ...

  19. A Case of Simultaneous Bilateral Anterior Shoulder Dislocation

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Mallanagouda N

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Anterior dislocation of shoulder is commonest dislocation one encounters in day to day Orthopaedic practice. But bilateral shoulder dislocations are relatively uncommon frequently posterior and secondary to violent muscle contraction. Simultaneous bilateral anterior dislocations of shoulder following trauma is rare occurrence. Case Report: 35 year old male presented to emergency department with history fall by tripping on a stone (fall on outstretched hand). He complained of...

  20. Bilateral fracture dislocation of the shoulder (Presentation of a Case)

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzgun, Unal; Baskir, Orhan; Temelli, Yener; Yazicioglu, Onder; Temocin, Bahattin O.; Kokino, Misel

    2004-01-01

    The largest portion of the dislocations encountered in the adults comprises shoulder dislocations and 2.16% of these dislocations constitute posterior dislocations. It is possible to detect that a dislocation develops secondary to convulsions due to immediate loss of consciousness in the history of most of the posterior dislocations of the shoulder. Approximately 20 cases have been so far reported in literature regurding bilateral dislocations of the shoulder. Bilateral dislocation associated...

  1. Contemporary treatment of amyloid heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palecek, Tomas; Fikrle, Michal; Nemecek, Eduard; Bauerova, Lenka; Kuchynka, Petr; Louch, William E; Spicka, Ivan; Rysava, Romana

    2015-01-01

    The amyloidoses represent a group of diseases characterized by extracellular deposition of abnormal protein, amyloid, which is formed by insoluble extracellular fibrils in β-pleated sheets. Although cardiac involvement may occur in all types of amyloidoses, clinically relevant amyloid cardiomyopathy is a typical feature of AL amyloidosis and transthyretin-related amyloidoses. Congestive heart failure represents the commonest manifestation of amyloid heart disease. Noninvasive imaging techniques, especially echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance, play a major role in the diagnosis of amyloid cardiomyopathy; however, histological confirmation and exact typing of amyloid deposits is necessary whether in extracardiac location or directly in the myocardium. Early diagnosis of amyloid heart disease is of utmost importance as the presence and especially the severity of cardiac involvement generally drives the prognosis of affected subjects and plays a major role in determining the intensity of specific treatment, namely in AL amyloidosis. The management of patients with amyloid heart disease is complex. Loop diuretics together with aldosterone antagonists represent the basis for influencing signs of congestion. In AL amyloidosis, high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation is generally considered to be a front-line treatment option, if the disease is diagnosed at its early stage. The combination of mephalan with dexamethasone has been the standard therapy for severely affected individuals; however, the combinations with several novel agents including immunomodulatory drugs and bortezomibe have been tested in clinical trials with promising results. New therapeutic substances with the potential to slow or even stop the progression of transthyretin-related amyloidosis are also extensively studied. PMID:25483951

  2. A Case of Simultaneous Bilateral Anterior Shoulder Dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallanagouda N Patil

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anterior dislocation of shoulder is commonest dislocation one encounters in day to day Orthopaedic practice. But bilateral shoulder dislocations are relatively uncommon frequently posterior and secondary to violent muscle contraction. Simultaneous bilateral anterior dislocations of shoulder following trauma is rare occurrence. Case Report: 35 year old male presented to emergency department with history fall by tripping on a stone (fall on outstretched hand. He complained of pain and difficulty in moving both the shoulders. On clinical examination, patient’s both upper limbs were abducted and externally rotated. Bilaterally shoulder contour was lost with flattening. Other classical signs of shoulder dislocation viz, Bryants test, Callway sign, Hamilton’s ruler test were positive. Diagnosis was confirmed on X rays. Both shoulders were reduced in emergency operation theater under general anaesthesia by Kocher’s method and were immobilised in sling. Conclusion: Though bilateral shoulder dislocations are commonly posterior, usually either secondary to convulsions or electric shock, anterior dislocation has to be kept in mind , especially in post traumatic injuries. This bilateral dislocation also presents with practical problems immobilization and day to day care of patients. Keywords: Simultaneous, bilateral, shoulder dislocation, traumatic.

  3. Bone mineral density measurement over the shoulder region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, A M; Faber, J; Lynnerup, N; Wätjen, I; Bliddal, H; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (1). establish a method for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) over the shoulder region; (2). compare the relationship between shoulder BMD levels with hip BMD and body mass index (BMI); and (3). discuss the relevance of the shoulder scan as an early indicator of...... osteoporosis compared with hip scans, the latter representing a weight-bearing part of the skeleton. We developed a scanning procedure, including a shoulder fixation device, and determined the most appropriate software in order to establish a reference material with the highest possible precision. Duplicate...

  4. The association between Generalized Joint Hypermobility and shoulder mobility in young, competitive swimmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Tina; Henriksen, P; Knudsen, H K;

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder overuse injuries frequently occur among competitive swimmers (Wanivenhaus et al, 2012), however, the aetiology of shoulder dysfunction remains unclear (Zemek et al., 1995). Increased shoulder mobility as well as Generalised Joint Hypermobility (GJH), are both suggested being predisposing...

  5. Extrahepatic production of acute phase serum amyloid A

    OpenAIRE

    Upragarin, N.; Landman, W.J.M.; Gaastra, W; Gruys, E.

    2005-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a group of diseases characterized by the extracellular deposition of protein that contains non-branching, straight fibrils on electron microscopy (amyloid fibrils) that have a high content of ß-pleated sheet conformation. Various biochemically distinct proteins can undergo transformation into amyloid fibrils. The precursor protein of amyloid protein A (AA) is the acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA). The concentration of SAA in plasma increa...

  6. STIMULATED PLATELETS RELEASE AMYLOID β–PROTEIN PRECURSOR

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Gregory M.; Galasko, Douglas; Shapiro, I. Paul; Saitoh, Tsunao

    1990-01-01

    Human platelets can be stimulated by thrombin or ionomycin to secrete soluble truncated amyloid β–protein precursor and particulate membrane fragments which contain C-terminal and N-terminal immunoreactive amyloid β–protein precursor. This suggests a possible circulating source of β–protein in serum which may play a role in the formation of amyloid deposits. The release of soluble amyloid β-protein precursor could be involved in normal platelet physiology.

  7. The novel amyloid-beta peptide aptamer inhibits intracellular amyloid-beta peptide toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Wang; Yi Yang; Mingyue Jia; Chi Ma; Mingyu Wang; Lihe Che; Yu Yang; Jiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β peptide binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) decoy peptide (DP) can competitively antagonize binding of amyloid β peptide to ABAD and inhibit the cytotoxic effects of amyloid β peptide. Based on peptide aptamers, the present study inserted ABAD-DP into the disulfide bond of human thioredoxin (TRX) using molecular cloning technique to construct a fusion gene that can express the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer. Moreover, adeno-associated virus was used to allow its stable expression. Immunofluorescent staining revealed the co-expression of the transduced fusion gene TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 and amyloid β peptide in NIH-3T3 cells, indicating that the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer can bind amyloid β peptide within cells. In addition, cell morphology and MTT results suggested that TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 attenuated amyloid β peptide-induced SH-SY5Y cell injury and improved cell viability. These findings confirmed the possibility of constructing TRX-based peptide aptamer using ABAD-DP. Moreover, TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 inhibited the cytotoxic effect of amyloid β peptide.

  8. Sorting swimmers shoulders: An observational study on swimmers that presented to a shoulder surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Butler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: It is common for swimmers to suffer shoulder injuries resulting in a wealth of research focusing on the causes and types of injury. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding current management for shoulder injuries in swimmers. Aims: To investigate the diagnosis, subsequent management, and the return to swimming outcomes for swimmers presenting to an orthopedic practice. Settings and Design: Retrospective cohort study of competitive swimmers presenting to an orthopedic practice. Materials and Methods: The diagnosis, subsequent management, and the return to swimming outcomes were analyzed for 14 swimmers whose injuries were managed by a shoulder surgeon. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive analysis. Results: No significant association was identified between swimming stroke and type of injury. The majority of swimmers had good scapula rhythm, with no visible dyskinesis, including those with impingement. Swimmers with impingement did not require arthroscopy, and with nonoperative management had a mean time to return to swimming of 1.6 months. All labral tears required arthroscopic labral repair, with these swimmers having a mean time of 2.9 months postsurgery to return to swimming. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that an accurate diagnosis, and appropriate choice of nonoperative and surgical treatments lead to reassuring outcomes for swimmers suffering from shoulder injuries.

  9. Formation of soluble amyloid oligomers and amyloid fibrils by the multifunctional protein vitronectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langen Ralf

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The multifunctional protein vitronectin is present within the deposits associated with Alzheimer disease (AD, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, atherosclerosis, systemic amyloidoses, and glomerulonephritis. The extent to which vitronectin contributes to amyloid formation within these plaques, which contain misfolded, amyloidogenic proteins, and the role of vitronectin in the pathophysiology of the aforementioned diseases is currently unknown. The investigation of vitronectin aggregation is significant since the formation of oligomeric and fibrillar structures are common features of amyloid proteins. Results We observed vitronectin immunoreactivity in senile plaques of AD brain, which exhibited overlap with the amyloid fibril-specific OC antibody, suggesting that vitronectin is deposited at sites of amyloid formation. Of particular interest is the growing body of evidence indicating that soluble nonfibrillar oligomers may be responsible for the development and progression of amyloid diseases. In this study we demonstrate that both plasma-purified and recombinant human vitronectin readily form spherical oligomers and typical amyloid fibrils. Vitronectin oligomers are toxic to cultured neuroblastoma and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells, possibly via a membrane-dependent mechanism, as they cause leakage of synthetic vesicles. Oligomer toxicity was attenuated in RPE cells by the anti-oligomer A11 antibody. Vitronectin fibrils contain a C-terminal protease-resistant fragment, which may approximate the core region of residues essential to amyloid formation. Conclusion These data reveal the propensity of vitronectin to behave as an amyloid protein and put forth the possibilities that accumulation of misfolded vitronectin may contribute to aggregate formation seen in age-related amyloid diseases.

  10. Humeral shaft fracture with ipsilateral shoulder dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behera Prateek

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Although fracture of the humeral shaft or dislocation of the shoulder joint is a common injury, a simutaneous injury is rare. We present such a case combined with head injury which took precedence over the skeletal injuries. The postoperative rehabilitation was slowed down by the head injury. This case report makes us aware of some problems when managing the patient with this rare injury and helps us understand the management options better. Also the need for proper follow-up and rehabilitation is emphasized.

  11. Humeral shaft fracture with ipsilateral shoulder dislocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prateek Behera; Vishal Kumar; Sameer Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Although fracture of the humeral shaft or dislocation of the shoulder joint is a common injury,a simutaneous injury is rare.We present such a case combined with head injury which took precedence over the skeletal injuries.The postoperative rehabilitation was slowed down by the head injury.This case report makes us aware of some problems when managing the patient with this rare injury and helps us understand the management options better.Also the need for proper follow-up and rehabilitation is emphasized.

  12. The Square-Shoulder-Asakura-Oosawa model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantoni, Riccardo

    2016-09-01

    A new model for a colloidal size-asymmetric binary mixture is proposed: The Square-Shoulder-Asakura-Oosawa. This belongs to the larger class of non-additive hard-spheres models and has the property that its effective pair formulation is exact whenever the solvent particle fits inside the interstitial region of three touching solute particles. Therefore one can study its properties from the equivalent one-component effective problem. Some remarks on the phase diagram of this new model are also addressed.

  13. Spontaneous ARIA (Amyloid-Related Imaging Abnormalities) and Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy Related Inflammation in Presenilin 1-Associated Familial Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, N. S.; Lashley, T.; Revesz, T; Dantu, K.; Fox, N.C.; Morris, H R

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-related imaging abnormalities (ARIA), thought to reflect immune responses to vascular amyloid, have been detected in several amyloid-modifying therapy trials for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We report a case of ARIA developing spontaneously during the course of Presenilin 1 (PSEN1)-associated familial AD (FAD), in an APOE4 homozygous patient. Severe cerebral amyloid angiopathy with associated inflammation was subsequently found at autopsy. Recognition that ARIA may arise spontaneously du...

  14. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); de Pablo, Juan J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  15. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 - 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 - 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  16. In vivo amyloid imaging in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targeted approaches to therapy for Alzheimer's disease have evolved based on detailed understanding of the genetic, molecular biologic, and neuropathologic basis of the disease. Given the potential for greater treatment efficacy in the earlier stages of the disease, the notion of early diagnosis has become more relevant. Current clinical and imaging diagnostic approaches lack reliability in the preclinical and prodromal phases of the disease. We review emerging studies on imaging of the molecular substrate of the disease, most notably the amyloid peptide, which hope to increase early diagnostic efficacy. We offer a brief overview of the demographics, diagnostic criteria, and current imaging tests, followed by a review of amyloid biology and developments in cerebral amyloid imaging yielded by recent in vitro, in vivo and human studies. (orig.)

  17. [Treatment of familial amyloid polyneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David; Samuel, Didier; Slama, Michel

    2012-09-01

    The treatment of familial amyloid polyneuropathies (FAP) is complex and requires a neurological and cardiological multidisciplinary coverage. It includes specific treatments to control the progression of the systemic amyloidogenesis, the symptomatic treatment of the peripheral and autonomic neuropathy (digestive, urinary, sexual, postural hypotension) and the treatment of organs severely involved by amyloidosis (heart, eyes, kidneys). First line specific treatment of met30 TTR-FAP is liver transplantation (LT) which allows to suppress the main source of mutant TTR, to stop the progression of the neuropathy in 70 % of cases at long-term (with an experience of 18 years) and to double the median survival. In case of severe renal or cardiac insufficiency, a double transplant kidney-liver or heart-liver can be discussed. The tafamidis (in temporary authorization of use in France) is a stabilizing medicine of the tetrameric TTR which showed in very early stages of met30 TTR-FAP short-term capacities to stop the progress of the peripheral neuropathy in 60 % of the cases versus 38 % with placebo. It should be proposed in case of contraindication of TH (age>70 years [20 % of the cases]), of very early stages (very low NIS-LL score), or for the period of wait of LT. Other innovative medicines issued from biopharmaceutical companies have been developed to block the hepatic production of both mutant and wild TTR which are noxious in the late forms NAH (>50 years old) (RNAi [RNA interference] therapeutics, AntiSens oligonucleotids), for removing the amyloid deposits (monoclonal antibody anti-SAP), or to slow down the formation of deposits of TTR and amyloidosis (combination of doxycycline-TUDCA). Clinical trials should be first addressed to the patients with a late onset of FAP or non-met30 TTR-FAP who are less responding to LT and patients with contraindications in the LT. Initial cardiac assessment and periodic cardiac investigations are important for the FAP according to the

  18. Subacronial shoulder complaints in physiotherapy an general practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, M.; Swinkels, I.; Veenhof, C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to describe the patient population and the process of care in patients with subacromial shoulder complaints both in physiotherapy and in general practice. Relevance: Shoulder complaints are common in the daily practice of a general practitioner (GP) and physiotherap

  19. Shoulder arthroplasty with the Neer Mark-II prosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, Lars Henrik; Møller, B.N.; Sneppen, O.

    1988-01-01

    Total shoulder joint replacement was used as primary intervention in 50 shoulders--35 with rheumatoid arthritis, eight with osteoarthritis, and seven with traumatic arthritis. Follow-up time was 27 (12-42) months. The primary indication for the operation was chronic severe pain; improvements in m...

  20. The role of sensitization in musculoskeletal shoulder pain

    OpenAIRE

    John Borstad; Christopher Woeste

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Peripheral and central sensitization are neurophysiological processes that can prolong painful conditions. Painful shoulder conditions are often persistent, perhaps due to the presence of sensitization. Method: This manuscript summarizes six studies that have evaluated those with musculoskeletal shoulder pain for the presence of sensitization. Results: All six manuscripts report evidence of peripheral sensitization, while central sensitization was described in five of the studie...

  1. Ultrasound diagnosis of impingement syndrome of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The finding of ultrasound investigation of shoulder joints of 62 patients with complains of a prolonged (over 1 year) pain in the shoulder area, limited movement in the joint without obvious trauma in the history were analyzed. The ultrasound finding were compared with those of MRI and radiography.

