WorldWideScience

Sample records for amyloid plaque pathogenesis

  1. Regional brain hypometabolism is unrelated to regional amyloid plaque burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Andre; Ng, Bernard; Landau, Susan M.; Jagust, William J.

    2015-01-01

    See Sorg and Grothe (doi:10.1093/brain/awv302) for a scientific commentary on this article. In its original form, the amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease holds that fibrillar deposits of amyloid are an early, driving force in pathological events leading ultimately to neuronal death. Early clinicopathological investigations highlighted a number of inconsistencies leading to an updated hypothesis in which amyloid plaques give way to amyloid oligomers as the driving force in pathogenesis. Rather than focusing on the inconsistencies, amyloid imaging studies have tended to highlight the overlap between regions that show early amyloid plaque signal on positron emission tomography and that also happen to be affected early in Alzheimer’s disease. Recent imaging studies investigating the regional dependency between metabolism and amyloid plaque deposition have arrived at conflicting results, with some showing regional associations and other not. We extracted multimodal neuroimaging data from the Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging database for 227 healthy controls and 434 subjects with mild cognitive impairment. We analysed regional patterns of amyloid deposition, regional glucose metabolism and regional atrophy using florbetapir (18F) positron emission tomography, 18F-fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Specifically, we derived grey matter density and standardized uptake value ratios for both positron emission tomography tracers in 404 functionally defined regions of interest. We examined the relation between regional glucose metabolism and amyloid plaques using linear models. For each region of interest, correcting for regional grey matter density, age, education and disease status, we tested the association of regional glucose metabolism with (i) cortex-wide florbetapir uptake; (ii) regional (i.e. in the same region of interest) florbetapir uptake; and (iii) regional florbetapir uptake

  2. Fibrillar amyloid plaque formation precedes microglial activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian K E Jung

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease (AD, hallmark β-amyloid deposits are characterized by the presence of activated microglia around them. Despite an extensive characterization of the relation of amyloid plaques with microglia, little is known about the initiation of this interaction. In this study, the detailed investigation of very small plaques in brain slices in AD transgenic mice of the line APP-PS1(dE9 revealed different levels of microglia recruitment. Analysing plaques with a diameter of up to 10 μm we find that only the half are associated with clear morphologically activated microglia. Utilizing in vivo imaging of new appearing amyloid plaques in double-transgenic APP-PS1(dE9xCX3CR1+/- mice further characterized the dynamic of morphological microglia activation. We observed no correlation of morphological microglia activation and plaque volume or plaque lifetime. Taken together, our results demonstrate a very prominent variation in size as well as in lifetime of new plaques relative to the state of microglia reaction. These observations might question the existing view that amyloid deposits by themselves are sufficient to attract and activate microglia in vivo.

  3. Pathogenesis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, A.A.M.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Kremer, H.P.H.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is the result of the deposition of an amyloidogenic protein in cortical and leptomeningeal vessels. The most common type of CAA is caused by amyloid beta-protein (Abeta), which is particularly associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Excessive Abeta-CAA formation c

  4. Amyloid plaque imaging in vivo: current achievement and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-03-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a very complex neurodegenerative disorder, the exact cause of which is still not known. The major histopathological features, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, already described by Alois Alzheimer, have been the focus in research for decades. Despite a probable whole cascade of events in the brain leading to impairment of cognition, amyloid is still the target for diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development of molecular imaging techniques now allows imaging of amyloid plaques in vivo in Alzheimer patients by PET amyloid ligands such as Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Studies so far have revealed high {sup 11}C-PIB retention in brain at prodromal stages of AD and a possibility to discriminate AD from other dementia disorders by {sup 11}C-PIB. Ongoing studies are focussing to understand the relationship between brain and CSF amyloid processes and cognitive processes. In vivo imaging of amyloid will be important for early diagnosis and evaluation of new anti-amyloid therapies in AD. (orig.)

  5. Butyrylcholinesterase in the life cycle of amyloid plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillozet, A L; Smiley, J F; Mash, D C; Mesulam, M M

    1997-12-01

    Deposits of diffuse beta-amyloid (Abeta) may exist in the brain for many years before leading to neuritic degeneration and dementia. The factors that contribute to the putative transformation of the Abeta amyloid from a relatively inert to a pathogenic state remain unknown and may involve interactions with additional plaque constituents. Matching brain sections from 2 demented and 4 nondemented subjects were processed for the demonstration of Abeta immunoreactivity, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) enzyme activity, and thioflavine S binding. Additional sections were processed for the concurrent demonstration of two or three of these markers. A comparative analysis of multiple cytoarchitectonic areas processed with each of these markers indicated that Abeta plaque deposits are likely to undergo three stages of maturation, ie, a "diffuse" thioflavine S-negative stage, a thioflavine S-positive (ie, compact) but nonneuritic stage, and a compact neuritic stage. A multiregional analysis showed that BChE-positive plaques were not found in cytoarchitectonic areas or cortical layers that contained only the thioflavine S-negative, diffuse type of Abeta plaques. The BChE-positive plaques were found only in areas containing thioflavine S-positive compact plaques, both neuritic and nonneuritic. Within such areas, almost all (>98%) BChE-containing plaques bound thioflavine S, and almost all (93%) thioflavine S plaques contained BChE. These results suggest that BChE becomes associated with amyloid plaques at approximately the same time that the Abeta deposit assumes a compact beta-pleated conformation. BChE may therefore participate in the transformation of Abeta from an initially benign form to an eventually malignant form associated with neuritic tissue degeneration and clinical dementia.

  6. [The pathogenesis of small-plaque parapsoriasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olisova, O Iu; Kop'eva, T N

    1994-01-01

    The paper deals with the origin of parapsoriasis nodularis, which in its micronodular variant belongs to chronic dermatosis and has a clear-cut clinical and histological appearance. The disease arises most frequently after stress and occurs for the most part in middle-aged males. The leading role in pathogenesis of parapsoriasis nodularis is played by cellular immunity as indicated by reduced count of T-lymphocytes, active T-lymphocytes as well as the emergence of delayed hypersensitivity.

  7. Automatic segmentation of amyloid plaques in MR images using unsupervised support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanescu, Gheorghe; Venkatasubramanian, Palamadai N; Wyrwicz, Alice M

    2012-06-01

    Deposition of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is an important pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, reliable quantification of amyloid plaques in both human and animal brains remains a challenge. We present here a novel automatic plaque segmentation algorithm based on the intrinsic MR signal characteristics of plaques. This algorithm identifies plaque candidates in MR data by using watershed transform, which extracts regions with low intensities completely surrounded by higher intensity neighbors. These candidates are classified as plaque or nonplaque by an unsupervised learning method using features derived from the MR data intensity. The algorithm performance is validated by comparison with histology. We also demonstrate the algorithm's ability to detect age-related changes in plaque load ex vivo in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice that coexpress five familial AD mutations (5xFAD mice). To our knowledge, this study represents the first quantitative method for characterizing amyloid plaques in MRI data. The proposed method can be used to describe the spatiotemporal progression of amyloid deposition, which is necessary for understanding the evolution of plaque pathology in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease and to evaluate the efficacy of emergent amyloid-targeting therapies in preclinical trials.

  8. Stable size distribution of amyloid plaques over the course of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Mielke, Matthew L; Muzitansky, Alona; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Growdon, John H; Bacskai, Brian J; Betensky, Rebecca A; Frosch, Matthew P; Hyman, Bradley T

    2012-08-01

    Amyloid β plaques are a key pathologic feature of Alzheimer disease (AD), but whether plaque sizes increase or stabilize over the course of AD is unknown. We measured the size distribution of total immunoreactive (10D5-positive) and dense-core (Thioflavin S-positive) plaques in the temporal neocortex of a large group of subjects with AD and age-matched plaque-bearing subjects without dementia to test the hypothesis that amyloid plaques continue to grow along with the progression of the disease. The size of amyloid β (10D5)-positive plaques did not differ between groups, whereas dense-core plaques from the group with AD were slightly larger than those from the group without dementia (∼25%-30%, p = 0.01). Within the group with AD, dense-core plaque size did not independently correlate with duration of clinical disease (from 4 to 21 years, p = 0.68), whereas 10D5-positive plaque size correlated negatively with disease duration (p = 0.01). By contrast, an earlier age of symptom onset strongly predicted a larger postmortem plaque size; this effect was independent of disease duration and the presence of the APOE[Latin Small Letter Open E]4 allele (p = 0.0001). We conclude that plaques vary in size among patients, with larger size distributions correlating with an earlier age of onset, but plaques do not substantially increase in size over the clinical course of the disease.

  9. Interactions between amyloid-β and hemoglobin: implications for amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Ying Chuang

    Full Text Available Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ peptides in the brain is one of the central pathogenic events in Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, why and how Aβ aggregates within the brain of AD patients remains elusive. Previously, we demonstrated hemoglobin (Hb binds to Aβ and co-localizes with the plaque and vascular amyloid deposits in post-mortem AD brains. In this study, we further characterize the interactions between Hb and Aβ in vitro and in vivo and report the following observations: 1 the binding of Hb to Aβ required iron-containing heme; 2 other heme-containing proteins, such as myoglobin and cytochrome C, also bound to Aβ; 3 hemin-induced cytotoxicity was reduced in neuroblastoma cells by low levels of Aβ; 4 Hb was detected in neurons and glial cells of post-mortem AD brains and was up-regulated in aging and APP/PS1 transgenic mice; 5 microinjection of human Hb into the dorsal hippocampi of the APP/PS1 transgenic mice induced the formation of an envelope-like structure composed of Aβ surrounding the Hb droplets. Our results reveal an enhanced endogenous expression of Hb in aging brain cells, probably serving as a compensatory mechanism against hypoxia. In addition, Aβ binds to Hb and other hemoproteins via the iron-containing heme moiety, thereby reducing Hb/heme/iron-induced cytotoxicity. As some of the brain Hb could be derived from the peripheral circulation due to a compromised blood-brain barrier frequently observed in aged and AD brains, our work also suggests the genesis of some plaques may be a consequence of sustained amyloid accretion at sites of vascular injury.

  10. Amyloid β oligomers in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, treatment, and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Kirsten L; Klein, William L

    2015-02-01

    Protein aggregation is common to dozens of diseases including prionoses, diabetes, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Over the past 15 years, there has been a paradigm shift in understanding the structural basis for these proteinopathies. Precedent for this shift has come from investigation of soluble Aβ oligomers (AβOs), toxins now widely regarded as instigating neuron damage leading to Alzheimer's dementia. Toxic AβOs accumulate in AD brain and constitute long-lived alternatives to the disease-defining Aβ fibrils deposited in amyloid plaques. Key experiments using fibril-free AβO solutions demonstrated that while Aβ is essential for memory loss, the fibrillar Aβ in amyloid deposits is not the agent. The AD-like cellular pathologies induced by AβOs suggest their impact provides a unifying mechanism for AD pathogenesis, explaining why early stage disease is specific for memory and accounting for major facets of AD neuropathology. Alternative ideas for triggering mechanisms are being actively investigated. Some research favors insertion of AβOs into membrane, while other evidence supports ligand-like accumulation at particular synapses. Over a dozen candidate toxin receptors have been proposed. AβO binding triggers a redistribution of critical synaptic proteins and induces hyperactivity in metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors. This leads to Ca(2+) overload and instigates major facets of AD neuropathology, including tau hyperphosphorylation, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and synapse loss. Because different species of AβOs have been identified, a remaining question is which oligomer is the major pathogenic culprit. The possibility has been raised that more than one species plays a role. Despite some key unknowns, the clinical relevance of AβOs has been established, and new studies are beginning to point to co-morbidities such as diabetes and hypercholesterolemia as etiological factors. Because pathogenic AβOs appear early in the disease, they

  11. Advances in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease: a re-evaluation of amyloid cascade hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Suzhen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized clinically by progressive deterioration of memory, and pathologically by histopathological changes including extracellular deposits of amyloid-beta (A-beta peptides forming senile plaques (SP and the intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFT of hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain. This review focused on the new developments of amyloid cascade hypothesis with details on the production, metabolism and clearance of A-beta, and the key roles of some important A-beta-related genes in the pathological processes of AD. The most recent research advances in genetics, neuropathology and pathogenesis of the disease were also discussed.

  12. IFN-gamma promotes complement expression and attenuates amyloid plaque deposition in amyloid beta precursor protein transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Paramita; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Beccard, Amanda; Janus, Christopher; Dickson, Dennis; Golde, Todd E; Das, Pritam

    2010-05-01

    Reactive gliosis surrounding amyloid beta (Abeta) plaques is an early feature of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis and has been postulated to represent activation of the innate immune system in an apparently ineffective attempt to clear or neutralize Abeta aggregates. To evaluate the role of IFN-gamma-mediated neuroinflammation on the evolution of Abeta pathology in transgenic (Tg) mice, we have expressed murine IFN-gamma (mIFN-gamma) in the brains of Abeta precursor protein (APP) Tg mice using recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 1. Expression of mIFN-gamma in brains of APP TgCRND8 mice results in robust noncell autonomous activation of microglia and astrocytes, and a concomitant significant suppression of Abeta deposition. In these mice, mIFN-gamma expression upregulated multiple glial activation markers, early components of the complement cascade as well as led to infiltration of Ly-6c positive peripheral monocytes but no significant effects on APP levels, APP processing or steady-state Abeta levels were noticed in vivo. Taken together, these results suggest that mIFN-gamma expression in the brain suppresses Abeta accumulation through synergistic effects of activated glia and components of the innate immune system that enhance Abeta aggregate phagocytosis.

  13. In vivo detection of amyloid plaques by gadolinium-stained MRI can be used to demonstrate the efficacy of an anti-amyloid immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu D. Santin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular deposition of β amyloid plaques is an early event associated to Alzheimer's disease. Here we have used in vivo gadolinium-stained high resolution (29*29*117µm3 MRI to follow-up in a longitudinal way individual amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 mice and evaluate the efficacy of a new immunotherapy (SAR255952 directed against protofibrillar and fibrillary forms of Aβ. APP/PS1 mice were treated for 5 months between the age of 3.5 and 8.5 months. SAR255952 reduced amyloid load in 8.5-month-old animals, but not in 5.5-month animals compared to mice treated with a control antibody (DM4. Histological evaluation confirmed the reduction of amyloid load and revealed a lower density of amyloid plaques in 8.5-month SAR255952-treated animals. The longitudinal follow-up of individual amyloid plaques by MRI revealed that plaques that were visible at 5.5 months were still visible at 8.5 months in both SAR255952 and DM4-treated mice. This suggests that the amyloid load reduction induced by SAR255952 is related to a slowing down in the formation of new plaques rather than to the clearance of already formed plaques.

  14. Polarization properties of amyloid-beta plaques in Alzheimer's disease (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Bernhard; Wöhrer, Adelheid; Ricken, Gerda; Pircher, Michael; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2016-03-01

    In histopathological practice, birefringence is used for the identification of amyloidosis in numerous tissues. Amyloid birefringence is caused by the parallel arrangement of fibrous protein aggregates. Since neurodegenerative processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are also linked to the formation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques, optical methods sensitive to birefringence may act as non-invasive tools for Aβ identification. At last year's Photonics West, we demonstrated polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) imaging of ex vivo cerebral tissue of advanced stage AD patients. PS-OCT provides volumetric, structural imaging based on both backscatter contrast and tissue polarization properties. In this presentation, we report on polarization-sensitive neuroimaging along with numerical simulations of three-dimensional Aβ plaques. High speed PS-OCT imaging was performed using a spectral domain approach based on polarization maintaining fiber optics. The sample beam was interfaced to a confocal scanning microscope arrangement. Formalin-fixed tissue samples as well as thin histological sections were imaged. For comparison to the PS-OCT results, ray propagation through plaques was modeled using Jones analysis and various illumination geometries and plaque sizes. Characteristic polarization patterns were found. The results of this study may not only help to understand PS-OCT imaging of neuritic Aβ plaques but may also have implications for polarization-sensitive imaging of other fibrillary structures.

  15. The Centiloid Project: Standardizing Quantitative Amyloid Plaque Estimation by PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klunk, William E.; Koeppe, Robert A.; Price, Julie C.; Benzinger, Tammie; Devous, Michael D.; Jagust, William; Johnson, Keith; Mathis, Chester A.; Minhas, Davneet; Pontecorvo, Michael J.; Rowe, Christopher C.; Skovronsky, Daniel; Mintun, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Although amyloid imaging with PiB-PET, and now with F-18-labelled tracers, has produced remarkably consistent qualitative findings across a large number of centers, there has been considerable variability in the exact numbers reported as quantitative outcome measures of tracer retention. In some cases this is as trivial as the choice of units, in some cases it is scanner dependent, and of course, different tracers yield different numbers. Our working group was formed to standardize quantitative amyloid imaging measures by scaling the outcome of each particular analysis method or tracer to a 0 to 100 scale, anchored by young controls (≤45 years) and typical Alzheimer’s disease patients. The units of this scale have been named “Centiloids.” Basically, we describe a “standard” method of analyzing PiB PET data and then a method for scaling any “non-standard” method of PiB PET analysis (or any other tracer) to the Centiloid scale. PMID:25443857

  16. The Role of the Blood-Brain Barrier in the Pathogenesis of Senile Plaques in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Provias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of beta-amyloid [Aβ] within senile plaques [SP] is characteristic of these lesions in Alzheimer’s disease. The accumulation of Aβ42, in particular, in the superior temporal [ST] cortex may result from an inability of the blood brain barrier (BBB to regulate the trans-endothelial transport and clearance of the amyloid. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein [LRP] and P-glycoprotein [P-gp] facilitate the efflux of Aβ out of the brain, whereas receptor for advanced glycation end products [RAGE] facilitates Aβ influx. Additionally, vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF] and endothelial nitric oxide synthase [eNOS] may influence the trans-BBB transport of Aβ. In this study we examined ST samples and compared SP burden of all types with the capillary expression of LRP, p-gp, RAGE, VEGF, and e-NOS in samples from 15 control and 15 Alzheimer brains. LRP, P-gp, RAGE, VEGF, and eNOS positive capillaries and Aβ42 plaques were quantified and statistical analysis of the nonparametric data was performed using the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. In the Alzheimer condition P-gp, VEGF, and eNOS positive capillaries were negatively correlated with SP burden, but LRP and RAGE were positively correlated with SP burden. These results indicate altered BBB function in the pathogenesis of SPs in Alzheimer brains.

  17. Unified theory on the pathogenesis of Randall's plaques and plugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saeed R; Canales, Benjamin K

    2015-01-01

    Kidney stones develop attached to sub-epithelial plaques of calcium phosphate (CaP) crystals (termed Randall's plaque) and/or form as a result of occlusion of the openings of the Ducts of Bellini by stone-forming crystals (Randall's plugs). These plaques and plugs eventually extrude into the urinary space, acting as a nidus for crystal overgrowth and stone formation. To better understand these regulatory mechanisms and the pathophysiology of idiopathic calcium stone disease, this review provides in-depth descriptions of the morphology and potential origins of these plaques and plugs, summarizes existing animal models of renal papillary interstitial deposits, and describes factors that are believed to regulate plaque formation and calcium overgrowth. Based on evidence provided within this review and from the vascular calcification literature, we propose a "unified" theory of plaque formation-one similar to pathological biomineralization observed elsewhere in the body. Abnormal urinary conditions (hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, and hypocitraturia), renal stress or trauma, and perhaps even the normal aging process lead to transformation of renal epithelial cells into an osteoblastic phenotype. With this de-differentiation comes an increased production of bone-specific proteins (i.e., osteopontin), a reduction in crystallization inhibitors (such as fetuin and matrix Gla protein), and creation of matrix vesicles, which support nucleation of CaP crystals. These small deposits promote aggregation and calcification of surrounding collagen. Mineralization continues by calcification of membranous cellular degradation products and other fibers until the plaque reaches the papillary epithelium. Through the activity of matrix metalloproteinases or perhaps by brute physical force produced by the large sub-epithelial crystalline mass, the surface is breached and further stone growth occurs by organic matrix-associated nucleation of CaOx or by the transformation of the outer layer

  18. The Effect of Iron in MR Imaging and Transverse Relaxation of Amyloid-Beta Plaques in Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Meadowcroft, Mark D.; Peters, Douglas G.; Dewal, Rahul; Connor, James R.; Yang, Qing X.

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of neural iron is known to occur during the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Visualization of amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has largely been credited to rapid proton relaxation in the vicinity of plaques due to focal iron deposition. The goal of this work was to determine the relationship between local relaxation and related focal iron content associated with Aβ plaques. Alzheimer’s disease (N=5) and control tissue (N=3) sample slices from th...

  19. Nanoparticulate Radiolabelled Quinolines Detect Amyloid Plaques in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste A. Roney

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Detecting aggregated amyloid peptides (Aβ plaques presents targets for developing biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Polymeric n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (PBCA nanoparticles (NPs were encapsulated with radiolabelled amyloid affinity I125-clioquinol (CQ, 5-chloro-7-iodo-8-hydroxyquinoline as in vivo probes. I125-CQ-PBCA NPs crossed the BBB (2.3±0.9 ID/g (P<.05 in the WT mouse (N = 210, compared to I125-CQ (1.0±0.4 ID/g. I125-CQ-PBCA NP brain uptake increased in AD transgenic mice (APP/PS1 versus WT (N = 38; 2.54×105±5.31×104 DLU/mm2; versus 1.98×105±2.22×104 DLU/mm2 and in APP/PS1/Tau. Brain increases were in mice intracranially injected with aggregated Aβ42 peptide (N = 17; 7.19×105±1.25×105 DLU/mm2, versus WT (6.07×105±7.47×104 DLU/mm2. Storage phosphor imaging and histopathological staining of the plaques, Fe2+ and Cu2+, validated results. I125-CQ-PBCA NPs have specificity for Aβ in vitro and in vivo and are promising as in vivo SPECT (I123, or PET (I124 amyloid imaging agents.

  20. Optimal parameters for near infrared fluorescence imaging of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease mouse models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, S B [Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology, 77 Mass Ave., E25-519, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Kumar, A T N; Boas, D A [Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 149 13th St Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); Bacskai, B J [Alzheimer' s Research Unit, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 114 16th St, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States)], E-mail: bbacskai@partners.org

    2009-10-21

    Amyloid-{beta} plaques are an Alzheimer's disease biomarker which present unique challenges for near-infrared fluorescence tomography because of size (<50 {mu}m diameter) and distribution. We used high-resolution simulations of fluorescence in a digital Alzheimer's disease mouse model to investigate the optimal fluorophore and imaging parameters for near-infrared fluorescence tomography of amyloid plaques. Fluorescence was simulated for amyloid-targeted probes with emission at 630 and 800 nm, plaque-to-background ratios from 1-1000, amyloid burden from 0-10%, and for transmission and reflection measurement geometries. Fluorophores with high plaque-to-background contrast ratios and 800 nm emission performed significantly better than current amyloid imaging probes. We tested idealized fluorophores in transmission and full-angle tomographic measurement schemes (900 source-detector pairs), with and without anatomical priors. Transmission reconstructions demonstrated strong linear correlation with increasing amyloid burden, but underestimated fluorescence yield and suffered from localization artifacts. Full-angle measurements did not improve upon the transmission reconstruction qualitatively or in semi-quantitative measures of accuracy; anatomical and initial-value priors did improve reconstruction localization and accuracy for both transmission and full-angle schemes. Region-based reconstructions, in which the unknowns were reduced to a few distinct anatomical regions, produced highly accurate yield estimates for cortex, hippocampus and brain regions, even with a reduced number of measurements (144 source-detector pairs)

  1. In vivo detection of prion amyloid plaques using [{sup 11}C]BF-227 PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, Nobuyuki; Yanai, Kazuhiko [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Shiga, Yusei; Itoyama, Yasuhito [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Sendai (Japan); Furumoto, Shozo [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Tashiro, Manabu [Tohoku University, Division of Cyclotron Nuclear Medicine, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Tsuboi, Yoshio [Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Fukuoka (Japan); Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki [Institute of Development, Aging, and Cancer, Tohoku University, Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Division of Brain Sciences, Sendai (Japan); Iwata, Ren [Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Kudo, Yukitsuka [Tohoku University, Innovation of New Biomedical Engineering Center, Sendai (Japan); Doh-ura, Katsumi [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Prion Research, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan)

    2010-05-15

    In vivo detection of pathological prion protein (PrP) in the brain is potentially useful for the diagnosis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). However, there are no non-invasive ante-mortem means for detection of pathological PrP deposition in the brain. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the amyloid imaging tracer BF-227 with positron emission tomography (PET) for the non-invasive detection of PrP amyloid in the brain. The binding ability of BF-227 to PrP amyloid was investigated using autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy. Five patients with TSEs, including three patients with Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) and two patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), underwent [{sup 11}C]BF-227 PET scans. Results were compared with data from 10 normal controls and 17 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The regional to pons standardized uptake value ratio was calculated as an index of BF-227 retention. Binding of BF-227 to PrP plaques was confirmed using brain samples from autopsy-confirmed GSS cases. In clinical PET study, significantly higher retention of BF-227 was detected in the cerebellum, thalamus and lateral temporal cortex of GSS patients compared to that in the corresponding tissues of normal controls. GSS patients also showed higher retention of BF-227 in the cerebellum, thalamus and medial temporal cortex compared to AD patients. In contrast, the two CJD patients showed no obvious retention of BF-227 in the brain. Although [{sup 11}C]BF-227 is a non-specific imaging marker of cerebral amyloidosis, it is useful for in vivo detection of PrP plaques in the human brain in GSS, based on the regional distribution of the tracer. PET amyloid imaging might provide a means for both early diagnosis and non-invasive disease monitoring of certain forms of TSEs. (orig.)

  2. Soluble amyloid beta levels are elevated in the white matter of Alzheimer's patients, independent of cortical plaque severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins-Praino, Lyndsey E; Francis, Yitshak I; Griffith, Erica Y; Wiegman, Anne F; Urbach, Jonathan; Lawton, Arlene; Honig, Lawrence S; Cortes, Etty; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G; Canoll, Peter D; Goldman, James E; Brickman, Adam M

    2014-08-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease and the leading cause of dementia. In addition to grey matter pathology, white matter changes are now recognized as an important pathological feature in the emergence of the disease. Despite growing recognition of the importance of white matter abnormalities in the pathogenesis of AD, the causes of white matter degeneration are still unknown. While multiple studies propose Wallerian-like degeneration as the source of white matter change, others suggest that primary white matter pathology may be due, at least in part, to other mechanisms, including local effects of toxic Aβ peptides. In the current study, we investigated levels of soluble amyloid-beta (Aβ) in white matter of AD patients (n=12) compared with controls (n=10). Fresh frozen white matter samples were obtained from anterior (Brodmann area 9) and posterior (Brodmann area 1, 2 and 3) areas of post-mortem AD and control brains. ELISA was used to examine levels of soluble Aβ -42 and Aβ -40. Total cortical neuritic plaque severity rating was derived from individual ratings in the following areas of cortex: mid-frontal, superior temporal, pre-central, inferior parietal, hippocampus (CA1), subiculum, entorhinal cortex, transentorhinal cortex, inferior temporal, amygdala and basal forebrain. Compared with controls, AD samples had higher white matter levels of both soluble Aβ -42 and Aβ -40. While no regional white matter differences were found in Aβ -40, Aβ -42 levels were higher in anterior regions than in posterior regions across both groups. After statistically controlling for total cortical neuritic plaque severity, differences in both soluble Aβ -42 and Aβ -40 between the groups remained, suggesting that white matter Aβ peptides accumulate independent of overall grey matter fibrillar amyloid pathology and are not simply a reflection of overall amyloid burden. These results shed light on one potential mechanism through which

  3. Detection of amyloid plaques targeted by bifunctional USPIO in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice using magnetic resonance microimaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Zaim Wadghiri

    Full Text Available Amyloid plaques are a key pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The detection of amyloid plaques in the brain is important for the diagnosis of AD, as well as for following potential amyloid targeting therapeutic interventions. Our group has developed several contrast agents to detect amyloid plaques in vivo using magnetic resonance microimaging (µMRI in AD transgenic mice, where we used mannitol to enhance blood brain barrier (BBB permeability. In the present study, we used bifunctional ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO nanoparticles, chemically coupled with Aβ1-42 peptide to image amyloid plaque deposition in the mouse brain. We coupled the nanoparticles to polyethylene glycol (PEG in order to improve BBB permeability. These USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 nanoparticles were injected intravenously in AD model transgenic mice followed by initial in vivo and subsequent ex vivo μMRI. A 3D gradient multi-echo sequence was used for imaging with a 100 µm isotropic resolution. The amyloid plaques detected by T2*-weighted μMRI were confirmed with matched histological sections. The region of interest-based quantitative measurement of T2* values obtained from the in vivo μMRI showed contrast injected AD Tg mice had significantly reduced T2* values compared to wild-type mice. In addition, the ex vivo scans were examined with voxel-based analysis (VBA using statistical parametric mapping (SPM for comparison of USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 injected AD transgenic and USPIO alone injected AD transgenic mice. The regional differences seen by VBA in the USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 injected AD transgenic correlated with the amyloid plaque distribution histologically. Our results indicate that USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 can be used for amyloid plaque detection in vivo by intravenous injection without the need to co-inject an agent which increases permeability of the BBB. This technique could aid the development of novel amyloid targeting drugs by allowing therapeutic effects

  4. The effect of iron in MRI and transverse relaxation of amyloid-beta plaques in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadowcroft, Mark D; Peters, Douglas G; Dewal, Rahul P; Connor, James R; Yang, Qing X

    2015-03-01

    Dysregulation of neural iron is known to occur during the progression of Alzheimer's disease. The visualization of amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques with MRI has largely been credited to rapid proton relaxation in the vicinity of plaques as a result of focal iron deposition. The goal of this work was to determine the relationship between local relaxation and related focal iron content associated with Aβ plaques. Alzheimer's disease (n=5) and control tissue (n=3) sample slices from the entorhinal cortex were treated overnight with the iron chelator deferoxamine or saline, and microscopic gradient-echo MRI datasets were taken. Subsequent to imaging, the same slices were stained for Aβ and iron, and then compared with regard to parametric R2 * relaxation maps and gradient-echo-weighted MR images. Aβ plaques in both chelated and unchelated tissue generated MR hypo-intensities and showed relaxation rates significantly greater than the surrounding tissue. The transverse relaxation rate associated with amyloid plaques was determined not to be solely a result of iron load, as much of the relaxation associated with Aβ plaques remained following iron chelation. The data indicate a dual relaxation mechanism associated with Aβ plaques, such that iron and plaque composition synergistically produce transverse relaxation.

  5. A (68)Ga complex based on benzofuran scaffold for the detection of β-amyloid plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Ono, Masahiro; Iikuni, Shimpei; Yoshimura, Masashi; Matsumura, Kenji; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Saji, Hideo

    2014-10-15

    Since the imaging of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in the brain is believed to be a useful tool for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), a number of imaging probes to detect Aβ plaques have been developed. Because the radionuclide (68)Ga (t1/2=68 min) for PET imaging could become an attractive alternative to (11)C and (18)F, we designed and synthesized a benzofuran derivative conjugated with a (68)Ga complex ((68)Ga-DOTA-C3-BF) as a novel Aβ imaging probe. In an in vitro binding assay, Ga-DOTA-C3-BF showed high affinity for Aβ(1-42) aggregates (Ki=10.8 nM). The Ga-DOTA-C3-BF clearly stained Aβ plaques in a section of Tg2576 mouse, reflecting the affinity for Aβ(1-42) aggregates in vitro. In a biodistribution study in normal mice, (68)Ga-DOTA-C3-BF displayed low initial uptake (0.45% ID/g) in the brain at 2 min post-injection. While improvement of the brain uptake of (68)Ga complexes appears to be essential, these results suggest that novel PET imaging probes that include (68)Ga as the radionuclide for PET may be feasible.

  6. Computed tomography of amyloid plaques in a mouse model of Alzheimers disease using diffraction enhanced imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, D.M.; Miller, L.; Benveniste, H.; Dilmanian, A.; Kritzer, M.; Zhong, Z.

    2009-03-19

    Our understanding of early development in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is clouded by the scale at which the disease progresses; amyloid beta (A{beta}) plaques, a hallmark feature of AD, are small ({approx} 50 {micro}m) and low contrast in diagnostic clinical imaging techniques. Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), a phase contrast x-ray imaging technique, has greater soft tissue contrast than conventional radiography and generates higher resolution images than magnetic resonance microimaging. Thus, in this proof of principle study, DEI in micro-CT mode was performed on the brains of AD-model mice to determine if DEI can visualize A{beta} plaques. Results revealed small nodules in the cortex and hippocampus of the brain. Histology confirmed that the features seen in the DEI images of the brain were A{beta} plaques. Several anatomical structures, including hippocampal subregions and white matter tracks, were also observed. Thus, DEI has strong promise in early diagnosis of AD, as well as general studies of the mouse brain.

  7. Demonstration of aluminum in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, Sakae; Kakimi, Shigeo; Ohsaki, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Akira

    2009-11-01

    Aluminum (Al) exposure has been reported to be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia of Alzheimer type), although the role of Al in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease remains controversial. We examined the presence of Al in the Alzheimer's brain using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM-EDX). TEM-EDX analysis allows simultaneous imaging of subcellular structures with high spatial resolution and analysis of small quantities of elements contained in the same subcellular structures. We identified senile plaques by observation using TEM and detected Al in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques located in the hippocampus and the temporal lobe by EDX. Phosphorus and calcium were also present in the amyloid fibers. No Al could be detected in the extracellular space in senile plaques or in the cytoplasm of nerve cells. In this study, we demonstrated colocalization of Al and beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques. The results support the following possibilities in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease: Al could be involved in the aggregation of Abeta peptides to form toxic fibrils; Al might induce Abeta peptides into the beta-sheet structure; and Al might facilitate iron-mediated oxidative reactions, which cause severe damage to brain tissues.

  8. {sup 18}F-labeled styrylpyridines as PET agents for amyloid plaque imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wei [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung Meip ing [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Oya, Shunichi [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Hou, Catherine [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2007-01-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques in the brain is a potentially valuable tool for studying the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It may also be applicable for measuring the effectiveness of therapeutic drugs aimed at lowering A{beta} plaques in the brain. We have successfully reported a series of {sup 18}F-labeled fluoropegylated stilbenes for PET imaging studies. Encouraging results clearly demonstrated the usefulness of {sup 18}F-labeled stilbenes as potential A{beta} plaque-imaging agents. In the present study, we applied a similar approach to a styrylpyridine backbone structure. Among all derivatives examined (E)-2-(2-(2-(2-fluoroethoxy)ethoxy)ethoxy)-5-(4-dimethylaminostyryl) -pyridine (2) displayed high binding affinity in postmortem AD brain homogenates (K {sub i}=2.5{+-}0.4 nM, with [{sup 125}I]IMPY as radioligand). No-carrier-added [{sup 18}F]2 was successfully prepared by [{sup 18}F]fluoride displacement of the corresponding tosylate precursor with a high labeling yield (30-40%) and a high radiochemical purity (>99%). Specific activity at the end of synthesis was determined to be 1500-2000 Ci/mmol. The tracer [{sup 18}F]2 showed adequate lipophilicity (log P=3.22). In vivo biodistribution of [{sup 18}F]2 in normal mice exhibited excellent initial brain penetration and rapid washout (7.77% and 1.03% dose/g in the brain at 2 and 30 min after intravenous injection, respectively) - properties that are highly desirable for A{beta}-plaque-specific brain imaging agents. Autoradiography of AD brain sections and homogenate binding with postmortem AD brain tissues confirmed the high binding signal of [{sup 18}F]2 due to the presence of A{beta} plaques. These preliminary results suggest that novel PET tracers may be potentially useful for the imaging of A{beta} plaques in the living human brain.

  9. Recognition memory and β-amyloid plaques in adult Tg2576 mice are not modified after oral exposure to aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribes, Diana; Torrente, Margarita; Vicens, Paloma; Colomina, Maria Teresa; Gómez, Mercedes; Domingo, José L

    2012-01-01

    The role of aluminum (Al) in Alzheimer disease is highly controversial. However, this element has been detected in neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in patients with Alzheimer disease. Its presence in neuritic plaques in hippocampus is especially relevant, as this is an area closely related to spatial learning and memory. In this study, the diet of wild-type and Tg2576 mice (animals overexpressing the human amyloid precursor protein) was supplemented with Al lactate (1 mg/g). General neurotoxic Al effects were evaluated using a functional observational battery and a novel object recognition task. Four experimental groups were used: Control-wild, Al-wild, Control-Tg, and Al-Tg mice. The results show a decreased home-cage activity and an increase in piloerection in all Al-exposed animals, and an increased sensorimotor reactivity in Tg2576 mice given Al. Neither Al treatment nor genotype had any noticeable effect on corticosterone levels and Al concentrations in frontal cortex and cerebellum of the mice. Recognition memory was impaired in Tg2576 mice, whereas β-amyloid plaque depositions were observed in all these animals. However, Al did not alter the recognition memory and β-amyloid plaque loads of Tg2576 mice.

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F-fluoroethylated benzothiazole derivatives for in vivo imaging of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumaier, B; Deisenhofer, S; Sommer, C; Solbach, C; Reske, S N; Mottaghy, F

    2010-06-01

    Amyloid aggregates play a major role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Targeting these aggregates by PET probes enables non-invasively the detection and quantification of amyloid deposit distribution in human brains. Based on benzothiazole core structure a series of amyloid imaging agents were developed. Currently [(11)C]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole (Pittsburgh Compound-B (PIB) is the most specific and widely used amyloid imaging ligand. But due to the short half life of (11)C, longer lived (18)F-labeled derivatives offer logistic advantages and higher contrast images. In this work, three different [(18)F]fluoroethoxy-substituted benzothiazole derivatives ([(18)F]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzothiazole, [(18)F]2-((2'-(2-fluoroethoxy)-4'-amino)phenyl)benzothiazole and [(18)F]2-(3'-((2-fluoroethoxy)-4'-amino)phenyl)benzothiazole) were synthesized via [(18)F]fluoroethylation. The latter two derivatives with fluoroethoxy-substitution on the aromatic amino group showed very low binding affinity for amyloid aggregates. In contrast [(18)F]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzothiazole with [(18)F]fluoroethoxy-substitution in 6-position showed excellent amyloid imaging properties with respect to lipophilicity, brain entry and brain clearance in normal SCID mice, amyloid plaque binding affinity and specificity.

  11. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of the nucleic acid sequences encoding the cerebrovascular and plaque amyloid peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robakis, N.K.; Ramakrishna, N.; Wolfe, G.; Wisniewski, H.M.

    1987-05-01

    Amyloid deposits in vessels and neuritic plaques are found in large numbers in the brains of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and adult Downs Syndrome (DS) patients. The partial amino acid sequence of the amyloid peptide has been determined. They used this amino acid sequence to synthesize an oligonucleotide probe specific for the amyloid peptide gene. Screening of a human brain cDNA library with this probe, yielded a clone which contained an insert 1.8 kb. This clone contains a long open reading frame including a region which encodes the 28 amino acids of the amyloid peptide. Northern blots of human brain mRNA detected a transcript of 3.3 kb long which hybridized to their cDNA clone. A similar mRNA was detected in the hamster, mouse, sheep and rabbit brains. Southern blots under stringent hybridization conditions detected sequences homologous to the amyloid gene in the genomes of hamster, mouse, sheep and rabbit suggesting that this gene has been conserved during mammalian evolution. Hybridization under reduced stringency revealed the presence of additional sequences related to the amyloid gene in the genome of the above organisms. Hybridization analysis of human x chinese hamster cell lines DNA showed that the gene encoding the amyloid peptide is located on chromosome 21, suggesting a genetic relationship between AD and DS.

  12. Synthesis of Oxorhenium(V) and Oxotechnetium(V) Complexes That Bind to AmyloidPlaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayne, David J; White, Jonathan M; McLean, Catriona A; Villemagne, Victor L; Barnham, Kevin J; Donnelly, Paul S

    2016-08-15

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques in the brain. The primary constituents of the plaques are aggregated forms of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide. With the goal of preparing technetium-99(m) complexes that bind to Aβ plaques with the potential to be diagnostic imaging agents for Alzheimer's disease, new tetradentate ligands capable of forming neutral and lipophilic complexes with oxotechentium(V) and oxorhenium(V) were prepared. Nonradioactive isotopes of technetium are not available so rhenium was used as a surrogate for exploratory chemistry. Two planar tetradentate N3O ligands were prepared that form charge-neutral complexes with oxorhenium(v) as well as a ligand featuring a styrylpyridyl functional group designed to bind to Aβ plaques. All three ligands formed complexes with oxorhenium(V), and each complex was characterized by NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and X-ray crystallography. The oxorhenium(V) complex with a styrylpyridyl functional group binds to Aβ plaques present in post-mortem human brain tissue. The chemistry was extrapolated to technetium-99(m) at the tracer level for two of the ligands. The resulting oxotechnetium(V) complexes were sufficiently lipophilic and charge-neutral to suggest that they have the potential to cross the blood-brain barrier but exhibited modest stability with respect to exchange with histidine. The chemistry presented here identifies a strategy to integrate styrylpyridyl functional groups into tetradentate ligands capable of forming complexes with [M═O](3+) cores (M = Re or Tc).

  13. Effect of catalpol on senile plaques and spatial learning and memory ability in amyloid-β protein precursor/presenilin 1 double transgenic mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋冲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether catalpol affects senile plaque formation and spatial learning and memory ability in the amyloid-βprotein precursor/presenilin 1(APP/PS1)double transgenic mice.Methods

  14. Chronic cladribine administration increases amyloid beta peptide generation and plaque burden in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal D Hayes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The clinical uses of 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (2-CDA or cladribine which was initially prescribed to patients with hematological and lymphoid cancers is now extended to treat patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Previous data has shown that 2-CDA has high affinity to the brain and readily passes through the blood brain barrier reaching CSF concentrations 25% of that found in plasma. However, whether long-term administration of 2-CDA can lead to any adverse effects in patients or animal models is not yet clearly known. METHODOLOGY: Here we show that exposure of 2-CDA to CHO cells stably expressing wild-type APP751 increased generation and secretion of amyloid β peptide (Aβ in to the conditioned medium. Interestingly, increased Aβ levels were noticed even at non-toxic concentrations of 2-CDA. Remarkably, chronic treatment of APdE9 mice, a model of Alzheimer's disease with 2-CDA for 60 days increased amyloid plaque burden by more than 1-fold. Increased Aβ generation appears to result from increased turnover of APP as revealed by cycloheximide-chase experiments. Additionally, surface labeling of APP with biotin and immunoprecipitation of surface labeled proteins with anti-biotin antibody also indicated increased APP at the cell surface in 2-CDA treated cells compared to controls. Increased turnover of APP by 2-CDA in turn might be a consequence of decreased protein levels of PIN 1, which is known to regulate cis-trans isomerization and phosphorylation of APP. Most importantly, like many other oncology drugs, 2-CDA administration led to significant delay in acquiring a reward-based learning task in a T maze paradigm. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, these data provide compelling evidence for the first time that chronic 2-CDA administration can increase amyloidogenic processing of APP leading to robustly increased plaque burden which may be responsible for the observed deficits in learning skills. Thus chronic treatment of mice with 2

  15. Role of gut microbiota and nutrients in amyloid formation and pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistollato, Francesca; Sumalla Cano, Sandra; Elio, Iñaki; Masias Vergara, Manuel; Giampieri, Francesca; Battino, Maurizio

    2016-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota might be associated with the onset of certain human pathologies, such as Alzheimer disease, a neurodegenerative syndrome associated with cerebral accumulation of amyloid-β fibrils. It has been shown that bacteria populating the gut microbiota can release significant amounts of amyloids and lipopolysaccharides, which might play a role in the modulation of signaling pathways and the production of proinflammatory cytokines related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Additionally, nutrients have been shown to affect the composition of the gut microbiota as well as the formation and aggregation of cerebral amyloid-β. This suggests that modulating the gut microbiome and amyloidogenesis through specific nutritional interventions might prove to be an effective strategy to prevent or reduce the risk of Alzheimer disease. This review examines the possible role of the gut in the dissemination of amyloids, the role of the gut microbiota in the regulation of the gut-brain axis, the potential amyloidogenic properties of gut bacteria, and the possible impact of nutrients on modulation of microbiota composition and amyloid formation in relation to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

  16. Curcumin-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles for detecting amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease mice using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kwok Kin; Chan, Pui Shan; Fan, Shujuan; Kwan, Siu Ming; Yeung, King Lun; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; Chow, Albert Hee Lum; Wu, Ed X; Baum, Larry

    2015-03-01

    Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be performed with the assistance of amyloid imaging. The current method relies on positron emission tomography (PET), which is expensive and exposes people to radiation, undesirable features for a population screening method. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is cheaper and is not radioactive. Our approach uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) made of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) conjugated with curcumin, a natural compound that specifically binds to amyloid plaques. Coating of curcumin-conjugated MNPs with polyethylene glycol-polylactic acid block copolymer and polyvinylpyrrolidone by antisolvent precipitation in a multi-inlet vortex mixer produces stable and biocompatible curcumin magnetic nanoparticles (Cur-MNPs) with mean diameter MRI) of Tg2576 mouse brains after injection of Cur-MNPs, and no plaques could be found in non-transgenic mice. Immunohistochemical examination of the mouse brains revealed that Cur-MNPs were co-localized with amyloid plaques. Thus, Cur-MNPs have the potential for non-invasive diagnosis of AD using MRI.

  17. A cyclic undecamer peptide mimics a turn in folded Alzheimer amyloid β and elicits antibodies against oligomeric and fibrillar amyloid and plaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hoogerhout

    Full Text Available The 39- to 42-residue amyloid β (Aβ peptide is deposited in extracellular fibrillar plaques in the brain of patients suffering from Alzheimer's Disease (AD. Vaccination with these peptides seems to be a promising approach to reduce the plaque load but results in a dominant antibody response directed against the N-terminus. Antibodies against the N-terminus will capture Aβ immediately after normal physiological processing of the amyloid precursor protein and therefore will also reduce the levels of non-misfolded Aβ, which might have a physiologically relevant function. Therefore, we have targeted an immune response on a conformational neo-epitope in misfolded amyloid that is formed in advance of Aβ-aggregation. A tetanus toxoid-conjugate of the 11-meric cyclic peptide Aβ(22-28-YNGK' elicited specific antibodies in Balb/c mice. These antibodies bound strongly to the homologous cyclic peptide-bovine serum albumin conjugate, but not to the homologous linear peptide-conjugate, as detected in vitro by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The antibodies also bound--although more weakly--to Aβ(1-42 oligomers as well as fibrils in this assay. Finally, the antibodies recognized Aβ deposits in AD mouse and human brain tissue as established by immunohistological staining. We propose that the cyclic peptide conjugate might provide a lead towards a vaccine that could be administered before the onset of AD symptoms. Further investigation of this hypothesis requires immunization of transgenic AD model mice.

  18. Affinity of (nat/68)Ga-Labelled Curcumin and Curcuminoid Complexes for β-Amyloid Plaques: Towards the Development of New Metal-Curcumin Based Radiotracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubagotti, Sara; Croci, Stefania; Ferrari, Erika; Iori, Michele; Capponi, Pier C; Lorenzini, Luca; Calzà, Laura; Versari, Annibale; Asti, Mattia

    2016-09-06

    Curcumin derivatives labelled with fluorine-18 or technetium-99m have recently shown their potential as diagnostic tools for Alzheimer's disease. Nevertheless, no study by exploiting the labelling with gallium-68 has been performed so far, in spite of its suitable properties (positron emitter, generator produced radionuclide). Herein, an evaluation of the affinity for synthetic β-amyloid fibrils and for amyloid plaques of three (nat/68)Ga-labelled curcumin analogues, namely curcumin curcumin (CUR), bis-dehydroxy-curcumin (bDHC) and diacetyl-curcumin (DAC), was performed. Affinity and specificity were tested in vitro on amyloid synthetic fibrils by using gallium-68 labelled compounds. Post-mortem brain cryosections from Tg2576 mice were used for the ex vivo visualization of amyloid plaques. The affinity of (68)Ga(CUR)₂⁺, (68)Ga(DAC)₂⁺, and (68)Ga(bDHC)₂⁺ for synthetic β-amyloid fibrils was moderate and their uptake could be observed in vitro. On the other hand, amyloid plaques could not be visualized on brain sections of Tg2576 mice after injection, probably due to the low stability of the complexes in vivo and of a hampered passage through the blood-brain barrier. Like curcumin, all (nat/68)Ga-curcuminoid complexes maintain a high affinity for β-amyloid plaques. However, structural modifications are still needed to improve their applicability as radiotracers in vivo.

  19. Complement C3 deficiency leads to accelerated amyloid beta plaque deposition and neurodegeneration and modulation of the microglia/macrophage phenotype in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Marcel; Peng, Ying; Jiang, Liying; Seabrook, Timothy J; Carroll, Michael C; Lemere, Cynthia A

    2008-06-18

    Complement factor C3 is the central component of the complement system and a key inflammatory protein activated in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies demonstrated that inhibition of C3 by overexpression of soluble complement receptor-related protein y in an AD mouse model led to reduced microgliosis, increased amyloid beta (Abeta) plaque burden, and neurodegeneration. To further address the role of C3 in AD pathology, we generated a complement C3-deficient amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic AD mouse model (APP;C3(-/-)). Brains were analyzed at 8, 12, and 17 months of age by immunohistochemical and biochemical methods and compared with age-matched APP transgenic mice. At younger ages (8-12 months), no significant neuropathological differences were observed between the two transgenic lines. In contrast, at 17 months of age, APP;C3(-/-) mice showed significant changes of up to twofold increased total Abeta and fibrillar amyloid plaque burden in midfrontal cortex and hippocampus, which correlated with (1) significantly increased Tris-buffered saline (TBS)-insoluble Abeta(42) levels and reduced TBS-soluble Abeta(42) and Abeta(40) levels in brain homogenates, (2) a trend for increased Abeta levels in the plasma, (3) a significant loss of neuronal-specific nuclear protein-positive neurons in the hippocampus, and (4) differential activation of microglia toward a more alternative phenotype (e.g., significantly increased CD45-positive microglia, increased brain levels of interleukins 4 and 10, and reduced levels of CD68, F4/80, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and tumor necrosis factor). Our results suggest a beneficial role for complement C3 in plaque clearance and neuronal health as well as in modulation of the microglia phenotype.

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of ethyleneoxylated and allyloxylated chalcone derivatives for imaging of amyloid β plaques by SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchigami, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yuki; Haratake, Mamoru; Ono, Masahiro; Yoshida, Sakura; Nakayama, Morio

    2014-05-01

    We report radioiodinated chalcone derivatives as new SPECT imaging probes for amyloid β (Aβ) plaques. The monoethyleneoxy derivative 2 and allyloxy derivative 8 showed a high affinity for Aβ(1-42) aggregates with Ki values of 24 and 4.5 nM, respectively. Fluorescent imaging demonstrated that 2 and 8 clearly stained thioflavin-S positive Aβ plaques in the brain sections of Tg2576 transgenic mice. In vitro autoradiography revealed that [(125)I]2 displayed no clear accumulation toward Aβ plaques in the brain sections of Tg2576 mice, whereas the accumulation pattern of [(125)I]8 matched with the presence of Aβ plaques both in the brain sections of Tg2576 mice and an AD patient. In biodistribution studies using normal mice, [(125)I]2 showed preferable in vivo pharmacokinetics (4.82%ID/g at 2 min and 0.45%ID/g at 60 min), while [(125)I]8 showed only a modest brain uptake (1.62%ID/g at 2 min) with slow clearance (0.56%ID/g at 60 min). [(125)I]8 showed prospective binding properties for Aβ plaques, although further structural modifications are needed to improve the blood brain barrier permeability and washout from brain.

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding the cerebrovascular and the neuritic plaque amyloid peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robakis, N.K.; Ramakrishna, N.; Wolfe, G.; Wisniewski, H.M.

    1987-06-01

    Deposits of amyloid fibers are found in large numbers in the walls of blood vessels and in neuritic plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease and adults with Down syndrome. The authors used the amino acid sequence of the amyloid peptide to synthesize oligonucleotide probes specific for the gene encoding this peptide. When a human brain cDNA library was screened with this probe, a clone was found with a 1.7-kilobase insert that contains a long open reading frame coding for 412 amino acid residues including the 28 amino acids of the amyloid peptide. RNA gel blots revealed that a 3.3-kilobase mRNA species was present in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer disease, with Down syndrome, or with not apparent neurological disorders. Southern blots showed that homologous genes are present in the genomic DNA of humans, rabbits, sheep, hamsters, and mice, suggesting that this gene has been conserved through mammalian evolution. Localization of the corresponding genomic sequences on human chromosome 21 suggest a genetic relationship between Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome, and it may explain the early appearance of large numbers of neuritic plaques in adult Down syndrome patients.

  2. Presynaptic dystrophic neurites surrounding amyloid plaques are sites of microtubule disruption, BACE1 elevation, and increased Aβ generation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, Katherine R; Kandalepas, Patty C; Buggia-Prévot, Virginie; Nicholson, Daniel A; Thinakaran, Gopal; Vassar, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by amyloid plaques composed of the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide surrounded by swollen presynaptic dystrophic neurites consisting of dysfunctional axons and terminals that accumulate the β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme (BACE1) required for Aβ generation. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern presynaptic dystrophic neurite formation are unclear, and elucidating these processes may lead to novel AD therapeutic strategies. Previous studies suggest Aβ may disrupt microtubules, which we hypothesize have a critical role in the development of presynaptic dystrophies. To investigate this further, here we have assessed the effects of Aβ, particularly neurotoxic Aβ42, on microtubules during the formation of presynaptic dystrophic neurites in vitro and in vivo. Live-cell imaging of primary neurons revealed that exposure to Aβ42 oligomers caused varicose and beaded neurites with extensive microtubule disruption, and inhibited anterograde and retrograde trafficking. In brain sections from AD patients and the 5XFAD transgenic mouse model of amyloid pathology, dystrophic neurite halos with BACE1 elevation around amyloid plaques exhibited aberrant tubulin accumulations or voids. At the ultrastructural level, peri-plaque dystrophies were strikingly devoid of microtubules and replete with multi-lamellar vesicles resembling autophagic intermediates. Proteins of the microtubule motors, kinesin and dynein, and other neuronal proteins were aberrantly localized in peri-plaque dystrophies. Inactive pro-cathepsin D also accumulated in peri-plaque dystrophies, indicating reduced lysosomal function. Most importantly, BACE1 accumulation in peri-plaque dystrophies caused increased BACE1 cleavage of APP and Aβ generation. Our study supports the hypothesis that Aβ induces microtubule disruption in presynaptic dystrophic neurites that surround plaques, thus impairing axonal transport and leading to accumulation of

  3. Intracranial administration of deglycosylated C-terminal-specific anti-Aβ antibody efficiently clears amyloid plaques without activating microglia in amyloid-depositing transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Marcia N

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibodies against the Aß peptide clear Aß deposits when injected intracranially. Deglycosylated antibodies have reduced effector functions compared to their intact counterparts, potentially avoiding immune activation. Methods Deglycosylated or intact C-terminal specific high affinity anti-Aβ antibody (2H6 were intracranially injected into the right frontal cortex and hippocampus of amyloid precursor protein (APP transgenic mice. The untreated left hemisphere was used to normalize for the extent of amyloid deposition present in each mouse. Control transgenic mice were injected with an antibody against a drosophila-specific protein (amnesiac. Tissues were examined for brain amyloid deposition and microglial responses 3 days after the injection. Results The deglycosylated 2H6 antibody had lower affinity for several murine Fcγ receptors and human complement than intact 2H6 without a change in affinity for Aß. Immunohistochemistry for Aβ and thioflavine-S staining revealed that both diffuse and compact deposits were reduced by both antibodies. In animals treated with the intact 2H6 antibody, a significant increase in Fcγ-receptor II/III immunostaining was observed compared to animals treated with the control IgG antibody. No increase in Fcγ-receptor II/III was found with the deglycosylated 2H6 antibody. Immunostaining for the microglial activation marker CD45 demonstrated a similar trend. Conclusion These findings suggest that the deglycosylated 2H6 is capable of removing both compact and diffuse plaques without activating microglia. Thus, antibodies with reduced effector functions may clear amyloid without concomitant immune activation when tested as immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Alzheimer neuropathology in mentally retarded adults: statistical independence of regional amyloid plaque and neurofibrillary tangle densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, W; Popovitch, E; Schupf, N; Zigman, W B; Rabe, A; Sersen, E; Wisniewski, H M

    1993-01-01

    The densities of neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and neuritic plaques (NP) were assessed quantitatively in the brains of 303 mentally retarded adults 23 to 90 years of age at the time of their deaths (mean = 59.5 years). Cases with Down's syndrome, hydrocephalus and metabolic disorders were excluded from the study. Examinations of frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital cortex, as well as hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus were made in every case. NPs and/or NFTs were observed within the brains of 163 cases (53.8%). Detailed analyses indicated that NP density within all brain regions examined was positively related to age, with the largest age associated increases in density seen in frontal and temporal regions. In contrast, NFT density increased with age only within hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, but not neocortex. In addition, NP lesions within neocortex were more diffusely distributed across regions for older compared to younger cases, while no similar age-associated change in the topography of NFTs was observed. Finally, factor analyses of the combined NP and NFT data indicated that, while strong correlations existed across the various brain regions for measures of NP and NFT densities, considered separately, there was virtually no indication of regional associations between these two types of lesions. While these data, from cases with mental retardation, cannot be generalized directly to the nonretarded population, they provide strong evidence that models of Alzheimer pathogenesis must take into account the fact that regional densities of NPs and NFTs, and, therefore, the underlying processes associated with formation of these lesions, can be largely independent.

  5. Chronic apocynin treatment attenuates beta amyloid plaque size and microglial number in hAPP(751(SL mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda E Lull

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: NADPH oxidase is implicated in neurotoxic microglial activation and the progressive nature of Alzheimer's Disease (AD. Here, we test the ability of two NADPH oxidase inhibitors, apocynin and dextromethorphan (DM, to reduce learning deficits and neuropathology in transgenic mice overexpressing human amyloid precursor protein with the Swedish and London mutations (hAPP(751(SL. METHODS: Four month old hAPP(751(SL mice were treated daily with saline, 15 mg/kg DM, 7.5 mg/kg DM, or 10 mg/kg apocynin by gavage for four months. RESULTS: Only hAPP(751(SL mice treated with apocynin showed reduced plaque size and a reduction in the number of cortical microglia, when compared to the saline treated group. Analysis of whole brain homogenates from all treatments tested (saline, DM, and apocynin demonstrated low levels of TNFα, protein nitration, lipid peroxidation, and NADPH oxidase activation, indicating a low level of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in hAPP(751(SL mice at 8 months of age that was not significantly affected by any drug treatment. Despite in vitro analyses demonstrating that apocynin and DM ameliorate Aβ-induced extracellular superoxide production and neurotoxicity, both DM and apocynin failed to significantly affect learning and memory tasks or synaptic density in hAPP(751(SL mice. To discern how apocynin was affecting plaque levels (plaque load and microglial number in vivo, in vitro analysis of microglia was performed, revealing no apocynin effects on beta-amyloid (Aβ phagocytosis, microglial proliferation, or microglial survival. CONCLUSIONS: Together, this study suggests that while hAPP(751(SL mice show increases in microglial number and plaque load, they fail to exhibit elevated markers of neuroinflammation consistent with AD at 8 months of age, which may be a limitation of this animal model. Despite absence of clear neuroinflammation, apocynin was still able to reduce both plaque size and microglial number

  6. Three-dimensional reconstruction and analysis of structure characteristics on senile plaques of Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Wei; LIU Jianwu; ZHOU Jiangning; HU Xiangyou; TANG Xiaowei

    2005-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neuro- degenerative disorder characterized by the presence of senile plaques primarily composed of amyloid ( in brain. Abnormal secretion and aggregation of amyloid ( are the key events in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Reduction of amyloid ( production and inhibition of amyloid ( aggregation to form senile plaques are hopeful strategies for the treatment and prevention of Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, the silver and immunohistochemical staining methods were applied to discover senile plaques in the hippocampus of Alzheimer's disease patients, and then images were processed and three-dimensionally reconstructed by Matlab and AVS software. The structure characteristics of senile plaques were measured through correlation function calculation and fractal dimension by a computer-aided method. Diffuse plaque had no amyloid center, but classic plaque presented compact central core structure; two types of plaques were both of porous structure, but the sizes of their pores were significantly different. Furthermore, there was difference in fractal dimension value between the diffuse plaque and classic plaque in the two staining methods. The comparison of structure characteristics between two types of plaques indicated that they developed independently. Establishment of the methods for reconstructing the three-dimen- sional structure of senile plaque and analyzing their structure characteristics is helpful for further study on the aggregation mechanism of senile plaque.

  7. Loss of GPR3 reduces the amyloid plaque burden and improves memory in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunhong; Skwarek-Maruszewska, Aneta; Horré, Katrien; Vandewyer, Elke; Wolfs, Leen; Snellinx, An; Saito, Takashi; Radaelli, Enrico; Corthout, Nikky; Colombelli, Julien; Lo, Adrian C; Van Aerschot, Leen; Callaerts-Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Trabzuni, Daniah; Bossers, Koen; Verhaagen, Joost; Ryten, Mina; Munck, Sebastian; D'Hooge, Rudi; Swaab, Dick F; Hardy, John; Saido, Takaomi C; De Strooper, Bart; Thathiah, Amantha

    2015-10-14

    The orphan G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptor (GPCR) GPR3 regulates activity of the γ-secretase complex in the absence of an effect on Notch proteolysis, providing a potential therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, given the vast resources required to develop and evaluate any new therapy for AD and the multiple failures involved in translational research, demonstration of the pathophysiological relevance of research findings in multiple disease-relevant models is necessary before initiating costly drug development programs. We evaluated the physiological consequences of loss of Gpr3 in four AD transgenic mouse models, including two that contain the humanized murine Aβ sequence and express similar amyloid precursor protein (APP) levels as wild-type mice, thereby reducing potential artificial phenotypes. Our findings reveal that genetic deletion of Gpr3 reduced amyloid pathology in all of the AD mouse models and alleviated cognitive deficits in APP/PS1 mice. Additional three-dimensional visualization and analysis of the amyloid plaque burden provided accurate information on the amyloid load, distribution, and volume in the structurally intact adult mouse brain. Analysis of 10 different regions in healthy human postmortem brain tissue indicated that GPR3 expression was stable during aging. However, two cohorts of human AD postmortem brain tissue samples showed a correlation between elevated GPR3 and AD progression. Collectively, these studies provide evidence that GPR3 mediates the amyloidogenic proteolysis of APP in four AD transgenic mouse models as well as the physiological processing of APP in wild-type mice, suggesting that GPR3 may be a potential therapeutic target for AD drug development.

  8. Vaccination with a non-human random sequence amyloid oligomer mimic results in improved cognitive function and reduced plaque deposition and micro hemorrhage in Tg2576 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool Suhail

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that vaccination of humans and transgenic animals against fibrillar Aβ prevents amyloid accumulation in plaques and preserves cognitive function in transgenic mouse models. However, autoimmune side effects have halted the development of vaccines based on full length human Aβ. Further development of an effective vaccine depends on overcoming these side effects while maintaining an effective immune response. Results We have previously reported that the immune response to amyloid oligomers is largely directed against generic epitopes that are common to amyloid oligomers of many different proteins and independent of a specific amino acid sequence. Here we have examined whether we can exploit this generic immune response to develop a vaccine that targets amyloid oligomers using a non-human random sequence amyloid oligomer. In order to study the effect of vaccination against generic oligomer epitopes, a random sequence oligomer (3A was selected as it forms oligomers that react with the oligomer specific A11 antibody. Oligomer mimics from 3A peptide, Aβ, islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, and Aβ fibrils were used to vaccinate Tg2576 mice, which develop a progressive accumulation of plaques and cognitive impairment. Vaccination with the 3A random sequence antigen was just as effective as vaccination with the other antigens in improving cognitive function and reducing total plaque load (Aβ burden in the Tg2576 mouse brains, but was associated with a much lower incidence of micro hemorrhage than Aβ antigens. Conclusion These results shows that the amyloid Aβ sequence is not necessary to produce a protective immune response that specifically targets generic amyloid oligomers. Using a non-human, random sequence antigen may facilitate the development of a vaccine that avoids autoimmune side effects.

  9. Forebrain microglia from wild-type but not adult 5xFAD mice prevent amyloid-beta plaque formation in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellwig, Sabine; Masuch, Annette; Nestel, Sigrun; Katzmarski, Natalie; Meyer-Luehmann, Melanie; Biber, Knut

    2015-01-01

    The role of microglia in amyloid-beta (A beta) deposition is controversial. In the present study, an organotypic hippocampal slice culture (OHSC) system with an in vivo-like microglial-neuronal environment was used to investigate the potential contribution of microglia to A beta plaque formation. We

  10. Acetylcholinesterase, a senile plaque component, affects the fibrillogenesis of amyloid-beta-peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, A; Bronfman, F; Pérez, C A; Vicente, M; Garrido, J; Inestrosa, N C

    1995-12-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) colocalizes with amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) deposits present in the brain of Alzheimer's patients. Recent studies showed that A beta 1-40 can adopt two different conformational states in solution (an amyloidogenic conformer, A beta ac, and a non-amyloidogenic conformer, A beta nac) which have distinct abilities to form amyloid fibrils. We report here that AChE binds A beta nac and accelerates amyloid formation by the same peptide. No such effect was observed with A beta ac, the amyloidogenic conformer, suggesting that AChE acts as a 'pathological chaperone' inducing a conformational transition from A beta nac into A beta ac in vitro.

