WorldWideScience

Sample records for amyloid plaque pathogenesis

  1. Enhancing astrocytic lysosome biogenesis facilitates Aβ clearance and attenuates amyloid plaque pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qingli; Yan, Ping; Ma, Xiucui; Liu, Haiyan; Perez, Ronaldo; Zhu, Alec; Gonzales, Ernesto; Burchett, Jack M; Schuler, Dorothy R; Cirrito, John R; Diwan, Abhinav; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2014-07-16

    In sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD), impaired Aβ removal contributes to elevated extracellular Aβ levels that drive amyloid plaque pathogenesis. Extracellular proteolysis, export across the blood-brain barrier, and cellular uptake facilitate physiologic Aβ clearance. Astrocytes can take up and degrade Aβ, but it remains unclear whether this function is insufficient in AD or can be enhanced to accelerate Aβ removal. Additionally, age-related dysfunction of lysosomes, the major degradative organelles wherein Aβ localizes after uptake, has been implicated in amyloid plaque pathogenesis. We tested the hypothesis that enhancing lysosomal function in astrocytes with transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosome biogenesis, would promote Aβ uptake and catabolism and attenuate plaque pathogenesis. Exogenous TFEB localized to the nucleus with transcriptional induction of lysosomal biogenesis and function in vitro. This resulted in significantly accelerated uptake of exogenously applied Aβ42, with increased localization to and degradation within lysosomes in C17.2 cells and primary astrocytes, indicating that TFEB is sufficient to coordinately enhance uptake, trafficking, and degradation of Aβ. Stereotactic injection of adeno-associated viral particles carrying TFEB driven by a glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter was used to achieve astrocyte-specific expression in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Exogenous TFEB localized to astrocyte nuclei and enhanced lysosome function, resulting in reduced Aβ levels and shortened half-life in the brain interstitial fluid and reduced amyloid plaque load in the hippocampus compared with control virus-injected mice. Therefore, activation of TFEB in astrocytes is an effective strategy to restore adequate Aβ removal and counter amyloid plaque pathogenesis in AD. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/349607-14$15.00/0.

  2. Neuronal-Targeted TFEB Accelerates Lysosomal Degradation of APP, Reducing Aβ Generation and Amyloid Plaque Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qingli; Yan, Ping; Ma, Xiucui; Liu, Haiyan; Perez, Ronaldo; Zhu, Alec; Gonzales, Ernesto; Tripoli, Danielle L; Czerniewski, Leah; Ballabio, Andrea; Cirrito, John R; Diwan, Abhinav; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2015-09-02

    In AD, an imbalance between Aβ production and removal drives elevated brain Aβ levels and eventual amyloid plaque deposition. APP undergoes nonamyloidogenic processing via α-cleavage at the plasma membrane, amyloidogenic β- and γ-cleavage within endosomes to generate Aβ, or lysosomal degradation in neurons. Considering multiple reports implicating impaired lysosome function as a driver of increased amyloidogenic processing of APP, we explored the efficacy of targeting transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal pathways, to reduce Aβ levels. CMV promoter-driven TFEB, transduced via stereotactic hippocampal injections of adeno-associated virus particles in APP/PS1 mice, localized primarily to neuronal nuclei and upregulated lysosome biogenesis. This resulted in reduction of APP protein, the α and β C-terminal APP fragments (CTFs), and in the steady-state Aβ levels in the brain interstitial fluid. In aged mice, total Aβ levels and amyloid plaque load were selectively reduced in the TFEB-transduced hippocampi. TFEB transfection in N2a cells stably expressing APP695, stimulated lysosome biogenesis, reduced steady-state levels of APP and α- and β-CTFs, and attenuated Aβ generation by accelerating flux through the endosome-lysosome pathway. Cycloheximide chase assays revealed a shortening of APP half-life with exogenous TFEB expression, which was prevented by concomitant inhibition of lysosomal acidification. These data indicate that TFEB enhances flux through lysosomal degradative pathways to induce APP degradation and reduce Aβ generation. Activation of TFEB in neurons is an effective strategy to attenuate Aβ generation and attenuate amyloid plaque deposition in AD. A key driver for AD pathogenesis is the net balance between production and clearance of Aβ, the major component of amyloid plaques. Here we demonstrate that lysosomal degradation of holo-APP influences Aβ production by limiting the availability of APP for amyloidogenic

  3. Role of phosphatidylinositol clathrin assembly lymphoid-myeloid leukemia (PICALM) in intracellular amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and amyloid plaque pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qingli; Gil, So-Chon; Yan, Ping; Wang, Yan; Han, Sharon; Gonzales, Ernie; Perez, Ronaldo; Cirrito, John R; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2012-06-15

    One of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease is the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the extracellular space in the brain. Amyloid plaques are primarily composed of aggregated amyloid β peptide (Aβ), a proteolytic fragment of the transmembrane amyloid precursor protein (APP). For APP to be proteolytically cleaved into Aβ, it must be internalized into the cell and trafficked to endosomes where specific protease complexes can cleave APP. Several recent genome-wide association studies have reported that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the phosphatidylinositol clathrin assembly lymphoid-myeloid leukemia (PICALM) gene were significantly associated with Alzheimer disease, suggesting a role in APP endocytosis and Aβ generation. Here, we show that PICALM co-localizes with APP in intracellular vesicles of N2a-APP cells after endocytosis is initiated. PICALM knockdown resulted in reduced APP internalization and Aβ generation. Conversely, PICALM overexpression increased APP internalization and Aβ production. In vivo, PICALM was found to be expressed in neurons and co-localized with APP throughout the cortex and hippocampus in APP/PS1 mice. PICALM expression was altered using AAV8 gene transfer of PICALM shRNA or PICALM cDNA into the hippocampus of 6-month-old APP/PS1 mice. PICALM knockdown decreased soluble and insoluble Aβ levels and amyloid plaque load in the hippocampus. Conversely, PICALM overexpression increased Aβ levels and amyloid plaque load. These data indicate that PICALM, an adaptor protein involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, regulates APP internalization and subsequent Aβ generation. PICALM contributes to amyloid plaque load in brain likely via its effect on Aβ metabolism.

  4. Role of Phosphatidylinositol Clathrin Assembly Lymphoid-Myeloid Leukemia (PICALM) in Intracellular Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Processing and Amyloid Plaque Pathogenesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qingli; Gil, So-Chon; Yan, Ping; Wang, Yan; Han, Sharon; Gonzales, Ernie; Perez, Ronaldo; Cirrito, John R.; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2012-01-01

    One of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease is the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the extracellular space in the brain. Amyloid plaques are primarily composed of aggregated amyloid β peptide (Aβ), a proteolytic fragment of the transmembrane amyloid precursor protein (APP). For APP to be proteolytically cleaved into Aβ, it must be internalized into the cell and trafficked to endosomes where specific protease complexes can cleave APP. Several recent genome-wide association studies have reported that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the phosphatidylinositol clathrin assembly lymphoid-myeloid leukemia (PICALM) gene were significantly associated with Alzheimer disease, suggesting a role in APP endocytosis and Aβ generation. Here, we show that PICALM co-localizes with APP in intracellular vesicles of N2a-APP cells after endocytosis is initiated. PICALM knockdown resulted in reduced APP internalization and Aβ generation. Conversely, PICALM overexpression increased APP internalization and Aβ production. In vivo, PICALM was found to be expressed in neurons and co-localized with APP throughout the cortex and hippocampus in APP/PS1 mice. PICALM expression was altered using AAV8 gene transfer of PICALM shRNA or PICALM cDNA into the hippocampus of 6-month-old APP/PS1 mice. PICALM knockdown decreased soluble and insoluble Aβ levels and amyloid plaque load in the hippocampus. Conversely, PICALM overexpression increased Aβ levels and amyloid plaque load. These data indicate that PICALM, an adaptor protein involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, regulates APP internalization and subsequent Aβ generation. PICALM contributes to amyloid plaque load in brain likely via its effect on Aβ metabolism. PMID:22539346

  5. Amyloid plaque formation precedes dendritic spine loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Tobias; Burgold, Steffen; Dorostkar, Mario M; Fuhrmann, Martin; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M; Schmidt, Boris; Kretzschmar, Hans; Herms, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    Amyloid-beta plaque deposition represents a major neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. While numerous studies have described dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques, much less is known about the kinetics of these processes. In particular, the question as to whether synapse loss precedes or follows plaque formation remains unanswered. To address this question, and to learn more about the underlying kinetics, we simultaneously imaged amyloid plaque deposition and dendritic spine loss by applying two-photon in vivo microscopy through a cranial window in double transgenic APPPS1 mice. As a result, we first observed that the rate of dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques is the same in both young and aged animals. However, plaque size only increased significantly in the young cohort, indicating that spine loss persists even many months after initial plaque appearance. Tracking the fate of individual spines revealed that net spine loss is caused by increased spine elimination, with the rate of spine formation remaining constant. Imaging of dendritic spines before and during plaque formation demonstrated that spine loss around plaques commences at least 4 weeks after initial plaque formation. In conclusion, spine loss occurs, shortly but with a significant time delay, after the birth of new plaques, and persists in the vicinity of amyloid plaques over many months. These findings hence give further hope to the possibility that there is a therapeutic window between initial amyloid plaque deposition and the onset of structural damage at spines.

  6. Regional brain hypometabolism is unrelated to regional amyloid plaque burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Andre; Ng, Bernard; Landau, Susan M; Jagust, William J; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-12-01

    In its original form, the amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease holds that fibrillar deposits of amyloid are an early, driving force in pathological events leading ultimately to neuronal death. Early clinicopathological investigations highlighted a number of inconsistencies leading to an updated hypothesis in which amyloid plaques give way to amyloid oligomers as the driving force in pathogenesis. Rather than focusing on the inconsistencies, amyloid imaging studies have tended to highlight the overlap between regions that show early amyloid plaque signal on positron emission tomography and that also happen to be affected early in Alzheimer's disease. Recent imaging studies investigating the regional dependency between metabolism and amyloid plaque deposition have arrived at conflicting results, with some showing regional associations and other not. We extracted multimodal neuroimaging data from the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging database for 227 healthy controls and 434 subjects with mild cognitive impairment. We analysed regional patterns of amyloid deposition, regional glucose metabolism and regional atrophy using florbetapir ((18)F) positron emission tomography, (18)F-fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Specifically, we derived grey matter density and standardized uptake value ratios for both positron emission tomography tracers in 404 functionally defined regions of interest. We examined the relation between regional glucose metabolism and amyloid plaques using linear models. For each region of interest, correcting for regional grey matter density, age, education and disease status, we tested the association of regional glucose metabolism with (i) cortex-wide florbetapir uptake; (ii) regional (i.e. in the same region of interest) florbetapir uptake; and (iii) regional florbetapir uptake while correcting in addition for cortex-wide florbetapir uptake. P-values for each setting

  7. Fibrillar amyloid plaque formation precedes microglial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christian K E; Keppler, Kevin; Steinbach, Sonja; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Herms, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), hallmark β-amyloid deposits are characterized by the presence of activated microglia around them. Despite an extensive characterization of the relation of amyloid plaques with microglia, little is known about the initiation of this interaction. In this study, the detailed investigation of very small plaques in brain slices in AD transgenic mice of the line APP-PS1(dE9) revealed different levels of microglia recruitment. Analysing plaques with a diameter of up to 10 μm we find that only the half are associated with clear morphologically activated microglia. Utilizing in vivo imaging of new appearing amyloid plaques in double-transgenic APP-PS1(dE9)xCX3CR1+/- mice further characterized the dynamic of morphological microglia activation. We observed no correlation of morphological microglia activation and plaque volume or plaque lifetime. Taken together, our results demonstrate a very prominent variation in size as well as in lifetime of new plaques relative to the state of microglia reaction. These observations might question the existing view that amyloid deposits by themselves are sufficient to attract and activate microglia in vivo.

  8. Amyloid cascade hypothesis: Pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barage, Sagar H; Sonawane, Kailas D

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an irreversible, progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Various therapeutic approaches are being used to improve the cholinergic neurotransmission, but their role in AD pathogenesis is still unknown. Although, an increase in tau protein concentration in CSF has been described in AD, but several issues remains unclear. Extensive and accurate analysis of CSF could be helpful to define presence of tau proteins in physiological conditions, or released during the progression of neurodegenerative disease. The amyloid cascade hypothesis postulates that the neurodegeneration in AD caused by abnormal accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) plaques in various areas of the brain. The amyloid hypothesis has continued to gain support over the last two decades, particularly from genetic studies. Therefore, current research progress in several areas of therapies shall provide an effective treatment to cure this devastating disease. This review critically evaluates general biochemical and physiological functions of Aβ directed therapeutics and their relevance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Peripheral treatment with enoxaparin exacerbates amyloid plaque pathology in Tg2576 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hao; King, Anna E; Jacobson, Glenn A; Small, David H

    2017-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex, progressive neurological disorder characterized by the formation of extracellular amyloid plaques composed of β-amyloid protein (Aβ), the key component in pathogenesis of AD. Peripheral administration of enoxaparin (ENO) reportedly reduces the level of Aβ and the amyloid plaques in the cortex of amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. However, the exact mechanism of these effects is unclear. Our previous studies indicated that ENO can inhibit APP processing to Aβ in primary cortical cells from Tg2576 mice by downregulating BACE1 levels. This study examines whether ENO-induced reduction of amyloid load is due to the decreased APP processing to Aβ in Tg2576 mice. Surprisingly, our results indicated that ENO significantly increases the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio in cortex and enhances the amyloid plaque load in both cortex and hippocampus, although overall APP processing was not influenced by ENO. Moreover, ENO stimulated the aggregation of both Aβ40 and Aβ42 in vitro. Although ENO has been reported to improve cognition in vivo and has potential as a therapeutic agent for AD, the results from our study suggest that ENO can exacerbate the amyloid pathology, and the strategy of using ENO for the treatment of AD may require further assessment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Neuronal activity and amyloid plaque pathology: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsepian, Saak V; O'Leary, Valerie B

    2016-01-01

    A breakthrough in Alzheimer's disease (AD) research came with the discovery of the link between activity-dependent release of amyloid-β (Aβ) from neurons and formation of amyloid plaques. Along with elucidating the cellular basis of behavioral-dependent fluctuations in Aβ levels in the brain, insights have been gained toward understanding the mechanisms that warrant selective vulnerability of various forebrain circuits to amyloid pathology. The notion of elevated activity as a source of excessive Aβ production and plaque formation is, however, in conflict with ample electrophysiological data, which demonstrate exceedingly intense activity (both intrinsic and synaptic) of neurons in several brain regions that are spared or marginally affected by amyloid plaques of AD. Thus, the link between the functional load of brain circuits and their vulnerability to amyloidosis, while evident, is also complex and remains poorly understood. Here, we discuss emerging data suggestive of a major role for super-intense synchronous activity of cortical and limbic networks in excessive Aβ production and plaque formation. It is proposed that dense recurrent wiring of associative areas prone to epileptic seizures might be of critical relevance to their higher susceptibility to plaque pathology and related functional impairments.

  11. Quantitative Comparison of Dense-Core Amyloid Plaque Accumulation in Amyloid-β Precursor Protein Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Reichl, John H.; Rao, Eshaan R.; McNellis, Brittany M.; Huang, Eric S.; Hemmy, Laura S.; Forster, Colleen L.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Borchelt, David R.; Vassar, Robert; Ashe, Karen H.; Zahs, Kathleen R.

    2016-01-01

    There exist several dozen lines of transgenic mice that express human amyloid-β precursor protein (AβPP) with Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-linked mutations. AβPP transgenic mouse lines differ in the types and amounts of Aβ that they generate and in their spatiotemporal patterns of expression of Aβ assemblies, providing a toolkit to study Aβ amyloidosis and the influence of Aβ aggregation on brain function. More complete quantitative descriptions of the types of Aβ assemblies present in transgenic mice and in humans during disease progression should add to our understanding of how Aβ toxicity in mice relates to the pathogenesis of AD. Here, we provide a direct quantitative comparison of amyloid plaque burdens and plaque sizes in four lines of AβPP transgenic mice. We measured the fraction of cortex and hippocampus occupied by dense-core plaques, visualized by staining with Thioflavin S, in mice from young adulthood through advanced age. We found that the plaque burdens among the transgenic lines varied by an order of magnitude: at 15 months of age, the oldest age studied, the median cortical plaque burden in 5XFAD mice was already ~4.5 times that of 21-month Tg2576 mice and ~15 times that of 21–24-month rTg9191 mice. Plaque-size distributions changed across the lifespan in a line- and region-dependent manner. We also compared the dense-core plaque burdens in the mice to those measured in a set of pathologically-confirmed AD cases from the Nun Study. Cortical plaque burdens in Tg2576, APPSwePS1ΔE9, and 5XFAD mice eventually far exceeded those measured in the human cohort. PMID:28059792

  12. Quantitative Comparison of Dense-Core Amyloid Plaque Accumulation in Amyloid-β Protein Precursor Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Reichl, John H; Rao, Eshaan R; McNellis, Brittany M; Huang, Eric S; Hemmy, Laura S; Forster, Colleen L; Kuskowski, Michael A; Borchelt, David R; Vassar, Robert; Ashe, Karen H; Zahs, Kathleen R

    2017-01-01

    There exist several dozen lines of transgenic mice that express human amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) with Alzheimer's disease (AD)-linked mutations. AβPP transgenic mouse lines differ in the types and amounts of Aβ that they generate and in their spatiotemporal patterns of expression of Aβ assemblies, providing a toolkit to study Aβ amyloidosis and the influence of Aβ aggregation on brain function. More complete quantitative descriptions of the types of Aβ assemblies present in transgenic mice and in humans during disease progression should add to our understanding of how Aβ toxicity in mice relates to the pathogenesis of AD. Here, we provide a direct quantitative comparison of amyloid plaque burdens and plaque sizes in four lines of AβPP transgenic mice. We measured the fraction of cortex and hippocampus occupied by dense-core plaques, visualized by staining with Thioflavin S, in mice from young adulthood through advanced age. We found that the plaque burdens among the transgenic lines varied by an order of magnitude: at 15 months of age, the oldest age studied, the median cortical plaque burden in 5XFAD mice was already ∼4.5 times that of 21-month-old Tg2576 mice and ∼15 times that of 21-24-month-old rTg9191 mice. Plaque-size distributions changed across the lifespan in a line- and region-dependent manner. We also compared the dense-core plaque burdens in the mice to those measured in a set of pathologically-confirmed AD cases from the Nun Study. Cortical plaque burdens in Tg2576, APPSwePS1ΔE9, and 5XFAD mice eventually far exceeded those measured in the human cohort.

  13. Amyloid plaque imaging in vivo: current achievement and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-03-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a very complex neurodegenerative disorder, the exact cause of which is still not known. The major histopathological features, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, already described by Alois Alzheimer, have been the focus in research for decades. Despite a probable whole cascade of events in the brain leading to impairment of cognition, amyloid is still the target for diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development of molecular imaging techniques now allows imaging of amyloid plaques in vivo in Alzheimer patients by PET amyloid ligands such as Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Studies so far have revealed high {sup 11}C-PIB retention in brain at prodromal stages of AD and a possibility to discriminate AD from other dementia disorders by {sup 11}C-PIB. Ongoing studies are focussing to understand the relationship between brain and CSF amyloid processes and cognitive processes. In vivo imaging of amyloid will be important for early diagnosis and evaluation of new anti-amyloid therapies in AD. (orig.)

  14. Amyloid plaque imaging in vivo: current achievement and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordberg, Agneta

    2008-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a very complex neurodegenerative disorder, the exact cause of which is still not known. The major histopathological features, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, already described by Alois Alzheimer, have been the focus in research for decades. Despite a probable whole cascade of events in the brain leading to impairment of cognition, amyloid is still the target for diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development of molecular imaging techniques now allows imaging of amyloid plaques in vivo in Alzheimer patients by PET amyloid ligands such as Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Studies so far have revealed high 11 C-PIB retention in brain at prodromal stages of AD and a possibility to discriminate AD from other dementia disorders by 11 C-PIB. Ongoing studies are focussing to understand the relationship between brain and CSF amyloid processes and cognitive processes. In vivo imaging of amyloid will be important for early diagnosis and evaluation of new anti-amyloid therapies in AD. (orig.)

  15. [The pathogenesis of small-plaque parapsoriasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olisova, O Iu; Kop'eva, T N

    1994-01-01

    The paper deals with the origin of parapsoriasis nodularis, which in its micronodular variant belongs to chronic dermatosis and has a clear-cut clinical and histological appearance. The disease arises most frequently after stress and occurs for the most part in middle-aged males. The leading role in pathogenesis of parapsoriasis nodularis is played by cellular immunity as indicated by reduced count of T-lymphocytes, active T-lymphocytes as well as the emergence of delayed hypersensitivity.

  16. Cellular and substrate adhesion molecules (integrins) and their ligands in cerebral amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Zhan, S. S.; Kamphorst, W.; van der Valk, P.; Rozemuller, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Integrins belonging to different subfamilies can be identified immunohistochemically in cerebral amyloid plaques. Monoclonal antibodies against the VLA family beta 1-integrins show staining of the corona of classical amyloid plaques for beta 1, alpha 3 and alpha 6. Immunostaining reveal also the

  17. The Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease: A Reevaluation of the “Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Armstrong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The most influential theory to explain the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD has been the “Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis” (ACH first formulated in 1992. The ACH proposes that the deposition of β-amyloid (Aβ is the initial pathological event in AD leading to the formation of senile plaques (SPs and then to neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs death of neurons, and ultimately dementia. This paper examines two questions regarding the ACH: (1 is there a relationship between the pathogenesis of SPs and NFTs, and (2 what is the relationship of these lesions to disease pathogenesis? These questions are examined in relation to studies of the morphology and molecular determinants of SPs and NFTs, the effects of gene mutation, degeneration induced by head injury, the effects of experimentally induced brain lesions, transgenic studies, and the degeneration of anatomical pathways. It was concluded that SPs and NFTs develop independently and may be the products rather than the causes of neurodegeneration in AD. A modification to the ACH is proposed which may better explain the pathogenesis of AD, especially of late-onset cases of the disease.

  18. Stable Size Distribution of Amyloid Plaques Over the Course of Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Mielke, Matthew L.; Muzitansky, Alona; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Growdon, John H.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloidplaques are a key pathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD), but whether plaque sizes increase or stabilize over the course of AD is unknown. We measured the size distribution of total immunoreactive (10D5-positive) and dense-core (Thioflavine-S-positive) plaques in the temporal neocortex of a large group of AD and plaque-bearing age-matched non-demented subjects to test the hypothesis that amyloid plaques continue to grow along with the progression of the disease. The size of amyloid-β (10D5)-positive plaques did not differ between groups whereas dense-core plaques from the AD group were slightly larger than those in the non-demented group (~25%–30%, p = 0.01). Within the AD group, dense-core plaque size did not independently correlate with duration of clinical disease (from 4 to 21 years, p = 0.68), whereas 10D5-positive plaque size correlated negatively with disease duration (p = 0.01). By contrast, an earlier age of symptom onset strongly predicted a larger postmortem plaque size; this effect was independent of disease duration and the presence of the APOEε4 allele (p = 0.0001). We conclude that plaques vary in size among patients, with larger size distributions correlating with an earlier age of onset, but plaques do not substantially increase in size over the clinical course of the disease. PMID:22805771

  19. Detection of Alzheimer’s disease amyloid-beta plaque deposition by deep brain impedance profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béduer, Amélie; Joris, Pierre; Mosser, Sébastien; Fraering, Patrick C.; Renaud, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease in elderly people. Toxic brain amyloid-beta (Aß) aggregates and ensuing cell death are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, we investigated if we could monitor the presence of these aggregates by performing in situ electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements in AD model mice brains. Approach. In this study, electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed post-mortem in APPPS1 transgenic mice brains. This transgenic model is commonly used to study amyloidogenesis, a pathological hallmark of AD. We used flexible probes with embedded micrometric electrodes array to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting senile plaques composed of Aß peptides by localized impedance measurements. Main results. We particularly focused on deep brain structures, such as the hippocampus. Ex vivo experiments using brains from young and old APPPS1 mice lead us to show that impedance measurements clearly correlate with the percentage of Aβ plaque load in the brain tissues. We could monitor the effects of aging in the AD APPPS1 mice model. Significance. We demonstrated that a localized electrical impedance measurement constitutes a valuable technique to monitor the presence of Aβ-plaques, which is complementary with existing imaging techniques. This method does not require prior Aβ staining, precluding the risk of variations in tissue uptake of dyes or tracers, and consequently ensuring reproducible data collection.

  20. A comparative study of dietary curcumin, nanocurcumin, and other classical amyloid-binding dyes for labeling and imaging of amyloid plaques in brain tissue of 5×-familial Alzheimer's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Panchanan; Hall, Tia C; Paladugu, Leela; Kolli, Nivya; Learman, Cameron; Rossignol, Julien; Dunbar, Gary L

    2016-11-01

    Deposition of amyloid beta protein (Aβ) is a key component in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). As an anti-amyloid natural polyphenol, curcumin (Cur) has been used as a therapy for AD. Its fluorescent activity, preferential binding to Aβ, as well as structural similarities with other traditional amyloid-binding dyes, make it a promising candidate for labeling and imaging of Aβ plaques in vivo. The present study was designed to test whether dietary Cur and nanocurcumin (NC) provide more sensitivity for labeling and imaging of Aβ plaques in brain tissues from the 5×-familial AD (5×FAD) mice than the classical Aβ-binding dyes, such as Congo red and Thioflavin-S. These comparisons were made in postmortem brain tissues from the 5×FAD mice. We observed that Cur and NC labeled Aβ plaques to the same degree as Aβ-specific antibody and to a greater extent than those of the classical amyloid-binding dyes. Cur and NC also labeled Aβ plaques in 5×FAD brain tissues when injected intraperitoneally. Nanomolar concentrations of Cur or NC are sufficient for labeling and imaging of Aβ plaques in 5×FAD brain tissue. Cur and NC also labeled different types of Aβ plaques, including core, neuritic, diffuse, and burned-out, to a greater degree than other amyloid-binding dyes. Therefore, Cur and or NC can be used as an alternative to Aβ-specific antibody for labeling and imaging of Aβ plaques ex vivo and in vivo. It can provide an easy and inexpensive means of detecting Aβ-plaque load in postmortem brain tissue of animal models of AD after anti-amyloid therapy.

  1. Roles of Amyloid β-Peptide-Associated Oxidative Stress and Brain Protein Modifications in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Butterfield, D. Allan; Reed, Tanea; Newman, Shelley F.; Sultana, Rukhsana

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and ischemia just to name a few. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that is recognized as the most common form of dementia. AD is histopathologically characterized by the presence of extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, the presence of oligomers of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), and ...

  2. [Role of syndecan-2 in amyloid plaque formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonova, E I; Galzitskaia, O V

    2015-01-01

    The famous phrase of F. Engels "Life is the mode of existence of protein bodies", has deeply insinuated itself in our mind. However at a more profound insight, the form of protein bodies is associaited not only with the fact of their existence, but also with the time changes. What unites all of us in our oldage? The answer is clear: it is the change in the way of existence of protein molecules, and more precisely, their uncontrolled aggregation that can take place in any organ and be associated with any protein. In spite of different clinical presentations, all diseases associated with pathological accumulation of aggregated proteins are combined in a general group called amyloisosis. Depen- dent on the place of formation, it is possible to distinguish an infinite number of pathologies from neurodegen- erative and oncologic ones to arthritis and tuberculosis. There is no doubt that provided all clandestine mechanisms are clarified at which an absolutely normal functioning.protein can transform into a pathological aggregated form, it will give us a chance to prevent protein aggregation and create a new form of drugs for prolongation of life. In this review we considered the function of syndecan-2, the structure of syndecan-2 and its role in the formation of amyloid plaques.

  3. Viscoelasticity of amyloid plaques in transgenic mouse brain studied by Brillouin microspectroscopy and correlative Raman analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mattana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidopathy is one of the most prominent hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the leading cause of dementia worldwide, and is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the brain parenchyma. The plaques consist of abnormal deposits mainly composed of an aggregation-prone protein fragment, β-amyloid 1-40/1-42, into the extracellular matrix. Brillouin microspectroscopy is an all-optical contactless technique that is based on the interaction between visible light and longitudinal acoustic waves or phonons, giving access to the viscoelasticity of a sample on a subcellular scale. Here, we describe the first application of micromechanical mapping based on Brillouin scattering spectroscopy to probe the stiffness of individual amyloid plaques in the hippocampal part of the brain of a β-amyloid overexpressing transgenic mouse. Correlative analysis based on Brillouin and Raman microspectroscopy showed that amyloid plaques have a complex structure with a rigid core of β-pleated sheet conformation (β-amyloid protein surrounded by a softer ring-shaped region richer in lipids and other protein conformations. These preliminary results give a new insight into the plaque biophysics and biomechanics, and a valuable contrast mechanism for the study and diagnosis of amyloidopathy.

  4. Viscoelasticity of amyloid plaques in transgenic mouse brain studied by Brillouin microspectroscopy and correlative Raman analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattana, Sara; Caponi, Silvia; Tamagnini, Francesco; Fioretto, Daniele; Palombo, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Amyloidopathy is one of the most prominent hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the leading cause of dementia worldwide, and is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the brain parenchyma. The plaques consist of abnormal deposits mainly composed of an aggregation-prone protein fragment, β-amyloid 1-40/1-42, into the extracellular matrix. Brillouin microspectroscopy is an all-optical contactless technique that is based on the interaction between visible light and longitudinal acoustic waves or phonons, giving access to the viscoelasticity of a sample on a subcellular scale. Here, we describe the first application of micromechanical mapping based on Brillouin scattering spectroscopy to probe the stiffness of individual amyloid plaques in the hippocampal part of the brain of a β-amyloid overexpressing transgenic mouse. Correlative analysis based on Brillouin and Raman microspectroscopy showed that amyloid plaques have a complex structure with a rigid core of β-pleated sheet conformation (β-amyloid) protein surrounded by a softer ring-shaped region richer in lipids and other protein conformations. These preliminary results give a new insight into the plaque biophysics and biomechanics, and a valuable contrast mechanism for the study and diagnosis of amyloidopathy. PMID:29151920

  5. Concomitant detection of beta-amyloid peptides with N-terminal truncation and different C-terminal endings in cortical plaques from cases with Alzheimer's disease, senile monkeys and triple transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtig, Wolfgang; Goldhammer, Simone; Bauer, Ute; Wegner, Florian; Wirths, Oliver; Bayer, Thomas A; Grosche, Jens

    2010-09-01

    The disturbed metabolism of beta-amyloid peptides generated from amyloid precursor protein is widely considered as a main factor during the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. A neuropathological hallmark in the brains from cases with Alzheimer's disease are senile plaques mainly composed of hardly soluble beta-amyloid peptides comprising up to 43 amino acids. Age-dependent cortical beta-amyloidosis was also shown in several transgenic mice and old individuals from various mammalian species, e.g., non-human primates. Beta-amyloid(1-42) is believed to be the main component in the core of senile plaques, whereas less hydrophobic beta-amyloid(1-40) predominantly occurs in the outer rim of plaques. Amino-terminally truncated pyroglutamyl-beta-amyloid(pE3-x) was recently found to be a beta-amyloid species of high relevance to the progression of the disease. While a few biochemical studies provided data on the co-occurrence of several beta-amyloid forms, their concomitant histochemical detection is still lacking. Here, we present a novel triple immunofluorescence labelling of amino- and differently carboxy-terminally truncated beta-amyloid peptides in cortical plaques from a case with Alzheimer's disease, senile macaques and baboons, and triple transgenic mice with age-dependent beta-amyloidosis and tau hyperphosphorylation. Additionally, beta-amyloid(pE3-x) and total beta-amyloid were concomitantly detected with beta-amyloid peptides ending with amino acid 40 or 42, respectively. Simultaneous staining of several beta-amyloid species reveals for instance vascular amyloid containing beta-amyloid(pE3-x) in Alzheimer's disease and monkeys, and may contribute to the further elucidation of beta-amyloidosis in neurodegenerative disorders and animal models. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Interleukin-1β mediated amyloid plaque clearance is independent of CCR2 signaling in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Escalera, Fátima; Matousek, Sarah B; Ghosh, Simantini; Olschowka, John A; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2014-09-01

    Neuroinflammation is a key component of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Particularly, the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is upregulated in human AD and believed to promote amyloid plaque deposition. However, studies from our laboratory have shown that chronic IL-1β overexpression in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 (APP/PS1) mouse model of AD ameliorates amyloid pathology, increases plaque-associated microglia, and induces recruitment of peripheral immune cells to the brain parenchyma. To investigate the contribution of CCR2 signaling in IL-1β-mediated amyloid plaque clearance, seven month-old APP/PS1/CCR2(-/-) mice were intrahippocampally transduced with a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 containing the cleaved form of human IL-1β (rAAV2-IL-1β). Four weeks after rAAV2-IL-1β transduction, we found significant reductions in 6E10 and Congo red staining of amyloid plaques that was confirmed by decreased levels of insoluble Aβ1-42 and Aβ1-40 in the inflamed hippocampus. Bone marrow chimeric studies confirmed the presence of infiltrating immune cells following IL-1β overexpression and revealed that dramatic reduction of CCR2(+) peripheral mononuclear cell recruitment to the inflamed hippocampus did not prevent the ability of IL-1β to induce amyloid plaque clearance. These results suggest that infiltrating CCR2(+) monocytes do not contribute to IL-1β-mediated amyloid plaque clearance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A Novel Liposomal Nanoparticle for the Imaging of Amyloid Plaque by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanifum, Eric A; Ghaghada, Ketan; Vollert, Craig; Head, Elizabeth; Eriksen, Jason L; Annapragada, Ananth

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid binding molecules with greater hydrophilicity than existing ligands were synthesized. The lead candidate ET6-21 bound amyloid fibrils, and amyloid deposits in dog brain and human brain tissue ex vivo. The ligand was used to prepare novel amyloid-targeted liposomal nanoparticles. The preparation was tested in the Tg2576 and TetO/APP mouse models of amyloid deposition. Gd chelates and Indocyanine green were included in the particles for visualization by MRI and near-infrared microscopy. Upon intravenous injection, the particles successfully traversed the blood-brain barrier in these mice, and bound to the plaques. Magnetic resonance imaging (T1-MRI) conducted 4 days after injection demonstrated elevated signal in the brains of mice with amyloid plaques present. No signal was observed in amyloid-negative mice, or in amyloid-positive mice injected with an untargeted version of the same agent. The MRI results were confirmed by immunohistochemical and fluorescent microscopic examination of mouse brain sections, showing colocalization of the fluorescent tags and amyloid deposits.

  8. Characterization of in vivo MRI detectable thalamic amyloid plaques from APP/PS1 mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhenain, M. [URA CEA CNRS 2210, I2BM, SHFJ, 4 Place du General Leclerc, 91401 Orsay Cedex (France); Dhenain, M.; El Tannir El Tayara, N.; Wu, T.D.; Volk, A.; Quintana, C. [U759 INSERM, Centre Universitaire, Laboratoire 112, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Dhenain, M.; El Tannir El Tayara, N.; Wu, T.D.; Volk, A.; Quintana, C. [Institut Curie, Centre Universitaire, Laboratoire 112, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Guegan, M.; Delatour, B. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid-CSIC, 8, Isaac Newton, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    Amyloid deposits are one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies, in transgenic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease showed that, using in vivo, contrast agent-free, MRI, thalamic amyloid plaques are more easily detected than other plaques of the brain. Our study evaluated the characteristics of these thalamic plaques in a large population of APP/PS1, PS1 and C57BL/6 mice. Thalamic spots were detected in all mice but with different frequency and magnitude. Hence, the prevalence and size of the lesions were higher in APP/PS1 mice. However, even in APP/PS1 mice, thalamic spots did not occur in all the old animals. In APP/PS1 mice, spots detection was related to high iron and calcium load within amyloid plaques and thus reflects the ability of such plaque to capture large amounts of minerals. Interestingly, calcium and iron was also detected in extra-thalamic plaques but with a lower intensity. Hypointense lesions in the thalamus were not associated with the iron load in the tissue surrounding the plaques, nor with micro-hemorrhages, inflammation, or a neuro-degenerative context. (authors)

  9. Impaired JIP3-dependent axonal lysosome transport promotes amyloid plaque pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowrishankar, Swetha; Wu, Yumei; Ferguson, Shawn M

    2017-10-02

    Lysosomes robustly accumulate within axonal swellings at Alzheimer's disease (AD) amyloid plaques. However, the underlying mechanisms and disease relevance of such lysosome accumulations are not well understood. Motivated by these problems, we identified JNK-interacting protein 3 (JIP3) as an important regulator of axonal lysosome transport and maturation. JIP3 knockout mouse neuron primary cultures accumulate lysosomes within focal axonal swellings that resemble the dystrophic axons at amyloid plaques. These swellings contain high levels of amyloid precursor protein processing enzymes (BACE1 and presenilin 2) and are accompanied by elevated Aβ peptide levels. The in vivo importance of the JIP3-dependent regulation of axonal lysosomes was revealed by the worsening of the amyloid plaque pathology arising from JIP3 haploinsufficiency in a mouse model of AD. These results establish the critical role of JIP3-dependent axonal lysosome transport in regulating amyloidogenic amyloid precursor protein processing and support a model wherein Aβ production is amplified by plaque-induced axonal lysosome transport defects. © 2017 Gowrishankar et al.

  10. BACE1 elevation is involved in amyloid plaque development in the triple transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease: differential Aβ antibody labeling of early-onset axon terminal pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yan; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Macklin, Lauren N; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Oddo, Salvatore; Laferla, Frank M; Struble, Robert G; Rose, Gregory M; Patrylo, Peter R; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2012-02-01

    β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilins mutations cause early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). Some FAD-based mouse models produce amyloid plaques, others do not. β-Amyloid (Aβ) deposition can manifest as compact and diffuse plaques; it is unclear why the same Aβ molecules aggregate in different patterns. Is there a basic cellular process governing Aβ plaque pathogenesis? We showed in some FAD mouse models that compact plaque formation is associated with a progressive axonal pathology inherent with increased expression of β-secretase (BACE1), the enzyme initiating the amyloidogenic processing of APP. A monoclonal Aβ antibody, 3D6, visualized distinct axon terminal labeling before plaque onset. The present study was set to understand BACE1 and axonal changes relative to diffuse plaque development and to further characterize the novel axonal Aβ antibody immunoreactivity (IR), using triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice as experimental model. Diffuse-like plaques existed in the forebrain in aged transgenics and were regionally associated with increased BACE1 labeled swollen/sprouting axon terminals. Increased BACE1/3D6 IR at axon terminals occurred in young animals before plaque onset. These axonal elements were also co-labeled by other antibodies targeting the N-terminal and mid-region of Aβ domain and the C-terminal of APP, but not co-labeled by antibodies against the Aβ C-terminal and APP N-terminal. The results suggest that amyloidogenic axonal pathology precedes diffuse plaque formation in the 3xTg-AD mice, and that the early-onset axonal Aβ antibody IR in transgenic models of AD might relate to a cross-reactivity of putative APP β-carboxyl terminal fragments.

  11. Amyloid-β diurnal pattern: possible role of sleep in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Brendan P; Bateman, Randall J

    2014-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline that is a growing public health crisis with a prevalence projected to more than double in the next 20 years. Sleep is frequently impaired in individuals with AD. Further, recent studies have linked numerous age-related sleep disturbances such as poor sleep efficiency and sleep apnea, to future risk of cognitive impairment. Aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) into extracellular plaques in the brain is a key step in AD pathogenesis and likely begins 20 years before the onset of dementia. Aβ concentrations in both humans and mouse models show Aβ concentrations rise during wakefulness and fall during sleep, that is, an Aβ diurnal pattern. There is evidence in animal models that changes in sleep time alter Aβ deposition, suggesting that sleep may play a role in AD pathogenesis. A hypothetical model for the role of sleep and the Aβ diurnal pattern in AD pathogenesis is proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. In vivo detection of amyloid plaques by gadolinium-stained MRI can be used to demonstrate the efficacy of an anti-amyloid immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu D. Santin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular deposition of β amyloid plaques is an early event associated to Alzheimer's disease. Here we have used in vivo gadolinium-stained high resolution (29*29*117µm3 MRI to follow-up in a longitudinal way individual amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 mice and evaluate the efficacy of a new immunotherapy (SAR255952 directed against protofibrillar and fibrillary forms of Aβ. APP/PS1 mice were treated for 5 months between the age of 3.5 and 8.5 months. SAR255952 reduced amyloid load in 8.5-month-old animals, but not in 5.5-month animals compared to mice treated with a control antibody (DM4. Histological evaluation confirmed the reduction of amyloid load and revealed a lower density of amyloid plaques in 8.5-month SAR255952-treated animals. The longitudinal follow-up of individual amyloid plaques by MRI revealed that plaques that were visible at 5.5 months were still visible at 8.5 months in both SAR255952 and DM4-treated mice. This suggests that the amyloid load reduction induced by SAR255952 is related to a slowing down in the formation of new plaques rather than to the clearance of already formed plaques.

  13. Delayed amyloid plaque deposition and behavioral deficits in outcrossed AβPP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Brian A; Kerrisk, Meghan E; Kaufman, Adam C; Nygaard, Haakon B; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Koleske, Anthony J

    2013-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative dementia characterized by amyloid plaque accumulation, synapse/dendrite loss, and cognitive impairment. Transgenic mice expressing mutant forms of amyloid-β precursor protein (AβPP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) recapitulate several aspects of this disease and provide a useful model system for studying elements of AD progression. AβPP/PS1 mice have been previously shown to exhibit behavioral deficits and amyloid plaque deposition between 4-9 months of age. We crossed AβPP/PS1 animals with mice of a mixed genetic background (C57BL/6 × 129/SvJ) and investigated the development of AD-like features in the resulting outcrossed mice. The onset of memory-based behavioral impairment is delayed considerably in outcrossed AβPP/PS1 mice relative to inbred mice on a C57BL/6 background. While inbred AβPP/PS1 mice develop deficits in radial-arm water maze performance and novel object recognition as early as 8 months, outcrossed AβPP/PS1 mice do not display defects until 18 months. Within the forebrain, we find that inbred AβPP/PS1 mice have significantly higher amyloid plaque burden at 12 months than outcrossed AβPP/PS1 mice of the same age. Surprisingly, inbred AβPP/PS1 mice at 8 months have low plaque burden, suggesting that plaque burden alone cannot explain the accompanying behavioral deficits. Analysis of AβPP processing revealed that elevated levels of soluble Aβ correlate with the degree of behavioral impairment in both strains. Taken together, these findings suggest that animal behavior, amyloid plaque deposition, and AβPP processing are sensitive to genetic differences between mouse strains. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Bioenergetic mechanisms in astrocytes may contribute to amyloid plaque deposition and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wen; Shi, Diya; Westaway, David; Jhamandas, Jack H

    2015-05-15

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized neuropathologically by synaptic disruption, neuronal loss, and deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) protein in brain structures that are critical for memory and cognition. There is increasing appreciation, however, that astrocytes, which are the major non-neuronal glial cells, may play an important role in AD pathogenesis. Unlike neurons, astrocytes are resistant to Aβ cytotoxicity, which may, in part, be related to their greater reliance on glycolytic metabolism. Here we show that, in cultures of human fetal astrocytes, pharmacological inhibition or molecular down-regulation of a main enzymatic regulator of glycolysis, 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase (PFKFB3), results in increased accumulation of Aβ within and around astrocytes and greater vulnerability of these cells to Aβ toxicity. We further investigated age-dependent changes in PFKFB3 and astrocytes in AD transgenic mice (TgCRND8) that overexpress human Aβ. Using a combination of Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, we identified an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in astrocytes that paralleled the escalation of the Aβ plaque burden in TgCRND8 mice in an age-dependent manner. Furthermore, PFKFB3 expression also demonstrated an increase in these mice, although at a later age (9 months) than GFAP and Aβ. Immunohistochemical staining showed significant reactive astrogliosis surrounding Aβ plaques with increased PFKFB3 activity in 12-month-old TgCRND8 mice, an age when AD pathology and behavioral deficits are fully manifested. These studies shed light on the unique bioenergetic mechanisms within astrocytes that may contribute to the development of AD pathology. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Bioenergetic Mechanisms in Astrocytes May Contribute to Amyloid Plaque Deposition and Toxicity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wen; Shi, Diya; Westaway, David; Jhamandas, Jack H.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized neuropathologically by synaptic disruption, neuronal loss, and deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) protein in brain structures that are critical for memory and cognition. There is increasing appreciation, however, that astrocytes, which are the major non-neuronal glial cells, may play an important role in AD pathogenesis. Unlike neurons, astrocytes are resistant to Aβ cytotoxicity, which may, in part, be related to their greater reliance on glycolytic metabolism. Here we show that, in cultures of human fetal astrocytes, pharmacological inhibition or molecular down-regulation of a main enzymatic regulator of glycolysis, 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase (PFKFB3), results in increased accumulation of Aβ within and around astrocytes and greater vulnerability of these cells to Aβ toxicity. We further investigated age-dependent changes in PFKFB3 and astrocytes in AD transgenic mice (TgCRND8) that overexpress human Aβ. Using a combination of Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, we identified an increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in astrocytes that paralleled the escalation of the Aβ plaque burden in TgCRND8 mice in an age-dependent manner. Furthermore, PFKFB3 expression also demonstrated an increase in these mice, although at a later age (9 months) than GFAP and Aβ. Immunohistochemical staining showed significant reactive astrogliosis surrounding Aβ plaques with increased PFKFB3 activity in 12-month-old TgCRND8 mice, an age when AD pathology and behavioral deficits are fully manifested. These studies shed light on the unique bioenergetic mechanisms within astrocytes that may contribute to the development of AD pathology. PMID:25814669

  16. Oral Administration of Thioflavin T Prevents Beta Amyloid Plaque Formation in Double Transgenic AD Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Paule, Merle G; Schmued, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and most common cause of adult-onset dementia. The major hallmarks of AD are the formation of senile amyloid plaques made of beta amyloid and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) which are primarily composed of phosphorylated tau protein. Although numerous agents have been considered as providing protection against AD, identification of potential agents with neuroprotective ability is limited. Thioflavin T has been used in the past to stain amyloid beta plaques in brain. In this study, Thioflavin T (ThT) and vehicle (infant formula) were administered orally by gavage to transgenic (B6C3 APP PS1; AD-Tg) mice beginning at 4 months age and continuing until sacrifice at 9 months of age at 40 mg/kg dose. The number of amyloid plaques was reduced dramatically by ThT treatment in both male and female transgenic mice compared to those in control mice. Additionally, GFAP and Amylo-Glo labeling suggest that astrocytic hypertrophy is minimized in ThT-treated animals. Similarly, CD68 labeling, which detects activated microglia, along with Amylo-Glo labeling, suggests that microglial activation is significantly less in ThT-treated mice. Both Aβ-40 and Aβ-42 concentrations in blood rose significantly in the ThT-treated animals suggesting that ThT may inhibit the deposition, degradation, and/or clearance of Aβ plaques in brain.

  17. Pathogenesis of lober intracerebral hemorrhage related to cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Naoto; Namba, Hiroki; Miura, Katsutoshi; Baba, Satoshi; Isoda, Haruo; Yokoyama, Tetsuo

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is an important cause of lober intracerebral hemorrhage in the elderly. Although leptomeningeal and cortical arteries with the deposition of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) have been thought to rupture in CAA, the pathogenesis of CAA-related hemorrhage still remains obscure. We studied 10 cases of CAA according to the Boston criteria from April 2006 to July 2009 in Omaezaki Municipal Hospital. Based on clinical data, we examined the primary site of hemorrhage and hypothesized the mechanisms of bleeding. Intracerebral hematoma evacuation was performed to alleviate neurological deteriolation in 2 patients and to make diagnosis in 3 patients. The surgical specimens were pathologically examined. The characteristic MR images of CAA related hemorrhage were characterized by microbleeds, superficial siderosis, subpial or subarachnoid hemorrhage, subcortical hemorrhage and lober intracerebral hemorrhage. Chronological images obtained in 1 patient revealed that lober intracerebral hemorrhage developed from microbleed with subpial hemorrhage without subarachnoid hemorrhage in one side of the cortex in the affected facing cerebral sulci. Operative findings showed subpial and subarachnoid hemorrhages around the cortical veins on the affected cerebral sulci in all cases. Abnormal fragile vessels existed in one side of the cortex of the affected sulci but not in the other side of the cortex. Complete hamatoma evacuation was performed in 4 cases. The surgical specimens of the hematoma and the adjacent brain parenchyma were pathologically examined by tissue staining with hematoxylin-eosin and Congo red. Many vessels in subpial, subcortical and subarachnoid space along the cerebral sulci were deposited with Aβ. From these findings, we speculated that the primary hemorrhage related to CAA occurred from the cortical arteries with Aβ deposition in the subpial space along the cerebral sulci and formed a lober intracerebral hematoma. Subarachnoid

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of a (18)F-curcumin derivate for β-amyloid plaque imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokka, Johanna; Snellman, Anniina; Zona, Cristiano; La Ferla, Barbara; Nicotra, Francesco; Salmona, Mario; Forloni, Gianluigi; Haaparanta-Solin, Merja; Rinne, Juha O; Solin, Olof

    2014-05-01

    Curcumin is a neuroprotective compound that inhibits the formation of amyloid oligomers and fibrils and binds to β-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We aimed to synthesize an (18)F-labeled curcumin derivate ([(18)F]4) and to characterize its positron emission tomography (PET) tracer-binding properties to β-amyloid plaques in a transgenic APP23 mouse model of AD. We utilized facile one-pot synthesis of [(18)F]4 using nucleophilic (18)F-fluorination and click chemistry. Binding of [(18)F]4 to β-amyloid plaques in the transgenic APP23 mouse brain cryosections was studied in vitro using heterologous competitive binding against PIB. [(18)F]4 uptake was studied ex vivo in rodents and in vivo using PET/computed tomography of transgenic APP23 and wild-type control mice. The radiochemical yield of [(18)F]4 was 21 ± 11%, the specific activity exceeded 1TBq/μmol, and the radiochemical purity exceeded 99.3% at the end of synthesis. In vitro studies of [(18)F]4 with the transgenic APP23 mouse revealed high β-amyloid plaque binding. In vivo and ex vivo studies demonstrated that [(18)F]4 has fast clearance from the blood, moderate metabolism but low blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration. [(18)F]4 was synthesized in high yield and excellent quality. In vitro studies, metabolite profile, and fast clearance from the blood indicated a promising tracer for Aβ imaging. However, [(18)F]4 has low in vivo BBB penetration and thus further studies are needed to reveal the reason for this and to possibly overcome this issue. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Role of the Blood-Brain Barrier in the Pathogenesis of Senile Plaques in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Provias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of beta-amyloid [Aβ] within senile plaques [SP] is characteristic of these lesions in Alzheimer’s disease. The accumulation of Aβ42, in particular, in the superior temporal [ST] cortex may result from an inability of the blood brain barrier (BBB to regulate the trans-endothelial transport and clearance of the amyloid. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein [LRP] and P-glycoprotein [P-gp] facilitate the efflux of Aβ out of the brain, whereas receptor for advanced glycation end products [RAGE] facilitates Aβ influx. Additionally, vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF] and endothelial nitric oxide synthase [eNOS] may influence the trans-BBB transport of Aβ. In this study we examined ST samples and compared SP burden of all types with the capillary expression of LRP, p-gp, RAGE, VEGF, and e-NOS in samples from 15 control and 15 Alzheimer brains. LRP, P-gp, RAGE, VEGF, and eNOS positive capillaries and Aβ42 plaques were quantified and statistical analysis of the nonparametric data was performed using the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. In the Alzheimer condition P-gp, VEGF, and eNOS positive capillaries were negatively correlated with SP burden, but LRP and RAGE were positively correlated with SP burden. These results indicate altered BBB function in the pathogenesis of SPs in Alzheimer brains.

  20. The Centiloid Project: standardizing quantitative amyloid plaque estimation by PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klunk, William E; Koeppe, Robert A; Price, Julie C; Benzinger, Tammie L; Devous, Michael D; Jagust, William J; Johnson, Keith A; Mathis, Chester A; Minhas, Davneet; Pontecorvo, Michael J; Rowe, Christopher C; Skovronsky, Daniel M; Mintun, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Although amyloid imaging with PiB-PET ([C-11]Pittsburgh Compound-B positron emission tomography), and now with F-18-labeled tracers, has produced remarkably consistent qualitative findings across a large number of centers, there has been considerable variability in the exact numbers reported as quantitative outcome measures of tracer retention. In some cases this is as trivial as the choice of units, in some cases it is scanner dependent, and of course, different tracers yield different numbers. Our working group was formed to standardize quantitative amyloid imaging measures by scaling the outcome of each particular analysis method or tracer to a 0 to 100 scale, anchored by young controls (≤ 45 years) and typical Alzheimer's disease patients. The units of this scale have been named "Centiloids." Basically, we describe a "standard" method of analyzing PiB PET data and then a method for scaling any "nonstandard" method of PiB PET analysis (or any other tracer) to the Centiloid scale. Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Near-infrared fluorescent probes for imaging of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer׳s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Hongjuan; Lou, Kaiyan; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    One of the early pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) is the deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques in the brain. There has been a tremendous interest in the development of Aβ plaques imaging probes for early diagnosis of AD in the past decades. Optical imaging, particularly near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, has emerged as a safe, low cost, real-time, and widely available technique, providing an attractive approach for in vivo detection of Aβ plaques among many different imaging techniques. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the state-of-the-art development of NIRF Aβ probes and their in vitro and in vivo applications with special focus on design strategies and optical, binding, and brain-kinetic properties.

  2. [18F]Fluoroazabenzoxazoles as potential amyloid plaque PET tracers: synthesis and in vivo evaluation in rhesus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, Eric D; Sanabria-Bohórquez, Sandra; Fan, Hong; Zeng, Zhizhen; Gammage, Linda; Miller, Patricia; O'Malley, Stacey; Connolly, Brett; Mulhearn, James; Harrison, Scott T; Wolkenberg, Scott E; Barrow, James C; Williams, David L; Hargreaves, Richard J; Sur, Cyrille; Cook, Jacquelynn J

    2011-11-01

    An (18)F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for amyloid plaque is desirable for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, particularly to enable preventative treatment once effective therapeutics are available. Similarly, such a tracer would be useful as a biomarker for enrollment of patients in clinical trials for evaluation of antiamyloid therapeutics. Furthermore, changes in the level of plaque burden as quantified by an amyloid plaque PET tracer may provide valuable insights into the effectiveness of amyloid-targeted therapeutics. This work describes our approach to evaluate and select a candidate PET tracer for in vivo quantification of human amyloid plaque. Ligands were evaluated for their in vitro binding to human amyloid plaques, lipophilicity and predicted blood-brain barrier permeability. Candidates with favorable in vitro properties were radiolabeled with (18)F and evaluated in vivo. Baseline PET scans in rhesus monkey were conducted to evaluate the regional distribution and kinetics of each tracer using tracer kinetic modeling methods. High binding potential in cerebral white matter and cortical grey matter was considered an unfavorable feature of the candidate tracers. [(18)F]MK-3328 showed the most favorable combination of low in vivo binding potential in white matter and cortical grey matter in rhesus monkeys, low lipophilicity (Log D=2.91) and high affinity for human amyloid plaques (IC(50)=10.5±1.3 nM). [(18)F]MK-3328 was identified as a promising PET tracer for in vivo quantification of amyloid plaques, and further evaluation in humans is warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A gallium(III) Schiff base-curcumin complex that binds to amyloidplaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jaclyn L; Hayne, David J; Roselt, Peter; McLean, Catriona A; White, Jonathan M; Donnelly, Paul S

    2016-09-01

    Gallium-68 is a positron-emitting isotope that can be used in positron-emission tomography imaging agents. Alzheimer's disease is associated with the formation of plaques in the brain primarily comprised of aggregates of a 42 amino acid protein called amyloid-β. With the goal of synthesising charge neutral, low molecular weight, lipophilic gallium complexes with the potential to cross the blood-brain barrier and bind to Aβ plaques we have used an ancillary tetradentate N 2 O 2 Schiff base ligand and the β-diketone curcumin as a bidentate ligand to give a six-coordinate Ga 3+ complex. The tetradentate Schiff base ligand adopts the cis-β configuration with deprotonated curcumin acting as a bidentate ligand. The complex binds to amyloidplaques in human brain tissue and it is possible that extension of this chemistry to positron-emitting gallium-68 could provide useful imaging agents for Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Iron Biochemistry is Correlated with Amyloid Plaque Morphology in an Established Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telling, Neil D; Everett, James; Collingwood, Joanna F; Dobson, Jon; van der Laan, Gerrit; Gallagher, Joseph J; Wang, Jian; Hitchcock, Adam P

    2017-10-19

    A signature characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is aggregation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) fibrils in the brain. Nevertheless, the links between Aβ and AD pathology remain incompletely understood. It has been proposed that neurotoxicity arising from aggregation of the Aβ 1-42 peptide can in part be explained by metal ion binding interactions. Using advanced X-ray microscopy techniques at sub-micron resolution, we investigated relationships between iron biochemistry and AD pathology in intact cortex from an established mouse model over-producing Aβ. We found a direct correlation of amyloid plaque morphology with iron, and evidence for the formation of an iron-amyloid complex. We also show that iron biomineral deposits in the cortical tissue contain the mineral magnetite, and provide evidence that Aβ-induced chemical reduction of iron could occur in vivo. Our observations point to the specific role of iron in amyloid deposition and AD pathology, and may impact development of iron-modifying therapeutics for AD. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Microspectroscopy (μFTIR) reveals co-localization of lipid oxidation and amyloid plaques in human Alzheimer disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseny-Cases, Núria; Klementieva, Oxana; Cotte, Marine; Ferrer, Isidre; Cladera, Josep

    2014-12-16

    Amyloid peptides are the main component of one of the characteristic pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD): senile plaques. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, amyloid peptides may play a central role in the sequence of events that leads to neurodegeneration. However, there are other factors, such as oxidative stress, that may be crucial for the development of the disease. In the present paper, we show that it is possible, by using Fourier tranform infrared (FTIR) microscopy, to co-localize amyloid deposits and lipid peroxidation in tissue slides from patients affected by Alzheimer's disease. Plaques and lipids can be analyzed in the same sample, making use of the characteristic infrared bands for peptide aggregation and lipid oxidation. The results show that, in samples from patients diagnosed with AD, the plaques and their immediate surroundings are always characterized by the presence of oxidized lipids. As for samples from non-AD individuals, those without amyloid plaques show a lower level of lipid oxidation than AD individuals. However, it is known that plaques can be detected in the brains of some non-AD individuals. Our results show that, in such cases, the lipid in the plaques and their surroundings display oxidation levels that are similar to those of tissues with no plaques. These results point to lipid oxidation as a possible key factor in the path that goes from showing the typical neurophatological hallmarks to suffering from dementia. In this process, the oxidative power of the amyloid peptide, possibly in the form of nonfibrillar aggregates, could play a central role.

  6. In vivo detection of prion amyloid plaques using [{sup 11}C]BF-227 PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, Nobuyuki; Yanai, Kazuhiko [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Shiga, Yusei; Itoyama, Yasuhito [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Sendai (Japan); Furumoto, Shozo [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Tashiro, Manabu [Tohoku University, Division of Cyclotron Nuclear Medicine, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Tsuboi, Yoshio [Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Fukuoka (Japan); Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki [Institute of Development, Aging, and Cancer, Tohoku University, Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Division of Brain Sciences, Sendai (Japan); Iwata, Ren [Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Kudo, Yukitsuka [Tohoku University, Innovation of New Biomedical Engineering Center, Sendai (Japan); Doh-ura, Katsumi [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Prion Research, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan)

    2010-05-15

    In vivo detection of pathological prion protein (PrP) in the brain is potentially useful for the diagnosis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). However, there are no non-invasive ante-mortem means for detection of pathological PrP deposition in the brain. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the amyloid imaging tracer BF-227 with positron emission tomography (PET) for the non-invasive detection of PrP amyloid in the brain. The binding ability of BF-227 to PrP amyloid was investigated using autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy. Five patients with TSEs, including three patients with Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) and two patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), underwent [{sup 11}C]BF-227 PET scans. Results were compared with data from 10 normal controls and 17 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The regional to pons standardized uptake value ratio was calculated as an index of BF-227 retention. Binding of BF-227 to PrP plaques was confirmed using brain samples from autopsy-confirmed GSS cases. In clinical PET study, significantly higher retention of BF-227 was detected in the cerebellum, thalamus and lateral temporal cortex of GSS patients compared to that in the corresponding tissues of normal controls. GSS patients also showed higher retention of BF-227 in the cerebellum, thalamus and medial temporal cortex compared to AD patients. In contrast, the two CJD patients showed no obvious retention of BF-227 in the brain. Although [{sup 11}C]BF-227 is a non-specific imaging marker of cerebral amyloidosis, it is useful for in vivo detection of PrP plaques in the human brain in GSS, based on the regional distribution of the tracer. PET amyloid imaging might provide a means for both early diagnosis and non-invasive disease monitoring of certain forms of TSEs. (orig.)

  7. In vivo detection of prion amyloid plaques using [11C]BF-227 PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Nobuyuki; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Shiga, Yusei; Itoyama, Yasuhito; Furumoto, Shozo; Tashiro, Manabu; Tsuboi, Yoshio; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Ren; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Doh-ura, Katsumi

    2010-01-01

    In vivo detection of pathological prion protein (PrP) in the brain is potentially useful for the diagnosis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). However, there are no non-invasive ante-mortem means for detection of pathological PrP deposition in the brain. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the amyloid imaging tracer BF-227 with positron emission tomography (PET) for the non-invasive detection of PrP amyloid in the brain. The binding ability of BF-227 to PrP amyloid was investigated using autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy. Five patients with TSEs, including three patients with Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) and two patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), underwent [ 11 C]BF-227 PET scans. Results were compared with data from 10 normal controls and 17 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The regional to pons standardized uptake value ratio was calculated as an index of BF-227 retention. Binding of BF-227 to PrP plaques was confirmed using brain samples from autopsy-confirmed GSS cases. In clinical PET study, significantly higher retention of BF-227 was detected in the cerebellum, thalamus and lateral temporal cortex of GSS patients compared to that in the corresponding tissues of normal controls. GSS patients also showed higher retention of BF-227 in the cerebellum, thalamus and medial temporal cortex compared to AD patients. In contrast, the two CJD patients showed no obvious retention of BF-227 in the brain. Although [ 11 C]BF-227 is a non-specific imaging marker of cerebral amyloidosis, it is useful for in vivo detection of PrP plaques in the human brain in GSS, based on the regional distribution of the tracer. PET amyloid imaging might provide a means for both early diagnosis and non-invasive disease monitoring of certain forms of TSEs. (orig.)

  8. Genetic Dissection of the Amyloid Precursor Protein in Developmental Function and Amyloid Pathogenesis*♦

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hongmei; Wang, Zilai; Wang, Baiping; Guo, Qinxi; Dolios, Georgia; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko; Hammer, Robert E.; Südhof, Thomas C.; Wang, Rong; Zheng, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) generates large soluble APP derivatives, β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, and APP intracellular domain. Expression of the extracellular sequences of APP or its Caenorhabditis elegans counterpart has been shown to be sufficient in partially rescuing the CNS phenotypes of the APP-deficient mice and the lethality of the apl-1 null C. elegans, respectively, leaving open the question as what is the role of the highly conserved APP intracellular...

  9. Calorie restriction attenuates astrogliosis but not amyloid plaque load in aged rhesus macaques: a preliminary quantitative imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Aadhavi; Pehar, Mariana; Salamat, M Shahriar; Pugh, Thomas D; Bendlin, Barbara B; Willette, Auriel A; Anderson, Rozalyn M; Kemnitz, Joseph W; Colman, Ricki J; Weindruch, Richard H; Puglielli, Luigi; Johnson, Sterling C

    2013-05-01

    While moderate calorie restriction (CR) in the absence of malnutrition has been consistently shown to have a systemic, beneficial effect against aging in several animals models, its effect on the brain microstructure in a non-human primate model remains to be studied using post-mortem histopathologic techniques. In the present study, we investigated differences in expression levels of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) and β-amyloid plaque load in the hippocampus and the adjacent cortical areas of 7 Control (ad libitum)-fed and 6 CR male rhesus macaques using immunostaining methods. CR monkeys expressed significantly lower levels (∼30% on average) of GFAP than Controls in the CA region of the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, suggesting a protective effect of CR in limiting astrogliosis. These results recapitulate the neuroprotective effects of CR seen in shorter-lived animal models. There was a significant positive association between age and average amyloid plaque pathology in these animals, but there was no significant difference in amyloid plaque distribution between the two groups. Two of the seven Control animals (28.6%) and one of the six CR animal (16.7%) did not express any amyloid plaques, five of seven Controls (71.4%) and four of six CR animals (66.7%) expressed minimal to moderate amyloid pathology, and one of six CR animals (16.7%) expressed severe amyloid pathology. That CR affects levels of GFAP expression but not amyloid plaque load provides some insight into the means by which CR is beneficial at the microstructural level, potentially by offsetting the increased load of oxidatively damaged proteins, in this non-human primate model of aging. The present study is a preliminary post-mortem histological analysis of the effects of CR on brain health, and further studies using molecular and biochemical techniques are warranted to elucidate underlying mechanisms. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Amyloid-plaque imaging in diagnosis of dementia; Amyloidplaque-Bildgebung in der Demenzdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drzezga, A. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik

    2009-06-15

    The increasing life-expectancy of our society results in a continuously growing number of patients suffering from dementing disorders, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD). Apart from the deleterious consequences for the patients and their relatives, this has also alarming effects on our social systems. These facts have justified increased scientific efforts regarding the identification of basic pathomechanisms of dementia and the development of new treatment options. Increased production of specific proteins and their pathologic aggregation in the brain appears to be a pathomechanism which occurs early in the course of many different neurodegenerative disorders. Among the most well-known of these protein aggregations are the amyloid-plaques, which arise from the aggregation of the {beta}-amyloid protein. Currently, this amyloid-aggregation pathology is regarded as a key pathology, playing a causal role in the development of AD. Consequently, modern therapy approaches are directed towards this target. Limited access to brain tissue has so far restricted the definite diagnosis of AD to post mortem histopathological assessment of brain tissue. For the same reason, a clear association between extent of amyloid deposition pathology and clinical course of AD has not been established so far. However, particularly with regard to new therapeutic options a reliable in vivo diagnosis is required. Modern molecular imaging tracers such as [{sup 11}C]PIB do now open the possibility to visualize amyloid-depositions in vivo, using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). These techniques allow the characterization of dementing disorders on the basis of the underlying pathology rather than on their symptomatic appearance. This type of ''in vivo histopathology''-approach may offer improved options for early and differential diagnosis, as well as for patient selection for therapy trials and for objective therapy monitoring. (orig.)