  2. Association of fetal cranial shape with shoulder dystocia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfort, M. A.; White, G. L.; Vermeulen, F. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether fetal cranial shape is related to shoulder dystocia. Methods We compared shoulder dystocia cases (n = 18) with controls (normal vaginal deliveries, n = 18) in a retrospective matched- pairs observational study. Subjects were matched for known maternal and fetal risk fac

  3. Proprioception and Throwing Accuracy in the Dominant Shoulder After Cryotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wassinger, Craig A; Myers, Joseph B; Gatti, Joseph M; Conley, Kevin M; Lephart, Scott M.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Application of cryotherapy modalities is common after acute shoulder injury and as part of rehabilitation. During athletic events, athletes may return to play after this treatment. The effects of cryotherapy on dominant shoulder proprioception have been assessed, yet the effects on throwing performance are unknown.

  4. Miniopen coracohumeral ligament release and manipulation for idiopathic frozen shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelsalam Eid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the management of idiopathic frozen shoulder, manipulation under anaesthesia is known to have serious potential complications including fractures and intra-articular injuries. Arthroscopy is a safer treatment modality but requires special instruments, experience, and involves added cost. The aim of this work was to study the use of miniopen Coracohumeral ligament release and manipulation of the shoulder as a safe and simple method of treating idiopathic frozen shoulder that could be performed as a quick procedure under short duration anaesthesia obtaining a significant improvement of shoulder function while avoiding complications that are feared to occur with the use of manipulation under anaesthesia. Miniopen Coracohumeral ligament release is performed through a 3-cm incision. The Coracohumeral ligament is divided, and then the shoulder is manipulated without undue force. A case series including fifteen patients (19 shoulders with idiopathic frozen shoulder operated by this technique is described. Miniopen Coracohumeral ligament release and manipulation is a quick procedure that may be performed under short duration anaesthesia obtaining a significant improvement of shoulder function meanwhile avoiding complications that are feared to occur with the use of manipulation under anaesthesia.

  5. Sporadic Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: Pathophysiology, Neuroimaging Features, and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulouis, Gregoire; Charidimou, Andreas; Greenberg, Steven M

    2016-06-01

    Sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a small vessel disorder defined pathologically by progressive amyloid deposition in the walls of cortical and leptomeningeal vessels resulting from disruption of a complex balance between production, circulation, and clearance of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the brain. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a major cause of lobar symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage, transient focal neurologic episodes, and a key contributor to vascular cognitive impairment. The mechanisms and consequences of amyloid-β deposition at the pathological level and its neuroimaging manifestations, clinical consequences, and implications for patient care are addressed in this review. PMID:27214698

  6. Resurfacing shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of severe rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voorde, Pia C Ten; Rasmussen, Jeppe V; Olsen, Bo S; Brorson, Stig

    2015-01-01

    outcome was obtained 1-year postoperatively using the Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder index (WOOS), and rates of revision were calculated by checking revisions reported until December 2011. The patient-reported outcome of RHA was compared to that of SHA using regression analysis with......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There is no consensus on which type of shoulder prosthesis should be used in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We describe patients with RA who were treated with shoulder replacement, regarding patient-reported outcome, prosthesis survival, and causes of revision, and...... we compare outcome after resurfacing hemi-arthroplasty (RHA) and stemmed hemi-arthroplasty (SHA). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used data from the national Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry and included patients with RA who underwent shoulder arthroplasty in Denmark between 2006 and 2010. Patient-reported...

  7. Glenoid Dysplasia in the Recurrent Shoulder Dislocation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Sucuoglu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Glenoid dysplasia, which is often ignored, is a rare developmental anomaly. In most cases the patients remain asymptomatic. Although glenoid dysplasia has been diagnosed by incidentally on chest radiograph, also it has been described because of the developing instability of shoulder joint. Our young male patient who has recurrent dislocation of the shoulder-joint 4-5 times a year for last 5 years, dislocation has been reduced in the emergency department and he has been discharged from hospital with shoulder strap and rest. Finally when he admitted to our outpatient clinic with recurrent shoulder dislocation, the diagnosis of glenoid dysplasia is revealed by X-ray examination. We present the diagnose of glenoid dysplasia with clinical and radiological findings which should be kept in mind in patients with recurrent dislocations of shoulder as in our case.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder: Rationale and current applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because it can demonstrate a wide range of tissue contrast with excellent resolution, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has revolutionized imaging in many areas of the musculoskeletal system and has generated excitement among those interested in the painful shoulder. Shoulder impingement syndrome and glenohumeral instability constitute the two major categories of shoulder derangements. Correct diagnosis requires the use of appropriate pulse sequences and imaging planes, proper patient positioning, and a satisfactory surface coil. In addition the imager must have a thorough understanding of shoulder anatomy and pathology. We present a summary of the current status of MR imaging of the shoulder including technical, anatomic, and pathologic considerations and a review of the pertinent literature. (orig.)

  9. Gorham-Stout syndrome of the shoulder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Ulrich; Rückl, Kilian; Konrads, Christian; Rudert, Maximilian; Plumhoff, Piet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Gorham-Stout syndrome (GSS) is a rare but severe subtype of idiopathic osteolysis. There are no guidelines for the treatment of GSS. We analysed different diagnostic and therapeutic regimes and we describe the sucessful treatment of GSS considering individual patient factors. Methods: We diagnosed three patients with shoulder-specific GSS using clinical, radiological and histopathological examinations. Two out of three patients with similar clinical appearances were treated non-operatively. One patient was treated by reverse shoulder arthroplasty. All patients were analysed retrospectively using clinical and radiological evaluation with a mean follow-up of 42 (range 30–50) months. Results: Two patients had few symptoms of GSS and were treated conservatively. One patient underwent arthroplasty, with a good clinical result. No additional therapy, such as radiation or anti-resorptive medications, was needed for the stable fixation of the prosthesis and the termination of osteolysis. In all patients we found good clinical outcomes with high patient satisfaction. Discussion: GSS is diagnosed after exclusion of infectious, malignant, and systemic disorders. The diagnosis should be supported by clinical, radiological, and histopathological characteristics of patients. Different humoral and cellular changes have been reported in GSS, but lack sufficient supporting evidence. GSS is associated with angiomatous and lymphatic malformations. The changes in GSS and the theories of its pathophysiology may reveal. PMID:27194110

  10. Treating Postlaparoscopic Surgery Shoulder Pain with Acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gur Kreindler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of acupuncture on postlaparoscopic shoulder pain (PLSP which is a common side effect in patients undergoing abdominal laparoscopic surgery. Methods. Patients with moderate to severe PLSP in spite of analgesic treatment, which were referred by the medical staff to the Complementary-Integrative Surgery Service (CISS at our institution, were provided with acupuncture treatment. The severity of PLSP and of general pain was assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS from 0 to 10. Pain assessment was conducted prior to and two hours following acupuncture treatment. Acupuncture treatment was individualized based on traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis. Results. A total of 25 patients were evaluated during a 14-month period, from March 2011 to May 2012. A significant reduction in PLSP (mean reduction of 6.4±2.3  P<0.0001 and general pain (mean reduction 6.4±2.1  P<0.0001 were observed, and no significant side effects were reported. Conclusion. Individualized acupuncture treatments according to traditional Chinese medicine principles may improve postlaparoscopic shoulder pain and general pain when used in conjunction with conventional therapy. The primary findings of this study warrant verification in controlled studies.

  11. Isolated Pulmonary Embolism following Shoulder Arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole H. Goldhaber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary embolism (PE following shoulder arthroscopy is a rare complication. We present a unique case report of a 43-year-old right-hand dominant female who developed a PE 41 days postoperatively with no associated upper or lower extremity DVT. The patient had minimal preoperative and intraoperative risk factors. Additionally, she had no thromboembolic symptoms postoperatively until 41 days following surgery when she developed sudden right-hand swelling, labored breathing, and abdominal pain. A stat pulmonary computed tomography (CT angiogram of the chest revealed an acute PE in the right lower lobe, and subsequent extremity ultrasounds showed no upper or lower extremity deep vein thrombosis. After a thorough review of the literature, we present the first documented isolated PE following shoulder arthroscopy. Although rare, sudden development of an isolated PE is possible, and symptoms such as sudden hand swelling, trouble breathing, and systemic symptoms should be evaluated aggressively with a pulmonary CT angiogram given the fact that an extremity ultrasound may be negative for deep vein thrombosis.

  12. Effective screen for amyloid β aggregation inhibitor using amyloid β-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Sun-Ho; Chang, Yu Jin; Jung, Eun Sun; Kim, Jong-Won; Na, Duk Lyul; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2010-01-01

    The abnormal aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) and its subsequent intra- and extracellular accumulation constitute the disease-causing cascade of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The detection of Aβ aggregates and senile plaque formation, however, is nearly impossible during early pathogenesis, and the absence of a convenient screen to validate the activity of Aβ aggregation regulators impedes the development of promising drug targets and diagnostic biomarkers for AD. Here, we conjugated amyloid β42 (Aβ...

  13. Posterior shoulder pain and anterior instability: a preliminary clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Alessandro; Conti, Marco; Borroni, Mario; Massazza, Giuseppe; Vinci, Enzo; Franceschi, Giorgio; Garofalo, Raffaele

    2008-02-01

    Different clinical tests have been suggested in the literature as significant indicators of anterior shoulder instability. Sometimes patients with recurrent anterior shoulder instability may show some muscular guarding thus making the evaluation of specific clinical tests very difficult. These patients may also report a medical history with posterior shoulder pain that can be also elicited during some clinical manoeuvres. From September 2005 to September 2006 we prospectively studied patients who underwent an arthroscopic anterior capsuloplasty. Shoulder clinical examination was performed including anterior shoulder instability tests (drawer, apprehension and relocation tests). Furthermore the exam was focused on the presence of scapular dyskinesia and posterior shoulder pain. The patients were also evaluated with ASES, Rowe, SST (Simple Shoulder Test), Constant and UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) scoring system preoperatively and at the latest follow-up time. In the period of this study we observed 16 patients treated for anterior gleno-humeral arthroscopic stabilisation, who preoperatively complained also of a posterior scapular pain. The pain was referred at the level of lower trapezium and upper rhomboids tendon insertion on the medial border of the scapula. It was also reproducible upon local palpation by the examiner. Four of these patients also referred pain in the region of the insertion of the infraspinatus and teres minor. After arthroscopic stabilisation the shoulder was immobilised in a sling with the arm in the neutral rotation for a period of 4 weeks. A single physician supervised shoulder rehabilitation. After a mean time of 6.8 months of follow-up, all the shoulder scores were significantly improved and, moreover, at the same time the patients referred the disappearance of the posterior pain. Posterior scapular shoulder pain seems to be another complaint and sign that can be found in patients affected by anterior shoulder instability

  14. Constrained fixed-fulcrum reverse shoulder arthroplasty improves functional outcome in epileptic patients with recurrent shoulder instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangarajah, Tanujan; Higgs, Deborah; Bayley, J I L; Lambert, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To report the results of fixed-fulcrum fully constrained reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability in patients with epilepsy. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted at a single facility. Cases were identified using a computerized database and all clinic notes and operative reports were reviewed. All patients with epilepsy and recurrent shoulder instability were included for study. Between July 2003 and August 2011 five shoulders in five consecutive patients with epilepsy underwent fixed-fulcrum fully constrained reverse shoulder arthroplasty for recurrent anterior shoulder instability. The mean duration of epilepsy in the cohort was 21 years (range, 5-51) and all patients suffered from grand mal seizures. RESULTS: Mean age at the time of surgery was 47 years (range, 32-64). The cohort consisted of four males and one female. Mean follow-up was 4.7 years (range, 4.3-5 years). There were no further episodes of instability, and no further stabilisation or revision procedures were performed. The mean Oxford shoulder instability score improved from 8 preoperatively (range, 5-15) to 30 postoperatively (range, 16-37) (P = 0.015) and the mean subjective shoulder value improved from 20 (range, 0-50) preoperatively to 60 (range, 50-70) postoperatively (P = 0.016). Mean active forward elevation improved from 71° preoperatively (range, 45°-130°) to 100° postoperatively (range, 80°-90°) and mean active external rotation improved from 15° preoperatively (range, 0°-30°) to 40° (20°-70°) postoperatively. No cases of scapular notching or loosening were noted. CONCLUSION: Fixed-fulcrum fully constrained reverse shoulder arthroplasty should be considered for the treatment of recurrent shoulder instability in patients with epilepsy. PMID:27458554

  15. Serum amyloid P inhibits dermal wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The repair of open wounds depends on granulation tissue formation and contraction, which is primarily mediated by myofibroblasts. A subset of myofibroblasts originates from bone-marrow-derived monocytes which differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes. Serum amyloid P (SAP) inhibits ...

  16. Is amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis always secondary?

    OpenAIRE

    Maury, C P; Törnroth, T; Wegelius, O

    1985-01-01

    The case is reported of a patient with systemic AA amyloidosis associated with non-specific mesenteric lymphadenitis and chronic sideropenia. Renal, small bowel, and rectal biopsies showed amyloid deposits containing AA protein, as defined by potassium permanganate sensitivity and by reactivity with AA antiserum. Reversal of the nephrotic syndrome occurred during steroid-azathioprine therapy.

  17. Protocol for Shoulder function training reducing musculoskeletal pain in shoulder and neck: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mortensen Ole S; Andersen Lars L; Andersen Christoffer H; Zebis Mette K; Sjøgaard Gisela

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Neck and shoulder complaints are common among employees in sedentary occupations characterized by intensive computer use. Such musculoskeletal pain - which is often associated with restricted range of motion and loss of muscle strength - is one of the most common conditions treated by physical therapists. The exact mechanism of neck pain is rarely revealed by clinical examination and the treatment has varied from passive rest to active treatments. Active treatments have of...

  18. Current and future treatment of amyloid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankarcrona, M; Winblad, B; Monteiro, C; Fearns, C; Powers, E T; Johansson, J; Westermark, G T; Presto, J; Ericzon, B-G; Kelly, J W

    2016-08-01

    There are more than 30 human proteins whose aggregation appears to cause degenerative maladies referred to as amyloid diseases or amyloidoses. These disorders are named after the characteristic cross-β-sheet amyloid fibrils that accumulate systemically or are localized to specific organs. In most cases, current treatment is limited to symptomatic approaches and thus disease-modifying therapies are needed. Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder with extracellular amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) fibrils and intracellular tau neurofibrillary tangles as pathological hallmarks. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted with passive and active immunotherapy, and small molecules to inhibit Aβ formation and aggregation or to enhance Aβ clearance; so far such clinical trials have been unsuccessful. Novel strategies are therefore required and here we will discuss the possibility of utilizing the chaperone BRICHOS to prevent Aβ aggregation and toxicity. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is symptomatically treated with insulin. However, the underlying pathology is linked to the aggregation and progressive accumulation of islet amyloid polypeptide as fibrils and oligomers, which are cytotoxic. Several compounds have been shown to inhibit islet amyloid aggregation and cytotoxicity in vitro. Future animal studies and clinical trials have to be conducted to determine their efficacy in vivo. The transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses are a group of systemic degenerative diseases compromising multiple organ systems, caused by TTR aggregation. Liver transplantation decreases the generation of misfolded TTR and improves the quality of life for a subgroup of this patient population. Compounds that stabilize the natively folded, nonamyloidogenic, tetrameric conformation of TTR have been developed and the drug tafamidis is available as a promising treatment. PMID:27165517

  19. Platelet-Rich Plasma for Frozen Shoulder: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Aslani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Frozen shoulder is a glenohumeral joint disorder that perturbs movement because of adhesion and the existence of fibrosis in the shoulder capsule. Platelet-rich plasma can produce collagen and growth factors, which increases stem cells and consequently enhances the healing. To date, there is no evidence regarding the effectiveness of platelet-rich plasma in frozen shoulder. A 45-year-old man with shoulder adhesive capsulitis volunteered for this treatment. He underwent two consecutive platelet-rich plasma injections at the seventh and eighth month after initiation of symptoms. We measured pain, function, and ROM by the visual analogue scale (VAS, and scores from the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH questionnaire and goniometer; respectively. After the first injection, the patient reported 60% improvement regarding diurnal shoulder pain, and no night pains. Also, two-fold improvement for ROM and more than 70% improvement for function were reported. This study suggests the use of platelet-rich plasma in frozen shoulder to be tested in randomized trials.