  11. Diminished perisomatic GABAergic terminals on cortical neurons adjacent to amyloid plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Garcia-Marin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the accumulation of plaques in the cerebral cortex, which may appear either in the neuropil or in direct association with neuronal somata. Since different axonal systems innervate the dendritic (mostly glutamatergic and perisomatic (mostly GABAergic regions of neurons, the accumulation of plaques in the neuropil or associated with the soma might produce different alterations to synaptic circuits. We have used a variety of conventional light, confocal and electron microscopy techniques to study their relationship with neuronal somata in the cerebral cortex from AD patients and APP/PS1 transgenic mice. The main finding was that the membrane surfaces of neurons (mainly pyramidal cells in contact with plaques lack GABAergic perisomatic synapses. Since these perisomatic synapses are thought to exert a strong influence on the output of pyramidal cells, their loss may lead to the hyperactivity of the neurons in contact with plaques. These results suggest that plaques modify circuits in a more selective manner than previously thought.

  12. Impairment of in vivo calcium signaling in amyloid plaque-associated microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawek, Bianca; Schwendele, Bernd; Riester, Karin; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Lerdkrai, Chommanad; Liang, Yajie; Garaschuk, Olga

    2014-04-01

    Neuroinflammation is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) both in man and in multiple mouse models, and epidemiological studies link the use of anti-inflammatory drugs with a reduced risk of developing the disease. AD-related neuroinflammation is largely mediated by microglia, the main immune cells of the central nervous system. In vitro, executive functions of microglia are regulated by intracellular Ca(2+) signals, but little is known about microglial Ca(2+) signaling in vivo. Here we analyze in vivo properties of these cells in two mouse models of AD. In both strains plaque-associated microglia had hypertrophic/amoeboid morphology and were strongly positive for markers of activation such as CD11b and CD68. Activated microglia failed to respond reliably to extracellular release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, mimicking tissue damage) and showed an increased incidence of spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) transients. These Ca(2+) transients required activation of ATP receptors and Ca(2+) release from the intracellular Ca(2+) stores, and were not induced by neuronal or astrocytic hyperactivity. Neuronal silencing, however, selectively increased the frequency of Ca(2+) transients in plaque-associated microglia. Thus, our in vivo data reveal substantial dysfunction of plaque-associated microglia and identify a novel Ca(2+) signal possibly triggering a Ca(2+)-dependent release of toxic species in the plaque vicinity.

  13. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy: pathogenesis and effects on the ageing and Alzheimer brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Roy O; Nicoll, James A

    2003-09-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a feature of ageing and Alzheimer's disease (AD); it is also associated with intracerebral hemorrhage and stroke. Here, the pathogenesis of CAA and its effects on the brain are reviewed and the possible effects of CAA on therapies for Alzheimer's disease are evaluated. Tracer experiments in animals and observations on human brains suggest that peptides such as A beta are eliminated along the peri-arterial interstitial fluid drainage pathways that are effectively the lymphatics of the brain. In CAA, A beta becomes entrapped in drainage pathways in the walls of cerebral arteries, reflecting a failure of elimination of A beta from the ageing brain. One consequence of failure in clearance of A beta is accumulation of soluble and insoluble A beta associated with cognitive decline in AD. Replacement of vascular smooth muscle cells by A beta occurs in severe CAA with weakening of artery walls and increased risk of vessel rupture and intracerebral hemorrhage. Risk factors for CAA include mutations of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene and possession of the epsilon 4 allele of apolipoprotein E. There is also evidence that cerebrovascular disease may be a factor in the failure of elimination of A beta along perivascular pathways in sporadic AD; this would link ageing in cerebral arteries with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. If therapeutic agents, including anti-A beta antibodies, are to be used to eliminate A beta in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, the effects of CAA on the treatment and the effects of the treatment on the CAA need to be considered.

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of {sup 18}F-fluoroethylated benzothiazole derivatives for in vivo imaging of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumaier, B. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Neurological Research, Klaus-Joachim-Zuelch Laboratories of the Max Planck Society and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: bernd.neumaier@nf.mpg.de; Deisenhofer, S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Sommer, C. [Department of Neuropathology, University of Mainz (Germany); Solbach, C.; Reske, S.N. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Mottaghy, F. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH Aachen, Aachen (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    Amyloid aggregates play a major role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Targeting these aggregates by PET probes enables non-invasively the detection and quantification of amyloid deposit distribution in human brains. Based on benzothiazole core structure a series of amyloid imaging agents were developed. Currently [{sup 11}C]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole (Pittsburgh Compound-B (PIB) is the most specific and widely used amyloid imaging ligand. But due to the short half life of {sup 11}C, longer lived {sup 18}F-labeled derivatives offer logistic advantages and higher contrast images. In this work, three different [{sup 18}F]fluoroethoxy-substituted benzothiazole derivatives ([{sup 18}F]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzothiazole, [{sup 18}F]2-((2'-(2-fluoroethoxy)-4'-amino)phenyl)benzothiazole and [{sup 18}F]2-(3'-((2-fluoroethoxy)-4'-amino)phenyl)benzothiazole) were synthesized via [{sup 18}F]fluoroethylation. The latter two derivatives with fluoroethoxy-substitution on the aromatic amino group showed very low binding affinity for amyloid aggregates. In contrast [{sup 18}F]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzothiazole with [{sup 18}F]fluoroethoxy-substitution in 6-position showed excellent amyloid imaging properties with respect to lipophilicity, brain entry and brain clearance in normal SCID mice, amyloid plaque binding affinity and specificity.

  15. Minocycline corrects early, pre-plaque neuroinflammation and inhibits BACE-1 in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease-like amyloid pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferretti Maria

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation is one of the earliest neuropathological events in Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, we have recently shown the occurrence of an early, pro-inflammatory reaction in the hippocampus of young, three-month-old transgenic McGill-Thy1-APP mice in the absence of amyloid plaques but associated with intracellular accumulation of amyloid beta petide oligomers. The role of such a pro-inflammatory process in the progression of the pathology remained to be elucidated. Methods and results To clarify this we administered minocycline, a tetracyclic derivative with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties, to young, pre-plaque McGill-Thy1-APP mice for one month. The treatment ended at the age of three months, when the mice were still devoid of plaques. Minocycline treatment corrected the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 observed in young transgenic placebo mice. Furthermore, the down-regulation of inflammatory markers correlated with a reduction in amyloid precursor protein levels and amyloid precursor protein-related products. Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 activity and levels were found to be up-regulated in transgenic placebo mice, while minocycline treatment restored these levels to normality. The anti-inflammatory and beta-secretase 1 effects could be partly explained by the inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. Conclusions Our study suggests that the pharmacological modulation of neuroinflammation might represent a promising approach for preventing or delaying the development of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology at its initial, pre-clinical stages. The results open new vistas to the interplay between inflammation and amyloid pathology.

  16. Prion seeding activities of mouse scrapie strains with divergent PrPSc protease sensitivities and amyloid plaque content using RT-QuIC and eQuIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Vascellari

    Full Text Available Different transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE-associated forms of prion protein (e.g. PrP(Sc can vary markedly in ultrastructure and biochemical characteristics, but each is propagated in the host. PrP(Sc propagation involves conversion from its normal isoform, PrP(C, by a seeded or templated polymerization mechanism. Such a mechanism is also the basis of the RT-QuIC and eQuIC prion assays which use recombinant PrP (rPrP(Sen as a substrate. These ultrasensitive detection assays have been developed for TSE prions of several host species and sample tissues, but not for murine models which are central to TSE pathogenesis research. Here we have adapted RT-QuIC and eQuIC to various murine prions and evaluated how seeding activity depends on glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI anchoring and the abundance of amyloid plaques and protease-resistant PrP(Sc (PrP(Res. Scrapie brain dilutions up to 10(-8 and 10(-13 were detected by RT-QuIC and eQuIC, respectively. Comparisons of scrapie-affected wild-type mice and transgenic mice expressing GPI anchorless PrP showed that, although similar concentrations of seeding activity accumulated in brain, the heavily amyloid-laden anchorless mouse tissue seeded more rapid reactions. Next we compared seeding activities in the brains of mice with similar infectivity titers, but widely divergent PrP(Res levels. For this purpose we compared the 263K and 139A scrapie strains in transgenic mice expressing P101L PrP(C. Although the brains of 263K-affected mice had little immunoblot-detectable PrP(Res, RT-QuIC indicated that seeding activity was comparable to that associated with a high-PrP(Res strain, 139A. Thus, in this comparison, RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated more closely with infectivity than with PrP(Res levels. We also found that eQuIC, which incorporates a PrP(Sc immunoprecipitation step, detected seeding activity in plasma from wild-type and anchorless PrP transgenic mice inoculated with 22L, 79A and/or RML

  17. Liberation of copper from amyloid plaques: making a risk factor useful for Alzheimer's disease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jie; Li, Meng; Wu, Li; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2012-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex multifactorial syndrome. Metal chelator and Aβ inhibitor are showing promise against AD. In this report, three small hybrid compounds (1, 2, and 3) have been designed and synthesized utilizing salicylaldehyde (SA) based Schiff bases as the chelators and benzothiazole (BT) as the recognition moiety for AD treatment. These conjugates can capture Cu(2+) from Aβ and become dimers upon Cu(2+) coordination and show high efficiency for both Cu(2+) elimination and Aβ assembly inhibition. Besides, the complexes have superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and significant antioxidant capacity and are capable of decreasing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increasing cell viability. All these results indicate that the multifunctional metal complexes which have Aβ specific recognition moiety and metal ion chelating elements show the potential for AD treatment. Therefore, our work will provide new insights into exploration of more potent amyloid inhibitors.

  18. Forebrain microglia from wild-type but not adult 5xFAD mice prevent amyloidplaque formation in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Sabine; Masuch, Annette; Nestel, Sigrun; Katzmarski, Natalie; Meyer-Luehmann, Melanie; Biber, Knut

    2015-01-01

    The role of microglia in amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition is controversial. In the present study, an organotypic hippocampal slice culture (OHSC) system with an in vivo-like microglial-neuronal environment was used to investigate the potential contribution of microglia to Aβ plaque formation. We found that microglia ingested Aβ, thereby preventing plaque formation in OHSCs. Conversely, Aβ deposits formed rapidly in microglia-free wild-type slices. The capacity to prevent Aβ plaque formation was absent in forebrain microglia from young adult but not juvenile 5xFamilial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) mice. Since no loss of Aβ clearance capacity was observed in both wild-type and cerebellar microglia from 5xFAD animals, the high Aβ1-42 burden in the forebrain of 5xFAD animals likely underlies the exhaustion of microglial Aβ clearance capacity. These data may therefore explain why Aβ plaque formation has never been described in wild-type mice, and point to a beneficial role of microglia in AD pathology. We also describe a new method to study Aβ plaque formation in a cell culture setting.

  19. Radiation dosimetry and biodistribution of the beta-amyloid plaque imaging tracer {sup 11}C-BTA-1 in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thees, S. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Neumaier, B.; Glatting, G.; Deisenhofer, S.; Reske, S.N.; Mottaghy, F.M. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Arnim, C.A.F. von [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neurologie

    2007-07-01

    Aim: [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]2-(4'-(methylaminophenyl)-benzothiazole({sup 11}C-BTA-1)) is a thioflavin-T derivative that has been one of the promising PET tracers for imaging of amyloid plaque distribution in the Alzheimer patients brain in vivo. The biodistribution and dosimetry of this tracer in humans is presented and compared to the results of a previous dosimetry and biodistribution study of another thioflavin-T derivative [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]2-hydroxy-(4'-(methylaminophenyl)-benzothiazole ({sup 11}C-OH-BTA-1)) in baboons. Methods: Five subjects underwent 2D dynamic PET imaging. Source organs were segmented using a semiautomatic algorithm based on clustering. Residence times for each source organ were determined by analytical integration of an exponential fit of the time activity curves. Finally organ doses were estimated using the software OLINDA/EXM. Results: The administration of 286 {+-} 93 MBq {sup 11}C-BTA-1 was well tolerated by all subjects. Effective radiation dose was 4.3 {mu}Sv/MBq, range 3.6-5.0 {mu}Sv/MBq. In four ofthe five subjects the liver, in one of the subjects the gallbladder was the critical organ. Conclusion: The radiation burden of a single dose of 300 MBq {sup 11}C-BTA-1 is within the accepted limits for research purpose. In contrast to the previous non-human primate study revealing the gallbladder as the critical organ for {sup 11}C-6-OH-BTA-1, we found the liver as the critical organ in humans using {sup 11}C-BTA-1. Possible explanations may be (1) a reduced bile concentration of {sup 11}C-BTA-1 due to the absent OH-group or (2) a different hepatic metabolism of thioflavin derivatives in human and baboon. (orig.)

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of benzothiophene derivatives as ligands for imaging {beta}-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Young Soo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)]|[Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Min [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)]|[Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of) and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jmjng@snu.ac.kr; Lee, Yun-Sang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)]|[Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Woo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)]|[Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ganesha, Rai B.; Kim, Young Ju; Lee, Dong Soo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, June-Key [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)]|[Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myung Chul [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    The imaging of the distribution of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques in the brain is becoming an important diagnostic modality in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we synthesized novel benzothiophene derivatives and labeled them with {sup 18}F for the potential diagnostic imaging of AD patients using positron emission tomography. The K {sub i} values of benzothiophene derivatives were evaluated by competitive binding assay using 2-(3'-[{sup 125}I]iodo-4'-N-methylaminophenyl)benzothiazole as a radioligand and A{beta}(1-40) or A{beta}(1-42) aggregates as receptors. All synthesized benzothiophene derivatives showed high binding affinities (K {sub i}=0.28-6.50 nM) to both A{beta}(1-40) and A{beta}(1-42) aggregates. Binding affinities were increased by O-alkylation or N-alkylation of 2-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiophene or 2-(4'-aminophenyl)benzothiophene. Biodistribution studies of 2-(4'-O-(2''-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)hydroxyphenyl)benzothiophene ([{sup 18}F]) and 2-(4'-O-(3''-[{sup 18}F]fluoropropyl)hydroxyphenyl)benzothiophene ([{sup 18}F]) in normal mice were performed after intravenous injection through the tail vein. In biodistribution data, [{sup 18}F] and [{sup 18}F] showed high initial brain uptakes at 2 min (5.2{+-}0.4% and 3.3{+-}0.2% ID/g, respectively), and brain activities washed out to 2.0{+-}0.2% and 0.5{+-}0.1% ID/g at 4 h, respectively. In conclusion, benzothiophene derivatives showed excellent binding affinities for A{beta} aggregates and high initial brain uptakes in normal mice.

  1. Link between Aluminum and the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease: The Integration of the Aluminum and Amyloid Cascade Hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Whilst being environmentally abundant, aluminum is not essential for life. On the contrary, aluminum is a widely recognized neurotoxin that inhibits more than 200 biologically important functions and causes various adverse effects in plants, animals, and humans. The relationship between aluminum exposure and neurodegenerative diseases, including dialysis encephalopathy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinsonism dementia in the Kii Peninsula and Guam, and Alzheimer's disease (AD has been suggested. In particular, the link between aluminum and Alzheimer's disease has been the subject of scientific debate for several decades. However, the complex characteristics of aluminum bioavailability make it difficult to evaluate its toxicity and therefore, the relationship remains to be established. Mounting evidence has suggested that significance of oligomerization of β-amyloid protein and neurotoxicity in the molecular mechanism of AD pathogenesis. Aluminum may play crucial roles as a cross-linker in β-amyloid oligomerization. Here, we review the detailed characteristics of aluminum neurotoxicity based on our own studies and the recent literatures. Our aim is to revisit the link between aluminum and AD and to integrate aluminum and amyloid cascade hypotheses in the context of β-amyloid oligomerization and the interactions with other metals.

  2. Goodpasture Antigen-binding Protein/Ceramide Transporter Binds to Human Serum Amyloid P-Component and Is Present in Brain Amyloid Plaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mencarelli, Chiara; Bode, Gerard H.; Losen, Mario; Kulharia, Mahesh; Molenaar, Peter C.; Veerhuis, Robert; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; De Baets, Marc H.; Nicolaes, Gerry A. F.; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) is a non-fibrillar glycoprotein belonging to the pentraxin family of the innate immune system. SAP is present in plasma, basement membranes, and amyloid deposits. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that the Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP) binds to

  3. Repeated administration of the noradrenergic neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4 modulates neuroinflammation and amyloid plaque load in mice bearing amyloid precursor protein and presenilin-1 mutant transgenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Jill C

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data indicates anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and pro-cognitive properties of noradrenaline and analyses of post-mortem brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients reveal major neuronal loss in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC, the main source of CNS noradrenaline (NA. The LC has projections to brain regions vulnerable to amyloid deposition and lack of LC derived NA could play a role in the progression of neuroinflammation in AD. Previous studies reveal that intraperitoneal (IP injection of the noradrenergic neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4 can modulate neuroinflammation in amyloid over-expressing mice and in one study, DSP-4 exacerbated existing neurodegeneration. Methods TASTPM mice over-express human APP and beta amyloid protein and show age related cognitive decline and neuroinflammation. In the present studies, 5 month old C57/BL6 and TASTPM mice were injected once monthly for 6 months with a low dose of DSP-4 (5 mg kg-1 or vehicle. At 8 and 11 months of age, mice were tested for cognitive ability and brains were examined for amyloid load and neuroinflammation. Results At 8 months of age there was no difference in LC tyrosine hydroxylase (TH across all groups and cortical NA levels of TASTPM/DSP-4, WT/Vehicle and WT/DSP-4 were similar. NA levels were lowest in TASTPM/Vehicle. Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA for various inflammatory markers were significantly increased in TASTPM/Vehicle compared with WT/Vehicle and by 8 months of age DSP-4 treatment modified this by reducing the levels of some of these markers in TASTPM. TASTPM/Vehicle showed increased astrocytosis and a significantly larger area of cortical amyloid plaque compared with TASTPM/DSP-4. However, by 11 months, NA levels were lowest in TASTPM/DSP-4 and there was a significant reduction in LC TH of TASTPM/DSP-4 only. Both TASTPM groups had comparable levels of amyloid, microglial activation and astrocytosis and mRNA for

  4. Zileuton improves memory deficits, amyloid and tau pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease with plaques and tangles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Chu

    Full Text Available The 5-lipoxygenase (5LO enzyme is widely distributed within the central nervous system. Previous works showed that this protein is up-regulated in Alzheimer's disease (AD, and plays an active role in the development of brain amyloidosis in the APP transgenic mice. In the present paper, we studied the effect of its pharmacological inhibition on the entire AD-like phenotype of a mouse model with plaques and tangles, the 3 × Tg mice. Compared with mice receiving placebo, the group treated with zileuton, a specific 5LO inhibitor, manifested a significant improvement of their memory impairments. The same animals had a significant reduction in Aβ levels and deposition, which was secondary to a down-regulation of the γ-secretase pathway. Additionally, while total tau levels were unchanged for both groups, zileuton-treated mice had a significant reduction in its phosphorylation state and insoluble forms, secondary to a decreased activation of the cdk5 kinase. These data establish a functional role for 5LO in the pathogenesis of the full spectrum of the AD-like phenotype and represent the successful completion of the initial step for the preclinical development of 5LO inhibitors as viable therapeutic agents for AD.

  5. Antibodies targeted to the brain with image-guided focused ultrasound reduces amyloid-beta plaque load in the TgCRND8 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica F Jordão

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD relies on antibodies directed against toxic amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta, which circulate in the bloodstream and remove Abeta from the brain. In mouse models of AD, the administration of anti-Abeta antibodies directly into the brain, in comparison to the bloodstream, was shown to be more efficient at reducing Abeta plaque pathology. Therefore, delivering anti-Abeta antibodies to the brain of AD patients may also improve treatment efficiency. Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS is known to transiently-enhance the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, allowing intravenously administered therapeutics to enter the brain. Our goal was to establish that anti-Abeta antibodies delivered to the brain using magnetic resonance imaging-guided FUS (MRIgFUS can reduce plaque pathology. To test this, TgCRND8 mice received intravenous injections of MRI and FUS contrast agents, as well as anti-Abeta antibody, BAM-10. MRIgFUS was then applied transcranially. Within minutes, the MRI contrast agent entered the brain, and BAM-10 was later found bound to Abeta plaques in targeted cortical areas. Four days post-treatment, Abeta pathology was significantly reduced in TgCRND8 mice. In conclusion, this is the first report to demonstrate that MRIgFUS delivery of anti-Abeta antibodies provides the combined advantages of using a low dose of antibody and rapidly reducing plaque pathology.

  6. 2-Phenylbenzothiazole conjugated with cyclopentadienyl tricarbonyl [CpM(CO)3] (M = Re, (99m)Tc) complexes as potential imaging probes for β-amyloid plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jianhua; Cui, Mengchao; Dai, Jiapei; Liu, Boli

    2015-04-14

    Technetium-99m-labeled cyclopentadienyl tricarbonyl complexes conjugated with the 2-phenylbenzothiazole binding motif were synthesized. The rhenium surrogates , , and were demonstrated to have moderate to high affinities for Aβ1-42 aggregates with Ki values of 142, 76, 64 and 24 nM, respectively. During the fluorescence staining of brain sections of transgenic mice and patients with Alzheimer's disease, these rhenium complexes demonstrated perfect and intense labeling of Aβ plaques. Moreover, in in vitro autoradiography, (99m)Tc-labeled complexes clearly detected β-amyloid plaques on sections of brain tissue from transgenic mice, which confirmed the sufficient affinity of these tracers for Aβ plaques. However, these compounds did not show desirable properties in vivo, especially showing poor brain uptake (below 0.5% ID g(-1)), which will hinder the further development of these tracers as brain imaging agents. Nonetheless, it is encouraging that these (99m)Tc-labeled complexes designed by a conjugate approach displayed sufficient affinities for Aβ plaques.

  7. Novel ¹⁸F-labeled benzoxazole derivatives as potential positron emission tomography probes for imaging of cerebral β-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Mengchao; Ono, Masahiro; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Masashi; Nakamoto, Yuji; Togashi, Kaori; Okamoto, Yoko; Ihara, Masafumi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Liu, Boli; Saji, Hideo

    2012-11-01

    Two radiofluoro-pegylated phenylbenzoxazole derivatives, 4-(5-(2-(2-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethoxy)ethoxy)ethoxy)benzo[d]oxazol-2-yl)-N-methylaniline ([(18)F]24) and 4-(5-(2-(2-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethoxy)ethoxy)ethoxy)benzo[d]oxazol-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylaniline ([(18)F]32), were synthesized and evaluated as probes for imaging cerebral β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in living brain tissue by PET. [(18)F]24 and [(18)F]32 displayed high affinity for Aβ(1-42) aggregates (K(i) = 9.3 and 3.9 nM, respectively). In vitro autoradiography with sections of post-mortem AD brain and transgenic mouse brain confirmed the affinity of these tracers. Initial high uptake into and rapid washout from the brain in normal mice were observed. [(18)F]24 also displayed excellent binding to Aβ plaques in ex vivo autoradiographic experiments with Tg2576 mice. Furthermore, small-animal PET studies demonstrated significant differences in the clearance profile after the administration of [(18)F]24 between Tg2576 and wild-type mice. The results suggest [(18)F]24 to be a useful PET agent for detecting Aβ plaques in the living human brain.

  8. Plaque deposition dependent decrease in 5-HT2A serotonin receptor in AbetaPPswe/PS1dE9 amyloid overexpressing mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Peter; Ettrup, Anders; Klein, Anders B

    2010-01-01

    -HT2A receptor regulation in double transgenic AbetaPPswe/PS1dE9 mice which display excess production of Abeta and age-dependent increase in amyloid plaques. Three different age-groups, 4-month-old, 8- month-old, and 11-month-old were included in the study. [3H]-MDL100907, [3H]-escitalopram, and [11C]-PIB...... in 5-HT2A receptor binding in mPFC in the 11-month-old group. The changes in 5-HT2A receptor binding correlated negatively with [11C]-PIB binding and were not accompanied by decreases in SERT binding. Correspondingly, 11-month-old transgenic mice showed diminished DOI-induced HTR and reduced increase...

  9. GMP-compliant automated synthesis of [{sup 18}F]AV-45 (Florbetapir F 18) for imaging {beta}-amyloid plaques in human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, C.-H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Lin, K.-J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Weng, C.-C. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, I.-T. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Ting, Y.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Yen, T.-C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Jan, T.-R. [Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Skovronsky, Daniel [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, M.-P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Wey, S.-P., E-mail: spwey@mail.cgu.edu.t [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2010-12-15

    We report herein the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant automated synthesis of {sup 18}F-labeled styrylpyridine, AV-45 (Florbetapir), a novel tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. [{sup 18}F]AV-45 was prepared in 105 min using a tosylate precursor with Sumitomo modules for radiosynthesis under GMP-compliant conditions. The overall yield was 25.4{+-}7.7% with a final radiochemical purity of 95.3{+-}2.2% (n=19). The specific activity of [{sup 18}F]AV-45 reached as high as 470{+-}135 TBq/mmol (n=19). The present studies show that [{sup 18}F]AV-45 can be manufactured under GMP-compliant conditions and could be widely available for routine clinical use.

  10. Aβ42 Is Essential for Parenchymal and Vascular Amyloid Deposition in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Eileen; Onstead, Luisa; Eriksen, Jason; Yu, Cindy; Skipper, Lisa; Murphy, M. Paul; Beard, Jenny; Das, Pritam; Jansen, Karen; DeLucia, Michael; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dolios, Georgia; Wang, Rong; Eckman, Christopher B.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Hutton, Mike; Hardy, John; Golde, Todd

    2005-01-01

    Summary Considerable circumstantial evidence suggests that Aβ42 is the initiating molecule in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. However, the absolute requirement for Aβ42 for amyloid deposition has never been demonstrated in vivo. We have addressed this by developing transgenic models that express Aβ1-40 or Aβ1-42 in the absence of human amyloid β protein precursor (APP) overexpression. Mice expressing high levels of Aβ1-40 do not develop overt amyloid pathology. In contrast, mice expressing lower levels of Aβ1-42 accumulate insoluble Aβ1-42 and develop compact amyloid plaques, congophilic amyloid angiopathy (CAA), and diffuse Aβ deposits. When mice expressing Aβ1-42 are crossed with mutant APP (Tg2576) mice, there is also a massive increase in amyloid deposition. These data establish that Aβ1-42 is essential for amyloid deposition in the parenchyma and also in vessels. PMID:16039562

  11. Collagen XVIII: a novel heparan sulfate proteoglycan associated with vascular amyloid depositions and senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horssen, J. van; Wilhelmus, M.M.M.; Heljasvaara, R.; Pihlajaniemi, T.; Wesseling, P.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Verbeek, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) may play a role in the formation and persistence of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease brains. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the human extracellular matrix-associated molecule collagen XVIII is the first collagen carrying

  12. Role of P2X7 and P2Y2 receptors on α-secretase-dependent APP processing: Control of amyloid plaques formation “in vivo” by P2X7 receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teresa Miras-Portugal

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo approach was made possible by the use of J20 mice, a transgenic mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD expressing human APP mutant protein. This animal exhibits prominent amyloid plaques by six months of age. In vivo inhibition of the P2X7 receptor induced a significant decrease in the number and size of hippocampal amyloid plaques. This reduction is mediated by an increase in the proteolytic processing of APP through α-secretase activity, which correlates with an increase in the phosphorylated form of GSK-3, a less active form of this enzyme. The in vivo findings corroborate the therapeutic potential of P2X7 antagonists in the treatment of FAD.

  13. Astrocytosis precedes amyloid plaque deposition in Alzheimer APPswe transgenic mouse brain: a correlative positron emission tomography and in vitro imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Ni, Ruiqing; Voytenko, Larysa; Marutle, Amelia [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Centre for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Gulyas, Balazs; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Nanyang Technological University, NTU - Imperial College, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Singapore (Singapore); Toth, Miklos; Haeggkvist, Jenny [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Centre for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-04-17

    Pathological studies suggest that neuroinflammation is exacerbated by increased beta-amyloid (Aβ) levels in the brain early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The time course and relationships between astrocytosis and Aβ deposition were examined using multitracer in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in an AD transgenic mouse model, followed by postmortem autoradiography and immunohistochemistry analysis. PET imaging with the amyloid plaque tracer {sup 11}C-AZD2184 and the astroglial tracer {sup 11}C-deuterium-L-deprenyl ({sup 11}C-DED) was carried out in APPswe mice aged 6, 8-15 and 18-24 months (4-6 animals/group) and in wild-type (wt) mice aged 8-15 and 18-24 months (3-6 animals/group). Tracer uptake was quantified by region of interest analysis using PMOD software and a 3-D digital mouse brain atlas. Postmortem brain tissues from the same APPswe and wt mice in all age groups were analysed for Aβ deposition and astrocytosis by in vitro autoradiography using {sup 3}H-AZD2184, {sup 3}H-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and {sup 3}H-L-deprenyl and immunostaining performed with antibodies for Aβ{sub 42} and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in sagittal brain sections. {sup 11}C-AZD2184 PET retention in the cerebral cortices of APPswe mice was significantly higher at 18-24 months than in age-matched wt mice. Cortical and hippocampal {sup 11}C-DED PET binding was significantly higher at 6 months than at 8-15 months or 18-24 months in APPswe mice, and it was also higher than at 8-15 months in wt mice. In vitro autoradiography {sup 3}H-AZD2184 and {sup 3}H-PIB binding confirmed the in vivo findings with {sup 11}C-AZD2184 and demonstrated age-dependent increases in Aβ deposition in APPswe cortex and hippocampus. There were no significant differences between APPswe and wt mice in {sup 3}H-L-deprenyl autoradiography binding across age groups. Immunohistochemical quantification demonstrated more Aβ{sub 42} deposits in the cortex and hippocampus and more

  14. Amyloid Plaques in Retina for Diagnosis in Alzheimer’s patients: unsatisfactory results from a mata-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangling Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Detection of retinal β-amyloid (Aβ peptide accumulation is a novel diagnostic method for Alzheimer’s disease (AD, but there is, as yet, no conclusive evidence of its accuracy.Aim: To identify the diagnostic accuracy of pathological retinal Aβ detection for AD by a meta-analytic approach.Methods: Electronic and reference searches were conducted to identify studies related to the diagnostic effects of retinal Aβ detection in AD that met pre-defined inclusion criteria. The QUADAS-2 tool was employed to assess the risk of bias, and Review Manager plus the Open Meta-Analyst were used to perform the data analysis.Results: From 493 unduplicated reports, five studies with small sample sizes were included in this review. Six staining methods were employed. The eligible studies showed extremely broad ranges of sensitivity (0 to 1.00 and specificity (0.50 to 1.00 with substantial heterogeneity. The estimates of positive likelihood ratio (PLR, negative likelihood ratio (NLR, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR were also extremely varied (from 0.71 to 11.57 for PLR, from 0.04 to 1.11 for NLR, and from 0.69 to 297.00 for DOR.Conclusions: The limited number of eligible studies and their methodological heterogeneity make it impossible to come to a conclusion whether pathological retinal Aβ detection is an effective diagnostic tool for AD. More studies, especially large surveys investigating retina Aβ load with quantitative methods among consecutive or random samples, are needed to determine the accuracy of Aβ detection for diagnosing AD.

  15. Neuroinflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis affects amyloid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anckarsäter Henrik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP and β-amyloid (Aβ is widely studied in Alzheimer's disease, where Aβ deposition and plaque development are essential components of the pathogenesis. However, the physiological role of amyloid in the adult nervous system remains largely unknown. We have previously found altered cerebral amyloid metabolism in other neuroinflammatory conditions. To further elucidate this, we investigated amyloid metabolism in patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB. Methods The first part of the study was a cross-sectional cohort study in 61 patients with acute facial palsy (19 with LNB and 42 with idiopathic facial paresis, Bell's palsy and 22 healthy controls. CSF was analysed for the β-amyloid peptides Aβ38, Aβ40 and Aβ42, and the amyloid precursor protein (APP isoforms α-sAPP and β-sAPP. CSF total-tau (T-tau, phosphorylated tau (P-tau and neurofilament protein (NFL were measured to monitor neural cell damage. The second part of the study was a prospective cohort-study in 26 LNB patients undergoing consecutive lumbar punctures before and after antibiotic treatment to study time-dependent dynamics of the biomarkers. Results In the cross-sectional study, LNB patients had lower levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau, and higher levels of CSF NFL than healthy controls and patients with Bell's palsy. In the prospective study, LNB patients had low levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau at baseline, which all increased towards normal at follow-up. Conclusions Amyloid metabolism is altered in LNB. CSF levels of α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau are decreased in acute infection and increase after treatment. In combination with earlier findings in multiple sclerosis, cerebral SLE and HIV with cerebral engagement, this points to an influence of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism.

  16. Using bacterial inclusion bodies to screen for amyloid aggregation inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villar-Piqué Anna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42 is the main component of the inter-neuronal amyloid plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The mechanism by which Aβ42 and other amyloid peptides assemble into insoluble neurotoxic deposits is still not completely understood and multiple factors have been reported to trigger their formation. In particular, the presence of endogenous metal ions has been linked to the pathogenesis of AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. Results Here we describe a rapid and high-throughput screening method to identify molecules able to modulate amyloid aggregation. The approach exploits the inclusion bodies (IBs formed by Aβ42 when expressed in bacteria. We have shown previously that these aggregates retain amyloid structural and functional properties. In the present work, we demonstrate that their in vitro refolding is selectively sensitive to the presence of aggregation-promoting metal ions, allowing the detection of inhibitors of metal-promoted amyloid aggregation with potential therapeutic interest. Conclusions Because IBs can be produced at high levels and easily purified, the method overcomes one of the main limitations in screens to detect amyloid modulators: the use of expensive and usually highly insoluble synthetic peptides.

  17. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD.

  18. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1 Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik H Hansen

    Full Text Available One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP and presenilin-1 (PS1 are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c., or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.. In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD.

  19. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  20. Eliminating microglia in Alzheimer's mice prevents neuronal loss without modulating amyloid-β pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangenberg, Elizabeth E; Lee, Rafael J; Najafi, Allison R; Rice, Rachel A; Elmore, Monica R P; Blurton-Jones, Mathew; West, Brian L; Green, Kim N

    2016-04-01

    In addition to amyloidplaque and tau neurofibrillary tangle deposition, neuroinflammation is considered a key feature of Alzheimer's disease pathology. Inflammation in Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of reactive astrocytes and activated microglia surrounding amyloid plaques, implicating their role in disease pathogenesis. Microglia in the healthy adult mouse depend on colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) signalling for survival, and pharmacological inhibition of this receptor results in rapid elimination of nearly all of the microglia in the central nervous system. In this study, we set out to determine if chronically activated microglia in the Alzheimer's disease brain are also dependent on CSF1R signalling, and if so, how these cells contribute to disease pathogenesis. Ten-month-old 5xfAD mice were treated with a selective CSF1R inhibitor for 1 month, resulting in the elimination of ∼80% of microglia. Chronic microglial elimination does not alter amyloid-β levels or plaque load; however, it does rescue dendritic spine loss and prevent neuronal loss in 5xfAD mice, as well as reduce overall neuroinflammation. Importantly, behavioural testing revealed improvements in contextual memory. Collectively, these results demonstrate that microglia contribute to neuronal loss, as well as memory impairments in 5xfAD mice, but do not mediate or protect from amyloid pathology.

  1. Antioxidant role of amyloid β protein in cell-free and biological systems: implication for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Maitrayee; Bhowmick, Pritha; Banerjee, Anindita; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2013-03-01

    In contrast to many studies showing the pro-oxidative nature of amyloid peptide, this work shows that aggregated Aβ42 peptide in varying concentrations (2-20 μM) in cell-free systems inhibits the formation of hydroxyl radicals and H(2)O(2) from a mixture of iron (20 μM FeSO(4)) and ascorbate (2mM) as measured by benzoate hydroxylation assay and coumarin carboxylic acid assay. Aggregated Aβ42 in similar concentrations further prevents protein and lipid oxidation in isolated rat brain mitochondria incubated alone or with FeSO(4) and ascorbate. Moreover, mitochondria exposed to FeSO(4) and ascorbate show enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species and this phenomenon is also abolished by aggregated Aβ42. It is suggested that the antioxidant property of Aβ42 in various systems is mediated by metal chelation and it is nearly as potent as a typical metal chelator, such as diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, in preventing oxidative damage. However, aggregated Aβ42 causes mitochondrial functional impairment in the form of membrane depolarization and a loss of phosphorylation capacity without involving reactive oxygen species in the process. Thus, the present results suggest that the amyloid peptide exhibits a protective antioxidant role in biological systems, but also has toxic actions independent of oxidative stress.

  2. ABCA7 Mediates Phagocytic Clearance of Amyloid-β in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, YuHong; Hsiao, Jen-Hsiang T; Paxinos, George; Halliday, Glenda M; Kim, Woojin Scott

    2016-09-06

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by dementia and abnormal deposits of aggregated amyloid-β in the brain. Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed that ABCA7 is strongly associated with AD. In vitro evidence suggests that the role of ABCA7 is related to phagocytic activity. Deletion of ABCA7 in a mouse model of AD exacerbates cerebral amyloidplaque load. However, the biological role of ABCA7 in AD brain pathogenesis is unknown. We show that ABCA7 is highly expressed in microglia and when monocytes are differentiated into macrophages. We hypothesized that ABCA7 plays a protective role in the brain that is related to phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β. We isolated microglia and macrophages from Abca7-/- and wild type mice and tested them for their capacity to phagocytose amyloid-β oligomers. We found that the phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β was substantially reduced in both microglia and macrophages from Abca7-/- mice compared to wild type mice. Consistent with these results, in vivo phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β oligomers in the hippocampus was reduced in Abca7-/- mice. Furthermore, ABCA7 transcription was upregulated in AD brains and in amyloidogenic mouse brains specifically in the hippocampus as a response to the amyloid-β pathogenic state. Together these results indicate that ABCA7 mediates phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β in the brain, and reveal a mechanism by which loss of function of ABCA7 increases the susceptibility to AD.

  3. Repeated administration of the noradrenergic neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) modulates neuroinflammation and amyloid plaque load in mice bearing amyloid precursor protein and presenilin-1 mutant transgenes

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson Jill C; Virley David J; Babin Anna; Bate Simon T; Joyce Flora; Perren Marion J; Seymour Zoe; Culbert Ainsley A; Ashmeade Tracey; Vidgeon-Hart Martin P; Pugh Perdita L; Upton Neil; Sunter David

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Data indicates anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and pro-cognitive properties of noradrenaline and analyses of post-mortem brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients reveal major neuronal loss in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), the main source of CNS noradrenaline (NA). The LC has projections to brain regions vulnerable to amyloid deposition and lack of LC derived NA could play a role in the progression of neuroinflammation in AD. Previous studies reveal that intrape...

  4. Amyloid beta-peptide worsens cognitive impairment following cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury*****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Song; Qiang Ao; Ying Niu; Qin Shen; Huancong Zuo; Xiufang Zhang; Yandao Gong

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β-peptide, a major component of senile plaques in Alzheimer’s disease, has been impli-cated in neuronal cel death and cognitive impairment. Recently, studies have shown that the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia is closely linked with Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, a rat model of global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was established via occlusion of four arteries;meanwhile, fibril ar amyloid β-peptide was injected into the rat lateral ventricle. The Morris water maze test and histological staining revealed that administration of amyloid β-peptide could further aggravate impairments to learning and memory and neuronal cel death in the hippocampus of rats subjected to cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Western blot showed that phosphorylation of tau protein and the activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3β were significantly stronger in cerebral is-chemia-reperfusion injury rats subjected to amyloidβ-peptide administration than those undergoing cerebral ischemia-reperfusion or amyloidβ-peptide administration alone. Conversely, the activity of protein phosphatase 2A was remarkably reduced in rats with cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury fol owing amyloidβ-peptide administration. These findings suggest that amyloidβ-peptide can po-tentiate tau phosphorylation induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion and thereby aggravate cog-nitive impairment.

  5. Is amyloid-β harmful to the brain? Insights from human imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagust, William

    2016-01-01

    Although the amyloid-β protein associated with the Alzheimer's disease plaque has been detectable in living people for over a decade, its importance in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is still debated. The frequent presence of amyloid-β in the brains of cognitively healthy older people has been interpreted as evidence against a causative role. If amyloid-β is crucial to the development of Alzheimer's disease, it should be associated with other Alzheimer's disease-like neurological changes. This review examines whether amyloid-β is associated with other biomarkers indicative of early Alzheimer's disease in normal older people. The preponderance of evidence links amyloid-β to functional change, progressive brain atrophy, and cognitive decline. Individuals at greatest risk of decline seem to be those with evidence of both amyloid-β and findings suggestive of neurodegeneration. The crucial question is thus how amyloid-β is related to brain degeneration and how these two processes interact to cause cognitive decline and dementia.

  6. Protection of the blood-brain barrier by pentosan against amyloid-β-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deli, Mária A; Veszelka, Szilvia; Csiszár, Boglárka; Tóth, Andrea; Kittel, Agnes; Csete, Mária; Sipos, Aron; Szalai, Anikó; Fülöp, Lívia; Penke, Botond; Abrahám, Csongor S; Niwa, Masami

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cells of brain capillaries forming the blood-brain barrier play an important role in the pathogenesis and therapy of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are key pathological elements in the development of the disease. A blood-brain barrier model, based on primary rat brain endothelial cells was used in which the barrier properties were induced by glial cells. The effects of amyloid peptides have been tested on cell viability and barrier functions. Aβ showed toxic effects on primary rat brain endothelial cells measured by MTT dye conversion and the lactate dehydrogenase release. Morphologically cytoplasmic vacuolization, disruption of the structure of cytoplasmic organelles and tight junctions could be observed in brain endothelial cells. Treatment with Aβ1-42 decreased the electrical resistance, and increased the permeability of brain endothelial cell monolayers for both fluorescein and albumin. Serum amyloid P component which stabilizes Aβ fibrils in cortical amyloid plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits significantly potentiated the barrier-weakening effect of Aβ1-42. Sulfated polysaccharide pentosan could decrease the toxic effects of Aβ peptides in brain endothelial cells. It could also significantly protect the barrier integrity of monolayers from damaging actions of peptides. Pentosan modified the size, and significantly decreased the number of amyloid aggregates demonstrated by atomic force microscopy. The present data further support the toxic effects of amyloid peptides on brain endothelial cells, and can contribute to the development of molecules protecting the blood-brain barrier in Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Maysin and Its Flavonoid Derivative from Centipedegrass Attenuates Amyloid Plaques by Inducting Humoral Immune Response with Th2 Skewed Cytokine Response in the Tg (APPswe, PS1dE9) Alzheimer’s Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Il-Hwa; Won, Chung-Kil; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, SungBeom; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Cho, Jae-Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a slow, progressive neurodegenerative disease and the most common type of dementia in the elderly. The etiology of AD and its underlying mechanism are still not clear. In a previous study, we found that an ethyl acetate extract of Centipedegrass (CG) (i.e., EA-CG) contained 4 types of Maysin derivatives, including Luteolin, Isoorientin, Rhamnosylisoorientin, and Derhamnosylmaysin, and showed protective effects against Amyloid beta (Aβ) by inhibiting oligomeric Aβ in cellular and in vitro models. Here, we examined the preventative effects of EA-CG treatment on the Aβ burden in the Tg (Mo/Hu APPswe PS1dE9) AD mouse model. We have investigated the EA-CG efficacy as novel anti-AD likely preventing amyloid plaques using immunofluorescence staining to visually analyze Aβ40/42 and fibril formation with Thioflavin-S or 6E10 which are the profile of immunoreactivity against epitope Aβ1–16 or neuritic plaque, the quantitation of humoral immune response against Aβ, and the inflammatory cytokine responses (Th1 and Th2) using ELISA and QRT-PCR. To minimize the toxicity of the extracted CG, we addressed the liver toxicity in response to the CG extract treatment in Tg mice using relevant markers, such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/ alanine aminotransferase (ALT) measurements in serum. The EA-CG extract significantly reduced the Aβ burden, the concentration of soluble Aβ40/42 protein, and fibril formation in the hippocampus and cortex of the Tg mice treated with EA-CG (50 mg/kg BW/day) for 6 months compared with the Tg mice treated with a normal diet. Additionally, the profile of anti-inflammatory cytokines revealed that the levels of Th2 (interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-10 (IL-10)) cytokines are more significantly increased than Th1 (interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-2(IL-2)) in the sera. These results suggest that the EA-CG fraction induces IL-4/IL-10-dependent anti-inflammatory cytokines (Th2) rather than pro

  8. Progranulin protects against amyloid β deposition and toxicity in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, S Sakura; Min, Sang-Won; Krabbe, Grietje; Wang, Chao; Zhou, Yungui; Asgarov, Rustam; Li, Yaqiao; Martens, Lauren H; Elia, Lisa P; Ward, Michael E; Mucke, Lennart; Farese, Robert V; Gan, Li

    2014-10-01

    Haploinsufficiency of the progranulin (PGRN) gene (GRN) causes familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and modulates an innate immune response in humans and in mouse models. GRN polymorphism may be linked to late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the role of PGRN in AD pathogenesis is unknown. Here we show that PGRN inhibits amyloid β (Aβ) deposition. Selectively reducing microglial expression of PGRN in AD mouse models impaired phagocytosis, increased plaque load threefold and exacerbated cognitive deficits. Lentivirus-mediated PGRN overexpression lowered plaque load in AD mice with aggressive amyloid plaque pathology. Aβ plaque load correlated negatively with levels of hippocampal PGRN, showing the dose-dependent inhibitory effects of PGRN on plaque deposition. PGRN also protected against Aβ toxicity. Lentivirus-mediated PGRN overexpression prevented spatial memory deficits and hippocampal neuronal loss in AD mice. The protective effects of PGRN against Aβ deposition and toxicity have important therapeutic implications. We propose enhancing PGRN as a potential treatment for PGRN-deficient FTLD and AD.

  9. Radiosynthesis and evaluation of [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 and [{sup 11}C]3'-Me-BTA-1 as potential radiotracers for in vivo imaging of {beta}-amyloid plaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumaier, B.; Deisenhofer, S.; Fuerst, D.; Thees, S.; Buck, A.K.; Glatting, G.; Landwehrmeyer, G.B.; Krause, B.J.; Reske, S.N.; Mottaghy, F.M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Ulm (Germany); Arnim, C.A.F. von [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. Hospital Ulm (Germany); Mueller, H.D.; Sommer, C. [Dept. of Neuropathology, Univ. of Mainz (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Aim: To evaluate the in vitro and in vivo characteristics of [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]2-(4'-(methylaminophenyl))-benzothiazole ([{sup 11}C]BTA-1) as well as [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]2-(3'-methyl-4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-benzothiazole ([{sup 11}C]3'-Me-BTA-1) as diagnostic markers of amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Material, methods: Brain uptake and clearance was determined in wild-type mice. Binding affinities (K{sub i}) of [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 and [{sup 11}C]3'-Me-BTA-1 for aggregated A{beta}(1-40) fibrils were assessed. Autoradiography was performed on brain sections of AD patients. To demonstrate binding specificity in vivo BTA-1 was injected i.p. in transgenic mice (Tg2576). Brain sections were analysed consecutively. Additionally, a [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 PET study of an AD patient and a healthy control was performed. Results: In mice brain uptake and clearance of [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 is compatible with the half life of {sup 11}C (2 min: 12.7% ID/g; 30 min: 4.6% ID/g). In contrast clearance rate of [{sup 11}C]3'-Me-BTA-1 is too slow (2 mm 4% ID/g; 30 min 12% ID/g) to achieve sufficient clearance of free and non specifically bound radioactivity. K{sub i} of [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 is 11 nmol/l and that of [{sup 11}C]3'-Me-BTA-1 27 nmol/l. Both radioligands label A{beta} selectively and specifically in AD patients and transgenic mice in vitro. The in vivo stained brain sections show a labelling of A{beta} plaques. The AD patient has a higher pre-frontal, parietal and striatal [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 accumulation than the healthy control. Metabolite analysis revealed approximately 75% intact [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 after 30min in plasma. [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 is favourable for in vivo imaging of A{beta} due to its rapid brain entry, sufficient clearance and good binding affinity for A{beta}. Conclusion: The ability to label A{beta} plaques in vivo in human subjects supports the suitability of [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 as a plaque imaging agent. (orig.)

  10. Amyloid Beta as a Modulator of Synaptic Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Parihar, Mordhwaj S.; Gregory J. Brewer

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is associated with synapse loss, memory dysfunction and pathological accumulation of amyloid beta in plaques. However, an exclusively pathological role for amyloid beta is being challenged by new evidence for an essential function of amyloid beta at the synapse. Amyloid beta protein exists in different assembly states in the central nervous system and plays distinct roles ranging from synapse and memory formation to memory loss and neuronal cell death. Amyloid beta is pres...

  11. Micro-MRI study of cerebral aging: ex vivo detection of hippocampal subfield reorganization, microhemorrhages and amyloid plaques in mouse lemur primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Bertrand

    Full Text Available Mouse lemurs are non-human primate models of cerebral aging and neurodegeneration. Much smaller than other primates, they recapitulate numerous features of human brain aging, including progressive cerebral atrophy and correlation between regional atrophy and cognitive impairments. Characterization of brain atrophy in mouse lemurs has been done by MRI measures of regional CSF volume and by MRI measures of regional atrophy. Here, we further characterize mouse lemur brain aging using ex vivo MR microscopy (31 µm in-plane resolution. First, we performed a non-biased, direct volumetric quantification of dentate gyrus and extended Ammon's horn. We show that both dentate gyrus and Ammon's horn undergo an age-related reorganization leading to a growth of the dentate gyrus and an atrophy of the Ammon's horn, even in the absence of global hippocampal atrophy. Second, on these first MR microscopic images of the mouse lemur brain, we depicted cortical and hippocampal hypointense spots. We demonstrated that their incidence increases with aging and that they correspond either to amyloid deposits or to cerebral microhemorrhages.

  12. Expression of complement system components during aging and amyloid deposition in APP transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiederhold Karl-Heinz

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A causal role of the complement system in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis has been postulated based on the identification of different activated components up to the membrane attack complex at amyloid plaques in brain. However, histological studies of amyloid plaque bearing APP transgenic mice provided only evidence for an activation of the early parts of the complement cascade. To better understand the contribution of normal aging and amyloid deposition to the increase in complement activation we performed a detailed characterization of the expression of the major mouse complement components. Methods APP23 mice expressing human APP751 with the Swedish double mutation as well as C57BL/6 mice were used at different ages. mRNA was quantified by Realtime PCR and the age- as well as amyloid induced changes determined. The protein levels of complement C1q and C3 were analysed by Western blotting. Histology was done to test for amyloid plaque association and activation of the complement cascade. Results High mRNA levels were detected for C1q and some inhibitory complement components. The expression of most activating components starting at C3 was low. Expression of C1q, C3, C4, C5 and factor B mRNA increased with age in control C57BL/6 mice. C1q and C3 mRNA showed a substantial additional elevation during amyloid formation in APP23 mice. This increase was confirmed on the protein level using Western blotting, whereas immunohistology indicated a recruitment of complement to amyloid plaques up to the C3 convertase. Conclusion Early but not late components of the mouse complement system show an age-dependent increase in expression. The response to amyloid deposition is comparatively smaller. The low expression of C3 and C5 and failure to upregulate C5 and downstream components differs from human AD brain and likely contributes to the lack of full complement activation in APP transgenic mice.

  13. Amyloid-β positron emission tomography imaging probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C; Långström, Bengt;

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly rising prevalence and cost of Alzheimer's disease in recent decades has made the imaging of amyloid-β deposits the focus of intense research. Several amyloid imaging probes with purported specificity for amyloidplaques are currently at various stages of FDA approval. However...

  14. Emerging roles for the amyloid precursor protein and derived peptides in the regulation of cellular and systemic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeczor, Juliane K; McGee, Sean L

    2017-03-28

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a transmembrane protein that can be cleaved by proteases through two different pathways to yield a number of small peptides, each with distinct physiological properties and functions. It has been extensively studied in the context of Alzheimer's disease, with the APP-derived amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide being a major constituent of the amyloid plaques observed in this disease. It has been known for some time that APP can regulate neuronal metabolism, however this review will examine evidence that APP and its peptides can also regulate key metabolic processes such as insulin action, lipid synthesis and storage and mitochondrial function in peripheral tissues. This review will present a hypothesis that amyloidogenic processing of APP in peripheral tissues plays a key role in the response to nutrient excess and that this could contribute to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Two memory associated genes regulated by amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain ovel insights into the pathogenesis of learning and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuandong Zheng; Xi Gu; Zhimei Zhong; Rui Zhu; Tianming Gao; Fang Wang

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we employed chromatin immunoprecipitation, a useful method for studying the locations of transcription factors bound to specific DNA regions in specific cells, to investigate amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain binding sites in chromatin DNA from hippocampal neurons of rats, and to screen out five putative genes associated with the learning and memory functions. The promoter regions of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha and glutamate receptor-2 genes were amplified by PCR from DNA products immunoprecipitated by amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and western blot analysis suggested that the promoter regions of these two genes associated with learning and memory were bound by amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain (in complex form). Our experimental findings indicate that the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain is involved in the transcriptional regulation of learning- and memory-associated genes in hippocampal neurons. These data may provide new insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the symptoms of progressive memory loss in Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Small-animal PET imaging of amyloid-beta plaques with [11C]PiB and its multi-modal validation in an APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Manook

    Full Text Available In vivo imaging and quantification of amyloidplaque (Aβ burden in small-animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD is a valuable tool for translational research such as developing specific imaging markers and monitoring new therapy approaches. Methodological constraints such as image resolution of positron emission tomography (PET and lack of suitable AD models have limited the feasibility of PET in mice. In this study, we evaluated a feasible protocol for PET imaging of Aβ in mouse brain with [(11C]PiB and specific activities commonly used in human studies. In vivo mouse brain MRI for anatomical reference was acquired with a clinical 1.5 T system. A recently characterized APP/PS1 mouse was employed to measure Aβ at different disease stages in homozygous and hemizygous animals. We performed multi-modal cross-validations for the PET results with ex vivo and in vitro methodologies, including regional brain biodistribution, multi-label digital autoradiography, protein quantification with ELISA, fluorescence microscopy, semi-automated histological quantification and radioligand binding assays. Specific [(11C]PiB uptake in individual brain regions with Aβ deposition was demonstrated and validated in all animals of the study cohort including homozygous AD animals as young as nine months. Corresponding to the extent of Aβ pathology, old homozygous AD animals (21 months showed the highest uptake followed by old hemizygous (23 months and young homozygous mice (9 months. In all AD age groups the cerebellum was shown to be suitable as an intracerebral reference region. PET results were cross-validated and consistent with all applied ex vivo and in vitro methodologies. The results confirm that the experimental setup for non-invasive [(11C]PiB imaging of Aβ in the APP/PS1 mice provides a feasible, reproducible and robust protocol for small-animal Aβ imaging. It allows longitudinal imaging studies with follow-up periods of approximately one and a

  17. FKBP12 regulates the localization and processing of amyloid precursor protein in human cell lines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fan-Lun Liu; Ting-Yi Liu; Fan-Lu Kung

    2014-03-01

    One of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease is the presence of insoluble extracellular amyloid plaques. These plaques are mainly constituted of amyloid beta peptide (A), a proteolytic product of amyloid precursor protein (APP). APP processing also generates the APP intracellular domain (AICD). We have previously demonstrated that AICD interacts with FKBP12, a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) ubiquitous in nerve systems. This interaction was interfered by FK506, a clinically used immunosuppressant that has recently been reported to be neuroprotective. To elucidate the roles of FKBP12 in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, the effect of FKBP12 overexpression on APP processing was evaluated. Our results revealed that APP processing was shifted towards the amyloidogenic pathway, accompanied by a change in the subcellular localization of APP, upon FKBP12 overexpression. This FKBP12-overexpression-induced effect was reverted by FK506. These findings support our hypothesis that FKBP12 may participate in the regulation of APP processing. FKBP12 overexpression may lead to the stabilization of a certain isomer (presumably the cis form) of the Thr668-Pro669 peptide bond in AICD, therefore change its affinity to flotillin-1 or other raft-associated proteins, and eventually change the localization pattern and cause a shift in the proteolytic processing of APP.

  18. Microglia, neuroinflammation, and beta-amyloid protein in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhiyou; Hussain, M Delwar; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Compelling evidence from basic molecular biology has demonstrated the dual roles of microglia in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). On one hand, microglia are involved in AD pathogenesis by releasing inflammatory mediators such as inflammatory cytokines, complement components, chemokines, and free radicals that are all known to contribute to beta-amyloid (Aβ) production and accumulation. On the other hand, microglia are also known to play a beneficial role in generating anti-Aβ antibodies and stimulating clearance of amyloid plaques. Aβ itself, an inducer of microglia activation and neuroinflammation, has been considered as an underlying and unifying factor in the development of AD. A vicious cycle of inflammation has been formed between Aβ accumulation, activated microglia, and microglial inflammatory mediators, which enhance Aβ deposition and neuroinflammation. Thus, inhibiting the vicious cycle seems to be a promising treatment to restrain further development of AD. With increasing research efforts on microglia in AD, intervention of microglia activation and neuroinflammation in AD may provide a potential target for AD therapy in spite of the provisional failure of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in clinical trials.

  19. Intravenous delivery of targeted liposomes to amyloid-β pathology in APP/PSEN1 transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Tanifum

    Full Text Available Extracellular amyloid-β (Aβ plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles constitute the major neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD. It is now apparent that parenchymal Aβ plaque deposition precedes behavioral signs of disease by several years. The development of agents that can target these plaques may be useful as diagnostic or therapeutic tools. In this study, we synthesized an Aβ-targeted lipid conjugate, incorporated it in stealth liposomal nanoparticles and tested their ability to bind amyloid plaque deposits in an AD mouse model. The results show that the particles maintain binding profiles to synthetic Aβ aggregates comparable to the free ligand, and selectively bind Aβ plaque deposits in brain tissue sections of an AD mouse model (APP/PSEN1 transgenic mice with high efficiency. When administered intravenously, these long circulating nanoparticles appear to cross the blood-brain barrier and bind to Aβ plaque deposits, labeling parenchymal amyloid deposits and vascular amyloid characteristic of cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

  20. Amyloid-beta Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Probes : A Critical Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C.; Langstrom, Bengt; Zaidi, Habib; Vinters, Harry V.; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Doudet, Doris; Mishani, Eyal; Cohen, Robert M.; Hoilund-Carlsen, Poul F.; Alavi, Abass; Barrio, Jorge R.

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly rising prevalence and cost of Alzheimer's disease in recent decades has made the imaging of amyloid-beta deposits the focus of intense research. Several amyloid imaging probes with purported specificity for amyloid-beta plaques are currently at various stages of FDA approval. However, a

  1. Specific Triazine Herbicides Induce Amyloid-beta(42) Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portelius, Erik; Durieu, Emilie; Bodin, Marion; Cam, Morgane; Pannee, Josef; Leuxe, Charlotte; Mabondzo, Aloise; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Herve; Lee, Jung Yeol; Chang, Young-Tae; Stuber, Kathrin; Koch, Philipp; Fontaine, Gaelle; Potier, Marie-Claude; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Garbis, Spiros D.; Covaci, Adrian; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter; Karg, Frank; Flajolet, Marc; Omori, Chiori; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Meijer, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid-beta protein precursor (A beta PP) ecretases leads to extracellular release of amyloid-beta (A beta) peptides. Increased production of A beta(42) over A beta(40) and aggregation into oligomers and plaques constitute an Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmark. Identifyin

  2. Glial fibrillary acidic protein isoform expression in plaque related astrogliosis in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, W.; Middeldorp, Jinte; Kooijman, Lieneke; Sluijs, Jacqueline A; Kooi, Evert-Jan; Moeton, Martina; Freriks, Michel; Mizee, Mark R; Hol, Elly M

    2014-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid plaques are surrounded by reactive astrocytes with an increased expression of intermediate filaments including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Different GFAP isoforms have been identified that are differentially expressed by specific subpopulations of ast

  3. Radiolabeled probes for imaging Alzheimer's plaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, P.V. [Departments of Radiology and Pathology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390-9058 (United States)]. E-mail: padmakar.kulkarni@utsouthwestern.edu; Arora, V. [Departments of Radiology and Pathology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390-9058 (United States); Roney, A.C. [Departments of Radiology and Pathology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390-9058 (United States); White, C. [Departments of Radiology and Pathology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390-9058 (United States); Bennett, M. [Departments of Radiology and Pathology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390-9058 (United States); Antich, P.P. [Departments of Radiology and Pathology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390-9058 (United States); Bonte, F.J. [Departments of Radiology and Pathology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390-9058 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a debilitating disease characterized by the presence of extra-cellular plaques and intra-cellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the brain. The major protein component of these plaques is beta amyloid peptide (A{beta}), a 40-42 amino acid peptide cleaved from amyloid precursor protein (APP) by {beta}-secretase and a putative {gamma}-secretase. We radioiodinated quinoline derivatives (clioquinol and oxine) and evaluated them as potential amyloid imaging agents based on their ability to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) and on their selectivity to metal binding sites on amyloid plaques. The uptake of theses tracers in the brains of normal swiss-webster mice was rapid and so was the clearance. Selectivity was demonstrated by higher binding to AD brain homogenates compared to normal brain. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated the localization of the tracers in the plaque regions of the AD brain sections as well as in liver tissue with amyloidosis. Further optimization and evaluations would likely lead to development of these molecules as AD plaque imaging agents.

  4. Characterization of Amyloid-β Deposits in Bovine Brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallino Costassa, Elena; Fiorini, Michele; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Peletto, Simone; Acutis, Pierluigi; Baioni, Elisa; Maurella, Cristiana; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Catania, Marcella; Gallo, Marina; Faro, Monica Lo; Chieppa, Maria Novella; Meloni, Daniela; D'Angelo, Antonio; Paciello, Orlando; Ghidoni, Roberta; Tonoli, Elisa; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits are seen in aged individuals of many mammalian species that possess the same aminoacid sequence as humans. This study describes Aβ deposition in 102 clinically characterized cattle brains from animals aged 0 to 20 years. Extracellular and intracellular Aβ deposition was detected with 4G8 antibody in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. X-34 staining failed to stain Aβ deposits, indicating the non β-pleated nature of these deposits. Western blot analysis and surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed in Tris, Triton, and formic acid fractions the presence of different Aβ peptides, characterized mainly by C-terminally truncated forms. Exploration of the genetic variability of APOE, PSEN1, and PSEN2 genes involved in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis revealed several previously unreported polymorphisms. This study demonstrates certain similarities between Aβ deposition patterns exhibited in cattle brains and those in the human brain in early stages of aging. Furthermore, the identification of the same Aβ peptides reported in humans, but unable to form aggregates, supports the hypothesis that cattle may be protected against amyloid plaque formation.

  5. A transgenic Alzheimer rat with plaques, tau pathology, behavioral impairment, oligomeric Aβ and frank neuronal loss

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is hallmarked by amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and widespread cortical neuronal loss (Selkoe, 2001). The ‘amyloid cascade hypothesis’ posits that cerebral amyloid sets neurotoxic events into motion that precipitate Alzheimer dementia (Hardy and Allsop, 1991). Yet, faithful recapitulation of all AD features in widely used transgenic (Tg) mice engineered to overproduce Aβ peptides has been elusive. We have developed a Tg rat model (line TgF344-AD) expressing...

  6. An anti-pyroglutamate-3 Aβ vaccine reduces plaques and improves cognition in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Jeffrey L.; Liu, Bin; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Kleinschmidt, Martin; O'Nuallain, Brian; Le, Kevin X.; Lues, Inge; Caldarone, Barbara J.; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Lemere, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Pyroglutamate-3 amyloid-beta (pGlu-3 Aβ) is an N-terminally truncated Aβ isoform likely playing a decisive role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Here, we describe a prophylactic passive immunization study in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice using a novel pGlu-3 Aβ IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb), 07/1 (150 and 500μg i.p. weekly), and compare its efficacy with a general Aβ IgG1 mAb, 3A1 (200μg i.p. weekly) as a positive control. After 28 weeks of treatment, plaque burden was reduced and cognitive performance of 07/1-immunized Tg mice, especially at the higher dose, was normalized to wild-type (Wt) levels in two hippocampal-dependent tests and partially spared compared to PBS-treated Tg mice. Mice that received 3A1 had reduced plaque burden but showed no cognitive benefit. In contrast to 3A1, treatment with 07/1 did not increase the concentration of Aβ in plasma, suggesting different modes of Aβ plaque clearance. In conclusion, early selective targeting of pGlu-3 Aβ by immunotherapy may be effective in lowering cerebral Aβ plaque burden and preventing cognitive decline in the clinical setting. Targeting this pathologically-modified form of Aβ thereby is unlikely to interfere with potential physiologic function(s) of Aβ that have been proposed. PMID:26453001

  7. The effects of enhanced zinc on spatial memory and plaque formation in transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkous, D.H.; Adlard, P.A.; Wanschura, P.B.; Conko, K.M.; Flinn, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable evidence suggesting that metals play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Reports suggest that elevated dietary metals may both precipitate and potentiate an Alzheimer's disease phenotype. Despite this, there remain few studies that have examined the behavioral consequences of elevated dietary metals in wild type and Alzheimer's disease animals. To further investigate this in the current study, two separate transgenic models of AD (Tg2576 and TgCRND8), together with wild type littermates were administered 10 ppm (0.153 mM) Zn. Tg2576 animals were maintained on a zinc-enriched diet both pre- and postnatally until 11 months of age, while TgCRND8 animals were treated for five months following weaning. Behavioral testing, consisting of "Atlantis" and "moving" platform versions of the Morris water maze, were conducted at the end of the study, and tissues were collected for immunohistochemical analysis of amyloid-β burden. Our data demonstrate that the provision of a zinc-enriched diet potentiated Alzheimer-like spatial memory impairments in the transgenic animals and was associated with reduced hippocampal amyloidplaque deposits. Zinc-related behavioral deficits were also demonstrated in wild type mice, which were sometimes as great as those present in the transgenic animals. However, zinc-related cognitive impairments in transgenic mice were greater than the summation of zinc effects in the wild type mice and the transgene effects.