  11. Plaque hemorrhage in carotid artery disease: Pathogenesis, clinical and biomechanical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Zhongzhao; Sadat, Umar; Brown, Adam J.; Gillard, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke remains the most prevalent disabling illness today, with internal carotid artery luminal stenosis due to atheroma formation responsible for the majority of ischemic cerebrovascular events. Severity of luminal stenosis continues to dictate both patient risk stratification and the likelihood of surgical intervention. But there is growing evidence to suggest that plaque morphology may help improve pre-existing risk stratification criteria. Plaque components such a fibrous tissue, lipid rich necrotic core and calcium have been well investigated but plaque hemorrhage (PH) has been somewhat overlooked. In this review we discuss the pathogenesis of PH, its role in dictating plaque vulnerability, PH imaging techniques, marterial properties of atherosclerotic tissues, in particular, those obtained based on in vivo measurements and effect of PH in modulating local biomechanics. PMID:24485514

  12. Detection of amyloid plaques targeted by bifunctional USPIO in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice using magnetic resonance microimaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Zaim Wadghiri

    Full Text Available Amyloid plaques are a key pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The detection of amyloid plaques in the brain is important for the diagnosis of AD, as well as for following potential amyloid targeting therapeutic interventions. Our group has developed several contrast agents to detect amyloid plaques in vivo using magnetic resonance microimaging (µMRI in AD transgenic mice, where we used mannitol to enhance blood brain barrier (BBB permeability. In the present study, we used bifunctional ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO nanoparticles, chemically coupled with Aβ1-42 peptide to image amyloid plaque deposition in the mouse brain. We coupled the nanoparticles to polyethylene glycol (PEG in order to improve BBB permeability. These USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 nanoparticles were injected intravenously in AD model transgenic mice followed by initial in vivo and subsequent ex vivo μMRI. A 3D gradient multi-echo sequence was used for imaging with a 100 µm isotropic resolution. The amyloid plaques detected by T2*-weighted μMRI were confirmed with matched histological sections. The region of interest-based quantitative measurement of T2* values obtained from the in vivo μMRI showed contrast injected AD Tg mice had significantly reduced T2* values compared to wild-type mice. In addition, the ex vivo scans were examined with voxel-based analysis (VBA using statistical parametric mapping (SPM for comparison of USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 injected AD transgenic and USPIO alone injected AD transgenic mice. The regional differences seen by VBA in the USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 injected AD transgenic correlated with the amyloid plaque distribution histologically. Our results indicate that USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 can be used for amyloid plaque detection in vivo by intravenous injection without the need to co-inject an agent which increases permeability of the BBB. This technique could aid the development of novel amyloid targeting drugs by allowing therapeutic effects

  13. Role of gut microbiota and nutrients in amyloid formation and pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistollato, Francesca; Sumalla Cano, Sandra; Elio, Iñaki; Masias Vergara, Manuel; Giampieri, Francesca; Battino, Maurizio

    2016-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota might be associated with the onset of certain human pathologies, such as Alzheimer disease, a neurodegenerative syndrome associated with cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β fibrils. It has been shown that bacteria populating the gut microbiota can release significant amounts of amyloids and lipopolysaccharides, which might play a role in the modulation of signaling pathways and the production of proinflammatory cytokines related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Additionally, nutrients have been shown to affect the composition of the gut microbiota as well as the formation and aggregation of cerebral amyloid-β. This suggests that modulating the gut microbiome and amyloidogenesis through specific nutritional interventions might prove to be an effective strategy to prevent or reduce the risk of Alzheimer disease. This review examines the possible role of the gut in the dissemination of amyloids, the role of the gut microbiota in the regulation of the gut-brain axis, the potential amyloidogenic properties of gut bacteria, and the possible impact of nutrients on modulation of microbiota composition and amyloid formation in relation to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Chronic cladribine administration increases amyloid beta peptide generation and plaque burden in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal D Hayes

    Full Text Available The clinical uses of 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (2-CDA or cladribine which was initially prescribed to patients with hematological and lymphoid cancers is now extended to treat patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Previous data has shown that 2-CDA has high affinity to the brain and readily passes through the blood brain barrier reaching CSF concentrations 25% of that found in plasma. However, whether long-term administration of 2-CDA can lead to any adverse effects in patients or animal models is not yet clearly known.Here we show that exposure of 2-CDA to CHO cells stably expressing wild-type APP751 increased generation and secretion of amyloid β peptide (Aβ in to the conditioned medium. Interestingly, increased Aβ levels were noticed even at non-toxic concentrations of 2-CDA. Remarkably, chronic treatment of APdE9 mice, a model of Alzheimer's disease with 2-CDA for 60 days increased amyloid plaque burden by more than 1-fold. Increased Aβ generation appears to result from increased turnover of APP as revealed by cycloheximide-chase experiments. Additionally, surface labeling of APP with biotin and immunoprecipitation of surface labeled proteins with anti-biotin antibody also indicated increased APP at the cell surface in 2-CDA treated cells compared to controls. Increased turnover of APP by 2-CDA in turn might be a consequence of decreased protein levels of PIN 1, which is known to regulate cis-trans isomerization and phosphorylation of APP. Most importantly, like many other oncology drugs, 2-CDA administration led to significant delay in acquiring a reward-based learning task in a T maze paradigm.Taken together, these data provide compelling evidence for the first time that chronic 2-CDA administration can increase amyloidogenic processing of APP leading to robustly increased plaque burden which may be responsible for the observed deficits in learning skills. Thus chronic treatment of mice with 2-CDA can have deleterious effects in vivo.

  15. A reduced astrocyte response to β-amyloid plaques in the ageing brain associates with cognitive impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Mathur

    Full Text Available β-amyloid (Aβ plaques are a key feature of Alzheimer's disease pathology but correlate poorly with dementia. They are associated with astrocytes which may modulate the effect of Aβ-deposition on the neuropil. This study characterised the astrocyte response to Aβ plaque subtypes, and investigated their association with cognitive impairment.Aβ plaque subtypes were identified in the cingulate gyrus using dual labelling immunohistochemistry to Aβ and GFAP+ astrocytes, and quantitated in two cortical areas: the area of densest plaque burden and the deep cortex near the white matter border (layer VI. Three subtypes were defined for both diffuse and compact plaques (also known as classical or core-plaques: Aβ plaque with (1 no associated astrocytes, (2 focal astrogliosis or (3 circumferential astrogliosis.In the area of densest burden, diffuse plaques with no astrogliosis (β = -0.05, p = 0.001 and with focal astrogliosis (β = -0.27, p = 0.009 significantly associated with lower MMSE scores when controlling for sex and age at death. In the deep cortex (layer VI, both diffuse and compact plaques without astrogliosis associated with lower MMSE scores (β = -0.15, p = 0.017 and β = -0.81, p = 0.03, respectively. Diffuse plaques with no astrogliosis in layer VI related to dementia status (OR = 1.05, p = 0.025. In the area of densest burden, diffuse plaques with no astrogliosis or with focal astrogliosis associated with increasing Braak stage (β = 0.01, p<0.001 and β = 0.07, p<0.001, respectively, and ApoEε4 genotype (OR = 1.02, p = 0.001 and OR = 1.10, p = 0.016, respectively. In layer VI all plaque subtypes associated with Braak stage, and compact amyloid plaques with little and no associated astrogliosis associated with ApoEε4 genotype (OR = 1.50, p = 0.014 and OR = 0.10, p = 0.003, respectively.Reactive astrocytes in close proximity to either diffuse or compact plaques may have a neuroprotective role in the ageing brain, and possession of

  16. How the formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles may be related: a mathematical modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, I. A.; Kuznetsov, A. V.

    2018-02-01

    We develop a mathematical model that enables us to investigate possible mechanisms by which two primary markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular tangles, may be related. Our model investigates the possibility that the decay of anterograde axonal transport of amyloid precursor protein (APP), caused by toxic tau aggregates, leads to decreased APP transport towards the synapse and APP accumulation in the soma. The developed model thus couples three processes: (i) slow axonal transport of tau, (ii) tau misfolding and agglomeration, which we simulated by using the Finke-Watzky model and (iii) fast axonal transport of APP. Because the timescale for tau agglomeration is much larger than that for tau transport, we suggest using the quasi-steady-state approximation for formulating and solving the governing equations for these three processes. Our results suggest that misfolded tau most likely accumulates in the beginning of the axon. The analysis of APP transport suggests that APP will also likely accumulate in the beginning of the axon, causing an increased APP concentration in this region, which could be interpreted as a `traffic jam'. The APP flux towards the synapse is significantly reduced by tau misfolding, but not due to the APP traffic jam, which can be viewed as a symptom, but rather due to the reduced affinity of kinesin-1 motors to APP-transporting vesicles.

  17. COPS5 protein overexpression increases amyloid plaque burden, decreases spinophilin-immunoreactive puncta, and exacerbates learning and memory deficits in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruizhi; Wang, Hongjie; Carrera, Ivan; Xu, Shaohua; Lakshmana, Madepalli K

    2015-04-03

    Brain accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid β (Aβ) peptide because of increased processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP), resulting in loss of synapses and neurodegeneration, is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Therefore, the identification of molecules that regulate Aβ generation and those that cause synaptic damage is crucial for future therapeutic approaches for AD. We demonstrated previously that COPS5 regulates Aβ generation in neuronal cell lines in a RanBP9-dependent manner. Consistent with the data from cell lines, even by 6 months, COPS5 overexpression in APΔE9 mice (APΔE9/COPS5-Tg) significantly increased Aβ40 levels by 32% (p plaque burden both in the cortex (54%, p < 0.01) and hippocampus (64%, p < 0.01). Interestingly, COPS5 overexpression increased RanBP9 levels in the brain, which, in turn, led to increased amyloidogenic processing of APP, as reflected by increased levels of sAPPβ and decreased levels of sAPPα. Furthermore, COPS5 overexpression reduced spinophilin in both the cortex (19%, p < 0.05) and the hippocampus (20%, p < 0.05), leading to significant deficits in learning and memory skills. Therefore, like RanBP9, COPS5 also plays a pivotal role in amyloid pathology in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. In vivo near-infrared fluorescence imaging of amyloidplaques with a dicyanoisophorone-based probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jia-ying; Zhou, Lin-fu; Li, Yu-kun [School of Bioscience and Bioengineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510006 (China); Chen, Shuo-bin [School of Pharmaceutical Science, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510006 (China); Yan, Jin-wu, E-mail: yjw@scut.edu.cn [School of Bioscience and Bioengineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510006 (China); Zhang, Lei, E-mail: lzhangce@scut.edu.cn [School of Bioscience and Bioengineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510006 (China)

    2017-04-08

    A dicyanoisophorone-based probe with two-photon absorption and NIR emission was developed for the in vivo fluorescence imaging of amyloidplaques, which exhibited high selectivity toward Aβ aggregates over other intracellular proteins. The detection limit was calculated to be as low as 109 nM. In vivo imaging studies indicated that the probe could penetrate the blood–brain barrier and label Aβ plaques in the living transgenic mice, and its specific binding to cerebral Aβ plaques was further confirmed by one- and two-photon ex vivo fluorescence imaging. All these results featured its promising application prospects for amyloid-β sensing in basic research and biomedical research. - Highlights: • A two-photon probe (DCIP-1) with NIR emission based on dicyanoisophorone group, for the in vivo fluorescence imaging of amyloidplaques, was reported. • The probe showed turn-on fluorescence (13-fold) with a large Stokes shift upon inserting into the hydrophobic pockets of Aβ aggregates. • The in vivo imaging studies indicated that the probe can penetrate the blood–brain barrier efficiently and discriminate APP/PS1 transgenic mice from WT controls.

  19. Fast in vivo imaging of amyloid plaques using μ-MRI Gd-staining combined with ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santin, Mathieu D.; Dhenain, Marc; Debeir, Thomas; Rooney, Thomas; Bridal, S. Lori

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid plaques are one of the major microscopic lesions that characterize Alzheimer's disease. Current approaches to detect amyloid plaques by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents require invasive procedures to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and to deliver the contrast agent into the vicinity of amyloid plaques. Here we have developed a new protocol (US-Gd-staining) that enables the detection of amyloid plaques in the brain of an APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of amyloidosis after intravenous injection of a non-targeted, clinically approved MRI contrast agent (Gd-DOTA, Dotarem) by transiently opening the BBB with unfocused ultrasound (1 MHz) and clinically approved micro-bubbles (Sonovue, Bracco). This US-Gd-staining protocol can detect amyloid plaques with a short imaging time (32 min) and high in-plane resolution (29 μm). The sensitivity and resolution obtained is at least equal to that provided by MRI protocols using intra-cerebro-ventricular injection of contrast agents, a reference method used to penetrate the BBB. To our knowledge this is the first study to demonstrate the ability of MR imaging to detect amyloid plaques by using a peripheral intravenous injection of a clinically approved NMR contrast agent. (authors)

  20. Curcumin-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles for detecting amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease mice using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kwok Kin; Chan, Pui Shan; Fan, Shujuan; Kwan, Siu Ming; Yeung, King Lun; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; Chow, Albert Hee Lum; Wu, Ed X; Baum, Larry

    2015-03-01

    Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be performed with the assistance of amyloid imaging. The current method relies on positron emission tomography (PET), which is expensive and exposes people to radiation, undesirable features for a population screening method. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is cheaper and is not radioactive. Our approach uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) made of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) conjugated with curcumin, a natural compound that specifically binds to amyloid plaques. Coating of curcumin-conjugated MNPs with polyethylene glycol-polylactic acid block copolymer and polyvinylpyrrolidone by antisolvent precipitation in a multi-inlet vortex mixer produces stable and biocompatible curcumin magnetic nanoparticles (Cur-MNPs) with mean diameter <100 nm. These nanoparticles were visualized by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, and their structure and chemistry were further characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Cur-MNPs exhibited no cytotoxicity in either Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) or differentiated human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). The Papp of Cur-MNPs was 1.03 × 10(-6) cm/s in an in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) model. Amyloid plaques could be visualized in ex vivo T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of Tg2576 mouse brains after injection of Cur-MNPs, and no plaques could be found in non-transgenic mice. Immunohistochemical examination of the mouse brains revealed that Cur-MNPs were co-localized with amyloid plaques. Thus, Cur-MNPs have the potential for non-invasive diagnosis of AD using MRI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Curcumin labels amyloid pathology in vivo, disrupts existing plaques, and partially restores distorted neurites in an Alzheimer mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Alloza, M; Borrelli, L A; Rozkalne, A; Hyman, B T; Bacskai, B J

    2007-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by senile plaques and neurodegeneration although the neurotoxic mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. It is clear that both oxidative stress and inflammation play an important role in the illness. The compound curcumin, with a broad spectrum of anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-fibrilogenic activities may represent a promising approach for preventing or treating AD. Curcumin is a small fluorescent compound that binds to amyloid deposits. In the present work we used in vivo multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to demonstrate that curcumin crosses the blood-brain barrier and labels senile plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. Moreover, systemic treatment of mice with curcumin for 7 days clears and reduces existing plaques, as monitored with longitudinal imaging, suggesting a potent disaggregation effect. Curcumin also led to a limited, but significant reversal of structural changes in dystrophic dendrites, including abnormal curvature and dystrophy size. Together, these data suggest that curcumin reverses existing amyloid pathology and associated neurotoxicity in a mouse model of AD. This approach could lead to more effective clinical therapies for the prevention of oxidative stress, inflammation and neurotoxicity associated with AD.

  2. Validation of an 18F-labeled biphenylalkyne as a positron emission tomography imaging agent for β-amyloid plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wey, S.-P.; Weng, C.-C.; Lin, K.-J.; Yao, C.-H.; Yen, T.-C.; Kung, Hank F.; Skovronsky, Daniel; Kung, M.-P.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Recently, the feasibility of detecting amyloid plaques in the living brain by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging has been successfully demonstrated. As such, imaging β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in the brain may further advance the differential diagnosis of the disease and allow clinicians to measure the effectiveness of therapeutic drugs aimed at lowering plaques in the brain. We report herein the preclinical validation of a potential 18 F-labeled biphenylalkyne, AV-138, as a preliminary step toward developing the imaging agent for patients suspected of having Alzheimer's disease. Methods: In vitro binding was carried out in the homogenates prepared from postmortem AD brains with [ 125 I]IMPY as the radioligand. [ 18 F]AV-138 was successfully prepared using a tosylate precursor and Sumitomo modules for radiosynthesis. Similarly, specific binding of [ 18 F]AV-138 (0.02-0.05 nM) to homogenates, prepared from gray and white matters of pooled AD patients and control subjects, was performed. Specific binding to Aβ plaques was measured by autoradiography in AD brain sections (n=11), and the same brain sections were fluorescently stained with thioflavin-S (TF-S). Images of both radiolabeling and fluorescent staining of plaques obtained by a phosphor imager were used for correlation image analysis. Results: As expected, AV-138 displayed a high binding affinity (K i =2.4±0.7 nM) in AD gray matter homogenates (due to its high level of Aβ plaque accumulation). Specific binding can be clearly measured in the AD gray matter homogenates, but not in the AD white matters. Control brain homogenates, due to a lack of Aβ plaques, also showed no specific binding. Furthermore, in vitro autoradiography of postmortem AD brain sections showed that the high binding signal of [ 18 F]AV-138 was specifically due to Aβ plaques. Fluorescent staining of plaques with TF-S correlated well with the radiolabeling of [ 18 F]AV-138 in AD brain sections (r>0.90). Conclusion: Taken

  3. Distribution of precursor amyloid-β-protein messenger RNA in human cerebral cortex: relationship to neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.A.; Higgins, G.A.; Young, W.G.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Wilson, M.C.; Morrison, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and neuritic plaques (NP), two neuropathological markers of Alzheimer disease, may both contain peptide fragments derived from the human amyloid β protein. However, the nature of the relationship between NFT and NP and the source of the amyloid β proteins found in each have remained unclear. The authors used in situ hybridization techniques to map the anatomical distribution of precursor amyloid-β-protein mRNA in the neocortex of brains from three subjects with no known neurologic disease and from five patients with Alzheimer disease. In brains from control subjects, positively hybridizing neurons were present in cortical regions and layers that contain a high density of neuropathological markers in Alzheimer disease, as well as in those loci that contain NP but few NFT. Quantitative analyses of in situ hybridization patterns within layers III and V of the superior frontal cortex revealed that the presence of high numbers of NFT in Alzheimer-diseased brains was associated with a decrease in the number of positively hybridizing neurons compared to controls and Alzheimer-diseased brains with few NFT. These findings suggest that the expression of precursor amyloid-β-protein mRNA may be a necessary but is clearly not a sufficient prerequisite for NFT formation. In addition, these results may indicate that the amyloid β protein, present in NP in a given region or layer of cortex, is not derived from the resident neuronal cell bodies that express the mRNA for the precursor protein

  4. Affinity of (nat/68)Ga-Labelled Curcumin and Curcuminoid Complexes for β-Amyloid Plaques: Towards the Development of New Metal-Curcumin Based Radiotracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubagotti, Sara; Croci, Stefania; Ferrari, Erika; Iori, Michele; Capponi, Pier C; Lorenzini, Luca; Calzà, Laura; Versari, Annibale; Asti, Mattia

    2016-09-06

    Curcumin derivatives labelled with fluorine-18 or technetium-99m have recently shown their potential as diagnostic tools for Alzheimer's disease. Nevertheless, no study by exploiting the labelling with gallium-68 has been performed so far, in spite of its suitable properties (positron emitter, generator produced radionuclide). Herein, an evaluation of the affinity for synthetic β-amyloid fibrils and for amyloid plaques of three (nat/68)Ga-labelled curcumin analogues, namely curcumin curcumin (CUR), bis-dehydroxy-curcumin (bDHC) and diacetyl-curcumin (DAC), was performed. Affinity and specificity were tested in vitro on amyloid synthetic fibrils by using gallium-68 labelled compounds. Post-mortem brain cryosections from Tg2576 mice were used for the ex vivo visualization of amyloid plaques. The affinity of (68)Ga(CUR)₂⁺, (68)Ga(DAC)₂⁺, and (68)Ga(bDHC)₂⁺ for synthetic β-amyloid fibrils was moderate and their uptake could be observed in vitro. On the other hand, amyloid plaques could not be visualized on brain sections of Tg2576 mice after injection, probably due to the low stability of the complexes in vivo and of a hampered passage through the blood-brain barrier. Like curcumin, all (nat/68)Ga-curcuminoid complexes maintain a high affinity for β-amyloid plaques. However, structural modifications are still needed to improve their applicability as radiotracers in vivo.

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of ethyleneoxylated and allyloxylated chalcone derivatives for imaging of amyloid β plaques by SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchigami, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yuki; Haratake, Mamoru; Ono, Masahiro; Yoshida, Sakura; Nakayama, Morio

    2014-05-01

    We report radioiodinated chalcone derivatives as new SPECT imaging probes for amyloid β (Aβ) plaques. The monoethyleneoxy derivative 2 and allyloxy derivative 8 showed a high affinity for Aβ(1-42) aggregates with Ki values of 24 and 4.5 nM, respectively. Fluorescent imaging demonstrated that 2 and 8 clearly stained thioflavin-S positive Aβ plaques in the brain sections of Tg2576 transgenic mice. In vitro autoradiography revealed that [(125)I]2 displayed no clear accumulation toward Aβ plaques in the brain sections of Tg2576 mice, whereas the accumulation pattern of [(125)I]8 matched with the presence of Aβ plaques both in the brain sections of Tg2576 mice and an AD patient. In biodistribution studies using normal mice, [(125)I]2 showed preferable in vivo pharmacokinetics (4.82%ID/g at 2 min and 0.45%ID/g at 60 min), while [(125)I]8 showed only a modest brain uptake (1.62%ID/g at 2 min) with slow clearance (0.56%ID/g at 60 min). [(125)I]8 showed prospective binding properties for Aβ plaques, although further structural modifications are needed to improve the blood brain barrier permeability and washout from brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Early enriched environment exposure protects spatial memory and accelerates amyloid plaque formation in APP(Swe/PS1(L166P mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Montarolo

    Full Text Available Enriched environment exposure improves several aspects of cognitive performance in Alzheimer's disease patients and in animal models and, although the role of amyloid plaques is questionable, several studies also assessed their response to enriched environment, with contrasting results. Here we report that rearing APP(Swe/PS1(L166P mice in an enriched environment since birth rescued the spatial memory impairment otherwise present at 6 months of age. At the same time, the exposure to the enriched environment caused a transient acceleration of plaque formation, while there was no effect on intracellular staining with the 6E10 antibody, which recognizes β-amyloid, full length amyloid precursor protein and its C-terminal fragments. The anticipation of plaque formation required exposure during early development, suggesting an action within critical periods for circuits formation. On the other hand, chronic neuronal activity suppression by tetrodotoxin decreased the number of plaques without affecting intracellular amyloid. These results indicate that enriched environment exposure since early life has a protective effect on cognitive deterioration although transiently accelerates amyloid deposition. In addition, the effects of the enriched environment might be due to increased neuronal activity, because plaques were reduced by suppression of electrical signaling by tetrodotoxin.

  7. Prophylactic liraglutide treatment prevents amyloid plaque deposition, chronic inflammation and memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClean, Paula L; Jalewa, Jaishree; Hölscher, Christian

    2015-10-15

    Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously, we have shown that the diabetes drug liraglutide is protective in middle aged and in old APP/PS1 mice. Here, we show that liraglutide has prophylactic properties. When injecting liraglutide once-daily ip. in two months old mice for 8 months, the main hallmarks of AD were much reduced. Memory formation in object recognition and Morris water maze were normalised and synapse loss and the loss of synaptic plasticity was prevented. In addition, amyloid plaque load, including dense core congophilic plaques, was much reduced. Chronic inflammation (activated microglia) was also reduced in the cortex, and neurogenesis was enhanced in the dentate gyrus. The results demonstrate that liraglutide may protect from progressive neurodegeneration that develops in AD. The drug is currently in clinical trials in patients with AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. (E-5-Styryl-1H-indole and (E-6-Styrylquinoline Derivatives Serve as Probes for β-Amyloid Plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Li Liu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of novel (E-5-styryl-1H-indole and (E-6-styrylquinoline derivatives as probes for imaging β-amyloid (Aβ plaques. These derivatives showed binding affinities for Aβ1–40 aggregates with Ki values varying from 4.1 to 288.4 nM. (E-5-(4-iodostyryl-1H-indole (8 clearly stained Aβ plaques in the brain sections of Alzheimer’s disease (AD model mice (APP/PS1. Furthermore, autoradiography for [125I]8 displayed intense and specific labeling of Aβ plaques in the brain sections mentioned above with low background. In biodistribution experiments using normal mice [125I]8 showed high initial brain uptake followed by rapid washout (4.27 and 0.64% ID/g at 2 and 30 min post injection, respectively. These findings suggests that [123I]8 may be a potential SPECT imaging agent for detecting Aβ plaques in AD brain.

  9. Disaggregation of amyloid plaque in brain of Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice with daily subcutaneous administration of a tetravalent bispecific antibody that targets the transferrin receptor and the Abeta amyloid peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbria, Rachita K; Hui, Eric Ka-Wai; Lu, Jeff Zhiqiang; Boado, Ruben J; Pardridge, William M

    2013-09-03

    Anti-amyloid antibodies (AAA) are under development as new therapeutics that disaggregate the amyloid plaque in brain in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the AAAs are large molecule drugs that do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in the absence of BBB disruption. In the present study, an AAA was re-engineered for receptor-mediated transport across the BBB via the endogenous BBB transferrin receptor (TfR). A single chain Fv (ScFv) antibody form of an AAA was fused to the carboxyl terminus of each heavy chain of a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the mouse TfR, and this produced a tetravalent bispecific antibody designated the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein. Unlike a conventional AAA, which has a plasma half-time of weeks, the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein is cleared from plasma in mice with a mean residence time of about 3 h. Therefore, a novel protocol was developed for the treatment of one year old presenilin (PS)-1/amyloid precursor protein (APP) AD double transgenic PSAPP mice, which were administered daily subcutaneous (sc) injections of 5 mg/kg of the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein for 12 consecutive weeks. At the end of the treatment, brain amyloid plaques were quantified with confocal microscopy using both Thioflavin-S staining and immunostaining with the 6E10 antibody against Abeta amyloid fibrils. Fusion protein treatment caused a 57% and 61% reduction in amyloid plaque in the cortex and hippocampus, respectively. No increase in plasma immunoreactive Abeta amyloid peptide, and no cerebral microhemorrhage, was observed. Chronic daily sc treatment of the mice with the fusion protein caused no immune reactions and only a low titer antidrug antibody response. In conclusion, re-engineering AAAs for receptor-mediated BBB transport allows for reduction in brain amyloid plaque without cerebral microhemorrhage following daily sc treatment for 12 weeks.

  10. Correspondence between in vivo (11)C-PiB-PET amyloid imaging and postmortem, region-matched assessment of plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Ira; Troncoso, Juan C; Rudow, Gay; Sojkova, Jitka; Pletnikova, Olga; Zhou, Yun; Kraut, Michael A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Mathis, Chester A; Klunk, William E; O'Brien, Richard J; Davatzikos, Christos; Wong, Dean F; Resnick, Susan M

    2012-12-01

    The definitive Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnosis requires postmortem confirmation of neuropathological hallmarks-amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). The advent of radiotracers for amyloid imaging presents an opportunity to investigate amyloid deposition in vivo. The (11)C-Pittsburgh compound-B (PiB)-PET ligand remains the most widely studied to date; however, regional variations in (11)C-PiB binding and the extent of agreement with neuropathological assessment have not been thoroughly investigated. Sojkova and colleagues [35] reported variable agreement between CERAD-based neuropathologic diagnosis of AD lesions and mean cortical PiB, suggesting the need for a more direct quantification of regional Aβ in relation to in vivo imaging. In the present study, we extend these findings by examining the correspondence among regional (11)C-PiB load, region-matched quantitative immunohistological assessments of Aβ and NFTs, and brain atrophy (MRI) in six older Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging participants who came to autopsy (imaging-autopsy interval range 0.2-2.4 years). The total number of Aβ plaques (6E10) and NFTs (PHF1) in paraffin sections from hippocampus, orbito-frontal cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate gyrus, precuneus and cerebellum was quantified using a technique guided by unbiased stereological principles. We report a general agreement between the regional measures of amyloid obtained via stereological assessment and imaging, with significant relationships evident for the anterior (r = 0.83; p = 0.04) and posterior (r = 0.94; p = 0.005) cingulate gyri, and the precuneus (r = 0.94; p = 0.005). No associations were observed between (11)C-PiB load and NFT count for any of the regions examined (p > 0.2 in all regions), or between regional Aβ or NFT counts and corresponding brain volumes. The strong associations of PiB retention with region-matched, quantitative analyses of Aβ in postmortem tissue offer

  11. Atypical Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with PrP-amyloid plaques in white matter: molecular characterization and transmission to bank voles show the M1 strain signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Marcello; Saverioni, Daniela; Di Bari, Michele; Baiardi, Simone; Lemstra, Afina Willemina; Pirisinu, Laura; Capellari, Sabina; Rozemuller, Annemieke; Nonno, Romolo; Parchi, Piero

    2017-11-23

    Amyloid plaques formed by abnormal prion protein (PrP Sc ) aggregates occur with low frequency in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, but represent a pathological hallmark of three relatively rare disease histotypes, namely variant CJD, sporadic CJDMV2K (methionine/valine at PRNP codon 129, PrP Sc type 2 and kuru-type amyloid plaques) and iatrogenic CJDMMiK (MM at codon 129, PrP Sc of intermediate type and kuru plaques). According to recent studies, however, PrP-amyloid plaques involving the subcortical and deep nuclei white matter may also rarely occur in CJDMM1 (MM at codon 129 and PrP Sc type 1), the most common CJD histotype.To further characterize the phenotype of atypical CJDMM1 with white matter plaques (p-CJDMM1) and unravel the basis of amyloid plaque formation in such cases, we compared clinical and histopathological features and PrP Sc physico-chemical properties between 5 p-CJDMM1 and 8 typical CJDMM1 brains lacking plaques. Furthermore, transmission properties after bioassay in two genetic lines of bank voles were also explored in the two groups.All 5 p-CJDMM1 cases had a disease duration longer than one year. Three cases were classified as sporadic CJDMM1, one as sporadic CJDMM1 + 2C and one as genetic CJDE200K-MM1. Molecular mass, protease sensitivity and thermo-solubilization of PrP Sc aggregates did not differ between p-CJDMM1 and classical CJDMM1 cases. Likewise, transmission properties such as incubation time, lesion profile and PrP Sc properties in bank voles also matched in the two groups.The present data further define the clinical-pathologic phenotype of p-CJDMM1, definitely establish it as a distinctive CJD histotype and demonstrate that PrP-plaque formation in this histotype is not a strain-specific feature. Since cases lacking amyloid plaques may also manifest a prolonged (i.e. > than one year) disease course, unidentified, host-specific factors likely play a significant role, in addition to disease duration, in generating white matter PrP-amyloid

  12. Amyloid Plaque in the Human Brain Can Decompose from Aβ(1-40/1-42) by Spontaneous Nonenzymatic Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Brian; Friedrich, Michael; Raftery, Mark; Truscott, Roger

    2016-03-01

    The degradation of long-lived proteins in the body is an important aspect of aging, and much of the breakdown is due to the intrinsic instability of particular amino acids. In this study, peptides were examined to discover if spontaneous nonenzymatic reactions could be responsible for the composition of Alzheimer's (AD) plaque in the human brain. The great majority of AD plaque consists of N-terminally truncated versions of Aβ(1-40/1-42), with the most abundant peptide commencing with Glu (residue 3 in Aβ1-40/1-42) that is present as pyroGlu. Several Asp residues are racemized in Aβ plaque, with residue 1 being predominantly l-isoAsp and peptide bond cleavage next to Ser 8 is also evident. In peptides, loss of the two N-terminal amino acids as a diketopiperazine was demonstrated at pH 7. For the Aβ N-terminal hexapeptide, AspAlaGluPheArgHis, this resulted in the removal of AspAla diketopiperazine and the generation of Glu as the new N-terminal residue. The Glu cyclized readily to pyroGlu. This pathway was altered significantly by zinc, which promoted pyroGlu formation but decreased AspAla diketopiperazine release. Zinc also facilitated cleavage on the N-terminal side of Ser 8. Racemization of the original N-terminal Asp to l-isoAsp was also detected and loss of one amino acid from the N-terminus. These data are therefore entirely consistent with plaque in the human brain forming from deposition of Aβ(1-40/1-42) and, over time, decomposing spontaneously. Since amyloid plaque is present in the human brain for years prior to the onset of AD, gradual spontaneous changes to the polypeptides within it will alter its properties and those of the oligomers that can diffuse from it. Such incremental changes in composition may therefore contribute to the origin of AD-associated cytotoxicity.

  13. Stabilization of a β-hairpin in monomeric Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide inhibits amyloid formation

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyer, Wolfgang; Grönwall, Caroline; Jonsson, Andreas; Ståhl, Stefan; Härd, Torleif

    2008-01-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is triggered by the oligomerization and aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into protein plaques. Formation of the potentially toxic oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ assemblies is accompanied by a conformational change toward a high content of β-structure. Here, we report the solution structure of Aβ(1–40) in complex with the phage-display selected affibody protein ZAβ3, a binding protein of nanomolar affinity. Boun...

  14. Iterative Image Processing for Early Diagnostic of Beta-Amyloid Plaque Deposition in Pre-Clinical Alzheimer's Disease Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavine, Nikolai V; Kulkarni, Padmakar V; McColl, Roderick W

    2017-08-01

    To test and evaluate an efficient iterative image processing strategy to improve the quality of sub-optimal pre-clinical PET images. A novel iterative resolution subsets-based method to reduce noise and enhance resolution (RSEMD) has been demonstrated on examples of PET imaging studies of Alzheimer's disease (AD) plaques deposition in mice brains. The RSEMD method was applied to imaging studies of non-invasive detection of beta-amyloid plaque in transgenic mouse models of AD. Data acquisition utilized a Siemens Inveon® micro PET/CT device. Quantitative uptake of the tracer in control and AD mice brains was determined by counting the extent of plaque deposition by histological staining. The pre-clinical imaging software inviCRO ® was used for fitting the recovery PET images to the mouse brain atlas and obtaining the time activity curves (TAC) from different brain areas. In all of the AD studies the post-processed images proved to have higher resolution and lower noise as compared with images reconstructed by conventional OSEM method. In general, the values of SNR reached a plateau at around 10 iterations with an improvement factor of about 2 over sub-optimal PET brain images. A rapidly converging, iterative deconvolution image processing algorithm with a resolution subsets-based approach RSEMD has been used for quantitative studies of changes in Alzheimer's pathology over time. The RSEMD method can be applied to sub-optimal clinical PET brain images to improve image quality to diagnostically acceptable levels and will be crucial in order to facilitate diagnosis of AD progression at the earliest stages.

  15. Synthesis, characterization, and preclinical validation of a PET radiopharmaceutical for interrogating Aβ (β-amyloid) plaques in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, Guruswami Sm; Dhavale, Dhruva; Prior, Julie L; Sivapackiam, Jothilingam; Laforest, Richard; Kotzbauer, Paul; Sharma, Vijay

    2015-12-01

    PET radiopharmaceuticals capable of imaging β-amyloid (Aβ) plaque burden in the brain could offer highly valuable diagnostic tools for clinical studies of Alzheimer's disease. To further supplement existing armamentarium of FDA-approved agents as well as those under development, and to correlate multiphoton-imaging data reported earlier, herein, we describe preclinical validation of a PET tracer. A novel PET radiopharmaceutical ((18)F-7B) was synthesized and characterized. To assess its affinity for Aβ, binding assays with Aβ1-42 fibrils, Alzheimer's disease (AD) homogenates, and autoradiography studies and their IHC correlations were performed. For assessing its overall pharmacokinetic profiles in general and its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in particular, biodistribution studies in normal mice were performed. Finally, for evaluating potential for (18)F-7B to serve as a targeted Aβ probe, the microPET/CT imaging was performed in age-matched amyloid precursor protein/presenilin-1 (APP/PS1) mice and wild-type (WT) counterparts. The radiotracer (18)F-7B shows saturable binding to autopsy-confirmed AD homogenates (K d = 17.7 nM) and Aβ1-42 fibrils (K d = 61 nM). Preliminary autoradiography studies show binding of (18)F-7B to cortical Aβ plaques in autopsy-confirmed AD tissue sections, inhibition of that binding by unlabeled counterpart 7A-indicating specificity, and a good correlation of tracer binding with Aβ immunostaining. The agent indicates high initial penetration into brains (7.23 ± 0.47%ID/g; 5 min) of normal mice, thus indicating a 5-min/120-min brain uptake clearance ratio of 4.7, a benchmark value (>4) consistent with the ability of agents to traverse the BBB to enable PET brain imaging. Additionally, (18)F-7B demonstrates the presence of parental species in human serum. Preliminary microPET/CT imaging demonstrates significantly higher retention of (18)F-7B in brains of transgenic mice compared with their WT counterparts

  16. Link between Aluminum and the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease: The Integration of the Aluminum and Amyloid Cascade Hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Whilst being environmentally abundant, aluminum is not essential for life. On the contrary, aluminum is a widely recognized neurotoxin that inhibits more than 200 biologically important functions and causes various adverse effects in plants, animals, and humans. The relationship between aluminum exposure and neurodegenerative diseases, including dialysis encephalopathy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinsonism dementia in the Kii Peninsula and Guam, and Alzheimer's disease (AD has been suggested. In particular, the link between aluminum and Alzheimer's disease has been the subject of scientific debate for several decades. However, the complex characteristics of aluminum bioavailability make it difficult to evaluate its toxicity and therefore, the relationship remains to be established. Mounting evidence has suggested that significance of oligomerization of β-amyloid protein and neurotoxicity in the molecular mechanism of AD pathogenesis. Aluminum may play crucial roles as a cross-linker in β-amyloid oligomerization. Here, we review the detailed characteristics of aluminum neurotoxicity based on our own studies and the recent literatures. Our aim is to revisit the link between aluminum and AD and to integrate aluminum and amyloid cascade hypotheses in the context of β-amyloid oligomerization and the interactions with other metals.

  17. AmyloidPlaques in Clinical Alzheimer’s Disease Brain Incorporate Stable Isotope Tracer In Vivo and Exhibit Nanoscale Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildburger, Norelle C.; Gyngard, Frank; Guillermier, Christelle; Patterson, Bruce W.; Elbert, Donald; Mawuenyega, Kwasi G.; Schneider, Theresa; Green, Karen; Roth, Robyn; Schmidt, Robert E.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Benzinger, Tammie L. S.; Steinhauser, Matthew L.; Bateman, Randall J.

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with clinical manifestations of progressive memory decline and loss of executive function and language. AD affects an estimated 5.3 million Americans alone and is the most common form of age-related dementia with a rapidly growing prevalence among the aging population—those 65 years of age or older. AD is characterized by accumulation of aggregated amyloid-beta (Aβ) in the brain, which leads to one of the pathological hallmarks of AD—Aβ plaques. As a result, Aβ plaques have been extensively studied after being first described over a century ago. Advances in brain imaging and quantitative measures of Aβ in biological fluids have yielded insight into the time course of plaque development decades before and after AD symptom onset. However, despite the fundamental role of Aβ plaques in AD, in vivo measures of individual plaque growth, growth distribution, and dynamics are still lacking. To address this question, we combined stable isotope labeling kinetics (SILK) and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) imaging in an approach termed SILK–SIMS to resolve plaque dynamics in three human AD brains. In human AD brain, plaques exhibit incorporation of a stable isotope tracer. Tracer enrichment was highly variable between plaques and the spatial distribution asymmetric with both quiescent and active nanometer sub-regions of tracer incorporation. These data reveal that Aβ plaques are dynamic structures with deposition rates over days indicating a highly active process. Here, we report the first, direct quantitative measures of in vivo deposition into plaques in human AD brain. Our SILK–SIMS studies will provide invaluable information on plaque dynamics in the normal and diseased brain and offer many new avenues for investigation into pathological mechanisms of the disease, with implications for therapeutic development. PMID:29623063

  18. AmyloidPlaques in Clinical Alzheimer’s Disease Brain Incorporate Stable Isotope Tracer In Vivo and Exhibit Nanoscale Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norelle C. Wildburger

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder with clinical manifestations of progressive memory decline and loss of executive function and language. AD affects an estimated 5.3 million Americans alone and is the most common form of age-related dementia with a rapidly growing prevalence among the aging population—those 65 years of age or older. AD is characterized by accumulation of aggregated amyloid-beta (Aβ in the brain, which leads to one of the pathological hallmarks of AD—Aβ plaques. As a result, Aβ plaques have been extensively studied after being first described over a century ago. Advances in brain imaging and quantitative measures of Aβ in biological fluids have yielded insight into the time course of plaque development decades before and after AD symptom onset. However, despite the fundamental role of Aβ plaques in AD, in vivo measures of individual plaque growth, growth distribution, and dynamics are still lacking. To address this question, we combined stable isotope labeling kinetics (SILK and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS imaging in an approach termed SILK–SIMS to resolve plaque dynamics in three human AD brains. In human AD brain, plaques exhibit incorporation of a stable isotope tracer. Tracer enrichment was highly variable between plaques and the spatial distribution asymmetric with both quiescent and active nanometer sub-regions of tracer incorporation. These data reveal that Aβ plaques are dynamic structures with deposition rates over days indicating a highly active process. Here, we report the first, direct quantitative measures of in vivo deposition into plaques in human AD brain. Our SILK–SIMS studies will provide invaluable information on plaque dynamics in the normal and diseased brain and offer many new avenues for investigation into pathological mechanisms of the disease, with implications for therapeutic development.

  19. Prion seeding activities of mouse scrapie strains with divergent PrPSc protease sensitivities and amyloid plaque content using RT-QuIC and eQuIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Vascellari

    Full Text Available Different transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE-associated forms of prion protein (e.g. PrP(Sc can vary markedly in ultrastructure and biochemical characteristics, but each is propagated in the host. PrP(Sc propagation involves conversion from its normal isoform, PrP(C, by a seeded or templated polymerization mechanism. Such a mechanism is also the basis of the RT-QuIC and eQuIC prion assays which use recombinant PrP (rPrP(Sen as a substrate. These ultrasensitive detection assays have been developed for TSE prions of several host species and sample tissues, but not for murine models which are central to TSE pathogenesis research. Here we have adapted RT-QuIC and eQuIC to various murine prions and evaluated how seeding activity depends on glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI anchoring and the abundance of amyloid plaques and protease-resistant PrP(Sc (PrP(Res. Scrapie brain dilutions up to 10(-8 and 10(-13 were detected by RT-QuIC and eQuIC, respectively. Comparisons of scrapie-affected wild-type mice and transgenic mice expressing GPI anchorless PrP showed that, although similar concentrations of seeding activity accumulated in brain, the heavily amyloid-laden anchorless mouse tissue seeded more rapid reactions. Next we compared seeding activities in the brains of mice with similar infectivity titers, but widely divergent PrP(Res levels. For this purpose we compared the 263K and 139A scrapie strains in transgenic mice expressing P101L PrP(C. Although the brains of 263K-affected mice had little immunoblot-detectable PrP(Res, RT-QuIC indicated that seeding activity was comparable to that associated with a high-PrP(Res strain, 139A. Thus, in this comparison, RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated more closely with infectivity than with PrP(Res levels. We also found that eQuIC, which incorporates a PrP(Sc immunoprecipitation step, detected seeding activity in plasma from wild-type and anchorless PrP transgenic mice inoculated with 22L, 79A and/or RML

  20. Prion seeding activities of mouse scrapie strains with divergent PrPSc protease sensitivities and amyloid plaque content using RT-QuIC and eQuIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vascellari, Sarah; Orrù, Christina D; Hughson, Andrew G; King, Declan; Barron, Rona; Wilham, Jason M; Baron, Gerald S; Race, Brent; Pani, Alessandra; Caughey, Byron

    2012-01-01

    Different transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE)-associated forms of prion protein (e.g. PrP(Sc)) can vary markedly in ultrastructure and biochemical characteristics, but each is propagated in the host. PrP(Sc) propagation involves conversion from its normal isoform, PrP(C), by a seeded or templated polymerization mechanism. Such a mechanism is also the basis of the RT-QuIC and eQuIC prion assays which use recombinant PrP (rPrP(Sen)) as a substrate. These ultrasensitive detection assays have been developed for TSE prions of several host species and sample tissues, but not for murine models which are central to TSE pathogenesis research. Here we have adapted RT-QuIC and eQuIC to various murine prions and evaluated how seeding activity depends on glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring and the abundance of amyloid plaques and protease-resistant PrP(Sc) (PrP(Res)). Scrapie brain dilutions up to 10(-8) and 10(-13) were detected by RT-QuIC and eQuIC, respectively. Comparisons of scrapie-affected wild-type mice and transgenic mice expressing GPI anchorless PrP showed that, although similar concentrations of seeding activity accumulated in brain, the heavily amyloid-laden anchorless mouse tissue seeded more rapid reactions. Next we compared seeding activities in the brains of mice with similar infectivity titers, but widely divergent PrP(Res) levels. For this purpose we compared the 263K and 139A scrapie strains in transgenic mice expressing P101L PrP(C). Although the brains of 263K-affected mice had little immunoblot-detectable PrP(Res), RT-QuIC indicated that seeding activity was comparable to that associated with a high-PrP(Res) strain, 139A. Thus, in this comparison, RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated more closely with infectivity than with PrP(Res) levels. We also found that eQuIC, which incorporates a PrP(Sc) immunoprecipitation step, detected seeding activity in plasma from wild-type and anchorless PrP transgenic mice inoculated with 22L, 79A and/or RML

  1. Plaque deposition dependent decrease in 5-HT2A serotonin receptor in AbetaPPswe/PS1dE9 amyloid overexpressing mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Peter; Ettrup, Anders; Klein, Anders B

    2010-01-01

    -HT2A receptor regulation in double transgenic AbetaPPswe/PS1dE9 mice which display excess production of Abeta and age-dependent increase in amyloid plaques. Three different age-groups, 4-month-old, 8- month-old, and 11-month-old were included in the study. [3H]-MDL100907, [3H]-escitalopram, and [11C...

  2. The role of selected chemokines and their receptors in the pathogenesis and destabilisation of atheromatous plaques in the carotid arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Konarska-Król

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are cytokines that act selectively on cells and are capable of inducing selective migration of cells in vitro and in vivo. The term was first coined at the 3rd International Symposium on Chemotactic Cytokines in 1992. The name “chemokine” is a contraction of “chemotactic cytokine,” meaning that these molecules combine features of both cytokines and chemotactic factors. They are a family of low-molecular-mass proteins acting on specific membrane receptors. A cell’s overall sensitivity to chemotaxis depends on the expression profile of chemokine receptors. Atherosclerosis is essentially an excessive inflammatory and proliferative response to the damage of arterial walls. It takes place within the wall and leads to the formation of unstable atherosclerotic plaques. Many chemokines have been studied in terms of their role in the pathogenesis of an atheromatous plaque in the carotid arteries, both in animal models and with the use of human tissue. It  seems that molecules that are the most involved in the formation of atheromas in the carotid arteries include: CCL2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5. However, reports are sometimes contradictory, and more research is needed. Finding a marker that could help predict the destabilisation of an atheromatous plaque would be a valuable addition to the standard diagnostic panel of tests used in both the diagnosis and monitoring of vascular pathologies.

  3. Early long-term administration of the CSF1R inhibitor PLX3397 ablates microglia and reduces accumulation of intraneuronal amyloid, neuritic plaque deposition and pre-fibrillar oligomers in 5XFAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosna, Justyna; Philipp, Stephan; Albay, Ricardo; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Baglietto-Vargas, David; LaFerla, Frank M; Glabe, Charles G

    2018-03-01

    Besides the two main classical features of amyloid beta aggregation and tau-containing neurofibrillary tangle deposition, neuroinflammation plays an important yet unclear role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Microglia are believed to be key mediators of neuroinflammation during AD and responsible for the regulation of brain homeostasis by balancing neurotoxicity and neuroprotective events. We have previously reported evidence that neuritic plaques are derived from dead neurons that have accumulated intraneuronal amyloid and further recruit Iba1-positive cells, which play a role in either neuronal demise or neuritic plaque maturation or both. To study the impact of microglia on neuritic plaque development, we treated two-month-old 5XFAD mice with a selective colony stimulation factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) inhibitor, PLX3397, for a period of 3 months, resulting in a significant ablation of microglia. Directly after this treatment, we analyzed the amount of intraneuronal amyloid and neuritic plaques and performed behavioral studies including Y-maze, fear conditioning and elevated plus maze. We found that early long-term PLX3397 administration results in a dramatic reduction of both intraneuronal amyloid as well as neuritic plaque deposition. PLX3397 treated young 5XFAD mice also displayed a significant decrease of soluble fibrillar amyloid oligomers in brain lysates, a depletion of soluble pre-fibrillar oligomers in plasma and an improvement in cognitive function measured by fear conditioning tests. Our findings demonstrate that CSF1R signaling, either directly on neurons or mediated by microglia, is crucial for the accumulation of intraneuronal amyloid and formation of neuritic plaques, suggesting that these two events are serially linked in a causal pathway leading to neurodegeneration and neuritic plaque formation. CSF1R inhibitors represent potential preventative or therapeutic approach that target the very earliest stages of the formation of

  4. Dynamic analysis of amyloid β-protein in behaving mice reveals opposing changes in ISF versus parenchymal Aβ during age-related plaque formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soyon; Quintero-Monzon, Omar; Ostaszewski, Beth L; Podlisny, Daniel R; Cavanaugh, William T; Yang, Ting; Holtzman, David M; Cirrito, John R; Selkoe, Dennis J

    2011-11-02

    Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that soluble, diffusible forms of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) are pathogenically important in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and thus have both diagnostic and therapeutic salience. To learn more about the dynamics of soluble Aβ economy in vivo, we used microdialysis to sample the brain interstitial fluid (ISF), which contains the most soluble Aβ species in brain at steady state, in >40 wake, behaving APP transgenic mice before and during the process of Aβ plaque formation (age 3-28 months). Diffusible forms of Aβ, especially Aβ(42), declined significantly in ISF as mice underwent progressive parenchymal deposition of Aβ. Moreover, radiolabeled Aβ administered at physiological concentrations into ISF revealed a striking difference in the fate of soluble Aβ in plaque-rich (vs plaque-free) mice: it clears more rapidly from the ISF and becomes more associated with the TBS-extractable pool, suggesting that cerebral amyloid deposits can rapidly sequester soluble Aβ from the ISF. Likewise, acute γ-secretase inhibition in plaque-free mice showed a marked decline of Aβ(38), Aβ(40), and Aβ(42), whereas in plaque-rich mice, Aβ(42) declined significantly less. These results suggest that most of the Aβ(42) that populates the ISF in plaque-rich mice is derived not from new Aβ biosynthesis but rather from the large reservoir of less soluble Aβ(42) in brain parenchyma. Together, these and other findings herein illuminate the in vivo dynamics of soluble Aβ during the development of AD-type neuropathology and after γ-secretase inhibition and help explain the apparent paradox that CSF Aβ(42) levels fall as humans develop AD.

  5. Immunization with the SDPM1 peptide lowers amyloid plaque burden and improves cognitive function in the APPswePSEN1(A246E) transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiou-Miin; Devries, Sarah; Camboni, Marybeth; Glass, Matthew; Martin, Paul T

    2010-09-01

    Vaccination has become an important therapeutic approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, immunization with Abeta amyloid can have unwanted, potentially lethal, side effects. Here we demonstrate an alternative peptide-mimotope vaccine strategy using the SDPM1 peptide. SDPM1 is a 20 amino acid peptide bounded by cysteines that binds tetramer forms of Abeta(1-40)- and Abeta(1-42)-amyloids and blocks subsequent Abeta amyloid aggregation. Immunization of mice with SDPM1 induced peptide-mimotope antibodies with the same biological activity as the SDPM1 peptide. When done prior to the onset of amyloid plaque formation, SDPM1 vaccination of APPswePSEN1(A246E) transgenic mice reduced amyloid plaque burden and Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) levels in the brain, improved cognitive performance in Morris water maze tests, and resulted in no increased T cell responses to immunogenic or Abeta peptides or brain inflammation. When done after plaque burden was already significant, SDPM1 immunization still significantly reduced amyloid plaque burden and Abeta(1-40/1-42) peptide levels in APPswePSEN1(A246E) brain without inducing encephalitogenic T cell responses or brain inflammation, but treatment at this stage did not improve cognitive function. These experiments demonstrate the efficacy of a novel vaccine approach for Alzheimer's disease where immunization with an Abeta(1-40/1-42) amyloid-specific binding and blocking peptide is used to inhibit the development of neuropathology and cognitive dysfunction.

  6. Radiation dosimetry and biodistribution of the beta-amyloid plaque imaging tracer 11C-BTA-1 in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thees, S; Neumaier, B; Glatting, G; Deisenhofer, S; von Arnim, C A F; Reske, S N; Mottaghy, F M

    2007-01-01

    [N-methyl-(11)C]2-(4'-(methylaminophenyl)-benzothiazole ((11)C-BTA-1) is a thioflavin-T derivative that has been one of the promising PET tracers for imaging of amyloid plaque distribution in the Alzheimer patients brain in vivo. The biodistribution and dosimetry of this tracer in humans is presented and compared to the results of a previous dosimetry and biodistribution study of another thioflavin-T derivative [N-methyl-(11)C]2-hydroxy-(4'-(methylaminophenyl)-benzothiazole ((11)C-OH-BTA-1) in baboons. Five subjects underwent 2D dynamic PET imaging. Source organs were segmented using a semiautomatic algorithm based on clustering. Residence times for each source organ were determined by analytical integration of an exponential fit of the time activity curves. Finally organ doses were estimated using the software OLINDA/EXM. The administration of 286 +/- 93 MBq (11)C-BTA-1 was well tolerated by all subjects. Effective radiation dose was 4.3 microSv/MBq, range 3.6-5.0 microSv/MBq. In four of the five subjects the liver, in one of the subjects the gallbladder was the critical organ. The radiation burden of a single dose of 300 MBq (11)C-BTA-1 is within the accepted limits for research purpose. In contrast to the previous non-human primate study revealing the gallbladder as the critical organ for (11)C-6-OH-BTA-1, we found the liver as the critical organ in humans using (11)C-BTA-1. Possible explanations may be (1) a reduced bile concentration of (11)C-BTA-1 due to the absent OH-group or (2) a different hepatic metabolism of thioflavin derivatives in human and baboon.

  7. Diagnostic value of β amyloid plaques imaging agent 131I-IMPY brain imaging in early Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Wanzhong; Lu Chunxiong; Yang Min; Bao Jiandong; Cheng Zhaohuo; Cai Deliang; Wang Zhiqiang; Yang Bixiu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of β-amyloid plaques imaging agent [ 131 I] 2( 4-dimethylaminop henyl)-6-iodoimidazo [1, 2-α] pyridine ( 131 I-IMPY) SPECT imaging in early Alzheimer's Disease. Methods: 24 cases of AD (7 males, 17 females, aged 48∼79 years) and 14 normal (6 males, 8 females, aged 42∼67 years) control subjects were selected for this study. 131 I-IMPY SPECT imaging was carried out 2-3 h post injection. 131 I-IMPY uptake defined as the ratio of each brain gyrus and cerebellum uptake on fixed region of interest (ROI) (Rcl/cb) was calculated. Comparative analysis between the two groups was carried out using t-test. Results: In patients with early AD (MCI), 131 I-IMPY was increased in parietal gyrus, temporal gyrus and frontal gyrus compared with normal control group and it were found to be statistically significant (t = 1.3967∼2.8757, all P 0.05). In patients with AD, increase in 131 I-IMPY were observed in parietal, temporal, occipital lobes and basal ganglia compared with normal control group and it were found to be statistically significant (t=2.1001∼6.2789, all P 0.05), and 131 I-IMPY was increased in occipital lobes and basal ganglia compared with MCI group and it were found to be statistically significant (t=2.0850∼3.6772, all P 131 I-IMPY was lightly increased in each brain of left side gyrus compared with right but without statistically significant difference (t=0.1273∼0.5571, all P>0.05). Conclusions: 131 I-IMPY SPECT Imaging was helpful for early diagnosis of AD. (authors)

  8. Binding of curcumin to senile plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy in the aged brain of various animals and to neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutsuga, Mayu; Chambers, James Kenn; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Tei, Meina; Makibuchi, Takao; Mizorogi, Tatsuya; Takashima, Akihiko; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    The binding of curcumin to senile plaques (SPs) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) was examined in the aged brain of various animal species and a human patient with Alzheimer's disease (AD), together with its binding to neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Brain sections were immunostained with anti-amyloid β protein 1-42 (Aβ42) and anti-amyloid β protein 1-40 (Aβ40) antibodies. These sections were also stained with alkaline Congo red, periodic acid-methenamine silver (PAM), and curcumin (0.009% curcumin solution) with or without formic acid pretreatment. The sections from the AD brain were also immunostained for anti-paired helical filament-tau (PHF-tau), and were stained with Gallyas silver for NFTs. Some SPs in the AD, monkey, dog, bear, and amyloid precursor protein transgenic mouse (APP Tg-mouse) brains contained congophilic materials, and were intensely positive for curcumin. In addition, curcumin labeled some diffuse SPs negative for Congo red in the AD, monkey, bear, and APP Tg-mouse brains. In all animals, CAA was intensely positive for both Congo red and curcumin. The specific curcumin staining activity was lost by formic acid pretreatment. In the AD brain, NFTs positive for PHF-tau and Gallyas silver were moderately stained with curcumin. These findings indicate that curcumin specifically binds to the aggregated Aβ molecules in various animals, and further to phosphorylated tau protein, probably according to its conformational nature.

  9. Zileuton improves memory deficits, amyloid and tau pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease with plaques and tangles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Chu

    Full Text Available The 5-lipoxygenase (5LO enzyme is widely distributed within the central nervous system. Previous works showed that this protein is up-regulated in Alzheimer's disease (AD, and plays an active role in the development of brain amyloidosis in the APP transgenic mice. In the present paper, we studied the effect of its pharmacological inhibition on the entire AD-like phenotype of a mouse model with plaques and tangles, the 3 × Tg mice. Compared with mice receiving placebo, the group treated with zileuton, a specific 5LO inhibitor, manifested a significant improvement of their memory impairments. The same animals had a significant reduction in Aβ levels and deposition, which was secondary to a down-regulation of the γ-secretase pathway. Additionally, while total tau levels were unchanged for both groups, zileuton-treated mice had a significant reduction in its phosphorylation state and insoluble forms, secondary to a decreased activation of the cdk5 kinase. These data establish a functional role for 5LO in the pathogenesis of the full spectrum of the AD-like phenotype and represent the successful completion of the initial step for the preclinical development of 5LO inhibitors as viable therapeutic agents for AD.

  10. Brain imaging with a novel β-amyloid plaque probe 131I-IMPY in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Wanzhong; Cheng Zaohuo; Lu Chunxiong; Cai Deliang; Yang Min; Bao Jiandong; Wang Zhiqiang; Yang Bixiu

    2011-01-01

    .6772, all P<0.05). Conclusion: 131 I-IMPY as a β-amyloid plaque probe for brain SPECT imaging may be potentially helpful for early diagnosis of AD. (authors)

  11. Multimodal imaging Gd-nanoparticles functionalized with Pittsburgh compound B or a nanobody for amyloid plaques targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansieri, Jonathan; Plissonneau, Marie; Stransky-Heilkron, Nathalie; Dumoulin, Mireille; Heinrich-Balard, Laurence; Rivory, Pascaline; Morfin, Jean-François; Toth, Eva; Saraiva, Maria Joao; Allémann, Eric; Tillement, Olivier; Forge, Vincent; Lux, François; Marquette, Christel

    2017-07-01

    Gadolinium-based nanoparticles were functionalized with either the Pittsburgh compound B or a nanobody (B10AP) in order to create multimodal tools for an early diagnosis of amyloidoses. The ability of the functionalized nanoparticles to target amyloid fibrils made of β-amyloid peptide, amylin or Val30Met-mutated transthyretin formed in vitro or from pathological tissues was investigated by a range of spectroscopic and biophysics techniques including fluorescence microscopy. Nanoparticles functionalized by both probes efficiently interacted with the three types of amyloid fibrils, with K D values in 10 micromolar and 10 nanomolar range for, respectively, Pittsburgh compound B and B10AP nanoparticles. Moreover, they allowed the detection of amyloid deposits on pathological tissues. Such functionalized nanoparticles could represent promising flexible and multimodal imaging tools for the early diagnostic of amyloid diseases, in other words, Alzheimer's disease, Type 2 diabetes mellitus and the familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy.

  12. Serum β-amyloid peptide levels spike in the early stage of Alzheimer-like plaque pathology in an APP/PS1 double transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jue; Qiao, Jin-Ping; Zhu, Shenghua; Xue, Mengzhou; Chen, Wenwu; Wang, Xinchun; Tempier, Adrien; Huang, Qingjun; Kong, Jiming; Li, Xin-Min

    2013-11-01

    Serum levels of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides may represent an early biomarker in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we investigated the temporal kinetic changes in the levels of serum Aβ 1-42 and 40 in an amyloid precursor protein (APP)/presenilin (PS)1 double transgenic mouse model of AD. Serum Aβ peptide levels in 2-, 3-, 6-, 9- and 18-month old, and liver Aβ 1-40 level in 6-month old mice were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Results revealed that serum Aβ levels peaked in 3-month old transgenic mice, and the Aβ level in non-transgenic and transgenic mice is comparable in liver. Compared to the 6-month old transgenic mice, Congo red staining showed that the 3-month old transgenic mice had minimum brain Aβ plaques, corresponding to the early stage of Alzheimer-like plaque pathology, and confocal microscope images showed that the deposition of Aβ in their cerebral vessels was minimal. Furthermore, results of the water maze test, showed that memory was normal for the 3- month old transgenic mice when compared to age-matched non-transgenic mice. These results suggest that serum Aβ peptide levels may be peaked during the early stage of AD. Monitoring serum Aβ peptide levels in the potential AD population may provide an early diagnosis of AD prior to the appearance of clinical symptoms.

  13. Plaque deposition dependent decrease in 5-HT2A serotonin receptor in AbetaPPswe/PS1dE9 amyloid overexpressing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Peter; Ettrup, Anders; Klein, Anders B; Santini, Martin A; El-Sayed, Mona; Elvang, Anders B; Stensbøl, Tine B; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Knudsen, Gitte M; Aznar, Susana

    2010-01-01

    Intrahippocampal injections of aggregated amyloid-beta (Abeta)1-42 in rats result in memory impairment and in reduction of hippocampal 5-HT2A receptor levels. In order to investigate how changes in 5-HT2A levels and functionality relate to the progressive accumulation of Abeta protein, we studied 5-HT2A receptor regulation in double transgenic AbetaPPswe/PS1dE9 mice which display excess production of Abeta and age-dependent increase in amyloid plaques. Three different age-groups, 4-month-old, 8- month-old, and 11-month-old were included in the study. [3H]-MDL100907, [3H]-escitalopram, and [11C]-PIB autoradiography was performed for measuring 5-HT2A receptor, serotonin transporter (SERT), and Abeta plaque levels in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), frontoparietal cortex (FPC), dorsal and ventral hippocampus, and somatosensory cortex. To investigate 5-HT2A receptor functionality, animals were treated with the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI and head-twitch response (HTR) subsequently recorded. Expression level of the immediate early gene c-fos was measured by in situ hybridization. We found that the age-related increase in Abeta plaque burden was accompanied by a significant decrease in 5-HT2A receptor binding in mPFC in the 11-month-old group. The changes in 5-HT2A receptor binding correlated negatively with [11C]-PIB binding and were not accompanied by decreases in SERT binding. Correspondingly, 11-month-old transgenic mice showed diminished DOI-induced HTR and reduced increase in expression of c-fos mRNA in mPFC and FPC. These observations point towards a direct association between Abeta accumulation and changes in 5-HT2A receptor expression that is independent of upstream changes in the serotonergic system.

  14. Anti-amyloid treatments in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, Mamta; Kim, Kye Y

    2009-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most challenging threats to the healthcare system in society. One of the main characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology is formation of amyloid plaques from accumulation of amyloid beta peptide. The therapeutic agents that are currently available for AD including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AchEIs) and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist are focused on improving the symptoms and do not revert the progression of the disease. This limitation coupled with the burgeoning increase in the prevalence of AD and resultant impact on healthcare economics calls for more substantial treatments for AD. According to the leading amyloid hypothesis, cleavage of amyloid precursor protein to release amyloid beta peptide is the critical event in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recently treatment strategies have been focused on modifying the formation, clearance and accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid beta peptide. This article reviews different therapeutic approaches that have been investigated to target amyloid beta ranging from secretase modulators, antiaggregation agents to amyloid immunotherapy. Authors review the different novel drugs which are in clinical trials.