  20. Lipidic characterization of Santa Inês lamb shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Albert Carvalho da Cruz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The edible portion of the shoulder of 12 castrated and 12 non-castrated Santa Inês lambs slaughtered at different ages (84, 168, 210, 252 days were used. The shoulders were chemically analyzed to determine the quantity of total lipids, cholesterol, and fatty acids composition. Castrated and non-castrated lambs gained body weight (p = 0.0393, p = 0.0017 and half carcass weight (p = 0.0240, p = 0.0017, respectively. The shoulder weight was increased in the carcasses of non-castrated lambs (p = 0.0110. The edible portion of the shoulder of castrated lambs presented higher total lipids (16.09 g.100 g-1. The cholesterol content was influenced by castration (p = 0.0001 reducing with age. Castrated animals presented higher content of C18:1 T11, CLA, and C18:0. The shoulder weight is only increased with increasing age in the carcasses of non-castrated lambs. Castration influences the cholesterol content of the shoulder; however, both castrated and non-castrated lambs had their cholesterol contents reduced with increasing age. Castration and age interfered in the estearic acid concentration of the edible portion of lamb shoulder.

  1. Histological development of human foetal shoulder joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabia Nazir

    2014-02-01

    Results: The bony structures - head of humerus and glenoid fossa and joint cavity appear by 10 weeks which prolongs into bicipital sulcus by 12-1/2 weeks. Synovial tissue appears by 10 weeks and synovial villi appear by 14 weeks. Glenoid labrum, capsular ligament, coracohumeral ligament and superior glenohumeral ligament are seen by 10 weeks. Middle glenohumeral ligament is seen at 12-1/2 weeks while inferior glenohumeral ligament is seen at 14 weeks. Tendon of biceps is seen at 10 weeks. Conclusions: By 10 weeks of gestational age various structures of shoulder joint develop in situ, resembling in form and arrangement as those of adults. From these early stages, development proceeds rapidly to achieve adult characteristics. There are no intermediate stages in between where structures similar to those of lower forms i.e. syn/amphi artroses appear temporarily. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(1.000: 293-299

  2. Point Cloud Oriented Shoulder Line Extraction in Loess Hilly Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Xin, Yang; Liyang, Xiong

    2016-06-01

    Shoulder line is the significant line in hilly area of Loess Plateau in China, dividing the surface into positive and negative terrain (P-N terrains). Due to the point cloud vegetation removal methods of P-N terrains are different, there is an imperative need for shoulder line extraction. In this paper, we proposed an automatic shoulder line extraction method based on point cloud. The workflow is as below: (i) ground points were selected by using a grid filter in order to remove most of noisy points. (ii) Based on DEM interpolated by those ground points, slope was mapped and classified into two classes (P-N terrains), using Natural Break Classified method. (iii) The common boundary between two slopes is extracted as shoulder line candidate. (iv) Adjust the filter gird size and repeat step i-iii until the shoulder line candidate matches its real location. (v) Generate shoulder line of the whole area. Test area locates in Madigou, Jingbian County of Shaanxi Province, China. A total of 600 million points are acquired in the test area of 0.23km2, using Riegl VZ400 3D Laser Scanner in August 2014. Due to the limit Granted computing performance, the test area is divided into 60 blocks and 13 of them around the shoulder line were selected for filter grid size optimizing. The experiment result shows that the optimal filter grid size varies in diverse sample area, and a power function relation exists between filter grid size and point density. The optimal grid size was determined by above relation and shoulder lines of 60 blocks were then extracted. Comparing with the manual interpretation results, the accuracy of the whole result reaches 85%. This method can be applied to shoulder line extraction in hilly area, which is crucial for point cloud denoising and high accuracy DEM generation.

  3. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder; Schulterimpingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E. [Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Klinische Abteilung Radiodiagnostik fuer chirurgische Faecher, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Wien (Austria); Breitenseher, M.J. [Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Waldviertelklinikum Horn (Austria)

    2004-06-01

    The impingement syndrome is a clinical entity characterized by shoulder pain due to primary or secondary mechanical irritation of the rotator cuff. The primary factors for the development of impingement are a curved or hook-shaped anterior acromion as well as subacromial osteophytes, which may lead to tearing of the supraspinatus tendon. Secondary impingement is mainly caused by calcific tendinopathy, glenohumeral instability, os acromiale and degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint. Conventional radiographs are initially obtained, mainly for evaluation of the bony structures of the shoulder. If available, sonography can be used for detection of lesions and tears of the rotator cuff. Finally, MR-imaging provides detailed information about the relationship of the acromion and the acromioclavicular joint to the rotator cuff itself. In many cases however, no morphologic cause for impingement syndrome can be found. While patients are initially treated conservatively, chronic disease usually requires surgical intervention. (orig.) [German] Das Impingementsyndrom ist ein klinisches Krankheitsbild multifaktorieller Genese, bei dem es primaer oder sekundaer zu einer schmerzhaften mechanischen Beeintraechtigung der Rotatorenmanschette kommt. Als primaere Faktoren gelten ein gebogener oder hakenfoermiger Vorderrand des Akromions oder von diesem entspringende Osteophyten, was zu Laesionen der Supraspinatussehne fuehren kann. Zu den sekundaeren Faktoren zaehlt man v. a. eine Tendinitis calcarea, eine glenohumerale Instabilitaet, ein Os acromiale sowie degenerative Veraenderungen im Bereich des Akromioklavikulargelenks. Bildgebend steht an erster Stelle ein Nativroentgen, mit dem sich die knoechernen Strukturen gut darstellen lassen. Falls vorhanden, kann in weiterer Folge die Sonographie Auskunft ueber den Zustand der Rotatorenmanschette geben. Mit der MRT schliesslich laesst sich die Beziehung von Akromion und gelenkassoziierten Strukturen zur Rotatorenmanschette

  4. A little-known cause of painful shoulder: os acromiale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granieri, G.F.; Bacarini, L. [Dipartimento di Radiologia Clinica, Ospedale Regionale, Treviso (Italy)

    1998-02-01

    The incidental discovery of an `os acromiale` might explain some cases of `painful shoulder`: this is what we have observed in three patients. The purpose of our article is to underline the relevance of the axillary roentgenogram of the shoulder for the correct diagnosis of this anomaly. In all patients the radiographic examination was performed using a computed radiography system; moreover we performed a computed tomographic examination of the acromioclavicular portion of the shoulders with three-dimensional reconstructions. (orig.) With 3 figs., 6 refs.

  5. Missed posterior shoulder dislocation with malunited proximal humerus fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunil Kumar; Rajesh Kumar Chopra; Abhishek Kashyap; Sumit Arora

    2013-01-01

    Posterior dislocation of the shoulder may be missed or neglected at initial presentation especially in developing countries.We present a case of 40-year-old Indian man who had 3-month missed posterior dislocation of the right shoulder along with malunited fracture of the anatomical neck of the humerus.Open reduction and stabilization with modified McLaughlin procedure was performed.Rotational osteotomy of proximal humerus had to be performed as supplementary procedure to keep the humeral head stable in glenoid cavity during functional range of movements.The patient had excellent result of the shoulder at 3 years follow-up.

  6. Spectrum of shoulder injuries in the baseball pitcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review describes a range of shoulder injuries experienced by baseball pitchers. It is estimated that more than 57% of pitchers suffer some form of shoulder injury during a playing season. Knowledge of the overhead throwing cycle is crucial for our understanding of these shoulder injuries. Baseball pitchers are prone to rotator cuff tears from tensile overload and impingement. Glenoid labrum degeneration or tears are also common, due to overuse syndrome (micro-instability), internal impingement and microtrauma. An understanding of the lesions involved in overhead throwing is crucial in baseball pitchers, as long-term disability can result from these injuries, sometimes with severe financial consequences to the player. (orig.)

  7. Prevalence of shoulder pain after stroke and associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Hadianfar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Purpose: Shoulder pain is a common complication from stroke that may cause some rehabilitation limits to achieve functional goals. The information regarding its prevalence and associated factors is limited. This study was conducted to investigate further details pertaining to its associated factors.Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 191 stroke patients at the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Ward at Shiraz-Medical School from 2001 to 2004. Each patient was followed up for one year. A questionnaire was prepared containing information about shoulder pain compliant, thorough history and physical examination, previous history of open heart surgery, scoliosis, limited neck range of motion, type of stroke (based on MRI and brain CT, osteoporosis (based on bone mineral density and X ray, shoulder adductor muscles and biceps spasticity (based on ashworth scale. In follow-up visits bi-monthly for one year, the questionnaire was filled out again and if present, shoulder pain was recorded.Results: Most patients developed shoulder pain between 2 and 6 months following their stroke. Forty-nine patients (32.2% developed shoulder pain, 39(79.6% of whom had spastic tone and 8 (16.3% had flaccid tone. In both groups, with shoulder pain and without shoulder pain respectively, 6.7% and 1.9% had a history of open heart surgery, 6.1% and 1% had scoliosis, 67.3% and 35.1% had Intracranial hemorrhage, 73.5% and 23.3% had limited neck range of motion, and 24.5% and 35% had osteopenia.Conclusion: Spasticity was significantly more common in the shoulder pain group, which can be due to capsulitis, soft tissue inflammation (especially ligament and rotator cuff muscle and anteroinferior subluxation of the shoulder. There was a significant statistical correlation between intracranial hemorrhage, reduced neck range of motion, and hemiplegic shoulder pain. It appears that treatment and rehabilitation of spasticity and underlying

  8. Intra-articular elastofibroma of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 19-year-old man presented with an elastofibroma in his left shoulder joint. The patient had had limitation of motion in his left arm for 3 years, especially when rotating internally. Radiography of his left shoulder showed bone erosion in the neck of the humerus. On MR imaging, a soft tissue mass was noted in the shoulder joint eroding bone. The mass showed similar signal intensity to that of surrounding muscles on T1- and T2-weighted images. At surgery, a soft, encapsulated mass was found attached to the subscapularis muscle. It was pathologically confirmed as an elastofibroma. This unusual manifestation of an elastofibroma is discussed. (orig.)

  9. Nuclear imaging of amyloid deposits based upon thioflavins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presence of amyloid deposits and neurofibrillar tangles in the brain. Direct assessment of local changes of amyloid deposits in vivo would greatly facilitate the diagnosis and therapeutic treatments of AD. The goal of this study is to develop small-molecule probes that can be used to follow amyloid deposition in vivo in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Over the past years, we set out to develop a series of small molecules based on thioflavins as radiotracers for use in nuclear imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. The potential of these amyloid-imaging agents for in vivo studies of amyloid deposition has been evaluated based on the following methods: 1) spectrophotometric binding assays with synthetic amyloid-β (Aβ) fibrils and AD brain homogenates; 2) fluorescent staining of brain tissue sections to evaluate specificity of binding to amyloid deposits; 3) fluorescent microscopy in mouse models to determine the brain permeability and characterize the binding specificity in vivo, and 4) PET studies in human subjects diagnosed with AD and age-matched control subjects. To date, we have identified some lead compounds as molecular probes with specificity towards amyloid deposits. The in vitro and in vivo binding properties of these compounds have been demonstrated in the following ways: 1) they selectively binds to Aβ fibrils; 2) they selectively stains amyloid deposits in AD brain tissue sections; 3) they readily penetrates the blood-brain barrier, selectively detects amyloid deposits in vivo in living mice; and 4) one of these compounds has been successfully used in PET studies in human subjects. In conclusion, amyloid-imaging probes have been developed that could be used to monitor amyloid load in vivo. Applications of the probes are under investigation for potential pathophysiology studies and

  10. Nuclear imaging of amyloid deposits based upon thioflavins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the presence of amyloid deposits and neurofibrillar tangles in the brain. Direct assessment of local changes of amyloid deposits in vivo would greatly facilitate the diagnosis and therapeutic treatments of AD. The goal of this study is to develop small-molecule probes that can be used to follow amyloid deposition in vivo in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Over the past years, we set out to develop a series of small molecules based on thioflavins as radiotracers for use in nuclear imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. The potential of these amyloid-imaging agents for in vivo studies of amyloid deposition has been evaluated based on the following methods: 1) spectrophotometric binding. assays with synthetic amyloid-β (Aβ) fibrils and AD brain homogenates; 2) fluorescent staining of brain tissue sections to evaluate specificity of binding to amyloid deposits; 3) fluorescent microscopy in mouse models to determine the brain permeability and characterize the binding specificity in vivo, and 4) PET studies in human subjects diagnosed with AD and age-matched control subjects. To date, we have identified some lead compounds as molecular probes with specificity towards amyloid deposits. The in vitro and in vivo binding properties of these compounds have been demonstrated in the following ways: 1) they selectively binds to Aβ fibrils; 2) they selectively stains amyloid deposits in AD brain tissue sections; 3) they readily penetrates the blood-brain barrier, selectively detects amyloid deposits in vivo iri living mice; and 4) One of these compounds, termed PIB, has been successfully used in PET studies in human subjects. In conclusion, amyloid-imaging probes have been developed that could be used to monitor amyloid load in vivo. Applications of the probes are under investigation for potential pathophysiology studies

  11. Fold modulating function: Bacterial toxins to functional amyloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AdnanKhawajaSyed

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria produce cytolytic toxins that target host cells or other competing microbes. It is well known that environmental factors control toxin expression, however recent work suggests that some bacteria manipulate the fold of these protein toxins to control their function. The β-sheet rich amyloid fold is a highly stable ordered aggregate that many toxins form in response to specific environmental conditions. When in the amyloid state, toxins become inert, losing the cytolytic activity they display in the soluble form. Emerging evidence suggest that some amyloids function as toxin storage systems until they are again needed, while other bacteria utilize amyloids as a structural matrix component of biofilms. This amyloid matrix component facilitates resistance to biofilm disruptive challenges. The bacterial amyloids discussed in this review reveal an elegant system where changes in protein fold and solubility dictate the function of proteins in response to the environment.

  12. Prevalence of amyloid PET positivity in dementia syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Jansen, Willemijn J; Rabinovici, Gil D;

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Amyloid-β positron emission tomography (PET) imaging allows in vivo detection of fibrillar plaques, a core neuropathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Its diagnostic utility is still unclear because amyloid plaques also occur in patients with non-AD dementia. OBJECTIVE: To use...... individual participant data meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of amyloid positivity on PET in a wide variety of dementia syndromes. DATA SOURCES: The MEDLINE and Web of Science databases were searched from January 2004 to April 2015 for amyloid PET studies. STUDY SELECTION: Case reports and studies on....... The reference groups were 1849 healthy control participants (based on amyloid PET) and an independent sample of 1369 AD participants (based on autopsy). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Estimated prevalence of positive amyloid PET scans according to diagnosis, age, and apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 status...

  13. Atomic View of a Toxic Amyloid Small Oligomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Park, Jiyong; Zhao, Minglei; Pensalfini, Anna; Soriaga, Angela B.; Landau, Meytal; Teng, Poh K.; Cascio, Duilio; Glabe, Charles; Eisenberg, David (UCI); (UCLA)

    2012-04-30

    Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and the prion conditions, are each associated with a particular protein in fibrillar form. These amyloid fibrils were long suspected to be the disease agents, but evidence suggests that smaller, often transient and polymorphic oligomers are the toxic entities. Here, we identify a segment of the amyloid-forming protein {alpha}{beta} crystallin, which forms an oligomeric complex exhibiting properties of other amyloid oligomers: {beta}-sheet-rich structure, cytotoxicity, and recognition by an oligomer-specific antibody. The x-ray-derived atomic structure of the oligomer reveals a cylindrical barrel, formed from six antiparallel protein strands, that we term a cylindrin. The cylindrin structure is compatible with a sequence segment from the {beta}-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease. Cylindrins offer models for the hitherto elusive structures of amyloid oligomers.

  14. Muscle activation patterns in patients with recurrent shoulder instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Jaggi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: The DEMG results suggest that increased activation of LD may play a role in both anterior and posterior shoulder instability; increased activation of PM may play a role in anterior instability.

  15. Measurement and Quantification of Gross Human Shoulder Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy T. Newkirk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The shoulder girdle plays an important role in the large pointing workspace that humans enjoy. The goal of this work was to characterize the human shoulder girdle motion in relation to the arm. The overall motion of the human shoulder girdle was characterized based on motion studies completed on test subjects during voluntary (natural/unforced motion. The collected data from the experiments were used to develop surface fit equations that represent the position and orientation of the glenohumeral joint for a given humeral pointing direction. These equations completely quantify gross human shoulder girdle motion relative to the humerus. The equations are presented along with goodness-of-fit results that indicate the equations well approximate the motion of the human glenohumeral joint. This is the first time the motion has been quantified for the entire workspace, and the equations provide a reference against which to compare future work.

  16. Shoulder arthroplasty. Part 1: Prosthesis terminology and classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheridan, B.D., E-mail: bdsheridan@hotmail.com [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Ahearn, N.; Tasker, A.; Wakeley, C.; Sarangi, P. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Shoulder arthroplasty is the third most common joint replacement procedure in the UK, and there are a number of different implant options available to surgeons to treat a variety of shoulder disorders. With an increasing burden placed on clinical follow-up, more patients are remaining under the care of their general practitioners and musculoskeletal triage assessment services and are not necessarily being seen by specialists. Referrals to orthopaedic specialists are therefore often prompted by radiological reports describing evidence of implant failure. This article is the first of two reviews on shoulder arthroplasty, concentrating on implant features and the indications for their use. The second article will address the modes of failure of shoulder arthroplasty and describe the relevant associated radiological features.