  8. Recent Development of Bifunctional Small Molecules to Study Metal-Amyloid-β Species in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braymer, Joseph J; Detoma, Alaina S; Choi, Jung-Suk; Ko, Kristin S; Lim, Mi Hee

    2010-12-08

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease related to the deposition of aggregated amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in the brain. It has been proposed that metal ion dyshomeostasis and miscompartmentalization contribute to AD progression, especially as metal ions (e.g., Cu(II) and Zn(II)) found in Aβ plaques of the diseased brain can bind to Aβ and be linked to aggregation and neurotoxicity. The role of metal ions in AD pathogenesis, however, is uncertain. To accelerate understanding in this area and contribute to therapeutic development, recent efforts to devise suitable chemical reagents that can target metal ions associated with Aβ have been made using rational structure-based design that combines two functions (metal chelation and Aβ interaction) in the same molecule. This paper presents bifunctional compounds developed by two different design strategies (linkage or incorporation) and discusses progress in their applications as chemical tools and/or potential therapeutics.

  9. Apopotic gene Bax expression in carotid plaque

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Zhong MEN; Ding-Biao ZHOU; Huai-Yin SHI; Xiao-Ming ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    The expression of BAX in carotid atherosclerosis and its regulation is far from defined. Objectives To investigate BAX expression in stable/fibrous and instable/vulnerable carotid plaque and its clinical significance. Methods 25 cases of carotid plaque specimens obtained from endarterectomy were divided into two groups, stable/fibrous 14 cases, vulnerable/instable 11 cases; aortic artery and its branches from hepatic transplantation donors 6 case as control. The expression of proapoptotic BAX was detected by immunohistochemistry(IHC), in situ hybridization(ISH) and in situ TdT dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Results 5 cases of BAX ( + ) were detected by ICH and ISH, 4 case of TUNEL ( + ) were detected by TUNEL in stable/fibrous carotid plaque , while 10 cases were BAX ( + )by IHC(P < 0.05) , 11case by ISH and 9 case by TUNEL were detected in instable/vulnerable carotid plaque ( P < 0.01 ), respectively. The intensity of BAX ( + ) cells by IHC and ISH was 8.63 ± 2.62 and 10.32 ± 3.12 in fibrous plaques, whereas 122 ± 21.64and 152 ± 23.35 in vulnerable plaques, respectively. No expression of BAX was found in controlled group. Conclusion The higher expression of Bax in vulnerable carotid plaque may be one mechanisms in molecular pathogenesis of carotid atherosclerosis which affect plaque stability and be the cause of higher incidence of stroke than fibrous carotid plaques, the regulation of BAX expression in different stage of atherosclerosis may provide targets in gene therapy for carotid atherosclerosis.

  10. The Role of Oxidative Stress-Induced Epigenetic Alterations in Amyloid-β Production in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of studies have proposed a strong correlation between reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced oxidative stress (OS and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. With over five million people diagnosed in the United States alone, AD is the most common type of dementia worldwide. AD includes progressive neurodegeneration, followed by memory loss and reduced cognitive ability. Characterized by the formation of amyloid-beta (Aβ plaques as a hallmark, the connection between ROS and AD is compelling. Analyzing the ROS response of essential proteins in the amyloidogenic pathway, such as amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP and beta-secretase (BACE1, along with influential signaling programs of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, has helped visualize the path between OS and Aβ overproduction. In this review, attention will be paid to significant advances in the area of OS, epigenetics, and their influence on Aβ plaque assembly. Additionally, we aim to discuss available treatment options for AD that include antioxidant supplements, Asian traditional medicines, metal-protein-attenuating compounds, and histone modifying inhibitors.

  11. Influence of hydrophobic Teflon particles on the structure of amyloid beta-peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacomelli, C.E.; Norde, W.

    2003-01-01

    The amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) constitutes the major peptide component of the amyloid plaque deposits of Alzheimer's disease in humans. The Abeta changes from a nonpathogenic to a pathogenic conformation resulting in self-aggregation and deposition of the peptide. It has been established that dena

  12. Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera reverses β-amyloid1-42 induced toxicity in human neuronal cells: implications in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesava Rao Venkata Kurapati

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by progressive dysfunction of memory and higher cognitive functions with abnormal accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles throughout cortical and limbic brain regions. At present no curative treatment is available, and research focuses on drugs for slowing disease progression or providing prophylaxis. Withania somnifera (WS also known as 'ashwagandha' is used widely in Ayurvedic medicine as a nerve tonic and memory enhancer. However, there is a paucity of data on the potential neuroprotective effects of W.somnifera against β-Amyloid (1-42-induced neuropathogenesis. In the present study, we have tested the neuroprotective effects of methanol:Chloroform (3:1 extract of ashwagandha against β-amyloid induced toxicity and HIV-1Ba-L (clade B infection using a human neuronal SK-N-MC cell line. Our results showed that β-amyloid induced cytotoxic effects in SK-N-MC cells as shown by decreased cell growth when tested individually. Also, confocal microscopic analysis showed decreased spine density, loss of spines and decreased dendrite diameter, total dendrite and spine area in clade B infected SK-N-MC cells compared to uninfected cells. However, when ashwagandha was added to β-amyloid treated and HIV-1 infected samples, the toxic effects were neutralized. Further, the MTT cell viability assays and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ levels supported these observations indicating the neuroprotective effect of WS root extract against β-amyloid and HIV-1Ba-L (clade B induced neuro-pathogenesis.

  13. Metabolic Characterization of Intact Cells Reveals Intracellular Amyloid Beta but Not Its Precursor Protein to Reduce Mitochondrial Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Patrick M.; von Einem, Bjoern; Walther, Paul; Calzia, Enrico; von Arnim, Christine A. F.

    2016-01-01

    One hallmark of Alzheimer´s disease are senile plaques consisting of amyloid beta (Aβ), which derives from the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer´s disease and both Aβ and APP have been reported to affect mitochondrial function in isolated systems. However, in intact cells, considering a physiological localization of APP and Aβ, it is pending what triggers the mitochondrial defect. Thus, the aim of this study was to dissect the impact of APP versus Aβ in inducing mitochondrial alterations with respect to their subcellular localization. We performed an overexpression of APP or beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), increasing APP and Aβ levels or Aβ alone, respectively. Conducting a comprehensive metabolic characterization we demonstrate that only APP overexpression reduced mitochondrial respiration, despite lower extracellular Aβ levels compared to BACE overexpression. Surprisingly, this could be rescued by a gamma secretase inhibitor, oppositionally indicating an Aβ-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. Analyzing Aβ localization revealed that intracellular levels of Aβ and an increased spatial association of APP/Aβ with mitochondria are associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration. Thus, our data provide marked evidence for a prominent role of intracellular Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer´s disease associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby it highlights the importance of the localization of APP processing and intracellular transport as a decisive factor for mitochondrial function, linking two prominent hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28005987

  14. The role of mutated amyloid beta 1-42 stimulating dendritic cells in a PDAPP transgenic mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Jia-lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Amyloid plaque is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Anti-beta-amyloid (Aβ immunotherapy is effective in removing brain Aβ, but has shown to be associated with detrimental effects. To avoid severe adverse effects such as meningoencephalitis induced by amyloid beta vaccine with adjuvant, and take advantage of amyloid beta antibody's therapeutic effect on Alzheimer's disease sufficiently, our group has developed a new Alzheimer vaccine with mutated amyloid beta 1-42 peptide stimulating dendritic cells (DC. Our previous work has confirmed that DC vaccine can induce adequate anti-amyloid beta antibody in PDAPP Tg mice safely and efficiently. The DC vaccine can improve impaired learning and memory in the Alzheimer's animal model, and did not cause microvasculitis, microhemorrhage or meningoencephalitis in the animal model. However, the exact mechanism of immunotherapy which reduces Aβ deposition remains unknown. In this report, we studied the mechanism of the vaccine, thinking that this may have implications for better understanding of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Methods A new Alzheimer vaccine with mutated amyloid beta 1-42 peptide stimulating DC which were obtained from C57/B6 mouse bone marrow was developed. Amyloid beta with Freund's adjuvant was inoculated at the same time to act as positive control. After the treatment was done, the samples of brains were collected, fixed, cut. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to observe the expression of the nuclear hormone liver X receptor (LXR, membrane-bound protein tyrosine phosphatase (CD45, the ATP-binding cassette family of active transporters (ABCA1, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, β-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE and Aβ in mouse brain tissue. Semi-quantitative analysis was used to defect CA1, CA2, CA3, DG, Rad in hippocampus region and positive neuron in cortex region. Results Aβ was significantly reduced in the

  15. An update on the amyloid hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Christopher B; Eckman, Elizabeth A

    2007-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease. To rationally develop novel therapeutic and/or preventative agents for AD, an understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of this complex disease is necessary. This article examines the evidence for the amyloid hypothesis of AD pathogenesis and discusses how it relates to the neurological and neuropathological features of AD, the known genetic risk factors and causative mutations, and the heightened risk associated with advanced age.

  16. Extraskeletal problems and amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drüeke, T B

    1999-12-01

    The major clinical manifestations of dialysis-associated A beta 2M amyloidosis are chronic arthralgias, destructive arthropathy and the carpal tunnel syndrome. For dialysis patients who have been maintained on renal replacement therapy for more than 10-15 years, this complication may become a major physical handicap. It may even be life-threatening in some instances due to cervical cord compression. Amyloid deposits in joint areas precede clinical symptoms and signs by several years. Systemic deposits may also occur but their clinical manifestations are infrequent. The diagnosis of dialysis arthropathy associated with beta 2-microglobulin-associated (A beta 2M) amyloidosis mostly relies on indirect clinical and radiological evidence. Histologic proof is rarely obtained in vivo. The pathogenesis of the disease is complex. It includes reduced elimination of beta 2M and potentially also as impaired degradation of A beta 2M as well as enhanced production of A beta 2M amyloid fibrils. Non enzymatic modifications of beta 2M probably play a role, including beta 2M protein modification with advanced glycation end-products (AGE) and advanced oxidation protein products. Modified beta 2M, collagen and proteoglycans appear actively involved in the induction of a local inflammatory response and beta 2M amyloid formation. There is also evidence in favor of treatment-related factors such as the type of hemodialysis membrane and the purity of dialysis water. Hopefully, the translation of our improving knowledge of all the factors involved will lead to a better treatment and eventually to the prevention of this dramatic complication of dialysis.

  17. Compressive deformation of ultralong amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Cranford, Steven; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-12-01

    Involved in various neurodegenerative diseases, amyloid fibrils and plaques feature a hierarchical structure, ranging from the atomistic to the micrometer scale. At the atomistic level, a dense and organized hydrogen bond network is resembled in a beta-sheet rich secondary structure, which drives a remarkable stiffness in the range of 10-20GPa, larger than many other biological nanofibrils, a result confirmed by both experiment and theory. However, the understanding of how these exceptional mechanical properties transfer from the atomistic to the nanoscale remains unknown. Here we report a multiscale analysis that, from the atomistic-level structure of a single fibril, extends to the mesoscale level, reaching size scales of hundreds of nanometers. We use parameters directly derived from full atomistic simulations of A β (1-40) amyloid fibrils to parameterize a mesoscopic coarse-grained model, which is used to reproduce the elastic properties of amyloid fibrils. We then apply our mesoscopic model in an analysis of the buckling behavior of amyloid fibrils with different lengths and report a comparison with predictions from continuum beam theory. An important implication of our results is a severe reduction of the effective modulus due to buckling, an effect that could be important to interpret experimental results of ultra-long amyloid fibrils. Our model represents a powerful tool to mechanically characterize molecular structures on the order of hundreds of nanometers to micrometers on the basis of the underlying atomistic behavior. The work provides insight into structural and mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils and may enable further analysis of larger-scale assemblies such as amyloidogenic bundles or plaques as found in disease states.

  18. Visualization of neuritic plaques in Alzheimer’s disease by polarization-sensitive optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Bernhard; Woehrer, Adelheid; Ricken, Gerda; Augustin, Marco; Mitter, Christian; Pircher, Michael; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2017-03-01

    One major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is the deposition of extracellular senile plaques and vessel wall deposits composed of amyloid-beta (Aβ). In AD, degeneration of neurons is preceded by the formation of Aβ plaques, which show different morphological forms. Most of them are birefringent owing to the parallel arrangement of amyloid fibrils. Here, we present polarization sensitive optical coherence microscopy (PS-OCM) for imaging mature neuritic Aβ plaques based on their birefringent properties. Formalin-fixed, post-mortem brain samples of advanced stage AD patients were investigated. In several cortical brain regions, neuritic Aβ plaques were successfully visualized in tomographic and three-dimensional (3D) images. Cortical grey matter appeared polarization preserving, whereas neuritic plaques caused increased phase retardation. Consistent with the results from PS-OCM imaging, the 3D structure of senile Aβ plaques was computationally modelled for different illumination settings and plaque sizes. Furthermore, the birefringent properties of cortical and meningeal vessel walls in CAA were investigated in selected samples. Significantly increased birefringence was found in smaller vessels. Overall, these results provide evidence that PS-OCM is able to assess amyloidosis based on intrinsic birefringent properties.

  19. Visualization of neuritic plaques in Alzheimer’s disease by polarization-sensitive optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Bernhard; Woehrer, Adelheid; Ricken, Gerda; Augustin, Marco; Mitter, Christian; Pircher, Michael; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2017-01-01

    One major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is the deposition of extracellular senile plaques and vessel wall deposits composed of amyloid-beta (Aβ). In AD, degeneration of neurons is preceded by the formation of Aβ plaques, which show different morphological forms. Most of them are birefringent owing to the parallel arrangement of amyloid fibrils. Here, we present polarization sensitive optical coherence microscopy (PS-OCM) for imaging mature neuritic Aβ plaques based on their birefringent properties. Formalin-fixed, post-mortem brain samples of advanced stage AD patients were investigated. In several cortical brain regions, neuritic Aβ plaques were successfully visualized in tomographic and three-dimensional (3D) images. Cortical grey matter appeared polarization preserving, whereas neuritic plaques caused increased phase retardation. Consistent with the results from PS-OCM imaging, the 3D structure of senile Aβ plaques was computationally modelled for different illumination settings and plaque sizes. Furthermore, the birefringent properties of cortical and meningeal vessel walls in CAA were investigated in selected samples. Significantly increased birefringence was found in smaller vessels. Overall, these results provide evidence that PS-OCM is able to assess amyloidosis based on intrinsic birefringent properties. PMID:28262719

  20. Brain burdens of aluminum, iron, and copper and their relationships with amyloid-β pathology in 60 human brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher; House, Emily; Polwart, Anthony; Esiri, Margaret M

    2012-01-01

    The deposition in the brain of amyloid-β as beta sheet conformers associated with senile plaques and vasculature is frequently observed in Alzheimer’s disease. While metals, primarily aluminum, iron, zinc, and copper, have been implicated in amyloid-β deposition in vivo, there are few data specifically relating brain metal burden with extent of amyloid pathologies in human brains. Herein brain tissue content of aluminum, iron, and copper are compared with burdens of amyloid-β, as senile plaques and as congophilic amyloid angiopathy, in 60 aged human brains. Significant observations were strong negative correlations between brain copper burden and the degree of severity of both senile plaque and congophilic amyloid angiopathy pathologies with the relationship with the former reaching statistical significance. While we did not have access to the dementia status of the majority of the 60 brain donors, this knowledge for just 4 donors allowed us to speculate that diagnosis of dementia might be predicted by a combination of amyloid pathology and a ratio of the brain burden of copper to the brain burden of aluminum. Taking into account only those donor brains with either senile plaque scores ≥4 and/or congophilic amyloid angiopathy scores ≥12, a Cu:Al ratio of <20 would predict that at least 39 of the 60 donors would have been diagnosed as suffering from dementia. Future research should test the hypothesis that, in individuals with moderate to severe amyloid pathology, low brain copper is a predisposition to developing dementia.

  1. The Relationship Between Astrocyte-mediated Metabolism of β-Amyloid Protein and Pathogenesis of The Early Stages of Alzheimer's Disease%星形胶质细胞介导的β-淀粉样蛋白代谢与阿尔茨海默病早期的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林律; 徐淑君; 王钦文

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is characterized with acquired deterioration of cognitive functioning and neuronal loss, is the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly population. However, the pathogenesis of AD is still unclear. The accumulation of β-amyloid protein(Aβ) in the brains has been associated with pathogenesis of AD. Studies have shown that astrocytes, the most abundant cells in the central nervous system (CNS), play an important role in the cause and progression of AD by regulating the metabolism of Aβ. The present paper reviews the production, internalization and degradation of Aβ in astrocytes. Our goal is to provide updated views of the role and mechanism of astrocytes in the metabolism of Aβ and its role in pathogenesis in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease.%星形胶质细胞是中枢神经系统中含量最丰富的细胞,研究表明,星形胶质细胞与阿尔茨海默病(Alzheimer's disease,AD)病程有关,尤其是对AD主要致病蛋白β-淀粉样蛋白(β-amyloid protein,Aβ)的产生、内化和降解过程起着重要的调节作用.本文讨论星形胶质细胞中Aβ的产生,星形胶质细胞对Aβ的内化、降解和清除的机制,并阐释星形胶质细胞在Aβ代谢中的作用与AD早期发病机制的关系.

  2. Mechanisms of beta-amyloid neurotoxicity : Perspectives of pharmacotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T; Abraham, [No Value; Konya, C; Nyakas, C; Zarandi, M; Penke, B; Luiten, PGM

    2000-01-01

    One of the characteristic neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the extracellular accumulation of beta -amyloid peptides (A beta) in neuritic plaques, Experimental data indicate that different molecular forms of A beta affect a wide array of neuronal and glial functions and ther

  3. Protective properties of lysozyme on β-amyloid pathology: implications for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmfors, Linda; Boman, Andrea; Civitelli, Livia; Nath, Sangeeta; Sandin, Linnea; Janefjord, Camilla; McCann, Heather; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Halliday, Glenda; Brorsson, Ann-Christin; Kågedal, Katarina

    2015-11-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer disease are amyloidplaques and neurofibrillary tangles accompanied by signs of neuroinflammation. Lysozyme is a major player in the innate immune system and has recently been shown to prevent the aggregation of amyloid-β1-40 in vitro. In this study we found that patients with Alzheimer disease have increased lysozyme levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and lysozyme co-localized with amyloid-β in plaques. In Drosophila neuronal co-expression of lysozyme and amyloid-β1-42 reduced the formation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-β species, prolonged survival and improved the activity of amyloid-β1-42 transgenic flies. This suggests that lysozyme levels rise in Alzheimer disease as a compensatory response to amyloid-β increases and aggregation. In support of this, in vitro aggregation assays revealed that lysozyme associates with amyloid-β1-42 and alters its aggregation pathway to counteract the formation of toxic amyloid-β species. Overall, these studies establish a protective role for lysozyme against amyloid-β associated toxicities and identify increased lysozyme in patients with Alzheimer disease. Therefore, lysozyme has potential as a new biomarker as well as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer disease.

  4. Cell number changes in Alzheimer's disease relate to dementia, not to plaques and tangles

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade-Moraes, CH; Oliveira-Pinto, AV; Castro-Fonseca, E; da Silva, CG; Guimaraes, DM; Szczupak, D; Parente-Bruno, DR; Carvalho, LRB; Polichiso, L; Gomes, BV; De Oliveira, LM; Rodriguez, RD; Leite, REP; Ferretti-Rebustini, REL; Jacob-filho, W

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is the commonest cause of dementia in the elderly, but its pathological determinants are still debated. Amyloidplaques and neurofibrillary tangles have been implicated either directly as disruptors of neural function, or indirectly by precipitating neuronal death and thus causing a reduction in neuronal number. Alternatively, the initial cognitive decline has been attributed to subtle intracellular events caused by amyloid-β oligomers, resulting in dementia after massiv...

  5. Genes contributing to prion pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Glidden, David V;

    2008-01-01

    incubation times, indicating that the conversion reaction may be influenced by other gene products. To identify genes that contribute to prion pathogenesis, we analysed incubation times of prions in mice in which the gene product was inactivated, knocked out or overexpressed. We tested 20 candidate genes...... show that many genes previously implicated in prion replication have no discernible effect on the pathogenesis of prion disease. While most genes tested did not significantly affect survival times, ablation of the amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein (App) or interleukin-1 receptor, type I (Il1r1...

  6. Copper(II) ions and the Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide: Affinity and stoichiometry of binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tõugu, Vello; Friedemann, Merlin; Tiiman, Ann; Palumaa, Peep

    2014-10-01

    Deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides into amyloid plaques is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis this deposition is an early event and primary cause of the disease, however, the mechanisms that cause this deposition remain elusive. An increasing amount of evidence shows that the interactions of biometals can contribute to the fibrillization and amyloid formation by amyloidogenic peptides. From different anions the copper ions deserve the most attention since it can contribute not only toamyloid formation but also to its toxicity due to the generation of ROS. In this thesis we focus on the affinity and stoichiometry of copper(II) binding to the Aβ molecule.

  7. Corneal mucus plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraunfelder, F T; Wright, P; Tripathi, R C

    1977-02-01

    Corneal mucus plaques adhered to the anterior corneal surface in 17 of 67 advanced cases of keratoconjunctivitis sicca. The plaques were translucent to opaque and varied in size and shape, from multiple isolated islands to bizarre patterns involving more than half the corneal surface. Ultrastructurally, they consisted of mucus mixed with desquamated degenerating epithelial cells and proteinaceous and lipoidal material. The condition may be symptomatic but can be controlled and prevented in most cases by topical ocular application of 10% acetylcysteine.

  8. Bapineuzumab alters aβ composition: implications for the amyloid cascade hypothesis and anti-amyloid immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex E Roher

    Full Text Available The characteristic neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD and other lines of evidence support the amyloid cascade hypothesis. Viewing amyloid deposits as the prime instigator of dementia has now led to clinical trials of multiple strategies to remove or prevent their formation. We performed neuropathological and biochemical assessments of 3 subjects treated with bapineuzumab infusions. Histological analyses were conducted to quantify amyloid plaque densities, Braak stages and the extent of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA. Amyloid-β (Aβ species in frontal and temporal lobe samples were quantified by ELISA. Western blots of amyloid-β precursor protein (AβPP and its C-terminal (CT fragments as well as tau species were performed. Bapineuzumab-treated (Bapi-AD subjects were compared to non-immunized age-matched subjects with AD (NI-AD and non-demented control (NDC cases. Our study revealed that Bapi-AD subjects exhibited overall amyloid plaque densities similar to those of NI-AD cases. In addition, CAA was moderate to severe in NI-AD and Bapi-AD patients. Although histologically-demonstrable leptomeningeal, cerebrovascular and neuroparenchymal-amyloid densities all appeared unaffected by treatment, Aβ peptide profiles were significantly altered in Bapi-AD subjects. There was a trend for reduction in total Aβ42 levels as well as an increase in Aβ40 which led to a corresponding significant decrease in Aβ42:Aβ40 ratio in comparison to NI-AD subjects. There were no differences in the levels of AβPP, CT99 and CT83 or tau species between Bapi-AD and NI-AD subjects. The remarkable alteration in Aβ profiles reveals a dynamic amyloid production in which removal and depositional processes were apparently perturbed by bapineuzumab therapy. Despite the alteration in biochemical composition, all 3 immunized subjects exhibited continued cognitive decline.

  9. 苯并噻唑希夫碱类化合物的合成及其与β-淀粉样蛋白结合性能的研究%Synthesis of benzothiazole derivatives and their binding characteristics with β-amyloid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周琳; 甘昌胜; 汪昊曙; 赵珍珍; 潘见

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease endangering human health seriously. Recent reports have revealed that β-amyloid aggregates play a key role in the pathogenesis of AD. Thus, targeting the Aβ plaques benzothiazole derivatives were synthesized with the scaffold of the most promising imaging agent PIB ([11C]-6-OH-BTA-l, ["C]-2-(4-(raethylamino)phenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole) and C=N as linker to study the binding characteristics with the target protein through surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. These derivatives were synthesized through simple yet effective method with high yields and characterized by 'H NMR and FUR. The binding properties {KD} were determined with Biacore X-100 instrument according to the fitting-plot curve. Compounds 3a and 3f showed high binding affinity for Aβ1-40. The results suggest that benzothiazole derivatives could be served as a scaffold to develop novel β-amyloid imaging agents for the diagnosis of AD.

  10. Enhancement of β-amyloid oligomer accumulation after intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin, which involves central insulin signaling in a transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fangju; Jia, Jianping; Qin, Wei

    2014-11-12

    The β-amyloid (Aβ) oligomer rather than fibrillar Aβ has become the important focus of recent studies on the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Insulin signaling plays important roles in cognitive disease, such as AD. However, in-vivo evidence for the link between central insulin signaling and the Aβ oligomer are lacking, and the mechanisms underlying the effect of central insulin signaling on AD are still elusive. Our team has established the Presenilin-1 Val97Leu mutant transgenic (PS1V97L) AD mouse model with the intraneuronal Aβ oligomer as the potential initiator for other pathologies, but without extracellular amyloid plaque formation. Using this model, we investigated the roles of disturbed central insulin signaling induced by intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin (STZ) in the progression of AD. We observed that PS1V97L mice after intracerebroventricular injection of STZ showed increased Aβ oligomer accumulation and aggravated spatial learning and memory deficit in the absence of diabetes symptoms. Furthermore, STZ administration inhibited the activation of the insulin receptor and enhanced the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, which was accompanied by increased production of carboxy-terminal fragments from the amyloid precursor protein, in the brain of PS1V97L mice. Overall, our study provided in-vivo evidence for a role of central insulin signaling in AD progression.

  11. Effect of catalpol on senile plaques and spatial learning and memory ability in amyloid-β protein precursor/presenilin 1 double transgenic mice%梓醇对淀粉样蛋白前体/早老素1双转基因小鼠老年斑和学习记忆的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋冲; 楚亚楠; 贺桂琼; 刘刚; 王凌唏; 周泽芬; 姚秋会

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察梓醇对淀粉样蛋白前体、早老素1(APP/PSI)双转基因小鼠老年斑和学习记忆能力的影响.方法 将3个月龄的APP/PS1双转基因小鼠按照随机数字表法分为梓醇治疗组和生理盐水对照组,每组10只,并以10只同月龄的相同遗传背景的C57小鼠作为正常对照组.用梓醇(每天5 mg/kg)和等量生理盐水腹腔注射阿尔茨海默病(AD)模型小鼠3周,应用免疫组织化学检测各组小鼠老年斑数量的变化;应用Morris水迷宫检测小鼠空间学习记忆能力的变化.结果 免疫组织化学结果显示:与生理盐水对照组(6.0±0.6)比较,梓醇治疗组小鼠老年斑数量(个)明显减少(2.3±0.7,t=3.500,P=0.025).行为学结果显示:(1)在可视平台实验中,3组小鼠找到平台的平均潜伏期和搜索的平均路径差异无统计学意义.(2)隐蔽平台下,梓醇治疗组小鼠找到平台的时间及搜索的路径较生理盐水对照组小鼠明显缩短;与正常对照组比较,差异无统计学意义.(3)在探索实验中,60 s内梓醇治疗组(6.4±0.5)小鼠穿越平台次数(次)明显高于生理盐水对照组(2.9±0.4,t=5.592,P=0.001),而与正常对照组(6.8±0.6)比较差异无统计学意义(t=0.418,P=0.682).结论 梓醇治疗能显著减少AD模型小鼠脑内老年斑数量,改善小鼠的空间学习记忆能力.%Objective To investigate whether catalpol affects senile plaque formation and spatial learning and memory ability in the amyloid-β protein precursor/presenilin 1 (APP/PSI) double transgenic mice.Methods Three month-old APP/PS1 double transgenic mice were randomly divided into catalpoltreated and saline-treated groups (n =10),with C57 mice of the same age and genetic background as normal control group (n =10).The catalpol (in a dose of 5 mg · kg-1 · d-1) and the same amount of saline were peritoneally injected into Alzheimer' s disease (AD) model mice for 3 weeks.Immunohistochemical staining was performed to examine senile

  12. Association between Randall's Plaque and Calcifying Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citfcioglu, Neva; Vejdani, Kaveh; Lee, Olivia; Mathew, Grace; Aho, Katja M.; Kajander, Olavi; McKay, David S.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2007-01-01

    Randall initially described calcified subepithelial papillary plaques, which he hypothesized as nidi for kidney stone formation. The discovery of calcifying nanoparticles (CNP) in many calcifying processes of human tissues has raised another hypothesis about their possible involvement in urinary stone formation. This research is the first attempt to investigate the potential association of these two hypotheses. We collected renal papilla and blood samples from 17 human patients who had undergone laparoscopic nephrectomy due to neoplasia. Immunohistochemical staining (IHS) was applied on the tissue samples using monoclonal antibody 8D10 (mAb) against CNP. Homogenized papillary tissues and serum samples were cultured for CNP. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis were performed on fixed papillary samples. Randall's plaques were visible on gross inspection in 11 out of 17 collected samples. IHS was positive for CNP antigen in 8 of these 11 visually positive samples, but in only 1 of the remaining 6 samples. SEM revealed spherical apatite formations in 14 samples, all of which had calcium and phosphate peaks detected by EDS analysis. From this study, there was some evidence of a link between the presence of Randall's plaques and the detection of CNP, also referred to as nanobacteria. Although causality was not demonstrated, these results suggest that further studies with negative control samples should be made to explore the etiology of Randall's plaque formation, thus leading to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of stone formation.

  13. A new mechanism found for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ After many years research,CAS scientists recently identified a new pathway underlying the Alzheimer's disease.They discovered that activation of a protein called β2-adrenergic receptor may lead to the abnormal formation of the amyloid plaques, which are believed to be the hallmark and primary cause of the disease. Their work was reported by Nature Medicine online on 19 November.

  14. Sulfonated dyes attenuate the toxic effects of beta-amyloid in a structure-specific fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, S J; Sadler, I I; Hawtin, S R; Tailor, V J; Shearman, M S

    1995-09-15

    We recently reported that several sulfate-containing glycosaminoglycans, a class of compounds associated with the beta-amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease, attenuate the toxic effects of beta-amyloid fragments beta 25-35 and beta 1-40. The amyloid-binding sulfonated dye Congo Red was shown to have a similar effect. Using two clonal cell lines, we now demonstrate that several sulfonated dyes attenuate beta-amyloid toxicity and that the protective effect appears specific for compounds whose sulfonate groups can interact with the beta-pleated structure of aggregated amyloid. These results suggest that by binding beta-amyloid these compounds may prevent toxic interactions of the peptide with cells.

  15. Effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone on sleep and brain interstitial fluid amyloid-β in an APP transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Fan; Zhang, Tony J; Mahan, Thomas E; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by impairment of cognitive function, extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, and synaptic and neuronal loss. There is substantial evidence that the aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain plays a key role in the pathogenesis of AD and that Aβ aggregation is a concentration dependent process. Recently, it was found that Aβ levels in the brain interstitial fluid (ISF) are regulated by the sleep-wake cycle in both humans and mice; ISF Aβ is higher during wakefulness and lower during sleep. Intracerebroventricular infusion of orexin increased wakefulness and ISF Aβ levels, and chronic sleep deprivation significantly increased Aβ plaque formation in amyloid precursor protein transgenic (APP) mice. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is a well-documented sleep regulatory substance which promotes non-rapid eye movement sleep. GHRHR(lit/lit) mice that lack functional GHRH receptor have shorter sleep duration and longer wakefulness during light periods. The current study was undertaken to determine whether manipulating sleep by interfering with GHRH signaling affects brain ISF Aβ levels in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 (PS1APP) transgenic mice that overexpress mutant forms of APP and PSEN1 that cause autosomal dominant AD. We found that intraperitoneal injection of GHRH at dark onset increased sleep and decreased ISF Aβ and that delivery of a GHRH antagonist via reverse-microdialysis suppressed sleep and increased ISF Aβ. The diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ in PS1APP/GHRHR(lit/lit) mice was significantly smaller than that in PS1APP/GHRHR(lit/+) mice. However despite decreased sleep in GHRHR deficient mice, this was not associated with an increase in Aβ accumulation later in life. One of several possibilities for the finding is the fact that GHRHR deficient mice have GHRH-dependent but sleep-independent factors which protect against Aβ deposition.

  16. Coronary spasm, a pathogenic trigger of vulnerable plaque rupture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-xin; L(U) Shu-zheng; ZHANG Wei-jun; SONG Xian-tao; CHEN Hui; ZHANG Li-jie

    2011-01-01

    Objective This coronary artery spasm review aimed to explore the most possible pathogenic trigger mechanism of vulnerable plaque rupture.Data sources Data used in this coronary artery spasm review were mainly from Medline and Pubmed in English.Study selection These reports from major review on coronary artery spasm.and these research included coronary artery conception,pathogenesis of spasm,mechanisms of plaque rupture,epidemiological evidence,clinical manifestation and the relationship between coronary artery spasm and vulnerable plaque rupture.Results Coronary artery spasm is somehow related to the presence of atherosclerotic intima disease in the coronary artery.However,chronic low-grade inflammation causes coronary vessel smooth muscle cell hypersensitivity,which can directely cause coronary artery spasm.Myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death may be initiated by a sudden intense localized contraction of coronary artery smooth muscle.Conclusion Coronary artery spasm may be one trigger that can initiate and exacerbate vulnerable plaque rupture.

  17. Plaque Type Blue Naevus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sentamilselvi G

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of plaque type blue naevus was encountered in a Dermatology Clinic in Madras. The various clinical differential diagnoses are discussed, the hitopathological features described and the benign nature of the tumour stressed. The case is reported for its rarity and to create an awareness of this entity.

  18. Erythropoietin improves memory function with reducing endothelial dysfunction and amyloid-beta burden in Alzheimer's disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Park, Jung-Eun; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Jeon, Daejong; Lim, Ji-Youn; Lee, Sang Kun; Kim, Manho; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2012-01-01

    Neurovascular degeneration contributes to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because erythropoietin (EPO) promotes endothelial regeneration, we investigated the therapeutic effects of EPO in animal models of AD. In aged Tg2576 mice, EPO receptors (EPORs) were expressed in the cortex and hippocampus. Tg2576 mice were treated with daily injection of EPO (5000 IU/kg/day) for 5 days. At 14 days, EPO improved contextual memory as measured by fear-conditioning test. EPO enhanced endothelial proliferation and the level of synaptophysin expression in the brain. EPO also increased capillary density, and decreased the level of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in the brain, while decreasing in the amount of amyloid plaque and amyloid-β (Aβ). In cultured human endothelial cells, EPO enhanced angiogenesis and suppressed the expression of the RAGE. These results show that EPO improves memory and ameliorates endothelial degeneration induced by Aβ in AD models. This pre-clinical evidence suggests that EPO may be useful for the treatment of AD.

  19. Aβ42 Is Essential for Parenchymal and Vascular Amyloid Deposition in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    McGowan, Eileen; Pickford, Fiona; Kim, Jungsu; Onstead, Luisa; Eriksen, Jason; Yu, Cindy; Skipper, Lisa; Murphy, M. Paul; Beard, Jenny; Das, Pritam; Jansen,Karen; DeLucia, Michael; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dolios, Georgia; Wang, Rong

    2005-01-01

    Considerable circumstantial evidence suggests that Aβ42 is the initiating molecule in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. However, the absolute requirement for Aβ42 for amyloid deposition has never been demonstrated in vivo. We have addressed this by developing transgenic models that express Aβ1-40 or Aβ1-42 in the absence of human amyloid β protein precursor (APP) overexpression. Mice expressing high levels of Aβ1-40 do not develop overt amyloid pathology. In contrast, mice expressing low...

  20. Multi-frequency, multi-technique pulsed EPR investigation of the copper binding site of murine amyloid β peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghun; Bang, Jeong Kyu; Kim, Sun Hee

    2015-01-26

    Copper-amyloid peptides are proposed to be the cause of Alzheimer's disease, presumably by oxidative stress. However, mice do not produce amyloid plaques and thus do not suffer from Alzheimer's disease. Although much effort has been focused on the structural characterization of the copper- human amyloid peptides, little is known regarding the copper-binding mode in murine amyloid peptides. Thus, we investigated the structure of copper-murine amyloid peptides through multi-frequency, multi-technique pulsed EPR spectroscopy in conjunction with specific isotope labeling. Based on our pulsed EPR results, we found that Ala2, Glu3, His6, and His14 are directly coordinated with the copper ion in murine amyloid β peptides at pH 8.5. This is the first detailed structural characterization of the copper-binding mode in murine amyloid β peptides. This work may advance the knowledge required for developing inhibitors of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Amyloid beta1–42 and the phoshorylated tau threonine 231 in brains of aged cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darusman, Huda Shalahudin; Gjedde, Albert; Sajuthi, Dondin

    2014-01-01

    Pathological hallmarks indicative of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which are the plaques of amyloid beta1-42 and neurofibrillary tangles, were found in brain of aged cynomolgus monkey. The aim of this study was to investigate if aged monkeys exhibiting spatial memory impairment and levels of biomarkers...... angiopathy, and the tauopathy, to possible neurofibrillary tangles. Six aged monkeys were selected based on their spatial memory performance and profile of biomarkers of AD, divided equally to affected aged subject - with Memory-affected and low amyloid level, and aged with higher performance in memory...... and amyloid, as the age-matched subjects. Using immunohistochemistry, plaques of amyloid beta1-42 were observed in two out of three brains of aged subjects with memory impairment and biomarkers indicative of AD. The cerebral amyloid angiopathy was observed in both aged monkey groups, and unlike in the human...

  2. Plasma beta amyloid and the risk of Alzheimer's disease in Down syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppus, A.M.W.; Schuur, M.; Vergeer, J.; Janssens, A.C.; Oostra, B.A.; Verbeek, M.M.; Duijn, C.M. van

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular deposition of amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) has been implicated as a critical step in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In Down syndrome (DS), Alzheimer's disease is assumed to be caused by the triplication and overexpression of the gene for amyloid precursor protein (APP),

  3. Cystatin C is Associated With Plaque Phenotype and Plaque Burden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufeng Wen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The relationship between carotid artery plaque burden, phenotype and serum cystatin C at normal and impaired renal function is still unclear. Methods: Demographic characteristics, carotid ultrasonography and other relevant information of 1,477 patients were collected. The association of carotid artery plaque burden, plaque phenotype with serum cystatin C was evaluated by strategy analysis based on renal function. Results: Serum cystatin C (OR=2.05, 95% CI: 1.83-2.29, POR=1.60, 95%CI: 1.43-1.78, POR=1.21, 95%CI: 1.10-1.32, P Conclusion: In normal renal function, serum cystatin C may confer stability of plaques. In mildly impaired renal function, serum cystatin C is a risk predictor of plaques. In normal renal function circumstances, serum cystatin C may benefit to the stability of plaques. In mild impaired renal function circumstances, serum cystatin C are a risk predictors of plaques.

  4. Beta-secretase-cleaved amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer brain: a morphologic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Bogdanovic, N; Volkmann, Inga

    2004-01-01

    beta-amyloid (Abeta) is the main constituent of senile plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease. Abeta is derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via proteolytic cleavage by proteases beta- and gamma-secretase. In this study, we examined content and localization of beta-secretase-cleaved APP...... the beta-sAPP immunostaining to be stronger and more extensive in gray matter in Alzheimer disease (AD) cases than controls. The axonal beta-sAPP staining was patchy and unevenly distributed for the AD cases, indicating impaired axonal transport. beta-sAPP was also found surrounding senile plaques...

  5. Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptides interact with DNA, as proved by surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrantes, Alejandro; Camero, Sergio; Garcia-Lucas, Angel; Navarro, Pedro J; Benitez, María J; Jiménez, Juan S

    2012-10-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, abnormal processing of the β-amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer's disease patients increases the production of β-amyloid toxic peptides, which, after forming highly aggregated fibrillar structures, lead to extracellular plaques formation, neuronal loss and dementia. However, a great deal of evidence has point to intracellular small oligomers of amyloid peptides, probably transient intermediates in the process of fibrillar structures formation, as the most toxic species. In order to study the amyloid-DNA interaction, we have selected here three different forms of the amyloid peptide: Aβ1-40, Aβ25-35 and a scrambled form of Aβ25-35. Surface Plasmon Resonance was used together with UV-visible spectroscopy, Electrophoresis and Electronic Microscopy to carry out this study. Our results prove that, similarly to the full length Aβ1-42, all conformations of toxic amyloid peptides, Aβ1-40 and Aβ25-35, may bind DNA. In contrast, the scrambled form of Aβ25-35, a non-aggregating and nontoxic form of this peptide, could not bind DNA. We conclude that although the amyloid-DNA interaction is closely related to the amyloid aggregation proneness, this cannot be the only factor which determines the interaction, since small oligomers of amyloid peptides may also bind DNA if their predominant negatively charged amino acid residues are previously neutralized.

  6. Calcium ionophore A23187 specifically decreases the secretion of beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein during apoptosis in primary rat cortical cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, K; Benedikz, Eirikur; Fastbom, J;

    2001-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the degeneration and loss of neurons, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and the accumulation of extracellular senile plaques consisting mainly of beta-amyloid (A beta). A beta is generated from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by sequential beta...

  7. Prevalence of amyloid PET positivity in dementia syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Jansen, Willemijn J; Rabinovici, Gil D;

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Amyloid-β positron emission tomography (PET) imaging allows in vivo detection of fibrillar plaques, a core neuropathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Its diagnostic utility is still unclear because amyloid plaques also occur in patients with non-AD dementia. OBJECTIVE: To use...... on neurological or psychiatric diseases other than dementia were excluded. Corresponding authors of eligible cohorts were invited to provide individual participant data. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Data were provided for 1359 participants with clinically diagnosed AD and 538 participants with non-AD dementia...... years; n = 377) and to a lesser degree in APOE ε4 carriers (97% [95% CI, 92%-99%] at 50 years to 90% [95% CI, 83%-94%] at 90 years; n = 593; P non-AD dementias...

  8. Astrocytic LRP1 Mediates Brain Aβ Clearance and Impacts Amyloid Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Chen; Hu, Jin; Zhao, Na; Wang, Jian; Na, Wang; Cirrito, John R; Kanekiyo, Takahisa; Holtzman, David M; Bu, Guojun

    2017-03-08

    Accumulation and deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain represents an early and perhaps necessary step in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ accumulation leads to the formation of Aβ aggregates which may directly and indirectly lead to eventual neurodegeneration. While Aβ production is accelerated in many familial forms of early-onset AD, increasing evidence indicates that impaired clearance of Aβ is more evident in late-onset AD. To uncover the mechanisms underlying impaired Aβ clearance in AD, we examined the role of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) in astrocytes. Although LRP1 has been shown to play critical roles in brain Aβ metabolism in neurons and vascular mural cells, its role in astrocytes, the most abundant cell type in the brain responsible for maintaining neuronal homeostasis, remains unclear. Here, we show that astrocytic LRP1 plays a critical role in brain Aβ clearance. LRP1 knockdown in primary astrocytes resulted in decreased cellular Aβ uptake and degradation. In addition, silencing of LRP1 in astrocytes led to down-regulation of several major Aβ-degrading enzymes, including matrix metalloproteases MMP2, MMP9 and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE). More important, conditional knockout of the Lrp1 gene in astrocytes in the background of APP/PS1 mice impaired brain Aβ clearance, exacerbated Aβ accumulation and accelerated amyloid plaque deposition without affecting its production. Together, our results demonstrate that astrocytic LRP1 plays an important role in Aβ metabolism and that restoring LRP1 expression and function in the brain could be an effective strategy to facilitate Aβ clearance and counter amyloid pathology in AD.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTAstrocytes represent a major cell type regulating brain homeostasis; however, their roles in brain clearance of amyloid-β (Aβ) and underlying mechanism are not clear. In this study, we used both cellular models and conditional knockout mouse models to

  9. Increased brain iron coincides with early plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskovjan, Andreana C; Kretlow, Ariane; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Barrea, Raul; Vogt, Stefan; Miller, Lisa M

    2011-03-01

    Elevated brain iron content, which has been observed in late-stage human Alzheimer's disease, is a potential target for early diagnosis. However, the time course for iron accumulation is currently unclear. Using the PSAPP mouse model of amyloid plaque formation, we conducted a time course study of metal ion content and distribution [iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn)] in the cortex and hippocampus using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). We found that iron in the cortex was 34% higher than age-matched controls at an early stage, corresponding to the commencement of plaque formation. The elevated iron was not associated with the amyloid plaques. Interestingly, none of the metal ions were elevated in the amyloid plaques until the latest time point (56 weeks), where only the Zn content was significantly elevated by 38%. Since neuropathological changes in human Alzheimer's disease are presumed to occur years before the first cognitive symptoms appear, quantification of brain iron content could be a powerful marker for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Migraine Pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nabih M. M.D. Ramadan

    2000-01-01

    @@Introduction Various theories of migraine pathogenesis have been developed over the years. To this date, none fully explains all the migraine phenomena. A complete description of each proposed theory is beyond the scope of this chapter. Nonetheless, a brief description of the arguments for and against the leading theories is noteworthy

  11. Development of Tc-99m Imaging Agents for Abeta Plaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi-Ping, Zhuang; Mei-Ping Kung; Catherihne Hou; Hank F. Kung

    2008-09-26

    Development of SPECT imaging agents based on Tc-99m targeting Aβ plaques is useful for diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A stilbene derivative, [11C]SB-13, showing promise in detecting senile plaques present in AD patients has been reported previously1,2. Based on the 4’-amino-stilbene core structure we have added substituted groups through which a chelating group, N2S2, was conjugated. We report herein a series of Tc-99m labeled stilbene derivative conjugated with a TcO[N2S2] core. The syntheses of stilbenes containing a N2S2 chelating ligand are achieved by a scheme shown. Lipophilic 99mTc stilbene complexes were successfully prepared and purified through HPLC. Preliminary results of in vitro labeling of brain sections from transgenic mice showed very promising plaque labeling. These 99mTc stilbene derivatives are warranted for further evaluations as potential imaging agents targeting amyloid plaques.

  12. Phosphorylation modifies the molecular stability of β-amyloid deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Amininasab, Mehriar; Kumar, Sathish; Walter, Jochen; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Protein aggregation plays a crucial role in neurodegenerative diseases. A key feature of protein aggregates is their ubiquitous modification by phosphorylation. Little is known, however, about the molecular consequences of phosphorylation of protein aggregates. Here we show that phosphorylation of β-amyloid at serine 8 increases the stability of its pathogenic aggregates against high-pressure and SDS-induced dissociation. We further demonstrate that phosphorylation results in an elevated number of hydrogen bonds at the N terminus of β-amyloid, the region that is critically regulated by a variety of post-translational modifications. Because of the increased lifetime of phosphorylated β-amyloid aggregates, phosphorylation can promote the spreading of β-amyloid in Alzheimer pathogenesis. Our study suggests that regulation of the molecular stability of protein aggregates by post-translational modifications is a crucial factor for disease progression in the brain.

  13. Specific binding of DNA to aggregated forms of Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camero, Sergio; Ayuso, Jose M; Barrantes, Alejandro; Benítez, María J; Jiménez, Juan S

    2013-04-01

    Anomalous protein aggregation is closely associated to age-related mental illness. Extraneuronal plaques, mainly composed of aggregated amyloid peptides, are considered as hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, this disease starts as a consequence of an abnormal processing of the amyloid precursor protein resulting in an excess of amyloid peptides. Nuclear localization of amyloid peptide aggregates together with amyloid-DNA interaction, have been repeatedly reported. In this paper we have used surface plasmon resonance and electron microscopy to study the structure and behavior of different peptides and proteins, including β-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, myoglobin, histone, casein and the amyloid-β peptides related to Alzheimer's disease Aβ25-35 and Aβ1-40. The main purpose of this study is to investigate whether proneness to DNA interaction is a general property displayed by aggregated forms of proteins, or it is an interaction specifically related to the aggregated forms of those particular proteins and peptides related to neurodegenerative diseases. Our results reveal that those aggregates formed by amyloid peptides show a particular proneness to interact with DNA. They are the only aggregated structures capable of binding DNA, and show more affinity for DNA than for other polyanions like heparin and polyglutamic acid, therefore strengthening the hypothesis that amyloid peptides may, by means of interaction with nuclear DNA, contribute to the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Inhibition of tau hyperphosphorylation and beta amyloid production in rat brain by oral administration of atorvastatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Fen; LI Xu; SUO Ai-qin; ZHANG Jie-wen

    2010-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and the leading cause of dementia in the elderly. The two hallmark lesions in AD brain are deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs).Hypercholesteremia is one of the risk factors of AD. But its role in the pathogenesis of AD is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between hypercholesteremia and tau phosphorylation or β-amyloid (Aβ),and evaluate the effect of atorvastatin on the level of tau phosphorylation and Aβ in the brains of rats fed with high cholesterol diet.Methods Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into normal diet control group, high cholesterol diet group,and high cholesterol diet plus atorvastatin (Lipitor, 15 mg·kg-1·d-1) treated group. Blood from caudal vein was collected to measure total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) at the end of the 3th and the 6th months by an enzymatic method. The animals were sacrificed 6 months later and brains were removed. All left brain hemispheres were fixed for immunohistochemistry. Hippocampus and cerebral cortex were separated from right hemispheres and homogenized separately. Tau phosphorylation and Aβ in the brain tissue were determined by Western blotting (using antibodies PHF-1 and Tau-1) and anti-Aβ40/anti-Aβ42, respectively.Results We found that high cholesterol diet led to hypercholesteremia of rats as well as hyperphosphorylation of tau and increased Aβ level in the brains. Treatment of the high cholesterol diet fed rats with atorvastatin prevented the changes of both tau phosphorylation and Aβ level induced by high cholesterol diet.Conclusions Hypercholesteremia could induce tau hyperphosphorylation and Aβ production in rat brain. Atorvastatin could inhibit tau hyperphosphorylation and decrease Aβ generation. It may play a protective role in the patho-process of hypercholesteremia

  15. SERF Protein Is a Direct Modifier of Amyloid Fiber Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fabio Falsone

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The inherent cytotoxicity of aberrantly folded protein aggregates contributes substantially to the pathogenesis of amyloid diseases. It was recently shown that a class of evolutionary conserved proteins, called MOAG-4/SERF, profoundly alter amyloid toxicity via an autonomous but yet unexplained mode. We show that the biological function of human SERF1a originates from its atypical ability to specifically distinguish between amyloid and nonamyloid aggregation. This inherently unstructured protein directly affected the aggregation kinetics of a broad range of amyloidogenic proteins in vitro, while being inactive against nonamyloid aggregation. A representative biophysical analysis of the SERF1a:α-synuclein (aSyn complex revealed that the amyloid-promoting activity resulted from an early and transient interaction, which was sufficient to provoke a massive increase of soluble aSyn amyloid nucleation templates. Therefore, the autonomous amyloid-modifying activity of SERF1a observed in living organisms relies on a direct and dedicated manipulation of the early stages in the amyloid aggregation pathway.

  16. Lipid rafts participate in aberrant degradative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta peptide in Alzheimer’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhou; Chun Yang; Yufeng Liu; Peng Li; Huiying Yang; Jingxing Dai; Rongmei Qu; Lin Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide is the main component of amyloid plaques, which are found in Alzhei-mer’s disease. The generation and deposition of amyloid-beta is one of the crucial factors for the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Lipid rafts are glycolipid-rich liquid domains of the plasma membrane, where certain types of protein tend to aggregate and intercalate. Lipid rafts are involved in the generation of amyloid-beta oligomers and the formation of amyloid-beta peptides. In this paper, we review the mechanism by which lipid rafts disturb the aberrant deg-radative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta, which plays an important role in the pathological process of Alzheimer’s disease. Moreover, we describe this mechanism from the view of the Two-system Theory of fasciology and thus, suggest that lipid rafts may be a new target of Alzheimer’s disease treatment.

  17. Oral administration of a fusion protein between the cholera toxin B subunit and the 42-amino acid isoform of amyloid-β peptide produced in silkworm pupae protects against Alzheimer's disease in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Li

    Full Text Available A key molecule in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD is a 42-amino acid isoform of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42, which is the most toxic element of senile plaques. In this study, to develop an edible, safe, low-cost vaccine for AD, a cholera toxin B subunit (CTB-Aβ42 fusion protein was successfully expressed in silkworm pupae. We tested the silkworm pupae-derived oral vaccination containing CTB-Aβ42 in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Anti-Aβ42 antibodies were induced in these mice, leading to a decreased Aβ deposition in the brain. We also found that the oral administration of the silk worm pupae vaccine improved the memory and cognition of mice, as assessed using a water maze test. These results suggest that the new edible CTB-Aβ42 silkworm pupae-derived vaccine has potential clinical application in the prevention of AD.

  18. Effect of Metals on Kinetic Pathways of Amyloid-β Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Hane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal ions, including copper and zinc, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease through a variety of mechanisms including increased amyloid-β affinity and redox effects. Recent reports have demonstrated that the amyloid-β monomer does not necessarily travel through a definitive intermediary en-route to a stable amyloid fibril structure. Rather, amyloid-β misfolding may follow a variety of pathways resulting in a fibrillar end-product or a variety of oligomeric end-products with a diversity of structures and sizes. The presence of metal ions has been demonstrated to alter the kinetic pathway of the amyloid-β peptide which may lead to more toxic oligomeric end-products. In this work, we review the contemporary literature supporting the hypothesis that metal ions alter the reaction pathway of amyloid-β misfolding leading to more neurotoxic species.

  19. Mitochondrion-derived reactive oxygen species lead to enhanced amyloid beta formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuner, K.; Schutt, T.; Kurz, C.; Eckert, S.H.; Schiller, C.; Occhipinti, A.; Mai, S.; Jendrach, M.; Eckert, G.P.; Kruse, S.E.; Palmiter, R.D.; Brandt, U.; Drose, S.; Wittig, I.; Willem, M.; Haass, C.; Reichert, A.S.; Muller, W.E.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Intracellular amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers and extracellular Abeta plaques are key players in the progression of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Still, the molecular signals triggering Abeta production are largely unclear. We asked whether mitochondrion-derived reactive oxygen species (RO

  20. Clinical and pathological study on 10 cases of cerebral lobe hemorrhage related with cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-qi LI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To summarize the clinical data and pathological features of 10 cases of cerebral lobar hemorrhage related with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA diagnosed pathologically, thereby to improve the knowledge and diagnosis of the disease. Methods The clinical data of 10 cases of cerebral lobar hemorrhage related with CAA, collected in the General Hospital of Shenyang Command from 1983 up to now, were retrospectively analyzed, and the clinical and neuropathological features of these cases were summarized. Results Of the 10 patients, 2 suffered from single lobar hemorrhage and 8 multiple lobar hemorrhage, all of them were confirmed pathologically to have ruptured into the subarachnoid space. Pathological examination revealed microaneurysm in 2 cases, "double barrel" change in 4 cases, multiple arteriolar clusters in 5 cases, obliterative onion-liked intima change in 4 cases, and fibrinoid necrosis of vessel wall in 7 cases. In addition, neurofibrillary tangles were found in 8 cases, and senile plaque was observed in 5 cases. Conclusions Cerebral lobar hemorrhage related with CAA is mainly located in the parietal, temporal and occipital lobes, readily breaking into the subarachnoid space, and it is often multiple and recurrent. The CAA associated microvasculopathy was found frequently in the autopsy sample of CAA related cerebral lobar hemorrhage, and it may contribute to the pathogenesis of cerebral hemorrhage. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.07.04

  1. β-Arrestin1 regulates γ-secretase complex assembly and modulates amyloid-β pathology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaosong Liu; Xiaohui Zhao; Xianglu Zeng; Koen Bossers; Dick F Swaab; Jian Zhao; Gang Pei

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and complex neurodegenerative disease in which the γ-secretasemediated amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology plays an important role.We found that a multifunctional protein,β-arrestin1,facilitated the formation of NCT/APH-1 (anterior pharynx-defective phenotype 1) precomplex and mature γ-secretase complex through its functional interaction with APH-1.Deficiency of β-arrestin1 or inhibition of binding of β-arrestin1 with APH-1 by small peptides reduced Aβ production without affecting Notch processing.Genetic ablation of β-arrestin1 diminished Aβ pathology and behavioral deficits in transgenic AD mice.Moreover,in brains of sporadic AD patients and transgenic AD mice,the expression of β-arrestin1 was upregulated and correlated well with neuropathological severity and senile Aβ plaques.Thus,our study identifies a regulatory mechanism underlying both γ-secretase assembly and AD pathogenesis,and indicates that specific reduction of Aβ pathology can be achieved by regulation of the γ-secretase assembly.

  2. Prolyl oligopeptidase colocalizes with α-synuclein, β-amyloid, tau protein and astroglia in the post-mortem brain samples with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannula, M J; Myöhänen, T T; Tenorio-Laranga, J; Männistö, P T; Garcia-Horsman, J A

    2013-07-09

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (EC 3.4.21.26, PREP) is a serine protease that hydrolyzes proline-containing peptides shorter than 30-mer but it has also nonhydrolytic functions. PREP has been shown to accelerate aggregation of wild-type α-synuclein (α-syn) under cell-free conditions, and PREP inhibitors can block this aggregation both in vitro and in vivo. α-syn is the main component of Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease (PD) and Lewy body dementia. To clarify the possible interaction of PREP with other markers of neurodegenerative diseases, we studied colocalizations of PREP and (1) α-syn, (2) β-amyloid, (3) tau protein and (4) astroglial and microglial cells in human post-mortem brain samples from PD, Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and in healthy control brain samples. In the substantia nigra of PD brains, an intense colocalization with PREP and α-syn was evident. PREP colocalized also with β-amyloid plaques in AD brains and with tau protein in AD and in healthy brains. PREP was also found in astroglial cells in PD, AD and control brains, but not in the microglia. Our findings are the first ones to demonstrate colocalization of PREP and pathological proteins in the human brain and support the view that, at least in spatial terms, PREP could be associated with pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Modeling amyloids in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villar-Piqué Anna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An increasing number of proteins are being shown to assemble into amyloid structures, self-seeding fibrillar aggregates that may lead to pathological states or play essential biological functions in organisms. Bacterial cell factories have raised as privileged model systems to understand the mechanisms behind amyloid assembly and the cellular fitness cost associated to the formation of these aggregates. In the near future, these bacterial systems will allow implementing high-throughput screening approaches to identify effective modulators of amyloid aggregation.

  4. Infliximab in the treatment of plaque type psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosita Saraceno

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Rosita Saraceno, Andrea Saggini, Lucia Pietroleonardo, Sergio ChimentiDepartment of Dermatology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Viale Oxford 81, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Psoriasis is a chronic and immunomediated skin disease characterized by erythematous scaly plaques. Psoriasis affects approximately 1% to 3% of the Caucasian population. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α is a proinflammatory cytokine that plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Infliximab is an anti-TNF-α drug widely used for the treatment of plaque type psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Controlled clinical trials demonstrated that infliximab is characterized by a high degree of clinical response in moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Moreover infliximab showed rapid efficacy in nail psoriasis which represents a therapeutic challenge for dermatologists and a relevant source of distress for patients with plaque psoriasis. This anti-TNF-α has an encouraging safety profile, especially as long as physicians are watchful in prevention and early diagnosis of infections and infuse reactions. The efficacy, tolerability and safety profiles suggest infliximab as a suitable anti-psoriatic drug in the long-term treatment of a chronic disease such as plaque-type psoriasis.Keywords: psoriasis, nail psoriasis, infliximab, long-term treatment

  5. Alzheimer's disease related markers, cellular toxicity and behavioral deficits induced six weeks after oligomeric amyloid-β peptide injection in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charleine Zussy

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative pathology associated with aging characterized by the presence of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that finally result in synaptic and neuronal loss. The major component of senile plaques is an amyloid-β protein (Aβ. Recently, we characterized the effects of a single intracerebroventricular (icv injection of Aβ fragment (25-35 oligomers (oAβ(25-35 for up to 3 weeks in rats and established a clear parallel with numerous relevant signs of AD. To clarify the long-term effects of oAβ(25-35 and its potential role in the pathogenesis of AD, we determined its physiological, behavioral, biochemical and morphological impacts 6 weeks after injection in rats. oAβ(25-35 was still present in the brain after 6 weeks. oAβ(25-35 injection did not affect general activity and temperature rhythms after 6 weeks, but decreased body weight, induced short- and long-term memory impairments, increased corticosterone plasma levels, brain oxidative (lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial (caspase-9 levels and reticulum stress (caspase-12 levels, astroglial and microglial activation. It provoked cholinergic neuron loss and decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. It induced cell loss in the hippocampic CA subdivisions and decreased hippocampic neurogenesis. Moreover, oAβ(25-35 injection resulted in increased APP expression, Aβ(1-42 generation, and increased Tau phosphorylation. In conclusion, this in vivo study evidenced that the soluble oligomeric forms of short fragments of Aβ, endogenously identified in AD patient brains, not only provoked long-lasting pathological alterations comparable to the human disease, but may also directly contribute to the progressive increase in amyloid load and Tau pathology, involved in the AD physiopathology.

  6. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... needed for weakness or clumsiness. This can include physical, occupational, or speech therapy. Sometimes, medicines that help improve memory, such as those for Alzheimer disease, are used. Seizures, also called amyloid spells, may ...

  7. Mechanical model of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque rupture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU; Haijun; ZHANG; Mei; ZHANG; Yun

    2004-01-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaque is the main trigger of acute cardiovascular events, but the mechanism of plaque rupture is still unknown. We have constructed a model describing the motion of the fibrous cap of the plaque using the theory of elastic mechanics and studied the stability of the plaque theoretically. It has shown that plaque rupture is the result of a dynamic interplay between factors intrinsic to the plaque itself and extrinsic factors. We have proposed a new mechanism of plaque rupture, given a new explanation about the nonlinear dynamic progress of atherosclerosis and suggested a method to identify the vulnerable plaques to manage atherosclerosis.

  8. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosicka, Iga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type II is a metabolic disease affecting millions of people worldwide. The disease is associated with occurence of insoluble, fibrillar, protein aggregates in islets of Langerhans in the pancreas - islet amyloid. The main constituent of these protein fibers is the human islet...... of diabetes type II, while revealing the structure(s) of islet amyloid fibrils is necessary for potential design of therapeutic agents....

  9. Concept of Remission in Chronic Plaque Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisondi, Paolo; Di Mercurio, Marco; Idolazzi, Luca; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2015-11-01

    Psoriasis is a lifelong chronic inflammatory disease affecting 2-3% of the worldwide population. Current understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriasis assigns central importance to an interaction between acquired and innate immunity. The disease is characterized by a series of linked cellular changes in the skin, including hyperplasia of epidermal keratinocytes, angiogenesis, and infiltration of T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and other types of leukocytes in the affected skin. Plaque psoriasis is the most common clinical form and is characterized by red and scaly plaques generally localized at extensor sites such as elbows and knees. Major determinants of psoriasis severity include the extent of skin involvement; localization in highly affected areas such as scalp, palms, and soles; pruritus; presence of comorbidities including psoriatic arthritis; and impairment on quality of life. About one-third of patients have moderate to severe psoriasis defined as PASI (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index) and/or Dermatology Life Quality Index>10, and/or affected body surface area>10%. The optimal treatment goal is to safely achieve complete or almost complete skin clearance. Treatments available are various and they are chosen according to disease features, comorbidities, and patient characteristics and priorities. Topical treatments including corticosteroids and Vitamin D analogs are reserved for mild disease. Phototherapy, cyclosporine, methotrexate, acitretin, or biologics such as tumor necrosis factor-α antagonists and ustekinumab are reserved for the moderate to severe forms.

  10. A STUDY ON TOPICAL CALCIUM DOBESILATE FOR THE TREATMENT OF LIMITED PLAQUE PSORIASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Puri

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Topical dobesilate offers the potential for treatment of plaque psoriasis without atrophy or other local side effects associated with the use of topical corticosteroids. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF-mediated pathways participate in many of the cellular events implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Thus, targeting FGF signals may be potentially therapeutic. Aims: To study the efficacy of topical calcium dobesilate for the treatment of 50 patients of limited plaque psoriasis. Methods: For the present study, fifty clinically diagnosed cases of psoriasis with limited number of plaques ( 0.05.

