WorldWideScience

Sample records for amyloid fibril mass-per-length

  1. Amyloid fibrils compared to peptide nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zganec, Matjaž; Zerovnik, Eva

    2014-09-01

    Prefibrillar oligomeric states and amyloid fibrils of amyloid-forming proteins qualify as nanoparticles. We aim to predict what biophysical and biochemical properties they could share in common with better researched peptide nanotubes. We first describe what is known of amyloid fibrils and prefibrillar aggregates (oligomers and protofibrils): their structure, mechanisms of formation and putative mechanism of cytotoxicity. In distinction from other neuronal fibrillar constituents, amyloid fibrils are believed to cause pathology, however, some can also be functional. Second, we give a review of known biophysical properties of peptide nanotubes. Finally, we compare properties of these two macromolecular states side by side and discuss which measurements that have already been done with peptide nanotubes could be done with amyloid fibrils as well.

  2. A structural model for Alzheimer's β-amyloid fibrils based on experimental constraints from solid state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkova, Aneta T.; Ishii, Yoshitaka; Balbach, John J.; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Leapman, Richard D.; Delaglio, Frank; Tycko, Robert

    2002-01-01

    We present a structural model for amyloid fibrils formed by the 40-residue β-amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease (Aβ1–40), based on a set of experimental constraints from solid state NMR spectroscopy. The model additionally incorporates the cross-β structural motif established by x-ray fiber diffraction and satisfies constraints on Aβ1–40 fibril dimensions and mass-per-length determined from electron microscopy. Approximately the first 10 residues of Aβ1–40 are structurally disordered in the fibrils. Residues 12–24 and 30–40 adopt β-strand conformations and form parallel β-sheets through intermolecular hydrogen bonding. Residues 25–29 contain a bend of the peptide backbone that brings the two β-sheets in contact through sidechain-sidechain interactions. A single cross-β unit is then a double-layered β-sheet structure with a hydrophobic core and one hydrophobic face. The only charged sidechains in the core are those of D23 and K28, which form salt bridges. Fibrils with minimum mass-per-length and diameter consist of two cross-β units with their hydrophobic faces juxtaposed. PMID:12481027

  3. Quenched Hydrogen Exchange NMR of Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a number of human diseases. These aggregatively misfolded intermolecular β-sheet assemblies constitute some of the most challenging targets in structural biology because to their complexity, size, and insolubility. Here, protocols and controls are described for experiments designed to study hydrogen-bonding in amyloid fibrils indirectly, by transferring information about amide proton occupancy in the fibrils to the dimethyl sulfoxide-denatured state. Since the denatured state is amenable to solution NMR spectroscopy, the method can provide residue-level-resolution data on hydrogen exchange for the monomers that make up the fibrils.

  4. Graphene oxide strongly inhibits amyloid beta fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Akhavan, Omid; Ghavami, Mahdi; Rezaee, Farhad; Ghiasi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin

    2012-01-01

    Since amyloid beta fibrillation (AbF) plays an important role in the development of neurodegenerative diseases, we investigated the effect of graphene oxide (GO) and their protein-coated surfaces on the kinetics of Ab fibrillation in the aqueous solution. We showed that GO and their protein-covered

  5. Atomic-resolution structure of a disease-relevant Aβ(1-42) amyloid fibril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälti, Marielle Aulikki; Ravotti, Francesco; Arai, Hiromi; Glabe, Charles G; Wall, Joseph S; Böckmann, Anja; Güntert, Peter; Meier, Beat H; Riek, Roland

    2016-08-23

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is present in humans as a 39- to 42-amino acid residue metabolic product of the amyloid precursor protein. Although the two predominant forms, Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42), differ in only two residues, they display different biophysical, biological, and clinical behavior. Aβ(1-42) is the more neurotoxic species, aggregates much faster, and dominates in senile plaque of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Although small Aβ oligomers are believed to be the neurotoxic species, Aβ amyloid fibrils are, because of their presence in plaques, a pathological hallmark of AD and appear to play an important role in disease progression through cell-to-cell transmissibility. Here, we solved the 3D structure of a disease-relevant Aβ(1-42) fibril polymorph, combining data from solid-state NMR spectroscopy and mass-per-length measurements from EM. The 3D structure is composed of two molecules per fibril layer, with residues 15-42 forming a double-horseshoe-like cross-β-sheet entity with maximally buried hydrophobic side chains. Residues 1-14 are partially ordered and in a β-strand conformation, but do not display unambiguous distance restraints to the remainder of the core structure.

  6. Chirality and chiroptical properties of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Chirality of amyloid fibrils-linear beta-sheet-rich aggregates of misfolded protein chains-often manifests in morphological traits such as helical twist visible in atomic force microscopy and in chiroptical properties accessible to vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). According to recent studies the relationship between molecular chirality of polypeptide building blocks and superstructural chirality of amyloid fibrils may be more intricate and less deterministic than previously assumed. Several puzzling experimental findings have put into question earlier intuitive ideas on: 1) the bottom-up chirality transfer upon amyloidogenic self-assembly, and 2) the structural origins of chiroptical properties of protein aggregates. For example, removal of a single amino acid residue from an amyloidogenic all-L peptide was shown to reverse handedness of fibrils. On the other hand, certain types of amyloid aggregates revealed surprisingly strong VCD spectra with the sign and shape dependent on the conditions of fibrillation. Hence, microscopic and chiroptical studies have highlighted chirality as one more aspect of polymorphism of amyloid fibrils. This brief review is intended to outline the current state of research on amyloid-like fibrils from the perspective of their structural and superstructural chirality and chiroptical properties.

  7. Compressive deformation of ultralong amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Cranford, Steven; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-12-01

    Involved in various neurodegenerative diseases, amyloid fibrils and plaques feature a hierarchical structure, ranging from the atomistic to the micrometer scale. At the atomistic level, a dense and organized hydrogen bond network is resembled in a beta-sheet rich secondary structure, which drives a remarkable stiffness in the range of 10-20GPa, larger than many other biological nanofibrils, a result confirmed by both experiment and theory. However, the understanding of how these exceptional mechanical properties transfer from the atomistic to the nanoscale remains unknown. Here we report a multiscale analysis that, from the atomistic-level structure of a single fibril, extends to the mesoscale level, reaching size scales of hundreds of nanometers. We use parameters directly derived from full atomistic simulations of A β (1-40) amyloid fibrils to parameterize a mesoscopic coarse-grained model, which is used to reproduce the elastic properties of amyloid fibrils. We then apply our mesoscopic model in an analysis of the buckling behavior of amyloid fibrils with different lengths and report a comparison with predictions from continuum beam theory. An important implication of our results is a severe reduction of the effective modulus due to buckling, an effect that could be important to interpret experimental results of ultra-long amyloid fibrils. Our model represents a powerful tool to mechanically characterize molecular structures on the order of hundreds of nanometers to micrometers on the basis of the underlying atomistic behavior. The work provides insight into structural and mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils and may enable further analysis of larger-scale assemblies such as amyloidogenic bundles or plaques as found in disease states.

  8. Magnetite nanoparticle interactions with insulin amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Hung, Huey-Shan; Kung, Mei-Lang; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2016-10-01

    Accumulation of amyloid fibrils is one of the likely key factors leading to the development of Alzheimer’s disease and other amyloidosis associated diseases. Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed as promising medical materials for many medical applications. In this study, we have explored the effects of Fe3O4 NPs on the fibrillogenesis process of insulin fibrils. When Fe3O4 NPs were co-incubated with insulin, Fe3O4 NPs had no effect on the structural transformation into amyloid-like fibrils but had higher affinity toward insulin fibrils. We demonstrated that the zeta potential of insulin fibrils and Fe3O4 NPs were both positive, suggesting the binding forces between Fe3O4 NPs and insulin fibrils were van der Waals forces but not surface charge. Moreover, a different amount of Fe3O4 NPs added had no effect on secondary structural changes of insulin fibrils. These results propose the potential use of Fe3O4 NPs as therapeutic agents against diseases related to protein aggregation or contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

  9. Laser-induced propagation and destruction of amyloid beta fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Hisashi; Ozawa, Daisaku; Sakurai, Kazumasa; Kawakami, Toru; Kuyama, Hiroki; Nishimura, Osamu; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Kuboi, Ryoichi; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2010-06-18

    The amyloid deposition of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides is a critical pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD). Preventing the formation of amyloid deposits and removing preformed fibrils in tissues are important therapeutic strategies against AD. Previously, we reported the destruction of amyloid fibrils of beta(2)-microglobulin K3 fragments by laser irradiation coupled with the binding of amyloid-specific thioflavin T. Here, we studied the effects of a laser beam on Abeta fibrils. As was the case for K3 fibrils, extensive irradiation destroyed the preformed Abeta fibrils. However, irradiation during spontaneous fibril formation resulted in only the partial destruction of growing fibrils and a subsequent explosive propagation of fibrils. The explosive propagation was caused by an increase in the number of active ends due to breakage. The results not only reveal a case of fragmentation-induced propagation of fibrils but also provide insights into therapeutic strategies for AD.

  10. Mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bumjoon; Yoon, Gwonchan; Lee, Sang Woo; Eom, Kilho

    2015-01-14

    Amyloid fibrils have recently received attention due to their remarkable mechanical properties, which are highly correlated with their biological functions. We have studied the mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibrils as a function of their length scales by using atomistic simulations. It is shown that the length of amyloid fibrils plays a role in their deformation and fracture mechanisms in such a way that the competition between shear and bending deformations is highly dependent on the fibril length, and that as the fibril length increases, so does the bending strength of the fibril while its shear strength decreases. The dependence of rupture force for amyloid fibrils on their length is elucidated using the Bell model, which suggests that the rupture force of the fibril is determined from the hydrogen bond rupture mechanism that critically depends on the fibril length. We have measured the toughness of amyloid fibrils, which is shown to depend on the fibril length. In particular, the toughness of the fibril with its length of ∼3 nm is estimated to be ∼30 kcal mol(-1) nm(-3), comparable to that of a spider silk crystal with its length of ∼2 nm. Moreover, we have shown the important effect of the pulling rate on the mechanical deformation mechanisms and properties of amyloid fibril. It is found that as the pulling rate increases, so does the contribution of the shear effect to the elastic deformation of the amyloid fibril with its length of deformation mechanism of the amyloid fibril with its length of >15 nm is almost independent of the pulling rate. Our study sheds light on the role of the length scale of amyloid fibrils and the pulling rate in their mechanical behaviors and properties, which may provide insights into how the excellent mechanical properties of protein fibrils can be determined.

  11. Stop-and-go kinetics in amyloid fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Fonslet, Jesper; Andersen, Christian Beyschau;

    2010-01-01

    Many human diseases are associated with protein aggregation and fibrillation. We present experiments on in vitro glucagon fibrillation using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, providing real-time measurements of single-fibril growth. We find that amyloid fibrils grow in an intermi...

  12. Preparation of Amyloid Fibrils Seeded from Brain and Meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherpelz, Kathryn P; Lu, Jun-Xia; Tycko, Robert; Meredith, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Seeding of amyloid fibrils into fresh solutions of the same peptide or protein in disaggregated form leads to the formation of replicate fibrils, with close structural similarity or identity to the original fibrillar seeds. Here we describe procedures for isolating fibrils composed mainly of β-amyloid (Aβ) from human brain and from leptomeninges, a source of cerebral blood vessels, for investigating Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. We also describe methods for seeding isotopically labeled, disaggregated Aβ peptide solutions for study using solid-state NMR and other techniques. These methods should be applicable to other types of amyloid fibrils, to Aβ fibrils from mice or other species, tissues other than brain, and to some non-fibrillar aggregates. These procedures allow for the examination of authentic amyloid fibrils and other protein aggregates from biological tissues without the need for labeling the tissue.