  17. CT investigation of instability of the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT is able to demonstrate the predisposing factors for recurrent und posttraumatic subluxation of the shoulder . In addition to demonstrating bony changes in the glenoid (Bankart lesion) and in the humeral head (Hill-Sachs lesion), CT can measure the degree of retroversion of the glenoid and torsion of the humerus. Measurements on 17 shoulders with habitual and 24 shoulders with recurrent posttraumatic subluxation showed low values for glenoid retriversion as compared with a control group. Particulary patients with habitual anterior subluxation frequently showed anteversion of the glenoid. Measurements of humeral torsion showed wide scatter amongst all groups, indicating wide biological variability. The results were compared with those published in the literature and the indications and limitations of CT for the investigation of shoulder instability are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Simple self-reduction method for anterior shoulder dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Wirbel

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The presented Boss-Holzach-Matter method for reduction of anterior shoulder dislocation is a simple method without the need of anaesthesia, but cooperation from patients is crucial. The successful rate is comparable with other established methods.

  19. Clinical Measures of Shoulder Mobility in the Professional Baseball Player

    OpenAIRE

    Downar, Jacquelyn M; Sauers, Eric L.

    2005-01-01

    Context: Professional baseball players must achieve a delicate balance between shoulder mobility and stability to attain optimal sports performance. The sport-specific demands of repetitive overhead throwing may result in an altered mobility-stability relationship.

  20. On the Design of a CADS for Shoulder Pain Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ipiña, K. López; Hernández, M. C.; Martínez, E.; Vaquero, C.

    A musculoskeletal disorder is a condition of the musculoskeletal system, which consists in part of it being injured continuously over time. Shoulder disorders are one of the most common musculoskeletal cases attended in primary health care services. Shoulder disorders cause pain and limit the ability to perform many routine activities, affecting about 15-25 % of the general population. Several clinical tests have been described to aid diagnosis of shoulder disorders. However, the current literature acknowledges a lack of concordance in clinical assessment, even among musculoskeletal specialists. We are working on the design of a Computer-Aided Decision Support (CADS) system for Shoulder Pain Pathology. The paper presents the results of our efforts to build a CADS system testing several classical classification paradigms, feature reduction methods (PCA) and K-means unsupervised clustering. The small database size imposes the use of robust covariance matrix estimation methods to improve the system performance. Finally, the system was evaluated by a medical specialist.

  1. Shoulder arthroplasty. Part 1: Prosthesis terminology and classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoulder arthroplasty is the third most common joint replacement procedure in the UK, and there are a number of different implant options available to surgeons to treat a variety of shoulder disorders. With an increasing burden placed on clinical follow-up, more patients are remaining under the care of their general practitioners and musculoskeletal triage assessment services and are not necessarily being seen by specialists. Referrals to orthopaedic specialists are therefore often prompted by radiological reports describing evidence of implant failure. This article is the first of two reviews on shoulder arthroplasty, concentrating on implant features and the indications for their use. The second article will address the modes of failure of shoulder arthroplasty and describe the relevant associated radiological features.

  2. Missed posterior shoulder dislocation with malunited proximal humerus fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sunil

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Posterior dislocation of the shoulder may be missed or neglected at initial presentation especially in developing countries. We present a case of 40-year-old In- dian man who had 3-month missed posterior dislocation of the right shoulder along with malunited fracture of the ana- tomical neck of the humerus. Open reduction and stabiliza- tion with modified McLaughlin procedure was performed. Rotational osteotomy of proximal humerus had to be per- formed as supplementary procedure to keep the humeral head stable in glenoid cavity during functional range of movements. The patient had excellent result of the shoulder at 3 years follow-up. Key words: Shoulder dislocation; Humerus; Osteotomy

  3. Use of Pool Noodles for The Shoulder and Ankle

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Russell

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to provide two clinical suggestions that are inexpensive, easy to fabricate, and very user-friendly activities that can be used for most patients and athletes. The first clinical suggestion is a method of restoring stability of the scapular muscles around the shoulder complex. Following a period of disuse, whether from a surgery or an injury, weakness may be present in the shoulder. This suggestion is an easy and inexpensive tool which can be used in restorin...

  4. Radiotherapy for shoulder impingement; Bestrahlung beim Impingementsyndrom des Schultergelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamietz, B. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Sauer, R.; Keilholz, L. [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen (Germany). Strahlentherapeutische Klinik

    2008-05-15

    Background and Purpose: Up to now, degenerative shoulder diseases were summarized by the term 'periarthritis humeroscapularis'. Actual shoulder diseases can be differentiated etiopathologically according to a primary and secondary impingement syndrome. Narrowing of the subacromial space, which is caused by an osseous shape variant, leads to primary impingement. Secondary impingement develops, when the subacromial space is reduced by swelling tissue below the osseous shoulder roof. This study aimed for the exact diagnosis to indicate therapy and to classify the results according to the Constant score. Patients and Methods: From August 1999 to September 2002, 102 patients with 115 shoulder joint conditions underwent radiation therapy (RT). All joints received two RT series (6 x 0.5 Gy/series) applied in two to three weekly fractions, totaling a dosage of 6.0 Gy (250 kV, 15 mAs, 1-mm Cu filter). The second RT course started 6 weeks after the end of the first. 115 shoulders were examined before RT, 6 weeks after the second RT course and, finally, during the follow-up from January to May 2003. Results: Pain relief was achieved in 94/115 shoulder joints (82%) after 18-month follow-up (median). A significant difference existed between secondary impingement and primary/non-impingement according to response. Tendinosis calcarea, bursitis subdeltoidea, tendovaginitis of the long biceps tendon, and capsulitis adhaesiva responded well to therapy. Conclusion: Shoulder diseases of secondary impingement demonstrate a good response to RT. Less or no benefit was found in primary impingement syndrome or complete rotator cuff disruption and acute shoulder injuries, respectively. (orig.)

  5. Aquaflo pump vs FMS 4 pump for shoulder arthroscopic surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Ampat, G.; Bruguera, J.; Copeland, S A

    1997-01-01

    A prospective controlled trial was carried out to compare two different fluid delivery systems used for shoulder arthroscopy. One an advanced pump system that controls both pressure and flow of fluid delivered, the other an air-driven diaphragm pump that only controls fluid pressure. Blood loss, presence of bleeding vessels and visual clarity were parameters used to assess the pump systems. There was no difference between the pumps in straightforward shoulder procedures. However, complicated ...

  6. Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery in Female Professional Tennis Players

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Simon W.; Safran, Marc R.; Dakic, Jodie; Nguyen, Michael L.; Stroia, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent publications have highlighted the relatively poor outcome of other overhead athletes, particularly baseball players, with regard to return to sports at the same or higher level after shoulder surgery. However, true assessment of their ability when returning to sport is not as clear. Further, ability to return to other overhead sports has not been reported. Our objective was to assess outcome and time to return to previous level of function following shoulder surgery in prof...

  7. Mini-Open Latarjet Procedure for Recurrent Anterior Shoulder Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Numa Mercier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior shoulder instability is a common problem. The Latarjet procedure has been advocated as an option for the treatment of anteroinferior shoulder instability. The purpose of this paper is to explain our surgical procedure titled “Mini-open Latarjet Procedure.” We detailed patient positioning, skin incision, subscapularis approach, and coracoid fixation. Then, we reviewed the literature to evaluate the clinical outcomes of this procedure.

  8. Audit on necessity of radiographs in anterior shoulder dislocations

    OpenAIRE

    K. Ahmadi, M.D; M. Mofidi, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    AbstractBackground and Purpose: Anterior shoulder dislocation is the most common major joint dislocation. In most cases, this dislocation is being relocated in emergency departments. Routinely, pre and post reduction radiographs are performed. This study was done to determine the necessity of radiographs in the emergency department for management of patients with suspected anterior shoulder dislocation.Materials and Methods: In this case series study, 116 patients suspected of anterior should...

  9. Glenoid Dysplasia in the Recurrent Shoulder Dislocation: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Hamza Sucuoglu

    2016-01-01

    Glenoid dysplasia, which is often ignored, is a rare developmental anomaly. In most cases the patients remain asymptomatic. Although glenoid dysplasia has been diagnosed by incidentally on chest radiograph, also it has been described because of the developing instability of shoulder joint. Our young male patient who has recurrent dislocation of the shoulder-joint 4-5 times a year for last 5 years, dislocation has been reduced in the emergency department and he has been discharged from hospita...

  10. Trapezius transfer to treat flail shoulder after brachial plexus palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz Humberto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After severe brachial palsy involving the shoulder, many different muscle transfers have been advocated to restore movement and stability of the shoulder. Paralysis of the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles can be treated by transfer of the trapezius. Methods We treated 10 patients, 8 males and 2 females, by transfer of the trapezius to the proximal humerus. In 6 patients the C5 and C6 roots had been injuried; in one C5, C6 and C7 roots; and 3 there were complete brachial plexus injuries. Eight of the 10 had had neurosurgical repairs before muscle transfer. Their average age was 28.3 years (range 17 to 41, the mean delay between injury and transfer was 3.1 years (range 14 months to 6.3 years and the average follow-up was 17.5 months (range 6 to 52, reporting the clinical and radiological results. Evaluation included physical and radiographic examinations. A modification of Mayer's transfer of the trapezius muscle was performed. The principal goal of this work was to evaluate the results of the trapezius transfer for flail shoulder after brachial plexus injury. Results All 10 patients had improved function with a decrease in instability of the shoulder. The average gain in shoulder abduction was 46.2°; the gain in shoulder flexion average 37.4°. All patients had stable shoulder (no subluxation of the humeral head on radiographs. Conclusion Trapezius transfer for a flail shoulder after brachial plexus palsy can provide satisfactory function and stability.

  11. Milwaukee Shoulder-Knee Syndrome: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Nuri Çetin; Kubra Ustaomer; Berrin Leblebici; Aysun Uguz

    2008-01-01

    Basic calsium phospate crystals frequently may form asymptomatic deposits that may give rise to several clinical syndromes, including calsific periarthritis, tendinitis, bursitis, Milwaukee shoulder syndrome, osteoarthritis, calcific tendinitis and bursitis, and mixed crystal deposition in and around joints. Milwaukee shoulder syndrome is a well defined clinical entity that can be observed particular in older women. It is a destructive arthropathy associated with the deposition of cristals, ...

  12. Injections and physiotherapy for the painful stiff shoulder.

    OpenAIRE

    Dacre, J E; Beeney, N; Scott, D L

    1989-01-01

    Cost effective treatment is needed for common self limiting rheumatological conditions. Periarthritis of the shoulder is an example. There is no consensus for one type of treatment, though local steroids or physiotherapy are conventionally used. Their cost and efficacy were compared in a prospective randomised observer-blind trial--in essence a medical audit of the treatment of a common rheumatological problem. Sixty two consecutive patients presenting with a painful stiff shoulder were studi...

  13. Surgical techniques to minimize shoulder pain after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donatsky, Anders Meller; Bjerrum, Flemming; Gögenür, Ismayil

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is the treatment of choice for symptomatic cholecystolithiasis. Despite the many advantages over open surgery, many patients complain about referred pain to the shoulder during the postoperative course. The purpose of this review was to evaluate...... different intraoperative surgical methods to minimize shoulder pain (SP). METHODS: A search of the literature was conducted using PubMed, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), and Cochrane database of systematic reviews. Eligibility criteria were: randomized clinical trials or meta-analysis evaluating...

  14. Bilateral Traumatic Anterior Dislocation of Shoulder – a rare entity

    OpenAIRE

    Yashavantha Kumar C; Nalini K B; Lalit Maini; Prashanth Nagaraj

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Bilateral shoulder dislocation are most commonly posterior type. These are most commonly due to seizure disorder and electrocution. Anterior shoulder dislocations occurring bilaterally without any predisposing factors are very rare. These types of injuries are due to trauma with a unique mechanism of injury. To best of our knowledge there are only few cases of similar kind are reported in literature. We hereby report a interesting case of posttraumatic, bilateral anterior dislo...

  15. Interscalene brachial plexus blocks in the management of shoulder dislocations.

    OpenAIRE

    Underhill, T J; Wan, A; Morrice, M

    1989-01-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block is a simple and effective alternative to intravenous benzodiazepines or general anaesthesia for manipulation of the dislocated shoulder. Thirty interscalene brachial plexus blocks were performed on 29 patients with dislocations of the shoulder to provide regional anaesthesia for reduction. Pain was abolished by 14 out of the 30 blocks performed, improved by 13 and unchanged by three. Muscle relaxation (MRC grade 3 or less) occurred in 21 patients. In 26 case...

  16. New aspects in pathogenesis and therapy of shoulder instability

    OpenAIRE

    Krüger, David Richard

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Instability of the glenohumeral joint is accompanied by macroscopic changes of the static stabilizers. Not much evidence is available whether these changes can be found on microscopic level and if they are influenced by demographic variables. Conservative and operative therapy options are available for the treatment of shoulder instability. Patients with failed operative shoulder stabilization resemble a special collective in which the value of arthroscopy for revision stabi...

  17. The Classic: Shoulder and Elbow Lesions Distinctive of Baseball Players

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, George E.

    2012-01-01

    This Classic Article is a reprint of the original work by G. Bennett, Shoulder and Elbow Lesions Distinctive of Baseball Players. An accompanying biographical sketch of G. Bennett is available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-012-2334-3. The Classic Article is ©1947 and is reprinted with permission from Wolters Kluwer Health from Bennett G. Shoulder and elbow lesions distinctive of baseball players. Ann Surg. 1947;126:107–110.

  18. Simulations of nucleation and elongation of amyloid fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jianing; Muthukumar, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a coarse-grained model for the growth kinetics of amyloid fibrils from solutions of peptides and address the fundamental mechanism of nucleation and elongation by using a lattice Monte Carlo procedure. We reproduce the three main characteristics of nucleation of amyloid fibrils: (1) existence of lag time, (2) occurrence of a critical concentration, and (3) seeding. We find the nucleation of amyloid fibrils to require a quasi-two-dimensional configuration, where a second layer of β ...

  19. Inhibition of Alzheimer amyloid β aggregation by polyvalent trehalose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A glycopolymer carrying trehalose was found to suppress the formation of amyloid fibrils from the amyloid β peptide (1-42) (Aβ), as evaluated by thioflavin T assay and atomic force microscopy. Glycopolymers carrying sugar alcohols also changed the aggregation properties of Aβ, and the inhibitory effect depended on the type of sugar and alkyl side chain. Neutralization activity was confirmed by in vitro assay using HeLa cells. The glycopolymer carrying trehalose strongly inhibited amyloid formation and neutralized cytotoxicity.

  20. Using bacterial inclusion bodies to screen for amyloid aggregation inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Villar-Piqué Anna; Espargaró Alba; Sabaté Raimon; de Groot Natalia S; Ventura Salvador

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42) is the main component of the inter-neuronal amyloid plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The mechanism by which Aβ42 and other amyloid peptides assemble into insoluble neurotoxic deposits is still not completely understood and multiple factors have been reported to trigger their formation. In particular, the presence of endogenous metal ions has been linked to the pathogenesis of AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. Results ...

  1. New Insights in the Amyloid-Beta Interaction with Mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Spuch; Saida Ortolano; Carmen Navarro

    2012-01-01

    Biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Particularly, mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of amyloid-beta-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. The recent emphasis on the intracellular biology of amyloid-beta and its precursor protein (APP) has led researchers to consider the possibility that mitochondria-associated and mitochondrial amyloid-beta may directly cause neurotoxicity. Both...