  11. A novel approach to the identification and quantitative elemental analysis of amyloid deposits-Insights into the pathology of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendran, Reshmi; Minqin, Ren [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Department of Physics, Blk S 12, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 2, Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Ynsa, Maria Dolores [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Casadesus, Gemma [Department of Neurosciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Smith, Mark A.; Perry, George [Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Halliwell, Barry [Department of Biochemistry, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Watt, Frank, E-mail: phywattf@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Department of Physics, Blk S 12, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 2, Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2009-04-24

    There is considerable interest in the role of metals such as iron, copper, and zinc in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease. However to convincingly establish their presence in plaques in vivo, a sensitive technique is required that is both quantitatively accurate and avoids isolation of plaques or staining/fixing brain tissue, since these processes introduce contaminants and redistribute elements within the tissue. Combining the three ion beam techniques of scanning transmission ion microscopy, Rutherford back scattering spectrometry and particle induced X-ray emission in conjunction with a high energy (MeV) proton microprobe we have imaged plaques in freeze-dried unstained brain sections from CRND-8 mice, and simultaneously quantified iron, copper, and zinc. Our results show increased metal concentrations within the amyloid plaques compared with the surrounding tissue: iron (85 ppm compared with 42 ppm), copper (16 ppm compared to 6 ppm), and zinc (87 ppm compared to 34 ppm).

  12. The presence of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the neuritic plaques and congophilic angiopathy in Alzheimer's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Snow, A. D.; Mar, H.; Nochlin, D.; Kimata, K.; Kato, M; Suzuki, S.; Hassell, J.; Wight, T. N.

    1988-01-01

    Two immunocytochemical probes were used to specifically identify and localize heparan sulphate proteoglycans (HSPGs) in 17 cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A monoclonal (HK-102) and an affinity-purified polyclonal antibody, each recognizing specific domains on the protein core of a basement membrane-derived HSPG, localized HSPGs to the amyloid fibrils present in neuritic plaques (NPs) and congophilic angiopathy (CA) in the brains of Alzheimer's patients, with weak to no immunostaining in ne...

  13. Exopolysaccharide Productivity and Biofilm Phenotype on Oral Commensal Bacteria as Pathogenesis of Chronic Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    2 Exopolysaccharide Productivity and Biofilm Phenotype on Oral Commensal Bacteria as Pathogenesis of Chronic Periodontitis Takeshi Yamanaka1... periodontitis is caused by dental plaque known as a complex biofilm which consists of several hundred different species of bacteria (Chen, 2001; Socransky and...species biofilm in the oral cavity can cause persistent chronic periodontitis along with the importance of dental plaque formation and maturation

  14. Toxic species in amyloid disorders: Oligomers or mature fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative disorders. These protein aggregation (fibrillization disorders are also known as amyloid disorders. The mechanism of protein aggregation involves conformation switch of the native protein, oligomer formation leading to protofibrils and finally mature fibrils. Mature fibrils have long been considered as the cause of disease pathogenesis; however, recent evidences suggest oligomeric intermediates formed during fibrillization to be toxic. In this review, we have tried to address the ongoing debate for these toxic amyloid species. We did an extensive literature search and collated information from Pubmed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov and Google search using various permutations and combinations of the following keywords: Neurodegeneration, amyloid disorders, protein aggregation, fibrils, oligomers, toxicity, Alzheimer′s Disease, Parkinson′s Disease. We describe different instances showing the toxicity of mature fibrils as well as oligomers in Alzheimer′s Disease and Parkinson′s Disease. Distinct structural framework and morphology of amyloid oligomers suggests difference in toxic effect between oligomers and fibrils. We highlight the difference in structure and proposed toxicity pathways for fibrils and oligomers. We also highlight the evidences indicating that intermediary oligomeric species can act as potential diagnostic biomarker. Since the formation of these toxic species follow a common structural switch among various amyloid disorders, the protein aggregation events can be targeted for developing broad-range therapeutics. The therapeutic trials based on the understanding of different protein conformers (monomers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils in amyloid cascade are also described.

  15. Immunotherapy against amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Daniela; Ghezzi, Laura; Scarpini, Elio

    2013-10-15

    The first drugs developed for Alzheimer's disease (AD), anticholinesterase inhibitors (AchEI), increase acetylcholine levels, previously demonstrated to be reduced in AD. To date, four AchEI are approved for the treatment of mild to moderate AD. A further therapeutic option available for moderate to severe AD is memantine. These treatments are symptomatic, whereas drugs under development are supposed to modify pathological steps leading to AD, thus acting on the evolution of the disease. For this reason they are currently termed "disease modifying" drugs. To block the progression of the disease, they have to interfere with pathogenic steps at the basis of clinical symptoms, including the deposition of extracellular amyloid beta (Aβ) plaques and of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. The most innovative approach is represented by the vaccination and passive immunization against Aβ peptide. In this article, current knowledge about concluded and ongoing clinical trials with both vaccination with different antigens and passive immunization will be reviewed and discussed.

  16. Periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj K. Rath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been increasing attention paid in recent years to the possibility that oral bacterial infection, particularly periodontal disease may influence the initiation and or progression of systemic diseases. These studies confirm the observation that heart disease is the most commonly found systemic condition in patients with periodontal disease. Moreover, the literature has also highlighted substantial evidence indicating the presence of Gram-negative periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaques. Aim: This study intends to investigate the possible association between periodontal health and coronary artery disease by evaluating periodontal status, association between the periodontal plaque and coronary atheromatous plaques for presence of micro-organisms such as, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Tannerella forsythia. Materials and methods: A case-control study was designed with seven patients who had undergone coronary endarterectomy for cardiovascular disease and 28 controls. The periodontal examination for cases was performed 1 day before vascular surgery and the controls were clinically examined. The atheromatous plaque sample collected during endarterectomy and the intraoral plaque samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction for identification of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, P. intermedia and T. forsythia. Results: The presence of periodontal bacteria DNA in coronary atheromatous plaques and sub-gingival plaque samples of the same patients was confirmed by this study. CONCLUSION A correlation was established between putative bacteria contributing to atheromatous plaques and species associated with periodontal disease. One particularly important study to be carried out is the investigation of a possible clinically meaningful reduction in coronary heart disease resulting from the prevention or treatment of periodontal disease.

  17. Association of Morning Blood Pressure Surge with Carotid Artery Plaque Ulceration in Ischemic Stroke Patients with Pathogenesis of Artery to Artery Embolism%动脉-动脉栓塞性缺血性卒中患者晨峰血压与颈动脉溃疡斑块的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程伟; 包艳娥; 聂莉; 李婉秋; 乔向亮; 程晓玲

    2013-01-01

    was examined by carotid ultrasonography. The association of MBPS with CAPU was evaluated by the Logistic regression model. Results The mean age of the total 120 IS patients was (62.6±12.8) years old, and 36.8% was female. Compared with the MBPS-group (n=72), the MBPS+group (n=48) did not have higher detection rate of CAPU (31.3%vs 30.6%, P=0.84). After separation of ipsilateral CAPU and contralateral CAPU, we found the detection rate was higher in MBPS+group than MBPS-group (27.1%vs 19.4%, P=0.008). The multivariate analysis showed that MBPS was associated with ipsilateral CAPU (odds ratio[OR], 1.42;95%conifdence interval[CI], 1.09~4.22) after adjusting for age and sex. The association still existed after further adjusting for other risk factors (OR 1.23;95%CI 1.02~3.46). Conclusion MBPS is associated with ipsilateral CAPU in the IS patients with pathogenesis of artery to artery embolism, which implies that higher MBPS may contribute to the fall of plaque that led to the occurrence of artery to artery embolism.

  18. Information-Selectivity of Beta-Amyloid Pathology in an Associative Memory Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eRowan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work updates Ruppin and Reggia's associative neural network model of Alzheimer's disease by simulating beta-amyloid pathology and modelling the progression of beta-amyloid throughout the network according to Small's synaptic scaling theory, leading to a self-reinforcing cascade of damage. Using an information theoretic approach, it is shown that the simulated beta-amyloid pathology initially selectively targets neurons with low contribution to the overall performance of the network, but that it targets neurons with increasingly higher significance to the network as the disease progresses. The results provide a possible explanation for the apparent low correlation between amyloid plaque density and cognitive decline in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

  19. HIV Tat protein and amyloid-β peptide form multifibrillar structures that cause neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hategan, Alina; Bianchet, Mario A; Steiner, Joseph; Karnaukhova, Elena; Masliah, Eliezer; Fields, Adam; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Dickens, Alex M; Haughey, Norman; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Nath, Avindra

    2017-02-20

    Deposition of amyloidplaques is increased in the brains of HIV-infected individuals, and the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein affects amyloidogenesis through several indirect mechanisms. Here, we investigated direct interactions between Tat and amyloid-β peptide. Our in vitro studies showed that in the presence of Tat, uniform amyloid fibrils become double twisted fibrils and further form populations of thick unstructured filaments and aggregates. Specifically, Tat binding to the exterior surfaces of the Aβ fibrils increases β-sheet formation and lateral aggregation into thick multifibrillar structures, thus producing fibers with increased rigidity and mechanical resistance. Furthermore, Tat and Aβ aggregates in complex synergistically induced neurotoxicity both in vitro and in animal models. Increased rigidity and mechanical resistance of the amyloid-β-Tat complexes coupled with stronger adhesion due to the presence of Tat in the fibrils may account for increased damage, potentially through pore formation in membranes.

  20. Does aluminium bind to histidine? An NMR investigation of amyloid β12 and amyloid β16 fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Priya; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Vishwanathan, Vinaya; Jagadeesh Kumar, Dasappa; Babu, Sudhir; Ramanathan, Krishna Venkatachala; Easwaran, Kalpathy Ramaier Katchap; Nagendra, Holenarasipur Gundurao; Raghothama, Srinivasarao

    2013-07-01

    Aluminium and zinc are known to be the major triggering agents for aggregation of amyloid peptides leading to plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease. While zinc binding to histidine in Aβ (amyloid β) fragments has been implicated as responsible for aggregation, not much information is available on the interaction of aluminium with histidine. In the NMR study of the N-terminal Aβ fragments, DAEFRHDSGYEV (Aβ12) and DAEFRHDSGYEVHHQK (Aβ16) presented here, the interactions of the fragments with aluminium have been investigated. Significant chemical shifts were observed for few residues near the C-terminus when aluminium chloride was titrated with Aβ12 and Aβ16 peptides. Surprisingly, it is nonhistidine residues which seem to be involved in aluminium binding. Based on NMR constrained structure obtained by molecular modelling, aluminium-binding pockets in Aβ12 were around charged residues such as Asp, Glu. The results are discussed in terms of native structure propagation, and the relevance of histidine residues in the sequences for metal-binding interactions. We expect that the study of such short amyloid peptide fragments will not only provide clues for plaque formation in aggregated conditions but also facilitate design of potential drugs for these targets.

  1. Fluorescent activated cell sorting: an effective approach to study dendritic cell subsets in human atherosclerotic plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Brussel, Ilse; Ammi, Rachid; Rombouts, Miche; Cools, Nathalie; Vercauteren, Sven R; De Roover, Dominique; Hendriks, Jeroen M H; Lauwers, Patrick; Van Schil, Paul E; Schrijvers, Dorien M

    2015-02-01

    Different immune cell types are present within atherosclerotic plaques. Dendritic cells (DC) are of special interest, since they are considered as the 'center of the immuniverse'. Identifying inflammatory DC subtypes within plaques is important for a better understanding of the lesion pathogenesis and pinpoints their contribution to the atherosclerotic process. We have developed a flow cytometry-based method to characterize and isolate different DC subsets (i.e. CD11b(+), Clec9A(+) and CD16(+) conventional (c)DC and CD123(+) plasmacytoid (p)DC) in human atherosclerotic plaques. We revealed a predominance of pro-inflammatory CD11b(+) DC in advanced human lesions, whereas atheroprotective Clec9A(+) DC were almost absent. CD123(+) pDC and CD16(+) DC were also detectable in plaques. Remarkably, plaques from distinct anatomical locations exhibited different cellular compositions: femoral plaques contained less CD11b(+) and Clec9A(+) DC than carotid plaques. Twice as many monocytes/macrophages were observed compared to DC. Moreover, relative amounts of T cells/B cells/NK cells were 6 times as high as DC numbers. For the first time, fluorescent activated cell sorting analysis of DC subsets in human plaques indicated a predominance of CD11b(+) cDC, in comparison with other DC subsets. Isolation of the different subsets will facilitate detailed functional analysis and may have significant implications for tailoring appropriate therapy.

  2. Galantamine slows down plaque formation and behavioral decline in the 5XFAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumee Bhattacharya

    Full Text Available The plant alkaloid galantamine is an established symptomatic drug treatment for Alzheimer's disease (AD, providing temporary cognitive and global relief in human patients. In this study, the 5X Familial Alzheimer's Disease (5XFAD mouse model was used to investigate the effect of chronic galantamine treatment on behavior and amyloid β (Aβ plaque deposition in the mouse brain. Quantification of plaques in untreated 5XFAD mice showed a gender specific phenotype; the plaque density increased steadily reaching saturation in males after 10 months of age, whereas in females the density further increased until after 14 months of age. Moreover, females consistently displayed a higher plaque density in comparison to males of the same age. Chronic oral treatment with galantamine resulted in improved performance in behavioral tests, such as open field and light-dark avoidance, already at mildly affected stages compared to untreated controls. Treated animals of both sexes showed significantly lower plaque density in the brain, i.e., the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, gliosis being always positively correlated to plaque load. A high dose treatment with a daily uptake of 26 mg/kg body weight was tolerated well and produced significantly larger positive effects than a lower dose treatment (14 mg/kg body weight in terms of plaque density and behavior. These results strongly support that galantamine, in addition to improving cognitive and behavioral symptoms in AD, may have disease-modifying and neuroprotective properties, as is indicated by delayed Aβ plaque formation and reduced gliosis.

  3. Anthrax Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H; Vrentas, Catherine; Pomerantsev, Andrei P; Liu, Shihui

    2015-01-01

    Anthrax is caused by the spore-forming, gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis. The bacterium's major virulence factors are (a) the anthrax toxins and (b) an antiphagocytic polyglutamic capsule. These are encoded by two large plasmids, the former by pXO1 and the latter by pXO2. The expression of both is controlled by the bicarbonate-responsive transcriptional regulator, AtxA. The anthrax toxins are three polypeptides-protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF)-that come together in binary combinations to form lethal toxin and edema toxin. PA binds to cellular receptors to translocate LF (a protease) and EF (an adenylate cyclase) into cells. The toxins alter cell signaling pathways in the host to interfere with innate immune responses in early stages of infection and to induce vascular collapse at late stages. This review focuses on the role of anthrax toxins in pathogenesis. Other virulence determinants, as well as vaccines and therapeutics, are briefly discussed.

  4. Characterization of amyloid in equine recurrent uveitis as AA amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostevik, L; de Souza, G A; Wien, T N; Gunnes, G; Sørby, R

    2014-01-01

    Two horses with chronic uveitis and histological lesions consistent with equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) were examined. Microscopical findings in the ciliary body included deposits of amyloid lining the non-pigmented epithelium, intracytoplasmic, rod-shaped, eosinophilic inclusions and intraepithelial infiltration of T lymphocytes. Ultrastructural examination of the ciliary body of one horse confirmed the presence of abundant extracellular deposits of non-branching fibrils (9-11 nm in diameter) consistent with amyloid. Immunohistochemistry revealed strong positive labelling for AA amyloid and mass spectrometry showed the amyloid to consist primarily of serum amyloid A1 in both cases. The findings suggest that localized, intraocular AA amyloidosis may occur in horses with ERU.

  5. Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adwait BHADBHADE

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Bhadbhade A, Cheng DW. Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Alzheimer’s Disease. Iranian Journal of Child Neurology2012;6(1:1-5.Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and a leading cause of dementia. The AD is characterized by presence of intraneuronal tangles and extracellular plaques in the brain. The plaques are composed of dense and mostly insoluble deposits of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ, formed by sequential cleavage of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP, by two pathways amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic. Tangles are composed of paired helical fragments, which aggregate to form, microtubular protein tau. Although Aβ plaques are established to be the cause of the disease, there exist genetic factors and other pathological identifications in addition to these which are an integral part of the disease. This article gives an overview into the mechanism of APP action, genetic factors and other pathological identifications contributing to Alzheimer’s disease formation.References Brookmeyer R, Gray S, Kawas C. Projections of Alzheimer’s disease in the United States and the public health impact of delaying disease onset. American Journal of Public Health 1998;88(9:1337. Hebert LE, Scherr PA, Bienias JL, Bennett DA, Evans DA. Alzheimer disease in the US population. Arch Neurol 2003;60(8:1119-22. Möller HJ, Graeber M. The case described by Alois Alzheimer in 1911. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience 1998:248(3:111-122. Selkoe D J. (2002. Deciphering the genesis and fate of amyloid beta-protein yields novel therapies for Alzheimer disease. J Clinic Investigat 2002;110(10: 1375-82. Wolfe MS. Tau mutations in neurodegenerative diseases. J Biolog Chem 2009;284(10:6021. Selkoe DJ. Alzheimer’s disease: genes, proteins, and therapy. Physiological reviews 2001;81(2:741. Selkoe DJ. The cell biology of [beta]-amyloid precursor protein and presenilin in Alzheimer

  6. Pathogenesis of Alzheimer′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell H Swerdlow

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Russell H SwerdlowDepartment of Neurology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USAAbstract: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is incredibly common. Increasing longevity ensures its prevalence will rise even further. Ongoing efforts to understand AD pathogenesis reveal numerous tantalizing leads. Formulating a comprehensive AD pathogenesis theory capable of incorporating these disparate leads, though, has proven difficult. This review discusses current attempts to formulate a comprehensive AD pathogenesis theory. In doing so, it focuses on clinical and molecular relationships between AD and aging. A better understanding of these relationships could inform and impact future development of AD-directed treatment strategies.Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, aging, amyloid, cascade, mitochondria

  7. CD40 signaling and Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Town, T; Tan, J; Mullan, M

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between CD40 and its cognate ligand, CD40 ligand, is a primary regulator of the peripheral immune response, including modulation of T lymphocyte activation, B lymphocyte differentiation and antibody secretion, and innate immune cell activation, maturation, and survival. Recently, we and others have identified CD40 expression on a variety of CNS cells, including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, astroglia and microglia, and have found that, on many of these cells, CD40 expression is enhanced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. Importantly, the CD40-CD40 ligand interaction on microglia triggers a series of intracellular signaling events that are discussed, beginning with Src-family kinase activation and culminating in microglial activation as evidenced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion. Based on the involvement of microglial activation and brain inflammation in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, we have investigated co-stimulation of microglia, smooth muscle, and endothelial cells with CD40 ligand in the presence of low doses of freshly solubilized amyloid-beta peptides. Data reviewed herein show that CD40 ligand and amyloid-beta act synergistically to promote pro-inflammatory responses by these cells, including secretion of interleukin-1 beta by endothelial cells and tumor necrosis factor-alpha by microglia. As these cytokines have been implicated in neuronal injury, a comprehensive model of pro-inflammatory CD40 ligand and amyloid-beta initiated Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis (mediated by multiple CNS cells) is proposed.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibrils: an in silico approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Ye; Wei Wang; Cheng Jiang; Qingfen Yu; Haifeng Chen

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils play causal roles in the pathogenesis of amyloid-related degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease,type Ⅱ diabetes mellitus,and the prion-related transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.The mechanism of fibril formation and protein aggregation is still hotly debated and remains an important open question in order to develop therapeutic method of these diseases.However,traditional molecular biological and crystallographic experiments could hardly observe atomic details and aggregation process.Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations could provide explanations for experimental results and detailed pathway of protein aggregation.In this review,we focus on the applications of MD simulations on several amyloidogenic protein systems.Furthermore,MD simulations could help us to understand the mechanism of amyloid aggregation and how to design the inhibitors.

  9. Manipulations of Amyloid Precursor Protein Cleavage Disrupt the Circadian Clock in Aging Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, Matthew R.; Holbrook, Scott D.; Kotwica-Rolinska, Joanna; Chow, Eileen; Kretzschmar, Doris; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by severe cognitive deterioration. While causes of AD pathology are debated, a large body of evidence suggests that increased cleavage of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) producing the neurotoxic Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide plays a fundamental role in AD pathogenesis. One of the detrimental behavioral symptoms commonly associated with AD is the fragmentation of sleep-activity cycles with increased nighttime activity and daytime n...

  10. Targeted pharmacological depletion of serum amyloid P component for treatment of human amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepys, M B; Herbert, J; Hutchinson, W L; Tennent, G A; Lachmann, H J; Gallimore, J R; Lovat, L B; Bartfai, T; Alanine, A; Hertel, C; Hoffmann, T; Jakob-Roetne, R; Norcross, R D; Kemp, J A; Yamamura, K; Suzuki, M; Taylor, G W; Murray, S; Thompson, D; Purvis, A; Kolstoe, S; Wood, S P; Hawkins, P N

    2002-05-16

    The normal plasma protein serum amyloid P component (SAP) binds to fibrils in all types of amyloid deposits, and contributes to the pathogenesis of amyloidosis. In order to intervene in this process we have developed a drug, R-1-[6-[R-2-carboxy-pyrrolidin-1-yl]-6-oxo-hexanoyl]pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid, that is a competitive inhibitor of SAP binding to amyloid fibrils. This palindromic compound also crosslinks and dimerizes SAP molecules, leading to their very rapid clearance by the liver, and thus produces a marked depletion of circulating human SAP. This mechanism of drug action potently removes SAP from human amyloid deposits in the tissues and may provide a new therapeutic approach to both systemic amyloidosis and diseases associated with local amyloid, including Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes.

  11. Immune functions of serum amyloid A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Kari K; Niemi, K; Kovanen, P T

    2012-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a highly conserved, acute-phase protein synthesized predominantly by the liver. After secretion into the circulation, it associates with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles. During acute inflammation, serum SAA levels may rise up to 1000-fold, and under these conditions, SAA displaces apolipoprotein A-I from HDL, thus becoming the major apolipoprotein of circulating HDL3. SAA exhibits significant immunological activity by, for example, inducing the synthesis of several cytokines and by being chemotactic for neutrophils and mast cells. It exerts many of its immunological activities by binding and activating cell-surface receptors, including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4, formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL1), class B scavenger receptor CD36, and the ATP receptor P2X7. SAA also recently has been shown to activate the inflammasome cascade, which has a key role in immune activation, thus further stressing the unique role of SAA in immunomodulation. Traditionally, SAA has been considered to have a key role in the pathogenesis of amyloid A-type amyloidosis, but we now understand that it may also participate in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis. Thus, SAA is one potential target in the treatment of diseases associated with chronic inflammation. The purpose of this review is to shed light on SAA as an immunologically active protein. We also focus on the recent findings implicating SAA in the regulation of the inflammasome cascade.

  12. Research of Magnetic Resonance Microscopy and Histological Section on Beta-Amyloid Plaques in PS/APP Transgenic Mice%PS/APP双转基因小鼠大脑中β-淀粉样蛋白的磁共振显微成像和组织切片研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林岚; 付振荣; 张柏雯; 周著黄; 高宏建; 吴水才

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) T2 map associated with Aβ plaques and their histology on dual transgenic PS/APP mouse brain. Methods The paper proposed an efficient, automated image-processing pipeline that used unstained sections to reconstruct a 3D brain model from 2D histological sections and further registered these with the corresponding 3D MRM. The imaging registration was a multistep registration procedure that ifrst aligned the neighboring 2D slices and then iteratively performed 2D and 3D registration.Results The registration pipeline can accurately register the 2D histology sections and 3D MRM. SomeAβ plaques can be found both in stained histology and MRM.Conclusion This research monitored theAβ plaques in PS/APP transgenic mice through neuroimaging technology, which can facilitate the understanding of the generation, deposition, and removal ofAβplaques in Alzheimer’s disease.%目的:探讨双转基因小鼠PS/APP大脑三维磁共振显微成像(MRM)的T2图与二维组织切片中Aβ斑块之间的关系。方法本文提出了一个高效、全自动的图像处理流程,即先通过未染色的二维组织切片重建三维脑模型,之后将其与三维MRM数据配准。配准是一个多步的过程,首先对邻接的二维切片进行配准,然后再进行迭代的二维和三维配准。结果该流程可以较好配准组织切片与MRM,并能在T2图和染色切片上发现一定的Aβ斑块间的对应关系。结论通过神经影像技术来对转基因小鼠大脑中的Aβ斑块进行监测,了解阿尔茨海默症(AD)中Aβ斑块的产生、沉积和清除过程。

  13. A peptide study of the relationship between the collagen triple-helix and amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Avanish S; Nunes, Ana Monica; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Type XXV collagen, or collagen-like amyloidogenic component, is a component of amyloid plaques, and recent studies suggest this collagen affects amyloid fibril elongation and has a genetic association with Alzheimer's disease. The relationship between the collagen triple helix and amyloid fibrils was investigated by studying peptide models, including a very stable triple helical peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)₁₀ , an amyloidogenic peptide GNNQQNY, and a hybrid peptide where the GNNQQNY sequence was incorporated between (GPO)(n) domains. Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy showed the GNNQQNY peptide formed a random coil structure, whereas the hybrid peptide contained a central disordered GNNQQNY region transitioning to triple-helical ends. Light scattering confirmed the GNNQQNY peptide had a high propensity to form amyloid fibrils, whereas amyloidogenesis was delayed in the hybrid peptide. NMR data suggested the triple-helix constraints on the GNNQQNY sequence within the hybrid peptide may disfavor the conformational change necessary for aggregation. Independent addition of a triple-helical peptide to the GNNQQNY peptide under aggregating conditions delayed nucleation and amyloid fibril growth. The inhibition of amyloid nucleation depended on the Gly-Xaa-Yaa sequence and required the triple-helix conformation. The inhibitory effect of the collagen triple-helix on an amyloidogenic sequence, when in the same molecule or when added separately, suggests Type XXV collagen, and possibly other collagens, may play a role in regulating amyloid fibril formation.

  14. Amyloid-β colocalizes with apolipoprotein B in absorptive cells of the small intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaliwal Satvinder S

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid-β is recognized as the major constituent of senile plaque found in subjects with Alzheimer's disease. However, there is increasing evidence that in a physiological context amyloid-β may serve as regulating apolipoprotein, primarily of the triglyceride enriched lipoproteins. To consider this hypothesis further, this study utilized an in vivo immunological approach to explore in lipogenic tissue whether amyloid-β colocalizes with nascent triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Results In murine absorptive epithelial cells of the small intestine, amyloid-β had remarkable colocalization with chylomicrons (Manders overlap coefficient = 0.73 ± 0.03 (SEM, the latter identified as immunoreactive apolipoprotein B. A diet enriched in saturated fats doubled the abundance of both amyloid-β and apo B and increased the overlap coefficient of the two proteins (0.87 ± 0.02. However, there was no evidence that abundance of the two proteins was interdependent within the enterocytes (Pearson's Coefficient Conclusion The findings of this study are consistent with the possibility that amyloid-β is secreted by enterocytes as an apolipoprotein component of chylomicrons. However, secretion of amyloid-β appears to be independent of chylomicron biogenesis.

  15. Nanomaterials for reducing amyloid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Mao, Xiaobo; Yu, Yue; Wang, Chen-Xuan; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2013-07-26

    This review is intended to reflect the recent progress on therapeutic applications of nanomaterials in amyloid diseases. The progress on anti-amyloid functions of various nanomaterials including inorganic nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials and biomolecular aggregates, is reviewed and discussed. The main functionalization strategies for general nanoparticle modifications are reviewed for potential applications of targeted therapeutics. The interaction mechanisms between amyloid peptides and nanomaterials are discussed from the perspectives of dominant interactions and kinetics. The encapsulation of anti-amyloid drugs, targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release and drug delivery crossing blood brain barrier by application of nanomaterials would also improve the therapeutics of amyloid diseases.

  16. Copper enhances amyloid-beta peptide neurotoxicity and non beta-aggregation: a series of experiments conducted upon copper-bound and copper-free amyloid-beta peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xueling; Sun, Yaxuan; Gao, Zhaolan; Jiang, Zhaofeng

    2010-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the abnormal aggregation of amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) in extracellular deposits known as senile plaques. However, the nature of the toxic Abeta species and its precise mechanism of action remain unclear. Previous reports suggest that the histidine residues are involved in copper-Abeta interaction, by which resulting in the neurotoxicity of Abeta and free radical damage. Here, we employed a mutant Abeta (Abeta H13R) in which a histidine residue was replaced by arginine. Copper facilitated the precipitation of both wild-type and mutant Abeta in the spectrophotometric absorbance assay but suppressed beta-structure aggregates according to Thioflavine-T assay. Wild-type Abeta alone is more cytotoxic but produced less amount of H(2)O(2) than AbetaH13R-copper complexes, suggesting that Abeta-membrane interaction may also implicated in the pathologic progress. Abeta toxicity is in positive correlation to its competence to aggregate despite the aggregation is mainly composed of non-beta fibril substances. In short, these findings may provide further evidence on the role of copper in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Denitrification in human dental plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verstraete Willy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial denitrification is not considered important in human-associated microbial communities. Accordingly, metabolic investigations of the microbial biofilm communities of human dental plaque have focused on aerobic respiration and acid fermentation of carbohydrates, even though it is known that the oral habitat is constantly exposed to nitrate (NO3- concentrations in the millimolar range and that dental plaque houses bacteria that can reduce this NO3- to nitrite (NO2-. Results We show that dental plaque mediates denitrification of NO3- to nitric oxide (NO, nitrous oxide (N2O, and dinitrogen (N2 using microsensor measurements, 15N isotopic labelling and molecular detection of denitrification genes. In vivo N2O accumulation rates in the mouth depended on the presence of dental plaque and on salivary NO3- concentrations. NO and N2O production by denitrification occurred under aerobic conditions and was regulated by plaque pH. Conclusions Increases of NO concentrations were in the range of effective concentrations for NO signalling to human host cells and, thus, may locally affect blood flow, signalling between nerves and inflammatory processes in the gum. This is specifically significant for the understanding of periodontal diseases, where NO has been shown to play a key role, but where gingival cells are believed to be the only source of NO. More generally, this study establishes denitrification by human-associated microbial communities as a significant metabolic pathway which, due to concurrent NO formation, provides a basis for symbiotic interactions.

  18. Amyloid-β alters the DNA methylation status of cell-fate genes in an Alzheimer's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Noor; McKenzie, Courtney; Garrett, Rebecca; Baker, Matthew; Fox, Nena; Isaacs, Gary D

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular amyloidplaques (Aβ). Despite ongoing research, some ambiguity remains surrounding the role of Aβ in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disease. While several studies have focused on the mutations associated with AD, our understanding of the epigenetic contributions to the disease remains less clear. To that end, we determined the changes in DNA methylation in differentiated human neurons with and without Aβ treatment. DNA was isolated from neurons treated with Aβ or vehicle, and the two samples were digested with either a methylation-sensitive (HpaII) or a methylation-insensitive (MspI) restriction endonuclease. The fragments were amplified and co-hybridized to a commercial promoter microarray. Data analysis revealed a subset of genomic loci that shows a significant change in DNA methylation following Aβ treatment in comparison to the control group. After mapping these loci to nearby genes, we discovered high enrichment for cell-fate genes that control apoptosis and neuronal differentiation. Finally, we incorporated three of those genes in a possible model suggesting the means by which Aβ contributes to the brain shrinkage and memory loss seen in AD.

  19. β-Amyloid pathogenesis: Chemical properties versus cellular levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2016-01-01

    , or aggregation propensities. Cytotoxicity correlates inversely with total Aβ42 (R2=0.65, P =.016) and Aβ42/Aβ40 ratios (R2=0.76, P=.005), i.e., chemical properties that increase Aβ42 also reduce toxicity. The complexity and heterogeneity of data reveal the need to understand these phenotypes better, e.......g., by focusing on the chemical properties of the involved Aβ species....

  20. Study of specially labeling amyloid plaques in vivo in Alzheimer transgenic mice with targeted magnetic nano-iron contrast agent%靶向纳米铁磁共振造影剂特异性标记阿尔茨海默病鼠脑内老年斑

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    湛彦强; 张苏明; 吴军; 许杰; 尹波; 马铭; 杜桂焕; 刘祖黎; 徐威; 雷浩

    2011-01-01

    目的 开发具有高度特异性的靶向磁共振对比剂,验证其特异性显示阿尔茨海默病(AD)脑内老年斑的可能性及有效性.方法 利用热分解法获得水相的磁性纳米四氧化三铁颗粒(MNPs),经过表面官能化学修饰,完成MNPs与β淀粉样蛋白肽段1-40(Aβ40)及蛋白质转导结合域(protein transduction domain,Tat-PTD)的连接后,制备出特异性与老年斑相结合的靶向纳米铁造影剂Aβ40-MNPs-Tat PTD,通过尾静脉注射人20只AD鼠和20只阴性对照C57小鼠(4、6、9、12月龄各5只)体内,不同的时间点采用7.0 T动物磁共振检测获得磁共振图像,观察靶向纳米造影剂对脑实质内老年斑信号的强化效果,继之处死小鼠后灌流取脑做连续冰冻切片,进行铁染色和Thioflavine S染色组织学验证.结果 所获得的靶向纳米颗粒Aβ40-MNPs-Tat PTD能够在体外进入细胞内进而改变细胞磁共振T2信号强度.尾静脉注射入AD鼠体内后能特异性负性强化AD鼠脑内老年斑病变,经组织学验证,能够与老年斑染色及铁染色相对应.结论 特异靶向性的磁性纳米铁造影剂Aβ40-MNPs-Tat PTD能特异性地针对小鼠脑内的老年斑病变进行负性强化和标记.%Objective To develop specific targeted magnetic biomarkers which can selectively mark the senile plaques in Alzheimer' s disease (AD) and verify its feasibility and validity.Methods Aβ1-40 peptide and Tat-PTD ( Tat-protein transduction domain) was binded with dextran-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide ( USPIO) particles.Visualization of plaques in vivo in Alzheimer transgenic mice was investigated at 7.0 Tesla using T2 sequences after intravenous administration of the targeted nanoiron contrast agent and verified by histological staining.Results The targeted nano-iron contrast agent could enter the cultured neural stem cells,and was able to accelerate T2 relaxation rates of water protons in the cells and negatively reinforce the T2

  1. Paradoxical Condensation of Copper with Elevated β-Amyloid in Lipid Rafts under Cellular Copper Deficiency Conditions: IMPLICATIONS FOR ALZHEIMER DISEASE*

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, Ya Hui; Robb, Elysia L.; Volitakis, Irene; Ho, Michael; Evin, Genevieve; Li, Qiao-Xin; Janetta G Culvenor; Masters, Colin L.; Cherny, Robert A.; Bush, Ashley I.

    2009-01-01

    Redox-active copper is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) aggregation, and amyloid formation. Aβ·copper complexes have been identified in AD and catalytically oxidize cholesterol and lipid to generate H2O2 and lipid peroxides. The site and mechanism of this abnormality is not known. Growing evidence suggests that amyloidogenic processing of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) occurs in lipid rafts, membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol. ...

  2. New Insights in the Amyloid-Beta Interaction with Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Spuch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Particularly, mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of amyloid-beta-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. The recent emphasis on the intracellular biology of amyloid-beta and its precursor protein (APP has led researchers to consider the possibility that mitochondria-associated and mitochondrial amyloid-beta may directly cause neurotoxicity. Both proteins are known to localize to mitochondrial membranes, block the transport of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to mitochondria, interact with mitochondrial proteins, disrupt the electron transport chain, increase reactive oxygen species production, cause mitochondrial damage, and prevent neurons from functioning normally. In this paper, we will outline current knowledge of the intracellular localization of amyloid-beta. Moreover, we summarize evidence from AD postmortem brain as well as animal AD models showing that amyloid-beta triggers mitochondrial dysfunction through a number of pathways such as impairment of oxidative phosphorylation, elevation of reactive oxygen species production, alteration of mitochondrial dynamics, and interaction with mitochondrial proteins. Thus, this paper supports the Alzheimer cascade mitochondrial hypothesis such as the most important early events in this disease, and probably one of the future strategies on the therapy of this neurodegenerative disease.

  3. An interaction of beta-amyloid with aluminium in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, C; Price, N C; Kelly, S M; Birchall, J D

    1993-06-21

    We have used circular dichroism spectroscopy to confirm that, in a membrane-mimicking solvent, A beta P(1-40) adopts a partially helical conformation and we have demonstrated the loss of this structure in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of aluminium. This is the first evidence of a direct biochemical interaction between aluminium and beta-amyloid and may have important implications for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Microglial C5aR (CD88) expression correlates with amyloid-β deposition in murine models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ager, Rahasson R.; Fonseca, Maria I.; Chu, Shu-Hui; Sanderson, Sam D.; Taylor, Stephen M; Woodruff, Trent M; Tenner, Andrea J.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer Disease (AD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β protein and neuronal loss, is the leading cause of age-related dementia in the world today. The disease is also associated with neuroinflammation, robust activation of astrocytes and microglia and evidence of activation of the complement system, localized with both fibrillar amyloid-β (fAβ) plaques and tangles. The observations are consistent with a complement dependent component of ...

  5. En plaque meningioma with angioinvasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basu Keya

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available En plaque meningioma is a rare type of meningioma characterized by infiltrative nature, sheet-like growth and at times invading the bone. We report here a case of en plaque meningioma with typical grade I histomorphology along with unusual feature of angioinvasion. The patient was a 55-year-old man presenting with headache and painful proptosis of right eye. Imaging modalities revealed an en -plaque meningioma extending into the right sylvian fissure, with thickening of right temporal calvarium, greater wing of sphenoid and extension into the orbit. Magnetic resonance angiography showed medial displacement of right middle cerebral artery. The tumor was removed from the sylvian fissure and right temporal convexity. However, only subtotal removal of the intraorbital part was possible. Histology showed a meningothelial meningioma with low tumor cell proliferation, but infiltration into the bone, skeletal muscle and angioinvasion. Recognition of meningiomas en plaque is useful, as these tumors are difficult to resect completely, and are more prone to undergo recurrence or malignant change. In addition, angioinvasion seen in this tumor may have additional prognostic significance.

  6. Ultrasound Tissue Characterization of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Picano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A thrombotic occlusion of the vessel fed by ruptured coronary atherosclerotic plaque may result in unstable angina, myocardial infarction or death, whereas embolization from a plaque in carotid arteries may result in transient ischemic attack or stroke. The atherosclerotic plaque prone to such clinical events is termed high-risk or vulnerable plaque, and its identification in humans before it becomes symptomatic has been elusive to date. Ultrasonic tissue characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque is possible with different techniques—such as vascular, transesophageal, and intravascular ultrasound—on a variety of arterial segments, including carotid, aorta, and coronary districts. The image analysis can be based on visual, video-densitometric or radiofrequency methods and identifies three distinct textural patterns: hypo-echoic (corresponding to lipid- and hemorrhage-rich plaque, iso- or moderately hyper-echoic (fibrotic or fibro-fatty plaque, and markedly hyperechoic with shadowing (calcific plaque. Hypoechoic or dishomogeneous plaques, with spotty microcalcification and large plaque burden, with plaque neovascularization and surface irregularities by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, are more prone to clinical complications than hyperechoic, extensively calcified, homogeneous plaques with limited plaque burden, smooth luminal plaque surface and absence of neovascularization. Plaque ultrasound morphology is important, along with plaque geometry, in determining the atherosclerotic prognostic burden in the individual patient. New quantitative methods beyond backscatter (to include speed of sound, attenuation, strain, temperature, and high order statistics are under development to evaluate vascular tissues. Although not yet ready for widespread clinical use, tissue characterization is listed by the American Society of Echocardiography roadmap to 2020 as one of the most promising fields of application in cardiovascular ultrasound imaging

  7. Red autofluorescence of dental plaque bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, M. H.; Thomas, R. Z.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.; de Soet, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Red autofluorescence of plaque and its relation to fluorescence of a single species in the biofilm was studied. Fluorescence images of non-disclosed and disclosed plaque of 28 first-year students were captured. The plaque samples were assessed by culture methods and studied for red autofluorescence.

  8. Targeting amyloid-degrading enzymes as therapeutic strategies in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Anthony J; Fisk, Lilia; Nalivaeva, Natalia N

    2004-12-01

    The levels of amyloid beta-peptides (Abeta) in the brain represent a dynamic equilibrium state as a result of their biosynthesis from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta- and gamma-secretases, their degradation by a team of amyloid-degrading enzymes, their subsequent oligomerization, and deposition into senile plaques. While most therapeutic attention has focused on developing inhibitors of secretases to prevent Abeta formation, enhancing the rate of Abeta degradation represents an alternative and viable strategy. Current evidence both in vivo and in vitro suggests that there are three major players in amyloid turnover: neprilysin, endothelin converting enzyme(s), and insulin-degrading enzyme, all of which are zinc metallopeptidases. Other proteases have also been implicated in amyloid metabolism, including angiotensin-converting enzyme, and plasmin but for these the evidence is less compelling. Neprilysin and endothelin converting enzyme(s) are homologous membrane proteins of the M13 peptidase family, which normally play roles in the biosynthesis and/or metabolism of regulatory peptides. Insulin-degrading enzyme is structurally and mechanistically distinct. The regional, cellular, and subcellular localizations of these enzymes differ, providing an efficient and diverse mechanism for protecting the brain against the normal accumulation of toxic Abeta peptides. Reduction in expression levels of some of these proteases following insults (e.g., hypoxia and ischemia) or aging might predispose to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Conversely, enhancement of their levels by gene delivery or pharmacological means could be neuroprotective. Even a relatively small enhancement of Abeta metabolism could slow the inexorable progression of the disease. The relative merits of targeting these enzymes for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease will be reviewed and possible side-effects of enhancing their activity evaluated.

  9. Failure of perivascular drainage of β-amyloid in cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Cheryl A; Jayakody, Nimeshi; Johnston, David A; Bechmann, Ingo; Carare, Roxana O

    2014-07-01

    In Alzheimer's disease, amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulates as insoluble plaques in the brain and deposits in blood vessel walls as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). The severity of CAA correlates with the degree of cognitive decline in dementia. The distribution of Aβ in the walls of capillaries and arteries in CAA suggests that Aβ is deposited in the perivascular pathways by which interstitial fluid drains from the brain. Soluble Aβ from the extracellular spaces of gray matter enters the basement membranes of capillaries and drains along the arterial basement membranes that surround smooth muscle cells toward the leptomeningeal arteries. The motive force for perivascular drainage is derived from arterial pulsations combined with the valve effect of proteins present in the arterial basement membranes. Physical and biochemical changes associated with arteriosclerosis, aging and possession of apolipoprotein E4 genotype lead to a failure of perivascular drainage of soluble proteins, including Aβ. Perivascular cells associated with arteries and the lymphocytes recruited in the perivenous spaces contribute to the clearance of Aβ. The failure of perivascular clearance of Aβ may be a major factor in the accumulation of Aβ in CAA and may have significant implications for the design of therapeutics for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Early-onset and robust amyloid pathology in a new homozygous mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Willuweit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transgenic mice expressing mutated amyloid precursor protein (APP and presenilin (PS-1 or -2 have been successfully used to model cerebral beta-amyloidosis, one of the characteristic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. However, the use of many transgenic lines is limited by premature death, low breeding efficiencies and late onset and high inter-animal variability of the pathology, creating a need for improved animal models. Here we describe the detailed characterization of a new homozygous double-transgenic mouse line that addresses most of these issues. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The transgenic mouse line (ARTE10 was generated by co-integration of two transgenes carrying the K670N/M671L mutated amyloid precursor protein (APP(swe and the M146V mutated presenilin 1 (PS1 both under control of a neuron-specific promoter. Mice, hemi- as well as homozygous for both transgenes, are viable and fertile with good breeding capabilities and a low rate of premature death. They develop robust AD-like cerebral beta-amyloid plaque pathology with glial inflammation, signs of neuritic dystrophy and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Using our novel image analysis algorithm for semi-automatic quantification of plaque burden, we demonstrate an early onset and progressive plaque deposition starting at 3 months of age in homozygous mice with low inter-animal variability and 100%-penetrance of the phenotype. The plaques are readily detected in vivo by PiB, the standard human PET tracer for AD. In addition, ARTE10 mice display early loss of synaptic markers and age-related cognitive deficits. By applying a gamma-secretase inhibitor we show a dose dependent reduction of soluble amyloid beta levels in the brain. CONCLUSIONS: ARTE10 mice develop a cerebral beta-amyloidosis closely resembling the beta-amyloid-related aspects of human AD neuropathology. Unifying several advantages of previous transgenic models, this line particularly qualifies for

  11. Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signalling: Roles in Alzheimer's Disease and Amyloid Neuroprotection

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the major contributor to dementia in the elderly, involves accumulation in the brain of extracellular plaques containing the β-amyloid protein (Aβ) and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. AD is also characterized by a loss of neurons, particularly those expressing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), thereby leading to a reduction in nAChR numbers. The Aβ1–42 protein, which is toxic to neurons, is critical to the onset and...

  12. Yuzu extract prevents cognitive decline and impaired glucose homeostasis in β-amyloid-infused rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hye Jeong; Hwang, Jin Taek; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Min Jung; Kang, Suna; Moon, Na Rang; Park, Sunmin

    2013-07-01

    Our preliminary study revealed that dementia induced by β-amyloid accumulation impairs peripheral glucose homeostasis (unpublished). We therefore evaluated whether long-term oral consumption of yuzu (Citrus junos Tanaka) extract improves cognitive dysfunction and glucose homeostasis in β-amyloid-induced rats. Male rats received hippocampal CA1 infusions of β-amyloid (25-35) [plaque forming β-amyloid; Alzheimer disease (AD)] or β-amyloid (35-25) [non-plaque forming β-amyloid; C (non-Alzheimer disease control)] at a rate of 3.6 nmol/d for 14 d. AD rats were divided into 2 dietary groups that received either 3% lyophilized 70% ethanol extracts of yuzu (AD-Y) or 3% dextrin (AD-C) in high-fat diets (43% energy as fat). The AD-C group exhibited greater hippocampal β-amyloid deposition, which was not detected in the C group, and attenuated hippocampal insulin signaling. Yuzu treatment prevented β-amyloid accumulation, increased tau phosphorylation, and attenuated hippocampal insulin signaling observed in AD-C rats. Consistent with β-amyloid accumulation, the AD-C rats experienced cognitive dysfunction, which was prevented by yuzu. AD-C rats gained less weight than did C rats due to decreased feed consumption, and yuzu treatment prevented the decrease in feed consumption. Serum glucose concentrations were higher in AD-C than in C rats at 40-120 min after glucose loading during an oral-glucose-tolerance test, but not at 0-40 min. Serum insulin concentrations were highly elevated in AD-C rats but not enough to lower serum glucose to normal concentrations, indicating that rats in the AD-C group had insulin resistance and a borderline diabetic state. Although AD-C rats were profoundly insulin resistant, AD-Y rats exhibited normal first and second phases of glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity and secretion. In conclusion, yuzu treatment prevented the cognitive dysfunction and impaired energy and glucose homeostasis induced by β-amyloid infusion.

  13. Mechanistic insights into mode of action of potent natural antagonists of BACE-1 for checking Alzheimer’s plaque pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanjal, Jaspreet Kaur [School of Biotechnology, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Goyal, Sukriti [Apaji Institute of Mathematics and Applied Computer Technology, Banasthali University, Tonk 304022, Rajasthan (India); Sharma, Sudhanshu [Department of Biotechnology, Delhi Technological University, New Delhi 110042 (India); Hamid, Rabia [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190006 (India); Grover, Abhinav, E-mail: abhinavgr@gmail.com [School of Biotechnology, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Accumulation of Aβ plaques is one of the major pathology associated with Alzheimer’s disease. •Inhibition of β-Secretase or BACE-1 offers a viable prospect to check the growth of these plaques. •A large virtual dataset of natural compounds was screened against BACE-1. •Top two hits were analyzed for thermodynamic and structural stability using MD simulations. •Their detailed binding mode of actions were elucidated. -- Abstract: Alzheimer’s is a neurodegenerative disorder resulting in memory loss and decline in cognitive abilities. Accumulation of extracellular beta amyloidal plaques is one of the major pathology associated with this disease. β-Secretase or BACE-1 performs the initial and rate limiting step of amyloidic pathway in which 37–43 amino acid long peptides are generated which aggregate to form plaques. Inhibition of this enzyme offers a viable prospect to check the growth of these plaques. Numerous efforts have been made in recent years for the generation of BACE-1 inhibitors but many of them failed during the preclinical or clinical trials due to drug related or drug induced toxicity. In the present work, we have used computational methods to screen a large dataset of natural compounds to search for small molecules having BACE-1 inhibitory activity with low toxicity to normal cells. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to analyze molecular interactions between the screened compounds and the active residues of the enzyme. Herein, we report two natural compounds of inhibitory nature active against β-secretase enzyme of amyloidic pathway and are potent lead molecules against Alzheimer’s disease.

  14. Beta-Amyloid Deposition and Alzheimer's Type Changes Induced by Borrelia Spirochetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklossy,J.; Kis, A.; Radenovic, A.; Miller, L.; Forro, L.; Martins, R.; Reiss, K.; Darbinian, N.; Darekar, P.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) consist of {beta}-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in affected brain areas. The processes, which drive this host reaction are unknown. To determine whether an analogous host reaction to that occurring in AD could be induced by infectious agents, we exposed mammalian glial and neuronal cells in vitro to Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes and to the inflammatory bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Morphological changes analogous to the amyloid deposits of AD brain were observed following 2-8 weeks of exposure to the spirochetes. Increased levels of {beta}-amyloid presursor protein (A{beta}PP) and hyperphosphorylated tau were also detected by Western blots of extracts of cultured cells that had been treated with spirochetes or LPS. These observations indicate that, by exposure to bacteria or to their toxic products, host responses similar in nature to those observed in AD may be induced.

  15. On the origin of Alzheimer's disease. Trials and tribulations of the amyloid hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Michael A; Soriano, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The amyloid cascade hypothesis, which implicates the amyloid Aβ peptide as the pathological initiator of both familial and sporadic, late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), continues to guide the majority of research. We believe that current evidence does not support the amyloid cascade hypothesis for late onset AD. Instead, we propose that Aβ is a key regulator of brain homeostasis. During AD, while Aβ accumulation may occur in the long term in parallel with disease progression, it does not contribute to primary pathogenesis. This view predicts that amyloid-centric therapies will continue to fail, and that progress in developing successful alternative therapies for AD will be slow until closer attention is paid to understanding the physiological function of Aβ and its precursor protein.

  16. AMYLOID-β PEPTIDE BINDS TO MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 1B (MAP1B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkian, Goar; Gonzalez-Noriega, Alfonso; Acero, Gonzalo; Ordoñez, Jorge; Michalak, Colette; Munguia, Maria Elena; Govezensky, Tzipe; Cribbs, David H.; Manoutcharian, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal formation of amyloid-beta aggregates have been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of targets have deleterious effects on cellular functions. In the present study we have shown for the first time that amyloid-beta 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the microtubule binding domain of the heavy chain of microtubule-associated protein 1B by the screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage. This interaction may explain, in part, the loss of neuronal cytoskeletal integrity, impairment of microtubule-dependent transport and synaptic dysfunction observed previously in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18079022

  17. Involvement of receptor tyrosine kinase Tyro3 in amyloidogenic APP processing and β-amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zheng

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common progressive neurodegenerative disease known to humankind. It is characterized by brain atrophy, extracellular amyloid plaques, and intracellular neurofibril tangles. β-Amyloid cascade is considered the major causative player in AD. Up until now, the mechanisms underlying the process of Aβ generation and accumulation in the brain have not been well understood. Tyro3 receptor belongs to the TAM receptor subfamily of receptor protein tyrosine kinases (RPTKs. It is specifically expressed in the neurons of the neocortex and hippocampus. In this study, we established a cell model stably expressing APPswe mutants and producing Aβ. We found that overexpression of Tyro3 receptor in the cell model significantly decreased Aβ generation and also down-regulated the expression of β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme (BACE1. However, the effects of Tyro3 were inhibited by its natural ligand, Gas6, in a concentration-dependent manner. In order to confirm the role of Tyro3 in the progression of AD development, we generated an AD transgenic mouse model accompanied by Tyro3 knockdown. We observed a significant increase in the number of amyloid plaques in the hippocampus in the mouse model. More plaque-associated clusters of astroglia were also detected. The present study may help researchers determine the role of Tyro3 receptor in the neuropathology of AD.

  18. Calcium signaling and amyloid toxicity in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuro, Angelo; Parker, Ian; Stutzmann, Grace E

    2010-04-23

    Intracellular Ca(2+) signaling is fundamental to neuronal physiology and viability. Because of its ubiquitous roles, disruptions in Ca(2+) homeostasis are implicated in diverse disease processes and have become a major focus of study in multifactorial neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD). A hallmark of AD is the excessive production of beta-amyloid (Abeta) and its massive accumulation in amyloid plaques. In this minireview, we highlight the pathogenic interactions between altered cellular Ca(2+) signaling and Abeta in its different aggregation states and how these elements coalesce to alter the course of the neurodegenerative disease. Ca(2+) and Abeta intersect at several functional levels and temporal stages of AD, thereby altering neurotransmitter receptor properties, disrupting membrane integrity, and initiating apoptotic signaling cascades. Notably, there are reciprocal interactions between Ca(2+) pathways and amyloid pathology; altered Ca(2+) signaling accelerates Abeta formation, whereas Abeta peptides, particularly in soluble oligomeric forms, induce Ca(2+) disruptions. A degenerative feed-forward cycle of toxic Abeta generation and Ca(2+) perturbations results, which in turn can spin off to accelerate more global neuropathological cascades, ultimately leading to synaptic breakdown, cell death, and devastating memory loss. Although no cause or cure is currently known, targeting Ca(2+) dyshomeostasis as an underlying and integral component of AD pathology may result in novel and effective treatments for AD.

  19. A transgenic Alzheimer rat with plaques, tau pathology, behavioral impairment, oligomeric Aβ and frank neuronal loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert M.; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Weitz, Tara M.; Rentsendorj, Altan; Gate, David; Spivak, Inna; Bholat, Yasmin; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Glabe, Charles G.; Breunig, Joshua J.; Rakic, Pasko; Davtyan, Hayk; Agadjanyan, Michael G.; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge; Bannykh, Serguei; Szekely, Christine A.; Pechnick, Robert N.; Town, Terrence

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is hallmarked by amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and widespread cortical neuronal loss (Selkoe, 2001). The ‘amyloid cascade hypothesis’ posits that cerebral amyloid sets neurotoxic events into motion that precipitate Alzheimer dementia (Hardy and Allsop, 1991). Yet, faithful recapitulation of all AD features in widely used transgenic (Tg) mice engineered to overproduce Aβ peptides has been elusive. We have developed a Tg rat model (line TgF344-AD) expressing mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APPsw) and presenilin 1 (PS1ΔE9) genes, each independent causes of early-onset familial AD. TgF344-AD rats manifest age-dependent cerebral amyloidosis that precedes tauopathy, gliosis, apoptotic loss of neurons in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and cognitive disturbance. These results demonstrate progressive neurodegeneration of the Alzheimer type in these animals. The TgF344-AD rat fills a critical need for a next-generation animal model to enable basic and translational AD research. PMID:23575824

  20. TLR2 is a primary receptor for Alzheimer's amyloid beta peptide to trigger neuroinflammatory activation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, S.; Liu, Y.; Hao, W.; Wolf, L.; Kiliaan, A.J.; Penke, B.; Rube, C.E.; Walter, J.; Heneka, M.T.; Hartmann, T.; Menger, M.D.; Fassbender, K.

    2012-01-01

    Microglia activated by extracellularly deposited amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) act as a two-edged sword in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis: on the one hand, they damage neurons by releasing neurotoxic proinflammatory mediators (M1 activation); on the other hand, they protect neurons by triggering an

  1. The roles of nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide in beta-amyloid neurotoxicity and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease%NOS及NO在介导Aβ神经毒性和阿尔茨海默病发病机制中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘辉; 陈俊抛; 梁丰; 李欣

    2003-01-01

    Aim To investigate the causative role of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and nitric oxide (NO) in neurotoxicity of beta-Amyloid( Aβ) and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) by the intervention of Aminoguanidine (AG),a selective inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibitor,and 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), a selective neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibitor, in the neurotoxicity of Aβ 1-40.Methods 35 adult SD rats selected from Y maze were divided into 7 groups:normal,saline,Aβ 1-40,AG+ Aβ 1-40,7-NI+ Aβ 1-40,Peanut oil(PO)+ Aβ 1-40 and saline+ Aβ 1-40.Using behavioral and neuropathological methods to observed the effects of Aβ 1-40 injection into hippocampi on rats learning and memory in Y maze and on the neuropathology in hippocampi.The intervention by intraperitoneal administration of AG and 7-NI in the neurotoxicity of Aβ 1-40 was studied then.Results In Aβ 1-40 injection group, the numbers of trial of acquisition and retrieval in Y maze were significantly increased (27.8± 2.3 and 19.7± 4.7),and the lesion length of DGCs was (1.93± 0.26) mm rounding with reactive glia.Intraperitoneal administration of AG, but not 7-NI,could reverse the damages caused by Aβ 1-40.In AG + Aβ 1-40 group, the numbers of trial of acquisition and retrieval were (14.6± 4.9) and (8.5± 2.1)(Facquisition=146.438,Pacquisition=0.000;Fretrieval=113.654,Pretrieval=0.000), and the lesion length of DGCs was (0.41± 0.21) mm with less reactive glia(Facquisition=146.438,Pacquisition=0.000;Fretrieval=113.654,Pretrieval=0.000).Conclusion iNOS/NO participates in the mechanisms of Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of AD.%目的观察诱导型一氧化氮合酶( iNOS)抑制剂胍氨酸( AG)及神经元型一氧化氮合酶( nNOS)抑制剂 7-硝基吲哚( 7-NI)对β淀粉样蛋白 1-40( Aβ 1-40)在体神经毒性的干预,进一步探讨一氧化氮合酶( NOS)及一氧化氮( NO)在 Aβ神经毒性和 Alzheimer病( AD)发病机制中的介导作用.方法雄性 SD

  2. Colocalisation of plasma derived apo B lipoproteins with cerebral proteoglycans in a transgenic-amyloid model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Virginie; Takechi, Ryusuke; Pallebage-Gamarallage, Menuka Madhavi Sompala; Galloway, Susan; Mamo, John C L

    2011-04-04

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by cerebral proteinaceous deposits comprised of amyloid beta (Aβ). Evidence suggests that enhanced blood-to-brain delivery of Aβ occurs when plasma concentration is increased, exacerbating amyloidosis. In blood, significant Aβ is associated with apolipoprotein (apo) B lipoproteins. In this study, immunofluorescent microscopy was utilised to explore if there is an association between apo B lipoproteins and proteoglycan expression within Aβ-rich plaques in transgenic-amyloid mice. Focal accumulation of apo B was found with Aβ-plaque in APP/PS1 mice. There was enrichment in the proteoglycans, agrin, perlecan, biglycan and decorin within the core of dense Aβ-plaque. Perlecan, biglycan and decorin were positively associated with apo B lipoprotein abundance within amyloid plaque consistent with a cause-for-retention effect. These findings show that proteoglycans are an integral component of Aβ deposits in APP/PS1 mice. This study suggests that some proteoglycans contribute to Aβ retention, whilst other proteoglycans have different functions in the aetiology of AD.

  3. Hacking the code of amyloid formation: the amyloid stretch hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, M Teresa; Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra; Serrano, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Many research efforts in the last years have been directed towards understanding the factors determining protein misfolding and amyloid formation. Protein stability and amino acid composition have been identified as the two major factors in vitro. The research of our group has been focused on understanding the relationship between amino acid sequence and amyloid formation. Our approach has been the design of simple model systems that reproduce the biophysical properties of natural amyloids. An amyloid sequence pattern was extracted that can be used to detect amyloidogenic hexapeptide stretches in proteins. We have added evidence supporting that these amyloidogenic stretches can trigger amyloid formation by nonamyloidogenic proteins. Some experimental results in other amyloid proteins will be analyzed under the conclusions obtained in these studies. Our conclusions together with evidences from other groups suggest that amyloid formation is the result of the interplay between a decrease of protein stability, and the presence of highly amyloidogenic regions in proteins. As many of these results have been obtained in vitro, the challenge for the next years will be to demonstrate their validity in in vivo systems.

  4. Cholesterol Depletion Reduces the Internalization of β-Amyloid Peptide in SH-SY5Y Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qinghua; HE Li; SUI Senfang

    2006-01-01

    Deposition of amyloid in the brain is a critical step in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The endocytosis of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is an important factor among the many factors that contribute to the genesis of amyloid deposits. Since cholesterol participates in many important physiological processes, the present work investigated the relationship between the cellular cholesterol content and the endocytosis of the exogenic Aβ, and found that reduction of the cholesterol content by methyl-β-cyclodextrin could reduce the endocytosis of Aβ. The study indicates that the endocytosis of Aβ is partly mediated by cholesterol.

  5. Following activation of the amyloid cascade, apolipoprotein E4 drives the in vivo oligomerization of amyloid-β resulting in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinson, Haim; Kariv-Inbal, Zehavit; Kayed, Rakez; Masliah, Eliezer; Michaelson, Daniel M

    2010-01-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, the accumulation of oligomerized amyloid-β (Aβ) is a primary event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The trigger of the amyloid cascade and of Aβ oligomerization in sporadic AD, the most prevalent form of the disease, remains elusive. Here, we examined the hypothesis that apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4), the most prevalent genetic risk factor for AD, triggers the accumulation of intraneuronal oligomerized Aβ following activation of the amyloid cascade. We investigated the intracellular organelles that are targeted by these processes and govern their pathological consequences. This revealed that activation of the amyloid cascade in vivo by inhibition of the Aβ degrading enzyme neprilysin specifically results in accumulation of Aβ and oligomerized Aβ and of ApoE4 in the CA1 neurons of ApoE4 mice. This was accompanied by lysosomal and mitochondrial pathology and the co-localization of Aβ, oligomerized Aβ, and ApoE4 with enlarged lysosomes and of Aβ and oligomerized Aβ with mitochondria. The time course of the lysosomal effects paralleled that of the loss of CA1 neurons, whereas the mitochondrial effects reached an earlier plateau. These findings suggest that ApoE4 potentiates the pathological effects of Aβ and the amyloid cascade by triggering the oligomerization of Aβ, which in turn, impairs intraneuronal mitochondria and lysosomes and drives neurodegeneration.

  6. Targeting vascular amyloid in arterioles of Alzheimer disease transgenic mice with amyloid β protein antibody-coated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poduslo, Joseph F; Hultman, Kristi L; Curran, Geoffry L; Preboske, Gregory M; Chamberlain, Ryan; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Garwood, Michael; Jack, Clifford R; Wengenack, Thomas M

    2011-08-01

    The relevance of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) and dementia in general emphasizes the importance of developing novel targeting approaches for detecting and treating cerebrovascular amyloid (CVA) deposits. We developed a nanoparticle-based technology that uses a monoclonal antibody against fibrillar human amyloid-β42 that is surface coated onto a functionalized phospholipid monolayer. We demonstrate that this conjugated nanoparticle binds to CVA deposits in arterioles of AD transgenic mice (Tg2576) after infusion into the external carotid artery using 3 different approaches. The first 2 approaches use a blood vessel enrichment of homogenized brain and a leptomeningeal vessel preparation from thin tangential brain slices from the surface of the cerebral cortex. Targeting of CVA by the antibody-coated nanoparticle was visualized using fluorescent lissamine rhodamine-labeled phospholipids in the nanoparticles, which were compared with fluorescent staining of the endothelial cells and amyloid deposits using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The third approach used high-field strength magnetic resonance imaging of antibody-coated iron oxide nanoparticles after infusion into the external carotid artery. Dark foci of contrast enhancement in cortical arterioles were observed in T2*-weighted images of ex vivo AD mouse brains that correlated histologically with CVA deposits. The targeting ability of these nanoparticles to CVA provides opportunities for the prevention and treatment of CAA.

  7. The effect of amyloid pathology and glucose metabolism on cortical volume loss over time in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriaanse, Sofie M. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van Dijk, Koene R.A. [Harvard University, Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Cambridge, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Ossenkoppele, Rik; Tolboom, Nelleke; Zwan, Marissa D.; Barkhof, Frederik; Berckel, Bart N.M. van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reuter, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Yaqub, Maqsood; Boellaard, Ronald; Windhorst, Albert D.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    The present multimodal neuroimaging study examined whether amyloid pathology and glucose metabolism are related to cortical volume loss over time in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and healthy elderly controls. Structural MRI scans of eleven AD patients and ten controls were available at baseline and follow-up (mean interval 2.5 years). Change in brain structure over time was defined as percent change of cortical volume within seven a-priori defined regions that typically show the strongest structural loss in AD. In addition, two PET scans were performed at baseline: [{sup 11}C]PIB to assess amyloidplaque load and [{sup 18}F]FDG to assess glucose metabolism. [{sup 11}C]PIB binding and [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake were measured in the precuneus, a region in which both amyloid deposition and glucose hypometabolism occur early in the course of AD. While amyloidplaque load at baseline was not related to cortical volume loss over time in either group, glucose metabolism within the group of AD patients was significantly related to volume loss over time (rho = 0.56, p < 0.05). The present study shows that in a group of AD patients amyloidplaque load as measured by [{sup 11}C]PIB behaves as a trait marker (i.e., all AD patients showed elevated levels of amyloid, not related to subsequent disease course), whilst hypometabolism as measured by [{sup 18}F]FDG changed over time indicating that it could serve as a state marker that is predictive of neurodegeneration. (orig.)