  15. The effect of focal brain injury on beta-amyloid plaque deposition, inflammation and synapses in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jessica M; King, Anna E; Woodhouse, Adele; Kirkcaldie, Matthew T K; Vickers, James C

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), however the effect of such neural damage on the onset and progression of beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaque pathology is not well understood. This study utilized an in vivo model of focal brain injury to examine how localized damage may acutely affect the onset and progression of Aβ plaque deposition as well as inflammatory and synaptic changes, in the APP/PS1 (APPSWE, PSEN1dE9) transgenic model of AD relative to wild-type (Wt) mice. Acute focal brain injury in 3- and 9-month-old APP/PS1 and Wt mice was induced by insertion of a needle into the somatosensory neocortex, as compared to sham surgery, and examined at 24h and 7d post-injury (PI). Focal brain injury did not induce thioflavine-S stained or (pan-Aβ antibody) MOAB-2-labeled plaques at either 24h or 7d PI in 3-month-old APP/PS1 mice or Wt mice. Nine-month-old APP/PS1 mice demonstrate cortical Aβ plaques but focal injury had no statistically significant (p>0.05) effect on thioflavine-S or MOAB-2 plaque load surrounding the injury site at 24h PI or 7d PI. There was a significant (p0.05). For both Wt and APP/PS1 mice alike, synaptophysin puncta near the injury site were significantly reduced 24h PI (compared to sites distant to the injury and the corresponding area in sham mice; p0.05). There was no significant effect of genotype on this response (p>0.05). These results indicate that focal brain injury and the associated microglial response do not acutely alter Aβ plaque deposition in the APP/PS1 mouse model. Furthermore the current study demonstrated that the brains of both Wt and APP/PS1 mice are capable of recovering lost synaptophysin immunoreactivity post-injury, the latter in the presence of Aβ plaque pathology that causes synaptic degeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes increases amyloid plaque deposition in AD transgenic mice through modulating AGEs/RAGE/NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Yu, Song; Hu, Jiang-Ping; Wang, Chun-Yan; Wang, Yue; Liu, Hai-Xing; Liu, Yu-Li

    2014-08-01

    An increasing number of studies have demonstrated of that diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with an increased prevalence of Alzheimer disease (AD), the underlying mechanisms are still obscure. We developed a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic AD transgenic mouse model and evaluated the effect of hyperglycemia on senile plaque formation. Our data showed that administration of STZ increased the level of blood glucose and increased the advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in brain tissue, and further enhanced the expression levels of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in the brain, and accelerated the senile plaque formation in the transgenic mice. Our results showed that STZ-induced insulin-deficient hyperglycemia caused the pathophysiology of AD in APP/PS1 transgenic mice by modulating the AGEs/RAGE/NF-κB pathway. Our study suggests that there is a close linkage of DM and cerebral amyloidosis in the pathogenesis of AD.

  17. The 5XFAD Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease Exhibits an Age-Dependent Increase in Anti-Ceramide IgG and Exogenous Administration of Ceramide Further Increases Anti-Ceramide Titers and Amyloid Plaque Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkins, Michael B; Dasgupta, Somsankar; Wang, Guanghu; Zhu, Gu; He, Qian; Kong, Ji Na; Bieberich, Erhard

    2015-01-01

    We present evidence that 5XFAD Alzheimer's disease model mice develop an age-dependent increase in antibodies against ceramide, suggesting involvement of autoimmunity against ceramide in Alzheimer's disease pathology. To test this, we increased serum anti-ceramide IgG (2-fold) by ceramide administration and analyzed amyloid plaque formation in 5XFAD mice. There were no differences in soluble or total amyloid-β levels. However, females receiving ceramide had increased plaque burden (number, area, and size) compared to controls. Ceramide-treated mice showed an increase of serum exosomes (up to 3-fold using Alix as marker), suggesting that systemic anti-ceramide IgG and exosome levels are correlated with enhanced plaque formation.

  18. GMP-compliant automated synthesis of [{sup 18}F]AV-45 (Florbetapir F 18) for imaging {beta}-amyloid plaques in human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, C.-H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Lin, K.-J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Weng, C.-C. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, I.-T. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Ting, Y.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Yen, T.-C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Jan, T.-R. [Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Skovronsky, Daniel [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, M.-P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Wey, S.-P., E-mail: spwey@mail.cgu.edu.t [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2010-12-15

    We report herein the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant automated synthesis of {sup 18}F-labeled styrylpyridine, AV-45 (Florbetapir), a novel tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. [{sup 18}F]AV-45 was prepared in 105 min using a tosylate precursor with Sumitomo modules for radiosynthesis under GMP-compliant conditions. The overall yield was 25.4{+-}7.7% with a final radiochemical purity of 95.3{+-}2.2% (n=19). The specific activity of [{sup 18}F]AV-45 reached as high as 470{+-}135 TBq/mmol (n=19). The present studies show that [{sup 18}F]AV-45 can be manufactured under GMP-compliant conditions and could be widely available for routine clinical use.

  19. Alterations in Cerebral Cortical Glucose and Glutamine Metabolism Precedes Amyloid Plaques in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens V; Christensen, Sofie K; Aldana, Blanca I

    2017-01-01

    by mass spectrometry. The ATP synthesis rate of isolated whole-brain mitochondria was assessed by an on-line luciferin-luciferase assay. Significantly increased (13)C labeling of intracellular lactate and alanine and decreased tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity were observed from cerebral cortical...... rate tended to be decreased in isolated whole-brain mitochondria of APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. Thus, several cerebral metabolic changes are evident in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mouse prior to amyloid plaque deposition, including altered glucose metabolism, hampered glutamine processing and mitochondrial......Alterations in brain energy metabolism have been suggested to be of fundamental importance for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, specific changes in brain energetics in the early stages of AD are poorly known. The aim of this study was to investigate cerebral energy metabolism...

  20. GMP-compliant automated synthesis of [18F]AV-45 (Florbetapir F 18) for imaging β-amyloid plaques in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, C.-H.; Lin, K.-J.; Weng, C.-C.; Hsiao, I.-T.; Ting, Y.-S.; Yen, T.-C.; Jan, T.-R.; Skovronsky, Daniel; Kung, M.-P.; Wey, S.-P.

    2010-01-01

    We report herein the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant automated synthesis of 18 F-labeled styrylpyridine, AV-45 (Florbetapir), a novel tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. [ 18 F]AV-45 was prepared in 105 min using a tosylate precursor with Sumitomo modules for radiosynthesis under GMP-compliant conditions. The overall yield was 25.4±7.7% with a final radiochemical purity of 95.3±2.2% (n=19). The specific activity of [ 18 F]AV-45 reached as high as 470±135 TBq/mmol (n=19). The present studies show that [ 18 F]AV-45 can be manufactured under GMP-compliant conditions and could be widely available for routine clinical use.

  1. A new molecular model for Congo Red-β amyloid interaction: implications for diagnosis and inhibition of brain plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kristine A.; Li, Yat

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), an age-related neurodegenerative disorder, is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. One strong pathological indicator of AD is senile plaques, which are aggregates of fibrils formed from amyloid β (Aβ) peptides. Thus, detection and inhibition of Aβ aggregation are critical for the prevention and treatment of AD. Congo red (CR) is one of the most widely used dye molecules for probing as well as inhabiting Aβ aggregation. However, the nature of interaction between CR and Aβ is not well understood. In this research, we systematically studied the interaction between CR and Aβ using a combination of optical techniques, including electronic absorption, fluorescence, Raman scattering, and circular dichroism, to provide detailed information with molecular specificity and high sensitivity. Compared to CR alone, interaction of the dye with Aβ results in a new absorption peak near 540 nm and significantly enhanced photoluminescence as well as Raman signal. Our results led us to propose a new model suggesting that CR exists primarily in a micellar form, resembling H-aggregates, in water and dissociates into monomers upon interaction with Aβ. This model has significant implications for the development of new strategies to detect and inhibit brain plaques for treatment of neurological diseases like AD.

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of 1-(4-[¹⁸F]fluoroethyl)-7-(4'-methyl)curcumin with improved brain permeability for β-amyloid plaque imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Iljung; Yang, Jehoon; Lee, Jung Hee; Choe, Yearn Seong

    2011-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the brain. We previously developed [(18)F]fluoropropylcurcumin ([(18)F]FP-curcumin), which demonstrated excellent binding affinity (K(i)=0.07 nM) for Aβ(1-40) aggregates and good pharmacokinetics in normal mouse brains. However, its initial brain uptake was poor (0.52% ID/g at 2 min post-injection). Therefore, in the present study, fluorine-substituted 4,4'-bissubstituted or pegylated curcumin derivatives were synthesized and evaluated. Their binding affinities for Aβ(1-42) aggregates were measured and 1-(4-fluoroethyl)-7-(4'-methyl)curcumin (1) had the highest binding affinity (K(i)=2.12 nM). Fluorescence staining of Tg APP/PS-1 mouse brain sections demonstrated high and specific labeling of Aβ plaques by 1 in the cortex region, which was confirmed with thioflavin-S staining of the same spots in the adjacent brain sections. Radioligand [(18)F]1 was found to have an appropriate partition coefficient (logP(o/w)=2.40), and its tissue distribution in normal mice demonstrated improved brain permeability (1.44% ID/g at 2 min post-injection) compared to that of [(18)F]FP-curcumin by a factor of 2.8 and fast wash-out from mouse brains (0.45% ID/g at 30 min post-injection). These results suggest that [(18)F]1 may hold promise as a PET radioligand for Aβ plaque imaging. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Astrocytosis precedes amyloid plaque deposition in Alzheimer APPswe transgenic mouse brain: a correlative positron emission tomography and in vitro imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Ni, Ruiqing; Gulyás, Balázs; Tóth, Miklós; Häggkvist, Jenny; Halldin, Christer; Voytenko, Larysa; Marutle, Amelia; Nordberg, Agneta

    2015-06-01

    Pathological studies suggest that neuroinflammation is exacerbated by increased beta-amyloid (Aβ) levels in the brain early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The time course and relationships between astrocytosis and Aβ deposition were examined using multitracer in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in an AD transgenic mouse model, followed by postmortem autoradiography and immunohistochemistry analysis. PET imaging with the amyloid plaque tracer (11)C-AZD2184 and the astroglial tracer (11)C-deuterium-L-deprenyl ((11)C-DED) was carried out in APPswe mice aged 6, 8-15 and 18-24 months (4-6 animals/group) and in wild-type (wt) mice aged 8-15 and 18-24 months (3-6 animals/group). Tracer uptake was quantified by region of interest analysis using PMOD software and a 3-D digital mouse brain atlas. Postmortem brain tissues from the same APPswe and wt mice in all age groups were analysed for Aβ deposition and astrocytosis by in vitro autoradiography using (3)H-AZD2184, (3)H-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and (3)H-L-deprenyl and immunostaining performed with antibodies for Aβ42 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in sagittal brain sections. (11)C-AZD2184 PET retention in the cerebral cortices of APPswe mice was significantly higher at 18-24 months than in age-matched wt mice. Cortical and hippocampal (11)C-DED PET binding was significantly higher at 6 months than at 8-15 months or 18-24 months in APPswe mice, and it was also higher than at 8-15 months in wt mice. In vitro autoradiography (3)H-AZD2184 and (3)H-PIB binding confirmed the in vivo findings with (11)C-AZD2184 and demonstrated age-dependent increases in Aβ deposition in APPswe cortex and hippocampus. There were no significant differences between APPswe and wt mice in (3)H-L-deprenyl autoradiography binding across age groups. Immunohistochemical quantification demonstrated more Aβ42 deposits in the cortex and hippocampus and more GFAP(+) reactive astrocytes in the hippocampus at 18-24 months than

  5. Astrocytosis precedes amyloid plaque deposition in Alzheimer APPswe transgenic mouse brain: a correlative positron emission tomography and in vitro imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Ni, Ruiqing; Voytenko, Larysa; Marutle, Amelia [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Centre for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Gulyas, Balazs; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Nanyang Technological University, NTU - Imperial College, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Singapore (Singapore); Toth, Miklos; Haeggkvist, Jenny [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Centre for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-04-17

    Pathological studies suggest that neuroinflammation is exacerbated by increased beta-amyloid (Aβ) levels in the brain early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The time course and relationships between astrocytosis and Aβ deposition were examined using multitracer in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in an AD transgenic mouse model, followed by postmortem autoradiography and immunohistochemistry analysis. PET imaging with the amyloid plaque tracer {sup 11}C-AZD2184 and the astroglial tracer {sup 11}C-deuterium-L-deprenyl ({sup 11}C-DED) was carried out in APPswe mice aged 6, 8-15 and 18-24 months (4-6 animals/group) and in wild-type (wt) mice aged 8-15 and 18-24 months (3-6 animals/group). Tracer uptake was quantified by region of interest analysis using PMOD software and a 3-D digital mouse brain atlas. Postmortem brain tissues from the same APPswe and wt mice in all age groups were analysed for Aβ deposition and astrocytosis by in vitro autoradiography using {sup 3}H-AZD2184, {sup 3}H-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and {sup 3}H-L-deprenyl and immunostaining performed with antibodies for Aβ{sub 42} and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in sagittal brain sections. {sup 11}C-AZD2184 PET retention in the cerebral cortices of APPswe mice was significantly higher at 18-24 months than in age-matched wt mice. Cortical and hippocampal {sup 11}C-DED PET binding was significantly higher at 6 months than at 8-15 months or 18-24 months in APPswe mice, and it was also higher than at 8-15 months in wt mice. In vitro autoradiography {sup 3}H-AZD2184 and {sup 3}H-PIB binding confirmed the in vivo findings with {sup 11}C-AZD2184 and demonstrated age-dependent increases in Aβ deposition in APPswe cortex and hippocampus. There were no significant differences between APPswe and wt mice in {sup 3}H-L-deprenyl autoradiography binding across age groups. Immunohistochemical quantification demonstrated more Aβ{sub 42} deposits in the cortex and hippocampus and more

  6. Neuroinflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis affects amyloid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anckarsäter Henrik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP and β-amyloid (Aβ is widely studied in Alzheimer's disease, where Aβ deposition and plaque development are essential components of the pathogenesis. However, the physiological role of amyloid in the adult nervous system remains largely unknown. We have previously found altered cerebral amyloid metabolism in other neuroinflammatory conditions. To further elucidate this, we investigated amyloid metabolism in patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB. Methods The first part of the study was a cross-sectional cohort study in 61 patients with acute facial palsy (19 with LNB and 42 with idiopathic facial paresis, Bell's palsy and 22 healthy controls. CSF was analysed for the β-amyloid peptides Aβ38, Aβ40 and Aβ42, and the amyloid precursor protein (APP isoforms α-sAPP and β-sAPP. CSF total-tau (T-tau, phosphorylated tau (P-tau and neurofilament protein (NFL were measured to monitor neural cell damage. The second part of the study was a prospective cohort-study in 26 LNB patients undergoing consecutive lumbar punctures before and after antibiotic treatment to study time-dependent dynamics of the biomarkers. Results In the cross-sectional study, LNB patients had lower levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau, and higher levels of CSF NFL than healthy controls and patients with Bell's palsy. In the prospective study, LNB patients had low levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau at baseline, which all increased towards normal at follow-up. Conclusions Amyloid metabolism is altered in LNB. CSF levels of α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau are decreased in acute infection and increase after treatment. In combination with earlier findings in multiple sclerosis, cerebral SLE and HIV with cerebral engagement, this points to an influence of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism.

  7. Amyloid Beta Mediates Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Osta, Ana; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes sequential cleavages to generate various polypeptides, including the amyloid [beta] (1-42) peptide (A[beta][1-42]), which is believed to play a major role in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide evidence that, in contrast with its pathological role when accumulated,…

  8. Effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone on sleep and brain interstitial fluid amyloid-β in an APP transgenic mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Fan; Zhang, Tony J.; Mahan, Thomas E.; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by impairment of cognitive function, extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, and synaptic and neuronal loss. There is substantial evidence that the aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain plays a key role in the pathogenesis of AD and that Aβ aggregation is a concentration dependent process. Recently, it was found that Aβ levels in the brain interstitial fluid (ISF) are regulated by the sle...

  9. Silymarin effect on amyloidplaque accumulation and gene expression of APP in an Alzheimer’s disease rat model

    OpenAIRE

    Yaghmaei, Parichehreh; Azarfar, Katia; Dezfulian, Mehrooz; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh

    2014-01-01

    Background The deposition of amyloid peptides is associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). These amyloid peptides are derived from the amyloid protein precursor (APP). Silymarin, a standardized extract of milk thistle, which is currently used in liver diseases, may be effective in the inhibition of amyloid formation. However, its effect has not been assessed on APP expression. Results In this study, first, the effect of silymarin was examined on the passive avoidance learning in a rat model o...

  10. Amyloid Plaques in Retina for Diagnosis in Alzheimer’s patients: unsatisfactory results from a mata-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangling Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Detection of retinal β-amyloid (Aβ peptide accumulation is a novel diagnostic method for Alzheimer’s disease (AD, but there is, as yet, no conclusive evidence of its accuracy.Aim: To identify the diagnostic accuracy of pathological retinal Aβ detection for AD by a meta-analytic approach.Methods: Electronic and reference searches were conducted to identify studies related to the diagnostic effects of retinal Aβ detection in AD that met pre-defined inclusion criteria. The QUADAS-2 tool was employed to assess the risk of bias, and Review Manager plus the Open Meta-Analyst were used to perform the data analysis.Results: From 493 unduplicated reports, five studies with small sample sizes were included in this review. Six staining methods were employed. The eligible studies showed extremely broad ranges of sensitivity (0 to 1.00 and specificity (0.50 to 1.00 with substantial heterogeneity. The estimates of positive likelihood ratio (PLR, negative likelihood ratio (NLR, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR were also extremely varied (from 0.71 to 11.57 for PLR, from 0.04 to 1.11 for NLR, and from 0.69 to 297.00 for DOR.Conclusions: The limited number of eligible studies and their methodological heterogeneity make it impossible to come to a conclusion whether pathological retinal Aβ detection is an effective diagnostic tool for AD. More studies, especially large surveys investigating retina Aβ load with quantitative methods among consecutive or random samples, are needed to determine the accuracy of Aβ detection for diagnosing AD.

  11. A carrier for non-covalent delivery of functional beta-galactosidase and antibodies against amyloid plaques and IgM to the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobinda Sarkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapeutic intervention of numerous brain-associated disorders currently remains unrealized due to serious limitations imposed by the blood-brain-barrier (BBB. The BBB generally allows transport of small molecules, typically <600 daltons with high octanol/water partition coefficients, but denies passage to most larger molecules. However, some receptors present on the BBB allow passage of cognate proteins to the brain. Utilizing such receptor-ligand systems, several investigators have developed methods for delivering proteins to the brain, a critical requirement of which involves covalent linking of the target protein to a carrier entity. Such covalent modifications involve extensive preparative and post-preparative chemistry that poses daunting limitations in the context of delivery to any organ. Here, we report creation of a 36-amino acid peptide transporter, which can transport a protein to the brain after routine intravenous injection of the transporter-protein mixture. No covalent linkage of the protein with the transporter is necessary. APPROACH: A peptide transporter comprising sixteen lysine residues and 20 amino acids corresponding to the LDLR-binding domain of apolipoprotein E (ApoE was synthesized. Transport of beta-galactosidase, IgG, IgM, and antibodies against amyloid plques to the brain upon iv injection of the protein-transporter mixture was evaluated through staining for enzyme activity or micro single photon emission tomography (micro-SPECT or immunostaining. Effect of the transporter on the integrity of the BBB was also investigated. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The transporter enabled delivery to the mouse brain of functional beta-galactosidase, human IgG and IgM, and two antibodies that labeled brain-associated amyloid beta plaques in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest the transporter is able to transport most or all proteins to the brain without the need for chemically linking the

  12. Using bacterial inclusion bodies to screen for amyloid aggregation inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42) is the main component of the inter-neuronal amyloid plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The mechanism by which Aβ42 and other amyloid peptides assemble into insoluble neurotoxic deposits is still not completely understood and multiple factors have been reported to trigger their formation. In particular, the presence of endogenous metal ions has been linked to the pathogenesis of AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. Results Here we describe a rapid and high-throughput screening method to identify molecules able to modulate amyloid aggregation. The approach exploits the inclusion bodies (IBs) formed by Aβ42 when expressed in bacteria. We have shown previously that these aggregates retain amyloid structural and functional properties. In the present work, we demonstrate that their in vitro refolding is selectively sensitive to the presence of aggregation-promoting metal ions, allowing the detection of inhibitors of metal-promoted amyloid aggregation with potential therapeutic interest. Conclusions Because IBs can be produced at high levels and easily purified, the method overcomes one of the main limitations in screens to detect amyloid modulators: the use of expensive and usually highly insoluble synthetic peptides. PMID:22553999

  13. The pathogenesis of Randall's plaque: a papilla cartography of Ca compounds through an ex vivo investigation based on XANES spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Xavier; Bazin, Dominique; Jungers, Paul; Reguer, Solenn; Thiaudière, Dominique; Daudon, Michel

    2010-05-01

    At the surface of attached kidney stones, a particular deposit termed Randall's plaque (RP) serves as a nucleus. This structural particularity as well as other major public health problems such as diabetes type-2 may explain the dramatic increase in urolithiasis now affecting up to 20% of the population in the industrialized countries. Regarding the chemical composition, even if other phosphate phases such as whitlockite or brushite can be found as minor components (less than 5%), calcium phosphate apatite as well as amorphous carbonated calcium phosphate (ACCP) are the major components of most RPs. Through X-ray absorption spectroscopy performed at the Ca K-absorption edge, a technique specific to synchrotron radiation, the presence and crystallinity of the Ca phosphate phases present in RP were determined ex vivo. The sensitivity of the technique was used as well as the fact that the measurements can be performed directly on the papilla. The sample was stored in formol. Moreover, a first mapping of the chemical phase from the top of the papilla to the deep medulla is obtained. Direct structural evidence of the presence of ACCP as a major constituent is given for the first time. This set of data, coherent with previous studies, shows that this chemical phase can be considered as one precursor in the genesis of RP.

  14. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  15. Eliminating microglia in Alzheimer’s mice prevents neuronal loss without modulating amyloid-β pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Elizabeth E.; Lee, Rafael J.; Najafi, Allison R.; Rice, Rachel A.; Elmore, Monica R. P.; Blurton-Jones, Mathew; West, Brian L.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to amyloidplaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle deposition, neuroinflammation is considered a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease pathology. Inflammation in Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of reactive astrocytes and activated microglia surrounding amyloid plaques, implicating their role in disease pathogenesis. Microglia in the healthy adult mouse depend on colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) signalling for survival, and pharmacological inhibition of this receptor results in rapid elimination of nearly all of the microglia in the central nervous system. In this study, we set out to determine if chronically activated microglia in the Alzheimer's disease brain are also dependent on CSF1R signalling, and if so, how these cells contribute to disease pathogenesis. Ten-month-old 5xfAD mice were treated with a selective CSF1R inhibitor for 1 month, resulting in the elimination of ∼80% of microglia. Chronic microglial elimination does not alter amyloid-β levels or plaque load; however, it does rescue dendritic spine loss and prevent neuronal loss in 5xfAD mice, as well as reduce overall neuroinflammation. Importantly, behavioural testing revealed improvements in contextual memory. Collectively, these results demonstrate that microglia contribute to neuronal loss, as well as memory impairments in 5xfAD mice, but do not mediate or protect from amyloid pathology. PMID:26921617

  16. Amyloid and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2018-03-01

    Extracellular amyloid deposition defines a range of amyloidosis and amyloid-related disease. Addition to primary and secondary amyloidosis, amyloid-related disease can be observed in different tissue/organ that sharing the common pathogenesis based on the formation of amyloid deposition. Currently, both Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes can be diagnosed with certainly only based on the autopsy results, by which amyloidosis of the associative tissue/organ is observed. Intriguingly, since it demonstrated that amyloid deposits trigger inflammatory reaction through the activation of cascaded immune response, wherein several lines of evidence implies a protective role of amyloid in preventing autoimmunity. Furthermore, attempts for preventing amyloid formation and/or removing amyloid deposits from the brain have caused meningoencephalitis and consequent deaths among the subjects. Hence, it is important to note that amyloid positively participates in maintaining immune homeostasis and contributes to irreversible inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the interactive relationship between amyloid and the immune system, discussing the potential functional roles of amyloid in immune tolerance and homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1 Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik H Hansen

    Full Text Available One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP and presenilin-1 (PS1 are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c., or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.. In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD.

  18. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD.

  19. Amyloid beta plaque-associated proteins C1q and SAP enhance the Abeta1-42 peptide-induced cytokine secretion by adult human microglia in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerhuis, Robert; van Breemen, Mariëlle J.; Hoozemans, Jeroen M.; Morbin, Michela; Ouladhadj, Jamal; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Eikelenboom, Piet

    2003-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines released by activated microglia could be a driving force in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. We evaluated whether the presence of complement factor C1q and serum amyloid P component (SAP) in Abeta deposits is related to microglial activation. Activated microglia

  20. Beta-amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice that harbor diffuse A beta deposits but do not form plaques show increased ischemic vulnerability: role of inflammation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koistinaho, M.; Kettunen, M. I.; Goldsteins, G.; Keinänen, R.; Salminen, A.; Ort, Michael; Bureš, Jan; Liu, D.; Kauppinen, R. A.; Higgins, L. S.; Koistinaho, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 3 (2002), s. 1610-1615 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/00/1656 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Beta-amyloid * Alzheimer disease * brain ischemia Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 10.701, year: 2002

  1. On the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease: The MAM Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Area-Gomez, Estela; Schon, Eric A

    2017-03-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is currently unclear and is the subject of much debate. The most widely accepted hypothesis designed to explain AD pathogenesis is the amyloid cascade, which invokes the accumulation of extracellular plaques and intracellular tangles as playing a fundamental role in the course and progression of the disease. However, besides plaques and tangles, other biochemical and morphological features are also present in AD, often manifesting early in the course of the disease before the accumulation of plaques and tangles. These include altered calcium, cholesterol, and phospholipid metabolism; altered mitochondrial dynamics; and reduced bioenergetic function. Notably, these other features of AD are associated with functions localized to a subdomain of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), known as mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAMs). The MAM region of the ER is a lipid raft-like domain closely apposed to mitochondria in such a way that the 2 organelles are able to communicate with each other, both physically and biochemically, thereby facilitating the functions of this region. We have found that MAM-localized functions are increased significantly in cellular and animal models of AD and in cells from patients with AD in a manner consistent with the biochemical findings noted above. Based on these and other observations, we propose that increased ER-mitochondrial apposition and perturbed MAM function lie at the heart of AD pathogenesis.-Area-Gomez, E., Schon, E. A. On the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease: the MAM hypothesis. © FASEB.

  2. Vulnerable Plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center > Vulnerable Plaque Menu Topics Topics FAQs Vulnerable Plaque Article Info En español Swelling (inflammation) is your ... aging, including coronary artery disease . What is vulnerable plaque? For many years, doctors have thought that the ...

  3. In silico modeling of the specific inhibitory potential of thiophene-2,3-dihydro-1,5-benzothiazepine against BChE in the formation of β-amyloid plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalsoom Saima

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease, known to be associated with the gradual loss of memory, is characterized by low concentration of acetylcholine in the hippocampus and cortex part of the brain. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase has successfully been used as a drug target to treat Alzheimer's disease but drug resistance shown by butyrylcholinesterase remains a matter of concern in treating Alzheimer's disease. Apart from the many other reasons for Alzheimer's disease, its association with the genesis of fibrils by β-amyloid plaques is closely related to the increased activity of butyrylcholinesterase. Although few data are available on the inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase, studies have shown that that butyrylcholinesterase is a genetically validated drug target and its selective inhibition reduces the formation of β-amyloid plaques. Rationale We previously reported the inhibition of cholinesterases by 2,3-dihydro-1, 5-benzothiazepines, and considered this class of compounds as promising inhibitors for the cure of Alzheimer's disease. One compound from the same series, when substituted with a hydroxy group at C-3 in ring A and 2-thienyl moiety as ring B, showed greater activity against butyrylcholinesterase than to acetylcholinesterase. To provide insight into the binding mode of this compound (Compound A, molecular docking in combination with molecular dynamics simulation of 5000 ps in an explicit solvent system was carried out for both cholinesterases. Conclusion Molecular docking studies revealed that the potential of Compound A to inhibit cholinesterases was attributable to the cumulative effects of strong hydrogen bonds, cationic-π, π-π interactions and hydrophobic interactions. A comparison of the docking results of Compound A against both cholinesterases showed that amino acid residues in different sub-sites were engaged to stabilize the docked complex. The relatively high affinity of Compound A for butyrylcholinesterase was

  4. Prevalence of amyloid PET positivity in dementia syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Jansen, Willemijn J; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Amyloid-β positron emission tomography (PET) imaging allows in vivo detection of fibrillar plaques, a core neuropathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Its diagnostic utility is still unclear because amyloid plaques also occur in patients with non-AD dementia. OBJECTIVE: To us...

  5. Stabilization of a β-hairpin in monomeric Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide inhibits amyloid formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Wolfgang; Grönwall, Caroline; Jonsson, Andreas; Ståhl, Stefan; Härd, Torleif

    2008-01-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is triggered by the oligomerization and aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into protein plaques. Formation of the potentially toxic oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ assemblies is accompanied by a conformational change toward a high content of β-structure. Here, we report the solution structure of Aβ(1–40) in complex with the phage-display selected affibody protein ZAβ3, a binding protein of nanomolar affinity. Bound Aβ(1–40) features a β-hairpin comprising residues 17–36, providing the first high-resolution structure of Aβ in β conformation. The positions of the secondary structure elements strongly resemble those observed for fibrillar Aβ. ZAβ3 stabilizes the β-sheet by extending it intermolecularly and by burying both of the mostly nonpolar faces of the Aβ hairpin within a large hydrophobic tunnel-like cavity. Consequently, ZAβ3 acts as a stoichiometric inhibitor of Aβ fibrillation. The selected Aβ conformation allows us to suggest a structural mechanism for amyloid formation based on soluble oligomeric hairpin intermediates. PMID:18375754

  6. Involvement of Macrophages in the Pathogenesis of Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy and Efficacy of Human iPS Cell-Derived Macrophages in Its Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genki Suenaga

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that tissue-resident macrophages in familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP patients will exhibit qualitative or quantitative abnormalities, that may accelerate transthyretin (TTR-derived amyloid deposition. To evaluate this, we examined the number and subset of tissue-resident macrophages in heart tissue from amyloid-deposited FAP and control patients. In both FAP and control patients, tissue-resident macrophages in heart tissue were all Iba+/CD163+/CD206+ macrophages. However, the number of macrophages was significantly decreased in FAP patients compared with control patients. Furthermore, the proportion of intracellular TTR in CD14+ monocytes was reduced in peripheral blood compared with healthy donors. Based on these results, we next examined degradation and endocytosis of TTR in human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cell-derived myeloid lineage cells (MLs, which function like macrophages. iPS-MLs express CD163 and CD206, and belong to the inhibitory macrophage category. In addition, iPS-MLs degrade both native and aggregated TTR in a cell-dependent manner in vitro. Further, iPS-MLs endocytose aggregated, and especially polymerized, TTR. These results suggest that decreased tissue-localized macrophages disrupt clearance of TTR-derived amyloid deposits, leading to progression of a pathological condition in FAP patients. To improve this situation, clinical application of pluripotent stem cell-derived MLs may be useful as an approach for FAP therapy.

  7. Micro-MRI study of cerebral aging: ex vivo detection of hippocampal sub-field reorganization, micro-hemorrhages and amyloid plaques in mouse lemur primates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, Anne; Petiet, Alexandra; Dhenain, Marc; Pasquier, Adrien; Kraska, Audrey; Joseph-Mathurin, Nelly; Wiggins, Christopher; Aujard, Fabienne; Mestre-Frances, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    Mouse lemurs are non-human primate models of cerebral aging and neuro-degeneration. Much smaller than other primates, they recapitulate numerous features of human brain aging, including progressive cerebral atrophy and correlation between regional atrophy and cognitive impairments. Characterization of brain atrophy in mouse lemurs has been done by MRI measures of regional CSF volume and by MRI measures of regional atrophy. Here, we further characterize mouse lemur brain aging using ex vivo MR microscopy (31 μm in-plane resolution). First, we performed a non-biased, direct volumetric quantification of dentate gyrus and extended Ammon's horn. We show that both dentate gyrus and Ammon's horn undergo an age-related reorganization leading to a growth of the dentate gyrus and an atrophy of the Ammon's horn, even in the absence of global hippocampal atrophy. Second, on these first MR microscopic images of the mouse lemur brain, we depicted cortical and hippocampal hypointense spots. We demonstrated that their incidence increases with aging and that they correspond either to amyloid deposits or to cerebral micro-hemorrhages. (authors)

  8. Overexpression of heparanase lowers the amyloid burden in amyloid-β precursor protein transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendresen, Charlotte B; Cui, Hao; Zhang, Xiao; Vlodavsky, Israel; Nilsson, Lars N G; Li, Jin-Ping

    2015-02-20

    Heparan sulfate (HS) and HS proteoglycans (HSPGs) colocalize with amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits in Alzheimer disease brain and in Aβ precursor protein (AβPP) transgenic mouse models. Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that specifically degrades the unbranched glycosaminoglycan side chains of HSPGs. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that HS and HSPGs are active participators of Aβ pathogenesis in vivo. We therefore generated a double-transgenic mouse model overexpressing both human heparanase and human AβPP harboring the Swedish mutation (tgHpa*Swe). Overexpression of heparanase did not affect AβPP processing because the steady-state levels of Aβ1-40, Aβ1-42, and soluble AβPP β were the same in 2- to 3-month-old double-transgenic tgHpa*Swe and single-transgenic tgSwe mice. In contrast, the Congo red-positive amyloid burden was significantly lower in 15-month-old tgHpa*Swe brain than in tgSwe brain. Likewise, the Aβ burden, measured by Aβx-40 and Aβx-42 immunohistochemistry, was reduced significantly in tgHpa*Swe brain. The intensity of HS-stained plaques correlated with the Aβx-42 burden and was reduced in tgHpa*Swe mice. Moreover, the HS-like molecule heparin facilitated Aβ1-42-aggregation in an in vitro Thioflavin T assay. The findings suggest that HSPGs contribute to amyloid deposition in tgSwe mice by increasing Aβ fibril formation because heparanase-induced fragmentation of HS led to a reduced amyloid burden. Therefore, drugs interfering with Aβ-HSPG interactions might be a potential strategy for Alzheimer disease treatment. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Peripheral administration of the soluble TNF inhibitor XPro1595 modifies brain immune cell profiles, decreases beta-amyloid plaque load, and rescues impaired long-term potentiation in 5xFAD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Kathryn P; Sompol, Pradoldej; Kannarkat, George T; Chang, Jianjun; Sniffen, Lindsey; Wildner, Mary E; Norris, Christopher M; Tansey, Malú G

    2017-06-01

    Clinical and animal model studies have implicated inflammation and peripheral immune cell responses in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Peripheral immune cells including T cells circulate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy adults and are found in the brains of AD patients and AD rodent models. Blocking entry of peripheral macrophages into the CNS was reported to increase amyloid burden in an AD mouse model. To assess inflammation in the 5xFAD (Tg) mouse model, we first quantified central and immune cell profiles in the deep cervical lymph nodes and spleen. In the brains of Tg mice, activated (MHCII + , CD45 high , and Ly6C high ) myeloid-derived CD11b + immune cells are decreased while CD3 + T cells are increased as a function of age relative to non-Tg mice. These immunological changes along with evidence of increased mRNA levels for several cytokines suggest that immune regulation and trafficking patterns are altered in Tg mice. Levels of soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor (sTNF) modulate blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and are increased in CSF and brain parenchyma post-mortem in AD subjects and Tg mice. We report here that in vivo peripheral administration of XPro1595, a novel biologic that sequesters sTNF into inactive heterotrimers, reduced the age-dependent increase in activated immune cells in Tg mice, while decreasing the overall number of CD4 + T cells. In addition, XPro1595 treatment in vivo rescued impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) measured in brain slices in association with decreased Aβ plaques in the subiculum. Selective targeting of sTNF may modulate brain immune cell infiltration, and prevent or delay neuronal dysfunction in AD. Immune cells and cytokines perform specialized functions inside and outside the brain to maintain optimal brain health; but the extent to which their activities change in response to neuronal dysfunction and degeneration is not well understood. Our findings indicate that neutralization of s

  10. Microglia, neuroinflammation, and beta-amyloid protein in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhiyou; Hussain, M Delwar; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Compelling evidence from basic molecular biology has demonstrated the dual roles of microglia in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). On one hand, microglia are involved in AD pathogenesis by releasing inflammatory mediators such as inflammatory cytokines, complement components, chemokines, and free radicals that are all known to contribute to beta-amyloid (Aβ) production and accumulation. On the other hand, microglia are also known to play a beneficial role in generating anti-Aβ antibodies and stimulating clearance of amyloid plaques. Aβ itself, an inducer of microglia activation and neuroinflammation, has been considered as an underlying and unifying factor in the development of AD. A vicious cycle of inflammation has been formed between Aβ accumulation, activated microglia, and microglial inflammatory mediators, which enhance Aβ deposition and neuroinflammation. Thus, inhibiting the vicious cycle seems to be a promising treatment to restrain further development of AD. With increasing research efforts on microglia in AD, intervention of microglia activation and neuroinflammation in AD may provide a potential target for AD therapy in spite of the provisional failure of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in clinical trials.

  11. Amyloid structure exhibits polymorphism on multiple length scales in human brain tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiliang; Costantino, Isabel; Venugopalan, Nagarajan; Fischetti, Robert F.; Hyman, Bradley; Frosch, Matthew; Gomez-Isla, Teresa; Makowski, Lee

    2016-09-15

    Although aggregation of Aβ amyloid fibrils into plaques in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), the correlation between amyloid burden and severity of symptoms is weak. One possible reason is that amyloid fibrils are structurally polymorphic and different polymorphs may contribute differentially to disease. However, the occurrence and distribution of amyloid polymorphisms in human brain is poorly documented. Here we seek to fill this knowledge gap by using X-ray microdiffraction of histological sections of human tissue to map the abundance, orientation and structural heterogeneities of amyloid within individual plaques; among proximal plaques and in subjects with distinct clinical histories. A 5 µ x-ray beam was used to generate diffraction data with each pattern arising from a scattering volume of only ~ 450 µ3 , making possible collection of dozens to hundreds of diffraction patterns from a single amyloid plaque. X-ray scattering from these samples exhibited all the properties expected for scattering from amyloid. Amyloid distribution was mapped using the intensity of its signature 4.7 Å reflection which also provided information on the orientation of amyloid fibrils across plaques. Margins of plaques exhibited a greater degree of orientation than cores and orientation around blood vessels frequently appeared tangential. Variation in the structure of Aβ fibrils is reflected in the shape of the 4.7 Å peak which usually appears as a doublet. Variations in this peak correspond to differences between the structure of amyloid within cores of plaques and at their periphery. Examination of tissue from a mismatch case - an individual with high plaque burden but no overt signs of dementia at time of death - revealed a diversity of structure and spatial distribution of amyloid that is distinct from typical AD cases. We demonstrate the existence of structural polymorphisms among amyloid within and among plaques of a single individual and suggest

  12. Binding Sites for Amyloid-β Oligomers and Synaptic Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Levi M.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), insoluble and fibrillary amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide accumulates in plaques. However, soluble Aβ oligomers are most potent in creating synaptic dysfunction and loss. Therefore, receptors for Aβ oligomers are hypothesized to be the first step in a neuronal cascade leading to dementia. A number of cell-surface proteins have been described as Aβ binding proteins, and one or more are likely to mediate Aβ oligomer toxicity in AD. Cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a high-affinity Aβ oligomer binding site, and a range of data delineates a signaling pathway leading from Aβ complexation with PrPC to neuronal impairment. Further study of Aβ binding proteins will define the molecular basis of this crucial step in AD pathogenesis. PMID:27940601

  13. Small-Animal PET Imaging of Amyloid-Beta Plaques with [11C]PiB and Its Multi-Modal Validation in an APP/PS1 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manook, André; Yousefi, Behrooz H.; Willuweit, Antje; Platzer, Stefan; Reder, Sybille; Voss, Andreas; Huisman, Marc; Settles, Markus; Neff, Frauke; Velden, Joachim; Schoor, Michael; von der Kammer, Heinz; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus

    2012-01-01

    In vivo imaging and quantification of amyloidplaque (Aβ) burden in small-animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a valuable tool for translational research such as developing specific imaging markers and monitoring new therapy approaches. Methodological constraints such as image resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) and lack of suitable AD models have limited the feasibility of PET in mice. In this study, we evaluated a feasible protocol for PET imaging of Aβ in mouse brain with [11C]PiB and specific activities commonly used in human studies. In vivo mouse brain MRI for anatomical reference was acquired with a clinical 1.5 T system. A recently characterized APP/PS1 mouse was employed to measure Aβ at different disease stages in homozygous and hemizygous animals. We performed multi-modal cross-validations for the PET results with ex vivo and in vitro methodologies, including regional brain biodistribution, multi-label digital autoradiography, protein quantification with ELISA, fluorescence microscopy, semi-automated histological quantification and radioligand binding assays. Specific [11C]PiB uptake in individual brain regions with Aβ deposition was demonstrated and validated in all animals of the study cohort including homozygous AD animals as young as nine months. Corresponding to the extent of Aβ pathology, old homozygous AD animals (21 months) showed the highest uptake followed by old hemizygous (23 months) and young homozygous mice (9 months). In all AD age groups the cerebellum was shown to be suitable as an intracerebral reference region. PET results were cross-validated and consistent with all applied ex vivo and in vitro methodologies. The results confirm that the experimental setup for non-invasive [11C]PiB imaging of Aβ in the APP/PS1 mice provides a feasible, reproducible and robust protocol for small-animal Aβ imaging. It allows longitudinal imaging studies with follow-up periods of approximately one and a half years and

  14. Specific Triazine Herbicides Induce Amyloid-beta(42) Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portelius, Erik; Durieu, Emilie; Bodin, Marion; Cam, Morgane; Pannee, Josef; Leuxe, Charlotte; Mabondzo, Aloise; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Herve; Lee, Jung Yeol; Chang, Young-Tae; Stuber, Kathrin; Koch, Philipp; Fontaine, Gaelle; Potier, Marie-Claude; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Garbis, Spiros D.; Covaci, Adrian; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter; Karg, Frank; Flajolet, Marc; Omori, Chiori; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Meijer, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid-beta protein precursor (A beta PP) ecretases leads to extracellular release of amyloid-beta (A beta) peptides. Increased production of A beta(42) over A beta(40) and aggregation into oligomers and plaques constitute an Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmark.

  15. What is the role of amyloid precursor protein dimerization?

    OpenAIRE

    Khalifa, Naouel Ben; Van Hees, Joanne; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Huysseune, Sandra; Smith, Steven O.; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Octave, Jean-Noël; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Extensive research efforts have been conducted over the past decades to understand the processing of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP). APP cleavage leads to the production of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta), which is the major constituent of the amyloid core of senile plaques found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Abeta is produced by the sequential cleavage of APP by beta- and gamma-secretases. Cleavage of APP by gamma-secretase also generates the APP Intracellula...

  16. Microglia in diffuse plaques in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (Dutch). An immunohistochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maat-Schieman, M. L.; Rozemuller, A. J.; van Duinen, S. G.; Haan, J.; Eikelenboom, P.; Roos, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    In hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (Dutch) (HCHWA-D) beta/A4 amyloid deposition is found in meningocortical blood vessels and in diffuse plaques in the cerebral cortex. Diffuse plaques putatively represent early stages in the formation of senile plaques. Microglia are intimately

  17. Evolutionary perspectives on amyloid and inflammatory features of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C E; Marchalonis, J J

    1996-01-01

    We propose that the amyloid deposits in senile plaques of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) result from ancient mechanisms in wound-healing and inflammatory processes that preceded the evolution of the inducible combinatorial immune responses characteristic of jawed vertebrates. AD plaques are unlike active plaques in MS, because antibodies, T-cells and, B cells are not conspicuous components of senile plaques or other loci of degeneration. However, senile plaques contain amyloids and other inflammatory proteins of ancient origin that appear to be made by local brain cells, including neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. We describe a highly conserved 16-mer found in pentrakins from mammals and from the horseshoe crab. The senile plaque thus provides a novel opportunity to study primitive features of complement-mediated inflammatory responses in the absence of immunoglobulins.

  18. Oxidative stress and the amyloid beta peptide in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cheignon

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. In particular, it is linked to the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, an age-related neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Histopathological hallmarks of AD are intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular formation of senile plaques composed of the amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ in aggregated form along with metal-ions such as copper, iron or zinc. Redox active metal ions, as for example copper, can catalyze the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS when bound to the amyloid-β (Aβ. The ROS thus produced, in particular the hydroxyl radical which is the most reactive one, may contribute to oxidative damage on both the Aβ peptide itself and on surrounding molecule (proteins, lipids, …. This review highlights the existing link between oxidative stress and AD, and the consequences towards the Aβ peptide and surrounding molecules in terms of oxidative damage. In addition, the implication of metal ions in AD, their interaction with the Aβ peptide and redox properties leading to ROS production are discussed, along with both in vitro and in vivo oxidation of the Aβ peptide, at the molecular level. Keywords: Oxidative stress, Amyloid beta peptide, Metal-ions, Reactive oxygen species, Oxidative damages

  19. Recent Development of Bifunctional Small Molecules to Study Metal-Amyloid-β Species in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J. Braymer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease related to the deposition of aggregated amyloid-β (Aβ peptides in the brain. It has been proposed that metal ion dyshomeostasis and miscompartmentalization contribute to AD progression, especially as metal ions (e.g., Cu(II and Zn(II found in Aβ plaques of the diseased brain can bind to Aβ and be linked to aggregation and neurotoxicity. The role of metal ions in AD pathogenesis, however, is uncertain. To accelerate understanding in this area and contribute to therapeutic development, recent efforts to devise suitable chemical reagents that can target metal ions associated with Aβ have been made using rational structure-based design that combines two functions (metal chelation and Aβ interaction in the same molecule. This paper presents bifunctional compounds developed by two different design strategies (linkage or incorporation and discusses progress in their applications as chemical tools and/or potential therapeutics.

  20. [Amyloid goiter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrívó, A; Péter, I; Bánkúti, B; Péley, G; Baska, F; Besznyák, I

    1999-03-21

    Amyloid goitre is at an extremely rare occurrence. Authors review the origin of disease and its symptoms, diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The disease may be due to either primary or secondary systemic or local amyloidosis. Diagnosis may be made even before surgery on anamnestic data, on very rapid growth of thyroid glands, on diffuse appearance, on other symptoms of systemic amyloidosis, on findings of iconographic procedures and on detection of amyloid in aspirates. Final diagnosis is based on histology. Surgical therapy is aiming at avoidance of the existing and the threatening consequences of expanding mass. The outcome is independent from thyroid surgery, it is related to other manifestations of amyloidosis. Concerning with the present case the chronic superior vena cava syndrome and chylous pleural effusion as first described symptoms and asymptomatic hyperthyroxinaemia is emphasised. Neither other organ involvement, nor primary amyloidogenous molecula was found during the 18 months follow up, so patient has secondary and localised amyloidosis.

  1. Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera reverses β-amyloid1-42 induced toxicity in human neuronal cells: implications in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesava Rao Venkata Kurapati

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by progressive dysfunction of memory and higher cognitive functions with abnormal accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles throughout cortical and limbic brain regions. At present no curative treatment is available, and research focuses on drugs for slowing disease progression or providing prophylaxis. Withania somnifera (WS also known as 'ashwagandha' is used widely in Ayurvedic medicine as a nerve tonic and memory enhancer. However, there is a paucity of data on the potential neuroprotective effects of W.somnifera against β-Amyloid (1-42-induced neuropathogenesis. In the present study, we have tested the neuroprotective effects of methanol:Chloroform (3:1 extract of ashwagandha against β-amyloid induced toxicity and HIV-1Ba-L (clade B infection using a human neuronal SK-N-MC cell line. Our results showed that β-amyloid induced cytotoxic effects in SK-N-MC cells as shown by decreased cell growth when tested individually. Also, confocal microscopic analysis showed decreased spine density, loss of spines and decreased dendrite diameter, total dendrite and spine area in clade B infected SK-N-MC cells compared to uninfected cells. However, when ashwagandha was added to β-amyloid treated and HIV-1 infected samples, the toxic effects were neutralized. Further, the MTT cell viability assays and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ levels supported these observations indicating the neuroprotective effect of WS root extract against β-amyloid and HIV-1Ba-L (clade B induced neuro-pathogenesis.

  2. Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) Reverses β-Amyloid1-42 Induced Toxicity in Human Neuronal Cells: Implications in HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurapati, Kesava Rao Venkata; Atluri, Venkata Subba Rao; Samikkannu, Thangavel; Nair, Madhavan P. N.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by progressive dysfunction of memory and higher cognitive functions with abnormal accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles throughout cortical and limbic brain regions. At present no curative treatment is available, and research focuses on drugs for slowing disease progression or providing prophylaxis. Withania somnifera (WS) also known as ‘ashwagandha’ is used widely in Ayurvedic medicine as a nerve tonic and memory enhancer. However, there is a paucity of data on the potential neuroprotective effects of W.somnifera against β-Amyloid (1–42)-induced neuropathogenesis. In the present study, we have tested the neuroprotective effects of methanol:Chloroform (3:1) extract of ashwagandha against β-amyloid induced toxicity and HIV-1Ba-L (clade B) infection using a human neuronal SK-N-MC cell line. Our results showed that β-amyloid induced cytotoxic effects in SK-N-MC cells as shown by decreased cell growth when tested individually. Also, confocal microscopic analysis showed decreased spine density, loss of spines and decreased dendrite diameter, total dendrite and spine area in clade B infected SK-N-MC cells compared to uninfected cells. However, when ashwagandha was added to β-amyloid treated and HIV-1 infected samples, the toxic effects were neutralized. Further, the MTT cell viability assays and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) levels supported these observations indicating the neuroprotective effect of WS root extract against β-amyloid and HIV-1Ba-L (clade B) induced neuro-pathogenesis. PMID:24147038

  3. Interaction of the amyloid β peptide with sodium dodecyl sulfate as a membrane-mimicking detergent.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hashemi, Shabestari M.; Meeuwenoord, N.J.; Filippov, D.V.; Huber, M.I.

    2016-01-01

    The amyloid β (A β) peptide is important in the context of Alzheimer's disease, since it is one of the major components of the fibrils that constitute amyloid plaques. Agents that can influence fibril formation are important, and of those, membrane mimics are particularly relevant, because the

  4. Influence of hydrophobic Teflon particles on the structure of amyloid beta-peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacomelli, C.E.; Norde, W.

    2003-01-01

    The amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) constitutes the major peptide component of the amyloid plaque deposits of Alzheimer's disease in humans. The Abeta changes from a nonpathogenic to a pathogenic conformation resulting in self-aggregation and deposition of the peptide. It has been established that

  5. The role of mutated amyloid beta 1-42 stimulating dendritic cells in a PDAPP transgenic mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Jia-lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Amyloid plaque is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Anti-beta-amyloid (Aβ immunotherapy is effective in removing brain Aβ, but has shown to be associated with detrimental effects. To avoid severe adverse effects such as meningoencephalitis induced by amyloid beta vaccine with adjuvant, and take advantage of amyloid beta antibody's therapeutic effect on Alzheimer's disease sufficiently, our group has developed a new Alzheimer vaccine with mutated amyloid beta 1-42 peptide stimulating dendritic cells (DC. Our previous work has confirmed that DC vaccine can induce adequate anti-amyloid beta antibody in PDAPP Tg mice safely and efficiently. The DC vaccine can improve impaired learning and memory in the Alzheimer's animal model, and did not cause microvasculitis, microhemorrhage or meningoencephalitis in the animal model. However, the exact mechanism of immunotherapy which reduces Aβ deposition remains unknown. In this report, we studied the mechanism of the vaccine, thinking that this may have implications for better understanding of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Methods A new Alzheimer vaccine with mutated amyloid beta 1-42 peptide stimulating DC which were obtained from C57/B6 mouse bone marrow was developed. Amyloid beta with Freund's adjuvant was inoculated at the same time to act as positive control. After the treatment was done, the samples of brains were collected, fixed, cut. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to observe the expression of the nuclear hormone liver X receptor (LXR, membrane-bound protein tyrosine phosphatase (CD45, the ATP-binding cassette family of active transporters (ABCA1, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, β-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE and Aβ in mouse brain tissue. Semi-quantitative analysis was used to defect CA1, CA2, CA3, DG, Rad in hippocampus region and positive neuron in cortex region. Results Aβ was significantly reduced in the

  6. Metabolic Characterization of Intact Cells Reveals Intracellular Amyloid Beta but Not Its Precursor Protein to Reduce Mitochondrial Respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick M Schaefer

    Full Text Available One hallmark of Alzheimer´s disease are senile plaques consisting of amyloid beta (Aβ, which derives from the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer´s disease and both Aβ and APP have been reported to affect mitochondrial function in isolated systems. However, in intact cells, considering a physiological localization of APP and Aβ, it is pending what triggers the mitochondrial defect. Thus, the aim of this study was to dissect the impact of APP versus Aβ in inducing mitochondrial alterations with respect to their subcellular localization. We performed an overexpression of APP or beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1, increasing APP and Aβ levels or Aβ alone, respectively. Conducting a comprehensive metabolic characterization we demonstrate that only APP overexpression reduced mitochondrial respiration, despite lower extracellular Aβ levels compared to BACE overexpression. Surprisingly, this could be rescued by a gamma secretase inhibitor, oppositionally indicating an Aβ-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. Analyzing Aβ localization revealed that intracellular levels of Aβ and an increased spatial association of APP/Aβ with mitochondria are associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration. Thus, our data provide marked evidence for a prominent role of intracellular Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer´s disease associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby it highlights the importance of the localization of APP processing and intracellular transport as a decisive factor for mitochondrial function, linking two prominent hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Revisiting Randall's plaque

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    N. Abrol

    novel method of quantifying plaque using digitized imaging and. Adobe Photoshop [15]. Using the technology most accurate plaque area estimation could become possible, whereas previous studies reported just absence or presence of plaque [6,15]. Plaque coverage was inversely proportional to urine volume and directly ...

  8. The effects of enhanced zinc on spatial memory and plaque formation in transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkous, D.H.; Adlard, P.A.; Wanschura, P.B.; Conko, K.M.; Flinn, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable evidence suggesting that metals play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Reports suggest that elevated dietary metals may both precipitate and potentiate an Alzheimer's disease phenotype. Despite this, there remain few studies that have examined the behavioral consequences of elevated dietary metals in wild type and Alzheimer's disease animals. To further investigate this in the current study, two separate transgenic models of AD (Tg2576 and TgCRND8), together with wild type littermates were administered 10 ppm (0.153 mM) Zn. Tg2576 animals were maintained on a zinc-enriched diet both pre- and postnatally until 11 months of age, while TgCRND8 animals were treated for five months following weaning. Behavioral testing, consisting of "Atlantis" and "moving" platform versions of the Morris water maze, were conducted at the end of the study, and tissues were collected for immunohistochemical analysis of amyloid-β burden. Our data demonstrate that the provision of a zinc-enriched diet potentiated Alzheimer-like spatial memory impairments in the transgenic animals and was associated with reduced hippocampal amyloidplaque deposits. Zinc-related behavioral deficits were also demonstrated in wild type mice, which were sometimes as great as those present in the transgenic animals. However, zinc-related cognitive impairments in transgenic mice were greater than the summation of zinc effects in the wild type mice and the transgene effects.

  9. Genes contributing to prion pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Glidden, David V

    2008-01-01

    incubation times, indicating that the conversion reaction may be influenced by other gene products. To identify genes that contribute to prion pathogenesis, we analysed incubation times of prions in mice in which the gene product was inactivated, knocked out or overexpressed. We tested 20 candidate genes...... show that many genes previously implicated in prion replication have no discernible effect on the pathogenesis of prion disease. While most genes tested did not significantly affect survival times, ablation of the amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein (App) or interleukin-1 receptor, type I (Il1r1...

  10. Differential Relationships of Reactive Astrocytes and Microglia to Fibrillar Amyloid Deposits in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Muzikansky, Alona; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Growdon, John H.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2013-01-01

    While it is clear that astrocytes and microglia cluster around dense-core amyloid plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD), whether they are primarily attracted to amyloid deposits or are just reacting to plaque-associated neuritic damage remains elusive. We postulate that astrocytes and microglia may differentially respond to fibrillar amyloid β (Aβ). Therefore, we quantified the size distribution of dense-core Thioflavin-S (ThioS)-positive plaques in the temporal neocortex of 40 AD patients and the microglial and astrocyte responses in their vicinity (≤50 μm), and performed correlations between both measures. As expected, both astrocytes and microglia were clearly spatially associated with ThioS-positive plaques (p = 0.0001, ≤50 μm vs. >50 μm from their edge), but their relationship to ThioS-positive plaque size differed; larger ThioS-positive plaques were associated with more surrounding activated microglia (p = 0.0026), but this effect was not observed with reactive astrocytes. Microglial response to dense-core plaques appears to be proportional to their size, which we postulate reflects a chemotactic effect of Aβ. By contrast, plaque-associated astrocytic response does not correlate with plaque size and seems to parallel the behavior of plaque-associated neuritic damage. PMID:23656989

  11. Protective properties of lysozyme on β-amyloid pathology: implications for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmfors, Linda; Boman, Andrea; Civitelli, Livia; Nath, Sangeeta; Sandin, Linnea; Janefjord, Camilla; McCann, Heather; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Halliday, Glenda; Brorsson, Ann-Christin; Kågedal, Katarina

    2015-11-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer disease are amyloidplaques and neurofibrillary tangles accompanied by signs of neuroinflammation. Lysozyme is a major player in the innate immune system and has recently been shown to prevent the aggregation of amyloid-β1-40 in vitro. In this study we found that patients with Alzheimer disease have increased lysozyme levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and lysozyme co-localized with amyloid-β in plaques. In Drosophila neuronal co-expression of lysozyme and amyloid-β1-42 reduced the formation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-β species, prolonged survival and improved the activity of amyloid-β1-42 transgenic flies. This suggests that lysozyme levels rise in Alzheimer disease as a compensatory response to amyloid-β increases and aggregation. In support of this, in vitro aggregation assays revealed that lysozyme associates with amyloid-β1-42 and alters its aggregation pathway to counteract the formation of toxic amyloid-β species. Overall, these studies establish a protective role for lysozyme against amyloid-β associated toxicities and identify increased lysozyme in patients with Alzheimer disease. Therefore, lysozyme has potential as a new biomarker as well as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer disease. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Functional Amyloids in Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewetson, Aveline; Do, Hoa Quynh; Myers, Caitlyn; Muthusubramanian, Archana; Sutton, Roger Bryan; Wylie, Benjamin J; Cornwall, Gail A

    2017-06-29

    Amyloids are traditionally considered pathological protein aggregates that play causative roles in neurodegenerative disease, diabetes and prionopathies. However, increasing evidence indicates that in many biological systems nonpathological amyloids are formed for functional purposes. In this review, we will specifically describe amyloids that carry out biological roles in sexual reproduction including the processes of gametogenesis, germline specification, sperm maturation and fertilization. Several of these functional amyloids are evolutionarily conserved across several taxa, including human, emphasizing the critical role amyloids perform in reproduction. Evidence will also be presented suggesting that, if altered, some functional amyloids may become pathological.

  13. Decreased cathepsin K levels in human atherosclerotic plaques are associated with plaque instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huiying; Qin, Xiujiao; Wang, Shuai; Sun, Xiwei; Dong, Bin

    2017-10-01

    Investigating the determinants and dynamics of atherosclerotic plaque instability is a key area of current cardiovascular research. Extracellular matrix degradation from excessive proteolysis induced by enzymes such as cathepsin K (Cat K) is implicated in the pathogenesis of unstable plaques. The current study assessed the expression of Cat K in human unstable atherosclerotic plaques. Specimens of popliteal arteries with atherosclerotic plaques were classified as stable (K and cystatin C (Cys C) were assessed by immunohistochemical examination and levels of Cat K mRNA were detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Morphological changes including a larger lipid core, endothelial proliferation with foam cells and destruction of internal elastic lamina were observed in unstable atherosclerotic plaques. In unstable plaques, the expression of Cat K protein and mRNA was upregulated, whereas Cys C protein expression was downregulated. The interplay between Cat K and Cys C may underlie the progression of plaques from stable to unstable and the current study indicated that Cat K and Cys C are potential targets for preventing and treating vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque ruptures.

  14. Innate Immunity Stimulation via Toll-Like Receptor 9 Ameliorates Vascular Amyloid Pathology in Tg-SwDI Mice with Associated Cognitive Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtzova, Henrieta; Do, Eileen; Dhakal, Shleshma; Sun, Yanjie; Liu, Shan; Mehta, Pankaj D; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2017-01-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of parenchymal amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques, cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and neurofibrillary tangles. Currently there are no effective treatments for AD. Immunotherapeutic approaches under development are hampered by complications related to ineffectual clearance of CAA. Genome-wide association studies have demonstrated the importance of microglia in AD pathogenesis. Microglia are the primary innate immune cells of the brain. Depending on their activation state and environment, microglia can be beneficial or detrimental. In our prior work, we showed that stimulation of innate immunity with Toll-like receptor 9 agonist, class B CpG (cytosine-phosphate-guanine) oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs), can reduce amyloid and tau pathologies without causing toxicity in Tg2576 and 3xTg-AD mouse models. However, these transgenic mice have relatively little CAA. In the current study, we evaluated the therapeutic profile of CpG ODN in a triple transgenic mouse model, Tg-SwDI, with abundant vascular amyloid, in association with low levels of parenchymal amyloid deposits. Peripheral administration of CpG ODN, both before and after the development of CAA, negated short-term memory deficits, as assessed by object-recognition tests, and was effective at improving spatial and working memory evaluated using a radial arm maze. These findings were associated with significant reductions of CAA pathology lacking adverse effects. Together, our extensive evidence suggests that this innovative immunomodulation may be a safe approach to ameliorate all hallmarks of AD pathology, supporting the potential clinical applicability of CpG ODN. Recent genetic studies have underscored the emerging role of microglia in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Microglia lose their amyloid-β-clearing capabilities with age and as AD progresses. Therefore, the ability to modulate microglia profiles offers a promising therapeutic avenue for reducing AD

  15. Deciphering the Biochemical Pathway and Pharmacokinetic Study of Amyloid βeta-42 with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs) Using Systems Biology Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Aman Chandra; Kumar, Ajay; Dwivedi, Vivek Dhar; Bharadwaj, Shiv; Kumar, Sanjay; Bharti, Kritika; Kumar, Pavan; Chaudhary, Ravi Kumar; Mishra, Sarad Kumar

    2018-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis leads to the appearance of senile plaques due to the production and deposition of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have potential role in the detection and imaging of Aβ plaques in AD. SPIONs have shown appropriate potential in the diagnosis and treatment of AD. In the present study, the pharmacokinetics of SPIONs and its effect in the biochemical pathway of AD were analyzed using collected information. During analysis, the interaction of SPIONs with amyloid beta-42 (Aβ 42 ), a biomarker for AD progression, has been shown. Nodes represent the entities and edges represent the relation (interactions) of one node to another node. Aβ 42 and their interaction with other entities making up biochemical network are involved in AD mechanism in presence of SPION. The kinetic simulation was done to investigate pharmacokinetics of SPIONs for AD, where concentration was assigned of nanoparticles and other entities were applied as a kinetic irreversible simple Michaelis-Menten or mass action kinetics. Simulation was done in presence and absence of SPIONs to investigate pharmacokinetic effect in AD and explore the mechanism of Aβ 42 in presence of SPIONs. This study may lead to better understanding, which is required to target the metabolism of Aß 42 peptide, a pivotal player in this pathology.

  16. Etiology and pathogenesis of periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatakis, Dimitris N; Kumar, Purnima S

    2005-07-01

    The two most prevalent and most investigated periodontal diseases are dental plaque-induced gingivitis and chronic periodontitis. The last 10 to 15 years have seen the emergence of several important new findings and concepts regarding the etiopathogenesis of periodontal diseases. These findings include the recognition of dental bacterial plaque as a biofilm, identification and characterization of genetic defects that predispose individuals to periodontitis, host-defense mechanisms implicated in periodontal tissue destruction, and the interaction of risk factors with host defenses and bacterial plaque. This article reviews current aspects of the etiology and pathogenesis of periodontal diseases.

  17. Novel lipid signaling pathways in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannopoulos, Phillip F; Joshi, Yash B; Praticò, Domenico

    2014-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. With an increasing longevity and the absence of a cure, AD has become not only a major health problem but also a heavy social and economic burden worldwide. In addition to the presence of abundant intra- and extra-cellular neurotoxic amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which form the amyloid plaques, and intracellular hyperphosphorylated tau protein, the main component of neurofibrillary tangles, consistent evidence indicates that the AD brain is characterized by extensive neuroinflammatory processes. The 5-lipoxygenase (5LO) is a pro-inflammatory enzymatic pathway widely distributed within the central nervous system and is up-regulated in AD. In the last five years our group has been involved in unraveling the neurobiology of this protein and investigating its relationship with cellular and molecular events of functional importance in AD pathogenesis. By using a combination of in vitro and in vivo experimental tools and implementing genetic as well as pharmacological approaches today we know that 5LO is likely an endogenous regulator of Aβ formation via the modulation of the γ-secretase complex, and tau metabolism by modulating its phosphorylation state at specific epitopes via the cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (cdk-5). In addition, 5LO influences synaptic function and integrity and by doing so significantly affects learning and memory in the Tg2576 and 3xTg AD transgenic mouse models. Taken together our data establish this protein as a pleiotropic contributor to the development of the full spectrum of the AD-like phenotype in these mouse models of the disease, making it a viable therapeutic target for the treatment of AD in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Localization and Trafficking of Amyloid-β Protein Precursor and Secretases: Impact on Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinho, Paula; Pliássova, Anna; Oliveira, Catarina R; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects almost 35 million people worldwide. One of the neuropathological features of AD is the presence of extracellular amyloid plaques, which are mainly composed of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. These peptides derive from the amyloidogenic proteolytic processing of the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), through the sequential action of β- and γ-secretases. However, AβPP can also be cleaved by a non-amyloidogenic pathway, involving an α-secretase, and in this case the Aβ formation is precluded. The production of Aβ and of other AβPP catabolites depends on the spatial and temporal co-localization of AβPP with α- or β-secretases and γ-secretase, which traffic through the secretory pathway in a highly regulated manner. Disturbances on AβPP and secretases intracellular trafficking and, consequently, in their localization may affect dynamic interactions between these proteins with consequences in the AD pathogenesis. In this article, we critically review the recent knowledge about the trafficking and co-localization of AβPP and related secretases in the brain under physiological and AD conditions. A particular focus is given to data concerning the distribution of AβPP and secretases in different types of synapses relatively to other neuronal or glial localizations. Furthermore, we discuss some possible signals that govern the dynamic encounter of AβPP with each group of secretases, such as AβPP mutations, estrogen deprivation, chronic stress, metabolic impairment, and alterations in sleep pattern-associated with aging. The knowledge of key signals that are responsible for the shifting of AβPP processing away from α-secretases and toward the β-secretases might be useful to develop AD therapeutic strategies.