  13. Inhibition of insulin amyloid fibril formation by cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Keisuke; Misumi, Yohei; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Hayashi, Yuya; Tasaki, Masayoshi; Obayashi, Konen; Yamashita, Taro; Jono, Hirofumi; Arima, Hidetoshi; Ando, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Localized insulin-derived amyloid masses occasionally form at the site of repeated insulin injections in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes and cause subcutaneous insulin resistance. Various kinds of insulin including porcine insulin, human insulin, and insulin analogues reportedly formed amyloid fibrils in vitro and in vivo, but the impact of the amino acid replacement in insulin molecules on amyloidogenicity is largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated the difference in amyloid fibril formation kinetics of human insulin and insulin analogues, which suggests an important role of the C-terminal domain of the insulin B chain in nuclear formation of amyloid fibrils. Furthermore, we determined that cyclodextrins, which are widely used as drug carriers in the pharmaceutical field, had an inhibitory effect on the nuclear formation of insulin amyloid fibrils. These findings have significant implications for the mechanism underlying insulin amyloid fibril formation and for developing optimal additives to prevent this subcutaneous adverse effect.

  14. Toxic species in amyloid disorders: Oligomers or mature fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation is the hallmark of several neurodegenerative disorders. These protein aggregation (fibrillization disorders are also known as amyloid disorders. The mechanism of protein aggregation involves conformation switch of the native protein, oligomer formation leading to protofibrils and finally mature fibrils. Mature fibrils have long been considered as the cause of disease pathogenesis; however, recent evidences suggest oligomeric intermediates formed during fibrillization to be toxic. In this review, we have tried to address the ongoing debate for these toxic amyloid species. We did an extensive literature search and collated information from Pubmed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov and Google search using various permutations and combinations of the following keywords: Neurodegeneration, amyloid disorders, protein aggregation, fibrils, oligomers, toxicity, Alzheimer′s Disease, Parkinson′s Disease. We describe different instances showing the toxicity of mature fibrils as well as oligomers in Alzheimer′s Disease and Parkinson′s Disease. Distinct structural framework and morphology of amyloid oligomers suggests difference in toxic effect between oligomers and fibrils. We highlight the difference in structure and proposed toxicity pathways for fibrils and oligomers. We also highlight the evidences indicating that intermediary oligomeric species can act as potential diagnostic biomarker. Since the formation of these toxic species follow a common structural switch among various amyloid disorders, the protein aggregation events can be targeted for developing broad-range therapeutics. The therapeutic trials based on the understanding of different protein conformers (monomers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils in amyloid cascade are also described.

  15. Amyloid-like fibril elongation follows michaelis-menten kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milto, Katazyna; Botyriute, Akvile; Smirnovas, Vytautas

    2013-01-01

    A number of proteins can aggregate into amyloid-like fibrils. It was noted that fibril elongation has similarities to an enzymatic reaction, where monomers or oligomers would play a role of substrate and nuclei/fibrils would play a role of enzyme. The question is how similar these processes really are. We obtained experimental data on insulin amyloid-like fibril elongation at the conditions where other processes which may impact kinetics of fibril formation are minor and fitted it using Michaelis-Menten equation. The correlation of the fit is very good and repeatable. It speaks in favour of enzyme-like model of fibril elongation. In addition, obtained [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] values at different conditions may help in better understanding influence of environmental factors on the process of fibril elongation.

  16. A Synchrotron-Based Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting Analysis of Amyloid Fibrils and Prefibrillar Intermediates with Residue-Specific Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinger, Alexandra L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kiselar, Janna [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Ilchenko, Serguei [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Komatsu, Hiroaki [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chance, Mark R. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Axelsen, Paul H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-11-09

    The structural models of the fibrils formed by the 40-residue amyloid-β (Aβ40) peptide in Alzheimer’s disease typically consist of linear polypeptide segments, oriented approximately perpendicular to the long axis of the fibril, and joined together as parallel in-register β-sheets to form filaments. However, various models differ in the number of filaments that run the length of a fibril, and in the topological arrangement of these filaments. In addition to questions about the structure of Aβ40 monomers in fibrils, there are important unanswered questions about their structure in prefibrillar intermediates, which are of interest because they may represent the most neurotoxic form of Aβ40. To assess different models of fibril structure and to gain insight into the structure of prefibrillar intermediates, the relative solvent accessibility of amino acid residue side chains in fibrillar and prefibrillar Aβ40 preparations was characterized in solution by hydroxyl radical footprinting and structural mass spectrometry. A key to the application of this technology was the development of hydroxyl radical reactivity measures for individual side chains of Aβ40. When we combined mass-per-length measurements performed by dark-field electron microscopy, we determined that the results of our study were consistent with the core filament structure represented by two- and three-filament solid state nuclear magnetic resonance-based models of the Aβ40 fibril (such as 2LMN, 2LMO, 2LMP, and 2LMQ), with minor refinements, but they are inconsistent with the more recently proposed 2M4J model. Our results also demonstrate that individual Aβ40 fibrils exhibit structural heterogeneity or polymorphism, where regions of two-filament structure alternate with regions of three-filament structure. The footprinting approach utilized in this study will be valuable for characterizing various fibrillar and nonfibrillar forms of the Aβ peptide.

  17. Destroying activity of magnetoferritin on lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopcansky, Peter; Siposova, Katarina [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Melnikova, Lucia, E-mail: melnikova@saske.sk [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Bednarikova, Zuzana [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Institute of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, Safarik University, Kosice (Slovakia); Timko, Milan; Mitroova, Zuzana; Antosova, Andrea [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Garamus, Vasil M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht: Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Street 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna, 141980 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, Kyiv 01033 (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna, 141980 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Gazova, Zuzana [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Department of Medical and Clinical Biochemistry and LABMED, Tr. SNP 1, 040 11 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2015-03-01

    Presence of protein amyloid aggregates (oligomers, protofilaments, fibrils) is associated with many diseases as diabetes mellitus or Alzheimer's disease. The interaction between lysozyme amyloid fibrils and magnetoferritin loaded with different amount of iron atoms (168 or 532 atoms) has been investigated by small-angle X-rays scattering and thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. Results suggest that magnetoferritin caused an iron atom-concentration dependent reduction of lysozyme fibril size. - Highlights: • The interaction between lysozyme amyloid fibrils and magnetoferritin loaded with different amount of iron atoms (168 or 532 atoms) has been investigated by small-angle X-rays scattering and thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. • Results suggest that magnetoferritin caused an iron atom-concentration dependent reduction of lysozyme fibril size.

  18. Amyloid fibrils composed of hexameric peptides attenuate neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnellas, Michael P; Adams, Chris M; Sobel, Raymond A; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B

    2013-04-03

    The amyloid-forming proteins tau, αB crystallin, and amyloid P protein are all found in lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS). Our previous work established that amyloidogenic peptides from the small heat shock protein αB crystallin (HspB5) and from amyloid β fibrils, characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, were therapeutic in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), reflecting aspects of the pathology of MS. To understand the molecular basis for the therapeutic effect, we showed a set of amyloidogenic peptides composed of six amino acids, including those from tau, amyloid β A4, major prion protein (PrP), HspB5, amylin, serum amyloid P, and insulin B chain, to be anti-inflammatory and capable of reducing serological levels of interleukin-6 and attenuating paralysis in EAE. The chaperone function of the fibrils correlates with the therapeutic outcome. Fibrils composed of tau 623-628 precipitated 49 plasma proteins, including apolipoprotein B-100, clusterin, transthyretin, and complement C3, supporting the hypothesis that the fibrils are active biological agents. Amyloid fibrils thus may provide benefit in MS and other neuroinflammatory disorders.

  19. Analysis of amyloid fibrils in the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Joakim; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Une, Yumi; Sun, Xuguo; Misumi, Shogo; Shoji, Shozo; Ando, Yukio

    2006-06-01

    Recently, a high prevalence of amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis has been documented among captive cheetahs worldwide. Biochemical analysis of amyloid fibrils extracted from the liver of a Japanese captive cheetah unequivocally showed that protein AA was the main fibril constituent. Further characterization of the AA fibril components by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis revealed three main protein AA bands with approximate molecular weights of 8, 10 and 12 kDa. Mass spectrometry analysis of the 12-kDa component observed in SDS-PAGE and Western blotting confirmed the molecular weight of a 12,381-Da peak. Our finding of a 12-kDa protein AA component provides evidence that the cheetah SAA sequence is longer than the previously reported 90 amino acid residues (approximately 10 kDa), and hence SAA is part of the amyloid fibril.

  20. Binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes for amyloid fibrils recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanczyc, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.hanczyc@chalmers.se

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Interactions of binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes with amyloid fibrils. • Dimer ruthenium(II) compounds are sensitive amyloid fibrils biomarkers. • Recognition of amyloid-chromophore adducts by two-photon excited emission. - Abstract: Metal–organic compounds represent a unique class of biomarkers with promising photophysical properties useful for imaging. Here interactions of insulin fibrils with two binuclear complexes [μ-(11,11′-bidppz)(phen){sub 4}Ru{sub 2}]{sup 4+} (1) and [μ-C4(cpdppz)(phen){sub 4}Ru{sub 2}]{sup 4+} (2) are studied by linear dichroism (LD) and fluorescence. These ruthenium(II) compounds could provide a new generation of amyloid binding chromophores with long lived lifetimes, good luminescence quantum yields for the bound molecules and photo-stability useful in multiphoton luminescence imaging.

  1. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid β fibrillation kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvey, M., E-mail: megan.garvey@molbiotech.rwth-aachen.de [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Morgado, I., E-mail: immorgado@ualg.pt [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: ► Aβ(1–40) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ► Aβ(1–40) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ► We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of Aβ(1–40) fibril formation. ► At high Aβ(1–40) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ► Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid β (Aβ) (1–40) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor Aβ(1–40) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleation–polymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. Aβ(1–40) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  2. The contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on amyloid fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyloid fibrils associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be considered biologically relevant failures of cellular quality control mechanisms. It is known that in vivo human Tau protein, human prion protein, and human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 have the tendency to form fibril deposits in a variety of tissues and they are associated with different neurodegenerative diseases, while rabbit prion protein and hen egg white lysozyme do not readily form fibrils and are unlikely to cause neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we have investigated the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation of different proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As revealed by assays based on thioflavin T binding and turbidity, human Tau fragments, when phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β, do not form filaments in the absence of a crowding agent but do form fibrils in the presence of a crowding agent, and the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes amyloid fibril formation of human prion protein and its two pathogenic mutants E196K and D178N. Such an enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation is also observed for a pathological human SOD1 mutant A4V. On the other hand, rabbit prion protein and hen lysozyme do not form amyloid fibrils when a crowding agent at 300 g/l is used but do form fibrils in the absence of a crowding agent. Furthermore, aggregation of these two proteins is remarkably inhibited by Ficoll 70 and dextran 70 at 200 g/l. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases are more likely to form amyloid fibrils under crowded conditions than in dilute solutions. By contrast, some of the proteins that are not neurodegenerative disease-associated are unlikely to misfold in crowded physiological environments. A possible explanation for the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on these two sets of

  3. Characterizing Structural Stability of Amyloid Motif Fibrils Mediated by Water Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunsung; Chang, Hyun Joon; Lee, Myeongsang; Na, Sungsoo

    2017-02-04

    In biological systems, structural confinements of amyloid fibrils can be mediated by the role of water molecules. However, the underlying effect of the dynamic behavior of water molecules on structural stabilities of amyloid fibrils is still unclear. By performing molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the dynamic features and the effect of interior water molecules on conformations and mechanical characteristics of various amyloid fibrils. We find that a specific mechanism induced by the dynamic properties of interior water molecules can affect diffusion of water molecules inside amyloid fibrils, inducing their different structural stabilities. The conformation of amyloid fibrils induced by interior water molecules show the fibrils' different mechanical features. We elucidate the role of confined and movable interior water molecules in structural stabilities of various amyloid fibrils. Our results offer insights not only in further understanding of mechanical features of amyloids as mediated by water molecules, but also in the fine-tuning of the functional abilities of amyloid fibrils for applications.