  2. Generation of amyloid-β is reduced by the interaction of calreticulin with amyloid precursor protein, presenilin and nicastrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Stemmer

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein by γ-secretase and the ensuing generation of amyloid-β is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the identification of amyloid precursor protein binding proteins involved in regulating processing of amyloid precursor protein by the γ-secretase complex is essential for understanding the mechanisms underlying the molecular pathology of the disease. We identified calreticulin as novel amyloid precursor protein interaction partner that binds to the γ-secretase cleavage site within amyloid precursor protein and showed that this Ca(2+- and N-glycan-independent interaction is mediated by amino acids 330-344 in the C-terminal C-domain of calreticulin. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed that calreticulin is not only associated with amyloid precursor protein but also with the γ-secretase complex members presenilin and nicastrin. Calreticulin was detected at the cell surface by surface biotinylation of cells overexpressing amyloid precursor protein and was co-localized by immunostaining with amyloid precursor protein and presenilin at the cell surface of hippocampal neurons. The P-domain of calreticulin located between the N-terminal N-domain and the C-domain interacts with presenilin, the catalytic subunit of the γ-secretase complex. The P- and C-domains also interact with nicastrin, another functionally important subunit of this complex. Transfection of amyloid precursor protein overexpressing cells with full-length calreticulin leads to a decrease in amyloid-β42 levels in culture supernatants, while transfection with the P-domain increases amyloid-β40 levels. Similarly, application of the recombinant P- or C-domains and of a synthetic calreticulin peptide comprising amino acid 330-344 to amyloid precursor protein overexpressing cells result in elevated amyloid-β40 and amyloid-β42 levels, respectively. These findings indicate that the interaction of

  3. An MRI study on the relations between muscle atrophy, shoulder function and glenohumeral deformity in shoulders of children with obstetric brachial plexus injury

    OpenAIRE

    van Doorn-Loogman Mirjam H; Mullender Margriet G; van Kooten Ed O; van Gelein Vitringa Valerie M; van der Sluijs Johannes A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background A substantial number of children with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) will develop internal rotation adduction contractures of the shoulder, posterior humeral head subluxations and glenohumeral deformities. Their active shoulder function is generally limited and a recent study showed that their shoulder muscles were atrophic. This study focuses on the role of shoulder muscles in glenohumeral deformation and function. Methods This is a prospective study on 24 chi...

  4. Myositis ossificans around shoulder following military training programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa C Kir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The myositis ossificans around shoulder in military recruits are not reported yet. Three young male soldiers presented with complaints of palpable mass at the anterior aspect of shoulder; tenderness around the superior part of deltopectoral groove close to acromioclavicular joint; and restriction of shoulder motion. They also noticed ecchymosis and pain around the coracoid process and anterior shoulder region during regular firing exercises. Plain X-rays and computerized tomography showed extra-capsular, dense, irregular structure in the space between pectoralis and deltoid muscles which correlated with heterotopic bone. One patient refused surgical intervention because of the completion of his military serving period. Surgical excision was performed for the other two patients. During surgical exploration, both ossified masses were found in deltopectoral region and mostly in fibers of clavicular and acromial parts of deltoid muscle. Pathological reports confirmed the structure of masses as mature trabecular bone. Postoperatively indomethacin treatment and active shoulder exercises were started until the full range of motion was regained. Mini soft bag was used on the rifle contact area of the shoulder. No complications or recurrences were observed during the 24 months of followup period.

  5. Evaluation of 67Ga accumulation around the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    67Ga scintigraphy was performed in 865 patients, and in 1078 examinations. 67Ga accumulation was evaluated retrospectively for asymmetric accumulation in the shoulders. Approximately 50% of patients showed no asymmetric distribution of 67Ga in the shoulders. About 40% of patients showed increased accumulation in the right side and about 10% of patients showed increased accumulation in the left side. A change of 67Ga distribution in the shoulder joints was recognized in about 30% of patients during the follow-up study. Reasons for asymmetric distribution of 67Ga in the shoulders were considered to be due to bone metastasis, changes of local blood flow, edema, irradiation, muscle atrophy after cerebral paralysis, and operation. 67Ga scintigraphy showed a broader range and more prominent accumulation in the soft tissues around the shoulder joint than 99mTc-MDP scintigraphy. The accumulation of 99mTc-MDP was recognized to be in the center of the region of 67Ga accumulation. 99mTc-MDP scintigraphy showed more prominently increased accumulation than 67Ga scintigraphy in patients with osseous lesions. Similar factors appeared to have had an influence on the abnormal accumulation of 67Ga and 99mTc-MDP around the shoulder joint. (author)

  6. Amyloid β protein and Alzheimer disease

    OpenAIRE

    Square, D

    1997-01-01

    Amyloid beta protein is predominant in senile plaques, the neuropathologic hallmarks of Alzheimer disease. Researchers in Winnipeg have shown that this protein can overstimulate certain hydrolytic enzymes to break down the phospholipid building blocks of the brain-cell wall. They speculate that the abnormal destruction of phospholipids gradually drains the energy resources a neuron uses to rebuild its membrane. As neurons "burn out," the brain loses its ability to function normally. In view o...

  7. Prions, amyloids, and RNA: Pieces of a puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizhnikov, Anton A; Antonets, Kirill S; Bondarev, Stanislav A; Inge-Vechtomov, Sergey G; Derkatch, Irina L

    2016-05-01

    Amyloids are protein aggregates consisting of fibrils rich in β-sheets. Growth of amyloid fibrils occurs by the addition of protein molecules to the tip of an aggregate with a concurrent change of a conformation. Thus, amyloids are self-propagating protein conformations. In certain cases these conformations are transmissible / infectious; they are known as prions. Initially, amyloids were discovered as pathological extracellular deposits occurring in different tissues and organs. To date, amyloids and prions have been associated with over 30 incurable diseases in humans and animals. However, a number of recent studies demonstrate that amyloids are also functionally involved in a variety of biological processes, from biofilm formation by bacteria, to long-term memory in animals. Interestingly, amyloid-forming proteins are highly overrepresented among cellular factors engaged in all stages of mRNA life cycle: from transcription and translation, to storage and degradation. Here we review rapidly accumulating data on functional and pathogenic amyloids associated with mRNA processing, and discuss possible significance of prion and amyloid networks in the modulation of key cellular functions. PMID:27248002

  8. Outcomes Study of the TM Reverse Shoulder System Used in Primary or Revision Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-11

    Osteoarthritis; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Ununited Humeral Head Fracture; Irreducible 3-and 4-part Proximal Humeral Fractures; Avascular Necrosis; Gross Rotator Cuff Deficiency; Failed Total Shoulder Arthroplasty (Both Glenoid and Humeral Components Require Revision

  9. Amyloid-beta Alzheimer targets — protein processing, lipid rafts, and amyloid-beta pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbor, Sage C.; LaFontaine, Mike; Cumbay, Medhane

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), now appears to be deleterious in its low number aggregate form as opposed to the macroscopic Aβ fibers historically seen postmortem. While Alzheimer targets, such as the tau protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and immune system activation continue to be investigated, the recent discovery that amyloid beta aggregates at lipid rafts and likely forms neurotoxic pores has led to a new paradigm regarding why past therapeutics may have failed and how to design the next round of compounds for clinical trials. An atomic resolution understanding of Aβ aggregates, which appear to exist in multiple conformations, is most desirable for future therapeutic development. The investigative difficulties, structures of these small Aβ aggregates, and current therapeutics are summarized in this review.

  10. Amyloid-beta Alzheimer targets - protein processing, lipid rafts, and amyloid-beta pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbor, Sage C; LaFontaine, Mike; Cumbay, Medhane

    2016-03-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), now appears to be deleterious in its low number aggregate form as opposed to the macroscopic Aβ fibers historically seen postmortem. While Alzheimer targets, such as the tau protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and immune system activation continue to be investigated, the recent discovery that amyloid beta aggregates at lipid rafts and likely forms neurotoxic pores has led to a new paradigm regarding why past therapeutics may have failed and how to design the next round of compounds for clinical trials. An atomic resolution understanding of Aβ aggregates, which appear to exist in multiple conformations, is most desirable for future therapeutic development. The investigative difficulties, structures of these small Aβ aggregates, and current therapeutics are summarized in this review. PMID:27505013

  11. Formation of Toxic Amyloid Fibrils by Amyloid β-Protein on Ganglioside Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsumi Matsuzaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that the conversion of the soluble, nontoxic amyloid β-protein (Aβ monomer to aggregated toxic Aβ rich in β-sheet structures is central to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the mechanism of the abnormal aggregation of Aβ in vivo is not well understood. Accumulating evidence suggests that lipid rafts (microdomains in membranes mainly composed of sphingolipids (gangliosides and sphingomyelin and cholesterol play a pivotal role in this process. This paper summarizes the molecular mechanisms by which Aβ aggregates on membranes containing ganglioside clusters, forming amyloid fibrils. Notably, the toxicity and physicochemical properties of the fibrils are different from those of Aβ amyloids formed in solution. Furthermore, differences between Aβ-(1–40 and Aβ-(1–42 in membrane interaction and amyloidogenesis are also emphasized.

  12. Design and Construction of Large Amyloid Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin M. Ridgley

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mixtures of “template” and “adder” proteins self-assemble into large amyloid fibers of varying morphology and modulus. Fibers range from low modulus, rectangular cross-sectioned tapes to high modulus, circular cross-sectioned cylinders. Varying the proteins in the mixture can elicit “in-between” morphologies, such as elliptical cross-sectioned fibers and twisted tapes, both of which have moduli in-between rectangular tapes and cylindrical fibers. Experiments on mixtures of proteins of known amino acid sequence show that control of the large amyloid fiber morphology is dependent on the amount of glutamine repeats or “Q-blocks” relative to hydrophobic side chained amino acids such as alanine, isoleucine, leucine, and valine in the adder protein. Adder proteins with only hydrophobic groups form low modulus rectangular cross-sections and increasing the Q-block content allows excess hydrogen bonding on amide groups that results in twist and higher modulus. The experimental results show that large amyloid fibers of specific shape and modulus can be designed and controlled at the molecular level.

  13. Reexamining Alzheimer's Disease: Evidence for a Protective Role for Amyloid-β Protein Precursor and Amyloid

    OpenAIRE

    Castellani, Rudy J.; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Siedlak, Sandra L.; Nunomura, Akihiko; Hayashi, Takaaki; Nakamura, Masao; Zhu, Xiongwei; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease characterized clinically by cognitive decline and pathologically by the accumulation of amyloid-β-containing senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. A great deal of attention has focused on amyloid-β as the major pathogenic mechanisms with the ultimate goal of using amyloid-β lowering therapies as an avenue of treatment. Unfortunately, nearly a quarter century later, no tangible progress has been offered, whereas spectac...

  14. Amyloid-β and Astrocytes Interplay in Amyloid-β Related Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batarseh, Yazan S; Duong, Quoc-Viet; Mousa, Youssef M; Al Rihani, Sweilem B; Elfakhri, Khaled; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology is known to promote chronic inflammatory responses in the brain. It was thought previously that Aβ is only associated with Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome. However, studies have shown its involvement in many other neurological disorders. The role of astrocytes in handling the excess levels of Aβ has been highlighted in the literature. Astrocytes have a distinctive function in both neuronal support and protection, thus its involvement in Aβ pathological process may tip the balance toward chronic inflammation and neuronal death. In this review we describe the involvement of astrocytes in Aβ related disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and frontotemporal dementia. PMID:26959008

  15. Hydraulic design of pervious concrete highway shoulders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahl, Nathan Andrew

    Stormwater drainage has been a factor in roadway design for years. Now stormwater quantity and quality are also becoming regulated for roadways. As regulations of stormwater management continue to increase so does the need for more viable and effect management practices. The research presented and discussed in this thesis presents the option of using pervious concrete in highway shoulders as a best management practice for stormwater management. Research focused on the hydraulic response of pervious concrete pavements exposed to sheet flowing water. Pervious concrete samples were placed in a hydraulic flume to determine capture discharges, infiltration rates, and by-pass flowrates for a broad range of void contents, across a broad range of pavement cross slopes. The results demonstrate that the capture discharge and infiltration rates are inversely related to the cross slope of the pavement. Results also showed the infiltration rate of the permeable pavement exposed to sheet flowing water, in the model, is significantly lower than the measured infiltration rate. Pervious concrete samples were also tested to determine hydraulic response when exposed to clogging associated with sand used in roadway de-icing. The results of the clogging of the permeable pavements followed similar trends as the unclogged samples, with the only difference being a more significant reduction in infiltration rates at higher applications of sand. Preliminary discussion of a design methodology is included with a design example.

  16. An Evaluation of the Responsiveness and Discriminant Validity of Shoulder Questionnaires among Patients Receiving Surgical Correction of Shoulder Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle A. R. Kemp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Health-related quality-of-life (HRQL measures must detect clinically important changes over time and between different patient subgroups. Forty-three patients (32 M, 13 F; mean age  =  26.00  ±  8.19 years undergoing arthroscopic Bankart repair completed three validated shoulder questionnaires (Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Standardized Shoulder Assessment form (ASES, Constant score preoperatively, and at 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Responsiveness and discriminant validity was assessed between those with a satisfactory outcome and those with (1 a major recurrence of instability, (2 a single episode of subluxation, (3 any postoperative episode of instability. Eight (20% patients reported recurrent instability. Compared to baseline, the WOSI detected improvement at the 6- (P<0.001 and 12-month (P=0.011 evaluations. The ASES showed improvement at 6 months (P=0.003, while the Constant score did not report significant improvement until 12 months postoperatively (P=0.001. Only the WOSI detected differential shoulder function related to shoulder instability. Those experiencing even a single episode of subluxation reported a 10% drop in their WOSI score, attaining the previously established minimal clinically important difference (MCID. Those experiencing a frank dislocation or multiple episodes of subluxation reported a 20% decline. The WOSI allows better discrimination of the severity of postoperative instability symptoms following arthroscopic Bankart repair.

  17. An Evaluation of the Responsiveness and Discriminant Validity of Shoulder Questionnaires among Patients Receiving Surgical Correction of Shoulder Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Kyle A. R.; Sheps, David M.; Beaupre, Lauren A.; Styles-Tripp, Fiona; Luciak-Corea, Charlene; Balyk, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Health-related quality-of-life (HRQL) measures must detect clinically important changes over time and between different patient subgroups. Forty-three patients (32 M, 13 F; mean age  =  26.00  ±  8.19 years) undergoing arthroscopic Bankart repair completed three validated shoulder questionnaires (Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI), American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Standardized Shoulder Assessment form (ASES), Constant score) preoperatively, and at 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Responsiveness and discriminant validity was assessed between those with a satisfactory outcome and those with (1) a major recurrence of instability, (2) a single episode of subluxation, (3) any postoperative episode of instability. Eight (20%) patients reported recurrent instability. Compared to baseline, the WOSI detected improvement at the 6- (P < 0.001) and 12-month (P = 0.011) evaluations. The ASES showed improvement at 6 months (P = 0.003), while the Constant score did not report significant improvement until 12 months postoperatively (P = 0.001). Only the WOSI detected differential shoulder function related to shoulder instability. Those experiencing even a single episode of subluxation reported a 10% drop in their WOSI score, attaining the previously established minimal clinically important difference (MCID). Those experiencing a frank dislocation or multiple episodes of subluxation reported a 20% decline. The WOSI allows better discrimination of the severity of postoperative instability symptoms following arthroscopic Bankart repair. PMID:23002386

  18. Amyloid cascade in Alzheimer's disease: Recent advances in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Tarek; Shakeri, Arash; Rao, Praveen P N

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is of major concern all over the world due to a number of factors including (i) an aging population (ii) increasing life span and (iii) lack of effective pharmacotherapy options. The past decade has seen intense research in discovering disease-modifying multitargeting small molecules as therapeutic options. The pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease is attributed to a number of factors such as the cholinergic dysfunction, amyloid/tau toxicity and oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction. In recent years, targeting the amyloid cascade has emerged as an attractive strategy to discover novel neurotherapeutics. Formation of beta-amyloid species, with different degrees of solubility and neurotoxicity is associated with the gradual decline in cognition leading to dementia. The two commonly used approaches to prevent beta-amyloid accumulation in the brain include (i) development of beta-secretase inhibitors and (ii) designing direct inhibitors of beta-amyloid (self-induced) aggregation. This review highlights the amyloid cascade hypothesis and the key chemical features required to design small molecules that inhibit lower and higher order beta-amyloid aggregates. Several recent examples of small synthetic molecules with disease-modifying properties were considered and their molecular docking studies were conducted using either a dimer or steric-zipper assembly of beta-amyloid. These investigations provide a mechanistic understanding on the structural requirements needed to design novel small molecules with anti-amyloid aggregation properties. Significantly, this work also demonstrates that the structural requirements to prevent aggregation of various amyloid species differs considerably, which explains the fact that many small molecules do not exhibit similar inhibition profile toward diverse amyloid species such as dimers, trimers, tetramers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils. PMID:26945113

