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Sample records for amyloid oligomers spectroscopic

  1. Atomic View of a Toxic Amyloid Small Oligomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Park, Jiyong; Zhao, Minglei; Pensalfini, Anna; Soriaga, Angela B.; Landau, Meytal; Teng, Poh K.; Cascio, Duilio; Glabe, Charles; Eisenberg, David (UCI); (UCLA)

    2012-04-30

    Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and the prion conditions, are each associated with a particular protein in fibrillar form. These amyloid fibrils were long suspected to be the disease agents, but evidence suggests that smaller, often transient and polymorphic oligomers are the toxic entities. Here, we identify a segment of the amyloid-forming protein {alpha}{beta} crystallin, which forms an oligomeric complex exhibiting properties of other amyloid oligomers: {beta}-sheet-rich structure, cytotoxicity, and recognition by an oligomer-specific antibody. The x-ray-derived atomic structure of the oligomer reveals a cylindrical barrel, formed from six antiparallel protein strands, that we term a cylindrin. The cylindrin structure is compatible with a sequence segment from the {beta}-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease. Cylindrins offer models for the hitherto elusive structures of amyloid oligomers.

  2. Toxic species in amyloid disorders: Oligomers or mature fibrils

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    Meenakshi Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative disorders. These protein aggregation (fibrillization disorders are also known as amyloid disorders. The mechanism of protein aggregation involves conformation switch of the native protein, oligomer formation leading to protofibrils and finally mature fibrils. Mature fibrils have long been considered as the cause of disease pathogenesis; however, recent evidences suggest oligomeric intermediates formed during fibrillization to be toxic. In this review, we have tried to address the ongoing debate for these toxic amyloid species. We did an extensive literature search and collated information from Pubmed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov and Google search using various permutations and combinations of the following keywords: Neurodegeneration, amyloid disorders, protein aggregation, fibrils, oligomers, toxicity, Alzheimer′s Disease, Parkinson′s Disease. We describe different instances showing the toxicity of mature fibrils as well as oligomers in Alzheimer′s Disease and Parkinson′s Disease. Distinct structural framework and morphology of amyloid oligomers suggests difference in toxic effect between oligomers and fibrils. We highlight the difference in structure and proposed toxicity pathways for fibrils and oligomers. We also highlight the evidences indicating that intermediary oligomeric species can act as potential diagnostic biomarker. Since the formation of these toxic species follow a common structural switch among various amyloid disorders, the protein aggregation events can be targeted for developing broad-range therapeutics. The therapeutic trials based on the understanding of different protein conformers (monomers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils in amyloid cascade are also described.

  3. Amyloid oligomer conformation in a group of natively folded proteins.

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    Yuji Yoshiike

    Full Text Available Recent in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that destabilized proteins with defective folding induce aggregation and toxicity in protein-misfolding diseases. One such unstable protein state is called amyloid oligomer, a precursor of fully aggregated forms of amyloid. Detection of various amyloid oligomers with A11, an anti-amyloid oligomer conformation-specific antibody, revealed that the amyloid oligomer represents a generic conformation and suggested that toxic beta-aggregation processes possess a common mechanism. By using A11 antibody as a probe in combination with mass spectrometric analysis, we identified GroEL in bacterial lysates as a protein that may potentially have an amyloid oligomer conformation. Surprisingly, A11 reacted not only with purified GroEL but also with several purified heat shock proteins, including human Hsp27, 40, 70, 90; yeast Hsp104; and bovine Hsc70. The native folds of A11-reactive proteins in purified samples were characterized by their anti-beta-aggregation activity in terms of both functionality and in contrast to the beta-aggregation promoting activity of misfolded pathogenic amyloid oligomers. The conformation-dependent binding of A11 with natively folded Hsp27 was supported by the concurrent loss of A11 reactivity and anti-beta-aggregation activity of heat-treated Hsp27 samples. Moreover, we observed consistent anti-beta-aggregation activity not only by chaperones containing an amyloid oligomer conformation but also by several A11-immunoreactive non-chaperone proteins. From these results, we suggest that the amyloid oligomer conformation is present in a group of natively folded proteins. The inhibitory effects of A11 antibody on both GroEL/ES-assisted luciferase refolding and Hsp70-mediated decelerated nucleation of Abeta aggregation suggested that the A11-binding sites on these chaperones might be functionally important. Finally, we employed a computational approach to uncover possible A11-binding sites on

  4. The Toxicity of Amyloid ß Oligomers

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    Lock Yue Chew

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In this review, we elucidate the mechanisms of Aβ oligomer toxicity which may contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. In particular, we discuss on the interaction of Aβ oligomers with the membrane through the process of adsorption and insertion. Such interaction gives rises to phase transitions  in the sub-structures of the Aβ peptide from α-helical to β-sheet  structure. By means of a coarse-grained model, we exhibit the tendency of β-sheet structures to aggregate, thus providing further insights to the process of membrane induced aggregation. We show that the aggregated oligomer causes membrane invagination, which is a precursor to the formation of pore structures and ion channels. Other pathological progressions to AD due to Aβ oligomers  are also covered,  such as their interaction with the membrane receptors, and their direct versus indirect effects on oxidative  stress and intraneuronal accumulation.  We further illustrate that the molecule curcumin is a potential Aβ toxicity inhibitor as a β-sheet breaker by having  a high propensity to interact with certain Aβ residues without  binding to them. The comprehensive understanding gained from these current  researches on the various toxicity mechanisms show promises in the provision of better therapeutics and treatment strategies in the near future.

  5. Size-dependent neurotoxicity of β-amyloid oligomers

    OpenAIRE

    Cizas, Paulius; Budvytyte, Rima; Morkuniene, Ramune; Moldovan, Radu; Broccio, Matteo; Lösche, Mathias; Niaura, Gediminas; Valincius, Gintaras; Borutaite, Vilmante

    2010-01-01

    The link between the size of soluble amyloid β (Aβ) oligomers and their toxicity to rat cerebellar granule cells (CGC) was investigated. Variation in conditions during in vitro oligomerization of Aβ1-42 resulted in peptide assemblies with different particle size as measured by atomic force microscopy and confirmed by the dynamic light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Small oligomers of Aβ1-42 with a mean particle z-height of 1-2 nm exhibited propensity to bind to the phos...

  6. Lipid raft disruption protects mature neurons against amyloid oligomer toxicity.

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    Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Contrusciere, Valentina; Raggi, Carla; Fecchi, Katia; Rainaldi, Gabriella; Paradisi, Silvia; Matteucci, Andrea; Santini, Maria Teresa; Sargiacomo, Massimo; Frank, Claudio; Gaudiano, Maria Cristina; Diociaiuti, Marco

    2010-04-01

    A specific neuronal vulnerability to amyloid protein toxicity may account for brain susceptibility to protein misfolding diseases. To investigate this issue, we compared the effects induced by oligomers from salmon calcitonin (sCTOs), a neurotoxic amyloid protein, on cells of different histogenesis: mature and immature primary hippocampal neurons, primary astrocytes, MG63 osteoblasts and NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. In mature neurons, sCTOs increased apoptosis and induced neuritic and synaptic damages similar to those caused by amyloid beta oligomers. Immature neurons and the other cell types showed no cytotoxicity. sCTOs caused cytosolic Ca(2+) rise in mature, but not in immature neurons and the other cell types. Comparison of plasma membrane lipid composition showed that mature neurons had the highest content in lipid rafts, suggesting a key role for them in neuronal vulnerability to sCTOs. Consistently, depletion in gangliosides protected against sCTO toxicity. We hypothesize that the high content in lipid rafts makes mature neurons especially vulnerable to amyloid proteins, as compared to other cell types; this may help explain why the brain is a target organ for amyloid-related diseases.

  7. Alpha-Synuclein Oligomers: an Amyloid Pore? Insights into Mechanisms of alpha-Synuclein Oligomer-Lipid Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stockl, Martin T.; Zijlstra, Niels; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    In many human diseases, oligomeric species of amyloid proteins may play a pivotal role in cytotoxicity. Many lines of evidence indicate that permeabilization of cellular membranes by amyloid oligomers may be the key factor in disrupting cellular homeostasis. However, the exact mechanisms by which th

  8. alpha-Synuclein Oligomers: an Amyloid Pore? : Insights into Mechanisms of alpha-Synuclein Oligomer-Lipid Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stockl, M.T.; Zijlstra, N.; Subramaniam, V.

    2013-01-01

    In many human diseases, oligomeric species of amyloid proteins may play a pivotal role in cytotoxicity. Many lines of evidence indicate that permeabilization of cellular membranes by amyloid oligomers may be the key factor in disrupting cellular homeostasis. However, the exact mechanisms by which th

  9. Size-dependent neurotoxicity of β-amyloid oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizas, Paulius; Budvytyte, Rima; Morkuniene, Ramune; Moldovan, Radu; Broccio, Matteo; Lösche, Mathias; Niaura, Gediminas; Valincius, Gintaras; Borutaite, Vilmante

    2010-01-01

    The link between the size of soluble amyloid β (Aβ) oligomers and their toxicity to rat cerebellar granule cells (CGC) was investigated. Variation in conditions during in vitro oligomerization of Aβ1-42 resulted in peptide assemblies with different particle size as measured by atomic force microscopy and confirmed by the dynamic light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Small oligomers of Aβ1-42 with a mean particle z-height of 1-2 nm exhibited propensity to bind to the phospholipid vesicles and they were the most toxic species that induced rapid neuronal necrosis at submicromolar concentrations whereas the bigger aggregates (z-height above 4-5 nm) did not bind vesicles and did not cause detectable neuronal death. Similar neurotoxic pattern was also observed in primary cultures of cortex neurons whereas Aβ1–42 oligomers, monomers and fibrils were non-toxic to glial cells in CGC cultures or macrophage J774 cells. However, both oligomeric forms of Aβ1-42 induced reduction of neuronal cell densities in the CGC cultures. PMID:20153288

  10. Size-dependent neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizas, Paulius; Budvytyte, Rima; Morkuniene, Ramune; Moldovan, Radu; Broccio, Matteo; Lösche, Mathias; Niaura, Gediminas; Valincius, Gintaras; Borutaite, Vilmante

    2010-04-15

    The link between the size of soluble amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers and their toxicity to rat cerebellar granule cells (CGC) was investigated. Variation in conditions during in vitro oligomerization of Abeta(1-42) resulted in peptide assemblies with different particle size as measured by atomic force microscopy and confirmed by dynamic light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Small oligomers of Abeta(1-42) with a mean particle z-height of 1-2 nm exhibited propensity to bind to phospholipid vesicles and they were the most toxic species that induced rapid neuronal necrosis at submicromolar concentrations whereas the bigger aggregates (z-height above 4-5 nm) did not bind vesicles and did not cause detectable neuronal death. A similar neurotoxic pattern was also observed in primary cultures of cortex neurons whereas Abeta(1-42) oligomers, monomers and fibrils were non-toxic to glial cells in CGC cultures or macrophage J774 cells. However, both oligomeric forms of Abeta(1-42) induced reduction of neuronal cell densities in the CGC cultures.

  11. Amyloid oligomer structure characterization from simulations: A general method

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    Nguyen, Phuong H., E-mail: phuong.nguyen@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Li, Mai Suan [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Derreumaux, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.derreumaux@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Institut Universitaire de France, 103 Bvd Saint-Germain, 75005 Paris (France)

    2014-03-07

    Amyloid oligomers and plaques are composed of multiple chemically identical proteins. Therefore, one of the first fundamental problems in the characterization of structures from simulations is the treatment of the degeneracy, i.e., the permutation of the molecules. Second, the intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom of the various molecules must be taken into account. Currently, the well-known dihedral principal component analysis method only considers the intramolecular degrees of freedom, and other methods employing collective variables can only describe intermolecular degrees of freedom at the global level. With this in mind, we propose a general method that identifies all the structures accurately. The basis idea is that the intramolecular and intermolecular states are described in terms of combinations of single-molecule and double-molecule states, respectively, and the overall structures of oligomers are the product basis of the intramolecular and intermolecular states. This way, the degeneracy is automatically avoided. The method is illustrated on the conformational ensemble of the tetramer of the Alzheimer's peptide Aβ{sub 9−40}, resulting from two atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent, each of 200 ns, starting from two distinct structures.

  12. Amyloid oligomer structure characterization from simulations: a general method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong H; Li, Mai Suan; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2014-03-07

    Amyloid oligomers and plaques are composed of multiple chemically identical proteins. Therefore, one of the first fundamental problems in the characterization of structures from simulations is the treatment of the degeneracy, i.e., the permutation of the molecules. Second, the intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom of the various molecules must be taken into account. Currently, the well-known dihedral principal component analysis method only considers the intramolecular degrees of freedom, and other methods employing collective variables can only describe intermolecular degrees of freedom at the global level. With this in mind, we propose a general method that identifies all the structures accurately. The basis idea is that the intramolecular and intermolecular states are described in terms of combinations of single-molecule and double-molecule states, respectively, and the overall structures of oligomers are the product basis of the intramolecular and intermolecular states. This way, the degeneracy is automatically avoided. The method is illustrated on the conformational ensemble of the tetramer of the Alzheimer's peptide Aβ9-40, resulting from two atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent, each of 200 ns, starting from two distinct structures.

  13. Amyloid β oligomers in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, treatment, and diagnosis.

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    Viola, Kirsten L; Klein, William L

    2015-02-01

    Protein aggregation is common to dozens of diseases including prionoses, diabetes, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Over the past 15 years, there has been a paradigm shift in understanding the structural basis for these proteinopathies. Precedent for this shift has come from investigation of soluble Aβ oligomers (AβOs), toxins now widely regarded as instigating neuron damage leading to Alzheimer's dementia. Toxic AβOs accumulate in AD brain and constitute long-lived alternatives to the disease-defining Aβ fibrils deposited in amyloid plaques. Key experiments using fibril-free AβO solutions demonstrated that while Aβ is essential for memory loss, the fibrillar Aβ in amyloid deposits is not the agent. The AD-like cellular pathologies induced by AβOs suggest their impact provides a unifying mechanism for AD pathogenesis, explaining why early stage disease is specific for memory and accounting for major facets of AD neuropathology. Alternative ideas for triggering mechanisms are being actively investigated. Some research favors insertion of AβOs into membrane, while other evidence supports ligand-like accumulation at particular synapses. Over a dozen candidate toxin receptors have been proposed. AβO binding triggers a redistribution of critical synaptic proteins and induces hyperactivity in metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors. This leads to Ca(2+) overload and instigates major facets of AD neuropathology, including tau hyperphosphorylation, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and synapse loss. Because different species of AβOs have been identified, a remaining question is which oligomer is the major pathogenic culprit. The possibility has been raised that more than one species plays a role. Despite some key unknowns, the clinical relevance of AβOs has been established, and new studies are beginning to point to co-morbidities such as diabetes and hypercholesterolemia as etiological factors. Because pathogenic AβOs appear early in the disease, they

  14. Direct Correlation Between Ligand-Induced α-Synuclein Oligomers and Amyloid-like Fibril Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Nors; Foderà, Vito; Horvath, Istvan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of proteins into amyloid deposits is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The suggestion that intermediate oligomeric species may be cytotoxic has led to intensified investigations of pre-fibrillar oligomers, which...

  15. Amyloid-beta Oligomers Relate to Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, W.; Bruggink, K.A.; Kester, M.I.; Visser, P.J.; Scheltens, P.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Verbeek, M.M.; Teunissen, C.E.; Veerhuis, R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amyloid-beta (Abeta)-oligomers are neurotoxic isoforms of Abeta and are a potential diagnostic biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD). OBJECTIVES: 1) Analyze the potential of Abeta-oligomer concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to diagnose and predict progression to AD in a large c

  16. Amyloid-beta Oligomers Relate to Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, W.; Bruggink, K.A.; Kester, M.I.; Visser, P.J.; Scheltens, P.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Verbeek, M.M.; Teunissen, C.E.; Veerhuis, R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Amyloid-beta (Abeta)-oligomers are neurotoxic isoforms of Abeta and are a potential diagnostic biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD). OBJECTIVES: 1) Analyze the potential of Abeta-oligomer concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to diagnose and predict progression to AD in a large

  17. Distinct annular oligomers captured along the assembly and disassembly pathways of transthyretin amyloid protofibrils.

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    Ricardo H Pires

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Defects in protein folding may lead to severe degenerative diseases characterized by the appearance of amyloid fibril deposits. Cytotoxicity in amyloidoses has been linked to poration of the cell membrane that may involve interactions with amyloid intermediates of annular shape. Although annular oligomers have been detected in many amyloidogenic systems, their universality, function and molecular mechanisms of appearance are debated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated with high-resolution in situ atomic force microscopy the assembly and disassembly of transthyretin (TTR amyloid protofibrils formed of the native protein by pH shift. Annular oligomers were the first morphologically distinct intermediates observed in the TTR aggregation pathway. Morphological analysis suggests that they can assemble into a double-stack of octameric rings with a 16 ± 2 nm diameter, and displaying the tendency to form linear structures. According to light scattering data coupled to AFM imaging, annular oligomers appeared to undergo a collapse type of structural transition into spheroid oligomers containing 8-16 monomers. Disassembly of TTR amyloid protofibrils also resulted in the rapid appearance of annular oligomers but with a morphology quite distinct from that observed in the assembly pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our observations indicate that annular oligomers are key dynamic intermediates not only in the assembly but also in the disassembly of TTR protofibrils. The balance between annular and more compact forms of aggregation could be relevant for cytotoxicity in amyloidogenic disorders.

  18. Fibril specific, conformation dependent antibodies recognize a generic epitope common to amyloid fibrils and fibrillar oligomers that is absent in prefibrillar oligomers

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    Rasool Suhail

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid-related degenerative diseases are associated with the accumulation of misfolded proteins as amyloid fibrils in tissue. In Alzheimer disease (AD, amyloid accumulates in several distinct types of insoluble plaque deposits, intracellular Aβ and as soluble oligomers and the relationships between these deposits and their pathological significance remains unclear. Conformation dependent antibodies have been reported that specifically recognize distinct assembly states of amyloids, including prefibrillar oligomers and fibrils. Results We immunized rabbits with a morphologically homogeneous population of Aβ42 fibrils. The resulting immune serum (OC specifically recognizes fibrils, but not random coil monomer or prefibrillar oligomers, indicating fibrils display a distinct conformation dependent epitope that is absent in prefibrillar oligomers. The fibril epitope is also displayed by fibrils of other types of amyloids, indicating that the epitope is a generic feature of the polypeptide backbone. The fibril specific antibody also recognizes 100,000 × G soluble fibrillar oligomers ranging in size from dimer to greater than 250 kDa on western blots. The fibrillar oligomers recognized by OC are immunologically distinct from prefibrillar oligomers recognized by A11, even though their sizes overlap broadly, indicating that size is not a reliable indicator of oligomer conformation. The immune response to prefibrillar oligomers and fibrils is not sequence specific and antisera of the same specificity are produced in response to immunization with islet amyloid polypeptide prefibrillar oligomer mimics and fibrils. The fibril specific antibodies stain all types of amyloid deposits in human AD brain. Diffuse amyloid deposits stain intensely with anti-fibril antibody although they are thioflavin S negative, suggesting that they are indeed fibrillar in conformation. OC also stains islet amyloid deposits in transgenic mouse models of type

  19. Construction of human Fab library and screening of a single-domain antibody of amyloid-beta 42 oligomers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuanning Yuan; Minge Du; Yiwen Chen; Fei Dou

    2013-01-01

    Screening humanized antibodies from a human Fab phage display library is an effective and quick method to obtain beta-amyloid oligomers. Thus, the present study prepared amyloid-beta 42 oli-gomers and constructed a naïve human Fab phage display library based on blood samples from six healthy people. After three rounds of biopanning in vitro, a human single-domain antibody that spe-cifical y recognized amyloid-beta 42 oligomers was identified. Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated this antibody bound specifical y to human amyloid-beta 42 te-tramer and nonamer, but not the monomer or high molecular weight oligomers. This study suc-cessful y constructed a human phage display library and screened a single-domain antibody that specifical y recognized amyloid-beta 42 oligomers.

  20. Effect of pathogenic mutations on the structure and dynamics of Alzheimer's A beta 42-amyloid oligomers.

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    Kassler, Kristin; Horn, Anselm H C; Sticht, Heinrich

    2010-05-01

    Converging lines of evidence suggest that soluble A beta-amyloid oligomers play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and present direct effectors of synaptic and cognitive dysfunction. Three pathological E22-A beta-amyloid point mutants (E22G, E22K, E22Q) and the deletion mutant E22 Delta exhibit an enhanced tendency to form prefibrillar aggregates. The present study assessed the effect of these four mutations using molecular dynamics simulations and subsequent structural and energetic analyses. Our data shows that E22 plays a unique role in wild type A beta, since it has a destabilising effect on the oligomer structure due to electrostatic repulsion between adjacent E22 side chains. Mutations in which E22 is replaced by an uncharged residue result in higher oligomer stability. This effect is also observed to a lesser extent for the E22K mutation and is consistent with its lower pathogenicity compared to other mutants. Interestingly, deletion of E22 does not destroy the amyloid fold but is compensated by local changes in the backbone geometry that allow the preservation of a structurally important salt bridge. The finding that all mutant oligomers investigated exhibit higher internal stability than the wild type offers an explanation for the experimentally observed enhanced oligomer formation and stability.

  1. The role of stable α-synuclein oligomers in the molecular events underlying amyloid formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Nikolai; Nielsen, Søren Bang; Buell, Alexander K.

    2014-01-01

    α-synuclein (αSN), whose aggregation is strongly implicated in the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The two types of oligomers are both formed under conditions where amyloid fibril formation is observed but differ in molecular weight by an order of magnitude. Both possess a degree of β...

  2. A cytotoxic amyloid oligomer self-triggered and NIR- enhanced amyloidosis therapeutic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can Xu[1,2; Peng Shi[1,2; Meng Li[1,2; Jinsong Ren[1; xiaogang Qu[1

    2015-01-01

    We report a new strategy for improving the efficiency of non-specific amyloidosis therapeutic drugs by coating amyloid-responsive lipid bilayers. The approach had drawn inspiration from amyloid oligomer-mediated cell membrane disruption in the pathogenesis of amyloidosis. A graphene-mesoporous silica hybrid (GMS)-supported lipid bilayer (GMS-Lip) system was used as a drug carrier, Drugs were well confined inside the nanocarrier until encountering amyloid oligomers, which could pierce the lipid bilayer coat and cause drug release. To ensure release efficiency, use of a near-infrared (NIR) laser was also introduced to facilitate drug release, taking advantage of the photothermal effect of GMS and thermal sensitivity of lipid bilayers. To facilitate tracking, fluorescent dyes were co-loaded with drugs within GMS-Lip and the NIR laser was used once the oligomer-triggered release had been signaled. Because of the spatially and temporally controllable property of light, the NIR-assisted release could be easily and selectively activated locally by tracking the fluorescence signal. Our design is based on arnyloidosis pathogenesis, the cytotoxic amyloid oligomer self-triggered release via cell membrane disruption, for the controlled release of drug molecules. The results may shed light on the development of pathogenesis- inspired drug delivery systems,

  3. Amyloid-beta oligomer detection by ELISA in cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, K.A.; Jongbloed, W.; Biemans, E.A.L.M.; Veerhuis, R.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Kuiperij, H.B.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) deposits are important pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Abeta aggregates into fibrils; however, the intermediate oligomers are believed to be the most neurotoxic species and, therefore, are of great interest as potential biomarkers. Here, we have developed an

  4. Cu K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Reveals Differential Copper Coordimation Within Amyloid-beta Oligomers Compared to Amyloid-beta Monomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Shearer; P Callan; T Tran; V Szalai

    2011-12-31

    The fatal neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been linked to the formation of soluble neurotoxic oligomers of amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptides. These peptides have high affinities for copper cations. Despite their potential importance in AD neurodegeneration few studies have focused on probing the Cu{sup 2+/1+} coordination environment within A{beta} oligomers. Herein we present a Cu K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopic study probing the copper-coordination environment within oligomers of A{beta}(42) (sequence: DAEFRHDSGYEVHHQKLVFFAEDVGSNKGAIIGLMVGGVVIA). We find that the Cu{sup 2+} cation is contained within a square planar mixed N/O ligand environment within A{beta}(42) oligomers, which is similar to the copper coordination environment of the monomeric forms of {l_brace}Cu{sup II}A{beta}(40){r_brace} and {l_brace}Cu{sup II}A{beta}(16){r_brace}. Reduction of the Cu{sup 2+} cation within the A{beta}(42) oligomers to Cu{sup 1+} yields a highly dioxygen sensitive copper-species that contains Cu{sup 1+} in a tetrahedral coordination geometry. This can be contrasted with monomers of {l_brace}Cu{sup I}A{beta}(40){r_brace} and {l_brace}Cu{sup I}A{beta}(16){r_brace}, which contain copper in a dioxygen inert linear bis-histidine ligand environment [Shearer and Szalai, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130, 17826]. The biological implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. Pre-amyloid oligomers budding:a metastatic mechanism of proteotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernini, Fabrizio; Malferrari, Daniele; Pignataro, Marcello; Bortolotti, Carlo Augusto; di Rocco, Giulia; Lancellotti, Lidia; Brigatti, Maria Franca; Kayed, Rakez; Borsari, Marco; Del Monte, Federica; Castellini, Elena

    2016-10-01

    The pathological hallmark of misfolded protein diseases and aging is the accumulation of proteotoxic aggregates. However, the mechanisms of proteotoxicity and the dynamic changes in fiber formation and dissemination remain unclear, preventing a cure. Here we adopted a reductionist approach and used atomic force microscopy to define the temporal and spatial changes of amyloid aggregates, their modes of dissemination and the biochemical changes that may influence their growth. We show that pre-amyloid oligomers (PAO) mature to form linear and circular protofibrils, and amyloid fibers, and those can break reforming PAO that can migrate invading neighbor structures. Simulating the effect of immunotherapy modifies the dynamics of PAO formation. Anti-fibers as well as anti-PAO antibodies fragment the amyloid fibers, however the fragmentation using anti-fibers antibodies favored the migration of PAO. In conclusion, we provide evidence for the mechanisms of misfolded protein maturation and propagation and the effects of interventions on the resolution and dissemination of amyloid pathology.

  6. Force spectroscopy reveals the presence of structurally modified dimers in transthyretin amyloid annular oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Ricardo H; Saraiva, Maria J; Damas, Ana M; Kellermayer, Miklós S Z

    2017-03-01

    Toxicity in amyloidogenic protein misfolding disorders is thought to involve intermediate states of aggregation associated with the formation of amyloid fibrils. Despite their relevance, the heterogeneity and transience of these oligomers have placed great barriers in our understanding of their structural properties. Among amyloid intermediates, annular oligomers or annular protofibrils have raised considerable interest because they may contribute to a mechanism of cellular toxicity via membrane permeation. Here we investigated, by using AFM force spectroscopy, the structural detail of amyloid annular oligomers from transthyretin (TTR), a protein involved in systemic and neurodegenerative amyloidogenic disorders. Manipulation was performed in situ, in the absence of molecular handles and using persistence length-fit values to select relevant curves. Force curves reveal the presence of dimers in TTR annular oligomers that unfold via a series of structural intermediates. This is in contrast with the manipulation of native TTR that was more often manipulated over length scales compatible with a TTR monomer and without unfolding intermediates. Imaging and force spectroscopy data suggest that dimers are formed by the assembly of monomers in a head-to-head orientation with a nonnative interface along their β-strands. Furthermore, these dimers stack through nonnative contacts that may enhance the stability of the misfolded structure. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Rapid α-oligomer formation mediated by the Aβ C terminus initiates an amyloid assembly pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Pinaki; Kodali, Ravindra; Chemuru, Saketh; Kar, Karunakar; Wetzel, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Since early oligomeric intermediates in amyloid assembly are often transient and difficult to distinguish, characterize and quantify, the mechanistic basis of the initiation of spontaneous amyloid growth is often opaque. We describe here an approach to the analysis of the Aβ aggregation mechanism that uses Aβ-polyglutamine hybrid peptides designed to retard amyloid maturation and an adjusted thioflavin intensity scale that reveals structural features of aggregation intermediates. The results support an aggregation initiation mechanism for Aβ-polyQ hybrids, and by extension for full-length Aβ peptides, in which a modular Aβ C-terminal segment mediates rapid, non-nucleated formation of α-helical oligomers. The resulting high local concentration of tethered amyloidogenic segments within these α-oligomers facilitates transition to a β-oligomer population that, via further remodelling and/or elongation steps, ultimately generates mature amyloid. Consistent with this mechanism, an engineered Aβ C-terminal fragment delays aggregation onset by Aβ-polyglutamine peptides and redirects assembly of Aβ42 fibrils. PMID:27546208

  8. Conformational stability of fibrillar amyloid-beta oligomers via protofilament pair formation - a systematic computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Anna; Sticht, Heinrich; Horn, Anselm H C

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-[Formula: see text] (A[Formula: see text]) oligomers play a crucial role in Alzheimer's disease due to their neurotoxic aggregation properties. Fibrillar A[Formula: see text] oligomerization can lead to protofilaments and protofilament pairs via oligomer elongation and oligomer association, respectively. Small fibrillar oligomers adopt the protofilament topology, whereas fibrils contain at least protofilament pairs. To date, the underlying growth mechanism from oligomers to the mature fibril still remains to be elucidated. Here, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent on single layer-like protofilaments and fibril-like protofilament pairs of different size ranging from the tetramer to the 48-mer. We found that the initial U-shaped topology per monomer is maintained over time in all oligomers. The observed deviations of protofilaments from the starting structure increase significantly with size due to the twisting of the in-register parallel [Formula: see text]-sheets. This twist causes long protofilaments to be unstable and leads to a breakage. Protofilament pairs, which are stabilized by a hydrophobic interface, exhibit more fibril-like properties such as the overall structure and the twist angle. Thus, they can act as stable conformational templates for further fibril growth. Key properties like the twist angle, shape complementarity, and energetics show a size-dependent behavior so that small oligomers favor the protofilament topology, whereas large oligomers favor the protofilament pair topology. The region for this conformational transition is at the size of approximately twelve A[Formula: see text] monomers. From that, we propose the following growth mechanism from A[Formula: see text] oligomers to fibrils: (1) elongation of short protofilaments; (2) breakage of large protofilaments; (3) formation of short protofilament pairs; and (4) elongation of protofilament pairs.

  9. Conformational stability of fibrillar amyloid-beta oligomers via protofilament pair formation - a systematic computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kahler

    Full Text Available Amyloid-[Formula: see text] (A[Formula: see text] oligomers play a crucial role in Alzheimer's disease due to their neurotoxic aggregation properties. Fibrillar A[Formula: see text] oligomerization can lead to protofilaments and protofilament pairs via oligomer elongation and oligomer association, respectively. Small fibrillar oligomers adopt the protofilament topology, whereas fibrils contain at least protofilament pairs. To date, the underlying growth mechanism from oligomers to the mature fibril still remains to be elucidated. Here, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent on single layer-like protofilaments and fibril-like protofilament pairs of different size ranging from the tetramer to the 48-mer. We found that the initial U-shaped topology per monomer is maintained over time in all oligomers. The observed deviations of protofilaments from the starting structure increase significantly with size due to the twisting of the in-register parallel [Formula: see text]-sheets. This twist causes long protofilaments to be unstable and leads to a breakage. Protofilament pairs, which are stabilized by a hydrophobic interface, exhibit more fibril-like properties such as the overall structure and the twist angle. Thus, they can act as stable conformational templates for further fibril growth. Key properties like the twist angle, shape complementarity, and energetics show a size-dependent behavior so that small oligomers favor the protofilament topology, whereas large oligomers favor the protofilament pair topology. The region for this conformational transition is at the size of approximately twelve A[Formula: see text] monomers. From that, we propose the following growth mechanism from A[Formula: see text] oligomers to fibrils: (1 elongation of short protofilaments; (2 breakage of large protofilaments; (3 formation of short protofilament pairs; and (4 elongation of protofilament pairs.

  10. Causative factors for formation of toxic islet amyloid polypeptide oligomer in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong HR

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hye Rin Jeong, Seong Soo A AnDepartment of Bionano Technology, Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of KoreaAbstract: Human islet amyloid polypeptide (h-IAPP is a peptide hormone that is synthesized and cosecreted with insulin from insulin-secreting pancreatic β-cells. Recently, h-IAPP was proposed to be the main component responsible for the cytotoxic pancreatic amyloid deposits in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Since the causative factors of IAPP (or amylin oligomer aggregation are not fully understood, this review will discuss the various forms of h-IAPP aggregation. Not all forms of IAPP aggregates trigger the destruction of β-cell function and loss of β-cell mass; however, toxic oligomers do trigger these events. Once these toxic oligomers form under abnormal metabolic conditions in T2DM, they can lead to cell disruption by inducing cell membrane destabilization. In this review, the various factors that have been shown to induce toxic IAPP oligomer formation will be presented, as well as the potential mechanism of oligomer and fibril formation from pro-IAPPs. Initially, pro-IAPPs undergo enzymatic reactions to produce the IAPP monomers, which can then develop into oligomers and fibrils. By this mechanism, toxic oligomers could be generated by diverse pathway components. Thus, the interconnections between factors that influence amyloid aggregation (eg, absence of PC2 enzyme, deamidation, reduction of disulfide bonds, environmental factors in the cell, genetic mutations, copper metal ions, and heparin will be presented. Hence, this review will aid in understanding the fundamental causative factors contributing to IAPP oligomer formation and support studies for investigating novel T2DM therapeutic approaches, such as the development of inhibitory agents for preventing oligomerization at the early stages of diabetic pathology.Keywords: amyloid aggregation, causative factor, IAPP, islet

  11. Natural amyloidoligomers acutely impair the formation of a contextual fear memory in mice.

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    Kara A Kittelberger

    Full Text Available Memory loss is one of the hallmark symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD. It has been proposed that soluble amyloid-beta (Abeta oligomers acutely impair neuronal function and thereby memory. We here report that natural Abeta oligomers acutely impair contextual fear memory in mice. A natural Abeta oligomer solution containing Abeta monomers, dimers, trimers, and tetramers was derived from the conditioned medium of 7PA2 cells, a cell line that expresses human amyloid precursor protein containing the Val717Phe familial AD mutation. As a control we used 7PA2 conditioned medium from which Abeta oligomers were removed through immunodepletion. Separate groups of mice were injected with Abeta and control solutions through a cannula into the lateral brain ventricle, and subjected to fear conditioning using two tone-shock pairings. One day after fear conditioning, mice were tested for contextual fear memory and tone fear memory in separate retrieval trials. Three experiments were performed. For experiment 1, mice were injected three times: 1 hour before and 3 hours after fear conditioning, and 1 hour before context retrieval. For experiments 2 and 3, mice were injected a single time at 1 hour and 2 hours before fear conditioning respectively. In all three experiments there was no effect on tone fear memory. Injection of Abeta 1 hour before fear conditioning, but not 2 hours before fear conditioning, impaired the formation of a contextual fear memory. In future studies, the acute effect of natural Abeta oligomers on contextual fear memory can be used to identify potential mechanisms and treatments of AD associated memory loss.

  12. Synaptic AmyloidOligomers Precede p-Tau and Differentiate High Pathology Control Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilousova, Tina; Miller, Carol A.; Poon, Wayne W.; Vinters, Harry V.; Corrada, Maria; Kawas, Claudia; Hayden, Eric Y.; Teplow, David B.; Glabe, Charles; Albay, Ricardo; Cole, Gregory M.; Teng, Edmond; Gylys, Karen H.

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) aggregates form the two discrete pathologies of Alzheimer disease (AD), and oligomeric assemblies of each protein are localized to synapses. To determine the sequence by which pathology appears in synapses, Aβ and p-tau were quantified across AD disease stages in parietal cortex. Nondemented cases with high levels of AD-related pathology were included to determine factors that confer protection from clinical symptoms. Flow cytometric analysis of synaptosome preparations was used to quantify Aβ and p-tau in large populations of individual synaptic terminals. Soluble Aβ oligomers were assayed by a single antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Total in situ Aβ was elevated in patients with early- and late-stage AD dementia, but not in high pathology nondemented controls compared with age-matched normal controls. However, soluble Aβ oligomers were highest in early AD synapses, and this assay distinguished early AD cases from high pathology controls. Overall, synapse-associated p-tau did not increase until late-stage disease in human and transgenic rat cortex, and p-tau was elevated in individual Aβ-positive synaptosomes in early AD. These results suggest that soluble oligomers in surviving neocortical synaptic terminals are associated with dementia onset and suggest an amyloid cascade hypothesis in which oligomeric Aβ drives phosphorylated tau accumulation and synaptic spread. These results indicate that antiamyloid therapies will be less effective once p-tau pathology is developed. PMID:26718979

  13. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate Abeta 42 oligomer binding and synaptotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Xu, Jinbin; Zeng, Chenbo; Kirk, Molly J; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Cruchaga, Carlos; Goate, Alison; Cahill, Michael A; Arancio, Ottavio; Mach, Robert H; Craven, Rolf; Head, Elizabeth; LeVine, Harry; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have identified a receptor not previously associated with AD that mediates the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons, and describe novel therapeutic antagonists of this receptor capable of blocking Abeta toxic effects on synapses in vitro and cognitive deficits in vivo. Knockdown of sigma-2/PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1) protein expression in vitro using siRNA results in a highly correlated reduction in binding of exogenous Abeta oligomers to neurons of more than 90%. Expression of sigma-2/PGRMC1 is upregulated in vitro by treatment with Abeta oligomers, and is dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease patients' brain compared to age-matched, normal individuals. Specific, high affinity small molecule receptor antagonists and antibodies raised against specific regions on this receptor can displace synthetic Abeta oligomer binding to synaptic puncta in vitro and displace endogenous human AD patient oligomers from brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner. These receptor antagonists prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking and synapse loss in vitro and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. These findings suggest sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate saturable oligomer binding to synaptic puncta on neurons and that brain penetrant, small molecules can displace endogenous and synthetic oligomers and improve cognitive deficits in AD models. We propose that sigma-2/PGRMC1 is a key mediator of the pathological effects of

  14. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate Abeta 42 oligomer binding and synaptotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta (Abeta 1-42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD. We have identified a receptor not previously associated with AD that mediates the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons, and describe novel therapeutic antagonists of this receptor capable of blocking Abeta toxic effects on synapses in vitro and cognitive deficits in vivo. Knockdown of sigma-2/PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1 protein expression in vitro using siRNA results in a highly correlated reduction in binding of exogenous Abeta oligomers to neurons of more than 90%. Expression of sigma-2/PGRMC1 is upregulated in vitro by treatment with Abeta oligomers, and is dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease patients' brain compared to age-matched, normal individuals. Specific, high affinity small molecule receptor antagonists and antibodies raised against specific regions on this receptor can displace synthetic Abeta oligomer binding to synaptic puncta in vitro and displace endogenous human AD patient oligomers from brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner. These receptor antagonists prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking and synapse loss in vitro and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. These findings suggest sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate saturable oligomer binding to synaptic puncta on neurons and that brain penetrant, small molecules can displace endogenous and synthetic oligomers and improve cognitive deficits in AD models. We propose that sigma-2/PGRMC1 is a key mediator of the pathological

  15. Formation and growth of oligomers: a Monte Carlo study of an amyloid tau fragment.

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    Da-Wei Li

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Small oligomers formed early in the process of amyloid fibril formation may be the major toxic species in Alzheimer's disease. We investigate the early stages of amyloid aggregation for the tau fragment AcPHF6 (Ac-VQIVYK-NH2 using an implicit solvent all-atom model and extensive Monte Carlo simulations of 12, 24, and 36 chains. A variety of small metastable aggregates form and dissolve until an aggregate of a critical size and conformation arises. However, the stable oligomers, which are beta-sheet-rich and feature many hydrophobic contacts, are not always growth-ready. The simulations indicate instead that these supercritical oligomers spend a lengthy period in equilibrium in which considerable reorganization takes place accompanied by exchange of chains with the solution. Growth competence of the stable oligomers correlates with the alignment of the strands in the beta-sheets. The larger aggregates seen in our simulations are all composed of two twisted beta-sheets, packed against each other with hydrophobic side chains at the sheet-sheet interface. These beta-sandwiches show similarities with the proposed steric zipper structure for PHF6 fibrils but have a mixed parallel/antiparallel beta-strand organization as opposed to the parallel organization found in experiments on fibrils. Interestingly, we find that the fraction of parallel beta-sheet structure increases with aggregate size. We speculate that the reorganization of the beta-sheets into parallel ones is an important rate-limiting step in the formation of PHF6 fibrils.

  16. Thermodynamically stable amyloid-β monomers have much lower membrane affinity than the small oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Bidyut; Das, Anand K; Maiti, Sudipta

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) is an extracellular 39-43 residue long peptide present in the mammalian cerebrospinal fluid, whose aggregation is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Small oligomers of Aβ are currently thought to be the key to toxicity. However, it is not clear why the monomers of Aβ are non-toxic, and at what stage of aggregation toxicity emerges. Interactions of Aβ with cell membranes is thought to be the initiator of toxicity, but membrane binding studies with different preparations of monomers and oligomers have not settled this issue. We have earlier found that thermodynamically stable Aβ monomers emerge spontaneously from oligomeric mixtures upon long term incubation in physiological solutions (Nag et al., 2011). Here we show that the membrane-affinity of these stable Aβ monomers is much lower than that of a mixture of monomers and small oligomers (containing dimers to decamers), providing a clue to the emergence of toxicity. Fluorescently labeled Aβ40 monomers show negligible binding to cell membranes of a neuronal cell line (RN46A) at physiological concentrations (250 nM), while oligomers at the same concentrations show strong binding within 30 min of incubation. The increased affinity most likely does not require any specific neuronal receptor, since this difference in membrane-affinity was also observed in a somatic cell-line (HEK 293T). Similar results are also obtained for Aβ42 monomers and oligomers. Minimal amount of cell death is observed at these concentrations even after 36 h of incubation. It is likely that membrane binding precedes subsequent slower toxic events induced by Aβ. Our results (a) provide an explanation for the non-toxic nature of Aβ monomers, (b) suggest that Aβ toxicity emerges at the initial oligomeric phase, and (c) provide a quick assay for monitoring the benign-to-toxic transformation of Aβ.

  17. Thermodynamically stable amyloid-β monomers have much lower membrane affinity than the small oligomers

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    Bidyut eSarkar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta (Aβ is an extracellular 39-43 residue long peptide present in the mammalian cerebrospinal fluid, whose aggregation is associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Small oligomers of Aβ are currently thought to be the key to toxicity. However, it is not clear why the monomers of Aβ are non-toxic, and at what stage of aggregation toxicity emerges. Interactions of Aβ with cell membranes is thought to be the initiator of toxicity, but membrane-binding studies with different preparations of monomers and oligomers have not settled this issue. We have earlier found that thermodynamically stable Aβ monomers emerge spontaneously from oligomeric mixtures upon long term incubation in physiological solutions (Nag et al, JBC, 2011. Here we show that the membrane-affinity of these stable Aβ monomers is much lower than that of a mixture of small oligomers (containing dimers to decamers, providing a clue to the emergence of toxicity. Fluorescently labeled Aβ40 monomers show negligible binding to cell membranes of a neuronal cell line (RN46A at physiological concentrations (250 nM, while oligomers at the same concentrations show strong binding within 30 minutes of incubation. The increased affinity most likely does not require any specific neuronal receptor, since this difference in membrane-affinity was also observed in a somatic cell-line (HEK 293T. Similar results are also obtained for Aβ42 monomers and oligomers. Minimal amount of cell death is observed at these concentrations even after 36 hours of incubation. It is likely that membrane binding precedes subsequent slower toxic events induced by Aβ. Our results a provide an explanation for the non-toxic nature of Aβ monomers, b suggest that Aβ toxicity emerges at the initial oligomeric phase, and c provide a quick assay for monitoring the benign-to-toxic transformation of Aβ.

  18. Salt anions promote the conversion of HypF-N into amyloid-like oligomers and modulate the structure of the oligomers and the monomeric precursor state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campioni, Silvia; Mannini, Benedetta; López-Alonso, Jorge P; Shalova, Irina N; Penco, Amanda; Mulvihill, Estefania; Laurents, Douglas V; Relini, Annalisa; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2012-12-07

    An understanding of the solution factors contributing to the rate of aggregation of a protein into amyloid oligomers, to the modulation of the conformational state populated prior to aggregation and to the structure/morphology of the resulting oligomers is one of the goals of present research in this field. We have studied the influence of six different salts on the conversion of the N-terminal domain of Escherichiacoli HypF (HypF-N) into amyloid-like oligomers under conditions of acidic pH. Our results show that salts having different anions (NaCl, NaClO(4), NaI, Na(2)SO(4)) accelerate oligomerization with an efficacy that follows the electroselectivity series of the anions (SO(4)(2-)≥ ClO(4)(-)>I(-)>Cl(-)). By contrast, salts with different cations (NaCl, LiCl, KCl) have similar effects. We also investigated the effect of salts on the structure of the final and initial states of HypF-N aggregation. The electroselectivity series does not apply to the effect of anions on the structure of the oligomers. By contrast, it applies to their effect on the content of secondary structure and on the exposure of hydrophobic clusters of the monomeric precursor state. The results therefore indicate that the binding of anions to the positively charged residues of HypF-N at low pH is the mechanism by which salts modulate the rate of oligomerization and the structure of the monomeric precursor state but not the structure of the resulting oligomers. Overall, the data contribute to rationalize the effect of salts on amyloid-like oligomer formation and to explain the role of charged biological macromolecules in protein aggregation processes.

  19. Time Until Neuron Death After Initial Puncture From an Amyloid-Beta Oligomer

    CERN Document Server

    Horton, Tanner

    2015-01-01

    Hardy and Higgins first proposed the amyloid cascade hypothesis in 1992, stating that the decrease in neuronal function observed in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is due to a process initiated by the oligomerization of amyloid-beta peptides. One hypothesis states that toxicity arises from the aggregation of amyloid-beta into a pore structure, which can then puncture the brain cell membrane; this allow toxic calcium ions to flood through the opening, causing eventual cell death. In 2007, neurobiologist Ruth Nussinov calculated the three pore sizes most likely to occur within the brain. Based on her findings, we constructed a method to determine the time it takes for a cell to die after the cell is punctured by the pore. Our findings have shown that cell death occurs within one second after the oligomer makes contact with the cell. We believe this is important because instant cell death has been one criticism of Nussinov's model, and we have calculated a concrete time value for that criticism. We identify two potenti...

  20. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD models

  1. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in

  2. Alzheimer's Therapeutics Targeting Amyloid Beta 1–42 Oligomers I: Abeta 42 Oligomer Binding to Specific Neuronal Receptors Is Displaced by Drug Candidates That Improve Cognitive Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J.; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F.; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1–42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors - i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD

  3. The Slowly Aggregating Salmon Calcitonin: A Useful Tool for the Study of the Amyloid Oligomers Structure and Activity

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    Marco Diociaiuti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid proteins of different aminoacidic composition share the tendency to misfold and aggregate in a similar way, following common aggregation steps. The process includes the formation of dimers, trimers, and low molecular weight prefibrillar oligomers, characterized by the typical morphology of globules less than 10 nm diameter. The globules spontaneously form linear or annular structures and, eventually, mature fibers. The rate of this process depends on characteristics intrinsic to the different proteins and to environmental conditions (i.e., pH, ionic strength, solvent composition, temperature. In the case of neurodegenerative diseases, it is now generally agreed that the pathogenic aggregates are not the mature fibrils, but the intermediate, soluble oligomers. However, the molecular mechanism by which these oligomers trigger neuronal damage is still unclear. Inparticular, it is not clear if there is a peculiar structure at the basis of the neurotoxic effect and how this structure interacts with neurons. This review will focus on the results we obtained using salmon Calcitonin, an amyloid protein characterized by a very slow aggregation rate, which allowed us to closely monitor the aggregation process. We used it as a tool to investigate the characteristics of amyloid oligomers formation and their interactions with neuronal cells. Our results indicate that small globules of about 6 nm could be the responsible for the neurotoxic effects. Moreover, our data suggest that the rich content in lipid rafts of neuronal cell plasma membrane may render neurons particularly vulnerable to the amyloid protein toxic effect.

  4. The slowly aggregating salmon Calcitonin: a useful tool for the study of the amyloid oligomers structure and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diociaiuti, Marco; Gaudiano, Maria Cristina; Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid proteins of different aminoacidic composition share the tendency to misfold and aggregate in a similar way, following common aggregation steps. The process includes the formation of dimers, trimers, and low molecular weight prefibrillar oligomers, characterized by the typical morphology of globules less than 10 nm diameter. The globules spontaneously form linear or annular structures and, eventually, mature fibers. The rate of this process depends on characteristics intrinsic to the different proteins and to environmental conditions (i.e., pH, ionic strength, solvent composition, temperature). In the case of neurodegenerative diseases, it is now generally agreed that the pathogenic aggregates are not the mature fibrils, but the intermediate, soluble oligomers. However, the molecular mechanism by which these oligomers trigger neuronal damage is still unclear. In particular, it is not clear if there is a peculiar structure at the basis of the neurotoxic effect and how this structure interacts with neurons. This review will focus on the results we obtained using salmon Calcitonin, an amyloid protein characterized by a very slow aggregation rate, which allowed us to closely monitor the aggregation process. We used it as a tool to investigate the characteristics of amyloid oligomers formation and their interactions with neuronal cells. Our results indicate that small globules of about 6 nm could be the responsible for the neurotoxic effects. Moreover, our data suggest that the rich content in lipid rafts of neuronal cell plasma membrane may render neurons particularly vulnerable to the amyloid protein toxic effect.

  5. Vaccination with a non-human random sequence amyloid oligomer mimic results in improved cognitive function and reduced plaque deposition and micro hemorrhage in Tg2576 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool Suhail

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that vaccination of humans and transgenic animals against fibrillar Aβ prevents amyloid accumulation in plaques and preserves cognitive function in transgenic mouse models. However, autoimmune side effects have halted the development of vaccines based on full length human Aβ. Further development of an effective vaccine depends on overcoming these side effects while maintaining an effective immune response. Results We have previously reported that the immune response to amyloid oligomers is largely directed against generic epitopes that are common to amyloid oligomers of many different proteins and independent of a specific amino acid sequence. Here we have examined whether we can exploit this generic immune response to develop a vaccine that targets amyloid oligomers using a non-human random sequence amyloid oligomer. In order to study the effect of vaccination against generic oligomer epitopes, a random sequence oligomer (3A was selected as it forms oligomers that react with the oligomer specific A11 antibody. Oligomer mimics from 3A peptide, Aβ, islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, and Aβ fibrils were used to vaccinate Tg2576 mice, which develop a progressive accumulation of plaques and cognitive impairment. Vaccination with the 3A random sequence antigen was just as effective as vaccination with the other antigens in improving cognitive function and reducing total plaque load (Aβ burden in the Tg2576 mouse brains, but was associated with a much lower incidence of micro hemorrhage than Aβ antigens. Conclusion These results shows that the amyloid Aβ sequence is not necessary to produce a protective immune response that specifically targets generic amyloid oligomers. Using a non-human, random sequence antigen may facilitate the development of a vaccine that avoids autoimmune side effects.

  6. AMYLOID BETA OLIGOMERS IMPAIR FEAR CONDITIONED MEMORY IN A CALCINEURIN-DEPENDENT FASHION IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineley, Kelly T.; Kayed, Rakez; Neugebauer, Volker; Fu, Yu; Zhang, Wenru; Reese, Lindsay C.; Taglialatela, Giulio

    2010-01-01

    Soluble oligomeric aggregates of the amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide are believed to be the most neurotoxic Aβ species affecting the brain in Alzheimer Disease (AD), a terminal neurodegenerative disorder involving severe cognitive decline underlined by initial synaptic dysfunction and later extensive neuronal death in the CNS. Recent evidence indicates that Aβ oligomers are recruited at the synapse, oppose expression of long term potentiation (LTP), perturb intracellular calcium balance, disrupt dendritic spines and induce memory deficits. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these outcomes are only partially understood; achieving such insight is necessary for the comprehension of Aβ-mediated neuronal dysfunction. We have investigated the role of the phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) in the pathological processes of AD. CaN is especially abundant in the CNS where it is involved in synaptic activity, LTP and memory function. Here, we describe how oligomeric Aβ treatment causes memory deficits and depresses LTP expression in a CaN-dependent fashion. Mice given a single intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ oligomers exhibited increased CaN activity and decreased pCREB, a transcription factor involved in proper synaptic function, accompanied by decreased memory in a fear conditioning task. These effects were reversed by treatment with the CaN inhibitor FK506. We further found that expression of hippocampal LTP in acutely cultured rodent brain slices was opposed by Aβ oligomers and that this effect was also reversed by FK506. Collectively, these results indicate that CaN activation may play a central role in mediating synaptic and memory disrupting effect induced by acute oligomeric Aβ treatment in mice. PMID:20544830

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL ENRICHMENT STRENGTHENS CORTICOCORTICAL INTERACTIONS AND REDUCES AMYLOIDOLIGOMERS IN AGED MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eMainardi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain aging is characterized by global changes which are thought to underlie age-related cognitive decline. These include variations in brain activity and the progressive increase in the concentration of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ oligomers, directly impairing synaptic function and plasticity even in the absence of any neurodegenerative disorder. Considering the high social impact of the decline in brain performance associated to aging, there is an urgent need to better understand how it can be prevented or contrasted. Lifestyle components, such as social interaction, motor exercise and cognitive activity, are thought to modulate brain physiology and its susceptibility to age-related pathologies. However, the precise functional and molecular factors that respond to environmental stimuli and might mediate their protective action again pathological aging still need to be clearly identified. To address this issue, we exploited environmental enrichment (EE, a reliable model for studying the effect of experience on the brain based on the enhancement of cognitive, social and motor experience, in aged wild-type mice. We analyzed the functional consequences of EE on aged brain physiology by performing in vivo local field potential (LFP recordings with chronic implants. In addition, we also investigated changes induced by EE on molecular markers of neural plasticity and on the levels of soluble Aβ oligomers. We report that EE induced profound changes in the activity of the primary visual and auditory cortices and in their functional interaction. At the molecular level, EE enhanced plasticity by an upward shift of the cortical excitation/inhibition balance. In addition, EE reduced brain Aβ oligomers and increased synthesis of the Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin. Our findings strengthen the potential of EE procedures as a non-invasive paradigm for counteracting brain aging processes.

  8. Environmental enrichment strengthens corticocortical interactions and reduces amyloidoligomers in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, Marco; Di Garbo, Angelo; Caleo, Matteo; Berardi, Nicoletta; Sale, Alessandro; Maffei, Lamberto

    2014-01-01

    Brain aging is characterized by global changes which are thought to underlie age-related cognitive decline. These include variations in brain activity and the progressive increase in the concentration of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers, directly impairing synaptic function and plasticity even in the absence of any neurodegenerative disorder. Considering the high social impact of the decline in brain performance associated to aging, there is an urgent need to better understand how it can be prevented or contrasted. Lifestyle components, such as social interaction, motor exercise and cognitive activity, are thought to modulate brain physiology and its susceptibility to age-related pathologies. However, the precise functional and molecular factors that respond to environmental stimuli and might mediate their protective action again pathological aging still need to be clearly identified. To address this issue, we exploited environmental enrichment (EE), a reliable model for studying the effect of experience on the brain based on the enhancement of cognitive, social and motor experience, in aged wild-type mice. We analyzed the functional consequences of EE on aged brain physiology by performing in vivo local field potential (LFP) recordings with chronic implants. In addition, we also investigated changes induced by EE on molecular markers of neural plasticity and on the levels of soluble Aβ oligomers. We report that EE induced profound changes in the activity of the primary visual and auditory cortices and in their functional interaction. At the molecular level, EE enhanced plasticity by an upward shift of the cortical excitation/inhibition balance. In addition, EE reduced brain Aβ oligomers and increased synthesis of the Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin. Our findings strengthen the potential of EE procedures as a non-invasive paradigm for counteracting brain aging processes.

  9. Amyloid-beta oligomers impair fear conditioned memory in a calcineurin-dependent fashion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineley, Kelly T; Kayed, Rakez; Neugebauer, Volker; Fu, Yu; Zhang, Wenru; Reese, Lindsay C; Taglialatela, Giulio

    2010-10-01

    Soluble oligomeric aggregates of the amyloid-beta (A beta) peptide are believed to be the most neurotoxic A beta species affecting the brain in Alzheimer disease (AD), a terminal neurodegenerative disorder involving severe cognitive decline underscored by initial synaptic dysfunction and later extensive neuronal death in the CNS. Recent evidence indicates that A beta oligomers are recruited at the synapse, oppose expression of long-term potentiation (LTP), perturb intracellular calcium balance, disrupt dendritic spines, and induce memory deficits. However, the molecular mechanisms behind these outcomes are only partially understood; achieving such insight is necessary for the comprehension of A beta-mediated neuronal dysfunction. We have investigated the role of the phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) in these pathological processes of AD. CaN is especially abundant in the CNS, where it is involved in synaptic activity, LTP, and memory function. Here, we describe how oligomeric A beta treatment causes memory deficits and depresses LTP expression in a CaN-dependent fashion. Mice given a single intracerebroventricular injection of A beta oligomers exhibited increased CaN activity and decreased pCREB, a transcription factor involved in proper synaptic function, accompanied by decreased memory in a fear conditioning task. These effects were reversed by treatment with the CaN inhibitor FK506. We further found that expression of hippocampal LTP in acutely cultured rodent brain slices was opposed by A beta oligomers and that this effect was also reversed by FK506. Collectively, these results indicate that CaN activation may play a central role in mediating synaptic and memory disruption induced by acute oligomeric A beta treatment in mice. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Protective spin-labeled fluorenes maintain amyloid beta peptide in small oligomers and limit transitions in secondary structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, Robin [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; Ly, Sonny [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Physical and Life Science Directorate; Hilt, Silvia [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; Petrlova, Jitka [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; Maezawa, Izumi [Univ. of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States). MIND Inst. and Dept. of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine; Kálai, Tamás [Univ. of Pecs (Hungary). Inst. of Organic and Medicinal Chemistry; Hideg, Kálmán [Univ. of Pecs (Hungary). Inst. of Organic and Medicinal Chemistry; Jin, Lee-Way [Univ. of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States). MIND Inst. and Dept. of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine; Laurence, Ted A. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; Voss, John C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques comprised of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides. Soluble oligomers of the Aβ peptide underlie a cascade of neuronal loss and dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease. Single particle analyses of Aβ oligomers in solution by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) were used to provide real-time descriptions of how spin-labeled fluorenes (SLFs; bi-functional small molecules that block the toxicity of Aβ) prevent and disrupt oligomeric assemblies of Aβ in solution. The FCS results, combined with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy, demonstrate SLFs can inhibit the growth of Aβ oligomers and disrupt existing oligomers while retaining Aβ in a largely disordered state. Furthermore, while the ability of SLF to block Aβ toxicity correlates with a reduction in oligomer size, our results suggest the conformation of Aβ within the oligomer determines the toxicity of the species. Attenuation of Aβ toxicity, which has been associated primarily with the soluble oligomeric form, can be achieved through redistribution of the peptides into smaller oligomers and arrest of the fractional increase in beta secondary structure.

  11. Dynamic assessment of Amyloid oligomers - cell membrane interaction by advanced impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, M.; David, S.; Polonschii, C.; Bratu, D.; Gheorghiu, E.

    2013-04-01

    The amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are believed to be pivotal in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis and onset of vascular dysfunction. Recent studies indicate that Aβ1-42 treatment influences the expression of tight junction protein complexes, stress fibre formation, disruption and aggregation of actin filaments and cellular gap formation. Aiming for functional characterization of model cells upon Aβ1-42 treatment, we deployed an advanced Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing for monitoring cell evolution. A precision Impedance Analyzer with a multiplexing module developed in house was used for recording individual electrode sets in the 40 Hz - 100 KHz frequency range. In a step forward from the classical ECIS assays, we report on a novel data analysis algorithm that enables access to cellular and paracellular electrical parameters and cell surface interaction with fully developed cell monolayers. The evolution of the impedance at selected frequencies provides evidence for a dual effect of Aβ42 exposure, at both paracellular permeability and cell adherence level, with intricate dynamics that open up new perspectives on Aβ1-42 oligomers - cell membrane interaction. Validation of electrical impedance assays of the amyloid fibrils effect on cell membrane structure is achieved by both AFM analysis and Surface Plasmon Resonance studies. The capabilities of this noninvasive, real time platform for cell analysis in a wider applicative context are outlined.

  12. The load of amyloidoligomers is decreased in the cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancesario, Giulia M; Cencioni, Maria T; Esposito, Zaira; Borsellino, Giovanna; Nuccetelli, Marzia; Martorana, Alessandro; Battistini, Luca; Sorge, Roberto; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Ferrazzoli, Davide; Bernardi, Giorgio; Bernardini, Sergio; Sancesario, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers are heterogeneous and instable compounds of variable molecular weight. Flow cytometry and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based methods allow the simultaneous detection of Aβ oligomers with low and high molecular weight in their native form. We evaluated whether an estimate of different species of Aβ oligomers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with or without dilution with RIPA buffer could be more useful in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) than the measurement of Aβ42 monomers, total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau). Increased t-tau (p tau (p tau was lower in AD than in OD (p estimate of low and high molecular weight Aβ oligomers is as useful as the other biomarkers in the diagnosis of AD. The low amount of Aβ oligomers detected in native CSF of AD may be inversely related to their levels in the brain, as occurs for Aβ monomers, representing a biomarker for the amyloid pathogenic cascade.

  13. Pre-amyloid oligomers of the proteotoxic RepA-WH1 prionoid assemble at the bacterial nucleoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-del Álamo, María; de la Espina, Susana Moreno-Díaz; Fernández-Tresguerres, M. Elena; Giraldo, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Upon binding to short specific dsDNA sequences in vitro, the N-terminal WH1 domain of the plasmid DNA replication initiator RepA assembles as amyloid fibres. These are bundles of single or double twisted tubular filaments in which distorted RepA-WH1 monomers are the building blocks. When expressed in Escherichia coli, RepA-WH1 triggers the first synthetic amyloid proteinopathy in bacteria, recapitulating some of the features of mammalian prion diseases: it is vertically transmissible, albeit non-infectious, showing up in at least two phenotypically distinct and interconvertible strains. Here we report B3h7, a monoclonal antibody specific for oligomers of RepA-WH1, but which does not recognize the mature amyloid fibres. Unlike a control polyclonal antibody generated against the soluble protein, B3h7 interferes in vitro with DNA-promoted or amyloid-seeded assembly of RepA-WH1 fibres, thus the targeted oligomers are on-pathway amyloidogenic intermediates. Immuno-electron microscopy with B3h7 on thin sections of E. coli cells expressing RepA-WH1 consistently labels the bacterial nucleoid, but not the large cytoplasmic aggregates of the protein. This observation points to the nucleoid as the place where oligomeric amyloid precursors of RepA-WH1 are generated, and suggests that, once nucleated by DNA, further growth must continue in the cytoplasm due to entropic exclusion. PMID:26423724

  14. Crystal structure of the amyloid-β p3 fragment provides a model for oligomer formation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, Victor A; Varghese, Joseph N; Masters, Colin L; Nuttall, Stewart D

    2011-01-26

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with the presence of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide fibrillar plaques in the brain. However, current evidence suggests that soluble nonfibrillar Aβ oligomers may be the major drivers of Aβ-mediated synaptic dysfunction. Structural information on these Aβ species has been very limited because of their noncrystalline and unstable nature. Here, we describe a crystal structure of amylogenic residues 18-41 of the Aβ peptide (equivalent to the p3 α/γ-secretase fragment of amyloid precursor protein) presented within the CDR3 loop region of a shark Ig new antigen receptor (IgNAR) single variable domain antibody. The predominant oligomeric species is a tightly associated Aβ dimer, with paired dimers forming a tetramer in the crystal caged within four IgNAR domains, preventing uncontrolled amyloid formation. Our structure correlates with independently observed features of small nonfibrillar Aβ oligomers and reveals conserved elements consistent with residues and motifs predicted as critical in Aβ folding and oligomerization, thus potentially providing a model system for nonfibrillar oligomer formation in Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Selective amyloid β oligomer assay based on abasic site-containing molecular beacon and enzyme-free amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linling; Zhang, Junying; Wang, Fengyang; Wang, Ya; Lu, Linlin; Feng, Chongchong; Xu, Zhiai; Zhang, Wen

    2016-04-15

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) oligomers are highly toxic species in the process of Aβ aggregation and are regarded as potent therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Herein, a label-free molecular beacon (MB) system integrated with enzyme-free amplification strategy was developed for simple and highly selective assay of Aβ oligomers. The MB system was constructed with abasic site (AP site)-containing stem-loop DNA and a fluorescent ligand 2-amino-5,6,7-trimethyl-1,8-naphyridine (ATMND), of which the fluorescence was quenched upon binding to the AP site in DNA stem. Enzyme-free amplification was realized by target-triggered continuous opening of two delicately designed MBs (MB1 and MB2). Target DNA hybridization with MB1 and then MB2 resulted in the release of two ATMND molecules in one binding event. Subsequent target recycling could greatly amplify the detection sensitivity due to the greatly enhanced turn-on emission of ATMND fluorescence. Combining with Aβ oligomers aptamers, the strategy was applied to analyze Aβ oligomers and the results showed that it could quantify Aβ oligomers with high selectivity and monitor the Aβ aggregation process. This novel method may be conducive to improve the diagnosis and pathogenic study of Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Amyloid β oligomers induce interleukin-1β production in primary microglia in a cathepsin B- and reactive oxygen species-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneo, Jun; Adachi, Takumi [Department of Animal Development and Physiology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Yoshida, Aiko; Takayasu, Kunio [Responses to Environmental Signals and Stresses, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Takahara, Kazuhiko, E-mail: ktakahar@zoo.zool.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Animal Development and Physiology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Tokyo 102-0081 (Japan); Inaba, Kayo [Department of Animal Development and Physiology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Tokyo 102-0081 (Japan)

    2015-03-13

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide, a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease, forms two types of aggregates: oligomers and fibrils. These aggregates induce inflammatory responses, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production by microglia, which are macrophage-like cells located in the brain. In this study, we examined the effect of the two forms of Aβ aggregates on IL-1β production in mouse primary microglia. We prepared Aβ oligomer and fibril from Aβ (1–42) peptide in vitro. We analyzed the characteristics of these oligomers and fibrils by electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy. Interestingly, Aβ oligomers but not Aβ monomers or fibrils induced robust IL-1β production in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, Aβ oligomers induced endo/phagolysosome rupture, which released cathepsin B into the cytoplasm. Aβ oligomer-induced IL-1β production was inhibited not only by the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074-Me but also by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor N-acetylcysteine. Random chemical crosslinking abolished the ability of the oligomers to induce IL-1β. Thus, multimerization and fibrillization causes Aβ oligomers to lose the ability to induce IL-1β. These results indicate that Aβ oligomers, but not fibrils, induce IL-1β production in primary microglia in a cathepsin B- and ROS-dependent manner. - Highlights: • We prepared amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils with minimum contamination of Aβ oligomers. • Primary microglia (MG) produced IL-1β in response to Aβ oligomers, but not fibrils. • Only Aβ oligomers induced leakage of cathepsin B from endo/phagolysosomes. • IL-1β production in response to Aβ oligomers depended on both cathepsin B and ROS. • Crosslinking reduced the ability of the Aβ oligomers to induce IL-1β from MG.