  19. A bifunctional curcumin analogue for two-photon imaging and inhibiting crosslinking of amyloid beta in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueli; Tian, Yanli; Yuan, Peng; Li, Yuyan; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Grutzendler, Jaime; Moore, Anna; Ran, Chongzhao

    2014-10-09

    In this report, we designed a highly bright bifunctional curcumin analogue CRANAD-28. In vivo two-photon imaging suggested that CRANAD-28 could penetrate the blood brain barrier (BBB) and label plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathies (CAAs). We also demonstrated that this imaging probe could inhibit the crosslinking of amyloid beta induced either by copper or by natural conditions.

  20. Enhancement of β-amyloid oligomer accumulation after intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin, which involves central insulin signaling in a transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fangju; Jia, Jianping; Qin, Wei

    2014-11-12

    The β-amyloid (Aβ) oligomer rather than fibrillar Aβ has become the important focus of recent studies on the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Insulin signaling plays important roles in cognitive disease, such as AD. However, in-vivo evidence for the link between central insulin signaling and the Aβ oligomer are lacking, and the mechanisms underlying the effect of central insulin signaling on AD are still elusive. Our team has established the Presenilin-1 Val97Leu mutant transgenic (PS1V97L) AD mouse model with the intraneuronal Aβ oligomer as the potential initiator for other pathologies, but without extracellular amyloid plaque formation. Using this model, we investigated the roles of disturbed central insulin signaling induced by intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin (STZ) in the progression of AD. We observed that PS1V97L mice after intracerebroventricular injection of STZ showed increased Aβ oligomer accumulation and aggravated spatial learning and memory deficit in the absence of diabetes symptoms. Furthermore, STZ administration inhibited the activation of the insulin receptor and enhanced the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, which was accompanied by increased production of carboxy-terminal fragments from the amyloid precursor protein, in the brain of PS1V97L mice. Overall, our study provided in-vivo evidence for a role of central insulin signaling in AD progression.

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of curcumin analogs as β-amyloid imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Changsheng; Hu, Jingyi; Nan, Dou-Dou; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Hong

    2017-09-01

    Detection of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in the brain is a very promising biomarker approach for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A series of curcumin analogs (1,5-diphenyl-1,4-pentadien-3-one derivatives) were synthesized and evaluated. Specific binding to Aβ plaques was demonstrated in vitro using postmortem AD homogenates, and the fluorescent staining and autoradiography in vitro of postmortem AD brain sections were performed. Some compounds showed high binding affinities with Aβ plaques. Fluorescent staining indicated that compound 4e clearly stained Aβ plaques within AD brain sections. In biodistribution, radioiodinated ligand [ 125 I]4e exhibited high brain uptake and favorable clearance from the brain. Autoradiography in vitro further confirmed the high affinities of [ 125 I]4e. The results strongly suggested that [ 125 I]4e might be developed into potential amyloid imaging agent for the detection of senile plaques in AD. [Formula: see text].

  2. Augmenting Amyloid PET Interpretations With Quantitative Information Improves Consistency of Early Amyloid Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harn, Nicholas R; Hunt, Suzanne L; Hill, Jacqueline; Vidoni, Eric; Perry, Mark; Burns, Jeffrey M

    2017-08-01

    Establishing reliable methods for interpreting elevated cerebral amyloidplaque on PET scans is increasingly important for radiologists, as availability of PET imaging in clinical practice increases. We examined a 3-step method to detect plaque in cognitively normal older adults, focusing on the additive value of quantitative information during the PET scan interpretation process. Fifty-five F-florbetapir PET scans were evaluated by 3 experienced raters. Scans were first visually interpreted as having "elevated" or "nonelevated" plaque burden ("Visual Read"). Images were then processed using a standardized quantitative analysis software (MIMneuro) to generate whole brain and region of interest SUV ratios. This "Quantitative Read" was considered elevated if at least 2 of 6 regions of interest had an SUV ratio of more than 1.1. The final interpretation combined both visual and quantitative data together ("VisQ Read"). Cohen kappa values were assessed as a measure of interpretation agreement. Plaque was elevated in 25.5% to 29.1% of the 165 total Visual Reads. Interrater agreement was strong (kappa = 0.73-0.82) and consistent with reported values. Quantitative Reads were elevated in 45.5% of participants. Final VisQ Reads changed from initial Visual Reads in 16 interpretations (9.7%), with most changing from "nonelevated" Visual Reads to "elevated." These changed interpretations demonstrated lower plaque quantification than those initially read as "elevated" that remained unchanged. Interrater variability improved for VisQ Reads with the addition of quantitative information (kappa = 0.88-0.96). Inclusion of quantitative information increases consistency of PET scan interpretations for early detection of cerebral amyloidplaque accumulation.

  3. Generation of amyloid-β is reduced by the interaction of calreticulin with amyloid precursor protein, presenilin and nicastrin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Stemmer

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein by γ-secretase and the ensuing generation of amyloid-β is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the identification of amyloid precursor protein binding proteins involved in regulating processing of amyloid precursor protein by the γ-secretase complex is essential for understanding the mechanisms underlying the molecular pathology of the disease. We identified calreticulin as novel amyloid precursor protein interaction partner that binds to the γ-secretase cleavage site within amyloid precursor protein and showed that this Ca(2+- and N-glycan-independent interaction is mediated by amino acids 330-344 in the C-terminal C-domain of calreticulin. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed that calreticulin is not only associated with amyloid precursor protein but also with the γ-secretase complex members presenilin and nicastrin. Calreticulin was detected at the cell surface by surface biotinylation of cells overexpressing amyloid precursor protein and was co-localized by immunostaining with amyloid precursor protein and presenilin at the cell surface of hippocampal neurons. The P-domain of calreticulin located between the N-terminal N-domain and the C-domain interacts with presenilin, the catalytic subunit of the γ-secretase complex. The P- and C-domains also interact with nicastrin, another functionally important subunit of this complex. Transfection of amyloid precursor protein overexpressing cells with full-length calreticulin leads to a decrease in amyloid-β42 levels in culture supernatants, while transfection with the P-domain increases amyloid-β40 levels. Similarly, application of the recombinant P- or C-domains and of a synthetic calreticulin peptide comprising amino acid 330-344 to amyloid precursor protein overexpressing cells result in elevated amyloid-β40 and amyloid-β42 levels, respectively. These findings indicate that the interaction of

  4. Modern supragingival plaque control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacono, V J; Aldredge, W A; Lucks, H; Schwartzstein, S

    1998-06-01

    Supragingival plaque control is essential for the maintenance of oral health. Despite the many chemotherapeutic agents available as mouthrinses and toothpastes, mechanical plaque removal is still the best method to achieve effective plaque control. This is due, in part, to the lack of development of oral antimicrobials with the effectiveness and substantivity of chlorhexidine gluconate but without its adverse effects of dental staining and calculus formation. The use of the numerous mechanical (manual and electric) oral hygiene devices extant and their effectiveness, however, are dependent upon patient dexterity and compliance and concomitant active professional treatment for the monitoring of home care, oral hygiene instruction and patient motivation. This paper evaluates the current methods available to reduce plaque and gingivitis with emphasis on their effectiveness at both supragingival plaque control and disease prevention. In addition, recent studies on the newer oscillating/rotating electric plaque removers and interdental cleaning devices will be discussed as related to their efficacy and compliance.

  5. Astrovirus Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cydney Johnson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Astroviruses are a major cause of diarrhea in the young, elderly, and the immunocompromised. Since the discovery of human astrovirus type 1 (HAstV-1 in 1975, the family Astroviridae has expanded to include two more human clades and numerous mammalian and avian-specific genotypes. Despite this, there is still little known about pathogenesis. The following review highlights the current knowledge of astrovirus pathogenesis, and outlines the critical steps needed to further astrovirus research, including the development of animal models of cell culture systems.

  6. Adaptor protein sorting nexin 17 regulates amyloid precursor protein trafficking and processing in the early endosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Jiyeon; Retamal, Claudio; Cuitino, Loreto; Caruano-Yzermans, Amy; Shin, Jung-Eun; van Kerkhof, Peter; Marzolo, Maria-Paz; Bu, Guojun

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of extracellular amyloid beta peptide (A beta), generated from amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing by beta- and gamma-secretases, is toxic to neurons and is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Production of A beta from APP is greatly affected by the subcellular

  7. Effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone on sleep and brain interstitial fluid amyloid-β in an APP transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Fan; Zhang, Tony J; Mahan, Thomas E; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by impairment of cognitive function, extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, and synaptic and neuronal loss. There is substantial evidence that the aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain plays a key role in the pathogenesis of AD and that Aβ aggregation is a concentration dependent process. Recently, it was found that Aβ levels in the brain interstitial fluid (ISF) are regulated by the sleep-wake cycle in both humans and mice; ISF Aβ is higher during wakefulness and lower during sleep. Intracerebroventricular infusion of orexin increased wakefulness and ISF Aβ levels, and chronic sleep deprivation significantly increased Aβ plaque formation in amyloid precursor protein transgenic (APP) mice. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is a well-documented sleep regulatory substance which promotes non-rapid eye movement sleep. GHRHR(lit/lit) mice that lack functional GHRH receptor have shorter sleep duration and longer wakefulness during light periods. The current study was undertaken to determine whether manipulating sleep by interfering with GHRH signaling affects brain ISF Aβ levels in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 (PS1APP) transgenic mice that overexpress mutant forms of APP and PSEN1 that cause autosomal dominant AD. We found that intraperitoneal injection of GHRH at dark onset increased sleep and decreased ISF Aβ and that delivery of a GHRH antagonist via reverse-microdialysis suppressed sleep and increased ISF Aβ. The diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ in PS1APP/GHRHR(lit/lit) mice was significantly smaller than that in PS1APP/GHRHR(lit/+) mice. However despite decreased sleep in GHRHR deficient mice, this was not associated with an increase in Aβ accumulation later in life. One of several possibilities for the finding is the fact that GHRHR deficient mice have GHRH-dependent but sleep-independent factors which protect against Aβ deposition. Copyright © 2014

  8. Beyond Amyloid - Widening the View on Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Christian; Ziegler, Christine

    2017-11-01

    For 25 years, the amyloid cascade hypothesis, based on the finding that mutations in the amyloid precursor protein are closely linked to familial forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), dominated the research on this disease. Recent failures of clinical anti-amyloidogenic trials, however, substantially support the reasoning (i) that the pathomechanisms that trigger familial AD, namely the generation, aggregation, and deposition of amyloid beta, cannot necessarily be extrapolated to sporadic cases and (ii) that amyloid beta represents a prominent histopathological feature in AD but not its exclusive causative factor. In autumn 2016, the Volkswagen Foundation hosted the Herrenhausen Symposium 'Beyond Amyloid - Widening the View on Alzheimer's Disease' in Hannover, Germany, to bring together current knowledge on cellular and molecular processes that contribute to AD pathogenesis independent of or alongside with the amyloid biochemistry. The following mini review series was authored by key speakers at the meeting, and highlights some of the mechanisms potentially involved in AD etiology that provide alternative viewpoints and mechanisms beyond the amyloid cascade hypothesis. This article is part of the series "Beyond Amyloid". © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. Preclinical studies of potential amyloid binding PET/SPECT ligands in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svedberg, Marie M.; Rahman, Obaidur; Hall, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    Visualizing the neuropathological hallmarks amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles of Alzheimer's disease in vivo using positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon emission computed tomography will be of great value in diagnosing the individual patient and will also help in our understanding of the disease. The successful introduction of [ 11 C]PIB as a PET tracer for the amyloid plaques less than 10 years ago started an intensive research, and numerous new compounds for use in molecular imaging of the amyloid plaques have been developed. The candidates are based on dyes like thioflavin T, Congo red and chrysamine G, but also on other types such as benzoxazoles, curcumin and stilbenes. In the present review, we present methods of the radiochemistry and preclinical evaluation as well as the main properties of some of these compounds.

  10. Plaque Type Eryrhema Nodosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Mittal

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Three young females developed plaque type erythema nodosum. The underlying causes in them were tuberculosis chest, recurrent furunculosis and malaria respectively. All the three cases were under treatment at the time of development of erythema nodosum plaques and the onset was acute.

  11. Amyloid beta1–42 and the phoshorylated tau threonine 231 in brains of aged cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darusman, Huda Shalahudin; Gjedde, Albert; Sajuthi, Dondin

    2014-01-01

    Pathological hallmarks indicative of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which are the plaques of amyloid beta1-42 and neurofibrillary tangles, were found in brain of aged cynomolgus monkey. The aim of this study was to investigate if aged monkeys exhibiting spatial memory impairment and levels of biomarkers...... angiopathy, and the tauopathy, to possible neurofibrillary tangles. Six aged monkeys were selected based on their spatial memory performance and profile of biomarkers of AD, divided equally to affected aged subject - with Memory-affected and low amyloid level, and aged with higher performance in memory...... and amyloid, as the age-matched subjects. Using immunohistochemistry, plaques of amyloid beta1-42 were observed in two out of three brains of aged subjects with memory impairment and biomarkers indicative of AD. The cerebral amyloid angiopathy was observed in both aged monkey groups, and unlike in the human...

  12. The Necessity of Having a Tetradentate Ligand to Extract Copper(II) Ions from Amyloids

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Michel; Rechignat, Lionel; Robert, Anne; Meunier, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of redox-active metal ions, in particular copper, in amyloid plaques is considered to the cause of the intensive oxidation damage to the brain of patients with Alzheimers disease (AD). Drug candidates based on a bis(8-aminoquinoline) tetradentate ligand are able to efficiently extract Cu2+ from copper-loaded amyloids (Cu?A?). Contrarily, in the presence of a bidentate hydroxyquinoline, such as clioquinol, the copper is not released from A?, but remains sequestrated within a A...

  13. Increased plasma concentration of serum amyloid P component in centenarians with impaired cognitive performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, M; Olsen, H; Jeune, B

    1998-01-01

    these to the cognitive performance evaluated by Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). We observed a significantly (p ... performance had significantly increased plasma concentrations of SAP, while the values for cognitive intact centenarians were within the normal range.......Serum amyloid P component (SAP) binds to all amyloid fibrils including those in the plaques and tangles of Alzheimer patients. To investigate whether the plasma SAP concentration correlated to cognitive impairment, we measured SAP levels in blood samples from 41 centenarians and compared...

  14. Beta-secretase-cleaved amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer brain: a morphologic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Bogdanovic, N; Volkmann, Inga

    2004-01-01

    beta-amyloid (Abeta) is the main constituent of senile plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease. Abeta is derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via proteolytic cleavage by proteases beta- and gamma-secretase. In this study, we examined content and localization of beta-secretase-cleaved APP...... the beta-sAPP immunostaining to be stronger and more extensive in gray matter in Alzheimer disease (AD) cases than controls. The axonal beta-sAPP staining was patchy and unevenly distributed for the AD cases, indicating impaired axonal transport. beta-sAPP was also found surrounding senile plaques...

  15. Amyloid polymorphisms constitute distinct clouds of conformational variants in different etiological subtypes of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jay; Mahler, Jasmin; Beschorner, Natalie; Kaeser, Stephan A; Häsler, Lisa M; Baumann, Frank; Nyström, Sofie; Portelius, Erik; Blennow, Kaj; Lashley, Tammaryn; Fox, Nick C; Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Glatzel, Markus; Oblak, Adrian L; Ghetti, Bernardino; Nilsson, K Peter R; Hammarström, Per; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Walker, Lary C; Jucker, Mathias

    2017-12-05

    The molecular architecture of amyloids formed in vivo can be interrogated using luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs), a unique class of amyloid dyes. When bound to amyloid, LCOs yield fluorescence emission spectra that reflect the 3D structure of the protein aggregates. Given that synthetic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) has been shown to adopt distinct structural conformations with different biological activities, we asked whether Aβ can assume structurally and functionally distinct conformations within the brain. To this end, we analyzed the LCO-stained cores of β-amyloid plaques in postmortem tissue sections from frontal, temporal, and occipital neocortices in 40 cases of familial Alzheimer's disease (AD) or sporadic (idiopathic) AD (sAD). The spectral attributes of LCO-bound plaques varied markedly in the brain, but the mean spectral properties of the amyloid cores were generally similar in all three cortical regions of individual patients. Remarkably, the LCO amyloid spectra differed significantly among some of the familial and sAD subtypes, and between typical patients with sAD and those with posterior cortical atrophy AD. Neither the amount of Aβ nor its protease resistance correlated with LCO spectral properties. LCO spectral amyloid phenotypes could be partially conveyed to Aβ plaques induced by experimental transmission in a mouse model. These findings indicate that polymorphic Aβ-amyloid deposits within the brain cluster as clouds of conformational variants in different AD cases. Heterogeneity in the molecular architecture of pathogenic Aβ among individuals and in etiologically distinct subtypes of AD justifies further studies to assess putative links between Aβ conformation and clinical phenotype.

  16. The proton-pump inhibitor lansoprazole enhances amyloid beta production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiola, Nahuai; Alcalde, Victor; Pujol, Albert; Münter, Lisa-Marie; Multhaup, Gerd; Lleó, Alberto; Coma, Mireia; Soler-López, Montserrat; Aloy, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    A key event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) species in the brain, derived from the sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. Based on a systems biology study to repurpose drugs for AD, we explore the effect of lansoprazole, and other proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), on Aβ production in AD cellular and animal models. We found that lansoprazole enhances Aβ37, Aβ40 and Aβ42 production and lowers Aβ38 levels on amyloid cell models. Interestingly, acute lansoprazole treatment in wild type and AD transgenic mice promoted higher Aβ40 levels in brain, indicating that lansoprazole may also exacerbate Aβ production in vivo. Overall, our data presents for the first time that PPIs can affect amyloid metabolism, both in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Mast Cell Activation in Brain Injury, Stress, and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Alzheimer's Disease Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duraisamy Kempuraj

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are localized throughout the body and mediate allergic, immune, and inflammatory reactions. They are heterogeneous, tissue-resident, long-lived, and granulated cells. Mast cells increase their numbers in specific site in the body by proliferation, increased recruitment, increased survival, and increased rate of maturation from its progenitors. Mast cells are implicated in brain injuries, neuropsychiatric disorders, stress, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Brain mast cells are the first responders before microglia in the brain injuries since mast cells can release prestored mediators. Mast cells also can detect amyloid plaque formation during Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis. Stress conditions activate mast cells to release prestored and newly synthesized inflammatory mediators and induce increased blood-brain barrier permeability, recruitment of immune and inflammatory cells into the brain and neuroinflammation. Stress induces the release of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH from paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus and mast cells. CRH activates glial cells and mast cells through CRH receptors and releases neuroinflammatory mediators. Stress also increases proinflammatory mediator release in the peripheral systems that can induce and augment neuroinflammation. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a traumatic-chronic stress related mental dysfunction. Currently there is no specific therapy to treat PTSD since its disease mechanisms are not yet clearly understood. Moreover, recent reports indicate that PTSD could induce and augment neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Mast cells play a crucial role in the peripheral inflammation as well as in neuroinflammation due to brain injuries, stress, depression, and PTSD. Therefore, mast cells activation in brain injury, stress, and PTSD may accelerate the pathogenesis of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases

  18. Mast Cell Activation in Brain Injury, Stress, and Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Alzheimer's Disease Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Selvakumar, Govindhasamy P; Thangavel, Ramasamy; Ahmed, Mohammad E; Zaheer, Smita; Raikwar, Sudhanshu P; Iyer, Shankar S; Bhagavan, Sachin M; Beladakere-Ramaswamy, Swathi; Zaheer, Asgar

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells are localized throughout the body and mediate allergic, immune, and inflammatory reactions. They are heterogeneous, tissue-resident, long-lived, and granulated cells. Mast cells increase their numbers in specific site in the body by proliferation, increased recruitment, increased survival, and increased rate of maturation from its progenitors. Mast cells are implicated in brain injuries, neuropsychiatric disorders, stress, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration. Brain mast cells are the first responders before microglia in the brain injuries since mast cells can release prestored mediators. Mast cells also can detect amyloid plaque formation during Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Stress conditions activate mast cells to release prestored and newly synthesized inflammatory mediators and induce increased blood-brain barrier permeability, recruitment of immune and inflammatory cells into the brain and neuroinflammation. Stress induces the release of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) from paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus and mast cells. CRH activates glial cells and mast cells through CRH receptors and releases neuroinflammatory mediators. Stress also increases proinflammatory mediator release in the peripheral systems that can induce and augment neuroinflammation. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a traumatic-chronic stress related mental dysfunction. Currently there is no specific therapy to treat PTSD since its disease mechanisms are not yet clearly understood. Moreover, recent reports indicate that PTSD could induce and augment neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Mast cells play a crucial role in the peripheral inflammation as well as in neuroinflammation due to brain injuries, stress, depression, and PTSD. Therefore, mast cells activation in brain injury, stress, and PTSD may accelerate the pathogenesis of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases including AD. This

  19. Investigation of Amyloid Structures at Nanoscale via AFM based Dynamic Nanomechncial Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuai

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid structures are one important kind of protein aggregations. They are a group of stable misfolded species, other than native states, which have been found to accumulate as plaques on neuron cells. This behavior is considered to associate with tens of human neurodegenerative diseases...... nanomechnical microscopy (DNM) provides the availability to link topography and corresponding nanomechnical properties. This nanomechnical mapping improves the understanding of amyloid self-assembly mechanisms, and it also assists to design the amyloid structure based nanomaterials. In my PhD thesis, I...

  20. Nanostructural Differentiation and Toxicity of Amyloid-β25-35 Aggregates Ensue from Distinct Secondary Conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongxiu; Li, Ping; Liu, Lei; Bortolini, Christian; Dong, Mingdong

    2018-01-15

    Amyloid nanostructures are originated from protein misfolding and aberrant aggregation, which is associated with the pathogenesis of many types of degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease. The secondary conformation of peptides is of a fundamental importance for aggregation and toxicity of amyloid peptides. In this work, Aβ25-35, a fragment of amyloid β(1-42) (Aβ42), was selected to investigate the correlation between secondary structures and toxicity of amyloid fibrils. Furthermore, each aggregation assemblies show different cell membrane disruption and cytotoxicity. The structural analysis of amyloid aggregates originated from different secondary structure motifs is helpful to understand the mechanism of peptides/cell interactions in the pathogenesis of amyloid diseases.

  1. Imaging unstable plaque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SRIRANJAN, Rouchelle S.; TARKIN, Jason M.; RUDD, James H.; EVANS, Nicholas R.; CHOWDHURY, Mohammed M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in imaging technology have enabled us to utilise a range of diagnostic approaches to better characterise high-risk atherosclerotic plaque. The aim of this article is to review current and emerging techniques used to detect and quantify unstable plaque in the context of large and small arterial systems and will focus on both invasive and non-invasive imaging techniques. While the diagnosis of clinically relevant atherosclerosis still relies heavily on anatomical assessment of arterial luminal stenosis, evolving multimodal cross-sectional imaging techniques that encompass novel molecular probes can provide added information with regard to plaque composition and overall disease burden. Novel molecular probes currently being developed to track precursors of plaque rupture such as inflammation, micro-calcification, hypoxia and neoangiogenesis are likely to have translational applications beyond diagnostics and have the potential to play a part in quantifying early responses to therapeutic interventions and more accurate cardiovascular risk stratification.

  2. The amyloid precursor protein – a novel player within the molecular array of presynaptic nanomachines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eLassek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 20 years ago the amyloid precursor protein (APP was identified as the precursor protein of the Aβ peptide, the main component of senile plaques in brains affected by Alzheimer´s disease. The pathophysiology of AD, characterized by a massive loss of synapses, cognitive decline, and behavioral changes was in principle attributed to the accumulation of Aβ. Within the last decades, much effort has gone into understanding the molecular basis of the progression of Alzheimer´s disease. However, little is known about the actual physiological function of amyloid precursor proteins. Allocating APP to the proteome of the structurally and functionally dynamic presynaptic active zone highlights APP as a hitherto unknown player within the setting of the presynapse. The molecular array of presynaptic nanomachines comprising the life cycle of synaptic vesicles, exo- and endocytosis, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and mitochondrial activity provides a balance between structural and functional maintenance and diversity. The generation of genetically designed mouse models further deciphered APP as an essential player in synapse formation and plasticity. Deletion of APP causes an age-dependent phenotype: while younger mice revealed almost no physiological impairments, this condition was changed in the elderly mice. Interestingly, the proteomic composition of neurotransmitter release sites already revealed substantial changes at young age. These changes point to a network that incorporates APP into a cluster of nanomachines. Currently, the underlying mechanism of how APP acts within these machines is still elusive. Within the scope of this review, we shall construct a network of APP interaction partners within the presynaptic active zone. Furthermore, we intend to outline how deletion of APP affects this network during space and time leading to impairments in learning and memory. These alterations may provide a molecular link to the pathogenesis of

  3. High Field Atherosclerotic Plaque MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Chun; Wang, Jinnan; Balu, Niranjan

    2012-01-01

    Manifestations of atherosclerotic plaque in different arterial beds range from perfusion deficits to overt ischemia such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Atherosclerotic plaque composition is known to be associated with its propensity to rupture and cause vascular events. MRI of atherosclerotic plaque using clinical 1.5T scanners can detect plaque composition. Plaque MRI at higher field strengths offers both opportunities and challenges to improving the high spatial-resolution and contras...

  4. A new integrated dual time-point amyloid PET/MRI data analysis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchin, Diego; Zucchetta, Pietro; Turco, Paolo; Bui, Franco [University Hospital of Padua, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Medicine - DIMED, Padua (Italy); Barthel, Henryk; Tiepolt, Solveig; Sabri, Osama [Leipzig University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Poggiali, Davide; Cagnin, Annachiara; Gallo, Paolo [University Hospital of Padua, Neurology, Department of Neurosciences (DNS), Padua (Italy); Frigo, Anna Chiara [University Hospital of Padua, Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Public Health Unit, Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Sciences, Padua (Italy)

    2017-11-15

    In the initial evaluation of patients with suspected dementia and Alzheimer's disease, there is no consensus on how to perform semiquantification of amyloid in such a way that it: (1) facilitates visual qualitative interpretation, (2) takes the kinetic behaviour of the tracer into consideration particularly with regard to at least partially correcting for blood flow dependence, (3) analyses the amyloid load based on accurate parcellation of cortical and subcortical areas, (4) includes partial volume effect correction (PVEC), (5) includes MRI-derived topographical indexes, (6) enables application to PET/MRI images and PET/CT images with separately acquired MR images, and (7) allows automation. A method with all of these characteristics was retrospectively tested in 86 subjects who underwent amyloid ({sup 18}F-florbetaben) PET/MRI in a clinical setting (using images acquired 90-110 min after injection, 53 were classified visually as amyloid-negative and 33 as amyloid-positive). Early images after tracer administration were acquired between 0 and 10 min after injection, and later images were acquired between 90 and 110 min after injection. PVEC of the PET data was carried out using the geometric transfer matrix method. Parametric images and some regional output parameters, including two innovative ''dual time-point'' indexes, were obtained. Subjects classified visually as amyloid-positive showed a sparse tracer uptake in the primary sensory, motor and visual areas in accordance with the isocortical stage of the topographic distribution of the amyloid plaque (Braak stages V/VI). In patients classified visually as amyloid-negative, the method revealed detectable levels of tracer uptake in the basal portions of the frontal and temporal lobes, areas that are known to be sites of early deposition of amyloid plaques that probably represented early accumulation (Braak stage A) that is typical of normal ageing. There was a strong correlation between

  5. Clinical and pathological study on 10 cases of cerebral lobe hemorrhage related with cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-qi LI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical data and pathological features of 10 cases of cerebral lobar hemorrhage related with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA diagnosed pathologically, thereby to improve the knowledge and diagnosis of the disease. Methods The clinical data of 10 cases of cerebral lobar hemorrhage related with CAA, collected in the General Hospital of Shenyang Command from 1983 up to now, were retrospectively analyzed, and the clinical and neuropathological features of these cases were summarized. Results Of the 10 patients, 2 suffered from single lobar hemorrhage and 8 multiple lobar hemorrhage, all of them were confirmed pathologically to have ruptured into the subarachnoid space. Pathological examination revealed microaneurysm in 2 cases, "double barrel" change in 4 cases, multiple arteriolar clusters in 5 cases, obliterative onion-liked intima change in 4 cases, and fibrinoid necrosis of vessel wall in 7 cases. In addition, neurofibrillary tangles were found in 8 cases, and senile plaque was observed in 5 cases. Conclusions Cerebral lobar hemorrhage related with CAA is mainly located in the parietal, temporal and occipital lobes, readily breaking into the subarachnoid space, and it is often multiple and recurrent. The CAA associated microvasculopathy was found frequently in the autopsy sample of CAA related cerebral lobar hemorrhage, and it may contribute to the pathogenesis of cerebral hemorrhage. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.07.04

  6. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosicka, Iga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type II is a metabolic disease affecting millions of people worldwide. The disease is associated with occurence of insoluble, fibrillar, protein aggregates in islets of Langerhans in the pancreas - islet amyloid. The main constituent of these protein fibers is the human islet...... of diabetes type II, while revealing the structure(s) of islet amyloid fibrils is necessary for potential design of therapeutic agents....

  7. Amyloid Fibril Solubility

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzi, L. G.; Auer, S.

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactio...

  8. Metabolism-Centric Overview of the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Somang; Lee, Yong Ho; Lee, Jong Eun

    2017-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative brain disease and the most common cause of dementia. AD is characterized by the extracellular amyloid beta (Aβ) plaques and intraneuronal deposits of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Recently, as aging has become a familiar phenomenon around the world, patients with AD are increasing in number. Thus, many researchers are working toward finding effective therapeutics for AD focused on Aβ hypothesis, although there has been no success yet. In this review paper, we suggest that AD is a metabolic disease and that we should focus on metabolites that are affected by metabolic alterations to find effective therapeutics for AD. Aging is associated with not only AD but also obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). AD, obesity, and T2DM share demographic profiles, risk factors, and clinical and biochemical features in common. Considering AD as a kind of metabolic disease, we suggest insulin, adiponectin, and antioxidants as mechanistic links among these diseases and targets for AD therapeutics. Patients with AD show reduced insulin signal transductions in the brain, and intranasal injection of insulin has been found to have an effect on AD treatment. In addition, adiponectin is decreased in the patients with obesity and T2DM. This reduction induces metabolic dysfunction both in the body and the brain, leading to AD pathogenesis. Oxidative stress is known to be induced by Aβ and NFTs, and we suggest that oxidative stress caused by metabolic alterations in the body induce brain metabolic alterations, resulting in AD. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017.

  9. Systemic inflammation, blood-brain barrier vulnerability and cognitive / non-cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer disease: Relevance to pathogenesis and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuko eTakeda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of dementia is increasing at an alarming rate, and has become a major public health concern. Alzheimer disease (AD is the most common form of dementia and is characterized by progressive cognitive impairment. In addition to classical neuropathological features such as amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, accumulation of activated immune cells has been documented in the AD brain, suggesting a contribution of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of AD. Besides cognitive deterioration, non-cognitive symptoms, such as agitation, aggression, depression and psychosis, are often observed in demented patients, including those with AD, and these neuropsychological symptoms place a heavy burden on caregivers. These symptoms often exhibit sudden onset and tend to fluctuate over time, and in many cases, they are triggered by an infection in peripheral organs, suggesting that inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of these non-cognitive symptoms. However, there is no mechanistic explanation for the relationship between inflammation and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Observations from experimental mouse models indicate that alteration of brain blood vessels, especially blood-brain barrier dysfunction, may contribute to the relationship. The current review summarizes the results from recent studies on the relationship between inflammation and AD, while focusing on cerebrovascular alterations, which might provide an insight into the pathogenesis of cognitive / non-cognitive symptoms in AD patients and suggest a basis for the development of new therapeutic treatments for these conditions.

  10. Toxic species in amyloid disorders: Oligomers or mature fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative disorders. These protein aggregation (fibrillization disorders are also known as amyloid disorders. The mechanism of protein aggregation involves conformation switch of the native protein, oligomer formation leading to protofibrils and finally mature fibrils. Mature fibrils have long been considered as the cause of disease pathogenesis; however, recent evidences suggest oligomeric intermediates formed during fibrillization to be toxic. In this review, we have tried to address the ongoing debate for these toxic amyloid species. We did an extensive literature search and collated information from Pubmed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov and Google search using various permutations and combinations of the following keywords: Neurodegeneration, amyloid disorders, protein aggregation, fibrils, oligomers, toxicity, Alzheimer′s Disease, Parkinson′s Disease. We describe different instances showing the toxicity of mature fibrils as well as oligomers in Alzheimer′s Disease and Parkinson′s Disease. Distinct structural framework and morphology of amyloid oligomers suggests difference in toxic effect between oligomers and fibrils. We highlight the difference in structure and proposed toxicity pathways for fibrils and oligomers. We also highlight the evidences indicating that intermediary oligomeric species can act as potential diagnostic biomarker. Since the formation of these toxic species follow a common structural switch among various amyloid disorders, the protein aggregation events can be targeted for developing broad-range therapeutics. The therapeutic trials based on the understanding of different protein conformers (monomers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils in amyloid cascade are also described.

  11. Amyloid Imaging: Poised for Integration into Medical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Keshav; Sabbagh, Marwan

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid imaging represents a significant advance as an adjunct in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) because it is the first imaging modality that identifies in vivo changes known to be associated with the pathogenesis. Initially, 11 C-PIB was developed, which was the prototype for many 18 F compounds, including florbetapir, florbetaben, and flutemetamol, among others. Despite the high sensitivity and specificity of amyloid imaging, it is not commonly used in clinical practice, mainly because it is not reimbursed under current Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services guidelines in the USA. To guide the field in who would be most appropriate for the utility of amyloid positron emission tomography, current studies are underway [Imaging Dementia Evidence for Amyloid Scanning (IDEAS) Study] that will inform the field on the utilization of amyloid positron emission tomography in clinical practice. With the advent of monoclonal antibodies that specifically target amyloid antibody, there is an interest, possibly a mandate, to screen potential treatment recipients to ensure that they are suitable for treatment. In this review, we summarize progress in the field to date.

  12. The vulnerable plaque: From plaque instability towards thrombus instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.

    2014-01-01

    Acuut coronair syndroom wordt meestal veroorzaakt door het scheuren van een atherosclerotische plaque in combinatie met (afsluitende) trombusvorming in de kransslagader. Plaque ruptuur en trombotische occlusie treden vaak niet gelijktijdig op, en het tijdstip van het ontstaan van klinische klachten

  13. Molecular approaches to the treatment, prophylaxis, and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: tangle formation, amyloid-β, and microglia in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Yoshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include senile plaques, neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), synaptic loss, and neurodegeneration. Senile plaques are composed of amyloid-β (Aβ) and are surrounded by microglia, a primary immune effector cell in the central nervous system. NFTs are formed by the intraneuronal accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau, and progressive synaptic and neuronal losses closely correlate with cognitive deficits in AD. Studies on responsible genes of familial AD and temporal patterns of pathological changes in brains of patients with Down's syndrome (Trisomy 21), who invariably develop neuropathology of AD, have suggested that Aβ accumulation is a primary event that influences other AD pathologies. Although details of the interaction between AD pathologies remain unclear, experimental evidences to discuss this issue have been accumulated. In this paper, we review and discuss recent findings that link the AD pathologies to each other. Further studies on the interaction between pathologies induced in AD brain may contribute to provide deep insight into the pathogenesis of AD and to develop novel therapeutic, prophylactic, and early diagnostic strategies for AD.

  14. Sortilin inhibits amyloid pathology by regulating non-specific degradation of APP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Chun-Sheng; Liu, Jia; Yang, Miao; Saadipour, Khalil; Zeng, Yue-Qin; Liao, Hong; Wang, Yan-Jiang; Bobrovskaya, Larisa; Zhou, Xin-Fu

    2018-01-01

    Amyloid plaque is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The key component beta-amyloid (Aβ) is generated via proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Sortilin (encoded by the gene Sort1) is a vacuolar protein sorting 10 protein domain-containing receptor, which is up-regulated in the brain of AD, colocalizes with amyloid plaques and interacts with APP. However, its role in amyloidogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we first found that the protein level of sortilin was up-regulated in the neocortex of aged (7 and 9months old) but not young (2 and 5months old) AD mice (APP/PS1). 9months old APP/PS1 transgenic mice with Sort1 gene knockout showed increased amyloid pathology in the brain; and this phenotype was rescued by intrahippocampal injection of AAV-hSORT1. Moreover, the 9months old APP/PS1 mice without Sort1 also displayed a decreased number of neurons and increased astrocyte activation in the hippocampus. In addition, the present study showed that the intracellular domain of sortilin was involved in the regulation of the non-specific degradation of APP. Together, our findings indicate that sortilin is a beneficial protein for the reduction of amyloid pathology in APP/PS1 mice by promoting APP degradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Expression and purification of 15N- and 13C-isotope labeled 40-residue human Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide for NMR-based structural analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Fei; Cho, Wonhwa; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) are a primary component of amyloid plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Enormous attention has been given to the structural features and functions of Aβ in amyloid fibrils and other type of aggregates in associated with development of AD. This report describes an efficient protocol to express and purify high-quality 40-residue Aβ(1–40), the most abundant Aβ in brains, for structural studies by NMR spectroscopy. Over-expression ...

  16. Selected mice models based on APP, MAPT and presenilin gene mutations in research on the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Więdłocha

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  The research conducted on animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD has provided valuable information about the pathogenesis of this disease and associated behavioral and cognitive deficits as well as the disease-associated anatomical and histopathological lesions of the brain. Transgenic technologies have enabled the creation of animal models based on mutations in APP, MAPT, presenilin genes, tau protein and apoE. Due to economic reasons studies are mainly conducted on mice. Their brain tissue, depending on the mutation, is characterized by histopathological changes, such as the presence of amyloid plaques, tau protein deposits and dystrophic neurites, gliosis, hippocampal atrophy and amyloid accumulation in vessels. Animal cognitive impairment and behavior, which can be demonstrated in behavioral tests, primarily relate to the working and reference memory, alternation and anxiety. Unfortunately, despite the various modifications specific to AD in the genome of animals, scientists have failed to create an animal model characterized by all the pathological changes that can occur in Alzheimer’s disease. Nevertheless, the role of transgenic animals is undeniable, both in research on AD neuropathology and for testing new therapies, such as immunotherapy. Despite the occurrence of abundant Alzheimer’s disease mice models this article is dedicated to selected models with mutations in the APP, MAPT and presenilin genes and their application for behavioral studies.

  17. Revisiting Randall's plaque

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    N. Abrol

    Department of Urology, Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamilnadu, India. Received 27 March 2014; received in revised form 27 .... High resolution radiography though showed a higher incidence of plaque than described by Randall, exact correlation .... These are phospholipid bound vesicles containing albumin, fetuin, ...

  18. β-Amyloid pathogenesis: Chemical properties versus cellular levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2016-01-01

    , or aggregation propensities. Cytotoxicity correlates inversely with total Aβ42 (R2=0.65, P =.016) and Aβ42/Aβ40 ratios (R2=0.76, P=.005), i.e., chemical properties that increase Aβ42 also reduce toxicity. The complexity and heterogeneity of data reveal the need to understand these phenotypes better, e.......g., by focusing on the chemical properties of the involved Aβ species....

  19. Atherosclerotic plaque rupture: local or systemic process?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgens, Esther; van Suylen, Robert-Jan; Faber, Birgit C.; Gijbels, Marion J.; Eurlings, Petra M.; Bijnens, Ann-Pascale; Cleutjens, Kitty B.; Heeneman, Sylvia; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.

    2003-01-01

    It is generally established that the unstable plaque is the major cause of acute clinical sequelae of atherosclerosis. Unfortunately, terms indicating lesions prone to plaque instability, such as "vulnerable plaque," and the different phenotypes of unstable plaques, such as plaque rupture, plaque

  20. Does aluminium bind to histidine? An NMR investigation of amyloid β12 and amyloid β16 fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Priya; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Vishwanathan, Vinaya; Jagadeesh Kumar, Dasappa; Babu, Sudhir; Ramanathan, Krishna Venkatachala; Easwaran, Kalpathy Ramaier Katchap; Nagendra, Holenarasipur Gundurao; Raghothama, Srinivasarao

    2013-07-01

    Aluminium and zinc are known to be the major triggering agents for aggregation of amyloid peptides leading to plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease. While zinc binding to histidine in Aβ (amyloid β) fragments has been implicated as responsible for aggregation, not much information is available on the interaction of aluminium with histidine. In the NMR study of the N-terminal Aβ fragments, DAEFRHDSGYEV (Aβ12) and DAEFRHDSGYEVHHQK (Aβ16) presented here, the interactions of the fragments with aluminium have been investigated. Significant chemical shifts were observed for few residues near the C-terminus when aluminium chloride was titrated with Aβ12 and Aβ16 peptides. Surprisingly, it is nonhistidine residues which seem to be involved in aluminium binding. Based on NMR constrained structure obtained by molecular modelling, aluminium-binding pockets in Aβ12 were around charged residues such as Asp, Glu. The results are discussed in terms of native structure propagation, and the relevance of histidine residues in the sequences for metal-binding interactions. We expect that the study of such short amyloid peptide fragments will not only provide clues for plaque formation in aggregated conditions but also facilitate design of potential drugs for these targets. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Extended analysis of AL-amyloid protein from abdominal wall subcutaneous fat biopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, K E; Sletten, K; Westermark, Per

    1998-01-01

    In AL-amyloidosis the cause of amyloid fibril formation in beta-pleated sheets from the precursor protein immunoglobulin light chain is not established, but studies of AL-proteins indicate that amino acid substitutions are important in the pathogenesis. Amyloid material was extracted from...... a subcutaneous fat tissue biopsy and submitted to extended protein separation, typing and amino acid sequence analyses. The AL-protein belonged to the rare immunoglobulin light chain kappa, subtype kappa IV and contained unique amino acid substitutions, mostly in the highly preserved framework regions. The study...... shows that subcutaneous fat biopsies are useful sources of amyloid material for biochemical studies....

  2. Etiology and Pathogenesis of Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehncke, Wolf-Henning

    2015-11-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic inflammatory skin disease most often appearing in the form of well-demarcated, scaly plaques. These lesions highlight the fundamental processes underlying its pathogenesis, namely, inflammation and epidermal hyperproliferation. Both phenomena are considered consequences of an intimate interplay between the innate and the adaptive immune system. This concept is supported by results of genetic studies, pointing toward the signaling pathways of nuclear factor-κB, interferon-γ, and interleukin (IL)-23 as well as antigen presentation as central axes of the psoriatic inflammation. Efficacy of biologics targeting tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-23, or IL-17 provides further evidence in favor of this model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Animal models of cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäkel, Lieke; Van Nostrand, William E; Nicoll, James A R; Werring, David J; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2017-10-15

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), due to vascular amyloid β (Aβ) deposition, is a risk factor for intracerebral haemorrhage and dementia. CAA can occur in sporadic or rare hereditary forms, and is almost invariably associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Experimental (animal) models are of great interest in studying mechanisms and potential treatments for CAA. Naturally occurring animal models of CAA exist, including cats, dogs and non-human primates, which can be used for longitudinal studies. However, due to ethical considerations and low throughput of these models, other animal models are more favourable for research. In the past two decades, a variety of transgenic mouse models expressing the human Aβ precursor protein (APP) has been developed. Many of these mouse models develop CAA in addition to senile plaques, whereas some of these models were generated specifically to study CAA. In addition, other animal models make use of a second stimulus, such as hypoperfusion or hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), to accelerate CAA. In this manuscript, we provide a comprehensive review of existing animal models for CAA, which can aid in understanding the pathophysiology of CAA and explore the response to potential therapies. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  4. Antibody responses, amyloid-beta peptide remnants and clinical effects of AN-1792 immunization in patients with AD in an interrupted trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokjohn, Tyler A; Roher, Alex E

    2009-04-01

    Post mortem examinations of AN-1792-vaccinated humans revealed this therapy produced focal senile plaque disruption. Despite the dispersal of substantial plaque material, vaccination did not constitute even a partial eradication of brain amyloid as water soluble amyloid-beta (Abeta) 40/42 increased in the gray matter compared to sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and total brain Abeta levels were not decreased. Significant aspects of AD pathology were unaffected by vaccination with both vascular amyloid and hyper-phosphorylated tau deposits appeared refractory to this therapy. In addition, vaccination resulted in the consequential and drastic expansion of the white matter (WM) amyloid pool to levels without precedent in sporadic AD patients. Although vaccination disrupted amyloid plaques, this therapy did not enhance long-term cognitive function or necessarily halt neurodegeneration. The intricate involvement of vascular pathology in AD evolution and the firm recalcitrance of vessel-associated amyloid to antibody-mediated disruption suggest that immunization therapies might be more effective if administered on a prophylactic basis before vascular impairment and well ahead of any clinically evident cognitive decline. Amyloid-beta is viewed as pathological based on the postmortem correlation of senile plaques with an AD diagnosis. It remains uncertain which of the various forms of this peptide is the most toxic and whether Abeta or senile plaques themselves serve any desirable or protective functions. The long-term cognitive effects of chronic immunotherapy producing a steadily accumulating and effectively permanent pool of disrupted Abeta peptides within the human brain are unknown. In addition, the side effects of such therapy provided on a chronic basis could extend far beyond the brain. Eagerly seeking new therapies, critical knowledge gaps should prompt us to take a more wholistic perspective viewing Abeta and the amyloid cascade as aspects of complex

  5. Structural origin of polymorphism of Alzheimer's amyloid β-fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agopian, Audrey; Guo, Zhefeng

    2012-10-01

    Formation of senile plaques containing amyloid fibrils of Aβ (amyloid β-peptide) is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Unlike globular proteins, which fold into unique structures, the fibrils of Aβ and other amyloid proteins often contain multiple polymorphs. Polymorphism of amyloid fibrils leads to different toxicity in amyloid diseases and may be the basis for prion strains, but the structural origin for fibril polymorphism is still elusive. In the present study we investigate the structural origin of two major fibril polymorphs of Aβ40: an untwisted polymorph formed under agitated conditions and a twisted polymorph formed under quiescent conditions. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we studied the inter-strand side-chain interactions at 14 spin-labelled positions in the Aβ40 sequence. The results of the present study show that the agitated fibrils have stronger inter-strand spin-spin interactions at most of the residue positions investigated. The two hydrophobic regions at residues 17-20 and 31-36 have the strongest interactions in agitated fibrils. Distance estimates on the basis of the spin exchange frequencies suggest that inter-strand distances at residues 17, 20, 32, 34 and 36 in agitated fibrils are approximately 0.2 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) closer than in quiescent fibrils. We propose that the strength of inter-strand side-chain interactions determines the degree of β-sheet twist, which then leads to the different association patterns between different cross β-units and thus distinct fibril morphologies. Therefore the inter-strand side-chain interaction may be a structural origin for fibril polymorphism in Aβ and other amyloid proteins.

  6. Molecular Mechanisms for Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Pathogenesis in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Steven A.; Harris, Elizabeth A.

    2018-01-01

    This review focuses on research in the areas of epidemiology, neuropathology, molecular biology and genetics that implicates herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) as a causative agent in the pathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Molecular mechanisms whereby HSV-1 induces AD-related pathophysiology and pathology, including neuronal production and accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ), hyperphosphorylation of tau proteins, dysregulation of calcium homeostasis, and impaired autophagy, are discussed. HSV-1 causes additional AD pathologies through mechanisms that promote neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, synaptic dysfunction, and neuronal apoptosis. The AD susceptibility genes apolipoprotein E (APOE), phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM), complement receptor 1 (CR1) and clusterin (CLU) are involved in the HSV lifecycle. Polymorphisms in these genes may affect brain susceptibility to HSV-1 infection. APOE, for example, influences susceptibility to certain viral infections, HSV-1 viral load in the brain, and the innate immune response. The AD susceptibility gene cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H) is upregulated in the AD brain and is involved in the antiviral immune response. HSV-1 interacts with additional genes to affect cognition-related pathways and key enzymes involved in Aβ production, Aβ clearance, and hyperphosphorylation of tau proteins. Aβ itself functions as an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) against various pathogens including HSV-1. Evidence is presented supporting the hypothesis that Aβ is produced as an AMP in response to HSV-1 and other brain infections, leading to Aβ deposition and plaque formation in AD. Epidemiologic studies associating HSV-1 infection with AD and cognitive impairment are discussed. Studies are reviewed supporting subclinical chronic reactivation of latent HSV-1 in the brain as significant in the pathogenesis of AD. Finally, the rationale for and importance of clinical

  7. New Insights in the Amyloid-Beta Interaction with Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Spuch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Particularly, mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of amyloid-beta-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. The recent emphasis on the intracellular biology of amyloid-beta and its precursor protein (APP has led researchers to consider the possibility that mitochondria-associated and mitochondrial amyloid-beta may directly cause neurotoxicity. Both proteins are known to localize to mitochondrial membranes, block the transport of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to mitochondria, interact with mitochondrial proteins, disrupt the electron transport chain, increase reactive oxygen species production, cause mitochondrial damage, and prevent neurons from functioning normally. In this paper, we will outline current knowledge of the intracellular localization of amyloid-beta. Moreover, we summarize evidence from AD postmortem brain as well as animal AD models showing that amyloid-beta triggers mitochondrial dysfunction through a number of pathways such as impairment of oxidative phosphorylation, elevation of reactive oxygen species production, alteration of mitochondrial dynamics, and interaction with mitochondrial proteins. Thus, this paper supports the Alzheimer cascade mitochondrial hypothesis such as the most important early events in this disease, and probably one of the future strategies on the therapy of this neurodegenerative disease.

  8. NGP 555, a γ-Secretase Modulator, Lowers the Amyloid Biomarker, Aβ42,in Cerebrospinal Fluid while Preventing Alzheimer's Disease Cognitive Decline in Rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kounnas, Maria Z; Lane-Donovan, Courtney; Nowakowski, Dan W; Herz, Joachim; Comer, William T

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is defined by the progressive accumulation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain which precedes cognitive decline by years. Using amyloid biomarkers, chemical modeling, mouse behavioral models, and drug development techniques we investigate the properties of NGP 555, a clinical-stage γ-secretase modulator. NGP 555 shifts amyloid peptide production to the smaller, non-aggregating forms of amyloid. Our preclinical studies show beneficial effects on amyloid biomarkers, pathology, and cognition. NGP 555 has successfully completed chemistry, pharmacology, toxicity, metabolism, and safety studies. Abundant data support Aβ 42 as a target for prophylactic or early-stage intervention therapies in AD. The γ-secretase modulator, NGP 555 is being actively developed in human clinical trials for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease with the overall aim to achieve an appropriate balance of potency/efficacy on reducing the toxic forms of amyloid versus safety.

  9. Variation of amino acid sequences of serum amyloid a (SAA) and immunohistochemical analysis of amyloid a (AA) in Japanese domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tei, Meina; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Chambers, James K; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Tamamoto, Takashi; Ohno, Koichi; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2018-02-02

    Amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, a fatal systemic amyloid disease, occurs secondary to chronic inflammatory conditions in humans. Although persistently elevated serum amyloid A (SAA) levels are required for its pathogenesis, not all individuals with chronic inflammation necessarily develop AA amyloidosis. Furthermore, many diseases in cats are associated with the elevated production of SAA, whereas only a small number actually develop AA amyloidosis. We hypothesized that a genetic mutation in the SAA gene may strongly contribute to the pathogenesis of feline AA amyloidosis. In the present study, genomic DNA from four Japanese domestic cats (JDCs) with AA amyloidosis and from five without amyloidosis was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and direct sequencing. We identified the novel variation combination of 45R-51A in the deduced amino acid sequences of four JDCs with amyloidosis and five without. However, there was no relationship between amino acid variations and the distribution of AA amyloid deposits, indicating that differences in SAA sequences do not contribute to the pathogenesis of AA amyloidosis. Immunohistochemical analysis using antisera against the three different parts of the feline SAA protein-i.e., the N-terminal, central, and C-terminal regions-revealed that feline AA contained the C-terminus, unlike human AA. These results indicate that the cleavage and degradation of the C-terminus are not essential for amyloid fibril formation in JDCs.

  10. Amyloid beta 1-42 and phoshorylated tau threonin 231 in brains of aged cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Shalahudin Darusman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Pathological hallmarks indicative of Alzheimer’s disease, which are the plaques of Amyloid Beta 1-42 and neurofibrillary tangles, were found in brain of aged cynomolgus monkey. The aim of the study was to investigate if aged monkeys exhibiting spatial memory impairment and levels of biomarkers indicative of Alzheimer’s disease, had brain lesions similar to human patients suffering from senile dementia. Generating immunohistochemistry technique to biomarkers of Amyloid beta 1-42 and the phosphorylated tau 231, our study assessed the amyloidopathy, such as indicative to the senile plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and the tauopathy, to possible neurofibrillary tangles. Six aged monkeys were selected based on their spatial memory performance and profile of biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease, divided equally to affected aged subject - with Memory-affected and low amyloid level, and aged with higher performance in memory and amyloid, as the age-matched subjects. Using immunohistochemistry, plaques of Amyloid Beta 1-42 were observed in two out of three brains of aged subjects with memory impairment and biomarkers indicative of Alzheimer’s disease. The cerebral amyloid angiopathy was observed in both aged monkey groups, and unlike in the human, the amyloids were found to deposit in the small veins and capillaries. In one of the affected individuals, phosphorylated tau was positively stained intracellularly of the neurons, indicating a possibility of an early stage of the formation of tangles. These findings add to the body of evidence of the utility of the aged cynomolgus monkeys as a spontaneous model for Alzheimer-related disease.

  11. Amyloid β Oligomeric Species Present in the Lag Phase of Amyloid Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wolff

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD-associated amyloid β peptide (Aβ is one of the main actors in AD pathogenesis. Aβ is characterized by its high tendency to self-associate, leading to the generation of oligomers and amyloid fibrils. The elucidation of pathways and intermediates is crucial for the understanding of protein assembly mechanisms in general and in conjunction with neurodegenerative diseases, e.g., for the identification of new therapeutic targets. Our study focused on Aβ42 and its oligomeric assemblies in the lag phase of amyloid formation, as studied by sedimentation velocity (SV centrifugation. The assembly state of Aβ during the lag phase, the time required by an Aβ solution to reach the exponential growth phase of aggregation, was characterized by a dominant monomer fraction below 1 S and a population of oligomeric species between 4 and 16 S. From the oligomer population, two major species close to a 12-mer and an 18-mer with a globular shape were identified. The recurrence of these two species at different initial concentrations and experimental conditions as the smallest assemblies present in solution supports the existence of distinct, energetically favored assemblies in solution. The sizes of the two species suggest an Aβ42 aggregation pathway that is based on a basic hexameric building block. The study demonstrates the potential of SV analysis for the evaluation of protein aggregation pathways.

  12. Microglia in diffuse plaques in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (Dutch). An immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maat-Schieman, M L; Rozemuller, A J; van Duinen, S G; Haan, J; Eikelenboom, P; Roos, R A

    1994-09-01

    In hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (Dutch) (HCHWA-D) beta/A4 amyloid deposition is found in meningocortical blood vessels and in diffuse plaques in the cerebral cortex. Diffuse plaques putatively represent early stages in the formation of senile plaques. Microglia are intimately associated with congophilic plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but microglial involvement in diffuse plaque formation is controversial. Therefore, we studied the relationship between microglia and diffuse plaques in the cerebral cortex of four patients with HCHWA-D using a panel of macrophage/microglia markers (mAbs LCA, LeuM5, LeuM3, LN3, KP1, OKIa, CLB54, Mac1, Ki-M6, AMC30 and the lectin RCA-1). Eight AD patients, one demented Down's syndrome (DS) patient and four non-demented controls were included for comparison. In controls and HCHWA-D patients ramified or "resting" microglia formed a reticular array in cortical gray and subcortical white matter. Microglial cells in or near HCHWA-D diffuse plaques retained their normal regular spacing and ramified morphology. In AD/DS gray matter more microglial cells were stained than in controls and HCHWA-D patients. Intensely immunoreactive microglia with enlarged cell bodies and short, thick processes clustered in congophilic plaques. In contrast to the resting microglia, these "activated microglia" strongly expressed class II major histocompatibility complex antigen, HLA-DR, and were AMC30-immunoreactive. These findings support the view that microglia play a role in the formation of congophilic plaques but do not initiate diffuse plaque formation. Another finding in this study is the presence of strong monocyte/macrophage marker immunoreactivity in the wall of cortical congophilic blood vessels in HCHWA-D.

  13. Infliximab in the treatment of plaque type psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosita Saraceno

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Rosita Saraceno, Andrea Saggini, Lucia Pietroleonardo, Sergio ChimentiDepartment of Dermatology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Viale Oxford 81, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Psoriasis is a chronic and immunomediated skin disease characterized by erythematous scaly plaques. Psoriasis affects approximately 1% to 3% of the Caucasian population. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α is a proinflammatory cytokine that plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Infliximab is an anti-TNF-α drug widely used for the treatment of plaque type psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Controlled clinical trials demonstrated that infliximab is characterized by a high degree of clinical response in moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Moreover infliximab showed rapid efficacy in nail psoriasis which represents a therapeutic challenge for dermatologists and a relevant source of distress for patients with plaque psoriasis. This anti-TNF-α has an encouraging safety profile, especially as long as physicians are watchful in prevention and early diagnosis of infections and infuse reactions. The efficacy, tolerability and safety profiles suggest infliximab as a suitable anti-psoriatic drug in the long-term treatment of a chronic disease such as plaque-type psoriasis.Keywords: psoriasis, nail psoriasis, infliximab, long-term treatment

  14. Periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Saroj K; Mukherjee, Manish; Kaushik, R; Sen, Sourav; Kumar, Mukesh

    2014-01-01

    There has been increasing attention paid in recent years to the possibility that oral bacterial infection, particularly periodontal disease may influence the initiation and or progression of systemic diseases. These studies confirm the observation that heart disease is the most commonly found systemic condition in patients with periodontal disease. Moreover, the literature has also highlighted substantial evidence indicating the presence of Gram-negative periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaques. This study intends to investigate the possible association between periodontal health and coronary artery disease by evaluating periodontal status, association between the periodontal plaque and coronary atheromatous plaques for presence of micro-organisms such as, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Tannerella forsythia. A case-control study was designed with seven patients who had undergone coronary endarterectomy for cardiovascular disease and 28 controls. The periodontal examination for cases was performed 1 day before vascular surgery and the controls were clinically examined. The atheromatous plaque sample collected during endarterectomy and the intraoral plaque samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction for identification of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, P. intermedia and T. forsythia. The presence of periodontal bacteria DNA in coronary atheromatous plaques and sub-gingival plaque samples of the same patients was confirmed by this study. CONCLUSION A correlation was established between putative bacteria contributing to atheromatous plaques and species associated with periodontal disease. One particularly important study to be carried out is the investigation of a possible clinically meaningful reduction in coronary heart disease resulting from the prevention or treatment of periodontal disease.

  15. [German Society of Nuclear Medicine procedure guideline on beta-amyloid brain PET imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Henryk; Meyer, Philipp T; Drzezga, Alexander; Bartenstein, Peter; Boecker, Henning; Brust, Peter; Buchert, Ralph; Coenen, Heinz H; la Fougère, Christian; Gründer, Gerhard; Grünwald, Frank; Krause, Bernd J; Kuwert, Torsten; Schreckenberger, Matthias; Tatsch, Klaus; Langen, Karl-Josef; Sabri, Osama

    2016-08-05

    Recently, a number of positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been approved for clinical use. These tracers target cerebral beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Increasing use of this method implies the need for respective standards. This German Society of Nuclear Medicine guideline describes adequate procedures for Aβ plaque PET imaging. It not only discusses the tracers used for that purpose, but also lists measures for correct patient preparation, image data generation, processing, analysis and interpretation. With that, this "S1" category (according to the German Association of the Scientific Medical Societies standard) guideline aims at contributing to quality assurance of nuclear imaging in Germany.

  16. Concept of Remission in Chronic Plaque Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisondi, Paolo; Di Mercurio, Marco; Idolazzi, Luca; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2015-11-01

    Psoriasis is a lifelong chronic inflammatory disease affecting 2-3% of the worldwide population. Current understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriasis assigns central importance to an interaction between acquired and innate immunity. The disease is characterized by a series of linked cellular changes in the skin, including hyperplasia of epidermal keratinocytes, angiogenesis, and infiltration of T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and other types of leukocytes in the affected skin. Plaque psoriasis is the most common clinical form and is characterized by red and scaly plaques generally localized at extensor sites such as elbows and knees. Major determinants of psoriasis severity include the extent of skin involvement; localization in highly affected areas such as scalp, palms, and soles; pruritus; presence of comorbidities including psoriatic arthritis; and impairment on quality of life. About one-third of patients have moderate to severe psoriasis defined as PASI (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index) and/or Dermatology Life Quality Index>10, and/or affected body surface area>10%. The optimal treatment goal is to safely achieve complete or almost complete skin clearance. Treatments available are various and they are chosen according to disease features, comorbidities, and patient characteristics and priorities. Topical treatments including corticosteroids and Vitamin D analogs are reserved for mild disease. Phototherapy, cyclosporine, methotrexate, acitretin, or biologics such as tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists and ustekinumab are reserved for the moderate to severe forms.

  17. Sortilin Fragments Deposit at Senile Plaques in Human Cerebrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Hu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variations in the vacuolar protein sorting 10 protein (Vps10p family have been linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Here we demonstrate deposition of fragments from the Vps10p member sortilin at senile plaques (SPs in aged and AD human cerebrum. Sortilin changes were characterized in postmortem brains with antibodies against the extracellular and intracellular C-terminal domains. The two antibodies exhibited identical labeling in normal human cerebrum, occurring in the somata and dendrites of cortical and hippocampal neurons. The C-terminal antibody also marked extracellular lesions in some aged and all AD cases, appearing as isolated fibrils, mini-plaques, dense-packing or circular mature-looking plaques. Sortilin and β-amyloid (Aβ deposition were correlated overtly in a region/lamina- and case-dependent manner as analyzed in the temporal lobe structures, with co-localized immunofluorescence seen at individual SPs. However, sortilin deposition rarely occurred around the pia, at vascular wall or in areas with typical diffuse Aβ deposition, with the labeling not enhanced by section pretreatment with heating or formic acid. Levels of a major sortilin fragment ~15 kDa, predicted to derive from the C-terminal region, were dramatically elevated in AD relative to control cortical lysates. Thus, sortilin fragments are a prominent constituent of the extracellularly deposited protein products at SPs in human cerebrum.

  18. Effect of four medicinal plants on Amyloid-β induced neurotoxicity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amyloid-beta peptide (Aâ) is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder. This study was designed to determine the effect of four medicinal plants used to treat neurodegenerative diseases on Aâ-induced cell death. Cytotoxicity of the ethanol extracts of the plants was ...

  19. Targeted Magnetic Nanoparticles for Remote Magnetothermal Disruption of Amyloid-β Aggregates

    OpenAIRE

    Loynachan, Colleen; Romero Uribe, Gabriela; Christiansen, Michael G.; Chen, Ritchie; Ellison, Rachel M.; O'Malley, Tiernan T.; Froriep, Ulrich; Walsh, Dominic M.; Anikeeva, Polina Olegovna

    2015-01-01

    Remotely triggered hysteretic heat dissipation by magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) selectively attached to targeted proteins can be used to break up self-assembled aggregates. This magnetothermal approach is applied to the amyloid-β (Aβ) protein, which forms dense, insoluble plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. Specific targeting of dilute MNPs to Aβ aggregates is confirmed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and is found to be consistent with a statistical model of MNP distribu...

  20. Galantamine slows down plaque formation and behavioral decline in the 5XFAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumee Bhattacharya

    Full Text Available The plant alkaloid galantamine is an established symptomatic drug treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD, providing temporary cognitive and global relief in human patients. In this study, the 5X Familial Alzheimer's Disease (5XFAD mouse model was used to investigate the effect of chronic galantamine treatment on behavior and amyloid β (Aβ plaque deposition in the mouse brain. Quantification of plaques in untreated 5XFAD mice showed a gender specific phenotype; the plaque density increased steadily reaching saturation in males after 10 months of age, whereas in females the density further increased until after 14 months of age. Moreover, females consistently displayed a higher plaque density in comparison to males of the same age. Chronic oral treatment with galantamine resulted in improved performance in behavioral tests, such as open field and light-dark avoidance, already at mildly affected stages compared to untreated controls. Treated animals of both sexes showed significantly lower plaque density in the brain, i.e., the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, gliosis being always positively correlated to plaque load. A high dose treatment with a daily uptake of 26 mg/kg body weight was tolerated well and produced significantly larger positive effects than a lower dose treatment (14 mg/kg body weight in terms of plaque density and behavior. These results strongly support that galantamine, in addition to improving cognitive and behavioral symptoms in AD, may have disease-modifying and neuroprotective properties, as is indicated by delayed Aβ plaque formation and reduced gliosis.