  19. Ultrasound-guided interventional procedures around the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Carmelo; Banfi, Giuseppe; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Mauri, Giovanni; Secchi, Francesco; Silvestri, Enzo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an established modality for shoulder evaluation, being accurate, low cost and radiation free. Different pathological conditions can be diagnosed using ultrasound and can be treated using ultrasound guidance, such as degenerative, traumatic or inflammatory diseases. Subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis is the most common finding on ultrasound evaluation for painful shoulder. Therapeutic injections of corticosteroids are helpful to reduce inflammation and pain. Calcific tendinopathy of rotator cuff affects up to 20% of painful shoulders. Ultrasound-guided treatment may be performed with both single- and double-needle approach. Calcific enthesopathy, a peculiar form of degenerative tendinopathy, is a common and mostly asymptomatic ultrasound finding; dry needling has been proposed in symptomatic patients. An alternative is represented by autologous platelet-rich plasma injections. Intra-articular injections of the shoulder can be performed in the treatment of a variety of inflammatory and degenerative diseases with corticosteroids or hyaluronic acid respectively. Steroid injections around the long head of the biceps brachii tendon are indicated in patients with biceps tendinopathy, reducing pain and humeral tenderness. The most common indication for acromion-clavicular joint injection is degenerative osteoarthritis, with ultrasound representing a useful tool in localizing the joint space and properly injecting various types of drugs (steroids, lidocaine or hyaluronic acid). Suprascapular nerve block is an approved treatment for chronic shoulder pain non-responsive to conventional treatments as well as candidate patients for shoulder arthroscopy. This review provides an overview of these different ultrasonography-guided procedures that can be performed around the shoulder. PMID:26313499

  20. Anatomical basics, variations, and degenerative changes of the shoulder joint and shoulder girdle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the anatomical basics of the shoulder, their variations, and precise definitions, including differential diagnoses. It also describes the characteristic degenerative changes caused by aging. A typical variation (7-15%) is the os acromiale, which forms the triangular epiphysis of the scapular spine. This abnormality must be differentiated from a fracture of the acromion or a pseudarthrosis. Because ossification of the acromion is complete after age 25, the os acromiale should be diagnosed only after this age. The shape of the acromion is a further important feature. In a recent anatomical study, the following frequencies of the Bigliani-types of the acromial shape were anatomically determined - type 1 (flat), 10.2% and type 2 (curved), 89.8%. Type 3 (hooked) was not observed, which indicates that this type is probably a misinterpretation of the so-called acromial spur. Minor dehiscences and perforations in the infraspinate or supraspinate fossa should not be confused with malignant osteolyses. The scapula has three ligaments of its own, (1) the coracoacromial ligament and its osseous fixations form an osteofibrous arch above the shoulder joint, which plays a part in impingement syndrome; (2) the superior transverse scapular ligament or its ossified correlate arches the scapular incisure and can cause a typical compression syndrome of the suprascapular nerve; (3) the inferior transverse scapular ligament is of no great clinical importance. Two intraarticular structures (glenoid labrum and tendon of the long bicipital head) must be mentioned. The glenoid labrum consists of dense connective tissue and surrounds the margin of the glenoid cavity. Two areas exhibit specialized conditions, cranial at the supraglenoid tubercle an intimate relationship exists to the tendon of the long bicipital head and in about 55% of cases, the labrum is stretched over the glenoid rim at the ventral side. At the area of the biceps-tendon-labrum complex, so-called SLAP

  1. The Effect of Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs on Amyloid Aggregation and Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Iannuzzi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a protein folding disorder in which normally soluble proteins are deposited extracellularly as insoluble fibrils, impairing tissue structure and function. Charged polyelectrolytes such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs are frequently found associated with the proteinaceous deposits in tissues of patients affected by amyloid diseases. Experimental evidence indicate that they can play an active role in favoring amyloid fibril formation and stabilization. Binding of GAGs to amyloid fibrils occurs mainly through electrostatic interactions involving the negative polyelectrolyte charges and positively charged side chains residues of aggregating protein. Similarly to catalyst for reactions, GAGs favor aggregation, nucleation and amyloid fibril formation functioning as a structural templates for the self-assembly of highly cytotoxic oligomeric precursors, rich in β-sheets, into harmless amyloid fibrils. Moreover, the GAGs amyloid promoting activity can be facilitated through specific interactions via consensus binding sites between amyloid polypeptide and GAGs molecules. We review the effect of GAGs on amyloid deposition as well as proteins not strictly related to diseases. In addition, we consider the potential of the GAGs therapy in amyloidosis.

  2. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian Stougaard; Dueholm, Morten Simonsen;

    2015-01-01

    and increases biofilm stiffness 20-fold. Deletion of any one of the individual members of in the fap operon (except the putative chaperone FapA) abolishes this ability to increase biofilm stiffness and correlates with the loss of amyloid. We conclude that amyloid makes major contributions to biofilm...

  3. The Tubular Sheaths Encasing Methanosaeta thermophila Filaments Are Functional Amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueholm, Morten S; Larsen, Poul; Finster, Kai; Stenvang, Marcel R; Christiansen, Gunna; Vad, Brian S; Bøggild, Andreas; Otzen, Daniel E; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-08-14

    Archaea are renowned for their ability to thrive in extreme environments, although they can be found in virtually all habitats. Their adaptive success is linked to their unique cell envelopes that are extremely resistant to chemical and thermal denaturation and that resist proteolysis by common proteases. Here we employ amyloid-specific conformation antibodies and biophysical techniques to show that the extracellular cell wall sheaths encasing the methanogenic archaea Methanosaeta thermophila PT are functional amyloids. Depolymerization of sheaths and subsequent MS/MS analyses revealed that the sheaths are composed of a single major sheath protein (MspA). The amyloidogenic nature of MspA was confirmed by in vitro amyloid formation of recombinant MspA under a wide range of environmental conditions. This is the first report of a functional amyloid from the archaeal domain of life. The amyloid nature explains the extreme resistance of the sheath, the elastic properties that allow diffusible substrates to penetrate through expandable hoop boundaries, and how the sheaths are able to split and elongate outside the cell. The archaeal sheath amyloids do not share homology with any of the currently known functional amyloids and clearly represent a new function of the amyloid protein fold. PMID:26109065

  4. A clinical and radiological observation of shoulder arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors analyzed 23 cases of shoulder arthrography performed at Busan National University Hospital and Inje Medical College Paik Hospital for about 2.5 years from March 1981 to September 1983, both clinically and radiologically. The results obtained were as follows: 1. Of the 23 cases, 20 cases (87.0%) were male and 3 cases (13.0%) were female, and the most prevalent age group was second decade. 2. Right shoulder arthrography was performed in 16 cases (69.6%), and left in 7 cases (30.4%). 3. The number of cases which had had certain history of trauma was 13 (56.5%), and remainder of 10 cases (43.5%) had no history of trauma. 4. Frequent symptoms and signs were pain in shoulder region in 16 cases (69.6%) and limitation of motion in 14 cases (60.9%). 5. On plain film findings, 18 cases (78.3%) were normal, and 5 cases (21.7%) were abnormal. 6. On shoulder arthrographic findings, 16 cases (69.6%) were normal, and 7 cases (30.4%) were abnormal. Those abnormal cases were consisted of 2 cases (8.7%) of adhesive capsulitis, 2 cases (8.7%) of chronic shoulder dislocation, 1 case (4.3%) of rotator cuff tear, 1 case (4.3%) of loose bodies in joint cavity, and 1 case (4.3%) of rupture of biceps tendon sheath. 7. Among routine views of shoulder arthrography of normal cases, the external rotation view revealed axillary recess and biceps tendon more distincity, and the internal rotation view revealed subscapular bursa more clearly. In case of double contrast shoulder arthrography, the contour and thickness of the medial segment of the contrast coated humeral articular cartilage were well demonstrated in erect views, with air-fluid levels in axillary recess, biceps tendon sheath and subscapular bursa. 8. The 2 cases of adhesive capsulitis revealed small joint space, obliteration of the axillary recess and subscapular bursa, and failure to fill the bicipital sheath. 9. The 2 cases of capsular deformities by chronic shoulder dislocation demonstrated loss of normal concavity of

  5. Shoulder morbidity after non-surgical treatment of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Reports on shoulder function after non-surgical treatment are not available. In the present study shoulder morbidity after surgical and non-surgical treatment of the neck is determined and compared. Materials and methods: In 100 head and neck cancer patients 174 neck sides were treated by surgery (n = 51) or (chemo)radiation (n = 123). Abduction, anteflexion, endorotation and exorotation were assessed. Subjective measurements were performed using the Visual Analogue Scale for pain, the Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ) and stiffness reporting. Results: Predictive factors for SDQ-score > 0 (n = 54) were VAS pain score, stiffness, abduction, anteflexion, physiotherapy, low shoulder position and surgical treatment. The SDQ, stiffness and pain scores were significantly higher in the surgically treated group than in the non-surgical group (p < 0.01). Anteflexion, abduction and exorotation were less impaired in the non-surgically treated group than in the surgically treated group (p < 0.01). No differences between neck dissection and neck dissection with post-operative radiotherapy, and radiotherapy and chemoradiation were found for these movements. Conclusions: Shoulder morbidity is often present after non-surgical treatment of the neck, but to a lesser extent compared to surgical treatment. Radiotherapy adds no morbidity to neck dissection and chemotherapy does not add extra morbidity to primary radiation

  6. Grading of shoulder ulcerations in sows by biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Elvang; Dahl-Pedersen, Kirstin; Barington, Krisitane;

    2014-01-01

    legislation, stating that sows with shoulder ulcers grade 3 or 4 must be kept loose and have access to soft bedding. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate if biopsies from the center of a shoulder ulcer can be used to point out animals for which an intervention must be initiated. Postmortem, a...... punch biopsy was sampled from the center of the ulceration or from the tissue overlaying the tuber spina scapula. Afterward, the shoulders were cross-sectioned and evaluated grossly and histologically (“gold standard”). In total, 121 shoulders were included in the study, and the diagnostic value of a...... punch biopsy in grading shoulder ulcerations was evaluated. The results showed a sensitivity of 0.78, a specificity of 0.98, a positive likelihood ratio of 38.36, and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.22. The agreement between the cross-section evaluation and the punch biopsy was found to be 0.90 by...

  7. The role of sensitization in musculoskeletal shoulder pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Borstad

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peripheral and central sensitization are neurophysiological processes that can prolong painful conditions. Painful shoulder conditions are often persistent, perhaps due to the presence of sensitization.Method:This manuscript summarizes six studies that have evaluated those with musculoskeletal shoulder pain for the presence of sensitization.Results:All six manuscripts report evidence of peripheral sensitization, while central sensitization was described in five of the studies. The chronicity of symptoms in subjects who were included in the studies is probably influencing this finding. The primary somatosensory test used to assess sensitization in these studies was Pressure Pain Threshold, a test for lowered nociceptive thresholds.Discussion:It appears that peripheral sensitization manifests consistently in those with musculoskeletal shoulder pathology, probably due to the inflammatory processes related to tissue injury. Central sensitization, while not universally present, was reported in a majority of the manuscripts. Because central sensitization is thought to be a key step on the pathway to chronic pain, evidence for its presence in those with shoulder pain is significant. Clinicians should expect the presence of sensitization with shoulder pathology and make appropriate choices about interventions so as not to exacerbate pain.

  8. Shoulder skin and muscle hemodynamics during backpack carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Clifford P; Macias, Brandon R; Hargens, Alan R

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of loaded backpacks on shoulder muscle oxygenation, skin blood flow, and pain. We hypothesized that backpack load carriage is associated with lower shoulder muscle oxygenation and skin microvascular flow. Near-infrared spectroscopy quantified shoulder tissue oxygenation and laser Doppler flow measured skin microvascular flow. Eight adult volunteers donned a standard backpack without added load, 5 kg load, and 10 kg load for 5 min while standing. An 8 min rest period before each backpack donning condition ensured that all measured parameters returned to baseline. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures ANOVA and significance set at p backpack significantly reduced shoulder muscle oxygenation by 22 ± 23% as compared to the empty backpack control condition (p = 0.023). In addition, a 10 kg backpack load reduced skin microvascular flow by 82 ± 22%, as compared to the empty backpack control condition (p = 0.024). Perceived pain was significantly higher when wearing the 10 kg backpack (level 4 on a 10-maximal pain scale) as compared to the empty backpack (0, 0-no pain) (p backpack loads of 10 kg decrease shoulder muscle oxygenation and skin microvascular flow. PMID:26154207

  9. Amyloid imaging in Alzheimer's disease: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidlitz, P; Voisin, T; Vellas, B; Payoux, P; Gabelle, A; Formaglio, M; Delrieu, J

    2014-07-01

    Therapies targeting amyloid-β peptide currently represent approximately 50% of drugs now being developed for Alzheimer's disease. Some, including active and passive anti-Aβ immunotherapy, directly target the amyloid plaques. The new amyloid tracers are increasingly being included in the proposed updated diagnostic criteria, and may allow earlier diagnosis. Those targeting amyloid-β peptide allow identification of amyloid plaques in vivo. We need to gain insight into all aspects of their application. As florbetapir (Amyvid™) and flutemetamol (Vizamyl™) have received marketing authorization, clinicians require deeper knowledge to be rationally used in diagnosis. In this paper, we review both completed and ongoing observational, longitudinal and interventional studies of these tracers, our main objective being to show the performance of the four most commonly used tracers and their validation. PMID:25226113

  10. Rational design of potent human transthyretin amyloid disease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabunde, T; Petrassi, H M; Oza, V B; Raman, P; Kelly, J W; Sacchettini, J C

    2000-04-01

    The human amyloid disorders, familial amyloid polyneuropathy, familial amyloid cardiomyopathy and senile systemic amyloidosis, are caused by insoluble transthyretin (TTR) fibrils, which deposit in the peripheral nerves and heart tissue. Several nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and structurally similar compounds have been found to strongly inhibit the formation of TTR amyloid fibrils in vitro. These include flufenamic acid, diclofenac, flurbiprofen, and resveratrol. Crystal structures of the protein-drug complexes have been determined to allow detailed analyses of the protein-drug interactions that stabilize the native tetrameric conformation of TTR and inhibit the formation of amyloidogenic TTR. Using a structure-based drug design approach ortho-trifluormethylphenyl anthranilic acid and N-(meta-trifluoromethylphenyl) phenoxazine 4, 6-dicarboxylic acid have been discovered to be very potent and specific TTR fibril formation inhibitors. This research provides a rationale for a chemotherapeutic approach for the treatment of TTR-associated amyloid diseases. PMID:10742177

  11. Development of (F-18)-Labeled Amyloid Imaging Agents for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicant proposes to design and synthesize a series of fluorine-18-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to be used as amyloid imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). The investigators will conduct comprehensive iterative in vitro and in vivo studies based upon well defined acceptance criteria in order to identify lead agents suitable for human studies. The long term goals are to apply the selected radiotracers as potential diagnostic agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as surrogate markers of amyloid in the brain to determine the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutic drugs, and as tools to help address basic scientific questions regarding the progression of the neuropathology of AD, such as testing the 'amyloid cascade hypothesis' which holds that amyloid accumulation is the primary cause of AD.

  12. Development of [F-18]-Labeled Amyloid Imaging Agents for PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathis, CA

    2007-05-09

    The applicant proposes to design and synthesize a series of fluorine-18-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to be used as amyloid imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). The investigators will conduct comprehensive iterative in vitro and in vivo studies based upon well defined acceptance criteria in order to identify lead agents suitable for human studies. The long term goals are to apply the selected radiotracers as potential diagnostic agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as surrogate markers of amyloid in the brain to determine the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutic drugs, and as tools to help address basic scientific questions regarding the progression of the neuropathology of AD, such as testing the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" which holds that amyloid accumulation is the primary cause of AD.

  13. Glycosaminoglycans in extracts of cardiac amyloid fibrils from familial amyloid cardiomyopathy of Danish origin related to variant transthyretin Met 111.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, J H; Stenstad, T; Kolset, S O; Husby, G

    1991-07-01

    We have previously demonstrated an association between secondary AA type amyloid fibrils and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in human liver. The present study was aimed at investigating whether a similar association could be demonstrated in isolated cardiac amyloid fibrils from a unique Danish family with amyloid cardiomyopathy related to variant transthyretin (TTR) with a single amino acid substitution of a methionin for leucine at position 111 (TTR Met 111). Using gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography, significant amounts of GAGs were detected in close association with purified myocardial amyloid fibrils, whereas only trace amounts of polysaccharides were present in the corresponding normal preparation. The GAGs were identified as 50% chondroitin sulfate, 33% heparin/heparan sulfate, and 17% hyaluronan. With the methods used the amyloid associated GAGs appeared as high molecular weight free polysaccharide chains, and not as part of intact proteoglycans (PGs) in the fibril extracts. We conclude that the association between purified amyloid fibrils and GAGs may be a general feature of amyloid deposits. Also, we suggest that the proportion of different GAGs in the amyloid deposits may depend both on the organ or tissues affected and the type of proteins making up the fibrils. PMID:2068532

  14. Calumenin interacts with serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Jacobsen, Christian; Honoré, Bent

    secretory pathway that include reticulocalbin, ERC-55, Cab45 and crocalbin. In order to further investigate the extracellular functions of calumenin we immobilized the recombinant protein to a column. After application of a placental tissue extract we were able to elute one protein that interacts with...... calumenin in the presence of Ca(2+). Amino acid sequencing identified this protein as serum amyloid P component (SAP). Furthermore, we verified and characterized the calumenin-SAP interaction by the surface plasmon resonance technique. The findings indicate that calumenin may participate in the...