  17. Evidence that a synthetic amyloidoligomer-binding peptide (ABP) targets amyloid-ß deposits in transgenic mouse brain and human Alzheimer's disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Balu; Ito, Shingo; Atkinson, Trevor; Gaudet, Chantal; Ménard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Whitfield, James

    2014-03-14

    The synthetic ~5 kDa ABP (amyloid-ß binding peptide) consists of a region of the 228 kDa human pericentrioloar material-1 (PCM-1) protein that selectively and avidly binds in vitro Aβ1-42 oligomers, believed to be key co-drivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but not monomers (Chakravarthy et al., (2013) [3]). ABP also prevents Aß1-42 from triggering the apoptotic death of cultured human SHSY5Y neuroblasts, likely by sequestering Aß oligomers, suggesting that it might be a potential AD therapeutic. Here we support this possibility by showing that ABP also recognizes and binds Aβ1-42 aggregates in sections of cortices and hippocampi from brains of AD transgenic mice and human AD patients. More importantly, ABP targets Aβ1-42 aggregates when microinjected into the hippocampi of the brains of live AD transgenic mice.

  18. Postsynaptic Receptors for AmyloidOligomers as Mediators of Neuronal Damage in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinamarca, Margarita C.; Ríos, Juvenal A.; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2012-01-01

    The neurotoxic effect of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) over the central synapses has been described and is reflected in the decrease of some postsynaptic excitatory proteins, the alteration in the number and morphology of the dendritic spines, and a decrease in long-term potentiation. Many studies has been carried out to identify the putative Aβ receptors in neurons, and is still no clear why the Aβ oligomers only affect the excitatory synapses. Aβ oligomers bind to neurite and preferentially to the postsynaptic region, where the postsynaptic protein-95 (PSD-95) is present in the glutamatergic synapse, and interacts directly with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and neuroligin (NL). NL is a postsynaptic protein which binds to the presynaptic protein, neurexin to form a heterophilic adhesion complex, the disruption of this interaction affects the integrity of the synaptic contact. Structurally, NL has an extracellular domain homolog to acetylcholinesterase, the first synaptic protein that was found to interact with Aβ. In the present review we will document the interaction between Aβ and the extracellular domain of NL-1 at the excitatory synapse, as well as the interaction with other postsynaptic components, including the glutamatergic receptors (NMDA and mGluR5), the prion protein, the neurotrophin receptor, and the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. We conclude that several Aβ oligomers receptors exist at the excitatory synapse, which could be the responsible for the neurotoxic effect described for the Aβ oligomers. The characterization of the interaction between Aβ receptors and Aβ oligomers could help to understand the source of the neurologic damage observed in the brain of the Alzheimer’s disease patients. PMID:23267328

  19. Oligomer Formation of Amyloid-β(29-42) from Its Monomers Using the Hamiltonian Replica-Permutation Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Satoru G; Okumura, Hisashi

    2016-07-14

    Oligomers of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) are formed during the early stage of the amyloidogenesis process and exhibit neurotoxicity. The oligomer formation process of Aβ and even that of Aβ fragments are still poorly understood, though understanding of these processes is essential for remedying Alzheimer's disease. In order to better understand the oligomerization process of the C-terminal Aβ fragment Aβ(29-42) at the atomic level, we performed the Hamiltonian replica-permutation molecular dynamics simulation with Aβ(29-42) molecules using the explicit water solvent model. We observed that oligomers increased in size through the sequential addition of monomers to the oligomer, rather than through the assembly of small oligomers. Moreover, solvent effects played an important role in this oligomerization process.

  20. Rapid α-oligomer formation mediated by the Aβ C terminus initiates an amyloid assembly pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Pinaki; Kodali, Ravindra; Chemuru, Saketh; Kar, Karunakar; Wetzel, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Since early oligomeric intermediates in amyloid assembly are often transient and difficult to distinguish, characterize and quantify, the mechanistic basis of the initiation of spontaneous amyloid growth is often opaque. We describe here an approach to the analysis of the Aβ aggregation mechanism that uses Aβ-polyglutamine hybrid peptides designed to retard amyloid maturation and an adjusted thioflavin intensity scale that reveals structural features of aggregation intermediates. The results ...

  1. A mechanistic model of tau amyloid aggregation based on direct observation of oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shammas, Sarah L.; Garcia, Gonzalo A.; Kumar, Satish; Kjaergaard, Magnus; Horrocks, Mathew H.; Shivji, Nadia; Mandelkow, Eva; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Klenerman, David

    2015-04-01

    Protein aggregation plays a key role in neurodegenerative disease, giving rise to small oligomers that may become cytotoxic to cells. The fundamental microscopic reactions taking place during aggregation, and their rate constants, have been difficult to determine due to lack of suitable methods to identify and follow the low concentration of oligomers over time. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence to study the aggregation of the repeat domain of tau (K18), and two mutant forms linked with familial frontotemporal dementia, the deletion mutant ΔK280 and the point mutant P301L. Our kinetic analysis reveals that aggregation proceeds via monomeric assembly into small oligomers, and a subsequent slow structural conversion step before fibril formation. Using this approach, we have been able to quantitatively determine how these mutations alter the aggregation energy landscape.

  2. Site-specific blockade of RAGE-Vd prevents amyloid-beta oligomer neurotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Sturchler, E; Galichet, A; Weibel, M; Leclerc, E; Heizmann, C W

    2008-01-01

    In the genesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), converging lines of evidence suggest that amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) triggers a pathogenic cascade leading to neuronal loss. It was long assumed that Abeta had to be assembled into extracellular amyloid fibrils or aggregates to exert its cytotoxic effects. Over the past decade, characterization of soluble oligomeric Abeta species in the brains of AD patients and in transgenic models has raised the possibility that different conformations of Abeta ...

  3. The Familial British Dementia Mutation Promotes Formation of Neurotoxic Cystine Cross-linked Amyloid Bri (ABri) Oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantlon, Adam; Frigerio, Carlo Sala; Freir, Darragh B; Boland, Barry; Jin, Ming; Walsh, Dominic M

    2015-07-03

    Familial British dementia (FBD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease believed to result from a mutation in the BRI2 gene. Post-translational processing of wild type BRI2 and FBD-BRI2 result in the production of a 23-residue long Bri peptide and a 34-amino acid long ABri peptide, respectively, and ABri is found deposited in the brains of individuals with FBD. Similarities in the neuropathology and clinical presentation shared by FBD and Alzheimer disease (AD) have led some to suggest that ABri and the AD-associated amyloid β-protein (Aβ) are molecular equivalents that trigger analogous pathogenic cascades. But the sequences and innate properties of ABri and Aβ are quite different, notably ABri contains two cysteine residues that can form disulfide bonds. Thus we sought to determine whether ABri was neurotoxic and if this activity was regulated by oxidation and/or aggregation. Crucially, the type of oxidative cross-linking dramatically influenced both ABri aggregation and toxicity. Cyclization of Bri and ABri resulted in production of biologically inert monomers that showed no propensity to assemble, whereas reduced ABri and reduced Bri aggregated forming thioflavin T-positive amyloid fibrils that lacked significant toxic activity. ABri was more prone to form inter-molecular disulfide bonds than Bri and the formation of covalently stabilized ABri oligomers was associated with toxicity. These results suggest that extension of the C-terminal of Bri causes a shift in the type of disulfide bonds formed and that structures built from covalently cross-linked oligomers can interact with neurons and compromise their function and viability.

  4. Major Reaction Coordinates Linking Transient AmyloidOligomers to Fibrils Measured at Atomic Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Bappaditya; Bhowmik, Debanjan; Maity, Barun Kumar; Mote, Kaustubh R; Dhara, Debabrata; Venkatramani, Ravindra; Maiti, Sudipta; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K

    2017-08-22

    The structural underpinnings for the higher toxicity of the oligomeric intermediates of amyloidogenic peptides, compared to the mature fibrils, remain unknown at present. The transient nature and heterogeneity of the oligomers make it difficult to follow their structure. Here, using vibrational and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations, we show that freely aggregating Aβ40 oligomers in physiological solutions have an intramolecular antiparallel configuration that is distinct from the intermolecular parallel β-sheet structure observed in mature fibrils. The intramolecular hydrogen-bonding network flips nearly 90°, and the two β-strands of each monomeric unit move apart, to give rise to the well-known intermolecular in-register parallel β-sheet structure in the mature fibrils. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance distance measurements capture the interstrand separation within monomer units during the transition from the oligomer to the fibril form. We further find that the D23-K28 salt-bridge, a major feature of the Aβ40 fibrils and a focal point of mutations linked to early onset Alzheimer's disease, is not detectable in the small oligomers. Molecular dynamics simulations capture the correlation between changes in the D23-K28 distance and the flipping of the monomer secondary structure between antiparallel and parallel β-sheet architectures. Overall, we propose interstrand separation and salt-bridge formation as key reaction coordinates describing the structural transition of the small Aβ40 oligomers to fibrils. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhancement of β-amyloid oligomer accumulation after intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin, which involves central insulin signaling in a transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fangju; Jia, Jianping; Qin, Wei

    2014-11-12

    The β-amyloid (Aβ) oligomer rather than fibrillar Aβ has become the important focus of recent studies on the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Insulin signaling plays important roles in cognitive disease, such as AD. However, in-vivo evidence for the link between central insulin signaling and the Aβ oligomer are lacking, and the mechanisms underlying the effect of central insulin signaling on AD are still elusive. Our team has established the Presenilin-1 Val97Leu mutant transgenic (PS1V97L) AD mouse model with the intraneuronal Aβ oligomer as the potential initiator for other pathologies, but without extracellular amyloid plaque formation. Using this model, we investigated the roles of disturbed central insulin signaling induced by intracerebroventricular injection of streptozotocin (STZ) in the progression of AD. We observed that PS1V97L mice after intracerebroventricular injection of STZ showed increased Aβ oligomer accumulation and aggravated spatial learning and memory deficit in the absence of diabetes symptoms. Furthermore, STZ administration inhibited the activation of the insulin receptor and enhanced the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, which was accompanied by increased production of carboxy-terminal fragments from the amyloid precursor protein, in the brain of PS1V97L mice. Overall, our study provided in-vivo evidence for a role of central insulin signaling in AD progression.

  6. Small angle X-ray scattering analysis of Cu(2+)-induced oligomers of the Alzheimer's amyloid β peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Timothy M; Kirby, Nigel; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Roberts, Blaine; Barnham, Kevin J; Cappai, Roberto; Pham, Chi Le Lan; Masters, Colin L; Curtain, Cyril C

    2015-03-01

    Research into causes of Alzheimer's disease and its treatment has produced a tantalising array of hypotheses about the role of transition metal dyshomeostasis, many of them on the interaction of these metals with the neurotoxic amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). Here, we have used small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to study the effect of the molar ratio, Cu(2+)/Aβ, on the early three-dimensional structures of the Aβ1-40 and Cu(2+)/Aβ1-42 peptides in solution. We found that at molar ratios of 0.5 copper to peptide Aβ1-40 aggregated, while Aβ1-42 adopted a relatively monodisperse cylindrical shape, and at a ratio of 1.5 copper to peptide Aβ1-40 adopted a monodisperse cylindrical shape, while Aβ1-42 adopted the shape of an ellipsoid of rotation. We also found, via in-line rapid mixing SAXS analysis, that both peptides in the absence of copper were monodisperse at very short timeframes (peptide, with a higher ratio favouring the formation of cytotoxic non-amyloid oligomers. Our results are relatively consistent with previous two-dimensional studies of the conformations of these Cu(2+)-induced entities, made on a much longer time-scale than SAXS, by transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, which showed that a range of oligomeric species are formed. We propose that SAXS carried out on a modern synchrotron beamline enables studies on initial events in disordered protein folding on physiologically-relevant time-scales, and will likely provide great insight into the initiating processes of the Aβ misfolding, oligomerisation and amyloid formation.

  7. Lithium and memantine improve spatial memory impairment and neuroinflammation induced by β-amyloid 1-42 oligomers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budni, J; Feijó, D P; Batista-Silva, H; Garcez, M L; Mina, F; Belletini-Santos, T; Krasilchik, L R; Luz, A P; Schiavo, G L; Quevedo, J

    2017-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. The main hallmarks of this disease include progressive cognitive dysfunction and an accumulation of soluble oligomers of β-amyloid (Aβ) 1-42 peptide. In this research, we show the effects of lithium and memantine on spatial memory and neuroinflammation in an Aβ1-42 oligomers-induced animal model of dementia in rats. Aβ 1-42 oligomers were administered intrahippocampally to male wistar rats to induce dementia. Oral treatments with memantine (5mg/kg), lithium (5mg/kg), or both drugs in combination were performed over a period of 17days. 14days after the administration of the Aβ1-42 oligomers, the radial arm-maze task was performed. At the end of the test period, the animals were euthanized, and the frontal cortex and hippocampus were removed for use in our analysis. Our results showed that alone treatments with lithium or memantine ameliorate the spatial memory damage caused by Aβ1-42. The animals that received combined doses of lithium and memantine showed better cognitive performance in their latency time and total errors to find food when compared to the results from alone treatments. Moreover, in our study, lithium and/or memantine were able to reverse the decreases observed in the levels of interleukin (IL)-4 that were induced by Aβ1-42 in the frontal cortex. In the hippocampus, only memantine and the association of memantine and lithium were able to reverse this effect. Alone doses of lithium and memantine or the association of lithium and memantine caused reductions in the levels of IL-1β in the frontal cortex and hippocampus, and decreased the levels of TNF-α in the hippocampus. Taken together, these data suggest that lithium and memantine might be a potential therapy against cognitive impairment and neuroinflammation induced by Aβ1-42, and their association may be a promising alternative to be investigated in the treatment of AD-like dementia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  8. Systematic analysis of time-dependent neural effects of soluble amyloid β oligomers in culture and in vivo: Prevention by scyllo-inositol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ming; Selkoe, Dennis J

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is currently being addressed by intensive investment in pre-clinical and clinical research on the amyloid hypothesis, but concern remains about the validity of the concept that soluble Aβ oligomers are principally responsible for initiating AD phenotypes. Here, we apply well-defined Aβ oligomers isolated from AD brains or made synthetically to document a systematic accrual of first subtle and then more profound changes in certain synaptic proteins in both primary neuronal cultures and behaving adult mice. Among the first (within hours) synaptic changes are selective decreases in surface levels of certain (e.g., GluA1) but not other (e.g., GluN2B) glutamate receptors and subtle microglial activation. After 4 days, numerous additional synaptic proteins are altered. Moreover, Aβ oligomers induce hyperphosphorylation of tau and subsequent neuritic dystrophy. All changes are prevented by scyllo-inositol in a dose- and stereoisomer-specific manner. Mechanistically, scyllo-inositol interferes quantitatively with the binding of Aβ oligomers to plasma membranes. These comprehensive analyses in culture and in vivo provide direct evidence that diffusible oligomers of human Aβ (without plaques) induce multiple phenotypic changes in healthy neurons, indicating their role as principal endogenous cytotoxins in AD. Our data recommend a re-examination of scyllo-inositol as an anti-oligomer therapeutic in humans with early AD.

  9. Low molecular weight oligomers of amyloid peptides display β-barrel conformations: A replica exchange molecular dynamics study in explicit solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Alfonso; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2010-04-01

    The self-assembly of proteins and peptides into amyloid fibrils is connected to over 40 pathological conditions including neurodegenerative diseases and systemic amyloidosis. Diffusible, low molecular weight protein and peptide oligomers that form in the early steps of aggregation appear to be the harmful cytotoxic species in the molecular etiology of these diseases. So far, the structural characterization of these oligomers has remained elusive owing to their transient and dynamic features. We here address, by means of full atomistic replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations, the energy landscape of heptamers of the amyloidogenic peptide NHVTLSQ from the beta-2 microglobulin protein. The simulations totaling 5 μs show that low molecular weight oligomers in explicit solvent consist of β-barrels in equilibrium with amorphous states and fibril-like assemblies. The results, also accounting for the influence of the pH on the conformational properties, provide a strong evidence of the formation of transient β-barrel assemblies in the early aggregation steps of amyloid-forming systems. Our findings are discussed in terms of oligomers cytotoxicity.

  10. Stabilization of native amyloid β-protein oligomers by Copper and Hydrogen peroxide Induced Cross-linking of Unmodified Proteins (CHICUP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas L; Serpell, Louise C; Urbanc, Brigita

    2016-03-01

    Oligomeric assemblies are postulated to be proximate neurotoxic species in human diseases associated with aberrant protein aggregation. Their heterogeneous and transient nature makes their structural characterization difficult. Size distributions of oligomers of several amyloidogenic proteins, including amyloid β-protein (Aβ) relevant to Alzheimer's disease (AD), have been previously characterized in vitro by photo-induced cross-linking of unmodified proteins (PICUP) followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Due to non-physiological conditions associated with the PICUP chemistry, Aβ oligomers cross-linked by PICUP may not be representative of in vivo conditions. Here, we examine an alternative Copper and Hydrogen peroxide Induced Cross-linking of Unmodified Proteins (CHICUP), which utilizes naturally occurring divalent copper ions and hydrogen peroxide and does not require photo activation. Our results demonstrate that CHICUP and PICUP applied to the two predominant Aβ alloforms, Aβ40 and Aβ42, result in similar oligomer size distributions. Thioflavin T fluorescence data and atomic force microscopy images demonstrate that both CHICUP and PICUP stabilize Aβ oligomers and attenuate fibril formation. Relative to noncross-linked peptides, CHICUP-treated Aβ40 and Aβ42 cause prolonged disruption to biomimetic lipid vesicles. CHICUP-stabilized Aβ oligomers link the amyloid cascade, metal, and oxidative stress hypotheses of AD into a more comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of AD pathology. Because copper and hydrogen peroxide are elevated in the AD brain, CHICUP-stabilized Aβ oligomers are biologically relevant and should be further explored as a new therapeutic target.

  11. Electrochemical Detection of AmyloidOligomers Based on the Signal Amplification of a Network of Silver Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ning; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Binbin; Wu, Yangyang; Mao, Wenhui; Liu, Lin

    2016-08-03

    Amyloidoligomers (AβOs) are the most important toxic species in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patient. AβOs, therefore, are considered reliable molecular biomarkers for the diagnosis of AD. Herein, we reported a simple and sensitive electrochemical method for the selective detection of AβOs using silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as the redox reporters and PrP(95-110), an AβOs-specific binding peptide, as the receptor. Specifically, adamantine (Ad)-labeled PrP(95-110), denoted as Ad-PrP(95-110), induced the aggregation and color change of AgNPs and the follow-up formation of a network of Ad-PrP(95-110)-AgNPs. Then, Ad-PrP(95-110)-AgNPs were anchored onto a β-cyclodextrin (β-CD)-covered electrode surface through the host-guest interaction between Ad and β-CD, thus producing an amplified electrochemical signal through the solid-state Ag/AgCl reaction by the AgNPs. In the presence of AβOs, Ad-PrP(95-110) interacted specifically with the AβOs, thus losing the capability to bind AgNPs and to induce the formation of an AgNPs-based network on the electrode surface. Consequently, the electrochemical signal decreased with an increase in the concentration of AβOs in the range of 20 pM to 100 nM. The biosensor had a detection limit of 8 pM and showed no response to amyloid-β monomers (AβMs) and fibrils (AβFs). On the basis of the well-defined and amplified electrochemical signal of the AgNPs-based network architecture, these results should be valuable for the design of novel electrochemical biosensors by marrying specific receptors.

  12. Association thermodynamics and conformational stability of beta-sheet amyloid beta(17-42) oligomers: effects of E22Q (Dutch) mutation and charge neutralization.

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    Blinov, Nikolay; Dorosh, Lyudmyla; Wishart, David; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2010-01-20

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. It was found that amyloidogenic oligomers, not mature fibrils, are neurotoxic agents related to these diseases. Molecular mechanisms of infectivity, pathways of aggregation, and molecular structure of these oligomers remain elusive. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics, molecular mechanics combined with solvation analysis by statistical-mechanical, three-dimensional molecular theory of solvation (also known as 3D-RISM-KH) in a new MM-3D-RISM-KH method to study conformational stability, and association thermodynamics of small wild-type Abeta(17-42) oligomers with different protonation states of Glu(22), as well the E22Q (Dutch) mutants. The association free energy of small beta-sheet oligomers shows near-linear trend with the dimers being thermodynamically more stable relative to the larger constructs. The linear (within statistical uncertainty) dependence of the association free energy on complex size is a consequence of the unilateral stacking of monomers in the beta-sheet oligomers. The charge reduction of the wild-type Abeta(17-42) oligomers upon protonation of the solvent-exposed Glu(22) at acidic conditions results in lowering the association free energy compared to the wild-type oligomers at neutral pH and the E22Q mutants. The neutralization of the peptides because of the E22Q mutation only marginally affects the association free energy, with the reduction of the direct electrostatic interactions mostly compensated by the unfavorable electrostatic solvation effects. For the wild-type oligomers at acidic conditions such compensation is not complete, and the electrostatic interactions, along with the gas-phase nonpolar energetic and the overall entropic effects, contribute to the lowering of the association free energy. The differences in the association thermodynamics between the wild-type Abeta(17-42) oligomers at neutral pH and the Dutch mutants, on the one hand, and the Abeta(17

  13. Specific Recognition of Biologically Active AmyloidOligomers by a New Surface Plasmon Resonance-based Immunoassay and an in Vivo Assay in Caenorhabditis elegans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stravalaci, Matteo; Bastone, Antonio; Beeg, Marten; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Colombo, Laura; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Cantù, Laura; Del Favero, Elena; Mazzanti, Michele; Chiesa, Roberto; Salmona, Mario; Diomede, Luisa; Gobbi, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Soluble oligomers of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide play a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, but their elusive nature makes their detection challenging. Here we describe a novel immunoassay based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) that specifically recognizes biologically active Aβ oligomers. As a capturing agent, we immobilized on the sensor chip the monoclonal antibody 4G8, which targets a central hydrophobic region of Aβ. This SPR assay allows specific recognition of oligomeric intermediates that rapidly appear and disappear during the incubation of synthetic Aβ1–42, discriminating them from monomers and higher order aggregates. The species recognized by SPR generate ionic currents in artificial lipid bilayers and inhibit the physiological pharyngeal contractions in Caenorhabditis elegans, a new method for testing the toxic potential of Aβ oligomers. With these assays we found that the formation of biologically relevant Aβ oligomers is inhibited by epigallocatechin gallate and increased by the A2V mutation, previously reported to induce early onset dementia. The SPR-based immunoassay provides new opportunities for detection of toxic Aβ oligomers in biological samples and could be adapted to study misfolding proteins in other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22736768

  14. Molecular insight into amyloid oligomer destabilizing mechanism of flavonoid derivative 2-(4' benzyloxyphenyl)-3-hydroxy-chromen-4-one through docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Akhil; Srivastava, Swati; Tripathi, Shubhandra; Singh, Sandeep Kumar; Srikrishna, Saripella; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-06-01

    Aggregation of amyloid peptide (Aβ) has been shown to be directly related to progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ is neurotoxic and its deposition and aggregation ultimately lead to cell death. In our previous work, we reported flavonoid derivative (compound 1) showing promising result in transgenic AD model of Drosophila. Compound 1 showed prevention of Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and neuroprotective efficacy in Drosophila system. However, mechanism of action of compound 1 and its effect on the amyloid is not known. We therefore performed molecular docking and atomistic, explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the process of Aβ interaction, inhibition, and destabilizing mechanism. Results showed different preferred binding sites of compound 1 and good affinity toward the target. Through the course of 35 ns molecular dynamics simulation, conformations_5 of compound 1 intercalates into the hydrophobic core near the salt bridge and showed major structural changes as compared to other conformations. Compound 1 showed interference with the salt bridge and thus reducing the inter strand hydrogen bound network. This minimizes the side chain interaction between the chains A-B leading to disorder in oligomer. Contact map analysis of amino acid residues between chains A and B also showed lesser interaction with adjacent amino acids in the presence of compound 1 (conformations_5). The study provides an insight into how compound 1 interferes and disorders the Aβ peptide. These findings will further help to design better inhibitors for aggregation of the amyloid oligomer.

  15. Β-amyloid 1-42 oligomers impair function of human embryonic stem cell-derived forebrain cholinergic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linn Wicklund

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD patients is associated with a decline in the levels of growth factors, impairment of axonal transport and marked degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs. Neurogenesis persists in the adult human brain, and the stimulation of regenerative processes in the CNS is an attractive prospect for neuroreplacement therapy in neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. Currently, it is still not clear how the pathophysiological environment in the AD brain affects stem cell biology. Previous studies investigating the effects of the β-amyloid (Aβ peptide on neurogenesis have been inconclusive, since both neurogenic and neurotoxic effects on progenitor cell populations have been reported. In this study, we treated pluripotent human embryonic stem (hES cells with nerve growth factor (NGF as well as with fibrillar and oligomeric Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 (nM-µM concentrations and thereafter studied the differentiation in vitro during 28-35 days. The process applied real time quantitative PCR, immunocytochemistry as well as functional studies of intracellular calcium signaling. Treatment with NGF promoted the differentiation into functionally mature BFCNs. In comparison to untreated cells, oligomeric Aβ1-40 increased the number of functional neurons, whereas oligomeric Aβ1-42 suppressed the number of functional neurons. Interestingly, oligomeric Aβ exposure did not influence the number of hES cell-derived neurons compared with untreated cells, while in contrast fibrillar Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 induced gliogenesis. These findings indicate that Aβ1-42 oligomers may impair the function of stem cell-derived neurons. We propose that it may be possible for future AD therapies to promote the maturation of functional stem cell-derived neurons by altering the brain microenvironment with trophic support and by targeting different aggregation forms of Aβ.

  16. Alzheimer’s Toxic Amyloid Beta Oligomers: Unwelcome Visitors to the Na/K ATPase alpha3 Docking Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiChiara, Thomas; DiNunno, Nadia; Clark, Jeffrey; Bu, Riana Lo; Cline, Erika N.; Rollins, Madeline G.; Gong, Yuesong; Brody, David L.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Velasco, Pauline T.; Viola, Kirsten L.; Klein, William L.

    2017-01-01

    Toxic amyloid beta oligomers (AβOs) are known to accumulate in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and in animal models of AD. Their structure is heterogeneous, and they are found in both intracellular and extracellular milieu. When given to CNS cultures or injected ICV into non-human primates and other non-transgenic animals, AβOs have been found to cause impaired synaptic plasticity, loss of memory function, tau hyperphosphorylation and tangle formation, synapse elimination, oxidative and ER stress, inflammatory microglial activation, and selective nerve cell death. Memory loss and pathology in transgenic models are prevented by AβO antibodies, while Aducanumab, an antibody that targets AβOs as well as fibrillar Aβ, has provided cognitive benefit to humans in early clinical trials. AβOs have now been investigated in more than 3000 studies and are widely thought to be the major toxic form of Aβ. Although much has been learned about the downstream mechanisms of AβO action, a major gap concerns the earliest steps: How do AβOs initially interact with surface membranes to generate neuron-damaging transmembrane events? Findings from Ohnishi et al (PNAS 2005) combined with new results presented here are consistent with the hypothesis that AβOs act as neurotoxins because they attach to particular membrane protein docks containing Na/K ATPase-α3, where they inhibit ATPase activity and pathologically restructure dock composition and topology in a manner leading to excessive Ca++ build-up. Better understanding of the mechanism that makes attachment of AβOs to vulnerable neurons a neurotoxic phenomenon should open the door to therapeutics and diagnostics targeting the first step of a complex pathway that leads to neural damage and dementia. PMID:28356893

  17. Intracerebroventricular Administration of Amyloid β-protein Oligomers Selectively Increases Dorsal Hippocampal Dialysate Glutamate Levels in the Awake Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean D. O’Shea

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Extensive evidence supports an important role for soluble oligomers of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ in Alzheimer’s Disease pathogenesis. In the present study we combined intracerebroventricular (icv injections with brain microdialysis technology in the fully conscious rat to assess the effects of icv administered SDS-stable low-n Aβ oligomers (principally dimers and trimers on excitatory and inhibitory amino acid transmission in the ipsilateral dorsal hippocampus. Microdialysis was employed to assess the effect of icv administration of Aβ monomers and Aβ oligomers on dialysate glutamate, aspartate and GABA levels in the dorsal hippocampus. Administration of Aβ oligomers was associated with a +183% increase (p<0.0001 vs. Aβ monomer-injected control in dorsal hippocampal glutamate levels which was still increasing at the end of the experiment (260 min, whereas aspartate and GABA levels were unaffected throughout. These findings demonstrate that icv administration and microdialysis technology can be successfully combined in the awake rat and suggests that altered dorsal hippocampal glutamate transmission may be a useful target for pharmacological intervention in Alzheimer’s Disease.

  18. Biflavonoids are superior to monoflavonoids in inhibiting amyloid-β toxicity and fibrillogenesis via accumulation of nontoxic oligomer-like structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Arjun; Woo, Eun-Rhan; Chi, Eva Y; Sharoar, Md Golam; Jin, Hong-Guang; Shin, Song Yub; Park, Il-Seon

    2011-04-05

    Polymerization of monomeric amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) into soluble oligomers and insoluble fibrils is one of the major pathways triggering the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using small molecules to prevent the polymerization of Aβ peptides can, therefore, be an effective therapeutic strategy for AD. In this study, we investigate the effects of mono- and biflavonoids in Aβ42-induced toxicity and fibrillogenesis and find that the biflavonoid taiwaniaflavone (TF) effectively and specifically inhibits Aβ toxicity and fibrillogenesis. Compared to TF, the monoflavonoid apigenin (AP) is less effective and less specific. Our data show that differential effects of the mono- and biflavonoids in Aβ fibrillogenesis correlate with their varying cytoprotective efficacies. We also find that other biflavonoids, namely, 2',8''-biapigenin, amentoflavone, and sumaflavone, can also effectively inhibit Aβ toxicity and fibrillogenesis, implying that the participation of two monoflavonoids in a single biflavonoid molecule enhances their activity. Biflavonoids, while strongly inhibiting Aβ fibrillogenesis, accumulate nontoxic Aβ oligomeric structures, suggesting that these are off-pathway oligomers. Moreover, TF abrogates the toxicity of preformed Aβ oligomers and fibrils, indicating that TF and other biflavonoids may also reduce the toxicity of toxic Aβ species. Altogether, our data clearly show that biflavonoids, possibly because of the possession of two Aβ binders separated by an appropriate size linker, are likely to be promising therapeutics for suppressing Aβ toxicity.

  19. Copper ligation to soluble oligomers of the English mutant of the amyloid-β peptide yields a linear Cu(I) site that is resistant to O2 oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Kristy L; Clewett, Heather S; Schmitt, Jennifer C; Shearer, Jason

    2013-05-25

    Copper coordination to soluble oligomers of the English (AβH(6)R) mutant of the amyloid-β peptide is probed. Cu(II) coordination yields a square planar (N/O)4 coordination environment, while reduction yields an O2 inert linear bis-His Cu(I) centre.

  20. Synergistic effects of atmospheric pressure plasma-emitted components on DNA oligomers: a Raman spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edengeiser, Eugen; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Bründermann, Erik; Schneider, Simon; Benedikt, Jan; Bandow, Julia E; Havenith, Martina

    2015-11-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasmas have become of increasing importance in sterilization processes especially with the growing prevalence of multi-resistant bacteria. Albeit the potential for technological application is obvious, much less is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial inactivation. X-jet technology separates plasma-generated reactive particles and photons, thus allowing the investigation of their individual and joint effects on DNA. Raman spectroscopy shows that particles and photons cause different modifications in DNA single and double strands. The treatment with the combination of particles and photons does not only result in cumulative, but in synergistic effects. Profilometry confirms that etching is a minor contributor to the observed DNA damage in vitro. Schematics of DNA oligomer treatment with cold atmospheric-pressure plasma.

  1. Keampferol-3-O-rhamnoside abrogates amyloid beta toxicity by modulating monomers and remodeling oligomers and fibrils to non-toxic aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharoar Md

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggregation of soluble, monomeric β- amyloid (Aβ to oligomeric and then insoluble fibrillar Aβ is a key pathogenic feature in development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Increasing evidence suggests that toxicity is linked to diffusible Aβ oligomers, rather than to insoluble fibrils. The use of naturally occurring small molecules for inhibition of Aβ aggregation has recently attracted significant interest for development of effective therapeutic strategies against the disease. A natural polyphenolic flavone, Kaempferol-3-O-rhamnoside (K-3-rh, was utilized to investigate its effects on aggregation and cytotoxic effects of Aβ42 peptide. Several biochemical techniques were used to determine the conformational changes and cytotoxic effect of the peptide in the presence and absence of K-3-rh. Results K-3-rh showed a dose-dependent effect against Aβ42 mediated cytotoxicity. Anti-amyloidogenic properties of K-3-rh were found to be efficient in inhibiting fibrilogenesis and secondary structural transformation of the peptide. The consequence of these inhibitions was the accumulation of oligomeric structural species. The accumulated aggregates were smaller, soluble, non-β-sheet and non-toxic aggregates, compared to preformed toxic Aβ oligomers. K-3-rh was also found to have the remodeling properties of preformed soluble oligomers and fibrils. Both of these conformers were found to remodel into non-toxic aggregates. The results showed that K-3-rh interacts with different Aβ conformers, which affects fibril formation, oligomeric maturation and fibrillar stabilization. Conclusion K-3-rh is an efficient molecule to hinder the self assembly and to abrogate the cytotoxic effects of Aβ42 peptide. Hence, K-3-rh and small molecules with similar structure might be considered for therapeutic development against AD.

  2. Electronic properties of diphenyl-s-tetrazine and some related oligomers. An spectroscopic and theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moral, Monica; Garcia, Gregorio [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Jaen, Campus las Lagunillas, E23071 Jaen (Spain); Penas, Antonio [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Organica, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Jaen, Campus las Lagunillas, E23071 Jaen (Spain); Garzon, Andres; Granadino-Roldan, Jose M. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Jaen, Campus las Lagunillas, E23071 Jaen (Spain); Melguizo, Manuel [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Organica, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Jaen, Campus las Lagunillas, E23071 Jaen (Spain); Fernandez-Gomez, Manuel, E-mail: mfg@ujaen.es [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Jaen, Campus las Lagunillas, E23071 Jaen (Spain)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study properties of Ph{sub 2}Tz and (PhTz){sub n}Ph as candidates for organic electronics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthesis of Ph{sub 2}Tz was performed through a modified Pinner-type reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IR/Raman spectra allowed to conclude that Ph{sub 2}Tz is nearly planar in liquid phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electronic structure was studied by UV-Vis/TD-DFT methods in different solvents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bandgap, E{sub LUMO}, electron mobility predict some n-type character for limit polymer. -- Abstract: This work presents a theoretical and spectroscopic study on the electronic and structural properties of the diphenyl-s-tetrazine molecule (Ph{sub 2}Tz) and some oligomeric derivatives. Ph{sub 2}Tz was synthesized through a variation of Pinner-type reaction which uses N-acetylcysteine as catalyst. Insight into the structure and electronic properties of the title compound was obtained through IR, Raman, UV-Vis spectra in different solvents, and theoretical calculations. Theoretical studies have been extended to different n-mers derivatives up to an ideal molecular wire through the oligomeric approximation, predicting this way electronic properties such as LUMO energy levels, electron affinity and reorganization energy in order to assess their possible applications in molecular electronics.

  3. Droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay using microchannel-connected multiwell plates (μCHAMPs) for the detection of amyloid beta oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Cheol; Kim, Moojong; Lim, Gun Taek; Kang, Sung Min; An, Seong Soo A; Kim, Tae Song; Kang, Ji Yoon

    2016-06-21

    Multiwell plates are regularly used in analytical research and clinical diagnosis but often require laborious washing steps and large sample or reagent volumes (typically, 100 μL per well). To overcome such drawbacks in the conventional multiwell plate, we present a novel microchannel-connected multiwell plate (μCHAMP) that can be used for automated disease biomarker detection in a small sample volume by performing droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay inside the plate. In this μCHAMP-based immunoassay platform, small volumes (30-50 μL) of aqueous-phase working droplets are stably confined within each well by the simple microchannel structure (200-300 μm in height and 0.5-1 mm in width), and magnetic beads are exclusively transported into an adjacent droplet through the oil-filled microchannels assisted by a magnet array aligned beneath and controlled by a XY-motorized stage. Using this μCHAMP-based platform, we were able to perform parallel detection of synthetic amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers as a model analyte for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This platform easily simplified the laborious and consumptive immunoassay procedure by achieving automated parallel immunoassay (32 assays per operation in 3-well connected 96-well plate) within 1 hour and at low sample consumption (less than 10 μL per assay) with no cumbersome manual washing step. Moreover, it could detect synthetic Aβ oligomers even below 10 pg mL(-1) concentration with a calculated detection limit of ∼3 pg mL(-1). Therefore, the μCHAMP and droplet-based magnetic bead immunoassay, with the combination of XY-motorized magnet array, would be a useful platform in the diagnosis of human disease, including AD, which requires low consumption of the patient's body fluid sample and automation of the entire immunoassay procedure for high processing capacity.

  4. Spectroscopic Characterization of Intermolecular Interaction of Amyloid β Promoted on GM1 Micelles

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    Maho Yagi-Utsumi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Clusters of GM1 gangliosides act as platforms for conformational transition of monomeric, unstructured amyloid β (Aβ to its toxic β-structured aggregates. We have previously shown that Aβ(1–40 accommodated on the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of lyso-GM1 or GM1 micelles assumes α-helical structures under ganglioside-excess conditions. For better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the α-to-β conformational transition of Aβ on GM1 clusters, we performed spectroscopic characterization of Aβ(1–40 titrated with GM1. It was revealed that the thioflavin T- (ThT- reactive β-structure is more populated in Aβ(1–40 under conditions where the Aβ(1–40 density on GM1 micelles is high. Under this circumstance, the C-terminal hydrophobic anchor Val39-Val40 shows two distinct conformational states that are reactive with ThT, while such Aβ species were not generated by smaller lyso-GM1 micelles. These findings suggest that GM1 clusters promote specific Aβ-Aβ interactions through their C-termini coupled with formation of the ThT-reactive β-structure depending on sizes and curvatures of the clusters.

  5. Magnetic bead droplet immunoassay of oligomer amyloid β for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease using micro-pillars to enhance the stability of the oil-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Ah; Kim, Moojong; Kang, Sung Min; Lim, Kun Taek; Kim, Tae Song; Kang, Ji Yoon

    2015-05-15

    Despite scientific progress in the study of Alzheimer's disease (AD), it is still challenging to develop a robust and sensitive methodology for the early diagnosis of AD due to the lack of a decisive biomarker in blood. Recent reports on the oligomer amyloid β (Aβ) as a biomarker demonstrated its possibility for identifying early onset of AD in patients, but its low concentration in blood requires highly reliable detection techniques. To overcome the low reliability and labor-intensive procedures of conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we present a magnetic bead-droplet immunoassay platform for simple and highly sensitive detection of oligomer Aβ for the diagnosis of AD. This microchip consists of chambers that contain water-based reagents or oil for consecutive assay procedures, and there are arrays of micro-pillars fabricated between the two adjacent chambers to form robust water-oil interfaces. With the aid of these micro-pillars, magnetic beads can stably pass through each chamber by linearly actuating a magnet along the microchip. The robust water-oil interface and simple procedures of the assay make it possible to obtain reliable results from this microchip. The intensity of the fluorescence at the read-out chamber increased quantitatively and linearly, depending on the amount of serially-diluted standard Aβ solution. The results of the assay indicated that the limit of detection was about 10 pg/mL even though it was done with manual manipulation of the magnet. This platform simplified the complicated ELISA procedure and achieved high sensitivity that was no lower than that of the conventional magnetic bead immunoassay. The magnetic bead-droplet platform reduced the assay time to 45 min, and it also reduced the amount of antibody usage in a single diagnosis significantly (10-30 ng of antibody per single assay). Consequently, this microfluidic chip has strong potential as a feasible system for use in the diagnosis of AD with a fast and

  6. Insulin Promotes Survival of Amyloid-Beta Oligomers Neuroblastoma Damaged Cells via Caspase 9 Inhibition and Hsp70 Upregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Di Carlo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD and type 2 diabetes are connected in a way that is still not completely understood, but insulin resistance has been implicated as a risk factor for developing AD. Here we show an evidence that insulin is capable of reducing cytotoxicity induced by Amyloid-beta peptides (A-beta in its oligomeric form in a dose-dependent manner. By TUNEL and biochemical assays we demonstrate that the recovery of the cell viability is obtained by inhibition of intrinsic apoptotic program, triggered by A-beta and involving caspase 9 and 3 activation. A protective role of insulin on mitochondrial damage is also shown by using Mito-red vital dye. Furthermore, A-beta activates the stress inducible Hsp70 protein in LAN5 cells and an overexpression is detectable after the addition of insulin, suggesting that this major induction is the necessary condition to activate a cell survival program. Together, these results may provide opportunities for the design of preventive and therapeutic strategies against AD.

  7. Neurodegeneration in an Animal Model of Chronic Amyloid-beta Oligomer Infusion Is Counteracted by Antibody Treatment Infused with Osmotic Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Ahmadali; Provost, Chloé; Pham, Brendon; Brouillette, Jonathan

    2016-08-14

    Decline in hippocampal-dependent explicit memory (memory for facts and events) is one of the earliest clinical symptom of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is well established that synapse loss and ensuing neurodegeneration are the best predictors for memory impairments in AD. Latest studies have emphasized the neurotoxic role of soluble amyloid-beta oligomers (Aβo) that begin to accumulate in the human brain approximately 10 to 15 yr before the clinical symptoms become apparent. Many reports indicate that soluble Aβo correlate with memory deficits in AD models and humans. The Aβo-induced neurodegeneration observed in neuronal and brain slice cultures has been more challenging to reproduce in many animal models. The model of repeated Aβo infusions shown here overcome this issue and allow addressing two key domains for developing new disease modifying therapies: identify biological markers to diagnose early AD, and determine the molecular mechanisms underpinning Aβo-induced memory deficits at the onset of AD. Since soluble Aβo aggregate relatively fast into insoluble Aβ fibrils that correlate poorly with the clinical state of patients, soluble Aβo are prepared freshly and injected once per day during six days to produce marked cell death in the hippocampus. We used cannula specially design for simultaneous infusions of Aβo and continuous infusion of Aβo antibody (6E10) in the hippocampus using osmotic pumps. This innovative in vivo method can now be used in preclinical studies to validate the efficiency of new AD therapies that might prevent the deposition and neurotoxicity of Aβo in pre-dementia patients.

  8. EphA4 Activation of c-Abl Mediates Synaptic Loss and LTP Blockade Caused by AmyloidOligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Vargas, Lina; Leal, Nancy; Estrada, Lisbell D.; González, Adrian; Serrano, Felipe; Araya, Katherine; Gysling, Katia; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.; Pasquale, Elena B.; Alvarez, Alejandra R.

    2014-01-01

    The early stages of Alzheimer's disease are characterised by impaired synaptic plasticity and synapse loss. Here, we show that amyloidoligomers (AβOs) activate the c-Abl kinase in dendritic spines of cultured hippocampal neurons and that c-Abl kinase activity is required for AβOs-induced synaptic loss. We also show that the EphA4 receptor tyrosine kinase is upstream of c-Abl activation by AβOs. EphA4 tyrosine phosphorylation (activation) is increased in cultured neurons and synaptoneurosomes exposed to AβOs, and in Alzheimer-transgenic mice brain. We do not detect c-Abl activation in EphA4-knockout neurons exposed to AβOs. More interestingly, we demonstrate EphA4/c-Abl activation is a key-signalling event that mediates the synaptic damage induced by AβOs. According to this results, the EphA4 antagonistic peptide KYL and c-Abl inhibitor STI prevented i) dendritic spine reduction, ii) the blocking of LTP induction and iii) neuronal apoptosis caused by AβOs. Moreover, EphA4-/- neurons or sh-EphA4-transfected neurons showed reduced synaptotoxicity by AβOs. Our results are consistent with EphA4 being a novel receptor that mediates synaptic damage induced by AβOs. EphA4/c-Abl signalling could be a relevant pathway involved in the early cognitive decline observed in Alzheimer's disease patients. PMID:24658113

  9. Detection of Soluble AmyloidOligomers and Insoluble High-Molecular-Weight Particles in CSF: Development of Methods with Potential for Diagnosis and Therapy Monitoring of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Aileen Funke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's disease (AD can be established premortem based on clinical criteria like neuropsychological tests. Post mortem, specific neuropathological changes like amyloid plaques define AD. However, the standard criteria based on medical history and mental status examinations do not take into account the long preclinical features of the disease, and a biomarker for improved diagnosis of AD is urgently needed. In a large number of studies, amyloid-β (Aβ monomer concentrations in CSF of AD patients are consistently and significantly reduced when compared to healthy controls. Therefore, monomeric Aβ in CSF was suggested to be a helpful biomarker for the diagnosis of preclinical AD. However, not the monomeric form, but Aβ oligomers have been shown to be the toxic species in AD pathology, and their quantification and characterization could facilitate AD diagnosis and therapy monitoring. Here, we review the current status of assay development to reliably and routinely detect Aβ oligomers and high-molecular-weight particles in CSF.

  10. Spatially resolved spectroscopic differentiation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on individual insulin amyloid fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Kurouski, Dmitry; Hedegaard, Martin A B;

    2016-01-01

    The formation of insoluble β-sheet-rich protein structures known as amyloid fibrils is associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. A detailed understanding of the molecular structure of the fibril surface is of interest as the first contact wi...

  11. Spatially resolved spectroscopic differentiation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on individual insulin amyloid fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Kurouski, Dmitry; Hedegaard, Martin A B

    2016-01-01

    The formation of insoluble β-sheet-rich protein structures known as amyloid fibrils is associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. A detailed understanding of the molecular structure of the fibril surface is of interest as the first contact...

  12. Thioflavin T and its photoirradiative derivatives: exploring their spectroscopic properties in the absence and presence of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jack C-C; Chen, Eric H-L; Snoeberger, Robert C; Luh, Frederick Y; Lim, T-S; Hsu, C-P; Chen, Rita P-Y

    2013-04-04

    In this work, we found that, during storage or after UV irradiation, ThT is demethylated or oxidized, forming three derivatives. These three derivatives were purified by high performance liquid chromatography and characterized by mass and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the spectroscopic properties of pure ThT and the derivatives carefully compared. Our results show that the emission peak at 450 nm results from oxidized ThT and not from the monomeric form of ThT, as previously proposed. The partial conversion of ThT into oxidized and demethylated derivatives has an effect on amyloid detection using ThT assay. Irradiated ThT has the same lag time as pure ThT in the amyloidogenesis of insulin, but the intensity of the emitted fluorescence is significantly decreased.

  13. Back to the oligomeric state pH-induced dissolution of concanavalin A amyloid-like fibrils into non-native oligomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santangelo, M. G.; Foderà, V.; Militello, V.

    2016-01-01

    The subtle interplay between long range electrostatic forces, hydrophobic interactions and short range protein-protein interactions regulates the onset/evolution of protein aggregation processes as well as the stability of protein supramolecular structures. Using a combination of FTIR spectroscopy...... protein-protein interactions cannot be neglected, we highlight a thermal-induced aggregation pathway in which amyloid-like aggregates are readily formed. When dissolved in solutions at different pHs, these aggregates show either a reduced β-sheet content keeping the same morphology (3 pH ..., light scattering and advanced imaging, we present evidence on the main role of electrostatic forces in the formation and stability of amyloid-like fibrils formed from concanavalin A (ConA), a protein showing structural homology with the human serum amyloid protein. At high protein concentration, where...

  14. Spatially resolved spectroscopic differentiation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on individual insulin amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Kurouski, Dmitry; Hedegaard, Martin A. B.; Singh, Pushkar; Lednev, Igor K.; Deckert, Volker

    2016-09-01

    The formation of insoluble β-sheet-rich protein structures known as amyloid fibrils is associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. A detailed understanding of the molecular structure of the fibril surface is of interest as the first contact with the physiological environment in vivo and plays a decisive role in biological activity and associated toxicity. Recent studies reveal that the inherent sensitivity and specificity of tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) renders this technique a compelling method for fibril surface analysis at the single-particle level. Here, the reproducibility of TERS is demonstrated, indicating its relevance for detecting molecular variations. Consequently, individual fibrils are systematically investigated at nanometer spatial resolution. Spectral parameters were obtained by band-fitting, particularly focusing on the identification of the secondary structure via the amide III band and the differentiation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains on the surface. In addition multivariate data analysis, specifically the N-FINDR procedure, was employed to generate structure-specific maps. The ability of TERS to localize specific structural domains on fibril surfaces shows promise to the development of new fibril dissection strategies and can be generally applied to any (bio)chemical surface when structural variations at the nanometer level are of interest.

  15. Carbon nanotube inhibits the formation of β-sheet-rich oligomers of the Alzheimer's amyloid-β(16-22) peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiyu; Luo, Yin; Derreumaux, Philippe; Wei, Guanghong

    2011-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease is associated with the abnormal self-assembly of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into toxic β-rich aggregates. Experimental studies have shown that hydrophobic nanoparticles retard Aβ fibrillation by slowing down the nucleation process; however, the effects of nanoparticles on Aβ oligomeric structures remain elusive. In this study, we investigate the conformations of Aβ(16-22) octamers in the absence and presence of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) by performing extensive all-atom replica exchange molecular-dynamics simulations in explicit solvent. Our simulations starting from eight random chains demonstrate that the addition of SWCNT into Aβ(16-22) solution prevents β-sheet formation. Simulation starting from a prefibrillar β-sheet octamer shows that SWCNT destabilizes the β-sheet structure. A detailed analysis of the Aβ(16-22)/SWCNT/water interactions reveals that both the inhibition of β-sheet formation and the destabilization of prefibrillar β-sheets by SWCNT result from the same physical forces: hydrophobic and π-stacking interactions (with the latter playing a more important role). By analyzing the stacking patterns between the Phe aromatic rings and the SWCNT carbon rings, we find that short ring-centroid distances mostly favor parallel orientation, whereas large distances allow all other orientations to be populated. Overall, our computational study provides evidence that SWCNT is likely to inhibit Aβ(16-22) and full-length Aβ fibrillation.

  16. Visual and fluorescent assays for selective detection of beta-amyloid oligomers based on the inner filter effect of gold nanoparticles on the fluorescence of CdTe quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ning; Zhou, Binbin; Huang, Nanbing; Jiang, Mengsha; Zhang, Jiebing; Liu, Lin

    2016-11-15

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are the major constituents of senile plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Aβ monomers (AβMs) can coalesce to form small, soluble oligomers (AβOs), followed by reorganization and assembly into long, thread-like fibrils (AβFs). Recently, soluble AβOs have been regarded as reliable molecular biomarkers for the diagnosis of AD because of their high toxicity for neuronal synapse and high concentration levels in the brains of AD patients. In this work, we reported a label-free, sensitive and selective method for visual and fluorescent detection of AβOs based on the inner filter effect (IFE) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the fluorescence of CdTe quantum dots (QDs). Specifically, the fluorescence of CdTe QDs was quenched significantly by AuNPs through the IFE. PrP(95-110), an AβOs-specific binding peptide from cellular prion protein, triggered the aggregation and color change of AuNPs suspension; thus, the IFE of AuNPs on the fluorescence of CdTe QDs was weakened and the fluorescence intensity was recovered. However, in the presence of AβOs, the specific interaction of AβOs and PrP(95-110) prevented the absorption of PrP(95-110) onto the surface of AuNPs. As a result, the aggregation of AuNPs was inhibited and the fluorescence intensity of CdTe QDs was quenched again. This label-free method is specific for detection of AβOs but not for AβMs and AβFs. The detection limits were found to be 0.5nM for the visual assay and 0.2nM for the fluorescent detection. We believe that this work would be valuable for many investigations related to AD diagnosis and drug discovery.

  17. Age-dependent accumulation of soluble amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers reverses the neuroprotective effect of soluble amyloid precursor protein-alpha (sAPP(alpha)) by modulating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt-GSK-3beta pathway in Alzheimer mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Sebastian; Torres, Manuel; Vizuete, Marisa; Sanchez-Varo, Raquel; Sanchez-Mejias, Elisabeth; Trujillo-Estrada, Laura; Carmona-Cuenca, Irene; Caballero, Cristina; Ruano, Diego; Gutierrez, Antonia; Vitorica, Javier

    2011-05-27

    Neurotrophins, activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, control neuronal survival and plasticity. Alterations in NGF, BDNF, IGF-1, or insulin signaling are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. We have previously characterized a bigenic PS1×APP transgenic mouse displaying early hippocampal Aβ deposition (3 to 4 months) but late (17 to 18 months) neurodegeneration of pyramidal cells, paralleled to the accumulation of soluble Aβ oligomers. We hypothesized that PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway could be involved in this apparent age-dependent neuroprotective/neurodegenerative status. In fact, our data demonstrated that, as compared with age-matched nontransgenic controls, the Ser-9 phosphorylation of GSK-3β was increased in the 6-month PS1×APP hippocampus, whereas in aged PS1×APP animals (18 months), GSK-3β phosphorylation levels displayed a marked decrease. Using N2a and primary neuronal cell cultures, we demonstrated that soluble amyloid precursor protein-α (sAPPα), the predominant APP-derived fragment in young PS1×APP mice, acting through IGF-1 and/or insulin receptors, activated the PI3K/Akt pathway, phosphorylated the GSK-3β activity, and in consequence, exerted a neuroprotective action. On the contrary, several oligomeric Aβ forms, present in the soluble fractions of aged PS1×APP mice, inhibited the induced phosphorylation of Akt/GSK-3β and decreased the neuronal survival. Furthermore, synthetic Aβ oligomers blocked the effect mediated by different neurotrophins (NGF, BDNF, insulin, and IGF-1) and sAPPα, displaying high selectivity for NGF. In conclusion, the age-dependent appearance of APP-derived soluble factors modulated the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway through the major neurotrophin receptors. sAPPα stimulated and Aβ oligomers blocked the prosurvival signaling. Our data might provide insights into the selective vulnerability of specific neuronal groups in Alzheimer disease.

  18. Spectroscopic investigation of Ginkgo biloba terpene trilactones and their interaction with amyloid peptide Aβ(25-35)

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiangtao; Petrovic, Ana G.; Dzyuba, Sergei V.; Berova, Nina; Nakanishi, Koji; Polavarapu, Prasad L.

    2008-04-01

    The beneficial effects of Ginkgo biloba extract in the "treatment" of dementia are attributed to its terpene trilactone (TTL) constituents. The interactions between TTLs and amyloid peptide are believed to be responsible in preventing the aggregation of peptide. These interactions have been investigated using infrared vibrational absorption (VA) and circular dichroism (VCD) spectra. Four TTLs, namely ginkgolide A (GA), ginkgolide B (GB), ginkgolide C (GC) and bilobalide (BB) and amyloid Aβ(25-35) peptide, as a model for the full length peptide, are used in this study. GA-monoether and GA-diether have also been synthesized and investigated to help understand the role of individual carbonyl groups in these interactions. The precipitation and solubility issues encountered with the mixture of ginkgolide + Aβ peptide for VA and VCD studies were overcome using binary ethanol-D 2O solvent mixture. The experimental VA and VCD spectra of GA, GB, GC and BB, GA-monoether and GA-diether have been analyzed using the corresponding spectra predicted with density functional theory. The time-dependent experimental VA and VCD spectra of Aβ(25-35) peptide and the corresponding experimental spectra in the presence of TTLs indicated that the effect of the TTLs in modulating the aggregation of Aβ(25-35) peptide is relatively small. Such small effects might indicate the absence of a specific interaction between the TTLs and Aβ(25-35) peptide as a major force leading to the reduced aggregation of amyloid peptides. It is possible that the therapeutic effect of G. biloba extract does not originate from direct interactions between TTLs and the Aβ(25-35) peptide and is more complex.

  19. Specific Triazine Herbicides Induce Amyloid-beta(42) Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portelius, Erik; Durieu, Emilie; Bodin, Marion; Cam, Morgane; Pannee, Josef; Leuxe, Charlotte; Mabondzo, Aloise; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Herve; Lee, Jung Yeol; Chang, Young-Tae; Stuber, Kathrin; Koch, Philipp; Fontaine, Gaelle; Potier, Marie-Claude; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Garbis, Spiros D.; Covaci, Adrian; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter; Karg, Frank; Flajolet, Marc; Omori, Chiori; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Meijer, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid-beta protein precursor (A beta PP) ecretases leads to extracellular release of amyloid-beta (A beta) peptides. Increased production of A beta(42) over A beta(40) and aggregation into oligomers and plaques constitute an Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmark. Identifyin

  20. Specific Triazine Herbicides Induce Amyloid-beta(42) Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portelius, Erik; Durieu, Emilie; Bodin, Marion; Cam, Morgane; Pannee, Josef; Leuxe, Charlotte; Mabondzo, Aloise; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Herve; Lee, Jung Yeol; Chang, Young-Tae; Stuber, Kathrin; Koch, Philipp; Fontaine, Gaelle; Potier, Marie-Claude; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Garbis, Spiros D.; Covaci, Adrian; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter; Karg, Frank; Flajolet, Marc; Omori, Chiori; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Meijer, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid-beta protein precursor (A beta PP) ecretases leads to extracellular release of amyloid-beta (A beta) peptides. Increased production of A beta(42) over A beta(40) and aggregation into oligomers and plaques constitute an Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmark.

  1. hA molecular switch in amyloid assembly: Met35 and amyloid beta-protein oligomerization

    OpenAIRE

    Bitan, Gal; Tarus, Bogdan; Vollers, Sabrina S.; Lashuel, Hilal A.; Condron, Margaret M.; Straub, John E.; Teplow, David B.

    2003-01-01

    Aberrant protein oligomerization is an important pathogenetic process in vivo. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) forms neurotoxic oligomers. The predominant in vivo Abeta alloforms, Abeta40 and Abeta42, have distinct oligomerization pathways. Abeta42 monomers oligomerize into pentamer/hexamer units (paranuclei) which self-associate to form larger oligomers. Abeta40 does not form these paranuclei, a fact which may explain the particularly strong linkage of Abeta42 w...

  2. Amyloid fibrils compared to peptide nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zganec, Matjaž; Zerovnik, Eva

    2014-09-01

    Prefibrillar oligomeric states and amyloid fibrils of amyloid-forming proteins qualify as nanoparticles. We aim to predict what biophysical and biochemical properties they could share in common with better researched peptide nanotubes. We first describe what is known of amyloid fibrils and prefibrillar aggregates (oligomers and protofibrils): their structure, mechanisms of formation and putative mechanism of cytotoxicity. In distinction from other neuronal fibrillar constituents, amyloid fibrils are believed to cause pathology, however, some can also be functional. Second, we give a review of known biophysical properties of peptide nanotubes. Finally, we compare properties of these two macromolecular states side by side and discuss which measurements that have already been done with peptide nanotubes could be done with amyloid fibrils as well.

  3. Exploring the assembly mechanism of tetrapeptide oligomers using the Activation-Relaxation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guanghong; Mousseau, Normand; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2004-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease are associated with formation of amyloid fibrils. All amyloid fibrils seem to share a common cross β-sheet structure. Experimental studies have shown that peptides as short as 4 amino acids can form amyloid fibrils. It has also been shown that the oligomers that form early in the aggregation process of even non-disease-related proteins may be cytotoxic. We report a detailed study of the assembly mechanisms of the tetrapeptides into different size oligomers: trimers, hexamers and more. The assembly of the oligomers, in which the peptides form β-sheets through interpeptide interactions, are studied using the activation-relaxation technique (ART) in combination with a reduced off-lattice energy model (OPEP). We also describe the multiple pathways of oligomerization as well as categorize the various oligomeric intermediates, providing information of the early events of β-sheet formation.

  4. Mitochondrion-derived reactive oxygen species lead to enhanced amyloid beta formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuner, K.; Schutt, T.; Kurz, C.; Eckert, S.H.; Schiller, C.; Occhipinti, A.; Mai, S.; Jendrach, M.; Eckert, G.P.; Kruse, S.E.; Palmiter, R.D.; Brandt, U.; Drose, S.; Wittig, I.; Willem, M.; Haass, C.; Reichert, A.S.; Muller, W.E.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Intracellular amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers and extracellular Abeta plaques are key players in the progression of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Still, the molecular signals triggering Abeta production are largely unclear. We asked whether mitochondrion-derived reactive oxygen species

  5. Natural polyphenols binding to amyloid: a broad class of compounds to treat different human amyloid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoungoure, Viviane L Ndam; Schluesener, Jan; Moundipa, Paul F; Schluesener, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenols are a large group of phytonutrients found in herbal beverages and foods. They have manifold biological activities, including antioxidative, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties. Interestingly, some polyphenols bind to amyloid and substantially ameliorate amyloid diseases. Misfolding, aggregation, and accumulation of amyloid fibrils in tissues or organs leads to a group of disorders, called amyloidoses. Prominent diseases are Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease, but there are other, less well-known diseases wherein accumulation of misfolded protein is a prominent feature. Amyloidoses are a major burden to public health. In particular, Alzheimer's disease shows a strong increase in patient numbers. Accelerated development of effective therapies for amyloidoses is a necessity. A viable strategy can be the prevention or reduction of protein misfolding, thus reducing amyloid build-up by restoring the cellular aggretome. Amyloid-binding polyphenols affect amyloid formation on various levels, e.g. by inhibiting fibril formation or steering oligomer formation into unstructured, nontoxic pathways. Consequently, preclinical studies demonstrate reduction of amyloid-formation by polyphenols. Amyloid-binding polyphenols might be suitable lead structures for development of imaging agents for early detection of disease and monitoring amyloid deposition. Intake of dietary polyphenols might be relevant to the prevention of amyloidoses. Nutraceutical strategies might be a way to reduce amyloid diseases.

  6. Crystal structure of human prion protein fragment reveals a motif for oligomer formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Marcin I.; Perry, Kay; Surewicz, Witold K.

    2013-01-01

    The structural transition of the prion protein from α-helical to β-sheet rich underlies its conversion into infectious and disease-associated isoforms. Here we describe the crystal structure of a fragment from human prion protein consisting of the disulfide bond linked portions of helices 2 and 3. Instead of forming a pair-of-sheets steric zipper structure characteristic of amyloid fibers, this fragment crystallized into an β-sheet rich assembly of hexameric oligomers. This study reveals a never before observed structural motif for ordered protein aggregates, and suggests a possible mechanism for self-propagation of misfolded conformations by such non-amyloid oligomers. PMID:23808589

  7. The new β amyloid-derived peptide Aβ1-6A2V-TAT(D) prevents Aβ oligomer formation and protects transgenic C. elegans from Aβ toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diomede, Luisa; Romeo, Margherita; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Rossi, Alessandro; Beeg, Marten; Stravalaci, Matteo; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Di Fede, Giuseppe; Gobbi, Marco; Salmona, Mario

    2016-04-01

    One attractive pharmacological strategy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is to design small peptides to interact with amyloid-β (Aβ) protein reducing its aggregation and toxicity. Starting from clinical observations indicating that patients coding a mutated Aβ variant (AβA2V) in the heterozygous state do not develop AD, we developed AβA2V synthetic peptides, as well as a small peptide homologous to residues 1-6. These hindered the amyloidogenesis of Aβ and its neurotoxicity in vitro, suggesting a basis for the design of a new small peptide in D-isomeric form, linked to the arginine-rich TAT sequence [Aβ1-6A2V-TAT(D)], to allow translocation across biological membranes and the blood-brain barrier. Aβ1-6A2V-TAT(D) was resistant to protease degradation, stable in serum and specifically able to interfere with Aβ aggregation in vitro, reducing the appearance of toxic soluble species and protecting transgenic C. elegans from toxicity related to the muscular expression of human Aβ. These observations offer a proof of concept for future pharmacological studies in mouse models of AD, providing a foundation for the design of AβA2V-based peptidomimetic molecules for therapeutic purposes.

  8. Macrocyclic 2,7-Anthrylene Oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yuta; Wakamatsu, Kan; Iwanaga, Tetsuo; Sato, Hiroyasu; Toyota, Shinji

    2016-05-06

    A macrocyclic compound consisting of six 2,7-anthrylene units was successfully synthesized by Ni-mediated coupling of the corresponding dibromo precursor as a novel π-conjugated compound. This compound was sufficiently stable and soluble in organic solvents due to the presence of mesityl groups. X-ray analysis showed that the molecule had a nonplanar and hexagonal wheel-shaped framework of approximately S6 symmetry. The dynamic process between two S6 structures was observed by using the dynamic NMR technique, the barrier being 58 kJ mol(-1) . The spectroscopic properties of the hexamer were compared with those of analogous linear oligomers.

  9. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a

  10. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloid-β peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  11. Methods for analysis of amyloid-beta aggregates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, K.A.; Muller, M.; Kuiperij, H.B.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid-beta protein (Abeta) accumulation is one of the major hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease and plays a crucial role in its pathogenesis. Abeta aggregates into fibrils, but rather than these end-products of the aggregation process, intermediate species, referred to as oligomers, have been

  12. Structural characterization of toxic oligomers that are kinetically trapped during α-synuclein fibril formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Serene W; Drakulic, Srdja; Deas, Emma; Ouberai, Myriam; Aprile, Francesco A; Arranz, Rocío; Ness, Samuel; Roodveldt, Cintia; Guilliams, Tim; De-Genst, Erwin J; Klenerman, David; Wood, Nicholas W; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Alfonso, Carlos; Rivas, Germán; Abramov, Andrey Y; Valpuesta, José María; Dobson, Christopher M; Cremades, Nunilo

    2015-04-21

    We describe the isolation and detailed structural characterization of stable toxic oligomers of α-synuclein that have accumulated during the process of amyloid formation. Our approach has allowed us to identify distinct subgroups of oligomers and to probe their molecular architectures by using cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) image reconstruction techniques. Although the oligomers exist in a range of sizes, with different extents and nature of β-sheet content and exposed hydrophobicity, they all possess a hollow cylindrical architecture with similarities to certain types of amyloid fibril, suggesting that the accumulation of at least some forms of amyloid oligomers is likely to be a consequence of very slow rates of rearrangement of their β-sheet structures. Our findings reveal the inherent multiplicity of the process of protein misfolding and the key role the β-sheet geometry acquired in the early stages of the self-assembly process plays in dictating the kinetic stability and the pathological nature of individual oligomeric species.

  13. Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptides interact with DNA, as proved by surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrantes, Alejandro; Camero, Sergio; Garcia-Lucas, Angel; Navarro, Pedro J; Benitez, María J; Jiménez, Juan S

    2012-10-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, abnormal processing of the β-amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer's disease patients increases the production of β-amyloid toxic peptides, which, after forming highly aggregated fibrillar structures, lead to extracellular plaques formation, neuronal loss and dementia. However, a great deal of evidence has point to intracellular small oligomers of amyloid peptides, probably transient intermediates in the process of fibrillar structures formation, as the most toxic species. In order to study the amyloid-DNA interaction, we have selected here three different forms of the amyloid peptide: Aβ1-40, Aβ25-35 and a scrambled form of Aβ25-35. Surface Plasmon Resonance was used together with UV-visible spectroscopy, Electrophoresis and Electronic Microscopy to carry out this study. Our results prove that, similarly to the full length Aβ1-42, all conformations of toxic amyloid peptides, Aβ1-40 and Aβ25-35, may bind DNA. In contrast, the scrambled form of Aβ25-35, a non-aggregating and nontoxic form of this peptide, could not bind DNA. We conclude that although the amyloid-DNA interaction is closely related to the amyloid aggregation proneness, this cannot be the only factor which determines the interaction, since small oligomers of amyloid peptides may also bind DNA if their predominant negatively charged amino acid residues are previously neutralized.

  14. PIPERIDINE OLIGOMERS AND COMBINATORIAL LIBRARIES THEREOF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to piperidine oligomers, methods for the preparation of piperidine oligomers and compound libraries thereof, and the use of piperidine oligomers as drug substances. The present invention also relates to the use of combinatorial libraries of piperidine oligomers...... in libraries (arrays) of compounds especially suitable for screening purposes....