  4. On the adsorption of magnetite nanoparticles on lysozyme amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majorosova, Jozefina; Petrenko, Viktor I; Siposova, Katarina; Timko, Milan; Tomasovicova, Natalia; Garamus, Vasil M; Koralewski, Marceli; Avdeev, Mikhail V; Leszczynski, Błażej; Jurga, Stefan; Gazova, Zuzana; Hayryan, Shura; Hu, Chin-Kun; Kopcansky, Peter

    2016-10-01

    An adsorption of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) from electrostatically stabilized aqueous ferrofluids on amyloid fibrils of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in 2mg/mL acidic dispersions have been detected for the MNP concentration range of 0.01-0.1vol.%. The association of the MNP with amyloid fibrils has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and magneto-optical measurements. It has been observed that the extent of adsorption is determined by the MNP concentration. When increasing the MNP concentration the formed aggregates of magnetic particles repeat the general rod-like structure of the fibrils. The effect is not observed when MNP are mixed with the solution of lysozyme monomers. The adsorption has been investigated with the aim to clarify previously found disaggregation activity of MNP in amyloid fibrils dispersions and to get deeper insight into interaction processes between amyloids and MNP. The observed effect is also discussed with respect to potential applications for ordering lysozyme amyloid fibrils in a liquid crystal phase under external magnetic fields.

  5. Complexation of amyloid fibrils with charged conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dhiman; Dutta, Paulami; Chakraborty, Chanchal; Singh, Pradeep K; Anoop, A; Jha, Narendra Nath; Jacob, Reeba S; Mondal, Mrityunjoy; Mankar, Shruti; Das, Subhadeep; Malik, Sudip; Maji, Samir K

    2014-04-01

    It has been suggested that conjugated charged polymers are amyloid imaging agents and promising therapeutic candidates for neurological disorders. However, very less is known about their efficacy in modulating the amyloid aggregation pathway. Here, we studied the modulation of Parkinson's disease associated α-synuclein (AS) amyloid assembly kinetics using conjugated polyfluorene polymers (PF, cationic; PFS, anionic). We also explored the complexation of these charged polymers with the various AS aggregated species including amyloid fibrils and oligomers using multidisciplinary biophysical techniques. Our data suggests that both polymers irrespective of their different charges in the side chains increase the fibrilization kinetics of AS and also remarkably change the morphology of the resultant amyloid fibrils. Both polymers were incorporated/aligned onto the AS amyloid fibrils as evident from electron microscopy (EM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the resultant complexes were structurally distinct from their pristine form of both polymers and AS supported by FTIR study. Additionally, we observed that the mechanism of interactions between the polymers with different species of AS aggregates were markedly different.

  6. Amyloid fibrils nucleated and organized by DNA origami constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udomprasert, Anuttara; Bongiovanni, Marie N.; Sha, Ruojie; Sherman, William B.; Wang, Tong; Arora, Paramjit S.; Canary, James W.; Gras, Sally L.; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2014-07-01

    Amyloid fibrils are ordered, insoluble protein aggregates that are associated with neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. The fibrils have a common rod-like core structure, formed from an elongated stack of β-strands, and have a rigidity similar to that of silk (Young's modulus of 0.2-14 GPa). They also exhibit high thermal and chemical stability and can be assembled in vitro from short synthetic non-disease-related peptides. As a result, they are of significant interest in the development of self-assembled materials for bionanotechnology applications. Synthetic DNA molecules have previously been used to form intricate structures and organize other materials such as metal nanoparticles and could in principle be used to nucleate and organize amyloid fibrils. Here, we show that DNA origami nanotubes can sheathe amyloid fibrils formed within them. The fibrils are built by modifying the synthetic peptide fragment corresponding to residues 105-115 of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin and a DNA origami construct is used to form 20-helix DNA nanotubes with sufficient space for the fibrils inside. Once formed, the fibril-filled nanotubes can be organized onto predefined two-dimensional platforms via DNA-DNA hybridization interactions.

  7. Endocytosed 2-Microglobulin Amyloid Fibrils Induce Necrosis and Apoptosis of Rabbit Synovial Fibroblasts by Disrupting Endosomal/Lysosomal Membranes: A Novel Mechanism on the Cytotoxicity of Amyloid Fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadakazu Okoshi

    Full Text Available Dialysis-related amyloidosis is a major complication in long-term hemodialysis patients. In dialysis-related amyloidosis, β2-microglobulin (β2-m amyloid fibrils deposit in the osteoarticular tissue, leading to carpal tunnel syndrome and destructive arthropathy with cystic bone lesions, but the mechanism by which these amyloid fibrils destruct bone and joint tissue is not fully understood. In this study, we assessed the cytotoxic effect of β2-m amyloid fibrils on the cultured rabbit synovial fibroblasts. Under light microscopy, the cells treated with amyloid fibrils exhibited both necrotic and apoptotic changes, while the cells treated with β2-m monomers and vehicle buffer exhibited no morphological changes. As compared to β2-m monomers and vehicle buffer, β2-m amyloid fibrils significantly reduced cellular viability as measured by the lactate dehydrogenase release assay and the 3-(4,5-di-methylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction assay and significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells as measured by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method. β2-m amyloid fibrils added to the medium adhered to cell surfaces, but did not disrupt artificial plasma membranes as measured by the liposome dye release assay. Interestingly, when the cells were incubated with amyloid fibrils for several hours, many endosomes/lysosomes filled with amyloid fibrils were observed under confocal laser microscopy and electron microscopy, Moreover, some endosomal/lysosomal membranes were disrupted by intravesicular fibrils, leading to the leakage of the fibrils into the cytosol and adjacent to mitochondria. Inhibition of actin-dependent endocytosis by cytochalasin D attenuated the toxicity of amyloid fibrils. These results suggest that endocytosed β2-m amyloid fibrils induce necrosis and apoptosis by disrupting endosomal/lysosomal membranes, and this novel mechanism on the cytotoxicity of amyloid

  8. Atomic Resolution Structure of Monomorphic Aβ42 Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Michael T; Silvers, Robert; Ni, Qing Zhe; Can, Thach V; Sergeyev, Ivan; Rosay, Melanie; Donovan, Kevin J; Michael, Brian; Wall, Joseph; Linse, Sara; Griffin, Robert G

    2016-08-03

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a 39-42 residue protein produced by the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which subsequently aggregates to form cross-β amyloid fibrils that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The most prominent forms of Aβ are Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, which differ by two amino acids (I and A) at the C-terminus. However, Aβ42 is more neurotoxic and essential to the etiology of AD. Here, we present an atomic resolution structure of a monomorphic form of AβM01-42 amyloid fibrils derived from over 500 (13)C-(13)C, (13)C-(15)N distance and backbone angle structural constraints obtained from high field magic angle spinning NMR spectra. The structure (PDB ID: 5KK3 ) shows that the fibril core consists of a dimer of Aβ42 molecules, each containing four β-strands in a S-shaped amyloid fold, and arranged in a manner that generates two hydrophobic cores that are capped at the end of the chain by a salt bridge. The outer surface of the monomers presents hydrophilic side chains to the solvent. The interface between the monomers of the dimer shows clear contacts between M35 of one molecule and L17 and Q15 of the second. Intermolecular (13)C-(15)N constraints demonstrate that the amyloid fibrils are parallel in register. The RMSD of the backbone structure (Q15-A42) is 0.71 ± 0.12 Å and of all heavy atoms is 1.07 ± 0.08 Å. The structure provides a point of departure for the design of drugs that bind to the fibril surface and therefore interfere with secondary nucleation and for other therapeutic approaches to mitigate Aβ42 aggregation.

  9. Islet amyloid polypeptide forms rigid lipid-protein amyloid fibrils on supported phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanov, Yegor A; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2008-02-08

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) forms fibrillar amyloid deposits in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and its misfolding and aggregation are thought to contribute to beta-cell death. Increasing evidence suggests that IAPP fibrillization is strongly influenced by lipid membranes and, vice versa, that the membrane architecture and integrity are severely affected by amyloid growth. Here, we report direct fluorescence microscopic observations of the morphological transformations accompanying IAPP fibrillization on the surface of supported lipid membranes. Within minutes of application in submicromolar concentrations, IAPP caused extensive remodeling of the membrane including formation of defects, vesiculation, and tubulation. The effects of IAPP concentration, ionic strength, and the presence of amyloid seeds on the bilayer perturbation and peptide aggregation were examined. Growth of amyloid fibrils was visualized using fluorescently labeled IAPP or thioflavin T staining. Two-color imaging of the peptide and membranes revealed that the fibrils were initially composed of the peptide only, and vesiculation occurred in the points where growing fibers touched the lipid membrane. Interestingly, after 2-5 h of incubation, IAPP fibers became "wrapped" by lipid membranes derived from the supported membrane. Progressive increase in molecular-level association between amyloid and membranes in the maturing fibers was confirmed by Förster resonance energy transfer spectroscopy.

  10. Atomic-resolution structures of prion AGAAAAGA amyloid fibrils

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2011-01-01

    To the best of the author's knowledge, there is little structural data available on the AGAAAAGA palindrome in the hydrophobic region (113-120) of prion proteins due to the unstable, noncrystalline and insoluble nature of the amyloid fibril, although many experimental studies have shown that this region has amyloid fibril forming properties and plays an important role in prion diseases. In view of this, the present study is devoted to address this problem from computational approaches such as local optimization steepest descent, conjugate gradient, discrete gradient and Newton methods, global optimization simulated annealing and genetic algorithms, canonical dual optimization theory, and structural bioinformatics. The optimal atomic-resolution structures of prion AGAAAAGA amyloid fibils reported in this Chapter have a value to the scientific community in its drive to find treatments for prion diseases or at least be useful for the goals of medicinal chemistry.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibrils: an in silico approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Ye; Wei Wang; Cheng Jiang; Qingfen Yu; Haifeng Chen

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils play causal roles in the pathogenesis of amyloid-related degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease,type Ⅱ diabetes mellitus,and the prion-related transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.The mechanism of fibril formation and protein aggregation is still hotly debated and remains an important open question in order to develop therapeutic method of these diseases.However,traditional molecular biological and crystallographic experiments could hardly observe atomic details and aggregation process.Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations could provide explanations for experimental results and detailed pathway of protein aggregation.In this review,we focus on the applications of MD simulations on several amyloidogenic protein systems.Furthermore,MD simulations could help us to understand the mechanism of amyloid aggregation and how to design the inhibitors.

  12. AL amyloid imaging and therapy with a monoclonal antibody to a cryptic epitope on amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Wall

    Full Text Available The monoclonal antibody 2A4 binds an epitope derived from a cleavage site of serum amyloid protein A (sAA containing a -Glu-Asp- amino acid pairing. In addition to its reactivity with sAA amyloid deposits, the antibody was also found to bind amyloid fibrils composed of immunoglobulin light chains. The antibody binds to synthetic fibrils and human light chain (AL amyloid extracts with high affinity even in the presence of soluble light chain proteins. Immunohistochemistry with biotinylated 2A4 demonstrated positive reaction with ALκ and ALλ human amyloid deposits in various organs. Surface plasmon resonance analyses using synthetic AL fibrils as a substrate revealed that 2A4 bound with a K(D of ∼10 nM. Binding was inhibited in the presence of the -Glu-Asp- containing immunogen peptide. Radiolabeled 2A4 specifically localized with human AL amyloid extracts implanted in mice (amyloidomas as evidenced by single photon emission (SPECT imaging. Furthermore, co-localization of the radiolabeled mAb with amyloid was shown in biodistribution and micro-autoradiography studies. Treatment with 2A4 expedited regression of ALκ amyloidomas in mice, likely mediated by the action of macrophages and neutrophils, relative to animals that received a control antibody. These data indicate that the 2A4 mAb might be of interest for potential imaging and immunotherapy in patients with AL amyloidosis.

  13. Aggregate geometry in amyloid fibril nucleation

    CERN Document Server

    Irbäck, A; Linnemann, N; Linse, B; Wallin, S; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.058101

    2013-01-01

    We present and study a minimal structure-based model for the self-assembly of peptides into ordered beta-sheet-rich fibrils. The peptides are represented by unit-length sticks on a cubic lattice and interact by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicity forces. By Monte Carlo simulations with >100,000 peptides, we show that fibril formation occurs with sigmoidal kinetics in the model. To determine the mechanism of fibril nucleation, we compute the joint distribution in length and width of the aggregates at equilibrium, using an efficient cluster move and flat-histogram techniques. This analysis, based on simulations with 256 peptides in which aggregates form and dissolve reversibly, shows that the main free-energy barriers that a nascent fibril has to overcome are associated with changes in width.