  8. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Said, Gerard

    2011-12-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathies (FAPs) are a group of life-threatening multisystem disorders transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. Nerve lesions are induced by deposits of amyloid fibrils, most commonly due to mutated transthyretin (TTR). Less often the precursor of amyloidosis is mutant apolipoprotein A-1 or gelsolin. The first identified cause of FAP-the TTR Val30Met mutation-is still the most common of more than 100 amyloidogenic point mutations identified worldwide. The penetrance and age at onset of FAP among people carrying the same mutation vary between countries. The symptomatology and clinical course of FAP can be highly variable. TTR FAP typically causes a nerve length-dependent polyneuropathy that starts in the feet with loss of temperature and pain sensations, along with life-threatening autonomic dysfunction leading to cachexia and death within 10 years on average. TTR is synthesised mainly in the liver, and liver transplantation seems to have a favourable effect on the course of neuropathy, but not on cardiac or eye lesions. Oral administration of tafamidis meglumine, which prevents misfolding and deposition of mutated TTR, is under evaluation in patients with TTR FAP. In future, patients with FAP might benefit from gene therapy; however, genetic counselling is recommended for the prevention of all types of FAP.

  9. Serum amyloid P component scintigraphy in familial amyloid polyneuropathy: regression of visceral amyloid following liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydh, A.; Hietala, S.O.; Aahlstroem, K.R. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Suhr, O. [Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Pepys, M.B.; Hawkins, P.N. [Immunological Medicine Unit, Department of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) associated with transthyretin (TTR) mutations is the commonest type of hereditary amyloidosis. Plasma TTR is produced almost exclusively in the liver and orthotopic liver transplantation is the only available treatment, although the clinical outcome varies. Serum amyloid P component (SAP) scintigraphy is a method for identifying and quantitatively monitoring amyloid deposits in vivo, but it has not previously been used to study the outcome of visceral amyloid deposits in FAP following liver transplantation. Whole body scintigraphy following injection of iodine-123 labelled SAP was performed in 17 patients with FAP associated with TTR Met30 and in five asymptomatic gene carriers. Follow-up studies were performed in ten patients, eight of whom had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation 1-5 years beforehand. There was abnormal uptake of {sup 123}I-SAP in all FAP patients, including the kidneys in each case, the spleen in five cases and the adrenal glands in three cases. Renal amyloid deposits were also present in three of the asymptomatic carriers. Follow-up studies 1-5 years after liver transplantation showed that there had been substantial regression of the visceral amyloid deposits in two patients and modest improvement in three cases. The amyloid deposits were unchanged in two patients. In conclusion, {sup 123}I-SAP scintigraphy identified unsuspected visceral amyloid in each patient with FAP due to TTR Met30. The universal presence of renal amyloid probably underlies the high frequency of renal failure that occurs in FAP following liver transplantation. The variable capacity of patients to mobilise amyloid deposits following liver transplantation may contribute to their long-term clinical outcome. (orig.) With 2 figs., 2 tabs., 22 refs.

  10. Serum Amyloid A as a Marker of Persistent Inflammation and an Indicator of Cardiovascular and Renal Involvement in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Targońska-Stępniak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic, inflammatory disease. Serum amyloid A (SAA is an acute-phase protein, involved in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The aim of the study was to assess serum concentration of SAA in RA patients, with reference to other inflammatory parameters and markers of extra-articular involvement. Methods. The study population consisted of 140 RA patients, low/moderate disease activity (L/MDA in 98 (70% patients and high disease activity (HDA in 42 (30%. Comprehensive clinical and laboratory assessment was performed with evaluation of electrocardiogram and carotid intima-media thickness. Results. The mean SAA concentration [327.0 (263.4 mg/L] was increased highly above the normal value, even in patients with L/MDA. Simultaneously, SAA was significantly higher in patients with HDA versus L/MDA. The mean SAA concentration was significantly higher in patients treated with glucocorticoids, was inversely associated with QTc duration, and was markedly higher in patients with atherosclerotic plaques, emphasizing increased CV risk. SAA was significantly higher in patients with increased cystatin-C level. Conclusions. In RA patients, high serum SAA concentration was strongly associated with activity of the disease and risk of CV and renal involvement. Recurrent assessment of SAA may facilitate searching patients with persistent inflammation and risk of extra-articular complications.

  11. Atherosclerotic plaque regression: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Nesan; Román-Rego, Ana; Ong, Peter; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2010-08-01

    Coronary artery disease is the major cause of death in the western world. The formation and rapid progression of atheromatous plaques can lead to serious cardiovascular events in patients with atherosclerosis. The better understanding, in recent years, of the mechanisms leading to atheromatous plaque growth and disruption and the availability of powerful HMG CoA-reductase inhibitors (statins) has permitted the consideration of plaque regression as a realistic therapeutic goal. This article reviews the existing evidence underpinning current therapeutic strategies aimed at achieving atherosclerotic plaque regression. In this review we also discuss imaging modalities for the assessment of plaque regression, predictors of regression and whether plaque regression is associated with a survival benefit.

  12. Diversity, biogenesis and function of microbial amyloids

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid is a distinct β-sheet-rich fold that many proteins can acquire. Frequently associated with neurodegenerative diseases in humans, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s, amyloids are traditionally considered the product of protein misfolding. However, the amyloid fold is now recognized as a ubiquitous part of normal cellular biology. ‘Functional’ amyloids have been identified in nearly all facets of cellular life, with microbial functional amyloids leading the way. Unlike ...

  13. Accuracy of coronary plaque detection and assessment of interobserver agreement for plaque quantification using automatic coronary plaque analysis software on coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laqmani, A.; Quitzke, M.; Creder, D.D.; Adam, G.; Lund, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclearmedicine; Klink, T. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate the accuracy of automatic plaque detection and the interobserver agreement of automatic versus manually adjusted quantification of coronary plaques on coronary CT angiography (cCTA) using commercially available software. 10 cCTA datasets were evaluated using plaque software. First, the automatically detected plaques were verified. Second, two observers independently performed plaque quantification without revising the automatically constructed plaque contours (automatic approach). Then, each observer adjusted the plaque contours according to plaque delineation (adjusted approach). The interobserver agreement of both approaches was analyzed. 32 of 114 automatically identified findings were true-positive plaques, while 82 (72 %) were false-positive. 20 of 52 plaques (38 %) were missed by the software (false-negative). The automatic approach provided good interobserver agreement with relative differences of 0.9 ± 16.0 % for plaque area and -3.3 ± 33.8 % for plaque volume. Both observers independently adjusted all contours because they did not represent the plaque delineation. Interobserver agreement decreased for the adjusted approach with relative differences of 25.0 ± 24.8 % for plaque area and 20.0 ± 40.4 % for plaque volume. The automatic plaque analysis software is of limited value due to high numbers of false-positive and false-negative plaque findings. The automatic approach was reproducible but it necessitated adjustment of all constructed plaque contours resulting in deterioration of the interobserver agreement.

  14. Diverging longitudinal changes in astrocytosis and amyloid PET in autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Carter, Stephen F; Almkvist, Ove; Farid, Karim; Schöll, Michael; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Thordardottir, Steinunn; Graff, Caroline; Wall, Anders; Långström, Bengt; Nordberg, Agneta

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a multifactorial dementia disorder characterized by early amyloid-β, tau deposition, glial activation and neurodegeneration, where the interrelationships between the different pathophysiological events are not yet well characterized. In this study, longitudinal multitracer positron emission tomography imaging of individuals with autosomal dominant or sporadic Alzheimer's disease was used to quantify the changes in regional distribution of brain astrocytosis (tracer (11)C-deuterium-L-deprenyl), fibrillar amyloidplaque deposition ((11)C-Pittsburgh compound B), and glucose metabolism ((18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose) from early presymptomatic stages over an extended period to clinical symptoms. The 52 baseline participants comprised autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carriers (n = 11; 49.6 ± 10.3 years old) and non-carriers (n = 16; 51.1 ± 14.2 years old; 10 male), and patients with sporadic mild cognitive impairment (n = 17; 61.9 ± 6.4 years old; nine male) and sporadic Alzheimer's disease (n = 8; 63.0 ± 6.5 years old; five male); for confidentiality reasons, the gender of mutation carriers is not revealed. The autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease participants belonged to families with known mutations in either presenilin 1 (PSEN1) or amyloid precursor protein (APPswe or APParc) genes. Sporadic mild cognitive impairment patients were further divided into (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B-positive (n = 13; 62.0 ± 6.4; seven male) and (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B-negative (n = 4; 61.8 ± 7.5 years old; two male) groups using a neocortical standardized uptake value ratio cut-off value of 1.41, which was calculated with respect to the cerebellar grey matter. All baseline participants underwent multitracer positron emission tomography scans, cerebrospinal fluid biomarker analysis and neuropsychological assessment. Twenty-six of the participants underwent clinical and imaging follow-up examinations after 2.8 ± 0.6 years. By using linear

  15. Mechanical Stresses in Carotid Plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuel, Samuel Alberg

    Aterosklerose er den hyppigste årsag til død og svær invaliditet i verden. Sygdommen danner aterosklerotiske plaques, som består af lipidkerner dækket af en fibrøs kappe. Såfremt kappen brister, dannes overliggende tromber, som kan føres med blodstrømmen og forårsage strokes hvis kappen brister i...... mekaniske kræfter, som påvirker den fibrøse kappe, for at være en medvirkende årsag til plaqueruptur. Endvidere er stress-niveauerne i den fibrøse kappe en risikomarkør, som påvirkes af såvel den fibrøse kappetykkelse som lipid kerne størrelsen, blodtryk og graden af forsnævring. Imidlertid har hidtidige...... for at få fjernet deres plaques (carotis endarterektomi). Dernæst blev skanningerne segmenteret i lipid-kerne, fibrøs kappe, blodbane, karvæg og calcificationer. Endvidere blev blodets hastighed, blodtryk og karvægs deformationer målt. Disse data blev benyttet til longitudinelle fluid-struktur interaktions...

  16. Interactions of laminin with the amyloid ß peptide: Implications for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive neuronal cell loss is observed in Alzheimer's disease. Laminin immunoreactivity colocalizes with senile plaques, the characteristic extracellular histopathological lesions of Alzheimer brain, which consist of the amyloid ß (Aß peptide polymerized into amyloid fibrils. These lesions have neurotoxic effects and have been proposed to be a main cause of neurodegeneration. In order to understand the pathological significance of the interaction between laminin and amyloid, we investigated the effect of laminin on amyloid structure and toxicity. We found that laminin interacts with the Aß1-40 peptide, blocking fibril formation and even inducing depolymerization of preformed fibrils. Protofilaments known to be intermediate species of Aß fibril formation were also detected as intermediate species of laminin-induced Aß fibril depolymerization. Moreover, laminin-amyloid interactions inhibited the toxic effects on rat primary hippocampal neurons. As a whole, our results indicate a putative anti-amyloidogenic role of laminin which may be of biological and therapeutic interest for controlling amyloidosis, such as those observed in cerebral angiopathy and Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Current status of vulnerable plaque detection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sharif, Faisal

    2012-02-01

    Critical coronary stenoses have been shown to contribute to only a minority of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and sudden cardiac death. Autopsy studies have identified a subgroup of high-risk patients with disrupted vulnerable plaque and modest stenosis. Consequently, a clinical need exists to develop methods to identify these plaques prospectively before disruption and clinical expression of disease. Recent advances in invasive and noninvasive imaging techniques have shown the potential to identify these high-risk plaques. The anatomical characteristics of the vulnerable plaque such as thin cap fibroatheroma and lipid pool can be identified with angioscopy, high frequency intravascular ultrasound, intravascular MRI, and optical coherence tomography. Efforts have also been made to recognize active inflammation in high-risk plaques using intravascular thermography. Plaque chemical composition by measuring electromagnetic radiation using spectroscopy is also an emerging technology to detect vulnerable plaques. Noninvasive imaging with MRI, CT, and PET also holds the potential to differentiate between low and high-risk plaques. However, at present none of these imaging modalities are able to detect vulnerable plaque neither has been shown to definitively predict outcome. Nevertheless in contrast, there has been a parallel development in the physiological assessment of advanced atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Thus recent trials using fractional flow reserve in patients with modest non flow-limiting stenoses have shown that deferral of PCI with optimal medical therapy in these patients is superior to coronary intervention. Further trials are needed to provide more information regarding the natural history of high-risk but non flow-limiting plaque to establish patient-specific targeted therapy and to refine plaque stabilizing strategies in the future.

  18. Biomechanics and inflammation in atherosclerotic plaque erosion and plaque rupture: implications for cardiovascular events in women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian C Campbell

    Full Text Available Although plaque erosion causes approximately 40% of all coronary thrombi and disproportionally affects women more than men, its mechanism is not well understood. The role of tissue mechanics in plaque rupture and regulation of mechanosensitive inflammatory proteins is well established, but their role in plaque erosion is unknown. Given obvious differences in morphology between plaque erosion and rupture, we hypothesized that inflammation in general as well as the association between local mechanical strain and inflammation known to exist in plaque rupture may not occur in plaque erosion. Therefore, our objective was to determine if similar mechanisms underlie plaque rupture and plaque erosion.We studied a total of 74 human coronary plaque specimens obtained at autopsy. Using lesion-specific computer modeling of solid mechanics, we calculated the stress and strain distribution for each plaque and determined if there were any relationships with markers of inflammation. Consistent with previous studies, inflammatory markers were positively associated with increasing strain in specimens with rupture and thin-cap fibroatheromas. Conversely, overall staining for inflammatory markers and apoptosis were significantly lower in erosion, and there was no relationship with mechanical strain. Samples with plaque erosion most closely resembled those with the stable phenotype of thick-cap fibroatheromas.In contrast to classic plaque rupture, plaque erosion was not associated with markers of inflammation and mechanical strain. These data suggest that plaque erosion is a distinct pathophysiological process with a different etiology and therefore raises the possibility that a different therapeutic approach may be required to prevent plaque erosion.

  19. Oral biofilm models for mechanical plaque removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, Martinus J.; Busscher, Henk J.; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Slomp, Anje M.; Abbas, Frank; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro plaque removal studies require biofilm models that resemble in vivo dental plaque. Here, we compare contact and non-contact removal of single and dual-species biofilms as well as of biofilms grown from human whole saliva in vitro using different biofilm models. Bacteria were adhered to a sa

  20. A cytotoxic amyloid oligomer self-triggered and NIR- enhanced amyloidosis therapeutic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can Xu[1,2; Peng Shi[1,2; Meng Li[1,2; Jinsong Ren[1; xiaogang Qu[1

    2015-01-01

    We report a new strategy for improving the efficiency of non-specific amyloidosis therapeutic drugs by coating amyloid-responsive lipid bilayers. The approach had drawn inspiration from amyloid oligomer-mediated cell membrane disruption in the pathogenesis of amyloidosis. A graphene-mesoporous silica hybrid (GMS)-supported lipid bilayer (GMS-Lip) system was used as a drug carrier, Drugs were well confined inside the nanocarrier until encountering amyloid oligomers, which could pierce the lipid bilayer coat and cause drug release. To ensure release efficiency, use of a near-infrared (NIR) laser was also introduced to facilitate drug release, taking advantage of the photothermal effect of GMS and thermal sensitivity of lipid bilayers. To facilitate tracking, fluorescent dyes were co-loaded with drugs within GMS-Lip and the NIR laser was used once the oligomer-triggered release had been signaled. Because of the spatially and temporally controllable property of light, the NIR-assisted release could be easily and selectively activated locally by tracking the fluorescence signal. Our design is based on arnyloidosis pathogenesis, the cytotoxic amyloid oligomer self-triggered release via cell membrane disruption, for the controlled release of drug molecules. The results may shed light on the development of pathogenesis- inspired drug delivery systems,

  1. The nitroxide radical TEMPOL prevents obesity, hyperlipidaemia, elevation of inflammatory cytokines, and modulates atherosclerotic plaque composition in apoE(-/-) mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Christine H. J.; Mitchell, James B.; Bursill, Christina A.

    2015-01-01

    cholesterol, inflammatory cytokines and markers (interleukin-6, IL-6; monocyte-chemotactic protein, MCP-1; myeloperoxidase, MPO; serum amyloid A, SAA; adiponectin; leptin). Plaques in the aortic sinus were analysed for area, and content of collagen, lipid, macrophages and smooth muscle cells. RESULTS: High...... and a decrease in adiponectin. TEMPOL supplementation reversed these effects. When compared to HFD-fed mice, TEMPOL supplementation increased plaque collagen content, decreased lipid content and increased macrophage numbers. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that in a well-established model of obesity...

  2. Destruction of amyloid fibrils by graphene through penetration and extraction of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zaixing; Ge, Cuicui; Liu, Jiajia; Chong, Yu; Gu, Zonglin; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A; Chai, Zhifang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-11-28

    Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We here provide both experimental and computational evidence that pristine graphene and graphene-oxide nanosheets can inhibit Aβ peptide monomer fibrillation and clear mature amyloid fibrils, thus impacting the central molecular superstructures correlated with AD pathogenesis. Our molecular dynamics simulations for the first time reveal that graphene nanosheets can penetrate and extract a large number of peptides from pre-formed amyloid fibrils; these effects seem to be related to exceptionally strong dispersion interactions between peptides and graphene that are further enhanced by strong π-π stacking between the aromatic residues of extracted Aβ peptides and the graphene surface. Atomic force microscopy images confirm these predictions by demonstrating that mature amyloid fibrils can be cut into pieces and cleared by graphene oxides. Thioflavin fluorescence assays further illustrate the detailed dynamic processes by which graphene induces inhibition of monomer aggregation and clearance of mature amyloid fibrils, respectively. Cell viability and ROS assays indicate that graphene oxide can indeed mitigate cytotoxicity of Aβ peptide amyloids. Our findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms that define graphene-amyloid interaction and suggest that further research on nanotherapies for Alzheimer's and other protein aggregation-related diseases is warranted.

  3. Metalloproteinases and advanced glycation end products: coupled navigation in atherosclerotic plaque pathophysiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furfaro, A L; Sanguineti, R; Storace, D; Monacelli, F; Puzzo, A; Pronzato, M A; Odetti, P; Traverso, N

    2012-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), their inhibitors (TIMPs) and inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), are considered markers of evolution and/or instability of atherosclerotic plaques. Accumulation of Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGE) is a well known phenomenon in diabetes and has also been considered in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Aim of the present study was to analyse the levels of pentosidine, a fluorescent AGE, and to evaluate the expression of MMP-2, TIMP-3, and IL-1 in an ex vivo model of human advanced atherosclerotic plaques. We intended to test the possible correlation between pentosidine and markers of ECM remodelling and inflammation in the atherosclerotic process, and to investigate if classic risk factors, such as diabetes and hypertension, influenced these biochemical parameters. We found that diabetic plaques showed higher level of pentosidine, as expected, but much lower, or even undetectable, expression levels of MMP-2 and TIMP-3; IL-1 expression was not different between diabetic and non diabetic plaques. Hypertension did not influence any of these parameters. Although the statistical correlations between the expression of the considered genes and pentosidine did not reach significance, slight negative trends were noted between TIMP-3 and IL-1 expression vs. pentosidine content. We suggest that in mature diabetic plaques AGE accumulation can exert stabilizing effects on matrix proteins, while scanty cell presence leads to poor capacity of reactive responses, such as remodelling and inflammation.

  4. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a

  5. Calcineurin inhibition with FK506 ameliorates dendritic spine density deficits in plaque-bearing Alzheimer model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozkalne, Anete; Hyman, Bradley T; Spires-Jones, Tara L

    2011-03-01

    Synapse loss is the strongest correlate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease, and synapses are an attractive therapeutic target due to their plastic nature that allows for potential recovery with intervention. We have previously demonstrated in transgenic mice that form senile plaques that dendrites surrounding plaques become dystrophic and lose postsynaptic dendritic spines. Furthermore, we found strong evidence that plaque-associated dendritic changes are mediated by calcineurin, a calcium-dependent phosphatase involved in cell signaling, using in vitro models and genetically encoded inhibitors in mouse models. In this study, we pharmacologically inhibited calcineurin with FK506 treatment to test the hypothesis that calcineurin inhibition will allow recovery of plaque-associated synapse loss. We found that in plaque bearing transgenic mice, short term (1 week) FK506 treatment results in an amelioration of dendritic spine loss. We also observe an effect on spine morphology in wild-type mice with FK506 treatment. These data show that systemic FK506 administration, and hence calcineurin inhibition, may be neuroprotective for amyloid beta induced synaptic alterations.

  6. Effects of synaptic modulation on β-amyloid, synaptophysin and memory performance in Alzheimer’s disease transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) and loss of synapses are hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). How synaptic activity relates to Aβ accumulation and loss of synapses is a current topic of major interest. Synaptic activation promotes Aβ secretion, and chronic reduction of synaptic activity reduced Aβ plaques in an AD transgenic mouse model. This suggested beneficial effects of reducing synaptic activity in AD. We now show that reduced synaptic activity causes detrimental effects on synapses and...

  7. Atomic-resolution structure of a disease-relevant Aβ(1-42) amyloid fibril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälti, Marielle Aulikki; Ravotti, Francesco; Arai, Hiromi; Glabe, Charles G; Wall, Joseph S; Böckmann, Anja; Güntert, Peter; Meier, Beat H; Riek, Roland

    2016-08-23

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is present in humans as a 39- to 42-amino acid residue metabolic product of the amyloid precursor protein. Although the two predominant forms, Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42), differ in only two residues, they display different biophysical, biological, and clinical behavior. Aβ(1-42) is the more neurotoxic species, aggregates much faster, and dominates in senile plaque of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Although small Aβ oligomers are believed to be the neurotoxic species, Aβ amyloid fibrils are, because of their presence in plaques, a pathological hallmark of AD and appear to play an important role in disease progression through cell-to-cell transmissibility. Here, we solved the 3D structure of a disease-relevant Aβ(1-42) fibril polymorph, combining data from solid-state NMR spectroscopy and mass-per-length measurements from EM. The 3D structure is composed of two molecules per fibril layer, with residues 15-42 forming a double-horseshoe-like cross-β-sheet entity with maximally buried hydrophobic side chains. Residues 1-14 are partially ordered and in a β-strand conformation, but do not display unambiguous distance restraints to the remainder of the core structure.

  8. Consequences of Inhibiting Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing Enzymes on Synaptic Function and Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disease, one of whose major pathological hallmarks is the accumulation of amyloid plaques comprised of aggregated β-amyloid (Aβ peptides. It is now recognized that soluble Aβ oligomers may lead to synaptic dysfunctions early in AD pathology preceding plaque deposition. Aβ is produced by a sequential cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP by the activity of β- and γ-secretases, which have been identified as major candidate therapeutic targets of AD. This paper focuses on how Aβ alters synaptic function and the functional consequences of inhibiting the activity of the two secretases responsible for Aβ generation. Abnormalities in synaptic function resulting from the absence or inhibition of the Aβ-producing enzymes suggest that Aβ itself may have normal physiological functions which are disrupted by abnormal accumulation of Aβ during AD pathology. This interpretation suggests that AD therapeutics targeting the β- and γ-secretases should be developed to restore normal levels of Aβ or combined with measures to circumvent the associated synaptic dysfunction(s in order to have minimal impact on normal synaptic function.

  9. Interleukin-2 improves amyloid pathology, synaptic failure and memory in Alzheimer's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Sandro; Churlaud, Guillaume; Audrain, Mickael; Michaelsen-Preusse, Kristin; Fol, Romain; Souchet, Benoit; Braudeau, Jérôme; Korte, Martin; Klatzmann, David; Cartier, Nathalie

    2016-12-20

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2)-deficient mice have cytoarchitectural hippocampal modifications and impaired learning and memory ability reminiscent of Alzheimer's disease. IL-2 stimulates regulatory T cells whose role is to control inflammation. As neuroinflammation contributes to neurodegeneration, we investigated IL-2 in Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we investigated IL-2 levels in hippocampal biopsies of patients with Alzheimer's disease relative to age-matched control individuals. We then treated APP/PS1ΔE9 mice having established Alzheimer's disease with IL-2 for 5 months using single administration of an AAV-IL-2 vector. We first found decreased IL-2 levels in hippocampal biopsies of patients with Alzheimer's disease. In mice, IL-2-induced systemic and brain regulatory T cells expansion and activation. In the hippocampus, IL-2 induced astrocytic activation and recruitment of astrocytes around amyloid plaques, decreased amyloid-β42/40 ratio and amyloid plaque load, improved synaptic plasticity and significantly rescued spine density. Of note, this tissue remodelling was associated with recovery of memory deficits, as assessed in the Morris water maze task. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that IL-2 can alleviate Alzheimer's disease hallmarks in APP/PS1ΔE9 mice with established pathology. Therefore, this should prompt the investigation of low-dose IL-2 in Alzheimer's disease and other neuroinflammatory/neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Proliferation in the Alzheimer Hippocampus Is due to Microglia, Not Astroglia, and Occurs at Sites of Amyloid Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Marlatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microglia and astrocytes contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD etiology and may mediate early neuroinflammatory responses. Despite their possible role in disease progression and despite the fact that they can respond to amyloid deposition in model systems, little is known about whether astro- or microglia can undergo proliferation in AD and whether this is related to the clinical symptoms or to local neuropathological changes. Previously, proliferation was found to be increased in glia-rich regions of the presenile hippocampus. Since their phenotype was unknown, we here used two novel triple-immunohistochemical protocols to study proliferation in astro- or microglia in relation to amyloid pathology. We selected different age-matched cohorts to study whether proliferative changes relate to clinical severity or to neuropathological changes. Proliferating cells were found across the hippocampus but never in mature neurons or astrocytes. Almost all proliferating cells were colabeled with Iba1+, indicating that particularly microglia contribute to proliferation in AD. Proliferating Iba1+ cells was specifically seen within the borders of amyloid plaques, indicative of an active involvement in, or response to, plaque accumulation. Thus, consistent with animal studies, proliferation in the AD hippocampus is due to microglia, occurs in close proximity of plaque pathology, and may contribute to the neuroinflammation common in AD.

  11. The desmosomal plaque and the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, W W; Cowin, P; Schmelz, M; Kapprell, H P

    1987-01-01

    Two major plasma membrane domains are involved in the architectural organization of the cytoskeleton. Both are junctions of the adherens category characterized by the presence of dense plaques associated with the cytoplasmic surface of their membranes. The plaques serve as specific anchorage structures for two different types of cytoplasmic filaments. Intermediate-sized filaments (IF) of several types, i.e. cytokeratin IF in epithelial cells, desmin IF in cardiac myocytes and vimentin IF in arachnoidal cells of meninges, meningiomas and several other cells, attach to the desmosomal plaques, whereas actin-containing microfilaments associate with non-desmosomal adhering junctions such as the zonula adherens, fascia adherens and punctum adherens. The plaques of both kinds of adhering junctions contain a common acidic polypeptide of Mr 83,000 identical to 'band 5 protein' of bovine snout epidermal desmosomes. However, other plaque components are mutually exclusive to one of the two subclasses of adhering junctions. The desmosomal plaque structure, which does not contain vinculin and alpha-actinin, comprises representatives of cytoplasmic, non-membrane-integrated proteins such as desmoplakin(s) and the cytoplasmic portions of transmembrane glycoproteins such as 'band 3 glycoprotein'. The analysis of both categories of junction-associated plaques should provide a basis for understanding the establishment and the dynamics of junction-cytoskeleton interaction.

  12. Complement Activation: An Emerging Player in the Pathogenesis of Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    A wealth of evidence indicates a fundamental role for inflammation in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), contributing to the development and progression of atherosclerotic lesion formation, plaque rupture, and thrombosis. An increasing body of evidence supports a functional role for complement activation in the pathogenesis of CVD through pleiotropic effects on endothelial and haematopoietic cell function and haemostasis. Prospective and case control studies have reported stron...

  13. Porcine prion protein amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions.

  14. Angiogenesis in atherosclerotic plaque obtained from carotid endarterectomy: association between symptomatology and plaque morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyama, Takami; Tanaka, Toshihide; Endo, Shinichi; Komine, Kazumasa; Kudo, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Hiroo; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    Carotid plaque with hemorrhage leads to cerebral embolism and ischemic stroke. Plaque angiogenesis and angiogenetic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are critical in the progression of atherosclerotic carotid plaque and intraplaque hemorrhage. The correlation between plaque angiogenesis and presence of clinical symptoms was studied in 41 specimens obtained during carotid endarterectomy from 20 symptomatic and 21 asymptomatic patients treated for carotid artery stenosis. Histological findings using hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining against von Willebrand factor and VEGF were examined. Intraplaque hemorrhage, calcification, necrosis, and invasion of foam cells were frequently observed in the carotid plaques from symptomatic patients compared with asymptomatic patients. Higher microvessel density was found in the carotid plaques with necrosis and invasion of foam cells compared with plaques without necrosis and/or foam cell invasion, and higher expression of VEGF was found from symptomatic patients compared with asymptomatic patents. These results suggest that plaque angiogenesis and higher level of VEGF expression may enhance the progression of ischemic symptoms in patients with carotid artery stenosis. Invasive macrophages in the plaque of symptomatic patients increase levels of VEGF and might enhance plaque angiogenesis and atherosclerosis progression.

  15. Lack of LDL receptor enhances amyloid deposition and decreases glial response in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loukia Katsouri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apolipoprotein E (ApoE, a cholesterol carrier associated with atherosclerosis, is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD. The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR regulates ApoE levels in the periphery and in the central nervous system. LDLR has been identified on astrocytes and a number of studies show that it modulates amyloid deposition in AD transgenic mice. However these findings are controversial on whether LDLR deletion is beneficial or detrimental on the AD-like phenotype of the transgenic mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the role of LDLR in the development of the amyloid related phenotype we used an APP/PS1 transgenic mouse (5XFAD that develops an AD-like pathology with amyloid plaques, astrocytosis and microgliosis. We found that 4 months old 5XFAD transgenic mice on the LDLR deficient background (LDLR-/- have increased amyloid plaque deposition. This increase is associated with a significant decrease in astrocytosis and microgliosis in the 5XFAD/LDLR-/- mice. To further elucidate the role of LDLR in relation with ApoE we have generated 5XFAD transgenic mice on the ApoE deficient (ApoE-/- or the ApoE/LDLR double deficient background (ApoE-/-/LDLR -/-. We have found that ApoE deletion in the 4 months old 5XFAD/ApoE-/- mice decreases amyloid plaque formation as expected, but has no effect on astrocytosis or microgliosis. By comparison 5XFAD/ApoE-/-LDLR -/- double deficient mice of the same age have increased amyloid deposition with decreased astrocytosis and microgliosis. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis shows that LDL deficiency regulates astrocytosis and microgliosis in an AD mouse model. This effect is independent of ApoE, as both 5XFAD/LDLR -/- and 5XFAD/ApoE-/- LDLR -/- mice show reduction in inflammatory response and increase in amyloid deposition compared to control mice. These results demonstrate that LDLR regulates glial response in this mouse model independently of ApoE and modifies amyloid

  16. Ablation of Prion Protein in Wild Type Human Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP Transgenic Mice Does Not Alter The Proteolysis of APP, Levels of Amyloid-β or Pathologic Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isobel J Whitehouse

    Full Text Available The cellular prion protein (PrPC has been proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. In cellular models PrPC inhibited the action of the β-secretase BACE1 on wild type amyloid precursor protein resulting in a reduction in amyloid-β (Aβ peptides. Here we have assessed the effect of genetic ablation of PrPC in transgenic mice expressing human wild type amyloid precursor protein (line I5. Deletion of PrPC had no effect on the α- and β-secretase proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP nor on the amount of Aβ38, Aβ40 or Aβ42 in the brains of the mice. In addition, ablation of PrPC did not alter Aβ deposition or histopathology phenotype in this transgenic model. Thus using this transgenic model we could not provide evidence to support the hypothesis that PrPC regulates Aβ production.

  17. Magnetic force microscopy of atherosclerotic plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexeeva T.A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work by methods of scanning probe microscopy, namely by atomic force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy the fragments of atherosclerotic plaque section of different nature were investigated. The fragments of atherosclerotic vessels with elements of immature plaque were taken during the coiled artery bypass surgery by alloprosthesis. As the result of investigation we found magnetically ordered phase of endogenous origin in the fragment of solid plaque of mixed structure. This phase is presents biogenic magnetic nanoparticles and their clusters with average size characteristic of 200-400 nm.

  18. Apolipoprotein E: Essential Catalyst of the Alzheimer Amyloid Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huntington Potter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid cascade hypothesis remains a robust model of AD neurodegeneration. However, amyloid deposits contain proteins besides Aβ, such as apolipoprotein E (apoE. Inheritance of the apoE4 allele is the strongest genetic risk factor for late-onset AD. However, there is no consensus on how different apoE isotypes contribute to AD pathogenesis. It has been hypothesized that apoE and apoE4 in particular is an amyloid catalyst or “pathological chaperone”. Alternatively it has been posited that apoE regulates Aβ clearance, with apoE4 been worse at this function compared to apoE3. These views seem fundamentally opposed. The former would indicate that removing apoE will reduce AD pathology, while the latter suggests increasing brain ApoE levels may be beneficial. Here we consider the scientific basis of these different models of apoE function and suggest that these seemingly opposing views can be reconciled. The optimal therapeutic target may be to inhibit the interaction of apoE with Aβ rather than altering apoE levels. Such an approach will not have detrimental effects on the many beneficial roles apoE plays in neurobiology. Furthermore, other Aβ binding proteins, including ACT and apo J can inhibit or promote Aβ oligomerization/polymerization depending on conditions and might be manipulated to effect AD treatment.

  19. Multiple low-dose infusions of human umbilical cord blood cells improve cognitive impairments and reduce amyloid-β-associated neuropathology in Alzheimer mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Donna; Deng, Juan; Giunta, Brian; Hou, Huayan; Sanberg, Cyndy D; Kuzmin-Nichols, Nicole; Zhou, Hua-Dong; Mori, Takashi; Ehrhart, Jared; Sanberg, Paul R; Tan, Jun

    2013-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common progressive age-related dementia in the elderly and the fourth major cause of disability and mortality in that population. The disease is pathologically characterized by deposition of β-amyloid plaques neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Current strategies for the treatment of AD are symptomatic only. As such, they are less than efficacious in terms of significantly slowing or halting the underlying pathophysiological progression of the disease. Modulation by cell therapy may be new promising disease-modifying therapy. Recently, we showed reduction in amyloid-β (Aβ) levels/β-amyloid plaques and associated astrocytosis following low-dose infusions of mononuclear human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBCs). Our current study extended our previous findings by examining cognition via (1) the rotarod test, (2) a 2-day version of the radial-arm water maze test, and (3) a subsequent observation in an open pool platform test to characterize the effects of monthly peripheral HUCBC infusion (1×10(6) cells/μL) into the transgenic PSAPP mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis (bearing mutant human APP and presenilin-1 transgenes) from 6 to 12 months of age. We show that HUCBC therapy correlates with decreased (1) cognitive impairment, (2) Aβ levels/β-amyloid plaques, (3) amyloidogenic APP processing, and (4) reactive microgliosis after a treatment of 6 or 10 months. As such, this report lays the groundwork for an HUCBC therapy as potentially novel alternative to oppose AD at the disease-modifying level.

  20. Aspects of structural landscape of human islet amyloid polypeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jianfeng; Dai, Jin; Li, Jing; Peng, Xubiao; Niemi, Antti J.

    2015-01-01

    The human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) co-operates with insulin to maintain glycemic balance. It also constitutes the amyloid plaques that aggregate in the pancreas of type-II diabetic patients. We have performed extensive in silico investigations to analyse the structural landscape of monomeric hIAPP, which is presumed to be intrinsically disordered. For this, we construct from first principles a highly predictive energy function that describes a monomeric hIAPP observed in a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment, as a local energy minimum. We subject our theoretical model of hIAPP to repeated heating and cooling simulations, back and forth between a high temperature regime where the conformation resembles a random walker and a low temperature limit where no thermal motions prevail. We find that the final low temperature conformations display a high level of degeneracy, in a manner which is fully in line with the presumed intrinsically disordered character of hIAPP. In particular, we identify an isolated family of α-helical conformations that might cause the transition to amyloidosis, by nucleation.

  1. Aspects of structural landscape of human islet amyloid polypeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jianfeng, E-mail: hjf@bit.edu.cn; Dai, Jin, E-mail: daijing491@gmail.com [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Li, Jing, E-mail: jinglichina@139.com [Institute of Biopharmaceutical Research, Yangtze River Pharmaceutical Group Beijing Haiyan Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd, Beijing 102206 (China); Peng, Xubiao, E-mail: xubiaopeng@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108 Uppsala (Sweden); Niemi, Antti J., E-mail: Antti.Niemi@physics.uu.se [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108 Uppsala (Sweden); Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS UMR 6083, Fédération Denis Poisson, Université de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, F37200 Tours (France)

    2015-01-28

    The human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) co-operates with insulin to maintain glycemic balance. It also constitutes the amyloid plaques that aggregate in the pancreas of type-II diabetic patients. We have performed extensive in silico investigations to analyse the structural landscape of monomeric hIAPP, which is presumed to be intrinsically disordered. For this, we construct from first principles a highly predictive energy function that describes a monomeric hIAPP observed in a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment, as a local energy minimum. We subject our theoretical model of hIAPP to repeated heating and cooling simulations, back and forth between a high temperature regime where the conformation resembles a random walker and a low temperature limit where no thermal motions prevail. We find that the final low temperature conformations display a high level of degeneracy, in a manner which is fully in line with the presumed intrinsically disordered character of hIAPP. In particular, we identify an isolated family of α-helical conformations that might cause the transition to amyloidosis, by nucleation.

  2. Toxic β-Amyloid (Aβ) Alzheimer's Ion Channels: From Structure to Function and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth

    2012-02-01

    Full-length amyloid beta peptides (Aβ1-40/42) form neuritic amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and are implicated in AD pathology. Recent biophysical and cell biological studies suggest a direct mechanism of amyloid beta toxicity -- ion channel mediated loss of calcium homeostasis. Truncated amyloid beta fragments (Aβ11-42 and Aβ17-42), commonly termed as non-amyloidogenic are also found in amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in the preamyloid lesions of Down's syndrome (DS), a model system for early onset AD study. Very little is known about the structure and activity of these smaller peptides although they could be key AD and DS pathological agents. Using complementary techniques of explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, atomic force microscopy (AFM), channel conductance measurements, cell calcium uptake assays, neurite degeneration and cell death assays, we have shown that non-amyloidogenic Aβ9-42 and Aβ17-42 peptides form ion channels with loosely attached subunits and elicit single channel conductances. The subunits appear mobile suggesting insertion of small oligomers, followed by dynamic channel assembly and dissociation. These channels allow calcium uptake in APP-deficient cells and cause neurite degeneration in human cortical neurons. Channel conductance, calcium uptake and neurite degeneration are selectively inhibited by zinc, a blocker of amyloid ion channel activity. Thus truncated Aβ fragments could account for undefined roles played by full length Aβs and provide a novel mechanism of AD and DS pathology. The emerging picture from our large-scale simulations is that toxic ion channels formed by β-sheets are highly polymorphic, and spontaneously break into loosely interacting dynamic units (though still maintaining ion channel structures as imaged with AFM), that associate and dissociate leading to toxic ion flux. This sharply contrasts intact conventional gated ion channels that consist of tightly

  3. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy presenting as a posterior leukoencephalopathy: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maramattom Boby Varkey

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA is well known to present with lobar intracerebral hemorrhage, dementia or transient neurological events. White matter changes with CAA have only been recently described and can be seen with either sporadic or familial CAA. We present a 50-year-old man with rapidly progressive dementia in whom MRI brain showed symmetrical white matter changes in the parieto-occipital regions. Brain biopsy revealed changes of CAA along with features of Alzheimer′s disease. Immunohistochemistry revealed amyloid beta protein. The subcortical lesions were thought to occur from hypoperfusion of the distal white matter. The role of amyloid in the pathogenesis of CAA and the mechanism of leukoencephalopathy are discussed.

  4. Cytotoxic amyloid peptides inhibit cellular 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction by enhancing MTT formazan exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Schubert, D

    1997-12-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (A beta) neurotoxicity is believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. An early indicator of A beta toxicity is the inhibition of cellular 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction to MTT formazan, a widely used assay for measuring cell viability. In this report we show that A beta and other cytotoxic amyloid peptides such as human amylin dramatically enhance MTT formazan exocytosis, resulting in the inhibition of cellular MTT reduction. Only the amyloid peptides that are known to be cytotoxic enhanced MTT formazan exocytosis. Basal MTT formazan exocytosis and amyloid peptide-enhanced MTT formazan exocytosis are blocked by several drugs with diverse known effects. These and other data suggest that MTT formazan exocytosis is a multistep process and that cytotoxic amyloid peptides enhance MTT formazan exocytosis through an intracellular signal transduction pathway.

  5. Large plaque parapsoriasis in a child

    OpenAIRE

    Das Jayanta; Gangopadhyay Asok

    2005-01-01

    A case of large plaque parapsoriasis with extensive skin lesions is presented for its unusual clinical features. The controversial issue of its nosological position is discussed as it has a considerable impact on the management of such cases.

  6. Atherosclerotic Aortic Plaques Detected by Transesophageal Echocardiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵云; 朱文玲; 倪超; 郭丽琳; 曾勇; 方理刚

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the predictive value of atherosclerotic aortic plaques in coronary artery disease (CAD) Methods In 50patients with suspected coronary artery disease, transesophageal echocardiography was performed to examine their thoracic aortas 2 weeks before or after coronary angiography. In the cases of coronary angiography studied, stenosis of the coronary artery ≥ 50 % was considered to be due to coronary artery disease,whereas the thickness of the intima ≥ 1.3 mm was taken to be the criteria for the presence of an atherosclerotic aortic plaque on the transesophageal echocardiographic test. Results Among the 50 patients, 37 cases were diagnosed as CAD and 13 cases were considered to be normal. The plaques of the thoracic aorta were observed in 34cases in the CAD group and 3 cases in the normal group. The sensitivity and specificity of aortic plaques for CAD were 91.9 % and 76.9%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values of the aortic plaques for CAD were 91.9% and 76.9%, respectively. The accuracy was 88.0%. 80 percent of the patients with single- yes sel disease had thoracic aortic plaques, 92 percent of the patients with two-vessel disease and 100 percent of the patients with three-vessel disease had thoracic aortic plaques. There was a significant difference in the thickness of aortic intimas between the normal group and the CAD group. Conclusions Detectingatherosclerotic plaques in the thoracic aorta with transesophageal echocardiography may be of great value in predicting the presence and extent of coronary artery disease.

  7. Carotid plaque age is a feature of plaque stability inversely related to levels of plasma insulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Hägg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The stability of atherosclerotic plaques determines the risk for rupture, which may lead to thrombus formation and potentially severe clinical complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Although the rate of plaque formation may be important for plaque stability, this process is not well understood. We took advantage of the atmospheric (14C-declination curve (a result of the atomic bomb tests in the 1950s and 1960s to determine the average biological age of carotid plaques. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: The cores of carotid plaques were dissected from 29 well-characterized, symptomatic patients with carotid stenosis and analyzed for (14C content by accelerator mass spectrometry. The average plaque age (i.e. formation time was 9.6±3.3 years. All but two plaques had formed within 5-15 years before surgery. Plaque age was not associated with the chronological ages of the patients but was inversely related to plasma insulin levels (p = 0.0014. Most plaques were echo-lucent rather than echo-rich (2.24±0.97, range 1-5. However, plaques in the lowest tercile of plaque age (most recently formed were characterized by further instability with a higher content of lipids and macrophages (67.8±12.4 vs. 50.4±6.2, p = 0.00005; 57.6±26.1 vs. 39.8±25.7, p<0.0005, respectively, less collagen (45.3±6.1 vs. 51.1±9.8, p<0.05, and fewer smooth muscle cells (130±31 vs. 141±21, p<0.05 than plaques in the highest tercile. Microarray analysis of plaques in the lowest tercile also showed increased activity of genes involved in immune responses and oxidative phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show, for the first time, that plaque age, as judge by relative incorporation of (14C, can improve our understanding of carotid plaque stability and therefore risk for clinical complications. Our results also suggest that levels of plasma insulin might be involved in determining carotid plaque age.

  8. Effects of cast gold surface finishing on plaque retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, M P; Shillingburg, H T; Duncanson, M G; Wade, C K

    1980-02-01

    The relationship between the surface finish on cast gold restorations and the amount of plaque deposited on that surface was examined. Six different finishes were tested. The rough finish was found to accumulate significantly less plaque than the other finishes. Every finish exhibited some plaque accumulation, even after the first 24 hours. Each finish accumulated progressively more plaque at each successive time interval.

  9. Innate immunity in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, Cheryl M

    2011-12-01

    Psoriasis is a common, immune-mediated inflammatory skin disorder. T helper(h)1 and Th17 lymphocytes contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis through the release of inflammatory cytokines that promote further recruitment of immune cells, keratinocyte proliferation and sustained inflammation. The innate immune system is the first line of defence against infection and plays a crucial role in the initiation of the adaptive immune response. The presence of innate immune cells and their products in psoriatic skin plaques suggests a role for innate immunity in this disease. In addition, the innate immune system can direct the development of pathogenic Th cells in psoriasis. In this article, we will summarise the role of the innate immune system in psoriasis with particular emphasis on the role of cytokines, signalling pathways and cells of the innate immune system.

  10. The Pathogenesis of Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, Timothy John

    2008-01-01

    Autism is well known as a complex developmental disorder with a seemingly confusing and uncertain pathogenesis. The definitive mechanisms that promote autism are poorly understood and mostly unknown, yet available theories do appear to focus on the disruption of normal cerebral development and its subsequent implications on the functional brain unit. This mini-review aims solely to discuss and evaluate the most prominent current theories regarding the pathogenesis of autism. The main conclusi...

  11. A transgenic Alzheimer rat with plaques, tau pathology, behavioral impairment, oligomeric aβ, and frank neuronal loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert M; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Weitz, Tara M; Rentsendorj, Altan; Gate, David; Spivak, Inna; Bholat, Yasmin; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Glabe, Charles G; Breunig, Joshua J; Rakic, Pasko; Davtyan, Hayk; Agadjanyan, Michael G; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R; Bannykh, Serguei; Szekely, Christine A; Pechnick, Robert N; Town, Terrence

    2013-04-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is hallmarked by amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and widespread cortical neuronal loss (Selkoe, 2001). The "amyloid cascade hypothesis" posits that cerebral amyloid sets neurotoxic events into motion that precipitate Alzheimer dementia (Hardy and Allsop, 1991). Yet, faithful recapitulation of all AD features in widely used transgenic (Tg) mice engineered to overproduce Aβ peptides has been elusive. We have developed a Tg rat model (line TgF344-AD) expressing mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APPsw) and presenilin 1 (PS1ΔE9) genes, each independent causes of early-onset familial AD. TgF344-AD rats manifest age-dependent cerebral amyloidosis that precedes tauopathy, gliosis, apoptotic loss of neurons in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and cognitive disturbance. These results demonstrate progressive neurodegeneration of the Alzheimer type in these animals. The TgF344-AD rat fills a critical need for a next-generation animal model to enable basic and translational AD research.

  12. Oleuropein aglycone protects transgenic C. elegans strains expressing Aβ42 by reducing plaque load and motor deficit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Diomede

    Full Text Available The presence of amyloid aggregates of the 42 amino acid peptide of amyloid beta (Aβ42 in the brain is the characteristic feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Amyloid beta (Aβ deposition is also found in muscle fibers of individuals affected by inclusion body myositis (sIBM, a rare muscular degenerative disease affecting people over 50. Both conditions are presently lacking an effective therapeutic treatment. There is increasing evidence to suggest that natural polyphenols may prevent the formation of toxic amyloid aggregates; this applies also to oleuropein aglycone (OLE, the most abundant polyphenol in extra virgin olive oil, previously shown to hinder amylin and Aβ aggregation. Here we evaluated the ability of OLE to interfere with Aβ proteotoxicity in vivo by using the transgenic CL2006 and CL4176 strains of Caenorhabditis elegans, simplified models of AD and of sIBM, which express human Aβ in the cytoplasm of body wall muscle cells. OLE-fed CL2006 worms displayed reduced Aβ plaque deposition, less abundant toxic Aβ oligomers, remarkably decreased paralysis and increased lifespan with respect to untreated animals. A protective effect was also observed in CL4176 worms but only when OLE was administered before the induction of the Aβ transgene expression. These effects were specific, dose-related, and not mediated by the known polyphenolic anti-oxidant activity, suggesting that, in this model organism, OLE interferes with the Aβ aggregation skipping the appearance of toxic species, as already shown in vitro for Aβ42.

  13. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  14. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Fowler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  15. Increased brain iron coincides with early plaque formation in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Leskovjan, Andreana C.; Kretlow, Ariane; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Barrea, Raul; Vogt, Stefan; Miller, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated brain iron content, which has been observed in late stage human Alzheimer’s disease, is a potential target for early diagnosis. However, the time course for iron accumulation is currently unclear. Using the PSAPP mouse model of amyloid plaque formation, we conducted a time course study of metal ion content and distribution [iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn)] in the cortex and hippocampus using X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). We found that iron in the cortex was 34% higher th...

  16. Sleep-wake cycle and diurnal fluctuation of amyloid-β as biomarkers of brain amyloid pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jee Hoon; Huang, Yafei; Bero, Adam W.; Kasten, Tom; Stewart, Floy R.; Bateman, Randall J.; Holtzman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain begins to occur years prior to the clinical onset of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Prior to Aβ aggregation, levels of extracellular, soluble interstitial fluid (ISF) Aβ, which are regulated by neuronal activity and the sleep-wake cycle, correlate with the amount of Aβ deposition in the brain seen later. The amount and quality of sleep declines with aging and to a greater extent in AD. How sleep quality amount as well as the diurnal fluctuation in Aβ change with age and Aβ aggregation are not well understood. We report that a normal sleep-wake cycle and diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ is present in the brain of APPswe/PS1δE9 mice before Aβ plaque formation. Following plaque formation, the sleep-wake cycle markedly deteriorated and diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ dissipated. As in mice, diurnal fluctuation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ in young adult humans with presenilin mutations was also markedly attenuated with Aβ plaque formation. Virtual elimination of Aβ deposits in the mouse brain by active immunization with Aβ42 normalized the sleep-wake cycle and the diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ. These data suggest that Aβ aggregation disrupts the sleep-wake cycle and diurnal fluctuation of Aβ. Sleep-wake behavior and diurnal fluctuation of Aβ in the central nervous system appear to be functional and biochemical markers respectively of Aβ-associated pathology that should be explored in humans diagnostically prior to and following symptom onset and in response to treatment. PMID:22956200

  17. 99mTc(CO)3-Labeled Benzothiazole Derivatives Preferentially Bind Cerebrovascular Amyloid: Potential Use as Imaging Agents for Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jianhua; Cui, Mengchao; Dai, Jiapei; Liu, Boli

    2015-08-03

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a disorder affecting the elderly that is characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in blood vessel walls of the brain. A series of 99mTc(CO)3-labeled benzothiazole derivatives as potential SPECT imaging probes for cerebrovascular Aβ deposition is reported. Rhenium surrogate displayed high affinities to Aβ aggregates with Ki values ranging from 106 to 42 nM, and they strongly stained Aβ deposits in transgenic mice (Tg) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. In vitro autoradiography on brain sections of Tg and AD patients confirmed that [99mTc]24 possessed sufficient affinity for Aβ plaques, and [99mTc]24 could only label Aβ deposition in blood vessels but not Aβ plaques in the parenchyma of the brain of AD patients. Moreover, [99mTc]24 possessed favorable initial uptake (1.21% ID/g) and fast blood washout (blood2 min/blood60 min=23) in normal mice. These preliminary results suggest that [99mTc]24 may be used as an Aβ imaging probe for the detection of CAA.

  18. Early Detection of Amyloid Plaque in Alzheimer’s Disease via X-ray Phase CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    developed an algorithm to significantly reduce, if not eliminate, the artifacts caused by the phenomenon of twin peaks, as shown in Fig. 5 (c... algorithm ” Med. Phys., 28(3): 812-25, 2001. 4. X Wu and H Liu, “Clinical implementation of x-ray phase-contrast imaging: Theoretical foundations and...k), spectrum of noise equivalent quanta NEQ(k), and detective quantum efficiency DQE(k). A cylindrical water phantom at 5.1 mm diameter and complex

  19. Early Detection of Amyloid Plaque in Alzheimer’s Disease Via X-ray Phase CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    to two reasons – (i) the fabrication/optimization of x-ray gratings were much more complicated and challenging than we initially anticipated and ( ii...Primarily due to two reasons – (i) the fabrication/optimization of x-ray gratings were much more complicated and challenging than we initially...re-optimization – Phase de-wrapping: Since x-ray grating fabrication is a complicated process, there inevitably exists imperfection in either grating

  20. Nanomechanical Characterization of Amyloid Fibrils Using Single-Molecule Experiments and Computational Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumjoon Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils have recently received much attention due to not only their important role in disease pathogenesis but also their excellent mechanical properties, which are comparable to those of mechanically strong protein materials such as spider silk. This indicates the necessity of understanding fundamental principles providing insight into how amyloid fibrils exhibit the excellent mechanical properties, which may allow for developing biomimetic materials whose material (e.g., mechanical properties can be controlled. Here, we describe recent efforts to characterize the nanomechanical properties of amyloid fibrils using computational simulations (e.g., atomistic simulations and single-molecule experiments (e.g., atomic force microscopy experiments. This paper summarizes theoretical models, which are useful in analyzing the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils based on simulations and experiments, such as continuum elastic (beam model, elastic network model, and polymer statistical model. In this paper, we suggest how the nanomechanical properties of amyloid fibrils can be characterized and determined using computational simulations and/or atomic force microscopy experiments coupled with the theoretical models.

  1. Deposition of kappa and lambda light chains in amyloid filaments of dialysis-related amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancaccio, D; Ghiggeri, G M; Braidotti, P; Garberi, A; Gallieni, M; Bellotti, V; Zoni, U; Gusmano, R; Coggi, G

    1995-10-01

    beta 2-Microglobulin (beta 2m) is considered to be the amyloidogenic precursor in dialysis-related amyloidosis, although the implication of other relevant cofactors in the pathogenesis of this disease has also been hypothesized. It is conceivable that substances found in amyloid deposits might represent something more than simple codeposition, possibly playing a pathogenic role in amyloidogenesis. Along these lines, a detailed analysis of the protein composition of amyloid fibrils purified from synovial material surgically obtained from nine patients on long-term dialysis was carried out. By the use of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, several other protein components, in addition to beta 2m, were found. These were characterized by NH2 amino-terminal sequencing and immunoblotting. In fibrils obtained by water extraction, which fulfill the electron microscopy criteria of highly pure amyloid material, polyclonal kappa and lambda light chains were detected with a concentration of 15 micrograms/mL in the water extraction material; the beta 2m concentration was 200 micrograms/mL. Light microscopy immunohistochemistry was performed on samples from five patients. Amyloid deposits reacted with anti-beta 2m, and anti-light (kappa, lambda), chain antibodies. The immunoreaction of amyloid filaments to anti-beta 2m, anti-lambda, and anti-kappa light chain antibodies was also tested by electron microscopy by use of the immunogold staining procedure. Amyloid filaments were labeled by the three antibodies and showed a different intensity of immunostaining apparently related to their different aggregation pattern. These observations demonstrate that polyclonal immunoglobulin light chains (kappa and lambda) are not contaminants but, together with beta 2m, represent a major constituent of amyloid deposits in dialysis-related osteoarticular amyloidosis, thus indicating their possible role in amyloidogenesis.

  2. Amyloid-beta Isoform Metabolism Quantitation by Stable Isotope Labeled Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Mawuenyega, Kwasi G.; Kasten, Tom; Sigurdson, Wendy; Bateman, Randall J.

    2013-01-01

    Abundant evidence suggests a central role for the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Production and clearance of different Aβ isoforms have been established as targets of proposed disease-modifying therapeutic treatments of AD. However, previous studies used multiple sequential purification steps to isolate the isoforms individually and quantitate them based on a common mid-domain peptide. We created a method to simultaneously purify Aβ isoforms and quantitate th...

  3. Amyloid β induces adhesion of erythrocytes to endothelial cells and affects endothelial viability and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kiko, Takehiro; Kuriwada, Satoko; Miyazawa, Taiki; Kimura, Fumiko; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) might mediate the adhesion of erythrocytes to the endothelium which could disrupt the properties of endothelial cells. We provide evidence here that Aβ actually induced the binding of erythrocytes to endothelial cells and decreased endothelial viability, perhaps by the generation of oxidative and inflammatory stress. These changes are likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Increase in β-Amyloid Levels in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Children with Down Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Englund, Hillevi; Annerén, Göran; Gustafsson, Jan; Wester, Ulrika; Wiltfang, Jens; Lannfelt, Lars; Blennow, Kaj; Höglund, Kina

    2013-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) invariably develop Alzheimer’s disease (AD) during their life span. It is therefore of importance to study young DS patients when trying to elucidate early events in AD pathogenesis. Aim: To investigate how levels of different amyloid- _ (A _ ) peptides, as well as tau and phosphorylated tau, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from children with DS change over time. The first CSF sample was taken at 8 months and the following two samples at 20–40 and ...

  5. Clinical and Capillaroscopic Modifications of the Psoriatic Plaque during Therapy: Observations with Oral Acitretin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Stinco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is considered to be an inflammatory autoimmune disease, where angiogenesis plays an undefined pathogenetic role. The well-known changes of the superficial microvasculature in the psoriatic plaque can be easily assessed in vivo by videocapillaroscopy. In the last years, several studies reported the clinical and capillaroscopic response of the psoriatic plaque during different topical and systemic treatments. In the present work we evaluated the effects of acitretin (0.8 mg/kg/day on videocapillaroscopic alterations and the clinical response in 11 patients affected by plaque psoriasis at the baseline (T0 and after 4 (T1, 8 (T2, and 12 (T3 weeks. A clinical improvement during the treatment with a complete clinical healing of the plaque in 7 of the 11 patients was observed. The typical “basket-weave” capillaries of the psoriatic lesions showed a reduction of 65.4% in diameter at the end of the study; only 3 patients returned to a normal capillaroscopic pattern. As observed during previous our studies, we found a discrepancy between clinical and capillaroscopic results, with a far greater improvement in the first than in the second. This finding could be in agreement with a secondary role of blood vessels in the pathogenesis and persistence of psoriatic lesions.

  6. DECT evaluation of noncalcified coronary artery plaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravanfar Haghighi, Rezvan [Medical Imaging Research Center and Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Science, Shiraz 719 363 5899 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chatterjee, S. [BGVS Chemical Engineering Building (Old), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Tabin, Milo; Singh, Rishi P.; Sharma, Munish; Krishna, Karthik [Department of Forensic Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Sharma, Sanjiv; Jagia, Priya [Department of Cardiac-Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Ray, Ruma; Arava, Sudhir [Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Yadav, Rakesh [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Vani, V. C. [Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Lakshmi, R.; Kumar, Pratik, E-mail: drpratikkumar@gmail.com [Department of Cardiac-Biochemistry, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Mandal, Susama R. [Department of Medical Physics Unit IRCH, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Composition of the coronary artery plaque is known to have critical role in heart attack. While calcified plaque can easily be diagnosed by conventional CT, it fails to distinguish between fibrous and lipid rich plaques. In the present paper, the authors discuss the experimental techniques and obtain a numerical algorithm by which the electron density (ρ{sub e}) and the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) can be obtained from the dual energy computed tomography (DECT) data. The idea is to use this inversion method to characterize and distinguish between the lipid and fibrous coronary artery plaques. Methods: For the purpose of calibration of the CT machine, the authors prepare aqueous samples whose calculated values of (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) lie in the range of (2.65 × 10{sup 23} ≤ ρ{sub e} ≤ 3.64 × 10{sup 23}/cm{sup 3}) and (6.80 ≤ Z{sub eff} ≤ 8.90). The authors fill the phantom with these known samples and experimentally determine HU(V{sub 1}) and HU(V{sub 2}), with V{sub 1},V{sub 2} = 100 and 140 kVp, for the same pixels and thus determine the coefficients of inversion that allow us to determine (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) from the DECT data. The HU(100) and HU(140) for the coronary artery plaque are obtained by filling the channel of the coronary artery with a viscous solution of methyl cellulose in water, containing 2% contrast. These (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) values of the coronary artery plaque are used for their characterization on the basis of theoretical models of atomic compositions of the plaque materials. These results are compared with histopathological report. Results: The authors find that the calibration gives ρ{sub e} with an accuracy of ±3.5% while Z{sub eff} is found within ±1% of the actual value, the confidence being 95%. The HU(100) and HU(140) are found to be considerably different for the same plaque at the same position and there is a linear trend between these two HU values. It is noted that pure lipid type plaques

  7. Functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Scott N; Meissner, Tobias; Su, Andrew I; Snesrud, Erik; Ong, Ana C; Schork, Nicholas J; Bretz, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries remains a significant public health problem and is considered pandemic worldwide. The prediction of dental caries based on profiling of microbial species involved in disease and equally important, the identification of species conferring dental health has proven more difficult than anticipated due to high interpersonal and geographical variability of dental plaque microbiota. We have used RNA-Seq to perform global gene expression analysis of dental plaque microbiota derived from 19 twin pairs that were either concordant (caries-active or caries-free) or discordant for dental caries. The transcription profiling allowed us to define a functional core microbiota consisting of nearly 60 species. Similarities in gene expression patterns allowed a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of human genetics, environmental factors and caries phenotype on the microbiota's transcriptome. Correlation analysis of transcription allowed the identification of numerous functional networks, suggesting that inter-personal environmental variables may co-select for groups of genera and species. Analysis of functional role categories allowed the identification of dominant functions expressed by dental plaque biofilm communities, that highlight the biochemical priorities of dental plaque microbes to metabolize diverse sugars and cope with the acid and oxidative stress resulting from sugar fermentation. The wealth of data generated by deep sequencing of expressed transcripts enables a greatly expanded perspective concerning the functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

  8. Fatigue crack propagation analysis of plaque rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xuan; Wu, Baijian; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2013-10-01

    Rupture of atheromatous plaque is the major cause of stroke or heart attack. Considering that the cardiovascular system is a classic fatigue environment, plaque rupture was treated as a chronic fatigue crack growth process in this study. Fracture mechanics theory was introduced to describe the stress status at the crack tip and Paris' law was used to calculate the crack growth rate. The effect of anatomical variation of an idealized plaque cross-section model was investigated. The crack initiation was considered to be either at the maximum circumferential stress location or at any other possible locations around the lumen. Although the crack automatically initialized at the maximum circumferential stress location usually propagated faster than others, it was not necessarily the most critical location where the fatigue life reached its minimum. We found that the fatigue life was minimum for cracks initialized in the following three regions: the midcap zone, the shoulder zone, and the backside zone. The anatomical variation has a significant influence on the fatigue life. Either a decrease in cap thickness or an increase in lipid pool size resulted in a significant decrease in fatigue life. Comparing to the previously used stress analysis, this fatigue model provides some possible explanations of plaque rupture at a low stress level in a pulsatile cardiovascular environment, and the method proposed here may be useful for further investigation of the mechanism of plaque rupture based on in vivo patient data.

  9. Functional Expression of Dental Plaque Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Norman Peterson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries remains a significant public health problem and is considered pandemic worldwide. The prediction of dental caries based on profiling of microbial species involved in disease and equally important, the identification of species conferring dental health has proven more difficult than anticipated due to high interpersonal and geographical variability of dental plaque microbiota. We have used RNA-Seq to perform global gene expression analysis of dental plaque microbiota derived from 19 twin pairs that were either concordant (caries-active or caries-free or discordant for dental caries. The transcription profiling allowed us to define a functional core microbiota consisting of nearly 60 species. Similarities in gene expression patterns allowed a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of human genetics, environmental factors and caries phenotype on the microbiota’s transcriptome. Correlation analysis of transcription allowed the identification of numerous functional networks, suggesting that inter-personal environmental variables may co-select for groups of genera and species. Analysis of functional role categories allowed the identification of dominant functions expressed by dental plaque biofilm communities, that highlight the biochemical priorities of dental plaque microbes to metabolize diverse sugars and cope with the acid and oxidative stress resulting from sugar fermentation. The wealth of data generated by deep sequencing of expressed transcripts enables a greatly expanded perspective concerning the functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

  10. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  11. Centrally Delivered BACE1 Inhibitor Activates Microglia, and Reverses Amyloid Pathology and Cognitive Deficit in Aged Tg2576 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakker, Deepak R; Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Weatherspoon, Marcy R; Harrison, Jonathan; Pierdomenico, Maria; Heisel, Jennifer M; Thompson, Lorin A; Haskell, Roy; Grace, James E; Taylor, Sarah J; Albright, Charles F; Shafer, Lisa L

    2015-04-29

    Multiple small-molecule inhibitors of the β-secretase enzyme (BACE1) are under preclinical or clinical investigation for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Prior work has illustrated robust lowering of central amyloid β (Aβ) after acute administration of BACE1 inhibitors. However, very few studies have assessed the overall impact of chronically administered BACE1 inhibitors on brain amyloid burden, neuropathology, and behavioral function in aged preclinical models. We investigated the effects of a potent nonbrain-penetrant BACE1 inhibitor, delivered directly to the brain using intracerebroventricular infusion in an aged transgenic mouse model. Intracerebroventricular infusion of the BACE1 inhibitor (0.3-23.5 μg/d) for 8 weeks, initiated in 17-month-old Tg2576 mice, produced dose-dependent increases in brain inhibitor concentrations (0.2-13 μm). BACE1 inhibition significantly reversed the behavioral deficit in contextual fear conditioning, and reduced brain Aβ levels, plaque burden, and associated pathology (e.g., dystrophic neurites), with maximal effects attained with ∼1 μg/d dose. Strikingly, the BACE1 inhibitor also reversed amyloid pathology below baseline levels (amyloid burden at the start of treatment), without adversely affecting cerebral amyloid angiopathy, microhemorrhages, myelination, or neuromuscular function. Inhibitor-mediated decline in brain amyloid pathology was associated with an increase in microglial ramification. This is the first demonstration of chronically administered BACE1 inhibitor to activate microglia, reverse brain amyloid pathology, and elicit functional improvement in an aged transgenic mouse model. Thus, engagement of novel glial-mediated clearance mechanisms may drive disease-modifying therapeutic benefit with BACE1 inhibition in AD.