  15. A catalytic surface for amyloid fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammarstroem, P; Ali, M M; Mishra, R; Tengvall, P; Lundstroem, I [Department of Physics, Biology and Chemistry, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Svensson, S [Astra Zeneca R and D, SE-151 85 Soedertaelje (Sweden)], E-mail: ingemar@ifm.liu.se

    2008-03-15

    A hydrophobic surface incubated in a solution of protein molecules (insulin monomers) was made into a catalytic surface for amyloid fibril formation by repeatedly incubate, rinse and dry the surface. The present contribution describes how this unexpected transformation occurred and its relation to rapid fibrillation of insulin solutions in contact with the surface. A tentative model of the properties of the catalytic surface is given, corroborated by ellipsometric measurements of the thickness of the organic layer on the surface and by atomic force microscopy. The surfaces used were spontaneously oxidized silicon made hydrophobic through treatment in dichlorodimethylsilane.

  16. Stability and cytotoxicity of crystallin amyloid nanofibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manmeet; Healy, Jackie; Vasudevamurthy, Madhusudan; Lassé, Moritz; Puskar, Ljiljana; Tobin, Mark J.; Valery, Celine; Gerrard, Juliet A.; Sasso, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    Previous work has identified crystallin proteins extracted from fish eye lenses as a cheap and readily available source for the self-assembly of amyloid nanofibrils. However, before exploring potential applications, the biophysical aspects and safety of this bionanomaterial need to be assessed so as to ensure that it can be effectively and safely used. In this study, crude crystallin amyloid fibrils are shown to be stable across a wide pH range, in a number of industrially relevant solvents, at both low and high temperatures, and in the presence of proteases. Crystallin nanofibrils were compared to well characterised insulin and whey protein fibrils using Thioflavin T assays and TEM imaging. Cell cytotoxicity assays suggest no adverse impact of both mature and fragmented crystallin fibrils on cell viability of Hec-1a endometrial cells. An IR microspectroscopy study supports long-term structural integrity of crystallin nanofibrils.Previous work has identified crystallin proteins extracted from fish eye lenses as a cheap and readily available source for the self-assembly of amyloid nanofibrils. However, before exploring potential applications, the biophysical aspects and safety of this bionanomaterial need to be assessed so as to ensure that it can be effectively and safely used. In this study, crude crystallin amyloid fibrils are shown to be stable across a wide pH range, in a number of industrially relevant solvents, at both low and high temperatures, and in the presence of proteases. Crystallin nanofibrils were compared to well characterised insulin and whey protein fibrils using Thioflavin T assays and TEM imaging. Cell cytotoxicity assays suggest no adverse impact of both mature and fragmented crystallin fibrils on cell viability of Hec-1a endometrial cells. An IR microspectroscopy study supports long-term structural integrity of crystallin nanofibrils. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: ThT fluorescence graphs of buffers and solvents used for

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Rotator Cuff in Destroyed Rheumatoid Shoulder: Comparison with Findings during Shoulder Replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the predictive value of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with respect to rotator cuff ruptures. Material and Methods: Thirty-one patients with rheumatic disease underwent preoperative MRI before shoulder arthroplasty. The scans were reviewed independently by two experienced radiologists. Three surgeons performed all the replacements (hemiarthroplasties), and the condition of the rotator cuff was assessed. Complete and massive tears of the rotator cuff were recorded and compared at surgery and on MRI. Results: With MRI, 21 shoulders (68%) were classified as having complete or massive tears of the rotator cuff and at surgery 14 shoulders (45%). Cohen's kappa coefficient was 0.44 (95% CI: 0.16 to 0.72) and accuracy 0.71 (95% CI: 0.52 to 0.86). Conclusion: In severely destroyed rheumatoid shoulder, the findings of soft tissues were incoherent both with MRI and at surgery. The integrity of tendons could not readily be elucidated with MRI because of an inflammatory process and scarred tissues; in surgery, too, changes were frequently difficult to categorize. Preoperative MRI of severely destroyed rheumatoid shoulder before arthroplasty turned out to be of only minor importance

  18. Acute osseous traumatic lesions of the shoulder girdle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traumatic injuries to the shoulder girdle are common lesions and occur from birth on through the whole life. Depending on the patient's age, localization and type of injury change. Diagnosis of acute osseous traumatic lesions to the shoulder is based on evaluation of trauma mechanism, patient's examination and, as for the most cases, conventional radiographs. Only in certain cases additional radiological examinations are necessary. As a minimum, two to three images in different planes, anteriorposterior, lateral and axillary, are recommended in order to display all components of the shoulder girdle without superposition. Knowledge of common clinical classifications systems is necessary for exact diagnosis in order to permit decision on conservative or operative treatment of injury. (orig.)

  19. Exploring the outcomes in studies of primary frozen shoulder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodgers, Sara; Brealey, Stephen; Jefferson, Laura; McDaid, Catriona; Maund, Emma; Hanchard, Nigel; Goodchild, Lorna; Spencer, Sally

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: In our study we explored the need to define a core outcome set for primary frozen shoulder. METHODS: We investigated the outcomes used by studies included in a systematic review of the management of primary frozen shoulder; surveyed which primary outcome measures health care professionals...... considered important; and re-examined papers previously obtained for a systematic review of patients' views of interventions for frozen shoulder to investigate their views on outcomes. RESULTS: Thirty-one studies investigated the outcomes range of movement (28 studies), pain (22), function and disability (22......), adverse events (13), quality of life (7) and other outcomes (5). Many different types of pain and ranges of movement were measured. Function and disability was measured using fifteen instruments, the content of which varied considerably. Function and disability, pain and range of movement (132, 108 and...

  20. Radiographic evaluation of anterior dislocation of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish radiographic criteria to choose the most appropriate technique of reduction for each type of anterior glenohumeral dislocation, and to determine the type of dislocation which requires general anesthesia. Material and Methods: Radiography in two different projections was performed in 67 patients with antero-inferior shoulder dislocations before a reduction attempt. The method proposed by Boss-Holzach-Matter was used as the primary technique for all shoulder dislocations. Results: Most subcoracoid dislocations (84.4%) could be reduced by the Boss-Holzach-Matter method while only a few subglenoid dislocations (15.8%) were reducible by this technique. Displaced associated fractures significantly reduced the success rate of the reduction attempts. Conclusion: Anterior dislocations of the shoulder require different methods of reduction depending upon the type (sub-group) of dislocation. Reduction of subglenoid dislocations with associated greater tuberosity fracture should be performed under general anesthesia to avoid head-splitting fracture

  1. Corticosteroid Injections Versus Manual Physical Therapy for Treatment of the Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicine Summaries for Patients Corticosteroid Injections Versus Manual Physical Therapy for Treatment of the Shoulder Impingement Syndrome The ... Outcome of Subacromial Corticosteroid Injection Compared With Manual Physical Therapy for the Management of the Unilateral Shoulder Impingement ...

  2. 78 FR 65451 - Agency Information Collection (Shoulder and Arm Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Shoulder and Arm Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire... Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Crystal Rennie... (Shoulder and Arm Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:...

  3. 78 FR 36307 - Proposed Information Collection (Shoulder and Arm Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Shoulder and Arm Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire... Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. During the comment period, comments may be viewed.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Shoulder and Arm Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form...

  4. Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Filip Holst; Pedersen, Christina Gravgaard; Jensen, Majbritt Lykke; Jensen, Steen Lund

    Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.......Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome....

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis detects cerebral amyloid-β accumulation earlier than positron emission tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Palmqvist, Sebastian; Mattsson, Niklas; Hansson, Oskar; ,

    2016-01-01

    See Rabinovici (doi:10.1093/brain/aww025) for a scientific commentary on this article. Cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β is thought to be the starting mechanism in Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid-β can be detected by analysis of cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 or amyloid positron emission tomography, but it is unknown if any of the methods can identify an abnormal amyloid accumulation prior to the other. Our aim was to determine whether cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β42 change before amyloid PET ...

  6. Simple self-reduction method for anterior shoulder dislocation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reiner Wirbel; Martin Ruppert; Elmar Schwarz; Bernhard Zapp

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To demonstrate and evaluate a modified simple method about self-reduction of anterior shoulder dislocation for significance in the emergency room. Methods:TheBoss-Holzach-Matter method for self-reduction of anterior shoulder disloaction is described.Patients with an anterior shoulder dislocation were retrospectively analysed concerning age, gender, type of anterior shoulder dislocation, occurrence of associated fractures, time between injury and reduction, reduction time, and method of reduction with its respective success rate. Results:Eighty-six patients(52 men,34 women, mean age49 years) were treated fromJanuary 2010 toJune2014.The reduction time ranged between20 seconds and6 min(mean1.5 min). Subcoracoid type of shoulder dislocation was seen in72 cases(84%), subglenoid type in14 cases(16%).Associated factures were seen in20 cases, proportionally more often in subgleboid dislocations,12 at the greater tuberosity,6 at the inferior rim of the glenoid fossa and2 at both localizations.TheBoss-Holzach-Matter method was used in35 cases with a success rate of 71.5%; dieKocher method and traction/countertraction method with premedication were used in 14 cases and17 cases with success rates of64% and70%, respectively.All other cases and the failed primary attempts required hyponotic medication.All patients older than70(n=16) were not able to perform the self reducing procedure. Conclusion:The presentedBoss-Holzach-Matter method for reduction of anterior shoulder dislocation is a simple method without the need of anaesthesia, but cooperation from patients is crucial.The successful rate is comparable with other established methods.

  7. Radiographic follow-up study of Little Leaguer's shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little Leaguer's shoulder is a syndrome involving the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate. Conservative treatment usually resolves the symptoms. However, there are no reports of a radiographic follow-up study of this disease. The purpose of this study was to show the radiographic healing process of Little Leaguer's shoulder. A total of 19 male baseball players diagnosed as having Little Leaguer's shoulder were retrospectively evaluated. The mean age at first presentation was 12.7 years. External rotation anteroposterior radiographs of the shoulder were taken. All patients were treated with rest from throwing, and no throwing was recommended until remodeling was confirmed. Follow-up radiographs were taken at 1-month intervals to assess healing. All patients were observed until healing was confirmed radiographically, after which they returned to baseball. The mean follow-up period was 8.5 months. In addition to radiography, patients were asked whether they had any symptoms and whether they had been able to return to baseball. At the first examination, radiographs showed a wider epiphyseal plate of the throwing side compared with the asymptomatic contralateral shoulder. Healing was observed in all cases. Healing occurred first along the medial side and was then extended laterally. The mean time required for healing was 4.7 months. All patients were able to return to playing baseball at their pre-injury level of play and were asymptomatic when examined at the final follow-up. The healing process of Little Leaguer's shoulder advanced from medial to lateral, and healing was achieved about 5 months after initial examination. (orig.)

  8. MRI of atraumatic sports injuries of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI of operatively or arthroscopically proven atraumatic sports injuries of 12 shoulders were reviewed retrospectively. Although it is difficult to diagnose the lesions localised at the superior glenoid labrum and to decide whether rotator interval is injured or not by MRI, MRI could detect thickening of subacromial bursae or rotator cuff injuries due to impingement syndrome and glenoid labrum injuries, such as Bankart lesion. On our limited experience, MRI was more valuable examination than arthrography and CT arthrography. MRI is a useful modality for screening or preoperative evaluation of atraumatic sports injuries of the shoulder. (author)

  9. Shoulder arthroplasty. Part 2: Normal and abnormal radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frequently, the decision made by general practitioners or musculoskeletal triage assessment services to refer patients for specialist review is initiated by a radiological report. Following shoulder arthroplasty it is important to ensure that any patient with asymptomatic evidence of a failing prosthesis is referred for review so that revision surgery can be contemplated and planned before the situation becomes unsalvageable. The first paper in this series described the various types of shoulder arthroplasty and indications for each. This follow-up paper will concentrate on their modes of failure and the associated radiographic features, and is aimed at radiology trainees and non-musculoskeletal specialist radiologists.

  10. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty: radiological and clinical short–term results

    OpenAIRE

    Atalar, Ata Can; Salduz, Ahmet; Cil, Hilal; Sungur, Mustafa; Celik, Derya; Demirhan, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the radiological and clinical short term results of the patients who underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty for rotator cuff arthropathy. Methods: The study included 14 (2 male, 12 female) patients who underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty for rotator cuff arthropathy between 2009 and 2010. The mean age of the patients was 74 (57–80) years and the mean follow–up period was 32 (21–40) months. Radiological methods as well as the range of mot...

  11. Milwaukee Shoulder-Knee Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Çetin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Basic calsium phospate crystals frequently may form asymptomatic deposits that may give rise to several clinical syndromes, including calsific periarthritis, tendinitis, bursitis, Milwaukee shoulder syndrome, osteoarthritis, calcific tendinitis and bursitis, and mixed crystal deposition in and around joints. Milwaukee shoulder syndrome is a well defined clinical entity that can be observed particular in older women. It is a destructive arthropathy associated with the deposition of cristals, rotator cuff tear, and joint instability. Clinical features include pain, swelling and progressive functional impairment.

  12. Endovascular treatment of axillary artery dissection following anterior shoulder dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fass, G; Barchiche, M Reda; Lemaitre, J; De Quin, I; Goffin, C; Bricart, R; Bellens, B

    2008-01-01

    Injury to the axillary artery is a rare complication of anterior shoulder dislocation. Open surgical repair is technically demanding because of the anatomical position of the vessel and the propensity for concomitant injuries. Standard surgical exposure techniques involve extensive dissection, including a combination of supraclavicular or infraclavicular incision, median sternotomy, and thoracotomy causing significant morbidity and mortality rates. Endovascular techniques may offer an alternative to these surgically demanding procedures. We present a patient with a traumatic dissection of the axillary artery following anterior shoulder dislocation who was successfully managed with an endovascular stent. PMID:18411587

  13. Shoulder arthroplasty. Part 2: Normal and abnormal radiographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheridan, B.D., E-mail: bdsheridan@hotmail.com [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Ahearn, N.; Tasker, A.; Wakeley, C.; Sarangi, P. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Frequently, the decision made by general practitioners or musculoskeletal triage assessment services to refer patients for specialist review is initiated by a radiological report. Following shoulder arthroplasty it is important to ensure that any patient with asymptomatic evidence of a failing prosthesis is referred for review so that revision surgery can be contemplated and planned before the situation becomes unsalvageable. The first paper in this series described the various types of shoulder arthroplasty and indications for each. This follow-up paper will concentrate on their modes of failure and the associated radiographic features, and is aimed at radiology trainees and non-musculoskeletal specialist radiologists.

  14. Anterior dislocation of shoulder in eclampsia:a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seema Rawat; Sanjay Meena; Shreesh Kumar Gangari; Lalit Kumar Lohia

    2012-01-01

    This case report presents a 25-year-old female patient with anterior dislocation of right shoulder secondary to seizures as a complication of eclampsia.This is an unusual mechanism of injury,but similar to other uncontrolled muscular contractions caused by electroconvulsive therapy,etc.To the best of our knowledge only one such case has been reported in the English literature.Closed reduction under general anaesthesia was successfully achieved.High suspicion in patients complaining of pain over shoulder joint is necessary for early diagnosis of this condition.

  15. Measurement of active shoulder proprioception: dedicated system and device

    OpenAIRE

    Lubiatowski, Przemyslaw; Ogrodowicz, Piotr; Wojtaszek, Marcin; Kaniewski, Ryszard; Stefaniak, Jakub; Dudziński, Witold; Romanowski, Leszek

    2012-01-01

    Proprioception is an essential part of shoulder stability and neuromuscular control. The purpose of the study was the development of a precise system of shoulder proprioception assessment in the active mode (Propriometr). For that purpose, devices such as the electronic goniometer and computer software had been designed. A pilot study was carried out on a control group of 27 healthy subjects, the average age being 23.8 (22–29) in order to test the system. The result of the assessment was the ...