  1. Beta-Amyloid Deposition and Alzheimer's Type Changes Induced by Borrelia Spirochetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklossy,J.; Kis, A.; Radenovic, A.; Miller, L.; Forro, L.; Martins, R.; Reiss, K.; Darbinian, N.; Darekar, P.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) consist of {beta}-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in affected brain areas. The processes, which drive this host reaction are unknown. To determine whether an analogous host reaction to that occurring in AD could be induced by infectious agents, we exposed mammalian glial and neuronal cells in vitro to Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes and to the inflammatory bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Morphological changes analogous to the amyloid deposits of AD brain were observed following 2-8 weeks of exposure to the spirochetes. Increased levels of {beta}-amyloid presursor protein (A{beta}PP) and hyperphosphorylated tau were also detected by Western blots of extracts of cultured cells that had been treated with spirochetes or LPS. These observations indicate that, by exposure to bacteria or to their toxic products, host responses similar in nature to those observed in AD may be induced.

  2. Impact of peripheral myeloid cells on amyloid-β pathology in Alzheimer's disease-like mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Stefan; Miller, Kelly R; Drost, Natalia; Handrick, Susann; Mathur, Vidhu; Luo, Jian; Wegner, Anja; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Heppner, Frank L

    2015-10-19

    Although central nervous system-resident microglia are believed to be ineffective at phagocytosing and clearing amyloid-β (Aβ), a major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), it has been suggested that peripheral myeloid cells constitute a heterogeneous cell population with greater Aβ-clearing capabilities. Here, we demonstrate that the conditional ablation of resident microglia in CD11b-HSVTK (TK) mice is followed by a rapid repopulation of the brain by peripherally derived myeloid cells. We used this system to directly assess the ability of peripheral macrophages to reduce Aβ plaque pathology and therefore depleted and replaced the pool of resident microglia with peripherally derived myeloid cells in Aβ-carrying APPPS1 mice crossed to TK mice (APPPS1;TK). Despite a nearly complete exchange of resident microglia with peripheral myeloid cells, there was no significant change in Aβ burden or APP processing in APPPS1;TK mice. Importantly, however, newly recruited peripheral myeloid cells failed to cluster around Aβ deposits. Even additional anti-Aβ antibody treatment aimed at engaging myeloid cells with amyloid plaques neither directed peripherally derived myeloid cells to amyloid plaques nor altered Aβ burden. These data demonstrate that mere recruitment of peripheral myeloid cells to the brain is insufficient in substantially clearing Aβ burden and suggest that specific additional triggers appear to be required to exploit the full potential of myeloid cell-based therapies for AD. © 2015 Prokop et al.

  3. Calcium signaling and amyloid toxicity in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuro, Angelo; Parker, Ian; Stutzmann, Grace E

    2010-04-23

    Intracellular Ca(2+) signaling is fundamental to neuronal physiology and viability. Because of its ubiquitous roles, disruptions in Ca(2+) homeostasis are implicated in diverse disease processes and have become a major focus of study in multifactorial neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD). A hallmark of AD is the excessive production of beta-amyloid (Abeta) and its massive accumulation in amyloid plaques. In this minireview, we highlight the pathogenic interactions between altered cellular Ca(2+) signaling and Abeta in its different aggregation states and how these elements coalesce to alter the course of the neurodegenerative disease. Ca(2+) and Abeta intersect at several functional levels and temporal stages of AD, thereby altering neurotransmitter receptor properties, disrupting membrane integrity, and initiating apoptotic signaling cascades. Notably, there are reciprocal interactions between Ca(2+) pathways and amyloid pathology; altered Ca(2+) signaling accelerates Abeta formation, whereas Abeta peptides, particularly in soluble oligomeric forms, induce Ca(2+) disruptions. A degenerative feed-forward cycle of toxic Abeta generation and Ca(2+) perturbations results, which in turn can spin off to accelerate more global neuropathological cascades, ultimately leading to synaptic breakdown, cell death, and devastating memory loss. Although no cause or cure is currently known, targeting Ca(2+) dyshomeostasis as an underlying and integral component of AD pathology may result in novel and effective treatments for AD.

  4. Highlighting Interleukin-36 Signalling in Plaque Psoriasis and Pustular Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furue, Kazuhisa; Yamamura, Kazuhiko; Tsuji, Gaku; Mitoma, Chikage; Uchi, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Takeshi; Kido-Nakahara, Makiko; Kadono, Takafumi; Furue, Masutaka

    2018-01-12

    Plaque psoriasis and pustular psoriasis are overlapping, but distinct, disorders. The therapeutic response to biologics supports the pivotal role of the tumour necrosis alpha (TNF-?)/ interleukin (IL)-23/IL-17/IL-22 axis in the pathogenesis of these disorders. Recently, functional activation of the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R) was discovered to be another driving force in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. This was first highlighted by the discovery that a loss-of-function mutation of the IL-36R antagonist (IL-36Ra) causes pustular psoriasis. Although the TNF-?/IL-23/IL-17/IL-22 axis and the functional activation of IL-36R are fundamentally involved in plaque psoriasis and pustular psoriasis, respectively, the 2 pathways are closely related and mutually reinforced, resulting in full-blown clinical manifestations. This review summarizes current topics on how IL-36 agonists (IL-36?, IL-36?, IL-36?) signal IL-36R, the pathological expression of IL-36 agonists and IL-36Ra in plaque and pustular psoriatic lesions, and the cross-talk between the TNF-?/IL-23/IL-17/IL-22 axis and the functional activation of IL-36R in the epidermal milieu.

  5. Curcumin Targeted, Polymalic Acid-Based MRI Contrast Agent for the Detection of Aβ Plaques in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Rameshwar; Gangalum, Pallavi R; Wagner, Shawn; Portilla-Arias, Jose; Ding, Hui; Rekechenetskiy, Arthur; Konda, Bindu; Inoue, Satoshi; Black, Keith L; Ljubimova, Julia Y; Holler, Eggehard

    2015-09-01

    Currently, there is no gadolinium-based contrast agent available for conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection of amyloidal beta (Aβ) plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Its timely finding would be vital for patient survival and quality of life. Curcumin (CUR), a common Indian spice effectively binds to Aβ plaques which is a hallmark of AD. To address this binding, we have designed a novel nanoimaging agent (NIA) based on nature-derived poly(β-l-malic acid) (PMLA) containing covalently attached gadolinium-DOTA(Gd-DOTA) and nature-derived CUR. The all-in-one agent recognizes and selectively binds to Aβ plaques and is detected by MRI. It efficiently detected Aβ plaques in human and mouse samples by an ex vivo staining. The method can be useful in clinic for safe and noninvasive diagnosis of AD. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj K. Rath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been increasing attention paid in recent years to the possibility that oral bacterial infection, particularly periodontal disease may influence the initiation and or progression of systemic diseases. These studies confirm the observation that heart disease is the most commonly found systemic condition in patients with periodontal disease. Moreover, the literature has also highlighted substantial evidence indicating the presence of Gram-negative periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaques. Aim: This study intends to investigate the possible association between periodontal health and coronary artery disease by evaluating periodontal status, association between the periodontal plaque and coronary atheromatous plaques for presence of micro-organisms such as, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Tannerella forsythia. Materials and methods: A case-control study was designed with seven patients who had undergone coronary endarterectomy for cardiovascular disease and 28 controls. The periodontal examination for cases was performed 1 day before vascular surgery and the controls were clinically examined. The atheromatous plaque sample collected during endarterectomy and the intraoral plaque samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction for identification of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, P. intermedia and T. forsythia. Results: The presence of periodontal bacteria DNA in coronary atheromatous plaques and sub-gingival plaque samples of the same patients was confirmed by this study. CONCLUSION A correlation was established between putative bacteria contributing to atheromatous plaques and species associated with periodontal disease. One particularly important study to be carried out is the investigation of a possible clinically meaningful reduction in coronary heart disease resulting from the prevention or treatment of periodontal disease.

  7. MRI evaluation of amyloid myopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzler, J.P.; Fleckenstein, J.L.; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX; White, C.L. III; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX; Haller, R.G.; Greenlee, R.G. Jr.; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX; Frenkel, E.P.; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Dallas, TX

    1992-01-01

    Amyloid myopathy is a rare complication of primary amyloidosis. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of two patients with amyloid myopathy were studied. Slight prolongation of muscle T1 and T2 relaxation times was evident but the striking abnormality was marked reticulation of the subcutaneous fat. The clinical findings of indurated extremities far exceeds the minimal signal intenisty alteration seen in the muscles. The MR appearance of amyloid myopathy differs from that of other neuromuscular conditions in the minimal changes found in muscle, but the striking abnormality seen in subcutaneous fat makes it distinct from many neuromuscular conditions. (orig.)

  8. Magnetite-Amyloid-β deteriorates activity and functional organization in an in vitro model for Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Sara; Tahirbegi, Islam Bogachan; Mir, Mònica; Samitier, Josep; Soriano, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    The understanding of the key mechanisms behind human brain deterioration in Alzheimer’ disease (AD) is a highly active field of research. The most widespread hypothesis considers a cascade of events initiated by amyloid-β peptide fibrils that ultimately lead to the formation of the lethal amyloid plaques. Recent studies have shown that other agents, in particular magnetite, can also play a pivotal role. To shed light on the action of magnetite and amyloid-β in the deterioration of neuronal circuits, we investigated their capacity to alter spontaneous activity patterns in cultured neuronal networks. Using a versatile experimental platform that allows the parallel monitoring of several cultures, the activity in controls was compared with the one in cultures dosed with magnetite, amyloid-β and magnetite-amyloid-β complex. A prominent degradation in spontaneous activity was observed solely when amyloid-β and magnetite acted together. Our work suggests that magnetite nanoparticles have a more prominent role in AD than previously thought, and may bring new insights in the understanding of the damaging action of magnetite-amyloid-β complex. Our experimental system also offers new interesting perspectives to explore key biochemical players in neurological disorders through a controlled, model system manner.

  9. Intraplaque Hemorrhage and the Plaque Surface in Carotid Atherosclerosis: The Plaque At RISK Study (PARISK)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, A. C.; Truijman, M. T. B.; Hussain, B.; Zadi, T.; Saiedie, G.; de Rotte, A. A. J.; Liem, M. I.; van der Steen, A. F. W.; Daemen, M. J. A. P.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Nederkoorn, P. J.; Hendrikse, J.; Kooi, M. E.; van der Lugt, A.

    2015-01-01

    An important characteristic of vulnerable plaque, intraplaque hemorrhage, may predict plaque rupture. Plaque rupture can be visible on noninvasive imaging as a disruption of the plaque surface. We investigated the association between intraplaque hemorrhage and disruption of the plaque surface. We

  10. Protein Polymers and Amyloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Michael Wulff

    2014-01-01

    Several human disorders are caused by a common general disease mechanism arising from abnormal folding and aggregation of the underlying protein. These include the prevalent dementias like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, where accumulation of protein fibrillar structures, known as amyloid fibrils...... that inhibits its target protease through a large conformational change but mutations compromise this function and cause premature structural collapse into hyperstable polymers. Understanding the conformational disorders at a molecular level is not only important for our general knowledge on protein folding......, underlining the importance of understanding this relationship. The monomeric C-36 peptide was investigated by liquid-state NMR spectroscopy and found to be intrinsically disordered with minor propensities towards β-sheet structure. The plasticity of such a peptide makes it suitable for a whole range...

  11. Serum Amyloid A as a Marker of Persistent Inflammation and an Indicator of Cardiovascular and Renal Involvement in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Targońska-Stępniak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic, inflammatory disease. Serum amyloid A (SAA is an acute-phase protein, involved in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of the study was to assess serum concentration of SAA in RA patients, with reference to other inflammatory parameters and markers of extra-articular involvement. Methods. The study population consisted of 140 RA patients, low/moderate disease activity (L/MDA in 98 (70% patients and high disease activity (HDA in 42 (30%. Comprehensive clinical and laboratory assessment was performed with evaluation of electrocardiogram and carotid intima-media thickness. Results. The mean SAA concentration [327.0 (263.4 mg/L] was increased highly above the normal value, even in patients with L/MDA. Simultaneously, SAA was significantly higher in patients with HDA versus L/MDA. The mean SAA concentration was significantly higher in patients treated with glucocorticoids, was inversely associated with QTc duration, and was markedly higher in patients with atherosclerotic plaques, emphasizing increased CV risk. SAA was significantly higher in patients with increased cystatin-C level. Conclusions. In RA patients, high serum SAA concentration was strongly associated with activity of the disease and risk of CV and renal involvement. Recurrent assessment of SAA may facilitate searching patients with persistent inflammation and risk of extra-articular complications.

  12. The effect of amyloid pathology and glucose metabolism on cortical volume loss over time in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriaanse, Sofie M. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van Dijk, Koene R.A. [Harvard University, Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Cambridge, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Ossenkoppele, Rik; Tolboom, Nelleke; Zwan, Marissa D.; Barkhof, Frederik; Berckel, Bart N.M. van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reuter, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Yaqub, Maqsood; Boellaard, Ronald; Windhorst, Albert D.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    The present multimodal neuroimaging study examined whether amyloid pathology and glucose metabolism are related to cortical volume loss over time in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and healthy elderly controls. Structural MRI scans of eleven AD patients and ten controls were available at baseline and follow-up (mean interval 2.5 years). Change in brain structure over time was defined as percent change of cortical volume within seven a-priori defined regions that typically show the strongest structural loss in AD. In addition, two PET scans were performed at baseline: [{sup 11}C]PIB to assess amyloidplaque load and [{sup 18}F]FDG to assess glucose metabolism. [{sup 11}C]PIB binding and [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake were measured in the precuneus, a region in which both amyloid deposition and glucose hypometabolism occur early in the course of AD. While amyloidplaque load at baseline was not related to cortical volume loss over time in either group, glucose metabolism within the group of AD patients was significantly related to volume loss over time (rho = 0.56, p < 0.05). The present study shows that in a group of AD patients amyloidplaque load as measured by [{sup 11}C]PIB behaves as a trait marker (i.e., all AD patients showed elevated levels of amyloid, not related to subsequent disease course), whilst hypometabolism as measured by [{sup 18}F]FDG changed over time indicating that it could serve as a state marker that is predictive of neurodegeneration. (orig.)

  13. Key Aging-Associated Alterations in Primary Microglia Response to Beta-Amyloid Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Caldeira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and believed to be driven by the self-aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ peptide into oligomers and fibrils that accumulate as senile plaques. It is widely accepted that microglia-mediated inflammation is a significant contributor to disease pathogenesis; however, different microglia phenotypes were identified along AD progression and excessive Aβ production was shown to dysregulate cell function. As so, the contribution of microglia to AD pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. In this study, we wondered if isolated microglia cultured for 16 days in vitro (DIV would react differentially from the 2 DIV cells upon treatment with 1000 nM Aβ1–42 for 24 h. No changes in cell viability were observed and morphometric alterations associated to microglia activation, such as volume increase and process shortening, were obvious in 2 DIV microglia, but less evident in 16 DIV cells. These cells showed lower phagocytic, migration and autophagic properties after Aβ treatment than the 2 DIV cultured microglia. Reduced phagocytosis may derive from increased CD33 expression, reduced triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2 and milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 protein (MFG-E8 levels, which were mainly observed in 16 DIV cells. Activation of inflammatory mediators, such as high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as increased expression of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2, TLR4 and fractalkine/CX3C chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1 cell surface receptors were prominent in 2 DIV microglia, while elevation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9 was marked in 16 DIV cells. Increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal and upregulated miR-146a expression that were observed in 16 DIV cells showed to increase by Aβ in 2 DIV microglia. Additionally, Aβ downregulated miR-155 and miR-124, and reduced the CD11b+ subpopulation in 2 DIV microglia, while

  14. Guselkumab for the treatment of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eric J; Sanchez, Isabelle M; Beck, Kristen; Sekhon, Sahil; Wu, Jashin J; Bhutani, Tina

    2018-04-01

    Guselkumab is a human monoclonal antibody targeting the p19 subunit of IL-23 that has been approved for the treatment of adult patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis who are candidates for systemic therapy or phototherapy. This medication blocks the IL-23/IL-17 axis, which has been implicated in playing a key role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Areas covered: This review outlines the pharmacologic properties, safety, and efficacy of guselkumab for the treatment of plaque psoriasis. Expert commentary: Guselkumab is the first IL-23 specific inhibitor to be approved for the treatment of plaque psoriasis. Phase II and III clinical trial results have demonstrated excellent safety and efficacy of guselkumab. IL-23 inhibitors may offer potential benefits over existing therapies for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis in terms of safety, frequency of administration, and efficacy. Long-term safety data will be critical in evaluating the role of guselkumab in the treatment of psoriasis.

  15. Toothbrush efficacy for plaque removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, K J; Chinta, S K; Agarwal, P; Nemelivsky, M; Frisina, A C; Cao, Z; Norman, R G; Fisch, G S; Corby, P

    2014-11-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a novel sonic toothbrush in reducing plaque and in maintenance of gingival health when compared to a standard manual brush. This study was a block-randomized, examiner-blind, two-treatment, parallel group, single centre clinical investigation. A total of 84 subjects were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either the Panasonic EW-DL90 or an American Dental Association-endorsed manual toothbrush. Subjects were instructed to follow a twice-daily brushing regimen without flossing. Plaque levels and gingival health were assessed at baseline and after 1 and 3 weeks of treatment using the Turesky Modification of the Quigley-Hein Plaque Index and the Papillary Bleeding Score. Subjects assigned to the EW-DL90 group had significantly lower plaque levels after 1 and 3 weeks of treatment than those in the manual group (P = 0.003 and 0.0035, respectively). Both groups showed a reduction in plaque levels at Week 3 relative to baseline. The EW-DL90 group had significantly lower gingival inflammation scores after 1 week of treatment (P = 0.0293), but there was no difference between groups after 3 weeks of treatment. The EW-DL90 toothbrush safely and effectively removes more plaque than a standard manual toothbrush. Improvement in gingival inflammation was observed after 1 week of treatment. There was no difference in Papillary Bleeding Score between the two groups after 3 weeks of treatment. The newly developed sonic brush (Panasonic EW-DL90) tested in this study was found to be more effective than a manual toothbrush at plaque removal. The papillary bleeding scores were significantly lower in the sonic brush group after 1 week of product use. After 3 weeks of product use, both treatment groups had similar papillary bleeding scores almost returning to baseline values. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Two distinct β-sheet structures in Italian-mutant amyloid-beta fibrils : a potential link to different clinical phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubin, Ellen; Deroo, Stéphanie; Schierle, Gabriele Kaminksi; Kaminski, Clemens; Serpell, Louise; Subramaniam, Vinod; van Nuland, Nico; Broersen, Kerensa; Raussens, Vincent; Sarroukh, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    Most Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases are late-onset and characterized by the aggregation and deposition of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide in extracellular plaques in the brain. However, a few rare and hereditary Aβ mutations, such as the Italian Glu22-to-Lys (E22K) mutation, guarantee the development

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid β40 Is Decreased in Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Marcel M.; Kremer, Berry P. H.; Rikkert, Marcel Olde; van Domburg, Peter H. M. F.; Skehan, Maureen E.; Greenberg, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is caused by deposition of the amyloid β protein in the cerebral vasculature. In analogy to previous observations in Alzheimer disease, we hypothesized that analysis of amyloid β40 and β42 proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid might serve as a molecular biomarker. We observed strongly decreased cerebrospinal fluid amyloid β40 (p < 0.01 vs controls or Alzheimer disease) and amyloid β42 concentrations (p < 0.001 vs controls and p < 0.05 vs Alzheimer disease) in cerebral amyloid angiopathy patients. The combination of amyloid β42 and total tau discriminated cerebral amyloid angiopathy from controls, with an area under the receiver operator curve of 0.98. Our data are consistent with neuropathological evidence that amyloid β40 as well as amyloid β42 protein are selectively trapped in the cerebral vasculature from interstitial fluid drainage pathways that otherwise transport amyloid β proteins toward the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:19743453

  18. Primary age-related tauopathy and the amyloid cascade hypothesis: the exception that proves the rule?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, John F

    2016-01-01

    Extensive data supports the amyloid cascade hypothesis, which states that Alzheimer's disease (AD) stems from neurotoxic forms of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide. But the poor correlation between Aβ plaques and neurodegeneration/cognitive impairment, the spaciotemporal disparity between Aβ and tau pathology, and the disappointing results following several large clinical trials using Aβ-targeting agents are inconsistent with this explanation. The most perplexing inconsistency is the existence of AD-type dementia patients that develop abundant neurofibrillary tangles that are indistinguishable from those in early to moderate-stage AD in the absence of compelling evidence of amyloid toxicity. This neuropathological phenotype, which is distinct from other diseases with tangles, represents a conceptual disconnect, because it does not fall within any previously established category of tauopathy and ostensibly invalidates the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Instead, recent efforts have led to consensus criteria for a new alternative diagnostic category, which presupposes that these tangle-only dementia patients represent extreme examples of a distinct primary age-related tauopathy (PART) that is universally observed, albeit to varying degrees, in the aging brain. The cause of PART is unknown, but sufficient evidence exists to hypothesize that it stems from an Aβ-independent mechanism, such as mechanical injury. Should the PART hypothesis withstand further experimental testing, it would represent a shift in the way a subset of subjects with AD neuropathological change are classified and has the potential to focus and reaffirm the amyloid cascade hypothesis.

  19. Interactions of laminin with the amyloid ß peptide: Implications for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive neuronal cell loss is observed in Alzheimer's disease. Laminin immunoreactivity colocalizes with senile plaques, the characteristic extracellular histopathological lesions of Alzheimer brain, which consist of the amyloid ß (Aß peptide polymerized into amyloid fibrils. These lesions have neurotoxic effects and have been proposed to be a main cause of neurodegeneration. In order to understand the pathological significance of the interaction between laminin and amyloid, we investigated the effect of laminin on amyloid structure and toxicity. We found that laminin interacts with the Aß1-40 peptide, blocking fibril formation and even inducing depolymerization of preformed fibrils. Protofilaments known to be intermediate species of Aß fibril formation were also detected as intermediate species of laminin-induced Aß fibril depolymerization. Moreover, laminin-amyloid interactions inhibited the toxic effects on rat primary hippocampal neurons. As a whole, our results indicate a putative anti-amyloidogenic role of laminin which may be of biological and therapeutic interest for controlling amyloidosis, such as those observed in cerebral angiopathy and Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Iron, Copper, and Zinc Concentration in Aβ Plaques in the APP/PS1 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease Correlates with Metal Levels in the Surrounding Neuropil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Simon A; Churches, Quentin I; de Jonge, Martin D; Birchall, Ian E; Streltsov, Victor; McColl, Gawain; Adlard, Paul A; Hare, Dominic J

    2017-03-15

    The metal ions of iron, copper, and zinc have long been associated with the aggregation of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in Alzheimer's disease; an interaction that has been suggested to promote increased oxidative stress and neuronal dysfunction. We examined plaque metal load in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice using X-ray fluorescence microscopy to assess how the anatomical location of Aβ plaques was influenced by the metal content of surrounding tissue. Immunohistochemical staining of Aβ plaques colocalized with areas of increased X-ray scattering power in unstained tissue sections, allowing direct X-ray based-assessment of plaque metal levels in sections subjected to minimal chemical fixation. We identified and mapped 48 individual plaques in four subregions of the hippocampus from four biological replicates. Iron, Cu, and Zn areal concentrations (ng cm -2 ) were increased in plaques compared to the surrounding neuropil. However, this elevation in metal load reflected the local metal makeup of the surrounding neuropil, where different brain regions are enriched for different metal ions. After correcting for tissue density, only Zn levels remained elevated in plaques. This study suggests that the in vivo binding of Zn to plaques is not simply due to increased protein deposition.

  1. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a

  2. A chemical analog of curcumin as an improved inhibitor of amyloid Abeta oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Robert A; Gonzales, Amanda M; Royer, Robert E; Deck, Lorraine M; Vander Jagt, David L

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid-like plaques are characteristic lesions defining the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The size and density of these plaques are closely associated with cognitive decline. To combat this disease, the few therapies that are available rely on drugs that increase neurotransmission; however, this approach has had limited success as it has simply slowed an imminent decline and failed to target the root cause of AD. Amyloid-like deposits result from aggregation of the Aβ peptide, and thus, reducing amyloid burden by preventing Aβ aggregation represents an attractive approach to improve the therapeutic arsenal for AD. Recent studies have shown that the natural product curcumin is capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier in the CNS in sufficient quantities so as to reduce amyloid plaque burden. Based upon this bioactivity, we hypothesized that curcumin presents molecular features that make it an excellent lead compound for the development of more effective inhibitors of Aβ aggregation. To explore this hypothesis, we screened a library of curcumin analogs and identified structural features that contribute to the anti-oligomerization activity of curcumin and its analogs. First, at least one enone group in the spacer between aryl rings is necessary for measureable anti-Aβ aggregation activity. Second, an unsaturated carbon spacer between aryl rings is essential for inhibitory activity, as none of the saturated carbon spacers showed any margin of improvement over that of native curcumin. Third, methoxyl and hydroxyl substitutions in the meta- and para-positions on the aryl rings appear necessary for some measure of improved inhibitory activity. The best lead inhibitors have either their meta- and para-substituted methoxyl and hydroxyl groups reversed from that of curcumin or methoxyl or hydroxyl groups placed in both positions. The simple substitution of the para-hydroxy group on curcumin with a methoxy substitution improved inhibitor function by 6

  3. Amyloid-beta (25-35) peptide induces the release of pro-matrix metalloprotease 9 (pro-MMP-9) from human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilli, Cesare; Ciana, Annarita; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative process of the brain, leading to increasing impairment of cognitive functions, and is associated with accumulation in the brain of several amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides (as amyloid plaques), including Aβ25-35. Neutrophils, the most abundant immune cell type infiltrated in the brain of AD patients, accumulate behind amyloid plaques. Aβ peptides can trigger activation of chemotaxis and oxidative burst in neutrophils, suggesting a role in modulating the neuroinflammation process. We have shown that Aβ25-35 can induce the release from human neutrophils of pro-MMP-9, a metalloprotease involved in the onset of inflammation, corroborating the hypothesis of the involvement of infiltrated neutrophils in the inflammatory processes, which occur in the AD brain.

  4. Plaque control and oral hygiene methods

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harrison, Peter

    2017-06-01

    The experimental gingivitis study of Löe et al.1 demonstrated a cause and effect relationship between plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation, and helped to establish plaque\\/biofilm as the primary risk factor for gingivitis. When healthy individuals withdrew oral hygiene efforts, gingival inflammation ensued within 21 days in all subjects. Once effective plaque removal was recommenced, clinical gingival health was quickly re-established – indicating that plaque-associated inflammation is modifiable by plaque control. As current consensus confirms that gingivitis and periodontitis may be viewed as a continuum of disease,2 the rationale for achieving effective plaque control is clear.

  5. Proteomic screening for amyloid proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton A Nizhnikov

    Full Text Available Despite extensive study, progress in elucidation of biological functions of amyloids and their role in pathology is largely restrained due to the lack of universal and reliable biochemical methods for their discovery. All biochemical methods developed so far allowed only identification of glutamine/asparagine-rich amyloid-forming proteins or proteins comprising amyloids that form large deposits. In this article we present a proteomic approach which may enable identification of a broad range of amyloid-forming proteins independently of specific features of their sequences or levels of expression. This approach is based on the isolation of protein fractions enriched with amyloid aggregates via sedimentation by ultracentrifugation in the presence of strong ionic detergents, such as sarkosyl or SDS. Sedimented proteins are then separated either by 2D difference gel electrophoresis or by SDS-PAGE, if they are insoluble in the buffer used for 2D difference gel electrophoresis, after which they are identified by mass-spectrometry. We validated this approach by detection of known yeast prions and mammalian proteins with established capacity for amyloid formation and also revealed yeast proteins forming detergent-insoluble aggregates in the presence of human huntingtin with expanded polyglutamine domain. Notably, with one exception, all these proteins contained glutamine/asparagine-rich stretches suggesting that their aggregates arose due to polymerization cross-seeding by human huntingtin. Importantly, though the approach was developed in a yeast model, it can easily be applied to any organism thus representing an efficient and universal tool for screening for amyloid proteins.

  6. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-2,5-Bis(4’-hydroxy-3’-carboxystyryl)benzene as a Probe for β-Amyloid Fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Sergey V.; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Sviripa, Vitaliy M.; Fazio, Robert C.; Watt, David S.; LeVine, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of Aβ in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients reflects an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance from their brains. Alternative cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by processing proteases generates soluble APP fragments including the neurotoxic amyloid Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides that assemble into fibrils and form plaques. Plaque-buildup occurs over an extended time-frame, and the early detection and modulation of plaque formation are areas of active research. Radiolabeled probes for the detection of amyloid plaques and fibrils in living subjects are important for noninvasive evaluation of AD diagnosis, progression, and differentiation of AD from other neurodegenerative diseases and age-related cognitive decline. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-1-[3H]-2,5-bis(4’-hydroxy-3’-carbomethoxystyryl)benzene possesses an improved level of chemical stability relative to a previously reported radioiodinated analog for radiometric quantification of Aβ plaque and tau pathology in brain tissue and in vitro studies with synthetic Aβ and tau fibrils. PMID:25452000

  7. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-2,5-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-carboxystyryl)benzene as a probe for β-amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Sergey V; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Sviripa, Vitaliy M; Fazio, Robert C; Watt, David S; LeVine, Harry

    2014-12-01

    Accumulation of Aβ in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients reflects an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance from their brains. Alternative cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by processing proteases generates soluble APP fragments including the neurotoxic amyloid Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides that assemble into fibrils and form plaques. Plaque-buildup occurs over an extended time-frame, and the early detection and modulation of plaque formation are areas of active research. Radiolabeled probes for the detection of amyloid plaques and fibrils in living subjects are important for noninvasive evaluation of AD diagnosis, progression, and differentiation of AD from other neurodegenerative diseases and age-related cognitive decline. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-1-[(3)H]-2,5-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-carbomethoxystyryl)benzene possesses an improved level of chemical stability relative to a previously reported radioiodinated analog for radiometric quantification of Aβ plaque and tau pathology in brain tissue and in vitro studies with synthetic Aβ and tau fibrils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Riederer, Peter; Lange, Klaus W.

    1992-01-01

    The importance of genetic aspects, ageing, environmental factors, head trauma, defective mitochondrial respiration, altered iron metabolism, oxidative stress and glutamatergic overactivity of the basal ganglia in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) are considered in this review.

  9. Viral pathogenesis in diagrams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tremblay, Michel; Berthiaume, Laurent; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    .... The 268 diagrams in Viral Pathogenesis in Diagrams were selected from over 800 diagrams of English and French virological literature, including one derived from a famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci...

  10. Synchrotron-based Infrared and X-ray Imaging Shows Focalized Accumulation of Cu and Zn Co-localized With Beta-amyloid Deposits in Alzheimer's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.; Wang, Q.; Telivala, T.; Smith, R.; Lanzirotti, A.; Miklossy, J.

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the misfolding and plaque-like accumulation of a naturally occurring peptide in the brain called amyloid beta (Abeta). Recently, this process has been associated with the binding of metal ions such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn). It is thought that metal dyshomeostasis is involved in protein misfolding and may lead to oxidative stress and neuronal damage. However, the exact role of the misfolded proteins and metal ions in the degenerative process of AD is not yet clear. In this study, we used synchrotron Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (FTIRM) to image the in situ secondary structure of the amyloid plaques in brain tissue of AD patients. These results were spatially correlated with metal ion accumulation in the same tissue sample using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobe. For both techniques, a spatial resolution of 5-10 microm was achieved. FTIRM results showed that the amyloid plaques have elevated beta-sheet content, as demonstrated by a strong amide I absorbance at 1625cm(-1). Using SXRF microprobe, we find that AD tissue also contains 'hot spots' of accumulated metal ions, specifically Cu and Zn, with a strong spatial correlation between these two ions. The 'hot spots' of accumulated Zn and Cu were co-localized with beta-amyloid plaques. Thus for the first time, a strong spatial correlation has been observed between elevated beta-sheet content in Abeta plaques and accumulated Cu and Zn ions, emphasizing an association of metal ions with amyloid formation in AD

  11. Deficiency in either COX-1 or COX-2 genes does not affect amyloid beta protein burden in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Ah; Chevallier, Nathalie; Tejwani, Karishma; Hung, Mary M; Maruyama, Hiroko; Golde, Todd E; Koo, Edward H

    2016-09-09

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that chronic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with a lower risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because the primary mode of action of NSAIDs is to inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX) activity, it has been proposed that perturbed activity of COX-1 or COX-2 contributes to AD pathogenesis. To test the role of COX-1 or COX-2 in amyloid deposition and amyloid-associated inflammatory changes, we examined amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice in the context of either COX-1 or COX-2 deficiency. Our studies showed that loss of either COX-1 or COX-2 gene did not alter amyloid burden in brains of the APP transgenic mice. However, one marker of microglial activation (CD45) was decreased in brains of COX-1 deficient/APP animals and showed a strong trend in reduction in COX-2 deficient/APP animals. These results suggest that COX activity and amyloid deposition in brain are likely independent processes. Further, if NSAIDs do causally reduce the risks of AD, then our findings indicate that the mechanisms are likely not due primarily to their inhibition on COX or γ-secretase modulation activity, the latter reported recently after acute dosing of ibuprofen in humans and nonhuman primates. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Mechanistic insights into mode of action of potent natural antagonists of BACE-1 for checking Alzheimer’s plaque pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanjal, Jaspreet Kaur [School of Biotechnology, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Goyal, Sukriti [Apaji Institute of Mathematics and Applied Computer Technology, Banasthali University, Tonk 304022, Rajasthan (India); Sharma, Sudhanshu [Department of Biotechnology, Delhi Technological University, New Delhi 110042 (India); Hamid, Rabia [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190006 (India); Grover, Abhinav, E-mail: abhinavgr@gmail.com [School of Biotechnology, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Accumulation of Aβ plaques is one of the major pathology associated with Alzheimer’s disease. •Inhibition of β-Secretase or BACE-1 offers a viable prospect to check the growth of these plaques. •A large virtual dataset of natural compounds was screened against BACE-1. •Top two hits were analyzed for thermodynamic and structural stability using MD simulations. •Their detailed binding mode of actions were elucidated. -- Abstract: Alzheimer’s is a neurodegenerative disorder resulting in memory loss and decline in cognitive abilities. Accumulation of extracellular beta amyloidal plaques is one of the major pathology associated with this disease. β-Secretase or BACE-1 performs the initial and rate limiting step of amyloidic pathway in which 37–43 amino acid long peptides are generated which aggregate to form plaques. Inhibition of this enzyme offers a viable prospect to check the growth of these plaques. Numerous efforts have been made in recent years for the generation of BACE-1 inhibitors but many of them failed during the preclinical or clinical trials due to drug related or drug induced toxicity. In the present work, we have used computational methods to screen a large dataset of natural compounds to search for small molecules having BACE-1 inhibitory activity with low toxicity to normal cells. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to analyze molecular interactions between the screened compounds and the active residues of the enzyme. Herein, we report two natural compounds of inhibitory nature active against β-secretase enzyme of amyloidic pathway and are potent lead molecules against Alzheimer’s disease.

  13. Mechanistic insights into mode of action of potent natural antagonists of BACE-1 for checking Alzheimer’s plaque pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhanjal, Jaspreet Kaur; Goyal, Sukriti; Sharma, Sudhanshu; Hamid, Rabia; Grover, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Accumulation of Aβ plaques is one of the major pathology associated with Alzheimer’s disease. •Inhibition of β-Secretase or BACE-1 offers a viable prospect to check the growth of these plaques. •A large virtual dataset of natural compounds was screened against BACE-1. •Top two hits were analyzed for thermodynamic and structural stability using MD simulations. •Their detailed binding mode of actions were elucidated. -- Abstract: Alzheimer’s is a neurodegenerative disorder resulting in memory loss and decline in cognitive abilities. Accumulation of extracellular beta amyloidal plaques is one of the major pathology associated with this disease. β-Secretase or BACE-1 performs the initial and rate limiting step of amyloidic pathway in which 37–43 amino acid long peptides are generated which aggregate to form plaques. Inhibition of this enzyme offers a viable prospect to check the growth of these plaques. Numerous efforts have been made in recent years for the generation of BACE-1 inhibitors but many of them failed during the preclinical or clinical trials due to drug related or drug induced toxicity. In the present work, we have used computational methods to screen a large dataset of natural compounds to search for small molecules having BACE-1 inhibitory activity with low toxicity to normal cells. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to analyze molecular interactions between the screened compounds and the active residues of the enzyme. Herein, we report two natural compounds of inhibitory nature active against β-secretase enzyme of amyloidic pathway and are potent lead molecules against Alzheimer’s disease

  14. Apolipoprotein E: Essential Catalyst of the Alzheimer Amyloid Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huntington Potter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid cascade hypothesis remains a robust model of AD neurodegeneration. However, amyloid deposits contain proteins besides Aβ, such as apolipoprotein E (apoE. Inheritance of the apoE4 allele is the strongest genetic risk factor for late-onset AD. However, there is no consensus on how different apoE isotypes contribute to AD pathogenesis. It has been hypothesized that apoE and apoE4 in particular is an amyloid catalyst or “pathological chaperone”. Alternatively it has been posited that apoE regulates Aβ clearance, with apoE4 been worse at this function compared to apoE3. These views seem fundamentally opposed. The former would indicate that removing apoE will reduce AD pathology, while the latter suggests increasing brain ApoE levels may be beneficial. Here we consider the scientific basis of these different models of apoE function and suggest that these seemingly opposing views can be reconciled. The optimal therapeutic target may be to inhibit the interaction of apoE with Aβ rather than altering apoE levels. Such an approach will not have detrimental effects on the many beneficial roles apoE plays in neurobiology. Furthermore, other Aβ binding proteins, including ACT and apo J can inhibit or promote Aβ oligomerization/polymerization depending on conditions and might be manipulated to effect AD treatment.

  15. The early involvement of the innate immunity in the pathogenesis of late-onset Alzheimer's disease: neuropathological, epidemiological and genetic evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Veerhuis, R.; van Exel, E.; Hoozemans, J. J. M.; Rozemuller, A. J. M.; van Gool, W. A.

    2011-01-01

    The idea that an inflammatory process is involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) was proposed already hundred years ago but only the past twenty years inflammation-related proteins have been identified within plaques. A number of acute-phase proteins colocalize with the extracellular amyloid fibrils,

  16. Inhibitory Activity Of Curcumin Derivatives Towards Metal-free And Metal-induced Amyloid-β Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochi, Akiko; Lee, Hyuck Jin; Vithanarachchi, Sashiprabha M; Padmini, Vediappen; Allen, Matthew J; Lim, Mi Hee

    2015-01-01

    When Alzheimer's disease (AD) progresses, several pathological features arise including accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates [e.g., amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques], metal ion dyshomeostasis, and oxidative stress. These characteristics are recently suggested to be interconnected through a potential factor, metal-associated Aβ (metal-Aβ) species. The role of metal-Aβ species in AD pathogenesis remains unclear, however. To elucidate the contribution of metal-Aβ species to AD pathology, as well as to develop small molecules as chemical tools and/or theranostic (therapeutic and diagnostic) agents for this disease, curcumin (Cur), a natural product from turmeric, and its derivatives have been studied towards both metal-free and metal-induced Aβ aggregation. Although Cur has indicated anti-amyloidogenic activities and antioxidant properties, its biological use has been hindered due to low solubility and stability in physiologically relevant conditions. Herein, we report the reactivity of Cur and its derivatives (Gd-Cur, a potential multimodal Aβ imaging agent; Cur-S, a water soluble derivative of Cur that has substitution at the phenolic hydroxyls) with metal-free Aβ and metal-Aβ species. Our results and observations indicate that Gd-Cur could modulate Cu(II)-triggered Aβ aggregation more noticeably over metal-free or Zn(II)-induced analogues; however, Cur-S was not observed to noticeably modulate Aβ aggregation with and without metal ions. Overall, our studies present information that could aid in optimizing the molecular scaffold of Cur for the development of chemical tools or theranostics for metal-Aβ species.

  17. Distinct inflammatory phenotypes of microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages in Alzheimer's disease models: effects of aging and amyloid pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elodie; Boucher, Céline; Fontaine, Bertrand; Delarasse, Cécile

    2017-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by formation of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques, activated microglia, and neuronal cell death leading to progressive dementia. Recent data indicate that microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) are key players in the initiation and progression of AD, yet their respective roles remain to be clarified. As AD occurs mostly in the elderly and aging impairs myeloid functions, we addressed the inflammatory profile of microglia and MDM during aging in TgAPP/PS1 and TgAPP/PS1dE9, two transgenic AD mouse models, compared to WT littermates. We only found MDM infiltration in very aged mice. We determined that MDM highly expressed activation markers at basal state. In contrast, microglia exhibited an activated phenotype only with normal aging and Aβ pathology. Our study showed that CD14 and CD36, two receptors involved in phagocytosis, were upregulated during Aβ pathogenesis. Moreover, we observed, at the protein levels in AD models, higher production of pro-inflammatory mediators: IL-1β, p40, iNOS, CCL-3, CCL-4, and CXCL-1. Taken together, our data indicate that microglia and MDM display distinct phenotypes in AD models and highlight the specific effects of normal aging vs Aβ peptides on inflammatory processes that occur during the disease progression. These precise phenotypes of different subpopulations of myeloid cells in normal and pathologic conditions may allow the design of pertinent therapeutic strategy for AD. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Mechanical Stresses in Carotid Plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuel, Samuel Alberg

    simulationer, som tillod beregning af longitudinelle stress-niveauer i den fibrøse kappe. Afhandlingen indeholder tre artikler, som beskriver denne metode. Den første; “Mechanical Stresses in Carotid Plaques using MRI-Based Fluid Structure Interaction Models”, beskriver i detaljer metoden til at danne de...

  19. Contemporary perspective on plaque control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, P D

    2012-06-22

    The aim of this review article is to provide a scientific platform that will enable the dental team to develop a rational approach to plaque control based on the latest knowledge of the role of the oral microflora in health and disease. The resident oral microflora is natural and forms spatially-organised, interactive, multi-species biofilms on mucosal and dental surfaces in the mouth. These resident oral microbial communities play a key function in the normal development of the physiology of the host and are important in preventing colonisation by exogenous and often undesirable microbes. A dynamic balance exists between the resident microflora and the host in health, and disease results from a breakdown of this delicate relationship. Patients should be taught effective plaque control techniques that maintain dental biofilms at levels compatible with oral health so as to retain the beneficial properties of the resident microflora while reducing the risk of dental disease from excessive plaque accumulation. Antimicrobial and antiplaque agents in oral care products can augment mechanical plaque control by several direct and indirect mechanisms that not only involve reducing or removing dental biofilms but also include inhibiting bacterial metabolism when the agents are still present at sub-lethal concentrations.

  20. Dental plaque identification at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from your teeth. Plaque that remains on your teeth can cause tooth decay or make your gums bleed easily and become ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Dental Health Read more Tooth Decay Read more Tooth Disorders Read more A.D. ...

  1. Effect of four medicinal plants on amyloid-beta induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adewusi, EA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-beta peptide (Aß) is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder. This study was designed to determine the effect of four medicinal plants used to treat neurodegenerative diseases on Aß...

  2. Evaluation of the Expression of Amyloid Precursor Protein and the Ratio of Secreted Amyloid Beta 42 to Amyloid Beta 40 in SH-SY5Y Cells Stably Transfected with Wild-Type, Single-Mutant and Double-Mutant Forms of the APP Gene for the Study of Alzheimer's Disease Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahrudin Arrozi, Aslina; Shukri, Siti Nur Syazwani; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Ahmad Damanhuri, Mohd Hanafi; Makpol, Suzana

    2017-11-01

    Neuroblastoma cell lines such as SH-SY5Y are the most frequently utilized models in neurodegenerative research, and their use has advanced the understanding of the pathology of neurodegeneration over the past few decades. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), several pathogenic mutations have been described, all of which cause elevated levels of pathological hallmarks such as amyloid-beta (Aβ). Although the genetics of Alzheimer's disease is well known, familial AD only accounts for a small number of cases in the population, with the rest being sporadic AD, which contains no known mutations. Currently, most of the in vitro models used to study AD pathogenesis only examine the level of Aβ42 as a confirmation of successful model generation and only perform comparisons between wild-type APP and single mutants of the APP gene. Recent findings have shown that the Aβ42/40 ratio in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a better diagnostic indicator for AD patients than is Aβ42 alone and that more extensive Aβ formation, such as accumulation of intraneuronal Aβ, Aβ plaques, soluble oligomeric Aβ (oAβ), and insoluble fibrillar Aβ (fAβ) occurs in TgCRND8 mice expressing a double-mutant form (Swedish and Indiana) of APP, later leading to greater progressive impairment of the brain. In this study, we generated SH-SY5Y cells stably transfected separately with wild-type APP, the Swedish mutation of APP, and the Swedish and Indiana mutations of APP and evaluated the APP expression as well as the Aβ42/40 ratio in those cells. The double-mutant form of APP (Swedish/Indiana) expressed markedly high levels of APP protein and showed a high Aβ2/40 ratio compared to wild-type and single-mutant cells.

  3. Red autofluorescence of dental plaque bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, M. H.; Thomas, R. Z.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.; de Soet, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Red autofluorescence of plaque and its relation to fluorescence of a single species in the biofilm was studied. Fluorescence images of non-disclosed and disclosed plaque of 28 first-year students were captured. The plaque samples were assessed by culture methods and studied for red autofluorescence.

  4. The pattern of amyloid accumulation in the brains of adults with Down syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annus, Tiina; Wilson, Liam R.; Hong, Young T.; Acosta–Cabronero, Julio; Fryer, Tim D.; Cardenas–Blanco, Arturo; Smith, Robert; Boros, Istvan; Coles, Jonathan P.; Aigbirhio, Franklin I.; Menon, David K.; Zaman, Shahid H.; Nestor, Peter J.; Holland, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adults with Down syndrome (DS) invariably develop Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology. Understanding amyloid deposition in DS can yield crucial information about disease pathogenesis. Methods Forty-nine adults with DS aged 25–65 underwent positron emission tomography with Pittsburgh compound–B (PIB). Regional PIB binding was assessed with respect to age, clinical, and cognitive status. Results Abnormal PIB binding became evident from 39 years, first in striatum followed by rostral prefrontal-cingulo-parietal regions, then caudal frontal, rostral temporal, primary sensorimotor and occipital, and finally parahippocampal cortex, thalamus, and amygdala. PIB binding was related to age, diagnostic status, and cognitive function. Discussion PIB binding in DS, first appearing in striatum, began around age 40 and was strongly associated with dementia and cognitive decline. The absence of a substantial time lag between amyloid accumulation and cognitive decline contrasts to sporadic/familial AD and suggests this population's suitability for an amyloid primary prevention trial. PMID:26362596

  5. Antroquinonol Lowers Brain Amyloid-? Levels and Improves Spatial Learning and Memory in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer?s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Wen-Han; Chen, Miles C.; Cheng, Irene H.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer?s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The deposition of brain amyloid-? peptides (A?), which are cleaved from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is one of the pathological hallmarks of AD. A?-induced oxidative stress and neuroinflammation play important roles in the pathogenesis of AD. Antroquinonol, a ubiquinone derivative isolated from Antrodia camphorata, has been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines via activating the nuclear transcription fact...

  6. Neuroprotective effects of statins against amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hua Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that disruption of the homeostasis of lipid metabolism affects the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. In particular, dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis in the brain has been reported to considerably increase the risk of developing AD. Thus, dysregulation of lipid homeostasis may increase the amyloid β (Aβ levels by affecting amyloid precursor protein (APP cleavage, which is the most important risk factor involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Previous research demonstrated that Aβ can trigger neuronal insulin resistance, which plays an important role in response to Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in AD. Epidemiological studies also suggested that statin use is associated with a decreased incidence of AD. Therefore, statins are believed to be a good candidate for conferring neuroprotective effects against AD. Statins may play a beneficial role in reducing Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Their effect involves a putative mechanism beyond its cholesterol-lowering effects in preventing Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of the protective effect of statins have not been clearly determined in Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Given that statins may provide benefits beyond the inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, these drugs may also improve the brain. Thus, statins may have beneficial effects on impaired insulin signaling by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in neuronal cells. They play a potential therapeutic role in targeting Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity.

  7. Degeneration of amyloid-ß fibrils caused by exposure to low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma in aqueous solution

    OpenAIRE

    Takai, Eisuke; Ohashi, Gai; Yoshida, Tomonori; Sörgjerd, Karin Margareta; Zako, Tamotsu; Maeda, Mizuo; Kitano, Katsuhisa; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma was applied to degenerate amyloid-ß (Aß) fibrils, which are a major component of neuritic plaque associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We showed that an Aß fibril exposed to a low-frequency (LF) plasma jet in aqueous solution retained its morphology, molecular weight, and cytotoxicity, but, intriguingly, decreased in protease resistance and ß-sheet content. These results suggested that an LF plasma jet could be utilized for the treatment of AD t...

  8. Innate immunity in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, Cheryl M

    2011-12-01

    Psoriasis is a common, immune-mediated inflammatory skin disorder. T helper(h)1 and Th17 lymphocytes contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis through the release of inflammatory cytokines that promote further recruitment of immune cells, keratinocyte proliferation and sustained inflammation. The innate immune system is the first line of defence against infection and plays a crucial role in the initiation of the adaptive immune response. The presence of innate immune cells and their products in psoriatic skin plaques suggests a role for innate immunity in this disease. In addition, the innate immune system can direct the development of pathogenic Th cells in psoriasis. In this article, we will summarise the role of the innate immune system in psoriasis with particular emphasis on the role of cytokines, signalling pathways and cells of the innate immune system.

  9. Effect of the surface charge of artificial model membranes on the aggregation of amyloid β-peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaté, Raimon; Espargaró, Alba; Barbosa-Barros, Lucyanna; Ventura, Salvador; Estelrich, Joan

    2012-08-01

    The neurotoxicity effect of the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide, the primary constituent of senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease, occurs through interactions with neuronal membranes. Here, we attempt to clarify the mechanisms and consequences of the interaction of Aβ with lipid membranes. We have used liposomes as a model of biological membrane, and have devoted particular attention to the bilayer charge effect. Our results show that insertion and surface association of peptide with membrane, increased in a membrane charge-dependent manner, lead to a reduction of Aβ soluble species, lag time elongation and an increase in the inter-molecular β-sheet ratio of amyloid fibrils. In addition, our findings suggest that the fine balance between peptide insertion and surface association modulates Aβ aggregation, influencing the amyloid fibrils concentration as well as their morphology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  11. Proliferation in the Alzheimer Hippocampus Is due to Microglia, Not Astroglia, and Occurs at Sites of Amyloid Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Marlatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microglia and astrocytes contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD etiology and may mediate early neuroinflammatory responses. Despite their possible role in disease progression and despite the fact that they can respond to amyloid deposition in model systems, little is known about whether astro- or microglia can undergo proliferation in AD and whether this is related to the clinical symptoms or to local neuropathological changes. Previously, proliferation was found to be increased in glia-rich regions of the presenile hippocampus. Since their phenotype was unknown, we here used two novel triple-immunohistochemical protocols to study proliferation in astro- or microglia in relation to amyloid pathology. We selected different age-matched cohorts to study whether proliferative changes relate to clinical severity or to neuropathological changes. Proliferating cells were found across the hippocampus but never in mature neurons or astrocytes. Almost all proliferating cells were colabeled with Iba1+, indicating that particularly microglia contribute to proliferation in AD. Proliferating Iba1+ cells was specifically seen within the borders of amyloid plaques, indicative of an active involvement in, or response to, plaque accumulation. Thus, consistent with animal studies, proliferation in the AD hippocampus is due to microglia, occurs in close proximity of plaque pathology, and may contribute to the neuroinflammation common in AD.

  12. Amyloid-linked cellular toxicity triggered by bacterial inclusion bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Montalban, Nuria; Villaverde, Antonio; Aris, Anna

    2007-01-01

    The aggregation of proteins in the form of amyloid fibrils and plaques is the characteristic feature of some pathological conditions ranging from neurodegenerative disorders to systemic amyloidoses. The mechanisms by which the aggregation processes result in cell damage are under intense investigation but recent data indicate that prefibrillar aggregates are the most proximate mediators of toxicity rather than mature fibrils. Since it has been shown that prefibrillar forms of the nondisease-related misfolded proteins are highly toxic to cultured mammalian cells we have studied the cytoxicity associated to bacterial inclusion bodies that have been recently described as protein deposits presenting amyloid-like structures. We have proved that bacterial inclusion bodies composed by a misfolding-prone β-galactosidase fusion protein are clearly toxic for mammalian cells but the β-galactosidase wild type enzyme forming more structured thermal aggregates does not impair cell viability, despite it also binds and enter into the cells. These results are in the line that the most cytotoxic aggregates are early prefibrilar assemblies but discard the hypothesis that the membrane destabilization is Key event to subsequent disruption of cellular processes, such as ion balance, oxidative state and the eventually cell death

  13. Nanomechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweers, K K M; Bennink, M L; Subramaniam, V

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are traditionally associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the ability to form amyloid fibrils appears to be a more generic property of proteins. While disease-related, or pathological, amyloid fibrils are relevant for understanding the pathology and course of the disease, functional amyloids are involved, for example, in the exceptionally strong adhesive properties of natural adhesives. Amyloid fibrils are thus becoming increasingly interesting as versatile nanobiomaterials for applications in biotechnology. In the last decade a number of studies have reported on the intriguing mechanical characteristics of amyloid fibrils. In most of these studies atomic force microscopy (AFM) and atomic force spectroscopy play a central role. AFM techniques make it possible to probe, at nanometer length scales, and with exquisite control over the applied forces, biological samples in different environmental conditions. In this review we describe the different AFM techniques used for probing mechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils on the nanoscale. An overview is given of the existing mechanical studies on amyloid. We discuss the difficulties encountered with respect to the small fibril sizes and polymorphic behavior of amyloid fibrils. In particular, the different conformational packing of monomers within the fibrils leads to a heterogeneity in mechanical properties. We conclude with a brief outlook on how our knowledge of these mechanical properties of the amyloid fibrils can be exploited in the construction of nanomaterials from amyloid fibrils. (topical review)

  14. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  15. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Fowler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  16. The Complexity of Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease Pathogenesis: The Role of RAGE as Therapeutic Target to Promote Neuroprotection by Inhibiting Neurovascular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Perrone

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia. Amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are prominent pathological features of AD. Aging and age-dependent oxidative stress are the major nongenetic risk factors for AD. The beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ, the major component of plaques, and advanced glycation end products (AGEs are key activators of plaque-associated cellular dysfunction. Aβ and AGEs bind to the receptor for AGEs (RAGE, which transmits the signal from RAGE via redox-sensitive pathways to nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB. RAGE-mediated signaling is an important contributor to neurodegeneration in AD. We will summarize the current knowledge and ongoing studies on RAGE function in AD. We will also present evidence for a novel pathway induced by RAGE in AD, which leads to the expression of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP, providing further evidence that pharmacological inhibition of RAGE will promote neuroprotection by blocking neurovascular dysfunction in AD.

  17. Specific Triazine Herbicides Induce Amyloid-β42 Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelius, Erik; Durieu, Emilie; Bodin, Marion; Cam, Morgane; Pannee, Josef; Leuxe, Charlotte; Mabondzo, Aloϊse; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Hervé; Lee, Jung Yeol; Chang, Young-Tae; Stϋber, Kathrin; Koch, Philipp; Fontaine, Gaëlle; Potier, Marie-Claude; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Garbis, Spiros D; Covaci, Adrian; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter; Karg, Frank; Flajolet, Marc; Omori, Chiori; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Meijer, Laurent

    2016-10-18

    Proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) by secretases leads to extracellular release of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Increased production of Aβ42 over Aβ40 and aggregation into oligomers and plaques constitute an Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmark. Identifying products of the 'human chemical exposome' (HCE) able to induce Aβ42 production may be a key to understanding some of the initiating causes of AD and to generate non-genetic, chemically-induced AD animal models. A cell model was used to screen HCE libraries for Aβ42 inducers. Out of 3500+ compounds, six triazine herbicides were found that induced a β- and γ-secretases-dependent, 2-10 fold increase in the production of extracellular Aβ42 in various cell lines, primary neuronal cells, and neurons differentiated from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Immunoprecipitation/mass spectrometry analyses show enhanced production of Aβ peptides cleaved at positions 42/43, and reduced production of peptides cleaved at positions 38 and lower, a characteristic of AD. Neurons derived from iPSCs obtained from a familial AD (FAD) patient (AβPP K724N) produced more Aβ42 versus Aβ40 than neurons derived from healthy controls iPSCs (AβPP WT). Triazines enhanced Aβ42 production in both control and AD iPSCs-derived neurons. Triazines also shifted the cleavage pattern of alcadeinα, another γ-secretase substrate, suggesting a direct effect of triazines on γ-secretase activity. In conclusion, several widely used triazines enhance the production of toxic, aggregation prone Aβ42/Aβ43 amyloids, suggesting the possible existence of environmental "Alzheimerogens" which may contribute to the initiation and propagation of the amyloidogenic process in late-onset AD.

  18. Terapeutika amyloidóz

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, Monika; Hrubý, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 12 (2016), s. 851-859 ISSN 0009-2770 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : amyloidosis * amyloid * Alzheimer's disease Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.387, year: 2016 http://www.chemicke-listy.cz/common/article-vol_110-issue_12-page_851.html

  19. The Pathogenesis of Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy John Watts

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism is well known as a complex developmental disorder with a seemingly confusing and uncertain pathogenesis. The definitive mechanisms that promote autism are poorly understood and mostly unknown, yet available theories do appear to focus on the disruption of normal cerebral development and its subsequent implications on the functional brain unit. This mini-review aims solely to discuss and evaluate the most prominent current theories regarding the pathogenesis of autism. The main conclusion is that although there is not a clear pathway of mechanisms directed towards a simple pathogenesis and an established link to autism on the symptomatic level; there are however several important theories (neural connectivity, neural migration, excitatory-inhibitory neural activity, dendritic morphology, neuroimmune; calcium signalling and mirror neurone which appear to offer an explanation to how autism develops. It seems probable that autism's neurodevelopmental defect is ‘multi-domain’ in origin (rather than a single anomaly and is hence distributed across numerous levels of study (genetic, immunopathogenic, etc.. A more definitive understanding of the pathogenesis could facilitate the development of better treatments for this complex psychiatric disorder.

  20. Molecular Pathogenesis of Spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing

    This dissertation includes a presentation of knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis achieved through a PhD programme at Aalborg University from 1.12.2011 - 1.12.2014. Work was carried out in the Laboratory of Medical Mass Spectrometry, headed by: Professor Svend Birkelund...

  1. Nasal administration of amyloid-beta peptide decreases cerebral amyloid burden in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner, H L; Lemere, C A; Maron, R

    2000-01-01

    Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease-implicated ......Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease......-implicated proteins can induce antigen-specific anti-inflammatory immune responses in mucosal lymphoid tissue which then act systemically. We hypothesized that chronic mucosal administration of Abeta peptide might induce an anti-inflammatory process in AD brain tissue that could beneficially affect...... Abeta plaque burden and Abeta42 levels in mice treated intranasally with Abeta peptide versus controls treated with myelin basic protein or left untreated. This lower Abeta burden was associated with decreased local microglial and astrocytic activation, decreased neuritic dystrophy, serum anti...

  2. Stickland reactions of dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, M A; Kemp, C W; Robrish, S A; Bowen, W H

    1983-01-01

    Dental plaque samples from monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were shown to contain proline reduction activity in coupled Stickland reactions with other amino acids and also with certain end products of bacterial glucose metabolism. The unusually high concentration of bound and free proline in the oral environment may be of importance in both the production of base and in the removal of acid from the tooth surface after dietary carbohydrate ingestion. PMID:6618673

  3. Protective Effects of Indian Spice Curcumin Against Amyloid Beta in Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Grady, Mary Catherine; Mitchell, Andrew; Tonk, Sahil; Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar; Bhatti, Jasvinder Singh; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Vijayan, Murali; Kumar, Subodh; Wang, Rui; Adi Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli; Ogunmokun, Gilbert; Thamarai, Kavya

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to assess the current understanding of Indian spice ‘Curcumin’ against amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Natural products, such as ginger, curcumin and gingko biloba have been used as diets and dietary supplements to treat human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular, respiratory, infectious, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndromes and neurological disorders. Products derived from plants are known to have protective effe...

  4. Heterogeneous Association of Alzheimer's Disease-Linked Amyloid-β and Amyloid-β Protein Precursor with Synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willén, Katarina; Sroka, Agnieszka; Takahashi, Reisuke H; Gouras, Gunnar K

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is increasingly viewed as a disease of synapses. Loss of synapses correlates better with cognitive decline than amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the hallmark neuropathological lesions of AD. Soluble forms of amyloid-β (Aβ) have emerged as mediators of synapse dysfunction. Aβ binds to, accumulates, and aggregates in synapses. However, the anatomical and neurotransmitter specificity of Aβ and the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) in AD remain poorly understood. In addition, the relative roles of Aβ and AβPP in the development of AD, at pre- versus post-synaptic compartments and axons versus dendrites, respectively, remain unclear. Here we use immunogold electron microscopy and confocal microscopy to provide evidence for heterogeneity in the localization of Aβ/AβPP. We demonstrate that Aβ binds to a subset of synapses in cultured neurons, with preferential binding to glutamatergic compared to GABAergic neurons. We also highlight the challenge of defining pre- versus post-synaptic localization of this binding by confocal microscopy. Further, endogenous Aβ42 accumulates in both glutamatergic and GABAergic AβPP/PS1 transgenic primary neurons, but at varying levels. Moreover, upon knock-out of presenilin 1 or inhibition of γ-secretase AβPP C-terminal fragments accumulate both pre- and post-synaptically; however earlier pre-synaptically, consistent with a higher rate of AβPP processing in axons. A better understanding of the synaptic and anatomical selectivity of Aβ/AβPP in AD can be important for the development of more effective new therapies for this major disease of aging.

  5. Heterogeneous Association of Alzheimer’s Disease-Linked Amyloid-β and Amyloid-β Protein Precursor with Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willén, Katarina; Sroka, Agnieszka; Takahashi, Reisuke H.; Gouras, Gunnar K.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is increasingly viewed as a disease of synapses. Loss of synapses correlates better with cognitive decline than amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the hallmark neuropathological lesions of AD. Soluble forms of amyloid-β (Aβ) have emerged as mediators of synapse dysfunction. Aβ binds to, accumulates, and aggregates in synapses. However, the anatomical and neurotransmitter specificity of Aβ and the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) in AD remain poorly understood. In addition, the relative roles of Aβ and AβPP in the development of AD, at pre- versus post-synaptic compartments and axons versus dendrites, respectively, remain unclear. Here we use immunogold electron microscopy and confocal microscopy to provide evidence for heterogeneity in the localization of Aβ/AβPP. We demonstrate that Aβ binds to a subset of synapses in cultured neurons, with preferential binding to glutamatergic compared to GABAergic neurons. We also highlight the challenge of defining pre- versus post-synaptic localization of this binding by confocal microscopy. Further, endogenous Aβ42 accumulates in both glutamatergic and GABAergic AβPP/PS1 transgenic primary neurons, but at varying levels. Moreover, upon knock-out of presenilin 1 or inhibition of γ-secretase AβPP C-terminal fragments accumulate both pre- and post-synaptically; however earlier pre-synaptically, consistent with a higher rate of AβPP processing in axons. A better understanding of the synaptic and anatomical selectivity of Aβ/AβPP in AD can be important for the development of more effective new therapies for this major disease of aging. PMID:28869466

  6. Bacterial sex in dental plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingar Olsen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genes are transferred between bacteria in dental plaque by transduction, conjugation, and transformation. Membrane vesicles can also provide a mechanism for horizontal gene transfer. DNA transfer is considered bacterial sex, but the transfer is not parallel to processes that we associate with sex in higher organisms. Several examples of bacterial gene transfer in the oral cavity are given in this review. How frequently this occurs in dental plaque is not clear, but evidence suggests that it affects a number of the major genera present. It has been estimated that new sequences in genomes established through horizontal gene transfer can constitute up to 30% of bacterial genomes. Gene transfer can be both inter- and intrageneric, and it can also affect transient organisms. The transferred DNA can be integrated or recombined in the recipient's chromosome or remain as an extrachromosomal inheritable element. This can make dental plaque a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes. The ability to transfer DNA is important for bacteria, making them better adapted to the harsh environment of the human mouth, and promoting their survival, virulence, and pathogenicity.

  7. Depolymerization of insulin amyloid fibrils by albumin-modified magnetic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siposova, Katarina; Kubovcikova, Martina; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Koneracka, Martina; Zavisova, Vlasta; Antosova, Andrea; Kopcansky, Peter; Daxnerova, Zuzana; Gazova, Zuzana

    2012-02-01

    Pathogenesis of amyloid-related diseases is associated with the presence of protein amyloid deposits. Insulin amyloids have been reported in a patient with diabetes undergoing treatment by injection of insulin and causes problems in the production and storage of this drug and in application of insulin pumps. We have studied the interference of insulin amyloid fibrils with a series of 18 albumin magnetic fluids (MFBSAs) consisting of magnetite nanoparticles modified by different amounts of bovine serum albumin (w/w BSA/Fe3O4 from 0.005 up to 15). We have found that MFBSAs are able to destroy amyloid fibrils in vitro. The extent of fibril depolymerization was affected by nanoparticle physical-chemical properties (hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential and isoelectric point) determined by the BSA amount present in MFBSAs. The most effective were MFBSAs with lower BSA/Fe3O4 ratios (from 0.005 to 0.1) characteristic of about 90% depolymerizing activity. For the most active magnetic fluids (ratios 0.01 and 0.02) the DC50 values were determined in the range of low concentrations, indicating their ability to interfere with insulin fibrils at stoichiometric concentrations. We assume that the present findings represent a starting point for the application of the active MFBSAs as therapeutic agents targeting insulin amyloidosis.