  12. Pathogenesis and treatment modalities of localized scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valančienė, Greta; Jasaitienė, Daiva; Valiukevičienė, Skaidra

    2010-01-01

    Localized scleroderma is a chronic inflammatory disease primarily of the dermis and subcutaneous fat that ultimately leads to a scar-like sclerosis of connective tissue. The disorder manifests as various plaques of different shape and size with signs of skin inflammation, sclerosis, and atrophy. This is a relatively rare inflammatory disease characterized by a chronic course, unknown etiology, and insufficiently clear pathogenesis. Many factors may influence its appearance: trauma, genetic factors, disorders of the immune system or hormone metabolism, viral infections, toxic substances or pharmaceutical agents, neurogenic factors, and Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Various therapeutic modalities are being used for the treatment of localized scleroderma. There is no precise treatment scheme for this disease. A majority of patients can be successfully treated with topical pharmaceutical agents and phototherapy, but some of them with progressive, disseminated, and causing disability localized scleroderma are in need of systemic treatment. The aim of this article is not only to dispute about the clinical and morphological characteristics of localized scleroderma, but also to present the newest generalized data about the possible origin, pathogenesis, and treatment modalities of this disease.

  13. Cobalt60 plaques in recurrent retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fass, D.; McCormick, B.; Abramson, D.; Ellsworth, R. (Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Cobalt60 plaque irradiation is one treatment option for patients with recurrent retinoblastoma following conventional external beam irradiation (ERT). Tumorocidal doses can be delivered without excessive risk of normal tissue injury. In patients not considered candidates for xenon arc or cryotherapy, 60Co is an alternative to enucleation. Between 1968 and 1987, 85 patients were treated with 60Co plaques, 72 of whom had failed prior ERT. Age at diagnosis ranged from 1 week to 4 years. There are 37 males and 35 females. Seventy-one patients had bilateral disease and one had unilateral. Three patients had both eyes plaqued. Prior ERT ranged from 30 to 70 Gy (mean 4200 Gy). Time from initial therapy to failure ranged from 13 to 60 months. Cobalt plaques of 10 mm, 15 mm, or 10 {times} 15 mm were used depending on tumor size and location. Dose prescribed to the apex of the tumor ranged from 30 to 50 Gy (median 40 Gy) given over 3 to 8 days. Twelve patients had two plaque applications; three patients had three plaque applications. All patients were followed with routine ophthalmoscopic examinations. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 22 years (mean 8.7). Seven patients died of metastatic disease; 10 patients developed non-ocular second tumors. Thirty patients required enucleation. Twenty-two patients had clear tumor progression, two patients had radiation complications, and six patients had a combination of tumor growth and complications. Cobalt60 can salvage eyes in retinoblastoma patients failing ERT. Currently, the authors are using I125 in an attempt to spare normal ocular tissue and reduce subsequent complications.

  14. Amyloid deposition in 2 feline thymomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrough, E R; Myers, R K; Hostetter, S J; Fox, L E; Bayer, B J; Felz, C L; Waller, K R; Whitley, E M

    2012-07-01

    Two cases of feline thymoma with amyloid deposition were encountered between 1982 and 2010. Neoplastic cells were separated by abundant, pale eosinophilic, homogeneous material that was congophilic and birefringent. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells were connected by desmosomes, and the extracellular deposits were composed of nonbranching, hollow-cored fibrils, 8-10 nm in diameter. In the case with sufficient archived tissue for additional sections, the amyloid remained congophilic following potassium permanganate incubation, and the neoplastic cells were immunoreactive for pancytokeratin. The histologic, histochemical, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical features of both neoplasms are consistent with epithelial-predominant thymoma with the unusual feature of intratumoral amyloid deposition. The affinity of the amyloid for Congo red following potassium permanganate incubation is consistent with non-AA amyloid. The ultrastructural findings were consistent with amyloid production by the neoplastic epithelial cells.

  15. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunyamin Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn’s disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis.

  16. 自身抗Aβ抗体的自然发生规律及其对阿尔茨海默病发病机制的启示%Natural occurrence of plasma autoantibodies to Aβs in normal aging and their enlightenment to pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐武华; 漆松涛; 徐俊; 桂见军

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the occurrence rates and changing role of plasma antibodies to Aβs in normal aging and their enlightenment to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.Methods Paraffin serial sections from Tg2576 mouse brains were immunostained with 205 plasma samples from healthy cases aged from 1 to 91 years old to make a specific tissue amyloid plaque immunoreactivity analysis, and subsequently, immunoprecipitation of plasma with synthetic Aβ peptides and formic acid soluble amyloid Aβ fractions (FAβ) was employed to clarify the immunospecialties of autoantibodies to Aβs. Results Plasma autoantibodies to Aβs were found to be naturally present in all age periods, even in childhood and juvenile, the total occurrence rate was 35.6%, and they showed a special age-related U-typed trend during aging. Conclusions Plasma autoantibodies to Aβ can occur before amyloid plaques in brains, and with no relationship with brain Aβ burden.%目的 探讨在自然衰老过程中血浆自身抗Aβ抗体的发生规律和对AD发病机制的启示.方法 采用一种特殊的组织淀粉样蛋白免疫活性测定方法(TAPIR)检测205例年龄为1~91岁的健康人群血浆免疫染色Tg2576转基因小鼠大脑组织切片中的老年斑核心,随后血浆与人工合成的Aβ多肽(sAβ)、蚁酸可溶性淀粉样Aβ颗粒(FAβ)进行免疫沉降和免疫印迹,以探查血浆自身抗Aβ抗体的免疫特性.结果 自然发生的自身抗Aβ抗体存在于各个年龄段,甚至于儿童和青少年,总发生率为35.6%,其变化规律呈现一种特殊的"U"型年龄相关性曲线.结论 血浆自身抗Aβ抗体的出现先于脑内淀粉样斑块的形成,且与脑内Aβ负荷无关.

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Clinical Isolates of Tannerella forsythia Isolated from Subgingival Plaque from Periodontitis Patients in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Stafford, G.P.; Chaudhuri, R. R.; Haraszthy, V.; Friedrich, V.; Schäffer, C.; Ruscitto, A.; Honma, K.; Sharma, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report the genome sequences of three clinical isolates of Tannerella forsythia from the subgingival plaque of periodontitis patients attending clinics at the School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo. The availability of these genome sequences will aid the understanding of the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Clinical Isolates of Tannerella forsythia Isolated from Subgingival Plaque from Periodontitis Patients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Graham P; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Haraszthy, Violet; Friedrich, Valentin; Schäffer, Christina; Ruscitto, Angela; Honma, Kiyonobu; Sharma, Ashu

    2016-12-01

    We report the genome sequences of three clinical isolates of Tannerella forsythia from the subgingival plaque of periodontitis patients attending clinics at the School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo. The availability of these genome sequences will aid the understanding of the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  19. Amyloid myopathy: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Tuomaala

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid myopathy (AM is a rare manifestation of primary systemic amyloidosis (AL. Like inflammatory myopathies, it presents with proximal muscle weakness and an increased creatine kinase level. We describe a case of AL with severe, rapidly progressive myopathy as the initial symptom. The clinical manifestation and muscle biopsy were suggestive of inclusion body myositis. AM was not suspected until amyloidosis was seen in the gastric mucosal biopsy. The muscle biopsy was then re-examined more specifically, and Congo red staining eventually showed vascular and interstitial amyloid accumulation, which led to a diagnosis of AM. The present case illustrates the fact that the clinical picture of AM can mimic that of inclusion body myositis.

  20. Surgical considerations about amyloid goiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Villanueva, Augusto; García Villanueva, María Jesús; García Villanueva, Mercedes; Rojo Blanco, Roberto; Collado Guirao, María Vicenta; Cabañas Montero, Jacobo; Beni Pérez, Rafael; Moreno Montes, Irene

    2013-05-01

    Amyloidosis is an uncommon syndrome consisting of a number of disorders having in common an extracellular deposit of fibrillary proteins. This results in functional and structural changes in the affected organs, depending on deposit location and severity. Amyloid infiltration of the thyroid gland may occur in 50% and up to 80% of patients with primary and secondary amyloidosis respectively. Amyloid goiter (AG) is a true rarity, usually found associated to secondary amyloidosis. AG may require surgical excision, usually because of compressive symptoms. We report the case of a patient with a big AG occurring in the course of a secondary amyloidosis associated to polyarticular onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis who underwent total thyroidectomy. Current literature is reviewed, an attempt is made to provide action guidelines, and some surgical considerations on this rare condition are given.

  1. Gestosis pathogenesis (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prigorodov M.V.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Literature review contains the analysis of information concerning disturbances in hemostasis system in case of arterial hypertension, frequency rate, risk factors, causes and mechanisms of occurrence. The review states the causes of complications, inadequate treatment effects and arterial hypertension pathogenesis

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease: pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Zhen; Li, Yong-Yu

    2014-01-07

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is characterized by chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. It has been a worldwide health-care problem with a continually increasing incidence. It is thought that IBD results from an aberrant and continuing immune response to the microbes in the gut, catalyzed by the genetic susceptibility of the individual. Although the etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, it involves a complex interaction between the genetic, environmental or microbial factors and the immune responses. Of the four components of IBD pathogenesis, most rapid progress has been made in the genetic study of gut inflammation. The latest internationally collaborative studies have ascertained 163 susceptibility gene loci for IBD. The genes implicated in childhood-onset and adult-onset IBD overlap, suggesting similar genetic predispositions. However, the fact that genetic factors account for only a portion of overall disease variance indicates that microbial and environmental factors may interact with genetic elements in the pathogenesis of IBD. Meanwhile, the adaptive immune response has been classically considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of IBD, as new studies in immunology and genetics have clarified that the innate immune response maintains the same importance in inducing gut inflammation. Recent progress in understanding IBD pathogenesis sheds lights on relevant disease mechanisms, including the innate and adaptive immunity, and the interactions between genetic factors and microbial and environmental cues. In this review, we provide an update on the major advances that have occurred in above areas.

  3. Amylin Amyloid Inhibition by Flavonoid Baicalein: Key Roles of Its Vicinal Dihydroxyl Groups of the Catechol Moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velander, Paul; Wu, Ling; Ray, W Keith; Helm, Richard F; Xu, Bin

    2016-08-09

    Amyloid formation of the 37-residue amylin is involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and, potentially, diabetes-induced neurological deficits. Numerous flavonoids exhibit inhibitory effects against amylin amyloidosis, but the mechanisms of inhibition remain unclear. Screening a library of natural compounds uncovered a potent lead compound, the flavone baicalein. Baicalein inhibits amylin amyloid formation and reduces amylin-induced cytotoxicity. Analogue analyses demonstrated, for the first time, key roles of the vicinal hydroxyl groups on the A-ring. We provided mass spectrometric evidence that incubating baicalein and amylin leads to their conjugation, consistent with a Schiff base mechanism.

  4. Accelerated microglial pathology is associated with Aβ plaques in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Rona; Babcock, Alicia A; Nemirovsky, Anna;

    2014-01-01

    with aging and in Alzheimer's-like disease. We show that, compared with microglia in young mice, microglia in old mice are less ramified and possess fewer branches and fine processes along with a slightly increased proinflammatory cytokine expression. A similar microglial pathology appeared 6-12 months...... earlier in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), along with a significant increase in brain parenchyma lacking coverage by microglial processes. We further demonstrate that microglia near amyloid plaques acquire unique activated phenotypes with impaired process complexity. We thus show that along...... with a chronic proinflammatory reaction in the brain, aging causes a significant reduction in the capacity of microglia to scan their environment. This type of pathology is markedly accelerated in mouse models of AD, resulting in a severe microglial process deficiency, and possibly contributing to enhanced...

  5. Atypical presentation of atypical amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, Danniele G; Acharya, Veena K; Dogan, Ahmet; Racusen, Lorraine C; Atta, Mohamed G

    2011-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a group of diseases categorized by precipitation of a group of protein aggregates (amyloid) in tissues, including the kidney, and proteinuria is usually the commonest, though not exclusive, hallmark of clinical presentation. AL and AA are the most commonly recognized forms of amyloidosis involving the kidney, but other forms have been described. We present a case of renal amyloidosis due to a novel amyloidogenic protein, leucocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2, without proteinuria at presentation or on subsequent follow-up.

  6. Janus faces of amyloid proteins in neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B; Kurnellas, Michael P

    2014-07-01

    Amyloid forming molecules are generally considered harmful. In Alzheimer's Disease two amyloid molecules Aβ A4 and tau vie for consideration as the main pathogenic culprit. But molecules obey the laws of chemistry and defy the way we categorize them as humans with our well-known proclivities to bias in our reasoning. We have been exploring the brains of multiple sclerosis patients to identify molecules that are associated with protection from inflammation and degeneration. In 2001 we noted that aB crystallin (cryab) was the most abundant transcript found in MS lesions, but not in healthy brains. Cryab can reverse paralysis and attenuate inflammation in several models of inflammation including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and various models of ischemia. Cryab is an amyloid forming molecule. We have identified a core structure common to many amyloids including amyloid protein Aβ A4, tau, amylin, prion protein, serum amyloid protein P, and cryab. The core hexapeptide structure is highly immune suppressive and can reverse paralysis in EAE when administered systemically. Administration of this amyloid forming hexapeptide quickly lowers inflammatory cytokines in plasma like IL-6 and IL-2. The hexapeptide bind a set of proinflammatory mediators in plasma, including acute phase reactants and complement components. The beneficial properties of amyloid forming hexapeptides provide a potential new therapeutic direction. These experiments indicate that amyloid forming molecules have Janus faces, providing unexpected benefit for neuroinflammatory conditions.

  7. Effect of creatine supplementation on cognitive performance and apoptosis in a rat model of amyloid-beta-induced Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohammadi-Kamalabadi, Malek; Eshraghian, Mohammadreza; Zarindast, Mohammad-Reza; Aliaghaei, Abbas; Pishva, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Neuroprotective effect of creatine (Cr) against β-amyloid (Aβ) is reported in an in vitro study. This study investigated the effect of Cr supplementation on β-amyloid toxicity in vivo. Materials and Methods: Thirty two, male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups. During ten weeks of study, control group went through no surgical or dietary intervention. At the 4th week of study Sham group had a hippocampal normal saline injection, while Aβ and AβCr groups had an β-amyloid injection in the hippocampus. AβCr group were fed by Cr diet during the study. After 10 weeks, Morris water maze (MWM) test was administered to measure learning ability and memory retrieval. Animals were sacrificed for TUNEL anti apoptotic assay and staining of amyloid plaques by Thioflavin-T. Results: There was a significant retention deficit among AβCr and Aβ group while the escape latency and the distance traveled to the platform were significantly higher in AβCr group compared to Aβ group. AβCr group had same percent of TUNEL positive neurons compared to Aβ group. Conclusion: Cr supplementation before and after β-amyloid injection into the CA1 area of hippocampus deteriorates the learning and memory impairment of rats and it does not protect neuronal apoptosis caused by β-amyloid. PMID:27917270

  8. Synthesis optimization of 2-(4-N-[11C]methylaminophenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole ([11C]PIB), β-amyloid PET imaging tracer for Alzheimer's disease diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coliva, A; Monterisi, C; Apollaro, A; Gatti, D; Penso, M; Gianolli, L; Perani, D; Gilardi, M C; Carpinelli, A

    2015-11-01

    [11C]PIB is the most used amyloid plaques-specific positron-emitting radiotracers. The radiosynthesis of this compound, carried out by methylation of its precursor with [11C]methyl triflate in 2-butanone, has been improved optimizing the initial concentration and the purification method. Two HPLC methods were compared: good radiochemical yields, specific activities, and chemical purity above 98% were achieved by using as eluant acetonitrile/citrate and formulation in 10% ethanol.

  9. Effects of Low Carbohydrate High Protein (LCHP) diet on atherosclerotic plaque phenotype in ApoE/LDLR-/- mice: FT-IR and Raman imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, T P; Marzec, K M; Chlopicki, S; Maślak, E; Jasztal, A; Franczyk-Żarów, M; Czyżyńska-Cichoń, I; Moszkowski, T; Kostogrys, R B; Baranska, M

    2015-09-22

    Low Carbohydrate High Protein (LCHP) diet displays pro-atherogenic effects, however, the exact mechanisms involved are still unclear. Here, with the use of vibrational imaging, such as Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman (RS) spectroscopies, we characterize biochemical content of plaques in Brachiocephalic Arteries (BCA) from ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice fed LCHP diet as compared to control, recomended by American Institute of Nutrition, AIN diet. FT-IR images were taken from 6-10 sections of BCA from each mice and were complemented with RS measurements with higher spatial resolution of chosen areas of plaque sections. In aortic plaques from LCHP fed ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice, the content of cholesterol and cholesterol esters was increased, while that of proteins was decreased as evidenced by global FT-IR analysis. High resolution imaging by RS identified necrotic core/foam cells, lipids (including cholesterol crystals), calcium mineralization and fibrous cap. The decreased relative thickness of the outer fibrous cap and the presence of buried caps were prominent features of the plaques in ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice fed LCHP diet. In conclusion, FT-IR and Raman-based imaging provided a complementary insight into the biochemical composition of the plaque suggesting that LCHP diet increased plaque cholesterol and cholesterol esters contents of atherosclerotic plaque, supporting the cholesterol-driven pathogenesis of LCHP-induced atherogenesis.

  10. Immunotherapy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: amyloid-β or tau, which is the right target?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo-Carranza DL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Diana L Castillo-Carranza,1,2 Marcos J Guerrero-Muñoz,1,2 Rakez Kayed1–31Mitchell Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, 2Departments of Neurology, Neuroscience, and Cell Biology, 3Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USAAbstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques composed mainly of amyloid-β (Aβ protein. Overproduction or slow clearance of Aβ initiates a cascade of pathologic events that may lead to formation of neurofibrillary tangles, neuronal cell death, and dementia. Although immunotherapy in animal models has been demonstrated to be successful at removing plaques or prefibrillar forms of Aβ, clinical trials have yielded disappointing results. The lack of substantial cognitive improvement obtained by targeting Aβ raises the question of whether or not this is the correct target. Another important pathologic process in the AD brain is tau aggregation, which seems to become independent once initiated. Recent studies targeting tau in AD mouse models have displayed evidence of cognitive improvement, providing a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AD. In this review, we describe new advances in immunotherapy targeting Aβ peptide and tau protein, as well as future directions.Keywords: immunotherapy, Alzheimer's disease, β-amyloid, tau

  11. Destruction of amyloid fibrils by graphene through penetration and extraction of peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zaixing; Ge, Cuicui; Liu, Jiajia; Chong, Yu; Gu, Zonglin; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A.; Chai, Zhifang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-11-01

    Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We here provide both experimental and computational evidence that pristine graphene and graphene-oxide nanosheets can inhibit Aβ peptide monomer fibrillation and clear mature amyloid fibrils, thus impacting the central molecular superstructures correlated with AD pathogenesis. Our molecular dynamics simulations for the first time reveal that graphene nanosheets can penetrate and extract a large number of peptides from pre-formed amyloid fibrils; these effects seem to be related to exceptionally strong dispersion interactions between peptides and graphene that are further enhanced by strong π-π stacking between the aromatic residues of extracted Aβ peptides and the graphene surface. Atomic force microscopy images confirm these predictions by demonstrating that mature amyloid fibrils can be cut into pieces and cleared by graphene oxides. Thioflavin fluorescence assays further illustrate the detailed dynamic processes by which graphene induces inhibition of monomer aggregation and clearance of mature amyloid fibrils, respectively. Cell viability and ROS assays indicate that graphene oxide can indeed mitigate cytotoxicity of Aβ peptide amyloids. Our findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms that define graphene-amyloid interaction and suggest that further research on nanotherapies for Alzheimer's and other protein aggregation-related diseases is warranted.Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We

  12. Garlic extract exhibits antiamyloidogenic activity on amyloid-beta fibrillogenesis: relevance to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Veer Bala; Indi, S S; Rao, K S J

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized pathologically by the deposition of amyloid plaques. Fibrillar Abeta is the principal component of amyloid plaques in the brain of AD patients. The prevention of Abeta aggregation or dissolution of fibrillar Abeta has clinical significance. The present communication examined in vitro the antiamyloidogenic properties of garlic extract. The effects of aqueous garlic extract (both fresh and boiled) on Abeta aggregation and defibrillation were studied by thioflavin-T based fluorescence assay, transmission electron microscopy and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The aqueous fresh garlic extract not only inhibited Abeta fibril formation in a concentration and time dependent manner but was also able to defibrillate Abeta preformed fibrils. The maximum defibrillization was observed after 2-3 days of incubation. The boiled aqueous garlic extract also retained its antiamyloidogenic activity. This indicated that antiamyloidogenic activity of garlic extract is non-enzymatic, i.e. proteases present in garlic did not degrade Abeta in solution. However, the fibril degrading ability of boiled garlic extract was significantly lost. The findings suggest that consumption of garlic may lead to inhibition of Abeta aggregation in human brain.

  13. Antibody-conjugated, dual-modal, near-infrared fluorescent iron oxide nanoparticles for antiamyloidgenic activity and specific detection of amyloid-β fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skaat H

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hadas Skaat,1 Enav Corem-Slakmon,1 Igor Grinberg,1 David Last,2 David Goez,2 Yael Mardor,2,3 Shlomo Margel1 1Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Ramat-Gan, Israel; 2Advanced Technology Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Ramat-Gan, Israel; 3Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel Abstract: Amyloid-β (Aβ peptide is the main fibrillar component of plaque deposits found in brains affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD and is related to the pathogenesis of AD. Passive anti-Aβ immunotherapy has emerged as a promising approach for the therapy of AD, based on the administration of specific anti-Aβ monoclonal antibodies (aAβmAbs to delay Aβ aggregation in the brain. However, the main disadvantage of this approach is the required readministration of the aAβmAbs at frequent intervals. There are only a few reports describing in vitro study for the immobilization of aAβmAbs to nanoparticles as potential targeting agents of Aβ aggregates. In this article, we report the immobilization of the aAβmAb clone BAM10 to near-infrared fluorescent maghemite nanoparticles for the inhibition of Aβ40 fibrillation kinetics and the specific detection of Aβ40 fibrils. The BAM10-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles were well-characterized, including their immunogold labeling and cytotoxic effect on PC-12 (pheochromocytoma cell line. Indeed, these antibody-conjugated nanoparticles significantly inhibit the Aβ40 fibrillation kinetics compared with the same concentration, or even five times higher, of the free BAM10. This inhibitory effect was confirmed by different assays such as the photo-induced crosslinking of unmodified proteins combined with sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A cell viability assay also confirmed that these antibody-conjugated nanoparticles significantly reduced the Aβ40-induced cytotoxicity to PC-12 cells. Furthermore, the selective

  14. Infliximab for the treatment of plaque psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S Gall

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer S Gall, Robert E KalbState University of New York at Buffalo, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Department of Dermatology, NY, USAAbstract: Infliximab is a monoclonal antibody that targets tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα. It is used in the treatment of a number of inflammatory disorders including severe plaque psoriasis. TNFα is thought to have a major role in psoriasis by promoting an inflammatory infiltrate into the skin and inducing keratinocyte proliferation and preventing keratinocyte apoptosis, which directly contributes to the characteristic plaque skin lesions. Based on four randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trials and nine open-label uncontrolled trials of the use of infliximab in plaque psoriasis, it was found that infliximab is a highly efficacious, rapid, sustainable, and relatively safe therapy. Yet as with any biologic, caution is recommended in its use as infusion reactions, lupus-like syndromes, infections, malignancies including lymphomas, as well as other rare events have been reported.Keywords: infliximab, psoriasis, plaque

  15. Intracoronary Thermography: a vulnerable Plaque Detection Technique?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G. ten Have (Anna)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe studies reported in this thesis were performed to answer the central question: can intracoronary thermography be used for vulnerable plaque detection? To answer this question, we have identified parameters that influence intracoronary thermography measurements, and have studied to w

  16. Large plaque parapsoriasis in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of large plaque parapsoriasis with extensive skin lesions is presented for its unusual clinical features. The controversial issue of its nosological position is discussed as it has a considerable impact on the management of such cases.

  17. Plaque rupture in humans and mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Stephen M; Galis, Zorina S; Rosenfeld, Michael E;

    2007-01-01

    Despite the many studies of murine atherosclerosis, we do not yet know the relevance of the natural history of this model to the final events precipitated by plaque disruption of human atherosclerotic lesions. The literature has become particularly confused because of the common use of terms such...

  18. Digitate dermatosis (small-plaque parapsoriasis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Jesse; Latkowski, Jo-Ann

    2012-12-15

    We report a 79-year-old man with a 15-year history of elongated, finger-like, erythematous patches that are symmetrically distributed on his flanks and of small, parapsoriasis, which is a benign entity that has been the center of controversy over the years, owing to its similarities to large-plaque parapsoriasis, which is on a spectrum with mycosis fungoides.

  19. Retroperitoneal liposarcoma associated with small plaque parapsoriasis

    OpenAIRE

    Polichetti Paolo; Sgueglia Monica; Blasi Sara; Tartaglia Francesco; Tromba Luciana; Berni Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Extremely rare cases of paraneoplastic syndromes or ectopic production of proteins associated with liposarcoma are reported in literature. Production of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor, alpha-fetoprotein, paraneoplastic pemphigus and leucocytosis, Acrokeratosis paraneoplastica (Bazex's syndrome) are reported. The present report describes a case of retroperitoneal liposarcoma associated with small plaque parapsoriasis. Our search in the English literature of such a ki...

  20. Vaporization of atherosclerotic plaques by spark erosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Slager (Cornelis); C.E. Essed; J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); N. Bom (Klaas); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); G.T. Meester (Geert)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractAn alternative to the laser irradiation of atherosclerotic lesions has been developed. A pulsed electrocardiogram R wave-triggered electrical spark erosion technique is described. Controlled vaporization of fibrous and lipid plaques with minimal thermal side effects was achieved and docu

  1. Lipidome of atherosclerotic plaques from hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojic, Lazar A; McLaren, David G; Shah, Vinit; Previs, Stephen F; Johns, Douglas G; Castro-Perez, Jose M

    2014-12-15

    The cellular, macromolecular and neutral lipid composition of the atherosclerotic plaque has been extensively characterized. However, a comprehensive lipidomic analysis of the major lipid classes within atherosclerotic lesions has not been reported. The objective of this study was to produce a detailed framework of the lipids that comprise the atherosclerotic lesion of a widely used pre-clinical model of plaque progression. Male New Zealand White rabbits were administered regular chow supplemented with 0.5% cholesterol (HC) for 12 weeks to induce hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Our lipidomic analyses of plaques isolated from rabbits fed the HC diet, using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and high-resolution mass spectrometry, detected most of the major lipid classes including: Cholesteryl esters, triacylglycerols, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, diacylglycerols, fatty acids, phosphatidylserines, lysophosphatidylcholines, ceramides, phosphatidylglycerols, phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylethanolamines. Given that cholesteryl esters, triacylglycerols and phosphatidylcholines comprise greater than 75% of total plasma lipids, we directed particular attention towards the qualitative and quantitative assessment of the fatty acid composition of these lipids. We additionally found that sphingomyelins were relatively abundant lipid class within lesions, and compared the abundance of sphingomyelins to their precursor phosphatidylcholines. The studies presented here are the first approach to a comprehensive characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque lipidome.

  2. Lipidome of Atherosclerotic Plaques from Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazar A. Bojic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The cellular, macromolecular and neutral lipid composition of the atherosclerotic plaque has been extensively characterized. However, a comprehensive lipidomic analysis of the major lipid classes within atherosclerotic lesions has not been reported. The objective of this study was to produce a detailed framework of the lipids that comprise the atherosclerotic lesion of a widely used pre-clinical model of plaque progression. Male New Zealand White rabbits were administered regular chow supplemented with 0.5% cholesterol (HC for 12 weeks to induce hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Our lipidomic analyses of plaques isolated from rabbits fed the HC diet, using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC and high-resolution mass spectrometry, detected most of the major lipid classes including: Cholesteryl esters, triacylglycerols, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, diacylglycerols, fatty acids, phosphatidylserines, lysophosphatidylcholines, ceramides, phosphatidylglycerols, phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylethanolamines. Given that cholesteryl esters, triacylglycerols and phosphatidylcholines comprise greater than 75% of total plasma lipids, we directed particular attention towards the qualitative and quantitative assessment of the fatty acid composition of these lipids. We additionally found that sphingomyelins were relatively abundant lipid class within lesions, and compared the abundance of sphingomyelins to their precursor phosphatidylcholines. The studies presented here are the first approach to a comprehensive characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque lipidome.

  3. Mathematical models for atherosclerotic plaque evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulelzai, M.A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a disease in which low density lipoproteins (LDL) accumulate in the arterial wall due to an inflammatory response, which is triggered by the oxidation of LDL molecules that are already present in the arterial wall. Progression of atherosclerotic plaques involves many components wh

  4. Adalimumab: A Review in Chronic Plaque Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burness, Celeste B; McKeage, Kate

    2015-12-01

    Adalimumab (Humira(®)) is a fully human monoclonal antibody against tumour necrosis factor (TNF), formulated for subcutaneous administration. It is well established in the treatment of adults with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis and has recently received approval in the EU for the treatment of severe chronic plaque psoriasis in children and adolescents from 4 years of age. In a phase III trial in paediatric patients, a significantly greater proportion of patients receiving adalimumab 0.8 mg/kg (to a maximum of 40 mg) every other week (eow) achieved a ≥75 % improvement from baseline in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index than those receiving methotrexate after 16 weeks of treatment. In adults, well-designed randomized clinical trials demonstrated that adalimumab 40 mg eow effectively reduced the signs and symptoms of psoriasis and improved dermatology-specific and general measures of health-related quality of life, with these benefits sustained during long-term treatment. Adalimumab was generally well tolerated, compared with placebo or methotrexate, during clinical trials in paediatric and adult patients with chronic plaque psoriasis. Thus, adalimumab remains an important treatment strategy in adults with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis and provides a promising new systemic treatment option for children and adolescents from 4 years of age with severe psoriasis.

  5. Alzheimer's Protein Plaques May Also Harm the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162241.html Alzheimer's Protein Plaques May Also Harm the Heart Deposits ... fragments that form plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's patients might also stiffen their heart muscle and ...

  6. Plaque retention on elastomeric ligatures. An in vivo study

    OpenAIRE

    CONDÒ, R.; CASAGLIA, A.; CONDÒ, S.G.; Cerroni, L

    2013-01-01

    Fixed orthodontic appliances make it difficult to maintain the oral hygiene, resulting in plaque accumulation. Retention of bacterial plaque, represents a risk for white spot lesions and development of periodontal disease.

  7. Inflamed psoriatic plaques: Drug toxicity or disease exacerbation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Jindal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We are presenting a case of Methotrexate treated stable plaque psoriasis, in whom inflamed psoriatic plaques of drug toxicity were misdiagnosed as disease exacerbation. Erosive psoriatic plaques were present in the absence of biochemical or hematological derangements. Ulceration of psoriatic plaques in the presence of disturbed hematological profile is well described as a harbinger of methotrexate toxicity, but this kind of erosions in the absence of any systemic involvement is the first report of its kind.

  8. Molecular Pathogenesis of Spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing

    This dissertation includes a presentation of knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis achieved through a PhD programme at Aalborg University from 1.12.2011 - 1.12.2014. Work was carried out in the Laboratory of Medical Mass Spectrometry, headed by: Professor Svend Birkelund...... and Immunology in San Diego, USA. Research was conducted on biological material from patients suffering from spondyloarthritis and healthy donors, to whom I dedicate this work....

  9. Three-dimensional carotid ultrasound plaque texture predicts vascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Engelen, Arna; Wannarong, Thapat; Parraga, Grace;

    2014-01-01

    carotid plaque volume and 376 measures of plaque texture. Patients were followed up to 5 years (median [range], 3.12 [0.77-4.66]) for myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack, and stroke. Sparse Cox regression was used to select the most predictive plaque texture measurements in independent...

  10. Tensile and compressive properties of fresh human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, Eoghan

    2009-12-11

    Accurate characterisation of the mechanical properties of human atherosclerotic plaque is important for our understanding of the role of vascular mechanics in the development and treatment of atherosclerosis. The majority of previous studies investigating the mechanical properties of human plaque are based on tests of plaque tissue removed following autopsy. This study aims to characterise the mechanical behaviour of fresh human carotid plaques removed during endarterectomy and tested within 2h. A total of 50 radial compressive and 17 circumferential tensile uniaxial tests were performed on samples taken from 14 carotid plaques. The clinical classification of each plaque, as determined by duplex ultrasound is also reported. Plaques were classified as calcified, mixed or echolucent. Experimental data indicated that plaques were highly inhomogeneous; with variations seen in the mechanical properties of plaque obtained from individual donors and between donors. The mean behaviour of samples for each classification indicated that calcified plaques had the stiffest response, while echolucent plaques were the least stiff. Results also indicated that there may be a difference in behaviour of samples taken from different anatomical locations (common, internal and external carotid), however the large variability indicates that more testing is needed to reach significant conclusions. This work represents a step towards a better understanding of the in vivo mechanical behaviour of human atherosclerotic plaque.

  11. En plaque meningioma in thoracic spine: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyeon Seon; Kang, Ho Yeong; Yoon, Deug Hee; Jo, Byung June; Lee, Sang Ho; Choi, Young Geun [Wooridul Spine Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Yeun [Puchon Daesung Hospital, Puchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-15

    Spinal en plaque meningioma is rarely found in the spinal canal, although lateral sphenoid wing meningioma displays a propensity for growth en plaque. We encountered a case of completely circumferential spinal en plaque meningioma, which is an even rarer condition. Herein, we report the CT MRI findings along with a review of the related literature.

  12. Characterization of Amyloid Cores in Prion Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant’Anna, Ricardo; Fernández, Maria Rosario; Batlle, Cristina; Navarro, Susanna; de Groot, Natalia S.; Serpell, Louise; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids consist of repetitions of a specific polypeptide chain in a regular cross-β-sheet conformation. Amyloid propensity is largely determined by the protein sequence, the aggregation process being nucleated by specific and short segments. Prions are special amyloids that become self-perpetuating after aggregation. Prions are responsible for neuropathology in mammals, but they can also be functional, as in yeast prions. The conversion of these last proteins to the prion state is driven by prion forming domains (PFDs), which are generally large, intrinsically disordered, enriched in glutamines/asparagines and depleted in hydrophobic residues. The self-assembly of PFDs has been thought to rely mostly on their particular amino acid composition, rather than on their sequence. Instead, we have recently proposed that specific amyloid-prone sequences within PFDs might be key to their prion behaviour. Here, we demonstrate experimentally the existence of these amyloid stretches inside the PFDs of the canonical Sup35, Swi1, Mot3 and Ure2 prions. These sequences self-assemble efficiently into highly ordered amyloid fibrils, that are functionally competent, being able to promote the PFD amyloid conversion in vitro and in vivo. Computational analyses indicate that these kind of amyloid stretches may act as typical nucleating signals in a number of different prion domains. PMID:27686217

  13. Glial fibrillary acidic protein isoform expression in plaque related astrogliosis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, Willem; Middeldorp, Jinte; Kooijman, Lieneke; Sluijs, Jacqueline A; Kooi, Evert-Jan; Moeton, Martina; Freriks, Michel; Mizee, Mark R; Hol, Elly M

    2014-03-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid plaques are surrounded by reactive astrocytes with an increased expression of intermediate filaments including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Different GFAP isoforms have been identified that are differentially expressed by specific subpopulations of astrocytes and that impose different properties to the intermediate filament network. We studied transcript levels and protein expression patterns of all known GFAP isoforms in human hippocampal AD tissue at different stages of the disease. Ten different transcripts for GFAP isoforms were detected at different abundancies. Transcript levels of most isoforms increased with AD progression. GFAPδ-immunopositive astrocytes were observed in subgranular zone, hilus, and stratum-lacunosum-moleculare. GFAPδ-positive cells also stained for GFAPα. In AD donors, astrocytes near plaques displayed increased staining of both GFAPα and GFAPδ. The reading-frame-shifted isoform, GFAP(+1), staining was confined to a subset of astrocytes with long processes, and their number increased in the course of AD. In conclusion, the various GFAP isoforms show differential transcript levels and are upregulated in a concerted manner in AD. The GFAP(+1) isoform defines a unique subset of astrocytes, with numbers increasing with AD progression. These data indicate the need for future exploration of underlying mechanisms concerning the functions of GFAPδ and GFAP(+1) isoforms in astrocytes and their possible role in AD pathology.

  14. Topographic association of angioscopic yellow plaques with coronary atherosclerotic plaque: assessment with quantitative colorimetry in human coronary artery autopsy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Fumiyuki; Lisauskas, Jennifer B; Kawamura, Akio; Waxman, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Yellow plaques seen during coronary angioscopy are thought to be the surrogates for superficial intimal lipids in coronary plaque. Given diffuse and heterogeneous nature of atherosclerosis, yellow plaques in coronaries may be seen as several yellow spots on diffuse coronary plaque. We examined the topographic association of yellow plaques with coronary plaque. In 40 non-severely stenotic ex-vivo coronary segments (average length: 52.2 +/- 3.1 mm), yellow plaques were examined by angioscopy with quantitative colorimetry. The segments were cut perpendicular to the long axis of the vessel at 2 mm intervals, and 1045 slides with 5 microm thick tissue for whole segments were prepared. To construct the plaque surface, each tissue slice was considered to be representative of the adjacent 2 mm. The circumference of the lumen and the lumen border of plaque were measured in each slide, and the plaque surface region was constructed. Coronary plaque was in 37 (93%) of 40 segments, and consisted of a single mass [39.9 +/- 3.9 (0-100) mm, 311.3 +/- 47.4 (0.0-1336.2) mm2]. In 30 (75%) segments, multiple (2-9) yellow plaques were detected on a mass of coronary plaque. The number of yellow plaques correlated positively with coronary plaque surface area (r = 0.77, P colorimetry, some of them are associated with lipid cores underneath thin fibrous caps, may be used to assess the extent of coronary plaque. Further research using angioscopy could be of value to study the association of high-risk coronaries with acute coronary syndromes.

  15. Amyloid fibrils compared to peptide nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zganec, Matjaž; Zerovnik, Eva

    2014-09-01

    Prefibrillar oligomeric states and amyloid fibrils of amyloid-forming proteins qualify as nanoparticles. We aim to predict what biophysical and biochemical properties they could share in common with better researched peptide nanotubes. We first describe what is known of amyloid fibrils and prefibrillar aggregates (oligomers and protofibrils): their structure, mechanisms of formation and putative mechanism of cytotoxicity. In distinction from other neuronal fibrillar constituents, amyloid fibrils are believed to cause pathology, however, some can also be functional. Second, we give a review of known biophysical properties of peptide nanotubes. Finally, we compare properties of these two macromolecular states side by side and discuss which measurements that have already been done with peptide nanotubes could be done with amyloid fibrils as well.

  16. Cannabidiol promotes amyloid precursor protein ubiquitination and reduction of beta amyloid expression in SHSY5YAPP+ cells through PPARγ involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuderi, Caterina; Steardo, Luca; Esposito, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    The amyloidogenic cascade is regarded as a key factor at the basis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. The aberrant cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) induces an increased production and a subsequent aggregation of beta amyloid (Aβ) peptide in limbic and association cortices. As a result, altered neuronal homeostasis and oxidative injury provoke tangle formation with consequent neuronal loss. Cannabidiol (CBD), a Cannabis derivative devoid of psychotropic effects, has attracted much attention because it may beneficially interfere with several Aβ-triggered neurodegenerative pathways, even though the mechanism responsible for such actions remains unknown. In the present research, the role of CBD was investigated as a possible modulating compound of APP processing in SHSY5Y(APP+) neurons. In addition, the putative involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) was explored as a candidate molecular site responsible for CBD actions. Results indicated the CBD capability to induce the ubiquitination of APP protein which led to a substantial decrease in APP full length protein levels in SHSY5Y(APP+) with the consequent decrease in Aβ production. Moreover, CBD promoted an increased survival of SHSY5Y(APP+) neurons, by reducing their long-term apoptotic rate. Obtained results also showed that all, here observed, CBD effects were dependent on the selective activation of PPARγ.

  17. Amyloid-β-Anti-Amyloid-β Complex Structure Reveals an Extended Conformation in the Immunodominant B-Cell Epitope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, Luke A; Wun, Kwok S; Crespi, Gabriela A.N.; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle T; Galatis, Denise; Bagley, Christopher J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; McKinstry, William J; Barnham, Kevin J; Parker, Michael W [SVIMR-A; (Hanson); (Heidelberg); (Melbourne)

    2012-04-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein, is central to AD pathogenesis. Most pharmaceutical activity in AD research has focused on Aβ, its generation and clearance from the brain. In particular, there is much interest in immunotherapy approaches with a number of anti-Aβ antibodies in clinical trials. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, called WO2, which recognises the Aβ peptide. To this end, we have determined the three-dimensional structure, to near atomic resolution, of both the antibody and the complex with its antigen, the Aβ peptide. The structures reveal the molecular basis for WO2 recognition and binding of Aβ. The Aβ peptide adopts an extended, coil-like conformation across its major immunodominant B-cell epitope between residues 2 and 8. We have also studied the antibody-bound Aβ peptide in the presence of metals known to affect its aggregation state and show that WO2 inhibits these interactions. Thus, antibodies that target the N-terminal region of Aβ, such as WO2, hold promise for therapeutic development.

  18. Host exopolysaccharide quantity and composition impact Erwinia amylovora bacteriophage pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Dwayne R; Sjaarda, David R; Castle, Alan J; Svircev, Antonet M

    2013-05-01

    Erwinia amylovora bacteriophages (phages) belonging to the Myoviridae and Podoviridae families demonstrated a preference for either high-exopolysaccharide-producing (HEP) or low-exopolysaccharide-producing (LEP) bacterial hosts when grown on artificial medium without or with sugar supplementation. Myoviridae phages produced clear plaques on LEP hosts and turbid plaques on HEP hosts. The reverse preference was demonstrated by most Podoviridae phages, where clear plaques were seen on HEP hosts. Efficiency of plating (EOP) was determined by comparing phage growth on the original isolation host to the that on the LEP or HEP host. Nine of 10 Myoviridae phages showed highest EOPs on LEP hosts, and 8 of 11 Podoviridae phages had highest EOPs on HEP hosts. Increasing the production of EPS on sugar-supplemented medium or decreasing production by knocking out the synthesis of amylovoran or levan, the two EPSs produced by E. amylovora, indicated that these components play crucial roles in phage infection. Amylovoran was virtually essential for proliferation of most Podoviridae phages when phage population growth was compared to the wild type. Decreased levan production resulted in a significant reduction of progeny from phages in the Myoviridae family. Thus, Podoviridae phages are adapted to hosts that produce high levels of exopolysaccharides and are dependent on host-produced amylovoran for pathogenesis. Myoviridae phages are adapted to hosts that produce lower levels of exopolysaccharides and host-produced levan.

  19. Amyloid-β peptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Zimbron, Luis Fernando; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Vazquez-Ramirez, Ricardo; Kubli-Garfias, Carlos; Cribbs, David H; Manoutcharian, Karen; Gevorkian, Goar

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  20. Membrane Incorporation, Channel Formation, and Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis by Alzheimer's β-Amyloid Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oligomerization, conformational changes, and the consequent neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's β-amyloid protein (AβP play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Mounting evidence suggests that oligomeric AβPs cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis, eventually leading to neuronal death. We have demonstrated that oligomeric AβPs directly incorporate into neuronal membranes, form cation-sensitive ion channels (“amyloid channels”, and cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis via the amyloid channels. Other disease-related amyloidogenic proteins, such as prion protein in prion diseases or α-synuclein in dementia with Lewy bodies, exhibit similarities in the incorporation into membranes and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. Here, based on our experimental results and those of numerous other studies, we review the current understanding of the direct binding of AβP into membrane surfaces and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. The implication of composition of membrane lipids and the possible development of new drugs by influencing membrane properties and attenuating amyloid channels for the treatment and prevention of AD is also discussed.

  1. Amyloid-β peptide binds to cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Hernandez-Zimbron

    Full Text Available Extracellular and intraneuronal accumulation of amyloid-beta aggregates has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, the precise mechanism of amyloid-beta neurotoxicity is not completely understood. Previous studies suggest that binding of amyloid-beta to a number of macromolecules has deleterious effects on cellular functions. Mitochondria were found to be the target for amyloid-beta, and mitochondrial dysfunction is well documented in AD. In the present study we have shown for the first time that Aβ 1-42 bound to a peptide comprising the amino-terminal region of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1. Phage clone, selected after screening of a human brain cDNA library expressed on M13 phage and bearing a 61 amino acid fragment of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, bound to Aβ 1-42 in ELISA as well as to Aβ aggregates present in AD brain. Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 co-immunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fraction of differentiated human neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, molecular dynamics simulation of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the Aβ 1-42 peptide complex resulted in a reliable helix-helix interaction, supporting the experimental results. The interaction between Aβ 1-42 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 may explain, in part, the diminished enzymatic activity of respiratory chain complex IV and subsequent neuronal metabolic dysfunction observed in AD.

  2. Natural polyphenols binding to amyloid: a broad class of compounds to treat different human amyloid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoungoure, Viviane L Ndam; Schluesener, Jan; Moundipa, Paul F; Schluesener, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenols are a large group of phytonutrients found in herbal beverages and foods. They have manifold biological activities, including antioxidative, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties. Interestingly, some polyphenols bind to amyloid and substantially ameliorate amyloid diseases. Misfolding, aggregation, and accumulation of amyloid fibrils in tissues or organs leads to a group of disorders, called amyloidoses. Prominent diseases are Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease, but there are other, less well-known diseases wherein accumulation of misfolded protein is a prominent feature. Amyloidoses are a major burden to public health. In particular, Alzheimer's disease shows a strong increase in patient numbers. Accelerated development of effective therapies for amyloidoses is a necessity. A viable strategy can be the prevention or reduction of protein misfolding, thus reducing amyloid build-up by restoring the cellular aggretome. Amyloid-binding polyphenols affect amyloid formation on various levels, e.g. by inhibiting fibril formation or steering oligomer formation into unstructured, nontoxic pathways. Consequently, preclinical studies demonstrate reduction of amyloid-formation by polyphenols. Amyloid-binding polyphenols might be suitable lead structures for development of imaging agents for early detection of disease and monitoring amyloid deposition. Intake of dietary polyphenols might be relevant to the prevention of amyloidoses. Nutraceutical strategies might be a way to reduce amyloid diseases.

  3. General amyloid inhibitors? A critical examination of the inhibition of IAPP amyloid formation by inositol stereoisomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin forms amyloid deposits in the islets of Langerhans; a process that is believed to contribute to the progression of type 2 diabetes and to the failure of islet transplants. An emerging theme in amyloid research is the hypothesis that the toxic species produced during amyloid formation by different polypeptides share common features and exert their effects by common mechanisms. If correct, this suggests that inhibitors of amyloid formation by one polypeptide might be effective against other amyloidogenic sequences. IAPP and Aβ, the peptide responsible for amyloid formation in Alzheimer's disease, are particularly interesting in this regard as they are both natively unfolded in their monomeric states and share some common characteristics. Comparatively little effort has been expended on the design of IAPP amyloid inhibitors, thus it is natural to inquire if Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP, especially since no IAPP inhibitors have been clinically approved. A range of compounds inhibit Aβ amyloid formation, including various stereoisomers of inositol. Myo-, scyllo-, and epi-inositol have been shown to induce conformational changes in Aβ and prevent Aβ amyloid fibril formation by stabilizing non-fibrillar β-sheet structures. We investigate the ability of inositol stereoisomers to inhibit amyloid formation by IAPP. The compounds do not induce a conformational change in IAPP and are ineffective inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation, although some do lead to modest apparent changes in IAPP amyloid fibril morphology. Thus not all classes of Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP. This work provides a basis of comparison to work on polyphenol based inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation and helps provide clues as to the features which render them effective. The study also helps provide information for further efforts in rational inhibitor design.

  4. Noninvasive diagnosis of vulnerable coronary plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, Eduardo; Agudo-Quilez, Pilar; Rojas-González, Antonio; Alvarado, Teresa; Olivera, María José; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis Jesús; Alfonso, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death are frequently the first manifestation of coronary artery disease. For this reason, screening of asymptomatic coronary atherosclerosis has become an attractive field of research in cardiovascular medicine. Necropsy studies have described histopathological changes associated with the development of acute coronary events. In this regard, thin-cap fibroatheroma has been identified as the main vulnerable coronary plaque feature. Hence, many imaging techniques, such as coronary computed tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance or positron emission tomography, have tried to detect noninvasively these histomorphological characteristics with different approaches. In this article, we review the role of these diagnostic tools in the detection of vulnerable coronary plaque with particular interest in their advantages and limitations as well as the clinical implications of the derived findings. PMID:27721935

  5. Oculocutaneous albinism complicated with an ulcerated plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokanatha Keshavalu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old male with a history of albinism and farmer by occupation presented with an ulcerated plaque on the right wrist. The patient had light eyes, hair, and skin. Physical examination showed extensive photodamage. A skin biopsy specimen from the plaque revealed a well-differentiated squamous-cell carcinoma. Wide surgical excision was done. The most common types of oculocutaneous albinism (OCA, OCA 1 and OCA 2, are autosomal recessive disorders of pigmentation that commonly affect the skin, hair and eyes. Photodamage and skin cancers plague patients with albinism. Albinos face a myriad of social and medical issues. Importance of photoprotection, skin cancer surveillance and treatment has been stressed upon in this report.

  6. Non-plaque-induced gingival lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, P

    1999-01-01

    The origin of gingival inflammation is occasionally different from that of routine plaque-associated gingivitis, and such non-plaque-associated types of gingivitis often present characteristic clinical features. Examples of such forms of gingivitis are specific bacterial, viral, and fungal......, the most important of these being Candida species including C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. guillermondii. Gingival histoplasmosis is a granulomatous disease caused by the fungus Histoplasma capsulatum and, as for the other specific infections of gingiva......, a confirmed diagnosis may require histopathologic examination and/or culture. Atypical gingivitis may also occur as gingival manifestations of dermatological diseases, the most relevant of these being lichen planus, pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, erythema multiforme, and lupus erythematosus. Non...

  7. Plaque accumulations caused by interdental stripping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radlanski, R J; Jäger, A; Schwestka, R; Bertzbach, F

    1988-11-01

    Human enamel surfaces were stripped with orthodontic grinding and finishing materials, and evaluated with the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Even under in vitro conditions with the finest finishing strips, it was not possible to produce an enamel surface free of the furrows that result from the initial abrasion caused by the coarse strip. Enamel surfaces stripped gradually from coarse to superfine were left in the mouths of patients for 12 weeks and evaluated with the SEM. The edges of the furrows were found to be smoother but the furrows remained wide and deep enough to facilitate more plaque accumulations than those on untreated surfaces. The use of dental floss did not result in prevention of plaque accumulations along the bottom of the furrows.

  8. Reliability and discriminatory power of methods for dental plaque quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Prócida Raggio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This in situ study evaluated the discriminatory power and reliability of methods of dental plaque quantification and the relationship between visual indices (VI and fluorescence camera (FC to detect plaque. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six volunteers used palatal appliances with six bovine enamel blocks presenting different stages of plaque accumulation. The presence of plaque with and without disclosing was assessed using VI. Images were obtained with FC and digital camera in both conditions. The area covered by plaque was assessed. Examinations were done by two independent examiners. Data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Kappa tests to compare different conditions of samples and to assess the inter-examiner reproducibility. RESULTS: Some methods presented adequate reproducibility. The Turesky index and the assessment of area covered by disclosed plaque in the FC images presented the highest discriminatory powers. CONCLUSION: The Turesky index and images with FC with disclosing present good reliability and discriminatory power in quantifying dental plaque.

  9. Arctigenin effectively ameliorates memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease model mice targeting both β-amyloid production and clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; Yan, Jianming; Jiang, Wei; Yao, Xin-gang; Chen, Jing; Chen, Lili; Li, Chenjing; Hu, Lihong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Xu

    2013-08-07

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) chiefly characterizes a progressively neurodegenerative disorder of the brain, and eventually leads to irreversible loss of intellectual abilities. The β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced neurodegeneration is believed to be the main pathological mechanism of AD, and Aβ production inhibition or its clearance promotion is one of the promising therapeutic strategies for anti-AD research. Here, we report that the natural product arctigenin from Arctium lappa (L.) can both inhibit Aβ production by suppressing β-site amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme 1 expression and promote Aβ clearance by enhancing autophagy through AKT/mTOR signaling inhibition and AMPK/Raptor pathway activation as investigated in cells and APP/PS1 transgenic AD model mice. Moreover, the results showing that treatment of arctigenin in mice highly decreased Aβ formation and senile plaques and efficiently ameliorated AD mouse memory impairment strongly highlight the potential of arctigenin in anti-AD drug discovery.

  10. Crude caffeine reduces memory impairment and amyloid β(1-42) levels in an Alzheimer's mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yi-Fang; Chang, Wen-Han; Black, Richard M; Liu, Jia-Ren; Sompol, Pradoldej; Chen, Yumin; Wei, Huilin; Zhao, Qiuyan; Cheng, Irene H

    2012-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a chronic neurodegenerative disorder associated with the abnormal accumulations of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide and oxidative stress in the brain, is the most common form of dementia among the elderly. Crude caffeine (CC), a major by-product of the decaffeination of coffee, has potent hydrophilic antioxidant activity and may reduce inflammatory processes. Here, we showed that CC and pure caffeine intake had beneficial effects in a mouse model of AD. Administration of CC or pure caffeine for 2months partially prevented memory impairment in AD mice, with CC having greater effects than pure caffeine. Furthermore, consumption of CC, but not pure caffeine, reduced the Aβ(1-42) levels and the number of amyloid plaques in the hippocampus. Moreover, CC and caffeine protected primary neurons from Aβ-induced cell death and suppressed Aβ-induced caspase-3 activity. Our data indicate that CC may contain prophylactic agents against the cell death and the memory impairment in AD.

  11. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F; Arellano-Jiménez, M Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-04-28

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Formation of amyloidplaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles.

  12. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloidplaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles.

  13. Randomization of amyloid-β-peptide(1-42) conformation by sulfonated and sulfated nanoparticles reduces aggregation and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Ana M; Cardoso, Isabel; Saraiva, Maria João; Tauer, Klaus; Pereira, M Carmo; Coelho, Manuel A N; Möhwald, Helmuth; Brezesinski, Gerald

    2010-10-08

    The amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) plays a central role in the mechanism of Alzheimer's disease, being the main constituent of the plaque deposits found in AD brains. Aβ amyloid formation and deposition are due to a conformational switching to a β-enriched secondary structure. Our strategy to inhibit Aβ aggregation involves the re-conversion of Aβ conformation by adsorption to nanoparticles. NPs were synthesized by sulfonation and sulfation of polystyrene, leading to microgels and latexes. Both polymeric nanostructures affect the conformation of Aβ inducing an unordered state. Oligomerization was delayed and cytotoxicity reduced. The proper balance between hydrophilic moieties and hydrophobic chains seems to be an essential feature of effective NPs.

  14. Yeast Two-Hybrid Screening for Proteins that Interact with the Extracellular Domain of Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, You; Li, Yinan; Zhang, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which amyloid β plaques are a pathological characteristic. Little is known about the physiological functions of amyloid β precursor protein (APP). Based on its structure as a type I transmembrane protein, it has been proposed that APP might be a receptor, but so far, no ligand has been reported. In the present study, 9 proteins binding to the extracellular domain of APP were identified using a yeast two-hybrid system. After confirming the interactions in the mammalian system, mutated PLP1, members of the FLRT protein family, and KCTD16 were shown to interact with APP. These proteins have been reported to be involved in Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) and axon guidance. Therefore, our results shed light on the mechanisms of physiological function of APP in AD, PMD, and axon guidance.

  15. N-Acetyl-L-Cystein downregulates beta-amyloid precursor protein gene transcription in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, R; Baysang, G; Brack, C

    2001-01-01

    The causes for the sporadic form of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are still poorly understood, except from the fact that age is an important risk factor. The main component of the characteristic amyloid plaques in brains of AD patients are Abeta peptides, derivatives of the amyloid precursor protein APP. Oxidative stress may contribute to the aetiology of AD by dysregulation of APP metabolism. Overexpression of the APP gene could result in an increased secretion of neurotoxic Abeta peptides, while preventing the overexpression might be protective. We here report that the antioxidant N-Acetyl-L-Cystein (NAC) downregulates APP gene transcription in human neuroblastoma cells. The effect is reversible when cells are returned to NAC free medium. These results open up new possibilities for the development of therapeutic agents that intervene at the transcriptional level.

  16. Pathogenesis of Tourette's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckman, J F; Peterson, B S; Anderson, G M; Arnsten, A F; Pauls, D L; Cohen, D J

    1997-01-01

    This review presents a models of disease pathogenesis in the context of CNS development. It begins with an exploration of the clinical features and natural history of Tourette's syndrome. This is followed by a consideration of the role of genetic and nongenetic factors. An effort is then made to review the anatomical organization of the basal ganglia and related cortical sites. These circuits are intimately involved in the normal processing of sensorimotor, cognitive, and emotionally laden information. Evidence implicating these circuits in the pathobiology of Tourette's syndrome is then considered. The review closes with the prospects for advances in interdisciplinary research and therapeutics using this model as a guide.

  17. Iron-export ferroxidase activity of β-amyloid precursor protein is inhibited by zinc in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duce, James A; Tsatsanis, Andrew; Cater, Michael A; James, Simon A; Robb, Elysia; Wikhe, Krutika; Leong, Su Ling; Perez, Keyla; Johanssen, Timothy; Greenough, Mark A; Cho, Hyun-Hee; Galatis, Denise; Moir, Robert D; Masters, Colin L; McLean, Catriona; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Cappai, Roberto; Barnham, Kevin J; Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D; Rogers, Jack T; Bush, Ashley I

    2010-09-17

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is complicated by pro-oxidant intraneuronal Fe(2+) elevation as well as extracellular Zn(2+) accumulation within amyloid plaque. We found that the AD β-amyloid protein precursor (APP) possesses ferroxidase activity mediated by a conserved H-ferritin-like active site, which is inhibited specifically by Zn(2+). Like ceruloplasmin, APP catalytically oxidizes Fe(2+), loads Fe(3+) into transferrin, and has a major interaction with ferroportin in HEK293T cells (that lack ceruloplasmin) and in human cortical tissue. Ablation of APP in HEK293T cells and primary neurons induces marked iron retention, whereas increasing APP695 promotes iron export. Unlike normal mice, APP(-/-) mice are vulnerable to dietary iron exposure, which causes Fe(2+) accumulation and oxidative stress in cortical neurons. Paralleling iron accumulation, APP ferroxidase activity in AD postmortem neocortex is inhibited by endogenous Zn(2+), which we demonstrate can originate from Zn(2+)-laden amyloid aggregates and correlates with Aβ burden. Abnormal exchange of cortical zinc may link amyloid pathology with neuronal iron accumulation in AD.

  18. Binding of ACE-inhibitors to in vitro and patient-derived amyloid-β fibril models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavaraju, Manikanthan; Phillips, Malachi; Bowman, Deborah; Aceves-Hernandez, Juan M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no drugs exist that can prevent or reverse Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disease associated with the presence, in the brain, of plaques that are composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. Recent studies suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, a set of drugs used to treat hypertension, may inhibit amyloid formation in vitro. In the present study, we investigate through computer simulations the binding of ACE inhibitors to patient-derived Aβ fibrils and contrast it with that of ACE inhibitors binding to in vitro generated fibrils. The binding affinities of the ACE inhibitors are compared with that of Congo red, a dye that is used to identify amyloid structures and that is known to be a weak inhibitor of Aβ aggregation. We find that ACE inhibitors have a lower binding affinity to the patient-derived fibrils than to in vitro generated ones. For patient-derived fibrils, their binding affinities are even lower than that of Congo red. Our observations raise doubts on the hypothesis that these drugs inhibit fibril formation in Alzheimer patients by interacting directly with the amyloids.

  19. Quantitative analysis of monocyte subpopulations in murine atherosclerotic plaques by multiphoton microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail S Haka

    Full Text Available The progressive accumulation of monocyte-derived cells in the atherosclerotic plaque is a hallmark of atherosclerosis. However, it is now appreciated that monocytes represent a heterogeneous circulating population of cells that differ in functionality. New approaches are needed to investigate the role of monocyte subpopulations in atherosclerosis since a detailed understanding of their differential mobilization, recruitment, survival and emigration during atherogenesis is of particular importance for development of successful therapeutic strategies. We present a novel methodology for the in vivo examination of monocyte subpopulations in mouse models of atherosclerosis. This approach combines cellular labeling by fluorescent beads with multiphoton microscopy to visualize and monitor monocyte subpopulations in living animals. First, we show that multiphoton microscopy is an accurate and timesaving technique to analyze monocyte subpopulation trafficking and localization in plaques in excised tissues. Next, we demonstrate that multiphoton microscopy can be used to monitor monocyte subpopulation trafficking in atherosclerotic plaques in living animals. This novel methodology should have broad applications and facilitate new insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and other inflammatory diseases.

  20. Intradural extramedullary tuberculoma mimicking en plaque meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozek Erdinc

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report an 18 year old woman with an intradural extramedullary tuberculoma mimicking en plaque meningioma located in the thoracic region. The patient was operated via thoracic laminoplasty and tumor was totally resected. On the follow-up examination the magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the total excision of the tumor. Here we describe a case of intradural extramedullary tuberculoma of the spinal cord as a complication of tuberculosis meningitis in a previously healthy young female.

  1. Reducing allergic symptoms through eliminating subgingival plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haryono Utomo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elimination of subgingival plaque for prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases through scaling is a routine procedure. It is also well-known that periodontal disease is related to systemic diseases. Nevertheless, the idea how scaling procedures also able to reduce allergic symptoms i.e. eczema and asthma, is not easily accepted, because it is contradictory to the “hygiene hypothesis”. However, since allergic symptoms also depend on variable factors such as genetic, environmental and infection factors; every possible effort to eliminate or avoid from these factors had to be considered. Subgingival plaque is a source of infection, especially the Gram-negative bacteria that produced endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides, LPS, a potential stimulator of immunocompetent cells, which may also related to allergy, such as mast cells and basophils. In addition, it also triggers the “neurogenic switching” mechanism which may be initiated from chronic gingivitis. Objective: This case report may explain the possible connection between subgingival plaque and allergy based on evidence-based cases. Case: Two adult siblings who suffered from chronic gingivitis also showed different manifestations of allergy that were allergic dermatitis and asthma for years. They were also undergone unsuccessful medical treatment for years. Oral and topical corticosteroids were taken for dermatitis and inhalation for asthma. Case Management: Patients were conducted deep scaling procedures, allergic symptoms gradually diminished in days even though without usual medications. Conclusion: Concerning to the effectiveness of scaling procedures which concomitantly eliminate subgingival plaque in allergic patients, it concluded that this concept is logical. Nevertheless, further verification and collaborated study with allergic expert should be done.

  2. Retroperitoneal liposarcoma associated with small plaque parapsoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polichetti Paolo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extremely rare cases of paraneoplastic syndromes or ectopic production of proteins associated with liposarcoma are reported in literature. Production of Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor, alpha-fetoprotein, paraneoplastic pemphigus and leucocytosis, Acrokeratosis paraneoplastica (Bazex's syndrome are reported. The present report describes a case of retroperitoneal liposarcoma associated with small plaque parapsoriasis. Our search in the English literature of such a kind of association did not reveal any case reported. Case presentation A 74 year male patient was admitted to our hospital because of the presence of an abdominal mass in right iliac fossa. He also complained of a two-year history of psoriasiform eruptions. The CT scan showed a retroperitoneal pelvic mass. Therefore surgical resection of the tumor was performed. After surgery, the skin eruptions disappeared completely in seven days and so a diagnosis of parapsoriasis syndrome was done. Conclusion Parallel disappearing of skin eruptions after surgery, typical clinical picture and not specific histology of the cutaneous lesions suggest the diagnosis of small plaque parapsoriasis. Therefore we propose to add Small Plaque Parapsoriasis to the list of paraneoplastic syndromes associated to liposarcoma.