  14. Distinguishing the cross-beta spine arrangements in amyloid fibrils using FRET analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Cao, Aoneng; Lai, Luhua

    2008-06-01

    The recently published microcrystal structures of amyloid fibrils from small peptides greatly enhanced our understanding of the atomic-level structure of the amyloid fibril. However, only a few amyloid fibrils can form microcrystals. The dansyl-tryptophan fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair was shown to be able to detect the inter-peptide arrangement of the Transthyretin (105-115) amyloid fibril. In this study, we combined the known microcrystal structures with the corresponding FRET efficiencies to build a model for amyloid fibril structure classification. We found that fibrils with an antiparallel structural arrangement gave the largest FRET signal, those with a parallel arrangement gave the lowest FRET signal, and those with a mixed arrangement gave a moderate FRET signal. This confirms that the amyloid fibril structure patterns can be classified based on the FRET efficiency.

  15. AFM-based force spectroscopy measurements of mature amyloid fibrils of the peptide glucagon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, M. D.; Hovgaard, M. B.; Mamdouh, W.;

    2008-01-01

    of such mature fibrils contribute to their high stability, suggesting that the internal hydrophobic interactions of amyloid fibrils are likely to be of fundamental importance in the assembly of amyloid fibrils and therefore for the understanding of the progression of their associated pathogenic disorders...

  16. How curcumin affords effective protection against amyloid fibrillation in insulin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabiee, Atefeh; Ebrahim Habibi, Azadeh; Ghasemi, Atiyeh Ghasemi;

    2013-01-01

    seems to be one of these compounds, possessing key structural components effective toward fibrillation prevention, and its anti-amyloidogenic property has been reported for a number of model and disease-related proteins such as lysozyme and alphasynuclein. In this study, insulin amyloid formation has......Since the formation of amyloid structures from proteins was recognized in numerous diseases, many efforts have been devoted to the task of finding effective anti-amyloidogenic compounds. In a number of these investigations, the existence of “generic” compounds is implicitly acknowledged. Curcumin...... been shown effectively influenced by micro molar concentrations of curcumin. Under amyloidogenic conditions (pH 2.5 and 37°C), the compound was observed to inhibit fibril formation of insulin in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, addition of curcumin to the protein incubated in such conditions...

  17. Functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and their pH-responsive hydrogels with amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaoxu; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2012-07-10

    New biocompatible, pH-responsive, and fully fibrous hydrogels have been prepared based on amyloid fibrils hybridized and gelled by functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) far below the gelling concentration of amyloid fibrils. Sulfonic functional groups were introduced on the surfaces of MWNTs either by a covalent diazonium reaction or by physical π-π interactions. The presence of the isoelectric point of amyloid fibrils allows a reversible gelling behavior through ionic interactions with functionalized MWNTs.

  18. Identification of a Common Binding Mode for Imaging Agents to Amyloid Fibrils from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby; Sørensen, Jesper; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid diseases are characterized by the misfolding and deposition of proteins in the body in the form of insoluble amyloid fibrils. Alzheimer’s disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus are two examples of amyloid diseases which are closely related both with respect to the atomic structures of the a......Amyloid diseases are characterized by the misfolding and deposition of proteins in the body in the form of insoluble amyloid fibrils. Alzheimer’s disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus are two examples of amyloid diseases which are closely related both with respect to the atomic structures...... of the amyloid fibrils and the disease pathology. Alzheimer’s disease is very difficult to diagnose, and much research is being performed to develop noninvasive diagnostic methods, such as imaging with small-molecule agents. The interactions between amyloid fibrils and imaging agents are challenging to examine...

  19. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Hisashi [Research Center for Computational Science, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); Department of Structural Molecular Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly.

  20. Binding of fullerenes to amyloid beta fibrils: size matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huy, Pham Dinh Quoc; Li, Mai Suan

    2014-10-01

    Binding affinity of fullerenes C20, C36, C60, C70 and C84 for amyloid beta fibrils is studied by docking and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with the Amber force field and water model TIP3P. Using the molecular mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann surface area method one can demonstrate that the binding free energy linearly decreases with the number of carbon atoms of fullerene, i.e. the larger is the fullerene size, the higher is the binding affinity. Overall, fullerenes bind to Aβ9-40 fibrils stronger than to Aβ17-42. The number of water molecules trapped in the interior of 12Aβ9-40 fibrils was found to be lower than inside pentamer 5Aβ17-42. C60 destroys Aβ17-42 fibril structure to a greater extent compared to other fullerenes. Our study revealed that the van der Waals interaction dominates over the electrostatic interaction and non-polar residues of amyloid beta peptides play the significant role in interaction with fullerenes providing novel insight into the development of drug candidates against Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Tensile deformation and failure of amyloid and amyloid-like protein fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar, Max; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-03-01

    Here we report a series of full atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of six amyloid or amyloid-like protein fibrils in order to systematically understand the effect of different secondary structure motifs on the mechanical tensile and failure response of cross-\\beta protein fibrils. We find a similar failure behavior across the six structures; an initial failure event occurs at small strains involving cooperative rupture of a group of hydrogen bonds, followed by a slow one-by-one hydrogen bond rupture process as the remaining \\beta -sheets peel off with very low applied stress. We also find that the ultimate tensile strength of the protein fibrils investigated scales directly with the number of hydrogen bonds per unit area which break in the initial rupture event. Our results provide insights into structure-property relationships in protein fibrils important for disease and engineering applications and lay the groundwork for the development of materials selection criteria for the design of de novo amyloid-based functional biomaterials.

  2. The Surprising Role of Amyloid Fibrils in HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Laura M; Shorter, James

    2012-01-01

    Despite its discovery over 30 years ago, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) continues to threaten public health worldwide. Semen is the principal vehicle for the transmission of this retrovirus and several endogenous peptides in semen, including fragments of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP248-286 and PAP85-120) and semenogelins (SEM1 and SEM2), assemble into amyloid fibrils that promote HIV infection. For example, PAP248-286 fibrils, termed SEVI (Semen derived Enhancer of Viral Infection), potentiate HIV infection by up to 105-fold. Fibrils enhance infectivity by facilitating virion attachment and fusion to target cells, whereas soluble peptides have no effect. Importantly, the stimulatory effect is greatest at low viral titers, which mimics mucosal transmission of HIV, where relatively few virions traverse the mucosal barrier. Devising a method to rapidly reverse fibril formation (rather than simply inhibit it) would provide an innovative and urgently needed preventative strategy for reducing HIV infection via the sexual route. Targeting a host-encoded protein conformer represents a departure from traditional microbicidal approaches that target the viral machinery, and could synergize with direct antiviral approaches. Here, we review the identification of these amyloidogenic peptides, their mechanism of action, and various strategies for inhibiting their HIV-enhancing effects.

  3. Reversible heat-induced dissociation of β2-microglobulin amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardos, József; Micsonai, András; Pál-Gábor, Henriett; Petrik, Éva; Gráf, László; Kovács, János; Lee, Young-Ho; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2011-04-19

    Recent progress in the field of amyloid research indicates that the classical view of amyloid fibrils, being irreversibly formed highly stable structures resistant to perturbating conditions and proteolytic digestion, is getting more complex. We studied the thermal stability and heat-induced depolymerization of amyloid fibrils of β(2)-microglobulin (β2m), a protein responsible for dialysis-related amyloidosis. We found that freshly polymerized β2m fibrils at 0.1-0.3 mg/mL concentration completely dissociated to monomers upon 10 min incubation at 99 °C. Fibril depolymerization was followed by thioflavin-T fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy at various temperatures. Dissociation of β2m fibrils was found to be a reversible and dynamic process reaching equilibrium between fibrils and monomers within minutes. Repolymerization experiments revealed that the number of extendable fibril ends increased significantly upon incubation at elevated temperatures suggesting that the mechanism of fibril unfolding involves two distinct processes: (1) dissociation of monomers from the fibril ends and (2) the breakage of fibrils. The breakage of fibrils may be an important in vivo factor multiplying the number of fibril nuclei and thus affecting the onset and progress of disease. We investigated the effects of some additives and different factors on the stability of amyloid fibrils. Sample aging increased the thermal stability of β2m fibril solution. 0.5 mM SDS completely prevented β2m fibrils from dissociation up to the applied highest temperature of 99 °C. The generality of our findings was proved on fibrils of K3 peptide and α-synuclein. Our simple method may also be beneficial for screening and developing amyloid-active compounds for therapeutic purposes.

  4. Role of sequence and structural polymorphism on the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwonchan Yoon

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils playing a critical role in disease expression, have recently been found to exhibit the excellent mechanical properties such as elastic modulus in the order of 10 GPa, which is comparable to that of other mechanical proteins such as microtubule, actin filament, and spider silk. These remarkable mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils are correlated with their functional role in disease expression. This suggests the importance in understanding how these excellent mechanical properties are originated through self-assembly process that may depend on the amino acid sequence. However, the sequence-structure-property relationship of amyloid fibrils has not been fully understood yet. In this work, we characterize the mechanical properties of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP fibrils with respect to their molecular structures as well as their amino acid sequence by using all-atom explicit water molecular dynamics (MD simulation. The simulation result suggests that the remarkable bending rigidity of amyloid fibrils can be achieved through a specific self-aggregation pattern such as antiparallel stacking of β strands (peptide chain. Moreover, we have shown that a single point mutation of hIAPP chain constituting a hIAPP fibril significantly affects the thermodynamic stability of hIAPP fibril formed by parallel stacking of peptide chain, and that a single point mutation results in a significant change in the bending rigidity of hIAPP fibrils formed by antiparallel stacking of β strands. This clearly elucidates the role of amino acid sequence on not only the equilibrium conformations of amyloid fibrils but also their mechanical properties. Our study sheds light on sequence-structure-property relationships of amyloid fibrils, which suggests that the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils are encoded in their sequence-dependent molecular architecture.

  5. AFM-based force spectroscopy measurements of mature amyloid fibrils of the peptide glucagon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Mingdong; Hovgaard, Mads Bruun; Mamdouh, Wael; Xu Sailong; Otzen, Daniel Erik; Besenbacher, Flemming [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)], E-mail: dao@inano.dk, E-mail: fbe@inano.dk

    2008-09-24

    We report on the mechanical characterization of individual mature amyloid fibrils by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). These self-assembling materials, formed from the 29-residue amphiphatic peptide hormone glucagon, were found to display a reversible elastic behaviour. Based on AFM morphology and SMFS studies, we suggest that the observed elasticity is due to a force-induced conformational transition which is reversible due to the {beta}-helical conformation of protofibrils, allowing a high degree of extension. The elastic properties of such mature fibrils contribute to their high stability, suggesting that the internal hydrophobic interactions of amyloid fibrils are likely to be of fundamental importance in the assembly of amyloid fibrils and therefore for the understanding of the progression of their associated pathogenic disorders. In addition, such biological amyloid fibril structures with highly stable mechanical properties can potentially be used to produce nanofibres (nanowires) that may be suitable for nanotechnological applications.

  6. Gallic acid is the major component of grape seed extract that inhibits amyloid fibril formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanqin; Pukala, Tara L; Musgrave, Ian F; Williams, Danielle M; Dehle, Francis C; Carver, John A

    2013-12-01

    Many protein misfolding diseases, for example, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's, are characterised by the accumulation of protein aggregates in an amyloid fibrillar form. Natural products which inhibit fibril formation are a promising avenue to explore as therapeutics for the treatment of these diseases. In this study we have shown, using in vitro thioflavin T assays and transmission electron microscopy, that grape seed extract inhibits fibril formation of kappa-casein (κ-CN), a milk protein which forms amyloid fibrils spontaneously under physiological conditions. Among the components of grape seed extract, gallic acid was the most active component at inhibiting κ-CN fibril formation, by stabilizing κ-CN to prevent its aggregation. Concomitantly, gallic acid significantly reduced the toxicity of κ-CN to pheochromocytoma12 cells. Furthermore, gallic acid effectively inhibited fibril formation by the amyloid-beta peptide, the putative causative agent in Alzheimer's disease. It is concluded that the gallate moiety has the fibril-inhibitory activity.