  15. Crystal structure of a human prion protein fragment reveals a motif for oligomer formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostol, Marcin I; Perry, Kay; Surewicz, Witold K

    2013-07-17

    The structural transition of the prion protein from α-helical- to β-sheet-rich underlies its conversion into infectious and disease-associated isoforms. Here we describe the crystal structure of a fragment from human prion protein consisting of the disulfide-bond-linked portions of helices 2 and 3. Instead of forming a pair-of-sheets steric zipper structure characteristic of amyloid fibers, this fragment crystallized into a β-sheet-rich assembly of hexameric oligomers. This study reveals a never before observed structural motif for ordered protein aggregates and suggests a possible mechanism for self-propagation of misfolded conformations by such nonamyloid oligomers.

  16. Self-propagative replication of Aβ oligomers suggests potential transmissibility in Alzheimer disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    Full Text Available The aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ peptide and its deposition in parts of the brain form the central processes in the etiology of Alzheimer disease (AD. The low-molecular weight oligomers of Aβ aggregates (2 to 30 mers are known to be the primary neurotoxic agents whose mechanisms of cellular toxicity and synaptic dysfunction have received substantial attention in the recent years. However, how these toxic agents proliferate and induce widespread amyloid deposition throughout the brain, and what mechanism is involved in the amplification and propagation of toxic oligomer species, are far from clear. Emerging evidence based on transgenic mice models indicates a transmissible nature of Aβ aggregates and implicates a prion-like mechanism of oligomer propagation, which manifests as the dissemination and proliferation of Aβ toxicity. Despite accumulating evidence in support of a transmissible nature of Aβ aggregates, a clear, molecular-level understanding of this intriguing mechanism is lacking. Recently, we reported the characterization of unique replicating oligomers of Aβ42 (12-24 mers in vitro called Large Fatty Acid-derived Oligomers (LFAOs (Kumar et al., 2012, J. Biol. Chem. In the current report, we establish that LFAOs possess physiological activity by activating NF-κB in human neuroblastoma cells, and determine the experimental parameters that control the efficiency of LFAO replication by self-propagation. These findings constitute the first detailed report on monomer - oligomer lateral propagation reactions that may constitute potential mechanism governing transmissibility among Aβ oligomers. These data support the previous reports on transmissible mechanisms observed in transgenic animal models.

  17. [Amyloid goiter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrívó, A; Péter, I; Bánkúti, B; Péley, G; Baska, F; Besznyák, I

    1999-03-21

    Amyloid goitre is at an extremely rare occurrence. Authors review the origin of disease and its symptoms, diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The disease may be due to either primary or secondary systemic or local amyloidosis. Diagnosis may be made even before surgery on anamnestic data, on very rapid growth of thyroid glands, on diffuse appearance, on other symptoms of systemic amyloidosis, on findings of iconographic procedures and on detection of amyloid in aspirates. Final diagnosis is based on histology. Surgical therapy is aiming at avoidance of the existing and the threatening consequences of expanding mass. The outcome is independent from thyroid surgery, it is related to other manifestations of amyloidosis. Concerning with the present case the chronic superior vena cava syndrome and chylous pleural effusion as first described symptoms and asymptomatic hyperthyroxinaemia is emphasised. Neither other organ involvement, nor primary amyloidogenous molecula was found during the 18 months follow up, so patient has secondary and localised amyloidosis.

  18. A lifespan observation of a novel mouse model: in vivo evidence supports aβ oligomer hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichi Zhang

    Full Text Available Transgenic mouse models are powerful tools in exploring the mechanisms of AD. Most current transgenic models of AD mimic the memory impairment and the main pathologic features, among which the formation of beta-amyloid (Aβ plaques is considered a dominant pathologic event. Recently, Aβ oligomers have been identified as more neurotoxic than Aβ plaques. However, no ideal transgenic mouse model directly support Aβ oligomers as a neurotoxic species due to the puzzling effects of amyloid plaques in the more widely-used models. Here, we constructed a single-mutant transgenic (Tg model harboring the PS1V97L mutation and used Non-Tg littermates as a control group. Employing the Morris water maze, electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, biochemistry, and electron microscopy, we investigated behavioral changes and pathology progression in our single-mutant transgenic model. We discovered the pathological alteration of intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ oligomers without Aβ plaques in the PS1V97L-Tg mouse model, which might be the result of PS1 gene mutation. Following Aβ oligomers, we detected synaptic alteration, tau hyperphosphorylation and glial activation. This model supports an initial role for Aβ oligomers in the onset of AD and suggests that Aβ plaques may not be the only prerequisite. This model provides a useful tool for studying the role of Aβ oligomers in AD pathogenesis.

  19. The metal loading ability of beta-amyloid N-terminus: a combined potentiometric and spectroscopic study of copper(II) complexes with beta-amyloid(1-16), its short or mutated peptide fragments, and its polyethylene glycol (PEG)-ylated analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damante, Chiara A; Osz, Katalin; Nagy, Zoltán; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Grasso, Giulia; Impellizzeri, Giuseppe; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Sóvágó, Imre

    2008-10-20

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is becoming a rapidly growing health problem, as it is one of the main causes of dementia in the elderly. Interestingly, copper(II) (together with zinc and iron) ions are accumulated in amyloid deposits, suggesting that metal binding to Abeta could be involved in AD pathogenesis. In Abeta, the metal binding is believed to occur within the N-terminal region encompassing the amino acid residues 1-16. In this work, potentiometric, spectroscopic (UV-vis, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) approaches were used to investigate the copper(II) coordination features of a new polyethylene glycol (PEG)-conjugated Abeta peptide fragment encompassing the 1-16 amino acid residues of the N-terminal region (Abeta(1-16)PEG). The high water solubility of the resulting metal complexes allowed us to obtain a complete complex speciation at different metal-to-ligand ratios ranging from 1:1 to 4:1. Potentiometric and ESI-MS data indicate that Abeta(1-16)PEG is able to bind up to four copper(II) ions. Furthermore, in order to establish the coordination environment at each metal binding site, a series of shorter peptide fragments of Abeta, namely, Abeta(1-4), Abeta(1-6), AcAbeta(1-6), and AcAbeta(8-16)Y10A, were synthesized, each encompassing a potential copper(II) binding site. The complexation properties of these shorter peptides were also comparatively investigated by using the same experimental approach.

  20. Amyloid cascade in Alzheimer's disease: Recent advances in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Tarek; Shakeri, Arash; Rao, Praveen P N

    2016-05-04

    Alzheimer's disease is of major concern all over the world due to a number of factors including (i) an aging population (ii) increasing life span and (iii) lack of effective pharmacotherapy options. The past decade has seen intense research in discovering disease-modifying multitargeting small molecules as therapeutic options. The pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease is attributed to a number of factors such as the cholinergic dysfunction, amyloid/tau toxicity and oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction. In recent years, targeting the amyloid cascade has emerged as an attractive strategy to discover novel neurotherapeutics. Formation of beta-amyloid species, with different degrees of solubility and neurotoxicity is associated with the gradual decline in cognition leading to dementia. The two commonly used approaches to prevent beta-amyloid accumulation in the brain include (i) development of beta-secretase inhibitors and (ii) designing direct inhibitors of beta-amyloid (self-induced) aggregation. This review highlights the amyloid cascade hypothesis and the key chemical features required to design small molecules that inhibit lower and higher order beta-amyloid aggregates. Several recent examples of small synthetic molecules with disease-modifying properties were considered and their molecular docking studies were conducted using either a dimer or steric-zipper assembly of beta-amyloid. These investigations provide a mechanistic understanding on the structural requirements needed to design novel small molecules with anti-amyloid aggregation properties. Significantly, this work also demonstrates that the structural requirements to prevent aggregation of various amyloid species differs considerably, which explains the fact that many small molecules do not exhibit similar inhibition profile toward diverse amyloid species such as dimers, trimers, tetramers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Stabilizing Off-pathway Oligomers by Polyphenol Nanoassemblies for IAPP Aggregation Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedumpully-Govindan, Praveen; Kakinen, Aleksandr; Pilkington, Emily H.; Davis, Thomas P.; Chun Ke, Pu; Ding, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that many naturally occurring polyphenols have inhibitory effect on the aggregation of several proteins. Here, we use discrete molecular dynamics (DMD) simulations and high-throughput dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments to study the anti-aggregation effects of two polyphenols, curcumin and resveratrol, on the aggregation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin). Our DMD simulations suggest that the aggregation inhibition is caused by stabilization of small molecular weight IAPP off-pathway oligomers by the polyphenols. Our analysis indicates that IAPP-polyphenol hydrogen bonds and π-π stacking combined with hydrophobic interactions are responsible for the stabilization of oligomers. The presence of small oligomers is confirmed with DLS measurements in which nanometer-sized oligomers are found to be stable for up to 7.5 hours, the time frame within which IAPP aggregates in the absence of polyphenols. Our study offers a general anti-aggregation mechanism for polyphenols, and further provides a computational framework for the future design of anti-amyloid aggregation therapeutics.

  2. Amyloid neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Susan C; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of many of the systemic amyloidoses. Although the cause of neuropathy is not entirely clear, it is likely related to amyloid deposition within the nerve. This may lead to focal, multifocal, or diffuse neuropathies involving sensory, motor and/or autonomic fibers. The presenting symptoms depend on the distribution of nerves affected. One of the most common phenotypes is sensorimotor polyneuropathy, which is characterized by symptoms of neuropathic pain, numbness, and in advanced cases weakness. Symptoms begin in the feet and ultimately progress to the proximal legs and hands. The most common focal neuropathy is a median neuropathy at the wrist, clinically known as carpal tunnel syndrome. Carpal tunnel symptoms may include pain and sensory disturbances in the lateral palm and fingers; hand weakness may ensue if the focal neuropathy is severe. Autonomic neuropathy may affect a variety of organ systems such as the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. Symptoms may be non-specific making the diagnosis of autonomic neuropathy more difficult to identify. However, it is important to recognize and distinguish autonomic neuropathy from diseases of the end-organs themselves. This article reviews the inherited and acquired amyloidoses that affect the peripheral nervous system including familial amyloid polyneuropathy, and primary, secondary and senile amyloidosis. We emphasize the clinical presentation of the neurologic aspects of these diseases, physical examination findings, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, treatment and prognosis. © 2012 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  3. Vanadate oligomer interactions with myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureliano, M

    2000-05-30

    'Monovanadate' containing a mixture of at least four different vanadate species and 'decavanadate' containing apparently only two vanadate species, mainly decameric species, inhibit myosin and actomyosin ATPase activities. The addition of myosin to 'monovanadate' and 'decavanadate' solutions promotes differential increases on the 51V NMR spectral linewidths of vanadate oligomers. The relative order of line broadening upon myosin addition, reflecting the interaction of the vanadate oligomers with the protein, was V10 > V4 > V1 = 1, whereas no changes were observed for monomeric vanadate species. It is concluded that decameric and tetrameric vanadate species interact quite potently with the protein and affect myosin as well actomyosin ATPase activities.

  4. ABCA7 Mediates Phagocytic Clearance of Amyloid-β in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, YuHong; Hsiao, Jen-Hsiang T; Paxinos, George; Halliday, Glenda M; Kim, Woojin Scott

    2016-09-06

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by dementia and abnormal deposits of aggregated amyloid-β in the brain. Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed that ABCA7 is strongly associated with AD. In vitro evidence suggests that the role of ABCA7 is related to phagocytic activity. Deletion of ABCA7 in a mouse model of AD exacerbates cerebral amyloid-β plaque load. However, the biological role of ABCA7 in AD brain pathogenesis is unknown. We show that ABCA7 is highly expressed in microglia and when monocytes are differentiated into macrophages. We hypothesized that ABCA7 plays a protective role in the brain that is related to phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β. We isolated microglia and macrophages from Abca7-/- and wild type mice and tested them for their capacity to phagocytose amyloidoligomers. We found that the phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β was substantially reduced in both microglia and macrophages from Abca7-/- mice compared to wild type mice. Consistent with these results, in vivo phagocytic clearance of amyloidoligomers in the hippocampus was reduced in Abca7-/- mice. Furthermore, ABCA7 transcription was upregulated in AD brains and in amyloidogenic mouse brains specifically in the hippocampus as a response to the amyloid-β pathogenic state. Together these results indicate that ABCA7 mediates phagocytic clearance of amyloid-β in the brain, and reveal a mechanism by which loss of function of ABCA7 increases the susceptibility to AD.

  5. RNA aptamers generated against oligomeric Abeta40 recognize common amyloid aptatopes with low specificity but high sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Rahimi

    Full Text Available Aptamers are useful molecular recognition tools in research, diagnostics, and therapy. Despite promising results in other fields, aptamer use has remained scarce in amyloid research, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease believed to be caused by neurotoxic amyloid beta-protein (Abeta oligomers. Abeta oligomers therefore are an attractive target for development of diagnostic and therapeutic reagents. We used covalently-stabilized oligomers of the 40-residue form of Abeta (Abeta40 for aptamer selection. Despite gradually increasing the stringency of selection conditions, the selected aptamers did not recognize Abeta40 oligomers but reacted with fibrils of Abeta40, Abeta42, and several other amyloidogenic proteins. Aptamer reactivity with amyloid fibrils showed some degree of protein-sequence dependency. Significant fibril binding also was found for the naïve library and could not be eliminated by counter-selection using Abeta40 fibrils, suggesting that aptamer binding to amyloid fibrils was RNA-sequence-independent. Aptamer binding depended on fibrillogenesis and showed a lag phase. Interestingly, aptamers detected fibril formation with > or =15-fold higher sensitivity than thioflavin T (ThT, revealing substantial beta-sheet and fibril formation undetected by ThT. The data suggest that under physiologic conditions, aptamers for oligomeric forms of amyloidogenic proteins cannot be selected due to high, non-specific affinity of oligonucleotides for amyloid fibrils. Nevertheless, the high sensitivity, whereby aptamers detect beta-sheet formation, suggests that they can serve as superior amyloid recognition tools.

  6. Study of neurotoxic intracellular calcium signalling triggered by amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Carlos; Caballero, Erica; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Núñez, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated to dishomeostasis of intracellular Ca(2+) induced by amyloid β peptide (Aβ) species. Understanding of the effects of Aβ on intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis requires preparation of the different Aβ assemblies including oligomers and fibrils and the testing of their effects on cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) in neurons. Procedures for cerebellar granule cell culture, preparation of Aβ species as well as fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging of cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) in neurons are described.

  7. Regional brain hypometabolism is unrelated to regional amyloid plaque burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Andre; Ng, Bernard; Landau, Susan M.; Jagust, William J.

    2015-01-01

    See Sorg and Grothe (doi:10.1093/brain/awv302) for a scientific commentary on this article. In its original form, the amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease holds that fibrillar deposits of amyloid are an early, driving force in pathological events leading ultimately to neuronal death. Early clinicopathological investigations highlighted a number of inconsistencies leading to an updated hypothesis in which amyloid plaques give way to amyloid oligomers as the driving force in pathogenesis. Rather than focusing on the inconsistencies, amyloid imaging studies have tended to highlight the overlap between regions that show early amyloid plaque signal on positron emission tomography and that also happen to be affected early in Alzheimer’s disease. Recent imaging studies investigating the regional dependency between metabolism and amyloid plaque deposition have arrived at conflicting results, with some showing regional associations and other not. We extracted multimodal neuroimaging data from the Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging database for 227 healthy controls and 434 subjects with mild cognitive impairment. We analysed regional patterns of amyloid deposition, regional glucose metabolism and regional atrophy using florbetapir (18F) positron emission tomography, 18F-fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Specifically, we derived grey matter density and standardized uptake value ratios for both positron emission tomography tracers in 404 functionally defined regions of interest. We examined the relation between regional glucose metabolism and amyloid plaques using linear models. For each region of interest, correcting for regional grey matter density, age, education and disease status, we tested the association of regional glucose metabolism with (i) cortex-wide florbetapir uptake; (ii) regional (i.e. in the same region of interest) florbetapir uptake; and (iii) regional florbetapir uptake

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Amyloid Beta Dimer Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Urbanc, B; Ding, F; Sammond, D; Khare, S; Buldyrev, S V; Stanley, H E; Dokholyan, N V

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments with amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide suggest that formation of toxic oligomers may be an important contribution to the onset of Alzheimer's disease. The toxicity of Abeta oligomers depends on their structure, which is governed by assembly dynamics. Due to limitations of current experimental techniques, a detailed knowledge of oligomer structure at the atomic level is missing. We introduce a molecular dynamics approach to study Abeta dimer formation: (1) we use discrete molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model to identify a variety of dimer conformations, and (2) we employ all-atom molecular mechanics simulations to estimate the thermodynamic stability of all dimer conformations. Our simulations of a coarse-grained Abeta peptide model predicts ten different planar beta-strand dimer conformations. We then estimate the free energies of all dimer conformations in all-atom molecular mechanics simulations with explicit water. We compare the free energies of Abeta(1-42) and Abeta(1-40...

  9. Targeting Cancer with Antisense Oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnatowich, DJ

    2008-10-28

    With financial assistance from the Department of Energy, we have shown definitively that radiolabeled antisense DNAs and other oligomers will accumulate in target cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by an antisense mechanism. We have also shown that the number of mRNA targets for our antisense oligomers in the cancer cell types that we have investigated so far is sufficient to provide and antisense image and/or radiotherapy of cancer in mice. These studies have been reported in about 10 publications. However our observation over the past several years has shown that radiolabeled antisense oligomers administered intravenously in their native and naked form will accumulate and be retained in target xenografts by an antisense mechanism but will also accumulate at high levels in normal organs such as liver, spleen and kidneys. We have investigated unsuccessfully several commercially available vectors. Thus the use of radiolabeled antisense oligomers for the imaging of cancer must await novel approaches to delivery. This laboratory has therefore pursued two new paths, optical imaging of tumor and Auger radiotherapy. We are developing a novel method of optical imaging tumor using antisense oligomers with a fluorophore is administered while hybridized with a shorter complementary oligomer with an inhibitor. In culture and in tumored mice that the duplex remains intact and thus nonfluorescent until it encounters its target mRNA at which time it dissociates and the antisense oligomer binds along with its fluorophore to the target. Simultaneous with the above, we have also observed, as have others, that antisense oligomers migrate rapidly and quantitatively to the nucleus upon crossing cell membranes. The Auger electron radiotherapy path results from this observation since the nuclear migration properties could be used effectively to bring and to retain in the nucleus an Auger emitting radionuclide such as 111In or 125I bound to the antisense oligomer. Since the object becomes

  10. Mitochondrial Ca2+ overload underlies Abeta oligomers neurotoxicity providing an unexpected mechanism of neuroprotection by NSAIDs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Sanz-Blasco

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis may underlie amyloid beta peptide (Abeta toxicity in Alzheimer's Disease (AD but the mechanism is unknown. In search for this mechanism we found that Abeta(1-42 oligomers, the assembly state correlating best with cognitive decline in AD, but not Abeta fibrils, induce a massive entry of Ca(2+ in neurons and promote mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload as shown by bioluminescence imaging of targeted aequorin in individual neurons. Abeta oligomers induce also mitochondrial permeability transition, cytochrome c release, apoptosis and cell death. Mitochondrial depolarization prevents mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload, cytochrome c release and cell death. In addition, we found that a series of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs including salicylate, sulindac sulfide, indomethacin, ibuprofen and R-flurbiprofen depolarize mitochondria and inhibit mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload, cytochrome c release and cell death induced by Abeta oligomers. Our results indicate that i mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload underlies the neurotoxicity induced by Abeta oligomers and ii inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+ overload provides a novel mechanism of neuroprotection by NSAIDs against Abeta oligomers and AD.

  11. Mitochondrial Ca2+ Overload Underlies Aβ Oligomers Neurotoxicity Providing an Unexpected Mechanism of Neuroprotection by NSAIDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Valero, Ruth A.; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio; Villalobos, Carlos; Núñez, Lucía

    2008-01-01

    Dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis may underlie amyloid β peptide (Aβ) toxicity in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) but the mechanism is unknown. In search for this mechanism we found that Aβ1–42 oligomers, the assembly state correlating best with cognitive decline in AD, but not Aβ fibrils, induce a massive entry of Ca2+ in neurons and promote mitochondrial Ca2+ overload as shown by bioluminescence imaging of targeted aequorin in individual neurons. Aβ oligomers induce also mitochondrial permeability transition, cytochrome c release, apoptosis and cell death. Mitochondrial depolarization prevents mitochondrial Ca2+ overload, cytochrome c release and cell death. In addition, we found that a series of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including salicylate, sulindac sulfide, indomethacin, ibuprofen and R-flurbiprofen depolarize mitochondria and inhibit mitochondrial Ca2+ overload, cytochrome c release and cell death induced by Aβ oligomers. Our results indicate that i) mitochondrial Ca2+ overload underlies the neurotoxicity induced by Aβ oligomers and ii) inhibition of mitochondrial Ca2+ overload provides a novel mechanism of neuroprotection by NSAIDs against Aβ oligomers and AD. PMID:18648507

  12. Diaryl hydrazones as multifunctional inhibitors of amyloid self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, Béla; Sood, Abha; Bag, Seema; Tulsan, Rekha; Ghosh, Sanjukta; Borkin, Dmitry; Kennedy, Arleen R; Melanson, Michelle; Madden, Richard; Zhou, Weihong; Levine, Harry; Török, Marianna

    2013-02-19

    The design and application of an effective, new class of multifunctional small molecule inhibitors of amyloid self-assembly are described. Several compounds based on the diaryl hydrazone scaffold were designed. Forty-four substituted derivatives of this core structure were synthesized using a variety of benzaldehydes and phenylhydrazines and characterized. The inhibitor candidates were evaluated in multiple assays, including the inhibition of amyloid β (Aβ) fibrillogenesis and oligomer formation and the reverse processes, the disassembly of preformed fibrils and oligomers. Because the structure of the hydrazone-based inhibitors mimics the redox features of the antioxidant resveratrol, the radical scavenging effect of the compounds was evaluated by colorimetric assays against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and superoxide radicals. The hydrazone scaffold was active in all of the different assays. The structure-activity relationship revealed that the substituents on the aromatic rings had a considerable effect on the overall activity of the compounds. The inhibitors showed strong activity in fibrillogenesis inhibition and disassembly, and even greater potency in the inhibition of oligomer formation and oligomer disassembly. Supporting the quantitative fluorometric and colorimetric assays, size exclusion chromatographic studies indicated that the best compounds practically eliminated or substantially inhibited the formation of soluble, aggregated Aβ species, as well. Atomic force microscopy was also applied to monitor the morphology of Aβ deposits. The compounds also possessed the predicted antioxidant properties; approximately 30% of the synthesized compounds showed a radical scavenging effect equal to or better than that of resveratrol or ascorbic acid.

  13. Ca(2+) -dependent endoplasmic reticulum stress correlates with astrogliosis in oligomeric amyloid β-treated astrocytes and in a model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi, Elena; Wyssenbach, Ane; Alberdi, María; Sánchez-Gómez, M V; Cavaliere, Fabio; Rodríguez, José J; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Matute, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    Neurotoxic effects of amyloid β peptides are mediated through deregulation of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and signaling, but relatively little is known about amyloid β modulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis and its pathological influence on glia. Here, we found that amyloid β oligomers caused a cytoplasmic Ca(2+) increase in cultured astrocytes, which was reduced by inhibitors of PLC and ER Ca(2+) release. Furthermore, amyloid β peptides triggered increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), as well as oxidative and ER stress, as indicated by eIF2α phosphorylation and overexpression of chaperone GRP78. These effects were decreased by ryanodine and 2APB, inhibitors of ryanodine receptors and InsP3 receptors, respectively, in both primary cultured astrocytes and organotypic cultures of hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. Importantly, intracerebroventricular injection of amyloid β oligomers triggered overexpression of GFAP and GRP78 in astrocytes of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. These data were validated in a triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Overexpression of GFAP and GRP78 in the hippocampal astrocytes correlated with the amyloid β oligomer load in 12-month-old mice, suggesting that this parameter drives astrocytic ER stress and astrogliosis in vivo. Together, these results provide evidence that amyloid β oligomers disrupt ER Ca(2+) homeostasis, which induces ER stress that leads to astrogliosis; this mechanism may be relevant to AD pathophysiology.

  14. Mitochondrion-derived reactive oxygen species lead to enhanced amyloid beta formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuner, K.; Schutt, T.; Kurz, C.; Eckert, S.H.; Schiller, C.; Occhipinti, A.; Mai, S.; Jendrach, M.; Eckert, G.P.; Kruse, S.E.; Palmiter, R.D.; Brandt, U.; Drose, S.; Wittig, I.; Willem, M.; Haass, C.; Reichert, A.S.; Muller, W.E.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Intracellular amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers and extracellular Abeta plaques are key players in the progression of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Still, the molecular signals triggering Abeta production are largely unclear. We asked whether mitochondrion-derived reactive oxygen species (RO

  15. Co-existence of Two Different α-Synuclein Oligomers with Different Core Structures Determined by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paslawski, Wojciech; Mysling, Simon; Thomsen, Karen;

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by the formation of protein oligomers and amyloid fibrils, which in the case of Parkinson's disease involves the protein α-synuclein (αSN). Cytotoxicity is mainly associated with the oligomeric species, but we still know little about their assembly an...

  16. Destroying activity of magnetoferritin on lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopcansky, Peter; Siposova, Katarina [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Melnikova, Lucia, E-mail: melnikova@saske.sk [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Bednarikova, Zuzana [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Institute of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, Safarik University, Kosice (Slovakia); Timko, Milan; Mitroova, Zuzana; Antosova, Andrea [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Garamus, Vasil M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht: Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Street 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna, 141980 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, Kyiv 01033 (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna, 141980 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Gazova, Zuzana [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Department of Medical and Clinical Biochemistry and LABMED, Tr. SNP 1, 040 11 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2015-03-01

    Presence of protein amyloid aggregates (oligomers, protofilaments, fibrils) is associated with many diseases as diabetes mellitus or Alzheimer's disease. The interaction between lysozyme amyloid fibrils and magnetoferritin loaded with different amount of iron atoms (168 or 532 atoms) has been investigated by small-angle X-rays scattering and thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. Results suggest that magnetoferritin caused an iron atom-concentration dependent reduction of lysozyme fibril size. - Highlights: • The interaction between lysozyme amyloid fibrils and magnetoferritin loaded with different amount of iron atoms (168 or 532 atoms) has been investigated by small-angle X-rays scattering and thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. • Results suggest that magnetoferritin caused an iron atom-concentration dependent reduction of lysozyme fibril size.

  17. Complexation of amyloid fibrils with charged conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dhiman; Dutta, Paulami; Chakraborty, Chanchal; Singh, Pradeep K; Anoop, A; Jha, Narendra Nath; Jacob, Reeba S; Mondal, Mrityunjoy; Mankar, Shruti; Das, Subhadeep; Malik, Sudip; Maji, Samir K

    2014-04-01

    It has been suggested that conjugated charged polymers are amyloid imaging agents and promising therapeutic candidates for neurological disorders. However, very less is known about their efficacy in modulating the amyloid aggregation pathway. Here, we studied the modulation of Parkinson's disease associated α-synuclein (AS) amyloid assembly kinetics using conjugated polyfluorene polymers (PF, cationic; PFS, anionic). We also explored the complexation of these charged polymers with the various AS aggregated species including amyloid fibrils and oligomers using multidisciplinary biophysical techniques. Our data suggests that both polymers irrespective of their different charges in the side chains increase the fibrilization kinetics of AS and also remarkably change the morphology of the resultant amyloid fibrils. Both polymers were incorporated/aligned onto the AS amyloid fibrils as evident from electron microscopy (EM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the resultant complexes were structurally distinct from their pristine form of both polymers and AS supported by FTIR study. Additionally, we observed that the mechanism of interactions between the polymers with different species of AS aggregates were markedly different.

  18. Lipid rafts participate in aberrant degradative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta peptide in Alzheimer’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhou; Chun Yang; Yufeng Liu; Peng Li; Huiying Yang; Jingxing Dai; Rongmei Qu; Lin Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide is the main component of amyloid plaques, which are found in Alzhei-mer’s disease. The generation and deposition of amyloid-beta is one of the crucial factors for the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Lipid rafts are glycolipid-rich liquid domains of the plasma membrane, where certain types of protein tend to aggregate and intercalate. Lipid rafts are involved in the generation of amyloid-beta oligomers and the formation of amyloid-beta peptides. In this paper, we review the mechanism by which lipid rafts disturb the aberrant deg-radative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta, which plays an important role in the pathological process of Alzheimer’s disease. Moreover, we describe this mechanism from the view of the Two-system Theory of fasciology and thus, suggest that lipid rafts may be a new target of Alzheimer’s disease treatment.

  19. CCL2 accelerates microglia-mediated Abeta oligomer formation and progression of neurocognitive dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Kiyota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The linkages between neuroinflammation and Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis are well established. What is not, however, is how specific immune pathways and proteins affect the disease. To this end, we previously demonstrated that transgenic over-expression of CCL2 enhanced microgliosis and induced diffuse amyloid plaque deposition in Tg2576 mice. This rodent model of AD expresses a Swedish beta-amyloid (Abeta precursor protein mutant. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We now report that CCL2 transgene expression accelerates deficits in spatial and working memory and hippocampal synaptic transmission in beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP mice as early as 2-3 months of age. This is followed by increased numbers of microglia that are seen surrounding Abeta oligomers. CCL2 does not suppress Abeta degradation. Rather, CCL2 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha directly facilitated Abeta uptake, intracellular Abeta oligomerization, and protein secretion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We posit that CCL2 facilitates Abeta oligomer formation in microglia and propose that such events accelerate memory dysfunction by affecting Abeta seeding in the brain.

  20. Hyperphosphorylation-induced tau oligomers

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    Khalid eIqbal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In normal adult brain the microtubule associated protein tau contains 2–3 phosphates per mole of the protein and at this level of phosphorylation it is a soluble cytosolic protein. The normal brain tau interacts with tubulin and promotes its assembly into microtubules and stabilizes these fibrils. In Alzheimer disease (AD brain tau is three to four fold hyperphosphorylated. The abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau binds to normal tau instead of the tubulin and this binding leads to the formation of tau oligomers. The tau oligomers can be sedimented at 200,000 x g whereas the normal tau under these conditions remains in the supernatant. The abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau is capable of sequestering not only normal tau but also microtubule associated protein (MAP MAP1 and MAP2 and causing disruption of the microtubule network promoted by these proteins. Unlike ABeta and prion protein (PrP oligomers, tau oligomerization in AD and related tauopathies is hyperphosphorylation-dependent; in vitro dephosphorylation of AD P-tau with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A inhibits and rehyperphosphorylation of the PP2A-AD P-tau with more than one combination of tau protein kinases promotes its oligomerization. In physiological assembly conditions the AD P-tau readily self-assembles into paired helical filaments. Missense tau mutations found in frontotemporal dementia apparently lead to tau oligomerization and neurofibrillary pathology by promoting its abnormal hyperphosphorylation. Dysregulation of the alternative splicing of tau that alters the 1 : 1 ratio of the 3-repeat : 4-repeat taus such as in Down syndrome, Pick disease and progressive supranuclear palsy leads to the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau.

  1. Hyperphosphorylation-induced tau oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Khalid; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2013-01-01

    In normal adult brain the microtubule associated protein (MAP) tau contains 2-3 phosphates per mol of the protein and at this level of phosphorylation it is a soluble cytosolic protein. The normal brain tau interacts with tubulin and promotes its assembly into microtubules and stabilizes these fibrils. In Alzheimer disease (AD) brain tau is three to fourfold hyperphosphorylated. The abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau binds to normal tau instead of the tubulin and this binding leads to the formation of tau oligomers. The tau oligomers can be sedimented at 200,000 × g whereas the normal tau under these conditions remains in the supernatant. The abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau is capable of sequestering not only normal tau but also MAP MAP1 and MAP2 and causing disruption of the microtubule network promoted by these proteins. Unlike Aβ and prion protein (PrP) oligomers, tau oligomerization in AD and related tauopathies is hyperphosphorylation-dependent; in vitro dephosphorylation of AD P-tau with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibits and rehyperphosphorylation of the PP2A-AD P-tau with more than one combination of tau protein kinases promotes its oligomerization. In physiological assembly conditions the AD P-tau readily self-assembles into paired helical filaments. Missense tau mutations found in frontotemporal dementia apparently lead to tau oligomerization and neurofibrillary pathology by promoting its abnormal hyperphosphorylation. Dysregulation of the alternative splicing of tau that alters the 1:1 ratio of the 3-repeat: 4-repeat taus such as in Down syndrome, Pick disease, and progressive supranuclear palsy leads to the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau.

  2. Isolating toxic insulin amyloid reactive species that lack β-sheets and have wide pH stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldt, Caryn L; Kurouski, Dmitry; Sorci, Mirco; Grafeld, Elizabeth; Lednev, Igor K; Belfort, Georges

    2011-06-08

    Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, are characterized by aggregation of normally functioning proteins or peptides into ordered, β-sheet rich fibrils. Most of the theories on amyloid toxicity focus on the nuclei or oligomers in the fibril formation process. The nuclei and oligomers are transient species, making their full characterization difficult. We have isolated toxic protein species that act like an oligomer and may provide the first evidence of a stable reactive species created by disaggregation of amyloid fibrils. This reactive species was isolated by dissolving amyloid fibrils at high pH and it has a mass >100 kDa and a diameter of 48 ± 15 nm. It seeds the formation of fibrils in a dose dependent manner, but using circular dichroism and deep ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy, the reactive species was found to not have a β-sheet rich structure. We hypothesize that the reactive species does not decompose at high pH and maintains its structure in solution. The remaining disaggregated insulin, excluding the toxic reactive species that elongated the fibrils, returned to native structured insulin. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that a stable reactive species of an amyloid reaction has been separated and characterized by disaggregation of amyloid fibrils.

  3. Targeting α-synuclein oligomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Diggelen, Femke

    2017-01-01

    . Although there is currently no cure for PD, αSn oligomers (αSOs) are a potential therapeutic target, but a major drawback it that little is known about the nature of PD-associated αSOs. The scientific literature describes a wide variety of protocols to generate αSOs in vitro, with a subsequent......+/K+ ATPase, V-type ATPase, VDAC, CaMKII and Rab-3A. The identification of these targets is a first step towards unravelling the toxic pathways which are activated upon synaptic binding of extracellularly added αSOs, and hopefully will contribute to the discovery of new disease modifying compounds, which can...

  4. Optimization of the All-D Peptide D3 for Aβ Oligomer Elimination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Nicole Klein

    Full Text Available The aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ is postulated to be the crucial event in Alzheimer's disease (AD. In particular, small neurotoxic Aβ oligomers are considered to be responsible for the development and progression of AD. Therefore, elimination of thesis oligomers represents a potential causal therapy of AD. Starting from the well-characterized d-enantiomeric peptide D3, we identified D3 derivatives that bind monomeric Aβ. The underlying hypothesis is that ligands bind monomeric Aβ and stabilize these species within the various equilibria with Aβ assemblies, leading ultimately to the elimination of Aβ oligomers. One of the hereby identified d-peptides, DB3, and a head-to-tail tandem of DB3, DB3DB3, were studied in detail. Both peptides were found to: (i inhibit the formation of Thioflavin T-positive fibrils; (ii bind to Aβ monomers with micromolar affinities; (iii eliminate Aβ oligomers; (iv reduce Aβ-induced cytotoxicity; and (v disassemble preformed Aβ aggregates. The beneficial effects of DB3 were improved by DB3DB3, which showed highly enhanced efficacy. Our approach yielded Aβ monomer-stabilizing ligands that can be investigated as a suitable therapeutic strategy against AD.

  5. QIAD assay for quantitating a compound’s efficacy in elimination of toxic Aβ oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, Oleksandr; Dunkelmann, Tina; Gremer, Lothar; van Groen, Thomas; Mirecka, Ewa A.; Kadish, Inga; Willuweit, Antje; Kutzsche, Janine; Jürgens, Dagmar; Rudolph, Stephan; Tusche, Markus; Bongen, Patrick; Pietruszka, Jörg; Oesterhelt, Filipp; Langen, Karl-Josef; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich; Janssen, Arnold; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Funke, Susanne A.; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard; Willbold, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Strong evidence exists for a central role of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) oligomers in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. We have developed a fast, reliable and robust in vitro assay, termed QIAD, to quantify the effect of any compound on the Aβ aggregate size distribution. Applying QIAD, we studied the effect of homotaurine, scyllo-inositol, EGCG, the benzofuran derivative KMS88009, ZAβ3W, the D-enantiomeric peptide D3 and its tandem version D3D3 on Aβ aggregation. The predictive power of the assay for in vivo efficacy is demonstrated by comparing the oligomer elimination efficiency of D3 and D3D3 with their treatment effects in animal models of Alzheimer´s disease. PMID:26394756

  6. Prion protein oligomer and its neurotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei Huang; Fulin Lian; Yi Wen; Chenyun Guo; Donghai Lin

    2013-01-01

    The prion diseases,also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies,are fatal neurodegenerative disorders.According to the 'protein only' hypothesis,the key molecular event in the pathogenesis of prion disease is the conformational conversion of the host-derived cellular prion protein (PrPC) into a misfolded form (scrapie PrP,prpSc).Increasing evidence has shown that the most infectious factor is the smaller subfibrillar oligomers formed by prion proteins.Both the prion oligomer and PrPSc are rich in β-sheet structure and resistant to the proteolysis of proteinase K.The prion oligomer is soluble in physiologic environments whereas PrPSc is insoluble.Various prion oligomers are formed in different conditions.Prion oligomers exhibited more neurotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo than the fibrillar forms of PrPSc,implying that prion oligomers could be potential drug targets for attacking prion diseases.In this article,we describe recent experimental evidence regarding prion oligomers,with a special focus on prion oligomer formation and its neurotoxicity.

  7. Apolipoprotein E, especially apolipoprotein E4, increases the oligomerization of amyloid β peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Hori, Yukiko; Adams, Kenneth W; Takeda, Shuko; Banerji, Adrian Olaf; Mitani, Akinori; Joyner, Daniel; Thyssen, Diana H; Bacskai, Brian J; Frosch, Matthew P; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Finn, Mary Beth; Holtzman, David M; Hyman, Bradley T

    2012-10-24

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common progressive neurodegenerative disorder causing dementia. Massive deposition of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) as senile plaques in the brain is the pathological hallmark of AD, but oligomeric, soluble forms of Aβ have been implicated as the synaptotoxic component. The apolipoprotein E ε 4 (apoE ε4) allele is known to be a genetic risk factor for developing AD. However, it is still unknown how apoE impacts the process of Aβ oligomerization. Here, we found that the level of Aβ oligomers in APOE ε4/ε4 AD patient brains is 2.7 times higher than those in APOE ε3/ε3 AD patient brains, matched for total plaque burden, suggesting that apoE4 impacts the metabolism of Aβ oligomers. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effect of apoE on Aβ oligomer formation. Using both synthetic Aβ and a split-luciferase method for monitoring Aβ oligomers, we observed that apoE increased the level of Aβ oligomers in an isoform-dependent manner (E2 apoE4, increases Aβ oligomers in the brain. Higher levels of Aβ oligomers in the brains of APOE ε4/ε4 carriers compared with APOE ε3/ε3 carriers may increase the loss of dendritic spines and accelerate memory impairments, leading to earlier cognitive decline in AD.

  8. SYNTHESIS OF OLIGOMERS CONTAINING 5-FLUOROURACIL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PIAO Aichih; SUN Shumen

    1983-01-01

    The condensation oligomers of 5-fluorouracil were prepared by reaction of 2,4-bis-(trimethyl-silyloxy)-5-fluoropyrimidine) with various dicarboxylic chlorides, e.g.R=(-CH2-)2, (-CH2-)4, (-CH2-)6, p-C6H4-, m-C6H4-, o-C6H4- The structures of obtained oligomers were characterized by IR and the oligomers were then hydrolyzed in acid, alkaline and neutral media at room temperature respectively. The amount of 5-fluorouracil released was quantitated by measuring its UV absorbance at 265.5nm. However in the case of oligomers containing phenylene moiety, 5-fluorouracil was not detected when the hydrolysis was conducted in acid or neutral medium, while in the case of oligomers containing methylene moiety, hydrolysis proceeded easily in acid, alkaline and neutral media.

  9. Interactions between amyloid-β and Tau fragments promote aberrant aggregates: implications for amyloid toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Thanh D; Economou, Nicholas J; Chamas, Ali; Buratto, Steven K; Shea, Joan-Emma; Bowers, Michael T

    2014-09-25

    We have investigated at the oligomeric level interactions between Aβ(25-35) and Tau(273-284), two important fragments of the amyloid-β and Tau proteins, implicated in Alzheimer's disease. We are able to directly observe the coaggregation of these two peptides by probing the conformations of early heteroligomers and the macroscopic morphologies of the aggregates. Ion-mobility experiment and theoretical modeling indicate that the interactions of the two fragments affect the self-assembly processes of both peptides. Tau(273-284) shows a high affinity to form heteroligomers with existing Aβ(25-35) monomer and oligomers in solution. The configurations and characteristics of the heteroligomers are determined by whether the population of Aβ(25-35) or Tau(273-284) is dominant. As a result, two types of aggregates are observed in the mixture with distinct morphologies and dimensions from those of pure Aβ(25-35) fibrils. The incorporation of some Tau into β-rich Aβ(25-35) oligomers reduces the aggregation propensity of Aβ(25-35) but does not fully abolish fibril formation. On the other hand, by forming complexes with Aβ(25-35), Tau monomers and dimers can advance to larger oligomers and form granular aggregates. These heteroligomers may contribute to toxicity through loss of normal function of Tau or inherent toxicity of the aggregates themselves.

  10. Key points concerning amyloid infectivity and prion-like neuronal invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba eEspargaró

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid aggregation has been related to an increasing number of human illnesses, from Alzheimer and Parkinson’s diseases to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Traditionally only prions have been considered as infectious agents with a high capacity of propagation. Although recent publications have showed that many amyloid proteins, including amyloid β-peptide, α-synuclein and tau protein, also propagate in a prion-like manner, the link between propagation of pathological proteins and neurotoxicity has not been evidenced. The extremely low infectivity in natural conditions of the most of non-prion amyloids is far from the spreading capacity displayed by the prions. However, it is important to elucidate the key factors that cause non-prion amyloids become infectious agents. In recent years, important advances in the understanding of the amyloid processes of amyloid-like proteins and unrelated prions (i.e., yeast and fungal prions have yielded essential information that can be applied to shed light on the prion phenomenon in mammals and humans. As shown in this review, recent evidences suggest that there are key factors that could dramatically modulate the prion capacity of proteins in the amyloid conformation. The concentration of nuclei, the presence of oligomers, and the toxicity, resistance and localization of these aggregates could be key factors affecting their spreading. In short, those factors that favor the high concentration of extracellular nuclei or oligomers, characterized by a small size, with a low toxicity could dramatically increase prion propensity; whereas low concentrations of highly toxic intracellular amyloids, with a large size, would prevent infectivity.

  11. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  12. Amyloid-β inhibits No-cGMP signaling in a CD36- and CD47-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Miller

    Full Text Available Amyloid-β interacts with two cell surface receptors, CD36 and CD47, through which the matricellular protein thrombospondin-1 inhibits soluble guanylate cyclase activation. Here we examine whether amyloid-β shares this inhibitory activity. Amyloid-β inhibited both drug and nitric oxide-mediated activation of soluble guanylate cyclase in several cell types. Known cGMP-dependent functional responses to nitric oxide in platelets and vascular smooth muscle cells were correspondingly inhibited by amyloid-β. Functional interaction of amyloid-β with the scavenger receptor CD36 was indicated by inhibition of free fatty acid uptake via this receptor. Both soluble oligomer and fibrillar forms of amyloid-β were active. In contrast, amyloid-β did not compete with the known ligand SIRPα for binding to CD47. However, both receptors were necessary for amyloid-β to inhibit cGMP accumulation. These data suggest that amyloid-β interaction with CD36 induces a CD47-dependent signal that inhibits soluble guanylate cyclase activation. Combined with the pleiotropic effects of inhibiting free fatty acid transport via CD36, these data provides a molecular mechanism through which amyloid-β can contribute to the nitric oxide signaling deficiencies associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Ballistic Energy Transport in Oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubtsova, Natalia I; Qasim, Layla N; Kurnosov, Arkady A; Burin, Alexander L; Rubtsov, Igor V

    2015-09-15

    The development of nanocomposite materials with desired heat management properties, including nanowires, layered semiconductor structures, and self-assembled monolayer (SAM) junctions, attracts broad interest. Such materials often involve polymeric/oligomeric components and can feature high or low thermal conductivity, depending on their design. For example, in SAM junctions made of alkane chains sandwiched between metal layers, the thermal conductivity can be very low, whereas the fibers of ordered polyethylene chains feature high thermal conductivity, exceeding that of many pure metals. The thermal conductivity of nanostructured materials is determined by the energy transport between and within each component of the material, which all need to be understood for optimizing the properties. For example, in the SAM junctions, the energy transport across the metal-chain interface as well as the transport through the chains both determine the overall heat conductivity, however, to separate these contributions is difficult. Recently developed relaxation-assisted two-dimensional infrared (RA 2DIR) spectroscopy is capable of studying energy transport in individual molecules in the time domain. The transport in a molecule is initiated by exciting an IR-active group (a tag); the method records the influence of the excess energy on another mode in the molecule (a reporter). The energy transport time can be measured for different reporters, and the transport speed through the molecule is evaluated. Various molecules were interrogated by RA 2DIR: in molecules without repeating units (disordered), the transport mechanism was expected and found to be diffusive. The transport via an oligomer backbone can potentially be ballistic, as the chain offers delocalized vibrational states. Indeed, the transport regime via three tested types of oligomers, alkanes, polyethyleneglycols, and perfluoroalkanes was found to be ballistic, whereas the transport within the end groups was diffusive

  14. Amyloid Beta Peptide Slows Down Sensory-Induced Hippocampal Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Peña-Ortega

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD progresses with a deterioration of hippocampal function that is likely induced by amyloid beta (Aβ oligomers. Hippocampal function is strongly dependent on theta rhythm, and disruptions in this rhythm have been related to the reduction of cognitive performance in AD. Accordingly, both AD patients and AD-transgenic mice show an increase in theta rhythm at rest but a reduction in cognitive-induced theta rhythm. We have previously found that monomers of the short sequence of Aβ (peptide 25–35 reduce sensory-induced theta oscillations. However, considering on the one hand that different Aβ sequences differentially affect hippocampal oscillations and on the other hand that Aβ oligomers seem to be responsible for the cognitive decline observed in AD, here we aimed to explore the effect of Aβ oligomers on sensory-induced theta rhythm. Our results show that intracisternal injection of Aβ1–42 oligomers, which has no significant effect on spontaneous hippocampal activity, disrupts the induction of theta rhythm upon sensory stimulation. Instead of increasing the power in the theta band, the hippocampus of Aβ-treated animals responds to sensory stimulation (tail pinch with an increase in lower frequencies. These findings demonstrate that Aβ alters induced theta rhythm, providing an in vivo model to test for therapeutic approaches to overcome Aβ-induced hippocampal and cognitive dysfunctions.

  15. Diaryl Hydrazones as Multifunctional Inhibitors of Amyloid Self-Assembly†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, Béla; Sood, Abha; Bag, Seema; Tulsan, Rekha; Ghosh, Sanjukta; Borkin, Dmitry; Kennedy, Arleen R.; Melanson, Michelle; Madden, Richard; Zhou, Weihong; LeVine, Harry; Török, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    The design and application of an effective, new class of multifunctional small molecule inhibitors of amyloid self-assembly are described. Several compounds, based on the diaryl hydrazone scaffold were designed. Forty-four substituted derivatives of this core structure were synthesized using a variety of benzaldehydes and phenylhydrazines and were characterized. The inhibitor candidates were evaluated in multiple assays, including the inhibition of Aβ fibrillogenesis and oligomer formation and the reverse processes, the disassembly of preformed fibrils and oligomers. Since the structure of the hydrazone-based inhibitors mimic the redox features of the antioxidant resveratrol the radical scavenging effect of the compounds was evaluated by colorimetric assays against 2,2-diphenyl-lpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and superoxide radicals. The hydrazone scaffold was active in all of the different assays. The structure-activity relationship revealed that the substituents on the aromatic rings had considerable effect on the overall activity of the compounds. The inhibitors showed strong activity in the fibrillogenesis inhibition and disassembly, and even greater potency in the inhibition of oligomer formation and oligomer disassembly. Supporting the quantitative fluorometric and colorimetric assays, size exclusion chromatographic studies indicated that the best compounds practically eliminated or substantially inhibited the formation of soluble, aggregated Aβ species, as well. Atomic Force Microscopy was also applied to monitor the morphology of Aβ deposits. The compounds also possessed the predicted antioxidant properties; approximately 30% of the synthesized compounds showed equal or better radical scavenging effect than resveratrol or ascorbic acid. PMID:23346953

  16. [Twenty-five years of the amyloid hypothesis of alzheimer disease: advances, failures and new perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, O S; Vasenina, E E

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been long the primary one. During the 25-year history the concept has been dramatically changed. Accumulation of β-amyloid is associated not only with the disruption of its synthesis (as it seemed after the discovery of genetic mechanisms of some familial cases of AD) but rather with the disruption of its clearance and elimination from the brain tissue via the microcirculatory system. It has been recognized that soluble oligomers of β-amyloid, but not senile plaques that consisted of insoluble conjugates described by A. Alzheimer 100 years ago, play a key pathogenic role in the brain. Interrelation of vascular and degenerative processes is confirmed by common risk factors, clinical, neuroimaging, pathomorphological and experimental data. Insulin-resistance is also one of the links between AD degenerative and vascular processes. Based on the current state of the amyloid hypothesis, perspectives of new multimodal treatment strategies are discussed.

  17. Interaction of amyloid inhibitor proteins with amyloid beta peptides: insight from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Das

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the detailed mechanism by which proteins such as human αB- crystallin and human lysozyme inhibit amyloid beta (Aβ peptide aggregation is crucial for designing treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Thus, unconstrained, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent have been performed to characterize the Aβ17-42 assembly in presence of the αB-crystallin core domain and of lysozyme. Simulations reveal that both inhibitor proteins compete with inter-peptide interaction by binding to the peptides during the early stage of aggregation, which is consistent with their inhibitory action reported in experiments. However, the Aβ binding dynamics appear different for each inhibitor. The binding between crystallin and the peptide monomer, dominated by electrostatics, is relatively weak and transient due to the heterogeneous amino acid distribution of the inhibitor surface. The crystallin-bound Aβ oligomers are relatively long-lived, as they form more extensive contact surface with the inhibitor protein. In contrast, a high local density of arginines from lysozyme allows strong binding with Aβ peptide monomers, resulting in stable complexes. Our findings not only illustrate, in atomic detail, how the amyloid inhibitory mechanism of human αB-crystallin, a natural chaperone, is different from that of human lysozyme, but also may aid de novo design of amyloid inhibitors.

  18. Adding Effects of Reactive Oligomers for Epoxy Resin

    OpenAIRE

    山田, 英介; 稲垣, 慎二; 岡本, 弘

    1991-01-01

    Reactive oligomers with both functional end groups were prepared by the radical telomerization and the effect of oligomers added to bisphenol-A-glycidylehter type epoxy resin was investigated by measuring mechanical properties, adhesive properties and dynamic viscoelasticities. These oligomers were high viscous liquid except the one prepared from methyl methacrylate, therefore the blend of oligomers with epoxy resin is easy. Adding oligomers, the cured epoxy resins showed the lower glass-tran...

  19. Heteromers of amyloid precursor protein in cerebrospinal fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Cuchillo-Ibáñez, Inmaculada; López-Font, Inmaculada; Boix-Amorós, Alba; Brinkmalm, Gunnar; Blennow, Kaj; Molinuevo, José L.; Sáez-Valero, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background Soluble fragments of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) generated by ?- and ?-secretases, sAPP? and sAPP?, have been postulated as promising new cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer?s disease (AD). However, the capacity of these soluble proteins to assemble has not been explored and could be relevant. Our aim is to characterize possible sAPP oligomers that could contribute to the quantification of sAPP? and sAPP? in CSF by ELISA, as well as ...

  20. Amyloid Fibrils from Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadishka Jayawardena

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils are a class of insoluble protein nanofibers that are formed via the self-assembly of a wide range of peptides and proteins. They are increasingly exploited for a broad range of applications in bionanotechnology, such as biosensing and drug delivery, as nanowires, hydrogels, and thin films. Amyloid fibrils have been prepared from many proteins, but there has been no definitive characterization of amyloid fibrils from hemoglobin to date. Here, nanofiber formation was carried out under denaturing conditions using solutions of apo-hemoglobin extracted from bovine waste blood. A characteristic amyloid fibril morphology was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM, with mean fibril dimensions of approximately 5 nm diameter and up to several microns in length. The thioflavin T assay confirmed the presence of β-sheet structures in apo-hemoglobin fibrils, and X-ray fiber diffraction showed the characteristic amyloid cross-β quaternary structure. Apo-hemoglobin nanofibers demonstrated high stability over a range of temperatures (−20 to 80 °C and pHs (2–10, and were stable in the presence of organic solvents and trypsin, confirming their potential as nanomaterials with versatile applications. This study conclusively demonstrates the formation of amyloid fibrils from hemoglobin for the first time, and also introduces a cost-effective method for amyloid fibril manufacture using meat industry by-products.

  1. Amyloid-like fibril elongation follows michaelis-menten kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milto, Katazyna; Botyriute, Akvile; Smirnovas, Vytautas

    2013-01-01

    A number of proteins can aggregate into amyloid-like fibrils. It was noted that fibril elongation has similarities to an enzymatic reaction, where monomers or oligomers would play a role of substrate and nuclei/fibrils would play a role of enzyme. The question is how similar these processes really are. We obtained experimental data on insulin amyloid-like fibril elongation at the conditions where other processes which may impact kinetics of fibril formation are minor and fitted it using Michaelis-Menten equation. The correlation of the fit is very good and repeatable. It speaks in favour of enzyme-like model of fibril elongation. In addition, obtained [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] values at different conditions may help in better understanding influence of environmental factors on the process of fibril elongation.

  2. Intracellular Aβ-oligomers and early inflammation in a model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Maria Teresa; Bruno, Martin A; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Klein, William L; Cuello, A Claudio

    2012-07-01

    Lifelong use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been shown to diminish the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD), suggesting a key role of inflammation in early stages of the pathology. While amyloid plaque-associated inflammation has been extensively studied in human and animal models, little is known about the inflammatory process prior to plaque deposition, i.e., in preclinical stages of AD. In this study we investigated microglial and neuronal inflammatory markers in preplaque transgenic McGill-Thy1-APP mice. We found evidence that prior to plaque deposition classical markers of microglial activation such as major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), inducible nitric oxide synthase (i-NOS), and CD40 are already upregulated in the hippocampus of transgenic mice. Microglial cells from transgenic mice in the preplaque stage displayed intermediately activated morphology and appeared to be recruited toward intracellular amyloid-β peptide (Aβ)-oligomer burdened neurons. The inducible, neuron-specific cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) enzyme was found to be upregulated and specifically expressed by neurons in close relationship with Aβ-bearing cells, at this early stage of the AD-like pathology. Our study suggests that neuroinflammation might be one of the earliest pathological responses to intracellular accumulation of Aβ-oligomers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Modeling amyloids in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villar-Piqué Anna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An increasing number of proteins are being shown to assemble into amyloid structures, self-seeding fibrillar aggregates that may lead to pathological states or play essential biological functions in organisms. Bacterial cell factories have raised as privileged model systems to understand the mechanisms behind amyloid assembly and the cellular fitness cost associated to the formation of these aggregates. In the near future, these bacterial systems will allow implementing high-throughput screening approaches to identify effective modulators of amyloid aggregation.

  4. Synthesis of a new π-conjugated redox oligomer: Electrochemical and optical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blili, Saber; Zaâboub, Zouhour; Maaref, Hassen; Haj Said, Ayoub

    2017-01-01

    A new π-conjugated redox oligomer was prepared according a two-Step Synthesis. Firstly, an oligophenylene (OMPA) was obtained from the anodic oxidation of the (4-methoxyphenyl)acetonitrile. Then, the resulting material was chemically modified by the Knoevenagel condensation with the ferrocenecarboxaldehyde. This reaction led to a redox-conjugated oligomer the Fc-OMPA. The synthesized material was characterized using different spectroscopic techniques: NMR, FTIR, UV-vis and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The Fc-OMPA was used to modify a platinum electrode surface and the electrochemical response of the ferrocene redox-center was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Moreover, the room temperature PL spectra of Fc-OMPA revealed that the ferrocene moiety, which acts as an electron donor, can effectively quench the oligomer luminescence. However, when ferrocene was oxidized to ferrocenium ion, the intramolecular charge transfer process was prevented which consequently enhanced the light emission. Thus, the oligomer light-emission can be, chemically or electrochemically tuned. The obtained results showed that the prepared material is a good candidate for the elaboration of electrochemical sensors and for the development of luminescent Redox-switchable devices.

  5. Anti-amyloid Aggregation Activity of Natural Compounds: Implications for Alzheimer's Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Xian-Le; Rao, Praveen P N; Wang, Yan-Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Several plant-derived natural compounds are known to exhibit anti-amyloid aggregation activity which makes them attractive as potential therapies to treat Alzheimer's disease. The mechanisms of their anti-amyloid activity are not well known. In this regard, many natural compounds are known to exhibit direct binding to various amyloid species including oligomers and fibrils, which in turn can lead to conformational change in the beta-sheet assembly to form nontoxic aggregates. This review discusses the mechanism of anti-amyloid activity of 16 natural compounds and gives structural details on their direct binding interactions with amyloid aggregates. Our computational investigations show that the physicochemical properties of natural products do fit Lipinski's criteria and that catechol and catechol-type moieties present in natural compounds act as lysine site-specific inhibitors of amyloid aggregation. Based on these observations, we propose a structural template to design novel small molecules containing site-specific ring scaffolds, planar aromatic and nonaromatic linkers with suitably substituted hydrogen bond acceptors and donors. These studies will have significant implications in the design and development of novel amyloid aggregation inhibitors with superior metabolic stability and blood-brain barrier penetration as potential agents to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Aβ40 oligomers identified as a potential biomarker for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Man Gao

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's Disease (AD is the most prevalent form of dementia worldwide, yet the development of therapeutics has been hampered by the absence of suitable biomarkers to diagnose the disease in its early stages prior to the formation of amyloid plaques and the occurrence of irreversible neuronal damage. Since oligomeric Aβ species have been implicated in the pathophysiology of AD, we reasoned that they may correlate with the onset of disease. As such, we have developed a novel misfolded protein assay for the detection of soluble oligomers composed of Aβ x-40 and x-42 peptide (hereafter Aβ40 and Aβ42 from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Preliminary validation of this assay with 36 clinical samples demonstrated the presence of aggregated Aβ40 in the CSF of AD patients. Together with measurements of total Aβ42, diagnostic sensitivity and specificity greater than 95% and 90%, respectively, were achieved. Although larger sample populations will be needed to confirm this diagnostic sensitivity, our studies demonstrate a sensitive method of detecting circulating Aβ40 oligomers from AD CSF and suggest that these oligomers could be a powerful new biomarker for the early detection of AD.

  7. Aβ1-42 monomers or oligomers have different effects on autophagy and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmotto, Michela; Monteleone, Debora; Piras, Antonio; Valsecchi, Valeria; Tropiano, Marta; Ariano, Stefania; Fornaro, Michele; Vercelli, Alessandro; Puyal, Julien; Arancio, Ottavio; Tabaton, Massimo; Tamagno, Elena

    2014-10-01

    The role of autophagy and its relationship with apoptosis in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis is poorly understood. Disruption of autophagy leads to buildup of incompletely digested substrates, amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide accumulation in vacuoles and cell death. Aβ, in turn, has been found to affect autophagy. Thus, Aβ might be part of a loop in which it is both the substrate of altered autophagy and its cause. Given the relevance of different soluble forms of Aβ1-42 in AD, we have investigated whether monomers and oligomers of the peptide have a differential role in causing altered autophagy and cell death. Using differentiated SK-N-BE neuroblastoma cells, we found that monomers hamper the formation of the autophagic BCL2-BECN1/Beclin 1 complex and activate the MAPK8/JNK1-MAPK9/JNK2 pathway phosphorylating BCL2. Monomers also inhibit apoptosis and allow autophagy with intracellular accumulation of autophagosomes and elevation of levels of BECN1 and LC3-II, resulting in an inhibition of substrate degradation due to an inhibitory action on lysosomal activity. Oligomers, in turn, favor the formation of the BCL2-BECN1 complex favoring apoptosis. In addition, they cause a less profound increase in BECN1 and LC3-II levels than monomers without affecting the autophagic flux. Thus, data presented in this work show a link for autophagy and apoptosis with monomers and oligomers, respectively. These studies are likely to help the design of novel disease modifying therapies.

  8. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosicka, Iga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type II is a metabolic disease affecting millions of people worldwide. The disease is associated with occurence of insoluble, fibrillar, protein aggregates in islets of Langerhans in the pancreas - islet amyloid. The main constituent of these protein fibers is the human islet...... of diabetes type II, while revealing the structure(s) of islet amyloid fibrils is necessary for potential design of therapeutic agents....

  9. Lipid Rafts: Linking Alzheimer's Amyloid-β Production, Aggregation, and Toxicity at Neuronal Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo V. Rushworth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains, enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, into which specific subsets of proteins and lipids partition, creating cell-signalling platforms that are vital for neuronal functions. Lipid rafts play at least three crucial roles in Alzheimer's Disease (AD, namely, in promoting the generation of the amyloid-β (Aβ peptide, facilitating its aggregation upon neuronal membranes to form toxic oligomers and hosting specific neuronal receptors through which the AD-related neurotoxicity and memory impairments of the Aβ oligomers are transduced. Recent evidence suggests that Aβ oligomers may exert their deleterious effects through binding to, and causing the aberrant clustering of, lipid raft proteins including the cellular prion protein and glutamate receptors. The formation of these pathogenic lipid raft-based platforms may be critical for the toxic signalling mechanisms that underlie synaptic dysfunction and neuropathology in AD.

  10. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  11. An infrared spectroscopy approach to follow β-sheet formation in peptide amyloid assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jongcheol; Hoffmann, Waldemar; Warnke, Stephan; Huang, Xing; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Bowers, Michael T.; von Helden, Gert; Pagel, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Amyloidogenic peptides and proteins play a crucial role in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These proteins undergo a spontaneous transition from a soluble, often partially folded form, into insoluble amyloid fibrils that are rich in β-sheets. Increasing evidence suggests that highly dynamic, polydisperse folding intermediates, which occur during fibril formation, are the toxic species in the amyloid-related diseases. Traditional condensed-phase methods are of limited use for characterizing these states because they typically only provide ensemble averages rather than information about individual oligomers. Here we report the first direct secondary-structure analysis of individual amyloid intermediates using a combination of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and gas-phase infrared spectroscopy. Our data reveal that oligomers of the fibril-forming peptide segments VEALYL and YVEALL, which consist of 4-9 peptide strands, can contain a significant amount of β-sheet. In addition, our data show that the more-extended variants of each oligomer generally exhibit increased β-sheet content.

  12. Structural Characterization of Monomers and Oligomers of D-Amino Acid-Containing Peptides Using T-Wave Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xueqin; Jia, Chenxi; Chen, Zhengwei; Li, Lingjun

    2016-11-01

    The D-residues are crucial to biological function of D-amino acid containing peptides (DAACPs). Previous ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) studies revealing oligomerization patterns of amyloid cascade demonstrated conversion from native soluble unstructured assembly to fibril ß-sheet oligomers, which has been implicated in amyloid diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes. Although neuropeptides are typically present at very low concentrations in circulation, their local concentrations could be much higher in large dense core vesicles, forming dimers or oligomers. We studied the oligomerization of protonated and metal-adducted achatin I and dermorphin peptide isomers with IM-MS. Our results suggested that dimerization, oligomerization, and metal adduction augment the structural differences between D/L peptide isomers compared to protonated monomers. Dimers and oligomers enhanced the structural differences between D/L peptide isomers in both aqueous and organic solvent system. Furthermore, some oligomer forms were only observed for either D- or L-isomers, indicating the importance of chiral center in oligomerization process. The oligomerization patterns of D/L isomers appear to be similar. Potassium adducts were detected to enlarge the structural differences between D/L isomers.

  13. Structural Characterization of Monomers and Oligomers of D-Amino Acid-Containing Peptides Using T-Wave Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xueqin; Jia, Chenxi; Chen, Zhengwei; Li, Lingjun

    2017-01-01

    The D-residues are crucial to biological function of D-amino acid containing peptides (DAACPs). Previous ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) studies revealing oligomerization patterns of amyloid cascade demonstrated conversion from native soluble unstructured assembly to fibril ß-sheet oligomers, which has been implicated in amyloid diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes. Although neuropeptides are typically present at very low concentrations in circulation, their local concentrations could be much higher in large dense core vesicles, forming dimers or oligomers. We studied the oligomerization of protonated and metal-adducted achatin I and dermorphin peptide isomers with IM-MS. Our results suggested that dimerization, oligomerization, and metal adduction augment the structural differences between D/L peptide isomers compared to protonated monomers. Dimers and oligomers enhanced the structural differences between D/L peptide isomers in both aqueous and organic solvent system. Furthermore, some oligomer forms were only observed for either D- or L-isomers, indicating the importance of chiral center in oligomerization process. The oligomerization patterns of D/L isomers appear to be similar. Potassium adducts were detected to enlarge the structural differences between D/L isomers.

  14. Lactic acid oligomers (OLAs) as prodrug moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, J; Lachmann, B; Lauer, R; Eppacher, S; Noe, C R

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we propose the use of lactic acid oligomers (OLAs) as prodrug moieties. Two synthetic approaches are presented, on the one hand a non selective oligomerisation of lactic acid and on the other hand a block synthesis to tetramers of lactic acid. Dimers of lactic acid were investigated with respect to their plasma stability and their adsorption to albumine. Ibuprofen was chosen as the first drug for OLAylation. The ester 19 of LA(1)-ibuprofen was evaluated with respect to the degradation to human plasma and the adsorption to albumine. All results indicate that lactic acid oligomers are promising prodrug moieties.

  15. Neuroprotective and nootropic drug noopept rescues α-synuclein amyloid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xueen; Gharibyan, Anna L; Öhman, Anders; Liu, Yonggang; Olofsson, Anders; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A

    2011-12-16

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by α-synuclein (α-Syn)-containing Lewy body formation and selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. We have demonstrated the modulating effect of noopept, a novel proline-containing dipeptide drug with nootropic and neuroprotective properties, on α-Syn oligomerization and fibrillation by using thioflavin T fluorescence, far-UV CD, and atomic force microscopy techniques. Noopept does not bind to a sterically specific site in the α-Syn molecule as revealed by heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR analysis, but due to hydrophobic interactions with toxic amyloid oligomers, it prompts their rapid sequestration into larger fibrillar amyloid aggregates. Consequently, this process rescues the cytotoxic effect of amyloid oligomers on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells as demonstrated by using cell viability assays and fluorescent staining of apoptotic and necrotic cells and by assessing the level of intracellular oxidative stress. The mitigating effect of noopept against amyloid oligomeric cytotoxicity may offer additional benefits to the already well-established therapeutic functions of this new pharmaceutical.