  8. Amyloid Beta-Mediated Hypomethylation of Heme Oxygenase 1 Correlates with Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Youn Sung

    Full Text Available To identify epigenetically regulated genes involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD we analyzed global mRNA expression and methylation profiles in amyloid precursor protein (APP-Swedish mutant-expressing AD model cells, H4-sw and selected heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1, which is associated with pathological features of AD such as neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. We examined the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of HMOX1 and its application as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for AD. Our results show that HMOX1 mRNA and protein expression was approximately 12.2-fold and 7.9-fold increased in H4-sw cells, respectively. Increased HMOX1 expression was also detected in the brain, particularly the hippocampus, of AD model transgenic mice. However, the methylation of specific CpG sites within its promoter, particularly at CpG located -374 was significantly decreased in H4-sw cells. Treatment of neuroglioma cells with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine resulted in reduced methylation of HMOX1 promoter accompanied by enhanced HMOX1 expression strongly supporting DNA methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation of HMOX1. Toxic Aβ-induced aberrant hypomethylation of HMOX1 at -374 promoter CpG site was correlated with increased HMOX1 expression. In addition to neuroglioma cells, we also found Aβ-induced epigenetic regulation of HMOX1 in human T lymphocyte Jurkat cells. We evaluated DNA methylation status of HMOX1 at -374 promoter CpG site in blood samples from AD patients, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and control individuals using quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. We observed lower methylation of HMOX1 at the -374 promoter CpG site in AD patients compared to MCI and control individuals, and a correlation between Mini-Mental State Examination score and demethylation level. Receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed good discrimination of AD patients from MCI

  9. Acute gamma-secretase inhibition of nonhuman primate CNS shifts amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism from amyloid-beta production to alternative APP fragments without amyloid-beta rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jacquelynn J; Wildsmith, Kristin R; Gilberto, David B; Holahan, Marie A; Kinney, Gene G; Mathers, Parker D; Michener, Maria S; Price, Eric A; Shearman, Mark S; Simon, Adam J; Wang, Jennifer X; Wu, Guoxin; Yarasheski, Kevin E; Bateman, Randall J

    2010-05-12

    The accumulation of amyloid beta (Abeta) in Alzheimer's disease is caused by an imbalance of production and clearance, which leads to increased soluble Abeta species and extracellular plaque formation in the brain. Multiple Abeta-lowering therapies are currently in development: an important goal is to characterize the molecular mechanisms of action and effects on physiological processing of Abeta, as well as other amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolites, in models which approximate human Abeta physiology. To this end, we report the translation of the human in vivo stable-isotope-labeling kinetics (SILK) method to a rhesus monkey cisterna magna ported (CMP) nonhuman primate model, and use the model to test the mechanisms of action of a gamma-secretase inhibitor (GSI). A major concern of inhibiting the enzymes which produce Abeta (beta- and gamma-secretase) is that precursors of Abeta may accumulate and cause a rapid increase in Abeta production when enzyme inhibition discontinues. In this study, the GSI MK-0752 was administered to conscious CMP rhesus monkeys in conjunction with in vivo stable-isotope-labeling, and dose-dependently reduced newly generated CNS Abeta. In contrast to systemic Abeta metabolism, CNS Abeta production was not increased after the GSI was cleared. These results indicate that most of the CNS APP was metabolized to products other than Abeta, including C-terminal truncated forms of Abeta: 1-14, 1-15 and 1-16; this demonstrates an alternative degradation pathway for CNS amyloid precursor protein during gamma-secretase inhibition.

  10. Atherosclerotic plaque regression: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Nesan; Román-Rego, Ana; Ong, Peter; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2010-08-01

    Coronary artery disease is the major cause of death in the western world. The formation and rapid progression of atheromatous plaques can lead to serious cardiovascular events in patients with atherosclerosis. The better understanding, in recent years, of the mechanisms leading to atheromatous plaque growth and disruption and the availability of powerful HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors (statins) has permitted the consideration of plaque regression as a realistic therapeutic goal. This article reviews the existing evidence underpinning current therapeutic strategies aimed at achieving atherosclerotic plaque regression. In this review we also discuss imaging modalities for the assessment of plaque regression, predictors of regression and whether plaque regression is associated with a survival benefit.

  11. Computed Tomography Biomarkers of Vulnerable Coronary Plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyulas Tiberiu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An unstable plaque has a high risk of thrombosis and at the same time for a fast progression of the stenosis degree. Also, “high-risk plaque” and “thrombosis-prone plaque” are used as synonym terms for characterization of a vulnerable plaque. The imaging biomarkers for vulnerable coronary plaques are considered to be spotty calcifications, active remodeling, low-density atheroma and the presence of a ring-like attenuation pattern, also known as the napkin-ring sign. Computed cardiac tomography can determine the plaque composition by assessing the plaque density, which is measured in Hounsfield units (HU. The aim of this manuscript was to provide an update about the most frequently used biomarkers of vulnerability in a vulnerable plaque with the help of computed cardiac tomography.

  12. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunyamin Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn’s disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis.

  13. Amyloid myopathy: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Tuomaala

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid myopathy (AM is a rare manifestation of primary systemic amyloidosis (AL. Like inflammatory myopathies, it presents with proximal muscle weakness and an increased creatine kinase level. We describe a case of AL with severe, rapidly progressive myopathy as the initial symptom. The clinical manifestation and muscle biopsy were suggestive of inclusion body myositis. AM was not suspected until amyloidosis was seen in the gastric mucosal biopsy. The muscle biopsy was then re-examined more specifically, and Congo red staining eventually showed vascular and interstitial amyloid accumulation, which led to a diagnosis of AM. The present case illustrates the fact that the clinical picture of AM can mimic that of inclusion body myositis.

  14. Accuracy of coronary plaque detection and assessment of interobserver agreement for plaque quantification using automatic coronary plaque analysis software on coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laqmani, A.; Quitzke, M.; Creder, D.D.; Adam, G.; Lund, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclearmedicine; Klink, T. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate the accuracy of automatic plaque detection and the interobserver agreement of automatic versus manually adjusted quantification of coronary plaques on coronary CT angiography (cCTA) using commercially available software. 10 cCTA datasets were evaluated using plaque software. First, the automatically detected plaques were verified. Second, two observers independently performed plaque quantification without revising the automatically constructed plaque contours (automatic approach). Then, each observer adjusted the plaque contours according to plaque delineation (adjusted approach). The interobserver agreement of both approaches was analyzed. 32 of 114 automatically identified findings were true-positive plaques, while 82 (72 %) were false-positive. 20 of 52 plaques (38 %) were missed by the software (false-negative). The automatic approach provided good interobserver agreement with relative differences of 0.9 ± 16.0 % for plaque area and -3.3 ± 33.8 % for plaque volume. Both observers independently adjusted all contours because they did not represent the plaque delineation. Interobserver agreement decreased for the adjusted approach with relative differences of 25.0 ± 24.8 % for plaque area and 20.0 ± 40.4 % for plaque volume. The automatic plaque analysis software is of limited value due to high numbers of false-positive and false-negative plaque findings. The automatic approach was reproducible but it necessitated adjustment of all constructed plaque contours resulting in deterioration of the interobserver agreement.

  15. Amyloid imaging: the court of public opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Alan J

    2013-09-24

    Human amyloid imaging is one of the great recent translational medicine stories. Beginning with the recognition that Thioflavin T derivatives could be used as PET tracers, through development of Pittsburgh compound B, to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of Florbetapir in 2012, human amyloid imaging has held great promise to allow in vivo inclusive diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD), even though the first principle of amyloid PET is that it functions as a surrogate for β-amyloid pathology, and not necessarily as a surrogate for the diagnosis of AD.(1,2.)

  16. [Effects of grain-sized moxibustion on learning and memory ability and amyloid deposition of transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Chu, Jia-Mei; Gao, Ling-Ai; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Bao, Ye-Hua

    2014-02-01

    To observe the effect of grain-sized moxibustion at "Xinshu" (BL 15) and "Shenshu" (BL 23) on memory-learning ability and amyloid deposition in transgenic Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice. seventeen amyloid precursor protein (APP)/presenilin (PS)1 (APP+/PS 1+) double transgenic 6799 mice aged 3-4 weeks were randomly divided into model group (n = 9) and moxibustion group (n = 8). Nine wide-type (C 57 BL/6 J) female mice were used as the normal control group. Moxibustion (ignited grain-sized moxa cone) was applied to bilateral "Xinshu" (BL 15) and "Shenshu" (BL 23) for about 30 s, once a day for 9 courses (10 days constitute a therapeutic course, with 2 days' break between every two courses). Morris water maze tests were performed to detect the mice's learning-memory ability. The alterations of beta-amyloid deposition (number of the positive plaques) in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus were detected by using an imaging analysis system following Congo red staining of the cerebral tissue sections. Compared with the normal group, the average escape latency of place navigation tests was significantly increased (P memory ability after moxibustion. Results of Congo red staining of the cerebral tissue showed that there were many irregular, uneven staining positive plaques in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of AD mice in the model group. Compared with the model group, the positive plaque numbers in both cerebral cortex and hippocampus were considerably reduced in the moxibustion group (P memory ability and restrain the formation of amyloid deposition in AD mice.

  17. Amyloid binding properties of curcumin analogues in Alzheimer's disease postmortem brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldman, Emma R; Jia, Zhisheng; Halldin, Christer; Svedberg, Marie M

    2016-09-06

    The presence of β-amyloid (Aβ) containing plaques in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and serves as a biomarker for confirmation of diagnosis postmortem. Early diagnosis is of great importance for optimal treatment and for monitoring disease progression in the brain. Highly specific and sensitive biomarkers are thus greatly needed to assess therapeutic efficacy, not only clinically, but also in terms of clearance of histopathological lesions and decelerated neurodegeneration. The objective of the present study was to give more insight into the binding of curcumin analogues, curcuminoids, to Aβ containing plaques in postmortem tissue from AD patients. In vitro autoradiography was utilized to explore affinity and displacement of the curcuminoids; curcumin, demethoxycurcumin (DMC), bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) and dimethoxycurcumin (DIMC). We found that BDMC had the highest affinity for Aβ containing plaques in cortical AD brain tissue in comparison to other curcuminoids. Subsequently, [(3)H]BDMC showed significantly higher specific binding in cortical AD brain tissue compared to control subjects. These findings suggest that curcumin analogues, especially BDMC, may serve as a potential radioligands for Aβ plaque neuroimaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Carotid plaque thickness and carotid plaque burden predict future cardiovascular events in asymptomatic adult Americans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Sartori, Samantha; Sandholt, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Prediction of cardiovascular events improves using imaging, i.e. coronary calcium score and ultrasound assessment of carotid plaque. This study analysed the predictive value of two ultrasound measures of carotid plaque size: carotid plaque thickness and carotid and intima-media thic...

  19. Complement and Viral Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoermer, Kristina A.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The complement system functions as an immune surveillance system that rapidly responds to infection. Activation of the complement system by specific recognition pathways triggers a protease cascade, generating cleavage products that function to eliminate pathogens, regulate inflammatory responses, and shape adaptive immune responses. However, when dysregulated, these powerful functions can become destructive and the complement system has been implicated as a pathogenic effector in numerous diseases, including infectious diseases. This review highlights recent discoveries that have identified critical roles for the complement system in the pathogenesis of viral infection. PMID:21292294

  20. Current status of vulnerable plaque detection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sharif, Faisal

    2012-02-01

    Critical coronary stenoses have been shown to contribute to only a minority of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and sudden cardiac death. Autopsy studies have identified a subgroup of high-risk patients with disrupted vulnerable plaque and modest stenosis. Consequently, a clinical need exists to develop methods to identify these plaques prospectively before disruption and clinical expression of disease. Recent advances in invasive and noninvasive imaging techniques have shown the potential to identify these high-risk plaques. The anatomical characteristics of the vulnerable plaque such as thin cap fibroatheroma and lipid pool can be identified with angioscopy, high frequency intravascular ultrasound, intravascular MRI, and optical coherence tomography. Efforts have also been made to recognize active inflammation in high-risk plaques using intravascular thermography. Plaque chemical composition by measuring electromagnetic radiation using spectroscopy is also an emerging technology to detect vulnerable plaques. Noninvasive imaging with MRI, CT, and PET also holds the potential to differentiate between low and high-risk plaques. However, at present none of these imaging modalities are able to detect vulnerable plaque neither has been shown to definitively predict outcome. Nevertheless in contrast, there has been a parallel development in the physiological assessment of advanced atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Thus recent trials using fractional flow reserve in patients with modest non flow-limiting stenoses have shown that deferral of PCI with optimal medical therapy in these patients is superior to coronary intervention. Further trials are needed to provide more information regarding the natural history of high-risk but non flow-limiting plaque to establish patient-specific targeted therapy and to refine plaque stabilizing strategies in the future.

  1. Dispersible amyloid β-protein oligomers, protofibrils, and fibrils represent diffusible but not soluble aggregates: their role in neurodegeneration in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijal Upadhaya, Ajeet; Capetillo-Zarate, Estibaliz; Kosterin, Irina; Abramowski, Dorothee; Kumar, Sathish; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Walter, Jochen; Fändrich, Marcus; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf

    2012-11-01

    Soluble amyloid β-protein (Aβ) aggregates have been identified in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Dispersed Aβ aggregates in the brain parenchyma are different from soluble, membrane-associated and plaque-associated solid aggregates. They are in mixture with the extra- or intracellular fluid but can be separated from soluble proteins by ultracentrifugation. To clarify the role of dispersible Aβ aggregates for neurodegeneration we analyzed 2 different amyloid precursor protein (APP)-transgenic mouse models. APP23 mice overexpress human mutant APP with the Swedish mutation. APP51/16 mice express high levels of human wild type APP. Both mice develop Aβ-plaques. Dendritic degeneration, neuron loss, and loss of asymmetric synapses were seen in APP23 but not in APP51/16 mice. The soluble and dispersible fractions not separated from one another were received as supernatant after centrifugation of native forebrain homogenates at 14,000 × g. Subsequent ultracentrifugation separated the soluble, i.e., the supernatant, from the dispersible fraction, i.e., the resuspended pellet. The major biochemical difference between APP23 and APP51/16 mice was that APP23 mice exhibited higher levels of dispersible Aβ oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils precipitated with oligomer (A11) and protofibril/fibril (B10AP) specific antibodies than APP51/16 mice. These differences, rather than soluble Aβ and Aβ plaque pathology were associated with dendritic degeneration, neuron, and synapse loss in APP23 mice in comparison with APP51/16 mice. Immunoprecipitation of dispersible Aβ oligomers, protofibrils, and fibrils revealed that they were associated with APP C-terminal fragments (APP-CTFs). These results indicate that dispersible Aβ oligomers, protofibrils, and fibrils represent an important pool of Aβ aggregates in the brain that critically interact with membrane-associated APP C-terminal fragments. The concentration of dispersible Aβ aggregates, thereby, presumably determines

  2. The polyphenol oleuropein aglycone protects TgCRND8 mice against Aß plaque pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Grossi

    Full Text Available The claimed beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet include prevention of several age-related dysfunctions including neurodegenerative diseases and Alzheimer-like pathology. These effects have been related to the protection against cognitive decline associated with aging and disease by a number of polyphenols found in red wine and extra virgin olive oil. The double transgenic TgCRND8 mice (overexpressing the Swedish and Indiana mutations in the human amyloid precursor protein, aged 1.5 and 4, and age-matched wild type control mice were used to examine in vivo the effects of 8 weeks dietary supplementation of oleuropein aglycone (50 mg/kg of diet, the main polyphenol found in extra virgin olive oil. We report here that dietary supplementation of oleuropein aglycone strongly improves the cognitive performance of young/middle-aged TgCRND8 mice, a model of amyloid-ß deposition, respect to age-matched littermates with un-supplemented diet. Immunofluorescence analysis of cerebral tissue in oleuropein aglycone-fed transgenic mice showed remarkably reduced ß-amyloid levels and plaque deposits, which appeared less compact and "fluffy"; moreover, microglia migration to the plaques for phagocytosis and a remarkable reduction of the astrocyte reaction were evident. Finally, oleuropein aglycone-fed mice brain displayed an astonishingly intense autophagic reaction, as shown by the increase of autophagic markers expression and of lysosomal activity. Data obtained with cultured cells confirmed the latter evidence, suggesting mTOR regulation by oleuropein aglycone. Our results support, and provide mechanistic insights into, the beneficial effects against Alzheimer-associated neurodegeneration of a polyphenol enriched in the extra virgin olive oil, a major component of the Mediterranean diet.

  3. Inclusion-body myositis, a multifactorial muscle disease associated with aging: current concepts of pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askanas, Valerie; Engel, W King

    2007-11-01

    Sporadic inclusion-body myositis, the most common muscle disease of older persons, has no known cause or persistently beneficial treatment. The unfolding pathogenesis could lead to new treatment strategies and it is now of growing interest among clinicians and basic scientists. About 100 papers related to the subject were published in 2006 and the first part of 2007 (we cite only articles most relevant to this review). This review focuses on the current concepts of the pathogenesis of sporadic inclusion-body myositis. Both degeneration and mononuclear-cell inflammation are components of the pathology, but how each relates to the pathogenesis remains unclear. We suggest that an intramuscle fiber degenerative component is primary, leading to muscle-fiber destruction, while the lymphocytic inflammatory component may only slightly contribute to sporadic inclusion-body myositis muscle-fiber damage. Intracellular accumulation of amyloid-beta precursor protein, amyloid-beta, and amyloid-beta oligomers in an aging muscle-fiber cellular milieu, and other abnormalities, appear to be key pathogenic factors. We summarize intracellular molecular events and their consequences, and correlate findings in sporadic inclusion-body myositis muscle biopsies with inclusion-body myositis experimental models in tissue culture and in transgenic mice. Treatment of sporadic inclusion-body myositis remains a challenge. Antiinflammatory approaches used so far are without major or enduring benefit. Possible new treatment avenues are suggested.

  4. Opposing effects of Apoe/Apoa1 double deletion on amyloid-β pathology and cognitive performance in APP mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz, Nicholas F.; Tapias, Victor; Cronican, Andrea A.; Castranio, Emilie L.; Saleem, Muzamil; Carter, Alexis Y.; Lefterova, Martina

    2015-01-01

    See Corona and Landreth (doi:10.1093/awv300) for a scientific commentary on this article. ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (encoded by ABCA1) regulates cholesterol efflux from cells to apolipoproteins A-I and E (ApoA-I and APOE; encoded by APOA1 and APOE, respectively) and the generation of high density lipoproteins. In Abca1 knockout mice (Abca1ko), high density lipoproteins and ApoA-I are virtually lacking, and total APOE and APOE-containing lipoproteins in brain substantially decreased. As the ε4 allele of APOE is the major genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, ABCA1 role as a modifier of APOE lipidation is of significance for this disease. Reportedly, Abca1 deficiency in mice expressing human APP accelerates amyloid deposition and behaviour deficits. We used APP/PS1dE9 mice crossed to Apoe and Apoa1 knockout mice to generate Apoe/Apoa1 double-knockout mice. We hypothesized that Apoe/Apoa1 double-knockout mice would mimic the phenotype of APP/Abca1ko mice in regards to amyloid plaques and cognitive deficits. Amyloid pathology, peripheral lipoprotein metabolism, cognitive deficits and dendritic morphology of Apoe/Apoa1 double-knockout mice were compared to APP/Abca1ko, APP/PS1dE9, and single Apoa1 and Apoe knockouts. Contrary to our prediction, the results demonstrate that double deletion of Apoe and Apoa1 ameliorated the amyloid pathology, including amyloid plaques and soluble amyloid. In double knockout mice we show that 125I-amyloid-β microinjected into the central nervous system cleared at a rate twice faster compared to Abca1 knockout mice. We tested the effect of Apoe, Apoa1 or Abca1 deficiency on spreading of exogenous amyloid-β seeds injected into the brain of young pre-depositing APP mice. The results show that lack of Abca1 augments dissemination of exogenous amyloid significantly more than the lack of Apoe. In the periphery, Apoe/Apoa1 double-knockout mice exhibited substantial atherosclerosis and very high levels of low

  5. Opposing effects of Apoe/Apoa1 double deletion on amyloid-β pathology and cognitive performance in APP mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz, Nicholas F; Tapias, Victor; Cronican, Andrea A; Castranio, Emilie L; Saleem, Muzamil; Carter, Alexis Y; Lefterova, Martina; Lefterov, Iliya; Koldamova, Radosveta

    2015-12-01

    ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (encoded by ABCA1) regulates cholesterol efflux from cells to apolipoproteins A-I and E (ApoA-I and APOE; encoded by APOA1 and APOE, respectively) and the generation of high density lipoproteins. In Abca1 knockout mice (Abca1(ko)), high density lipoproteins and ApoA-I are virtually lacking, and total APOE and APOE-containing lipoproteins in brain substantially decreased. As the ε4 allele of APOE is the major genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease, ABCA1 role as a modifier of APOE lipidation is of significance for this disease. Reportedly, Abca1 deficiency in mice expressing human APP accelerates amyloid deposition and behaviour deficits. We used APP/PS1dE9 mice crossed to Apoe and Apoa1 knockout mice to generate Apoe/Apoa1 double-knockout mice. We hypothesized that Apoe/Apoa1 double-knockout mice would mimic the phenotype of APP/Abca1(ko) mice in regards to amyloid plaques and cognitive deficits. Amyloid pathology, peripheral lipoprotein metabolism, cognitive deficits and dendritic morphology of Apoe/Apoa1 double-knockout mice were compared to APP/Abca1(ko), APP/PS1dE9, and single Apoa1 and Apoe knockouts. Contrary to our prediction, the results demonstrate that double deletion of Apoe and Apoa1 ameliorated the amyloid pathology, including amyloid plaques and soluble amyloid. In double knockout mice we show that (125)I-amyloid-β microinjected into the central nervous system cleared at a rate twice faster compared to Abca1 knockout mice. We tested the effect of Apoe, Apoa1 or Abca1 deficiency on spreading of exogenous amyloid-β seeds injected into the brain of young pre-depositing APP mice. The results show that lack of Abca1 augments dissemination of exogenous amyloid significantly more than the lack of Apoe. In the periphery, Apoe/Apoa1 double-knockout mice exhibited substantial atherosclerosis and very high levels of low density lipoproteins compared to APP/PS1dE9 and APP/Abca1(ko). Plasma level of amyloid

  6. Pathogenesis of microbial keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhundi, Sahreena; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    Microbial keratitis is a sight-threatening ocular infection caused by bacteria, fungi, and protist pathogens. Epithelial defects and injuries are key predisposing factors making the eye susceptible to corneal pathogens. Among bacterial pathogens, the most common agents responsible for keratitis include Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia and Serratia species. Fungal agents of corneal infections include both filamentous as well as yeast, including Fusarium, Aspergillus, Phaeohyphomycetes, Curvularia, Paecilomyces, Scedosporium and Candida species, while in protists, Acanthamoeba spp. are responsible for causing ocular disease. Clinical features include redness, pain, tearing, blur vision and inflammation but symptoms vary depending on the causative agent. The underlying molecular mechanisms associated with microbial pathogenesis include virulence factors as well as the host factors that aid in the progression of keratitis, resulting in damage to the ocular tissue. The treatment therefore should focus not only on the elimination of the culprit but also on the neutralization of virulence factors to minimize the damage, in addition to repairing the damaged tissue. A complete understanding of the pathogenesis of microbial keratitis will lead to the rational development of therapeutic interventions. This is a timely review of our current understanding of the advances made in this field in a comprehensible manner. Coupled with the recently available genome sequence information and high throughput genomics technology, and the availability of innovative approaches, this will stimulate interest in this field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cryotherapy-induced milia en plaque: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutler, Bryce David; Cohen, Philip R

    2014-12-12

    Cryotherapy-induced milia is a rarely described cutaneous reaction that may occur in patients who have received cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen. Cryotherapy-induced milia is characterized by 1-2 millimeter white dermal cysts that develop at the healed cryotherapy site. Milia en plaque, an erythematous plaque containing numerous milia, has not previously been described following treatment of a skin lesion with liquid nitrogen cryotherapy. We describe a man who developed cryotherapy-induced milia en plaque after receiving cryotherapy to his dorsal hand for the treatment of an actinic keratosis. We also summarize the potential complications of cryotherapy, the differential diagnosis of milia en plaque, and therapeutic interventions for this lesion. The features of a man with cryotherapy-induced milia en plaque are presented. Using PubMed, the following terms were searched and relevant citations assessed: cryosurgery, cryotherapy, hypothermia, milia, milia en plaque, and Wolf's isotopic response. In addition, the literature on cryotherapy-induced milia and cryotherapy-induced milia en plaque is reviewed. Our patient developed cryotherapy-induced milia en plaque shortly after his cryotherapy site had healed. Some of the asymptomatic cystic dermal lesions had spontaneously resolved when a lesional biopsy was performed to confirm the diagnosis. The diagnosis, natural course, and potential treatments were discussed with the patient. Subsequent management was to observe the area; at follow-up examination, the remainder of the milia had also spontaneously resolved. Cryotherapy-induced milia is a benign condition characterized by the development of small white dermal cystic lesions that develop at a healed liquid nitrogen cryotherapy site. The lesions may appear individually or as milia en plaque. While the mechanism of pathogenesis is unknown, we postulate that the condition is an example of Wolf's isotopic response, in which a new, unrelated skin disease develops at the

  8. Why are Functional Amyloids Non-Toxic in Humans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Jackson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Amyloids were first identified in association with amyloidoses, human diseases in which proteins and peptides misfold into amyloid fibrils. Subsequent studies have identified an array of functional amyloid fibrils that perform physiological roles in humans. Given the potential for the production of toxic species in amyloid assembly reactions, it is remarkable that cells can produce these functional amyloids without suffering any obvious ill effect. Although the precise mechanisms are unclear, there are a number of ways in which amyloid toxicity may be prevented. These include regulating the level of the amyloidogenic peptides and proteins, minimising the production of prefibrillar oligomers in amyloid assembly reactions, sequestrating amyloids within membrane bound organelles, controlling amyloid assembly by other molecules, and disassembling the fibrils under physiological conditions. Crucially, a better understanding of how toxicity is avoided in the production of functional amyloids may provide insights into the prevention of amyloid toxicity in amyloidoses.

  9. Fluoride bioavailability in saliva and plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Different fluoride formulations may have different effects on caries prevention. It was the aim of this clinical study to assess the fluoride content, provided by NaF compared to amine fluoride, in saliva and plaque. Methods Eight trained volunteers brushed their teeth in the morning for 3 minutes with either NaF or amine fluoride, and saliva and 3-day-plaque-regrowth was collected at 5 time intervals during 6 hours after tooth brushing. The amount of collected saliva and plaque was measured, and the fluoride content was analysed using a fluoride sensitive electrode. All subjects repeated all study cycles 5 times, and 3 cycles per subject underwent statistical analysis using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results Immediately after brushing the fluoride concentration in saliva increased rapidly and dropped to the baseline level after 360 minutes. No difference was found between NaF and amine fluoride. All plaque fluoride levels were elevated after 30 minutes until 120 minutes after tooth brushing, and decreasing after 360 minutes to baseline. According to the highly individual profile of fluoride in saliva and plaque, both levels of bioavailability correlated for the first 30 minutes, and the fluoride content of saliva and plaque was back to baseline after 6 hours. Conclusions Fluoride levels in saliva and plaque are interindividually highly variable. However, no significant difference in bioavailability between NaF and amine fluoride, in saliva, or in plaque was found. PMID:22230722

  10. Disrupting beta-amyloid aggregation for Alzheimer disease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, L D; Soto, C

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a devastating degenerative disorder for which there is no cure or effective treatment. Although the etiology of Alzheimer's disease is not fully understood, compelling evidence indicates that deposition of aggregates composed by a misfolded form of the amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) is the central event in the disease pathogenesis. Therefore, an attractive therapeutic strategy is to prevent or reverse Abeta misfolding and aggregation. Diverse strategies have been described to identify inhibitors of this process, including screening of libraries of small molecules chemical compounds, rational design of synthetic peptides, assessment of natural Abeta-binding proteins and stimulation of the immune system by vaccination. In this article we describe these different approaches, their principles and their potential strengths and weaknesses. Overall the available data suggest that the development of drugs to interfere with Abeta misfolding and aggregation is a feasible target that hold great promise for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  11. PLAQUE ASSAY OF NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sardjono

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Newcastle disease virus (NDV was isolated from a 3 months-old indigenous chicken (buras or kampung chicken which showed clinical signs of Newcastle disease (ND. For viral isolation a small part of the spleen and lung were inoculated into 10 days-old embryonated chicken eggs. The physical characteristics of the isolate (A/120 were studied. The hemagglutination of chicken red blood cell showed slow elution, thermostability of hemagglutinin at 56°C was 120 minutes. The vims was able to agglutinate horse erythrocytes but not those of sheep. The biological characteristics on mean death time (MDT of embryonated chicken egg and plaque morphology on chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF primary cell cultures were studied. The MDT was 56 hours, the isolate was velogenic NDV. There were three different plaque morphologies on CEF : 2 mm clear plaques, 1 mm clear plaques, and minute clear plaques which were visible only with microscopic examination.

  12. Nonculprit Plaque Characteristics in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome Caused by Plaque Erosion vs Plaque Rupture: A 3-Vessel Optical Coherence Tomography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Tomoyo; Yamamoto, Erika; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Xing, Lei; Lee, Hang; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Libby, Peter; Jang, Ik-Kyung

    2018-03-01

    Patients with culprit plaque rupture are known to have pancoronary plaque vulnerability. However, the characteristics of nonculprit plaques in patients with acute coronary syndromes caused by plaque erosion are unknown. To investigate the nonculprit plaque phenotype in patients with acute coronary syndrome according to culprit plaque pathology (erosion vs rupture) by 3-vessel optical coherence tomography imaging. In this observational cohort study, between August 2010 and May 2014, 82 patients with acute coronary syndrome who underwent preintervention optical coherence tomography imaging of all 3 major epicardial coronary arteries were enrolled at the Massachusetts General Hospital Optical Coherence Tomography Registry database. Analysis of the data was conducted between November 2016 and July 2017. Patients were classified into 2 groups based on the culprit lesion pathology: 17 patients with culprit plaque erosion and 34 patients with culprit plaque rupture. Thirty-one patients with the absence of culprit rupture or erosion were excluded from further analysis. Preintervention 3-vessel optical coherence tomography imaging. Plaque characteristics at the culprit and nonculprit lesions evaluated by optical coherence tomography. In 51 patients (37 men; mean age, 58.7 years), the characteristics of 51 culprit plaques and 216 nonculprit plaques were analyzed. In patients with culprit erosion, the mean (SD) number of nonculprit plaques per patient was smaller (3.4 [1.9] in erosion vs 4.7 [2.1] in rupture, P = .05). Patient-based analysis showed that none of 17 patients with culprit plaque erosion had nonculprit plaque rupture, whereas 26% of the patients (9 of 34) with culprit plaque rupture had nonculprit plaque rupture (P = .02). Plaque-based analysis showed that, compared with the culprit rupture group (n = 158), the culprit erosion group (n = 58) had lower prevalence of plaque rupture (0% vs 8%; P erosion had a smaller number of nonculprit plaques

  13. Antibodies to human serum amyloid P component eliminate visceral amyloid deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Karl; Ellmerich, Stephan; Kahan, Melvyn C; Tennent, Glenys A; Loesch, Andrzej; Gilbertson, Janet A; Hutchinson, Winston L; Mangione, Palma P; Gallimore, J Ruth; Millar, David J; Minogue, Shane; Dhillon, Amar P; Taylor, Graham W; Bradwell, Arthur R; Petrie, Aviva; Gillmore, Julian D; Bellotti, Vittorio; Botto, Marina; Hawkins, Philip N; Pepys, Mark B

    2010-11-04

    Accumulation of amyloid fibrils in the viscera and connective tissues causes systemic amyloidosis, which is responsible for about one in a thousand deaths in developed countries. Localized amyloid can also have serious consequences; for example, cerebral amyloid angiopathy is an important cause of haemorrhagic stroke. The clinical presentations of amyloidosis are extremely diverse and the diagnosis is rarely made before significant organ damage is present. There is therefore a major unmet need for therapy that safely promotes the clearance of established amyloid deposits. Over 20 different amyloid fibril proteins are responsible for different forms of clinically significant amyloidosis and treatments that substantially reduce the abundance of the respective amyloid fibril precursor proteins can arrest amyloid accumulation. Unfortunately, control of fibril-protein production is not possible in some forms of amyloidosis and in others it is often slow and hazardous. There is no therapy that directly targets amyloid deposits for enhanced clearance. However, all amyloid deposits contain the normal, non-fibrillar plasma glycoprotein, serum amyloid P component (SAP). Here we show that administration of anti-human-SAP antibodies to mice with amyloid deposits containing human SAP triggers a potent, complement-dependent, macrophage-derived giant cell reaction that swiftly removes massive visceral amyloid deposits without adverse effects. Anti-SAP-antibody treatment is clinically feasible because circulating human SAP can be depleted in patients by the bis-d-proline compound CPHPC, thereby enabling injected anti-SAP antibodies to reach residual SAP in the amyloid deposits. The unprecedented capacity of this novel combined therapy to eliminate amyloid deposits should be applicable to all forms of systemic and local amyloidosis.

  14. Antibody-conjugated, dual-modal, near-infrared fluorescent iron oxide nanoparticles for antiamyloidgenic activity and specific detection of amyloid-β fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skaat H

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hadas Skaat,1 Enav Corem-Slakmon,1 Igor Grinberg,1 David Last,2 David Goez,2 Yael Mardor,2,3 Shlomo Margel1 1Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Ramat-Gan, Israel; 2Advanced Technology Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Ramat-Gan, Israel; 3Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel Abstract: Amyloid-β (Aβ peptide is the main fibrillar component of plaque deposits found in brains affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD and is related to the pathogenesis of AD. Passive anti-Aβ immunotherapy has emerged as a promising approach for the therapy of AD, based on the administration of specific anti-Aβ monoclonal antibodies (aAβmAbs to delay Aβ aggregation in the brain. However, the main disadvantage of this approach is the required readministration of the aAβmAbs at frequent intervals. There are only a few reports describing in vitro study for the immobilization of aAβmAbs to nanoparticles as potential targeting agents of Aβ aggregates. In this article, we report the immobilization of the aAβmAb clone BAM10 to near-infrared fluorescent maghemite nanoparticles for the inhibition of Aβ40 fibrillation kinetics and the specific detection of Aβ40 fibrils. The BAM10-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles were well-characterized, including their immunogold labeling and cytotoxic effect on PC-12 (pheochromocytoma cell line. Indeed, these antibody-conjugated nanoparticles significantly inhibit the Aβ40 fibrillation kinetics compared with the same concentration, or even five times higher, of the free BAM10. This inhibitory effect was confirmed by different assays such as the photo-induced crosslinking of unmodified proteins combined with sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A cell viability assay also confirmed that these antibody-conjugated nanoparticles significantly reduced the Aβ40-induced cytotoxicity to PC-12 cells. Furthermore, the selective

  15. Early Detection of Amyloid Plaque in Alzheimer’s Disease via X-ray Phase CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    preliminary channelized Hotelling observer study,” Proc. SPIE, v.8668, 2013. 6. X. Tang and Y. Yang, “Internal noise in channelized Hotelling observer...or other Internet site(s): No Technologies or techniques: Nothing to report. 12 Inventions, patent applications, and/or licenses: Nothing to...system is intrinsically determined by their interaction with the x-ray beam,14–16 while the system’s performance is determined by its signal and

  16. Oleuropein aglycone protects transgenic C. elegans strains expressing Aβ42 by reducing plaque load and motor deficit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Diomede

    Full Text Available The presence of amyloid aggregates of the 42 amino acid peptide of amyloid beta (Aβ42 in the brain is the characteristic feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Amyloid beta (Aβ deposition is also found in muscle fibers of individuals affected by inclusion body myositis (sIBM, a rare muscular degenerative disease affecting people over 50. Both conditions are presently lacking an effective therapeutic treatment. There is increasing evidence to suggest that natural polyphenols may prevent the formation of toxic amyloid aggregates; this applies also to oleuropein aglycone (OLE, the most abundant polyphenol in extra virgin olive oil, previously shown to hinder amylin and Aβ aggregation. Here we evaluated the ability of OLE to interfere with Aβ proteotoxicity in vivo by using the transgenic CL2006 and CL4176 strains of Caenorhabditis elegans, simplified models of AD and of sIBM, which express human Aβ in the cytoplasm of body wall muscle cells. OLE-fed CL2006 worms displayed reduced Aβ plaque deposition, less abundant toxic Aβ oligomers, remarkably decreased paralysis and increased lifespan with respect to untreated animals. A protective effect was also observed in CL4176 worms but only when OLE was administered before the induction of the Aβ transgene expression. These effects were specific, dose-related, and not mediated by the known polyphenolic anti-oxidant activity, suggesting that, in this model organism, OLE interferes with the Aβ aggregation skipping the appearance of toxic species, as already shown in vitro for Aβ42.

  17. Arginase 1+ microglia reduce Aβ plaque deposition during IL-1β-dependent neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Jonathan D; Olschowka, John A; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2015-11-04

    Neuroinflammation has long been considered a driver of Alzheimer's disease progression. However, experiments developed to explore the interaction between neuroinflammation and Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology showed a surprising reduction in amyloid beta (Aβ) plaque deposition. We sought to understand this unexpected outcome by examining microglia phenotypes during chronic neuroinflammation. Using an adeno-associated virus vector carrying hIL-1β cDNA, inflammation was induced in one hippocampus of 8-month-old amyloid precursor protein (APP)/PS1 mice for 4 weeks, while the other hemisphere received control injections. Bone marrow chimeras and staining analysis were used to identify the origins and types of immune cells present during sustained inflammation. Arginase 1 (Arg1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) immunoreactivity were used as markers of alternatively activated and classically activated cells, respectively, and changes in cellular uptake of Aβ by Arg1+ or iNOS+ microglia was demonstrated by confocal microscopy. To determine if an anti-inflammatory phenotype was present during neuroinflammation, RNA was extracted on flow-sorted microglia and rt-PCR was performed. Interleukin-4 injection was used to induce alternatively activated cells, whereas a minipump and intrahippocampal cannula was used to deliver an interleukin (IL)-4Rα antibody to block the induction of Arg1+ cells in the setting of sustained IL-1β expression. We observed a robust upregulation of centrally derived Arg1+ microglia present only in the inflamed hemisphere. Furthermore, in the inflamed hemisphere, greater numbers of Arg1+ microglia contained Aβ when compared to iNOS+ microglia. RNA isolated from flow-sorted microglia from the inflamed hemisphere demonstrated elevation of mRNA species consistent with alternative activation as well as neuroprotective genes such as BDNF and IGF1. To explore if Arg1+ microglia mediated plaque reduction, we induced Arg1+ microglia with IL-4

  18. Carbon nanospecies affecting amyloid formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, Monika; Konefal, Rafal; Morávková, Zuzana; Zhigunov, Alexander; Svoboda, Jan; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Hromádková, Jiřina; Groborz, Ondřej; Štěpánek, Petr; Hrubý, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 85 (2017), s. 53887-53898 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-30544A; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03156S; GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Grant - others:OPPK(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21545 Program:OPPK Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : amyloid fibril * nanodiamond * fullerene Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  19. Immunotherapy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: amyloid-β or tau, which is the right target?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo-Carranza DL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Diana L Castillo-Carranza,1,2 Marcos J Guerrero-Muñoz,1,2 Rakez Kayed1–31Mitchell Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, 2Departments of Neurology, Neuroscience, and Cell Biology, 3Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USAAbstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques composed mainly of amyloid-β (Aβ protein. Overproduction or slow clearance of Aβ initiates a cascade of pathologic events that may lead to formation of neurofibrillary tangles, neuronal cell death, and dementia. Although immunotherapy in animal models has been demonstrated to be successful at removing plaques or prefibrillar forms of Aβ, clinical trials have yielded disappointing results. The lack of substantial cognitive improvement obtained by targeting Aβ raises the question of whether or not this is the correct target. Another important pathologic process in the AD brain is tau aggregation, which seems to become independent once initiated. Recent studies targeting tau in AD mouse models have displayed evidence of cognitive improvement, providing a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AD. In this review, we describe new advances in immunotherapy targeting Aβ peptide and tau protein, as well as future directions.Keywords: immunotherapy, Alzheimer's disease, β-amyloid, tau

  20. Molecular Pathogenesis of NASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Caligiuri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is the main cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world and a major health problem, owing to its close association with obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. NASH progression results from numerous events originating within the liver, as well as from signals derived from the adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal tract. In a fraction of NASH patients, disease may progress, eventually leading to advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding the mechanisms leading to NASH and its evolution to cirrhosis is critical to identifying effective approaches for the treatment of this condition. In this review, we focus on some of the most recent data reported on the pathogenesis of NASH and its fibrogenic progression, highlighting potential targets for treatment or identification of biomarkers of disease progression.

  1. Pathogenesis of Candida infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odds, F C

    1994-09-01

    Candida infections of the skin and superficial mucosal sites are the result of an interplay between fungal virulence and host defenses. Epidermal proliferation and T-lymphocyte immune responses are expressed by the host to combat fungal invasion, but inflammatory responses and nonspecific inhibitors also probably play a role. Candida albicans can express at least three types of surface adhesion molecules to colonize epithelial surfaces, plus an aspartyl proteinase enzyme able to facilitate initial penetration of keratinized cells. Deeper penetration of keratinized epithelia is assisted by hypha formation, and C. albicans hyphae may use contact sensing (thigmotropism) as a guiding mechanism. Pathogenesis requires differential expression of virulence factors at each new stage of the process: a propensity for rapid alteration of the expressed phenotype in C. albicans may therefore be a significant factor in establishing the comparatively high pathogenic potential of this species.

  2. Pathogenesis of Takotsubo syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Masarone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo syndrome (TTS is an enigmatic disease with a multifactorial and still unresolved pathogenesis. Postulated mechanisms include catecholamine excess, coronary artery spasm, and microvascular dysfunction, however catecholamines seem to play a central role in the pathophysiology of TTS. In facts catecholamines have relevant effects on the vasculature and myocardium. Toxic direct effects of catecholamine on myocardium are mediated by multiple pathway including functional hypoxia, metabolic changes and changes in membrane permeability leading to various electrolytic imbalances. Recently report of familial cases has suggested a genetic component. Further research is required to help clarify the proposed hypotheses and to increase our understanding of the cardiovascular responses to acute stress and the pathophysiology underpinning TTS.

  3. Characterization of Mn(II) ion binding to the amyloid-β peptide in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Cecilia; Kulkarni, Yashraj S; Abelein, Axel; Jarvet, Jüri; Liao, Qinghua; Strodel, Birgit; Olsson, Lisa; Luo, Jinghui; Abrahams, Jan Pieter; Sholts, Sabrina B; Roos, Per M; Kamerlin, Shina C L; Gräslund, Astrid; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S

    2016-12-01

    Growing evidence links neurodegenerative diseases to metal exposure. Aberrant metal ion concentrations have been noted in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains, yet the role of metals in AD pathogenesis remains unresolved. A major factor in AD pathogenesis is considered to be aggregation of and amyloid formation by amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Previous studies have shown that Aβ displays specific binding to Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions, and such binding has been shown to modulate Aβ aggregation. Here, we use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to show that Mn(II) ions also bind to the N-terminal part of the Aβ(1-40) peptide, with a weak binding affinity in the milli- to micromolar range. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, solid state atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence spectroscopy, and molecular modeling suggest that the weak binding of Mn(II) to Aβ may not have a large effect on the peptide's aggregation into amyloid fibrils. However, identification of an additional metal ion displaying Aβ binding reveals more complex AD metal chemistry than has been previously considered in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Chiral recognition in amyloid fiber growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbeev, Vladimir; Grogg, Marcel; Ruiz, Jérémy; Boehringer, Régis; Schirer, Alicia; Hellwig, Petra; Jeschke, Gunnar; Hilvert, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Insoluble amyloid fibers represent a pathological signature of many human diseases. To treat such diseases, inhibition of amyloid formation has been proposed as a possible therapeutic strategy. d-Peptides, which possess high proteolytic stability and lessened immunogenicity, are attractive candidates in this context. However, a molecular understanding of chiral recognition phenomena for d-peptides and l-amyloids is currently incomplete. Here we report experiments on amyloid growth of individual enantiomers and their mixtures for two distinct polypeptide systems of different length and structural organization: a 44-residue covalently-linked dimer derived from a peptide corresponding to the [20-41]-fragment of human β2-microglobulin (β2m) and the 99-residue full-length protein. For the dimeric [20-41]β2m construct, a combination of electron paramagnetic resonance of nitroxide-labeled constructs and (13) C-isotope edited FT-IR spectroscopy of (13) C-labeled preparations was used to show that racemic mixtures precipitate as intact homochiral fibers, i.e. undergo spontaneous Pasteur-like resolution into a mixture of left- and right-handed amyloids. In the case of full-length β2m, the presence of the mirror-image d-protein affords morphologically distinct amyloids that are composed largely of enantiopure domains. Removal of the l-component from hybrid amyloids by proteolytic digestion results in their rapid transformation into characteristic long straight d-β2m amyloids. Furthermore, the full-length d-enantiomer of β2m was found to be an efficient inhibitor of l-β2m amyloid growth. This observation highlights the potential of longer d-polypeptides for future development into inhibitors of amyloid propagation. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Membrane Incorporation, Channel Formation, and Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis by Alzheimer's β-Amyloid Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oligomerization, conformational changes, and the consequent neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's β-amyloid protein (AβP play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Mounting evidence suggests that oligomeric AβPs cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis, eventually leading to neuronal death. We have demonstrated that oligomeric AβPs directly incorporate into neuronal membranes, form cation-sensitive ion channels (“amyloid channels”, and cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis via the amyloid channels. Other disease-related amyloidogenic proteins, such as prion protein in prion diseases or α-synuclein in dementia with Lewy bodies, exhibit similarities in the incorporation into membranes and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. Here, based on our experimental results and those of numerous other studies, we review the current understanding of the direct binding of AβP into membrane surfaces and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. The implication of composition of membrane lipids and the possible development of new drugs by influencing membrane properties and attenuating amyloid channels for the treatment and prevention of AD is also discussed.

  6. Amyloid formation and disaggregation of α-synuclein and its tandem repeat (α-TR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Song Yi; Kim, Seulgi; Hwang, Heejin; Kim, Hyun-Kyung; Yoon, Hyun C.; Kim, Jae Ho; Lee, SangYoon; Kim, T. Doohun

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Formation of the α-synuclein amyloid fibrils by [BIMbF 3 Im]. → Disaggregation of amyloid fibrils by epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and baicalein. → Amyloid formation of α-synuclein tandem repeat (α-TR). -- Abstract: The aggregation of α-synuclein is clearly related to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Therefore, detailed understanding of the mechanism of fibril formation is highly valuable for the development of clinical treatment and also of the diagnostic tools. Here, we have investigated the interaction of α-synuclein with ionic liquids by using several biochemical techniques including Thioflavin T assays and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our data shows a rapid formation of α-synuclein amyloid fibrils was stimulated by 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [BIMbF 3 Im], and these fibrils could be disaggregated by polyphenols such as epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and baicalein. Furthermore, the effect of [BIMbF 3 Im] on the α-synuclein tandem repeat (α-TR) in the aggregation process was studied.

  7. Protective Effects of Indian Spice Curcumin Against Amyloid Beta in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Grady, Mary Catherine; Mitchell, Andrew; Tonk, Sahil; Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar; Bhatti, Jasvinder Singh; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Vijayan, Murali; Kumar, Subodh; Wang, Rui; Adi Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli; Ogunmokun, Gilbert; Thamarai, Kavya; Quesada, Kandi; Boles, Annette; Reddy, Arubala P

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to assess the current understanding of Indian spice ‘Curcumin’ against amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Natural products, such as ginger, curcumin and gingko biloba have been used as diets and dietary supplements to treat human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular, respiratory, infectious, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndromes and neurological disorders. Products derived from plants are known to have protective effects, including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-arthritis, pro-healing and boosting memory cognitive functions. In the last decade, several groups have designed and synthesized curcumin and its derivatives and extensively tested using cell and mouse models of AD. Recent research on amyloid-β and curcumin has revealed that curcumin prevents amyloid-β aggregation and crosses the blood brain barrier (BBB), reach brain cells and protect neurons from various toxic insults of aging and amyloid-β in humans. Recent research has also reported that curcumin ameliorates cognitive decline and improves synaptic functions in mouse models of AD. Further, recent groups have initiated studies on elderly individuals and patients with AD and the outcome of these studies is currently being assessed. This article highlights the beneficial effects of curcumin on AD. This article also critically assesses the current limitations of curcumin’s bioavailability and urgent need for new formulation to increase its brain levels to treat patients with AD. PMID:29332042

  8. Neuroinflammation and β amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease: in vivo quantification with molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommet, C; Mondon, K; Camus, V; Ribeiro, M J; Beaufils, E; Arlicot, N; Corcia, P; Paccalin, M; Minier, F; Gosselin, T; Page, G; Guilloteau, D; Chalon, S

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Its relationship with underlying β amyloid deposition remains unclear. In vivo visualization of microglial activation has become possible with the development of molecular imaging ligands when used with positron emission tomography (PET). The translocator protein (TSPO) is upregulated during neuroinflammation. Consequently, targeting TSPO with radiolabeled ligands for PET is an attractive biomarker for neuroinflammation. A review of the research literature on PET imaging which studied in vivo neuroinflammation in AD subjects and its relationship with amyloid load was performed, including papers published between 2001 and 2012. Six studies were included using either [(11)C]PK-11195 or another non-TSPO radioligand that binds to the monoaminooxidase B. All the studies evaluated amyloid load with [(11)C]PIB. Microglial activation and astrocytosis are potentially early phenomena in AD. However, the individual levels of amyloid deposition and microglial activation were not correlated. Noninvasive in vivo molecular imaging to visualize neuroinflammation in AD may contribute to our understanding of the kinetics of neuroinflammation and its relationship to the hallmarks of the disease. Both are important for the development of future therapeutic modalities and for quantifying the efficacy of future disease-modifying treatments. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Analysis of Amyloid Precursor Protein function in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Kretzschmar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Amyloid precursor protein (APP has mainly been investigated in connection with its role in Alzheimer’s disease due to its cleavage resulting in the production of the Aβ peptides that accumulate in the plaques characteristic for this disease. However, APP is an evolutionary conserved protein that is not only found in humans but also in many other species, including Drosophila, suggesting an important physiological function. Besides Aβ, several other fragments are produced by the cleavage of APP; large secreted fragments derived from the N-terminus and a small intracellular C-terminal fragment. Although these fragments have received much less attention than Aβ, a picture about their function is finally emerging. In contrast to mammals, which express three APP family members, Drosophila expresses only one APP protein called Amyloid Precursor Protein-like or APPL. Therefore APPL functions can be studied in flies without the complication that other APP family members may have redundant functions. Flies lacking APPL are viable but show defects in neuronal outgrowth in the central and peripheral nervous system in addition to synaptic changes. Furthermore, APPL has been connected with axonal transport functions. In the adult nervous system, APPL, and more specifically its secreted fragments, can protect neurons from degeneration. APPL cleavage also prevents glial death. Lastly, APPL was found to be involved in behavioural deficits and in regulating sleep/activity patterns. This review, will describe the role of APPL in neuronal development and maintenance and briefly touch on its emerging function in circadian rhythms while an accompanying review will focus on its role in learning and memory formation.

  10. General amyloid inhibitors? A critical examination of the inhibition of IAPP amyloid formation by inositol stereoisomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin forms amyloid deposits in the islets of Langerhans; a process that is believed to contribute to the progression of type 2 diabetes and to the failure of islet transplants. An emerging theme in amyloid research is the hypothesis that the toxic species produced during amyloid formation by different polypeptides share common features and exert their effects by common mechanisms. If correct, this suggests that inhibitors of amyloid formation by one polypeptide might be effective against other amyloidogenic sequences. IAPP and Aβ, the peptide responsible for amyloid formation in Alzheimer's disease, are particularly interesting in this regard as they are both natively unfolded in their monomeric states and share some common characteristics. Comparatively little effort has been expended on the design of IAPP amyloid inhibitors, thus it is natural to inquire if Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP, especially since no IAPP inhibitors have been clinically approved. A range of compounds inhibit Aβ amyloid formation, including various stereoisomers of inositol. Myo-, scyllo-, and epi-inositol have been shown to induce conformational changes in Aβ and prevent Aβ amyloid fibril formation by stabilizing non-fibrillar β-sheet structures. We investigate the ability of inositol stereoisomers to inhibit amyloid formation by IAPP. The compounds do not induce a conformational change in IAPP and are ineffective inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation, although some do lead to modest apparent changes in IAPP amyloid fibril morphology. Thus not all classes of Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP. This work provides a basis of comparison to work on polyphenol based inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation and helps provide clues as to the features which render them effective. The study also helps provide information for further efforts in rational inhibitor design.

  11. General Amyloid Inhibitors? A Critical Examination of the Inhibition of IAPP Amyloid Formation by Inositol Stereoisomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Raleigh, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin) forms amyloid deposits in the islets of Langerhans; a process that is believed to contribute to the progression of type 2 diabetes and to the failure of islet transplants. An emerging theme in amyloid research is the hypothesis that the toxic species produced during amyloid formation by different polypeptides share common features and exert their effects by common mechanisms. If correct, this suggests that inhibitors of amyloid formation by one polypeptide might be effective against other amyloidogenic sequences. IAPP and Aβ, the peptide responsible for amyloid formation in Alzheimer's disease, are particularly interesting in this regard as they are both natively unfolded in their monomeric states and share some common characteristics. Comparatively little effort has been expended on the design of IAPP amyloid inhibitors, thus it is natural to inquire if Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP, especially since no IAPP inhibitors have been clinically approved. A range of compounds inhibit Aβ amyloid formation, including various stereoisomers of inositol. Myo-, scyllo-, and epi-inositol have been shown to induce conformational changes in Aβ and prevent Aβ amyloid fibril formation by stabilizing non-fibrillar β-sheet structures. We investigate the ability of inositol stereoisomers to inhibit amyloid formation by IAPP. The compounds do not induce a conformational change in IAPP and are ineffective inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation, although some do lead to modest apparent changes in IAPP amyloid fibril morphology. Thus not all classes of Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP. This work provides a basis of comparison to work on polyphenol based inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation and helps provide clues as to the features which render them effective. The study also helps provide information for further efforts in rational inhibitor design. PMID:25260075

  12. Bacterial colonization during de novo plaque formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramberg, Per; Sekino, Satoshi; Uzel, Naciye Guzin; Socransky, Sigmund; Lindhe, Jan

    2003-11-01

    To determine microbial changes that occur during plaque formation in a dentition free of gingival inflammation. Ten subjects were recruited. The study included one preparatory period (2 weeks) and a plaque accumulation period (4 days). The volunteers exercised proper tooth cleaning methods, were scaled and received repeated professional mechanical tooth cleaning during the preparatory period. During the plaque accumulation period, the participants abstained from plaque control measures. Plaque was scored on the approximal surfaces of maxillary and mandibular premolars on Days 0, 1, 2 and 4 using a scale from 0 to 5 and according to the criteria of the Quigley and Hein Plaque Index (QHI). Supragingival plaque samples were obtained from the same intervals and surfaces and evaluated using a checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. The mean QHI increased from 0 to 1.6 (Day 4). The total number of organisms on Day 0 averaged 140 x 10(5) and increased to about 210 x 10(5) after 4 days without oral hygiene. The most dominant species on Day 0 were members of the genus Actinomyces. These organisms comprised almost 50% of the microbiota evaluated. None of the Actinomyces species increased significantly during the 4 days. Some Streptococcus species increased significantly over time as well as species of the genera Capnocytophaga, Campylobacter, Fusobacteria and Actinomyces actinomycetemcomitans. In the present investigation, the preparatory phase established a situation with minimal gingival inflammation and close to zero amounts of dental plaque. The Day 0 plaque samples exhibited high proportions of Actinomyces species. During the 4 days of no oral hygiene, there was a small increase in total numbers of organisms as well as a modest increase in the proportion of "disease-associated" taxa such as species of the "orange complex" species.

  13. The Necessity of Having a Tetradentate Ligand to Extract Copper(II) Ions from Amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michel; Rechignat, Lionel; Robert, Anne; Meunier, Bernard

    2015-02-01

    The accumulation of redox-active metal ions, in particular copper, in amyloid plaques is considered to the cause of the intensive oxidation damage to the brain of patients with Alzheimers disease (AD). Drug candidates based on a bis(8-aminoquinoline) tetradentate ligand are able to efficiently extract Cu(2+) from copper-loaded amyloids (Cu-Aβ). Contrarily, in the presence of a bidentate hydroxyquinoline, such as clioquinol, the copper is not released from Aβ, but remains sequestrated within a Aβ-Cu-clioquinol ternary complex that has been characterized by mass spectrometry. Facile extraction of copper(II) at a low amyloid/ligand ratio is essential for the re-introduction of copper in regular metal circulation in the brain. As, upon reduction, the Cu(+) is easily released from the bis(8-aminoquinoline) ligand unable to accommodate Cu(I), it should be taken by proteins with an affinity for copper. So, the tetradentate bis(8-aminoquinoline) described here might act as a regulator of copper homeostasis.

  14. Heparan sulfate regulates amyloid precursor protein processing by BACE1, the Alzheimer's β-secretase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholefield, Zoe; Yates, Edwin A.; Wayne, Gareth; Amour, Augustin; McDowell, William; Turnbull, Jeremy E.

    2003-01-01

    Cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the Alzheimer's β-secretase (BACE1) is a key step in generating amyloid β-peptide, the main component of amyloid plaques. Here we report evidence that heparan sulfate (HS) interacts with β-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE) 1 and regulates its cleavage of APP. We show that HS and heparin interact directly with BACE1 and inhibit in vitro processing of peptide and APP substrates. Inhibitory activity is dependent on saccharide size and specific structural characteristics, and the mechanism of action involves blocking access of substrate to the active site. In cellular assays, HS specifically inhibits BACE1 cleavage of APP but not alternative cleavage by α-secretase. Endogenous HS immunoprecipitates with BACE1 and colocalizes with BACE1 in the Golgi complex and at the cell surface, two of its putative sites of action. Furthermore, inhibition of cellular HS synthesis results in enhanced BACE1 activity. Our findings identify HS as a natural regulator of BACE1 and suggest a novel mechanism for control of APP processing. PMID:14530380

  15. Amyloid-β oligomers are sequestered by both intracellular and extracellular chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Priyanka; Meehan, Sarah; Carver, John A; Wilson, Mark R; Dobson, Christopher M; Klenerman, David

    2012-11-20

    The aberrant aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide into β-sheet rich, fibrillar structures proceeds via a heterogeneous ensemble of oligomeric intermediates that have been associated with neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Of particular interest in this context are the mechanisms by which molecular chaperones, part of the primary biological defenses against protein misfolding, influence Aβ aggregation. We have used single-molecule fluorescence techniques to compare the interactions between distinct aggregation states (monomers, oligomers, and amyloid fibrils) of the AD-associated amyloid-β(1-40) peptide, and two molecular chaperones, both of which are upregulated in the brains of patients with AD and have been found colocalized with Aβ in senile plaques. One of the chaperones, αB-crystallin, is primarily found inside cells, while the other, clusterin, is predominantly located in the extracellular environment. We find that both chaperones bind to misfolded oligomeric species and form long-lived complexes, thereby preventing both their further growth into fibrils and their dissociation. From these studies, we conclude that these chaperones have a common mechanism of action based on sequestering Aβ oligomers. This conclusion suggests that these chaperones, both of which are ATP-independent, are able to inhibit potentially pathogenic Aβ oligomer-associated processes whether they occur in the extracellular or intracellular environment.

  16. Magnetic Fluids Have Ability to Decrease Amyloid Aggregation Associated with Amyloid-Related Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosova, Andrea; Koneracka, Martina; Siposova, Katarina; Zavisova, Vlasta; Daxnerova, Zuzana; Vavra, Ivo; Fabian, Martin; Kopcansky, Peter; Gazova, Zuzana

    2010-12-01

    At least twenty human proteins can fold abnormally to form pathological deposits that are associated with several amyloid-related diseases. We have investigated the effect of four magnetic fluids (MFs)—electrostatically stabilized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MF1) and sterically stabilized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles by sodium oleate (MF2, MF3 and MF4) with adsorbed BSA (MF2) or dextran (MF4)—on amyloid aggregation of two proteins, human insulin and chicken egg lysozyme. The morphology, particle size and size distribution of the prepared magnetic fluids were characterized. We have found that MFs are able to decrease amyloid aggregation of both studied proteins and the extent of depolymerization depended on the MF properties. The most effective reduction was observed for MF4 as 90% decrease of amyloids was detected for insulin and lysozyme amyloid aggregates. Our findings indicate that MFs have potential to be used for treatment of amyloid diseases.

  17. Pathogenesis of Mucormycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellberg, Brad; Walsh, Thomas J.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2012-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection that occurs in patients who are immunocompromised because of diabetic ketoacidosis, neutropenia, organ transplantation, and/or increased serum levels of available iron. Because of the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, cancer, and organ transplantation, the number of patients at risk for this deadly infection is increasing. Despite aggressive therapy, which includes disfiguring surgical debridement and frequently adjunctive toxic antifungal therapy, the overall mortality rate is high. New strategies to prevent and treat mucormycosis are urgently needed. Understanding the pathogenesis of mucormycosis and the host response to invading hyphae ultimately will provide targets for novel therapeutic interventions. In this supplement, we review the current knowledge about the virulence traits used by the most common etiologic agent of mucormycosis, Rhizopus oryzae. Because patients with elevated serum levels of available iron are uniquely susceptible to mucormycosis and these infections are highly angioinvasive, emphasis is placed on the ability of the organism to acquire iron from the host and on its interactions with endothelial cells lining blood vessels. Several promising therapeutic strategies in preclinical stages are identified. PMID:22247441

  18. Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariggiò, Giuseppe; Koch, Sandra; Schulz, Thomas F

    2017-10-19

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV), taxonomical name human gammaherpesvirus 8, is a phylogenetically old human virus that co-evolved with human populations, but is now only common (seroprevalence greater than 10%) in sub-Saharan Africa, around the Mediterranean Sea, parts of South America and in a few ethnic communities. KSHV causes three human malignancies, Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and many cases of the plasmablastic form of multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) as well as occasional cases of plasmablastic lymphoma arising from MCD; it has also been linked to rare cases of bone marrow failure and hepatitis. As it has colonized humans physiologically for many thousand years, cofactors are needed to allow it to unfold its pathogenic potential. In most cases, these include immune defects of genetic, iatrogenic or infectious origin, and inflammation appears to play an important role in disease development. Our much improved understanding of its life cycle and its role in pathogenesis should now allow us to develop new therapeutic strategies directed against key viral proteins or intracellular pathways that are crucial for virus replication or persistence. Likewise, its limited (for a herpesvirus) distribution and transmission should offer an opportunity for the development and use of a vaccine to prevent transmission.This article is part of the themed issue 'Human oncogenic viruses'. © 2017 The Authors.

  19. Pathogenesis and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Metastasis to the brain is an increasing complication of solid cancers. Fortunately, our understanding of its pathogenesis has greatly increased in the last decade, with crucial insights into the molecular and cellular determinants of successful brain colonization; some aspects remain less well understood. The latter include the exact features of brain metastasis-initiating cancer cells, and a potential premetastatic niche. It is clear that a brain-arrested cancer cell has to master a sequence of steps to eventually grow to a clinically relevant brain metastasis. Various brain-specific cell types and molecular niches promote or hinder brain colonization in a dynamic and reciprocal manner. After mandatory extravasation and colonization of a brain-specific perivascular niche, the cancer cell can stay dormant, or further grow by dynamic interactions with cerebral blood vessels. In addition, the activation of certain molecular pathways on site of the cancer cell which are related to growth, motility, survival, and adaptation to the brain environment appears also important, given their characteristic modification in brain metastases of patients. A deeper understanding of the most vulnerable steps of the brain metastatic cascade may foster the development of novel preventive approaches, and that of core biologic mechanisms for macrometastatic growth and persistence will help to develop better therapeutics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Amyloid- and FDG-PET in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Correlation with pathological prion protein in neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Guerrero-Márquez, Carmen; Cabrera-Martín, María Nieves; Gómez-Pinedo, Ulises; Romeral, María; Mayo, Diego; Porta-Etessam, Jesús; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Carreras, José Luis; Matías-Guiu, Jorge

    2017-05-04

    The role of positron emission tomography (PET) in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is less defined than in other neurodegenerative diseases. We studied the correlation between the uptake of 18 F-florbetaben and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose with pathological prion protein deposition in histopathology in a case. A patient with 80 y old with a rapid neurological deterioration with a confirmed diagnosis of CJD was studied. PET and MRI studies were performed between 13-20 d before the death. A region of interest analysis was performed using Statistical Parametric Mapping. MRI showed atrophy with no other alterations. FDG-PET showed extensive areas of hypometabolism including left frontoparietal lobes as well as bilateral thalamus. Correlation between uptake of 18 F-florbetaben and pathological prion protein deposition was r = 0.786 (p < 0.05). Otherwise, correlation between uptake of 18 F-FDG and pathological prion protein was r = 0.357 (p = 0.385). Immunohistochemistry with β-amyloid did not show amyloid deposition or neuritic plaques. Our study supports the use of FDG-PET in the assessment of CJD. FDG-PET may be especially useful in cases of suspected CJD and negative MRI. Furthermore, this case report provides more evidence about the behavioral of amyloid tracers, and the possibility of a low-affinity binding to other non-amyloid proteins, such as the pathological prion protein, is discussed.