  3. In vivo amyloid-β imaging in the APPPS1-21 transgenic mouse model with a 89Zr- labeled monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Marie eWaldron

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The accumulation of amyloid-β is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and is a target for molecular imaging probes to aid in diagnosis and disease monitoring. This study evaluated the feasibility of using a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-amyloid-β antibody (JRF/AβN/25 to non-invasively assess amyloid-β burden in aged transgenic mice (APPPS1-21 with μPET imaging.Methods: We investigated the antibody JRF/AβN/25 that binds to full-length Aβ. JRF/AβN/25 was radiolabeled with a [89Zr]-desferal chelate and intravenously injected into 12-13 month aged APPPS1-21 mice and their wild-type (WT controls. Mice underwent in vivo μPET imaging at 2, 4 and 7 days post injection and were sacrificed at the end of each time point to assess brain penetrance, plaque labeling, biodistribution and tracer stability. To confirm imaging specificity we also evaluated brain uptake of a non-amyloid targeting [89Zr]-labeled antibody (Trastuzumab as a negative control, additionally we performed a competitive blocking study with non-radiolabeled Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 and finally we assessed the possible confounding effects of blood retention. Results: Voxel-wise analysis of μPET data demonstrated significant [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 retention in APPPS1-21 mice at all time points investigated. With ex vivo measures of radioactivity, significantly higher retention of [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 was found at 4 and 7 day pi in APPPS1-21 mice. Despite the observed genotypic differences, comparisons with immunohistochemistry revealed that in vivo plaque labeling was low. Furthermore, pre-treatment with Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 only partially blocked [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 uptake indicative of a high contribution of non-specific binding. Conclusion: Amyloid plaques were detected in vivo with a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-amyloid antibody. The low brain penetrance of the antibodies in addition to non-specific binding prevented an accurate estimation of plaque

  4. Pathogenesis of Stone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worcester, Elaine M.; Evan, Andrew P.; Coe, Fredric L.

    2008-09-01

    All stones share similar presenting symptoms, and urine supersaturation with respect to the mineral phase of the stone is essential for stone formation. However, recent studies using papillary biopsies of stone formers provide a view of the histology of renal crystal deposition which suggests that the early sequence of events leading to stone formation may differ depending on the type of stone and on the urine chemistry leading to supersaturation. Three general patterns of crystal deposition are seen: interstitial apatite plaque in idiopathic calcium oxalate stone formers, which is the site of stone attachment; tubule deposition of apatite, seen in all calcium phosphate stone formers; and mixtures of apatite and another crystal phase, such as cystine or calcium oxalate, seen in patients with cystinuria or enteric hyperoxaluria. The presence of apatite crystal in either the interstitial or tubule compartment (and sometimes both) of the renal medulla in stone formers is the rule, and has implications for the initial steps of stone formation and the potential for renal injury.

  5. The Effect of Beta-Amyloid on Neurons and the Influence of Glucocorticoid and Age on Such Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈红辉; 孙圣刚; 梅元武; 刘昌勤; 刘安求; 童萼塘

    2002-01-01

    Summary: To explore the relationship between β-amyloid (Aβ) and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), after injection of β-amyloid into the rat brain, the apoptosis of nerve cells and acetylcholine (Ach) content in rat hippocampus were examined by employing TUNEL technique and base hydroxylamine colorimetry respectively. The influence of age and glucocorticoid on the neurotoxic effect of Aβ was also analyzed. Aβ peptide could strongly induce the apoptosis of neurons in hippocampus, cortex and striate body (P<0. 05 or P<0. 01). In addition, the senility and glucocorticoid pre-treatment could enhance the toxic effect of Aβ(P<0. 05 or P<0. 01). It is concluded that Aβ may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease via its induction of apoptosis of neurons and by decreasing the content of the Ach.

  6. Pathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, A L

    2005-05-01

    The pathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon is not fully understood. However, the last 20 yr have witnessed enormous increases in our understanding of different mechanisms which, singly or in combination, may contribute. A key point is that Raynaud's phenomenon can be either primary (idiopathic) or secondary to a number of underlying conditions, and that the pathogenesis and pathophysiology vary between these conditions. This review concentrates upon those subtypes of Raynaud's phenomenon of most interest to rheumatologists: systemic sclerosis-related Raynaud's phenomenon, primary Raynaud's phenomenon and Raynaud's phenomenon secondary to hand-arm vibration syndrome. In this review, I shall discuss the main mechanisms thought to be important in pathophysiology under the three broad headings of 'vascular', 'neural' and 'intravascular'. While these are false distinctions because all interrelate, they facilitate discussion of the key elements: the blood vessel wall (particularly the endothelium), the neural control of vascular tone, and the many circulating factors which can impair blood flow and/or cause endothelial injury. Vascular abnormalities include those of both structure and function. Neural abnormalities include deficiency of the vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (released from sensory afferents), alpha(2)-adrenoreceptor activation (possibly with up-regulation of the normally 'silent' alpha(2C)-adrenoreceptor) and a central nervous system component. Intravascular abnormalities include platelet activation, impaired fibrinolysis, increased viscosity and probably oxidant stress. As our understanding of the pathophysiology of Raynaud's phenomenon increases, so do our possibilities for identifying effective treatments.

  7. Pemphigus: Epidemiology and Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelda Karıncaoğlu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus, a group of bullous diseases affecting the oral mucosa and the skin, is caused by antibody-mediated autoimmune reaction to desmogleins (Dsg, desmosomal transmembrane glycoproteins, leading to acantholysis. Pemphigus has a worldwide distribution but the incidence in patients of Jewish origin is higher. The disease has a peak incidence of occurrence between the 4th and 6th decades. While various environmental factors have been implicated as triggering agents, HLA association is probably the most important predisposing factor. Pemphigus, is caused by antibody-mediated autoimmune reaction to desmosomal cadherins, Dsg1, and Dsg3. Recent molecular studies have shown that acantholysis can occur also in the presence of antibodies against 9a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Pemphigus is currently divided into three distinct varieties, i.e., pemphigus vulgaris (PV, pemphigus foliaceus (PF and other variants of pemphigus, depending on clinical features, the level of separation in the epidermis, and immunologic characteristics of auto-antigens. Blistering pathogenesis differ for each of the types of pemphigus. PV is characterized by IgG autoantibodies against Dsg 3, whereas the target of PF is Dsg1, although about 50% of PV patients also have Dsg1 autoantibodies. Lesion distribution is related to the location of the antigen (Dgs 3 and/or Dgs 1 in the epithelium and specific autoantibody production. This article reviews the epidemiology and pathogenesis of pemphigus.

  8. Hacking the Code of Amyloid Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, M Teresa; Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Many research efforts in the last years have been directed towards understanding the factors determining protein misfolding and amyloid formation. Protein stability and amino acid composition have been identified as the two major factors in vitro. The research of our group has been focused on understanding the relationship between amino acid sequence and amyloid formation. Our approach has been the design of simple model systems that reproduce the biophysical properties of natural amyloids. An amyloid sequence pattern was extracted that can be used to detect amyloidogenic hexapeptide stretches in proteins. We have added evidence supporting that these amyloidogenic stretches can trigger amyloid formation by nonamyloidogenic proteins. Some experimental results in other amyloid proteins will be analyzed under the conclusions obtained in these studies. Our conclusions together with evidences from other groups suggest that amyloid formation is the result of the interplay between a decrease of protein stability, and the presence of highly amyloidogenic regions in proteins. As many of these results have been obtained in vitro, the challenge for the next years will be to demonstrate their validity in in vivo systems. PMID:19164912

  9. Role of IL-17 in plaque psoriasis: therapeutic potential of ixekizumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Tessa L; Yiu, Zenas ZN

    2017-01-01

    Developments in the understanding of the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis have identified interleukin (IL)-17 as the key proinflammatory cytokine in the pathogenesis of plaque psoriasis, with the consequent development of drugs that target this cytokine or associated receptors. Ixekizumab is a subcutaneously administered humanized monoclonal antibody, which acts to neutralize IL-17A. This article reviews the role of IL-17 in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, the biological and pharmacokinetics of ixekizumab and the safety profile and the clinical efficacy of ixekizumab in Phase III clinical trials. Phase III clinical trials of ixekizumab have so far demonstrated excellent early clinical efficacy, with a comparable safety profile to the existing biologic therapies for psoriasis. To further assess its position in the treatment algorithm for psoriasis, a further head to head RCT with secukinumab could be established, alongside comparative effectiveness studies from observational research. In addition, trials are needed to assess its role in those with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors/ustekinumab resistant disease. However, it is clear that the IL-17 antagonists have changed the benchmark for clinical efficacy, and it is likely that ixekizumab along with the other IL-17 antagonists are set to achieve a new standard of care in the treatment of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. PMID:28352182

  10. TRAF6 and p62 inhibit amyloid β-induced neuronal death through p75 neurotrophin receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Geetha, Thangiah; Zheng, Chen; McGregor, Wade C.; White, B. Douglas; Diaz-Meco, Maria T; Moscat, Jorge; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates are the primary component of senile plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD) patient’s brain. Aβ is known to bind p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) and mediates Aβ-induced neuronal death. Recently, we showed that NGF leads to p75NTR polyubiquitination, which promotes neuronal cell survival. Here, we demonstrate that Aβ stimulation impaired the p75NTR polyubiquitination. TRAF6 and p62 are required for polyubiquitination of p75NTR on NGF stimulation. Interestingly, we found ...

  11. Intravascular probe for detection of vulnerable plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patt, Bradley E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Tull, Carolyn R.; Janecek, Martin; Hoffman, Edward J.; Strauss, H. William; Tsugita, Ross; Ghazarossian, Vartan

    2001-12-01

    Coronary angiography is unable to define the status of the atheroma, and only measures the luminal dimensions of the blood vessel, without providing information about plaque content. Up to 70% of heart attacks are caused by minimally obstructive vulnerable plaques, which are too small to be detected adequately by angiography. We have developed an intravascular imaging detector to identify vulnerable coronary artery plaques. The detector works by sensing beta or conversion electron radiotracer emissions from plaque-binding radiotracers. The device overcomes the technical constraints of size, sensitivity and conformance to the intravascular environment. The detector at the distal end of the catheter uses six 7mm long by 0.5mm diameter scintillation fibers coupled to 1.5m long plastic fibers. The fibers are offset from each other longitudinally by 6mm and arranged spirally around a guide wire in the catheter. At the proximal end of the catheter the optical fibers are coupled to an interface box with a snap on connector. The interface box contains a position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT) to decode the individual fibers. The whole detector assembly fits into an 8-French (2.7 mm in diameter) catheter. The PSPMT image is further decoded with software to give a linear image, the total instantaneous count rate and an audio output whose tone corresponds to the count rate. The device was tested with F-18 and Tl-204 sources. Spectrometric response, spatial resolution, sensitivity and beta to background ratio were measured. System resolution is 6 mm and the sensitivity is >500 cps / micrometers Ci when the source is 1 mm from the detector. The beta to background ratio was 11.2 for F-18 measured on a single fiber. The current device will lead to a system allowing imaging of labeled vulnerable plaque in coronary arteries. This type of signature is expected to enable targeted and cost effective therapies to prevent acute coronary artery diseases such as: unstable angina

  12. A potential function for neuronal exosomes: sequestering intracerebral amyloid-β peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuyama, Kohei; Sun, Hui; Usuki, Seigo; Sakai, Shota; Hanamatsu, Hisatoshi; Mioka, Tetsuo; Kimura, Nobuyuki; Okada, Megumi; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Furukawa, Jun-ichi; Fujitani, Naoki; Shinohara, Yasuro; Igarashi, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-02

    Elevated amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in brain contributes to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. We demonstrated the presence of exosome-associated Aβ in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of cynomolgus monkeys and APP transgenic mice. The levels of exosome-associated Aβ notably decreased in the CSF of aging animals. We also determined that neuronal exosomes, but not glial exosomes, had abundant glycosphingolipids and could capture Aβ. Infusion of neuronal exosomes into brains of APP transgenic mice decreased Aβ and amyloid depositions, similarly to what reported previously on neuroblastoma-derived exosomes. These findings highlight the role of neuronal exosomes in Aβ clearance, and suggest that their downregulation might relate to Aβ accumulation and, ultimately, the development of AD pathology.

  13. Shear-Induced Amyloid Formation in the Brain: I. Potential Vascular and Parenchymal Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbore, Conrad N

    2016-09-06

    Shear distortion of amyloid-beta (Aβ) solutions accelerates amyloid cascade reactions that may yield different toxic oligomers than those formed in quiescent solutions. Recent experiments indicate that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) containing Aβ flow through narrow brain perivascular pathways and brain parenchyma. This paper suggests that such flow causes shear distortion of Aβ molecules involving conformation changes that may be one of the initiating events in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ shearing can occur in or around brain arteries and arterioles and is suggested as the origin of cerebral amyloid angiopathy deposits in cerebrovascular walls. Comparatively low flow rates of ISF within the narrow extracellular spaces (ECS) of the brain parenchyma are suggested as a possible initiating factor in both the formation of neurotoxic Aβ42 oligomers and amyloid fibrils. Aβ42 in slow-flowing ISF can gain significant shear energy at or near the walls of tortuous brain ECS flow paths, promoting the formation of a shear-distorted, excited state hydrophobic Aβ42* conformation. This Aβ42* molecule could possibly be involved in one of two paths, one involving rapid adsorption to a brain membrane surface, ultimately forming neurotoxic oligomers on membranes, and the other ultimately forming plaque within the ECS flow pathways. Rising Aβ concentrations combined with shear at or near critical brain membranes are proposed as contributing factors to Alzheimer's disease neurotoxicity. These hypotheses may be applicable in other neurodegenerative diseases, including tauopathies and alpha-synucleinopathies, in which shear-distorted proteins also may form in the brain ECS.

  14. Amyloid oligomer structure characterization from simulations: a general method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong H; Li, Mai Suan; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2014-03-07

    Amyloid oligomers and plaques are composed of multiple chemically identical proteins. Therefore, one of the first fundamental problems in the characterization of structures from simulations is the treatment of the degeneracy, i.e., the permutation of the molecules. Second, the intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom of the various molecules must be taken into account. Currently, the well-known dihedral principal component analysis method only considers the intramolecular degrees of freedom, and other methods employing collective variables can only describe intermolecular degrees of freedom at the global level. With this in mind, we propose a general method that identifies all the structures accurately. The basis idea is that the intramolecular and intermolecular states are described in terms of combinations of single-molecule and double-molecule states, respectively, and the overall structures of oligomers are the product basis of the intramolecular and intermolecular states. This way, the degeneracy is automatically avoided. The method is illustrated on the conformational ensemble of the tetramer of the Alzheimer's peptide Aβ9-40, resulting from two atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent, each of 200 ns, starting from two distinct structures.

  15. Amyloid oligomer structure characterization from simulations: A general method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Phuong H., E-mail: phuong.nguyen@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Li, Mai Suan [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Derreumaux, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.derreumaux@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Institut Universitaire de France, 103 Bvd Saint-Germain, 75005 Paris (France)

    2014-03-07

    Amyloid oligomers and plaques are composed of multiple chemically identical proteins. Therefore, one of the first fundamental problems in the characterization of structures from simulations is the treatment of the degeneracy, i.e., the permutation of the molecules. Second, the intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom of the various molecules must be taken into account. Currently, the well-known dihedral principal component analysis method only considers the intramolecular degrees of freedom, and other methods employing collective variables can only describe intermolecular degrees of freedom at the global level. With this in mind, we propose a general method that identifies all the structures accurately. The basis idea is that the intramolecular and intermolecular states are described in terms of combinations of single-molecule and double-molecule states, respectively, and the overall structures of oligomers are the product basis of the intramolecular and intermolecular states. This way, the degeneracy is automatically avoided. The method is illustrated on the conformational ensemble of the tetramer of the Alzheimer's peptide Aβ{sub 9−40}, resulting from two atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent, each of 200 ns, starting from two distinct structures.

  16. Overexpression of Prolyl-4-Hydroxylase-α1 Stabilizes but Increases Shear Stress-Induced Atherosclerotic Plaque in Apolipoprotein E-Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin-xin; Li, Meng-meng; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Liang; Wang, Lin; Di, Ming-xue

    2016-01-01

    The rupture and erosion of atherosclerotic plaque can induce coronary thrombosis. Prolyl-4-hydroxylase (P4H) plays a central role in the synthesis of all known types of collagens, which are the most abundant constituent of the extracellular matrix in atherosclerotic plaque. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is thought to be in part caused by shear stress. In this study, we aimed to investigate a relationship between P4Hα1 and shear stress-induced atherosclerotic plaque. Carotid arteries of ApoE−/− mice were exposed to low and oscillatory shear stress conditions by the placement of a shear stress cast for 2 weeks; we divided 60 male ApoE−/− mice into three groups for treatments with saline (mock) (n = 20), empty lentivirus (lenti-EGFP) (n = 20), and lentivirus-P4Hα1 (lenti-P4Hα1) (n = 20). Our results reveal that after 2 weeks of lenti-P4Hα1 treatment both low and oscillatory shear stress-induced plaques increased collagen and the thickness of fibrous cap and decreased macrophage accumulation but no change in lipid accumulation. We also observed that overexpression of P4Ha1 increased plaque size. Our study suggests that P4Hα1 overexpression might be a potential therapeutic target in stabilizing vulnerable plaques.

  17. Fibril specific, conformation dependent antibodies recognize a generic epitope common to amyloid fibrils and fibrillar oligomers that is absent in prefibrillar oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool Suhail

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid-related degenerative diseases are associated with the accumulation of misfolded proteins as amyloid fibrils in tissue. In Alzheimer disease (AD, amyloid accumulates in several distinct types of insoluble plaque deposits, intracellular Aβ and as soluble oligomers and the relationships between these deposits and their pathological significance remains unclear. Conformation dependent antibodies have been reported that specifically recognize distinct assembly states of amyloids, including prefibrillar oligomers and fibrils. Results We immunized rabbits with a morphologically homogeneous population of Aβ42 fibrils. The resulting immune serum (OC specifically recognizes fibrils, but not random coil monomer or prefibrillar oligomers, indicating fibrils display a distinct conformation dependent epitope that is absent in prefibrillar oligomers. The fibril epitope is also displayed by fibrils of other types of amyloids, indicating that the epitope is a generic feature of the polypeptide backbone. The fibril specific antibody also recognizes 100,000 × G soluble fibrillar oligomers ranging in size from dimer to greater than 250 kDa on western blots. The fibrillar oligomers recognized by OC are immunologically distinct from prefibrillar oligomers recognized by A11, even though their sizes overlap broadly, indicating that size is not a reliable indicator of oligomer conformation. The immune response to prefibrillar oligomers and fibrils is not sequence specific and antisera of the same specificity are produced in response to immunization with islet amyloid polypeptide prefibrillar oligomer mimics and fibrils. The fibril specific antibodies stain all types of amyloid deposits in human AD brain. Diffuse amyloid deposits stain intensely with anti-fibril antibody although they are thioflavin S negative, suggesting that they are indeed fibrillar in conformation. OC also stains islet amyloid deposits in transgenic mouse models of type

  18. DBA/2J genetic background exacerbates spontaneous lethal seizures but lessens amyloid deposition in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet M Jackson

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a leading cause of dementia in the elderly and is characterized by amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs and neuronal dysfunction. Early onset AD (EOAD is commonly caused by mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP or genes involved in the processing of APP including the presenilins (e.g. PSEN1 or PSEN2. In general, mouse models relevant to EOAD recapitulate amyloidosis, show only limited amounts of NFTs and neuronal cell dysfunction and low but significant levels of seizure susceptibility. To investigate the effect of genetic background on these phenotypes, we generated APPswe and PSEN1de9 transgenic mice on the seizure prone inbred strain background, DBA/2J. Previous studies show that the DBA/2J genetic background modifies plaque deposition in the presence of mutant APP but the impact of PSEN1de9 has not been tested. Our study shows that DBA/2J.APPswePSEN1de9 mice are significantly more prone to premature lethality, likely to due to lethal seizures, compared to B6.APPswePSEN1de9 mice-70% of DBA/2J.APPswePSEN1de9 mice die between 2-3 months of age. Of the DBA/2J.APPswePSEN1de9 mice that survived to 6 months of age, plaque deposition was greatly reduced compared to age-matched B6.APPswePSEN1de9 mice. The reduction in plaque deposition appears to be independent of microglia numbers, reactive astrocytosis and complement C5 activity.

  19. Thrombosis and morphology of plaque rupture using optical coherence tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jun; CHEN Yun-dai; TIAN Feng; LIU Hong-bin; CHEN Lian; SUN Zhi-jun; REN Yi-hong

    2013-01-01

    Background Thrombosis following plaque rupture is the main cause of acute coronary syndrome,but not all plaque ruptures lead to thrombosis.There are limited in vivo data on the relationship between the morphology of ruptured plaque and thrombosis.Methods We used optical coherence tomography (OCT) to investigate the morphology of plaque rupture and its relation to coronary artery thrombosis in patients with coronary heart disease.Forty-two patients with coronary artery plaque rupture detected by OCT were divided into two groups (with or without thrombus) and the morphological characteristics of ruptured plaque,including fibrous cap thickness and broken cap site,were recorded.Results The fibrous cap of ruptured plaque with thrombus was significantly thinner compared to caps without thrombus ((57.00±17.00) μm vs.(96.00±48.00) μm; P=0.0076).Conclusions Plaque rupture associated with thrombosis occurs primarily in plaque covered by a thin fibrous cap.Thick fibrous caps are associated with greater stability of ruptured plaque.

  20. Amyloid Imaging in Aging and Dementia: Testing the Amyloid Hypothesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Rabinovici

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging represents a major advance in neuroscience, enabling the detection and quantification of pathologic protein aggregations in the brain. In this review we survey current amyloid imaging techniques, focusing on positron emission tomography (PET with ^{11}carbon-labelled Pittsburgh Compound-B (11C-PIB, the most extensively studied and best validated tracer. PIB binds specifically to fibrillar beta-amyloid (Aβ deposits, and is a sensitive marker for Aβ pathology in cognitively normal older individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. PIB-PET provides us with a powerful tool to examine in vivo the relationship between amyloid deposition, clinical symptoms, and structural and functional brain changes in the continuum between normal aging and AD. Amyloid imaging studies support a model in which amyloid deposition is an early event on the path to dementia, beginning insidiously in cognitively normal individuals, and accompanied by subtle cognitive decline and functional and structural brain changes suggestive of incipient AD. As patients progress to dementia, clinical decline and neurodegeneration accelerate and proceed independently of amyloid accumulation. In the future, amyloid imaging is likely to supplement clinical evaluation in selecting patients for anti-amyloid therapies, while MRI and FDG-PET may be more appropriate markers of clinical progression.

  1. [About etiology and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitruk, S K

    2013-01-01

    On the ground own researches and researches of other authors etiology and pathogenesis of atherosclerosis are proved and refuted existing concept about leading role of disturbance of lipid exchange and atherogenicity of lipoproteins of low and very low density. Established basic etiological factors of damage intima of artery and reason of penetration of lipoproteins in intima after her damage. Is determined that development and progression of atherosclerosis do not depend also from quantitative content of lipoproteins of low density in blood and from normalization of them under influence of drugs. According to our researches atherosclerosis is the polyetiological chronic disease basis of pathogeny which is infringement of blood supply (chronic microcirculatory insufficiency) in arterial wall causing damage of it, and in first place, damage of intima with her most vulnerable microcirculation; inflammation intima hence influence of endogenous and exogenous factors; destruction of antiaggregatic and fibrinolytic properties of intima in places of her damage; formation atherosclerotic plaque with level-by-level imposing of lipoproteins in result of cyclic process of restoration or balance between coagulation and anticoagulation of blood systems.

  2. Traffic jam at the blood-brain barrier promotes greater accumulation of Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β proteins in the cerebral vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyare, Edward K; Leonard, Sarah R; Curran, Geoffry L; Yu, Caroline C; Lowe, Val J; Paravastu, Anant K; Poduslo, Joseph F; Kandimalla, Karunya K

    2013-05-06

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in the brain vasculature results in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), which occurs in about 80% of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. While Aβ42 predominates parenchymal amyloid plaques in AD brain, Aβ40 is prevalent in the cerebrovascular amyloid. Dutch mutation of Aβ40 (E22Q) promotes aggressive cerebrovascular accumulation and leads to severe CAA in the mutation carriers; knowledge of how DutchAβ40 drives this process more efficiently than Aβ40 could reveal various pathophysiological events that promote CAA. In this study we have demonstrated that DutchAβ40 shows preferential accumulation in the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) endothelial cells due to its inefficient blood-to-brain transcytosis. Consequently, DutchAβ40 establishes a permeation barrier in the BBB endothelium, prevents its own clearance from the brain, and promotes the formation of amyloid deposits in the cerebral microvessels. The BBB endothelial accumulation of native Aβ40 is not robust enough to exercise such a significant impact on its brain clearance. Hence, the cerebrovascular accumulation of Aβ40 is slow and may require other copathologies to precipitate into CAA. In conclusion, the magnitude of Aβ accumulation in the BBB endothelial cells is a critical factor that promotes CAA; hence, clearing vascular endothelium of Aβ proteins may halt or even reverse CAA.

  3. Pathogenesis of Takotsubo syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Masarone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo syndrome (TTS is an enigmatic disease with a multifactorial and still unresolved pathogenesis. Postulated mechanisms include catecholamine excess, coronary artery spasm, and microvascular dysfunction, however catecholamines seem to play a central role in the pathophysiology of TTS. In facts catecholamines have relevant effects on the vasculature and myocardium. Toxic direct effects of catecholamine on myocardium are mediated by multiple pathway including functional hypoxia, metabolic changes and changes in membrane permeability leading to various electrolytic imbalances. Recently report of familial cases has suggested a genetic component. Further research is required to help clarify the proposed hypotheses and to increase our understanding of the cardiovascular responses to acute stress and the pathophysiology underpinning TTS.

  4. Molecular Pathogenesis of NASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Caligiuri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is the main cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world and a major health problem, owing to its close association with obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. NASH progression results from numerous events originating within the liver, as well as from signals derived from the adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal tract. In a fraction of NASH patients, disease may progress, eventually leading to advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding the mechanisms leading to NASH and its evolution to cirrhosis is critical to identifying effective approaches for the treatment of this condition. In this review, we focus on some of the most recent data reported on the pathogenesis of NASH and its fibrogenic progression, highlighting potential targets for treatment or identification of biomarkers of disease progression.

  5. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Walker, David H

    2012-10-09

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host's immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents.

  6. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Walker

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae, is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host’s immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents.

  7. Molecular Pathogenesis of NASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiuri, Alessandra; Gentilini, Alessandra; Marra, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is the main cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world and a major health problem, owing to its close association with obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. NASH progression results from numerous events originating within the liver, as well as from signals derived from the adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal tract. In a fraction of NASH patients, disease may progress, eventually leading to advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding the mechanisms leading to NASH and its evolution to cirrhosis is critical to identifying effective approaches for the treatment of this condition. In this review, we focus on some of the most recent data reported on the pathogenesis of NASH and its fibrogenic progression, highlighting potential targets for treatment or identification of biomarkers of disease progression. PMID:27657051

  8. [Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branimir Anić; Miroslav Mayer

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune systemic disease that primarily affects joints. Etiology and the pathogenesis of RA are complex, involving many types of cells, among others macrophages, T and B cells, fibro- blasts, chondrocytes and dendritic cells. Despite well documented role of many genes and epigenetic modifications in the development and evolution of the disease, in most RA patients there is no clear predisposing factor present. Environmental factors involved in RA pathogenesis are cigarette smoke, industrial pollutants like silica crystals, disturbances of intestinal, lung, and oral microbiota and some specific bacterial and viral infectious agents and their components. In the initial disease stage there are qualitative and quantitative disturbances ofpeptide citrulination as well as other protein modifications, followed by antigen presenting cell (APC) (macrophages and dendritic cells) and fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS) activation. Some microbes foster this processes by APC and FLS direct and indirect activation. In the second stage APC's elicit specific humoral B cell re- sponse resulting in specific antibodies production and T cell autoreactivity. Inherited and acquired defects in T and B cell responses caused by repeated activation of innate immunity as well as loss of tolerance, elicit chronic autoimmune inflammation, primarily of synovial membranes, and development of cellular panus. Pathologic activation of the osteoclasts and release of the immune system effector molecules and the proteolytic enzymes damage the cartilage, bone and tendons composition and structure. Persistent inflammation through its complex mechanisms results in many systemic and extraarticular RA manifestations of almost all organ systems, resulting in severe complications and comorbidities such as rheumatoid lung, carditis, vasculitis, cahexia, anemia, accelerated atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebrovascular vascular disease, lymphoma, osteoporosis, depression etc

  9. Plaque complement activation and cognitive loss in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camp Dianne M

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complement activation is increased in Alzheimer's disease (AD, but its significance is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between complement activation and cognition during the development of AD. Methods iC3b, C9, Bielschowsky, and Gallyas staining was performed on aged normal (n = 17, mild cognitively impaired (n = 12, and AD (n = 17–18 inferior temporal gyrus specimens. Plaques were counted in 10× fields with high numbers of Bielschowsky-stained plaques. One-way ANOVA was used to determine between-group differences for plaque counts and measures of cognitive function, and linear regression was used to evaluate global cognition as a function of Bielschowsky-stained plaques. Terms for iC3b- and C9-stained plaques were then added sequentially as additional predictors in a "mediation analysis" model. Results Complement was detected on plaques in all groups, and on neurofibrillary tangles only in AD specimens. iC3b, C9, and Bielschowsky-stained plaque counts increased 2.5- to 3-fold in AD vs. other groups (all p ≤ 0.01. C9 staining was present on some diffuse plaques, as well as on neuritic plaques. Bielschowsky-stained and complement-stained plaque counts were highly correlated, and were negatively correlated with cognitive measures. When the Bielschowsky plaque count was used as a predictor, its correlations with cognitive measures were statistically significant, but when iC3b and C9 plaque counts were added as additional predictors, these correlations were no longer significant. This loss of significance was attributed to multicollinearity, i.e., high correlations between Bielschowsky-stained and complement-stained plaque counts. Conclusion Both early-stage (iC3b and late-stage (C9 complement activation occurs on neocortical plaques in subjects across the cognitive spectrum; contrary to previous reports, C9 is present on some diffuse plaques. Because of high correlations between

  10. Combination of Magnetic Resonance Angiography and Computational Fluid Dynamics May Predict the Risk of Stroke in Patients with Asymptomatic Carotid Plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qian; Liu, Hongbin; Li, Yanping; Wang, Xiaoxi; Jia, Jinju; Li, Yuying

    2017-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis plaques in the carotid arteries frequently have been found in patients with stroke. However, the pathogenesis of carotid plaque from asymptomatic to cerebrovascular events is a complex process which is still not completely understood. We aimed to investigate the prognosis of asymptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaques by use of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) combined with computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Material/Methods We prospectively studied a cohort of 228 participants (mean age 59.21±8.48) with asymptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaques; mean follow-up duration was 1147.56±224.84 days. Plaque morphology parameters were obtained by MRA analysis. Lumen area (LA) and total vessel area (TVA) were measured, and wall area (WA=TVA−LA) and normalized wall area index (NWI=WA/TVA) were calculated. CFD analysis was performed to evaluate hemodynamic characteristics, including wall pressure (WP) and wall shear stress (WSS). Independent risk factors for stroke were obtained by Cox regression analysis. The area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operator characteristic (ROC) and Z-statistic test were used to evaluate risk factors. Results Logistics regression analysis showed NWI (OR: 3.472, 95% CI: 2.943–4.096, P=0.11) and WSS (OR: 6.974, 95% CI: 1.070–45.453, P=0.42) were independent risk factors of stroke for patients with asymptomatic carotid plaques. The area under the ROC curve values for WSS, NWI, and WSS+NWI were 0.772, 0.798, and 0.903, respectively. Conclusions The combination of plaque morphology characteristics NWI and hemodynamic parameter WSS may predict the risk of stroke in patients with asymptomatic carotid plaques. PMID:28126983

  11. 18FDG PET and ultrasound echolucency in carotid artery plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graebe, Martin; Pedersen, Sune F; Højgaard, Liselotte;

    2010-01-01

    for ultrasound and PET imaging. Plaque standardized gray scale medians (GSM) were measured in longitudinal ultrasound images to quantitate echolucency, and GSM values were compared with FDG PET uptake quantified by maximum standardized uptake values (SUV). Symptomatic plaques were compared with contralateral...... carotid artery plaques considered asymptomatic, and in 17 symptomatic patients, endarterectomized plaque specimens were analyzed for CD68 expression. RESULTS: There was a negative correlation between GSM and FDG SUV (r = -0.56, p ... plaques ranged from high to low inflammatory activity, as depicted with PET. Quantitative FDG SUV differentiated asymptomatic from symptomatic plaques, whereas GSM values did not. There was a positive correlation between CD68 expression and FDG uptake (r = 0.50, p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Our results...

  12. Plaques Formed by Mutagenized Viral Populations Have Elevated Coinfection Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Elizabeth R.; Erickson, Andrea K.; Jesudhasan, Palmy R.; Robinson, Christopher M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The plaque assay is a common technique used to measure virus concentrations and is based upon the principle that each plaque represents a single infectious unit. As such, the number of plaques is expected to correlate linearly with the virus dilution plated, and each plaque should be formed by a single founder virus. Here, we examined whether more than one virus can contribute to plaque formation. By using genetic and phenotypic assays with genetically marked polioviruses, we found that multiple parental viruses are present in 5 to 7% of plaques, even at an extremely low multiplicity of infection. We demonstrated through visual and biophysical assays that, like many viral stocks, our viral stocks contain both single particles and aggregates. These data suggest that aggregated virions are capable of inducing coinfection and chimeric plaque formation. In fact, inducing virion aggregation via exposure to low pH increased coinfection in a flow cytometry-based assay. We hypothesized that plaques generated by viruses with high mutation loads may have higher coinfection frequencies due to processes restoring fitness, such as complementation and recombination. Indeed, we found that coinfection frequency correlated with mutation load, with 17% chimeric plaque formation for heavily mutagenized viruses. Importantly, the frequency of chimeric plaques may be underestimated by up to threefold, since coinfection with the same parental virus cannot be scored in our assay. This work indicates that more than one virus can contribute to plaque formation and that coinfection may assist plaque formation in situations where the amount of genome damage is high. PMID:28292984

  13. Stability Analysis of a Model of Atherosclerotic Plaque Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushruth Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, the formation of life-threatening plaques in blood vessels, is a form of cardiovascular disease. In this paper, we analyze a simplified model of plaque growth to derive physically meaningful results about the growth of plaques. In particular, the main results of this paper are two conditions, which express that the immune response increases as LDL cholesterol levels increase and that diffusion prevails over inflammation in a healthy artery.

  14. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane.

  15. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide: Structure, Function, and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehana Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hormone islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, or amylin plays a role in glucose homeostasis but aggregates to form islet amyloid in type-2 diabetes. Islet amyloid formation contributes to β-cell dysfunction and death in the disease and to the failure of islet transplants. Recent work suggests a role for IAPP aggregation in cardiovascular complications of type-2 diabetes and hints at a possible role in type-1 diabetes. The mechanisms of IAPP amyloid formation in vivo or in vitro are not understood and the mechanisms of IAPP induced β-cell death are not fully defined. Activation of the inflammasome, defects in autophagy, ER stress, generation of reactive oxygen species, membrane disruption, and receptor mediated mechanisms have all been proposed to play a role. Open questions in the field include the relative importance of the various mechanisms of β-cell death, the relevance of reductionist biophysical studies to the situation in vivo, the molecular mechanism of amyloid formation in vitro and in vivo, the factors which trigger amyloid formation in type-2 diabetes, the potential role of IAPP in type-1 diabetes, the development of clinically relevant inhibitors of islet amyloidosis toxicity, and the design of soluble, bioactive variants of IAPP for use as adjuncts to insulin therapy.

  16. Plaque biofilms: the effect of chemical environment on natural human plaque biofilm architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C; Strafford, S; Rees, G; Brookes, S J; Kirkham, J; Shore, R C; Watson, P S; Wood, S

    2006-11-01

    The architecture of microbial biofilms especially the outer regions have an important influence on the interaction between biofilm and local environment particularly on the flux of materials into and out of biofilm compartments and as a consequence, biofilm metabolic behaviour. In the case of dental plaque biofilms, architecture will determine access of nutrients including acidogenic substrates and therapeutic materials to the microbial biomass and to the underlying tooth surface. Manipulation of this architecture may offer a means of altering mass transfer into the whole biofilm and biomass and raises the possibility of improving access of therapeutics. Plaque biofilms formed in vivo on human enamel were subjected to a number of different chemical conditions while under observation by confocal laser scanning microscopy in reflection mode. In this way the outer 50-100 microm or so of the biofilms was examined. Density and distribution of biomass were recorded as degree of reflectance. The amount and density of biofilm biomass increased from the plaque saliva interface towards the interior. Plaque biofilms were robust and little affected by mechanical manipulation, high ionic strength or low pH (2.5). Detergent (SLS), however, often appeared to either remove biomass and/or dramatically reduce its density.

  17. Stress analysis of fracture of atherosclerotic plaques: crack propagation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani-Sharif, Alireza; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Kazemi-Saleh, Davood; Sotoudeh-Anvari, Maryam

    2016-12-09

    Traditionally, the degree of luminal obstruction has been used to assess the vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques. However, recent studies have revealed that other factors such as plaque morphology, material properties of lesion components and blood pressure may contribute to the fracture of atherosclerotic plaques. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of fracture of atherosclerotic plaques based on the mechanical stress distribution and fatigue analysis by means of numerical simulation. Realistic models of type V plaques were reconstructed based on histological images. Finite element method was used to determine mechanical stress distribution within the plaque. Assuming that crack propagation initiated at the sites of stress concentration, crack propagation due to pulsatile blood pressure was modeled. Results showed that crack propagation considerably changed the stress field within the plaque and in some cases led to initiation of secondary cracks. The lipid pool stiffness affected the location of crack formation and the rate and direction of crack propagation. Moreover, increasing the mean or pulse pressure decreased the number of cycles to rupture. It is suggested that crack propagation analysis can lead to a better recognition of factors involved in plaque rupture and more accurate determination of vulnerable plaques.

  18. Association of Streptococcus with Plaque Type of Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Akram Hossain

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Guttate psoriasis has a well-known association with streptococcal throat infections, but the effects of these infections in patients with chronic plaque type of psoriasis remains to be evaluated. In Bangladesh several studies were done on psoriasis but no data about association between streptococcal throat infection and plaque type psoriasis are available so far. Considering the co-morbidities of psoriasis patients, it might be justifiable to find out the events that provoke the initiation or exacerbation of psoriatic disease process. Objective: To observe the association of streptococcus with plaque type of psoriasis. Materials and Methods: This observational study was conducted in the department of Dermatology and Venereology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka. Forty seven patients clinically and histopathologically diagnosed as having plaque psoriasis were selected as cases and patients with skin diseases other than psoriasis were selected as controls. Results: In this study majority of subjects (55% were diagnosed as chronic plaque psoriasis. Among the subjects with guttate flare of chronic plaque psoriasis 64.2% gave a positive history of sore throat. ASO titer was raised (>200 IU/mL in 28 (59.5% patients of chronic plaque psoriasis and 7 (17.9% patients of non-psoriatic respondents. The difference between two groups was significant (p0.05. Conclusion: This study shows that streptococcal throat infections are associated with plaque psoriasis and early treatment of throat infections may be beneficial for plaque type of psoriasis patients.

  19. Cu(II) mediates kinetically distinct, non-amyloidogenic aggregation of amyloid-β peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jeppe T.; Østergaard, Jesper; Rozlosnik, Noemi

    2011-01-01

    Cu(II) ions are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease by influencing the aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide. Elucidating the underlying Cu(II)-induced Aβ aggregation is paramount for understanding the role of Cu(II) in the pathology of Alzheimer disease. The aim of this study...... on (i) the aggregation kinetics/mechanism of Aβ, because three different kinetic scenarios were observed depending on the Cu(II):Aβ ratio, (ii) the metal:peptide stoichiometry in the aggregates, which increased to 1.4 at supra-equimolar Cu(II):Aβ ratio; and (iii) the morphology of the aggregates, which...

  20. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloid-β peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  1. The molecular concept of atheromatous plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thent, Zar Chi; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Mahakkanukrauh, Pasuk; Kosai, Nik; Rajan, Reynu; Das, Srijit

    2016-05-02

    Recently, there are scientific attempts to devise new drugs in the biotechnology industry in order to treat various diseases including atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is considered to be a leading cause of death throughout the world. Atherosclerosis involves oxidative damage to the cells with production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Development of atheromatous plaques in the arterial wall is a common feature. Specific inflammatory markers pertaining to the arterial wall in atherosclerosis may be useful for both diagnosis and treatment. These include macrophage inhibiting factor (MIF), leucocytes and P-selectin. Modern therapeutic paradigms involving endothelial progenitor cells therapy, angiotensin II type-2 (AT2R) and ATP-activated purinergic receptor therapy are notable to mention. Future drugs may be designed aiming three signalling mechanisms of AT2R which are (a) activation of protein phosphatases resulting in protein dephosphorylation (b) activation of bradykinin/nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate pathway by vasodilation and (c) stimulation of phospholipase A(2) and release of arachidonic acid. Drugs may also be designed to act on ATP-activated purinergic receptor channel type P2X7 molecules which acts on cardiovascular system. In the present review, we discuss the molecular concept of the inflammatory process occurring inside the arterial wall. Better understanding of the vascular inflammatory processes and the cells involved in the formation of plaques, may prove to be beneficial for future diagnosis, clinical treatment and planning innovative novel anti-atherosclerotic drugs.

  2. Assessment of plaque assay methods for alphaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Diana; Long, Kanya C; Aguilar, Patricia; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Halsey, Eric S

    2013-01-01

    Viruses from the Alphavirus genus are responsible for numerous arboviral diseases impacting human health throughout the world. Confirmation of acute alphavirus infection is based on viral isolation, identification of viral RNA, or a fourfold or greater increase in antibody titers between acute and convalescent samples. In convalescence, the specificity of antibodies to an alphavirus may be confirmed by plaque reduction neutralization test. To identify the best method for alphavirus and neutralizing antibody recognition, the standard solid method using a cell monolayer overlay with 0.4% agarose and the semisolid method using a cell suspension overlay with 0.6% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) overlay were evaluated. Mayaro virus, Una virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), and Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) were selected to be tested by both methods. The results indicate that the solid method showed consistently greater sensitivity than the semisolid method. Also, a "semisolid-variant method" using a 0.6% CMC overlay on a cell monolayer was assayed for virus titration. This method provided the same sensitivity as the solid method for VEEV and also had greater sensitivity for WEEV titration. Modifications in plaque assay conditions affect significantly results and therefore evaluation of the performance of each new assay is needed.

  3. Acceleration and inhibition of amyloid-β fibril formation by peptide-conjugated fluorescent-maghemite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaat, Hadas; Shafir, Gilead; Margel, Shlomo

    2011-08-01

    The formation of amyloid aggregates by association of peptides into ordered structures is hallmark of certain neurodegenerative disorders. Exploring the effect of specific nanoparticles on the formation of amyloid fibrils may contribute toward a mechanistic understanding of the aggregation processes, leading to design nanoparticles that modulate the formation of toxic amyloid plaques. Uniform maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) magnetic nanoparticles, containing fluorescein covalently encapsulated within (F-γ-Fe2O3), were prepared. These F-γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles of 14.0 ± 4.0 nm were then coated with human serum albumin (HSA) via a precipitation process. Covalent conjugation of the spacer arm succinimidyl polyethylene glycol succinimidyl ester (NHS-PEG-NHS) to the F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA nanoparticles was then accomplished by interacting the primary amine groups of the HSA coating with excess NHS-PEG-NHS molecules. Covalent conjugation of the peptides amyloid-β 40 (Aβ40) or Leu-Pro-Phe-Phe-Asp (LPFFD) onto the surface of the former fluorescent nanoparticles was then performed, by interacting the terminal activated NHS groups of the PEG derivatized F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA nanoparticles with primary amino groups of the peptides. Kinetics of the Aβ40 fibrillation process in the absence and presence of varying concentrations of the Aβ40 or LPFFD conjugated nanoparticles were also elucidated. The non-peptide conjugated fluorescent nanoparticles do not affect the Aβ40 fibrillation process significantly. However, the Aβ40-conjugated nanoparticles (F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA-PEG-Aβ40) accelerate the fibrillation process while the LPFFD-conjugated nanoparticles (F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA-PEG-LPFFD) inhibit it. By applying MRI and fluorescence imaging techniques simultaneously these bioactive fluorescent magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can be used as an efficient tool to study and control the Aβ40 amyloid fibril formation process.

  4. Fatal transmissible amyloid encephalopathy: a new type of prion disease associated with lack of prion protein membrane anchoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Chesebro

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative diseases of humans and animals characterized by gray matter spongiosis and accumulation of aggregated, misfolded, protease-resistant prion protein (PrPres. PrPres can be deposited in brain in an amyloid-form and/or non-amyloid form, and is derived from host-encoded protease-sensitive PrP (PrPsen, a protein normally anchored to the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI. Previously, using heterozygous transgenic mice expressing only anchorless PrP, we found that PrP anchoring to the cell membrane was required for typical clinical scrapie. However, in the present experiments, using homozygous transgenic mice expressing two-fold more anchorless PrP, scrapie infection induced a new fatal disease with unique clinical signs and altered neuropathology, compared to non-transgenic mice expressing only anchored PrP. Brain tissue of transgenic mice had high amounts of infectivity, and histopathology showed dense amyloid PrPres plaque deposits without gray matter spongiosis. In contrast, infected non-transgenic mice had diffuse non-amyloid PrPres deposits with significant gray matter spongiosis. Brain graft studies suggested that anchored PrPsen expression was required for gray matter spongiosis during prion infection. Furthermore, electron and light microscopic studies in infected transgenic mice demonstrated several pathogenic processes not seen in typical prion disease, including cerebral amyloid angiopathy and ultrastructural alterations in perivascular neuropil. These findings were similar to certain human familial prion diseases as well as to non-prion human neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Immunohistochemical analysis of small plaque parapsoriasis: involvement of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeybek, N Dilara; Asan, Esin; Erbil, A Hakan; Dagdeviren, Attila

    2008-01-01

    Small plaque parapsoriasis (SPP) is one of the cutaneous T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. The aim of the present study was to show the antigenic profile of a subset of dendritic cells and lymphocytes in SPP in comparison with normal cells to provide data on the role of these two cell types in the pathogenesis of SPP. Skin biopsy specimens of lesions were obtained from 8 patients with SPP. Biopsies of the healthy skin from 9 control individuals were also analyzed. Immunohistochemistry was performed on the frozen tissue sections to reveal binding of anti-HLA Class II, anti-CD1a, anti-CD4, anti-CD8, anti-CD44, anti-CD45, and anti-CD68 monoclonal antibodies. There was a statistically significant increase in the number of CD1a(+), Langerhans cells (LCs), HLA-DR-immunoreactive and, CD1a-positive dermal dendritic cells and CD68(+) macrophages in the SPP group (p=0.008, 0.008, 0.002 and <0.0009, respectively). The number of lymphocytes positive for CD4, CD8 and CD45 was significantly higher than normal in the SPP group (p=0.015, <0.0009 and <0.0009, respectively). Our study demonstrates that both peptide- and lipid-based antigens are involved in the persistent antigenic exposure in SPP. Dendritic cells play a pivotal role in SPP by presenting antigens by both LC and dermal dendritic cells via MHC Class II and CD1a molecules. The CD68(+) macrophages are thought to be involved in the immune response in this pathology as an antigen-presenting cell.

  6. Recent progress in melasma pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ai-Young

    2015-11-01

    Melasma is a common skin pigmentation condition. Given therapeutic difficulty as one of the biggest concerns, understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of melasma becomes essential. UV irradiation, female sex hormones, and inflammatory processes are addressed as triggering factors with genetic predisposition. The mechanism of UV-induced melanogenesis has been extensively investigated as a model system to study melasma pathogenesis. Hitherto, treatment modalities for melasma are similar to other hyperpigmentation disorders. However, individual triggering factors induce a separate pigmentation disease, whose pathogenic mechanisms and clinical phenotypes are different from the ones encountered in melasma. Fortunately, there have been ongoing updates on melasma pathogenesis with regard to major triggering factors. Presence of certain factors working independently of UV exposure and role of dermal factors and microRNAs are being identified as novel discoveries about melasma pathogenesis. In this review, the melasma pathogenesis is reviewed in association with updated and new findings.

  7. The 5-lipoxygenase pathway: oxidative and inflammatory contributions to the Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praticò eDomenico

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common, and, arguably, one of the most-well studied, neurodegenerative conditions. Several decades of investigation have revealed that amyloid-β and tau proteins are critical pathological players in this condition. Genetic analyses have revealed specific mutations in the cellular machinery that produces amyloid-β, but these mutations are found in only a small fraction of patients with the early-onset variant of AD. In addition to development of amyloid-β and tau pathology, oxidative damage and inflammation are consistently found in the brains of these patients. The 5-lipoxygenase protein enzyme (5LO and its downstream leukotriene metabolites have long been known to be important modulators of oxidation and inflammation in other disease states. Recent in vivo evidence using murine knock-out models has implicated the 5LO pathway, which also requires the 5LO activating protein (FLAP, in the molecular pathology of AD, including the metabolism of amyloid-β and tau. In this manuscript, we will provide an overview of 5LO and FLAP, discussing their involvement in biochemical pathways relevant to AD pathogenesis. We will also discuss how the 5LO pathway contributes to the molecular and behavioral insults seen in AD and provide an assessment of how targeting these proteins could lead to therapeutics relevant not only for Alzheimer’s disease, but also other related neurodegenerative conditions.

  8. The Role of the 14–20 Domain of the Islet Amyloid Polypeptide in Amyloid Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Gilead

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism of amyloid formation by the islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP has been intensively studied since its identification in the late 1980s. The IAPP(20–29 region is considered to be the central amyloidogenic module of the polypeptide. This assumption is mainly based on the amyloidogenic properties of the region and on the large sequence diversity within this region between the human and mouse IAPP, as the mouse IAPP does not form amyloids. A few years ago, another region within IAPP was identified that seems to be at least as important as IAPP(20–29 in facilitation of molecular recognition that leads to amyloid formation. Here, we reinforce our and others' previous findings by analyzing supporting evidence from the recent literature. Moreover, we provide new proofs to our hypothesis by comparing between the amyloidogenic properties of the two regions derived from the IAPP of cats, which is also known to form amyloid fibrils.

  9. Dynamin 1 regulates amyloid generation through modulation of BACE-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several lines of investigation support the notion that endocytosis is crucial for Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis. Substantial evidence have already been reported regarding the mechanisms underlying amyloid precursor protein (APP traffic, but the regulation of beta-site APP-Cleaving Enzyme 1 (BACE-1 distribution among endosomes, TGN and plasma membrane remains unclear. Dynamin, an important adaptor protein that controls sorting of many molecules, has recently been associated with AD but its functions remain controversial. Here we studied possible roles for dynamin 1 (dyn1 in Aβ biogenesis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that genetic perturbation of dyn1 reduces both secreted and intracellular Aβ levels in cell culture. There is a dramatic reduction in BACE-1 cleavage products of APP (sAPPβ and βCTF. Moreover, dyn1 knockdown (KD leads to BACE-1 redistribution from the Golgi-TGN/endosome to the cell surface. There is an increase in the amount of surface holoAPP upon dyn1 KD, with resultant elevation of α-secretase cleavage products sAPPα and αCTF. But no changes are seen in the amount of nicastrin (NCT or PS1 N-terminal fragment (NTF at cell surface with dyn1 KD. Furthermore, treatment with a selective dynamin inhibitor Dynasore leads to similar reduction in βCTF and Aβ levels, comparable to changes with BACE inhibitor treatment. But combined inhibition of BACE-1 and dyn1 does not lead to further reduction in Aβ, suggesting that the Aβ-lowering effects of dynamin inhibition are mainly mediated through regulation of BACE-1 internalization. Aβ levels in dyn1(-/- primary neurons, as well as in 3-month old dyn1 haploinsufficient animals with AD transgenic background are consistently reduced when compared to their wildtype counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, these data suggest a previously unknown mechanism by which dyn1 affects amyloid generation through regulation of BACE-1 subcellular localization and therefore its

  10. Plaque removal efficacy of Colgate 360 toothbrush: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nageshwar Iyer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this clinical study was to confirm the plaque removal efficacy of the Colgate 360 Whole Mouth Clean Toothbrush. Study Design: This was a single-center, monadic, case-controlled study with the 7 days duration. Materials and Methods: A total of eighty participants (56 male and 24 female aged between 18 and 45 years with a minimum of 20 permanent teeth (excluding the third molars without any prosthetic crowns and an initial plaque score of minimum 1.5 as determined by Modified Quigley-Hein Plaque Index (1970 participated in the study. There were two dropouts during the study duration, one male and one female. The participants were instructed to brush for 1 min, after which plaque index was recorded again. They were then instructed to brush their teeth twice a day for 1 min with the assigned toothbrush (Colgate 360 Whole Mouth Clean Toothbrush and a commercially available fluoride toothpaste for the next 7 days. On the 7 th day, all the participants were recalled for follow-up and plaque examination. The plaque index scores (pre- and post-brushing were recorded, tabulated, and analyzed statistically. Results: The mean plaque indices reduced after brushing both on day 1 and day 7. There was also a reduction in mean plaque indices from day 1 to day 7. All these reductions were statistically significant (P < 0.001. The reduction in plaque scores was independent of the gender of the participants however female participants showed lower scores as compared to male participants (P < 0.001. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated a significant reduction in plaque scores with the use of Colgate 360 Whole Mouth Clean Soft Toothbrush throughout the study period. Continued use resulted in a further significant reduction in plaque scores irrespective of the gender of participants.

  11. Plaque removal efficacy of Colgate 360 toothbrush: A clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Nageshwar; Chandna, Shalu; Dhindsa, Abhishek; Damle, Dhanashree; Loomba, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this clinical study was to confirm the plaque removal efficacy of the Colgate 360 Whole Mouth Clean Toothbrush. Study Design: This was a single-center, monadic, case–controlled study with the 7 days duration. Materials and Methods: A total of eighty participants (56 male and 24 female) aged between 18 and 45 years with a minimum of 20 permanent teeth (excluding the third molars) without any prosthetic crowns and an initial plaque score of minimum 1.5 as determined by Modified Quigley-Hein Plaque Index (1970) participated in the study. There were two dropouts during the study duration, one male and one female. The participants were instructed to brush for 1 min, after which plaque index was recorded again. They were then instructed to brush their teeth twice a day for 1 min with the assigned toothbrush (Colgate 360 Whole Mouth Clean Toothbrush) and a commercially available fluoride toothpaste for the next 7 days. On the 7th day, all the participants were recalled for follow-up and plaque examination. The plaque index scores (pre- and post-brushing) were recorded, tabulated, and analyzed statistically. Results: The mean plaque indices reduced after brushing both on day 1 and day 7. There was also a reduction in mean plaque indices from day 1 to day 7. All these reductions were statistically significant (P < 0.001). The reduction in plaque scores was independent of the gender of the participants however female participants showed lower scores as compared to male participants (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The present study demonstrated a significant reduction in plaque scores with the use of Colgate 360 Whole Mouth Clean Soft Toothbrush throughout the study period. Continued use resulted in a further significant reduction in plaque scores irrespective of the gender of participants. PMID:27630494

  12. Pathogenesis of achalasia cardia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Uday C Ghoshal; Sunil B Daschakraborty; Renu Singh

    2012-01-01

    Achalasia cardia is one of the common causes of motor dysphagia.Though the disease was first described more than 300 years ago,exact pathogenesis of this condition still remains enigmatic.Pathophysiologically,achalasia cardia is caused by loss of inhibitory ganglion in the myenteric plexus of the esophagus.In the initial stage,degeneration of inhibitory nerves in the esophagus results in unopposed action of excitatory neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine,resulting in high amplitude non-peristaltic contractions (vigorous achalasia); progressive loss of cholinergic neurons over time results in dilation and low amplitude simultaneous contractions in the esophageal body (classic achaiasia).Since the initial description,several studies have attempted to explore initiating agents that may cause the disease,such as viral infection,other environmental factors,autoimmunity,and genetic factors.Though Chagas disease,which mimics achalasia,is caused by an infective agent,available evidence suggests that infection may not be an independent cause of primary achalasia.A genetic basis for achalasia is supported by reports showing occurrence of disease in monozygotic twins,siblings and other first-degree relatives and occurrence in association with other genetic diseases such as Down's syndrome and Parkinson's disease.Polymorphisms in genes encoding for nitric oxide synthase,receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide,interleukin 23 and the ALADIN gene have been reported.However,studies on larger numbers of patients and controls from different ethnic groups are needed before definite conclusions can be obtained.Currently,the disease is believed to be multi-factorial,with autoimmune mechanisms triggered by infection in a genetically predisposed individual leading to degeneration of inhibitory ganglia in the wall of the esophagus.

  13. Plaque removal by young children using old and new toothbrushes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palenstein Helderman, W.H. van; Kyaing, M.M.; Aung, M.T.; Soe, W.; Rosema, N.A.; Weijden, G.A. van der; Hof, M.A. van 't

    2006-01-01

    There is inconclusive evidence about the relationship between toothbrush wear and plaque removal. This randomized cross-over clinical trial aimed to validate or invalidate non-inferiority in the plaque-removal efficacy of old vs. new toothbrushes in the hands of 7- and 8-year-old children. The lower

  14. Lack of autologous tissue transmission of eosinophilic plaques in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriello, K A; Kunkle, G; Miller, L M; Crowley, A

    1990-07-01

    Autologous tissue transmission of spontaneously developing feline eosinophilic plaques was attempted in 5 cats. Macerated tissue from the plaque was vigorously rubbed onto 2 scarified skin sites in each cat. The inoculated areas were observed daily for 30 days. During that time, no clinical or histologic evidence of transmission was found.

  15. Directional spatial frequency analysis of lipid distribution in atherosclerotic plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Clyde; Reese, Eric; Shi, Lingyan; Alfano, Robert; Russell, Stewart

    2016-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the growth of fibrous plaques due to the retention of cholesterol and lipids within the artery wall, which can lead to vessel occlusion and cardiac events. One way to evaluate arterial disease is to quantify the amount of lipid present in these plaques, since a higher disease burden is characterized by a higher concentration of lipid. Although therapeutic stimulation of reverse cholesterol transport to reduce cholesterol deposits in plaque has not produced significant results, this may be due to current image analysis methods which use averaging techniques to calculate the total amount of lipid in the plaque without regard to spatial distribution, thereby discarding information that may have significance in marking response to therapy. Here we use Directional Fourier Spatial Frequency (DFSF) analysis to generate a characteristic spatial frequency spectrum for atherosclerotic plaques from C57 Black 6 mice both treated and untreated with a cholesterol scavenging nanoparticle. We then use the Cauchy product of these spectra to classify the images with a support vector machine (SVM). Our results indicate that treated plaque can be distinguished from untreated plaque using this method, where no difference is seen using the spatial averaging method. This work has the potential to increase the effectiveness of current in-vivo methods of plaque detection that also use averaging methods, such as laser speckle imaging and Raman spectroscopy.

  16. A comparative study on plaque vulnerability using constitutive equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, A; Navidbakhsh, M; Faghihi, S

    2014-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most serious and common form of cardiovascular disease in which plaque builds up inside the arteries. Peak plaque stress is considered as the main reason for plaque rupture, which results in heart attack and stroke. In the current research, the finite element method is used to anticipate plaque vulnerability, using human samples. A total of 23 healthy and atherosclerotic human coronary arteries (14 healthy and 9 atherosclerotic) were removed within 5 h postmortem. The samples were mounted on a uniaxial tensile test machine and the obtained mechanical properties were used in finite element models. The peak plaque stresses for the Ogden hyperelastic model were compared to the Mooney-Rivlin and Neo-Hookean outcomes. The results indicated that hypocellular plaque in all three models has the highest stress values compared to the cellular and calcified ones and, as a result, is quite prone to rupture. The calcified plaque type, in contrast, has the lowest stress values and remains stable. The results can be used in plaque vulnerability prediction and have clinical implications for interventions and surgeries such as balloon-angioplasty, cardiopulmonary bypass and stenting.

  17. [Effect of Root Iron Plaque on Norfloxacin Uptake by Rice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Bao, Yan-yu

    2015-06-01

    In anaerobic condition, release of oxygen by roots to rhyzosphere caused the formation of red plaque of iron oxides or hydroxides on the root surface of rice. The effect of iron plaque on norfloxacin uptake was investigated with solution culture in greenhouse, and the results are showed in the following. The content of iron plaque increased with the increase of Fe2+ concentration in medium. After the addition of norfloxacin in nutrient solution, the content of iron plaques on the root surface decreased to different degree, and the reduction of iron plaques was increasing with the increase of norfloxacin mass concentration. Significant relationships were found between the iron plaques and norfloxacin on the root surface, and the correlation coefficients were 0.959 (norfloxacin mass concentration was 10 mg x L(-1)) and 0.987 (norfloxacin mass concentration was 50 mg x L(-1)), respectively, however, the norfloxacin contents in roots and shoots had no significant correlation with the iron plaques. After addition of different mass concentrations of norfloxacin, the quality distribution percentages of norfloxacin on the root surface and in roots and shoots were 87.7%-97.6%, 0.8%-4.8%, 1.5%-7.5%, respectively, the norfloxacin content on the root surface was far greater than those in roots and shoots. It was therefore concluded that iron plaque on roots was a norfloxacin reservoir for rice plant but had no significant effect on the transfer of norfloxacin to roots and shoots of the rice plant.

  18. Red fluorescent dental plaque: An indicator of oral disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volgenant, C.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Oral diseases are worldwide the most common diseases, with dental caries and periodontal inflammatory diseases as most frequently occurring diseases. Both are strongly associated with dental plaque, which is the mass of bacteria (biofilm) that grows on surfaces in the mouth. Some dental plaque fluor

  19. Carotid plaque, intima-media thickness, and incident aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsson, Andreas; Östling, Gerd; Persson, Margaretha

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Aortic stenosis (AS) shares risk factors with atherosclerotic vascular disease. Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaque may reflect the cumulative damage from exposure to different atherosclerotic risk factors. We examined the relationship of carotid IMT and plaque with incident...

  20. microRNA-132/212 deficiency enhances Aβ production and senile plaque deposition in Alzheimer's disease triple transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Rapp, Julia; Rainone, Sara; Goupil, Claudia; Dorval, Véronique; Smith, Pascal Y; Saint-Pierre, Martine; Vallée, Maxime; Planel, Emmanuel; Droit, Arnaud; Calon, Frédéric; Cicchetti, Francesca; Hébert, Sébastien S

    2016-08-03

    The abnormal regulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolism (e.g., production, cleavage, clearance) plays a central role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Among endogenous factors believed to participate in AD progression are the small regulatory non-coding microRNAs (miRs). In particular, the miR-132/212 cluster is severely reduced in the AD brain. In previous studies we have shown that miR-132/212 deficiency in mice leads to impaired memory and enhanced Tau pathology as seen in AD patients. Here we demonstrate that the genetic deletion of miR-132/212 promotes Aβ production and amyloid (senile) plaque formation in triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice. Using RNA-Seq and bioinformatics, we identified genes of the miR-132/212 network with documented roles in the regulation of Aβ metabolism, including Tau, Mapk, and Sirt1. Consistent with these findings, we show that the modulation of miR-132, or its target Sirt1, can directly regulate Aβ production in cells. Finally, both miR-132 and Sirt1 levels correlated with Aβ load in humans. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that the miR-132/212 network, including Sirt1 and likely other target genes, contributes to abnormal Aβ metabolism and senile plaque deposition in AD. This study strengthens the importance of miR-dependent networks in neurodegenerative disorders, and opens the door to multifactorial drug targets of AD by targeting Aβ and Tau.

  1. Chirality and chiroptical properties of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Chirality of amyloid fibrils-linear beta-sheet-rich aggregates of misfolded protein chains-often manifests in morphological traits such as helical twist visible in atomic force microscopy and in chiroptical properties accessible to vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). According to recent studies the relationship between molecular chirality of polypeptide building blocks and superstructural chirality of amyloid fibrils may be more intricate and less deterministic than previously assumed. Several puzzling experimental findings have put into question earlier intuitive ideas on: 1) the bottom-up chirality transfer upon amyloidogenic self-assembly, and 2) the structural origins of chiroptical properties of protein aggregates. For example, removal of a single amino acid residue from an amyloidogenic all-L peptide was shown to reverse handedness of fibrils. On the other hand, certain types of amyloid aggregates revealed surprisingly strong VCD spectra with the sign and shape dependent on the conditions of fibrillation. Hence, microscopic and chiroptical studies have highlighted chirality as one more aspect of polymorphism of amyloid fibrils. This brief review is intended to outline the current state of research on amyloid-like fibrils from the perspective of their structural and superstructural chirality and chiroptical properties.