  16. Amyloid beta-induced nerve growth factor dysmetabolism in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Martin A; Leon, Wanda C; Fragoso, Gabriela; Mushynski, Walter E; Almazan, Guillermina; Cuello, A Claudio

    2009-08-01

    We previously reported that the precursor form of nerve growth factor (pro-NGF) and not mature NGF is liberated in the CNS in an activity-dependent manner, and that its maturation and degradation occur in the extracellular space by the coordinated action of proteases.Here, we present evidence of diminished conversion of pro-NGF to its mature form and of greater NGF degradation in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain samples compared with controls. These alterations of the NGF metabolic pathway likely resulted in the increased pro-NGF levels. The pro-NGF was largely in a peroxynitrited form in the AD samples. Intrahippocampal injection of amyloid-beta oligomers provoked similar upregulation of pro-NGF in naive rats that was accompanied by evidence of microglial activation (CD40), increased levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase, and increased activity of the NGF-degrading enzyme matrix metalloproteinase 9. The elevated inducible nitric oxide synthase provoked the generation of biologically inactive, peroxynitrite-modified pro-NGF in amyloid-beta oligomer-injected rats. These parameters were corrected by minocycline treatment. Minocycline also diminished altered matrix metalloproteinase 9, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and microglial activation (CD40); improved cognitive behavior; and normalized pro-NGF levels in a transgenic mouse AD model. The effects of amyloid-beta amyloid CNS burden on NGF metabolism may explain the paradoxical upregulation of pro-NGF in AD accompanied by atrophy of forebrain cholinergic neurons.

  17. Characterization of amyloid in equine recurrent uveitis as AA amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostevik, L; de Souza, G A; Wien, T N; Gunnes, G; Sørby, R

    2014-01-01

    Two horses with chronic uveitis and histological lesions consistent with equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) were examined. Microscopical findings in the ciliary body included deposits of amyloid lining the non-pigmented epithelium, intracytoplasmic, rod-shaped, eosinophilic inclusions and intraepithelial infiltration of T lymphocytes. Ultrastructural examination of the ciliary body of one horse confirmed the presence of abundant extracellular deposits of non-branching fibrils (9-11 nm in diameter) consistent with amyloid. Immunohistochemistry revealed strong positive labelling for AA amyloid and mass spectrometry showed the amyloid to consist primarily of serum amyloid A1 in both cases. The findings suggest that localized, intraocular AA amyloidosis may occur in horses with ERU.

  18. Amyloid Fibril Solubility

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzi, L G

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  19. Structure-Based Peptide Design to Modulate Amyloid Beta Aggregation and Reduce Cytotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Kumar

    Full Text Available The deposition of Aβ peptide in the brain is the key event in Alzheimer disease progression. Therefore, the prevention of Aβ self assembly into disease-associated oligomers is a logical strategy for treatment. π stacking is known to provide structural stability to many amyloids; two phenylalanine residues within the Aβ 14-23 self recognition element are in such an arrangement in many solved structures. Therefore, we targeted this structural stacking by substituting these two phenylalanine residues with their D-enantiomers. The resulting peptides were able to modulate Aβ aggregation in vitro and reduce Aβ cytotoxicity in primary neuronal cultures. Using kinetic analysis of fibril formation, electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering characterization of oligomer size distributions, we demonstrate that, in addition to altering fibril structural characteristics, these peptides can induce the formation of larger amorphous aggregates which are protective against toxic oligomers, possibly because they are able to sequester the toxic oligomers during co-incubation. Alternatively, they may alter the surface structure of the oligomers such that they can no longer interact with cells to induce toxic pathways.

  20. Preparation, isolation, and characterization of cutin monomers and oligomers from tomato peels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, S F; Irwin, P; Fett, W F; O'Connor, J V; Parris, N

    1999-02-01

    Cutin in tomato peels was depolymerized in methanolic base to yield cutin monomers or a mixture of cutin oligomers. These products were isolated by typical solvent extraction methods or by precipitation, and the isolates were characterized by chromatographic and spectroscopic analyses. It was determined that the compositions of the isolates from both isolation procedures were similar, although solvent extraction gave higher yields. However, the precipitation method, which is easy to carry out and avoids the use of undesirable organic solvents, may be preferable in commercial processes for recovering these compounds.

  1. Flavonoid oligomers from Chinese dragon’s blood, the red resins of Dracaena cochinchinensis

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Qing-An; Xu, Min; Yang, Chong-Ren; Dong WANG; Li, Hai-Zhou; Zhu, Hong-Tao; Zhang, Ying-Jun

    2012-01-01

    A detailed chemical investigation of the red resins from Dracaena cochinchinensis (Chinese dragon’s blood) yielded five new flavonoid oligomers, named cochinchinenins D-H (1–5), together with a known biflavonoid, cinnabarone (6), and a mixture of two known biflavonoids, socotrin-4′-ol (7) and homoisosocotrin-4′-ol (8). Of these new compounds, 1–3 were biflavonoids and 4 and 5 were triflavonoids. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. The isolated compounds we...

  2. Nanomaterials for reducing amyloid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Mao, Xiaobo; Yu, Yue; Wang, Chen-Xuan; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2013-07-26

    This review is intended to reflect the recent progress on therapeutic applications of nanomaterials in amyloid diseases. The progress on anti-amyloid functions of various nanomaterials including inorganic nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials and biomolecular aggregates, is reviewed and discussed. The main functionalization strategies for general nanoparticle modifications are reviewed for potential applications of targeted therapeutics. The interaction mechanisms between amyloid peptides and nanomaterials are discussed from the perspectives of dominant interactions and kinetics. The encapsulation of anti-amyloid drugs, targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release and drug delivery crossing blood brain barrier by application of nanomaterials would also improve the therapeutics of amyloid diseases.

  3. X-Ray Structural Study of Amyloid-Like Fibrils of Tau Peptides Bound to Small-Molecule Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayeb-Fligelman, Einav; Landau, Meytal

    2017-01-01

    Atomic structures of Tau involved in Alzheimer's disease complexed with small molecule binders are the first step to define the Tau pharmacophore, leading the way to a structure-based design of improved diagnostics and therapeutics. Yet the partially disordered and polymorphic nature of Tau hinders structural analyses. Fortunately, short segments from amyloid proteins, which exhibit similar biophysical properties to the full-length proteins, also form fibrils and oligomers, and their atomic structures can be determined using X-ray microcrystallography. Such structures were successfully used to design amyloid inhibitors. This chapter describes experimental procedures used to determine crystal structures of Tau peptide segments in complex with small-molecule binders.

  4. Curcumin Binding to Beta Amyloid: A Computational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Praveen P N; Mohamed, Tarek; Teckwani, Karan; Tin, Gary

    2015-10-01

    Curcumin, a chemical constituent present in the spice turmeric, is known to prevent the aggregation of amyloid peptide implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. While curcumin is known to bind directly to various amyloid aggregates, no systematic investigations have been carried out to understand its ability to bind to the amyloid aggregates including oligomers and fibrils. In this study, we constructed computational models of (i) Aβ hexapeptide (16) KLVFFA(21) octamer steric-zipper β-sheet assembly and (ii) full-length Aβ fibril β-sheet assembly. Curcumin binding in these models was evaluated by molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. In both the models, curcumin was oriented in a linear extended conformation parallel to fiber axis and exhibited better stability in the Aβ hexapeptide (16) KLVFFA(21) octamer steric-zipper model (Ebinding  = -10.05 kcal/mol) compared to full-length Aβ fibril model (Ebinding  = -3.47 kcal/mol). Analysis of MD trajectories of curcumin bound to full-length Aβ fibril shows good stability with minimum Cα-atom RMSD shifts. Interestingly, curcumin binding led to marked fluctuations in the (14) HQKLVFFA(21) region that constitute the fibril spine with RMSF values ranging from 1.4 to 3.6 Å. These results show that curcumin binding to Aβ shifts the equilibrium in the aggregation pathway by promoting the formation of non-toxic aggregates.

  5. Shear-Induced Amyloid Formation in the Brain: I. Potential Vascular and Parenchymal Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbore, Conrad N

    2016-09-06

    Shear distortion of amyloid-beta (Aβ) solutions accelerates amyloid cascade reactions that may yield different toxic oligomers than those formed in quiescent solutions. Recent experiments indicate that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) containing Aβ flow through narrow brain perivascular pathways and brain parenchyma. This paper suggests that such flow causes shear distortion of Aβ molecules involving conformation changes that may be one of the initiating events in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ shearing can occur in or around brain arteries and arterioles and is suggested as the origin of cerebral amyloid angiopathy deposits in cerebrovascular walls. Comparatively low flow rates of ISF within the narrow extracellular spaces (ECS) of the brain parenchyma are suggested as a possible initiating factor in both the formation of neurotoxic Aβ42 oligomers and amyloid fibrils. Aβ42 in slow-flowing ISF can gain significant shear energy at or near the walls of tortuous brain ECS flow paths, promoting the formation of a shear-distorted, excited state hydrophobic Aβ42* conformation. This Aβ42* molecule could possibly be involved in one of two paths, one involving rapid adsorption to a brain membrane surface, ultimately forming neurotoxic oligomers on membranes, and the other ultimately forming plaque within the ECS flow pathways. Rising Aβ concentrations combined with shear at or near critical brain membranes are proposed as contributing factors to Alzheimer's disease neurotoxicity. These hypotheses may be applicable in other neurodegenerative diseases, including tauopathies and alpha-synucleinopathies, in which shear-distorted proteins also may form in the brain ECS.

  6. Polymorphic structures of Alzheimer's β-amyloid globulomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Misfolding and self-assembly of Amyloid-β (Aβ peptides into amyloid fibrils is pathologically linked to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Polymorphic Aβ structures derived from monomers to intermediate oligomers, protofilaments, and mature fibrils have been often observed in solution. Some aggregates are on-pathway species to amyloid fibrils, while the others are off-pathway species that do not evolve into amyloid fibrils. Both on-pathway and off-pathway species could be biologically relevant species. But, the lack of atomic-level structural information for these Aβ species leads to the difficulty in the understanding of their biological roles in amyloid toxicity and amyloid formation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we model a series of molecular structures of Aβ globulomers assembled by monomer and dimer building blocks using our peptide-packing program and explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Structural and energetic analysis shows that although Aβ globulomers could adopt different energetically favorable but structurally heterogeneous conformations in a rugged energy landscape, they are still preferentially organized by dynamic dimeric subunits with a hydrophobic core formed by the C-terminal residues independence of initial peptide packing and organization. Such structural organizations offer high structural stability by maximizing peptide-peptide association and optimizing peptide-water solvation. Moreover, curved surface, compact size, and less populated β-structure in Aβ globulomers make them difficult to convert into other high-order Aβ aggregates and fibrils with dominant β-structure, suggesting that they are likely to be off-pathway species to amyloid fibrils. These Aβ globulomers are compatible with experimental data in overall size, subunit organization, and molecular weight from AFM images and H/D amide exchange NMR. CONCLUSIONS: Our computationally modeled Aβ globulomers provide useful

  7. Tau Oligomers: The Toxic Player at Synapses in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Muñoz, Marcos J.; Gerson, Julia; Castillo-Carranza, Diana L.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive disorder in which the most noticeable symptoms are cognitive impairment and memory loss. However, the precise mechanism by which those symptoms develop remains unknown. Of note, neuronal loss occurs at sites where synaptic dysfunction is observed earlier, suggesting that altered synaptic connections precede neuronal loss. The abnormal accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau protein is the main histopathological feature of the disease. Several lines of evidence suggest that the small oligomeric forms of Aβ and tau may act synergistically to promote synaptic dysfunction in AD. Remarkably, tau pathology correlates better with the progression of the disease than Aβ. Recently, a growing number of studies have begun to suggest that missorting of tau protein from the axon to the dendrites is required to mediate the detrimental effects of Aβ. In this review we discuss the novel findings regarding the potential mechanisms by which tau oligomers contribute to synaptic dysfunction in AD. PMID:26696824

  8. Structure of ring-shaped Aβ42 oligomers determined by conformational selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Linh; Basdevant, Nathalie; Prévost, Chantal; Ha-Duong, Tâp

    2016-02-01

    The oligomerization of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides into soluble non-fibrillar species plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. However, it has been challenging to characterize the tertiary and quaternary structures of Aβ peptides due to their disordered nature and high aggregation propensity. In this work, replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore the conformational space of Aβ42 monomer. Among the most populated transient states, we identified a particular conformation which was able to generate ring-shaped pentamers and hexamers, when docked onto itself. The structures of these aggregates were stable during microsecond all-atom MD simulations in explicit solvent. In addition to high resolution models of these oligomers, this study provides support for the conformational selection mechanism of Aβ peptide self-assembly.

  9. On the fluorescence of pyrrole derivative oligomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Jeconias Rocha; Amazonas, Jarlesson Gama; Alberto Brito Silva Junior, Carlos [Pos-Graduacao em Fisica, Universidade Federal do Para, 66075-110 Belem, Para (Brazil); Melo, Celso P. de [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-020 Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil); Laks, Bernardo [Instituto de Fisica, UNICAMP, 13083-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Nero, Jordan del [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Para, 66075-110 Belem, Para (Brazil)], E-mail: jordan@ufpa.br

    2008-08-01

    In this work we have investigated the ground state and others eletronic properties of the biosensor 3-methyl pyrrole-4-carboxilic acid (MPC) oligomers and related compounds. We considered the systems described by a DFT/B3LYP/6-31G* type Hamiltonian and explored the effects due to the presence of conformational defects. Furthermore the excited states have been determined by a post Hartree-Fock CI methodology. The results revealed the existence of different electronic patterns for the MPC if compared to the ones existing for the oligopyrrole derivative systems. The response of one of investigated polymers (MPC) was found to be critically dependent on the radicals linked to the studied oligomer chain structure so that the electronic structure analyses should be easily improved by choosing a proper set of preparation parameters to design conducting polymers with desirable properties.

  10. Oligomer functionalized nanotubes and composites formed therewith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zettl, Alexander K; Sainsbury, Toby; Frechet, Jean M.J.

    2014-03-18

    Disclosed herein is a sequential functionalization methodology for the covalent modification of nanotubes with between one and four repeat units of a polymer. Covalent attachment of oligomer units to the surface of nanotubes results in oligomer units forming an organic sheath around the nanotubes, polymer-functionalized-nanotubes (P-NTs). P-NTs possess chemical functionality identical to that of the functionalizing polymer, and thus provide nanoscale scaffolds which may be readily dispersed within a monomer solution and participate in the polymerization reaction to form a polymer-nanotube/polymer composite. Formation of polymer in the presence of P-NTs leads to a uniform dispersion of nanotubes within the polymer matrix, in contrast to aggregated masses of nanotubes in the case of pristine-NTs. The covalent attachment of oligomeric units to the surface of nanotubes represents the formation of a functional nanoscale building block which can be readily dispersed and integrated within the polymer to form a novel composite material.

  11. Ethynyl terminated ester oligomers and polymers therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); hesives and composite matrices. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A new class of ethynyl-terminated oligomers and the process for preparing same are disclosed. Upon the application of heat, with or without a catalyst, the ethynyl groups react to provide crosslinking and chain extension to increase the polymer use temperature and improve the polymer solvent resistance. These improved polyesters are potentially useful in packaging, magnetic tapes, capacitors, industrial belting, protective coatings, structural adhesives and composite matrices.

  12. Using optical profilometry to characterize cell membrane roughness influenced by amyloid-beta 42 aggregates and electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huei-Jyuan; Wang, Ruei-Lin; Xiao, Jian-Long; Chang, Yu-Jen; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Chen, Yun-Ru; Lee, Chau-Hwang

    2014-01-01

    The membrane roughness of Neuro-2a neroblastoma cells is measured by using noninterferometric wide-field optical profilometry. The cells are treated with the fibril and oligomer conformers of amyloid-beta (Aβ) 42, which is a peptide of 42 amino acids related to the development of Alzheimer's disease. We find that both the Aβ42 fibrils and Aβ42 oligomers reduced the cell membrane roughness, but the effect of Aβ42 oligomers was faster and stronger than that of the fibrils. We also apply direct-current electric field (dcEF) stimulations on the cells. A dcEF of 300 mV/mm can increase the membrane roughness under the treatment of Aβ42. These results suggest that Aβ42 can decrease the membrane compliance of live neuroblastoma cells, and dcEFs may counteract this effect.

  13. Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK) Disrupts and Remodels Early Oligomer States of the Alzheimer Disease Aβ42 Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xueyun; Gessel, Megan M.; Wisniewski, Meagan L.; Viswanathan, Kishore; Wright, Dennis L.; Bahr, Ben A.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    The oligomerization of the amyloid-β protein (Aβ) is an important event in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology. Developing small molecules that disrupt formation of early oligomeric states of Aβ and thereby reduce the effective amount of toxic oligomers is a promising therapeutic strategy for AD. Here, mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry were used to investigate the effects of a small molecule, Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK), on the Aβ42 form of the protein. The mass spectrum of a mixture of PADK and Aβ42 clearly shows that PADK binds directly to Aβ42 monomers and small oligomers. Ion mobility results indicate that PADK not only inhibits the formation of Aβ42 dodecamers, but also removes preformed Aβ42 dodecamers from the solution. Electron microscopy images show that PADK inhibits Aβ42 fibril formation in the solution. These results are consistent with a previous study that found that PADK has protective effects in an AD transgenic mouse model. The study of PADK and Aβ42 provides an example of small molecule therapeutic development for AD and other amyloid diseases. PMID:22253440

  14. Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK) disrupts and remodels early oligomer states of the Alzheimer disease Aβ42 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xueyun; Gessel, Megan M; Wisniewski, Meagan L; Viswanathan, Kishore; Wright, Dennis L; Bahr, Ben A; Bowers, Michael T

    2012-02-24

    The oligomerization of the amyloid-β protein (Aβ) is an important event in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology. Developing small molecules that disrupt formation of early oligomeric states of Aβ and thereby reduce the effective amount of toxic oligomers is a promising therapeutic strategy for AD. Here, mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry were used to investigate the effects of a small molecule, Z-Phe-Ala-diazomethylketone (PADK), on the Aβ42 form of the protein. The mass spectrum of a mixture of PADK and Aβ42 clearly shows that PADK binds directly to Aβ42 monomers and small oligomers. Ion mobility results indicate that PADK not only inhibits the formation of Aβ42 dodecamers, but also removes preformed Aβ42 dodecamers from the solution. Electron microscopy images show that PADK inhibits Aβ42 fibril formation in the solution. These results are consistent with a previous study that found that PADK has protective effects in an AD transgenic mouse model. The study of PADK and Aβ42 provides an example of small molecule therapeutic development for AD and other amyloid diseases.

  15. Study of amyloids using yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Wickner, Reed B.; Kryndushkin, Dmitry; Shewmaker, Frank; McGlinchey, Ryan; Edskes, Herman K.

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a useful model organism in such fields as the cell cycle, regulation of transcription, protein trafficking and cell biology, primarily because of its ease of genetic manipulation. This is no less so in the area of amyloid studies. The endogenous yeast amyloids described to date include prions, infectious proteins (Table 1), and some cell wall proteins (1). and amyloids of humans and a fungal prion have also been studied using the yeast system. Accordingly, th...

  16. Lipid-induced conformational transition of the amyloid core fragment Abeta(28-35) and its A30G and A30I mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Sureshbabu; Ramalingam, Kirubagaran; Neelakanta Reddy, P; Cereghetti, Damiano M; Padma Malar, E J; Rajadas, Jayakumar

    2008-05-01

    The interaction of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) with neuronal membranes could play a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies have focused on the interactions of Abeta oligomers to explain the neuronal toxicity accompanying Alzheimer's disease. In our study, we have investigated the role of lipid interactions with soluble Abeta(28-35) (wild-type) and its mutants A30G and A30I in their aggregation and conformational preferences. CD and Trp fluorescence spectroscopic studies indicated that, immediately on dissolution, these peptides adopted a random coil structure. Upon addition of negatively charged 1,2-dipalmitoyl-syn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-(glycerol) sodium salt (PG) lipid, the wild-type and A30I mutant underwent reorganization into a predominant beta-sheet structure. However, no conformational changes were observed in the A30G mutant on interaction with PG. In contrast, the presence of zwitterionic 1,2-dipalmitoyl-syn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid had no effect on the conformation of these three peptides. These observations were also confirmed with atomic force microscopy and the thioflavin-T assay. In the presence of PG vesicles, both the wild-type and A30I mutant formed fibrillar structures within 2 days of incubation in NaCl/P(i), but not in their absence. Again, no oligomerization was observed with PC vesicles. The Trp studies also revealed that both ends of the three peptides are not buried deep in the vesicle membrane. Furthermore, fluorescence spectroscopy using the environment-sensitive probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene showed an increase in the membrane fluidity upon exposure of the vesicles to the peptides. The latter effect may result from the lipid head group interactions with the peptides. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments revealed that these peptides undergo a random coil-to-sheet conversion in solution on aging and that this process is accelerated by negatively charged lipid vesicles

  17. Small heat shock proteins potentiate amyloid dissolution by protein disaggregases from yeast and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L Duennwald

    Full Text Available How small heat shock proteins (sHsps might empower proteostasis networks to control beneficial prions or disassemble pathological amyloid is unknown. Here, we establish that yeast sHsps, Hsp26 and Hsp42, inhibit prionogenesis by the [PSI+] prion protein, Sup35, via distinct and synergistic mechanisms. Hsp42 prevents conformational rearrangements within molten oligomers that enable de novo prionogenesis and collaborates with Hsp70 to attenuate self-templating. By contrast, Hsp26 inhibits self-templating upon binding assembled prions. sHsp binding destabilizes Sup35 prions and promotes their disaggregation by Hsp104, Hsp70, and Hsp40. In yeast, Hsp26 or Hsp42 overexpression prevents [PSI+] induction, cures [PSI+], and potentiates [PSI+]-curing by Hsp104 overexpression. In vitro, sHsps enhance Hsp104-catalyzed disaggregation of pathological amyloid forms of α-synuclein and polyglutamine. Unexpectedly, in the absence of Hsp104, sHsps promote an unprecedented, gradual depolymerization of Sup35 prions by Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40. This unanticipated amyloid-depolymerase activity is conserved from yeast to humans, which lack Hsp104 orthologues. A human sHsp, HspB5, stimulates depolymerization of α-synuclein amyloid by human Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40. Thus, we elucidate a heretofore-unrecognized human amyloid-depolymerase system that could have applications in various neurodegenerative disorders.

  18. Copper inducing Aβ42 rather than Aβ40 nanoscale oligomer formation is the key process for Aβ neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lu; Wu, Wei-Hui; Li, Qiu-Ye; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Li, Yan-Mei

    2011-11-01

    Copper is known to be a critical factor in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, as it is involved in amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide related toxicity. However, the relationship between neurotoxicity and Aβ peptide in the presence of copper remains unclear. The effect of copper has not been clearly differentiated between Aβ42 and Aβ40, and it is still debated whether copper-mediated neurotoxicity is due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation or other molecular mechanisms. Here, we describe that copper dramatically affects Aβ42 aggregation and enhances Aβ42 cytotoxicity while it shows no significant effects on Aβ40. These phenomena are mainly because that the strong interactions between copper and Aβ42 lead to great conformation changes, and stabilize Aβ42 aggregates at highly toxic nanoscale oligomer stage, whereas copper shows no similar impact on Aβ40. We also propose a possible molecular mechanism that copper enhances Aβ42 cytotoxicity via perturbing membrane structure. Moreover, we test the effect of an analogue of copper, nickel, on Aβ aggregation and cytotoxicity, finding that nickel also enhances cytotoxicity via Aβ42 nanoscale oligomer formation. These results clarify that the copper-induced Aβ42 nanoscale oligomer formation is the key process for Aβ neurotoxicity, and suggest that disrupting the interactions between copper and Aβ42 peptide to inhibit nanoscale oligomerization process, deserves more attention in AD drug development.

  19. Environmental novelty activates β2-adrenergic signaling to prevent the impairment of hippocampal LTP by Aβ oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaomin; Jin, Ming; Zhang, Dainan; Yang, Ting; Koeglsperger, Thomas; Fu, Hongjun; Selkoe, Dennis J

    2013-03-06

    A central question about human brain aging is whether cognitive enrichment slows the development of Alzheimer changes. Here, we show that prolonged exposure to an enriched environment (EE) facilitated signaling in the hippocampus of wild-type mice that promoted long-term potentiation. A key feature of the EE effect was activation of β2-adrenergic receptors and downstream cAMP/PKA signaling. This EE pathway prevented LTP inhibition by soluble oligomers of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) isolated from AD cortex. Protection by EE occurred in both young and middle-aged wild-type mice. Exposure to novelty afforded greater protection than did aerobic exercise. Mice chronically fed a β-adrenergic agonist without EE were protected from hippocampal impairment by Aβ oligomers. Thus, EE enhances hippocampal synaptic plasticity by activating β-adrenoceptor signaling and mitigating synaptotoxicity of human Aβ oligomers. These mechanistic insights support using prolonged exposure to cognitive novelty and/or oral β-adrenergic agonists to lessen the effects of Aβ accumulation during aging.

  20. Tabersonine inhibits amyloid fibril formation and cytotoxicity of Aβ(1-42).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Tianhan; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xiaoying; Jing, Aihua; Zhao, Bingqing; Yu, Xiang; Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Feimeng

    2015-06-17

    The misfolding and aggregation of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides into amyloid fibrils are key events in the amyloid cascade hypothesis for the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using thioflavin-T (ThT) fluorescence assay, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism, size exclusion chromatography, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and cytotoxicity tests, we demonstrate that tabersonine, an ingredient extracted from the bean of Voacanga africana, disrupts Aβ(1-42) aggregation and ameliorates Aβ aggregate-induced cytotoxicity. A small amount of tabersonine (e.g., 10 μM) can effectively inhibit the formation of Aβ(1-42) (e.g., 80 μM) fibrils or convert mature fibrils into largely innocuous amorphous aggregates. SPR results indicate that tabersonine binds to Aβ(1-42) oligomers in a dose-dependent way. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations further confirm that tabersonine can bind to oligomers such as the pentamer of Aβ(1-42). Tabersonine preferentially interact with the β-sheet grooves of Aβ(1-42) containing aromatic and hydrophobic residues. The various binding sites and modes explain the diverse inhibitory effects of tabersonine on Aβ aggregation. Given that tabersonine is a natural product and a precursor for vincristine used in cancer chemotherapy, the biocompatibility and small size essential for permeating the blood-brain barrier make it a potential therapeutic drug candidate for treating AD.

  1. LTP and memory impairment caused by extracellular Aβ and Tau oligomers is APP-dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzzo, Daniela; Piacentini, Roberto; Fá, Mauro; Gulisano, Walter; Li Puma, Domenica D; Staniszewski, Agnes; Zhang, Hong; Tropea, Maria Rosaria; Cocco, Sara; Palmeri, Agostino; Fraser, Paul; D'Adamio, Luciano; Grassi, Claudio; Arancio, Ottavio

    2017-01-01

    The concurrent application of subtoxic doses of soluble oligomeric forms of human amyloid-beta (oAβ) and Tau (oTau) proteins impairs memory and its electrophysiological surrogate long-term potentiation (LTP), effects that may be mediated by intra-neuronal oligomers uptake. Intrigued by these findings, we investigated whether oAβ and oTau share a common mechanism when they impair memory and LTP in mice. We found that as already shown for oAβ, also oTau can bind to amyloid precursor protein (APP). Moreover, efficient intra-neuronal uptake of oAβ and oTau requires expression of APP. Finally, the toxic effect of both extracellular oAβ and oTau on memory and LTP is dependent upon APP since APP-KO mice were resistant to oAβ- and oTau-induced defects in spatial/associative memory and LTP. Thus, APP might serve as a common therapeutic target against Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and a host of other neurodegenerative diseases characterized by abnormal levels of Aβ and/or Tau. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.26991.001 PMID:28696204

  2. Replica exchange molecular dynamics study of the truncated amyloid beta (11-40) trimer in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Son Tung; Hung, Huynh Minh; Truong, Duc Toan; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2017-01-18

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers are neurotoxic compounds that destroy the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. Recent studies indicated that the trimer is one of the most cytotoxic forms of low molecular weight Aβ oligomers. As there was limited information about the structure of the Aβ trimer, either by experiment or by computation, we determined in this work the structure of the 3Aβ11-40 oligomer for the first time using the temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations in the presence of an explicit solvent. More than 20.0 μs of MD simulations were performed. The probability of the β-content and random coil structure of the solvated trimer amounts to 42 ± 6 and 49 ± 7% which is in good agreement with experiments. Intermolecular interactions in central hydrophobic cores play a key role in stabilizing the oligomer. Intermolecular polar contacts between D23 and residues 24-29 replace the salt bridge D23-K28 to secure the loop region. The hydrophilic region of the N-terminus is maintained by the intermolecular polar crossing contacts H13A-Q15B and H13B-Q15C. The difference in the free energy of binding between the constituting monomers and the others amounts to -36 ± 8 kcal mol(-1). The collision cross section of the representative structures of the trimer was computed to be 1330 ± 47 Å(2), which is in good agreement with previous experiments.

  3. Inhibition of Alzheimer's amyloid toxicity with a tricyclic pyrone molecule in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyun-Seok; Rana, Sandeep; Barrigan, Lydia; Shi, Aibin; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Feimeng; Jin, Lee-Way; Hua, Duy H

    2009-02-01

    Small beta-amyloid (Abeta) 1-42 aggregates are toxic to neurons and may be the primary toxic species in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Methods to reduce the level of Abeta, prevent Abeta aggregation, and eliminate existing Abeta aggregates have been proposed for treatment of AD. A tricyclic pyrone named CP2 is found to prevent cell death associated with Abeta oligomers. We studied the possible mechanisms of neuroprotection by CP2. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy shows a direct binding of CP2 with Abeta42 oligomer. Circular dichroism spectroscopy reveals monomeric Abeta42 peptide remains as a random coil/alpha-helix structure in the presence of CP2 over 48 h. Atomic force microscopy studies show CP2 exhibits similar ability to inhibit Abeta42 aggregation as that of Congo red and curcumin. Atomic force microscopy closed-fluid cell study demonstrates that CP2 disaggregates Abeta42 oligomers and protofibrils. CP2 also blocks Abeta fibrillations using a protein quantification method. Treatment of 5x familial Alzheimer's disease mice, a robust Abeta42-producing animal model of AD, with a 2-week course of CP2 resulted in 40% and 50% decreases in non-fibrillar and fibrillar Abeta species, respectively. Our results suggest that CP2 might be beneficial to AD patients by preventing Abeta aggregation and disaggregating existing Abeta oligomers and protofibrils.

  4. Familial Alzheimer's disease mutations differentially alter amyloid β-protein oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessel, Megan Murray; Bernstein, Summer; Kemper, Martin; Teplow, David B; Bowers, Michael T

    2012-11-21

    Although most cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are sporadic, ∼5% of cases are genetic in origin. These cases, known as familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), are caused by mutations that alter the rate of production or the primary structure of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ). Changes in the primary structure of Aβ alter the peptide's assembly and toxic activity. Recently, a primary working hypothesis for AD has evolved where causation has been attributed to early, soluble peptide oligomer states. Here we posit that both experimental and pathological differences between FAD-related mutants and wild-type Aβ could be reflected in the early oligomer distributions of these peptides. We use ion mobility-based mass spectrometry to probe the structure and early aggregation states of three mutant forms of Aβ40 and Aβ42: Tottori (D7N), Flemish (A21G), and Arctic (E22G). Our results indicate that the FAD-related amino acid substitutions have no noticeable effect on Aβ monomer cross section, indicating there are no major structural changes in the monomers. However, we observe significant changes to the aggregation states populated by the various Aβ mutants, indicating that structural changes present in the monomers are reflected in the oligomers. Moreover, the early oligomer distributions differ for each mutant, suggesting a possible structural basis for the varied pathogenesis of different forms of FAD.

  5. Effect of synthetic aβ peptide oligomers and fluorinated solvents on Kv1.3 channel properties and membrane conductance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I Lioudyno

    Full Text Available The impact of synthetic amyloid β (1-42 (Aβ(1-42 oligomers on biophysical properties of voltage-gated potassium channels Kv 1.3 and lipid bilayer membranes (BLMs was quantified for protocols using hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP or sodium hydroxide (NaOH as solvents prior to initiating the oligomer formation. Regardless of the solvent used Aβ(1-42 samples contained oligomers that reacted with the conformation-specific antibodies A11 and OC and had similar size distributions as determined by dynamic light scattering. Patch-clamp recordings of the potassium currents showed that synthetic Aβ(1-42 oligomers accelerate the activation and inactivation kinetics of Kv 1.3 current with no significant effect on current amplitude. In contrast to oligomeric samples, freshly prepared, presumably monomeric, Aβ(1-42 solutions had no effect on Kv 1.3 channel properties. Aβ(1-42 oligomers had no effect on the steady-state current (at -80 mV recorded from Kv 1.3-expressing cells but increased the conductance of artificial BLMs in a dose-dependent fashion. Formation of amyloid channels, however, was not observed due to conditions of the experiments. To exclude the effects of HFIP (used to dissolve lyophilized Aβ(1-42 peptide, and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA (used during Aβ(1-42 synthesis, we determined concentrations of these fluorinated compounds in the stock Aβ(1-42 solutions by (19F NMR. After extensive evaporation, the concentration of HFIP in the 100× stock Aβ(1-42 solutions was ∼1.7 μM. The concentration of residual TFA in the 70× stock Aβ(1-42 solutions was ∼20 μM. Even at the stock concentrations neither HFIP nor TFA alone had any effect on potassium currents or BLMs. The Aβ(1-42 oligomers prepared with HFIP as solvent, however, were more potent in the electrophysiological tests, suggesting that fluorinated compounds, such as HFIP or structurally-related inhalational anesthetics, may affect Aβ(1-42 aggregation and potentially enhance ability

  6. Effect of synthetic aβ peptide oligomers and fluorinated solvents on Kv1.3 channel properties and membrane conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioudyno, Maria I; Broccio, Matteo; Sokolov, Yuri; Rasool, Suhail; Wu, Jessica; Alkire, Michael T; Liu, Virginia; Kozak, J Ashot; Dennison, Philip R; Glabe, Charles G; Lösche, Mathias; Hall, James E

    2012-01-01

    The impact of synthetic amyloid β (1-42) (Aβ(1-42)) oligomers on biophysical properties of voltage-gated potassium channels Kv 1.3 and lipid bilayer membranes (BLMs) was quantified for protocols using hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) or sodium hydroxide (NaOH) as solvents prior to initiating the oligomer formation. Regardless of the solvent used Aβ(1-42) samples contained oligomers that reacted with the conformation-specific antibodies A11 and OC and had similar size distributions as determined by dynamic light scattering. Patch-clamp recordings of the potassium currents showed that synthetic Aβ(1-42) oligomers accelerate the activation and inactivation kinetics of Kv 1.3 current with no significant effect on current amplitude. In contrast to oligomeric samples, freshly prepared, presumably monomeric, Aβ(1-42) solutions had no effect on Kv 1.3 channel properties. Aβ(1-42) oligomers had no effect on the steady-state current (at -80 mV) recorded from Kv 1.3-expressing cells but increased the conductance of artificial BLMs in a dose-dependent fashion. Formation of amyloid channels, however, was not observed due to conditions of the experiments. To exclude the effects of HFIP (used to dissolve lyophilized Aβ(1-42) peptide), and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) (used during Aβ(1-42) synthesis), we determined concentrations of these fluorinated compounds in the stock Aβ(1-42) solutions by (19)F NMR. After extensive evaporation, the concentration of HFIP in the 100× stock Aβ(1-42) solutions was ∼1.7 μM. The concentration of residual TFA in the 70× stock Aβ(1-42) solutions was ∼20 μM. Even at the stock concentrations neither HFIP nor TFA alone had any effect on potassium currents or BLMs. The Aβ(1-42) oligomers prepared with HFIP as solvent, however, were more potent in the electrophysiological tests, suggesting that fluorinated compounds, such as HFIP or structurally-related inhalational anesthetics, may affect Aβ(1-42) aggregation and potentially enhance

  7. Pathogenesis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, A.A.M.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Kremer, H.P.H.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is the result of the deposition of an amyloidogenic protein in cortical and leptomeningeal vessels. The most common type of CAA is caused by amyloid beta-protein (Abeta), which is particularly associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Excessive Abeta-CAA formation c

  8. Peptide oligomers for holographic data storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf Henrik; Hvilsted, Søren; Ramanujam, P.S.

    1996-01-01

    SEVERAL classes of organic materials (such as photoanisotropic liquid-crystalline polymers(1-4) and photorefractive polymers(5-7)) are being investigated for the development of media for optical data storage. Here we describe a new family of organic materials-peptide oligomers containing azobenzene...... chromophores-which appear particularly promising for erasable holographic data storage applications. The rationale for our approach is to use the structural properties of peptide-like molecules to impose orientational order on the chromophores, and thereby optimize the optical properties of the resulting...

  9. A Cu-amyloid β complex activating Fenton chemistry in Alzheimer's disease: Learning with multiple first-principles simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Penna, Giovanni; Hureau, Christelle; Faller, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Amyloid β peptides form complexes with copper, both in vitro and in vivo, relatively soluble in water as oligomers and active as catalysts for oxidation of organic substrates by hydrogen peroxide, a species always present in cells and in their aerobic environment. All these species are present in the synapse, thus making a connection between the amyloid cascade hypothesis and the oxidative damages by reactive oxygen species in neurons, when pathological dishomeostasis of amyloid peptides and metal ions occur. In order to understand the structural features of these toxic complexes, we built several models of Cu-Aβ peptides in monomeric and dimeric forms and we found, performing multiple first-principles molecular dynamics simulations, that Cu-induced dimers are more active than monomers in converting hydrogen peroxide into aggressive hydroxyl radicals.

  10. Extraskeletal problems and amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drüeke, T B

    1999-12-01

    The major clinical manifestations of dialysis-associated A beta 2M amyloidosis are chronic arthralgias, destructive arthropathy and the carpal tunnel syndrome. For dialysis patients who have been maintained on renal replacement therapy for more than 10-15 years, this complication may become a major physical handicap. It may even be life-threatening in some instances due to cervical cord compression. Amyloid deposits in joint areas precede clinical symptoms and signs by several years. Systemic deposits may also occur but their clinical manifestations are infrequent. The diagnosis of dialysis arthropathy associated with beta 2-microglobulin-associated (A beta 2M) amyloidosis mostly relies on indirect clinical and radiological evidence. Histologic proof is rarely obtained in vivo. The pathogenesis of the disease is complex. It includes reduced elimination of beta 2M and potentially also as impaired degradation of A beta 2M as well as enhanced production of A beta 2M amyloid fibrils. Non enzymatic modifications of beta 2M probably play a role, including beta 2M protein modification with advanced glycation end-products (AGE) and advanced oxidation protein products. Modified beta 2M, collagen and proteoglycans appear actively involved in the induction of a local inflammatory response and beta 2M amyloid formation. There is also evidence in favor of treatment-related factors such as the type of hemodialysis membrane and the purity of dialysis water. Hopefully, the translation of our improving knowledge of all the factors involved will lead to a better treatment and eventually to the prevention of this dramatic complication of dialysis.

  11. Combining the rapid MTT formazan exocytosis assay and the MC65 protection assay led to the discovery of carbazole analogs as small molecule inhibitors of Abeta oligomer-induced cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyun-Seok; Maezawa, Izumi; Yao, Nianhuan; Xu, Bailing; Diaz-Avalos, Ruben; Rana, Sandeep; Hua, Duy H; Cheng, R Holland; Lam, Kit S; Jin, Lee-Way

    2007-01-26

    The discovery of small molecule inhibitors of cytotoxicity induced by amyloid-beta (Abeta) oligomers, either applied extracellularly or accumulated intraneuronally, is an important goal of drug development for Alzheimer's disease (AD), but has been limited by the lack of efficient screening methods. Here we describe our approach using two cell-based methods. The first method takes advantage of the unique ability of extracellularly applied Abeta oligomers to rapidly induce the exocytosis of formazan formed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). We employed a short protocol to quantify this toxicity, and quickly identified two novel inhibitors, code-named CP2 and A5, from two compound libraries. A second independent screen of the same libraries using our previously published MC65 protection assay, which identifies inhibitors of toxicity related to intracellular Abeta oligomers, also selected the same two leads, suggesting that both assays select for the same anti-Abeta oligomer properties displayed by these compounds. We further demonstrated that A5 attenuated the progressive aggregation of existing Abeta oligomers, reduced the level of intracellular Abeta oligomers, and prevented the Abeta oligomer-induced death of primary cortical neurons, effects similar to those demonstrated by CP2. Our results suggest that, when combined, the two methods would generate fewer false results and give a high likelihood of identifying leads that show promises in ameliorating Abeta oligomer-induced toxicities within both intraneuronal and extracellular sites. Both assays are simple, suitable for rapid screening of a large number of medicinal libraries, and amenable for automation.

  12. Canonical Wnt signaling protects hippocampal neurons from Aβ oligomers: role of non-canonical Wnt-5a/Ca2+ in mitochondrial dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Alvarez, Carmen; Arrázola, Macarena S.; Godoy, Juan A.; Ordenes, Daniela; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of age-related dementia. The disease is characterized by a progressive loss of cognitive abilities, severe neurodegeneration, synaptic loss and mitochondrial dysfunction. The Wnt signaling pathway participates in the development of the central nervous system and growing evidence indicates that Wnts also regulate the function of the adult nervous system. We report here, that indirect activation of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling using Bromoindirubin-30-Oxime (6-BIO), an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β, protects hippocampal neurons from amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers with the concomitant blockade of neuronal apoptosis. More importantly, activation with Wnt-5a, a non-canonical Wnt ligand, results in the modulation of mitochondrial dynamics, preventing the changes induced by Aβ oligomers (Aβo) in mitochondrial fission-fusion dynamics and modulates Bcl-2 increases induced by oligomers. The canonical Wnt-3a ligand neither the secreted Frizzled-Related Protein (sFRP), a Wnt scavenger, did not prevent these effects. In contrast, some of the Aβ oligomer effects were blocked by Ryanodine. We conclude that canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls neuronal survival, and that non-canonical Wnt/Ca2+signaling modulates mitochondrial dysfunction. Since mitochondrial dysfunction is present in neurodegenerative diseases, the therapeutic possibilities of the activation of Wnt signaling are evident. PMID:23805073

  13. Shaking alone induces de novo conversion of recombinant prion proteins to β-sheet rich oligomers and fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol L Ladner-Keay

    Full Text Available The formation of β-sheet rich prion oligomers and fibrils from native prion protein (PrP is thought to be a key step in the development of prion diseases. Many methods are available to convert recombinant prion protein into β-sheet rich fibrils using various chemical denaturants (urea, SDS, GdnHCl, high temperature, phospholipids, or mildly acidic conditions (pH 4. Many of these methods also require shaking or another form of agitation to complete the conversion process. We have identified that shaking alone causes the conversion of recombinant PrP to β-sheet rich oligomers and fibrils at near physiological pH (pH 5.5 to pH 6.2 and temperature. This conversion does not require any denaturant, detergent, or any other chemical cofactor. Interestingly, this conversion does not occur when the water-air interface is eliminated in the shaken sample. We have analyzed shaking-induced conversion using circular dichroism, resolution enhanced native acidic gel electrophoresis (RENAGE, electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thioflavin T fluorescence and proteinase K resistance. Our results show that shaking causes the formation of β-sheet rich oligomers with a population distribution ranging from octamers to dodecamers and that further shaking causes a transition to β-sheet fibrils. In addition, we show that shaking-induced conversion occurs for a wide range of full-length and truncated constructs of mouse, hamster and cervid prion proteins. We propose that this method of conversion provides a robust, reproducible and easily accessible model for scrapie-like amyloid formation, allowing the generation of milligram quantities of physiologically stable β-sheet rich oligomers and fibrils. These results may also have interesting implications regarding our understanding of prion conversion and propagation both within the brain and via techniques such as protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA and quaking induced conversion (QuIC.

  14. Beta-strand interfaces of non-dimeric protein oligomers are characterized by scattered charged residue patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Feverati

    Full Text Available Protein oligomers are formed either permanently, transiently or even by default. The protein chains are associated through intermolecular interactions constituting the protein interface. The protein interfaces of 40 soluble protein oligomers of stœchiometries above two are investigated using a quantitative and qualitative methodology, which analyzes the x-ray structures of the protein oligomers and considers their interfaces as interaction networks. The protein oligomers of the dataset share the same geometry of interface, made by the association of two individual β-strands (β-interfaces, but are otherwise unrelated. The results show that the β-interfaces are made of two interdigitated interaction networks. One of them involves interactions between main chain atoms (backbone network while the other involves interactions between side chain and backbone atoms or between only side chain atoms (side chain network. Each one has its own characteristics which can be associated to a distinct role. The secondary structure of the β-interfaces is implemented through the backbone networks which are enriched with the hydrophobic amino acids favored in intramolecular β-sheets (MCWIV. The intermolecular specificity is provided by the side chain networks via positioning different types of charged residues at the extremities (arginine and in the middle (glutamic acid and histidine of the interface. Such charge distribution helps discriminating between sequences of intermolecular β-strands, of intramolecular β-strands and of β-strands forming β-amyloid fibers. This might open new venues for drug designs and predictive tool developments. Moreover, the β-strands of the cholera toxin B subunit interface, when produced individually as synthetic peptides, are capable of inhibiting the assembly of the toxin into pentamers. Thus, their sequences contain the features necessary for a β-interface formation. Such β-strands could be considered as 'assemblons

  15. Hacking the code of amyloid formation: the amyloid stretch hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, M Teresa; Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra; Serrano, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Many research efforts in the last years have been directed towards understanding the factors determining protein misfolding and amyloid formation. Protein stability and amino acid composition have been identified as the two major factors in vitro. The research of our group has been focused on understanding the relationship between amino acid sequence and amyloid formation. Our approach has been the design of simple model systems that reproduce the biophysical properties of natural amyloids. An amyloid sequence pattern was extracted that can be used to detect amyloidogenic hexapeptide stretches in proteins. We have added evidence supporting that these amyloidogenic stretches can trigger amyloid formation by nonamyloidogenic proteins. Some experimental results in other amyloid proteins will be analyzed under the conclusions obtained in these studies. Our conclusions together with evidences from other groups suggest that amyloid formation is the result of the interplay between a decrease of protein stability, and the presence of highly amyloidogenic regions in proteins. As many of these results have been obtained in vitro, the challenge for the next years will be to demonstrate their validity in in vivo systems.

  16. Cooperative Switching in Nanofibers of Azobenzene Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christopher; Liebig, Tobias; Gensler, Manuel; Zykov, Anton; Pithan, Linus; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Hecht, Stefan; Bléger, David; Kowarik, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Next-generation molecular devices and machines demand the integration of molecular switches into hierarchical assemblies to amplify the response of the system from the molecular level to the meso- or macro-scale. Here, we demonstrate that multi-azobenzene oligomers can assemble to form robust supramolecular nanofibers in which they can be switched repeatedly between the E- and Z-configuration. While in isolated oligomers the azobenzene units undergo reversible photoisomerization independently, in the nanofibers they are coupled via intermolecular interactions and switch cooperatively as evidenced by unusual thermal and kinetic behavior. We find that the photoisomerization rate from the Z-isomer to the E-isomer depends on the fraction of Z-azobenzene in the nanofibers, and is increased by more than a factor of 4 in Z-rich fibers when compared to E-rich fibers. This demonstrates the great potential of coupling individual photochromic units for increasing their quantum efficiency in the solid state with potential relevance for actuation and sensing.

  17. Highly Stable Foams from Block Oligomers Synthesized by Enzymatic Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.; Boeriu, C.G.; Frissen, A.E.; Schols, H.A.; Wierenga, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    We have synthesized a new amphiphilic block oligomer by the enzymatic linking of a fatty acid (lauric acid) to a fructan oligomer (inulin) and tested the functionality of this carbohydrate derivative in foam stabilization. The structure of the modified oligosaccharide was found to be (Fruc)n(Glc)1CO

  18. The Challenge of Synthesizing Oligomers for Molecular Wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Roar; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-01-01

    Controlling the size of the oligomer and introducing functional groups at the ends of the oligomer that allow it to react with separate electrodes are critical issues when preparing materials for molecular wires. We demonstrate a general synthetic approach to oligophenylenevinylene (OPV) derivative...

  19. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Said, Gerard

    2011-12-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathies (FAPs) are a group of life-threatening multisystem disorders transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. Nerve lesions are induced by deposits of amyloid fibrils, most commonly due to mutated transthyretin (TTR). Less often the precursor of amyloidosis is mutant apolipoprotein A-1 or gelsolin. The first identified cause of FAP-the TTR Val30Met mutation-is still the most common of more than 100 amyloidogenic point mutations identified worldwide. The penetrance and age at onset of FAP among people carrying the same mutation vary between countries. The symptomatology and clinical course of FAP can be highly variable. TTR FAP typically causes a nerve length-dependent polyneuropathy that starts in the feet with loss of temperature and pain sensations, along with life-threatening autonomic dysfunction leading to cachexia and death within 10 years on average. TTR is synthesised mainly in the liver, and liver transplantation seems to have a favourable effect on the course of neuropathy, but not on cardiac or eye lesions. Oral administration of tafamidis meglumine, which prevents misfolding and deposition of mutated TTR, is under evaluation in patients with TTR FAP. In future, patients with FAP might benefit from gene therapy; however, genetic counselling is recommended for the prevention of all types of FAP.

  20. Statistical mechanics of thermal denaturation of DNA oligomers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navin Singh; Yashwant Singh

    2003-08-01

    Double stranded DNA chain is known to have non-trivial elasticity. We study the effect of this elasticity on the denaturation profile of DNA oligomer by constraining one base pair at one end of the oligomer to remain in unstretched (or intact) state. The effect of this constraint on the denaturation profile of the oligomer has been calculated using the Peyrard–Bishop Hamiltonian. The denaturation profile is found to be very different from the free (i.e. without the constraint) oligomer. We have also examined how this constraint affects the denaturation profile of the oligomer having a segment of defect sites located at different parts of the chain.

  1. Origin and diversification of a metabolic cycle in oligomer world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Tomoaki; Narikiyo, Osamu

    2013-02-01

    Based on the oligomer-world hypothesis we propose an abstract model where the molecular recognition among oligomers is described in the shape space. The origin of life in the oligomer world is regarded as the establishment of a metabolic cycle in a primitive cell. The cycle is sustained by the molecular recognition. If an original cell acquires the ability of the replication of oligomers, the relationship among oligomers changes due to the poor fidelity of the replication. This change leads to the diversification of metabolic cycles. The selection among diverse cycles is the basis of the evolution. The evolvability is one of the essential characters of life. We demonstrate the origin and diversification of the metabolic cycle by the computer simulation of our model. Such a simulation is expected to be the simplified demonstration of what actually occurred in the primordial soup. Our model describes an analog era preceding the digital era based on the genetic code.

  2. Properties of Surface Cyclic Oligomers Present on Polyester Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑敏; 宋心远

    2003-01-01

    The effects of different treatments, such as dry heat,wet heat, solvent vapor and ultrasonic, on properties of the cyclic oligomers on the surface of polyester fiber are studied. The components of surface oligomers are analyzed through Thin-Layer Chromatograph. The result shows that: all of the treatments, especially solvent vapor treatment, can significantly increase the content of surface cyclic oligomers. The content of cyclic trimer is increased more considerably than other oligomers. Moreover, the morphology and the distribution of surface cyclic oligomers are also different from different treatments: Dry heat and wet heat cause larger polygonal solids distributed evenly on the surface of fiber; solvent vapor makes fiber surface exhibit irregular rodlike crystal shapes randomly; ultrasonic treatment induces some obscure and smaller deposits on the surface of fiber.

  3. Serum amyloid P component scintigraphy in familial amyloid polyneuropathy: regression of visceral amyloid following liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydh, A.; Hietala, S.O.; Aahlstroem, K.R. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Suhr, O. [Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Pepys, M.B.; Hawkins, P.N. [Immunological Medicine Unit, Department of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) associated with transthyretin (TTR) mutations is the commonest type of hereditary amyloidosis. Plasma TTR is produced almost exclusively in the liver and orthotopic liver transplantation is the only available treatment, although the clinical outcome varies. Serum amyloid P component (SAP) scintigraphy is a method for identifying and quantitatively monitoring amyloid deposits in vivo, but it has not previously been used to study the outcome of visceral amyloid deposits in FAP following liver transplantation. Whole body scintigraphy following injection of iodine-123 labelled SAP was performed in 17 patients with FAP associated with TTR Met30 and in five asymptomatic gene carriers. Follow-up studies were performed in ten patients, eight of whom had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation 1-5 years beforehand. There was abnormal uptake of {sup 123}I-SAP in all FAP patients, including the kidneys in each case, the spleen in five cases and the adrenal glands in three cases. Renal amyloid deposits were also present in three of the asymptomatic carriers. Follow-up studies 1-5 years after liver transplantation showed that there had been substantial regression of the visceral amyloid deposits in two patients and modest improvement in three cases. The amyloid deposits were unchanged in two patients. In conclusion, {sup 123}I-SAP scintigraphy identified unsuspected visceral amyloid in each patient with FAP due to TTR Met30. The universal presence of renal amyloid probably underlies the high frequency of renal failure that occurs in FAP following liver transplantation. The variable capacity of patients to mobilise amyloid deposits following liver transplantation may contribute to their long-term clinical outcome. (orig.) With 2 figs., 2 tabs., 22 refs.

  4. Diversity, biogenesis and function of microbial amyloids

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid is a distinct β-sheet-rich fold that many proteins can acquire. Frequently associated with neurodegenerative diseases in humans, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s, amyloids are traditionally considered the product of protein misfolding. However, the amyloid fold is now recognized as a ubiquitous part of normal cellular biology. ‘Functional’ amyloids have been identified in nearly all facets of cellular life, with microbial functional amyloids leading the way. Unlike ...

  5. Spectroscopic data

    CERN Document Server

    Melzer, J

    1976-01-01

    During the preparation of this compilation, many people contributed; the compilers wish to thank all of them. In particular they appreciate the efforts of V. Gilbertson, the manuscript typist, and those of K. C. Bregand, J. A. Kiley, and W. H. McPherson, who gave editorial assistance. They would like to thank Dr. J. R. Schwartz for his cooperation and encouragement. In addition, they extend their grati­ tude to Dr. L. Wilson of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, who gave the initial impetus to this project. v Contents I. I ntroduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11. Organization ofthe Spectroscopic Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Methods of Production and Experimental Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Band Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2...

  6. In vitro oligomerization and fibrillogenesis of amyloid-beta peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseny-Cases, Núria; Klementieva, Oksana; Cladera, Josep

    2012-01-01

    The amyloid beta Ab(1-40) and Ab(1-42) peptides are the main components of the fibrillar plaques characteristically found in the brains affected by Alzheimer's disease. Fibril formation has been thoroughly studied in vitro using synthetic amyloid peptides and has been described to be a nucleation dependent polymerization process. During this process, defined by a slow nucleation phase followed by a rapid exponential elongation reaction, a whole range of aggregated species (low and high molecular weight aggregates) precede fibril formation. Toxic species related to the onset and development of Alzheimer's disease are thought to be found among these prefibrillar aggregates. Two main procedures are used to experimentally monitor fibril formation kinetics: through the measurement of the light scattered by the different peptide aggregates and using the fluorescent dye thioflavin T, which fluorescence increases when specifically interacting with amyloid fibrils. Reproducibility may, however, be difficult to achieve when measuring and characterizing fibril formation kinetics. This fact is mainly due to the difficulty in experimentally handling amyloid peptides, which is directly related to the difficulty of having them in a monomeric form at the beginning of the polymerization process. This has to do mainly with the type of solvent used for the preparation of the peptide stock solutions (water, DMSO, TFE, HFIP) and the control of determinant physicochemical parameters such as pH. Moreover, kinetic progression turns out to be highly dependent on the type of peptide counter-ion used, which will basically determine the duration of the nucleation phase and the rate at which high molecular weight oligomers are formed. Centrifugation and filtration procedures used in the preparation of the peptide stock solutions will also greatly influence the duration of the fibril formation process. In this chapter, a survey of the alluded experimental procedures is provided and a general

  7. Design, synthesis, and characterization of biomimetic oligomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jonas Striegler

    . Using NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallographic analysis, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we found evidence for the presence of thioamide–aromatic interactions through Csp2-H···Samide hydrogen bonding. Based on these studies we designed a ß-peptoid oligomer from residues prone to fit......Peptides and proteins made from the 20 canonical amino acids are responsible for many processes necessary for organisms to function. Beside their composition, proteins obtain their activity and unique selectivity through an ability to display functionalities accurately in the three......, for their ability to mimic the structural elements seen in proteins. Two prominent peptidomimetics are ß-peptides and a-peptoids (N-alkylglycines), which have been shown to fold into helical and sheet-like arrangements. To expand the chemical space available for mimicking protein structure their features have been...

  8. Protein misfolding, congophilia, oligomerization, and defective amyloid processing in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhimschi, Irina A; Nayeri, Unzila A; Zhao, Guomao; Shook, Lydia L; Pensalfini, Anna; Funai, Edmund F; Bernstein, Ira M; Glabe, Charles G; Buhimschi, Catalin S

    2014-07-16

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disorder of unknown etiology and a leading contributor to maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Because there is no cure other than delivery, preeclampsia is the leading cause of iatrogenic preterm birth. We show that preeclampsia shares pathophysiologic features with recognized protein misfolding disorders. These features include urine congophilia (affinity for the amyloidophilic dye Congo red), affinity for conformational state-dependent antibodies, and dysregulation of prototype proteolytic enzymes involved in amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing. Assessment of global protein misfolding load in pregnancy based on urine congophilia (Congo red dot test) carries diagnostic and prognostic potential for preeclampsia. We used conformational state-dependent antibodies to demonstrate the presence of generic supramolecular assemblies (prefibrillar oligomers and annular protofibrils), which vary in quantitative and qualitative representation with preeclampsia severity. In the first attempt to characterize the preeclampsia misfoldome, we report that the urine congophilic material includes proteoforms of ceruloplasmin, immunoglobulin free light chains, SERPINA1, albumin, interferon-inducible protein 6-16, and Alzheimer's β-amyloid. The human placenta abundantly expresses APP along with prototype APP-processing enzymes, of which the α-secretase ADAM10, the β-secretases BACE1 and BACE2, and the γ-secretase presenilin-1 were all up-regulated in preeclampsia. The presence of β-amyloid aggregates in placentas of women with preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction further supports the notion that this condition should join the growing list of protein conformational disorders. If these aggregates play a pathophysiologic role, our findings may lead to treatment for preeclampsia.

  9. Exploring the early steps of aggregation of amyloid-forming peptide KFFE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Guanghong [Departement de Physique and Regroupement Quebecois sur les Materiaux de Pointe, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, succursale centre-ville, Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Mousseau, Normand [Departement de Physique and Regroupement Quebecois sur les Materiaux de Pointe, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, succursale centre-ville, Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Derreumaux, Philippe [Laboratoire de Biochimie, Theorique, UPR 9080 CNRS, IBPC, Universite Paris 7 Denis-Diderot, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2004-11-10

    It has been shown recently that even a tetrapeptide can form amyloid fibrils sharing all the characteristics of amyloid fibrils built from large proteins. Recent experimental studies also suggest that the toxicity observed in several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, is not only related to the mature fibrils themselves, but also to the soluble oligomers formed early in the process of fibrillogenesis. This raises the interest in studying the early steps of the aggregation process. Although fibril formation follows the nucleation-condensation process, characterized by the presence of lag phase, the exact pathways remain to be determined. In this study, we used the activation-relaxation technique and a generic energy model to explore the process of self-assembly and the structures of the resulting aggregates of eight KFFE peptides. Our simulations show, starting from different states with a preformed antiparallel dimer, that eight chains can self-assemble to adopt, with various orientations, four possible distant oligomeric well-aligned structures of similar energy. Two of these structures show a double-layer {beta}-sheet organization, in agreement with the structure of amyloid fibrils as observed by x-ray diffraction; another two are mixtures of dimers and trimers. Our results also suggest that octamers are likely to be below the critical size for nucleation of amyloid fibrils for small peptides.

  10. Dependence on solution conditions of aggregation and amyloid formation by an SH3 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurdo, J; Guijarro, J I; Jiménez, J L; Saibil, H R; Dobson, C M

    2001-08-10

    The formation of amyloid fibrils by the SH3 domain of the alpha-subunit of bovine phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase (PI3-SH3) has been investigated under carefully controlled solution conditions. NMR and CD characterisation of the denatured states from which fibrils form at low pH show that their properties can be correlated with the nature of the resulting aggregates defined by EM and FTIR spectroscopy. Compact partially folded states, favoured by the addition of anions, are prone to precipitate rapidly into amorphous species, whilst well-defined fibrillar structures are formed slowly from more expanded denatured states. Kinetic data obtained by a variety of techniques show a clear lag phase in the formation of amyloid fibrils. NMR spectroscopy shows no evidence for a significant population of small oligomers in solution during or after this lag phase. EM and FTIR indicate the presence of amorphous aggregates (protofibrils) rich in beta-structure after the lag phase but prior to the development of well-defined amyloid fibrils. These observations strongly suggest a nucleation and growth mechanism for the formation of the ordered aggregates. The morphologies of the fibrillar structures were found to be highly sensitive to the pH at which the protein solutions are incubated. This can be attributed to the effect of small perturbations in the electrostatic interactions that stabilise the contacts between the protofilaments forming the amyloid fibrils. Moreover, different hydrogen bonding patterns related to the various aggregate morphologies can be distinguished by FTIR analysis. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. Protein Polymers and Amyloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Michael Wulff

    2014-01-01

    Several human disorders are caused by a common general disease mechanism arising from abnormal folding and aggregation of the underlying protein. These include the prevalent dementias like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, where accumulation of protein fibrillar structures, known as amyloid fibrils......, is a general hallmark. They also include the α1-antitrypsin deficiency, where disease-causing mutations in the serine protease inhibitor, α1-antitrypsin (α1AT), leads to accumulation of the aberrant protein in the liver of these patients. The native metastable structure of α1AT constitutes a molecular trap...... that inhibits its target protease through a large conformational change but mutations compromise this function and cause premature structural collapse into hyperstable polymers. Understanding the conformational disorders at a molecular level is not only important for our general knowledge on protein folding...

  12. Amyloid β Ion Channels in a Membrane Comprising Brain Total Lipid Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon; Kim, Young Hun; T Arce, Fernando; Gillman, Alan L; Jang, Hyunbum; Kagan, Bruce L; Nussinov, Ruth; Yang, Jerry; Lal, Ratnesh

    2017-02-20

    Amyloid β (Aβ) oligomers are the predominant toxic species in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. The prevailing mechanism for toxicity by Aβ oligomers includes ionic homeostasis destabilization in neuronal cells by forming ion channels. These channel structures have been previously studied in model lipid bilayers. In order to gain further insight into the interaction of Aβ oligomers with natural membrane compositions, we have examined the structures and conductivities of Aβ oligomers in a membrane composed of brain total lipid extract (BTLE). We utilized two complementary techniques: atomic force microscopy (AFM) and black lipid membrane (BLM) electrical recording. Our results indicate that Aβ1-42 forms ion channel structures in BTLE membranes, accompanied by a heterogeneous population of ionic current fluctuations. Notably, the observed current events generated by Aβ1-42 peptides in BTLE membranes possess different characteristics compared to current events generated by the presence of Aβ1-42 in model membranes comprising a 1:1 mixture of DOPS and POPE lipids. Oligomers of the truncated Aβ fragment Aβ17-42 (p3) exhibited similar ion conductivity behavior as Aβ1-42 in BTLE membranes. However, the observed macroscopic ion flux across the BTLE membranes induced by Aβ1-42 pores was larger than for p3 pores. Our analysis of structure and conductance of oligomeric Aβ pores in a natural lipid membrane closely mimics the in vivo cellular environment suggesting that Aβ pores could potentially accelerate the loss of ionic homeostasis and cellular abnormalities. Hence, these pore structures may serve as a target for drug development and therapeutic strategies for AD treatment.

  13. Intramolecular triplet energy transfer in anthracene-based platinum acetylide oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongjun; Köse, Muhammet E; Schanze, Kirk S

    2013-08-01

    Platinum acetylide oligomers that contain an anthracene moiety have been synthesized and subjected to photophysical characterization. Spectroscopic measurement and DFT calculations reveal that both the singlet and triplet energy levels of the anthracene segment are lower than those of the platinum acetylide segment. Thus, the platinum acetylide segment acts as a sensitizer to populate the triplet state of the anthrancene segment via intramolecular triplet-triplet energy transfer. The objective of this work is to understand the mechanisms of energy-transfer dynamics in these systems. Fluorescence quenching and the dominant triplet absorption that arises from the anthracene segment in the transient absorption spectrum of Pt4An give clear evidence that energy transfer adopts an indirect mechanism, which begins with singlet-triplet energy transfer from the anthracene segment to the platinum acetylide segment followed by triplet-triplet energy transfer to the anthracene segment.

  14. Investigation of ferroelectric domains in thin films of vinylidene fluoride oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Pankaj, E-mail: psharma@huskers.unl.edu; Poddar, Shashi; Ducharme, Stephen; Gruverman, Alexei, E-mail: alexei-gruverman@unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Korlacki, Rafal [Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Nanohybrid Functional Materials, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

    2014-07-14

    High-resolution vector piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has been used to investigate ferroelectric domains in thin vinylidene fluoride oligomer films fabricated by the Langmuir-Blodgett deposition technique. Molecular chains are found to be preferentially oriented normal to the substrate, and PFM imaging shows that the films are in ferroelectric β-phase with a predominantly in-plane polarization, in agreement with infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry and X-ray diffraction measurements. The fractal analysis of domain structure has yielded the Hausdorff dimension (D) in the range of ∼1.3–1.5 indicating a random-bond nature of the disorder potential, with domain size exhibiting Landau-Lifshitz-Kittel scaling.

  15. Amyloid misfolding, aggregation, and the early onset of protein deposition diseases: insights from AFM experiments and computational analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri L. Lyubchenko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of Alzheimer's disease is believed to be caused by the assembly of amyloid β proteins into aggregates and the formation of extracellular senile plaques. Similar models suggest that structural misfolding and aggregation of proteins are associated with the early onset of diseases such as Parkinson's, Huntington's, and other protein deposition diseases. Initially, the aggregates were structurally characterized by traditional techniques such as x-ray crystallography, NMR, electron microscopy, and AFM. However, data regarding the structures formed during the early stages of the aggregation process were unknown. Experimental models of protein deposition diseases have demonstrated that the small oligomeric species have significant neurotoxicity. This highlights the urgent need to discover the properties of these species, to enable the development of efficient diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The oligomers exist transiently, making it impossible to use traditional structural techniques to study their characteristics. The recent implementation of single-molecule imaging and probing techniques that are capable of probing transient states have enabled the properties of these oligomers to be characterized. Additionally, powerful computational techniques capable of structurally analyzing oligomers at the atomic level advanced our understanding of the amyloid aggregation problem. This review outlines the progress in AFM experimental studies and computational analyses with a primary focus on understanding the very first stage of the aggregation process. Experimental approaches can aid in the development of novel sensitive diagnostic and preventive strategies for protein deposition diseases, and several examples of these approaches will be discussed.