  1. Amyloid Imaging in Aging and Dementia: Testing the Amyloid Hypothesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Rabinovici

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging represents a major advance in neuroscience, enabling the detection and quantification of pathologic protein aggregations in the brain. In this review we survey current amyloid imaging techniques, focusing on positron emission tomography (PET with ^{11}carbon-labelled Pittsburgh Compound-B (11C-PIB, the most extensively studied and best validated tracer. PIB binds specifically to fibrillar beta-amyloid (Aβ deposits, and is a sensitive marker for Aβ pathology in cognitively normal older individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. PIB-PET provides us with a powerful tool to examine in vivo the relationship between amyloid deposition, clinical symptoms, and structural and functional brain changes in the continuum between normal aging and AD. Amyloid imaging studies support a model in which amyloid deposition is an early event on the path to dementia, beginning insidiously in cognitively normal individuals, and accompanied by subtle cognitive decline and functional and structural brain changes suggestive of incipient AD. As patients progress to dementia, clinical decline and neurodegeneration accelerate and proceed independently of amyloid accumulation. In the future, amyloid imaging is likely to supplement clinical evaluation in selecting patients for anti-amyloid therapies, while MRI and FDG-PET may be more appropriate markers of clinical progression.

  2. A new inexpensive customized plaque for choroidal melanoma iodine-125 plaque therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vine, A.K.; Tenhaken, R.K.; Diaz, R.F.; Maxson, B.B.; Lichter, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have developed a new inexpensive precious metal alloy plaque for use in customized iodine-125 plaque therapy. Each plaque is formed from two flat circular gold/palladium foils which are used in dental crown work. Using a simple manual mechanism, the two forms are stamped over a customized acrylic die shaped to the dimensions of the tumor base plus a 2-mm margin. Completed plaques consist of a back wall, a 2-mm side wall, and a 1.5-mm wide lip with holes for suture placement. Advantages include: simple construction from inexpensive components, customized shape, and iodine seeds that are readily visible on plane radiographs

  3. Arctigenin effectively ameliorates memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease model mice targeting both β-amyloid production and clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; Yan, Jianming; Jiang, Wei; Yao, Xin-gang; Chen, Jing; Chen, Lili; Li, Chenjing; Hu, Lihong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Xu

    2013-08-07

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) chiefly characterizes a progressively neurodegenerative disorder of the brain, and eventually leads to irreversible loss of intellectual abilities. The β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced neurodegeneration is believed to be the main pathological mechanism of AD, and Aβ production inhibition or its clearance promotion is one of the promising therapeutic strategies for anti-AD research. Here, we report that the natural product arctigenin from Arctium lappa (L.) can both inhibit Aβ production by suppressing β-site amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme 1 expression and promote Aβ clearance by enhancing autophagy through AKT/mTOR signaling inhibition and AMPK/Raptor pathway activation as investigated in cells and APP/PS1 transgenic AD model mice. Moreover, the results showing that treatment of arctigenin in mice highly decreased Aβ formation and senile plaques and efficiently ameliorated AD mouse memory impairment strongly highlight the potential of arctigenin in anti-AD drug discovery.

  4. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloidplaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles. PMID:27121137

  5. Development of Plaque Assay Systems for Poliovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    inter- action must be ascertained for each type of virus to be collected and assayed. The vaccine strain of poliovirus type 1 (Sabin) was chosen as a...1067 DEVELOPMENT OF PLAQUE ASSAY SYSTEMS FOR POLIOVIRUS (U) by R.E. Fulton and K. Munroe Abstract During the summer months of 1978, Ms. Krista Munroe...quantitation of infectious poliovirus type 1. .Two different plaque assay techniques were developed and compared. The results of this work are presented

  6. Pathogenesis of rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifan, A O; Durham, S R

    2016-09-01

    Rhinitis is a heterogeneous condition that has been associated with inflammatory responses as in allergic rhinitis but can also occur in the absence of inflammation such as in so-called idiopathic (previously 'vasomotor') rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis affects approximately one in four of the population of westernized countries and is characterized by typical symptoms of nasal itching, sneezing, watery discharge and congestion. The intention of this review is to illustrate key concepts of the pathogenesis of rhinitis. Imbalance in innate and adaptive immunity together with environmental factors is likely to play major roles. In allergic rhinitis, initial allergen exposure and sensitization involves antigen-presenting cells, T and B lymphocytes and results in the generation of allergen-specific T cells and allergen-specific IgE antibodies. On re-exposure to relevant allergens, cross-linking of IgE on mast cells results in the release of mediators of hypersensitivity such as histamine and immediate nasal symptoms. Within hours, there is an infiltration by inflammatory cells, particularly Th2 T lymphocytes, eosinophils and basophils into nasal mucosal tissue that results in the late-phase allergic response. Evidence for nasal priming and whether or not remodelling may be a feature of allergic rhinitis will be reviewed. The occurrence of so-called local allergic rhinitis in the absence of systemic IgE will be discussed. Non-allergic (non-IgE-mediated) rhinitis will be considered in the context of inflammatory and non-inflammatory disorders. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Pathogenesis of bovine neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Buxton, D; Wouda, W

    2006-05-01

    The protozoan parasite Neospora caninum is a major pathogen of cattle and dogs, being a significant cause of abortion in cattle in many countries. It is one of the most efficiently transmitted parasites, with up to 90% of cattle infected in some herds. The pathogenesis of abortion due to Neospora is complex and only partially understood. Losses occur after a primary infection during pregnancy but more commonly as the result of recrudescence of a persistent infection during pregnancy. Parasitaemia is followed by invasion of the placenta and fetus. It is suggested that abortion occurs when primary parasite-induced placental damage jeopardises fetal survival directly or causes release of maternal prostaglandins that in turn cause luteolysis and abortion. Fetal damage may also occur due to primary tissue damage caused by the multiplication of N. caninum in the fetus or due to insufficient oxygen/nutrition, secondary to placental damage. In addition, maternal immune expulsion of the fetus may occur associated with maternal placental inflammation and the release of maternal pro-inflammatory cytokines in the placenta. Thus N. caninum is a primary pathogen capable of causing abortion either through maternal placental inflammation, maternal and fetal placental necrosis, fetal damage, or a combination of all three. The question of how N. caninum kills the fetus exposes the complex and finely balanced biological processes that have evolved to permit bovine and other mammalian pregnancies to occur. Defining these immunological mechanisms will shed light on potential methods of control of bovine neosporosis and enrich our understanding of the continuity of mammalian and protozoal survival.

  8. In vivo amyloid-β imaging in the APPPS1-21 transgenic mouse model with a 89Zr- labeled monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Marie eWaldron

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The accumulation of amyloid-β is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and is a target for molecular imaging probes to aid in diagnosis and disease monitoring. This study evaluated the feasibility of using a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-amyloid-β antibody (JRF/AβN/25 to non-invasively assess amyloid-β burden in aged transgenic mice (APPPS1-21 with μPET imaging.Methods: We investigated the antibody JRF/AβN/25 that binds to full-length Aβ. JRF/AβN/25 was radiolabeled with a [89Zr]-desferal chelate and intravenously injected into 12-13 month aged APPPS1-21 mice and their wild-type (WT controls. Mice underwent in vivo μPET imaging at 2, 4 and 7 days post injection and were sacrificed at the end of each time point to assess brain penetrance, plaque labeling, biodistribution and tracer stability. To confirm imaging specificity we also evaluated brain uptake of a non-amyloid targeting [89Zr]-labeled antibody (Trastuzumab as a negative control, additionally we performed a competitive blocking study with non-radiolabeled Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 and finally we assessed the possible confounding effects of blood retention. Results: Voxel-wise analysis of μPET data demonstrated significant [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 retention in APPPS1-21 mice at all time points investigated. With ex vivo measures of radioactivity, significantly higher retention of [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 was found at 4 and 7 day pi in APPPS1-21 mice. Despite the observed genotypic differences, comparisons with immunohistochemistry revealed that in vivo plaque labeling was low. Furthermore, pre-treatment with Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 only partially blocked [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 uptake indicative of a high contribution of non-specific binding. Conclusion: Amyloid plaques were detected in vivo with a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-amyloid antibody. The low brain penetrance of the antibodies in addition to non-specific binding prevented an accurate estimation of plaque

  9. Amyloid oligomer structure characterization from simulations: A general method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Phuong H., E-mail: phuong.nguyen@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Li, Mai Suan [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Derreumaux, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.derreumaux@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Institut Universitaire de France, 103 Bvd Saint-Germain, 75005 Paris (France)

    2014-03-07

    Amyloid oligomers and plaques are composed of multiple chemically identical proteins. Therefore, one of the first fundamental problems in the characterization of structures from simulations is the treatment of the degeneracy, i.e., the permutation of the molecules. Second, the intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom of the various molecules must be taken into account. Currently, the well-known dihedral principal component analysis method only considers the intramolecular degrees of freedom, and other methods employing collective variables can only describe intermolecular degrees of freedom at the global level. With this in mind, we propose a general method that identifies all the structures accurately. The basis idea is that the intramolecular and intermolecular states are described in terms of combinations of single-molecule and double-molecule states, respectively, and the overall structures of oligomers are the product basis of the intramolecular and intermolecular states. This way, the degeneracy is automatically avoided. The method is illustrated on the conformational ensemble of the tetramer of the Alzheimer's peptide Aβ{sub 9−40}, resulting from two atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent, each of 200 ns, starting from two distinct structures.

  10. Calumenin interacts with serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Jacobsen, Christian; Honoré, Bent

    2000-01-01

    with calumenin in the presence of Ca(2+). Amino acid sequencing identified this protein as serum amyloid P component (SAP). Furthermore, we verified and characterized the calumenin-SAP interaction by the surface plasmon resonance technique. The findings indicate that calumenin may participate...... in the immunological defense system and could be involved in the pathological process of amyloidosis that leads to formation of amyloid deposits seen in different types of tissues. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Jan-14...

  11. Fibril specific, conformation dependent antibodies recognize a generic epitope common to amyloid fibrils and fibrillar oligomers that is absent in prefibrillar oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool Suhail

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid-related degenerative diseases are associated with the accumulation of misfolded proteins as amyloid fibrils in tissue. In Alzheimer disease (AD, amyloid accumulates in several distinct types of insoluble plaque deposits, intracellular Aβ and as soluble oligomers and the relationships between these deposits and their pathological significance remains unclear. Conformation dependent antibodies have been reported that specifically recognize distinct assembly states of amyloids, including prefibrillar oligomers and fibrils. Results We immunized rabbits with a morphologically homogeneous population of Aβ42 fibrils. The resulting immune serum (OC specifically recognizes fibrils, but not random coil monomer or prefibrillar oligomers, indicating fibrils display a distinct conformation dependent epitope that is absent in prefibrillar oligomers. The fibril epitope is also displayed by fibrils of other types of amyloids, indicating that the epitope is a generic feature of the polypeptide backbone. The fibril specific antibody also recognizes 100,000 × G soluble fibrillar oligomers ranging in size from dimer to greater than 250 kDa on western blots. The fibrillar oligomers recognized by OC are immunologically distinct from prefibrillar oligomers recognized by A11, even though their sizes overlap broadly, indicating that size is not a reliable indicator of oligomer conformation. The immune response to prefibrillar oligomers and fibrils is not sequence specific and antisera of the same specificity are produced in response to immunization with islet amyloid polypeptide prefibrillar oligomer mimics and fibrils. The fibril specific antibodies stain all types of amyloid deposits in human AD brain. Diffuse amyloid deposits stain intensely with anti-fibril antibody although they are thioflavin S negative, suggesting that they are indeed fibrillar in conformation. OC also stains islet amyloid deposits in transgenic mouse models of type

  12. Natural product-based amyloid inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velander, Paul; Wu, Ling; Henderson, Frances; Zhang, Shijun; Bevan, David R; Xu, Bin

    2017-09-01

    Many chronic human diseases, including multiple neurodegenerative diseases, are associated with deleterious protein aggregates, also called protein amyloids. One common therapeutic strategy is to develop protein aggregation inhibitors that can slow down, prevent, or remodel toxic amyloids. Natural products are a major class of amyloid inhibitors, and several dozens of natural product-based amyloid inhibitors have been identified and characterized in recent years. These plant- or microorganism-extracted compounds have shown significant therapeutic potential from in vitro studies as well as in vivo animal tests. Despite the technical challenges of intrinsic disordered or partially unfolded amyloid proteins that are less amenable to characterizations by structural biology, a significant amount of research has been performed, yielding biochemical and pharmacological insights into how inhibitors function. This review aims to summarize recent progress in natural product-based amyloid inhibitors and to analyze their mechanisms of inhibition in vitro. Major classes of natural product inhibitors and how they were identified are described. Our analyses comprehensively address the molecular interactions between the inhibitors and relevant amyloidogenic proteins. These interactions are delineated at molecular and atomic levels, which include covalent, non-covalent, and metal-mediated mechanisms. In vivo animal studies and clinical trials have been summarized as an extension. To enhance natural product bioavailability in vivo, emerging work using nanocarriers for delivery has also been described. Finally, issues and challenges as well as future development of such inhibitors are envisioned. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane.

  14. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide: Structure, Function, and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehana Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hormone islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, or amylin plays a role in glucose homeostasis but aggregates to form islet amyloid in type-2 diabetes. Islet amyloid formation contributes to β-cell dysfunction and death in the disease and to the failure of islet transplants. Recent work suggests a role for IAPP aggregation in cardiovascular complications of type-2 diabetes and hints at a possible role in type-1 diabetes. The mechanisms of IAPP amyloid formation in vivo or in vitro are not understood and the mechanisms of IAPP induced β-cell death are not fully defined. Activation of the inflammasome, defects in autophagy, ER stress, generation of reactive oxygen species, membrane disruption, and receptor mediated mechanisms have all been proposed to play a role. Open questions in the field include the relative importance of the various mechanisms of β-cell death, the relevance of reductionist biophysical studies to the situation in vivo, the molecular mechanism of amyloid formation in vitro and in vivo, the factors which trigger amyloid formation in type-2 diabetes, the potential role of IAPP in type-1 diabetes, the development of clinically relevant inhibitors of islet amyloidosis toxicity, and the design of soluble, bioactive variants of IAPP for use as adjuncts to insulin therapy.

  15. Pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2010-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a serious infection of the cornea. At present, diagnosis of the disease is not straightforward and treatment is very demanding. While contact lens wear is the leading risk factor for AK, Acanthamoeba parasites are increasingly recognized as an important cause of keratitis in non-contact lens wearers. The first critical step in the pathogenesis of infection is the adhesion of the microbe to the surface of the host tissues. Acanthamoebae express a major virulence protein, the mannose-binding protein (MBP), which mediates the adhesion of amoebae to the surface of the cornea. The MBP is a transmembrane protein with characteristics of a typical cell surface receptor. Subsequent to the MBP-mediated adhesion to host cells, the amoebae produce a contact-dependent metalloproteinase and several contact-independent serine proteinases. These proteinases work in concert to produce a potent cytopathic effect (CPE) involving killing of the host cells, degradation of epithelial basement membrane and underlying stromal matrix, and penetration into the deeper layers of the cornea. In the hamster animal model, oral immunization with the recombinant MBP protects against AK, and this protection is associated with an increased level of anti-MBP IgA in tears of protected animals. Normal human tear fluid contains IgA antibodies against Acanthamoeba MBP that is likely to provide protection by inhibiting the adhesion of parasites to host cells. Indeed, in in vitro CPE assays, even a low concentration of tears (10 [MU]μL of undiluted tears per milliliter of media) almost completely inhibits Acanthamoeba-induced CPE. In addition to adherence-inhibiting, IgA-mediated protection, human tears also contain IgA-independent factors that provide protection against Acanthamoeba-induced CPE by inhibiting the activity of cytotoxic proteinases. Characterization of the CPE-inhibitory factors of human tears should lead to a better understanding of the mechanism by which the

  16. Traffic jam at the blood-brain barrier promotes greater accumulation of Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β proteins in the cerebral vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyare, Edward K; Leonard, Sarah R; Curran, Geoffry L; Yu, Caroline C; Lowe, Val J; Paravastu, Anant K; Poduslo, Joseph F; Kandimalla, Karunya K

    2013-05-06

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in the brain vasculature results in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), which occurs in about 80% of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. While Aβ42 predominates parenchymal amyloid plaques in AD brain, Aβ40 is prevalent in the cerebrovascular amyloid. Dutch mutation of Aβ40 (E22Q) promotes aggressive cerebrovascular accumulation and leads to severe CAA in the mutation carriers; knowledge of how DutchAβ40 drives this process more efficiently than Aβ40 could reveal various pathophysiological events that promote CAA. In this study we have demonstrated that DutchAβ40 shows preferential accumulation in the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) endothelial cells due to its inefficient blood-to-brain transcytosis. Consequently, DutchAβ40 establishes a permeation barrier in the BBB endothelium, prevents its own clearance from the brain, and promotes the formation of amyloid deposits in the cerebral microvessels. The BBB endothelial accumulation of native Aβ40 is not robust enough to exercise such a significant impact on its brain clearance. Hence, the cerebrovascular accumulation of Aβ40 is slow and may require other copathologies to precipitate into CAA. In conclusion, the magnitude of Aβ accumulation in the BBB endothelial cells is a critical factor that promotes CAA; hence, clearing vascular endothelium of Aβ proteins may halt or even reverse CAA.

  17. Traffic Jam at the Blood Brain Barrier Promotes Greater Accumulation of Alzheimer’s Disease Amyloid-β Proteins in the Cerebral Vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyare, Edward K.; Leonard, Sarah R.; Curran, Geoffry L.; Yu, Caroline C.; Lowe, Val J.; Paravastu, Anant K.; Poduslo, Joseph F.; Kandimalla, Karunya K.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in the brain vasculature results in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), which occurs in about 80% of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. While Aβ42 predominates parenchymal amyloid plaques in AD brain, Aβ40 is prevalent in the cerebrovascular amyloid. Dutch mutation of Aβ40 (E22Q) promotes aggressive cerebrovascular accumulation and leads to severe CAA in the mutation carriers; knowledge of how DutchAβ40 drives this process more efficiently than Aβ40 could reveal various pathophysiological events that promote CAA. In this study we have demonstrated that DutchAβ40 show preferential accumulation in the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) endothelial cells due to its inefficient blood-to-brain transcytosis. Consequently, DutchAβ40 establishes a permeation barrier in the BBB endothelium, prevents its own clearance from the brain and promotes the formation of amyloid deposits in the cerebral microvessels. The BBB endothelial accumulation of native Aβ40 is not robust enough to exercise such a significant impact on its brain clearance. Hence, the cerebrovascular accumulation of Aβ40 is slow and may require other co-pathologies to precipitate into CAA. In conclusion, the magnitude of Aβ accumulation in the BBB endothelial cells is a critical factor that promotes CAA; hence, clearing vascular endothelium of Aβ proteins may halt or even reverse CAA. PMID:23249146

  18. Chemical agents for the control of plaque and plaque microflora: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffar, A; Afflitto, J; Nabi, N

    1997-10-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the technologies available for the chemical control of plaque. It is generally accepted that the formation of dental plaque at the interfaces of tooth/gingiva is one of the major causes of gingival inflammation and dental caries. Several therapeutic approaches have been used to control dental plaque and supragingival infections. These include fluoride preparations such as stannous fluoride, oxygenating agents, anti-attachment agents, and cationic and non-cationic antibacterial agents. Among the fluoride preparations, stable stannous fluoride pastes and gels have been shown to reduce supragingival plaque, gingivitis, hypersensitivity and caries. The effect of the oxygenating agents on the supragingival plaque has been equivocal, but recent data indicate that a stable agent which provides sustained active oxygen release is effective in controlling plaque. A polymer, PVPA, which reduced attachment of bacteria to teeth was shown to significantly reduce plaque formation in humans. A new generation of antibacterials includes non-ionics such as triclosan, which in combination with a special polymer delivery system, has been shown to reduce plaque, gingivitis, supragingival calculus and dental caries in long-term studies conducted around the world. Unlike the first generation of agents, the triclosan/copolymer/sodium fluoride system is effective in long-term clinicals and does not cause staining of teeth, increase in calculus, or disturbance in the oral microbial ecology.

  19. Proposal for novel curcumin derivatives as potent inhibitors against Alzheimer's disease: Ab initio molecular simulations on the specific interactions between amyloid-beta peptide and curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Shintaro; Fujimori, Mitsuki; Ishimura, Hiromi; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2017-10-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in a brain is closely related with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. To suppress the production of Aβ peptides, we propose novel curcumin derivatives and investigate their binding properties with the amyloid precursor protein (APP), using protein-ligand docking as well as ab initio molecular simulations. Our proposed derivative (curcumin XIV) is found to have a large binding energy with APP and interacts strongly with the cleavage site Ala19 by secretase. It is thus expected that curcumin XIV can protect APP from the secretase attack and be a potent inhibitor against the production of Aβ peptides.

  20. Variables affecting viral plaque formation in microculture plaque assays using homologous antibody in a liquid overlay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, A S; Stanton, G J; Green, J A; Baron, S

    1977-05-01

    A liquid antibody microculture plaque assay and the variables that govern its effectiveness are described. The assay is based on the principle that low concentrations of homologous antibody can inhibit secondary plaque formation without inhibiting formation of primary plaques. Thus, clear plaques that followed a linear dose response were produced. The assay was found to be more rapid, less cumbersome, and less expensive than assays using agar overlays and larger tissue culture plates. It was reproducible, quantitative, and had about the same sensitivity as the agar overlay technique in measuring infectious coxsackievirus type B-3. It was more sensitive in assaying adenovirus type 3 and Western equine encephalomyelitis, vesicular stomatitis, Semliki forest, Sendai, Sindbis, and Newcastle disease viruses than were liquid, carboxymethylcellulose, and methylcellulose microculture plaque assays. The variables influencing sensitivity and accuracy, as determined by using coxsackievirus type B-3, were: (i) the inoculum volume of virus; (ii) the incubation period of virus; and (iii) the incubation temperature.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of rosacea pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davydova A.M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents possible molecular mechanisms for rosacea pathogenesis from current domestic and foreign clinical observations and laboratory research: regulation and expression defects of antimicrobial peptides, vascular endothelial growth factor, the effect of serine proteases, oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species and ferritin on the occurrence and course of rosacea. New developments in molecular biology and genetics are advanced for researching the interaction of multiple factors involved in rosacea pathogenesis, as well as providing the bases for potentially new therapies.

  2. Concepts in viral pathogenesis II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notkins, A.L.; Oldstone, M.B.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper contains papers divided among 10 sections. The section titles are: Viral Structure and Function; Viral Constructs; Oncogenes, Transfection, and Differentiation; Viral Tropism and Entry into Cells; Immune Recognition of Viruses; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Plant and Animal Models; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Diseases in Humans; New Trends in Diagnosis and Epidemiology; and Vaccines and Antiviral Therapy.

  3. Immunoprecipitation of amyloid fibrils by the use of an antibody that recognizes a generic epitope common to amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin R Greiner

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils are associated with many maladies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. The isolation of amyloids from natural materials is very challenging because the extreme structural stability of amyloid fibrils makes it difficult to apply conventional protein science protocols to their purification. A protocol to isolate and detect amyloids is desired for the diagnosis of amyloid diseases and for the identification of new functional amyloids. Our aim was to develop a protocol to purify amyloid from organisms, based on the particular characteristics of the amyloid fold, such as its resistance to proteolysis and its capacity to be recognized by specific conformational antibodies. We used a two-step strategy with proteolytic digestion as the first step followed by immunoprecipitation using the amyloid conformational antibody LOC. We tested the efficacy of this method using as models amyloid fibrils produced in vitro, tissue extracts from C. elegans that overexpress Aβ peptide, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from patients diagnosed with AD. We were able to immunoprecipitate Aβ(1-40 amyloid fibrils, produced in vitro and then added to complex biological extracts, but not α-synuclein and gelsolin fibrils. This method was useful for isolating amyloid fibrils from tissue homogenates from a C. elegans AD model, especially from aged worms. Although we were able to capture picogram quantities of Aβ(1-40 amyloid fibrils produced in vitro when added to complex biological solutions, we could not detect any Aβ amyloid aggregates in CSF from AD patients. Our results show that although immunoprecipitation using the LOC antibody is useful for isolating Aβ(1-40 amyloid fibrils, it fails to capture fibrils of other amyloidogenic proteins, such as α-synuclein and gelsolin. Additional research might be needed to improve the affinity of these amyloid conformational antibodies for an array of amyloid fibrils without compromising their selectivity before

  4. Review: pathogenesis of gallstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, R H

    2000-05-01

    The aim of this article is to review selected aspects of the pathogenesis of cholesterol-rich, gall-bladder stones (GBS)--with emphasis on recent developments in biliary cholesterol saturation, cholesterol microcrystal nucleation, statis within the gall-bladder and, particularly, on the roles of intestinal transit and altered deoxycholic acid (DCA) metabolism, in GBS development. In biliary cholesterol secretion, transport and saturation, recent developments include evidence in humans and animals, that bile lipid secretion is under genetic control. Thus in mice the md-2 gene, and in humans the MDR-3 gene, encodes for a canalicular protein that acts as a 'flippase' transporting phospholipids from the inner to the outer hemi-leaflet of the canalicular membrane. In the absence of this gene, there is virtually no phospholipid or cholesterol secretion into bile. Furthermore, when inbred strains of mice that have 'lith genes' are fed a lithogenic diet, they become susceptible to high rates of GBS formation. The precipitation/nucleation of cholesterol microcrystals from supersaturated bile remains a critical step in gallstone formation. methods of studying this phenomenon have now been refined from the original 'nucleation time' to measurement of cholesterol appearance/detection times, and crystal growth assays. Furthermore, the results of recent studies indicate that, in addition to classical Rhomboid-shape monohydrate crystals, cholesterol can also crystallize, transiently, as needle-, spiral- and tubule-shaped crystals of anhydrous cholesterol. A lengthy list of promoters, and a shorter list of inhibitors, has now been defined. There are many situations where GB stasis in humans is associated with an increased risk of gallstone formation--including iatrogenic stone formation in acromegalic patients treated chronically with octreotide (OT). As well as GB stasis, however, OT-treated patients all have 'bad' bile which is supersaturated with cholesterol, has excess

  5. DECT evaluation of noncalcified coronary artery plaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravanfar Haghighi, Rezvan [Medical Imaging Research Center and Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Science, Shiraz 719 363 5899 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chatterjee, S. [BGVS Chemical Engineering Building (Old), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Tabin, Milo; Singh, Rishi P.; Sharma, Munish; Krishna, Karthik [Department of Forensic Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Sharma, Sanjiv; Jagia, Priya [Department of Cardiac-Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Ray, Ruma; Arava, Sudhir [Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Yadav, Rakesh [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Vani, V. C. [Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Lakshmi, R.; Kumar, Pratik, E-mail: drpratikkumar@gmail.com [Department of Cardiac-Biochemistry, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Mandal, Susama R. [Department of Medical Physics Unit IRCH, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Composition of the coronary artery plaque is known to have critical role in heart attack. While calcified plaque can easily be diagnosed by conventional CT, it fails to distinguish between fibrous and lipid rich plaques. In the present paper, the authors discuss the experimental techniques and obtain a numerical algorithm by which the electron density (ρ{sub e}) and the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) can be obtained from the dual energy computed tomography (DECT) data. The idea is to use this inversion method to characterize and distinguish between the lipid and fibrous coronary artery plaques. Methods: For the purpose of calibration of the CT machine, the authors prepare aqueous samples whose calculated values of (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) lie in the range of (2.65 × 10{sup 23} ≤ ρ{sub e} ≤ 3.64 × 10{sup 23}/cm{sup 3}) and (6.80 ≤ Z{sub eff} ≤ 8.90). The authors fill the phantom with these known samples and experimentally determine HU(V{sub 1}) and HU(V{sub 2}), with V{sub 1},V{sub 2} = 100 and 140 kVp, for the same pixels and thus determine the coefficients of inversion that allow us to determine (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) from the DECT data. The HU(100) and HU(140) for the coronary artery plaque are obtained by filling the channel of the coronary artery with a viscous solution of methyl cellulose in water, containing 2% contrast. These (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) values of the coronary artery plaque are used for their characterization on the basis of theoretical models of atomic compositions of the plaque materials. These results are compared with histopathological report. Results: The authors find that the calibration gives ρ{sub e} with an accuracy of ±3.5% while Z{sub eff} is found within ±1% of the actual value, the confidence being 95%. The HU(100) and HU(140) are found to be considerably different for the same plaque at the same position and there is a linear trend between these two HU values. It is noted that pure lipid type plaques

  6. Functional Expression of Dental Plaque Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Norman Peterson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries remains a significant public health problem and is considered pandemic worldwide. The prediction of dental caries based on profiling of microbial species involved in disease and equally important, the identification of species conferring dental health has proven more difficult than anticipated due to high interpersonal and geographical variability of dental plaque microbiota. We have used RNA-Seq to perform global gene expression analysis of dental plaque microbiota derived from 19 twin pairs that were either concordant (caries-active or caries-free or discordant for dental caries. The transcription profiling allowed us to define a functional core microbiota consisting of nearly 60 species. Similarities in gene expression patterns allowed a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of human genetics, environmental factors and caries phenotype on the microbiota’s transcriptome. Correlation analysis of transcription allowed the identification of numerous functional networks, suggesting that inter-personal environmental variables may co-select for groups of genera and species. Analysis of functional role categories allowed the identification of dominant functions expressed by dental plaque biofilm communities, that highlight the biochemical priorities of dental plaque microbes to metabolize diverse sugars and cope with the acid and oxidative stress resulting from sugar fermentation. The wealth of data generated by deep sequencing of expressed transcripts enables a greatly expanded perspective concerning the functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

  7. Functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Scott N; Meissner, Tobias; Su, Andrew I; Snesrud, Erik; Ong, Ana C; Schork, Nicholas J; Bretz, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries remains a significant public health problem and is considered pandemic worldwide. The prediction of dental caries based on profiling of microbial species involved in disease and equally important, the identification of species conferring dental health has proven more difficult than anticipated due to high interpersonal and geographical variability of dental plaque microbiota. We have used RNA-Seq to perform global gene expression analysis of dental plaque microbiota derived from 19 twin pairs that were either concordant (caries-active or caries-free) or discordant for dental caries. The transcription profiling allowed us to define a functional core microbiota consisting of nearly 60 species. Similarities in gene expression patterns allowed a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of human genetics, environmental factors and caries phenotype on the microbiota's transcriptome. Correlation analysis of transcription allowed the identification of numerous functional networks, suggesting that inter-personal environmental variables may co-select for groups of genera and species. Analysis of functional role categories allowed the identification of dominant functions expressed by dental plaque biofilm communities, that highlight the biochemical priorities of dental plaque microbes to metabolize diverse sugars and cope with the acid and oxidative stress resulting from sugar fermentation. The wealth of data generated by deep sequencing of expressed transcripts enables a greatly expanded perspective concerning the functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

  8. Approach To Unstable Plaque In Carotid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojdeh Ghabaee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Risk of cerebral infarction due to thrombo emboli originating  from carotid artery disease estimated to be near 15%, and this risk  is closely associated with the severity of luminal stenosis. But at the same time characteristics  of the plaque should be taken into account for therapeutic planning when the patient is asymptomatic and the diameter of the stenosis does not reach the threshold of 70%. Search for markers of plaque vulnerability, instability, or thromboembolic potential as complementary to the degree of the luminal stenosis in stroke risk prediction should be considered .These morphologic features of carotid plaques are increasingly believed to be one of those markers that could carry further prognostic information, and early recognition of these plaques features may identify a high-risk subgroup of patients who might particularly benefit from aggressive interventions with aggressive medical treatment. Color and duplex Doppler sonography  evaluates both  morphologic and hemodynamic   abnormalitie of carotid. Echogensity, degree of stenosis and plaque surface features are essential parameters of morphological abnormality.

  9. Emerging targeted therapies for plaque psoriasis – impact of ixekizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazemi T

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tiana Kazemi,1 Benjamin Farahnik,2 John Koo,3 Kourosh Beroukhim1 1University of California – Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, 2University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT, 3University of California – San Francisco, Department of Dermatology, Psoriasis and Skin Treatment Center, San Francisco, CA, USA Background: Recent studies into the pathogenesis of psoriasis have identified the importance of interleukin 17 (IL-17 in disease activity and have thus provided a new target for biologic therapy. Ixekizumab, the most recent US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved anti-IL-17 biologic agent, appears to be a promising medication for patients suffering from moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. Methods: We reviewed the results of phase III trials for ixekizumab in order to assess the efficacy, safety, and impact on quality of life of this agent in the treatment of plaque psoriasis. Additionally, we compared these results to phase II and phase III trials for other biologic psoriasis medications including the anti-IL-23 agents tildrakizumab and guselkumab, the combined anti-IL-12 and anti-IL-23 agent ustekinumab, and the anti-IL-17 agents brodalumab and secukinumab. Results: Pooled results from individual studies demonstrate that among the most efficacious dosing regimens of these anti-interleukin therapies, ixekizumab achieves higher Psoriasis Area and Severity Index 75 rates and similar or higher static Physician Global Assessment 0-1 rates than the other anti-IL-17 and anti-IL-23 agents. The safety profile of ixekizumab is similar to these agents, with nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory infection, headache, arthralgia, and injection-site erythema as the most commonly reported adverse events. Conclusion: Ixekizumab is a highly efficacious, newly FDA-approved treatment for moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis that demonstrates a robust clinical response, significant improvement in patient quality of

  10. Cobalt60 plaques in recurrent retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fass, D.; McCormick, B.; Abramson, D.; Ellsworth, R. (Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Cobalt60 plaque irradiation is one treatment option for patients with recurrent retinoblastoma following conventional external beam irradiation (ERT). Tumorocidal doses can be delivered without excessive risk of normal tissue injury. In patients not considered candidates for xenon arc or cryotherapy, 60Co is an alternative to enucleation. Between 1968 and 1987, 85 patients were treated with 60Co plaques, 72 of whom had failed prior ERT. Age at diagnosis ranged from 1 week to 4 years. There are 37 males and 35 females. Seventy-one patients had bilateral disease and one had unilateral. Three patients had both eyes plaqued. Prior ERT ranged from 30 to 70 Gy (mean 4200 Gy). Time from initial therapy to failure ranged from 13 to 60 months. Cobalt plaques of 10 mm, 15 mm, or 10 {times} 15 mm were used depending on tumor size and location. Dose prescribed to the apex of the tumor ranged from 30 to 50 Gy (median 40 Gy) given over 3 to 8 days. Twelve patients had two plaque applications; three patients had three plaque applications. All patients were followed with routine ophthalmoscopic examinations. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 22 years (mean 8.7). Seven patients died of metastatic disease; 10 patients developed non-ocular second tumors. Thirty patients required enucleation. Twenty-two patients had clear tumor progression, two patients had radiation complications, and six patients had a combination of tumor growth and complications. Cobalt60 can salvage eyes in retinoblastoma patients failing ERT. Currently, the authors are using I125 in an attempt to spare normal ocular tissue and reduce subsequent complications.

  11. Cobalt60 plaques in recurrent retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fass, D.; McCormick, B.; Abramson, D.; Ellsworth, R.

    1991-01-01

    Cobalt60 plaque irradiation is one treatment option for patients with recurrent retinoblastoma following conventional external beam irradiation (ERT). Tumorocidal doses can be delivered without excessive risk of normal tissue injury. In patients not considered candidates for xenon arc or cryotherapy, 60Co is an alternative to enucleation. Between 1968 and 1987, 85 patients were treated with 60Co plaques, 72 of whom had failed prior ERT. Age at diagnosis ranged from 1 week to 4 years. There are 37 males and 35 females. Seventy-one patients had bilateral disease and one had unilateral. Three patients had both eyes plaqued. Prior ERT ranged from 30 to 70 Gy (mean 4200 Gy). Time from initial therapy to failure ranged from 13 to 60 months. Cobalt plaques of 10 mm, 15 mm, or 10 x 15 mm were used depending on tumor size and location. Dose prescribed to the apex of the tumor ranged from 30 to 50 Gy (median 40 Gy) given over 3 to 8 days. Twelve patients had two plaque applications; three patients had three plaque applications. All patients were followed with routine ophthalmoscopic examinations. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 22 years (mean 8.7). Seven patients died of metastatic disease; 10 patients developed non-ocular second tumors. Thirty patients required enucleation. Twenty-two patients had clear tumor progression, two patients had radiation complications, and six patients had a combination of tumor growth and complications. Cobalt60 can salvage eyes in retinoblastoma patients failing ERT. Currently, the authors are using I125 in an attempt to spare normal ocular tissue and reduce subsequent complications

  12. Computational Modelling of the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby

    2014-01-01

    of a specific protein into amyloid fibrils. During this process, a cytotoxic event occurs which can be a serious actor in the evolvement of the disease. This thesis is concerned with elucidating the biological processes concerning amyloid proteins, more specifically, the peptide hormone human islet amyloid...... setup. We have exploited these strengths to study the interactions between an amyloid fibril and amyloid imaging agents. Imaging agents are promising tools for the detection of amyloid deposits in the brain of AD patients. This could aid in the early diagnosis as well as evaluation of new treatments......When proteins do not fold correctly, it can lead to very serious diseases. One such group of diseases is the amyloid diseases, of which Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are members. The amyloid diseases are characterized by the aggregation...

  13. Interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdovinová, Veronika; Tomašovičová, Natália; Batko, Ivan; Batková, Marianna; Balejčíková, Lucia; Garamus, Vasyl M.; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Kopčanský, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This work is devoted to the structural study of complex solutions of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils due to possible ordering of such system by applying the external magnetic field. The interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with amyloid fibrils has been followed by atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. It has been observed that magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. It was found that MNPs alter amyloids structures, namely the diameter of lysozyme amyloid fibrils is increased whereas the length of fibrils is decreased. In the same time MNPs do not change the helical pitch significantly. - Highlights: • Solution of MNPs with lysozyme amyloid fibrils was characterized by AFM and SAXS. • MNPs adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. • Diameter and size of lysozyme amyloid fibrils change due to doping with MNPs.

  14. Interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdovinová, Veronika [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Tomašovičová, Natália, E-mail: nhudak@saske.sk [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Batko, Ivan; Batková, Marianna; Balejčíková, Lucia [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Garamus, Vasyl M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht: Zentrum fr Material, und Kstenforschung GmbH, Max-Plank-Strae 1, Geesthacht 216502 (Germany); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Physics Department, Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kopčanský, Peter [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia)

    2017-06-01

    This work is devoted to the structural study of complex solutions of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils due to possible ordering of such system by applying the external magnetic field. The interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with amyloid fibrils has been followed by atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. It has been observed that magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. It was found that MNPs alter amyloids structures, namely the diameter of lysozyme amyloid fibrils is increased whereas the length of fibrils is decreased. In the same time MNPs do not change the helical pitch significantly. - Highlights: • Solution of MNPs with lysozyme amyloid fibrils was characterized by AFM and SAXS. • MNPs adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. • Diameter and size of lysozyme amyloid fibrils change due to doping with MNPs.

  15. Astrocytic Gap Junctional Communication is Reduced in Amyloid-β-Treated Cultured Astrocytes, but not in Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy F Cruz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is characterized by accumulation of amyloid deposits in brain, progressive cognitive deficits and reduced glucose utilization. Many consequences of the disease are attributed to neuronal dysfunction, but roles of astrocytes in its pathogenesis are not well understood. Astrocytes are extensively coupled via gap junctions, and abnormal trafficking of metabolites and signalling molecules within astrocytic syncytia could alter functional interactions among cells comprising the neurovascular unit. To evaluate the influence of amyloid-β on astrocyte gap junctional communication, cultured astrocytes were treated with monomerized amyloid-β1-40 (1 μmol/l for intervals ranging from 2 h to 5 days, and the areas labelled by test compounds were determined by impaling a single astrocyte with a micropipette and diffusion of material into coupled cells. Amyloid-β-treated astrocytes had rapid, sustained 50-70% reductions in the area labelled by Lucifer Yellow, anionic Alexa Fluor® dyes and energy-related compounds, 6-NBDG (a fluorescent glucose analogue, NADH and NADPH. Amyloid-β treatment also caused a transient increase in oxidative stress. In striking contrast with these results, spreading of Lucifer Yellow within astrocytic networks in brain slices from three regions of 8.5-14-month-old control and transgenic Alzheimer's model mice was variable, labelling 10-2000 cells; there were no statistically significant differences in the number of dye-labelled cells among the groups or with age. Thus amyloid-induced dysfunction of gap junctional communication in cultured astrocytes does not reflect the maintenance of dye transfer through astrocytic syncytial networks in transgenic mice; the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease is not appropriately represented by the cell culture system.

  16. Astrocytic gap junctional communication is reduced in amyloid-β-treated cultured astrocytes, but not in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Nancy F; Ball, Kelly K; Dienel, Gerald A

    2010-08-17

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by accumulation of amyloid deposits in brain, progressive cognitive deficits and reduced glucose utilization. Many consequences of the disease are attributed to neuronal dysfunction, but roles of astrocytes in its pathogenesis are not well understood. Astrocytes are extensively coupled via gap junctions, and abnormal trafficking of metabolites and signalling molecules within astrocytic syncytia could alter functional interactions among cells comprising the neurovascular unit. To evaluate the influence of amyloid-beta on astrocyte gap junctional communication, cultured astrocytes were treated with monomerized amyloid-β(1-40) (1 μmol/l) for intervals ranging from 2 h to 5 days, and the areas labelled by test compounds were determined by impaling a single astrocyte with a micropipette and diffusion of material into coupled cells. Amyloid-β-treated astrocytes had rapid, sustained 50-70% reductions in the area labelled by Lucifer Yellow, anionic Alexa Fluor® dyes and energy-related compounds, 6-NBDG (a fluorescent glucose analogue), NADH and NADPH. Amyloid-β treatment also caused a transient increase in oxidative stress. In striking contrast with these results, spreading of Lucifer Yellow within astrocytic networks in brain slices from three regions of 8.5-14-month-old control and transgenic Alzheimer's model mice was variable, labelling 10-2000 cells; there were no statistically significant differences in the number of dye-labelled cells among the groups or with age. Thus amyloid-induced dysfunction of gap junctional communication in cultured astrocytes does not reflect the maintenance of dye transfer through astrocytic syncytial networks in transgenic mice; the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease is not appropriately represented by the cell culture system.

  17. A modified COMS plaque for iris melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Scanderbeg

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma of the iris is a rare condition compared to posterior ocular tumors and in this case report we presenta 51-year-old female patient with diffuse iris melanoma. Traditional COMS (Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Studyplaques are used at our institution for radiation therapy, so a novel modification of the traditional plaque was requiredto allow better conformance with placement on the cornea. The usual silastic insert was machined to dimensions incompliance with the cornea, placed without incident, and treatment delivered with excellent patient tolerance of themodified plaque.

  18. Effectiveness of Electric Toothbrushes on Plaque Removal

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 悦子; 高見沢, 恵; 奥田, 一博; 原, 耕二; 新井, 文子; 藤野, 仁; Satoh, Etsuko; Takamizawa, Megumi; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Hara, Kohji; Arai, Humiko; Fujino, Hitoshi

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the plaque removal efficiency of two types of toothbrushes, one with a rotary combined with horizontal movement (brush 1) and the other with a rotary movement (brush 2) on 13 volunteers. They stopped all oral hygiene procedures for 48 houres, after which the subjects were instructed to brush their teeth for two minutes with each of the respective electric toothbrushes using the split-mouth technique twice a day and continued to brush for 1week. Plaque ...

  19. Amyloid formation via supramolecular peptide assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Roger A; Hayes, Stanley F; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Priola, Suzette A

    2007-06-19

    Amyloid fibrils have been classically defined as linear, nonbranched polymeric proteins with a cross beta-sheet structure and the ability to alter the optical properties of the amyloid-specific dye Congo Red. Mounting evidence suggests that soluble oligomeric peptide assemblies approximately 2-20 nm in diameter are critical intermediates in amyloid formation. Using a pathogenic prion protein peptide comprised of residues 23-144, we demonstrate that, under quiescent but not agitated conditions, much larger globular assemblies up to 1 mum in diameter are made. These globules precede fibril formation and directly interact with growing fibril bundles. Fibrils made via these large spherical peptide assemblies displayed a remarkable diversity of ultrastructural features. Fibrillization of the Abeta1-40 peptide under similar conditions yielded similar results, suggesting a mechanism of general amyloid formation that can proceed through intermediates much larger than those previously described. Our data suggest that simply changing the physical microenvironment can profoundly influence the mechanism of amyloid formation and yield fibrils with novel ultrastructural properties.

  20. Halogenation dictates the architecture of amyloid peptide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Andrea; Pigliacelli, Claudia; Gori, Alessandro; Nonappa; Ikkala, Olli; Demitri, Nicola; Terraneo, Giancarlo; Castelletto, Valeria; Hamley, Ian W; Baldelli Bombelli, Francesca; Metrangolo, Pierangelo

    2017-07-20

    Amyloid peptides yield a plethora of interesting nanostructures though difficult to control. Here we report that depending on the number, position, and nature of the halogen atoms introduced into either one or both phenylalanine benzene rings of the amyloid β peptide-derived core-sequence KLVFF, four different architectures were obtained in a controlled manner. Our findings demonstrate that halogenation may develop as a general strategy to engineer amyloidal peptide self-assembly and obtain new amyloidal nanostructures.

  1. AL amyloid imaging and therapy with a monoclonal antibody to a cryptic epitope on amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Wall

    Full Text Available The monoclonal antibody 2A4 binds an epitope derived from a cleavage site of serum amyloid protein A (sAA containing a -Glu-Asp- amino acid pairing. In addition to its reactivity with sAA amyloid deposits, the antibody was also found to bind amyloid fibrils composed of immunoglobulin light chains. The antibody binds to synthetic fibrils and human light chain (AL amyloid extracts with high affinity even in the presence of soluble light chain proteins. Immunohistochemistry with biotinylated 2A4 demonstrated positive reaction with ALκ and ALλ human amyloid deposits in various organs. Surface plasmon resonance analyses using synthetic AL fibrils as a substrate revealed that 2A4 bound with a K(D of ∼10 nM. Binding was inhibited in the presence of the -Glu-Asp- containing immunogen peptide. Radiolabeled 2A4 specifically localized with human AL amyloid extracts implanted in mice (amyloidomas as evidenced by single photon emission (SPECT imaging. Furthermore, co-localization of the radiolabeled mAb with amyloid was shown in biodistribution and micro-autoradiography studies. Treatment with 2A4 expedited regression of ALκ amyloidomas in mice, likely mediated by the action of macrophages and neutrophils, relative to animals that received a control antibody. These data indicate that the 2A4 mAb might be of interest for potential imaging and immunotherapy in patients with AL amyloidosis.

  2. Immuno-pathogenesis of Periodontal Disease: Current and Emerging Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Nasi; Gibson, Frank C

    2014-06-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is a highly complex disease involving many factors; however, two principal facets central to initiation and progression of the majority of PD are the composition of the microbes in the sub-gingival plaque, and the host immune response to these organisms. Numerous studies point to the complexity of PD, and to the fact that despite innate and adaptive immune activation, and resultant inflammation, our immune response fails to cure disease. Stunning new findings have begun to clarify several complexities of the host-pathogen interaction of PD pointing to key roles for microbial dysboisis and immune imbalance in the pathogenesis of disease. Furthermore, these investigations have identified novel translational opportunities to intercede in PD treatment. In this review we will highlight a select few recent findings in innate and adaptive immunity, and host pathogen interactions of PD at a micro-environmental level that may have profound impact on PD progression.

  3. Lib, transcriptionally induced in senile plaque-associated astrocytes, promotes glial migration through extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Kazuki; Hata, Mitsumi; Shimizu, Tomoko; Yokota, Hiroshi; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Kosaka, Kenji; Yamada, Tatsuo

    2005-09-23

    In an effort to identify astrocyte-derived molecules that may be intimately associated with progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), Lib, a type I transmembrane protein belonging to leucine-rich repeat superfamily, has been identified as a distinctly inducible gene, responsive to beta-amyloid as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines in astrocytes. To evaluate the roles of Lib in AD, we investigated Lib expression in AD brain. In non-AD brain, Lib mRNA has been detected in neurons but not in quiescent astrocytes. On the contrary, in AD brain, Lib mRNA is expressed in activated astrocytes associated with senile plaques, but not expressed in neurons around lesions. Lib-expressing glioma cells displayed promotion of migration ability through reconstituted extracellular matrix and recombinant Lib protein bound to constituents of extracellular matrix. These observations suggest that Lib may contribute to regulation of cell-matrix adhesion interactions with respect to astrocyte recruitment around senile plaques in AD brain.

  4. The prion protein as a receptor for amyloid-beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, Helmut W.; Nguyen, Louis N.; Nabavi, Sadegh; Malinow, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Increased levels of brain amyloid-beta, a secreted peptide cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP), is believed to be critical in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease. Increased amyloid-beta can cause synaptic depression, reduce the number of spine protrusions (that is, sites of synaptic

  5. Brazilin inhibits amyloid β-protein fibrillogenesis, remodels amyloid fibrils and reduces amyloid cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wen-Jie; Guo, Jing-Jing; Gao, Ming-Tao; Hu, Sheng-Quan; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Han, Yi-Fan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Jiang, Shaoyi; Sun, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Soluble amyloid β-protein (Aβ) oligomers, the main neurotoxic species, are predominantly formed from monomers through a fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Herein, we virtually screened an in-house library of natural compounds and discovered brazilin as a dual functional compound in both Aβ42 fibrillogenesis inhibition and mature fibril remodeling, leading to significant reduction in Aβ42 cytotoxicity. The potent inhibitory effect of brazilin was proven by an IC50 of 1.5 +/- 0.3 μM, which was smaller than that of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate in Phase III clinical trials and about one order of magnitude smaller than those of curcumin and resveratrol. Most importantly, it was found that brazilin redirected Aβ42 monomers and its mature fibrils into unstructured Aβ aggregates with some β-sheet structures, which could prevent both the primary nucleation and the fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Molecular simulations demonstrated that brazilin inhibited Aβ42 fibrillogenesis by directly binding to Aβ42 species via hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding and remodeled mature fibrils by disrupting the intermolecular salt bridge Asp23-Lys28 via hydrogen bonding. Both experimental and computational studies revealed a different working mechanism of brazilin from that of known inhibitors. These findings indicate that brazilin is of great potential as a neuroprotective and therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); de Pablo, Juan J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  7. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Tomonaga, Masanori; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Shimada, Hiroyuki.

    1985-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy was studied clinicopathologically, with special attention given to the CT images. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy is characterized, by a lobar-type hemorrhage involving the cortex, with direct extension into the subarachnoid space. Multiple hemorrhages are frequent, and cortical infarctions are present as complications in elderly patients without risk factors. CT scans taken in 5 cases demonstrated lobar hemorrhages in superficial locations, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently, with surrounding edema and mass effect. A subarachnoid extension of the hemorrhage through the superficial cortex, proven pathologically in all cases, was noted by CT in 4 of the 5 cases. However, cortical infarction was not detected by CT in any case. Therefore, CT is of value in the diagnosis of cerebral hemorrhage due to amyloid angiopathy based on distinctive findings such as a lobar hemorrhage in superficial regions, with extension into the subarachnoid space, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently. (author)

  8. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 - 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 - 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of human islet amyloid polypeptides: an insight into amyloid peptides' connection with antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Liu, Qian; Chen, Jin-Chun; Cui, Yi-Xian; Zhou, Bing; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Li, Yan-Mei

    2012-07-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) shows an antimicrobial activity towards two types of clinically relevant bacteria. The potency of hIAPP varies with its aggregation states. Circular dichroism was employed to determine the interaction between hIAPP and bacteria lipid membrane mimic. The antimicrobial activity of each aggregate species is associated with their ability to induce membrane disruption. Our findings provide new evidence revealing the antimicrobial activity of amyloid peptide, which suggest a possible connection between amyloid peptides and antimicrobial peptides.

  10. GULP1/CED-6 ameliorates amyloid-β toxicity in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivien Chiu, Wai Yin; Koon, Alex Chun; Ki Ngo, Jacky Chi; Edwin Chan, Ho Yin; Lau, Kwok-Fai

    2017-11-21

    Amyloidogenic processing of APP by β- and γ-secretases leads to the generation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), and the accumulation of Aβ in senile plaques is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Understanding the mechanisms of APP processing is therefore paramount. Increasing evidence suggests that APP intracellular domain (AICD) interacting proteins influence APP processing. In this study, we characterized the overexpression of AICD interactor GULP1 in a Drosophila AD model expressing human BACE and APP695. Transgenic GULP1 significantly lowered the levels of both Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 without decreasing the BACE and APP695 levels. Overexpression of GULP1 also reduced APP/BACE-mediated retinal degeneration, rescued motor dysfunction and extended longevity of the flies. Our results indicate that GULP1 regulate APP processing and reduce neurotoxicity in a Drosophila AD model.

  11. Amyloid beta-peptide(25-35) changes [Ca2+] in hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Beatty, D M; Morris, S J

    1998-01-01

    Insoluble aggregates of the amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) is a major constituent of senile plaques found in brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. The detrimental effects of aggregated A beta is associated with an increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). We examined the effects...... of A beta(25-35) on [Ca2+]i and intracellular H+ concentration ([H+]i) in single hippocampal neurons by real time fluorescence imaging using the Ca(2+)- and H(+)-specific ratio dyes, indo-1 and SNARF-1. Incubation of these cultures with A beta(25-35) for 3-12 days in vitro increased [Ca2+]i and [H+]i...

  12. Coronary CT Angiography in the Quantitative Assessment of Coronary Plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghua Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA has been recently evaluated for its ability to assess coronary plaque characteristics, including plaque composition. Identification of the relationship between plaque composition by CCTA and patient clinical presentations may provide insight into the pathophysiology of coronary artery plaque, thus assisting identification of vulnerable plaques which are associated with the development of acute coronary syndrome. CCTA-generated 3D visualizations allow evaluation of both coronary lesions and lumen changes, which are considered to enhance the diagnostic performance of CCTA. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent developments that have occurred in the field of CCTA with regard to its diagnostic accuracy in the quantitative assessment of coronary plaques, with a focus on the characterization of plaque components and identification of vulnerable plaques.

  13. Huntington disease: pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayalu, Praveen; Albin, Roger L

    2015-02-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive motor, behavioral, and cognitive decline, culminating in death. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene. Even years before symptoms become overt, mutation carriers show subtle but progressive striatal and cerebral white matter atrophy by volumetric MRI. Although there is currently no direct treatment of HD, management options are available for several symptoms. A better understanding of HD pathogenesis, and more sophisticated clinical trials using newer biomarkers, may lead to meaningful treatments. This article reviews the current knowledge of HD pathogenesis and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Large plaque parapsoriasis in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of large plaque parapsoriasis with extensive skin lesions is presented for its unusual clinical features. The controversial issue of its nosological position is discussed as it has a considerable impact on the management of such cases.

  15. Digitate dermatosis (small-plaque parapsoriasis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Jesse; Latkowski, Jo-Ann

    2012-12-15

    We report a 79-year-old man with a 15-year history of elongated, finger-like, erythematous patches that are symmetrically distributed on his flanks and of small, parapsoriasis, which is a benign entity that has been the center of controversy over the years, owing to its similarities to large-plaque parapsoriasis, which is on a spectrum with mycosis fungoides.

  16. Intracoronary Thermography: a vulnerable Plaque Detection Technique?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G. ten Have (Anna)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe studies reported in this thesis were performed to answer the central question: can intracoronary thermography be used for vulnerable plaque detection? To answer this question, we have identified parameters that influence intracoronary thermography measurements, and have studied to

  17. Mathematical models for atherosclerotic plaque evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulelzai, M.A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a disease in which low density lipoproteins (LDL) accumulate in the arterial wall due to an inflammatory response, which is triggered by the oxidation of LDL molecules that are already present in the arterial wall. Progression of atherosclerotic plaques involves many components

  18. Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Beta-Amyloid Interactions with Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kelvin

    2012-10-01

    Early events of human beta-amyloid protein interactions with cholesterol-containing membranes are critical to understanding the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to exploring new therapeutic interventions of AD. Atomistic molecular dynamics (AMD) simulations have been extensively used to study the protein-lipid interaction at high atomic resolutions. However, traditional MD simulations are not efficient in sampling the phase space of complex lipid/protein systems with rugged free energy landscapes. Meanwhile, coarse-grained MD (CGD) simulations are efficient in the phase space sampling but suffered from low spatial resolutions and from the fact that the energy landscapes are not identical to those of the AMD. Here, a multiscale approach was employed to simulate the protein-lipid interactions of beta-amyloid upon its release from proteolysis residing in the neuronal membranes. We utilized a forward (AMD to CGD) and reverse (CGD-AMD) strategy to explore new transmembrane and surface protein configuration and evaluate the stabilization mechanisms by measuring the residue-specific protein-lipid or protein conformations. The detailed molecular interactions revealed in this multiscale MD approach will provide new insights into understanding the early molecular events leading to the pathogenesis of AD.

  19. A radiochemical assay for glycolytic activity in dental plaque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.A.D.; Nuki, K.; Nanda, V.; Schlenker, R.

    1976-01-01

    A radiochemical technique for the rapid and precise measurement of glucose utilization of fresh samples of dental plaque is described. The method appears to be a sensitive indicator of the actual glycolytic ability of an organized microbial plaque including activity in the Embden-Meyerhof pathway as well as heterolactic fermentation and the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. It was found that the glycolytic rate of plaque associated with periodontal pockets was significantly higher than that for plaque not so associated. (author)

  20. Case report 480: Periosteal amyloid tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, S.O.; Karjoo, R.; Johnstone, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    In summary, a 66-year-old woman presented with an asymptomatic left pretibial tumor of 7 years duration. Serial radiographs over this period demonstrated a slowly enlarging periosteal tumor with focal and increasing calcifications/ossifications. No involvement of the underlying medullary bone, as demonstrated by computed tomography was noted. Following the diagnosis by biopsy of an amyloid tumor, serum and urine electrophoreses, complete blood count, SMAC panel, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and serum rheumatoid factor level were found to be within reference ranges. A needle biopsy of the abdominal wall failed to reveal amyloid in the fat by Congo-red staining. (orig.)

  1. Diesel engine exhaust accelerates plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullmann, Maja; Albrecht, Catrin; van Berlo, Damiën; Gerlofs-Nijland, Miriam E; Wahle, Tina; Boots, Agnes W; Krutmann, Jean; Cassee, Flemming R; Bayer, Thomas A; Schins, Roel P F

    2017-08-30

    Increasing evidence from toxicological and epidemiological studies indicates that the central nervous system is an important target for ambient air pollutants. We have investigated whether long-term inhalation exposure to diesel engine exhaust (DEE), a dominant contributor to particulate air pollution in urban environments, can aggravate Alzheimer's Disease (AD)-like effects in female 5X Familial AD (5XFAD) mice and their wild-type female littermates. Following 3 and 13 weeks exposures to diluted DEE (0.95 mg/m 3 , 6 h/day, 5 days/week) or clean air (controls) behaviour tests were performed and amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque formation, pulmonary histopathology and systemic inflammation were evaluated. In a string suspension task, assessing for grip strength and motor coordination, 13 weeks exposed 5XFAD mice performed significantly less than the 5XFAD controls. Spatial working memory deficits, assessed by Y-maze and X-maze tasks, were not observed in association with the DEE exposures. Brains of the 3 weeks DEE-exposed 5XFAD mice showed significantly higher cortical Aβ plaque load and higher whole brain homogenate Aβ42 levels than the clean air-exposed 5XFAD littermate controls. After the 13 weeks exposures, with increasing age and progression of the AD-phenotype of the 5XFAD mice, DEE-related differences in amyloid pathology were no longer present. Immunohistochemical evaluation of lungs of the mice revealed no obvious genetic background-related differences in tissue structure, and the DEE exposure did not cause histopathological changes in the mice of both backgrounds. Luminex analysis of plasma cytokines demonstrated absence of sustained systemic inflammation upon DEE exposure. Inhalation exposure to DEE causes accelerated plaque formation and motor function impairment in 5XFAD transgenic mice. Our study provides further support that the brain is a relevant target for the effects of inhaled DEE and suggests that long-term exposure to this ubiquitous air

  2. Light-triggered dissociation of self-assembled β-amyloid aggregates into small, nontoxic fragments by ruthenium (II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Giyeong; Lee, Byung Il; Chung, You Jung; Park, Chan Beum

    2018-02-01

    The self-assembly of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides into highly stable plaques is a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Here, we report visible light-driven dissociation of β-sheet-rich Aβ aggregates into small, nontoxic fragments using ruthenium (II) complex {[Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ } that functions as a highly sensitive, biocompatible, photoresponsive anti-Aβ agent. According to our multiple analyses using thioflavin T, bicinchoninic acid, dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ successfully disassembled Aβ aggregates by destabilizing the β-sheet secondary structure under illumination of white light-emitting diode light. We validated that photoexcited [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ causes oxidative damages of Aβ peptides, resulting in the dissociation of Aβ aggregates. The efficacy of [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ is attributed to reactive oxygen species, such as singlet oxygen, generated from [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ that absorbed photon energy in the visible range. Furthermore, photoexcited [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ strongly inhibited the self-assembly of Aβ monomers even at concentrations as low as 1 nM and reduced the cytotoxicity of Aβ aggregates. Alzheimer's disease is the most common progressive neurodegenerative disease, affecting more than 13% of the population over age 65. Over the last decades, researchers have focused on understanding the mechanism of amyloid formation, the hallmark of various amyloid diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. In this paper, we successfully demonstrate the dissociation of β-Amyloid (Aβ) aggregates into small, less-amyloidic fragments by photoexcited [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ through destabilization of β-sheet secondary structure. We validated the light-triggered dissociation of amyloid structure using multiple analytical tools. Furthermore, we confirmed that photoexcited [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ reduces cytotoxicity of Aβ aggregates. Our work should open a new horizon in the study of

  3. Population studies of sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy and dementia: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wharton Stephen B

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ in vessel walls of the brain as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA could be a major factor in the pathogenesis of dementia. Here we investigate the relationship between dementia and the prevalence of CAA in older populations. We searched the literature for prospective population-based epidemiological clinicopathological studies, free of the biases of other sampling techniques, which were used as a comparison. Methods To identify population-based studies assessing CAA and dementia, a previous systematic review of population-based clinicopathological studies of ageing and dementia was employed. To identify selected-sample studies, PsychInfo (1806–April Week 3 2008, OVID MEDLINE (1950–April Week 2 2008 and Pubmed (searched 21 April 2008 databases were searched using the term "amyloid angiopathy". These databases were also employed to search for any population-based studies not included in the previous systematic review. Studies were included if they reported the prevalence of CAA relative to a dementia classification (clinical or neuropathological. Results Four population-based studies were identified. They showed that on average 55–59% of those with dementia displayed CAA (of any severity compared to 28–38% of the non-demented. 37–43% of the demented displayed severe CAA in contrast to 7–24% of the non-demented. There was no overlap in the range of these averages and they were less variable and lower than those reported in 38 selected sample studies (demented v non-demented: 32–100 v 0–77% regardless of severity; 0–50 v 0–11% for severe only. Conclusion CAA prevalence in populations is consistently higher in the demented as compared to the non-demented. This supports a significant role for CAA in the pathogenesis of dementia.

  4. Drosophila Melanogaster as a Model System for Studies of Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Sebastian Wolfgang; Nilsson, K. Peter R.; Westermark, Gunilla Torstensdotter

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent research supports that aggregation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) leads to cell death and this makes islet amyloid a plausible cause for the reduction of beta cell mass, demonstrated in patients with type 2 diabetes. IAPP is produced by the beta cells as a prohormone, and proIAPP is processed into IAPP by the prohormone convertases PC1/3 and PC2 in the secretory granules. Little is known about the pathogenesis for islet amyloid and which intracellular mechanisms are involved in amyloidogenesis and induction of cell death. Methodology/Principal Findings We have established expression of human proIAPP (hproIAPP), human IAPP (hIAPP) and the non-amyloidogenic mouse IAPP (mIAPP) in Drosophila melanogaster, and compared survival of flies with the expression driven to different cell populations. Only flies expressing hproIAPP in neurons driven by the Gal4 driver elavC155,Gal4 showed a reduction in lifespan whereas neither expression of hIAPP or mIAPP influenced survival. Both hIAPP and hproIAPP expression caused formation of aggregates in CNS and fat body region, and these aggregates were both stained by the dyes Congo red and pFTAA, both known to detect amyloid. Also, the morphology of the highly organized protein granules that developed in the fat body of the head in hIAPP and hproIAPP expressing flies was characterized, and determined to consist of 15.8 nm thick pentagonal rod-like structures. Conclusions/Significance These findings point to a potential for Drosophila melanogaster to serve as a model system for studies of hproIAPP and hIAPP expression with subsequent aggregation and developed pathology. PMID:21695120

  5. [Small-plaque parapsoriasis: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasić, S; Stojanović, S; Poljacki, M; Vucković, N

    2001-01-01

    Small plaque parapsoriasis is a relatively rare, chronic, idiopathic dermatosis, most often seen in middle age people. This disease shows a definite male predominance of approximately 3-4: 1. It is characterized by presence of round or oval erythematous, slightly scaly plaques on the limbs and trunk, which histologically reveal mild eczematous changes. A male patient, 61 years of age, was admitted to the Clinic of Dermatovenereology in Novi Sad due to long persisting erythematous patches on his upper and lower limbs. Plaques were of oval and round shape, pretty well marginated. They were of light red colour, covered with fine scales with a slightly wrinkled surface. He complained of itching. Laboratory findings showed no abnormalities. Histopathologic examination of the skin specimen revealed epidermal atrophy, focal parakeratosis, perivascular dermal infiltrate of mononuclear cells with exocytosis in the epidermis. This finding was compatible with the clinical diagnosis. After treatment with topical corticosteroid cream combined with whole body exposure to sunlight irradiation, vast majority of skin lesions regressed. The clinical course of small plaque parapsoriasis is very long. The plaques are remarkably stubborn, responding to treatment with steroid creams or to natural or artificial sunlight, but usually reappearing promptly when treatment is discontinued. The patches increase in number for a time, and then remain relatively constant for a long time. A small minority of cases clears entirely. Recent studies provided evidence of monoclonality and immunophenotypic abnormalities. Rearrangement of T-cell receptor genes was demonstrated by using PCR method. Detection of monoclonal T-cell populations in skin lesions, as a characteristic of lymphoproliferative diseases, forced some authors to include this dermatosis into a group of abortive cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. This case deserves a long and probably life-long clinical and histological assessment, especially

  6. Detection and segmentation of virus plaque using HOG and SVM: toward automatic plaque assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yihao; Liu, Hong; Ye, Rong; Shi, Yonghong; Song, Zhijian

    2014-01-01

    Plaque assaying, measurement of the number, diameter, and area of plaques in a Petri dish image, is a standard procedure gauging the concentration of phage in biology. This paper presented a novel and effective method for implementing automatic plaque assaying. The method was mainly comprised of the following steps: In the training stage, after pre-processing the images for noise suppression, an initial training set was readied by sampling positive (with a plaque at the center) and negative (plaque-free) patches from the training images, and extracting the HOG features from each patch. The linear SVM classifier was trained in a self-learnt supervised learning strategy to avoid possible missing detection. Specifically, the training set which contained positive and negative patches sampled manually from training images was used to train the preliminary classifier which exhaustively searched the training images to predict the label for the unlabeled patches. The mislabeled patches were evaluated by experts and relabeled. And all the newly labeled patches and their corresponding HOG features were added to the initial training set to train the final classifier. In the testing stage, a sliding-window technique was first applied to the unseen image for obtaining HOG features, which were inputted into the classifier to predict whether the patch was positive. Second, a locally adaptive Otsu method was performed on the positive patches to segment the plaques. Finally, after removing the outliers, the parameters of the plaques were measured in the segmented plaques. The experimental results demonstrated that the accuracy of the proposed method was similar to the one measured manually by experts, but it took less than 30 seconds.