  16. 3D Finite Element Models of Shoulder Muscles for Computing Lines of Actions and Moment Arms

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Joshua D.; Blemker, Silvia S.; Delp, Scott L.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate representation of musculoskeletal geometry is needed to characterize the function of shoulder muscles. Previous models of shoulder muscles have represented muscle geometry as a collection of line segments, making it difficult to account the large attachment areas, muscle-muscle interactions, and complex muscle fiber trajectories typical of shoulder muscles. To better represent shoulder muscle geometry we developed three-dimensional finite element models of the deltoid and rotator cuf...

  17. Use of two-axis joystick for control of externally powered shoulder disarticulation prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    Robert D. Lipschutz, BSME, CP; Blair Lock, MS; Jonathon Sensinger, PhD; Aimee E. Schultz, MS; Todd A. Kuiken, MD, PhD

    2011-01-01

    We explored a new method for simple and accurate control of shoulder movement for externally powered shoulder disarticulation prostheses with a two-axis joystick. We tested 10 subjects with intact shoulders and arms to determine the average amount of shoulder motion and force available to control an electronic input device. We then applied this information to two different input strategies to examine their effectiveness: (1) a traditional rocker potentiometer and a pair of force-sensing resis...

  18. ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF BANKART’S LESION USING SUTURE ANCHORS IN RECURRENT ANTERIOR SHOULDER INSTABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Santosh Kumar; Anant Kumar; Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Shoulder instability and its treatment were described even in ancient times by the Greek and Egyptian physicians. Evidence of shoulder dislocation has been found in archaeological and paleopathological examinations of human shoulders several thousand years old. 1 Many techniques have been described in literature for treatment of recurrent shoulder dislocation. Arthroscopic repair of Bankart’s lesion using suture anchors is a noble technique. A sut...

  19. A multivariable prediction model for the chronification of non-traumatic shoulder pain: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Struyf, Filip; Geeraerts, Jaques; Noten, Suzie; Meeus, Mira; Nijs, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Shoulder pain is the third most common musculoskeletal complaint and many patients have an unfavorable outcome with long-term disability. Only 50% of all new episodes of shoulder pain show complete recovery within 6 months. Little is known about factors that contribute to chronicity of shoulder pain, although such information is needed for the management of patients with acute and sub-acute shoulder pain. Objective: To systematically review the literature for prognostic factor...

  20. Calcific shoulder periarthritis (tendinitis) in adult onset diabetes mellitus: a controlled study.

    OpenAIRE

    Mavrikakis, M E; Drimis, S; Kontoyannis, D A; Rasidakis, A.; Moulopoulou, E S; Kontoyannis, S

    1989-01-01

    Two groups, one of 824 adult diabetics and one of 320 age and sex matched non-diabetics, were examined for abnormal glucose metabolism and calcifications on anteroposterior shoulder x rays. Two hundred and sixty two (31.8%) of the diabetics had shoulder calcification compared with 33 (10.3%) of the control group, with a preponderant localisation in the right shoulder. Diabetes of long duration treated with insulin for a long time was associated with a larger percentage of shoulder calcificati...

  1. Kinesio Taping for Shoulder Impingement: a Practical Lesson for Physiotherapy Students

    OpenAIRE

    Rask, Henri

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to implement a practical lesson of kinesio taping for shoulder impingement for physiotherapy students in Satakunta University of Applied Sciences. The aim was to provide the attendants of the lesson a preparedness to use kinesio taping as a part of a physiotherapeutic treatment for shoulder impingement. The purpose was to gather information about kinesio taping, shoulder structure and shoulder impingement. After teaching the basic information about the three ...

  2. Musculoskeletal ultrasonographic findings of the affected and unaffected shoulders in hemiplegic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma Ali; Mona Hamdy; Rasha A Abdel-Magied; Mostafa M Elian

    2016-01-01

    Background There are many sonographic changes in affected and unaffected shoulders in patients with established hemiplegia. Aim The aim of this study was to evaluate the sonographic findings of hemiplegic shoulder in patients after acute stroke and the detection of the correlation between the physical or sonographic findings and early-onset hemiplegic shoulder pain. Patients and methods Shoulders of 30 patients with cerebrovascular stroke (six male and 24 female patients), 18...

  3. Neglected Anterior Dislocation of Shoulder: is surgery necessary? A Rare Case with review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Kunal; Ubale, Tushar; Ugrappa, Harish; Pilankar, Samir; Bhaskar, Atul; Kale, Satishchandra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Shoulder joint is the most frequently dislocated joint. However, it is rarely neglected and treatment is sought immediately. Delayed or neglected shoulder dislocations are difficult to manage and require extensive procedures to obtain good functional outcome. Very few cases are described in literature showing neglected shoulder dislocation with good functional range of movement. We report a case with 3 years of neglected anterior shoulder dislocation with preserved joint functio...

  4. Clinical Usefulness of Shoulder Stability Exercises for Middle-aged Women

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Seok-Hwa; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the clinical usefulness of shoulder stability exercises and the effect of stability exercise on the shoulder pain of middle-aged women. [Subjects] Twenty-two middle-aged female subjects were randomly divided into two groups: a shoulder stability exercise group (Experimental group, n=11) and a control group (n=11). [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group performed a shoulder stability exercise, which was designed to correct abnormal location of the scapula, f...

  5. A Biomechanical Model Correlating Shoulder Kinetics to Pain in Young Baseball Pitchers

    OpenAIRE

    Keeley, David W.; Oliver, Gretchen D.; Dougherty, Christopher P.

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has postulated that shoulder pain may be associated with increases in both peak shoulder anterior force and peak shoulder proximal force. Unfortunately these relationships have yet to be quantified. Thus, the purpose of this study was to associate these kinetic values with reported shoulder pain in youth baseball pitchers. Nineteen healthy baseball pitchers participated in this study. Segment based reference systems and established calculations were utilized to identify peak sho...

  6. Return to Play After Shoulder Stabilization in National Football League Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    White, Matthew J.; Fleisig, Glenn S.; Aune, Kyle; Andrews, James R.; Dugas, Jeffrey R.; Cain, E. Lyle

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Shoulder instability is a common and limiting injury to football players. The return to play (RTP) percentage and factors affecting RTP after shoulder stabilization in National Football League (NFL) players are not defined. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of return to professional football play in the NFL after shoulder stabilization and to determine what factors may affect RTP in these athletes. Methods: Sixty NFL players who had undergone shoulder stabilizati...

  7. Functional Hydrogel Materials Inspired by Amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Joel

    2012-02-01

    Protein assembly resulting in the formation of amyloid fibrils, assemblies rich in cross beta-sheet structure, is normally thought of as a deleterious event associated with disease. However, amyloid formation is also involved in a diverse array of normal biological functions such as cell adhesion, melanin synthesis, insect defense mechanism and modulation of water surface tension by fungi and bacteria. These findings indicate that Nature has evolved to take advantage of large, proteinaceous fibrillar assemblies to elicit function. We are designing functional materials, namely hydrogels, from peptides that self-assembled into fibrillar networks, rich in cross beta-sheet structure. These gels can be used for the direct encapsulation and delivery of small molecule-, protein- and cell-based therapeutics. Loaded gels exhibit shear-thinning/self-healing mechanical properties enabling their delivery via syringe. In addition to their use for delivery, we have found that some of these gels display antibacterial activity. Although cytocompatible towards mammalian cells, the hydrogels can kill a broad spectrum of bacteria on contact.

  8. Looking for a generic inhibitor of amyloid-like fibril formation among flavone derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Šneideris, Tomas; Baranauskienė, Lina; Jonathan G Cannon; Rutkienė, Rasa; Meškys, Rolandas; Smirnovas, Vytautas

    2015-01-01

    A range of diseases is associated with amyloid fibril formation. Despite different proteins being responsible for each disease, all of them share similar features including beta-sheet-rich secondary structure and fibril-like protein aggregates. A number of proteins can form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro, resembling structural features of disease-related amyloids. Given these generic structural properties of amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils, generic inhibitors of fibril formation would be of i...

  9. A Novel liposomal nanoparticle for the imaging of amyloid plaque by MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Tanifum, Eric A; Ghaghada, Ketan; Vollert, Craig; Head, Elizabeth; Eriksen, Jason L.; Annapragada, Ananth

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid binding molecules with greater hydrophilicity than existing ligands were synthesized. The lead candidate ET6-21 bound amyloid fibrils, and amyloid deposits in dog brain and human brain tissue ex vivo. The ligand was used to prepare novel amyloid-targeted liposomal nanoparticles. The preparation was tested in the Tg2576 and TetO/APP mouse models of amyloid deposition. Gd chelates and Indocyanine green were included in the particles for visualization by MRI and near-infrared microscopy....

  10. 46 CFR 160.031-4 - Equipment for shoulder gun type line-throwing appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipment for shoulder gun type line-throwing appliance... Appliance, Shoulder Gun Type (and Equipment) § 160.031-4 Equipment for shoulder gun type line-throwing... the gun. The line canister shall be secured by clamps or brackets below the barrel of the gun. (c)...

  11. Musculoskeletal ultrasonographic findings of the affected and unaffected shoulders in hemiplegic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Ali

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Hemiplegic stroke Results in injury to the affected shoulder and the shoulder on the unaffected side. Musculoskeletal ultrasonography is an essential method in the evaluation of poststroke painful hemiplegic shoulder. However, the US grades did not correlate with the stages of motor recovery.

  12. Responsiveness of the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index in patients with adhesive capsulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Juel Niels; Ekeberg Ole; Tveitå Einar; Bautz-Holter Erik

    2008-01-01

    Background Instruments designed to measure the subjective impact of painful shoulder conditions have become essential in shoulder research. The Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) is one of the most extensively used scales of this type. The objective of this study was to investigate reproducibility and responsiveness of the SPADI in patients with adhesive capsulitis. Methods SPADI test-retest r...

  13. Influence of frequency and duration of strength training for effective management of neck and shoulder pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christoffer H; Andersen, Lars Louis; Gram, Bibi;

    2012-01-01

    training (REF). Primary outcome was self-reported neck and shoulder pain (scale 0-9) and secondary outcome work disability (Disability in Arms, Shoulders and Hands (DASH)). RESULTS: The intention-to-treat analysis showed reduced neck and right shoulder pain in the training groups after 20 weeks compared...

  14. 14 CFR 23.785 - Seats, berths, litters, safety belts, and shoulder harnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... shoulder harnesses. 23.785 Section 23.785 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... belts, and shoulder harnesses. There must be a seat or berth for each occupant that meets the following... and the attachment of— (1) Each seat to the structure; and (2) Each safety belt and shoulder...

  15. SERF Protein Is a Direct Modifier of Amyloid Fiber Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fabio Falsone

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The inherent cytotoxicity of aberrantly folded protein aggregates contributes substantially to the pathogenesis of amyloid diseases. It was recently shown that a class of evolutionary conserved proteins, called MOAG-4/SERF, profoundly alter amyloid toxicity via an autonomous but yet unexplained mode. We show that the biological function of human SERF1a originates from its atypical ability to specifically distinguish between amyloid and nonamyloid aggregation. This inherently unstructured protein directly affected the aggregation kinetics of a broad range of amyloidogenic proteins in vitro, while being inactive against nonamyloid aggregation. A representative biophysical analysis of the SERF1a:α-synuclein (aSyn complex revealed that the amyloid-promoting activity resulted from an early and transient interaction, which was sufficient to provoke a massive increase of soluble aSyn amyloid nucleation templates. Therefore, the autonomous amyloid-modifying activity of SERF1a observed in living organisms relies on a direct and dedicated manipulation of the early stages in the amyloid aggregation pathway.

  16. Accumulation of murine amyloid-β mimics early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Markus; Bracke, Alexander; Avchalumov, Yosef; Schumacher, Toni; Hofrichter, Jacqueline; Paarmann, Kristin; Fröhlich, Christina; Lange, Cathleen; Brüning, Thomas; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Pahnke, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Amyloidosis mouse models of Alzheimer's disease are generally established by transgenic approaches leading to an overexpression of mutated human genes that are known to be involved in the generation of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's families. Although these models made substantial contributions to the current knowledge about the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer's disease, the overproduction of amyloid-β peptides mimics only inherited (familiar) Alzheimer's disease, which accounts for mild cognitive impairment. Using behavioural tests, electrophysiology and morphological analyses, we compared different ABC transporter-deficient animals and found that alterations are most prominent in neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice. We show that these mice have a reduced probability to survive, show increased anxiety in new environments, and have a reduced working memory performance. Furthermore, we detected morphological changes in the hippocampus and amygdala, e.g. astrogliosis and reduced numbers of synapses, leading to defective long-term potentiation in functional measurements. Compared to human, murine amyloid-β is poorly aggregating, due to changes in three amino acids at N-terminal positions 5, 10, and 13. Interestingly, our findings account for the action of early occurring amyloid-β species/aggregates, i.e. monomers and small amyloid-β oligomers. Thus, neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice present a new model for early effects of amyloid-β-related mild cognitive impairment that allows investigations without artificial overexpression of inherited Alzheimer's disease genes. PMID:25991605

  17. Amyloid plaque imaging in vivo: current achievement and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a very complex neurodegenerative disorder, the exact cause of which is still not known. The major histopathological features, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, already described by Alois Alzheimer, have been the focus in research for decades. Despite a probable whole cascade of events in the brain leading to impairment of cognition, amyloid is still the target for diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development of molecular imaging techniques now allows imaging of amyloid plaques in vivo in Alzheimer patients by PET amyloid ligands such as Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Studies so far have revealed high 11C-PIB retention in brain at prodromal stages of AD and a possibility to discriminate AD from other dementia disorders by 11C-PIB. Ongoing studies are focussing to understand the relationship between brain and CSF amyloid processes and cognitive processes. In vivo imaging of amyloid will be important for early diagnosis and evaluation of new anti-amyloid therapies in AD. (orig.)

  18. Counterrotating-Shoulder Mechanism for Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A counterrotating-shoulder mechanism has been proposed as an alternative to the mechanism and fixtures used in conventional friction stir welding. The mechanism would internally react most or all of the forces and torques exerted on the workpiece, making it unnecessary to react the forces and torques through massive external fixtures. In conventional friction stir welding, a rotating pin tool is inserted into, and moved along, a weld seam. As the pin tool moves, it stirs together material from the opposite sides of the seam to form the weld. A large axial plunge force must be exerted upon the workpiece through and by the pin tool and a shoulder attached above the pin tool in order to maintain the pressure necessary for the process. The workpiece is secured on top of an anvil, which supports the workpiece against the axial plunge force and against the torque exerted by the pin tool and shoulder. The anvil and associated fixtures must be made heavy (and, therefore, are expensive) to keep the workpiece stationary. In addition, workpiece geometries must be limited to those that can be accommodated by the fixtures. The predecessor of the proposed counterrotating-shoulder mechanism is a second-generation, self-reacting tool, resembling a bobbin, that makes it possible to dispense with the heavy anvil. This tool consists essentially of a rotating pin tool with opposing shoulders. Although the opposing shoulders maintain the necessary pressure without need to externally apply or react a large plunge force, the torque exerted on the workpiece remains unreacted in the absence of a substantial external fixture. Depending on the RPM and the thickness of the workpiece, the torque can be large. The proposed mechanism (see figure) would include a spindle attached to a pin tool with a lower shoulder. The spindle would be coupled via splines to the upper one of three bevel gears in a differential drive. The middle bevel gear would be the power-input gear and would be coupled to the

  19. Ligand-binding sites in human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Roepstorff, P.; Robey, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    Amyloid P component (AP) is a naturally occurring glycoprotein that is found in serum and basement membranes, AP is also a component of all types of amyloid, including that found in individuals who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Because AP has been found to bind strongly and...... of 25 mu M, while the IC50 of AP-(27-38)-peptide and AP-(33-38)-peptide are 10 mu M and 2 mu M, respectively, The understanding of the structure and function of active AP peptides will be useful for development of amyloid-targeted diagnostics and therapeutics....

  20. Amyloid-β and Astrocytes Interplay in Amyloid-β Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazan S. Batarseh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-β (Aβ pathology is known to promote chronic inflammatory responses in the brain. It was thought previously that Aβ is only associated with Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome. However, studies have shown its involvement in many other neurological disorders. The role of astrocytes in handling the excess levels of Aβ has been highlighted in the literature. Astrocytes have a distinctive function in both neuronal support and protection, thus its involvement in Aβ pathological process may tip the balance toward chronic inflammation and neuronal death. In this review we describe the involvement of astrocytes in Aβ related disorders including Alzheimer’s disease, Down syndrome, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and frontotemporal dementia.