  16. Polyalanine and Abeta Aggregation Kinetics: Probing Intermediate Oligomer Formation and Structure Using Computer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Erin Melissa

    2011-12-01

    The aggregation of proteins into stable, well-ordered structures known as amyloid fibrils has been associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. Amyloid fibrils are long straight, and un-branched structures containing several proto-filaments, each of which exhibits "cross beta structure," -- ribbon-like layers of large beta sheets whose strands run perpendicular to the fibril axis. It has been suggested in the literature that the pathway to fibril formation has the following steps: unfolded monomers associate into transient unstable oligomers, the oligomers undergo a rearrangement into the cross-beta structure and form into proto-filaments, these proto-filaments then associate and grow into fully formed fibrils. Recent experimental studies have determined that the unstable intermediate structures are toxic to cells and that their presence may play a key role in the pathogenesis of the amyloid diseases. Many efforts have been made to determine the structure of intermediate oligomer aggregates that form during the fibrillization process. The goal of this work is to provide details about the structure and formation kinetics of the unstable oligomers that appear in the fibril formation pathway. The specific aims of this work are to determine the steps in the fibril formation pathway and how the kinetics of fibrillization changes with variations in temperature and concentration. The method used is the application of discontinuous molecular dynamics to large systems of peptides represented with an intermediate resolution model, PRIME, that was previously developed in our group. Three different peptide sequences are simulated: polyalanine (KA14K), Abeta17-40, and Abeta17-42; the latter two are truncated sequences of the Alzheimer's peptide. We simulate the spontaneous assembly of these peptide chains from a random initial configuration of random coils. We investigate aggregation kinetics and oligomer formation of a system of 192 polyalanine (KA14K) chains over a

  17. The Challenge of Synthesizing Oligomers for Molecular Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik C. Krebs

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Controlling the size of the oligomer and introducing functional groups at the ends of the oligomer that allow it to react with separate electrodes are critical issues when preparing materials for molecular wires. We demonstrate a general synthetic approach to oligophenylenevinylene (OPV derivative molecules with a molecular length up to 9–10 nm which allow for the introduction of aromatic thioacetate functionality in fully conjugated oligomer systems. Oligomers containing 3–15 phenyl units were synthesized by step wise Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons (HWE reactions of a bifunctional OPV-monomer, which demonstrated good control of the size of the OPVs. Workup after each reaction step ensures a high purity of the final products. End group functionalization was introduced as a last step.

  18. Structure, orientation, and surface interaction of Alzheimer amyloid-β peptides on the graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiang; Wang, Qiuming; Lin, Yinan; Zhao, Jun; Zhao, Chao; Zheng, Jie

    2012-04-24

    The misfolding and aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides into amyloid fibrils in solution and on the cell membrane has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Although it is well-known that the presence of different surfaces can accelerate the aggregation of Aβ peptides into fibrils, surface-induced conformation, orientation, aggregation, and adsorption of Aβ peptides have not been well understood at the atomic level. Here, we perform all-atom explicit-water molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the orientation change, conformational dynamics, surface interaction of small Aβ aggregates with different sizes (monomer to tetramer), and conformations (α-helix and β-hairpin) upon adsorption on the graphite surface, in comparison with Aβ structures in bulk solution. Simulation results show that hydrophobic graphite induces the quick adsorption of Aβ peptides regardless of their initial conformations and sizes. Upon the adsorption, Aβ prefers to adopt random structure for monomers and to remain β-rich-structure for small oligomers, but not helical structures. More importantly, due to the amphiphilic sequence of Aβ and the hydrophobic nature of graphite, hydrophobic C-terminal residues of higher-order Aβ oligomers appear to have preferential interactions with the graphite surface for facilitating Aβ fibril formation and fibril growth. In combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) images and MD simulation results, a postulated mechanism is proposed to describe the structure and kinetics of Aβ aggregation from aqueous solution to the graphite surface, providing parallel insights into Aβ aggregation on biological cell membranes.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Thermosetting Polyimide Oligomers for Microelectronics Packaging

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    A series of reactive phenylethynyl endcapped imide oligomers has been prepared in either fully cyclized or amic acid precursor form. Soluble oligomers have been synthesized with controlled molecular weights ranging from 2- to 12 Kg/mol. Molecular weight characterization was performed using SEC (size exclusion chromatography) and 13C-NMR, revealing good agreement between the theoretical and experimental (Mn) values. Crosslinked polyimides were obtained by solution or melt processing the oli...

  20. A cyclic undecamer peptide mimics a turn in folded Alzheimer amyloid β and elicits antibodies against oligomeric and fibrillar amyloid and plaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hoogerhout

    Full Text Available The 39- to 42-residue amyloid β (Aβ peptide is deposited in extracellular fibrillar plaques in the brain of patients suffering from Alzheimer's Disease (AD. Vaccination with these peptides seems to be a promising approach to reduce the plaque load but results in a dominant antibody response directed against the N-terminus. Antibodies against the N-terminus will capture Aβ immediately after normal physiological processing of the amyloid precursor protein and therefore will also reduce the levels of non-misfolded Aβ, which might have a physiologically relevant function. Therefore, we have targeted an immune response on a conformational neo-epitope in misfolded amyloid that is formed in advance of Aβ-aggregation. A tetanus toxoid-conjugate of the 11-meric cyclic peptide Aβ(22-28-YNGK' elicited specific antibodies in Balb/c mice. These antibodies bound strongly to the homologous cyclic peptide-bovine serum albumin conjugate, but not to the homologous linear peptide-conjugate, as detected in vitro by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The antibodies also bound--although more weakly--to Aβ(1-42 oligomers as well as fibrils in this assay. Finally, the antibodies recognized Aβ deposits in AD mouse and human brain tissue as established by immunohistological staining. We propose that the cyclic peptide conjugate might provide a lead towards a vaccine that could be administered before the onset of AD symptoms. Further investigation of this hypothesis requires immunization of transgenic AD model mice.

  1. The hunt for brain Aβ oligomers by peripherally circulating multi-functional nanoparticles: Potential therapeutic approach for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Simona; Minniti, Stefania; Gregori, Maria; Sancini, Giulio; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Ordóñez-Gutiérrez, Lara; Wandosell, Francisco; Salmona, Mario; Re, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed the ability of liposomes bi-functionalized with phosphatidic acid and an ApoE-derived peptide (mApoE-PA-LIP) to reduce brain Aβ in transgenic Alzheimer mice. Herein we investigated the efficacy of mApoE-PA-LIP to withdraw Aβ peptide in different aggregation forms from the brain, using a transwell cellular model of the blood-brain barrier and APP/PS1 mice. The spontaneous efflux of Aβ oligomers (Aβo), but not of Aβ fibrils, from the 'brain' side of the transwell was strongly enhanced (5-fold) in presence of mApoE-PA-LIP in the 'blood' compartment. This effect is due to a withdrawal of Aβo exerted by peripheral mApoE-PA-LIP by sink effect, because, when present in the brain side, they did not act as Aβo carrier and limit the oligomer efflux. In vivo peripheral administration of mApoE-PA-LIP significantly increased the plasma Aβ level, suggesting that Aβ-binding particles exploiting the sink effect can be used as a therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer disease. From the Clinical Editor: Alzheimer disease (AD) at present is an incurable disease, which is thought to be caused by an accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in the brain. Many strategies in combating this disease have been focused on either the prevention or dissolving these peptides. In this article, the authors showed the ability of liposomes bi-functionalized with phosphatidic acid and with an ApoE- derived peptide to withdraw amyloid peptides from the brain. The data would help the future design of more novel treatment for Alzheimer disease.

  2. Mechanisms of hybrid oligomer formation in the pathogenesis of combined Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

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    Igor F Tsigelny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Misfolding and pathological aggregation of neuronal proteins has been proposed to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD are frequent neurodegenerative diseases of the aging population. While progressive accumulation of amyloid beta protein (Abeta oligomers has been identified as one of the central toxic events in AD, accumulation of alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn resulting in the formation of oligomers and protofibrils has been linked to PD and Lewy body Disease (LBD. We have recently shown that Abeta promotes alpha-syn aggregation and toxic conversion in vivo, suggesting that abnormal interactions between misfolded proteins might contribute to disease pathogenesis. However the molecular characteristics and consequences of these interactions are not completely clear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in potential Abeta/alpha-syn interactions, immunoblot, molecular modeling, and in vitro studies with alpha-syn and Abeta were performed. We showed in vivo in the brains of patients with AD/PD and in transgenic mice, Abeta and alpha-synuclein co-immunoprecipitate and form complexes. Molecular modeling and simulations showed that Abeta binds alpha-syn monomers, homodimers, and trimers, forming hybrid ring-like pentamers. Interactions occurred between the N-terminus of Abeta and the N-terminus and C-terminus of alpha-syn. Interacting alpha-syn and Abeta dimers that dock on the membrane incorporated additional alpha-syn molecules, leading to the formation of more stable pentamers and hexamers that adopt a ring-like structure. Consistent with the simulations, under in vitro cell-free conditions, Abeta interacted with alpha-syn, forming hybrid pore-like oligomers. Moreover, cells expressing alpha-syn and treated with Abeta displayed increased current amplitudes and calcium influx consistent with the

  3. Porcine prion protein amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions.

  4. Copper inducing Aβ42 rather than Aβ40 nanoscale oligomer formation is the key process for Aβ neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lu; Wu, Wei-Hui; Li, Qiu-Ye; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Li, Yan-Mei

    2011-11-01

    Copper is known to be a critical factor in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, as it is involved in amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide related toxicity. However, the relationship between neurotoxicity and Aβ peptide in the presence of copper remains unclear. The effect of copper has not been clearly differentiated between Aβ42 and Aβ40, and it is still debated whether copper-mediated neurotoxicity is due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation or other molecular mechanisms. Here, we describe that copper dramatically affects Aβ42 aggregation and enhances Aβ42 cytotoxicity while it shows no significant effects on Aβ40. These phenomena are mainly because that the strong interactions between copper and Aβ42 lead to great conformation changes, and stabilize Aβ42 aggregates at highly toxic nanoscale oligomer stage, whereas copper shows no similar impact on Aβ40. We also propose a possible molecular mechanism that copper enhances Aβ42 cytotoxicity via perturbing membrane structure. Moreover, we test the effect of an analogue of copper, nickel, on Aβ aggregation and cytotoxicity, finding that nickel also enhances cytotoxicity via Aβ42 nanoscale oligomer formation. These results clarify that the copper-induced Aβ42 nanoscale oligomer formation is the key process for Aβ neurotoxicity, and suggest that disrupting the interactions between copper and Aβ42 peptide to inhibit nanoscale oligomerization process, deserves more attention in AD drug development.Copper is known to be a critical factor in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, as it is involved in amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide related toxicity. However, the relationship between neurotoxicity and Aβ peptide in the presence of copper remains unclear. The effect of copper has not been clearly differentiated between Aβ42 and Aβ40, and it is still debated whether copper-mediated neurotoxicity is due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation or other molecular mechanisms. Here, we describe that copper

  5. Subdiffusion of proteins and oligomers on membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepzelter, David; Zaman, Muhammad

    2012-11-01

    Diffusion of proteins on lipid membranes plays a central role in cell signaling processes. From a mathematical perspective, most membrane diffusion processes are explained by the Saffman-Delbrück theory. However, recent studies have suggested a major limitation in the theoretical framework, the lack of complexity in the modeled lipid membrane. Lipid domains (sometimes termed membrane rafts) are known to slow protein diffusion, but there have been no quantitative theoretical examinations of how much diffusion is slowed in a general case. We provide an overall theoretical framework for confined-domain ("corralled") diffusion. Further, there have been multiple apparent contradictions of the basic conclusions of Saffman and Delbrück, each involving cases in which a single protein or an oligomer has multiple transmembrane regions passing through a lipid phase barrier. We present a set of corrections to the Saffman-Delbrück theory to account for these experimental observations. Our corrections are able to provide a quantitative explanation of numerous cellular signaling processes that have been considered beyond the scope of the Saffman-Delbrück theory, and may be extendable to other forms of subdiffusion.

  6. Study of amyloids using yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickner, Reed B.; Kryndushkin, Dmitry; Shewmaker, Frank; McGlinchey, Ryan; Edskes, Herman K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a useful model organism in such fields as the cell cycle, regulation of transcription, protein trafficking and cell biology, primarily because of its ease of genetic manipulation. This is no less so in the area of amyloid studies. The endogenous yeast amyloids described to date include prions, infectious proteins (Table 1), and some cell wall proteins (1). and amyloids of humans and a fungal prion have also been studied using the yeast system. Accordingly, the emphasis of this chapter will be on genetic, biochemical, cell biological and physical methods particularly useful in the study of yeast prions and other amyloids studied in yeast. We limit our description of these methods to those aspects which have been most useful in studying yeast prions, citing more detailed expositions in the literature. Volumes on yeast genetics methods (2–4), and on amyloids and prions (5, 6) are useful, and Masison has edited a volume of Methods on “Identification, analysis and characterization of fungal prions” which covers some of this territory (7). We also outline some useful physical methods, pointing the reader to more extensive and authoratative descriptions. PMID:22528100

  7. Extensive p-tau pathology and SDS-stable p-tau oligomers in Alzheimer's cortical synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkins, Kristen M; Sokolow, Sophie; Miller, Carol A; Vinters, Harry V; Poon, Wayne W; Cornwell, Lindsey B; Saing, Tommy; Gylys, Karen Hoppens

    2012-11-01

    Like amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers, tau aggregates are increasingly recognized as potential key toxic intermediates in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and as therapeutic targets. P-tau co-localizes with Aβ in cortical AD synapses and may contribute to synapse dysfunction and loss. Flow cytometry analysis of synaptosomes from AD compared with aged cognitively normal cortex demonstrates increased immunolabeling for three p-tau antibodies (AT8, PHF-1 and pS422), indicating phosphorylation at multiple tau epitopes. Sequential extraction experiments show increased soluble p-tau in AD synapses, but a sizable pool of p-tau requires detergent solubilization, suggesting endosomal/lysosomal localization. P-tau is co-localized with Aβ in individual synaptosomes in dual labeling experiments, and flow cytometry sorting of Aβ-positive synaptosomes from an AD case reveals a marked enrichment of p-tau aggregates. The p-tau enrichment, a 76-fold increase over the initial homogenate, is consistent with sequestration of p-tau in internal synaptic compartments. Western analysis of a series of AD and normal cases shows SDS-stable tau oligomers in the dimer/trimer size range in AD samples. These results indicate that widespread synaptic p-tau pathology accompanies Aβ accumulations in surviving synaptic terminals, particularly in late-stage AD.

  8. Initial stages of beta-amyloid Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 oligomerization observed using fluorescence decay and molecular dynamics analyses of tyrosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Mariana; Kubiak-Ossowska, Karina; Birch, David J. S.; Rolinski, Olaf J.

    2013-03-01

    The development of Alzheimer’s disease is associated with the aggregation of the beta-amyloid peptides Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42. It is believed that the small oligomers formed during the early stages of the aggregation are neurotoxic and involved in the process of neurodegeneration. In this paper we use fluorescence decay measurements of beta-amyloid intrinsic fluorophore tyrosine (Tyr) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the early stages of oligomer formation for the Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 peptides in vitro. We demonstrate that the lifetime distributions of the amyloid fluorescence decay efficiently describe changes in the complex Tyr photophysics during the peptide aggregation and highlight the differences in aggregation performance of the two amyloids. Tyr fluorescence decay is found to be a more sensitive sensor of Aβ1-40 aggregation than Aβ1-42 aggregation. The MD simulation of the peptide aggregation is compared with the experimental data and supports a four-rotamer model of Tyr.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide is generated during the very early stages of aggregation of the amyloid peptides implicated in Alzheimer disease and familial British dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabner, Brian J; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Turnbull, Stuart; German, Matthew J; Paleologou, Katerina E; Hayashi, Yoshihito; Cooper, Leanne J; Fullwood, Nigel J; Allsop, David

    2005-10-28

    Alzheimer disease and familial British dementia are neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by the presence of numerous amyloid plaques in the brain. These lesions contain fibrillar deposits of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) and the British dementia peptide (ABri), respectively. Both peptides are toxic to cells in culture, and there is increasing evidence that early "soluble oligomers" are the toxic entity rather than mature amyloid fibrils. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this toxicity are not clear, but in the case of Abeta, one prominent hypothesis is that the peptide can induce oxidative damage via the formation of hydrogen peroxide. We have developed a reliable method, employing electron spin resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with the spin-trapping technique, to detect any hydrogen peroxide generated during the incubation of Abeta and other amyloidogenic peptides. Here, we monitored levels of hydrogen peroxide accumulation during different stages of aggregation of Abeta-(1-40) and ABri and found that in both cases it was generated as a short "burst" early on in the aggregation process. Ultrastructural studies with both peptides revealed that structures resembling "soluble oligomers" or "protofibrils" were present during this early phase of hydrogen peroxide formation. Mature amyloid fibrils derived from Abeta-(1-40) did not generate hydrogen peroxide. We conclude that hydrogen peroxide formation during the early stages of protein aggregation may be a common mechanism of cell death in these (and possibly other) neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. MMPBSA decomposition of the binding energy throughout a molecular dynamics simulation of amyloid-beta (Abeta(10-35)) aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanera, Josep M; Pouplana, Ramon

    2010-04-15

    Recent experiments with amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides indicate that the formation of toxic oligomers may be an important contribution to the onset of Alzheimer's disease. The toxicity of Abeta oligomers depend on their structure, which is governed by assembly dynamics. However, a detailed knowledge of the structure of at the atomic level has not been achieved yet due to limitations of current experimental techniques. In this study, replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations are used to identify the expected diversity of dimer conformations of Abeta(10-35) monomers. The most representative dimer conformation has been used to track the dimer formation process between both monomers. The process has been characterized by means of the evolution of the decomposition of the binding free energy, which provides an energetic profile of the interaction. Dimers undergo a process of reorganization driven basically by inter-chain hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions and also solvation/desolvation processes.

  11. MMPBSA Decomposition of the Binding Energy throughout a Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Amyloid-Beta (Aß10−35 Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Campanera

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments with amyloid-beta (Aβ peptides indicate that the formation of toxic oligomers may be an important contribution to the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. The toxicity of Aβ oligomers depend on their structure, which is governed by assembly dynamics. However, a detailed knowledge of the structure of at the atomic level has not been achieved yet due to limitations of current experimental techniques. In this study, replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations are used to identify the expected diversity of dimer conformations of Aβ10−35 monomers. The most representative dimer conformation has been used to track the dimer formation process between both monomers. The process has been characterized by means of the evolution of the decomposition of the binding free energy, which provides an energetic profile of the interaction. Dimers undergo a process of reorganization driven basically by inter-chain hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions and also solvation/desolvation processes.

  12. Pore formation by human stefin B in its native and oligomeric states and the consequent amyloid induced toxicity.

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    Gregor eAnderluh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is well documented that amyloid forming peptides and proteins interact with membranes and that this correlates with cytotoxicity. To introduce the theme we give a brief description of some amyloidogenic proteins and note their similarities with pore forming toxins and cell penetrating peptides. Human stefin B, a member of the family of cystatins, is an amyloidogenic protein in vitro. This review describes our studies of the interaction of stefin B oligomers and prefibrillar aggregates with model membranes leading to pore formation. We have studied the interaction between human stefin B and artificial membranes of various compositions. We also have prepared distinct sizes and morphologies of stefin B prefibrillar states and assessed their toxicity. Furthermore, we have measured electrical currents through pores formed by stefin B prefibrillar oligomers in a planar lipid bilayer setup. We finally discuss the possible functional and pathological significance of such pores formed by human stefin B.

  13. E. coli chaperones DnaK, Hsp33 and Spy inhibit bacterial functional amyloid assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Margery L; Schmidt, Jens C; Ilbert, Marianne; Doyle, Shannon M; Quan, Shu; Bardwell, James C A; Jakob, Ursula; Wickner, Sue; Chapman, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid formation is an ordered aggregation process, where β-sheet rich polymers are assembled from unstructured or partially folded monomers. We examined how two Escherichia coli cytosolic chaperones, DnaK and Hsp33, and a more recently characterized periplasmic chaperone, Spy, modulate the aggregation of a functional amyloid protein, CsgA. We found that DnaK, the Hsp70 homologue in E. coli, and Hsp33, a redox-regulated holdase, potently inhibited CsgA amyloidogenesis. The Hsp33 anti-amyloidogenesis activity was oxidation dependent, as oxidized Hsp33 was significantly more efficient than reduced Hsp33 at preventing CsgA aggregation. When soluble CsgA was seeded with preformed amyloid fibers, neither Hsp33 nor DnaK were able to efficiently prevent soluble CsgA from adopting the amyloid conformation. Moreover, both DnaK and Hsp33 increased the time that CsgA was reactive with the amyloid oligomer conformation-specific A11 antibody. Since CsgA must also pass through the periplasm during secretion, we assessed the ability of the periplasmic chaperone Spy to inhibit CsgA polymerization. Like DnaK and Hsp33, Spy also inhibited CsgA polymerization in vitro. Overexpression of Spy resulted in increased chaperone activity in periplasmic extracts and in reduced curli biogenesis in vivo. We propose that DnaK, Hsp33 and Spy exert their effects during the nucleation stages of CsgA fibrillation. Thus, both housekeeping and stress induced cytosolic and periplasmic chaperones may be involved in discouraging premature CsgA interactions during curli biogenesis.

  14. Cholesterol modulates the interaction of the islet amyloid polypeptide with membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillon, Lucie; Duma, Luminita; Lequin, Olivier; Khemtemourian, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    The deposition of insoluble amyloid fibrils resulting from the aggregation of the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) within the islet of Langerhans is a pathological feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Increasing evidence indicates that biological membranes play a key role in amyloid aggregation, modulating among others the kinetics of amyloid formation, and being the target of toxic species generated during amyloid formation. In T2DM patients, elevated levels of cholesterol, an important determinant of the physical state of biological membranes, are observed in β-cells and are thought to directly impair β-cell function and insulin secretion. However, it is not known whether cholesterol enhances membrane-interaction or membrane-insertion of hIAPP. In this study, we investigated the effect of cholesterol incorporated in zwitterionic and anionic membranes. Our circular dichroism and liquid state NMR data reveal that 10-30% of cholesterol slightly affects the aggregational and conformational behaviour of hIAPP. Additional fluorescence results indicate that 10 and 20% of cholesterol slightly slow down the kinetics of oligomer and fibril formation while anionic lipids accelerate this kinetics. This behavior might be caused by differences in membrane insertion and therefore in membrane binding of hIAPP. The membrane binding affinity was evaluated using (1)H NMR experiments and our results show that the affinity of hIAPP for membranes containing cholesterol is significantly smaller than that for membranes containing anionic lipids. Furthermore, we found that hIAPP-induced membrane damage is synchronized to fibril formation in the absence and in the presence of cholesterol.

  15. Density functional theory study of neutral and oxidized thiophene oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Yafei; Wei, Chengwei [School of Physics Science and Technology and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for NSLSCS, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Blaisten-Barojas, Estela, E-mail: blaisten@gmu.edu [Computational Materials Science Center and School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States)

    2013-11-14

    The effect of oxidation on the energetics and structure of thiophene (Th) oligomers is studied with density functional theory at the B3PW91/6-311++G(d,p) level. Neutral n-Th oligomers (2 < n < 13) are gently curved planar chains. Ionization potential and electron affinity results show that n-Th oligomers are easier to be oxidized as their chain length increases. Oxidation states +2, +4, +6, and +8 are energetically stable in 12-Th. Upon oxidation the conjugated backbone of 12-Th switches from extended benzenoid phase to quinoid phase localized on groups of monomers regularly spaced along the chain. Oxidized states +2, +4, +6, and +8 of 12-Th display two +1e localized at the ends of their chains only because of the finite size of the chains. In 12-Th this end-effect extends over the two terminal monomers forming a positive-negative charge duet. This peculiar charge localization makes n-Th oligomers different from other conducting polymers with similar structure, such as polypyrrole. The spectrum of single-electron molecular states of oxidized 12-Th displays two localized single-electron states in the HOMO-LUMO energy gap per +2 oxidation state. Oligothiophene 12-Th doped with F atoms at 1:2 concentration presents a charge transfer of 3.4 e from oligomer to dopants that increases to 4.8 e in the presence of solvent. The charge distribution in these F-doped oligomers is similar to the +4 oxidation state of 12-Th. It is predicted that dopants produce an enhanced charge transfer localized in the proximity of their locations enhancing the formation of bipolarons in the central part of the oligomer chain.

  16. Ordered self-assembly mechanism of a spherical oncoprotein oligomer triggered by zinc removal and stabilized by an intrinsically disordered domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Smal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Self-assembly is a common theme in proteins of unrelated sequences or functions. The human papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein is an extended dimer with an intrinsically disordered domain, that can form large spherical oligomers. These are the major species in the cytosol of HPV transformed and cancerous cells. E7 binds to a large number of targets, some of which lead to cell transformation. Thus, the assembly process not only is of biological relevance, but represents a model system to investigate a widely distributed mechanism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using various techniques, we monitored changes in secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure in a time course manner. By applying a robust kinetic model developed by Zlotnik, we determined the slow formation of a monomeric "Z-nucleus" after zinc removal, followed by an elongation phase consisting of sequential second-order events whereby one monomer is added at a time. This elongation process takes place at a strikingly slow overall average rate of one monomer added every 28 seconds at 20 µM protein concentration, strongly suggesting either a rearrangement of the growing complex after binding of each monomer or the existence of a "conformation editing" mechanism through which the monomer binds and releases until the appropriate conformation is adopted. The oligomerization determinant lies within its small 5 kDa C-terminal globular domain and, remarkably, the E7 N-terminal intrinsically disordered domain stabilizes the oligomer, preventing an insoluble amyloid route. CONCLUSION: We described a controlled ordered mechanism with features in common with soluble amyloid precursors, chaperones, and other spherical oligomers, thus sharing determining factors for symmetry, size and shape. In addition, such a controlled and discrete polymerization reaction provides a valuable tool for nanotechnological applications. Finally, its increased immunogenicity related to its supramolecular

  17. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

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    Douglas M Fowler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  18. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  19. Effect of procyandin oligomers on oxidative hair damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon-Moo

    2011-02-01

    Procyanidins are a subclass of flavonoids and consist of oligomers of catechin that naturally occur in plants and are known to exert many physiological effects, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and enzyme inhibitory effects. These possible inhibitory effects of the procyanidins were known to involve metal chelation, radical trapping, or direct enzyme binding. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of procyandin oligomers on hair damage induced by oxidative stress. In this study, several methods for evaluating oxidative damage in bleached hair are utilized to analyze the protective effect of procyandin oligomers against oxidative hair damage. It was observed that procyanidin oligomers strongly bind to keratin in hair and inhibit the breakdown of hair caused by oxidative damage in an analysis of hair using electrophoresis, transmission electron microscope, and fluorescence dye. These results confirm that procyanidin oligomers can be applicable as a potential candidate to the development of hair care with protective effect on hair damage. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Molecular recycling within amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carulla, Natàlia; Caddy, Gemma L; Hall, Damien R; Zurdo, Jesús; Gairí, Margarida; Feliz, Miguel; Giralt, Ernest; Robinson, Carol V; Dobson, Christopher M

    2005-07-28

    Amyloid fibrils are thread-like protein aggregates with a core region formed from repetitive arrays of beta-sheets oriented parallel to the fibril axis. Such structures were first recognized in clinical disorders, but more recently have also been linked to a variety of non-pathogenic phenomena ranging from the transfer of genetic information to synaptic changes associated with memory. The observation that many proteins can convert into similar structures in vitro has suggested that this ability is a generic feature of polypeptide chains. Here we have probed the nature of the amyloid structure by monitoring hydrogen/deuterium exchange in fibrils formed from an SH3 domain using a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The results reveal that under the conditions used in this study, exchange is dominated by a mechanism of dissociation and re-association that results in the recycling of molecules within the fibril population. This insight into the dynamic nature of amyloid fibrils, and the ability to determine the parameters that define this behaviour, have important implications for the design of therapeutic strategies directed against amyloid disease.

  1. The effects of amino acid composition of glutamine-rich domains on amyloid formation and fragmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I Alexandrov

    Full Text Available Fragmentation of amyloid polymers by the chaperone Hsp104 allows them to propagate as prions in yeast. The factors which determine the frequency of fragmentation are unclear, though it is often presumed to depend on the physical strength of prion polymers. Proteins with long polyglutamine stretches represent a tractable model for revealing sequence elements required for polymer fragmentation in yeast, since they form poorly fragmented amyloids. Here we show that interspersion of polyglutamine stretches with various amino acid residues differentially affects the in vivo formation and fragmentation of the respective amyloids. Aromatic residues tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine strongly stimulated polymer fragmentation, leading to the appearance of oligomers as small as dimers. Alanine, methionine, cysteine, serine, threonine and histidine also enhanced fragmentation, while charged residues, proline, glycine and leucine inhibited polymerization. Our data indicate that fragmentation frequency primarily depends on the recognition of fragmentation-promoting residues by Hsp104 and/or its co-chaperones, rather than on the physical stability of polymers. This suggests that differential exposure of such residues to chaperones defines prion variant-specific differences in polymer fragmentation efficiency.

  2. Insight into the stability of cross-beta amyloid fibril from molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; He, Yong-Jie; Wu, Maoying; Yan, Guanwen; Li, Yixue; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2010-06-01

    Amyloid fibrils are considered to play causal roles in the pathogenesis of amyloid-related degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes mellitus, the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, and prion disease. The mechanism of fibril formation is still hotly debated and remains an important open question. In this study, we utilized molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to analyze the stability of hexamer for eight class peptides. The MD results suggest that VEALYL and MVGGVV-1 are the most stable ones, then SNQNNY, followed by LYQLEN, MVGGVV-2, VQIVYK, SSTSAA, and GGVVIA. The statistics result indicates that hydrophobic residues play a key role in stabilizing the zipper interface. Single point and two linkage mutants of MVGGVV-1 confirmed that both Met1 and Val2 are key hydrophobic residues. This is consistent with the statistics analysis. The stability results of oligomer for MVGGVV-1 suggest that the intermediate state should be trimer (3-0) and tetramer (2-2). These methods can be used in stabilization study of other amyloid fibril.

  3. Atomic-resolution structure of a disease-relevant Aβ(1-42) amyloid fibril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälti, Marielle Aulikki; Ravotti, Francesco; Arai, Hiromi; Glabe, Charles G; Wall, Joseph S; Böckmann, Anja; Güntert, Peter; Meier, Beat H; Riek, Roland

    2016-08-23

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is present in humans as a 39- to 42-amino acid residue metabolic product of the amyloid precursor protein. Although the two predominant forms, Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42), differ in only two residues, they display different biophysical, biological, and clinical behavior. Aβ(1-42) is the more neurotoxic species, aggregates much faster, and dominates in senile plaque of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Although small Aβ oligomers are believed to be the neurotoxic species, Aβ amyloid fibrils are, because of their presence in plaques, a pathological hallmark of AD and appear to play an important role in disease progression through cell-to-cell transmissibility. Here, we solved the 3D structure of a disease-relevant Aβ(1-42) fibril polymorph, combining data from solid-state NMR spectroscopy and mass-per-length measurements from EM. The 3D structure is composed of two molecules per fibril layer, with residues 15-42 forming a double-horseshoe-like cross-β-sheet entity with maximally buried hydrophobic side chains. Residues 1-14 are partially ordered and in a β-strand conformation, but do not display unambiguous distance restraints to the remainder of the core structure.

  4. Consequences of Inhibiting Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing Enzymes on Synaptic Function and Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disease, one of whose major pathological hallmarks is the accumulation of amyloid plaques comprised of aggregated β-amyloid (Aβ peptides. It is now recognized that soluble Aβ oligomers may lead to synaptic dysfunctions early in AD pathology preceding plaque deposition. Aβ is produced by a sequential cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP by the activity of β- and γ-secretases, which have been identified as major candidate therapeutic targets of AD. This paper focuses on how Aβ alters synaptic function and the functional consequences of inhibiting the activity of the two secretases responsible for Aβ generation. Abnormalities in synaptic function resulting from the absence or inhibition of the Aβ-producing enzymes suggest that Aβ itself may have normal physiological functions which are disrupted by abnormal accumulation of Aβ during AD pathology. This interpretation suggests that AD therapeutics targeting the β- and γ-secretases should be developed to restore normal levels of Aβ or combined with measures to circumvent the associated synaptic dysfunction(s in order to have minimal impact on normal synaptic function.

  5. Effects of bulk and free surface shear flows on amyloid fibril formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada, David; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2008-11-01

    Amyloid diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's, among others, are characterized by the conversion of monomers to oligomers (precursors) and then to amyloid fibrils. Besides factors such as concentration, pH, and ionic strength, evidence exists that shearing flow strongly influences amyloid formation in vitro. Also, during fibrillation in the presence of either gas or solid surfaces, both the polarity and roughness of the surfaces play a significant role in the kinetics of the fibrillation process. By studying the nucleation and growth of a model system (insulin fibrils) in a well-defined flow field, we can identify the flow and interfacial conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics. The present flow system consists of an annular region, bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders and driven by rotation of the floor, with either a hydrophobic (air) or hydrophilic (solid) interface. We show both the combined and separated effects of shear and interfacial hydrophobicity on the fibrillation process, and the use of interfacial shear viscosity as a parameter for quantifying the oligomerization process.

  6. Preparation and applications of a variety of fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomer/hydroxyapatite composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Hiroki; Iwaki, Ken-Ichi; Furukuwa, Rika; Takishita, Katsuhisa; Sawada, Hideo

    2008-04-15

    A variety of fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomers were applied to the preparation of fluorinated oligomer/hydroxyapatite (HAp) composites (particle size: 38-356 nm), which exhibit a good dispersibility in water and traditional organic solvents. These fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomer/HAp composites were easily prepared by the reactions of disodium hydrogen phosphate and calcium chloride in the presence of self-assembled molecular aggregates formed by fluoroalkyl end-capped oligomers in aqueous solutions. In these fluorinated HAp composites thus obtained, fluoroalkyl end-capped acrylic acid oligomers and 2-methacryloyloxyethanesulfonic acid oligomer/HAp nanocomposites afforded transparent colorless solutions toward water; however, fluoroalkyl end-capped N,N-dimethylacrylamide oligomer and acryloylmorpholine oligomer were found to afford transparent colorless solutions with trace amounts of white-colored HAp precipitants under similar conditions. HAp could be encapsulated more effectively into fluorinated 2-methacryloyloxyethanesulfonic acid oligomeric aggregate cores to afford colloidal stable fluorinated oligomer/HAp composites, compared to that of fluorinated acrylic acid oligomers. These fluorinated oligomer/HAp composites were applied to the surface modification of glass and PVA to exhibit a good oleophobicity imparted by fluorine. HAp formation was newly observed on the modified polyethylene terephthalate film surface treated with fluorinated 2-methacryloyloxyethanesulfonic acid oligomers and acrylic acid oligomer/HAp composites by soaking these films into the simulated body fluid.

  7. Electronic coherence dynamics in trans-polyacetylene oligomers

    CERN Document Server

    Franco, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Electronic decoherence processes in trans-polyacetylene oligomers are considered by explicitly computing the time dependent molecular polarization from the coupled dynamics of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom in a mean-field mixed quantum-classical approximation. The oligomers are described by the SSH Hamiltonian and the effect of decoherence is incorporated by propagating an ensemble of quantum-classical trajectories with initial conditions obtained by sampling the Wigner distribution of the nuclear degrees of freedom. The decoherence for superpositions between the ground and excited and between pairs of excited states is considered for chains of different length, and the dynamics is discussed in terms of the nuclear overlap function that appears in the off-diagonal elements of the electronic reduced density matrix. For long oligomers the loss of coherence occurs in tens of femtoseconds. This timescale is determined by the initial decay of the nuclear overlap and by the decay of population into ...

  8. A Brief Review of Chelators for Radiolabeling Oligomers

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    Yuxia Liu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The chemical modification of oligomers such as DNA, PNA, MORF, LNA to attach radionuclides for nuclear imaging and radiotherapy applications has become a field rich in innovation as older methods are improved and new methods are introduced. This review intends to provide a brief overview of several chelators currently in use for the labeling of oligomers with metallic radionuclides such as 99mTc, 111In and 188Re. While DNA and its analogs have been radiolabeled with important radionuclides of nonmetals such as 32P, 35S, 14C, 18F and 125I, the labeling methods for these isotopes involve covalent chemistry that is quite distinct from the coordinate-covalent chelation chemistry described herein. In this review, we provide a summary of the several chelators that have been covalently conjugated to oligomers for the purpose of radiolabeling with metallic radionuclides by chelation and including details on the conjugation, the choice of radionuclides and labeling methods.

  9. Oligomer formation within secondary organic aerosol: equilibrium and dynamic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. Trump

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a model based on the volatility basis set to consider the potential influence of oligomer content on volatility-driven SOA yields. The implications for aerosol evaporation studies, including dilution, chamber thermo-equilibration, and thermodenuder studies are also considered. A simplified description of oligomer formation reproduces essentially all of the broad classes of equilibrium and dynamical observations related to SOA formation and evaporation: significant oligomer content may be consistent with mass yields that increase with organic aerosol mass concentration; reversible oligomerization can explain the hysteresis between the rate of SOA formation and its evaporation rate upon dilution; and the model is consistent with both chamber thermo-equilibration studies and thermodenuder studies of SOA evaporation.

  10. Resveratrol Oligomers for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancers

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    You-Qiu Xue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol (3,4′,5-trihydroxystilbene is a naturally derived phytoalexin stilbene isolated from grapes and other plants, playing an important role in human health and is well known for its extensive bioactivities, such as antioxidation, anti-inflammatory, anticancer. In addition to resveratrol, scientists also pay attention to resveratrol oligomers, derivatives of resveratrol, which are characterized by the polymerization of two to eight, or even more resveratrol units, and are the largest group of oligomeric stilbenes. Resveratrol oligomers have multiple beneficial properties, of which some are superior in activity, stability, and selectivity compared with resveratrol. The complicated structures and diverse biological activities are of significant interest for drug research and development and may provide promising prospects as cancer preventive and therapeutical agents. This review presents an overview on preventive or anticancer properties of resveratrol oligomers.

  11. Coffee components inhibit amyloid formation of human islet amyloid polypeptide in vitro: possible link between coffee consumption and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Biao; Liu, Xinran; Gong, Hao; Huang, Lianqi; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Xin; Li, Chuanzhou; Yang, Muyang; Ma, Bingjun; Jiao, Lihua; Zheng, Ling; Huang, Kun

    2011-12-28

    Global epidemic studies have suggested that coffee consumption is reversely correlated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), a metabolic disease. The misfolding of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is regarded as one of the causative factors of T2DM. Coffee extracts have three major active components: caffeine, caffeic acid (CA), and chlorogenic acid (CGA). In this study, the effects of these major coffee components, as well as dihydrocaffeic acid (DHCA) (a major metabolite of CGA and CA), on the amyloidogenicity of hIAPP were investigated by thioflavin-T based fluorescence emission, transmission electronic microscopy, circular dichroism, light-induced cross-linking, dynamic light scattering, and MTT-based cell viability assays. The results suggest that all components show varied inhibitory effects on the formation of toxic hIAPP amyloids, in which CA shows the highest potency in delaying the conformational transition of the hIAPP molecule with the most prolonged lag time, whereas caffeine shows the lowest potency. At a 5-fold excess molar ratio of compound to hIAPP, all coffee-derived compounds affect the secondary structures of incubated hIAPP as suggested by the circular dichroism spectra and CDPro deconvolution analysis. Further photoinduced cross-linking based oligomerization and dynamic light scattering studies suggested CA and CGA significantly suppressed the formation of hIAPP oligomers, whereas caffeine showed no significant effect on oligomerization. Cell protection effects were also observed for all three compounds, with the protection efficiency being greatest for CA and least for CGA. These findings suggest that the beneficial effects of coffee consumption on T2DM may be partly due to the ability of the major coffee components and metabolites to inhibit the toxic aggregation of hIAPP.

  12. Toxic β-Amyloid (Aβ) Alzheimer's Ion Channels: From Structure to Function and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth

    2012-02-01

    Full-length amyloid beta peptides (Aβ1-40/42) form neuritic amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and are implicated in AD pathology. Recent biophysical and cell biological studies suggest a direct mechanism of amyloid beta toxicity -- ion channel mediated loss of calcium homeostasis. Truncated amyloid beta fragments (Aβ11-42 and Aβ17-42), commonly termed as non-amyloidogenic are also found in amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in the preamyloid lesions of Down's syndrome (DS), a model system for early onset AD study. Very little is known about the structure and activity of these smaller peptides although they could be key AD and DS pathological agents. Using complementary techniques of explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, atomic force microscopy (AFM), channel conductance measurements, cell calcium uptake assays, neurite degeneration and cell death assays, we have shown that non-amyloidogenic Aβ9-42 and Aβ17-42 peptides form ion channels with loosely attached subunits and elicit single channel conductances. The subunits appear mobile suggesting insertion of small oligomers, followed by dynamic channel assembly and dissociation. These channels allow calcium uptake in APP-deficient cells and cause neurite degeneration in human cortical neurons. Channel conductance, calcium uptake and neurite degeneration are selectively inhibited by zinc, a blocker of amyloid ion channel activity. Thus truncated Aβ fragments could account for undefined roles played by full length Aβs and provide a novel mechanism of AD and DS pathology. The emerging picture from our large-scale simulations is that toxic ion channels formed by β-sheets are highly polymorphic, and spontaneously break into loosely interacting dynamic units (though still maintaining ion channel structures as imaged with AFM), that associate and dissociate leading to toxic ion flux. This sharply contrasts intact conventional gated ion channels that consist of tightly

  13. Gas chromatographic retention characteristics of different polysiloxane oligomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Lenten, F. J.; Conaway, J. E.; Rogers, L. B.

    1975-01-01

    The effects on the Kovats and McReynolds indices for a modified set of Rohrschneider solutes have been examined using two different batches of a commercial polysiloxane stationary phase, Dow-Corning DC-710, and five pure oligomers isolated from the mixture. The significant differences that were found between batches appear to be due primarily to changes in the percentage of one oligomer, the cyclic pentamer. This finding emphasizes the desirability of using a pure stationary phase as well as carefully specifying the column temperature in order to improve intra- and inter- laboratory comparisons of retention indices.

  14. Intracellular amyloid formation in muscle cells of Aβ-transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans: determinants and physiological role in copper detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bush Ashley I

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amyloid β-peptide is a ubiquitous peptide, which is prone to aggregate forming soluble toxic oligomers and insoluble less-toxic aggregates. The intrinsic and external/environmental factors that determine Aβ aggregation in vivo are poorly understood, as well as the cellular meaning of this process itself. Genetic data as well as cell biological and biochemical evidence strongly support the hypothesis that Aβ is a major player in the onset and development of Alzheimer's disease. In addition, it is also known that Aβ is involved in Inclusion Body Myositis, a common myopathy of the elderly in which the peptide accumulates intracellularly. Results In the present work, we found that intracellular Aβ aggregation in muscle cells of Caenorhabditis elegans overexpressing Aβ peptide is affected by two single amino acid substitutions, E22G (Arctic and V18A (NIC. Both variations show decrease intracellular amyloidogenesis compared to wild type Aβ. We show that intracellular amyloid aggregation of wild type Aβ is accelerated by Cu2+ and diminished by copper chelators. Moreover, we demonstrate through toxicity and behavioral assays that Aβ-transgenic worms display a higher tolerance to Cu2+ toxic effects and that this resistance may be linked to the formation of amyloid aggregates. Conclusion Our data show that intracellular Aβ amyloid aggregates may trap excess of free Cu2+ buffering its cytotoxic effects and that accelerated intracellular Aβ aggregation may be part of a cell protective mechanism.

  15. Stepwise organization of the β-structure identifies key regions essential for the propagation and cytotoxicity of insulin amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatani, Eri; Imamura, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Kato, Minoru

    2014-04-11

    Amyloid fibrils are supramolecular assemblies, the deposition of which is associated with many serious diseases including Alzheimer, prion, and Huntington diseases. Several smaller aggregates such as oligomers and protofibrils have been proposed to play a role in early stages of the fibrillation process; however, little is known about how these species contribute to the formation of mature amyloid fibrils with a rigid cross-β structure. Here, we identified a new pathway for the formation of insulin amyloid fibrils at a high concentration of salt in which mature fibrils were formed in a stepwise manner via a prefibrillar intermediate: minute prefibrillar species initially accumulated, followed by the subsequent formation of thicker amyloid fibrils. Fourier transform infrared spectra suggested the sequential formation of two types of β-sheets with different strength hydrogen bonds, one of which was developed concomitantly with the mutual assembly of the prefibrillar intermediate to form mature fibrils. Interestingly, fibril propagation and cellular toxicity appeared only after the later step of structural organization, and a comparison of β-sheet regions between the prefibrillar intermediate and mature fibrils using proteolysis led to the proposal of specific regions essential for manifestation of these properties.

  16. Islet amyloid polypeptide, islet amyloid, and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermark, Per; Andersson, Arne; Westermark, Gunilla T

    2011-07-01

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, or amylin) is one of the major secretory products of β-cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. It is a regulatory peptide with putative function both locally in the islets, where it inhibits insulin and glucagon secretion, and at distant targets. It has binding sites in the brain, possibly contributing also to satiety regulation and inhibits gastric emptying. Effects on several other organs have also been described. IAPP was discovered through its ability to aggregate into pancreatic islet amyloid deposits, which are seen particularly in association with type 2 diabetes in humans and with diabetes in a few other mammalian species, especially monkeys and cats. Aggregated IAPP has cytotoxic properties and is believed to be of critical importance for the loss of β-cells in type 2 diabetes and also in pancreatic islets transplanted into individuals with type 1 diabetes. This review deals both with physiological aspects of IAPP and with the pathophysiological role of aggregated forms of IAPP, including mechanisms whereby human IAPP forms toxic aggregates and amyloid fibrils.

  17. Preventive immunization of aged and juvenile non-human primates to beta-amyloid

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    Kofler Julia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunization against beta-amyloid (Aβ is a promising approach for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, but the optimal timing for the vaccination remains to be determined. Preventive immunization approaches may be more efficacious and associated with fewer side-effects; however, there is only limited information available from primate models about the effects of preclinical vaccination on brain amyloid composition and the neuroinflammatory milieu. Methods Ten non-human primates (NHP of advanced age (18–26 years and eight 2-year-old juvenile NHPs were immunized at 0, 2, 6, 10 and 14 weeks with aggregated Aβ42 admixed with monophosphoryl lipid A as adjuvant, and monitored for up to 6 months. Anti-Aβ antibody levels and immune activation markers were assessed in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid samples before and at several time-points after immunization. Microglial activity was determined by [11C]PK11195 PET scans acquired before and after immunization, and by post-mortem immunohistochemical and real-time PCR evaluation. Aβ oligomer composition was assessed by immunoblot analysis in the frontal cortex of aged immunized and non-immunized control animals. Results All juvenile animals developed a strong and sustained serum anti-Aβ IgG antibody response, whereas only 80 % of aged animals developed detectable antibodies. The immune response in aged monkeys was more delayed and significantly weaker, and was also more variable between animals. Pre- and post-immunization [11C]PK11195 PET scans showed no evidence of vaccine-related microglial activation. Post-mortem brain tissue analysis indicated a low overall amyloid burden, but revealed a significant shift in oligomer size with an increase in the dimer:pentamer ratio in aged immunized animals compared with non-immunized controls (P  Conclusions Our results indicate that preventive Aβ immunization is a safe therapeutic approach lacking adverse CNS immune system

  18. Oligomer Molecules for Efficient Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuze; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2016-02-16

    Solar cells, a renewable, clean energy technology that efficiently converts sunlight into electricity, are a promising long-term solution for energy and environmental problems caused by a mass of production and the use of fossil fuels. Solution-processed organic solar cells (OSCs) have attracted much attention in the past few years because of several advantages, including easy fabrication, low cost, lightweight, and flexibility. Now, OSCs exhibit power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of over 10%. In the early stage of OSCs, vapor-deposited organic dye materials were first used in bilayer heterojunction devices in the 1980s, and then, solution-processed polymers were introduced in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices. Relative to polymers, vapor-deposited small molecules offer potential advantages, such as a defined molecular structure, definite molecular weight, easy purification, mass-scale production, and good batch-to-batch reproducibility. However, the limited solubility and high crystallinity of vapor-deposited small molecules are unfavorable for use in solution-processed BHJ OSCs. Conversely, polymers have good solution-processing and film-forming properties and are easily processed into flexible devices, whereas their polydispersity of molecular weights and difficulty in purification results in batch to batch variation, which may hamper performance reproducibility and commercialization. Oligomer molecules (OMs) are monodisperse big molecules with intermediate molecular weights (generally in the thousands), and their sizes are between those of small molecules (generally with molecular weights 10000). OMs not only overcome shortcomings of both vapor-deposited small molecules and solution-processed polymers, but also combine their advantages, such as defined molecular structure, definite molecular weight, easy purification, mass-scale production, good batch-to-batch reproducibility, good solution processability, and film-forming properties. Therefore, OMs are a

  19. TANGO-Inspired Design of Anti-Amyloid Cyclic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaomeng; Brickson, Claire R; Murphy, Regina M

    2016-09-21

    β-Amyloid peptide (Aβ) self-associates into oligomers and fibrils, in a process that is believed to directly lead to neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease. Compounds that bind to Aβ, and inhibit fibrillogenesis and neurotoxicity, are of interest as an anti-Alzheimer therapeutic strategy. Peptides are particularly attractive for this purpose, because they have advantages over small molecules in their ability to disrupt protein-protein interactions, yet they are amenable to tuning of their properties through chemical means, unlike antibodies. Self-complementation and peptide library screening are two strategies that have been employed in the search for peptides that bind to Aβ. We have taken a different approach, by designing Aβ-binding peptides using transthyretin (TTR) as a template. Previously, we demonstrated that a cyclic peptide, with sequence derived from the known Aβ-binding site on TTR, suppressed Aβ aggregation into fibrils and protected neurons against Aβ toxicity. Here, we searched for cyclic peptides with improved efficacy, by employing the algorithm TANGO, designed originally to identify amyloidogenic sequences in proteins. By using TANGO as a guide to predict the effect of sequence modifications on conformation and aggregation, we synthesized a significantly improved cyclic peptide. We demonstrate that the peptide, in binding to Aβ, redirects Aβ toward protease-sensitive, nonfibrillar aggregates. Cyclic peptides designed using this strategy have attractive solubility, specificity, and stability characteristics.

  20. Amyloid deposition in 2 feline thymomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrough, E R; Myers, R K; Hostetter, S J; Fox, L E; Bayer, B J; Felz, C L; Waller, K R; Whitley, E M

    2012-07-01

    Two cases of feline thymoma with amyloid deposition were encountered between 1982 and 2010. Neoplastic cells were separated by abundant, pale eosinophilic, homogeneous material that was congophilic and birefringent. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells were connected by desmosomes, and the extracellular deposits were composed of nonbranching, hollow-cored fibrils, 8-10 nm in diameter. In the case with sufficient archived tissue for additional sections, the amyloid remained congophilic following potassium permanganate incubation, and the neoplastic cells were immunoreactive for pancytokeratin. The histologic, histochemical, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical features of both neoplasms are consistent with epithelial-predominant thymoma with the unusual feature of intratumoral amyloid deposition. The affinity of the amyloid for Congo red following potassium permanganate incubation is consistent with non-AA amyloid. The ultrastructural findings were consistent with amyloid production by the neoplastic epithelial cells.

  1. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunyamin Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn’s disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis.

  2. Surgical considerations about amyloid goiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Villanueva, Augusto; García Villanueva, María Jesús; García Villanueva, Mercedes; Rojo Blanco, Roberto; Collado Guirao, María Vicenta; Cabañas Montero, Jacobo; Beni Pérez, Rafael; Moreno Montes, Irene

    2013-05-01

    Amyloidosis is an uncommon syndrome consisting of a number of disorders having in common an extracellular deposit of fibrillary proteins. This results in functional and structural changes in the affected organs, depending on deposit location and severity. Amyloid infiltration of the thyroid gland may occur in 50% and up to 80% of patients with primary and secondary amyloidosis respectively. Amyloid goiter (AG) is a true rarity, usually found associated to secondary amyloidosis. AG may require surgical excision, usually because of compressive symptoms. We report the case of a patient with a big AG occurring in the course of a secondary amyloidosis associated to polyarticular onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis who underwent total thyroidectomy. Current literature is reviewed, an attempt is made to provide action guidelines, and some surgical considerations on this rare condition are given.

  3. Amyloid myopathy: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Tuomaala

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid myopathy (AM is a rare manifestation of primary systemic amyloidosis (AL. Like inflammatory myopathies, it presents with proximal muscle weakness and an increased creatine kinase level. We describe a case of AL with severe, rapidly progressive myopathy as the initial symptom. The clinical manifestation and muscle biopsy were suggestive of inclusion body myositis. AM was not suspected until amyloidosis was seen in the gastric mucosal biopsy. The muscle biopsy was then re-examined more specifically, and Congo red staining eventually showed vascular and interstitial amyloid accumulation, which led to a diagnosis of AM. The present case illustrates the fact that the clinical picture of AM can mimic that of inclusion body myositis.

  4. Atypical presentation of atypical amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, Danniele G; Acharya, Veena K; Dogan, Ahmet; Racusen, Lorraine C; Atta, Mohamed G

    2011-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a group of diseases categorized by precipitation of a group of protein aggregates (amyloid) in tissues, including the kidney, and proteinuria is usually the commonest, though not exclusive, hallmark of clinical presentation. AL and AA are the most commonly recognized forms of amyloidosis involving the kidney, but other forms have been described. We present a case of renal amyloidosis due to a novel amyloidogenic protein, leucocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2, without proteinuria at presentation or on subsequent follow-up.

  5. Protein-induced photophysical changes to the amyloid indicator dye thioflavin T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Leslie S.; Calabrese, Matthew F.; Nath, Abhinav; Blaho, Dorottya V.; Miranker, Andrew D.; Xiong, Yong (Yale)

    2010-10-04

    The small molecule thioflavin T (ThT) is a defining probe for the identification and mechanistic study of amyloid fiber formation. As such, ThT is fundamental to investigations of serious diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease, and type II diabetes. For each disease, a different protein undergoes conformational conversion to a {beta}-sheet rich fiber. The fluorescence of ThT exhibits an increase in quantum yield upon binding these fibers. Despite its widespread use, the structural basis for binding specificity and for the changes to the photophysical properties of ThT remain poorly understood. Here, we report the co-crystal structures of ThT with two alternative states of {beta}-2 microglobulin ({beta}2m); one monomeric, the other an amyloid-like oligomer. In the latter, the dye intercalates between {beta}-sheets orthogonal to the {beta}-strands. Importantly, the fluorophore is bound in such a manner that a photophysically relevant torsion is limited to a range of angles generally associated with low, not high, quantum yield. Quantum mechanical assessment of the fluorophore shows the electronic distribution to be strongly stabilized by aromatic interactions with the protein. Monomeric {beta}2m gives little increase in ThT fluorescence despite showing three fluorophores, at two binding sites, in configurations generally associated with high quantum yield. Our efforts fundamentally extend existing understanding about the origins of amyloid-induced photophysical changes. Specifically, the {beta}-sheet interface that characterizes amyloid acts both sterically and electronically to stabilize the fluorophore's ground state electronic distribution. By preventing the fluorophore from adopting its preferred excited state configuration, nonradiative relaxation pathways are minimized and quantum yield is increased.

  6. Protein-induced Photophysical Changes to the Amyloid Indicator Dye Thioflavin T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Wolfe; M Calabrese; A Nath; D Blaho; A Miranker; Y Xiong

    2011-12-31

    The small molecule thioflavin T (ThT) is a defining probe for the identification and mechanistic study of amyloid fiber formation. As such, ThT is fundamental to investigations of serious diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease, and type II diabetes. For each disease, a different protein undergoes conformational conversion to a {beta}-sheet rich fiber. The fluorescence of ThT exhibits an increase in quantum yield upon binding these fibers. Despite its widespread use, the structural basis for binding specificity and for the changes to the photophysical properties of ThT remain poorly understood. Here, we report the co-crystal structures of ThT with two alternative states of {beta}-2 microglobulin ({beta}2m); one monomeric, the other an amyloid-like oligomer. In the latter, the dye intercalates between {beta}-sheets orthogonal to the {beta}-strands. Importantly, the fluorophore is bound in such a manner that a photophysically relevant torsion is limited to a range of angles generally associated with low, not high, quantum yield. Quantum mechanical assessment of the fluorophore shows the electronic distribution to be strongly stabilized by aromatic interactions with the protein. Monomeric {beta}2m gives little increase in ThT fluorescence despite showing three fluorophores, at two binding sites, in configurations generally associated with high quantum yield. Our efforts fundamentally extend existing understanding about the origins of amyloid-induced photophysical changes. Specifically, the {beta}-sheet interface that characterizes amyloid acts both sterically and electronically to stabilize the fluorophore's ground state electronic distribution. By preventing the fluorophore from adopting its preferred excited state configuration, nonradiative relaxation pathways are minimized and quantum yield is increased.

  7. Janus faces of amyloid proteins in neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B; Kurnellas, Michael P

    2014-07-01

    Amyloid forming molecules are generally considered harmful. In Alzheimer's Disease two amyloid molecules Aβ A4 and tau vie for consideration as the main pathogenic culprit. But molecules obey the laws of chemistry and defy the way we categorize them as humans with our well-known proclivities to bias in our reasoning. We have been exploring the brains of multiple sclerosis patients to identify molecules that are associated with protection from inflammation and degeneration. In 2001 we noted that aB crystallin (cryab) was the most abundant transcript found in MS lesions, but not in healthy brains. Cryab can reverse paralysis and attenuate inflammation in several models of inflammation including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and various models of ischemia. Cryab is an amyloid forming molecule. We have identified a core structure common to many amyloids including amyloid protein Aβ A4, tau, amylin, prion protein, serum amyloid protein P, and cryab. The core hexapeptide structure is highly immune suppressive and can reverse paralysis in EAE when administered systemically. Administration of this amyloid forming hexapeptide quickly lowers inflammatory cytokines in plasma like IL-6 and IL-2. The hexapeptide bind a set of proinflammatory mediators in plasma, including acute phase reactants and complement components. The beneficial properties of amyloid forming hexapeptides provide a potential new therapeutic direction. These experiments indicate that amyloid forming molecules have Janus faces, providing unexpected benefit for neuroinflammatory conditions.

  8. Curcumin Dictates Divergent Fates for the Central Salt Bridges in Amyloid-β40 and Amyloid-β42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Bappaditya; Mithu, Venus Singh; Bhowmik, Debanjan; Das, Anand Kant; Sahoo, Bankanidhi; Maiti, Sudipta; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K

    2017-04-25

    There are three specific regions in the Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide sequence where variations cause enhanced toxicity in Alzheimer's disease: the N-terminus, the central salt bridge, and the C-terminus. Here, we investigate if there is a close conformational connection between these three regions, which may suggest a concerted mechanism of toxicity. We measure the effects of Zn(2+) and curcumin on Aβ40, and compare these with their previously reported effects on Aβ42. Aβ42 and Aβ40 differ only near the C-terminus, where curcumin interacts, while Zn(2+) interacts near the N-terminus. Therefore, this comparison should help us differentiate the effect of modulating the C- and the N-termini. We find that curcumin allows fibril-like structures containing the salt bridge to emerge in the mature Aβ40 aggregates, but not in Aβ42. In contrast, we find no difference in the effects of Zn(+2) on Aβ40 and Aβ42. In the presence of Zn(+2), both of these fail to form proper fibrils, and the salt bridge remains disrupted. These results indicate that modulations of the Aβ termini can determine the fate of a salt bridge far away in the sequence, and this has significant consequences for Aβ toxicity. We also infer that small molecules can alter oligomer-induced toxicity by modulating the aggregation pathway, without substantially changing the final product of aggregation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. The butter flavorant, diacetyl, exacerbates β-amyloid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Swati S; Vartak, Ashish P; Vince, Robert

    2012-10-15

    Diacetyl (DA), an ubiquitous butter-flavoring agent, was found to influence several aspects of amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation--one of the two primary pathologies associated with Alzheimer's disease. Thioflavin T fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic measurements revealed that DA accelerates Aβ¹⁻⁴² aggregation into soluble and ultimately insoluble β-pleated sheet structures. DA was found to covalently bind to Arg⁵ of Aβ¹⁻⁴² through proteolytic digestion-mass spectrometric experiments. These biophysical and chemical effects translated into the potentiation of Aβ¹⁻⁴² cytotoxicity by DA toward SH-SY5Y cells in culture. DA easily traversed through a MDR1-MDCK cell monolayer, an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier. Additionally, DA was found not only to be resistant to but also inhibitory toward glyoxalase I, the primary initiator of detoxification of amyloid-promoting reactive dicarbonyl species that are generated naturally in large amounts by neuronal tissue. In light of the chronic exposure of industry workers to DA, this study raises the troubling possibility of long-term neurological toxicity mediated by DA.

  10. Proteolytically inactive insulin-degrading enzyme inhibits amyloid formation yielding non-neurotoxic aβ peptide aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias B de Tullio

    Full Text Available Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE is a neutral Zn(2+ peptidase that degrades short peptides based on substrate conformation, size and charge. Some of these substrates, including amyloid β (Aβ are capable of self-assembling into cytotoxic oligomers. Based on IDE recognition mechanism and our previous report of the formation of a stable complex between IDE and intact Aβ in vitro and in vivo, we analyzed the possibility of a chaperone-like function of IDE. A proteolytically inactive recombinant IDE with Glu111 replaced by Gln (IDEQ was used. IDEQ blocked the amyloidogenic pathway of Aβ yielding non-fibrillar structures as assessed by electron microscopy. Measurements of the kinetics of Aβ aggregation by light scattering showed that 1 IDEQ effect was promoted by ATP independent of its hydrolysis, 2 end products of Aβ-IDEQ co-incubation were incapable of "seeding" the assembly of monomeric Aβ and 3 IDEQ was ineffective in reversing Aβ aggregation. Moreover, Aβ aggregates formed in the presence of IDEQ were non-neurotoxic. IDEQ had no conformational effects upon insulin (a non-amyloidogenic protein under physiological conditions and did not disturb insulin receptor activation in cultured cells. Our results suggest that IDE has a chaperone-like activity upon amyloid-forming peptides. It remains to be explored whether other highly conserved metallopeptidases have a dual protease-chaperone function to prevent the formation of toxic peptide oligomers from bacteria to mammals.

  11. The chaperonin CCT inhibits assembly of α-synuclein amyloid fibrils by a specific, conformation-dependent interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sot, Begoña; Rubio-Muñoz, Alejandra; Leal-Quintero, Ahudrey; Martínez-Sabando, Javier; Marcilla, Miguel; Roodveldt, Cintia; Valpuesta, José M.

    2017-01-01

    The eukaryotic chaperonin CCT (chaperonin containing TCP-1) uses cavities built into its double-ring structure to encapsulate and to assist folding of a large subset of proteins. CCT can inhibit amyloid fibre assembly and toxicity of the polyQ extended mutant of huntingtin, the protein responsible for Huntington’s disease. This raises the possibility that CCT modulates other amyloidopathies, a still-unaddressed question. We show here that CCT inhibits amyloid fibre assembly of α-synuclein A53T, one of the mutants responsible for Parkinson’s disease. We evaluated fibrillation blockade in α-synuclein A53T deletion mutants and CCT interactions of full-length A53T in distinct oligomeric states to define an inhibition mechanism specific for α-synuclein. CCT interferes with fibre assembly by interaction of its CCTζ and CCTγ subunits with the A53T central hydrophobic region (NAC). This interaction is specific to NAC conformation, as it is produced once soluble α-synuclein A53T oligomers form and blocks the reaction before fibres begin to grow. Finally, we show that this association inhibits α-synuclein A53T oligomer toxicity in neuroblastoma cells. In summary, our results and those for huntingtin suggest that CCT is a general modulator of amyloidogenesis via a specific mechanism. PMID:28102321

  12. Heterologous amyloid seeding: revisiting the role of acetylcholinesterase in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Létitia Jean

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases associated with abnormal protein folding and ordered aggregation require an initial trigger which may be infectious, inherited, post-inflammatory or idiopathic. Proteolytic cleavage to generate vulnerable precursors, such as amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta production via beta and gamma secretases in Alzheimer's Disease (AD, is one such trigger, but the proteolytic removal of these fragments is also aetiologically important. The levels of Abeta in the central nervous system are regulated by several catabolic proteases, including insulysin (IDE and neprilysin (NEP. The known association of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE with pathological aggregates in AD together with its ability to increase Abeta fibrilization prompted us to search for proteolytic triggers that could enhance this process. The hAChE C-terminal domain (T40, AChE(575-614 is an exposed amphiphilic alpha-helix involved in enzyme oligomerisation, but it also contains a conformational switch region (CSR with high propensity for conversion to non-native (hidden beta-strand, a property associated with amyloidogenicity. A synthetic peptide (AChE(586-599 encompassing the CSR region shares homology with Abeta and forms beta-sheet amyloid fibrils. We investigated the influence of IDE and NEP proteolysis on the formation and degradation of relevant hAChE beta-sheet species. By combining reverse-phase HPLC and mass spectrometry, we established that the enzyme digestion profiles on T40 versus AChE(586-599, or versus Abeta, differed. Moreover, IDE digestion of T40 triggered the conformational switch from alpha- to beta-structures, resulting in surfactant CSR species that self-assembled into amyloid fibril precursors (oligomers. Crucially, these CSR species significantly increased Abeta fibril formation both by seeding the energetically unfavorable formation of amyloid nuclei and by enhancing the rate of amyloid elongation. Hence, these results may offer an explanation

  13. Induction of volatile organic compound in the leaves of Lycopersicon esculentum by chitosan oligomer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Peiqing; Lin Xuezheng; Shen Jihong; Huang Xiaohang; Chen Kaoshan; Li Guangyou

    2005-01-01

    Induction of VOCs (volatile organic compounds) in the leaves of Lycopersicon esculentum by chitosan oligomer elictor was studied. The results demonstrated that VOCs in chitosan oligomer-treated leaves showed stronger inhibitory activity against Botrytis cinerea than that in water-treated leaves, and the spore germination was reduced by 22.1% in 144h after elicitor treatment at a concentration of 1.0%. A total of 16 constituents were detected in water-treated leaves, and chitosan oligomer treatment increased the amount of VOCs production. Chitosan oligomer at different concentration and different time courses of induction treatment could induce different amount of VOCs. Chitosan oligomer resulted in an optimal production of VOCs in 144h after elicitation at concentration of 0.6%. Chitosan oligomer also enhanced activtity of PAL and LOX. The results showed that the enhancement of VOCs production after chitosan oligomer treatment might be an important agent for L.esculentum acquiring resistance against pathogen.

  14. Molecular modeling of the ion channel-like nanotube structure of amyloid β-peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Yong; YANG Pin

    2007-01-01

    The ion channel-like nanotube structure of the oligomers of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) was first investigated by molecular modeling. The results reveal that the hydrogen bond net is one of the key factors to stabilize the structure. The hydrophobicity distribution mode of the side chains is in favor of the structure inserting into the bilayers and forming a hydrophilic pore. The lumen space is under the control of the negative potential, weaker but spreading continuously, to which the cation selectivity attributes; meanwhile, the alternate distribution of the stronger positive and negative potentials makes the electrostatic distribution of the structure framework balance, which is also one of the key factors stabilizing the structure. The results lay the theoretical foundation for illuminating the structure stability and the ion permeability, and give a clue to elucidating the molecular mechanism of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and designing novel drugs to prevent or reverse AD at the root.

  15. Monoacylated Cellular Prion Proteins Reduce Amyloid-β-Induced Activation of Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 and Synapse Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan West

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ and the loss of synapses. Aggregation of the cellular prion protein (PrPC by Aβ oligomers induced synapse damage in cultured neurons. PrPC is attached to membranes via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor, the composition of which affects protein targeting and cell signaling. Monoacylated PrPC incorporated into neurons bound “natural Aβ”, sequestering Aβ outside lipid rafts and preventing its accumulation at synapses. The presence of monoacylated PrPC reduced the Aβ-induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2 and Aβ-induced synapse damage. This protective effect was stimulus specific, as treated neurons remained sensitive to α-synuclein, a protein associated with synapse damage in Parkinson’s disease. In synaptosomes, the aggregation of PrPC by Aβ oligomers triggered the formation of a signaling complex containing the cPLA2.a process, disrupted by monoacylated PrPC. We propose that monoacylated PrPC acts as a molecular sponge, binding Aβ oligomers at the neuronal perikarya without activating cPLA2 or triggering synapse damage.