  7. The emergence of superstructural order in insulin amyloid fibrils upon multiple rounds of self-seeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmacz-Chwedoruk, Weronika; Babenko, Viktoria; Dec, Robert; Szymczak, Piotr; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2016-08-01

    Typically, elongation of an amyloid fibril entails passing conformational details of the mother seed to daughter generations of fibrils with high fidelity. There are, however, several factors that can potentially prevent such transgenerational structural imprinting from perpetuating, for example heterogeneity of mother seeds or so-called conformational switching. Here, we examine phenotypic persistence of bovine insulin amyloid ([BI]) upon multiple rounds of self-seeding under quiescent conditions. According to infrared spectroscopy, with the following passages of homologous seeding, daughter fibrils gradually depart from the mother seed’s spectral characteristics. We note that this transgenerational structural drift in [BI] amyloid leads toward fibrils with infrared, chiroptical, and morphological traits similar to those of the superstructural variant of fibrils which normally forms upon strong agitation of insulin solutions. However, in contrast to agitation-induced insulin amyloid, the superstructural assemblies of daughter fibrils isolated through self-seeding are sonication-resistant. Our results suggest that formation of single amyloid fibrils is not a dead-end of the amyloidogenic self-assembly. Instead, the process appears to continue toward the self-assembly of higher-order structures although on longer time-scales. From this perspective, the fast agitation-induced aggregation of insulin appears to be a shortcut to amyloid superstructures whose formation under quiescent conditions is slow.

  8. (99m)Tc-DPD uptake reflects amyloid fibril composition in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilebro, Björn; Suhr, Ole B; Näslund, Ulf; Westermark, Per; Lindqvist, Per; Sundström, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Aims In transthyretin amyloid (ATTR) amyloidosis various principal phenotypes have been described: cardiac, neuropathic, or a mixed cardiac and neuropathic. In addition, two different types of amyloid fibrils have been identified (type A and type B). Type B fibrils have thus far only been found in predominantly early-onset V30M and in patients carrying the Y114C mutation, whereas type A is noted in all other mutations currently examined as well as in wild-type ATTR amyloidosis. The fibril type is a determinant of the ATTR V30M disease phenotype. (99m)Tc-DPD scintigraphy is a highly sensitive method for diagnosing heart involvement in ATTR amyloidosis. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between ATTR fibril composition and (99m)Tc-DPD scintigraphy outcome in patients with biopsy-proven ATTR amyloidosis. Methods Altogether 55 patients with biopsy-proven diagnosis of ATTR amyloidosis and amyloid fibril composition determined were examined by (99m)Tc-DPD scintigraphy. The patients were grouped and compared according to their type of amyloid fibrils. Cardiovascular evaluation included ECG, echocardiography, and cardiac biomarkers. The medical records were scrutinized to identify subjects with hypertension or other diseases that have an impact on cardiac dimensions. Results A total of 97% with type A and none of the patients with type B fibrils displayed (99m)Tc-DPD uptake at scintigraphy (p DPD scintigraphy is strongly related to the patients' transthyretin amyloid fibril composition.

  9. Carnosine's effect on amyloid fibril formation and induced cytotoxicity of lysozyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine W Wu

    Full Text Available Carnosine, a common dipeptide in mammals, has previously been shown to dissemble alpha-crystallin amyloid fibrils. To date, the dipeptide's anti-fibrillogensis effect has not been thoroughly characterized in other proteins. For a more complete understanding of carnosine's mechanism of action in amyloid fibril inhibition, we have investigated the effect of the dipeptide on lysozyme fibril formation and induced cytotoxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Our study demonstrates a positive correlation between the concentration and inhibitory effect of carnosine against lysozyme fibril formation. Molecular docking results show carnosine's mechanism of fibrillogenesis inhibition may be initiated by binding with the aggregation-prone region of the protein. The dipeptide attenuates the amyloid fibril-induced cytotoxicity of human neuronal cells by reducing both apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths. Our study provides solid support for carnosine's amyloid fibril inhibitory property and its effect against fibril-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. The additional insights gained herein may pave way to the discovery of other small molecules that may exert similar effects against amyloid fibril formation and its associated neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability.

  11. The cytotoxic Staphylococcus aureus PSMα3 reveals a cross-α amyloid-like fibril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayeb-Fligelman, Einav; Tabachnikov, Orly; Moshe, Asher; Goldshmidt-Tran, Orit; Sawaya, Michael R; Coquelle, Nicolas; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Landau, Meytal

    2017-02-24

    Amyloids are ordered protein aggregates, found in all kingdoms of life, and are involved in aggregation diseases as well as in physiological activities. In microbes, functional amyloids are often key virulence determinants, yet the structural basis for their activity remains elusive. We determined the fibril structure and function of the highly toxic, 22-residue phenol-soluble modulin α3 (PSMα3) peptide secreted by Staphylococcus aureus PSMα3 formed elongated fibrils that shared the morphological and tinctorial characteristics of canonical cross-β eukaryotic amyloids. However, the crystal structure of full-length PSMα3, solved de novo at 1.45 angstrom resolution, revealed a distinctive "cross-α" amyloid-like architecture, in which amphipathic α helices stacked perpendicular to the fibril axis into tight self-associating sheets. The cross-α fibrillation of PSMα3 facilitated cytotoxicity, suggesting that this assembly mode underlies function in S. aureus.

  12. Phospholipids enhance nucleation but not elongation of apolipoprotein C-II amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Timothy M; Teoh, Chai L; Griffin, Michael D W; Bailey, Michael F; Schuck, Peter; Howlett, Geoffrey J

    2010-06-25

    Amyloid fibrils and their oligomeric intermediates accumulate in several age-related diseases where their presence is considered to play an active role in disease progression. A common characteristic of amyloid fibril formation is an initial lag phase indicative of a nucleation-elongation mechanism for fibril assembly. We have investigated fibril formation by human apolipoprotein (apo) C-II. ApoC-II readily forms amyloid fibrils in a lipid-dependent manner via an initial nucleation step followed by fibril elongation, breaking, and joining. We used fluorescence techniques and stopped-flow analysis to identify the individual kinetic steps involved in the activation of apoC-II fibril formation by the short-chain phospholipid dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC). Submicellar DHPC activates fibril formation by promoting the rapid formation of a tetrameric species followed by a slow isomerisation that precedes monomer addition and fibril growth. Global fitting of the concentration dependence of apoC-II fibril formation showed that DHPC increased the overall tetramerisation constant from 7.5 x 10(-13) to 1.2 x 10(-6) microM(-3) without significantly affecting the rate of fibril elongation, breaking, or joining. Studies on the effect of DHPC on the free pool of apoC-II monomer and on fibril formation by cross-linked apoC-II dimers further demonstrate that DHPC affects nucleation but not elongation. These studies demonstrate the capacity of small lipid compounds to selectively target individual steps in the amyloid fibril forming pathway.

  13. Promotion of formation of amyloid fibrils by aluminium adenosine triphosphate (AlATP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, C; Korchazhkina, O V

    2001-04-01

    The formation of amyloid fibrils is considered to be an important step in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease and other amyloidoses. Fibril formation in vitro has been shown to depend on many different factors including modifications to the amino acid profile of fibrillogenic peptides and interactions with both large and small molecules of physiological significance. How these factors might contribute to amyloid fibril formation in vivo is not clear as very little is known about the promotion of fibril formation in undersaturated solutions of amyloidogenic peptides. We have used thioflavin T fluorescence and reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography to show that ATP, and in particular AlATP, promoted the formation of thioflavin T-reactive fibrils of beta amyloid and, an unrelated amyloidogenic peptide, amylin. Evidence is presented that induction of fibril formation followed the complexation of AIATP by one or more monomers of the respective peptide. However, the complex formed could not be identified directly and it is suggested that AlATP might be acting as a chaperone in the assembly of amyloid fibrils. The effect of AlATP was not mimicked by either AlADP or AlAMP. However, it was blocked by suramin, a P2 ATP receptor antagonist, and this has prompted us to speculate that the precursor proteins to beta amyloid and amylin may be substrates or receptors for ATP in vivo.

  14. Amyloid Fibril-Induced Structural and Spectral Modifications in the Thioflavin-T Optical Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murugan, N. Arul; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Kongsted, Jacob;

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by future possibilities to design target molecules for fibrils with diagnostic or therapeutic capability related to amyloidosis diseases, we investigate in this work the dielectric nature of amyloid fibril microenvironments in different binding sites using an optical probe, thioflavin-T...

  15. Spatially resolved spectroscopic differentiation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on individual insulin amyloid fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Kurouski, Dmitry; Hedegaard, Martin A B;

    2016-01-01

    The formation of insoluble β-sheet-rich protein structures known as amyloid fibrils is associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. A detailed understanding of the molecular structure of the fibril surface is of interest as the first contact wi...

  16. Influence of Aluminium and EGCG on Fibrillation and Aggregation of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhi-Xue; Zhang, Qiang; Ma, Gong-Li; Chen, Cong-Heng; He, Yan-Ming; Xu, Li-Hui; Zhang, Yuan; Zhou, Guang-Rong; Li, Zhen-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The abnormal fibrillation of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) has been implicated in the development of type II diabetes. Aluminum is known to trigger the structural transformation of many amyloid proteins and induce the formation of toxic aggregate species. The (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is considered capable of binding both metal ions and amyloid proteins with inhibitory effect on the fibrillation of amyloid proteins. However, the effect of Al(III)/EGCG complex on hIAPP fibrillation is unclear. In the present work, we sought to view insight into the structures and properties of Al(III) and EGCG complex by using spectroscopic experiments and quantum chemical calculations and also investigated the influence of Al(III) and EGCG on hIAPP fibrillation and aggregation as well as their combined interference on this process. Our studies demonstrated that Al(III) could promote fibrillation and aggregation of hIAPP, while EGCG could inhibit the fibrillation of hIAPP and lead to the formation of hIAPP amorphous aggregates instead of the ordered fibrils. Furthermore, we proved that the Al(III)/EGCG complex in molar ratio of 1 : 1 as Al(EGCG)(H2O)2 could inhibit the hIAPP fibrillation more effectively than EGCG alone. The results provide the invaluable reference for the new drug development to treat type II diabetes. PMID:28074190

  17. Influence of Aluminium and EGCG on Fibrillation and Aggregation of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Xue Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The abnormal fibrillation of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP has been implicated in the development of type II diabetes. Aluminum is known to trigger the structural transformation of many amyloid proteins and induce the formation of toxic aggregate species. The (−-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG is considered capable of binding both metal ions and amyloid proteins with inhibitory effect on the fibrillation of amyloid proteins. However, the effect of Al(III/EGCG complex on hIAPP fibrillation is unclear. In the present work, we sought to view insight into the structures and properties of Al(III and EGCG complex by using spectroscopic experiments and quantum chemical calculations and also investigated the influence of Al(III and EGCG on hIAPP fibrillation and aggregation as well as their combined interference on this process. Our studies demonstrated that Al(III could promote fibrillation and aggregation of hIAPP, while EGCG could inhibit the fibrillation of hIAPP and lead to the formation of hIAPP amorphous aggregates instead of the ordered fibrils. Furthermore, we proved that the Al(III/EGCG complex in molar ratio of 1 : 1 as Al(EGCG(H2O2 could inhibit the hIAPP fibrillation more effectively than EGCG alone. The results provide the invaluable reference for the new drug development to treat type II diabetes.

  18. Immunohistochemical identification and crossreactions of amyloid-A fibril protein in man and eleven other species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruys, E.; Linke, R.P.; Hol, P.R.; Geisel, O.; Nathrath, W.B.J.; Trautwein, G.