  2. Appropriate Use Criteria for Amyloid PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith A.; Minoshima, Satoshi; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Donohoe, Kevin J.; Foster, Norman L.; Herscovitch, Peter; Karlawish, Jason H.; Rowe, Christopher C.; Carrillo, Maria C.; Hartley, Dean M.; Hedrick, Saima; Mitchell, Kristi; Pappas, Virginia; Thies, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) of brain amyloid-beta is a technology that is becoming more available, but its clinical utility in medical practice requires careful definition. In order to provide guidance to dementia care practitioners, patients and caregivers, the Alzheimer Association and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging convened the Amyloid Imaging Taskforce (AIT). The AIT considered a broad range of specific clinical scenarios in which amyloid PET could potentially be appropriately used. Peer-reviewed, published literature was searched to ascertain available evidence relevant to these scenarios, and the AIT developed a consensus of expert opinion. While empirical evidence of impact on clinical outcomes is not yet available, a set of specific Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) were agreed upon that define the types of patients and clinical circumstances in which amyloid PET could be used. Both appropriate and inappropriate uses were considered and formulated, and are reported and discussed here. Because both dementia care and amyloid PET technology are in active development, these AUC will require periodic reassessment. Future research directions are also outlined, including diagnostic utility and patient-centered outcomes. PMID:23360977

  3. Spectroscopy to improve identification of vulnerable plaques in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggink, Janneke L M; Meerwaldt, Robbert; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Lefrandt, Joop D; Slart, Riemer H J A; Tio, René A; Smit, Andries J; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2010-01-01

    Many apparent healthy persons die from cardiovascular disease, despite major advances in prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors are able to predict cardiovascular events in the long run, but fail to assess current disease activity or nearby cardiovascular events. There is a clear relation between the occurrence of cardiovascular events and the presence of so-called vulnerable plaques. These vulnerable plaques are characterized by active inflammation, a thin cap and a large lipid pool. Spectroscopy is an optical imaging technique which depicts the interaction between light and tissues, and thereby shows the biochemical composition of tissues. In recent years, impressive advances have been made in spectroscopy technology and intravascular spectroscopy is able to assess the composition of plaques of interest and thereby to identify and actually quantify plaque vulnerability. This review summarizes the current evidence for spectroscopy as a measure of plaque vulnerability and discusses the potential role of intravascular spectroscopic imaging techniques.

  4. Imaging Modalities to Identity Inflammation in an Atherosclerotic Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunny Goel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, multifocal arterial wall disease caused by local and systemic inflammation responsible for major cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. With the recent understanding that vulnerable plaque erosion and rupture, with subsequent thrombosis, rather than luminal stenosis, is the underlying cause of acute ischemic events, there has been a shift of focus to understand the mechanisms that make an atherosclerotic plaque unstable or vulnerable to rupture. The presence of inflammation in the atherosclerotic plaque has been considered as one of the initial events which convert a stable plaque into an unstable and vulnerable plaque. This paper systemically reviews the noninvasive and invasive imaging modalities that are currently available to detect this inflammatory process, at least in the intermediate stages, and discusses the ongoing studies that will help us to better understand and identify it at the molecular level.

  5. Effect of pathogenic mutations on the structure and dynamics of Alzheimer's A beta 42-amyloid oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassler, Kristin; Horn, Anselm H C; Sticht, Heinrich

    2010-05-01

    Converging lines of evidence suggest that soluble A beta-amyloid oligomers play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and present direct effectors of synaptic and cognitive dysfunction. Three pathological E22-A beta-amyloid point mutants (E22G, E22K, E22Q) and the deletion mutant E22 Delta exhibit an enhanced tendency to form prefibrillar aggregates. The present study assessed the effect of these four mutations using molecular dynamics simulations and subsequent structural and energetic analyses. Our data shows that E22 plays a unique role in wild type A beta, since it has a destabilising effect on the oligomer structure due to electrostatic repulsion between adjacent E22 side chains. Mutations in which E22 is replaced by an uncharged residue result in higher oligomer stability. This effect is also observed to a lesser extent for the E22K mutation and is consistent with its lower pathogenicity compared to other mutants. Interestingly, deletion of E22 does not destroy the amyloid fold but is compensated by local changes in the backbone geometry that allow the preservation of a structurally important salt bridge. The finding that all mutant oligomers investigated exhibit higher internal stability than the wild type offers an explanation for the experimentally observed enhanced oligomer formation and stability.

  6. Insight into the stability of cross-beta amyloid fibril from molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; He, Yong-Jie; Wu, Maoying; Yan, Guanwen; Li, Yixue; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2010-06-01

    Amyloid fibrils are considered to play causal roles in the pathogenesis of amyloid-related degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes mellitus, the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, and prion disease. The mechanism of fibril formation is still hotly debated and remains an important open question. In this study, we utilized molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to analyze the stability of hexamer for eight class peptides. The MD results suggest that VEALYL and MVGGVV-1 are the most stable ones, then SNQNNY, followed by LYQLEN, MVGGVV-2, VQIVYK, SSTSAA, and GGVVIA. The statistics result indicates that hydrophobic residues play a key role in stabilizing the zipper interface. Single point and two linkage mutants of MVGGVV-1 confirmed that both Met1 and Val2 are key hydrophobic residues. This is consistent with the statistics analysis. The stability results of oligomer for MVGGVV-1 suggest that the intermediate state should be trimer (3-0) and tetramer (2-2). These methods can be used in stabilization study of other amyloid fibril.

  7. AL amyloid imaging and therapy with a monoclonal antibody to a cryptic epitope on amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Wall

    Full Text Available The monoclonal antibody 2A4 binds an epitope derived from a cleavage site of serum amyloid protein A (sAA containing a -Glu-Asp- amino acid pairing. In addition to its reactivity with sAA amyloid deposits, the antibody was also found to bind amyloid fibrils composed of immunoglobulin light chains. The antibody binds to synthetic fibrils and human light chain (AL amyloid extracts with high affinity even in the presence of soluble light chain proteins. Immunohistochemistry with biotinylated 2A4 demonstrated positive reaction with ALκ and ALλ human amyloid deposits in various organs. Surface plasmon resonance analyses using synthetic AL fibrils as a substrate revealed that 2A4 bound with a K(D of ∼10 nM. Binding was inhibited in the presence of the -Glu-Asp- containing immunogen peptide. Radiolabeled 2A4 specifically localized with human AL amyloid extracts implanted in mice (amyloidomas as evidenced by single photon emission (SPECT imaging. Furthermore, co-localization of the radiolabeled mAb with amyloid was shown in biodistribution and micro-autoradiography studies. Treatment with 2A4 expedited regression of ALκ amyloidomas in mice, likely mediated by the action of macrophages and neutrophils, relative to animals that received a control antibody. These data indicate that the 2A4 mAb might be of interest for potential imaging and immunotherapy in patients with AL amyloidosis.

  8. The novel amyloid-beta peptide aptamer inhibits intracellular amyloid-beta peptide toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Wang; Yi Yang; Mingyue Jia; Chi Ma; Mingyu Wang; Lihe Che; Yu Yang; Jiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β peptide binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) decoy peptide (DP) can competitively antagonize binding of amyloid β peptide to ABAD and inhibit the cytotoxic effects of amyloid β peptide. Based on peptide aptamers, the present study inserted ABAD-DP into the disulfide bond of human thioredoxin (TRX) using molecular cloning technique to construct a fusion gene that can express the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer. Moreover, adeno-associated virus was used to allow its stable expression. Immunofluorescent staining revealed the co-expression of the transduced fusion gene TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 and amyloid β peptide in NIH-3T3 cells, indicating that the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer can bind amyloid β peptide within cells. In addition, cell morphology and MTT results suggested that TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 attenuated amyloid β peptide-induced SH-SY5Y cell injury and improved cell viability. These findings confirmed the possibility of constructing TRX-based peptide aptamer using ABAD-DP. Moreover, TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 inhibited the cytotoxic effect of amyloid β peptide.

  9. Plaque Formation by and Plaque Cloning of Chlamydia trachomatis Biovar Trachoma

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Akira; Izutsu, Hiroshi; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Ohuchi, Masanobu

    1998-01-01

    A new technique for the induction of plaque formation by Chlamydia trachomatis biovar trachoma applicable to the titration of infectivity and cloning of biovar trachoma was established. Three novel strains were cloned and confirmed to be free of glycogen inclusions. The lack of glycogen accumulation correlated with the absence of a 7.5-kb plasmid, which is highly conserved in other strains of C. trachomatis. Although the growth efficiency of these plasmid-free strains was slightly lower than ...

  10. The plaque inhibitory effect of a CPC mouthrinse in a 3-day plaque accumulation model - a cross-over study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, P.A.; Rosema, N.A.M.; Hoenderdos, N.L.; Slot, D.E.; van der Weijden, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective:  To test the plaque inhibitory effect of an experimental 0.07% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) mouthrinse in a 3-day plaque accumulation model in a cross-over design. Material and Methods:  A total of 30 subjects (non-dental students), ≥18 years of age, were randomly assigned to use one of

  11. Circulating Leukocyte and Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaque Telomere Length Interrelation, Association With Plaque Characteristics, and Restenosis After Endarterectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huzen, Jardi; Peeters, Wouter; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Moll, Frans L.; Wong, Liza S. M.; Codd, Veryan; de Kleijn, Dominique P. V.; de Smet, Bart J. G. L.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; van der Harst, Pim

    2011-01-01

    Objective-Shorter leukocyte telomeres are associated with atherosclerosis and predict future heart disease. The goal of the present study was to determine whether leukocyte telomere length is related to atherosclerotic plaque telomere length and whether it is associated with plaque characteristics o

  12. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1 levels unaltered in symptomatic atherosclerotic carotid plaque patients from North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dheeraj eKhurana

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify the role of vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF and monocyte chemoattractant protein(MCP-1 as a serum biomarker of symptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaque in North Indian population. Individuals with symptomatic carotid atherosclerotic plaque have high risk of ischemic stroke. Previous studies from western countries have shown an association between VEGF and MCP-1 levels and the incidence of ischemic stroke. In this study, venous blood from 110 human subjects was collected, 57 blood samples of which were obtained from patients with carotid plaques, 38 neurological controls without carotid plaques and another 15 healthy controls who had no history of serious illness. Serum VEGF and MCP-1 levels were measured using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA. We also correlated the data clinically and carried out risk factor analysis based on the detailed questionnaire obtained from each patient. For risk factor analysis, a total of 70 symptomatic carotid plaque cases and equal number of age and sex matched healthy controls were analyzed. We found that serum VEGF levels in carotid plaque patients did not show any significant change when compared to either of the controls. Similarly, there was no significant upregulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the serum of these patients. The risk factor analysis revealed that hypertension, diabetes, and physical inactivity were the main correlates of carotid atherosclerosis(p<0.05. Prevalence of patients was higher residing in urban areas as compared to rural region. We also found that patients coming from mountaineer region were relatively less vulnerable to cerebral atherosclerosis as compared to the ones residing at plain region. We conclude that the pathogenesis of carotid plaques may progress independent of these inflammatory molecules. In parallel, risk factor analysis indicates hypertension, diabetes and sedentary lifestyle as the most

  13. [Pseudomembranous colitis: pathogenesis, prevention, treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, N V; Fil', T S

    2013-01-01

    The article reviews a pathogenesis of Pseudomembranous colitis. Questions of prevention and treatment of Clostridium difficile--associated diarrhea are shown by the Evidence-based medicine. There is an accent on the rational prescription of antibiotics.

  14. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Ghada F; Gomaa, Amal Ha; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-03-16

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune hypothesis, followed by the reactive oxygen species model, zinc-α2-glycoprotein deficiency hypothesis, viral theory, intrinsic theory and biochemical, molecular and cellular alterations accounting for loss of functioning melanocytes in vitiligo. Many theories were elaborated to clarify vitiligo pathogenesis. It is a multifactorial disease involving the interplay of several factors. Future research is needed to clarify the interaction of these factors for better understanding of vitiligo pathogenesis and subsequent successful treatment.

  15. Estrogen stimulates release of secreted amyloid precursor protein from primary rat cortical neurons via protein kinase C pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun ZHANG; Ying HUANG; Yi-chun ZHU; Tai YAO

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mechanism of the action of estrogen, which stimulates the release of secreted amyloid precursor protein α (sAPPα) and decreases the gen eration of amyloid-β protein (Aβ), a dominant component in senile plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Methods: Experiments were carried out inprimary rat cortical neurons, and Western blot was used to detect sAPPα in aculture medium and the total amount of cellular amyloid precursor protein (APP) in neurons. Results: 17β-Estradiol (but not 17α-estradiol) and β-estradiol 6-(Ocarboxymethyl) oxime: BSA increased the secretion of sAPPα and this effect was blocked by protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor calphostin C, but not by the classical estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. Meanwhile, 17β-estradiol did not alter the synthesis of cellular APP. Conclusion: The effect of 17β-estradiol on sAPPα secretion is likely mediated through the membrane binding sites, and needs molecular configuration specificity of the ligand. Furthermore, the action of the PKC dependent pathway might be involved in estrogen-induced sAPPα secretion.

  16. Determining the Effect of Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles on the Aggregation of Amyloid-Beta in Transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Suhag; Matticks, John; Howell, Carina

    2014-03-01

    The cause of Alzheimer's disease has been linked partially to genetic factors but the predicted environmental components have yet to be determined. In Alzheimer's, accumulation of amyloid-beta protein in the brain forms plaques resulting in neurodegeneration and loss of mental functions. It has been postulated that aluminum influences the aggregation of amyloid-beta. To test this hypothesis, transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans, CL2120, was used as a model organism to observe neurodegeneration in nematodes exposed to aluminum oxide nanoparticles. Behavioral testing, fluorescent staining, and fluorescence microscopy were used to test the effects of aggregation of amyloid-beta in the nervous systems of effected nematodes exposed to aluminum oxide nanoparticles. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy was used to quantify the total concentration of aluminum oxide that the worms were exposed to during the experiment. Exposure of transgenic and wild type worms to a concentration of 4 mg mL-1 aluminum oxide showed a decrease in the sinusoidal motion, as well as an infirmity of transgenic worms when compared to control worms. These results support the hypothesis that aluminum may play a role in neurodegeneration in C. elegans, and may influence and increase the progression of Alzheimer's disease. This work was supported by National Science Foundation grants DUE-1058829, DMR-0923047 DUE-0806660 and Lock Haven FPDC grants.

  17. A setup for simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and light scattering signals: Watching amyloid fibrils grow from intact proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang; Maurer, Jürgen; Roth, Andreas; Vogel, Vitali; Winter, Ernst; Mäntele, Werner, E-mail: maentele@biophysik.uni-frankfurt.de [Institut für Biophysik, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Max-von Laue-Straße 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    A setup for the simultaneous measurement of mid-infrared spectra and static light scattering is described that can be used for the analysis of the formation of nanoscale and microscopic aggregates from smaller molecules to biopolymers. It can be easily integrated into sample chambers of infrared spectrometers or combined with laser beams from tunable infrared lasers. Here, its use for the analysis of the formation of amyloid fibrils from intact proteins is demonstrated. The formation of amyloid fibrils or plaques from proteins is a widespread and pathogenetic relevant process, and a number of diseases are caused and correlated with the deposition of amyloid fibrils in cells and tissues. The molecular mechanisms of these transformations, however, are still unclear. We report here the simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and static light scattering for the analysis of fibril formation from egg-white lysozyme. The transformation of the native form into non-native forms rich in β-sheet structure is measured by analysis of the amide I spectral region in the infrared spectra, which is sensitive for local structures. At the same time, light scattering signals at forward direction as well as the forward/backward ratio, which are sensitive for the number of scattering centers and their approximate sizes, respectively, are collected for the analysis of fibril growth. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters as well as mechanistic information are deduced from the combination of the two complementary techniques.

  18. The anti-inflammatory glycoprotein, CD200, restores neurogenesis and enhances amyloid phagocytosis in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnum, Megan M; Kiyota, Tomomi; Ingraham, Kaitlin L; Ikezu, Seiko; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2015-11-01

    Cluster of Differentiation-200 (CD200) is an anti-inflammatory glycoprotein expressed in neurons, T cells, and B cells, and its receptor is expressed on glia. Both Alzheimer's disease patients and mouse models display age-related or amyloid-β peptide (Aβ)-induced reductions in CD200. The goal of this study was to determine if neuronal CD200 expression restores hippocampal neurogenesis and reduces Aβ in the amyloid precursor protein mouse model. Amyloid precursor protein and wild-type mice were injected at 6 months of age with an adeno-associated virus expressing CD200 into the hippocampus and sacrificed at 12 months. CD200 expression restored neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation in the subgranular and granular cell layers of the dentate gyrus and reduced diffuse but not thioflavin-S(+) plaques in the hippocampus. In vitro studies demonstrated that CD200-stimulated microglia increased neural differentiation of neural stem cells and enhanced axon elongation and dendrite number. CD200 also enhanced Aβ uptake by microglia. These data indicate that CD200 is capable of enhancing microglia-mediated Aβ clearance and neural differentiation and has potential as a therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Crystal structure of the amyloid-β p3 fragment provides a model for oligomer formation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, Victor A; Varghese, Joseph N; Masters, Colin L; Nuttall, Stewart D

    2011-01-26

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with the presence of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide fibrillar plaques in the brain. However, current evidence suggests that soluble nonfibrillar Aβ oligomers may be the major drivers of Aβ-mediated synaptic dysfunction. Structural information on these Aβ species has been very limited because of their noncrystalline and unstable nature. Here, we describe a crystal structure of amylogenic residues 18-41 of the Aβ peptide (equivalent to the p3 α/γ-secretase fragment of amyloid precursor protein) presented within the CDR3 loop region of a shark Ig new antigen receptor (IgNAR) single variable domain antibody. The predominant oligomeric species is a tightly associated Aβ dimer, with paired dimers forming a tetramer in the crystal caged within four IgNAR domains, preventing uncontrolled amyloid formation. Our structure correlates with independently observed features of small nonfibrillar Aβ oligomers and reveals conserved elements consistent with residues and motifs predicted as critical in Aβ folding and oligomerization, thus potentially providing a model system for nonfibrillar oligomer formation in Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Highlights in pathogenesis of vitiligo

    OpenAIRE

    Ghada F. Mohammed; Gomaa, Amal HA; Al-Dhubaibi, Mohammed Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder. Many studies across decades and all over the world have attempted to illustrate the pathogenesis behind it; however, the pathogenesis of vitiligo remains elusive. This review article, we present the findings behind the most and updated theories behind this psychologically debilitating and disfiguring disease. The discussion begun with the role of genetic predisposition followed by neural theory first proposed in the 1950s. We highlight the autoimmune ...

  1. Molecular mechanisms of rosacea pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davydova A.M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents possible molecular mechanisms for rosacea pathogenesis from current domestic and foreign clinical observations and laboratory research: regulation and expression defects of antimicrobial peptides, vascular endothelial growth factor, the effect of serine proteases, oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species and ferritin on the occurrence and course of rosacea. New developments in molecular biology and genetics are advanced for researching the interaction of multiple factors involved in rosacea pathogenesis, as well as providing the bases for potentially new therapies.

  2. Reference Intervals for Plasma Amyloid β in Korean Adults Without Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Young; Kim, Kyu Nam; Cho, Hye Min; Lee, Duck Joo; Cho, Doo Yeoun

    2016-11-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are important components of plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies suggest that a low plasma ratio of Aβ42 to Aβ40 may precede the development of the sporadic form of AD. The aim of this study was to establish reference intervals for plasma Aβ in Korean adults. A total of 370 apparently healthy individuals (181 males and 189 females aged 40-69 yr) without cognitive impairment were enrolled. Plasma concentrations of Aβ40 and Aβ42 were measured by using a human amyloid β assay kit (Immuno-Biological Laboratories, Japan). Reference intervals were established according to the "CLSI guidelines for defining, establishing, and verifying reference intervals in the clinical laboratory". There was no need to partition the data with respect to gender or age group. The 95th percentile reference intervals for Aβ40 and Aβ42 were 127-331 pg/mL and 2.31-19.84 pg/mL, respectively. The reference interval for the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio was 0.011-0.092. Plasma Aβ concentrations obtained in this study could be used as reference intervals for clinical purposes.

  3. Surface chemistry of lipid raft and amyloid Aβ (1-40) Langmuir monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Garima; Pao, Christine; Micic, Miodrag; Johnson, Sheba; Leblanc, Roger M

    2011-10-15

    Lipid rafts being rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids are considered to provide ordered lipid environment in the neuronal membranes, where it is hypothesized that the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) to Aβ (1-40) and Aβ (1-42) takes place. It is highly likely that the interaction of lipid raft components like cholesterol, sphingomylein or GM1 leads to nucleation of Aβ and results in aggregation or accumulation of amyloid plaques. One has investigated surface pressure-area isotherms of the lipid raft and Aβ (1-40) Langmuir monolayer. The compression-decompression cycles and the stability of the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer are crucial parameters for the investigation of interaction of Aβ (1-40) with the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer. It was revealed that GM1 provides instability to the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer. Adsorption of Aβ (1-40) onto the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer containing neutral (POPC) or negatively charged phospholipid (DPPG) was examined. The adsorption isotherms revealed that the concentration of cholesterol was important for adsorption of Aβ (1-40) onto the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer containing POPC whereas for the lipid raft Langmuir monolayer containing DPPG:cholesterol or GM1 did not play any role. In situ UV-vis absorption spectroscopy supported the interpretation of results for the adsorption isotherms.

  4. Lost region in amyloid precursor protein (APP) through TALEN-mediated genome editing alters mitochondrial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yajie; Wu, Fengyi; Pan, Haining; Zheng, Wenzhong; Feng, Chi; Wang, Yunfu; Deng, Zixin; Wang, Lianrong; Luo, Jie; Chen, Shi

    2016-02-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in the brain. Aβ plaques are produced through sequential β/γ cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP), of which there are three main APP isoforms: APP695, APP751 and APP770. KPI-APPs (APP751 and APP770) are known to be elevated in AD, but the reason remains unclear. Transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) induce mutations with high efficiency at specific genomic loci, and it is thus possible to knock out specific regions using TALENs. In this study, we designed and expressed TALENs specific for the C-terminus of APP in HeLa cells, in which KPI-APPs are predominantly expressed. The KPI-APP mutants lack a 12-aa region that encompasses a 5-aa trans-membrane (TM) region and 7-aa juxta-membrane (JM) region. The mutated KPI-APPs exhibited decreased mitochondrial localization. In addition, mitochondrial morphology was altered, resulting in an increase in spherical mitochondria in the mutant cells through the disruption of the balance between fission and fusion. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including decreased ATP levels, disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential, increased ROS generation and impaired mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, was also found. These results suggest that specific regions of KPI-APPs are important for mitochondrial localization and function.

  5. Elevation in sphingomyelin synthase activity is associated with increases in amyloid-beta peptide generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Hsiang T Hsiao

    Full Text Available A pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD is the presence of amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ plaques in the brain. Aβ is derived from a sequential proteolysis of the transmenbrane amyloid precursor protein (APP, a process which is dependent on the distribution of lipids present in the plasma membrane. Sphingomyelin is a major membrane lipid, however its role in APP processing is unclear. Here, we assessed the expression of sphingomyelin synthase (SGMS1; the gene responsible for sphingomyelin synthesis in human brain and found that it was significantly elevated in the hippocampus of AD brains, but not in the cerebellum. Secondly, we assessed the impact of altering SGMS activity on Aβ generation. Inhibition of SGMS activity significantly reduced the level of Aβ in a dose- and time dependent manner. The decrease in Aβ level occurred without changes in APP expression or cell viability. These results when put together indicate that SGMS activity impacts on APP processing to produce Aβ and it could be a contributing factor in Aβ pathology associated with AD.

  6. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); de Pablo, Juan J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  7. Enzyme specificity of proteinase inhibitor region in amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer's disease: different properties compared with protease nexin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaguchi, N; Takahashi, Y; Oishi, K; Shiojiri, S; Tokushima, Y; Utsunomiya, T; Ito, H

    1990-03-29

    Senile plaques, often surrounded by abnormally grown neurites, are characteristic of Alzheimer's diseased brain. The core of the plaque is mainly composed of amyloid beta protein (beta-AP), two of whose three precursors (APP) have serine proteinase inhibitor regions (APPI). APPI derivatives containing 60, 72 or 88 amino-acid fragments (APPI-60, APPI-72 and APPI-88, respectively) of the longest APP were produced in COS-1 cell culture medium, with the APPI cDNA ligated to the signal sequence of tissue plasminogen activator. The secreted APPIs were purified by sequential acetone precipitation followed by affinity chromatography using immobilized trypsin. These three APPIs and O-glycosylation-site-mutated APPI showed similar inhibitory activity against trypsin, chymotrypsin and plasmin. The purified APPI-72 was found to inhibit trypsin (Ki = 1.1 x 10(-10) M) and chymotrypsin (Ki = 5.8 x 10(-9) M) most strongly, and to inhibit leukocyte elastase (Ki = 7.9 x 10(-7) M) and several blood coagulation proteinases (Ki = 0.46-12 x 10(-7) M), but not urokinase or thrombin. The observed inhibition pattern was quite different from that of protease nexin I, one of serine proteinase inhibitors possessing neurite outgrowth activity. This suggests that the physiological roles of APPI are different from those of protease nexin I, and that APPI could not cause aberrant growth of neurite into the plaque. The presence of APPI having strong inhibitory activity in the brain might lead to the formation of amyloid deposits by preventing complete degradation of APPs.

  8. Neuroprotective Effects of Pomegranate Peel Extract after Chronic Infusion with Amyloid-β Peptide in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morzelle, Maressa Caldeira; Salgado, Jocelem Mastrodi; Telles, Milena; Mourelle, Danilo; Bachiega, Patricia; Buck, Hudson Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a chronic and degenerative condition that had no treatment until recently. The current therapeutic strategies reduce progression of the disease but are expensive and commonly cause side effects that are uncomfortable for treated patients. Functional foods to prevent and/or treat many conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases, represent a promising field of study currently gaining attention. To this end, here we demonstrate the effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum) peel extract (PPE) regarding spatial memory, biomarkers of neuroplasticity, oxidative stress and inflammation in a mouse model of neurodegeneration. Male C57Bl/6 mice were chronically infused for 35 days with amyloid-β peptide 1–42 (Aβ) or vehicle (control) using mini-osmotic pumps. Another group, also infused with Aβ, was treated with PPE (p.o.– βA+PPE, 800 mg/kg/day). Spatial memory was evaluated in the Barnes maze. Animals treated with PPE and in the control group exhibited a reduction in failure to find the escape box, a finding that was not observed in the Aβ group. The consumption of PPE reduced amyloid plaque density, increased the expression of neurotrophin BDNF and reduced the activity of acetylcholinesterase enzyme. A reduction in lipid peroxidation and in the concentration of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α was also observed in the PPE group. No hepatic lesions were observed in animals treated with PPE. In conclusion, administration of pomegranate peel extract has neuroprotective effects involving multiple mechanisms to prevent establishment and progression of the neurodegenerative process induced by infusion with amyloid-β peptide in mice. PMID:27829013

  9. Evidence for novel beta-sheet structures in Iowa mutant beta-amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Meredith, Stephen C

    2009-07-01

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of beta-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-Abeta40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-Abeta40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 x 10(-3) min(-1) and 1.07 x 10(-4) min(-1) for D23N-Abeta40 and the wild-type peptide WT-Abeta40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-Abeta40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-beta pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 A and a broad reflection at 9.4 A, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-Abeta40 fibrils (10.4 A). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-Abeta40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel beta-sheet structure commonly found in WT-Abeta40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel beta-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through (13)C-(13)C and (15)N-(13)C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-Abeta40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients.

  10. Evidence for Novel [beta]-Sheet Structures in Iowa Mutant [beta]-Amyloid Fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L.; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Meredith, Stephen C.; (IIT); (NIH); (UC)

    2009-07-24

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of {beta}-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-A{beta}40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-A{beta}40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 x 10{sup -3} min{sup -1} and 1.07 x 10{sup -4} min{sup -1} for D23N-A{beta}40 and the wild-type peptide WT-A{beta}40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-A{beta}40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-{beta} pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 {angstrom} and a broad reflection at 9.4 {angstrom}, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-A{beta}40 fibrils (10.4 {angstrom}). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-A{beta}40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel {beta}-sheet structure commonly found in WT-A{beta}40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel {beta}-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through 13C-13C and 15N-13C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-A{beta}40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients.

  11. Complement Activation: An Emerging Player in the Pathogenesis of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Angela M.

    2012-01-01

    A wealth of evidence indicates a fundamental role for inflammation in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), contributing to the development and progression of atherosclerotic lesion formation, plaque rupture, and thrombosis. An increasing body of evidence supports a functional role for complement activation in the pathogenesis of CVD through pleiotropic effects on endothelial and haematopoietic cell function and haemostasis. Prospective and case control studies have reported strong relationships between several complement components and cardiovascular outcomes, and in vitro studies and animal models support a functional effect. Complement activation, in particular, generation of C5a and C5b-9, influences many processes involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, including promotion of endothelial cell activation, leukocyte infiltration into the extracellular matrix, stimulation of cytokine release from vascular smooth muscle cells, and promotion of plaque rupture. Complement activation also influences thrombosis, involving components of the mannose-binding lectin pathway, and C5b-9 in particular, through activation of platelets, promotion of fibrin formation, and impairment of fibrinolysis. The participation of the complement system in inflammation and thrombosis is consistent with the physiological role of the complement system as a rapid effector system conferring protection following vessel injury. However, in the context of CVD, these same processes contribute to development of atherosclerosis, plaque rupture, and thrombosis. PMID:24278688

  12. Complement Activation: An Emerging Player in the Pathogenesis of Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M. Carter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A wealth of evidence indicates a fundamental role for inflammation in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD, contributing to the development and progression of atherosclerotic lesion formation, plaque rupture, and thrombosis. An increasing body of evidence supports a functional role for complement activation in the pathogenesis of CVD through pleiotropic effects on endothelial and haematopoietic cell function and haemostasis. Prospective and case control studies have reported strong relationships between several complement components and cardiovascular outcomes, and in vitro studies and animal models support a functional effect. Complement activation, in particular, generation of C5a and C5b-9, influences many processes involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, including promotion of endothelial cell activation, leukocyte infiltration into the extracellular matrix, stimulation of cytokine release from vascular smooth muscle cells, and promotion of plaque rupture. Complement activation also influences thrombosis, involving components of the mannose-binding lectin pathway, and C5b-9 in particular, through activation of platelets, promotion of fibrin formation, and impairment of fibrinolysis. The participation of the complement system in inflammation and thrombosis is consistent with the physiological role of the complement system as a rapid effector system conferring protection following vessel injury. However, in the context of CVD, these same processes contribute to development of atherosclerosis, plaque rupture, and thrombosis.

  13. Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Beta-Amyloid Interactions with Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kelvin

    2012-10-01

    Early events of human beta-amyloid protein interactions with cholesterol-containing membranes are critical to understanding the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to exploring new therapeutic interventions of AD. Atomistic molecular dynamics (AMD) simulations have been extensively used to study the protein-lipid interaction at high atomic resolutions. However, traditional MD simulations are not efficient in sampling the phase space of complex lipid/protein systems with rugged free energy landscapes. Meanwhile, coarse-grained MD (CGD) simulations are efficient in the phase space sampling but suffered from low spatial resolutions and from the fact that the energy landscapes are not identical to those of the AMD. Here, a multiscale approach was employed to simulate the protein-lipid interactions of beta-amyloid upon its release from proteolysis residing in the neuronal membranes. We utilized a forward (AMD to CGD) and reverse (CGD-AMD) strategy to explore new transmembrane and surface protein configuration and evaluate the stabilization mechanisms by measuring the residue-specific protein-lipid or protein conformations. The detailed molecular interactions revealed in this multiscale MD approach will provide new insights into understanding the early molecular events leading to the pathogenesis of AD.

  14. Amyloids or prions? That is the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabate, Raimon; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Batlle, Cristina; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Despite major efforts devoted to understanding the phenomenon of prion transmissibility, it is still poorly understood how this property is encoded in the amino acid sequence. In recent years, experimental data on yeast prion domains allow to start at least partially decrypting the sequence requirements of prion formation. These experiments illustrate the need for intrinsically disordered sequence regions enriched with a particularly high proportion of glutamine and asparagine. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that these regions strike a balance between sufficient amyloid nucleation propensity on the one hand and disorder on the other, which ensures availability of the amyloid prone regions but entropically prevents unwanted nucleation and facilitates brittleness required for propagation.

  15. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular β-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils.

  16. Amyloid-β as a modulator of synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, Mordhwaj S; Brewer, Gregory J

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is associated with synapse loss, memory dysfunction, and pathological accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) in plaques. However, an exclusively pathological role for Aβ is being challenged by new evidence for an essential function of Aβ at the synapse. Aβ protein exists in different assembly states in the central nervous system and plays distinct roles ranging from synapse and memory formation to memory loss and neuronal cell death. Aβ is present in the brain of symptom-free people where it likely performs important physiological roles. New evidence indicates that synaptic activity directly evokes the release of Aβ at the synapse. At physiological levels, Aβ is a normal, soluble product of neuronal metabolism that regulates synaptic function beginning early in life. Monomeric Aβ40 and Aβ42 are the predominant forms required for synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival. With age, some assemblies of Aβ are associated with synaptic failure and Alzheimer's disease pathology, possibly targeting the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor through the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, mitochondrial Aβ alcohol dehydrogenase, and cyclophilin D. But emerging data suggests a distinction between age effects on the target response in contrast to the assembly state or the accumulation of the peptide. Both aging and Aβ independently decrease neuronal plasticity. Our laboratory has reported that Aβ, glutamate, and lactic acid are each increasingly toxic with neuron age. The basis of the age-related toxicity partly resides in age-related mitochondrial dysfunction and an oxidative shift in mitochondrial and cytoplasmic redox potential. In turn, signaling through phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases is affected along with an age-independent increase in phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein. This review examines the long-awaited functional impact of Aβ on synaptic plasticity.

  17. P-glycoprotein expression and amyloid accumulation in human aging and Alzheimer's disease: preliminary observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Catherine; Miller, Miles C; Monahan, Renée; Osgood, Doreen P; Stopa, Edward G; Silverberg, Gerald D

    2015-09-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), part of the blood-brain barrier, limits drug access to the brain and is the target for therapies designed to improve drug penetration. P-gp also extrudes brain amyloid-beta (Aβ). Accumulation of Aβ is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ accumulates in normal aging and in AD primarily due to decreased Aβ clearance. This is a preliminary report on the relative protein and messenger RNA expression of P-gp in human brains, ages 20-100 years, including AD subjects. In these preliminary studies, cortical endothelial P-gp expression decreased in AD compared with controls (p P-gp expression in human aging are similar to aging rats. Microvessel P-gp messenger RNA remained unchanged with aging and AD. Aβ plaques were found in 42.8% of normal subjects (54.5% of those older than 50 years). A qualitative analysis showed that P-gp expression is lower than the group mean in subjects older than 75 years but increased if younger. Decreased P-gp expression may be related to Aβ plaques in aging and AD. Downregulating P-gp to allow pharmaceuticals into the central nervous system may increase Aβ accumulation.

  18. Apolipoprotein E, especially apolipoprotein E4, increases the oligomerization of amyloid β peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Hori, Yukiko; Adams, Kenneth W; Takeda, Shuko; Banerji, Adrian Olaf; Mitani, Akinori; Joyner, Daniel; Thyssen, Diana H; Bacskai, Brian J; Frosch, Matthew P; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Finn, Mary Beth; Holtzman, David M; Hyman, Bradley T

    2012-10-24

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common progressive neurodegenerative disorder causing dementia. Massive deposition of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) as senile plaques in the brain is the pathological hallmark of AD, but oligomeric, soluble forms of Aβ have been implicated as the synaptotoxic component. The apolipoprotein E ε 4 (apoE ε4) allele is known to be a genetic risk factor for developing AD. However, it is still unknown how apoE impacts the process of Aβ oligomerization. Here, we found that the level of Aβ oligomers in APOE ε4/ε4 AD patient brains is 2.7 times higher than those in APOE ε3/ε3 AD patient brains, matched for total plaque burden, suggesting that apoE4 impacts the metabolism of Aβ oligomers. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of apoE on Aβ oligomer formation. Using both synthetic Aβ and a split-luciferase method for monitoring Aβ oligomers, we observed that apoE increased the level of Aβ oligomers in an isoform-dependent manner (E2 apoE4, increases Aβ oligomers in the brain. Higher levels of Aβ oligomers in the brains of APOE ε4/ε4 carriers compared with APOE ε3/ε3 carriers may increase the loss of dendritic spines and accelerate memory impairments, leading to earlier cognitive decline in AD.

  19. Inflammatory Eicosanoids Increase Amyloid Precursor Protein Expression via Activation of Multiple Neuronal Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst-Robinson, Katie J; Liu, Li; James, Michael; Yao, Yuemang; Xie, Sharon X; Brunden, Kurt R

    2015-12-17

    Senile plaques comprised of Aβ peptides are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, as are activated glia that release inflammatory molecules, including eicosanoids. Previous studies have demonstrated that amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Aβ levels can be increased through activation of thromboxane A2-prostanoid (TP) receptors on neurons. We demonstrate that TP receptor regulation of APP expression depends on Gαq-signaling and conventional protein kinase C isoforms. Importantly, we discovered that Gαq-linked prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene D4 receptors also regulate APP expression. Prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane A2, as well as total APP levels, were found to be elevated in the brains of aged 5XFAD transgenic mice harboring Aβ plaques and activated glia, suggesting that increased APP expression resulted from eicosanoid binding to Gαq-linked neuronal receptors. Notably, inhibition of eicosanoid synthesis significantly lowered brain APP protein levels in aged 5XFAD mice. These results provide new insights into potential AD therapeutic strategies.

  20. Amyloid-β aggregation with gold nanoparticles on brain lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyojin; Kim, Yuna; Park, Anna; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2014-05-14

    Understanding and manipulating amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation provide key knowledge and means for the diagnosis and cure of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the applications of Aβ-based aggregation systems. Here, we studied the formation of various Aβ aggregate structures with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and brain total lipid extract-based supported lipid bilayer (brain SLB). The roles of AuNPs and brain SLB in forming Aβ aggregates were studied in real time, and the structural details of Aβ aggregates were monitored and analyzed with the dark-field imaging of plasmonic AuNPs that allows for long-term in situ imaging of Aβ aggregates with great structural details without further labeling. It was shown that the fluid brain SLB platform provides the binding sites for Aβ and drives the fast and efficient formation of Aβ aggregate structures and, importantly, large Aβ plaque structures (>15 μm in diameter), a hallmark for AD, were formed without going through fibril structures when Aβ peptides were co-incubated with AuNPs on the brain SLB. The dark-field scattering and circular dichroism-correlation data suggest that AuNPs were heavily involved with Aβ aggregation on the brain SLB and less α-helix, less β-sheet and more random coil structures were found in large plaque-like Aβ aggregates.

  1. Impact of obesity on disease severity in patients with plaque type psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuriye Kayıran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory systemic disease involving the skin, scalp, nails, and the joints and is characterized by periods of remission and exacerbation. Although the pathogenesis of psoriasis is not fully understood, many genetic and environmental factors are believed to have a role in the development of the disease. Obesity, smoking, family history of psoriasis, repetitive physical traumas and major stress disorders are the factors thought to affect the severity and progress of the disease. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of obesity on the clinical severity of psoriasis in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis. Materials and Methods: Three hundred twenty-five outpatients with chronic plaque-type psoriasis were enrolled in the study. Body Mass Index (BMI and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI values were recorded for each patient. Results: When normal, overweight and obese psoriasis patients were compared, a statistically significant difference was not found in disease severity (p=0.707. There was also no significant correlation between BMI and PASI values (r=0.006, p=0916. Conclusion: Although no effect of obesity on the severity of the disease was shown in our study, further controlled population based studies are needed to investigate the possible role of obesity in triggering and beginning of the disease.

  2. Antibacterial effect of taurolidine (2%) on established dental plaque biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arweiler, Nicole Birgit; Auschill, Thorsten Mathias; Sculean, Anton

    2012-04-01

    Preliminary data have suggested that taurolidine may bear promising disinfectant properties for the therapy of bacterial infections. However, at present, the potential antibacterial effect of taurolidine on the supragingival plaque biofilm is unknown. To evaluate the antibacterial effect of taurolidine on the supragingival plaque biofilm using the vital fluorescence technique and to compare it with the effect of NaCl and chlorhexidine (CHX), 18 subjects had to refrain from all mechanical and chemical hygiene measures for 24 h. A voluminous supragingival plaque sample was taken from the buccal surfaces of the lower molars and wiped on an objective slide. The sample was then divided into three equal parts and mounted with one of the three test or control preparations (a) NaCl, (b) taurolidine 2% and (c) CHX 0.2%. After a reaction time of 2 min, the test solutions were sucked of. Subsequently, the plaque biofilm was stained with fluorescence dye and vitality of the plaque flora was evaluated under the fluorescence microscope (VF%). Plaque samples treated with NaCl showed a mean VF of 82.42 ± 6.04%. Taurolidine affected mean VF with 47.57 ± 16.60% significantly (p taurolidine). Taurolidine possesses a significant antibacterial effect on the supragingival plaque biofilm which was, however, not as pronounced as that of CHX.

  3. Atherosclerotic Plaque Destabilization in Mice: A Comparative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Hartwig

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis-associated diseases are the main cause of mortality and morbidity in western societies. The progression of atherosclerosis is a dynamic process evolving from early to advanced lesions that may become rupture-prone vulnerable plaques. Acute coronary syndromes are the clinical manifestation of life-threatening thrombotic events associated with high-risk vulnerable plaques. Hyperlipidemic mouse models have been extensively used in studying the mechanisms controlling initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. However, the understanding of mechanisms leading to atherosclerotic plaque destabilization has been hampered by the lack of proper animal models mimicking this process. Although various mouse models generate atherosclerotic plaques with histological features of human advanced lesions, a consensus model to study atherosclerotic plaque destabilization is still lacking. Hence, we studied the degree and features of plaque vulnerability in different mouse models of atherosclerotic plaque destabilization and find that the model based on the placement of a shear stress modifier in combination with hypercholesterolemia represent with high incidence the most human like lesions compared to the other models.

  4. Dental plaque biofilm in oral health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneviratne, Chaminda Jayampath; Zhang, Cheng Fei; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera

    2011-01-01

    Dental plaque is an archetypical biofilm composed of a complex microbial community. It is the aetiological agent for major dental diseases such as dental caries and periodontal disease. The clinical picture of these dental diseases is a net result of the cross-talk between the pathogenic dental plaque biofilm and the host tissue response. In the healthy state, both plaque biofilm and adjacent tissues maintain a delicate balance, establishing a harmonious relationship between the two. However, changes occur during the disease process that transform this 'healthy' dental plaque into a 'pathogenic' biofilm. Recent advances in molecular microbiology have improved the understanding of dental plaque biofilm and produced numerous clinical benefits. Therefore, it is imperative that clinicians keep abreast with these new developments in the field of dentistry. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind dental diseases will facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to establish a 'healthy dental plaque biofilm' by modulating both host and microbial factors. In this review, the present authors aim to summarise the current knowledge on dental plaque as a microbial biofilm and its properties in oral health and disease.

  5. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-01-07

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture.

  6. Potential role of ustekinumab in the treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santo Raffaele Mercuri

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Santo Raffaele Mercuri1, Luigi Naldi21Unità di Dermatologia, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico San Raffaele, Università Vita-Salute, Milano, Italy; 2Centro Studi GISED, Fondazione per la Ricerca Ospedale Maggiore, Unità di Dermatologia, Ospedali Riuniti, Bergamo, ItalyAbstract: Psoriasis is a relatively common, chronic and disabling skin disease, with an immune-related pathogenesis and a genetic background which may be triggered by several environmental factors including smoking and infections. There is no cure but several treatment options are available. The treatment of psoriasis is far from being satisfactory due to impractical modalities of topical treatment and suboptimal safety profile of the systemic treatments available. In the last few years, parallel to an improved understanding of the disease pathogenesis, there has been a boost in research on new agents for the treatment of psoriasis. Ustekinumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the p40 subunit of interleukin (IL-12 and IL-23, is one such new agent. Psoriasis and its management are briefly reviewed before focusing on the evidence for ustekinumab in the treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis through a systematic search of the main registries of ongoing trials up to December 2009. Ustekinumab proved to be very effective short term in the control of clinical manifestations in psoriasis compared with placebo and with etanercept. Long-term and comparative data are still limited. There is a need for continuing research on the long-term effectiveness and safety of the drug.Keywords: ustekinumab, chronic plaque psoriasis

  7. Amyloid precursor protein modulates β-catenin degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yuzhi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amyloid precursor protein (APP is genetically associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Elucidating the function of APP should help understand AD pathogenesis and provide insights into therapeutic designs against this devastating neurodegenerative disease. Results We demonstrate that APP expression in primary neurons induces β-catenin phosphorylation at Ser33, Ser37, and Thr41 (S33/37/T41 residues, which is a prerequisite for β-catenin ubiquitinylation and proteasomal degradation. APP-induced phosphorylation of β-catenin resulted in the reduction of total β-catenin levels, suggesting that APP expression promotes β-catenin degradation. In contrast, treatment of neurons with APP siRNAs increased total β-catenin levels and decreased β-catenin phosphorylation at residues S33/37/T41. Further, β-catenin was dramatically increased in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells from APP knockout animals. Acute expression of wild type APP or of familial AD APP mutants in primary neurons downregulated β-catenin in membrane and cytosolic fractions, and did not appear to affect nuclear β-catenin or β-catenin-dependent transcription. Conversely, in APP knockout CA1 pyramidal cells, accumulation of β-catenin was associated with the upregulation of cyclin D1, a downstream target of β-catenin signaling. Together, these data establish that APP downregulates β-catenin and suggest a role for APP in sustaining neuronal function by preventing cell cycle reactivation and maintaining synaptic integrity. Conclusion We have provided strong evidence that APP modulates β-catenin degradation in vitro and in vivo. Future studies may investigate whether APP processing is necessary for β-catenin downregulation, and determine if excessive APP expression contributes to AD pathogenesis through abnormal β-catenin downregulation.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide is generated during the very early stages of aggregation of the amyloid peptides implicated in Alzheimer disease and familial British dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabner, Brian J; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Turnbull, Stuart; German, Matthew J; Paleologou, Katerina E; Hayashi, Yoshihito; Cooper, Leanne J; Fullwood, Nigel J; Allsop, David

    2005-10-28

    Alzheimer disease and familial British dementia are neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by the presence of numerous amyloid plaques in the brain. These lesions contain fibrillar deposits of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) and the British dementia peptide (ABri), respectively. Both peptides are toxic to cells in culture, and there is increasing evidence that early "soluble oligomers" are the toxic entity rather than mature amyloid fibrils. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this toxicity are not clear, but in the case of Abeta, one prominent hypothesis is that the peptide can induce oxidative damage via the formation of hydrogen peroxide. We have developed a reliable method, employing electron spin resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with the spin-trapping technique, to detect any hydrogen peroxide generated during the incubation of Abeta and other amyloidogenic peptides. Here, we monitored levels of hydrogen peroxide accumulation during different stages of aggregation of Abeta-(1-40) and ABri and found that in both cases it was generated as a short "burst" early on in the aggregation process. Ultrastructural studies with both peptides revealed that structures resembling "soluble oligomers" or "protofibrils" were present during this early phase of hydrogen peroxide formation. Mature amyloid fibrils derived from Abeta-(1-40) did not generate hydrogen peroxide. We conclude that hydrogen peroxide formation during the early stages of protein aggregation may be a common mechanism of cell death in these (and possibly other) neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Model Hirano bodies protect against tau-independent and tau-dependent cell death initiated by the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Furgerson

    Full Text Available The main pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease are amyloid-beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, which are primarily composed of amyloid precursor protein (APP and tau, respectively. These proteins and their role in the mechanism of neurodegeneration have been extensively studied. Hirano bodies are a frequently occurring pathology in Alzheimer's disease as well as other neurodegenerative diseases. However, the physiological role of Hirano bodies in neurodegenerative diseases has yet to be determined. We have established cell culture models to study the role of Hirano bodies in amyloid precursor protein and tau-induced cell death mechanisms. Exogenous expression of APP and either of its c-terminal fragments c31 or Amyloid Precursor Protein Intracellular Domain c58 (AICDc58 enhance cell death. The presence of tau is not required for this enhanced cell death. However, the addition of a hyperphosphorylated tau mimic 352PHPtau significantly increases cell death in the presence of both APP and c31 or AICDc58 alone. The mechanism of cell death induced by APP and its c-terminal fragments and tau was investigated. Fe65, Tip60, p53, and caspases play a role in tau-independent and tau-dependent cell death. In addition, apoptosis was determined to contribute to cell death. The presence of model Hirano bodies protected against cell death, indicating Hirano bodies may play a protective role in neurodegeneration.

  10. Disruption of the sleep-wake cycle and diurnal fluctuation of β-amyloid in mice with Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jee Hoon; Huang, Yafei; Bero, Adam W; Kasten, Tom; Stewart, Floy R; Bateman, Randall J; Holtzman, David M

    2012-09-05

    Aggregation of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain begins to occur years before the clinical onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Before Aβ aggregation, concentrations of extracellular soluble Aβ in the interstitial fluid (ISF) space of the brain, which are regulated by neuronal activity and the sleep-wake cycle, correlate with the amount of Aβ deposition in the brain seen later. The amount and quality of sleep decline with normal aging and to a greater extent in AD patients. How sleep quality as well as the diurnal fluctuation in Aβ change with age and Aβ aggregation is not well understood. We report a normal sleep-wake cycle and diurnal fluctuation in ISF Aβ in the brain of the APPswe/PS1δE9 mouse model of AD before Aβ plaque formation. After plaque formation, the sleep-wake cycle markedly deteriorated and diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ dissipated. As in mice, diurnal fluctuation of cerebrospinal fluid Aβ in young adult humans with presenilin mutations was also markedly attenuated after Aβ plaque formation. Virtual elimination of Aβ deposits in the mouse brain by active immunization with Aβ(42) normalized the sleep-wake cycle and the diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ. These data suggest that Aβ aggregation disrupts the sleep-wake cycle and diurnal fluctuation of Aβ. Sleep-wake behavior and diurnal fluctuation of Aβ in the central nervous system may be functional and biochemical indicators, respectively, of Aβ-associated pathology.

  11. Effects of synaptic modulation on beta-amyloid, synaptophysin, and memory performance in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampellini, Davide; Capetillo-Zarate, Estibaliz; Dumont, Magali; Huang, Zhenyong; Yu, Fangmin; Lin, Michael T; Gouras, Gunnar K

    2010-10-27

    Accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) and loss of synapses are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). How synaptic activity relates to Aβ accumulation and loss of synapses is a current topic of major interest. Synaptic activation promotes Aβ secretion, and chronic reduction of synaptic activity reduced Aβ plaques in an AD transgenic mouse model. This suggested beneficial effects of reducing synaptic activity in AD. We now show that reduced synaptic activity causes detrimental effects on synapses and memory despite reducing plaques using two different models of chronic synaptic inhibition: deafferentation of the barrel cortex and administration of benzodiazepine. An interval of prolonged synaptic inhibition exacerbated loss of synaptophysin compared with synaptically more active brain in AD transgenic but not wild-type mice. Furthermore, an interval of benzodiazepine treatment, followed by a washout period, exacerbated memory impairment in AD transgenic mice. Exacerbation of synaptic and behavioral abnormalities occurred in the setting of reduced Aβ plaques but elevated intraneuronal Aβ immunoreactivity. These data support beneficial effects of synaptic activation on Aβ-related synaptic and behavioral impairment in AD.

  12. Increased γ-secretase activity in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus patients with β-amyloid pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Laiterä

    Full Text Available The potential similarity between the brain pathology of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH and Alzheimer disease (AD is intriguing and thus further studies focusing on the underlying molecular mechanisms may offer valuable information for differential diagnostics and the development of treatments for iNPH. Here, we investigated β- and γ-secretase activities in relation to amyloid-β (Aβ pathology in the brain tissue samples collected from iNPH and AD patients. β- and γ-secretase activities were measured from the frontal cortical biopsies of 26 patients with suspected iNPH as well as post-mortem tissue samples from the inferior temporal cortex of 74 AD patients and eight subjects without neurofibrillary pathology. In iNPH samples with detectable Aβ plaques, γ-secretase activity was significantly increased (∼ 1.6-fold when compared to iNPH samples without Aβ plaques (p = 0.009. In the AD samples, statistically significant differences in the γ-secretase activity were not observed with respect to disease severity (mild, moderate and severe AD according to neurofibrillary pathology. Conversely, β-secretase activity was unaltered in iNPH samples with or without Aβ plaques, while it was significantly increased in relation to disease severity in the AD patients. These results show for the first time increased γ-secretase but not β-secretase activity in the biopsy samples from the frontal cortex of iNPH patients with AD-like Aβ pathology. Conversely, the opposite was observed in these secretase activities in AD patients with respect to neurofibrillary pathology. Despite the resemblances in the Aβ pathology, iNPH and AD patients appear to have marked differences in the cellular mechanisms responsible for the production of Aβ.

  13. Lymphoma with large-plaque parapsoriasis treated with PUVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamagawa, Risa; Katoh, Norito; Shimazaki, Chihiro; Okano, Akira; Yamada, Shinya; Ichihashi, Kaori; Masuda, Koji; Kishimoto, Saburo

    2005-01-01

    We report on a 78-year-old Japanese woman with a 50-year history of large-plaque parapsoriasis that had evolved into cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Her large-plaque parapsoriasis had been treated with psoralen plus ultraviolet A for 10 years. Subsequently an isolated nodule appeared on her right lower leg. Prior or concurrent patches or plaques were absent. Histology revealed a diffuse nonepidermotropic infiltrate of large lymphocytes in the dermis, which had enlarged nuclei and prominent nucleoli. A diagnosis of CD30- cutaneous large T-cell lymphoma was made. Following systemic chemotherapy, there was clinical improvement. No evidence of recurrence or systemic lymphoma has subsequently been found.

  14. In vivo and in vitro evidence that {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-interleukin-2 is able to detect T lymphocytes in vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques of the carotid artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Koole, Michel; Luurtsema, Gert; Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Bonanno, Elena [Univ. of Rome Tor Vergata (Italy). Dept. of Anatomic Pathology; Galli, Filippo [Sapienza Univ, Rome (Italy). Nuclear Medicine Unit; Zeebregts, Clark J. [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Surgery (Div. Vascular Surgery); Boersma, Hendrikus H. [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Clinical and Hospital Pharmacy; Taurino, Maurizio [Sapienza Univ., Rome (Italy). Vascular Surgery Unit; Signore, Alberto [University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Sapienza Univ, Rome (Italy). Nuclear Medicine Unit

    2014-09-15

    Recent advances in basic science have established that inflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Inflammatory cells are thought to be responsible for the transformation of a stable plaque into a vulnerable one. Lymphocytes constitute at least 20 % of infiltrating cells in these vulnerable plaques. Therefore, the interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptor, being overexpressed on activated T lymphocytes, may represent an attractive biomarker for plaque vulnerability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the specificity of radiolabelled IL-2 [{sup 99m}Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide (HYNIC)-IL-2] for imaging the lymphocytic infiltration in carotid plaques in vivo by planar and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT imaging and ex vivo by microSPECT and autoradiography. For the in vivo study, ten symptomatic patients with advanced plaques at ultrasound who were scheduled for carotid endarterectomy underwent {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 scintigraphy. The images were analysed visually on planar and SPECT images and semi-quantitatively on SPECT images by calculating target to background (T/B) ratios. After endarterectomy, immunomorphological evaluation and immunophenotyping were performed on plaque slices. For the ex vivo studies, four additional patients were included and, after in vitro incubation of removed plaques with {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-IL-2, autoradiography was performed and microSPECT images were acquired. Visual analysis defined clear {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 uptake in seven of the ten symptomatic plaques. SPECT/CT allowed visualization in eight of ten. A significant correlation was found between the number of CD25+ lymphocytes and the total number of CD25+ cells in the plaque and the T/B ratio with adjacent carotid artery as background (Pearson's r = 0.89, p = 0.003 and r = 0.87, p = 0.005, respectively). MicroSPECT imaging showed clear {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-IL-2 uptake within the plaque wall and not in the lipidic core. With autoradiography

  15. Amyloid β levels in human red blood cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Kiko

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ is hypothesized to play a key role by oxidatively impairing the capacity of red blood cells (RBCs to deliver oxygen to the brain. These processes are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Although plasma Aβ has been investigated thoroughly, the presence and distribution of Aβ in human RBCs are still unclear. In this study, we quantitated Aβ40 and Aβ42 in human RBCs with ELISA assays, and provided evidence that significant amounts of Aβ could be detected in RBCs and that the RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. The RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. On the other hand, providing an antioxidant supplement (astaxanthin, a polar carotenoid to humans was found to decrease RBC Aβ as well as oxidative stress marker levels. These results suggest that plasma Aβ40 and Aβ42 bind to RBCs (possibly with aging, implying a pathogenic role of RBC Aβ. Moreover, the data indicate that RBC Aβ40 and Aβ42 may constitute biomarkers of AD. As a preventive strategy, therapeutic application of astaxanthin as an Aβ-lowering agent in RBCs could be considered as a possible anti-dementia agent. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN42483402.

  16. Purified and synthetic Alzheimer's amyloid beta (Aβ) prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhr, Jan; Watts, Joel C; Mensinger, Zachary L; Oehler, Abby; Grillo, Sunny K; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B; Giles, Kurt

    2012-07-03

    The aggregation and deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are believed to be central events in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Inoculation of brain homogenates containing Aβ aggregates into susceptible transgenic mice accelerated Aβ deposition, suggesting that Aβ aggregates are capable of self-propagation and hence might be prions. Recently, we demonstrated that Aβ deposition can be monitored in live mice using bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Here, we use BLI to probe the ability of Aβ aggregates to self-propagate following inoculation into bigenic mice. We report compelling evidence that Aβ aggregates are prions by demonstrating widespread cerebral β-amyloidosis induced by inoculation of either purified Aβ aggregates derived from brain or aggregates composed of synthetic Aβ. Although synthetic Aβ aggregates were sufficient to induce Aβ deposition in vivo, they exhibited lower specific biological activity compared with brain-derived Aβ aggregates. Our results create an experimental paradigm that should lead to identification of self-propagating Aβ conformations, which could represent novel targets for interrupting the spread of Aβ deposition in AD patients.

  17. Islet amyloid polypeptide forms rigid lipid-protein amyloid fibrils on supported phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanov, Yegor A; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2008-02-08

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) forms fibrillar amyloid deposits in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and its misfolding and aggregation are thought to contribute to beta-cell death. Increasing evidence suggests that IAPP fibrillization is strongly influenced by lipid membranes and, vice versa, that the membrane architecture and integrity are severely affected by amyloid growth. Here, we report direct fluorescence microscopic observations of the morphological transformations accompanying IAPP fibrillization on the surface of supported lipid membranes. Within minutes of application in submicromolar concentrations, IAPP caused extensive remodeling of the membrane including formation of defects, vesiculation, and tubulation. The effects of IAPP concentration, ionic strength, and the presence of amyloid seeds on the bilayer perturbation and peptide aggregation were examined. Growth of amyloid fibrils was visualized using fluorescently labeled IAPP or thioflavin T staining. Two-color imaging of the peptide and membranes revealed that the fibrils were initially composed of the peptide only, and vesiculation occurred in the points where growing fibers touched the lipid membrane. Interestingly, after 2-5 h of incubation, IAPP fibers became "wrapped" by lipid membranes derived from the supported membrane. Progressive increase in molecular-level association between amyloid and membranes in the maturing fibers was confirmed by Förster resonance energy transfer spectroscopy.

  18. Modeling clustered activity increase in amyloid-beta positron emission tomographic images with statistical descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhi S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sepideh Shokouhi,1 Baxter P Rogers,1 Hakmook Kang,2 Zhaohua Ding,1 Daniel O Claassen,3 John W Mckay,1 William R Riddle1On behalf of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative1Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, 2Department of Biostatistics, 3Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USABackground: Amyloid-beta (Aβ imaging with positron emission tomography (PET holds promise for detecting the presence of Aβ plaques in the cortical gray matter. Many image analyses focus on regional average measurements of tracer activity distribution; however, considerable additional information is available in the images. Metrics that describe the statistical properties of images, such as the two-point correlation function (S2, have found wide applications in astronomy and materials science. S2 provides a detailed characterization of spatial patterns in images typically referred to as clustering or flocculence. The objective of this study was to translate the two-point correlation method into Aβ-PET of the human brain using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB to characterize longitudinal changes in the tracer distribution that may reflect changes in Aβ plaque accumulation.Methods: We modified the conventional S2 metric, which is primarily used for binary images and formulated a weighted two-point correlation function (wS2 to describe nonbinary, real-valued PET images with a single statistical function. Using serial 11C-PiB scans, we calculated wS2 functions from two-dimensional PET images of different cortical regions as well as three-dimensional data from the whole brain. The area under the wS2 functions was calculated and compared with the mean/median of the standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR. For three-dimensional data, we compared the area under the wS2 curves with the subjects’ cerebrospinal fluid measures.Results: Overall, the longitudinal changes in wS2

  19. Mechanisms of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathogenesis and Prevention: The Brain, Neural Pathology, N-methyl-D-aspartate Receptors, Tau Protein and Other Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocahan, Sayad; Doğan, Zumrut

    2017-01-01

    The characteristic features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are the appearance of extracellular amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the intracellular environment, neuronal death and the loss of synapses, all of which contribute to cognitive decline in a progressive manner. A number of hypotheses have been advanced to explain AD. Abnormal tau phosphorylation may contribute to the formation of abnormal neurofibrillary structures. Many different structures are susceptible to AD, including the reticular formation, the nuclei in the brain stem (e.g., raphe nucleus), thalamus, hypothalamus, locus ceruleus, amygdala, substantia nigra, striatum, and claustrum. Excitotoxicity results from continuous, low-level activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Premature synaptotoxicity, changes in neurotransmitter expression, neurophils loss, accumulation of amyloid β-protein deposits (amyloid/senile plaques), and neuronal loss and brain atrophy are all associated with stages of AD progression. Several recent studies have examined the relationship between Aβ and NMDA receptors. Aβ-induced spine loss is associated with a decrease in glutamate receptors and is dependent upon the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, which has also been linked to long-term depression. PMID:28138104

  20. Bap: A New Type of Functional Amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martino, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria can build a biofilm matrix scaffold from exopolysaccharides or proteins, and DNA. In a recent report, Taglialegna and colleagues show that pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus produces a protein scaffold based on amyloid assembly of fragments from the biofilm-associated protein. Amyloidogenesis occurs in response to environmental signals.

  1. Serum amyloid P inhibits dermal wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The repair of open wounds depends on granulation tissue formation and contraction, which is primarily mediated by myofibroblasts. A subset of myofibroblasts originates from bone-marrow-derived monocytes which differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes. Serum amyloid P (SAP) inhibits ...

  2. Calumenin interacts with serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Jacobsen, Christian; Honoré, Bent

    2000-01-01

    with calumenin in the presence of Ca(2+). Amino acid sequencing identified this protein as serum amyloid P component (SAP). Furthermore, we verified and characterized the calumenin-SAP interaction by the surface plasmon resonance technique. The findings indicate that calumenin may participate...

  3. Graphene oxide strongly inhibits amyloid beta fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Akhavan, Omid; Ghavami, Mahdi; Rezaee, Farhad; Ghiasi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin

    2012-01-01

    Since amyloid beta fibrillation (AbF) plays an important role in the development of neurodegenerative diseases, we investigated the effect of graphene oxide (GO) and their protein-coated surfaces on the kinetics of Ab fibrillation in the aqueous solution. We showed that GO and their protein-covered

  4. Large plaque parapsoriasis: clinical and genotypic correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M; Flaig, M J; Kind, P; Sander, C A; Kaudewitz, P

    2000-02-01

    Twelve patients with large plaque parapsoriasis (LPP) were investigated for the presence of predominant T-cell clones, analyzing the T-cell receptor (TCR) gamma-chain gene. The diagnostic and prognostic significance of TCR gene rearrangement status was assessed by a correlation with the long-term clinical follow-up. Six out of 12 patients showed a clonal T-cell population. Clinically, among the patients with clonal disease one developed clearcut mycosis fungoides (MF) after a follow-up of 8 years, in the other 5 patients no such diagnosis could be made after follow-up of 2-21 years (median: 9 years). In patients with polyclonal infiltrates the lesions remained virtually unchanged. These findings indicate that in LPP TCR gene rearrangement status has no prognostic significance and does not allow distinction of LPP and early MF. Both conditions show a clonal T-cell infiltrate with similar frequency, are very similar in clinical and histologic presentation and according to recent studies share the same low risk to develop overt MF. Therefore both terms refer to the identical clinical situation. This should be designated as early MF and efforts should concentrate on identifying those patients that are at risk to develop aggressive disease.

  5. Moderate-to-Severe Plaque Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Prieto-Pérez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease in which genetics play a major role. Although many genome-wide association studies have been performed in psoriasis, knowledge of the age at onset remains limited. Therefore, we analyzed 173 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes associated with psoriasis and other autoimmune diseases in patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis type I (early-onset, <40 years or type II (late-onset, ≥40 years and healthy controls. Moreover, we performed a comparison between patients with type I psoriasis and patients with type II psoriasis. Our comparison of a stratified population with type I psoriasis n=155 and healthy controls N=197 is the first to reveal a relationship between the CLMN, FBXL19, CCL4L, C17orf51, TYK2, IL13, SLC22A4, CDKAL1, and HLA-B/MICA genes. When we compar