  16. Influence of Aluminium and EGCG on Fibrillation and Aggregation of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhi-Xue; Zhang, Qiang; Ma, Gong-Li; Chen, Cong-Heng; He, Yan-Ming; Xu, Li-Hui; Zhang, Yuan; Zhou, Guang-Rong; Li, Zhen-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The abnormal fibrillation of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) has been implicated in the development of type II diabetes. Aluminum is known to trigger the structural transformation of many amyloid proteins and induce the formation of toxic aggregate species. The (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is considered capable of binding both metal ions and amyloid proteins with inhibitory effect on the fibrillation of amyloid proteins. However, the effect of Al(III)/EGCG complex on hIAPP fibrillation is unclear. In the present work, we sought to view insight into the structures and properties of Al(III) and EGCG complex by using spectroscopic experiments and quantum chemical calculations and also investigated the influence of Al(III) and EGCG on hIAPP fibrillation and aggregation as well as their combined interference on this process. Our studies demonstrated that Al(III) could promote fibrillation and aggregation of hIAPP, while EGCG could inhibit the fibrillation of hIAPP and lead to the formation of hIAPP amorphous aggregates instead of the ordered fibrils. Furthermore, we proved that the Al(III)/EGCG complex in molar ratio of 1 : 1 as Al(EGCG)(H2O)2 could inhibit the hIAPP fibrillation more effectively than EGCG alone. The results provide the invaluable reference for the new drug development to treat type II diabetes. PMID:28074190

  17. Influence of Aluminium and EGCG on Fibrillation and Aggregation of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Xue Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The abnormal fibrillation of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP has been implicated in the development of type II diabetes. Aluminum is known to trigger the structural transformation of many amyloid proteins and induce the formation of toxic aggregate species. The (−-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG is considered capable of binding both metal ions and amyloid proteins with inhibitory effect on the fibrillation of amyloid proteins. However, the effect of Al(III/EGCG complex on hIAPP fibrillation is unclear. In the present work, we sought to view insight into the structures and properties of Al(III and EGCG complex by using spectroscopic experiments and quantum chemical calculations and also investigated the influence of Al(III and EGCG on hIAPP fibrillation and aggregation as well as their combined interference on this process. Our studies demonstrated that Al(III could promote fibrillation and aggregation of hIAPP, while EGCG could inhibit the fibrillation of hIAPP and lead to the formation of hIAPP amorphous aggregates instead of the ordered fibrils. Furthermore, we proved that the Al(III/EGCG complex in molar ratio of 1 : 1 as Al(EGCG(H2O2 could inhibit the hIAPP fibrillation more effectively than EGCG alone. The results provide the invaluable reference for the new drug development to treat type II diabetes.

  18. Nanoscale Synaptic Membrane Mimetic Allows Unbiased High Throughput Screen That Targets Binding Sites for Alzheimer's-Associated Aβ Oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle C Wilcox

    Full Text Available Despite their value as sources of therapeutic drug targets, membrane proteomes are largely inaccessible to high-throughput screening (HTS tools designed for soluble proteins. An important example comprises the membrane proteins that bind amyloid β oligomers (AβOs. AβOs are neurotoxic ligands thought to instigate the synapse damage that leads to Alzheimer's dementia. At present, the identities of initial AβO binding sites are highly uncertain, largely because of extensive protein-protein interactions that occur following attachment of AβOs to surface membranes. Here, we show that AβO binding sites can be obtained in a state suitable for unbiased HTS by encapsulating the solubilized synaptic membrane proteome into nanoscale lipid bilayers (Nanodiscs. This method gives a soluble membrane protein library (SMPL--a collection of individualized synaptic proteins in a soluble state. Proteins within SMPL Nanodiscs showed enzymatic and ligand binding activity consistent with conformational integrity. AβOs were found to bind SMPL Nanodiscs with high affinity and specificity, with binding dependent on intact synaptic membrane proteins, and selective for the higher molecular weight oligomers known to accumulate at synapses. Combining SMPL Nanodiscs with a mix-incubate-read chemiluminescence assay provided a solution-based HTS platform to discover antagonists of AβO binding. Screening a library of 2700 drug-like compounds and natural products yielded one compound that potently reduced AβO binding to SMPL Nanodiscs, synaptosomes, and synapses in nerve cell cultures. Although not a therapeutic candidate, this small molecule inhibitor of synaptic AβO binding will provide a useful experimental antagonist for future mechanistic studies of AβOs in Alzheimer's model systems. Overall, results provide proof of concept for using SMPLs in high throughput screening for AβO binding antagonists, and illustrate in general how a SMPL Nanodisc system can

  19. Characterization of Amyloid Cores in Prion Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant’Anna, Ricardo; Fernández, Maria Rosario; Batlle, Cristina; Navarro, Susanna; de Groot, Natalia S.; Serpell, Louise; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids consist of repetitions of a specific polypeptide chain in a regular cross-β-sheet conformation. Amyloid propensity is largely determined by the protein sequence, the aggregation process being nucleated by specific and short segments. Prions are special amyloids that become self-perpetuating after aggregation. Prions are responsible for neuropathology in mammals, but they can also be functional, as in yeast prions. The conversion of these last proteins to the prion state is driven by prion forming domains (PFDs), which are generally large, intrinsically disordered, enriched in glutamines/asparagines and depleted in hydrophobic residues. The self-assembly of PFDs has been thought to rely mostly on their particular amino acid composition, rather than on their sequence. Instead, we have recently proposed that specific amyloid-prone sequences within PFDs might be key to their prion behaviour. Here, we demonstrate experimentally the existence of these amyloid stretches inside the PFDs of the canonical Sup35, Swi1, Mot3 and Ure2 prions. These sequences self-assemble efficiently into highly ordered amyloid fibrils, that are functionally competent, being able to promote the PFD amyloid conversion in vitro and in vivo. Computational analyses indicate that these kind of amyloid stretches may act as typical nucleating signals in a number of different prion domains. PMID:27686217

  20. Hydrodynamic effects on β-amyloid (16-22) peptide aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiricotto, Mara; Melchionna, Simone; Derreumaux, Philippe; Sterpone, Fabio

    2016-07-01

    Computer simulations based on simplified representations are routinely used to explore the early steps of amyloid aggregation. However, when protein models with implicit solvent are employed, these simulations miss the effect of solvent induced correlations on the aggregation kinetics and lifetimes of metastable states. In this work, we apply the multi-scale Lattice Boltzmann Molecular Dynamics technique (LBMD) to investigate the initial aggregation phases of the amyloid Aβ16-22 peptide. LBMD includes naturally hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) via a kinetic on-lattice representation of the fluid kinetics. The peptides are represented by the flexible OPEP coarse-grained force field. First, we have tuned the essential parameters that control the coupling between the molecular and fluid evolutions in order to reproduce the experimental diffusivity of elementary species. The method is then deployed to investigate the effect of HIs on the aggregation of 100 and 1000 Aβ16-22 peptides. We show that HIs clearly impact the aggregation process and the fluctuations of the oligomer sizes by favouring the fusion and exchange dynamics of oligomers between aggregates. HIs also guide the growth of the leading largest cluster. For the 100 Aβ16-22 peptide system, the simulation of ˜300 ns allowed us to observe the transition from ellipsoidal assemblies to an elongated and slightly twisted aggregate involving almost the totality of the peptides. For the 1000 Aβ16-22 peptides, a system of unprecedented size at quasi-atomistic resolution, we were able to explore a branched disordered fibril-like structure that has never been described by other computer simulations, but has been observed experimentally.

  1. Amyloid-β peptides act as allosteric modulators of cholinergic signalling through formation of soluble BAβACs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajnish; Nordberg, Agneta; Darreh-Shori, Taher

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β peptides, through highly sophisticated enzymatic machinery, are universally produced and released in an action potential synchronized manner into the interstitial fluids in the brain. Yet no native functions are attributed to amyloid-β. The amyloid-β hypothesis ascribes just neurotoxicity properties through build-up of soluble homomeric amyloidoligomers or fibrillar deposits. Apolipoprotein-ε4 (APOE4) allele is the only confirmed genetic risk factor of sporadic Alzheimer's disease; once more it is unclear how it increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Similarly, central cholinergic signalling is affected selectively and early in the Alzheimer's disease brain, again why cholinergic neurons show this sensitivity is still unclear. However, the three main known Alzheimer's disease risk factors, advancing age, female gender and APOE4, have been linked to a high apolipoprotein-E and accumulation of the acetylcholine degrading enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase in cerebrospinal fluids of patients. Furthermore, numerous reports indicate that amyloid-β interacts with butyrylcholinesterase and apolipoprotein-E. We have proposed that this interaction leads to formation of soluble ultrareactive acetylcholine-hydrolyzing complexes termed BAβACs, to adjust at demand both synaptic and extracellular acetylcholine signalling. This hypothesis predicted presence of acetylcholine-synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase in extracellular fluids to allow maintenance of equilibrium between breakdown and synthesis of acetylcholine through continuous in situ syntheses. A recent proof-of-concept study led to the discovery of this enzyme in the human extracellular fluids. We report here that apolipoprotein-E, in particular ε4 isoprotein acts as one of the strongest endogenous anti-amyloid-β fibrillization agents reported in the literature. At biological concentrations, apolipoprotein-E prevented amyloid-β fibrillization for at least 65 h. We show that amyloid

  2. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural reorganisation and potential toxicity of oligomeric species formed during the assembly of amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mookyung Cheon

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that oligomeric protein assemblies may represent the molecular species responsible for cytotoxicity in a range of neurological disorders including Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. We use all-atom computer simulations to reveal that the process of oligomerization can be divided into two steps. The first is characterised by a hydrophobic coalescence resulting in the formation of molten oligomers in which hydrophobic residues are sequestered away from the solvent. In the second step, the oligomers undergo a process of reorganisation driven by interchain hydrogen bonding interactions that induce the formation of beta sheet rich assemblies in which hydrophobic groups can become exposed. Our results show that the process of aggregation into either ordered or amorphous species is largely determined by a competition between the hydrophobicity of the amino acid sequence and the tendency of polypeptide chains to form arrays of hydrogen bonds. We discuss how the increase in solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface resulting from such a competition offers an explanation for recent observations concerning the cytotoxicity of oligomeric species formed prior to mature amyloid fibrils.

  4. Morphology and structural dynamics of amyloid beta 42 assembly in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhang; Jinsheng He; Shuhan Guo; Jingdong Song; Jianguo Gu; Tao Hong

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid β42 (Aβ42) aggregation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.However, the morphology and structural dynamics in different stages of Aβ42 assembly are not well known.To investigate the dynamic properties of morphological and structural changes in the aggregation process of A(3 in vitro, transmission electron microscopy, western blot analysis and circular dichroism were used to observe the changes in morphology, immunoreactivity and secondary structure during Ap aggregation, respectively.Results demonstrated that at 24 hours following Ap42 aggregation in vitro, the structures of spherical granules from 5 to 10 nm and coils from 20 to 30 nm were visualized by transmission electron microscopy.Different immunoreactivities of the oligomers and fibers were detected by western blot analysis.The dynamic changes of the a-helix to β-sheet were confirmed by circular dichroism spectra.The dynamic properties of the morphological and structural changes in the aggregation process of Aβ42 in vitro were analyzed,which contributed to the identification of stable conditions of Aβ42 oligomer formation.

  5. Design of β-amyloid aggregation inhibitors from a predicted structural motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Paul A.; Lopes, Dahabada H.; Branson, Kim M.; Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra; Graef, Isabella A.; Bitan, Gal; Pande, Vijay S.

    2012-01-01

    Drug design studies targeting one of the primary toxic agents in Alzheimer’s Disease, soluble oligomers of amyloid β-protein (Aβi), have been complicated by the rapid, heterogeneous aggregation of Aβ and the resulting difficulty to structurally characterize the peptide. To address this, we have developed [Nle35, D-Pro37]Aβ42, a substituted peptide inspired from molecular dynamics simulations which forms structures stable enough to be analyzed by NMR. We report herein that [Nle35, D-Pro37]Aβ42 stabilizes the trimer, and prevents mature fibril and β-sheet formation. Further, [Nle35, D-Pro37]Aβ42 interacts with WT Aβ42 and reduces aggregation levels and fibril formation in mixtures. Using ligand-based drug design based on [Nle35, D-Pro37]Aβ42, a lead compound was identified with effects on inhibition similar to the peptide. The ability of [Nle35, D-Pro37]Aβ42 and the compound to inhibit the aggregation of Aβ42 provides a novel tool to study the structure of Aβ oligomers. More broadly, our data demonstrate how molecular dynamics simulation can guide experiment for further research into AD. PMID:22420626

  6. Charge transfer in conjugated oligomers encapsulated into carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almadori, Y.; Alvarez, L.; Michel, T.; Le Parc, R.; Bantignies, J.L.; Hermet, P.; Sauvajol, J.L. [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR 5521, Universite Montpellier 2, 34095 Montpellier (France); Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR 5521, CNRS, 34095 Montpellier (France); Arenal, R. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures, CNRS-ONERA, 92322 Chatillon (France); Laboratorio de Microscopias Avanzadas, Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, U. Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Babaa, R. [Laboratoire de Chimie des Surfaces et Interfaces, CEA, IRAMIS, SPCSI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Chemical Engineering Department, University of Technology PETRONAS, UTP, Ipoh-Perak (Malaysia); Jouselme, B.; Palacin, S. [Laboratoire de Chimie des Surfaces et Interfaces, CEA, IRAMIS, SPCSI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-11-15

    This study deals with a hybrid system consisting in quaterthiophene derivative encapsulated inside single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Investigations of the encapsulation step are performed by transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy data point out different behaviors depending on the laser excitation energy with respect to the optical absorption of quaterthiophene. At low excitation energy (far from the oligomer resonance window) there is no significant modification of the Raman spectra before and after encapsulation. By contrast, at high excitation energy (close to the oligomer resonance window), Raman spectra exhibit a G-band shift together with an important RBM intensity loss, suggesting a significant charge transfer between the inserted molecule and the host nanotubes. Those results suggest a photo induced process leading to a significant charge transfer. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Acidic pH retards the fibrillization of human islet amyloid polypeptide due to electrostatic repulsion of histidines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Xu, Weixin; Mu, Yuguang; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2013-08-01

    The human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP) is the major constituent of amyloid deposits in pancreatic islets of type-II diabetes. IAPP is secreted together with insulin from the acidic secretory granules at a low pH of approximately 5.5 to the extracellular environment at a neutral pH. The increased accumulation of extracellular hIAPP in diabetes indicates that changes in pH may promote amyloid formation. To gain insights and underlying mechanisms of the pH effect on hIAPP fibrillogenesis, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent model were performed to study the structural properties of five hIAPP protofibrillar oligomers, under acidic and neutral pH, respectively. In consistent with experimental findings, simulation results show that acidic pH is not conducive to the structural stability of these oligomers. This provides a direct evidence for a recent experiment [L. Khemtemourian, E. Domenech, J. P. F. Doux, M. C. Koorengevel, and J. A. Killian, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 15598 (2011)], 10.1021/ja205007j, which suggests that acidic pH inhibits the fibril formation of hIAPP. In addition, a complementary coarse-grained simulation shows the repulsive electrostatic interactions among charged His18 residues slow down the dimerization process of hIAPP by twofold. Besides, our all-atom simulations reveal acidic pH mainly affects the local structure around residue His18 by destroying the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, due to the repulsive interactions between protonated interchain His18 residues at acidic pH. It is also disclosed that the local interactions nearby His18 operating between adjacent β-strands trigger the structural transition, which gives hints to the experimental findings that the rate of hIAPP fibril formation and the morphologies of the fibrillar structures are strongly pH-dependent.

  8. Ethynyl-terminated ester oligomers and polymers therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Havens, Stephen J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A class of ethynyl terminated oligomers and the process for preparing the same are disclosed. Upon the application of heat, with or without a catalyst, the ethynyl groups react to provide crosslinking and chain extension to increase the polymer use temperature and improve the polymer solvent resistance. These polyesters are potentially useful in packaging, magnetic tapes, capacitors, industrial belting, protective coatings, structural adhesives and composite matrices.

  9. Electroactive Reactive Oligomers and Polymers as Device Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-03

    development of conjugated. conducting and electroactive oligomers, polymers and multi-component materials is proposed for application to photovoltaic...characteristics. Intense research has focused on oligo- and polythiophenes , as such materials early showed high hole mobilities. While vapor deposited a...to atmospheric oxygen, air stability now becomes an issue. The research conducted in this project focuses on the study of a soluble polymer consisting

  10. Changes of adiponectin oligomer composition by moderate weight reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Thomas; Rochlitz, Helmut; Wegewitz, Uta; Akpulat, Suzan; Mai, Knut; Weickert, Martin O; Möhlig, Matthias; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Spranger, Joachim

    2005-09-01

    Adiponectin affects lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity. However, adiponectin circulates in three different oligomers that may also have distinct biological functions. We aimed to analyze the role of these oligomers in obesity and lipid metabolism after weight reduction. A total of 17 obese volunteers (15 women and 2 men) participated in a weight reduction program. Individuals were characterized before and after 6 months of a balanced diet. Adiponectin was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and oligomers were detected by nondenaturating Western blot. BMI decreased (35.1 +/- 1.2 to 32.8 +/- 1.1 kg/m(2), P < 0.001), which was associated with an improved metabolite profile. Total adiponectin increased from 5.3 +/- 0.5 to 6.1 +/- 0.6 microg/ml (P = 0.076). High (HMW) and medium molecular weight (MMW) adiponectin oligomers significantly increased during weight reduction (HMW: 0.37 +/- 0.07 to 0.4 +/- 0.08 microg/ml, P = 0.042; MMW: 2.3 +/- 0.2 to 2.9 +/- 0.3 microg/ml, P = 0.007), while low molecular weight (LMW) did not significantly change. Body weight inversely correlated with HMW (r = -0.695, P = 0.002) and positively with LMW (r = 0.579, P = 0.015). Interestingly, HDL cholesterol and HMW were strongly correlated (r = 0.665, P = 0.007). Indeed, HMW and free fatty acids before weight reduction predicted approximately 60% of HDL changes during intervention. In conclusion, weight reduction results in a relative increase of HMW/MMW adiponectin and a reduction of LMW adiponectin. Total adiponectin and especially HMW adiponectin are related to circulating HDL cholesterol.

  11. Spectroscopic analysis and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate; , James D.; Reed, Christopher J.; Domke, Christopher H.; Le, Linh; Seasholtz, Mary Beth; Weber, Andy; Lipp, Charles

    2017-04-18

    Apparatus for spectroscopic analysis which includes a tunable diode laser spectrometer having a digital output signal and a digital computer for receiving the digital output signal from the spectrometer, the digital computer programmed to process the digital output signal using a multivariate regression algorithm. In addition, a spectroscopic method of analysis using such apparatus. Finally, a method for controlling an ethylene cracker hydrogenator.

  12. General amyloid inhibitors? A critical examination of the inhibition of IAPP amyloid formation by inositol stereoisomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin forms amyloid deposits in the islets of Langerhans; a process that is believed to contribute to the progression of type 2 diabetes and to the failure of islet transplants. An emerging theme in amyloid research is the hypothesis that the toxic species produced during amyloid formation by different polypeptides share common features and exert their effects by common mechanisms. If correct, this suggests that inhibitors of amyloid formation by one polypeptide might be effective against other amyloidogenic sequences. IAPP and Aβ, the peptide responsible for amyloid formation in Alzheimer's disease, are particularly interesting in this regard as they are both natively unfolded in their monomeric states and share some common characteristics. Comparatively little effort has been expended on the design of IAPP amyloid inhibitors, thus it is natural to inquire if Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP, especially since no IAPP inhibitors have been clinically approved. A range of compounds inhibit Aβ amyloid formation, including various stereoisomers of inositol. Myo-, scyllo-, and epi-inositol have been shown to induce conformational changes in Aβ and prevent Aβ amyloid fibril formation by stabilizing non-fibrillar β-sheet structures. We investigate the ability of inositol stereoisomers to inhibit amyloid formation by IAPP. The compounds do not induce a conformational change in IAPP and are ineffective inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation, although some do lead to modest apparent changes in IAPP amyloid fibril morphology. Thus not all classes of Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP. This work provides a basis of comparison to work on polyphenol based inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation and helps provide clues as to the features which render them effective. The study also helps provide information for further efforts in rational inhibitor design.

  13. Oligomers, organosulfates, and nitroxy organosulfates identified in rainwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, K. E.; Turpin, B. J.; Seitzinger, S. P.

    2008-12-01

    Wet deposition is an important removal mechanism for atmospheric organic matter, and a potentially important input for receiving ecosystems, yet less than 50 percent of rainwater organic matter is considered chemically characterized. Precipitation samples collected in New Jersey, USA, were analyzed by negative ion ultra-high resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). We document the presence of 552 unique compounds in the rainwater over a mass range of 50-500 Da, in four compound classes (i.e., CHO, CHOS, CHON, and CHONS). The presence of oligomers, organosulfates, nitroxy organosulfates, organic acids, and linear alkylbenzene sulfonates is reported. Some compounds detected have distinct primary sources; however, the composition of the bulk of this material suggests it is formed in the atmosphere and composed of known contributors to secondary organic aerosol. For example, eight oligomer series known to form through aqueous photooxidation of methylglyoxal and organosulfate compounds known to form from 4 precursors in smog chamber experiments were identified in the rainwater samples. The oligomers, organosulfates, and nitroxy organosulfates detected in the rainwater could all contribute to the HULIS fraction of atmospheric organic matter.

  14. Molecular simulation of oligomer inhibitors for calcite scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiuyu Zhang; Hua Ren; Wenwen Wang; Junping Zhang; Hepeng Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Molecular simulation was performed to study the interaction between CaCO3 crystal and several oligomer inhibitors,by using the equilibrium morphology method to calculate the growth morphology of CaCO3 without inhibitors.The calculated morphology agreed well with SEM photographs.Then,a double-layer model was built to investigate the interaction between calcite crystal and oligomer inhibitors containing maleic anhydride (MA) and acrylic acid (AA).Interaction energy per gram of an oligomer inhibitor was introduced as a scale of inhibition efficiency of different monomers.The results indicated that,for calcite scale inhibition,acrylamide (AM) and vinyl phosphonic acid (VPA) were the most efficient monomers,while allylsulfonic acid (AS) was the poorest.Increasing proportion of AM in dimer inhibitor molecule would improve the inhibition efficiency of MA,though,for a trimer,such as MA-AA-AM,certain sequence of monomers in the inhibitor molecule was necessary besides higher proportion of AM.

  15. α-Synuclein oligomers and clinical implications for Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Lorraine V; Kalia, Suneil K; McLean, Pamela J; Lozano, Andres M; Lang, Anthony E

    2013-02-01

    Protein aggregation within the central nervous system has been recognized as a defining feature of neurodegenerative diseases since the early 20th century. Since that time, there has been a growing list of neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson disease, which are characterized by inclusions of specific pathogenic proteins. This has led to the long-held dogma that these characteristic protein inclusions, which are composed of large insoluble fibrillar protein aggregates and visible by light microscopy, are responsible for cell death in these diseases. However, the correlation between protein inclusion formation and cytotoxicity is inconsistent, suggesting that another form of the pathogenic proteins may be contributing to neurodegeneration. There is emerging evidence implicating soluble oligomers, smaller protein aggregates not detectable by conventional microscopy, as potential culprits in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. The protein α-synuclein is well recognized to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease and is the major component of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. However, α-synuclein also forms oligomeric species, with certain conformations being toxic to cells. The mechanisms by which these α-synuclein oligomers cause cell death are being actively investigated, as they may provide new strategies for diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson disease and related disorders. Here we review the possible role of α-synuclein oligomers in cell death in Parkinson disease and discuss the potential clinical implications.

  16. Self-Assembly of Large Amyloid Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgley, Devin M.

    Functional amyloids found throughout nature have demonstrated that amyloid fibers are potential industrial biomaterials. This work introduces a new "template plus adder" cooperative mechanism for the spontaneous self-assembly of micrometer sized amyloid fibers. A short hydrophobic template peptide induces a conformation change within a highly alpha-helical adder protein to form beta-sheets that continue to assemble into micrometer sized amyloid fibers. This study utilizes a variety of proteins that have template or adder characteristics which suggests that this mechanism may be employed throughout nature. Depending on the amino acid composition of the proteins used the mixtures form amyloid fibers of a cylindrical ( 10 mum diameter, 2 GPa Young's modulus) or tape (5- 10 mum height, 10-20 mum width and 100-200 MPa Young's modulus) morphology. Processing conditions are altered to manipulate the morphology and structural characteristics of the fibers. Spectroscopy is utilized to identify certain amino acid groups that contribute to the self-assembly process. Aliphatic amino acids (A, I, V and L) are responsible for initiating conformation change of the adder proteins to assemble into amyloid tapes. Additional polyglutamine segments (Q-blocks) within the protein mixtures will form Q hydrogen bonds to reinforce the amyloid structure and form a cylindrical fiber of higher modulus. Atomic force microscopy is utilized to delineate the self-assembly of amyloid tapes and cylindrical fibers from protofibrils (15-30 nm width) to fibers (10-20 mum width) spanning three orders of magnitude. The aliphatic amino acid content of the adder proteins' alpha-helices is a good predictor of high density beta-sheet formation within the protein mixture. Thus, it is possible to predict the propensity of a protein to undergo conformation change into amyloid structures. Finally, Escherichia coli is genetically engineered to express a template protein which self-assembles into large amyloid

  17. New Insights from Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy into the Interactions of Islet Amyloid Polypeptides with Lipid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of amyloid polypeptides on membrane surfaces have gained increasing attention in recent years. Several studies have revealed that membranes can catalyze protein aggregation and that the early products of amyloid aggregation can disrupt membrane integrity, increasing water permeability and inducing ion cytotoxicity. Nonetheless, probing aggregation of amyloid proteins on membrane surfaces is challenging. Surface-specific methods are required to discriminate contributions of aggregates at the membrane interface from those in the bulk phase and to characterize protein secondary structures in situ and in real time without the use of perturbing spectroscopic labels. Here, we review the most recent applications of sum frequency generation (SFG vibrational spectroscopy applied in conjunction with computational modeling techniques, a joint experimental and computational methodology that has provided valuable insights into the aggregation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP on membrane surfaces. These applications show that SFG can provide detailed information about structures, kinetics, and orientation of IAPP during interfacial aggregation, relevant to the molecular mechanisms of type II diabetes. These recent advances demonstrate the promise of SFG as a new approach for studying amyloid diseases at the molecular level and for the rational drug design targeting early aggregation products on membrane surfaces.

  18. Characterization of large amyloid fibers and tapes with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgley, Devin M; Claunch, Elizabeth C; Barone, Justin R

    2013-12-01

    Amyloids are self-assembled protein structures implicated in a host of neurodegenerative diseases. Organisms can also produce "functional amyloids" to perpetuate life, and these materials serve as models for robust biomaterials. Amyloids are typically studied using fluorescent dyes, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), or Raman spectroscopy analysis of the protein amide I region, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) because the self-assembled β-sheet secondary structure of the amyloid can be easily identified with these techniques. Here, FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy analyses are described to characterize amyloid structures beyond just identification of the β-sheet structure. It has been shown that peptide mixtures can self-assemble into nanometer-sized amyloid structures that then continue to self-assemble to the micrometer scale. The resulting structures are flat tapes of low rigidity or cylinders of high rigidity depending on the peptides in the mixture. By monitoring the aggregation of peptides in solution using FT-IR spectroscopy, it is possible to identify specific amino acids implicated in β-sheet formation and higher order self-assembly. It is also possible to predict the final tape or cylinder morphology and gain insight into the structure's physical properties based on observed intermolecular interactions during the self-assembly process. Tapes and cylinders are shown to both have a similar core self-assembled β-sheet structure. Soft tapes also have weak hydrophobic interactions between alanine, isoleucine, leucine, and valine that facilitate self-assembly. Rigid cylinders have similar hydrophobic interactions that facilitate self-assembly and also have extensive hydrogen bonding between glutamines. Raman spectroscopy performed on the dried tapes and fibers shows the persistence of these interactions. The spectroscopic analyses described could be generalized to other self-assembling amyloid systems to explain property and morphological differences.

  19. Hacking the Code of Amyloid Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, M Teresa; Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Many research efforts in the last years have been directed towards understanding the factors determining protein misfolding and amyloid formation. Protein stability and amino acid composition have been identified as the two major factors in vitro. The research of our group has been focused on understanding the relationship between amino acid sequence and amyloid formation. Our approach has been the design of simple model systems that reproduce the biophysical properties of natural amyloids. An amyloid sequence pattern was extracted that can be used to detect amyloidogenic hexapeptide stretches in proteins. We have added evidence supporting that these amyloidogenic stretches can trigger amyloid formation by nonamyloidogenic proteins. Some experimental results in other amyloid proteins will be analyzed under the conclusions obtained in these studies. Our conclusions together with evidences from other groups suggest that amyloid formation is the result of the interplay between a decrease of protein stability, and the presence of highly amyloidogenic regions in proteins. As many of these results have been obtained in vitro, the challenge for the next years will be to demonstrate their validity in in vivo systems. PMID:19164912

  20. Amyloid Beta as a Modulator of Synaptic Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Parihar, Mordhwaj S.; Gregory J. Brewer

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is associated with synapse loss, memory dysfunction and pathological accumulation of amyloid beta in plaques. However, an exclusively pathological role for amyloid beta is being challenged by new evidence for an essential function of amyloid beta at the synapse. Amyloid beta protein exists in different assembly states in the central nervous system and plays distinct roles ranging from synapse and memory formation to memory loss and neuronal cell death. Amyloid beta is pres...

  1. Neuroinflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis affects amyloid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anckarsäter Henrik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP and β-amyloid (Aβ is widely studied in Alzheimer's disease, where Aβ deposition and plaque development are essential components of the pathogenesis. However, the physiological role of amyloid in the adult nervous system remains largely unknown. We have previously found altered cerebral amyloid metabolism in other neuroinflammatory conditions. To further elucidate this, we investigated amyloid metabolism in patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB. Methods The first part of the study was a cross-sectional cohort study in 61 patients with acute facial palsy (19 with LNB and 42 with idiopathic facial paresis, Bell's palsy and 22 healthy controls. CSF was analysed for the β-amyloid peptides Aβ38, Aβ40 and Aβ42, and the amyloid precursor protein (APP isoforms α-sAPP and β-sAPP. CSF total-tau (T-tau, phosphorylated tau (P-tau and neurofilament protein (NFL were measured to monitor neural cell damage. The second part of the study was a prospective cohort-study in 26 LNB patients undergoing consecutive lumbar punctures before and after antibiotic treatment to study time-dependent dynamics of the biomarkers. Results In the cross-sectional study, LNB patients had lower levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau, and higher levels of CSF NFL than healthy controls and patients with Bell's palsy. In the prospective study, LNB patients had low levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau at baseline, which all increased towards normal at follow-up. Conclusions Amyloid metabolism is altered in LNB. CSF levels of α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau are decreased in acute infection and increase after treatment. In combination with earlier findings in multiple sclerosis, cerebral SLE and HIV with cerebral engagement, this points to an influence of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism.

  2. Aggregation process of Aβ1-40 with non-Aβ amyloid component of α-synuclein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugene, Cindie; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-09-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, are characterized by the presence of amyloid fibers. Recently, attention has turned from the fibers to the early stages of oligomerization where toxicity could be highest. Here, we focus on the interactions between non-Aβ amyloid component of a-synuclein (NAC) and Aβ1-40, two proteins found in amyloid fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease. We combine the coarse-grained OPEP potential with a Hamiltonian and temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation (HT-REMD) to identify mechanisms leading to the formation of secondary structures promoting fibrillation. We observe that the propensity to form beta-sheet remains the same for Aβ1-40 whereas is decreases significantly for NAC. In particular, the 25-35 region of Aβ1-40 is a significant area of secondary structure stabilization with NAC. The ionic interactions between salt-bridge D23 and K28 in Aβ1-40 and K20 and E23 in NAC of the heterogeneous dimer are consistent with the salt-bridges found in NAC and Aβ1-40 homogenous dimers and allow us to see that these interactions don't necessarily dominate the interchain stabilizations. Our numerical simulation also show the formation of interaction between the early oligomer of NAC and Aβ1-40.

  3. Amyloid-type fiber formation in control of enzyme action: interfacial activation of phospholipase A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Code, Christian; Domanov, Yegor; Jutila, Arimatti; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2008-07-01

    The lag-burst behavior in the action of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) on 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine was investigated at temperatures slightly offset from the main phase transition temperature T(m) of this lipid, thus slowing down the kinetics of the activation process. Distinct stages leading to maximal activity were resolved using a combination of fluorescence parameters, including Förster resonance energy transfer between donor- and acceptor-labeled enzyme, fluorescence anisotropy, and lifetime, as well as thioflavin T fluorescence enhancement. We showed that the interfacial activation of PLA(2), evident after the preceding lag phase, coincides with the formation of oligomers staining with thioflavin T and subsequently with Congo red. Based on previous studies and our findings here, we propose a novel mechanism for the control of PLA(2), involving amyloid protofibrils with highly augmented enzymatic activity. Subsequently, these protofibrils form "mature" fibrils, devoid of activity. Accordingly, the process of amyloid formation is used as an on-off switch to obtain a transient burst in enzymatic catalysis.

  4. Dewetting transition assisted clearance of (NFGAILS) amyloid fibrils from cell membranes by graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiajia; Yang, Zaixing; Gu, Zonglin [Institute of Quantitative Biology and Medicine, SRMP and RAD-X, Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Li, Haotian [Bio-X Lab, Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Garate, Jose Antonio [IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Zhou, Ruhong, E-mail: ruhongz@us.ibm.com [Institute of Quantitative Biology and Medicine, SRMP and RAD-X, Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    Clearance of partially ordered oligomers and monomers deposited on cell membrane surfaces is believed to be an effective route to alleviate many potential protein conformational diseases (PCDs). With large-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, here we show that graphene nanosheets can easily and quickly win a competitive adsorption of human islet amyloid polypeptides (hIAPP{sub 22-28}) NFGAILS and associated fibrils against cell membrane, due to graphene's unique two-dimensional, highly hydrophobic surface with its all-sp{sup 2} hybrid structure. A nanoscale dewetting transition was observed at the interfacial region between the fibril (originally deposited on the membrane) and the graphene nanosheet, which significantly assisted the adsorption of fibrils onto graphene from the membrane. The π–π stacking interaction between Phe23 and graphene played a crucial role, providing the driving force for the adsorption at the graphene surface. This study renders new insight towards the importance of water during the interactions between amyloid peptides, the phospholipidic membrane, and graphene, which might shed some light on future developments of graphene-based nanomedicine for preventing/curing PCDs like type II diabetes mellitus.

  5. [beta subsccript 2]-microglobulin forms three-dimensional domain-swapped amyloid fibrils with disulfide linkages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-08-09

    {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}-m) is the light chain of the type I major histocompatibility complex. It deposits as amyloid fibrils within joints during long-term hemodialysis treatment. Despite the devastating effects of dialysis-related amyloidosis, full understanding of how fibrils form from soluble {beta}{sub 2}-m remains elusive. Here we show that {beta}{sub 2}-m can oligomerize and fibrillize via three-dimensional domain swapping. Isolating a covalently bound, domain-swapped dimer from {beta}{sub 2}-m oligomers on the pathway to fibrils, we were able to determine its crystal structure. The hinge loop that connects the swapped domain to the core domain includes the fibrillizing segment LSFSKD, whose atomic structure we also determined. The LSFSKD structure reveals a class 5 steric zipper, akin to other amyloid spines. The structures of the dimer and the zipper spine fit well into an atomic model for this fibrillar form of {beta}{sub 2}-m, which assembles slowly under physiological conditions.

  6. Influence of thermalization on thermal conduction through molecular junctions: Computational study of PEG oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Hari Datt; Leitner, David M.

    2017-08-01

    Thermalization in molecular junctions and the extent to which it mediates thermal transport through the junction are explored and illustrated with computational modeling of polyethylene glycol (PEG) oligomer junctions. We calculate rates of thermalization in the PEG oligomers from 100 K to 600 K and thermal conduction through PEG oligomer interfaces between gold and other materials, including water, motivated in part by photothermal applications of gold nanoparticles capped by PEG oligomers in aqueous and cellular environments. Variation of thermalization rates over a range of oligomer lengths and temperatures reveals striking effects of thermalization on thermal conduction through the junction. The calculated thermalization rates help clarify the scope of applicability of approaches that can be used to predict thermal conduction, e.g., where Fourier's law breaks down and where a Landauer approach is suitable. The rates and nature of vibrational energy transport computed for PEG oligomers are compared with available experimental results.

  7. Amyloid Imaging in Aging and Dementia: Testing the Amyloid Hypothesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Rabinovici

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging represents a major advance in neuroscience, enabling the detection and quantification of pathologic protein aggregations in the brain. In this review we survey current amyloid imaging techniques, focusing on positron emission tomography (PET with ^{11}carbon-labelled Pittsburgh Compound-B (11C-PIB, the most extensively studied and best validated tracer. PIB binds specifically to fibrillar beta-amyloid (Aβ deposits, and is a sensitive marker for Aβ pathology in cognitively normal older individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. PIB-PET provides us with a powerful tool to examine in vivo the relationship between amyloid deposition, clinical symptoms, and structural and functional brain changes in the continuum between normal aging and AD. Amyloid imaging studies support a model in which amyloid deposition is an early event on the path to dementia, beginning insidiously in cognitively normal individuals, and accompanied by subtle cognitive decline and functional and structural brain changes suggestive of incipient AD. As patients progress to dementia, clinical decline and neurodegeneration accelerate and proceed independently of amyloid accumulation. In the future, amyloid imaging is likely to supplement clinical evaluation in selecting patients for anti-amyloid therapies, while MRI and FDG-PET may be more appropriate markers of clinical progression.

  8. Chitosan polymer sizes effective in inducing phytoalexin accumulation and fungal suppression are verified with synthesized oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadwiger, L A; Ogawa, T; Kuyama, H

    1994-01-01

    Biologically derived chitosan has been reported to induce pisatin and disease resistance response proteins in pea tissue and also to inhibit the germination and growth of some fungal pathogens. Stereo-controlled synthesis of chitosan tetramer, hexamer, and octamer allowed the precise verification of oligomer size required for biological activity. The octameric oligomer optimally induced pisatin accumulation and inhibited fungal growth, verifying previous results obtained with column-purified oligomers derived from crab shells.

  9. Cellular prion protein expression is not regulated by the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Lewis

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence of molecular and cellular links between Alzheimer's disease (AD and prion diseases. The cellular prion protein, PrP(C, modulates the post-translational processing of the AD amyloid precursor protein (APP, through its inhibition of the β-secretase BACE1, and oligomers of amyloid-β bind to PrP(C which may mediate amyloid-β neurotoxicity. In addition, the APP intracellular domain (AICD, which acts as a transcriptional regulator, has been reported to control the expression of PrP(C. Through the use of transgenic mice, cell culture models and manipulation of APP expression and processing, this study aimed to clarify the role of AICD in regulating PrP(C. Over-expression of the three major isoforms of human APP (APP(695, APP(751 and APP(770 in cultured neuronal and non-neuronal cells had no effect on the level of endogenous PrP(C. Furthermore, analysis of brain tissue from transgenic mice over-expressing either wild type or familial AD associated mutant human APP revealed unaltered PrP(C levels. Knockdown of endogenous APP expression in cells by siRNA or inhibition of γ-secretase activity also had no effect on PrP(C levels. Overall, we did not detect any significant difference in the expression of PrP(C in any of the cell or animal-based paradigms considered, indicating that the control of cellular PrP(C levels by AICD is not as straightforward as previously suggested.

  10. Minocycline attenuates Aβ oligomers-induced pro-inflammatory phenotype in primary microglia while enhancing Aβ fibrils phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shimy, Ismail Amr; Heikal, Ola Ahmed; Hamdi, Nabila

    2015-11-16

    Microglia, the brain innate immune cells, are activated in response to amyloid beta (Aβ) resulting in neuroinflammation in AD brains. Recently, two phenotypes have been described for microglia: the pro-inflammatory classical and the anti-inflammatory alternative. Changes in microglia phenotype that control their phagocytic function are yet to be determined. The highly neurotoxic Aβ oligomers (oAβ) formed at an early disease stage induce pro-inflammatory microglia activation releasing neurotoxic mediators and contributing to neurodegeneration. A novel strategy for AD treatment is to attenuate microglia-induced inflammation while maintaining efficient Aβ clearance. Minocycline effectively crosses the blood-brain barrier and has widely reported neuroprotective effects. Yet, its exact mechanism of neuroprotection and its effects on microglia are still unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of minocycline on the phagocytic uptake of fAβ by primary microglia in relation to their activation state in an inflammatory milieu generated by oAβ or LPS. The study shows that minocycline is able to attenuate oAβ-induced neuroinflammatory response of microglia by inhibiting their pro-inflammatory phenotype activation. In addition, a significant enhancement of fAβ phagocytosis by minocycline- treated microglia is reported for the first time, providing novel insight into its neuroprotective role in AD.

  11. Adsorption behavior of conjugated {C}3-oligomers on Si(100) and HOPG surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Mahieu, G; Stiévenard, Didier; Krzeminski, Christophe; Delerue, Christophe; Roncali, Jean; Martineau, C; 10.1021/la026907n

    2012-01-01

    A pi-conjugated {C}3h-oligomer involving three dithienylethylene branches bridged at the meta positions of a central benzenic core has been synthesized and deposited either on the Si(100) surface or on the HOPG surface. On the silicon surface, scanning tunneling microscopy allows the observation of isolated molecules. Conversely, by substituting the thiophene rings of the oligomers with alkyl chains, a spontaneous ordered film is observed on the HOPG surface. As the interaction of the oligomers is different with both surfaces, the utility of the Si(100) surface to characterize individual oligomers prior to their use into a 2D layer is discussed.

  12. Minocycline corrects early, pre-plaque neuroinflammation and inhibits BACE-1 in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease-like amyloid pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Maria Teresa; Allard, Simon; Partridge, Vanessa; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Cuello, A Claudio

    2012-04-02

    A growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation is one of the earliest neuropathological events in Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, we have recently shown the occurrence of an early, pro-inflammatory reaction in the hippocampus of young, three-month-old transgenic McGill-Thy1-APP mice in the absence of amyloid plaques but associated with intracellular accumulation of amyloid beta petide oligomers. The role of such a pro-inflammatory process in the progression of the pathology remained to be elucidated. To clarify this we administered minocycline, a tetracyclic derivative with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties, to young, pre-plaque McGill-Thy1-APP mice for one month. The treatment ended at the age of three months, when the mice were still devoid of plaques. Minocycline treatment corrected the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 observed in young transgenic placebo mice. Furthermore, the down-regulation of inflammatory markers correlated with a reduction in amyloid precursor protein levels and amyloid precursor protein-related products. Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 activity and levels were found to be up-regulated in transgenic placebo mice, while minocycline treatment restored these levels to normality. The anti-inflammatory and beta-secretase 1 effects could be partly explained by the inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. Our study suggests that the pharmacological modulation of neuroinflammation might represent a promising approach for preventing or delaying the development of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology at its initial, pre-clinical stages. The results open new vistas to the interplay between inflammation and amyloid pathology.

  13. Minocycline corrects early, pre-plaque neuroinflammation and inhibits BACE-1 in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease-like amyloid pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferretti Maria

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation is one of the earliest neuropathological events in Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, we have recently shown the occurrence of an early, pro-inflammatory reaction in the hippocampus of young, three-month-old transgenic McGill-Thy1-APP mice in the absence of amyloid plaques but associated with intracellular accumulation of amyloid beta petide oligomers. The role of such a pro-inflammatory process in the progression of the pathology remained to be elucidated. Methods and results To clarify this we administered minocycline, a tetracyclic derivative with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties, to young, pre-plaque McGill-Thy1-APP mice for one month. The treatment ended at the age of three months, when the mice were still devoid of plaques. Minocycline treatment corrected the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 observed in young transgenic placebo mice. Furthermore, the down-regulation of inflammatory markers correlated with a reduction in amyloid precursor protein levels and amyloid precursor protein-related products. Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 activity and levels were found to be up-regulated in transgenic placebo mice, while minocycline treatment restored these levels to normality. The anti-inflammatory and beta-secretase 1 effects could be partly explained by the inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. Conclusions Our study suggests that the pharmacological modulation of neuroinflammation might represent a promising approach for preventing or delaying the development of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology at its initial, pre-clinical stages. The results open new vistas to the interplay between inflammation and amyloid pathology.

  14. Presynaptic dystrophic neurites surrounding amyloid plaques are sites of microtubule disruption, BACE1 elevation, and increased Aβ generation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, Katherine R; Kandalepas, Patty C; Buggia-Prévot, Virginie; Nicholson, Daniel A; Thinakaran, Gopal; Vassar, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by amyloid plaques composed of the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide surrounded by swollen presynaptic dystrophic neurites consisting of dysfunctional axons and terminals that accumulate the β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme (BACE1) required for Aβ generation. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern presynaptic dystrophic neurite formation are unclear, and elucidating these processes may lead to novel AD therapeutic strategies. Previous studies suggest Aβ may disrupt microtubules, which we hypothesize have a critical role in the development of presynaptic dystrophies. To investigate this further, here we have assessed the effects of Aβ, particularly neurotoxic Aβ42, on microtubules during the formation of presynaptic dystrophic neurites in vitro and in vivo. Live-cell imaging of primary neurons revealed that exposure to Aβ42 oligomers caused varicose and beaded neurites with extensive microtubule disruption, and inhibited anterograde and retrograde trafficking. In brain sections from AD patients and the 5XFAD transgenic mouse model of amyloid pathology, dystrophic neurite halos with BACE1 elevation around amyloid plaques exhibited aberrant tubulin accumulations or voids. At the ultrastructural level, peri-plaque dystrophies were strikingly devoid of microtubules and replete with multi-lamellar vesicles resembling autophagic intermediates. Proteins of the microtubule motors, kinesin and dynein, and other neuronal proteins were aberrantly localized in peri-plaque dystrophies. Inactive pro-cathepsin D also accumulated in peri-plaque dystrophies, indicating reduced lysosomal function. Most importantly, BACE1 accumulation in peri-plaque dystrophies caused increased BACE1 cleavage of APP and Aβ generation. Our study supports the hypothesis that Aβ induces microtubule disruption in presynaptic dystrophic neurites that surround plaques, thus impairing axonal transport and leading to accumulation of

  15. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neubert TA, Lu Y, Rebeck GW, Frangione B, Greenberg SM, Ghiso J. Iowa variant of familial Alzheimer's ... ML, van Duinen SG, Roos RA, Frosch MP, Greenberg SM. The cerebral beta-amyloid angiopathies: hereditary and ...

  16. Spectroscopic Dosimeter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Analysis of Phase I test data demonstrates that the Photogenics Spectroscopic Dosimeter will detect neutron energies from 0.8 up to 600 MeV. The detector...

  17. Molecular determinants of S100B oligomer formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Thulin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: S100B is a dimeric protein that can form tetramers, hexamers and higher order oligomers. These forms have been suggested to play a role in RAGE activation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Oligomerization was found to require a low molecular weight trigger/cofactor and could not be detected for highly pure dimer, irrespective of handling. Imidazol was identified as a substance that can serve this role. Oligomerization is dependent on both the imidazol concentration and pH, with optima around 90 mM imidazol and pH 7, respectively. No oligomerization was observed above pH 8, thus the protonated form of imidazol is the active species in promoting assembly of dimers to higher species. However, disulfide bonds are not involved and the process is independent of redox potential. The process was also found to be independent of whether Ca(2+ is bound to the protein or not. Tetramers that are purified from dimers and imidazol by gel filtration are kinetically stable, but dissociate into dimers upon heating. Dimers do not revert to tetramer and higher oligomer unless imidazol is again added. Both tetramers and hexamers bind the target peptide from p53 with retained stoichiometry of one peptide per S100B monomer, and with high affinity (lgK = 7.3±0.2 and 7.2±0.2, respectively in 10 mM BisTris, 5 mM CaCl(2, pH 7.0, which is less than one order of magnitude reduced compared to dimer under the same buffer conditions. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: S100B oligomerization requires protonated imidazol as a trigger/cofactor. Oligomers are kinetically stable after imidazol is removed but revert back to dimer if heated. The results underscore the importance of kinetic versus thermodynamic control of S100B protein aggregation.

  18. Acute hyperinsulinaemia and hyperlipidaemia modify circulating adiponectin and its oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Thomas; Weicht, Jessica; Mai, Knut; Möhlig, Matthias; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Spranger, Joachim

    2009-10-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with low adiponectin levels, although adiponectin is exclusively expressed in white adipose tissue. The mechanism beyond that paradox is not entirely clear, although insulin itself may reduce circulating adiponectin levels. However, obesity is also associated with hyperlipidaemia and the effects of free fatty acids (FFAs) and triglycerides (TG) on circulating adiponectin levels have not yet been investigated. We analysed the effect of an acute and euglycaemic elevation of insulin on adiponectin oligomers in 23 healthy individuals. In a subgroup including 11 healthy men, FFAs and TG were acutely elevated by infusion of heparin/lipids over 120 min. Again the effect on circulating adiponectin and its oligomers was investigated. Adiponectin was determined by ELISA, oligomers were detected by nondenaturating Western blot. Acute hyperinsulinaemia resulted in a significant reduction of total adiponectin to 7.74 +/- 0.98 microg/ml (P = 0.004). High molecular weight (HMW) adiponectin did not change (0.80 +/- 0.12 to 0.81 +/- 0.14 microg/ml; P = 0.887), whereas MMW adiponectin decreased from 4.30 +/- 0.51 to 3.78 +/- 0.48 microg/ml (P = 0.005) and LMW adiponectin from 3.63 +/- 0.42 to 3.15 +/- 0.46 microg/ml (P = 0.048). Interestingly, heparin/lipid infusion also reduced circulating adiponectin levels (P = 0.001), which was primarily the result of reduced MMW adiponectin (P = 0.004), whereas LMW and HMW were not significantly affected. The presented data suggest that both, hyperinsulinaemia and hyperlipidaemia, may contribute to low adiponectin levels in states of obesity.

  19. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane.

  20. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide: Structure, Function, and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehana Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hormone islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, or amylin plays a role in glucose homeostasis but aggregates to form islet amyloid in type-2 diabetes. Islet amyloid formation contributes to β-cell dysfunction and death in the disease and to the failure of islet transplants. Recent work suggests a role for IAPP aggregation in cardiovascular complications of type-2 diabetes and hints at a possible role in type-1 diabetes. The mechanisms of IAPP amyloid formation in vivo or in vitro are not understood and the mechanisms of IAPP induced β-cell death are not fully defined. Activation of the inflammasome, defects in autophagy, ER stress, generation of reactive oxygen species, membrane disruption, and receptor mediated mechanisms have all been proposed to play a role. Open questions in the field include the relative importance of the various mechanisms of β-cell death, the relevance of reductionist biophysical studies to the situation in vivo, the molecular mechanism of amyloid formation in vitro and in vivo, the factors which trigger amyloid formation in type-2 diabetes, the potential role of IAPP in type-1 diabetes, the development of clinically relevant inhibitors of islet amyloidosis toxicity, and the design of soluble, bioactive variants of IAPP for use as adjuncts to insulin therapy.

  1. Expression of enzymes in yeast for lignocellulose derived oligomer CBP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, John E.; Wiswall, Erin; Shikhare, Indraneel; Xu, Haowen; Thorngren, Naomi; Hau, Heidi H.; Stonehouse, Emily

    2017-08-29

    The present invention provides a multi-component enzyme system that hydrolyzes hemicellulose oligomers from hardwood which can be expressed, for example, in yeast such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In some embodiments, this invention provides for the engineering of a series of biocatalysts combining the expression and secretion of components of this enzymatic system with robust, rapid xylose utilization, and ethanol fermentation under industrially relevant process conditions for consolidated bioprocessing. In some embodiments, the invention utilizes co-cultures of strains that can achieve significantly improved performance due to the incorporation of additional enzymes in the fermentation system.

  2. Structural Transitions of Solvent-Free Oligomer-Grafted Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Chremos, Alexandros

    2011-09-01

    Novel structural transitions of solvent-free oligomer-grafted nanoparticles are investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained bead-spring model. Variations in core size and grafting density lead to self-assembly of the nanoparticles into a variety of distinct structures. At the boundaries between different structures, the nanoparticle systems undergo thermoreversible transitions. This structural behavior, which has not been previously reported, deviates significantly from that of simple liquids. The reversible nature of these transitions in solvent-free conditions offers new ways to control self-assembly of nanoparticles at experimentally accessible conditions. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  3. EGb761 provides a protective effect against Aβ1-42 oligomer-induced cell damage and blood-brain barrier disruption in an in vitro bEnd.3 endothelial model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-bin Wan

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common form of senile dementia which is characterized by abnormal amyloid beta (Aβ accumulation and deposition in brain parenchyma and cerebral capillaries, and leads to blood-brain barrier (BBB disruption. Despite great progress in understanding the etiology of AD, the underlying pathogenic mechanism of BBB damage is still unclear, and no effective treatment has been devised. The standard Ginkgo biloba extract EGb761 has been widely used as a potential cognitive enhancer for the treatment of AD. However, the cellular mechanism underlying the effect remain to be clarified. In this study, we employed an immortalized endothelial cell line (bEnd.3 and incubation of Aβ(1-42 oligomer, to mimic a monolayer BBB model under conditions found in the AD brain. We investigated the effect of EGb761 on BBB and found that Aβ1-42 oligomer-induced cell injury, apoptosis, and generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, were attenuated by treatment with EGb761. Moreover, treatment of the cells with EGb761 decreased BBB permeability and increased tight junction scaffold protein levels including ZO-1, Claudin-5 and Occludin. We also found that the Aβ(1-42 oligomer-induced upregulation of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE, which mediates Aβ cytotoxicity and plays an essential role in AD progression, was significantly decreased by treatment with EGb761. To our knowledge, we provide the first direct in vitro evidence of an effect of EGb761 on the brain endothelium exposed to Aβ(1-42 oligomer, and on the expression of tight junction (TJ scaffold proteins and RAGE. Our results provide a new insight into a possible mechanism of action of EGb761. This study provides a rational basis for the therapeutic application of EGb761 in the treatment of AD.

  4. The Role of the 14–20 Domain of the Islet Amyloid Polypeptide in Amyloid Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Gilead

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism of amyloid formation by the islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP has been intensively studied since its identification in the late 1980s. The IAPP(20–29 region is considered to be the central amyloidogenic module of the polypeptide. This assumption is mainly based on the amyloidogenic properties of the region and on the large sequence diversity within this region between the human and mouse IAPP, as the mouse IAPP does not form amyloids. A few years ago, another region within IAPP was identified that seems to be at least as important as IAPP(20–29 in facilitation of molecular recognition that leads to amyloid formation. Here, we reinforce our and others' previous findings by analyzing supporting evidence from the recent literature. Moreover, we provide new proofs to our hypothesis by comparing between the amyloidogenic properties of the two regions derived from the IAPP of cats, which is also known to form amyloid fibrils.

  5. Global properties and propensity to dimerization of the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment through the modeling of its monomer and dimer diffusion coefficients and electrophoretic mobilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiber, Julio A; Peirotti, Marta B; Piaggio, Maria V

    2015-03-01

    Neuronal activity loss may be due to toxicity caused mainly by amyloid-beta (1-40) and (1-42) peptides forming soluble oligomers. Here the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment (monomer) and its dimer are characterized at low pH through the modeling of their diffusion coefficients and effective electrophoretic mobilities. Translational diffusion coefficient experimental values of monomer and dimer analogs of this peptide fragment and monomer and dimer mixtures at thermodynamic equilibrium are used as reported in the literature for different monomer initial concentrations. The resulting electrokinetic and hydrodynamic global properties are employed to evaluate the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment propensity to dimerization through a thermodynamic theoretical framework. Therefore equilibrium constants are considered at pH 2.9 to elucidate one of the amyloidogenic mechanisms involving the central hydrophobic region LVFFA of the peptide spanning residues 17-21 associated with phenylalanine at positions 19 and 20 in the amino acid sequence of amyloid-beta peptides. An analysis demonstrating that peptide aggregation is a concentration-dependent process is provided, where both pair and intraparticle charge regulation phenomena become relevant. It is shown that the modeling of the effective electrophoretic mobility of the amyloid-beta (12-28) peptide fragment is crucial to understand the effect of hydrophobic region LVFFA in the amyloidogenic process. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Broadband terahertz dynamics of propylene glycol monomer and oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Shota; Mori, Tatsuya; Kojima, Seiji

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the broadband terahertz spectra (0.1-5.0 THz) of glass-forming liquids, propylene glycol (PG), its oligomers poly (propylene glycol)s (PPGs), and poly (propylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PPG-de) using broadband terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and low-frequency Raman scattering. The numerical value of the dielectric loss at around 1.5 THz, which is the peak position of broad peaks in all samples, decreased as the molecular weight increased. Furthermore, the peak at around 1.5 THz is insensitive to the molecular weight. For PPGs, the side chain effect of the oligomer was observed in the terahertz region. Based on the experimental and calculation results for the PPGs and PPG-de, whose end groups are epoxy groups, the beginnings of the increases in the observed dielectric loss above 3.5 THz of the PPGs are assigned to the OH bending vibration. The higher value of the dielectric loss in the terahertz region for the PPG-de can be the tail of a broad peak located in the MHz region. The difference between the Raman susceptibility and dielectric loss reflects the difference in the observable molecular dynamics between the infrared and Raman spectroscopies.

  7. Charge Separation and Recombination in Small Band Gap Oligomer-Fullerene Triads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsten, Bram P.; Bouwer, Ricardo K. M.; Hummelen, Jan C.; Williams, Rene M.; Janssen, Rene A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis and photophysics of a series of thiophene-thienopyrazine small band gap oligomers end-capped at both ends with C(60) are presented In these triads a photoinduced electron transfer reaction occurs between the oligomer as a donor and the fullerene as an acceptor Femtosecond photoinduced

  8. Tau oligomers impair memory and induce synaptic and mitochondrial dysfunction in wild-type mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The correlation between neurofibrillary tangles of tau and disease progression in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients remains an area of contention. Innovative data are emerging from biochemical, cell-based and transgenic mouse studies that suggest that tau oligomers, a pre-filament form of tau, may be the most toxic and pathologically significant tau aggregate. Results Here we report that oligomers of recombinant full-length human tau protein are neurotoxic in vivo after subcortical stereotaxic injection into mice. Tau oligomers impaired memory consolidation, whereas tau fibrils and monomers did not. Additionally, tau oligomers induced synaptic dysfunction by reducing the levels of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins synaptophysin and septin-11. Tau oligomers produced mitochondrial dysfunction by decreasing the levels of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (electron transport chain complex I), and activated caspase-9, which is related to the apoptotic mitochondrial pathway. Conclusions This study identifies tau oligomers as an acutely toxic tau species in vivo, and suggests that tau oligomers induce neurodegeneration by affecting mitochondrial and synaptic function, both of which are early hallmarks in AD and other tauopathies. These results open new avenues for neuroprotective intervention strategies of tauopathies by targeting tau oligomers. PMID:21645391

  9. Tau oligomers impair memory and induce synaptic and mitochondrial dysfunction in wild-type mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson George R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The correlation between neurofibrillary tangles of tau and disease progression in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients remains an area of contention. Innovative data are emerging from biochemical, cell-based and transgenic mouse studies that suggest that tau oligomers, a pre-filament form of tau, may be the most toxic and pathologically significant tau aggregate. Results Here we report that oligomers of recombinant full-length human tau protein are neurotoxic in vivo after subcortical stereotaxic injection into mice. Tau oligomers impaired memory consolidation, whereas tau fibrils and monomers did not. Additionally, tau oligomers induced synaptic dysfunction by reducing the levels of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins synaptophysin and septin-11. Tau oligomers produced mitochondrial dysfunction by decreasing the levels of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (electron transport chain complex I, and activated caspase-9, which is related to the apoptotic mitochondrial pathway. Conclusions This study identifies tau oligomers as an acutely toxic tau species in vivo, and suggests that tau oligomers induce neurodegeneration by affecting mitochondrial and synaptic function, both of which are early hallmarks in AD and other tauopathies. These results open new avenues for neuroprotective intervention strategies of tauopathies by targeting tau oligomers.

  10. Oligomer-fullerene dyads and triads as model compounds for bulk-heterojunction PV cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.A.J.; Peeters, E.; Langeveld-Voss, B.M.W.; Hal, P.A. van; Knol, J.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Covalent oligomer-fullerene donor-acceptor structures can serve as important model systems for plastic PV cells, based on interpenetrating networks of conjugated polymers and fullerene derivatives. Several series of [60]fullerene-oligomer dyads and triads were prepared. Photoinduced electron

  11. Photo-Electron Spectroscopy Study of Energy Levels in Conjugated Oligomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, Sjoerd; Heeres, A.; Stalmach, U.; Wildeman, J.; Hadziioannou, G.; Sawatzky, G.A.; Jonkman, H.T.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the valence orbital structure of poly(para-phenylenevinylene) (PPV)-like oligomers. We studied these molecules as isolated oligomers in the gas phase, as well as in thin films deposited on metal substrates. We use a simple model based on a previously reported Hamiltonian that accurately

  12. Preparation of Chito-Oligomers by Hydrolysis of Chitosan in the Presence of Zeolite as Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid A. Ibrahim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An increasing interest has recently been shown to use chitin/chitosan oligomers (chito-oligomers in medicine and food fields because they are not only water-soluble, nontoxic, and biocompatible materials, but they also exhibit numerous biological properties, including antibacterial, antifungal, and antitumor activities, as well as immuno-enhancing effects on animals. Conventional depolymerization methods of chitosan to chito-oligomers are either chemical by acid-hydrolysis under harsh conditions or by enzymatic degradation. In this work, hydrolysis of chitosan to chito-oligomers has been achieved by applying adsorption-separation technique using diluted HCl in the presence of different types of zeolite as adsorbents. The chito-oligomers were retrieved from adsorbents and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy (LC/MS, and ninhydrin test.

  13. Star-shaped tetrathiafulvalene oligomers towards the construction of conducting supramolecular assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Summary The construction of redox-active supramolecular assemblies based on star-shaped and radially expanded tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) oligomers with divergent and extended conjugation is summarized. Star-shaped TTF oligomers easily self-aggregate with a nanophase separation to produce supramolecular structures, and their TTF units stack face-to-face to form columnar structures using the fastener effect. Based on redox-active self-organizing supramolecular structures, conducting nanoobjects are constructed by doping of TTF oligomers with oxidants after the formation of such nanostructures. Although radical cations derived from TTF oligomers strongly interact in solution to produce a mixed-valence dimer and π-dimer, it seems to be difficult to produce nanoobjects of radical cations different from those of neutral TTF oligomers. In some cases, however, radical cations form nanostructured fibers and rods by controlling the supramolecular assembly, oxidation states, and counter anions employed. PMID:26664579

  14. Continuation of exercise is necessary to inhibit high fat diet-induced β-amyloid deposition and memory deficit in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesako, Masato; Uemura, Kengo; Iwata, Ayana; Kubota, Masakazu; Watanabe, Kiwamu; Uemura, Maiko; Noda, Yasuha; Asada-Utsugi, Megumi; Kihara, Takeshi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Shimohama, Shun; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2013-01-01

    High fat diet (HFD) is prevalent in many modern societies and HFD-induced metabolic condition is a growing concern worldwide. It has been previously reported that HFD clearly worsens cognitive function in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. On the other hand, we have demonstrated that voluntary exercise in an enriched environment is an effective intervention to rescue HFD-induced β-amyloid (Aβ) deposition and memory deficit. However, it had been unclear whether consumption of HFD after exercising abolished the beneficial effect of exercise on the inhibition of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. To examine this question, we exposed wild type (WT) and APP mice fed with HFD to exercise conditions at different time periods. In our previous experiment, we gave HFD to mice for 20 weeks and subjected them to exercise during weeks 10-20. In the present study, mice were subjected to exercise conditions during weeks 0-10 or weeks 5-15 while being on HFD. Interestingly, we found that the effect of exercise during weeks 0-10 or weeks 5-15 on memory function was not abolished in WT mice even if they kept having HFD after finishing exercise. However, in APP transgenic mice, HFD clearly disrupted the effect of exercise during weeks 0-10 or weeks 5-15 on memory function. Importantly, we observed that the level of Aβ oligomer was significantly elevated in the APP mice that exercised during weeks 0-10: this might have been caused by the up-regulation of Aβ production. These results provide solid evidence that continuation of exercise is necessary to rescue HFD-induced aggravation of cognitive decline in the pathological setting of AD.

  15. Continuation of exercise is necessary to inhibit high fat diet-induced β-amyloid deposition and memory deficit in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Maesako

    Full Text Available High fat diet (HFD is prevalent in many modern societies and HFD-induced metabolic condition is a growing concern worldwide. It has been previously reported that HFD clearly worsens cognitive function in amyloid precursor protein (APP transgenic mice. On the other hand, we have demonstrated that voluntary exercise in an enriched environment is an effective intervention to rescue HFD-induced β-amyloid (Aβ deposition and memory deficit. However, it had been unclear whether consumption of HFD after exercising abolished the beneficial effect of exercise on the inhibition of Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. To examine this question, we exposed wild type (WT and APP mice fed with HFD to exercise conditions at different time periods. In our previous experiment, we gave HFD to mice for 20 weeks and subjected them to exercise during weeks 10-20. In the present study, mice were subjected to exercise conditions during weeks 0-10 or weeks 5-15 while being on HFD. Interestingly, we found that the effect of exercise during weeks 0-10 or weeks 5-15 on memory function was not abolished in WT mice even if they kept having HFD after finishing exercise. However, in APP transgenic mice, HFD clearly disrupted the effect of exercise during weeks 0-10 or weeks 5-15 on memory function. Importantly, we observed that the level of Aβ oligomer was significantly elevated in the APP mice that exercised during weeks 0-10: this might have been caused by the up-regulation of Aβ production. These results provide solid evidence that continuation of exercise is necessary to rescue HFD-induced aggravation of cognitive decline in the pathological setting of AD.

  16. Folding Landscape of Mutant Huntingtin Exon1: Diffusible Multimers, Oligomers and Fibrils, and No Detectable Monomer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bankanidhi Sahoo

    Full Text Available Expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ track of the Huntingtin (HTT protein above 36 is associated with a sharply enhanced risk of Huntington's disease (HD. Although there is general agreement that HTT toxicity resides primarily in N-terminal fragments such as the HTT exon1 protein, there is no consensus on the nature of the physical states of HTT exon1 that are induced by polyQ expansion, nor on which of these states might be responsible for toxicity. One hypothesis is that polyQ expansion induces an alternative, toxic conformation in the HTT exon1 monomer. Alternative hypotheses posit that the toxic species is one of several possible aggregated states. Defining the nature of the toxic species is particularly challenging because of facile interconversion between physical states as well as challenges to identifying these states, especially in vivo. Here we describe the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS to characterize the detailed time and repeat length dependent self-association of HTT exon1-like fragments both with chemically synthesized peptides in vitro and with cell-produced proteins in extracts and in living cells. We find that, in vitro, mutant HTT exon1 peptides engage in polyQ repeat length dependent dimer and tetramer formation, followed by time dependent formation of diffusible spherical and fibrillar oligomers and finally by larger, sedimentable amyloid fibrils. For expanded polyQ HTT exon1 expressed in PC12 cells, monomers are absent, with tetramers being the smallest molecular form detected, followed in the incubation time course by small, diffusible aggregates at 6-9 hours and larger, sedimentable aggregates that begin to build up at 12 hrs. In these cell cultures, significant nuclear DNA damage appears by 6 hours, followed at later times by caspase 3 induction, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cell death. Our data thus defines limits on the sizes and concentrations of different physical states of HTT exon1 along the

  17. Dicyanovinylnaphthalenes for neuroimaging of amyloids and relationships of electronic structures and geometries to binding affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petric, Andrej; Johnson, Scott A; Pham, Hung V; Li, Ying; Ceh, Simon; Golobic, Amalija; Agdeppa, Eric D; Timbol, Gerald; Liu, Jie; Keum, Gyochang; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Kepe, Vladimir; Houk, Kendall N; Barrio, Jorge R

    2012-10-09

    The positron-emission tomography (PET) probe 2-(1-[6-[(2-fluoroethyl)(methyl)amino]-2-naphthyl]ethylidene) (FDDNP) is used for the noninvasive brain imaging of amyloid-β (Aβ) and other amyloid aggregates present in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. A series of FDDNP analogs has been synthesized and characterized using spectroscopic and computational methods. The binding affinities of these molecules have been measured experimentally and explained through the use of a computational model. The analogs were created by systematically modifying the donor and the acceptor sides of FDDNP to learn the structural requirements for optimal binding to Aβ aggregates. FDDNP and its analogs are neutral, environmentally sensitive, fluorescent molecules with high dipole moments, as evidenced by their spectroscopic properties and dipole moment calculations. The preferred solution-state conformation of these compounds is directly related to the binding affinities. The extreme cases were a nonplanar analog t-butyl-FDDNP, which shows low binding affinity for Aβ aggregates (520 nM K(i)) in vitro and a nearly planar tricyclic analog cDDNP, which displayed the highest binding affinity (10 pM K(i)). Using a previously published X-ray crystallographic model of 1,1-dicyano-2-[6-(dimethylamino)naphthalen-2-yl]propene (DDNP) bound to an amyloidogenic Aβ peptide model, we show that the binding affinity is inversely related to the distortion energy necessary to avoid steric clashes along the internal surface of the binding channel.