    1984-01-01

    Antisera were prepared in rabbits, sheep or chicken against purified amyloid fibril protein AA from man, mouse, stone marten, dog, cow and hamster. These antisera were tested by immunodiffusion against all purified antigens and applied to tissue sections containing amyloid from man, mouse, hamster,

  19. Immunohistochemical identification and crossreactions of amyloid-A fibril protein in man and eleven other species

    OpenAIRE

    Gruys, E.; Linke, R.P.; Hol, P.R.; Geisel, O.; Nathrath, W.B.J.; Trautwein, G

    1984-01-01

    Antisera were prepared in rabbits, sheep or chicken against purified amyloid fibril protein AA from man, mouse, stone marten, dog, cow and hamster. These antisera were tested by immunodiffusion against all purified antigens and applied to tissue sections containing amyloid from man, mouse, hamster, guinea pig, rabbit, cat, dog, mink, stone marten, pine marten, cow and horse. The binding of the antibodies to amyloid in tissue sections was assessed by the indirect immunoperoxidase method. The s...

  20. Destruction of amyloid fibrils by graphene through penetration and extraction of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zaixing; Ge, Cuicui; Liu, Jiajia; Chong, Yu; Gu, Zonglin; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A; Chai, Zhifang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-11-28

    Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We here provide both experimental and computational evidence that pristine graphene and graphene-oxide nanosheets can inhibit Aβ peptide monomer fibrillation and clear mature amyloid fibrils, thus impacting the central molecular superstructures correlated with AD pathogenesis. Our molecular dynamics simulations for the first time reveal that graphene nanosheets can penetrate and extract a large number of peptides from pre-formed amyloid fibrils; these effects seem to be related to exceptionally strong dispersion interactions between peptides and graphene that are further enhanced by strong π-π stacking between the aromatic residues of extracted Aβ peptides and the graphene surface. Atomic force microscopy images confirm these predictions by demonstrating that mature amyloid fibrils can be cut into pieces and cleared by graphene oxides. Thioflavin fluorescence assays further illustrate the detailed dynamic processes by which graphene induces inhibition of monomer aggregation and clearance of mature amyloid fibrils, respectively. Cell viability and ROS assays indicate that graphene oxide can indeed mitigate cytotoxicity of Aβ peptide amyloids. Our findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms that define graphene-amyloid interaction and suggest that further research on nanotherapies for Alzheimer's and other protein aggregation-related diseases is warranted.

  1. Mechanically functional amyloid fibrils in the adhesive of a marine invertebrate as revealed by Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S Mostaert, Anika; Crockett, Rowena; Kearn, Graham; Cherny, Izhack; Gazit, Ehud; C Serpell, Louise; P Jarvis, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are primarily known in a pathogenic context for their association with a wide range of debilitating human diseases. Here we show a marine invertebrate (Entobdella soleae) utilizes functional amyloid fibrils comparable to those of a unicellular prokaryote (Escherichia coli). Thioflavin-T binding and Raman spectroscopy provided evidence for the presence of amyloid in the adhesive of Entobdella soleae. We elucidated that for these two very different organisms, amyloid fibrils provide adhesive and cohesive strength to their natural adhesives. Comparing the nanoscale mechanical responses of these fibrils with those of pathogenic amyloid by atomic force microscopy revealed that the molecular level origin of the cohesive strength was associated with the generic intermolecular β-sheet structure of amyloid fibrils. Functional adhesive residues were found only in the case of the functional amyloid. Atomic force microscopy provided a useful means to characterize the internal structural forces within individual amyloid fibrils and how these relate to the mechanical performance of both functional and pathogenic amyloid. The mechanistic link of amyloid-based cohesive and adhesive strength could be widespread amongst natural adhesives, irrespective of environment, providing a new strategy for biomimicry and a new source of materials for understanding the formation and stability of amyloid fibrils more generally.

  2. Benzofuranone derivatives as effective small molecules related to insulin amyloid fibrillation: a structure-function study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabiee, Atefeh; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Navidpour, Latifeh;

    2011-01-01

    . In this study, the effects of five new synthetic benzofuranone derivatives were investigated on the insulin amyloid formation process. Protein fibrillation was analyzed by thioflavin-T fluorescence, Congo red binding, circular dichroism, and electron microscopy. Despite high structural similarity, one......Amyloids are protein fibrils of nanometer size resulting from protein self-assembly. They have been shown to be associated with a wide variety of diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's and may contribute to various other pathological conditions, known as amyloidoses. Insulin is prone to form...... amyloid fibrils under slightly destabilizing conditions in vitro and may form amyloid structures when subcutaneously injected into patients with diabetes. There is a great deal of interest in developing novel small molecule inhibitors of amyloidogenic processes, as potential therapeutic compounds...

  3. Benzalkonium Chloride Accelerates the Formation of the Amyloid Fibrils of Corneal Dystrophy-associated Peptides*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yusuke; Yagi, Hisashi; Kaji, Yuichi; Oshika, Tetsuro; Goto, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Corneal dystrophies are genetic disorders resulting in progressive corneal clouding due to the deposition of amyloid fibrils derived from keratoepithelin, also called transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBI). The formation of amyloid fibrils is often accelerated by surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Most eye drops contain benzalkonium chloride (BAC), a cationic surfactant, as a preservative substance. In the present study, we aimed to reveal the role of BAC in the amyloid fibrillation of keratoepithelin-derived peptides in vitro. We used three types of 22-residue synthetic peptides covering Leu110-Glu131 of the keratoepithelin sequence: an R-type peptide with wild-type R124, a C-type peptide with C124 associated with lattice corneal dystrophy type I, and a H-type peptide with H124 associated with granular corneal dystrophy type II. The time courses of spontaneous amyloid fibrillation and seed-dependent fibril elongation were monitored in the presence of various concentrations of BAC or SDS using thioflavin T fluorescence. BAC and SDS accelerated the fibrillation of all synthetic peptides in the absence and presence of seeds. Optimal acceleration occurred near the CMC, which suggests that the unstable and dynamic interactions of keratoepithelin peptides with amphipathic surfactants led to the formation of fibrils. These results suggest that eye drops containing BAC may deteriorate corneal dystrophies and that those without BAC are preferred especially for patients with corneal dystrophies. PMID:23861389

  4. Picosecond dissociation of amyloid fibrils with infrared laser: A nonequilibrium simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang Viet, Man; Derreumaux, Philippe; Li, Mai Suan; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste; Nguyen, Phuong H

    2015-10-21

    Recently, mid-infrared free-electron laser technology has been developed to dissociate amyloid fibrils. Here, we present a theoretical framework for this type of experiment based on laser-induced nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the fibril is destroyed due to the strong resonance between its amide I vibrational modes and the laser field. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between fibril formation and dissociation. While the overall rearrangements of the fibril finish over short time scales, the interaction between the peptides and the solvent continues over much longer times indicating that the waters play an important role in the dissociation process. Our results thus provide new insights into amyloid fibril dissociation by laser techniques and open up new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  5. Conjugated Quantum Dots Inhibit the Amyloid β (1–42 Fibrillation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Thakur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have enormous potential in diagnostic and therapeutic studies. We have demonstrated that the amyloid beta mixed with and conjugated to dihydrolipoic acid- (DHLA capped CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs of size approximately 2.5 nm can be used to reduce the fibrillation process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM were used as tools for analysis of fibrillation. There is a significant change in morphology of fibrils when amyloid β (1–42 (Aβ (1–42 is mixed or conjugated to the QDs. The length and the width of the fibrils vary under modified conditions. Thioflavin T (ThT fluorescence supports the decrease in fibril formation in presence of DHLA-capped QDs.

  6. Picosecond dissociation of amyloid fibrils with infrared laser: A nonequilibrium simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang Viet, Man; Roland, Christopher, E-mail: cmroland@ncsu.edu; Sagui, Celeste, E-mail: sagui@ncsu.edu [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Derreumaux, Philippe; Nguyen, Phuong H., E-mail: phuong.nguyen@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Li, Mai Suan [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute for Computational Science and Technology, SBI Building, Quang Trung Software City, Tan Chanh Hiep Ward, District 12, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2015-10-21

    Recently, mid-infrared free-electron laser technology has been developed to dissociate amyloid fibrils. Here, we present a theoretical framework for this type of experiment based on laser-induced nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the fibril is destroyed due to the strong resonance between its amide I vibrational modes and the laser field. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between fibril formation and dissociation. While the overall rearrangements of the fibril finish over short time scales, the interaction between the peptides and the solvent continues over much longer times indicating that the waters play an important role in the dissociation process. Our results thus provide new insights into amyloid fibril dissociation by laser techniques and open up new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  7. A strategy on prion AGAAAAGA amyloid fibril molecular modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2011-01-01

    X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are two powerful tools to determine the protein 3D structure. However, not all proteins can be successfully crystallized, particularly for membrane proteins. Although NMR spectroscopy is indeed very powerful in determining the 3D structures of membrane proteins, same as X-ray crystallography, it is still very time-consuming and expensive. Under many circumstances, due to the noncrystalline and insoluble nature of some proteins, X-ray and NMR cannot be used at all. Computational approaches, however, allow us to obtain a description of the protein 3D structure at a submicroscopic level. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there is little structural data available to date on the AGAAAAGA palindrome in the hydrophobic region (113-120) of prion proteins, which falls just within the N-terminal unstructured region (1-123) of prion proteins. Many experimental studies have shown that the AGAAAAGA region has amyloid fibril forming properties and...

  8. Amyloid Fibrils as Building Blocks for Natural and Artificial Functional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Tuomas P J; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-08-01

    Proteinaceous materials based on the amyloid core structure have recently been discovered at the origin of biological functionality in a remarkably diverse set of roles, and attention is increasingly turning towards such structures as the basis of artificial self-assembling materials. These roles contrast markedly with the original picture of amyloid fibrils as inherently pathological structures. Here we outline the salient features of this class of functional materials, both in the context of the functional roles that have been revealed for amyloid fibrils in nature, as well as in relation to their potential as artificial materials. We discuss how amyloid materials exemplify the emergence of function from protein self-assembly at multiple length scales. We focus on the connections between mesoscale structure and material function, and demonstrate how the natural examples of functional amyloids illuminate the potential applications for future artificial protein based materials.

  9. Nanomechanical Characterization of Amyloid Fibrils Using Single-Molecule Experiments and Computational Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bumjoon Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils have recently received much attention due to not only their important role in disease pathogenesis but also their excellent mechanical properties, which are comparable to those of mechanically strong protein materials such as spider silk. This indicates the necessity of understanding fundamental principles providing insight into how amyloid fibrils exhibit the excellent mechanical properties, which may allow for developing biomimetic materials whose material (e.g., mechanical properties can be controlled. Here, we describe recent efforts to characterize the nanomechanical properties of amyloid fibrils using computational simulations (e.g., atomistic simulations and single-molecule experiments (e.g., atomic force microscopy experiments. This paper summarizes theoretical models, which are useful in analyzing the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils based on simulations and experiments, such as continuum elastic (beam model, elastic network model, and polymer statistical model. In this paper, we suggest how the nanomechanical properties of amyloid fibrils can be characterized and determined using computational simulations and/or atomic force microscopy experiments coupled with the theoretical models.