  7. Isolation of Helicobacter pylori from dental plaques in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majmudar, P; Shah, S M; Dhunjibhoy, K R; Desai, H G

    1990-10-01

    The presence of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) was looked for in dental plaques of 40 healthy volunteers by CLO test, culture and smear stained with Warthin-Starry stain. H pylori was found to be present in the dental plaques of all 40 volunteers. The dental plaque is an important reservoir of H pylori.

  8. Animal models for plaque rupture: a biomechanical assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heiden, Kim; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Daemen, Mat J.; Gijsen, Frank J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques is the main cause of acute cardiovascular events. Animal models of plaque rupture are rare but essential for testing new imaging modalities to enable diagnosis of the patient at risk. Moreover, they enable the design of new treatment strategies to prevent plaque

  9. Tensile and compressive properties of fresh human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, Eoghan

    2009-12-11

    Accurate characterisation of the mechanical properties of human atherosclerotic plaque is important for our understanding of the role of vascular mechanics in the development and treatment of atherosclerosis. The majority of previous studies investigating the mechanical properties of human plaque are based on tests of plaque tissue removed following autopsy. This study aims to characterise the mechanical behaviour of fresh human carotid plaques removed during endarterectomy and tested within 2h. A total of 50 radial compressive and 17 circumferential tensile uniaxial tests were performed on samples taken from 14 carotid plaques. The clinical classification of each plaque, as determined by duplex ultrasound is also reported. Plaques were classified as calcified, mixed or echolucent. Experimental data indicated that plaques were highly inhomogeneous; with variations seen in the mechanical properties of plaque obtained from individual donors and between donors. The mean behaviour of samples for each classification indicated that calcified plaques had the stiffest response, while echolucent plaques were the least stiff. Results also indicated that there may be a difference in behaviour of samples taken from different anatomical locations (common, internal and external carotid), however the large variability indicates that more testing is needed to reach significant conclusions. This work represents a step towards a better understanding of the in vivo mechanical behaviour of human atherosclerotic plaque.

  10. View of plaque Apollo 11 astronauts left on moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Closeup view of the plaque which the Apollo 11 astronauts left on the moon in commemoration of the historic lunar landing mission. The plaque was attached to the ladder on the landing gear strut on the descent stage of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module. The plaque was covered with a thin sheet of stainless steel during flight.

  11. Artery buckling affects the mechanical stress in atherosclerotic plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Arnav; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-01-01

    Tortuous arteries are often seen in patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis. While the mechanical stress in atherosclerotic plaque under lumen pressure has been studied extensively, the mechanical stability of atherosclerotic arteries and subsequent effect on the plaque stress remain unknown. To this end, we investigated the buckling and post-buckling behavior of model stenotic coronary arteries with symmetric and asymmetric plaque. Buckling analysis for a model coronary artery with symmetric and asymmetric plaque was conducted using finite element analysis based on the dimensions and nonlinear anisotropic materials properties reported in the literature. Artery with asymmetric plaque had lower critical buckling pressure compared to the artery with symmetric plaque and control artery. Buckling increased the peak stress in the plaque and led to the development of a high stress concentration in artery with asymmetric plaque. Stiffer calcified tissue and severe stenosis increased the critical buckling pressure of the artery with asymmetric plaque. Arteries with atherosclerotic plaques are prone to mechanical buckling which leads to a high stress concentration in the plaques that can possibly make the plaques prone to rupture.

  12. 3D Fiber Orientation in Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Akyildiz (Ali); C.-K. Chai (Chen-Ket); C.W.J. Oomens (Cees); A. van der Lugt (Aad); F.P.T. Baaijens (Frank); G.J. Strijkers (Gustav); F.J.H. Gijsen (Frank)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAtherosclerotic plaque rupture is the primary trigger of fatal cardiovascular events. Fibrillar collagen in atherosclerotic plaques and their directionality are anticipated to play a crucial role in plaque rupture. This study aimed assessing 3D fiber orientations and architecture in

  13. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-01-07

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture.

  14. Amyloid in basal cell carcinoma and seborrheic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, K E; Westermark, Per

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of amyloid substance was studied in two different types of skin tumours: basal cell carcinoma and seborrheic keratosis. In 9 out of 49 cases of seborrheic keratosis amyloid substance was found. In the basal cell carcinomas, 194 out of 260 cases showed amyloid deposits, a rate...... that is higher than that previously reported. The basal cell carcinoma material was further studied regarding the amount of amyloid, mitotic rate, degree of apoptosis and the age of the patients. There was no correlation between the amount of amyloid and the mitotic rate, or the degree of apoptosis...

  15. Relation between TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway activation by 27-hydroxycholesterol and 4-hydroxynonenal, and atherosclerotic plaque instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Simona; Gamba, Paola; Testa, Gabriella; Rossin, Daniela; Biasi, Fiorella; Poli, Giuseppe; Leonarduzzi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    It is now thought that atherosclerosis, although due to increased plasma lipids, is mainly the consequence of a complicated inflammatory process, with immune responses at the different stages of plaque development. Increasing evidence points to a significant role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a key player in innate immunity, in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. This study aimed to determine the effects on TLR4 activation of two reactive oxidized lipids carried by oxidized low-density lipoproteins, the oxysterol 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OH) and the aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), both of which accumulate in atherosclerotic plaques and play a key role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Secondarily, it examined their potential involvement in mediating inflammation and extracellular matrix degradation, the hallmarks of high-risk atherosclerotic unstable plaques. In human promonocytic U937 cells, both 27-OH and HNE were found to enhance cell release of IL-8, IL-1β, and TNF-α and to upregulate matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) via TLR4/NF-κB-dependent pathway; these actions may sustain the inflammatory response and matrix degradation that lead to atherosclerotic plaque instability and to their rupture. Using specific antibodies, it was also demonstrated that these inflammatory cytokines increase MMP-9 upregulation, thus enhancing the release of this matrix-degrading enzyme by macrophage cells and contributing to plaque instability. These innovative results suggest that, by accumulating in atherosclerotic plaques, the two oxidized lipids may contribute to plaque instability and rupture. They appear to do so by sustaining the release of inflammatory molecules and MMP-9 by inflammatory and immune cells, for example, macrophages, through activation of TLR4 and its NF-κB downstream signaling. PMID:25757594

  16. Optical measurement of arterial mechanical properties: from atherosclerotic plaque initiation to rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Seemantini K

    2013-12-01

    During the pathogenesis of coronary atherosclerosis, from lesion initiation to rupture, arterial mechanical properties are altered by a number of cellular, molecular, and hemodynamic processes. There is growing recognition that mechanical factors may actively drive vascular cell signaling and regulate atherosclerosis disease progression. In advanced plaques, the mechanical properties of the atheroma influence stress distributions in the fibrous cap and mediate plaque rupture resulting in acute coronary events. This review paper explores current optical technologies that provide information on the mechanical properties of arterial tissue to advance our understanding of the mechanical factors involved in atherosclerosis development leading to plaque rupture. The optical approaches discussed include optical microrheology and traction force microscopy that probe the mechanical behavior of single cell and extracellular matrix components, and intravascular imaging modalities including laser speckle rheology, optical coherence elastography, and polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography to measure the mechanical properties of advanced coronary lesions. Given the wealth of information that these techniques can provide, optical imaging modalities are poised to play an increasingly significant role in elucidating the mechanical aspects of coronary atherosclerosis in the future.

  17. Quantitative analysis of monocyte subpopulations in murine atherosclerotic plaques by multiphoton microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail S Haka

    Full Text Available The progressive accumulation of monocyte-derived cells in the atherosclerotic plaque is a hallmark of atherosclerosis. However, it is now appreciated that monocytes represent a heterogeneous circulating population of cells that differ in functionality. New approaches are needed to investigate the role of monocyte subpopulations in atherosclerosis since a detailed understanding of their differential mobilization, recruitment, survival and emigration during atherogenesis is of particular importance for development of successful therapeutic strategies. We present a novel methodology for the in vivo examination of monocyte subpopulations in mouse models of atherosclerosis. This approach combines cellular labeling by fluorescent beads with multiphoton microscopy to visualize and monitor monocyte subpopulations in living animals. First, we show that multiphoton microscopy is an accurate and timesaving technique to analyze monocyte subpopulation trafficking and localization in plaques in excised tissues. Next, we demonstrate that multiphoton microscopy can be used to monitor monocyte subpopulation trafficking in atherosclerotic plaques in living animals. This novel methodology should have broad applications and facilitate new insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and other inflammatory diseases.

  18. Pathogenesis of giant colonic diverticula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhletaler, C.A.; Berger, J.L.; Robinette, C.L. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The clinical, radiographic, and pathologic findings of 3 patients with giant colonic diverticula are presented. Although several theories have been proposed for the formation of these diverticula, they have not been fully documented. One of our cases illustrates the evolution of this disorder following typical colonic diverticulitis. The pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of this unusual entity are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Molecular pathogenesis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jesper Bøje

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an orphan cancer of the hepatobiliary tract, the incidence of which has increased in the past decade. The molecular pathogenesis of this treatment-refractory disease is poorly understood. Desmoplasia is a key causal feature of CCA; however, a majority of tumors develop...

  20. Reference Intervals for Plasma Amyloid β in Korean Adults Without Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Young; Kim, Kyu Nam; Cho, Hye Min; Lee, Duck Joo; Cho, Doo Yeoun

    2016-11-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are important components of plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies suggest that a low plasma ratio of Aβ42 to Aβ40 may precede the development of the sporadic form of AD. The aim of this study was to establish reference intervals for plasma Aβ in Korean adults. A total of 370 apparently healthy individuals (181 males and 189 females aged 40-69 yr) without cognitive impairment were enrolled. Plasma concentrations of Aβ40 and Aβ42 were measured by using a human amyloid β assay kit (Immuno-Biological Laboratories, Japan). Reference intervals were established according to the "CLSI guidelines for defining, establishing, and verifying reference intervals in the clinical laboratory". There was no need to partition the data with respect to gender or age group. The 95th percentile reference intervals for Aβ40 and Aβ42 were 127-331 pg/mL and 2.31-19.84 pg/mL, respectively. The reference interval for the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio was 0.011-0.092. Plasma Aβ concentrations obtained in this study could be used as reference intervals for clinical purposes.

  1. Lipid peroxidation and Alzheimer’s disease: Key role of Amyloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kontush Anatol

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased lipid peroxidation and elevated oxidative stress represent well-established characteristics of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Amyloid-β (Aβ peptide, a major component of amyloid plaques, can strongly influence oxidative processes. In aggregated form, Aβ has prooxidative properties, whereas in monomeric form it functions as an antioxidant. The antioxidative properties of monomeric Aβ are related to its ability to chelate transition metal ions, which are potent catalysts of oxidation. Aβ possesses an amphiphilic structure, associates with lipoproteins in vivo and may therefore function as a preventive antioxidant which protects lipoproteins from oxidation by transition metal ions. Increased production of Aβ in response to elevated oxidative stress has been documented in a number of in vitro studies, implying that production of monomeric Aβ as a lipoprotein antioxidant can be abnormally increased in response to elevated oxidative stress in aging. Subsequent accumulation of Aβ-metal aggregates, production of reactive oxygen species and toxic action to neuronal cells may represent a gain-of-function transformation and form temporal sequence of events in the development of AD.

  2. Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB) binds amyloid β-protein protofibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamin, Ghiam; Teplow, David B

    2017-01-01

    The neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) includes amyloid plaque formation by the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) and intracellular paired helical filament formation by tau protein. These neuropathogenetic features correlate with disease progression and have been revealed in brains of AD patients using positron emission tomography (PET). One of the most useful positron emission tomography imaging agents has been Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB). However, since its introduction in 2002, substantial evidence has accumulated suggesting that Aβ oligomerization and protofibril formation, rather than fibril formation per se, may be the more important pathogenetic event in AD. Detecting protofibrils and oligomeric forms of Aβ thus may be of value. We report here the results of experiments to determine whether PiB binds to oligomers or protofibrils formed by Aβ40 and Aβ42. We observed strong binding to Aβ42 fibrils, significant binding to protofibrils, and weaker binding to Aβ42 oligomers. PiB also binds Aβ40 fibrils, but its binding to Aβ40 protofibrils and oligomers is substantially lower than for that observed for Aβ42. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. The Level of NMDA Receptor in the Membrane Modulates Amyloid-β Association and Perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Christian; Sepúlveda, Fernando J; Fernández-Pérez, Eduardo J; Peoples, Robert W; Aguayo, Luis G

    2016-05-06

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects mostly the elderly. The main histopathological markers are the senile plaques formed by amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) aggregates that can perforate the plasma membrane of cells, increasing the intracellular calcium levels and releasing synaptic vesicles that finally lead to a delayed synaptic failure. Several membrane proteins and lipids interact with Aβ affecting its toxicity in neurons. Here, we focus on NMDA receptors (NMDARs) as proteins that could be modulating the association and neurotoxic perforation induced by Aβ on the plasma membrane. In fact, our results showed that decreasing NMDARs, using enzymatic or siRNA approaches, increased the association of Aβ to the neurons. Furthermore, overexpression of NMDARs also resulted in an enhanced association between NMDA and Aβ. Functionally, the reduction in membrane NMDARs augmented the process of membrane perforation. On the other hand, overexpressing NMDARs had a protective effect because Aβ was now unable to cause membrane perforation, suggesting a complex relationship between Aβ and NMDARs. Because previous studies have recognized that Aβ oligomers are able to increase membrane permeability and produce amyloid pores, the present study supports the conclusion that NMDARs play a critical protective role on Aβ actions in hippocampal neurons. These results could explain the lack of correlation between brain Aβ burden and clinically observed dementia.

  4. Vitamin D and Its Analogues Decrease Amyloid-β (Aβ Formation and Increase Aβ-Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus O. W. Grimm

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is characterized by extracellular plaques in the brain, mainly consisting of amyloid-β (Aβ, as derived from sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. Epidemiological studies suggest a tight link between hypovitaminosis of the secosteroid vitamin D and AD. Besides decreased vitamin D level in AD patients, an effect of vitamin D on Aβ-homeostasis is discussed. However, the exact underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated and nothing is known about the potential effect of vitamin D analogues. Here we systematically investigate the effect of vitamin D and therapeutically used analogues (maxacalcitol, calcipotriol, alfacalcidol, paricalcitol, doxercalciferol on AD-relevant mechanisms. D2 and D3 analogues decreased Aβ-production and increased Aβ-degradation in neuroblastoma cells or vitamin D deficient mouse brains. Effects were mediated by affecting the Aβ-producing enzymes BACE1 and γ-secretase. A reduced secretase activity was accompanied by a decreased BACE1 protein level and nicastrin expression, an essential component of the γ-secretase. Vitamin D and analogues decreased β-secretase activity, not only in mouse brains with mild vitamin D hypovitaminosis, but also in non-deficient mouse brains. Our results further strengthen the link between AD and vitamin D, suggesting that supplementation of vitamin D or vitamin D analogues might have beneficial effects in AD prevention.

  5. Vitamin D and Its Analogues Decrease Amyloid-β (Aβ) Formation and Increase Aβ-Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Marcus O W; Thiel, Andrea; Lauer, Anna A; Winkler, Jakob; Lehmann, Johannes; Regner, Liesa; Nelke, Christopher; Janitschke, Daniel; Benoist, Céline; Streidenberger, Olga; Stötzel, Hannah; Endres, Kristina; Herr, Christian; Beisswenger, Christoph; Grimm, Heike S; Bals, Robert; Lammert, Frank; Hartmann, Tobias

    2017-12-19

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by extracellular plaques in the brain, mainly consisting of amyloid-β (Aβ), as derived from sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. Epidemiological studies suggest a tight link between hypovitaminosis of the secosteroid vitamin D and AD. Besides decreased vitamin D level in AD patients, an effect of vitamin D on Aβ-homeostasis is discussed. However, the exact underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated and nothing is known about the potential effect of vitamin D analogues. Here we systematically investigate the effect of vitamin D and therapeutically used analogues (maxacalcitol, calcipotriol, alfacalcidol, paricalcitol, doxercalciferol) on AD-relevant mechanisms. D₂ and D₃ analogues decreased Aβ-production and increased Aβ-degradation in neuroblastoma cells or vitamin D deficient mouse brains. Effects were mediated by affecting the Aβ-producing enzymes BACE1 and γ-secretase. A reduced secretase activity was accompanied by a decreased BACE1 protein level and nicastrin expression, an essential component of the γ-secretase. Vitamin D and analogues decreased β-secretase activity, not only in mouse brains with mild vitamin D hypovitaminosis, but also in non-deficient mouse brains. Our results further strengthen the link between AD and vitamin D, suggesting that supplementation of vitamin D or vitamin D analogues might have beneficial effects in AD prevention.

  6. Radiologically Isolated Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy-Related Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Dimitri; Wacongne, Anne; Thouvenot, Eric

    2017-11-01

    In amyloid β-related angiitis of the central nervous system (also called cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation), cerebral amyloid angiopathy occurs in association with primary vasculitis of small- and medium-sized leptomeningeal and cortical arteries. To avoid brain biopsy, clinicoradiological criteria (including clinical features due to inflammation-related uni/multifocal white matter hyperintensities) for the diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation have been validated recently. We report 3 cases with acute symptoms directly related to cerebral amyloid angiopathy in the presence of asymptomatic cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation hyperintensities on initial magnetic resonance imaging. Recognizing radiological features of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation in patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy is important because radiological isolated cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation may become symptomatic and immunosuppressive treatment is often effective in cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation, although optimal treatment regimen is yet unknown. In contrast, apart from hypertension treatment, few therapeutic options exist in cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nonpathological extracellular amyloid is present during normal epididymal sperm maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Whelly

    Full Text Available Amyloids are aggregated proteins characterized by a specific cross-β-sheet structure and are typically associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease. Recently, however, several nonpathological amyloids have been found in intracellular organelles of normal mammalian tissues suggesting that amyloid may also carry out biological functions. We previously have shown that the epididymal cystatin CRES (cystatin-related epididymal spermatogenic, cst8, a reproductive-specific member of the cystatin superfamily of cysteine protease inhibitors, forms amyloid in vitro suggesting that CRES amyloid may also form in vivo within the epididymal lumen. Here we show that amyloid structures containing CRES are a component of the normal mouse epididymal lumen without any apparent cytotoxic effects on spermatozoa and that these structures change along the length of the tubule. These studies suggest the presence of a functional amyloid structure that may carry out roles in sperm maturation or maintenance of the luminal milieu and which itself may undergo maturational changes along the epididymis. In contrast to previous examples of functional amyloid which were intracellular, our studies now show that nonpathological/functional amyloid can also be extracellular. The presence of an extracellular and nonpathological amyloid in the epididymis suggests that similar amyloid structures may be present in other organ systems and may carry out distinctive tissue-specific functions.

  8. Quantitative coronary plaque analysis predicts high-risk plaque morphology on coronary computed tomography angiography: results from the ROMICAT II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Puchner, Stefan B; Lu, Michael T; Ghemigian, Khristine; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Broersen, Alexander; Pursnani, Amit; Hoffmann, Udo; Ferencik, Maros

    2018-02-01

    Semi-automated software can provide quantitative assessment of atherosclerotic plaques on coronary CT angiography (CTA). The relationship between established qualitative high-risk plaque features and quantitative plaque measurements has not been studied. We analyzed the association between quantitative plaque measurements and qualitative high-risk plaque features on coronary CTA. We included 260 patients with plaque who underwent coronary CTA in the Rule Out Myocardial Infarction/Ischemia Using Computer Assisted Tomography (ROMICAT) II trial. Quantitative plaque assessment and qualitative plaque characterization were performed on a per coronary segment basis. Quantitative coronary plaque measurements included plaque volume, plaque burden, remodeling index, and diameter stenosis. In qualitative analysis, high-risk plaque was present if positive remodeling, low CT attenuation plaque, napkin-ring sign or spotty calcium were detected. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between quantitative and qualitative high-risk plaque assessment. Among 888 segments with coronary plaque, high-risk plaque was present in 391 (44.0%) segments by qualitative analysis. In quantitative analysis, segments with high-risk plaque had higher total plaque volume, low CT attenuation plaque volume, plaque burden and remodeling index. Quantitatively assessed low CT attenuation plaque volume (odds ratio 1.12 per 1 mm 3 , 95% CI 1.04-1.21), positive remodeling (odds ratio 1.25 per 0.1, 95% CI 1.10-1.41) and plaque burden (odds ratio 1.53 per 0.1, 95% CI 1.08-2.16) were associated with high-risk plaque. Quantitative coronary plaque characteristics (low CT attenuation plaque volume, positive remodeling and plaque burden) measured by semi-automated software correlated with qualitative assessment of high-risk plaque features.

  9. Amyloid β levels in human red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Kiko

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ is hypothesized to play a key role by oxidatively impairing the capacity of red blood cells (RBCs to deliver oxygen to the brain. These processes are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Although plasma Aβ has been investigated thoroughly, the presence and distribution of Aβ in human RBCs are still unclear. In this study, we quantitated Aβ40 and Aβ42 in human RBCs with ELISA assays, and provided evidence that significant amounts of Aβ could be detected in RBCs and that the RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. The RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. On the other hand, providing an antioxidant supplement (astaxanthin, a polar carotenoid to humans was found to decrease RBC Aβ as well as oxidative stress marker levels. These results suggest that plasma Aβ40 and Aβ42 bind to RBCs (possibly with aging, implying a pathogenic role of RBC Aβ. Moreover, the data indicate that RBC Aβ40 and Aβ42 may constitute biomarkers of AD. As a preventive strategy, therapeutic application of astaxanthin as an Aβ-lowering agent in RBCs could be considered as a possible anti-dementia agent. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN42483402.

  10. Formation of amyloid fibers by monomeric light chain variable domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumshtein, Boris; Esswein, Shannon R; Landau, Meytal; Ryan, Christopher M; Whitelegge, Julian P; Phillips, Martin L; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-10-03

    Systemic light chain amyloidosis is a lethal disease characterized by excess immunoglobulin light chains and light chain fragments composed of variable domains, which aggregate into amyloid fibers. These fibers accumulate and damage organs. Some light chains induce formation of amyloid fibers, whereas others do not, making it unclear what distinguishes amyloid formers from non-formers. One mechanism by which sequence variation may reduce propensity to form amyloid fibers is by shifting the equilibrium toward an amyloid-resistant quaternary structure. Here we identify the monomeric form of the Mcg immunoglobulin light chain variable domain as the quaternary unit required for amyloid fiber assembly. Dimers of Mcg variable domains remain stable and soluble, yet become prone to assemble into amyloid fibers upon disassociation into monomers. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Preventing effect of L-type calcium channel blockade on electrophysiological alterations in dentate gyrus granule cells induced by entorhinal amyloid pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Gholami Pourbadie

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex (EC is one of the earliest affected brain regions in Alzheimer's disease (AD. EC-amyloid pathology induces synaptic failure in the dentate gyrus (DG with resultant behavioral impairment, but there is little known about its impact on neuronal properties in the DG. It is believed that calcium dyshomeostasis plays a pivotal role in the etiology of AD. Here, the effect of the EC amyloid pathogenesis on cellular properties of DG granule cells and also possible neuroprotective role of L-type calcium channel blockers (CCBs, nimodipine and isradipine, were investigated. The amyloid beta (Aβ 1-42 was injected bilaterally into the EC of male rats and one week later, electrophysiological properties of DG granule cells were assessed. Voltage clamp recording revealed appearance of giant sIPSC in combination with a decrease in sEPSC frequency which was partially reversed by CCBs in granule cells from Aβ treated rats. EC amyloid pathogenesis induced a significant reduction of input resistance (Rin accompanied by a profound decreased excitability in the DG granule cells. However, daily administration of CCBs, isradipine or nimodipine (i.c.v. for 6 days, almost preserved the normal excitability against Aβ. In conclusion, lower tendency to fire AP along with reduced Rin suggest that DG granule cells might undergo an alteration in the membrane ion channel activities which finally lead to the behavioral deficits observed in animal models and patients with early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Neuroprotective Effects of Pomegranate Peel Extract after Chronic Infusion with Amyloid-β Peptide in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morzelle, Maressa Caldeira; Salgado, Jocelem Mastrodi; Telles, Milena; Mourelle, Danilo; Bachiega, Patricia; Buck, Hudson Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a chronic and degenerative condition that had no treatment until recently. The current therapeutic strategies reduce progression of the disease but are expensive and commonly cause side effects that are uncomfortable for treated patients. Functional foods to prevent and/or treat many conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases, represent a promising field of study currently gaining attention. To this end, here we demonstrate the effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum) peel extract (PPE) regarding spatial memory, biomarkers of neuroplasticity, oxidative stress and inflammation in a mouse model of neurodegeneration. Male C57Bl/6 mice were chronically infused for 35 days with amyloid-β peptide 1–42 (Aβ) or vehicle (control) using mini-osmotic pumps. Another group, also infused with Aβ, was treated with PPE (p.o.– βA+PPE, 800 mg/kg/day). Spatial memory was evaluated in the Barnes maze. Animals treated with PPE and in the control group exhibited a reduction in failure to find the escape box, a finding that was not observed in the Aβ group. The consumption of PPE reduced amyloid plaque density, increased the expression of neurotrophin BDNF and reduced the activity of acetylcholinesterase enzyme. A reduction in lipid peroxidation and in the concentration of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α was also observed in the PPE group. No hepatic lesions were observed in animals treated with PPE. In conclusion, administration of pomegranate peel extract has neuroprotective effects involving multiple mechanisms to prevent establishment and progression of the neurodegenerative process induced by infusion with amyloid-β peptide in mice. PMID:27829013

  13. Regional correlations between [11C]PIB PET and post-mortem burden of amyloid-beta pathology in a diverse neuropathological cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Won Seo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging-pathological correlation studies show that in vivo amyloid-β (Aβ positron emission tomography (PET strongly predicts the presence of significant Aβ pathology at autopsy. We sought to determine whether regional PiB-PET uptake would improve sensitivity for amyloid detection in comparison with global measures (experiment 1, and to estimate the relative contributions of different Aβ aggregates to in vivo PET signal (experiment 2. In experiment 1, 54 subjects with [11C] PiB-PET during life and postmortem neuropathologic examination (85.2% with dementia, interval from PET to autopsy 3.1 ± 1.9 years were included. We assessed Thal amyloid phase (N = 36 and CERAD score (N = 54 versus both global and regional PiB SUVRs. In experiment 2 (N = 42, PiB SUVR and post-mortem amyloid β burden was analyzed in five customized regions of interest matching regions sampled at autopsy. We assessed the relative contribution of neuritic plaques (NPs, diffuse plaques (DPs and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA to regional PIB SUVR using multi-linear regression. In experiment 1, there were no differences in Area Under the Curve for amyloid phase ≥ A2 and CERAD score ≥ C2 between global and highest regional PiB SUVR (p = 0.186 and 0.230. In experiment 2, when NPs, DPs, and/or CAA were included in the same model, moderate to severe NPs were independently correlated with PiB SUVR in all regions except for the inferior temporal and calcarine ROI (β = 0.414–0.804, p < 0.05, whereas DPs were independently correlated with PiB SUVR in the angular gyrus ROI (β = 0.446, p = 0.010. CAA was also associated with PiB SUVR in the inferior temporal and calcarine ROI (β = 0.222–0.355, p < 0.05. In conclusion, global PiB-PET SUVR performed as well as regional values for amyloid detection in our cohort. The substrate-specific binding of PiB might differ among the brain specific regions.

  14. Regional correlations between [11C]PIB PET and post-mortem burden of amyloid-beta pathology in a diverse neuropathological cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Sang Won; Ayakta, Nagehan; Grinberg, Lea T; Villeneuve, Sylvia; Lehmann, Manja; Reed, Bruce; DeCarli, Charles; Miller, Bruce L; Rosen, Howard J; Boxer, Adam L; O'Neil, James P; Jin, Lee-Way; Seeley, William W; Jagust, William J; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2017-01-01

    Imaging-pathological correlation studies show that in vivo amyloid-β (Aβ) positron emission tomography (PET) strongly predicts the presence of significant Aβ pathology at autopsy. We sought to determine whether regional PiB-PET uptake would improve sensitivity for amyloid detection in comparison with global measures (experiment 1), and to estimate the relative contributions of different Aβ aggregates to in vivo PET signal (experiment 2). In experiment 1, 54 subjects with [ 11 C] PiB-PET during life and postmortem neuropathologic examination (85.2% with dementia, interval from PET to autopsy 3.1 ± 1.9 years) were included. We assessed Thal amyloid phase (N = 36) and CERAD score (N = 54) versus both global and regional PiB SUVRs. In experiment 2 (N = 42), PiB SUVR and post-mortem amyloid β burden was analyzed in five customized regions of interest matching regions sampled at autopsy. We assessed the relative contribution of neuritic plaques (NPs), diffuse plaques (DPs) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) to regional PIB SUVR using multi-linear regression. In experiment 1, there were no differences in Area Under the Curve for amyloid phase ≥ A2 and CERAD score ≥ C2 between global and highest regional PiB SUVR ( p  = 0.186 and 0.230). In experiment 2, when NPs, DPs, and/or CAA were included in the same model, moderate to severe NPs were independently correlated with PiB SUVR in all regions except for the inferior temporal and calcarine ROI (β = 0.414-0.804, p  PiB SUVR in the angular gyrus ROI (β = 0.446, p  = 0.010). CAA was also associated with PiB SUVR in the inferior temporal and calcarine ROI (β = 0.222-0.355, p  PiB-PET SUVR performed as well as regional values for amyloid detection in our cohort. The substrate-specific binding of PiB might differ among the brain specific regions.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the genes associated with hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy APP CST3 ITM2B Related Information What is a gene? What is a gene mutation ... a disorder seems to run in my family? What are the different ways in which a genetic condition can be inherited? More about ... APP-related Genetic Testing Registry: Dementia familial British Genetic ...

  16. Infectious particles, stress, and induced prion amyloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Transmissible encephalopathies (TSEs) are believed by many to arise by spontaneous conversion of host prion protein (PrP) into an infectious amyloid (PrP-res, PrPSc) without nucleic acid. Many TSE agents reside in the environment, with infection controlled by public health measures. These include the disappearance of kuru with the cessation of ritual cannibalism, the dramatic reduction of epidemic bovine encephalopathy (BSE) by removal of contaminated feed, and the lack of endemic scrapie in geographically isolated Australian sheep with susceptible PrP genotypes. While prion protein modeling has engendered an intense focus on common types of protein misfolding and amyloid formation in diverse organisms and diseases, the biological characteristics of infectious TSE agents, and their recognition by the host as foreign entities, raises several fundamental new directions for fruitful investigation such as: (1) unrecognized microbial agents in the environmental metagenome that may cause latent neurodegenerative disease, (2) the evolutionary social and protective functions of different amyloid proteins in diverse organisms from bacteria to mammals, and (3) amyloid formation as a beneficial innate immune response to stress (infectious and non-infectious). This innate process however, once initiated, can become unstoppable in accelerated neuronal aging. PMID:23633671

  17. Energetics Underlying Twist Polymorphisms in Amyloid Fibrils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Periole, Xavier; Huber, Thomas; Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Aberg, Karina C; van der Wel, Patrick C A; Sakmar, Thomas P; Marrink, Siewert J

    2018-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are highly ordered protein aggregates associated with more than 40 human diseases. The exact conditions in which the fibrils are grown determine many types of reported fibril polymorphism, including different twist patterns. Twist-based polymorphs display unique mechanical properties

  18. Value of the lateral view in diagnosing pleural plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillerdal, G.

    1986-01-01

    To assess the value of the lateral view in the diagnosis of pleural plaques, 2018 chest roentgenograms from the general population were scrutinized for such plaques. The lateral and posterior-anterior (PA) views were read separately and without knowledge of the occupational history or other clinical data. Of the males, 4.8% had pleural plaques in the PA view and 2% had dorsal pleural plaques in the lateral view. A total of 54% of the positive cases in the PA view also showed typical plaques in the PA view. Thus, there remained a number of cases which were diagnosed only in the lateral view; in all, these constituted 18.8%

  19. Amyloid positron emission tomography in sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy: A systematic critical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Farid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA is a very common small vessel disease of the brain, showing preferential and progressive amyloid-βdeposition in the wall of small arterioles and capillaries of the leptomeninges and cerebral cortex. CAA now encompasses not only a specific cerebrovascular pathological trait, but also different clinical syndromes - including spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH, dementia and ‘amyloid spells’ - an expanding spectrum of brain parenchymal MRI lesions and a set of diagnostic criteria – the Boston criteria, which have resulted in increasingly detecting CAA during life. Although currently available validated diagnostic criteria perform well in multiple lobar ICH, a formal diagnosis is currently lacking unless a brain biopsy is performed. This is partly because in practice CAA MRI biomarkers provide only indirect evidence for the disease. An accurate diagnosis of CAA in different clinical settings would have substantial impact for ICH risk stratification and antithrombotic drug use in elderly people, but also for sample homogeneity in drug trials. It has recently been demonstrated that vascular (in addition to parenchymal amyloid-βdeposition can be detected and quantified in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET amyloid tracers. This non-invasive approach has the potential to provide a molecular signature of CAA, and could in turn have major clinical impact. However, several issues around amyloid-PET in CAA remain unsettled and hence its diagnostic utility is limited. In this article we systematically review and critically appraise the published literature on amyloid-PET (PiB and other tracers in sporadic CAA. We focus on two key areas: (a the diagnostic utility of amyloid-PET in CAA and (b the use of amyloid-PET as a window to understand pathophysiological mechanism of the disease. Key issues around amyloid-PET imaging in CAA, including relevant technical aspects are also covered in depth

  20. Cholinergic degeneration is associated with increased plaque deposition and cognitive impairment in APPswe/PS1dE9 mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Bettina; Mørk, Arne; Plath, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic dysfunction and deposition of plaques containing amyloid ß-peptides (Aß) are two of the characteristics of Alzheimer's disease. Here, we combine APPswe/PS1dE9 (APP/PS1) mice with the cholinergic immunotoxin mu p75-saporin (SAP) to integrate partial basal forebrain cholinergic degenera...... decline and accelerated plaque burden. SAP treated APP/PS1 mice might thus constitute an improved model of Alzheimer's disease-like neuropathology and cognitive deficits compared to the conventional APP/PS1 model without selective removal of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons........ Additionally, APP/PS1 mice treated with SAP showed a tendency towards an increased level of soluble and insoluble Aß1-40 and Aß1-42 measured in brain tissue homogenate. Our results suggest that the combination of cholinergic degeneration and Aß overexpression in the APP/PS1 mouse model results in cognitive...

  1. Facts and artefacts in research on human dental plaque fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatevossian, A

    1990-06-01

    In 1966, Jenkins suggested that the plaque fluid environment was likely to have higher concentrations of extracellular solutes than was apparent from analyses of total plaque concentrations. Early work on plaque fluid confirmed this contention, but some artefact was also generated by the prolonged centrifugation used for separation. The solute concentrations in plaque fluid mostly exceed those in saliva or crevicular fluid. Thus, the environmental conditions are distinctly different from those based on the assumption that saliva readily permeates films of dental plaque. In contrast, the presence of serum proteins suggests a crevicular input to plaque fluid. These data suggest that exchange between dental plaque and its environment is apparently restricted. Diffusion rates measured in dental plaque by different methods do not agree on how restricted it is. However, measuring diffusion in plaque introduces artefacts in packing density, a major determinant of the diffusion rate. The conditions used for collection and analysis have been reported to produce artefactual changes in plaque fluid potassium, a predominantly intracellular ion. Measurements of predominantly extracellular ions, such as calcium, are no less prone to artefact, whether based on ion-selective electrodes or on total calcium. We have much to learn about the fluid environment of the teeth and about dynamic changes in plaque fluid composition and properties during perturbations. Such information can give insights into pathological processes such as tooth demineralization and dental caries, calculus formation, and gingival inflammation.

  2. Reliability and discriminatory power of methods for dental plaque quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Prócida Raggio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This in situ study evaluated the discriminatory power and reliability of methods of dental plaque quantification and the relationship between visual indices (VI and fluorescence camera (FC to detect plaque. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six volunteers used palatal appliances with six bovine enamel blocks presenting different stages of plaque accumulation. The presence of plaque with and without disclosing was assessed using VI. Images were obtained with FC and digital camera in both conditions. The area covered by plaque was assessed. Examinations were done by two independent examiners. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Kappa tests to compare different conditions of samples and to assess the inter-examiner reproducibility. RESULTS: Some methods presented adequate reproducibility. The Turesky index and the assessment of area covered by disclosed plaque in the FC images presented the highest discriminatory powers. CONCLUSION: The Turesky index and images with FC with disclosing present good reliability and discriminatory power in quantifying dental plaque.

  3. Three-dimensional carotid ultrasound plaque texture predicts vascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Engelen, Arna; Wannarong, Thapat; Parraga, Grace

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Carotid ultrasound atherosclerosis measurements, including those of the arterial wall and plaque, provide a way to monitor patients at risk of vascular events. Our objective was to examine carotid ultrasound plaque texture measurements and the change in carotid plaque...... texture during 1 year in patients at risk of events and to compare these with measurements of plaque volume and other risk factors as predictors of vascular events. METHODS: We evaluated 298 patients with carotid atherosclerosis using 3-dimensional (3D) ultrasound at baseline and after 1 year and measured...... carotid plaque volume and 376 measures of plaque texture. Patients were followed up to 5 years (median [range], 3.12 [0.77-4.66]) for myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack, and stroke. Sparse Cox regression was used to select the most predictive plaque texture measurements in independent...

  4. New dimensions in mechanical plaque control: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Mandal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Plaque control is the daily removal of dental plaque, oral biofilm and also prevention of their accumulation on the teeth and other parts of oral cavity. Dental plaque is the major etiology of maximum gingival and periodontal diseases. It is also related with various dental problems. Mechanical plaque control is a very effective method to get rid of plaque accumulation in oral cavity. In 3000 BC there was the first toothbrush invented by human beings. With time several modifications came in toothbrushes to make mechanical plaque control more effective in day to day oral hygiene practice. This article emphasizes on the advanced and emerging tools in mechanical plaque control methods in attaining an optimal level of oral hygiene standards and maintenance of oral health.

  5. Oculocutaneous albinism complicated with an ulcerated plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokanatha Keshavalu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old male with a history of albinism and farmer by occupation presented with an ulcerated plaque on the right wrist. The patient had light eyes, hair, and skin. Physical examination showed extensive photodamage. A skin biopsy specimen from the plaque revealed a well-differentiated squamous-cell carcinoma. Wide surgical excision was done. The most common types of oculocutaneous albinism (OCA, OCA 1 and OCA 2, are autosomal recessive disorders of pigmentation that commonly affect the skin, hair and eyes. Photodamage and skin cancers plague patients with albinism. Albinos face a myriad of social and medical issues. Importance of photoprotection, skin cancer surveillance and treatment has been stressed upon in this report.

  6. Plaque rupture in humans and mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Stephen M; Galis, Zorina S; Rosenfeld, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    " should be discouraged. Similarly, terms such as "buried fibrous caps" that imply preceding events that are unproven tend to create confusion. We will argue that such terminology may mislead readers by implying knowledge that does not yet exist. We suggest, instead, a focus on specific processes......Despite the many studies of murine atherosclerosis, we do not yet know the relevance of the natural history of this model to the final events precipitated by plaque disruption of human atherosclerotic lesions. The literature has become particularly confused because of the common use of terms...... such as "instability", "vulnerable", "rupture", or even "thrombosis" for features of plaques in murine model systems not yet shown to rupture spontaneously and in an animal surprisingly resistant to formation of thrombi at sites of atherosclerosis. We suggest that use of conclusory terms like "vulnerable" and "stable...

  7. Reducing allergic symptoms through eliminating subgingival plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haryono Utomo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elimination of subgingival plaque for prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases through scaling is a routine procedure. It is also well-known that periodontal disease is related to systemic diseases. Nevertheless, the idea how scaling procedures also able to reduce allergic symptoms i.e. eczema and asthma, is not easily accepted, because it is contradictory to the “hygiene hypothesis”. However, since allergic symptoms also depend on variable factors such as genetic, environmental and infection factors; every possible effort to eliminate or avoid from these factors had to be considered. Subgingival plaque is a source of infection, especially the Gram-negative bacteria that produced endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides, LPS, a potential stimulator of immunocompetent cells, which may also related to allergy, such as mast cells and basophils. In addition, it also triggers the “neurogenic switching” mechanism which may be initiated from chronic gingivitis. Objective: This case report may explain the possible connection between subgingival plaque and allergy based on evidence-based cases. Case: Two adult siblings who suffered from chronic gingivitis also showed different manifestations of allergy that were allergic dermatitis and asthma for years. They were also undergone unsuccessful medical treatment for years. Oral and topical corticosteroids were taken for dermatitis and inhalation for asthma. Case Management: Patients were conducted deep scaling procedures, allergic symptoms gradually diminished in days even though without usual medications. Conclusion: Concerning to the effectiveness of scaling procedures which concomitantly eliminate subgingival plaque in allergic patients, it concluded that this concept is logical. Nevertheless, further verification and collaborated study with allergic expert should be done.

  8. Unilateral hyperkeratotic plaques along blaschko lines

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Piyush; Debbarman, Panchami; RK, Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    Epidermolytic ichthyosis (or epidermolytic hyperkeratosis) classically presents with erythroderma and increased fragility (blistering) at birth or soon thereafter. In later life, erythroderma and blistering improve gradually and the clinical picture is dominated by hyperkeratotic plaques in flexures and around joints. Linear epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is a unique, uncommon clinical variant and the absence of erythroderma and blistering are its hallmark. Linear lesions may be localized or ge...

  9. Unilateral hyperkeratotic plaques along blaschko lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Piyush; Debbarman, Panchami; Rk, Shilpa

    2015-07-15

    Epidermolytic ichthyosis (or epidermolytic hyperkeratosis) classically presents with erythroderma and increased fragility (blistering) at birth or soon thereafter. In later life, erythroderma and blistering improve gradually and the clinical picture is dominated by hyperkeratotic plaques in flexures and around joints. Linear epidermolytic hyperkeratosis is a unique, uncommon clinical variant and the absence of erythroderma and blistering are its hallmark. Linear lesions may be localized or generalized andunilateral or bilateral. Herein we report a 6-year-old girl with unilateral epidermolytic ichthyosis.

  10. Multi-potent Natural Scaffolds Targeting Amyloid Cascade: In Search of Alzheimer's Disease Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sandipan

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) once considered a rare disorder emerges as a major health concern in recent times. The disease pathogenesis is very complex and yet to be understood completely. However, "Amyloid Cascade" is the central event in disease pathogenesis. Several proteins of the amyloid cascade are currently being considered as potential targets for AD therapeutics discovery. Many potential compounds are in clinical trials, but till now there is no known cure for the disease. Recent years have witnessed remarkable research interest in the search of novel concepts in drug designing for AD. Multi-targeted ligand design is a paradigm shift in conventional drug discovery. In this process rather than designing ligands targeting a single receptor, novel ligands have been designed/ synthesized that can simultaneously target many pathways involved in disease pathogenesis. Here, recent developments in computational drug designing protocols to identify multi-targeted ligand for AD have been discussed. Therapeutic potential of different multi-potent compounds also has been discussed briefly. Prime emphasis has been given to multi-potent ligand from natural resources. Polyphenols are an interesting group of compounds which show efficacy against a wide range of disease and have the property to exhibit multi-potency. Several groups attempted to identify novel multi-potent phytochemicals for AD therapy. Multi-potency of several polyphenols or compounds synthesized using the poly-phenolic scaffolds have been briefly discussed here. However, the multi-targeted drug designing for AD is still in early stages, more advancement in drug designing method/algorithm developments is urgently required to discover more efficient compounds for AD therapeutics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Retroperitoneal liposarcoma associated with small plaque parapsoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Francesco; Blasi, Sara; Sgueglia, Monica; Polichetti, Paolo; Tromba, Luciana; Berni, Alberto

    2007-07-09

    Extremely rare cases of paraneoplastic syndromes or ectopic production of proteins associated with liposarcoma are reported in literature. Production of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor, alpha-fetoprotein, paraneoplastic pemphigus and leucocytosis, Acrokeratosis paraneoplastica (Bazex's syndrome) are reported. The present report describes a case of retroperitoneal liposarcoma associated with small plaque parapsoriasis. Our search in the English literature of such a kind of association did not reveal any case reported. A 74 year male patient was admitted to our hospital because of the presence of an abdominal mass in right iliac fossa. He also complained of a two-year history of psoriasiform eruptions. The CT scan showed a retroperitoneal pelvic mass. Therefore surgical resection of the tumor was performed. After surgery, the skin eruptions disappeared completely in seven days and so a diagnosis of parapsoriasis syndrome was done. Parallel disappearing of skin eruptions after surgery, typical clinical picture and not specific histology of the cutaneous lesions suggest the diagnosis of small plaque parapsoriasis. Therefore we propose to add Small Plaque Parapsoriasis to the list of paraneoplastic syndromes associated to liposarcoma.

  12. Retroperitoneal liposarcoma associated with small plaque parapsoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polichetti Paolo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extremely rare cases of paraneoplastic syndromes or ectopic production of proteins associated with liposarcoma are reported in literature. Production of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor, alpha-fetoprotein, paraneoplastic pemphigus and leucocytosis, Acrokeratosis paraneoplastica (Bazex's syndrome are reported. The present report describes a case of retroperitoneal liposarcoma associated with small plaque parapsoriasis. Our search in the English literature of such a kind of association did not reveal any case reported. Case presentation A 74 year male patient was admitted to our hospital because of the presence of an abdominal mass in right iliac fossa. He also complained of a two-year history of psoriasiform eruptions. The CT scan showed a retroperitoneal pelvic mass. Therefore surgical resection of the tumor was performed. After surgery, the skin eruptions disappeared completely in seven days and so a diagnosis of parapsoriasis syndrome was done. Conclusion Parallel disappearing of skin eruptions after surgery, typical clinical picture and not specific histology of the cutaneous lesions suggest the diagnosis of small plaque parapsoriasis. Therefore we propose to add Small Plaque Parapsoriasis to the list of paraneoplastic syndromes associated to liposarcoma.

  13. Optimization of 125I ophthalmic plaque brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrahan, M.A.; Luxton, G.; Jozsef, G.; Liggett, P.E.; Petrovich, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Episcleral plaques containing 125 I sources are often used in the treatment of ocular melanoma. Within four years post-treatment, however, the majority of patients experience some visual loss due to radiation retinopathy. The high incidence of late complications suggests that careful treatment optimization may lead to improved outcome. The goal of optimization would be to reduce the magnitude of vision-limiting complications without compromising tumor control. We have developed a three-dimensional computer model for ophthalmic plaque therapy which permits us to explore the potential of various optimization strategies. One simple strategy which shows promise is to maximize the ratio of dose to the tumor apex (T) compared to dose to the macula (M). By modifying the parameters of source location, activity distribution, source orientation, and shielding we find that the calculated T:M ratio can be varied by a factor of 2 for a common plaque design and posterior tumor location. Margins and dose to the tumor volume remain essentially unchanged

  14. Macrophage antioxidant protection within atherosclerotic plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieseg, Steven P; Leake, David S; Flavall, Elizabeth M; Amit, Zunika; Reid, Linzi; Yang, Ya-Ting

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage cells within inflammatory lesions are exposed to a wide range of degrading and cytotoxic molecules including reactive oxygen species. Unlike neutrophils, macrophages do not normally die in this environment but continue to generate oxidants, phagocytose cellular remains, and release a range of cyto-active agents which modulate the immune response. It is this potential of the macrophage cell to survive in an oxidative environment that allows the growth and complexity of advanced atherosclerotic plaques. This review will examine the oxidants encountered by macrophages within an atherosclerotic plaque and describe some of the potential antioxidant mechanisms which enable macrophages to function within inflammatory lesions. Ascorbate, a-tocopherol, and glutathione appear to be central to the protection of macrophages yet additional antioxidant mechanisms appear to be involved. Gamma-Interferon causes macrophages to generate 7,8-dihydroneopterin, neopterin and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid both of which have antioxidant properties. Manganese superoxide dismutase is also upregulated in macrophages. The evidence that these antioxidants provide further protection, so allowing the macrophage cells to survive within sites of chronic inflammation such as atherosclerotic plaques, will be described.

  15. Helicobacter pylori in dental plaque; is it related to brushing frequency, plaque load and oral health status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Saima; Khan, Ayyaz Ali; Butt, Arshad Kamal; Idrees, Muhammad; Izhar, Mateen; Iqbal, Hafiz Aamer

    2011-10-01

    To determine the relation between presence of H. pylori in supra-gingival dental plaque with oral hygiene habits and oral health status of patients suffering from symptomatic dyspepsia. Descriptive study. The Department of Oral Health Sciences, Shaikh Zayed FPGMI, Lahore, from September 2008 to August 2009. One hundred and fifty dyspeptic subjects with dental plaque were enrolled. After recording brushing frequency, oral health status and plaque load, the supra-gingival dental plaque samples were collected by sterile curettes. Helicobacter pylori were detected in dental plaque samples through PCR assay. Presence of H. pylori in dental plaque was found to be 37.5% in the sample. Most of the subjects brushed once daily, had plaque index score of 1 and had fair to poor oral hygiene status. Approximately 35% of the individuals who brushed once or twice a day harbored the bacterium in their dental plaque. There was no difference between bacterial detection rates among different categories of plaque index and oral health status of the study subjects. Presence of H. pylori in dental plaque was found to be associated with neither brushing frequency nor with the plaque load nor with the oral health status of individuals suffering from symptomatic dyspepsia.

  16. Nonlinear dynamics of early atherosclerotic plaque formation may determine the efficacy of high density lipoproteins (HDL in plaque regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D Chalmers

    Full Text Available We use a computational model to explore the effect of foam cell accumulation on plaque regression following an increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL influx into the plaque. Atherosclerotic plaque formation is the outcome of cellular and cytokine responses to low density lipoproteins (LDL that penetrate the artery wall following an injury to the endothelium and become modified. We modelled the cells and cytokines that are most important in plaque formation using partial differential equations. The model includes monocytes and macrophages, foam cells, macrophage chemoattractants, endothelium-stimulating cytokines, modified low density lipoproteins (mod LDL and HDL. We included interactions both at the endothelium surface and inside the artery wall. The model predicts that when HDL influx into a well-established plaque with large numbers of foam cells is increased, the plaque may not regress but may continue to grow at a slower rate. If HDL influx is increased when a model plaque is recently established and has fewer foam cells, then the plaque does regress. If modLDL influx into the plaque is lowered at the same time that HDL influx increased or the capacity of the HDL to remove cholesterol from foam cells is increased, then the plaque is more likely to regress. The predictions of the model are in qualitative agreement with experimental studies in mice and rabbits. The results suggest that the intrinsic dynamics of reverse cholesterol transport by HDL are important in determining the success of HDL raising in promoting plaque regression.

  17. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy

  18. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin, E-mail: Kliu@gru.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College of Georgia, and Cancer Center, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States)

    2013-06-05

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  19. Magnetic resonance T2 relaxation time at 7 Tesla associated with amyloid β pathology and age in a double-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lang; Wang, Xiao-Yi; Gao, Fa-Bao; Wang, Lei; Xia, Rui; Li, Zhi-Xiao; Xing, Wu; Tang, Bei-Sha; Zeng, Yi; Zhou, Gao-Feng; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Liao, Wei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand the effect of amyloidplaques on magnetic resonance T2 relaxation time. We investigated these changes associated with age in an APP/PS1 mouse model of AD at 7 Tesla, combined with histology. Ten double-transgenic AD and ten wild type (WT) female mice (aged 12-20 months) were used in a cross-sectional study. Mean T2 values and standard deviations were calculated for each Regions of interest (ROIs) on T2 map. Immunohistochemistry for amyloid plaques and fluorescence staining with thioflavine S were performed of brain sections after imaging. The results showed that mean T2 values of the hippocampus, cortex, corpus callosum, and thalamus of older mice were significantly lower than of the younger. Compared to WT mice, the T2 values of the hippocampus, corpus callosum, and thalamus in younger AD mice were significantly greater, while the T2 values of the hippocampus and cortex in older AD mice were significantly less. Aβ-40 immunohistochemistry and thioflavine S stainging were positive in the matched region both for younger and older AD mice, while neither Aβ-40 nor thioflavine S were observed in WT mice. These findings suggest that regional T2 values of AD mice may decrease with age, and changes in T2 values in AD mice may be influenced by many factors besides amyloidplaque accumulation. Furthermore, they support that the standard deviation of the mean T2 value should be considered as well as the mean. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ghrelin inhibits atherosclerotic plaque angiogenesis and promotes plaque stability in a rabbit atherosclerotic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Chen, Qingwei; Ke, Dazhi; Li, Guiqiong

    2017-04-01

    Intraplaque angiogenesis associates with the instability of atherosclerotic plaques. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ghrelin on intraplaque angiogenesis and plaque instability in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis. The rabbits were randomly divided into three groups, namely, the control group, atherosclerotic model group, and ghrelin-treated group, with treatments lasting for 4 weeks. We found that the thickness ratio of the intima to media in rabbits of the ghrelin-treated group was significantly lower than that in rabbits of the atherosclerotic model group. The number of neovessels and the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) decreased dramatically in rabbits of the ghrelin-treated group compared to those of the atherosclerotic model group. Ghrelin significantly decreased the plaque content of macrophages, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9, in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis. In addition, the level of the pro-inflammatory factor monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 was significantly lower in rabbits of the ghrelin-treated group than in rabbits of the atherosclerotic model group. In summary, ghrelin can inhibit intraplaque angiogenesis and promote plaque stability by down-regulating VEGF and VEGFR2 expression, inhibiting the plaque content of macrophages, and reducing MCP-1 expression at an advanced stage of atherosclerosis in rabbits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy and its co-occurrence with Alzheimer’s disease and other cerebrovascular neuropathologic changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenowitz, Willa D.; Nelson, Peter T.; Besser, Lilah M.; Heller, Katherine B.; Kukull, Walter A.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the relationship between cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), Alzheimer’s disease neuropathologic changes (ADNC), other vascular brain pathologies, and cognition in a large multi-center autopsy sample. Data was obtained from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center on autopsied subjects (N=3,976) who died between 2005 and 2012. Descriptive statistics and multivariable regression models estimated the associations between CAA and other pathologies, and between CAA severity and cognitive test scores proximal to death. CAA tended to co-occur with ADNC but a substantial minority of cases were discrepant. CAA was absent in 22% (n= 520) of subjects with frequent neuritic plaques but present in 20.9% (n=91) of subjects with no neuritic plaques. In subjects with no/sparse neuritic plaques, non-hemorrhagic brain infarcts were more common in those with CAA pathology than without (P= 0.007). In subjects without the APOE ε4 allele, CAA severity was associated with lower cognition proximal to death, factoring in other pathologies. The presence of CAA in non-AD patients may indicate a distinct cerebrovascular condition. PMID:26239176

  2. Modeling clustered activity increase in amyloid-beta positron emission tomographic images with statistical descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhi S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sepideh Shokouhi,1 Baxter P Rogers,1 Hakmook Kang,2 Zhaohua Ding,1 Daniel O Claassen,3 John W Mckay,1 William R Riddle1On behalf of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative1Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, 2Department of Biostatistics, 3Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USABackground: Amyloid-beta (Aβ imaging with positron emission tomography (PET holds promise for detecting the presence of Aβ plaques in the cortical gray matter. Many image analyses focus on regional average measurements of tracer activity distribution; however, considerable additional information is available in the images. Metrics that describe the statistical properties of images, such as the two-point correlation function (S2, have found wide applications in astronomy and materials science. S2 provides a detailed characterization of spatial patterns in images typically referred to as clustering or flocculence. The objective of this study was to translate the two-point correlation method into Aβ-PET of the human brain using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB to characterize longitudinal changes in the tracer distribution that may reflect changes in Aβ plaque accumulation.Methods: We modified the conventional S2 metric, which is primarily used for binary images and formulated a weighted two-point correlation function (wS2 to describe nonbinary, real-valued PET images with a single statistical function. Using serial 11C-PiB scans, we calculated wS2 functions from two-dimensional PET images of different cortical regions as well as three-dimensional data from the whole brain. The area under the wS2 functions was calculated and compared with the mean/median of the standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR. For three-dimensional data, we compared the area under the wS2 curves with the subjects’ cerebrospinal fluid measures.Results: Overall, the longitudinal changes in wS2

  3. Structural polymorphism of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) oligomers highlights the importance of interfacial residue interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Yu, Xiang; Liang, Guizhao; Zheng, Jie

    2011-01-10

    A 37-residue of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) is a main component of amyloid plaques found in the pancreas of ∼90% of type II diabetes patients. It is reported that hIAPP oligomers, rather than mature fibrils, are major toxic species responsible for pancreatic islet β-cell dysfunction and even cell death, but molecular structures of these oligomers remain elusive. In this work, on the basis of recent solid-state NMR and mass-per-length (MPL) data, we model a series of hIAPP oligomers with different β-layers (one, two, and three layers), symmetries (symmetry and asymmetry), and associated interfaces using molecular dynamics simulations. Three distinct interfaces formed by C-terminal β-sheet and C-terminal β-sheet (CC), N-terminal β-sheet and N-terminal β-sheet (NN), and C-terminal β-sheet and N-terminal β-sheet (CN) are identified to drive multiple cross-β-layers laterally associated together to form different amyloid organizations via different intermolecular interactions, in which the CC interface is dominated by polar interactions, the NN interface is dominated by hydrophobic interactions, and the CN interface is dominated by mixed polar and hydrophobic interactions. Overall, the structural stability of the proposed hIAPP oligomers is a result of delicate balance between maximization of favorable peptide-peptide interactions at the interfaces and optimization of solvation energy with globular structure. Different hIAPP oligomeric models indicate a general and intrinsic nature of amyloid polymorphism, driven by different interfacial side-chain interactions. The proposed models are compatible with recent experimental data in overall size, cross-section area, and molecular weight. A general hIAPP aggregation mechanism is proposed on the basis of our simulated models and experimental data.

  4. The Role of Inflammatory Mediators in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Azizi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, a neurodegenerative disorder associated with advanced age, is the most common cause of dementia globally. AD is characterised by cognitive dysfunction, deposition of amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and neuro-inflammation. Inflammation of the brain is a key pathological hallmark of AD. Thus, clinical and immunopathological evidence of AD could be potentially supported by inflammatory mediators, including cytokines, chemokines, the complement system, acute phase proteins and oxidative mediators. In particular, oxidative mediators may actively contribute to the progression of AD and on-going inflammation in the brain. This review provides an overview of the functions and activities of inflammatory mediators in AD. An improved understanding of inflammatory processes and their role in AD is needed to improve therapeutic research aims in the field of AD and similar diseases.

  5. Characterization of Atherosclerotic Plaques by Laser Speckle Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Seemantini K.; Bouma, Brett E.; Helg, Tina; Chan, Raymond; Halpern, Elkan; Chau, Alexandra; Minsky, Milan Singh; Motz, Jason T.; Houser, Stuart L.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2010-01-01

    Background A method capable of determining atherosclerotic plaque composition and measuring plaque viscoelasticity can provide valuable insight into intrinsic features associated with plaque rupture and can enable the identification of high-risk lesions. In this article, we describe a new optical technique, laser speckle imaging (LSI), that measures an index of plaque viscoelasticity. We evaluate the potential of LSI for characterizing atherosclerotic plaque. Methods and Results Time-varying helium-neon laser speckle images were acquired from 118 aortic plaque specimens from 14 human cadavers under static and deforming conditions (0 to 200 μm/s). Temporal fluctuations in the speckle patterns were quantified by exponential fitting of the normalized cross-correlation of sequential frames in each image series of speckle patterns to obtain the exponential decay time constant, τ. The decorrelation time constants of thin-cap fibroatheromas (TCFA) (τ=47.5±19.2 ms) were significantly lower than those of other atherosclerotic lesions (P90%. Speckle decorrelation time constants demonstrated strong correlation with histological measurements of plaque collagen (R=0.73, P0.05). Conclusions The measurement of speckle decorrelation time constant from laser speckle images provides an index of plaque viscoelasticity and facilitates the characterization of plaque type. Our results demonstrate that LSI is a highly sensitive technique for characterizing plaque and identifying thin-cap fibroatheromas. PMID:16061738

  6. Imaging of amyloid deposition in human brain using positron emission tomography and [{sup 18}F]FACT: comparison with [{sup 11}C]PIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroshi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Molecular Imaging Center, Chiba (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Biophysics Program, Molecular Imaging Center, Chiba (Japan); Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Shimada, Hitoshi; Miyoshi, Michie; Takano, Harumasa; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Arakawa, Ryosuke; Kodaka, Fumitoshi; Ono, Maiko; Eguchi, Yoko; Higuchi, Makoto; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Suhara, Tetsuya [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Molecular Imaging Center, Chiba (Japan); Yanai, Kazuhiko; Okamura, Nobuyuki [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    The characteristic neuropathological changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are deposition of amyloid senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The {sup 18}F-labeled amyloid tracer, [{sup 18}F]2-[(2-{(E)-2-[2-(dimethylamino)-1,3-thiazol-5-yl]vinyl}-1, 3-benzoxazol-6-yl)oxy ]-3-fluoropropan-1-ol (FACT), one of the benzoxazole derivatives, was recently developed. In the present study, deposition of amyloid senile plaques was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) with both [ {sup 11}C ]Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and [ {sup 18}F ]FACT in the same subjects, and the regional uptakes of both radiotracers were directly compared. Two PET scans, one of each with [ {sup 11}C ]PIB and [ {sup 18}F ]FACT, were performed sequentially on six normal control subjects, two mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients, and six AD patients. The standardized uptake value ratio of brain regions to the cerebellum was calculated with partial volume correction using magnetic resonance (MR) images to remove the effects of white matter accumulation. No significant differences in the cerebral cortical uptake were observed between normal control subjects and AD patients in [ {sup 18}F ]FACT studies without partial volume correction, while significant differences were observed in [ {sup 11}C ]PIB. After partial volume correction, the cerebral cortical uptake was significantly larger in AD patients than in normal control subjects for [ {sup 18}F ]FACT studies as well as [ {sup 11}C ]PIB. Relatively lower uptakes of [ {sup 11}C ]PIB in distribution were observed in the medial side of the temporal cortex and in the occipital cortex as compared with [ {sup 18}F ]FACT. Relatively higher uptake of [ {sup 11}C ]PIB in distribution was observed in the frontal and parietal cortices. Since [ {sup 18}F ]FACT might bind more preferentially to dense-cored amyloid deposition, regional differences in cerebral cortical uptake between [ {sup 11}C ]PIB and [ {sup 18}F ]FACT might be due to differences

  7. Imaging of amyloid deposition in human brain using positron emission tomography and [18F]FACT: comparison with [11C]PIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Shimada, Hitoshi; Miyoshi, Michie; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Takano, Harumasa; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Arakawa, Ryosuke; Kodaka, Fumitoshi; Ono, Maiko; Eguchi, Yoko; Higuchi, Makoto; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2014-04-01

    The characteristic neuropathological changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are deposition of amyloid senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The (18)F-labeled amyloid tracer, [(18)F]2-[(2-{(E)-2-[2-(dimethylamino)-1,3-thiazol-5-yl]vinyl}-1,3-benzoxazol-6-yl)oxy]-3-fluoropropan-1-ol (FACT), one of the benzoxazole derivatives, was recently developed. In the present study, deposition of amyloid senile plaques was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) with both [(11)C]Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and [(18)F]FACT in the same subjects, and the regional uptakes of both radiotracers were directly compared. Two PET scans, one of each with [(11)C]PIB and [(18)F]FACT, were performed sequentially on six normal control subjects, two mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients, and six AD patients. The standardized uptake value ratio of brain regions to the cerebellum was calculated with partial volume correction using magnetic resonance (MR) images to remove the effects of white matter accumulation. No significant differences in the cerebral cortical uptake were observed between normal control subjects and AD patients in [(18)F]FACT studies without partial volume correction, while significant differences were observed in [(11)C]PIB. After partial volume correction, the cerebral cortical uptake was significantly larger in AD patients than in normal control subjects for [(18)F]FACT studies as well as [(11)C]PIB. Relatively lower uptakes of [(11)C]PIB in distribution were observed in the medial side of the temporal cortex and in the occipital cortex as compared with [(18)F]FACT. Relatively higher uptake of [(11)C]PIB in distribution was observed in the frontal and parietal cortices. Since [(18)F]FACT might bind more preferentially to dense-cored amyloid deposition, regional differences in cerebral cortical uptake between [(11)C]PIB and [(18)F]FACT might be due to differences in regional distribution between diffuse and dense-cored amyloid plaque shown in the