  18. Amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ruei-Lin; Lee, Kung-Ta; Wang, Jung-Hao; Lee, Lily Y-L; Chen, Rita P-Y

    2009-01-28

    More than 20 unrelated proteins can form amyloid fibrils in vivo which are related to various diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, prion disease, and systematic amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils are an ordered protein aggregate with a lamellar cross-beta structure. Enhancing amyloid clearance is one of the targets of the therapy of these amyloid-related diseases. Although there is debate on whether the toxicity is due to amyloids or their precursors, research on the degradation of amyloids may help prevent or alleviate these diseases. In this study, we explored the amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase, a fibrinolytic subtilisin-like serine protease, and determined the optimal conditions for amyloid hydrolysis. This ability is shared by proteinase K and subtilisin Carlsberg, but not by trypsin or plasmin.

  19. Structure-dependent effects of amyloid-β on long-term memory in Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Lenzie; Crossley, Michael; Vadukul, Devkee M; Kemenes, György; Serpell, Louise C

    2017-05-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are implicated in the causation of memory loss, neuronal impairment, and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease. Our recent work revealed that Aβ 1-42 and Aβ 25-35 inhibit long-term memory (LTM) recall in Lymnaea stagnalis (pond snail) in the absence of cell death. Here, we report the characterization of the active species prepared under different conditions, describe which Aβ species is present in brain tissue during the behavioral recall time point and relate the sequence and structure of the oligomeric species to the resulting neuronal properties and effect on LTM. Our results suggest that oligomers are the key toxic Aβ1-42 structures, which likely affect LTM through synaptic plasticity pathways, and that Aβ 1-42 and Aβ 25-35 cannot be used as interchangeable peptides. © 2017 The Authors. FEBS Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  20. Macroautophagy-generated increase of lysosomal amyloid β-protein mediates oxidant-induced apoptosis of cultured neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Lin; Terman, Alexei; Hallbeck, Martin

    2011-01-01

    and accumulation of Aβ within lysosomes, induced apoptosis in differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Cells under hyperoxia showed: (1) increased numbers of autophagic vacuoles that contained amyloid precursor protein (APP) as well as Aβ monomers and oligomers, (2) increased reactive oxygen species production......, and (3) enhanced apoptosis. Oxidant-induced apoptosis positively correlated with cellular Aβ production, being the highest in cells that were stably transfected with APP Swedish KM670/671NL double mutation. Inhibition of γ-secretase, prior and/or in parallel to hyperoxia, suggested that the increase...... and resulting lysosomal Aβ accumulation are essential for oxidant-induced apoptosis in cultured neuroblastoma cells and provide additional support for the interactive role of oxidative stress and the lysosomal system in AD-related neurodegeneration....

  1. Appropriate Use Criteria for Amyloid PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith A.; Minoshima, Satoshi; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Donohoe, Kevin J.; Foster, Norman L.; Herscovitch, Peter; Karlawish, Jason H.; Rowe, Christopher C.; Carrillo, Maria C.; Hartley, Dean M.; Hedrick, Saima; Mitchell, Kristi; Pappas, Virginia; Thies, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) of brain amyloid-beta is a technology that is becoming more available, but its clinical utility in medical practice requires careful definition. In order to provide guidance to dementia care practitioners, patients and caregivers, the Alzheimer Association and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging convened the Amyloid Imaging Taskforce (AIT). The AIT considered a broad range of specific clinical scenarios in which amyloid PET could potentially be appropriately used. Peer-reviewed, published literature was searched to ascertain available evidence relevant to these scenarios, and the AIT developed a consensus of expert opinion. While empirical evidence of impact on clinical outcomes is not yet available, a set of specific Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) were agreed upon that define the types of patients and clinical circumstances in which amyloid PET could be used. Both appropriate and inappropriate uses were considered and formulated, and are reported and discussed here. Because both dementia care and amyloid PET technology are in active development, these AUC will require periodic reassessment. Future research directions are also outlined, including diagnostic utility and patient-centered outcomes. PMID:23360977

  2. Chirality and chiroptical properties of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Chirality of amyloid fibrils-linear beta-sheet-rich aggregates of misfolded protein chains-often manifests in morphological traits such as helical twist visible in atomic force microscopy and in chiroptical properties accessible to vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). According to recent studies the relationship between molecular chirality of polypeptide building blocks and superstructural chirality of amyloid fibrils may be more intricate and less deterministic than previously assumed. Several puzzling experimental findings have put into question earlier intuitive ideas on: 1) the bottom-up chirality transfer upon amyloidogenic self-assembly, and 2) the structural origins of chiroptical properties of protein aggregates. For example, removal of a single amino acid residue from an amyloidogenic all-L peptide was shown to reverse handedness of fibrils. On the other hand, certain types of amyloid aggregates revealed surprisingly strong VCD spectra with the sign and shape dependent on the conditions of fibrillation. Hence, microscopic and chiroptical studies have highlighted chirality as one more aspect of polymorphism of amyloid fibrils. This brief review is intended to outline the current state of research on amyloid-like fibrils from the perspective of their structural and superstructural chirality and chiroptical properties.

  3. One-Step Synthesis of Precursor Oligomers for Organic Photovoltaics: A Comparative Study between Polymers and Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Daojuan; Wang, Suhao; Ma, Wei; Hedström, Svante; James, David Ian; Xu, Xiaofeng; Persson, Petter; Fabiano, Simone; Berggren, Magnus; Inganäs, Olle; Huang, Fei; Wang, Ergang

    2015-12-16

    Two series of oligomers TQ and rhodanine end-capped TQ-DR were synthesized using a facile one-step method. Their optical, electrical, and thermal properties and photovoltaic performances were systematically investigated and compared. The TQ series of oligomers were found to be amorphous, whereas the TQ-DR series are semicrystalline. For the TQ oligomers, the results obtained in solar cells show that as the chain length of the oligomers increases, an increase in power conversion efficiency (PCE) is obtained. However, when introducing 3-ethylrhodanine into the TQ oligomers as end groups, the PCE of the TQ-DR series of oligomers decreases as the chain length increases. Moreover, the TQ-DR series of oligomers give much higher performances compared to the original amorphous TQ series of oligomers owing to the improved extinction coefficient (ε) and crystallinity afforded by the rhodanine. In particular, the highly crystalline oligomer TQ5-DR, which has the shortest conjugation length shows a high hole mobility of 0.034 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and a high PCE of 3.14%, which is the highest efficiency out of all of the six oligomers. The structure-property correlations for all of the oligomers and the TQ1 polymer demonstrate that structural control of enhanced intermolecular interactions and crystallinity is a key for small molecules/oligomers to achieve high mobilities, which is an essential requirement for use in OPVs.

  4. Solvent exposure of Tyr10 as a probe of structural differences between monomeric and aggregated forms of the amyloid-β peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aran Terol, Pablo; Kumita, Janet R.; Hook, Sharon C.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Esbjörner, Elin K.

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides is a characteristic pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease. We have exploited the relationship between solvent exposure and intrinsic fluorescence of a single tyrosine residue, Tyr10, in the Aβ sequence to probe structural features of the monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar forms of the 42-residue Aβ1-42. By monitoring the quenching of Tyr10 fluorescence upon addition of water-soluble acrylamide, we show that in Aβ1-42 oligomers this residue is solvent-exposed to a similar extent to that found in the unfolded monomer. By contrast, Tyr10 is significantly shielded from acrylamide quenching in Aβ1-42 fibrils, consistent with its proximity to the fibrillar cross-β core. Furthermore, circular dichroism measurements reveal that Aβ1-42 oligomers have a considerably lower β-sheet content than the Aβ1-42 fibrils, indicative of a less ordered molecular arrangement in the former. Taken together these findings suggest significant differences in the structural assembly of oligomers and fibrils that are consistent with differences in their biological effects. PMID:26551456

  5. AL amyloid imaging and therapy with a monoclonal antibody to a cryptic epitope on amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Wall

    Full Text Available The monoclonal antibody 2A4 binds an epitope derived from a cleavage site of serum amyloid protein A (sAA containing a -Glu-Asp- amino acid pairing. In addition to its reactivity with sAA amyloid deposits, the antibody was also found to bind amyloid fibrils composed of immunoglobulin light chains. The antibody binds to synthetic fibrils and human light chain (AL amyloid extracts with high affinity even in the presence of soluble light chain proteins. Immunohistochemistry with biotinylated 2A4 demonstrated positive reaction with ALκ and ALλ human amyloid deposits in various organs. Surface plasmon resonance analyses using synthetic AL fibrils as a substrate revealed that 2A4 bound with a K(D of ∼10 nM. Binding was inhibited in the presence of the -Glu-Asp- containing immunogen peptide. Radiolabeled 2A4 specifically localized with human AL amyloid extracts implanted in mice (amyloidomas as evidenced by single photon emission (SPECT imaging. Furthermore, co-localization of the radiolabeled mAb with amyloid was shown in biodistribution and micro-autoradiography studies. Treatment with 2A4 expedited regression of ALκ amyloidomas in mice, likely mediated by the action of macrophages and neutrophils, relative to animals that received a control antibody. These data indicate that the 2A4 mAb might be of interest for potential imaging and immunotherapy in patients with AL amyloidosis.

  6. The novel amyloid-beta peptide aptamer inhibits intracellular amyloid-beta peptide toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Wang; Yi Yang; Mingyue Jia; Chi Ma; Mingyu Wang; Lihe Che; Yu Yang; Jiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β peptide binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) decoy peptide (DP) can competitively antagonize binding of amyloid β peptide to ABAD and inhibit the cytotoxic effects of amyloid β peptide. Based on peptide aptamers, the present study inserted ABAD-DP into the disulfide bond of human thioredoxin (TRX) using molecular cloning technique to construct a fusion gene that can express the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer. Moreover, adeno-associated virus was used to allow its stable expression. Immunofluorescent staining revealed the co-expression of the transduced fusion gene TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 and amyloid β peptide in NIH-3T3 cells, indicating that the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer can bind amyloid β peptide within cells. In addition, cell morphology and MTT results suggested that TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 attenuated amyloid β peptide-induced SH-SY5Y cell injury and improved cell viability. These findings confirmed the possibility of constructing TRX-based peptide aptamer using ABAD-DP. Moreover, TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 inhibited the cytotoxic effect of amyloid β peptide.

  7. Amyloid fibril formation of peptides derived from the C-terminus of CETP modulated by lipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-González, Victor [Instituto de Fisiología Celular, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, DF (Mexico); Mas-Oliva, Jaime, E-mail: jmas@ifc.unam.mx [Instituto de Fisiología Celular, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, DF (Mexico); División de Investigación, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, DF (Mexico)

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •The secondary structure of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP was studied. •Lipids modulate secondary structure changes of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP. •Lysophosphatidic acid maintains a functional α-helix and prevents fibril formation. •Transfer of lipids by CETP is related to the presence of an α-helix at its C-end. -- Abstract: Cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) is a plasmatic protein involved in neutral lipid transfer between lipoproteins. Focusing on the last 12 C-terminus residues we have previously shown that mutation D{sub 470}N promotes a conformational change towards a β-secondary structure. In turn, this modification leads to the formation of oligomers and fibrillar structures, which cause cytotoxic effects similar to the ones provoked by amyloid peptides. In this study, we evaluated the role of specific lipid arrangements on the structure of peptide helix-Z (D{sub 470}N) through the use of thioflavin T fluorescence, peptide bond absorbance, circular dichroism and electron microscopy. The results indicate that the use of micelles formed with lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) under neutral pH induce a conformational transition of peptide helix-Z containing a β-sheet conformation to a native α-helix structure, therefore avoiding the formation of amyloid fibrils. In contrast, incubation with phosphatidic acid does not change the profile for the β-sheet conformation. When the electrostatic charge at the surface of micelles or vesicles is regulated through the use of lipids such as phospholipid and LPA, minimal changes and the presence of β-structures were recorded. Mixtures with a positive net charge diminished the percentage of β-structure and the amount of amyloid fibrils. Our results suggest that the degree of solvation determined by the presence of a free hydroxyl group on lipids such as LPA is a key condition that can modulate the secondary structure and the consequent formation of

  8. Amyloid-β positron emission tomography imaging probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C; Långström, Bengt;

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly rising prevalence and cost of Alzheimer's disease in recent decades has made the imaging of amyloid-β deposits the focus of intense research. Several amyloid imaging probes with purported specificity for amyloid-β plaques are currently at various stages of FDA approval. However...

  9. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); de Pablo, Juan J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  10. Formation of RNA oligomers on montmorillonite: site of catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, G.; Ferris, J. P.

    1998-01-01

    Certain montmorillonites catalyze the self condensation of the 5'-phosphorimidazolide of nucleosides in pH 8 aqueous electrolyte solutions at ambient temperatures leading to formation of RNA oligomers. In order to establish the nature of the sites on montmorillonite responsible for this catalytic activity, oligomerization reactions were run with montmorillonites which had been selectively modified (I) at the edges by (a) fluoride treatment, (b) silylation, (c) metaphosphate treatment of the anion exchange sites (II) in the interlayer by (a) saturation with quaternary alkylammonium ions of increasing size, (b) aluminum polyoxo cations. High pressure liquid chromatography, HPLC, analysis of condensation products for their chain lengths and yields indicated that modification at the edges did not affect the catalytic activity to a significant extent, while blocking the interlayer strongly inhibited product formation.

  11. Tau oligomers and fibrils induce activation of microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Inelia; Jiménez, José M; Mancilla, Marcela; Maccioni, Ricardo B

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a process related to the onset of several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Increasing sets of evidence support the major role of deregulation of the interaction patterns between glial cells and neurons in the pathway toward neuronal degeneration, a process we are calling neuroimmunomodulation in AD. On the basis of the hypothesis that pathological tau aggregates induce microglial activation with the subsequent events of the neuroinflammatory cascade, we have studied the effects of tau oligomeric species and filamentous structures over microglial cells in vitro. Tau oligomers and fibrils were induced by arachidonic acid and then their actions assayed upon addition to microglial cells. We showed activation of the microglia, with significant morphological alterations as analyzed by immunofluorescence. The augmentation of nitrites and the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 was evaluated in ELISA assays. Furthermore, conditioned media of stimulated microglia cells were exposed to hippocampal neurons generating altered patterns in these cells, including shortening of neuritic processes and cytoskeleton reorganization.

  12. Diffusivities and Viscosities of Poly(ethylene oxide) Oligomers

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Bingbing

    2010-10-14

    Diffusivities and viscosities of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) oligomer melts with 1 to 12 repeat units have been obtained from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations using the TraPPE-UA force field. The simulations generated diffusion coefficients with high accuracy for all of the molar masses studied, but the statistical uncertainties in the viscosity calculations were significantly larger for longer chains. There is good agreement of the calculated viscosities and densities with available experimental data, and thus, the simulations can be used to bridge gaps in the data and for extrapolations with respect to chain length, temperature, and pressure. We explored the convergence characteristics of the Green-Kubo formulas for different chain lengths and propose minimal production times required for convergence of the transport properties. The chain-length dependence of the transport properties suggests that neither Rouse nor reptation models are applicable in the short-chain regime investigated. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  13. Compressive deformation of ultralong amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Cranford, Steven; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-12-01

    Involved in various neurodegenerative diseases, amyloid fibrils and plaques feature a hierarchical structure, ranging from the atomistic to the micrometer scale. At the atomistic level, a dense and organized hydrogen bond network is resembled in a beta-sheet rich secondary structure, which drives a remarkable stiffness in the range of 10-20GPa, larger than many other biological nanofibrils, a result confirmed by both experiment and theory. However, the understanding of how these exceptional mechanical properties transfer from the atomistic to the nanoscale remains unknown. Here we report a multiscale analysis that, from the atomistic-level structure of a single fibril, extends to the mesoscale level, reaching size scales of hundreds of nanometers. We use parameters directly derived from full atomistic simulations of A β (1-40) amyloid fibrils to parameterize a mesoscopic coarse-grained model, which is used to reproduce the elastic properties of amyloid fibrils. We then apply our mesoscopic model in an analysis of the buckling behavior of amyloid fibrils with different lengths and report a comparison with predictions from continuum beam theory. An important implication of our results is a severe reduction of the effective modulus due to buckling, an effect that could be important to interpret experimental results of ultra-long amyloid fibrils. Our model represents a powerful tool to mechanically characterize molecular structures on the order of hundreds of nanometers to micrometers on the basis of the underlying atomistic behavior. The work provides insight into structural and mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils and may enable further analysis of larger-scale assemblies such as amyloidogenic bundles or plaques as found in disease states.

  14. Orally administrated cinnamon extract reduces β-amyloid oligomerization and corrects cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Frydman-Marom

    Full Text Available An increasing body of evidence indicates that accumulation of soluble oligomeric assemblies of β-amyloid polypeptide (Aβ play a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Specifically, 56 kDa oligomeric species were shown to be correlated with impaired cognitive function in AD model mice. Several reports have documented the inhibition of Aβ plaque formation by compounds from natural sources. Yet, evidence for the ability of common edible elements to modulate Aβ oligomerization remains an unmet challenge. Here we identify a natural substance, based on cinnamon extract (CEppt, which markedly inhibits the formation of toxic Aβ oligomers and prevents the toxicity of Aβ on neuronal PC12 cells. When administered to an AD fly model, CEppt rectified their reduced longevity, fully recovered their locomotion defects and totally abolished tetrameric species of Aβ in their brain. Furthermore, oral administration of CEppt to an aggressive AD transgenic mice model led to marked decrease in 56 kDa Aβ oligomers, reduction of plaques and improvement in cognitive behavior. Our results present a novel prophylactic approach for inhibition of toxic oligomeric Aβ species formation in AD through the utilization of a compound that is currently in use in human diet.

  15. Real-time imaging and quantification of amyloid-beta peptide aggregates by novel quantum-dot nanoprobes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyotaka Tokuraku

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein aggregation plays a major role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. However, direct real-time imaging of protein aggregation, including oligomerization and fibrillization, has never been achieved. Here we demonstrate the preparation of fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystal (quantum dot; QD-labeled amyloid-beta peptide (QDAbeta and its advanced applications. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The QDAbeta construct retained Abeta oligomer-forming ability, and the sizes of these oligomers could be estimated from the relative fluorescence intensities of the imaged spots. Both QDAbeta coaggregation with intact Abeta42 and insertion into fibrils were detected by fluorescence microscopy. The coaggregation process was observed by real-time 3D imaging using slit-scanning confocal microscopy, which showed a typical sigmoid curve with 1.5 h in the lag-time and 12 h until saturation. Inhibition of coaggregation using an anti-Abeta antibody can be observed as 3D images on a microscopic scale. Microglia ingested monomeric QDAbeta more significantly than oligomeric QDAbeta, and the ingested QDAbeta was mainly accumulated in the lysosome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that QDAbeta is a novel nanoprobe for studying Abeta oligomerization and fibrillization in multiple modalities and may be applicable for high-throughput drug screening systems.

  16. Fluorescence detection of lipid-induced oligomeric intermediates involved in lysozyme "amyloid-like" fiber formation driven by anionic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Ana M; Ricardo, Joana C; Fedorov, Aleksander; Prieto, Manuel; Coutinho, Ana

    2013-03-14

    Recent findings implicate that "amyloid-like" fiber formation by several non-amyloidogenic proteins/peptides can be triggered by negatively charged lipid membranes. In order to elucidate the factors that govern the formation of these structures, the interaction of lysozyme with phosphatidylserine-containing lipid vesicles was studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Three consecutive stages in the interaction of Alexa488-fluorescently labeled lysozyme (Lz-A488) with acidic lipid vesicles were identified in ensemble average measurements. The variation of the mean fluorescence lifetime of Lz-A488 as a function of the surface coverage of the liposomes was quantitatively described by a cooperative partition model that assumes that monomeric lysozyme molecules partition into the bilayer surface and reversibly assemble into oligomers with k subunits (k ≥ 6). The global fit to the experimental data covering a wide range of experimental conditions was performed by taking into account electrostatic effects by means of the Gouy-Chapman theory using a single self-consistent pair of parameters (aggregation constant and stoichiometry). The lipid-protein supramolecular assemblies formed at a low lipid/protein molar ratio were further characterized by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy at the single-fiber level, which reported that quenched oligomers are the predominant species in these structures.

  17. Shell model and spectroscopic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poves, P. [Madrid Univ. Autonoma and IFT, UAM/CSIC, E-28049 (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    In these lectures, I introduce the notion of spectroscopic factor in the shell model context. A brief review is given of the present status of the large scale applications of the Interacting Shell Model. The spectroscopic factors and the spectroscopic strength are discussed for nuclei in the vicinity of magic closures and for deformed nuclei. (author)

  18. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular β-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils.

  19. Amyloids or prions? That is the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabate, Raimon; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Batlle, Cristina; Ventura, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Despite major efforts devoted to understanding the phenomenon of prion transmissibility, it is still poorly understood how this property is encoded in the amino acid sequence. In recent years, experimental data on yeast prion domains allow to start at least partially decrypting the sequence requirements of prion formation. These experiments illustrate the need for intrinsically disordered sequence regions enriched with a particularly high proportion of glutamine and asparagine. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that these regions strike a balance between sufficient amyloid nucleation propensity on the one hand and disorder on the other, which ensures availability of the amyloid prone regions but entropically prevents unwanted nucleation and facilitates brittleness required for propagation.

  20. Fluorene- and benzofluorene-cored oligomers as low threshold and high gain amplifying media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazlauskas, Karolis, E-mail: karolis.kazlauskas@ff.vu.lt; Kreiza, Gediminas; Bobrovas, Olegas; Adomėnienė, Ona; Adomėnas, Povilas; Juršėnas, Saulius [Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Jankauskas, Vygintas [Department of Solid State Electronics, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2015-07-27

    Deliberate control of intermolecular interactions in fluorene- and benzofluorene-cored oligomers was attempted via introduction of different-length alkyl moieties to attain high emission amplification and low amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) threshold at high oligomer concentrations. Containing fluorenyl peripheral groups decorated with different-length alkyl moieties, the oligomers were found to express weak concentration quenching of emission, yet excellent carrier drift mobilities (close to 10{sup −2} cm{sup 2}/V/s) in the amorphous films. Owing to the larger radiative decay rates (>1.0 × 10{sup 9 }s{sup −1}) and smaller concentration quenching, fluorene-cored oligomers exhibited down to one order of magnitude lower ASE thresholds at higher concentrations as compared to those of benzofluorene counterparts. The lowest threshold (300 W/cm{sup 2}) obtained for the fluorene-cored oligomers at the concentration of 50 wt % in polymer matrix is among the lowest reported for solution-processed amorphous films in ambient conditions, what makes the oligomers promising for lasing application. Great potential in emission amplification was confirmed by high maximum net gain (77 cm{sup −1}) revealed for these compounds. Although the photostability of the oligomers was affected by photo-oxidation, it was found to be comparable to that of various organic lasing materials including some commercial laser dyes evaluated under similar excitation conditions.

  1. SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION AND RING-OPENING POLYMERIZATION OF CYCLIC (ARYLENE PHOSPHONATE) OLIGOMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-ming Zhang; Qing-zhong Guo; Tian-lu Chen

    2004-01-01

    A series of cyclic (arylene phosphonate) oligomers were prepared by reaction of phenylphosphonic dichloride (PPD) with various bisphenols under pseudo-high dilution conditions via interfacial polycondensation. The yield of cyclic (arylenc phosphonate) oligomers is over 85% by using hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide as phase transfer catalyst (PTC) at 0 ℃. The structures of the cyclic oligomers were confirmed by a combination of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and IR analysis. These cyclic oligomers undergo facile ring-opening polymerization in the melt by using potassium 4,4'-biphenoxide as the initiator to give linear polyphosphonate. Free-radical ring-opening polymerization of cyclic(arylene phosphonate) oligomers containing sulfur linkages was also performed in the melt using 2,2'-dithiobis(benzothiazole) (DTB) as the initiator at 270℃ and the resulting polymer had a Mw of 8 × 103 with a molecular weight distribution of 4. Ring-opening copolymerization of these cyclic oligomers with cyclic carbonate oligomers was also achieved. The average molecular weight of the resulting copolymer is higher than the corresponding homopolymer and the thermal stability of the copolymer is better than the corresponding homopolymer.

  2. Elongation of the C-terminal domain of an anti-amyloid β single-chain variable fragment increases its thermodynamic stability and decreases its aggregation tendency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Hernández, Geovanny; Marin-Argany, Marta; Blasco-Moreno, Bernat; Bonet, Jaume; Oliva, Baldo; Villegas, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) immunotherapy is considered a promising approach to Alzheimer disease treatment. In contrast to the use of complete antibodies, administration of single-chain variable fragments (scFv) has not been associated with either meningoencephalitis or cerebral hemorrhage. ScFv-h3D6 is known to preclude cytotoxicity of the Aβ 1-42 peptide by removing its oligomers from the amyloid pathway. As is the case for other scFv molecules, the recombinant production of scFv-h3D6 is limited by its folding and stability properties. Here, we show that its urea-induced unfolding pathway is characterized by the presence of an intermediate state composed of the unfolded VL domain and the folded VH domain, which suggests the VL domain as a target for thermodynamic stability redesign. The modeling of the 3D structure revealed that the VL domain, located at the C-terminal of the molecule, was ending before its latest β-strand was completed. Three elongation mutants, beyond VL-K107, showed increased thermodynamic stability and lower aggregation tendency, as determined from urea denaturation experiments and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Because the mutants maintained the capability of removing Aβ-oligomers from the amyloid pathway, we expect these traits to increase the half-life of scFv-h3D6 in vivo and, consequently, to decrease the effective doses. Our results led to the improvement of a potential Alzheimer disease treatment and may be extrapolated to other class-I scFv molecules of therapeutic interest.

  3. Bisphenol A accelerates toxic amyloid formation of human islet amyloid polypeptide: a possible link between bisphenol A exposure and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hao; Zhang, Xin; Cheng, Biao; Sun, Yue; Li, Chuanzhou; Li, Ting; Zheng, Ling; Huang, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical compound widely used in manufacturing plastic products. Recent epidemiological studies suggest BPA exposure is positively associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), however the mechanisms underlying this link remain unclear. Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is a hormone synthesized and secreted by the pancreatic β-cells. Misfolding of hIAPP into toxic oligomers and mature fibrils can disrupt cell membrane and lead to β-cell death, which is regarded as one of the causative factors of T2DM. To test whether there are any connections between BPA exposure and hIAPP misfolding, we investigated the effects of BPA on hIAPP aggregation using thioflavin-T based fluorescence, transmission electronic microscopy, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, size-exclusion chromatography, fluorescence-dye leakage assay in an artificial micelle system and the generation of reactive oxygen species in INS-1 cells. We demonstrated that BPA not only dose-dependently promotes the aggregation of hIAPP and enhances the membrane disruption effects of hIAPP, but also promotes the extent of hIAPP aggregation related oxidative stress. Taken together, our results suggest that BPA exposure increased T2DM risk may involve the exacerbated toxic aggregation of hIAPP.

  4. Modelling Ser129 phosphorylation inhibits membrane binding of pore-forming alpha-synuclein oligomers.

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    Georg Sebastian Nübling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In several neurodegenerative diseases, hyperphosphorylation at position Ser129 is found in fibrillar deposits of alpha-synuclein (asyn, implying a pathophysiological role of asyn phosphorylation in neurodegeneration. However, recent animal models applying asyn phosphorylation mimics demonstrated a protective effect of phosphorylation. Since metal-ion induced asyn oligomers were identified as a potential neurotoxic aggregate species with membrane pore-forming abilities, the current study was undertaken to determine effects of asyn phosphorylation on oligomer membrane binding. METHODS: We investigated the influence of S129 phosphorylation on interactions of metal-ion induced asyn oligomers with small unilamellar lipid vesicles (SUV composed of POPC and DPPC applying the phosphorylation mimic asyn129E. Confocal single-particle fluorescence techniques were used to monitor membrane binding at the single-particle level. RESULTS: Binding of asyn129E monomers to gel-state membranes (DPPC-SUV is slightly reduced compared to wild-type asyn, while no interactions with membranes in the liquid-crystalline state (POPC-SUV are seen for both asyn and asyn129E. Conversely, metal-ion induced oligomer formation is markedly increased in asyn129E. Surprisingly, membrane binding to POPC-SUV is nearly absent in Fe(3+ induced asyn129E oligomers and markedly reduced in Al(3+ induced oligomers. CONCLUSION: The protective effect of pseudophosphorylation seen in animal models may be due to impeded oligomer membrane binding. Phosphorylation at Ser129 may thus have a protective effect against neurotoxic asyn oligomers by preventing oligomer membrane binding and disruption of the cellular electrophysiological equilibrium. Importantly, these findings put a new complexion on experimental pharmaceutical interventions against POLO-2 kinase.

  5. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-01-07

    New materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential for addressing climate change. Here, we demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture. Solid-state NMR proves that amyloid fibers containing alkylamine groups reversibly bind carbon dioxide via carbamate formation. Thermodynamic and kinetic capture-and-release tests show the carbamate formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence of water, in both a natural amyloid and designed amyloids having increased carbon dioxide capacity. Heating to 100 °C regenerates the material. These results demonstrate the potential of amyloid fibers for environmental carbon dioxide capture.

  6. Robust trans-amide helical structure of oligomers of bicyclic mimics of β-proline: impact of positional switching of bridgehead substituent on amide cis-trans equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyuan; Otani, Yuko; Liu, Xin; Kawahata, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2014-06-06

    Because homooligomers of 7-azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2-endo-carboxylic acid, a bridged β-proline analogue with a substituent installed at the remote C4-bridgehead position, completely biased the amide cis-trans equilibrium to the cis-amide structure, we expected that introduction of a substituent at the C1-bridgehead position adjacent to the carboxylic acid moiety, rather than the remote C4-bridgehead position, would tip the cis-trans amide equilibrium toward trans-amide structure without the aid of hydrogen bonding. Thus, in this work we established an efficient synthetic route to an optically active bicyclic analogue of 1,1-disubstituted β-proline, bearing a substituent at the C1-bridgehead position. Crystallographic, spectroscopic, and computational studies showed that indeed oligomers of this analogue take a consistent helical structure involving all-trans-amide linkages, independently of the number of residues, from the dimer up to the octamer. Oligomers composed of (R)-β-amino acid units form an extended left-handed helix with about 2.7 residues per turn and an approximately 4.0 Å rise per residue, characterized by complete lack of main-chain hydrogen bonding. This unique helical structure shows some similarity in shape to the trans-amide-based polyproline II (PPII) helix. The present helix was stable in various kinds of solvents such as alcohols. The present work provided a fundamental structural basis for future applications.

  7. Oligomers Solidification Depending on the Nature, Molecular Mass, Type and Reactional Group Containing

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    Vasiliyp. Medvedev

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to regularity defining of curing oligomers, and prepolymers with hydroxyl and isocyanate groups and double bonds reactive oligomers.The features of the spatial structure of elasticpolyurethane based oligomers and prepolymers with the definition of the physical and chemical bonds share, as well as the chain interval length between grid points were researched. The possibility of oligodiendiolecuring in the presence of a methacrylate component on the mechanism of radical polymerization was experimentally confirmed.To achieve the objectives rheokinetic method of analysis (rotational viscometer, thermometric and iodometric methods, IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetrywere used.

  8. Electrochemical and optical properties of biphenyl bridged-dicarbazole oligomer films: Electropolymerization and electrochromism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyuncu, Sermet [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, 17020 Canakkale (Turkey); Can Vocational School, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, 17400 Canakkale (Turkey)], E-mail: sermetkoyuncu@hotmail.com; Gultekin, Burak [Solar Energy Institute, Ege University, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Zafer, Ceylan [Solar Energy Institute, Ege University, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: ceylan.zafer@ege.edu.tr; Bilgili, Hakan; Can, Mustafa; Demic, Serafettin [Solar Energy Institute, Ege University, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Kaya, Ismet [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, 17020 Canakkale (Turkey); Icli, Siddik [Solar Energy Institute, Ege University, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey)

    2009-10-01

    4,4'-Di(N-carbazoyl)biphenyl monomer (CBP) was synthesized and coated onto ITO-glass surface by electrochemical oxidative polymerization. Its CV shows two distinct one-electron and stepwise oxidation processes occurred at 1.29 and 1.61 V. By using this property, the monomer was electrochemically polymerized separately at these oxidation states and thus, two different oligomer films were obtained afterwards. Their spectro-electrochemical and electrochromic properties were also investigated. Switching ability of the oligomers was evaluated by kinetic studies upon measuring the percent transmittance (%T) at their maximum contrast point, indicating that these oligomers were found to be suitable material for electrochromic devices.

  9. Coulombic free energy and salt ion association per phosphate of all-atom models of DNA oligomer: dependence on oligomer size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkel, Irina A; Record, M Thomas

    2012-08-23

    We investigate how the coulombic Gibbs free energy and salt ion association per phosphate charge of DNA oligomers vary with oligomer size (i.e. number of charged residues ∣ZD∣) at 0.15 M univalent salt by non-linear Poisson Boltzmann (NLPB) analysis of all-atom DNA models. Calculations of these quantities ([Formula: see text], [Formula: see text]) are performed for short and long double-stranded (ds) and single-stranded (ss) DNA oligomers, ranging from 4 to 118 phosphates (ds) and from 2 to 59 phosphates (ss). Behaviors of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] as functions of ∣ZD∣ provide a measure of the range of the coulombic end effect and determine the size of an oligomer at which an interior region with the properties (per charge) of the infinite-length polyelectrolyte first appears. This size (10-11 phosphates at each end for ds DNA and 6-9 for ss DNA at 0.15 M salt) is in close agreement with values obtained previously by Monte Carlo and NLPB calculations for cylindrical models of polyions, and by analysis of binding of oligocations to DNA oligomers. Differences in [Formula: see text] and in [Formula: see text] between ss and ds DNA are used to predict effects of oligomeric size and salt concentration on duplex stability in the vicinity of 0.15 M salt. Results of all-atom calculations are compared with results of less structurally detailed models and with experimental data.

  10. Islet amyloid polypeptide forms rigid lipid-protein amyloid fibrils on supported phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanov, Yegor A; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2008-02-08

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) forms fibrillar amyloid deposits in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and its misfolding and aggregation are thought to contribute to beta-cell death. Increasing evidence suggests that IAPP fibrillization is strongly influenced by lipid membranes and, vice versa, that the membrane architecture and integrity are severely affected by amyloid growth. Here, we report direct fluorescence microscopic observations of the morphological transformations accompanying IAPP fibrillization on the surface of supported lipid membranes. Within minutes of application in submicromolar concentrations, IAPP caused extensive remodeling of the membrane including formation of defects, vesiculation, and tubulation. The effects of IAPP concentration, ionic strength, and the presence of amyloid seeds on the bilayer perturbation and peptide aggregation were examined. Growth of amyloid fibrils was visualized using fluorescently labeled IAPP or thioflavin T staining. Two-color imaging of the peptide and membranes revealed that the fibrils were initially composed of the peptide only, and vesiculation occurred in the points where growing fibers touched the lipid membrane. Interestingly, after 2-5 h of incubation, IAPP fibers became "wrapped" by lipid membranes derived from the supported membrane. Progressive increase in molecular-level association between amyloid and membranes in the maturing fibers was confirmed by Förster resonance energy transfer spectroscopy.

  11. Self-assembly of a nine-residue amyloid-forming peptide fragment of SARS corona virus E-protein: mechanism of self aggregation and amyloid-inhibition of hIAPP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anirban; Pithadia, Amit S; Bhat, Jyotsna; Bera, Supriyo; Midya, Anupam; Fierke, Carol A; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Bhunia, Anirban

    2015-04-01

    Molecular self-assembly, a phenomenon widely observed in nature, has been exploited through organic molecules, proteins, DNA, and peptides to study complex biological systems. These self-assembly systems may also be used in understanding the molecular and structural biology which can inspire the design and synthesis of increasingly complex biomaterials. Specifically, use of these building blocks to investigate protein folding and misfolding has been of particular value since it can provide tremendous insights into peptide aggregation related to a variety of protein misfolding diseases, or amyloid diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type-II diabetes). Herein, the self-assembly of TK9, a nine-residue peptide of the extra membrane C-terminal tail of the SARS corona virus envelope, and its variants were characterized through biophysical, spectroscopic, and simulated studies, and it was confirmed that the structure of these peptides influences their aggregation propensity, hence, mimicking amyloid proteins. TK9, which forms a beta-sheet rich fibril, contains a key sequence motif that may be critical for beta-sheet formation, thus making it an interesting system to study amyloid fibrillation. TK9 aggregates were further examined through simulations to evaluate the possible intra- and interpeptide interactions at the molecular level. These self-assembly peptides can also serve as amyloid inhibitors through hydrophobic and electrophilic recognition interactions. Our results show that TK9 inhibits the fibrillation of hIAPP, a 37 amino acid peptide implicated in the pathology of type-II diabetes. Thus, biophysical and NMR experimental results have revealed a molecular level understanding of peptide folding events, as well as the inhibition of amyloid-protein aggregation are reported.

  12. Electroanalytical and spectroscopic characterization of poly(o-phenylenediamine) grown on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giglio, Elvira; Losito, Ilario; Torsi, Luisa; Sabbatini, Luigia; Zambonin, Pier Giorgio

    2003-03-01

    The polymerization of ortho-phenylenediamine (o-PD) on Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) at different pH (1,3,5,7) was investigated by electroanalytical and spectroscopic methods. Cyclic voltammetry was used both to polymerize o-PD and to study the electroactivity of the resulting poly(ortho-phenylenediamine) (PPD) film. A redox couple associated to the PPD electroactivity, deeply influenced by the pH adopted during polymerization, was recorded. A correlation between this feature and the electrochemistry shown by the oligomers of o-PD, generated in solution during the polymer synthesis, was also found. A comparison between the absorption spectra, in the visible region, of the soluble oligomers and of the PPD films was also performed, suggesting that changes in both the polymer and the oligomer structure occur and are highly related to the polymerization pH. In particular, a higher degree of conjugation is exhibited by the PPD films electrosynthesised at lower pH and this likely explains the higher conductivity as well as the higher electroactivity shown by the material obtained in these conditions.

  13. Nanoparticles and amyloid systems: A fatal encounter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, Bernd [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, Chemical Department, Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig, Germany and Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Linnéstr. 3, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-10-06

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many products of our daily life, however, there has been concern that they may also be harmful to human health. Recently NPs have been found to accelerate the fibrillation kinetics of amyloid systems. In the past this has been preliminarily attributed to a nucleation effect. Nanoparticle surfaces and interfaces appear to limit the degrees of freedom of amyloid systems (i.e., peptides and proteins) due to a phase space constraint such that rapid cross-beta structures are formed faster than without interface interactions and in turn fibril formation is enhanced significantly. Here we explore if lipid bilayers in the form of liposomes (140nm) also accelerate fibril formation for amyloid systems. We have investigated a fragment NNFGAIL of the Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) in contact with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) liposomes in aqueous solution. We found that the lipid bilayer vesicles do accelerate fibril formation in time-resolved off-line detected atomic force microscopy experiments. Characteristic Thioflavine-T fluorescence on the same structures verify that the structures consist of aggregated peptides in a typical cross-β-structure arrangement.

  14. Serum amyloid P inhibits dermal wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The repair of open wounds depends on granulation tissue formation and contraction, which is primarily mediated by myofibroblasts. A subset of myofibroblasts originates from bone-marrow-derived monocytes which differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes. Serum amyloid P (SAP) inhibits ...

  15. Bap: A New Type of Functional Amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martino, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria can build a biofilm matrix scaffold from exopolysaccharides or proteins, and DNA. In a recent report, Taglialegna and colleagues show that pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus produces a protein scaffold based on amyloid assembly of fragments from the biofilm-associated protein. Amyloidogenesis occurs in response to environmental signals.

  16. Fibrillar amyloid plaque formation precedes microglial activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian K E Jung

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease (AD, hallmark β-amyloid deposits are characterized by the presence of activated microglia around them. Despite an extensive characterization of the relation of amyloid plaques with microglia, little is known about the initiation of this interaction. In this study, the detailed investigation of very small plaques in brain slices in AD transgenic mice of the line APP-PS1(dE9 revealed different levels of microglia recruitment. Analysing plaques with a diameter of up to 10 μm we find that only the half are associated with clear morphologically activated microglia. Utilizing in vivo imaging of new appearing amyloid plaques in double-transgenic APP-PS1(dE9xCX3CR1+/- mice further characterized the dynamic of morphological microglia activation. We observed no correlation of morphological microglia activation and plaque volume or plaque lifetime. Taken together, our results demonstrate a very prominent variation in size as well as in lifetime of new plaques relative to the state of microglia reaction. These observations might question the existing view that amyloid deposits by themselves are sufficient to attract and activate microglia in vivo.

  17. Graphene oxide strongly inhibits amyloid beta fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Akhavan, Omid; Ghavami, Mahdi; Rezaee, Farhad; Ghiasi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin

    2012-01-01

    Since amyloid beta fibrillation (AbF) plays an important role in the development of neurodegenerative diseases, we investigated the effect of graphene oxide (GO) and their protein-coated surfaces on the kinetics of Ab fibrillation in the aqueous solution. We showed that GO and their protein-covered

  18. Phospholipids as inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation

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    K. O. Vus

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils are the protein aggregates, whose formation is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, systemic amyloidosis, etc. Since there is no effective ways to treat these diseases, developing the new anti-amyloid drugs is of great importance. In this study a series of phospholipids have been tested for their ability to inhibit lysozyme and insulin amyloid fibril formation at acidic or neutral pH and elevated temperature.  The lag time, elongation rate and fibrillization extent were estimated using Thioflavin T fluorescence assay. It is found that the oxidized and charged phospholipids, included into the liposomes, were the most effective inhibitors of the protein fibrillization. By comparing the magnitude and direction of the lipid effect in different lipid-protein systems it was concluded that the reduction of the amyloid fibril formation is governed by hydrophobic and specific liposome-protein interactions. It is hypothesized that the presence of the surface formed by the lipid polar heads is critical for reducing the protein fibrillization extent.

  19. Computational Studies of Beta Amyloid (Aβ42 with p75NTR Receptor: A Novel Therapeutic Target in Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Shine Devarajan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of beta amyloid plaques (Aβ which can induce neurite degeneration and progressive dementia. It has been identified that neuronal apoptosis is induced by binding of Aβ42 to pan neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR and gave the possibility that beta amyloid oligomer is a ligand for p75NTR. However, the atomic contact point responsible for molecular interactions and conformational changes of the protein upon binding was not studied in detail. In view of this, we conducted a molecular docking and simulation study to investigate the binding behaviour of Aβ42 monomer with p75NTR ectodomain. Furthermore, we proposed a p75NTR-ectodomain-Aβ42 complex model. Our data revealed that, Aβ42 specifically recognizes CRD1 and CRD2 domains of the receptor and formed a “cap” like structure at the N-terminal of receptor which is stabilized by a network of hydrogen bonds. These findings are supported by molecular dynamics simulation that Aβ42 showed distinct structural alterations at N- and C-terminal regions due to the influence of the receptor binding site. Overall, the present study gives more structural insight on the molecular interactions of beta amyloid protein involved in the activation of p75NTR receptor.

  20. Pro-Inflammatory S100A8 and S100A9 Proteins: Self-Assembly into Multifunctional Native and Amyloid Complexes

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    Ludmilla A. Morozova-Roche

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available S100A8 and S100A9 are EF-hand Ca2+ binding proteins belonging to the S100 family. They are abundant in cytosol of phagocytes and play critical roles in numerous cellular processes such as motility and danger signaling by interacting and modulating the activity of target proteins. S100A8 and S100A9 expression levels increased in many types of cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and they are implicated in the numerous disease pathologies. The Ca2+ and Zn2+-binding properties of S100A8/A9 have a pivotal influence on their conformation and oligomerization state, including self-assembly into homo- and heterodimers, tetramers and larger oligomers. Here we review how the unique chemical and conformational properties of individual proteins and their structural plasticity at the quaternary level account for S100A8/A9 functional diversity. Additional functional diversification occurs via non-covalent assembly into oligomeric and fibrillar amyloid complexes discovered in the aging prostate and reproduced in vitro. This process is also regulated by Ca2+and Zn2+-binding and effectively competes with the formation of the native complexes. High intrinsic amyloid-forming capacity of S100A8/A9 proteins may lead to their amyloid depositions in numerous ailments characterized by their elevated expression patterns and have additional pathological significance requiring further thorough investigation.

  1. Different effect of vitamin D2 and vitamin D3 on amyloid-β40 aggregation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suenaga, Midori; Takahashi, Hironobu; Imagawa, Hiroshi; Wagatsuma, Michiru; Ouma, Shinji; Tsuboi, Yoshio; Furuta, Akiko; Matsunaga, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    The seeding of amyloid-β 40 (Aβ40) oligomers from monomers is the initial step of Aβ aggregation, and many reports have suggested that cholesterol enhances this step. We studied the potential of secosteroid vitamin D derivatives for Aβ40 aggregation in vitro. The quartz-crystal microbalance technique demonstrated that vitamin D3 does not show any effect on Aβ40 aggregation while vitamin D2 promoted it and docking simulation but that vitamin D2 has high potential in this regard. Thus, stacking of the Phe19 benzene ring in Aβ40 and the C22-C23 double bond in vitamin D2 may alter the energy of these molecules. Electron microscopy revealed the potential of vitamin D2 to increase Aβ40 aggregation. Thioflavin-T assays indicated that Vitamin D2 induced increased fluorescence at 490 nm, as typically observed for amyloid fibrils but also for protofibrils; in both cases this reflects of the increase of β-sheet contents. Aβ40 aggregation was further confirmed in ELISA, SDS-PAGE and dot blot analysis which revealed changes in protease K resistance. These results suggest a possible mechanism, of how vitamin D2 could increase Aβ40 aggregation and the docking simulation explains, why the same is not observed with vitamin D3.

  2. Pressure effects on α-synuclein amyloid fibrils: An experimental investigation on their dissociation and reversible nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccirilli, Federica; Plotegher, Nicoletta; Spinozzi, Francesco; Bubacco, Luigi; Mariani, Paolo; Beltramini, Mariano; Tessari, Isabella; Militello, Valeria; Perucchi, Andrea; Amenitsch, Heinz; Baldassarri, Enrico; Steinhart, Milos; Lupi, Stefano; Ortore, Maria Grazia

    2017-08-01

    α-synuclein amyloid fibrils are found in surviving neurons of Parkinson's disease affected patients, but the role they play in the disease development is still under debate. A growing number of evidences points to soluble oligomers as the major cytotoxic species, while insoluble fibrillar aggregates could even play a protection role. In this work, we investigate α-synuclein fibrils dissociation induced at high pressure by means of Small Angle X-ray Scattering and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Fibrils were produced from wild type α-synuclein and two familial mutants, A30P and A53T. Our results enlighten the different reversible nature of α-synuclein fibrils fragmentation at high pressure and suggest water excluded volumes presence in the fibrils core. Wild type and A30P species stabilized at high pressure are highly amyloidogenic and quickly re-associate into fibrils upon decompression, while A53T species shows a partial reversibility of the process likely due to the presence of an intermediate oligomeric state stabilized at high pressure. The amyloid fibrils dissociation process is here suggested to be associated to a negative activation volume, supporting the notion that α-synuclein fibrils are in a high-volume and high-compressibility state and hinting at the presence of a hydration-mediated activated state from which dissociation occurs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Wnt Signaling Prevents the Aβ Oligomer-Induced Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Opening Preserving Mitochondrial Structure in Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrázola, Macarena S.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Cisternas, Pedro; Ordenes, Daniela; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder mainly known for synaptic impairment and neuronal cell loss, affecting memory processes. Beside these damages, mitochondria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of AD through the induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). The mPTP is a non-selective pore that is formed under apoptotic conditions, disturbing mitochondrial structure and thus, neuronal viability. In AD, Aβ oligomers (Aβos) favor the opening of the pore, activating mitochondria-dependent neuronal cell death cascades. The Wnt signaling activated through the ligand Wnt3a has been described as a neuroprotective signaling pathway against amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide toxicity in AD. However, the mechanisms by which Wnt signaling prevents Aβos-induced neuronal cell death are unclear. We proposed here to study whether Wnt signaling protects neurons earlier than the late damages in the progression of the disease, through the preservation of the mitochondrial structure by the mPTP inhibition. To study specific events related to mitochondrial permeabilization we performed live-cell imaging from primary rat hippocampal neurons, and electron microscopy to analyze the mitochondrial morphology and structure. We report here that Wnt3a prevents an Aβos-induced cascade of mitochondrial events that leads to neuronal cell death. This cascade involves (a) mPTP opening, (b) mitochondrial swelling, (c) mitochondrial membrane potential loss and (d) cytochrome c release, thus leading to neuronal cell death. Furthermore, our results suggest that the activation of the Wnt signaling prevents mPTP opening by two possible mechanisms, which involve the inhibition of mitochondrial GSK-3β and/or the modulation of mitochondrial hexokinase II levels and activity. This study suggests a possible new approach for the treatment of AD from a mitochondrial perspective, and will also open new lines of study in the field of Wnt signaling in neuroprotection

  4. Microglial phagocytosis induced by fibrillar β-amyloid is attenuated by oligomeric β-amyloid: implications for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Nan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive microglia are associated with β-amyloid (Aβ deposit and clearance in Alzhiemer's Disease (AD. Paradoxically, entocranial resident microglia fail to trigger an effective phagocytic response to clear Aβ deposits although they mainly exist in an "activated" state. Oligomeric Aβ (oAβ, a recent target in the pathogenesis of AD, can induce more potent neurotoxicity when compared with fibrillar Aβ (fAβ. However, the role of the different Aβ forms in microglial phagocytosis, induction of inflammation and oxidation, and subsequent regulation of phagocytic receptor system, remain unclear. Results We demonstrated that Aβ(1-42 fibrils, not Aβ(1-42 oligomers, increased the microglial phagocytosis. Intriguingly, the pretreatment of microglia with oAβ(1-42 not only attenuated fAβ(1-42-triggered classical phagocytic response to fluorescent microspheres but also significantly inhibited phagocytosis of fluorescent labeled fAβ(1-42. Compared with the fAβ(1-42 treatment, the oAβ(1-42 treatment resulted in a rapid and transient increase in interleukin 1β (IL-1β level and produced higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, nitric oxide (NO, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and intracellular superoxide anion (SOA. The further results demonstrated that microglial phagocytosis was negatively correlated with inflammatory mediators in this process and that the capacity of phagocytosis in fAβ(1-42-induced microglia was decreased by IL-1β, lippolysaccharide (LPS and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP. The decreased phagocytosis could be relieved by pyrrolidone dithiocarbamate (PDTC, a nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB inhibitor, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a free radical scavenger. These results suggest that the oAβ-impaired phagocytosis is mediated through inflammation and oxidative stress-mediated mechanism in microglial cells. Furthermore, oAβ(1-42 stimulation reduced the mRNA expression of CD36, integrin β1 (Itgb1, and Ig

  5. Drug Development in Conformational Diseases: A Novel Family of Chemical Chaperones that Bind and Stabilise Several Polymorphic Amyloid Structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquiza Sablón-Carrazana

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of conformational diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer, poses a global challenge at many different levels. It has devastating effects on the sufferers as well as a tremendous economic impact on families and the health system. In this work, we apply a cross-functional approach that combines ideas, concepts and technologies from several disciplines in order to study, in silico and in vitro, the role of a novel chemical chaperones family (NCHCHF in processes of protein aggregation in conformational diseases. Given that Serum Albumin (SA is the most abundant protein in the blood of mammals, and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA is an off-the-shelf protein available in most labs around the world, we compared the ligandability of BSA:NCHCHF with the interaction sites in the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP:NCHCHF, and in the amyloid pharmacophore fragments (Aβ17-42 and Aβ16-21:NCHCHF. We posit that the merging of this interaction sites is a meta-structure of pharmacophore which allows the development of chaperones that can prevent protein aggregation at various states from: stabilizing the native state to destabilizing oligomeric state and protofilament. Furthermore to stabilize fibrillar structures, thus decreasing the amount of toxic oligomers in solution, as is the case with the NCHCHF. The paper demonstrates how a set of NCHCHF can be used for studying and potentially treating the various physiopathological stages of a conformational disease. For instance, when dealing with an acute phase of cytotoxicity, what is needed is the recruitment of cytotoxic oligomers, thus chaperone F, which accelerates fiber formation, would be very useful; whereas in a chronic stage it is better to have chaperones A, B, C, and D, which stabilize the native and fibril structures halting self-catalysis and the creation of cytotoxic oligomers as a consequence of fiber formation. Furthermore, all the

  6. Drug Development in Conformational Diseases: A Novel Family of Chemical Chaperones that Bind and Stabilise Several Polymorphic Amyloid Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencomo, Alberto; Lara-Martínez, Reyna; Rivera-Marrero, Suchitil; Domínguez, Guadalupe; Pérez-Perera, Rafaela; Jiménez-García, Luis Felipe; Altamirano-Bustamante, Nelly F.; Diaz-Delgado, Massiel; Vedrenne, Fernand; Rivillas-Acevedo, Lina; Pasten-Hidalgo, Karina; Segura-Valdez, María de Lourdes; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Garrido-Magaña, Eulalia; Perera-Pintado, Alejandro; Prats-Capote, Anaís; Rodríguez-Tanty, Chryslaine; Altamirano-Bustamante, Myriam M.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of conformational diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer, poses a global challenge at many different levels. It has devastating effects on the sufferers as well as a tremendous economic impact on families and the health system. In this work, we apply a cross-functional approach that combines ideas, concepts and technologies from several disciplines in order to study, in silico and in vitro, the role of a novel chemical chaperones family (NCHCHF) in processes of protein aggregation in conformational diseases. Given that Serum Albumin (SA) is the most abundant protein in the blood of mammals, and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) is an off-the-shelf protein available in most labs around the world, we compared the ligandability of BSA:NCHCHF with the interaction sites in the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP):NCHCHF, and in the amyloid pharmacophore fragments (Aβ17–42 and Aβ16–21):NCHCHF. We posit that the merging of this interaction sites is a meta-structure of pharmacophore which allows the development of chaperones that can prevent protein aggregation at various states from: stabilizing the native state to destabilizing oligomeric state and protofilament. Furthermore to stabilize fibrillar structures, thus decreasing the amount of toxic oligomers in solution, as is the case with the NCHCHF. The paper demonstrates how a set of NCHCHF can be used for studying and potentially treating the various physiopathological stages of a conformational disease. For instance, when dealing with an acute phase of cytotoxicity, what is needed is the recruitment of cytotoxic oligomers, thus chaperone F, which accelerates fiber formation, would be very useful; whereas in a chronic stage it is better to have chaperones A, B, C, and D, which stabilize the native and fibril structures halting self-catalysis and the creation of cytotoxic oligomers as a consequence of fiber formation. Furthermore, all the chaperones are

  7. Evaluation of membrane models and their composition for islet amyloid polypeptide-membrane aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillon, Lucie; Lequin, Olivier; Khemtémourian, Lucie

    2013-09-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) forms amyloid fibrils in the pancreatic islets of patients suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The formation of IAPP fibrils has been shown to cause membrane damage which most likely is responsible for the death of pancreatic islet β-cells during the pathogenesis of T2DM. Several studies have demonstrated a clear interaction between IAPP and lipid membranes. However the effect of different lipid compositions and of various membrane mimetics (including micelles, bicelles, SUV and LUV) on fibril formation kinetics and fibril morphology has not yet systematically been analysed. Here we report that the interaction of IAPP with various membrane models promoted different processes of fibril formation. Our data reveal that in SDS and DPC micelles, IAPP adopts a stable α-helical structure for several days, suggesting that the micelle models may stabilize monomeric or small oligomeric species of IAPP. In contrast, zwitterionic DMPC/DHPC bicelles and DOPC SUV accelerate the fibril formation compared to zwitterionic DOPC LUV, indicating that the size of the membrane model and its curvature influence the fibrillation process. Negatively charged membranes decrease the lag-time of the fibril formation kinetics while phosphatidylethanolamine and cholesterol have an opposite effect, probably due to the modulation of the physical properties of the membrane and/or due to direct interactions with IAPP within the membrane core. Finally, our results show that the modulation of lipid composition influences not only the growth of fibrils at the membrane surface but also the interactions of β-sheet oligomers with membranes.

  8. Aluminum, copper, iron and zinc differentially alter amyloid-Aβ(1-42) aggregation and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognin, Silvia; Messori, Luigi; Drago, Denise; Gabbiani, Chiara; Cendron, Laura; Zatta, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    Amyloid-β(1-42) (Aβ) is believed to play a crucial role in the ethiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). In particular, its interactions with biologically relevant metal ions may lead to the formation of highly neurotoxic complexes. Here we describe the species that are formed upon reacting Aβ with several biometals, namely copper, zinc, iron, and with non-physiological aluminum to assess whether different metal ions are able to differently drive Aβ aggregation. The nature of the resulting Aβ-metal complexes and of the respective aggregates was ascertained through a number of biophysical techniques, including electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, dynamic light scattering, fluorescence, transmission electron microscopy and by the use of conformation-sensitive antibodies (OC, αAPF). Metal binding to Aβ is shown to confer highly different chemical properties to the resulting complexes; accordingly, their overall aggregation behaviour was deeply modified. Both aluminum(III) and iron(III) ions were found to induce peculiar aggregation properties, ultimately leading to the formation of annular protofibrils and of fibrillar oligomers. Notably, only Aβ-aluminum was characterized by the presence of a relevant percentage of aggregates with a mean radius slightly smaller than 30 nm. In contrast, both zinc(II) and copper(II) ions completely prevented the formation of soluble fibrillary aggregates. The biological effects of the various Aβ-metal complexes were studied in neuroblastoma cell cultures: Aβ-aluminum turned out to be the only species capable of triggering amyloid precursor and tau181 protein overproduction. Our results point out that Al can effectively interact with Aβ, forming "structured" aggregates with peculiar biophysical properties which are associated with a high neurotoxicity.

  9. Diffusion of oligomers in latex systems A route to low volatile organic compound (VOC) coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fasano, David M; Fitzwater, Susan J; Lau, Willie; Sheppard, Aurelia C

    2010-01-01

    We synthesize specially designed latex polymer systems by an in situ emulsion polymerization process that yields latex particles with both a high molecular weight polymer phase and a low molecular weight oligomer phase...

  10. PHOTOPHYSICAL BEHAVIORS OF OLIGOMER BASED ON 1,1'-BINAPHTHOL WITH 3,3'-ACETYLENE SPACER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The photophysical behaviors of the oligomer based on 1,1'-binaphthol with 3,3'-acetylene spacer were investigated. The oligomer molecule has a naphthyl-acetylenenaphthyl effective conjugation segment. The atropic of the 1,1'-binaphthyl moiety led to twisted and rigid main chain in the oligomer. With the changes of the external environment such as solvents used, solvent viscosity and ambient temperature, the wavelengths of absorption and the intensities of fluorescence and absorption are changed slightly, but the fluorescent intensity and quantum yield can be influenced. The luminescent behaviors of the oligomer exhibit twisted intramolecular charge transfer characteristics, which could have a potential application in wavelength-stable light emitting material adaptable to ambient temperature and the solvents used in wide range.

  11. Multi-pathway excited state relaxation of adenine oligomers in aqueous solution: a joint theoretical and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyasz, Akos; Gustavsson, Thomas; Onidas, Delphine; Changenet-Barret, Pascale; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Improta, Roberto

    2013-03-11

    The singlet excited states of adenine oligomers, model systems widely used for the understanding of the interaction of ultraviolet radiation with DNA, are investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and time-dependent (TD) DFT calculations. Fluorescence decays, fluorescence anisotropy decays, and time-resolved fluorescence spectra are recorded from the femtosecond to the nanosecond timescales for single strand (dA)20 in aqueous solution. These experimental observations and, in particular, the comparison of the fluorescence behavior upon UVC and UVA excitation allow the identification of various types of electronic transitions with different energy and polarization. Calculations performed for up to five stacked 9-methyladenines, taking into account the solvent, show that different excited states are responsible for the absorption in the UVC and UVA spectral domains. Independently of the number of bases, bright excitons may evolve toward two types of excited dimers having π-π* or charge-transfer character, each one distinguished by its own geometry and spectroscopic signature. According to the picture arising from the joint experimental and theoretical investigation, UVC-induced fluorescence contains contribution from 1) exciton states with a different degree of localization, decaying within a few ps, 2) "neutral" excited dimers decaying on the sub-nanosecond timescale, being the dominant species, and 3) charge-transfer states decaying on the nanosecond timescale. The majority of the photons emitted upon UVA excitation are related to charge-transfer states.

  12. Redox cycling of copper-amyloid β 1-16 peptide complexes is highly dependent on the coordination mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujano-Ortiz, Lidia G; González, Felipe J; Quintanar, Liliana

    2015-01-05

    Copper (Cu)-amyloid β (Aβ) interactions play a role in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. This work presents a spectroscopic and electrochemical study of two physiologically relevant Aβ-Cu(II) complexes, as a function of pH and relative Cu-Aβ(1-16) concentrations. Our results reveal that these coordination modes display distinct redox behaviors and provide experimental evidence for the existence of an intermediate Cu(I) species. A mechanism for the redox cycling of these complexes is proposed, providing further insight into the redox relevance of Aβ-Cu interactions.

  13. Bacterial resistance to antisense peptide phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Susan E; Reese, Kaleb A; Mitev, Georgi M; Mullen, Valerie; Johnson, Rudd C; Pomraning, Kyle R; Mellbye, Brett L; Tilley, Lucas D; Iversen, Patrick L; Freitag, Michael; Geller, Bruce L

    2012-12-01

    Peptide phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PPMOs) are synthetic DNA mimics that bind cRNA and inhibit bacterial gene expression. The PPMO (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP (where R is arginine, F, phenylalanine, X is 6-aminohexanoic acid, B is β-alanine, and AcpP is acyl carrier protein) is complementary to 11 bases of the essential gene acpP (which encodes acyl carrier protein). The MIC of (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP was 2.5 μM (14 μg/ml) in Escherichia coli W3110. The rate of spontaneous resistance of E. coli to (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP was 4 × 10(-7) mutations/cell division. A spontaneous (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP-resistant mutant (PR200.1) was isolated. The MIC of (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP was 40 μM (224 μg/ml) for PR200.1. The MICs of standard antibiotics for PR200.1 and W3110 were identical. The sequence of acpP was identical in PR200.1 and W3110. PR200.1 was also resistant to other PPMOs conjugated to (RFF)(3)RXB or peptides with a similar composition or pattern of cationic and nonpolar residues. Genomic sequencing of PR200.1 identified a mutation in sbmA, which encodes an active transport protein. In separate experiments, a (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP-resistant isolate (RR3) was selected from a transposome library, and the insertion was mapped to sbmA. Genetic complementation of PR200.1 or RR3 with sbmA restored susceptibility to (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP. Deletion of sbmA caused resistance to (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP. We conclude that resistance to (RFF)(3)RXB-AcpP was linked to the peptide and not the phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer, dependent on the composition or repeating pattern of amino acids, and caused by mutations in sbmA. The data further suggest that (RFF)(3)R-XB PPMOs may be transported across the plasma membrane by SbmA.

  14. Identification And Characterization Of Oligomers As Major Components Of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalberer, M. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Paulsen, D. [PSI and ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Sax, M. [ETH Zuerich and PSI (Switzerland); Steinbacher, M.; Dommen, J.; Prevot, A.S.H.; Fisseha, R.; Richter, R.; Weingartner, E.; Frankevich, V. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Zenobi, R. [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Baltensperger, U.

    2005-03-01

    The chemical composition and volatility of organic aerosols formed during photo-oxidation of volatile organic compounds were measured in the PSI smog chamber. With mass spectrometric and aerosol volatility methods, oligomers were identified for the first time as main constituents of these organic aerosols. Measurements showed that oligomers account for about 50% of the aerosol mass after more than 20 hours of aging. (author)

  15. KCTD Hetero-oligomers Confer Unique Kinetic Properties on Hippocampal GABAB Receptor-Induced K+ Currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzius, Thorsten; Turecek, Rostislav; Seddik, Riad; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Tiao, Jim; Rem, Pascal D; Metz, Michaela; Kralikova, Michaela; Bouvier, Michel; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard

    2017-02-01

    GABAB receptors are the G-protein coupled receptors for the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, GABA. GABAB receptors were shown to associate with homo-oligomers of auxiliary KCTD8, KCTD12, KCTD12b, and KCTD16 subunits (named after their T1 K(+)-channel tetramerization domain) that regulate G-protein signaling of the receptor. Here we provide evidence that GABAB receptors also associate with hetero-oligomers of KCTD subunits. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicate that two-thirds of the KCTD16 proteins in the hippocampus of adult mice associate with KCTD12. We show that the KCTD proteins hetero-oligomerize through self-interacting T1 and H1 homology domains. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer measurements in live cells reveal that KCTD12/KCTD16 hetero-oligomers associate with both the receptor and the G-protein. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrate that KCTD12/KCTD16 hetero-oligomers impart unique kinetic properties on G-protein-activated Kir3 currents. During prolonged receptor activation (one min) KCTD12/KCTD16 hetero-oligomers produce moderately desensitizing fast deactivating K(+) currents, whereas KCTD12 and KCTD16 homo-oligomers produce strongly desensitizing fast deactivating currents and nondesensitizing slowly deactivating currents, respectively. During short activation (2 s) KCTD12/KCTD16 hetero-oligomers produce nondesensitizing slowly deactivating currents. Electrophysiological recordings from hippocampal neurons of KCTD knock-out mice are consistent with these findings and indicate that KCTD12/KCTD16 hetero-oligomers increase the duration of slow IPSCs. In summary, our data demonstrate that simultaneous assembly of distinct KCTDs at the receptor increases the molecular and functional repertoire of native GABAB receptors and modulates physiologically induced K(+) current responses in the hippocampus.