  10. Combined thioflavin T-Congo red fluorescence assay for amyloid fibril detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girych, Mykhailo; Gorbenko, Galyna; Maliyov, Ivan; Trusova, Valeriya; Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Saito, Hiroyuki; Kinnunen, Paavo

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence represents one of the most powerful tools for the detection and structural characterization of the pathogenic protein aggregates, amyloid fibrils. The traditional approaches to the identification and quantification of amyloid fibrils are based on monitoring the fluorescence changes of the benzothiazole dye thioflavin T (ThT) and absorbance changes of the azo dye Congo red (CR). In routine screening it is usually sufficient to perform only the ThT and CR assays, but both of them, when used separately, could give false results. Moreover, fibrillization kinetics can be measured only by ThT fluorescence, while the characteristic absorption spectra and birefringence of CR represent more rigid criteria for the presence of amyloid fibrils. Therefore, it seemed reasonable to use both these dyes simultaneously, combining the advantages of each technique. To this end, we undertook a detailed analysis of the fluorescence spectral behavior of these unique amyloid tracers upon their binding to amyloid fibrils from lysozyme, insulin and an N-terminal fragment of apolipoprotein A-I with Iowa mutation. The fluorescence measurements revealed several criteria for distinguishing between fibrillar and monomeric protein states: (i) a common drastic increase in ThT fluorescence intensity; (ii) a sharp decrease in ThT fluorescence upon addition of CR; (iii) an appearance of the maximum at 535-540 nm in the CR excitation spectra; (iv) increase in CR fluorescence intensity at 610 nm. Based on these findings we designed a novel combined ThT-CR fluorescence assay for amyloid identification. Such an approach not only strengthens the reliability of the ThT assay, but also provides new opportunities for structural characterization of amyloid fibrils.

  11. Fibril specific, conformation dependent antibodies recognize a generic epitope common to amyloid fibrils and fibrillar oligomers that is absent in prefibrillar oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool Suhail

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid-related degenerative diseases are associated with the accumulation of misfolded proteins as amyloid fibrils in tissue. In Alzheimer disease (AD, amyloid accumulates in several distinct types of insoluble plaque deposits, intracellular Aβ and as soluble oligomers and the relationships between these deposits and their pathological significance remains unclear. Conformation dependent antibodies have been reported that specifically recognize distinct assembly states of amyloids, including prefibrillar oligomers and fibrils. Results We immunized rabbits with a morphologically homogeneous population of Aβ42 fibrils. The resulting immune serum (OC specifically recognizes fibrils, but not random coil monomer or prefibrillar oligomers, indicating fibrils display a distinct conformation dependent epitope that is absent in prefibrillar oligomers. The fibril epitope is also displayed by fibrils of other types of amyloids, indicating that the epitope is a generic feature of the polypeptide backbone. The fibril specific antibody also recognizes 100,000 × G soluble fibrillar oligomers ranging in size from dimer to greater than 250 kDa on western blots. The fibrillar oligomers recognized by OC are immunologically distinct from prefibrillar oligomers recognized by A11, even though their sizes overlap broadly, indicating that size is not a reliable indicator of oligomer conformation. The immune response to prefibrillar oligomers and fibrils is not sequence specific and antisera of the same specificity are produced in response to immunization with islet amyloid polypeptide prefibrillar oligomer mimics and fibrils. The fibril specific antibodies stain all types of amyloid deposits in human AD brain. Diffuse amyloid deposits stain intensely with anti-fibril antibody although they are thioflavin S negative, suggesting that they are indeed fibrillar in conformation. OC also stains islet amyloid deposits in transgenic mouse models of type

  12. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Fibril Binding to Catalase: A Transmission Electron Microscopy and Microplate Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel G. N. Milton

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The diabetes-associated human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP is a 37-amino-acid peptide that forms fibrils in vitro and in vivo. Human IAPP fibrils are toxic in a similar manner to Alzheimer's amyloid-β (Aβ and prion protein (PrP fibrils. Previous studies have shown that catalase binds to Aβ fibrils and appears to recognize a region containing the Gly-Ala-Ile-Ile sequence that is similar to the Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu sequence found in human IAPP residues 24-27. This study presents a transmission electron microscopy (TEM—based analysis of fibril formation and the binding of human erythrocyte catalase to IAPP fibrils. The results show that human IAPP 1-37, 8-37, and 20-29 peptides form fibrils with diverse and polymorphic structures. All three forms of IAPP bound catalase, and complexes of IAPP 1-37 or 8-37 with catalase were identified by immunoassay. The binding of biotinylated IAPP to catalase was high affinity with a KD of 0.77nM, and could be inhibited by either human or rat IAPP 1-37 and 8-37 forms. Fibrils formed by the PrP 118-135 peptide with a Gly-Ala-Val-Val sequence also bound catalase. These results suggest that catalase recognizes a Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu—like sequence in amyloid fibril-forming peptides. For IAPP 1-37 and 8-37, the catalase binding was primarily directed towards fibrillar rather than ribbon-like structures, suggesting differences in the accessibility of the human IAPP 24-27 Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu region. This suggests that catalase may be able to discriminate between different structural forms of IAPP fibrils. The ability of catalase to bind IAPP, Aβ, and PrP fibrils demonstrates the presence of similar accessible structural motifs that may be targets for antiamyloid therapeutic development.

  13. Granular assembly of alpha-synuclein leading to the accelerated amyloid fibril formation with shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhak, Ghibom; Lee, Jung-Ho; Hahn, Ji-Sook; Paik, Seung R

    2009-01-01

    alpha-Synuclein participates in the Lewy body formation of Parkinson's disease. Elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanism of the amyloid fibril formation is crucial not only to develop a controlling strategy toward the disease, but also to apply the protein fibrils for future biotechnology. Discernable homogeneous granules of alpha-synuclein composed of approximately 11 monomers in average were isolated in the middle of a lag phase during the in vitro fibrillation process. They were demonstrated to experience almost instantaneous fibrillation during a single 12-min centrifugal membrane-filtration at 14,000 x g. The granular assembly leading to the drastically accelerated fibril formation was demonstrated to be a result of the physical influence of shear force imposed on the preformed granular structures by either centrifugal filtration or rheometer. Structural rearrangement of the preformed oligomomeric structures is attributable for the suprastructure formation in which the granules act as a growing unit for the fibril formation. To parallel the prevailing notion of nucleation-dependent amyloidosis, we propose a double-concerted fibrillation model as one of the mechanisms to explain the in vitro fibrillation of alpha-synuclein, in which two consecutive concerted associations of monomers and subsequent oligomeric granular species are responsible for the eventual amyloid fibril formation.

  14. Granular assembly of alpha-synuclein leading to the accelerated amyloid fibril formation with shear stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghibom Bhak

    Full Text Available alpha-Synuclein participates in the Lewy body formation of Parkinson's disease. Elucidation of the underlying molecular mechanism of the amyloid fibril formation is crucial not only to develop a controlling strategy toward the disease, but also to apply the protein fibrils for future biotechnology. Discernable homogeneous granules of alpha-synuclein composed of approximately 11 monomers in average were isolated in the middle of a lag phase during the in vitro fibrillation process. They were demonstrated to experience almost instantaneous fibrillation during a single 12-min centrifugal membrane-filtration at 14,000 x g. The granular assembly leading to the drastically accelerated fibril formation was demonstrated to be a result of the physical influence of shear force imposed on the preformed granular structures by either centrifugal filtration or rheometer. Structural rearrangement of the preformed oligomomeric structures is attributable for the suprastructure formation in which the granules act as a growing unit for the fibril formation. To parallel the prevailing notion of nucleation-dependent amyloidosis, we propose a double-concerted fibrillation model as one of the mechanisms to explain the in vitro fibrillation of alpha-synuclein, in which two consecutive concerted associations of monomers and subsequent oligomeric granular species are responsible for the eventual amyloid fibril formation.

  15. Mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils defined by secondary structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolini, C.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Wang, C.; Besenbacher, F.; Dong, M.

    2015-04-01

    Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology are extensively studied - among these parameters, the secondary structures and the pH have been revealed to be crucial, since a variation in pH changes the fibril morphology and net chirality during protein aggregation. It is important to quantify the mechanical properties of these fibrils in order to help the design of effective strategies for treating diseases related to the presence of amyloid fibrils. In this work, we show that by changing pH the mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils vary as well. In particular, we reveal that these mechanical properties are strongly related to the content of secondary structures. We analysed and estimated the Young's modulus (E) by comparing the persistence length (Lp) - measured from the observation of TEM images by using statistical mechanics arguments - with the mechanical information provided by peak force quantitative nanomechanical property mapping (PF-QNM). The secondary structure content and the chirality are investigated by means of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SR-CD). Results arising from this study could be fruitfully used as a protocol to investigate other medical or engineering relevant peptide fibrils.Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology

  16. Lysozyme stability and amyloid fibrillization dependence on Hofmeister anions in acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poniková, Slavomíra; Antošová, Andrea; Demjén, Erna; Sedláková, Dagmar; Marek, Jozef; Varhač, Rastislav; Gažová, Zuzana; Sedlák, Erik

    2015-09-01

    We have explored an effect of Hofmeister anions, Na2SO4, NaCl, NaBr, NaNO3, NaSCN and NaClO4, on stability and amyloid fibrillization of hen egg white lysozyme at pH 2.7. The stability of the protein was analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry. The Hofmeister effect of the anions was assessed by the parameter dT trs/d[anion] (T trs, transition temperature). We show that dT trs/d[anion] correlates with anion surface tension effects and anion partition coefficients indicating direct interactions between anions and lysozyme. The kinetic of amyloid fibrillization of lysozyme was followed by Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence. Negative correlation between dT trs/d[anion] and the nucleation rate of fibrillization in the presence of monovalent anions indicates specific effect of anions on fibrillization rate of lysozyme. The efficiency of monovalent anions to accelerate fibrillization correlates with inverse Hofmeister series. The far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy findings show that conformational properties of fibrils depend on fibrillization rate. In the presence of sodium chloride, lysozyme forms typical fibrils with elongated structure and with the secondary structure of the β-sheet. On the other hand, in the presence of both chaotropic perchlorate and kosmotropic sulfate anions, the fibrils form clusters with secondary structure of β-turn. Moreover, the acceleration of fibril formation is accompanied by decreased amount of the formed fibrils as indicated by ThT fluorescence. Taken together, our study shows Hofmeister effect of monovalent anions on: (1) lysozyme stability; (2) ability to accelerate nucleation phase of lysozyme fibrillization; (3) amount, and (4) conformational properties of the formed fibrils.

  17. Destruction of amyloid fibrils by graphene through penetration and extraction of peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zaixing; Ge, Cuicui; Liu, Jiajia; Chong, Yu; Gu, Zonglin; Jimenez-Cruz, Camilo A.; Chai, Zhifang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-11-01

    Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We here provide both experimental and computational evidence that pristine graphene and graphene-oxide nanosheets can inhibit Aβ peptide monomer fibrillation and clear mature amyloid fibrils, thus impacting the central molecular superstructures correlated with AD pathogenesis. Our molecular dynamics simulations for the first time reveal that graphene nanosheets can penetrate and extract a large number of peptides from pre-formed amyloid fibrils; these effects seem to be related to exceptionally strong dispersion interactions between peptides and graphene that are further enhanced by strong π-π stacking between the aromatic residues of extracted Aβ peptides and the graphene surface. Atomic force microscopy images confirm these predictions by demonstrating that mature amyloid fibrils can be cut into pieces and cleared by graphene oxides. Thioflavin fluorescence assays further illustrate the detailed dynamic processes by which graphene induces inhibition of monomer aggregation and clearance of mature amyloid fibrils, respectively. Cell viability and ROS assays indicate that graphene oxide can indeed mitigate cytotoxicity of Aβ peptide amyloids. Our findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms that define graphene-amyloid interaction and suggest that further research on nanotherapies for Alzheimer's and other protein aggregation-related diseases is warranted.Current therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) can provide a moderate symptomatic reduction or delay progression at various stages of the disease, but such treatments ultimately do not arrest the advancement of AD. As such, novel approaches for AD treatment and prevention are urgently needed. We

  18. Structural Transformation and Aggregation of cc-beta Peptides Into Amyloid Proto-fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Yuba; Steckmann, Timothy; Chapagain, Prem; Gerstman, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    The study of amyloid fibrils has important implications in understanding and treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. During the formation of amyloid fibrils, peptide polymers manifest fascinating physical behavior by undergoing complicated structural transformations. We examine the behavior of a small engineered peptide called cc-beta, that was designed to mimic the structural changes of the much larger, naturally occurring amyloid beta proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to uncover the underlying physics that is responsible for the large scale structural transformations. By using implicit solvent replica exchange MD simulations, we examined the behavior of 12 peptides, initially arranged in four different cc-beta alpha helix trimers. We observed various intermediate stages of aggregation, as well as an organized proto-fibril beta aggregate. We discuss the time evolution and the various interactions involved in the structural transformation.