  16. Mitochondrial oligomers boost glycolysis in cancer stem cells to facilitate blebbishield-mediated transformation after apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jinesh, GG; Molina, JR; Huang, L.; Laing, NM; Mills, GB; Bar-Eli, M; Kamat, AM

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis culminates in secondary necrosis due to lack of ATP. Cancer stem cells form spheres after apoptosis by evoking the blebbishield emergency program. Hence, determining how blebbishields avoid secondary necrosis is crucial. Here we demonstrate that N-Myc and VEGFR2 control transformation from blebbishields, during which oligomers of K-Ras, p27, BAD, Bax, and Bak boost glycolysis to avoid secondary necrosis. Non-apoptotic cancer cells also utilize oligomers to boost glycolysis, which di...

  17. A role for amyloid in cell aggregation and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa C Garcia

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion molecules in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans contain amyloid-forming sequences that are highly conserved. We have now used site-specific mutagenesis and specific peptide perturbants to explore amyloid-dependent activity in the Candida albicans adhesin Als5p. A V326N substitution in the amyloid-forming region conserved secondary structure and ligand binding, but abrogated formation of amyloid fibrils in soluble Als5p and reduced cell surface thioflavin T fluorescence. When displayed on the cell surface, Als5p with this substitution prevented formation of adhesion nanodomains and formation of large cellular aggregates and model biofilms. In addition, amyloid nanodomains were regulated by exogenous peptides. An amyloid-forming homologous peptide rescued aggregation and biofilm activity of Als5p(V326N cells, and V326N substitution peptide inhibited aggregation and biofilm activity in Als5p(WT cells. Therefore, specific site mutation, inhibition by anti-amyloid peturbants, and sequence-specificity of pro-amyloid and anti-amyloid peptides showed that amyloid formation is essential for nanodomain formation and activation.

  18. Genome-scale DNA sequence recognition by hybridization to short oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosavljević, A; Savković, S; Crkvenjakov, R; Salbego, D; Serrato, H; Kreuzer, H; Gemmell, A; Batus, S; Grujić, D; Carnahan, S; Tepavcević, J

    1996-01-01

    Recently developed hybridization technology (Drmanac et al. 1994) enables economical large-scale detection of short oligomers within DNA fragments. The newly developed recognition method (Milosavljević 1995b) enables comparison of lists of oligomers detected within DNA fragments against known DNA sequences. We here describe an experiment involving a set of 4,513 distinct genomic E.coli clones of average length 2kb, each hybridized with 636 randomly selected short oligomer probes. High hybridization signal with a particular probe was used as an indication of the presence of a complementary oligomer in the particular clone. For each clone, a list of oligomers with highest hybridization signals was compiled. The database consisting of 4,513 oligomer lists was then searched using known E.coli sequences as queries in an attempt to identify the clones that match the query sequence. Out of a total of 11 clones that were recognized at highest significance level by our method, 8 were single-pass sequenced from both ends. The single-pass sequenced ends were then compared against the query sequences. The sequence comparisons confirmed 7 out of the total of 8 examined recognitions. This experiment represents the first successful example of genome-scale sequence recognition based on hybridization data.

  19. Carboxybetaine methacrylate oligomer modified nylon for circulating tumor cells capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chaoqun; Wang, Huiyu; Zhang, Zhuo; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Baorui

    2014-10-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) capture is one of the most effective approaches in diagnosis and treatment of cancers in the field of personalized cancer medicine. In our study, zwitterionic carboxybetaine methacrylate (CBMA) oligomers were grafted onto nylon via atomic transfer random polymerization (ATRP) which would serve as a novel material for the development of convenient CTC capture interventional medical devices. The chemical, physical and biological properties of pristine and modified nylon surfaces were assessed by Fourier transform infrared spectra, atomic force microscope, water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, and plasma recalcification time (PRT) determinations, etc. The results, including the significant decrease of proteins adsorption and platelets adhesion, as well as prolonged PRTs demonstrated the extraordinary biocompatibility and blood compatibility of the modified surface. Furthermore, we showed that upon immobilization of anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecular (anti-EpCAM) antibody onto the CBMA moiety, the modified nylon surface can selectively capture EpCAM positive tumor cells from blood with high efficiency, indicating the potential of the modified nylon in the manufacture of convenient interventional CTC capture medical devices.

  20. Oligomer formation of tau protein hyperphosphorylated in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Katharina; Biernat, Jacek; Kumar, Satish; Wegmann, Susanne; Timm, Thomas; Hübschmann, Sabrina; Redecke, Lars; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Müller, Daniel J; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2014-12-05

    Abnormal phosphorylation ("hyperphosphorylation") and aggregation of Tau protein are hallmarks of Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies, but their causative connection is still a matter of debate. Tau with Alzheimer-like phosphorylation is also present in hibernating animals, mitosis, or during embryonic development, without leading to pathophysiology or neurodegeneration. Thus, the role of phosphorylation and the distinction between physiological and pathological phosphorylation needs to be further refined. So far, the systematic investigation of highly phosphorylated Tau was difficult because a reliable method of preparing reproducible quantities was not available. Here, we generated full-length Tau (2N4R) in Sf9 cells in a well defined phosphorylation state containing up to ∼20 phosphates as judged by mass spectrometry and Western blotting with phospho-specific antibodies. Despite the high concentration in living Sf9 cells (estimated ∼230 μm) and high phosphorylation, the protein was not aggregated. However, after purification, the highly phosphorylated protein readily formed oligomers, whereas fibrils were observed only rarely. Exposure of mature primary neuronal cultures to oligomeric phospho-Tau caused reduction of spine density on dendrites but did not change the overall cell viability. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Oligomer Formation of Tau Protein Hyperphosphorylated in Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Katharina; Biernat, Jacek; Kumar, Satish; Wegmann, Susanne; Timm, Thomas; Hübschmann, Sabrina; Redecke, Lars; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Müller, Daniel J.; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation (“hyperphosphorylation”) and aggregation of Tau protein are hallmarks of Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies, but their causative connection is still a matter of debate. Tau with Alzheimer-like phosphorylation is also present in hibernating animals, mitosis, or during embryonic development, without leading to pathophysiology or neurodegeneration. Thus, the role of phosphorylation and the distinction between physiological and pathological phosphorylation needs to be further refined. So far, the systematic investigation of highly phosphorylated Tau was difficult because a reliable method of preparing reproducible quantities was not available. Here, we generated full-length Tau (2N4R) in Sf9 cells in a well defined phosphorylation state containing up to ∼20 phosphates as judged by mass spectrometry and Western blotting with phospho-specific antibodies. Despite the high concentration in living Sf9 cells (estimated ∼230 μm) and high phosphorylation, the protein was not aggregated. However, after purification, the highly phosphorylated protein readily formed oligomers, whereas fibrils were observed only rarely. Exposure of mature primary neuronal cultures to oligomeric phospho-Tau caused reduction of spine density on dendrites but did not change the overall cell viability. PMID:25339173

  2. HAMLET forms annular oligomers when deposited with phospholipid monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Anne; Gjerde, Anja Underhaug; Ying, Ming; Svanborg, Catharina; Holmsen, Holm; Glomm, Wilhelm R; Martinez, Aurora; Halskau, Oyvind

    2012-04-20

    Recently, the anticancer activity of human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) has been linked to its increased membrane affinity in vitro, at neutral pH, and ability to cause leakage relative to the inactive native bovine α-lactalbumin (BLA) protein. In this study, atomic force microscopy resolved membrane distortions and annular oligomers (AOs) produced by HAMLET when deposited at neutral pH on mica together with a negatively charged lipid monolayer. BLA, BAMLET (HAMLET's bovine counterpart) and membrane-binding Peptide C, corresponding to BLA residues 75-100, also form AO-like structures under these conditions but at higher subphase concentrations than HAMLET. The N-terminal Peptide A, which binds to membranes at acidic but not at neutral pH, did not form AOs. This suggests a correlation between the capacity of the proteins/peptides to integrate into the membrane at neutral pH-as observed by liposome content leakage and circular dichroism experiments-and the formation of AOs, albeit at higher concentrations. Formation of AOs, which might be important to HAMLET's tumor toxic action, appears related to the increased tendency of the protein to populate intermediately folded states compared to the native protein, the formation of which is promoted by, but not uniquely dependent on, the oleic acid molecules associated with HAMLET. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Simulation of force spectroscopy experiments on galacturonic acid oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Cybulska

    Full Text Available Pectins, forming a matrix for cellulose and hemicellulose, determine the mechanics of plant cell walls. They undergo salient structural changes during their development. In the presence of divalent cations, usually calcium, pectins can form gel-like structures. Because of their importance they have been the subject of many force spectroscopy experiments, which have examined the conformational changes and molecular tensions due to external forces. The most abundant unit present in the pectin backbone is polygalacturonic acid. Unfortunately, experimental force spectroscopy on polygalacturonic acid molecules is still not a trivial task. The mechanism of the single-molecule response to external forces can be inferred by theoretical methods. Therefore, in this work we simulated such force spectroscopy experiments using the Enforced Geometry Optimization (EGO method. We examined the oligomeric (up to hexamer structures of α-D-galacturonic acid exposed to external stretching forces. The EGO simulation of the force spectroscopy appropriately reproduced the experimental course of the enforced conformational transition: chair →inverted chair via the twisted boat conformation(s in the pyranose ring of α-D-galacturonic acid. Additionally, our theoretical approach also allowed to determine the minimum oligomer size adequate for the description of nano-mechanical properties of (poly-α-D-galacturonic acid.

  4. Simulation of force spectroscopy experiments on galacturonic acid oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulska, Justyna; Brzyska, Agnieszka; Zdunek, Artur; Woliński, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Pectins, forming a matrix for cellulose and hemicellulose, determine the mechanics of plant cell walls. They undergo salient structural changes during their development. In the presence of divalent cations, usually calcium, pectins can form gel-like structures. Because of their importance they have been the subject of many force spectroscopy experiments, which have examined the conformational changes and molecular tensions due to external forces. The most abundant unit present in the pectin backbone is polygalacturonic acid. Unfortunately, experimental force spectroscopy on polygalacturonic acid molecules is still not a trivial task. The mechanism of the single-molecule response to external forces can be inferred by theoretical methods. Therefore, in this work we simulated such force spectroscopy experiments using the Enforced Geometry Optimization (EGO) method. We examined the oligomeric (up to hexamer) structures of α-D-galacturonic acid exposed to external stretching forces. The EGO simulation of the force spectroscopy appropriately reproduced the experimental course of the enforced conformational transition: chair →inverted chair via the twisted boat conformation(s) in the pyranose ring of α-D-galacturonic acid. Additionally, our theoretical approach also allowed to determine the minimum oligomer size adequate for the description of nano-mechanical properties of (poly)-α-D-galacturonic acid.

  5. Unique copper-induced oligomers mediate alpha-synuclein toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Josephine A; Wang, Xiaoyan; Brown, David R

    2009-08-01

    Parkinson's disease and a number of other neurodegenerative diseases have been linked to either genetic mutations in the alpha-synuclein gene or show evidence of aggregates of the alpha-synuclein protein, sometimes in the form of Lewy bodies. There currently is no clear evidence of a distinct neurotoxic species of alpha-synuclein to explain the death of neurons in these diseases. We undertook to assess the toxicity of alpha-synuclein via exogenous application in cell culture. Initially, we showed that only aggregated alpha-synuclein is neurotoxic and requires the presence copper but not iron. Other members of the synuclein family showed no toxicity in any form and inherited point mutations did not alter the effective toxic concentration of alpha-synuclein. Through protein fractionation techniques, we were able to isolate an oligomeric species responsible for the toxicity of alpha-synuclein. This oligomeric species has a unique stellate appearance under EM and again, requires association with copper to induce cell death. The results allow us to suggest that the toxic species of alpha-synuclein in vivo could possibly be these stellate oligomers and not fibrils. Our data provide a link between the recently noted association of copper and alpha-synuclein and a potential role for the combination in causing neurodegeneration.

  6. Mapping eGFP oligomer mobility in living cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dross, Nicolas; Spriet, Corentin; Zwerger, Monika; Müller, Gabriele; Waldeck, Waldemar; Langowski, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Movement of particles in cell nuclei can be affected by viscosity, directed flows, active transport, or the presence of obstacles such as the chromatin network. Here we investigate whether the mobility of small fluorescent proteins is affected by the chromatin density. Diffusion of inert fluorescent proteins was studied in living cell nuclei using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) with a two-color confocal scanning detection system. We first present experiments exposing FCS-specific artifacts encountered in live cell studies as well as strategies to prevent them, in particular those arising from the choice of the fluorophore used for calibration of the focal volume, as well as temperature and acquisition conditions used for fluorescence fluctuation measurements. After defining the best acquisition conditions, we show for various human cell lines that the mobility of GFP varies significantly within the cell nucleus, but does not correlate with chromatin density. The intranuclear diffusional mobility strongly depends on protein size: in a series of GFP-oligomers, used as free inert fluorescent tracers, the diffusion coefficient decreased from the monomer to the tetramer much more than expected for molecules free in aqueous solution. Still, the entire intranuclear chromatin network is freely accessible for small proteins up to the size of eGFP-tetramers, regardless of the chromatin density or cell line. Even the densest chromatin regions do not exclude free eGFP-monomers or multimers.

  7. Mapping eGFP oligomer mobility in living cell nuclei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Dross

    Full Text Available Movement of particles in cell nuclei can be affected by viscosity, directed flows, active transport, or the presence of obstacles such as the chromatin network. Here we investigate whether the mobility of small fluorescent proteins is affected by the chromatin density. Diffusion of inert fluorescent proteins was studied in living cell nuclei using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS with a two-color confocal scanning detection system. We first present experiments exposing FCS-specific artifacts encountered in live cell studies as well as strategies to prevent them, in particular those arising from the choice of the fluorophore used for calibration of the focal volume, as well as temperature and acquisition conditions used for fluorescence fluctuation measurements. After defining the best acquisition conditions, we show for various human cell lines that the mobility of GFP varies significantly within the cell nucleus, but does not correlate with chromatin density. The intranuclear diffusional mobility strongly depends on protein size: in a series of GFP-oligomers, used as free inert fluorescent tracers, the diffusion coefficient decreased from the monomer to the tetramer much more than expected for molecules free in aqueous solution. Still, the entire intranuclear chromatin network is freely accessible for small proteins up to the size of eGFP-tetramers, regardless of the chromatin density or cell line. Even the densest chromatin regions do not exclude free eGFP-monomers or multimers.

  8. Amyloid plaque structure and cell surface interactions of β-amyloid fibrils revealed by electron tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shen; Kollmer, Marius; Markx, Daniel; Claus, Stephanie; Walther, Paul; Fändrich, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    The deposition of amyloid fibrils as plaques is a key feature of several neurodegenerative diseases including in particular Alzheimer’s. This disease is characterized, if not provoked, by amyloid aggregates formed from Aβ peptide that deposit inside the brain or are toxic to neuronal cells. We here used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to determine the fibril network structure and interactions of Aβ fibrils within a cell culture model of Alzheimer’s disease. STEM images taken from the formed Aβ amyloid deposits revealed three main types of fibril network structures, termed amorphous meshwork, fibril bundle and amyloid star. All three were infiltrated by different types of lipid inclusions from small-sized exosome-like structures (50–100 nm diameter) to large-sized extracellular vesicles (up to 300 nm). The fibrils also presented strong interactions with the surrounding cells such that fibril bundles extended into tubular invaginations of the plasma membrane. Amyloid formation in the cell model was previously found to have an intracellular origin and we show here that it functionally destroys the integrity of the intracellular membranes as it leads to lysosomal leakage. These data provide a mechanistic link to explain why intracellular fibril formation is toxic to the cell. PMID:28240273

  9. Drugs and drug delivery systems targeting amyloid-β in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Robinson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder with no cure and limited treatment solutions that are unable to target any of the suspected causes. Increasing evidence suggests that one of the causes of neurodegeneration is the overproduction of amyloid beta (Aβ and the inability of Aβ peptides to be cleared from the brain, resulting in self-aggregation to form toxic oligomers, fibrils and plaques. One of the potential treatment options is to target Aβ and prevent self-aggregation to allow for a natural clearing of the brain. In this paper, we review the drugs and drug delivery systems that target Aβ in relation to Alzheimer's disease. Many attempts have been made to use anti-Aβ targeting molecules capable of targeting Aβ (with much success in vitro and in vivo animal models, but the major obstacle to this technique is the challenge posed by the blood brain barrier (BBB. This highly selective barrier protects the brain from toxic molecules and pathogens and prevents the delivery of most drugs. Therefore novel Aβ aggregation inhibitor drugs will require well thought-out drug delivery systems to deliver sufficient concentrations to the brain.

  10. Amyloid-β triggers the release of neuronal hexokinase 1 from mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo M Saraiva

    Full Text Available Brain accumulation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ and oxidative stress underlie neuronal dysfunction and memory loss in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Hexokinase (HK, a key glycolytic enzyme, plays important pro-survival roles, reducing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and preventing apoptosis in neurons and other cell types. Brain isozyme HKI is mainly associated with mitochondria and HK release from mitochondria causes a significant decrease in enzyme activity and triggers oxidative damage. We here investigated the relationship between Aβ-induced oxidative stress and HK activity. We found that Aβ triggered HKI detachment from mitochondria decreasing HKI activity in cortical neurons. Aβ oligomers further impair energy metabolism by decreasing neuronal ATP levels. Aβ-induced HKI cellular redistribution was accompanied by excessive ROS generation and neuronal death. 2-deoxyglucose blocked Aβ-induced oxidative stress and neuronal death. Results suggest that Aβ-induced cellular redistribution and inactivation of neuronal HKI play important roles in oxidative stress and neurodegeneration in AD.

  11. Analyzing and Modeling the Kinetics of Amyloid Beta Pores Associated with Alzheimer's Disease Pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Ullah

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta (Aβ oligomers associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD form Ca2+-permeable plasma membrane pores, leading to a disruption of the otherwise well-controlled intracellular calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis. The resultant up-regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration has detrimental implications for memory formation and cell survival. The gating kinetics and Ca2+ permeability of Aβ pores are not well understood. We have used computational modeling in conjunction with the ability of optical patch-clamping for massively parallel imaging of Ca2+ flux through thousands of pores in the cell membrane of Xenopus oocytes to elucidate the kinetic properties of Aβ pores. The fluorescence time-series data from individual pores were idealized and used to develop data-driven Markov chain models for the kinetics of the Aβ pore at different stages of its evolution. Our study provides the first demonstration of developing Markov chain models for ion channel gating that are driven by optical-patch clamp data with the advantage of experiments being performed under close to physiological conditions. Towards the end, we demonstrate the up-regulation of gating of various Ca2+ release channels due to Aβ pores and show that the extent and spatial range of such up-regulation increases as Aβ pores with low open probability and Ca2+ permeability transition into those with high open probability and Ca2+ permeability.

  12. Letrozole Potentiates Mitochondrial and Dendritic Spine Impairments Induced by β Amyloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K.-Y. Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reduced estrogens, either through aging or postsurgery breast cancer treatment with the oral nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor letrozole, are linked with declined cognitive abilities. However, a direct link between letrozole and neuronal deficits induced by pathogenic insults associated with aging such as beta amyloid (Aβ1–42 has not been established. The objective of this study was to determine if letrozole aggravates synaptic deficits concurrent with Aβ1–42 insult. We examined the effects of letrozole and oligomeric Aβ1–42 treatment in dissociated and organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. Changes in glial cell morphology, neuronal mitochondria, and synaptic structures upon letrozole treatment were monitored by confocal microscopy, as they were shown to be affected by Aβ1–42 oligomers. Oligomeric Aβ1–42 or letrozole alone caused decreases in mitochondrial volume, dendritic spine density, synaptophysin (synaptic marker, and the postsynaptic protein, synaptopodin. Here, we demonstrated that mitochondrial and synaptic structural deficits were exacerbated when letrozole therapy was combined with Aβ1–42 treatment. Our novel findings suggest that letrozole may increase neuronal susceptibility to pathological insults, such as oligomeric Aβ1–42 in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. These changes in dendritic spine number, synaptic protein expression, and mitochondrial morphology may, in part, explain the increased prevalence of cognitive decline associated with aromatase inhibitor use.

  13. Biological markers of amyloid beta-related mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2012-02-01

    Recent research progress has given detailed knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD), which has been translated into an intense, ongoing development of disease-modifying treatments. Most new drug candidates are targeted on inhibiting amyloid beta (Abeta) production and aggregation. In drug development, it is important to co-develop biomarkers for Abeta-related mechanisms to enable early diagnosis and patient stratification in clinical trials, and to serve as tools to identify and monitor the biochemical effect of the drug directly in patients. Biomarkers are also requested by regulatory authorities to serve as safety measurements. Molecular aberrations in the AD brain are reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Core CSF biomarkers include Abeta isoforms (Abeta40\\/Abeta42), soluble APP isoforms, Abeta oligomers and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). This article reviews recent research advances on core candidate CSF and plasma Abeta-related biomarkers, and gives a conceptual review on how to implement biomarkers in clinical trials in AD.

  14. Disrupted cross-laminar cortical processing in β amyloid pathology precedes cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lison, H; Happel, M F K; Schneider, F; Baldauf, K; Kerbstat, S; Seelbinder, B; Schneeberg, J; Zappe, M; Goldschmidt, J; Budinger, E; Schröder, U H; Ohl, F W; Schilling, S; Demuth, H-U; Scheich, H; Reymann, K G; Rönicke, R

    2014-03-01

    Disruption of neuronal networks in the Alzheimer-afflicted brain is increasingly recognized as a key correlate of cognitive and memory decline in Alzheimer patients. We hypothesized that functional synaptic disconnections within cortical columnar microcircuits by pathological β-amyloid accumulation, rather than cell death, initially causes the cognitive impairments. During development of cortical β-amyloidosis with still few plaques in the transgenic 5xFAD mouse model single cell resolution mapping of neuronal thallium uptake revealed that electrical activity of pyramidal cells breaks down throughout infragranular cortical layer V long before cell death occurs. Treatment of 5xFAD mice with the glutaminyl cyclase inhibitor, PQ 529, partially prevented the decline of pyramidal cell activity, indicating pyroglutamate-modified forms, potentially mixed oligomers of Aβ are contributing to neuronal impairment. Laminar investigation of cortical circuit dysfunction with current source density analysis identified an early loss of excitatory synaptic input in infragranular layers, linked to pathological recurrent activations in supragranular layers. This specific disruption of normal cross-laminar cortical processing coincided with a decline of contextual fear learning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Biological markers of amyloid beta-related mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2010-06-01

    Recent research progress has given detailed knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD), which has been translated into an intense, ongoing development of disease-modifying treatments. Most new drug candidates are targeted on inhibiting amyloid beta (Abeta) production and aggregation. In drug development, it is important to co-develop biomarkers for Abeta-related mechanisms to enable early diagnosis and patient stratification in clinical trials, and to serve as tools to identify and monitor the biochemical effect of the drug directly in patients. Biomarkers are also requested by regulatory authorities to serve as safety measurements. Molecular aberrations in the AD brain are reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Core CSF biomarkers include Abeta isoforms (Abeta40\\/Abeta42), soluble APP isoforms, Abeta oligomers and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). This article reviews recent research advances on core candidate CSF and plasma Abeta-related biomarkers, and gives a conceptual review on how to implement biomarkers in clinical trials in AD.

  16. Analyzing and Modeling the Kinetics of Amyloid Beta Pores Associated with Alzheimer's Disease Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Ghanim; Demuro, Angelo; Parker, Ian; Pearson, John E

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) form Ca2+-permeable plasma membrane pores, leading to a disruption of the otherwise well-controlled intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. The resultant up-regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration has detrimental implications for memory formation and cell survival. The gating kinetics and Ca2+ permeability of Aβ pores are not well understood. We have used computational modeling in conjunction with the ability of optical patch-clamping for massively parallel imaging of Ca2+ flux through thousands of pores in the cell membrane of Xenopus oocytes to elucidate the kinetic properties of Aβ pores. The fluorescence time-series data from individual pores were idealized and used to develop data-driven Markov chain models for the kinetics of the Aβ pore at different stages of its evolution. Our study provides the first demonstration of developing Markov chain models for ion channel gating that are driven by optical-patch clamp data with the advantage of experiments being performed under close to physiological conditions. Towards the end, we demonstrate the up-regulation of gating of various Ca2+ release channels due to Aβ pores and show that the extent and spatial range of such up-regulation increases as Aβ pores with low open probability and Ca2+ permeability transition into those with high open probability and Ca2+ permeability.

  17. Control the aggregation of model amyloid insulin protein under ac-electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhongli; Jing, Benxin; Zhu, Y. Elaine

    2013-03-01

    In vitro experiments have been widely used to characterize the misfolding/unfolding pathway characteristic of amylodogenic proteins. Conversion from natively folded amyloidogenic proteins to oligomers via nucleation is the accepted path to fibril formation upon heating over a certain lag time period. In an alternative engineering approach to manipulate and control protein aggregation, we have investigated the aggregation kinetics of insulin, a well-established amyloid model protein, under applied ac-electric fields of varied ac-frequency and voltage at room temperature. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging, we have observed that the insulin aggregation can occur at much shortened lag time under applied ac-electric fields, when a critical ac-voltage is exceeded. The strong dependence of lag time on ac-frequency over a narrow range of 500 Hz-5 kHz indicates the effect of ac-electroosmosis on the diffusion controlled process of insulin nucleation. Yet, no difference of conformational structure is detected with insulin under applied ac-fields, suggesting the equivalence of ac-polarization to the conventional thermal activation process for insulin aggregation.

  18. Fold modulating function: Bacterial toxins to functional amyloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Khawaja Syed

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria produce cytolytic toxins that target host cells or other competing microbes. It is well known that environmental factors control toxin expression, however recent work suggests that some bacteria manipulate the fold of these protein toxins to control their function. The β-sheet rich amyloid fold is a highly stable ordered aggregate that many toxins form in response to specific environmental conditions. When in the amyloid state, toxins become inert, losing the cytolytic activity they display in the soluble form. Emerging evidence suggest that some amyloids function as toxin storage systems until they are again needed, while other bacteria utilize amyloids as a structural matrix component of biofilms. This amyloid matrix component facilitates resistance to biofilm disruptive challenges. The bacterial amyloids discussed in this review reveal an elegant system where changes in protein fold and solubility dictate the function of proteins in response to the environment.

  19. Chemical Methods to Knock Down the Amyloid Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Gao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid proteins are closely related with amyloid diseases and do tremendous harm to human health. However, there is still a lack of effective strategies to treat these amyloid diseases, so it is important to develop novel methods. Accelerating the clearance of amyloid proteins is a favorable method for amyloid disease treatment. Recently, chemical methods for protein reduction have been developed and have attracted much attention. In this review, we focus on the latest progress of chemical methods that knock down amyloid proteins, including the proteolysis-targeting chimera (PROTAC strategy, the “recognition-cleavage” strategy, the chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA strategy, the selectively light-activatable organic and inorganic molecules strategy and other chemical strategies.

  20. Fold modulating function: bacterial toxins to functional amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Adnan K; Boles, Blaise R

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria produce cytolytic toxins that target host cells or other competing microbes. It is well known that environmental factors control toxin expression, however, recent work suggests that some bacteria manipulate the fold of these protein toxins to control their function. The β-sheet rich amyloid fold is a highly stable ordered aggregate that many toxins form in response to specific environmental conditions. When in the amyloid state, toxins become inert, losing the cytolytic activity they display in the soluble form. Emerging evidence suggest that some amyloids function as toxin storage systems until they are again needed, while other bacteria utilize amyloids as a structural matrix component of biofilms. This amyloid matrix component facilitates resistance to biofilm disruptive challenges. The bacterial amyloids discussed in this review reveal an elegant system where changes in protein fold and solubility dictate the function of proteins in response to the environment.

  1. Copper Promotes the Trafficking of the Amyloid Precursor Protein*

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo, Karla M.; Hung, Ya Hui; Dalziel, Andrew H.; Li, Qiao-Xin; Laughton, Katrina; Wikhe, Krutika; Rembach, Alan; Roberts, Blaine; Masters, Colin L.; Ashley I. Bush; Camakaris, James

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of the amyloid β peptide in the cortical and hippocampal regions of the brain is a major pathological feature of Alzheimer disease. Amyloid β peptide is generated from the sequential protease cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). We reported previously that copper increases the level of APP at the cell surface. Here we report that copper, but not iron or zinc, promotes APP trafficking in cultured polarized epithelial cells and neuronal cells. In SH-SY5Y neuronal cells ...

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury, Microglia, and Beta Amyloid

    OpenAIRE

    Mannix, Rebekah C.; Whalen, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been growing interest in the association between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Alzheimer's Disease (AD). TBI and AD share many pathologic features including chronic inflammation and the accumulation of beta amyloid (A\\(\\beta\\)). Data from both AD and TBI studies suggest that microglia play a central role in A\\(\\beta\\) accumulation after TBI. This paper focuses on the current research on the role of microglia response to A\\(\\beta\\) after TBI.

  3. An update on the amyloid hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Christopher B; Eckman, Elizabeth A

    2007-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease. To rationally develop novel therapeutic and/or preventative agents for AD, an understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of this complex disease is necessary. This article examines the evidence for the amyloid hypothesis of AD pathogenesis and discusses how it relates to the neurological and neuropathological features of AD, the known genetic risk factors and causative mutations, and the heightened risk associated with advanced age.

  4. Iatrogenic amyloid polyneuropathy after domino liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnatsakanova, Diana; Živković, Saša A

    2017-01-28

    Liver transplantation has been used in treatment of transthyretin amyloidosis, and some patients undergo domino liver transplantation (DLT) with explanted liver being transplanted to another patient with liver failure as the liver is otherwise usually functionally normal. Until end of 2015, there were 1154 DLT performed worldwide. DLT for transthyretin amyloidosis is associated with the risk of developing de novo systemic amyloidosis and amyloid neuropathy, and the risk may be greater with some non-Val30Met mutations. De novo amyloid neuropathy has been described in up to 23% of transplant recipients. Neuropathy may be preceded by asymptomatic amyloid deposition in various tissues and symptoms of neuropathy started after a median of 7 years following DLT (5.7 ± 3.2 years; range 2 mo to 10 years). Typical initial symptoms include neuropathic pain and sensory loss, while dysautonomia usually starts later. Progression of neuropathy may necessitate liver re-transplantation, and subsequent improvement of neuropathy has been reported in some patients. Explant allograft recipients need close monitoring for signs of systemic amyloidosis, neuropathy and dysautonomia as progressive symptoms may require re-transplantation.

  5. Amyloid positron emission tomography and cognitive reserve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matteo Bauckneht; Agnese Picco; Flavio Nobili; Silvia Morbelli

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease(AD) is characterized by a nonlinear progressive course and several aspects influence the relationship between cerebral amount of AD pathology and the clinical expression of the disease. Brain cognitive reserve(CR) refers to the hypothesized capacity of an adult brain to cope with brain damage in order to minimize symptomatology. CR phenomenon contributed to explain the disjunction between the degree of neurodegeneration and the clinical phenotype of AD. The possibility to track brain amyloidosis(Aβ) in vivo has huge relevance for AD diagnosis and new therapeutic approaches. The clinical repercussions of positron emission tomography(PET)-assessed Aβ load are certainly mediated by CR thus potentially hampering the prognostic meaning of amyloid PET in selected groups of patients. Similarly, amyloid PET and cerebrospinal fluid amyloidosis biomarkers have recently provided new evidence for CR. The present review discusses the concept of CR in the framework of available neuroimaging studies and specifically deals with the reciprocal influences between amyloid PET and CR in AD patients and with the potential consequent interventional strategies for AD.

  6. Partial Volume Correction in Quantitative Amyloid Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Marcus, Daniel S.; Ances, Beau M.; Bateman, Randall J.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Aldea, Patricia; Cash, Lisa; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Farrar, Angela M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam M.; Klunk, William; Price, Julie C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Saykin, Andrew J.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Schofield, Peter R.; Buckles, Virginia; Morris, John C.; Benzinger, Tammie. LS.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid imaging is a valuable tool for research and diagnosis in dementing disorders. As positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have limited spatial resolution, measured signals are distorted by partial volume effects. Various techniques have been proposed for correcting partial volume effects, but there is no consensus as to whether these techniques are necessary in amyloid imaging, and, if so, how they should be implemented. We evaluated a two-component partial volume correction technique and a regional spread function technique using both simulated and human Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging data. Both correction techniques compensated for partial volume effects and yielded improved detection of subtle changes in PiB retention. However, the regional spread function technique was more accurate in application to simulated data. Because PiB retention estimates depend on the correction technique, standardization is necessary to compare results across groups. Partial volume correction has sometimes been avoided because it increases the sensitivity to inaccuracy in image registration and segmentation. However, our results indicate that appropriate PVC may enhance our ability to detect changes in amyloid deposition. PMID:25485714

  7. Design and Construction of Large Amyloid Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devin M. Ridgley

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mixtures of “template” and “adder” proteins self-assemble into large amyloid fibers of varying morphology and modulus. Fibers range from low modulus, rectangular cross-sectioned tapes to high modulus, circular cross-sectioned cylinders. Varying the proteins in the mixture can elicit “in-between” morphologies, such as elliptical cross-sectioned fibers and twisted tapes, both of which have moduli in-between rectangular tapes and cylindrical fibers. Experiments on mixtures of proteins of known amino acid sequence show that control of the large amyloid fiber morphology is dependent on the amount of glutamine repeats or “Q-blocks” relative to hydrophobic side chained amino acids such as alanine, isoleucine, leucine, and valine in the adder protein. Adder proteins with only hydrophobic groups form low modulus rectangular cross-sections and increasing the Q-block content allows excess hydrogen bonding on amide groups that results in twist and higher modulus. The experimental results show that large amyloid fibers of specific shape and modulus can be designed and controlled at the molecular level.

  8. [Effect of mutations and modifications of amino acid residues on zinc-induced interaction of the metal-binding domain of β-amyloid with DNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmeleva, S A; Mezentsev, Y V; Kozin, S A; Mitkevich, V A; Medvedev, A E; Ivanov, A S; Bodoev, N V; Makarov, A A; Radko, S P

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of intranuclear β-amyloid with DNA is considered to be a plausible mechanism of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. The interaction of single- and double-stranded DNA with synthetic peptides was analyzed using surface plasmon resonance. The peptides represent the metal-binding domain of β-amyloid (amino acids 1-16) and its variants with chemical modifications and point substitutions of amino acid residues which are associated with enhanced neurotoxicity of β-amyloid in cell tests. It has been shown that the presence of zinc ions is necessary for the interaction of the peptides with DNA in solution. H6R substitution has remarkably reduced the ability of domain 1-16 to bind DNA. This is in accordance with the supposition that the coordination of a zinc ion by amino acid residues His6, Glu11, His13, and His14 of the β-amyloid metal-binding domain results in the occurrence of an anion-binding site responsible for the interaction of the domain with DNA. Zinc-induced dimerization and oligomerization of domain 1-16 associated with phosphorylation of Ser8 and the presence of unblocked amino- and carboxy-terminal groups have resulted in a decrease of peptide concentrations required for detection of the peptide-DNA interaction. The presence of multiple anion-binding sites on the dimers and oligomers is responsible for the enhancement of the peptide-DNA interaction. A substitution of the negatively charged residue Asp7 for the neutral residue Asn in close proximity to the anion-binding site of the domain 1-16 of Aβ facilitates the electrostatic interaction between this site and phosphates of a polynucleotide chain, which enhances zinc-induced binding to DNA.

  9. Appraisal of role of the polyanionic inducer length on amyloid formation by 412-residue 1N4R Tau protein: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangholi, Abolfazl; Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Arab, Seyed Shahriar; Riazi, Gholamhossein; Mokhtari, Farzad; Poorebrahim, Mansour; Mahdiuni, Hamid; Kurganov, Boris I; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2016-11-01

    In many neurodegenerative diseases, formation of protein fibrillar aggregates has been observed as a major pathological change. Neurofibrillary tangles, mainly composed of fibrils formed by the microtubule-associated protein; Tau, are a hallmark of a group of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Tau belongs to the class of natively unfolded proteins and partially folds into an ordered β-structure during aggregation. Polyanionic cofactors such as heparin are commonly used as inducer of Tau aggregation in vitro. The role of heparin in nucleation and elongation steps during Tau fibril formation is not fully understood. In the current study, aggregation kinetics as well as structure of Tau amyloid fibrils, by using the 1N4R isoform, have been reproducibly determined in the presence of heparin and the shorter molecule; enoxaparin. The kinetic studies demonstrated that heparin (not enoxaparin) efficiently accelerates Tau amyloid formation and revealed, mechanistically, that the molecular weight of the inducer is important in accelerating amyloidogenesis. The kinetic parameter values of Tau amyloid aggregation, especially, the amyloid aggregation extent, were relatively different in the presence of heparin and enoxaparin, at various stoichiometries of the inducers binding. Also, based on the results, obtained from CD, FTIR, AFM and XRD studies, it may be suggested that the inducer length plays a critical role mainly in the nucleation process, so that it determines that oligomers lie on or off the pathway of Tau fibrillization. The biochemical results herein suggest that the chemical environment of the extracellular matrix as well as localization of distinct glycosaminoglycans may influence deposition behavior of Tau amyloidosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian Stougaard; Dueholm, Morten Simonsen

    2015-01-01

    The success of Pseudomonas species as opportunistic pathogens derives in great part from their ability to form stable biofilms that offer protection against chemical and mechanical attack. The extracellular matrix of biofilms contains numerous biomolecules, and it has recently been discovered...... that in Pseudomonas one of the components includes β-sheet rich amyloid fibrils (functional amyloid) produced by the fap operon. However, the role of the functional amyloid within the biofilm has not yet been investigated in detail. Here we investigate how the fap-based amyloid produced by Pseudomonas affects biofilm...

  11. Contrasting effects of nanoparticle-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radic, Slaven; Davis, Thomas P; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been experimentally found to either promote or inhibit amyloid aggregation of proteins, but the molecular mechanisms for such complex behaviors remain unknown. Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the effects of varying the strength of nonspecific NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation of a model protein, the amyloid-beta peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, with increasing NP-peptide attraction, amyloid aggregation on the NP surface was initially promoted due to increased local protein concentration on the surface and destabilization of the folded state. However, further increase of NP-peptide attraction decreased the stability of amyloid fibrils and reduced their lateral diffusion on the NP surface necessary for peptide conformational changes and self-association, thus prohibiting amyloid aggregation. Moreover, we found that the relative concentration between protein and NPs also played an important role in amyloid aggregation. With a high NP/protein ratio, NPs that intrinsically promote protein aggregation may display an inhibitive effect by depleting the proteins in solution while having a low concentration of the proteins on each NP's surface. Our coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation study offers a molecular mechanism for delineating the contrasting and seemingly conflicting effects of NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation and highlights the potential of tailoring anti-aggregation nanomedicine against amyloid diseases.

  12. Solvent free low-melt viscosity imide oligomers and thermosetting polymide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chun-Hua (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    .[.This invention relates to the composition and a solvent-free process for preparing novel imide oligomers and polymers specifically formulated with effective amounts of a dianhydride such as 2,3,3',4-biphenyltetra carboxylic dianydride (a-BPDA), at least one aromatic diamine and an endcapped of 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA) or nadic anhydride to produce imide oligomers that possess a low-melt viscosity of 1-60 poise at 260-280.degree. C. When the imide oligomer melt is cured at about 371.degree. C. in a press or autoclave under 100-500 psi, the melt resulted in a thermoset polyimide having a glass transition temperature (T.sub.g) equal to and above 310.degree. C. A novel feature of this process is that the monomers; namely the dianhydrides, diamines and the endcaps, are melt processable to form imide oligomers at temperatures ranging between 232-280.degree. C. (450-535.degree. F.) without any solvent. These low-melt imide oligomers can be easily processed by resin transfer molding (RTM), vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) or the resin infusion process with fiber preforms e.g. carbon, glass or quartz preforms to produce polyimide matrix composites with 288-343.degree. C. (550-650.degree. F.) high temperature performance capability..]. .Iadd.This invention relates to compositions and a solvent-free reaction process for preparing imide oligomers and polymers specifically derived from effective amounts of dianhydrides such as 2,3,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride (a-BPDA), at least one aromatic polyamine and an end-cap such as 4-phenylethynyphthalic anhydride (PEPA) or nadic anhydride to produce imide oligomers that possess a low-melt viscosity of 1-60 poise at 260.degree. C.-280.degree. C..Iaddend.

  13. Self-assembly of conjugated oligomers and polymers at the interface: structure and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lirong; Yang, Liu; Lei, Shengbin

    2012-08-01

    In this review, we give a brief account on the recent scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of interfacial structures and properties of π-conjugated semiconducting oligomers and polymers, either at the solid-air (including solid-vacuum) or at the solid-liquid interface. The structural aspects of the self-assembly of both oligomers and polymers are highlighted. Conjugated oligomers can form well ordered supramolecular assemblies either at the air-solid or liquid-solid interface, thanks to the relatively high mobility and structural uniformity in comparison with polymers. The backbone structure, substitution of side chains and functional groups can affect the assembling behavior significantly, which offers the opportunity to tune the supramolecular structure of these conjugated oligomers at the interface. For conjugated polymers, the large molecular weight limits the mobility on the surface and the distribution in size also prevents the formation of long range ordered supramolecular assembly. The submolecular resolution obtained on the assembling monolayers enables a detailed investigation of the chain folding at the interface, both the structural details and the effect on electronic properties. Besides the ability in studying the assembling structures at the interfaces, STM also provides a reasonable way to evaluate the distribution of the molecular weight of conjugated polymers by statistic of the contour length of the adsorbed polymer chains. Both conjugated oligomers and polymers can form composite assemblies with other materials. The ordered assembly of oligomers can act as a template to controllably disperse other molecules such as coronene or fullerene. These investigations open a new avenue to fine tune the assembling structure at the interface and in turn the properties of the composite materials. To summarize scanning tunneling microscopy has demonstrated its surprising ability in the investigation of the assembling structures and properties of

  14. Interactions of vanadate oligomers with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureliano, M; Mdeira, V M

    1994-04-28

    Upon addition of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), the line width of tetrameric vanadate signal of 51V-NMR spectra narrowed in the presence of ATP and Ca2+, whereas monomeric vanadate line widths were broadened. Thus, ATP decreases the affinity of the enzyme for tetravanadate whereas it induces the interaction with monomeric vanadate. In the presence of Ca2+ it was observed that tetrameric and decameric vanadate bind to SR ATPase whereas monomeric vanadate only binds to SR when ATP is present. However, decameric vanadate clearly differs from vanadate oligomers present in monovanadate solutions in preventing the accumulation of Ca2+ by sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles coupled to ATP hydrolysis. Mg2+ increased the inhibitory effect promoted by decavanadate whereas a slight enhancement of Ca2+ uptake was observed in the presence of monovanadate. For 5 mM Mg2+, a nominal 2 mM vanadium 'decavanadate' solution containing about 190 to 200 microM decameric and less than 100 microM monomeric species depressed the rate of Ca2+ uptake by 50% whereas a nominal 2 mM monovanadate solution containing about 662 microM monomeric, 143 microM dimeric and 252 microM tetrameric species had no effect on the rate of Ca2+ accumulation. However, 2 mM 'decavanadate' inhibits by 75% the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase activity whereas the presence of 2 mM 'monovanadate' produces an inhibitory effect below 50%. Therefore, the Ca:ATP stoichiometry of Ca2+ transport is enhanced by monovanadate. In the presence of oxalate, inhibition of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase activity by these solutions is enhanced to 97% and 86% whereas in the presence of the ionophore lasalocid, the inhibitory values were 87% and 19% for 2 mM decavanadate and 2 mM monovanadate solutions, respectively. Apparently, the increase of vesicular Ca2+ concentration counteracts monovanadate inhibition of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase activity but it does not significantly affect decavanadate inhibition.

  15. Amyloid Beta-peptide (25-35) changes (Ca2+) in hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Beatty, Diane; Morris, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    neuroscience, Alzheimer, calcium ion, hippocampal neurons, amyloid-beta-peptide, hydrogen ion, rat......neuroscience, Alzheimer, calcium ion, hippocampal neurons, amyloid-beta-peptide, hydrogen ion, rat...

  16. CHIRAL CONJUGATED OLIGOMER BASED ON 1,1'-BINOL WITH 3,3'-ACETYLENE-PHENYLENE-ACETYLENE SPACER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-jun Liu; Ke-shen Zhang; Yong-jun Chen; Dong Wang; Chao-jun Li

    2001-01-01

    The 1,1'-binaphthol based oligomers 3 and 7 with 3,3'-acetylene-phenylene-acetylene spacer were prepared from BINOL 1. The high optical rotation value and CD spectra demonstrated the main chain chirality of the oligomer molecule. The UV-VIS and fluorescent spectra evidence the characteristics of conjugated structure. In comparison with oligomer 2 bearing 3,3'-acetylene spacer, the oligomers 3 and 7 have longer efficient conjugation segment, and their fluorescent quantum yields (φ) increased (0.60-0.65 versus 0.14). Extending the effective conjugation segment would improve the photophysical properties of chiral conjugated polymers.``

  17. Conformational Effects of the A21G Flemish Mutation on the Aggregation of Amyloid β Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Dobson, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Among the various hereditary mutants of amyloid β (Aβ) in familial Alzheimer's disease (AD), the A21G Flemish-type mutant has unique properties showing a low aggregation propensity but progressive deposition in vascular walls. Moreover, in contrast to other familial AD cases that show extensive Aβ1-42 deposition in the brain, patients with Flemish AD predominantly exhibit the deposition of the Aβ1-40 isoform. Here we report the structural characterization of the Flemish-type mutant (A21G) in comparison with the wild-type Aβ1-40 peptide to examine the possible effects of the A21G mutation on the conformation of the Aβ1-40 isoform. The kinetic analysis of the aggregation of the peptides monitored by thioflavin T fluorescence measurement indicates that the mutation precludes the initial nucleation process of amyloid fibril formation by Aβ1-40. Spectroscopic data indicate that the Flemish-type mutant bound to aqueous micelles composed of lyso-GM1, in which the mobile N-terminal segment is tethered through the C-terminal helical segment, has reduced α-helical structure compared to the wild-type peptide. Our findings suggest that the mutational perturbation to the membrane binding properties is coupled with the changes in nucleation behavior of Aβ during its fibril formation.

  18. The role of metals in amyloid aggregation - Experiments and ab initio simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minicozzi, V.; Morante, S.; Rossi, G. C.; Stellato, F.; Christian, N.; Jansen, K.

    With a combination of modern spectroscopic techniques and numerical first principle simulations it is possible to investigate the physico-chemical basis of the beta-amyloid aggregation phenomenon, which is suspected to be at the basis of the development of the Alzheimer disease. On the experimental side, in fact, X-ray absorption spectroscopy can be successfully used to determine the atomic structure around the metal binding site in samples where beta-amyloid peptides are complexed with either Cu2+ or Zn2+ ions. Exploiting spectroscopic information obtained on a selected set of fragments of the natural Abeta-peptide, the residues that along the sequence are coordinated to the metal are identified. Although copper data can be consistently interpreted assuming that oligopeptides encompassing the minimal 1-16 amino acidic sequence display a metal coordination mode which involves three Histidines (His6, His13, and His14), in complexes with zinc a four Histidines coordination mode is seen to be preferred. Lacking a fourth Histidine in the Abeta1-16 fragment, this geometrical arrangement hints to a Zn2+ promoted inter-peptide aggregation mode. On the theoretical side, first principle ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of the Car-Parrinello type, which have proved to be of invaluable help in understanding the microscopic mechanisms of chemical bonding both in solid-state physics and structural biophysics, have been employed in an effort to give a microscopic basis and find a phenomenological interpretation of the body of available experimental data on Abeta-peptides-metal complexes. Using medium size PC-clusters as well as larger parallel platforms, it is possible to deal with systems comprising 300-500 atoms and 1,000-2,000 electrons for simulation times as long as 2-3 ps. We present structural results that nicely compare with NMR and XAS data.

  19. Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds and Oligomers in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formed by Photooxidation of Isoprene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander; Nizkorodov, Serguei

    2011-07-06

    Electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI HR-MS) was used to probe molecular structures of oligomers in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated in laboratory experiments on isoprene photooxidation at low- and high-NOx conditions. Up to 80-90% of the observed products are oligomers and up to 33% are nitrogen-containing organic compounds (NOC). We observe oligomers with up to 8 monomer units in length. Tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) confirms NOC compounds are organic nitrates and elucidates plausible chemical building blocks contributing to oligomer formation. Most organic nitrates are comprised of methylglyceric acid units. Other important multifunctional C2-C5 monomer units are identified including methylglyoxal, hydroxyacetone, hydroxyacetic acid, glycolaldehyde, and 2-methyltetrols. The majority of the NOC oligomers contain only one nitrate moiety resulting in a low average N:C ratio of 0.019. Average O:C ratios of the detected SOA compounds are 0.54 under the low-NOx conditions and 0.83 under the high-NOx conditions. Our results underscore the importance of isoprene photooxidation as a source of NOC in organic particulate matter.

  20. Synthesis of poly(methyl urethane) acrylate oligomer using 2-isocyanatoethyl methacrylate for UV curable coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, M N; Oh, S W; Ahn, B H; Moon, M J; Kang, Y S

    2009-02-01

    The poly(methyl urethane) acrylate oligomer was obtained by the reaction of methyl acrylate oligomer and 2-isocyanatoethyl methacrylate. Synthesis of poly(methyl urethane) acrylate oligomer was done with 2-mercaptoethanol (2-MEOH), methyl acrylate, 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN, initiator) and dibutyltin dilaurate as a catalyst. Then 2-MEOH was used for functional chain transfer agent. The structure and property of the synthesized oligomers were characterized by FT-IR, FT-NMR, rheometer, and DSC. In this study, by synthetic method including the addition of 2-isocyanatoethyl methacrylate, thermal behavior of synthesized material was improved more than that reported in the previous study. Poly(methyl urethane) oligomer can be used for UV curable coatings, inks and adhesives. UV curable coating have high resistance against weather, ozone, aging, frictional wear, and heat. Besides they can absorb the shock and resist rust according to the thickness of film. It is used as an adhesive, paint, optical fiber coating agent, and waterproof agent because of these advantages at the present time.

  1. Extracellular Tau Oligomers Induce Invasion of Endogenous Tau into the Somatodendritic Compartment and Axonal Transport Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Eric; Breckenridge, Leigham; McMahon, Lloyd; Som, Sreemoyee; McConnell, Ian; Bloom, George S

    2017-01-01

    Aggregates composed of the microtubule associated protein, tau, are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and non-Alzheimer's tauopathies. Extracellular tau can induce the accumulation and aggregation of intracellular tau, and tau pathology can be transmitted along neural networks over time. There are six splice variants of central nervous system tau, and various oligomeric and fibrillar forms are associated with neurodegeneration in vivo. The particular extracellular forms of tau capable of transferring tau pathology from neuron to neuron remain ill defined, however, as do the consequences of intracellular tau aggregation on neuronal physiology. The present study was undertaken to compare the effects of extracellular tau monomers, oligomers, and filaments comprising various tau isoforms on the behavior of cultured neurons. We found that 2N4R or 2N3R tau oligomers provoked aggregation of endogenous intracellular tau much more effectively than monomers or fibrils, or of oligomers made from other tau isoforms, and that a mixture of all six isoforms most potently provoked intracellular tau accumulation. These effects were associated with invasion of tau into the somatodendritic compartment. Finally, we observed that 2N4R oligomers perturbed fast axonal transport of membranous organelles along microtubules. Intracellular tau accumulation was often accompanied by increases in the run length, run time and instantaneous velocity of membranous cargo. This work indicates that extracellular tau oligomers can disrupt normal neuronal homeostasis by triggering axonal tau accumulation and loss of the polarized distribution of tau, and by impairing fast axonal transport.

  2. Migration of oligomers from PET: determination of diffusion coefficients and comparison of experimental versus modelled migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Maria; Fornari, Roberta; de Voogt, Pim; Franz, Roland

    2017-07-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is increasingly used as food-contact material in, for example, containers for beverage such as bottles for soft drinks, mineral water, juices and beer. Mass transport of substances present in packaging materials into the packed food and beverages is monitored to verify the food law compliance of the materials. PET is known to contain or give rise to migrants that are oligomers derived from the polymeric material. Until now their actual migration potential has been investigated only poorly. A convenient way to determine their migration would be by using models. To verify existing models with experimental data, a migration kinetic study of PET oligomers was conducted. PET bottle material was submerged in 50% ethanol at 80°C for 15 h. The oligomer content in the migration solutions was determined every hour using LC-MS with the first-series cyclic PET trimer as standard. Diffusion coefficients of five PET oligomers (first-series dimer and trimer, second-series dimer and trimer, and third-series dimer) were calculated from the obtained data and compared with the calculated diffusion coefficients using the models of Welle and Piringer. This is the first study to provide diffusion characteristics of oligomers in PET other than the first-series cyclic trimer.

  3. Antioxidant Activity of Hispidin Oligomers from Medicinal Fungi: A DFT Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Hassane Anouar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hispidin oligomers are styrylpyrone pigments isolated from the medicinal fungi Inonotus xeranticus and Phellinus linteus. They exhibit diverse biological activities and strong free radical scavenging activity. To rationalize the antioxidant activity of a series of four hispidin oligomers and determine the favored mechanism involved in free radical scavenging, DFT calculations were carried out at the B3P86/6-31+G (d, p level of theory in gas and solvent. The results showed that bond dissociation enthalpies of OH groups of hispidin oligomers (ArOH and spin density delocalization of related radicals (ArO• are the appropriate parameters to clarify the differences between the observed antioxidant activities for the four oligomers. The effect of the number of hydroxyl groups and presence of a catechol moiety conjugated to a double bond on the antioxidant activity were determined. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies showed that the PC-ET mechanism is the main mechanism involved in free radical scavenging. The spin density distribution over phenoxyl radicals allows a better understanding of the hispidin oligomers formation.

  4. Solvent Free Low-Melt Viscosity Imide Oligomers And Thermosetting Polyimide Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, CHun-Hua (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    This invention relates to the composition and a solvent-free process for preparing novel imide oligomers and polymers specifically formulated with effective amounts of a dianhydride such as 2,3,3',4-biphenyltetra carboxylic dianydride (a-BPDA), at least one aromatic diamine' and an endcapped of 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA) or nadic anhydride to produce imide oligomers that possess a low-melt viscosity of 1-60 poise at 260-280" C. When the imide oligomer melt is cured at about 371 C. in a press or autoclave under 100-500 psi, the melt resulted in a thermoset polyimide having a glass transition temperature (T(sub g)) equal to and above 310 C. A novel feature of this process is that the monomers; namely the dianhydrides, diamines and the endcaps, are melt processable to form imide oligomers at temperatures ranging between 232-280 C. (450-535 F) without any solvent. These low-melt imide oligomers can be easily processed by resin transfer molding (RTM), vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) or the resin infusion process with fiber preforms e.g. carbon, glass or quartz preforms to produce polyimide matrix composites with 288-343C (550-650 F) high temperature performance capability.

  5. Thin films of arylenevinylene oligomers prepared by MAPLE for applications in non-linear optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanculescu, A., E-mail: sanca@infim.ro [National Institute of Materials Physics, Optics and Spectroscopy Laboratory, 105 bis Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG-7, Bucharest-Magurele 077125 (Romania); Vacareanu, L.; Grigoras, M. [P. Poni' Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41 A Gr. Ghica Voda Alley, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Socol, M. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Optics and Spectroscopy Laboratory, 105 bis Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG-7, Bucharest-Magurele 077125 (Romania); Socol, G. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Str. Atomistilor, Nr. 409, P.O. Box MG-36, Magurele, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Stanculescu, F. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Str. Atomistilor nr.405, P.O. Box MG-11, Bucharest-Magurele 077125 (Romania); Preda, N.; Matei, E. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Optics and Spectroscopy Laboratory, 105 bis Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG-7, Bucharest-Magurele 077125 (Romania); Ionita, I. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Str. Atomistilor nr.405, P.O. Box MG-11, Bucharest-Magurele 077125 (Romania); Girtan, M. [Laboratoire de Photonique d' Angers, Universite d' Angers, 2, Bd. Lavoisier, 49045 Angers (France); Mihailescu, I.N. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Str. Atomistilor, Nr. 409, P.O. Box MG-36, Magurele, Bucharest 077125 (Romania)

    2011-04-01

    This paper discusses two arylenevinylene oligomers with optical nonlinear properties. Their trans molecular structure was confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Second Harmonic Generation and two-photon fluorescence have been observed on Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation-deposited thin films. We have seen two local maxima in UV-Vis spectra and a red shift of the photoluminescence peak for carbazole-based oligomer, which can be correlated with a higher conformational flexibility and with strong polarization interactions in the solid state. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy images have revealed a grainy morphology of the film deposited on titanium and a higher roughness for carbazole-based oligomer. Second harmonic measurements have shown nearly equal values of the second-order nonlinear optical coefficient for the triphenylamine and carbazole-based oligomers for P{sub laser} < 100 mW. z-Scan and x-scan representations of the carbazole-based oligomer film have shown strong two-photon fluorescence intensity inside the sample confirming a volume process, and a strong second harmonic at the surface of the sample determined by the surface morphology.

  6. Determination of the critical molar mass of ovalbumin oligomers degraded by ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRATOLJUB H. MILOSAVLJEVIC

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available An experimental method has been developed which enables the determination of the critical molar mass (Mmc of ovalbumin oligomers degraded by ultrasound of known frequency. To test the validity of the Mmc postulate, a series of ovalbumin oligomers was prepared by the radiolytic cross-linking of 1% solutions of ovalbumin monomer dissolved in 50 mM Na/K-phosphate buffer pH 7.0 saturated with N2O. Under these conditions, irradiation with 5 kGy from a 60Co source, yielded ovalbumin dimers, trimers, tetramers, and higher order oligomers. On the basis of the results obtained with the ovalbumin oligomers, it was concluded that for ultrasound of 23 kHz frequency and 5mm amplitude, the Mmc was 274000 + 14000 g/mol. Our results confirmed that the two postulates in the chemistry of polymer degradation by ultrasound are valid when ovalbumin oligomers are used as substrates, i.e., (1 that the higher the molar mass of the original macromolecule, the faster is its degradation rate, and (2 that a lower molar mass limit (LMmL exists below which the macromolecules are resistent to further degradation.

  7. A Food and Drug Administration-approved asthma therapeutic agent impacts amyloid β in the brain in a transgenic model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yukiko; Takeda, Shuko; Cho, Hansang; Wegmann, Susanne; Shoup, Timothy M; Takahashi, Kazue; Irimia, Daniel; Elmaleh, David R; Hyman, Bradley T; Hudry, Eloise

    2015-01-23

    Interfering with the assembly of Amyloid β (Aβ) peptides from monomer to oligomeric species and fibrils or promoting their clearance from the brain are targets of anti-Aβ-directed therapies in Alzheimer disease. Here we demonstrate that cromolyn sodium (disodium cromoglycate), a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug already in use for the treatment of asthma, efficiently inhibits the aggregation of Aβ monomers into higher-order oligomers and fibrils in vitro without affecting Aβ production. In vivo, the levels of soluble Aβ are decreased by over 50% after only 1 week of daily intraperitoneally administered cromolyn sodium. Additional in vivo microdialysis studies also show that this compound decreases the half-life of soluble Aβ in the brain. These data suggest a clear effect of a peripherally administered, Food and Drug Administration-approved medication on Aβ economy, supporting further investigation of the potential long-term efficacy of cromolyn sodium in Alzheimer disease.

  8. A novel retro-inverso peptide inhibitor reduces amyloid deposition, oxidation and inflammation and stimulates neurogenesis in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadivel Parthsarathy

    Full Text Available Previously, we have developed a retro-inverso peptide inhibitor (RI-OR2, rGffvlkGr that blocks the in vitro formation and toxicity of the Aβ oligomers which are thought to be a cause of neurodegeneration and memory loss in Alzheimer's disease. We have now attached a retro-inverted version of the HIV protein transduction domain 'TAT' to RI-OR2 to target this new inhibitor (RI-OR2-TAT, Ac-rGffvlkGrrrrqrrkkrGy-NH(2 into the brain. Following its peripheral injection, a fluorescein-labelled version of RI-OR2-TAT was found to cross the blood brain barrier and bind to the amyloid plaques and activated microglial cells present in the cerebral cortex of 17-months-old APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice. Daily intraperitoneal injection of RI-OR2-TAT (at 100 nmol/kg for 21 days into 10-months-old APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice resulted in a 25% reduction (p<0.01 in the cerebral cortex of Aβ oligomer levels, a 32% reduction (p<0.0001 of β-amyloid plaque count, a 44% reduction (p<0.0001 in the numbers of activated microglial cells, and a 25% reduction (p<0.0001 in oxidative damage, while the number of young neurons in the dentate gyrus was increased by 210% (p<0.0001, all compared to control APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice injected with vehicle (saline alone. Our data suggest that oxidative damage, inflammation, and inhibition of neurogenesis are all a downstream consequence of Aβ aggregation, and identify a novel brain-penetrant retro-inverso peptide inhibitor of Aβ oligomer formation for further testing in humans as a potential disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

  9. A new source of oxygenated organic aerosol and oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liggio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A large oxygenated organic uptake to aerosols was observed when exposing ambient urban air to inorganic acidic and non-acidic sulfate seed aerosol. For non-acidic seed aerosol the uptake was attributed to the direct dissolution of primary vehicle exhaust gases into the aqueous aerosol fraction, and was correlated to the initial seed sulphate mass. The uptake of primary oxygenated organic gases to aerosols in this study represents a significant amount of organic aerosol (OA that may be considered primary when compared to that reported for primary organic aerosol (POA, but is considerably more oxygenated (O : C ~ 0.3 than traditional POA. Consequently, a fraction of measured ambient oxygenated OA, which correlates with secondary sulphate, may in fact be of a primary, rather than secondary source. These results represent a new source of oxygenated OA on neutral aerosol and imply that the uptake of primary organic gases will occur in the ambient atmosphere, under dilute conditions, and in the presence of pre-existing SO4 aerosols which contain water. Conversely, under acidic seed aerosol conditions, oligomer formation was observed with the uptake of organics being enhanced by a factor of three or more compared to neutral aerosols, and in less than 2 min, representing an additional source of SOA to the atmosphere. This resulted in a trajectory in Van Krevelen space towards higher O : C (slope ~ −1.5, despite a lack of continual gas-phase oxidation in this closed system. The results demonstrate that high molecular weight species will form on acidic aerosols at the ambient level and mixture of organic gases, but are otherwise unaffected by subsequent aerosol neutralization, and that aerosol acidity will affect the organic O : C via aerosol-phase reactions. These two processes, forming oxygenated POA under neutral conditions and SOA under acidic conditions can contribute to the total ambient OA mass and the evolution of ambient aerosol O : C ratios

  10. The Effect of Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs on Amyloid Aggregation and Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Iannuzzi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a protein folding disorder in which normally soluble proteins are deposited extracellularly as insoluble fibrils, impairing tissue structure and function. Charged polyelectrolytes such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs are frequently found associated with the proteinaceous deposits in tissues of patients affected by amyloid diseases. Experimental evidence indicate that they can play an active role in favoring amyloid fibril formation and stabilization. Binding of GAGs to amyloid fibrils occurs mainly through electrostatic interactions involving the negative polyelectrolyte charges and positively charged side chains residues of aggregating protein. Similarly to catalyst for reactions, GAGs favor aggregation, nucleation and amyloid fibril formation functioning as a structural templates for the self-assembly of highly cytotoxic oligomeric precursors, rich in β-sheets, into harmless amyloid fibrils. Moreover, the GAGs amyloid promoting activity can be facilitated through specific interactions via consensus binding sites between amyloid polypeptide and GAGs molecules. We review the effect of GAGs on amyloid deposition as well as proteins not strictly related to diseases. In addition, we consider the potential of the GAGs therapy in amyloidosis.

  11. Cardiac resynchronization therapy in a patient with amyloid cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizek, David; Cvijić, Marta; Zupan, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic light chain amyloidosis carries poor prognosis. Amyloid deposition in the myocardium can alter regional left ventricular contraction and cause dyssynchrony. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an effective treatment strategy for patients with advanced heart failure and echocardiographic dyssynchrony. We report a clinical and echocardiographic response of a patient with amyloid cardiomyopathy, treated with a combination of chemotherapy and CRT.

  12. Computational Modelling of the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby

    2014-01-01

    When proteins do not fold correctly, it can lead to very serious diseases. One such group of diseases is the amyloid diseases, of which Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are members. The amyloid diseases are characterized by the aggregation...

  13. Native human serum amyloid P component is a single pentamer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Inge Juul; Andersen, Ove; Nielsen, EH;

    1995-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are members of the pentraxin protein family. SAP is the precursor protein to amyloid P component present in all forms of amyloidosis. The prevailing notion is that SAP in circulation has the form of a double pentameric molecule (decamer...

  14. Structural network alterations and neurological dysfunction in cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijmer, Yael D.; Fotiadis, Panagiotis; Martinez-Ramirez, Sergi; Salat, David H.; Schultz, Aaron; Shoamanesh, Ashkan; Ayres, Alison M.; Vashkevich, Anastasia; Rosas, Diana; Schwab, Kristin; Leemans, Alexander; Biessels, Geert Jan; Rosand, Jonathan; Johnson, Keith A.; Viswanathan, Anand; Gurol, M. Edip; Greenberg, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a common form of small-vessel disease and an important risk factor for cognitive impairment. The mechanisms linking small-vessel disease to cognitive impairment are not well understood. We hypothesized that in patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy, multiple small s

  15. Unraveling the mystery of protein-amyloid binding mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beringer, D.

    2013-01-01

    There are several diseases which are caused by amyloid, a deposit of aggregated protein. Examples of these diseases are Alzheimer’s disease, caused by the aggregation of the peptide Aβ, and Diabetes type 2, caused by hIAPP aggregates. A large number of proteins interact with these amyloid fibrils, s

  16. β-amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer disease are not inert when bound to copper ions but can degrade hydrogen peroxide and generate reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Jennifer; Tinker-Mill, Claire; Kolosov, Oleg; Zhang, Hao; Tabner, Brian J; Allsop, David

    2014-04-25

    According to the "amyloid cascade" hypothesis of Alzheimer disease, the formation of Aβ fibrils and senile plaques in the brain initiates a cascade of events leading to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, neurodegeneration, and the symptom of dementia. Recently, however, emphasis has shifted away from amyloid fibrils as the predominant toxic form of Aβ toward smaller aggregates, referred to as "soluble oligomers." These oligomers have become one of the prime suspects for involvement in the early oxidative damage that is evident in this disease. This raises the question whether or not Aβ fibrils are actually "inert tombstones" present at the end of the aggregation process. Here we show that, when Aβ(1-42) aggregates, including fibrils, are bound to Cu(II) ions, they retain their redox activity and are able to degrade hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with the formation of hydroxyl radicals and the consequent oxidation of the peptide (detected by formation of carbonyl groups). We find that this ability increases as the Cu(II):peptide ratio increases and is accompanied by changes in aggregate morphology, as determined by atomic force microscopy. When aggregates are prepared in the copresence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions, the ratio of Cu(II):Zn(II) becomes an important factor in the degeneration of H2O2, the formation of carbonyl groups in the peptide, and in aggregate morphology. We believe, therefore, that Aβ fibrils can destroy H2O2 and generate damaging hydroxyl radicals and, so, are not necessarily inert end points.

  17. Stress relaxation following uniaxial extension of polystyrene melt and oligomer dilutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qian; Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    2016-01-01

    The filament stretching rheometer has been used to measure the stress relaxation following the startup of uniaxial extensional flow, on anarrow molar mass distribution (NMMD) polystyrene melt and styrene oligomer dilutions thereof. All samples used here were characterizedin molecular weight......, mechanical spectroscopy, and constant strain rate uniaxial extension in the work of Huang et al. [Macromolecules 46,5026–5035 (2013); ACS Macro Lett. 2, 741–744 (2013)]. The stress relaxation following the steady extensional stress was measured on a285 kg/mole NMMD polystyrene and two 1.92 kg/mole styrene...... oligome