  19. Polymorphism of amyloid-like fibrils can be defined by the concentration of seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Sneideris

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Prions are infectious proteins where the same protein may express distinct strains. The strains are enciphered by different misfolded conformations. Strain-like phenomena have also been reported in a number of other amyloid-forming proteins. One of the features of amyloid strains is the ability to self-propagate, maintaining a constant set of physical properties despite being propagated under conditions different from those that allowed initial formation of the strain. Here we report a cross-seeding experiment using strains formed under different conditions. Using high concentrations of seeds results in rapid elongation and new fibrils preserve the properties of the seeding fibrils. At low seed concentrations, secondary nucleation plays the major role and new fibrils gain properties predicted by the environment rather than the structure of the seeds. Our findings could explain conformational switching between amyloid strains observed in a wide variety of in vivo and in vitro experiments.

  20. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  1. In vitro study: binding of 99mTc-DPD to synthetic amyloid fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buroni Federica E

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an report of the investigation of the in vitro binding of 99mTc-DPD for synthetic amyloid fibrils used for the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis (CA, as compared with the use of 99mTc-HMDP and 99mTc-PPI. It also includes an inquiry into the role played by Ca2+ ions and serum proteins on binding to amyloid like materials, as well as the saturability and specificity of DPD for fibrils versus amorphous precipitates (AP.

  2. Michler’s Hydrol Blue: A Sensitive Probe for Amyloid Fibril Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Kitts, Catherine C.

    2011-05-03

    Michler\\'s hydrol blue (MHB) is investigated with respect to photophysical properties in varied solvent environment and when bound to insulin and lysozyme fibrils. The MHB chromophore is shown to act like a molecular rotor and bind well to amyloid fibrils, where it exhibits a characteristic red-shift in its excitation spectrum and an increase in the emission quantum yield upon binding. MHB is more sensitive to environmental changes than Thioflavin T (ThT) and furthermore, in contrast to the latter amyloid probe, can differentiate between insulin and lysozyme fibrils by a more red-shifted excitation spectrum for insulin fibrils. To support the experimental observations, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations were performed on MHB at several levels of theory. The predicted changes of spectral properties as a function of the environment are in good agreement with the experimental results. Linear dichroism (LD) is used to determine the orientation of the MHB within the fibrils. It was shown through LD and molecular modeling that MHB aligns itself preferentially parallel with the amyloid fiber at an angle of 14°-22° to the fibril axis and along the grooves of the β-sheet. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. Evidence for novel beta-sheet structures in Iowa mutant beta-amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Meredith, Stephen C

    2009-07-01

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of beta-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-Abeta40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-Abeta40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 x 10(-3) min(-1) and 1.07 x 10(-4) min(-1) for D23N-Abeta40 and the wild-type peptide WT-Abeta40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-Abeta40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-beta pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 A and a broad reflection at 9.4 A, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-Abeta40 fibrils (10.4 A). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-Abeta40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel beta-sheet structure commonly found in WT-Abeta40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel beta-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through (13)C-(13)C and (15)N-(13)C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-Abeta40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients.

  4. Evidence for Novel [beta]-Sheet Structures in Iowa Mutant [beta]-Amyloid Fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L.; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Meredith, Stephen C.; (IIT); (NIH); (UC)

    2009-07-24

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of {beta}-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-A{beta}40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-A{beta}40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 x 10{sup -3} min{sup -1} and 1.07 x 10{sup -4} min{sup -1} for D23N-A{beta}40 and the wild-type peptide WT-A{beta}40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-A{beta}40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-{beta} pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 {angstrom} and a broad reflection at 9.4 {angstrom}, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-A{beta}40 fibrils (10.4 {angstrom}). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-A{beta}40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel {beta}-sheet structure commonly found in WT-A{beta}40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel {beta}-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through 13C-13C and 15N-13C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-A{beta}40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients.

  5. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Emily B.; Williams, Angela [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Heidel, Eric [Department of Surgery, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Macy, Sallie [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Kennel, Stephen J. [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Wall, Jonathan S., E-mail: jwall@utmck.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States)

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Polybasic peptide p5 binds human light chain amyloid extracts. •The binding of p5 with amyloid involves both glycosaminoglycans and fibrils. •Heparinase treatment led to a correlation between p5 binding and fibril content. •p5 binding to AL amyloid requires electrostatic interactions. -- Abstract: In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as

  6. Protein corona composition of gold nanoparticles/nanorods affects amyloid beta fibrillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsadeghi, Somayeh; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Hormozi-Nezhad, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoudi, Zohreh; Hajipour, Mohammad Javad; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Ghavami, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2015-03-01

    Protein fibrillation process (e.g., from amyloid beta (Aβ) and α-synuclein) is the main cause of several catastrophic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. During the past few decades, nanoparticles (NPs) were recognized as one of the most promising tools for inhibiting the progress of the disease by controlling the fibrillation kinetic process; for instance, gold NPs have a strong capability to inhibit Aβ fibrillations. It is now well understood that a layer of biomolecules would cover the surface of NPs (so called ``protein corona'') upon the interaction of NPs with protein sources. Due to the fact that the biological species (e.g., cells and amyloidal proteins) ``see'' the protein corona coated NPs rather than the pristine coated particles, one should monitor the fibrillation process of amyloidal proteins in the presence of corona coated NPs (and not pristine coated ones). Therefore, the previously obtained data on NPs effects on the fibrillation process should be modified to achieve a more reliable and predictable in vivo results. Herein, we probed the effects of various gold NPs (with different sizes and shapes) on the fibrillation process of Aβ in the presence and absence of protein sources (i.e., serum and plasma). We found that the protein corona formed a shell at the surface of gold NPs, regardless of their size and shape, reducing the access of Aβ to the gold inhibitory surface and, therefore, affecting the rate of Aβ fibril formation. More specifically, the anti-fibrillation potencies of various corona coated gold NPs were strongly dependent on the protein source and their concentrations (10% serum/plasma (simulation of an in vitro milieu) and 100% serum/plasma (simulation of an in vivo milieu)).Protein fibrillation process (e.g., from amyloid beta (Aβ) and α-synuclein) is the main cause of several catastrophic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases. During the past few decades

  7. In vitro fibrillization of Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide (1-42)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiiman, Ann; Krishtal, Jekaterina; Palumaa, Peep; Tõugu, Vello

    2015-09-01

    The amyloid deposition in the form of extracellular fibrillar aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is a critical pathological event in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effects of environmental factors on the kinetics of Aβ fibrillization in vitro. The effects of Aβ42 peptide concentration, temperature, pH, added solvents and the ratio of Aβ40 and Aβ42 on the peptide fibrillization under agitated conditions was studied. The analysis show that the rate of fibril growth by monomer addition is not limited by diffusion but by rearrangement in the monomer structure, which is enhanced by low concentrations of fluorinated alcohols and characterized by the activation energy of 12 kcal/mol. Fibrillization rate decreases at pH values below 7.0 where simultaneous protonation of His 13 and 14 inhibits fibril formation. The lag period for Aβ42 was only twofold shorter and the fibril growth rate twofold faster than those of Aβ40. Lag period was shortened and the fibrillization rate was increased only at 90% content of Aβ42.

  8. In vitro fibrillization of Alzheimer’s amyloid-β peptide (1-42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Tiiman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid deposition in the form of extracellular fibrillar aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ peptide is a critical pathological event in Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effects of environmental factors on the kinetics of Aβ fibrillization in vitro. The effects of Aβ42 peptide concentration, temperature, pH, added solvents and the ratio of Aβ40 and Aβ42 on the peptide fibrillization under agitated conditions was studied. The analysis show that the rate of fibril growth by monomer addition is not limited by diffusion but by rearrangement in the monomer structure, which is enhanced by low concentrations of fluorinated alcohols and characterized by the activation energy of 12 kcal/mol. Fibrillization rate decreases at pH values below 7.0 where simultaneous protonation of His 13 and 14 inhibits fibril formation. The lag period for Aβ42 was only twofold shorter and the fibril growth rate twofold faster than those of Aβ40. Lag period was shortened and the fibrillization rate was increased only at 90% content of Aβ42.

  9. Elongation of mouse prion protein amyloid-like fibrils: effect of temperature and denaturant concentration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katazyna Milto

    Full Text Available Prion protein is known to have the ability to adopt a pathogenic conformation, which seems to be the basis for protein-only infectivity. The infectivity is based on self-replication of this pathogenic prion structure. One of possible mechanisms for such replication is the elongation of amyloid-like fibrils. We measured elongation kinetics and thermodynamics of mouse prion amyloid-like fibrils at different guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl concentrations. Our data show that both increases in temperature and GuHCl concentration help unfold monomeric protein and thus accelerate elongation. Once the monomers are unfolded, further increases in temperature raise the rate of elongation, whereas the addition of GuHCl decreases it. We demonstrated a possible way to determine different activation energies of amyloid-like fibril elongation by using folded and unfolded protein molecules. This approach separates thermodynamic data for fibril-assisted monomer unfolding and for refolding and formation of amyloid-like structure.

  10. Timesaving microwave assisted synthesis of insulin amyloid fibrils with enhanced nanofiber aspect ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Tiago; Pinto, Ricardo J B; Martins, Manuel A; Silvestre, Armando J D; Freire, Carmen S R

    2016-11-01

    Insulin amyloid fibrils with enhanced aspect ratio, were prepared using a timesaving microwave assisted (MW) methodology, reducing the incubation time from 13 to 2h. The fibrillation process was followed indirectly by Thioflavin T Fluorescence and UV-vis analysis, by measuring the amount of β-sheets formed and the insulin present in solution, respectively. TEM and AFM analysis revealed that the insulin fibrils obtained through the MW method, have very similar lengths but are much thinner than the ones obtained using the conventional method (CM). Additionally, it was verified that the nature of the peptides present in the final insulin fibrils was not affected by microwave irradiation. These morphological differences might reflect on noticeably enhanced mechanical and optical properties that can exploited on the development of advanced bionanomaterials.

  11. Fluorescence quantum yield of thioflavin T in rigid isotropic solution and incorporated into the amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna I Sulatskaya

    Full Text Available In this work, the fluorescence of thioflavin T (ThT was studied in a wide range of viscosity and temperature. It was shown that ThT fluorescence quantum yield varies from 0.0001 in water at room temperature to 0.28 in rigid isotropic solution (T/η→0. The deviation of the fluorescence quantum yield from unity in rigid isotropic solution suggests that fluorescence quantum yield depends not only on the ultra-fast oscillation of ThT fragments relative to each other in an excited state as was suggested earlier, but also depends on the molecular configuration in the ground state. This means that the fluorescence quantum yield of the dye incorporated into amyloid fibrils must depend on its conformation, which, in turn, depends on the ThT environment. Therefore, the fluorescence quantum yield of ThT incorporated into amyloid fibrils can differ from that in the rigid isotropic solution. In particular, the fluorescence quantum yield of ThT incorporated into insulin fibrils was determined to be 0.43. Consequently, the ThT fluorescence quantum yield could be used to characterize the peculiarities of the fibrillar structure, which opens some new possibilities in the ThT use for structural characterization of the amyloid fibrils.

  12. A Detailed Analysis of the Morphology of Fibrils of Selectively Mutated Amyloid β (1-40).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Juliane; Baumann, Monika; Voigt, Bruno; Scheidt, Holger A; Bhowmik, Debanjan; Häupl, Tilmann; Abel, Bernd; Madhu, Perunthiruthy K; Balbach, Jochen; Maiti, Sudipta; Huster, Daniel

    2016-09-05

    A small library of rationally designed amyloid β [Aβ(1-40)] peptide variants is generated, and the morphology of their fibrils is studied. In these molecules, the structurally important hydrophobic contact between phenylalanine 19 (F19) and leucine 34 (L34) is systematically mutated to introduce defined physical forces to act as specific internal constraints on amyloid formation. This Aβ(1-40) peptide library is used to study the fibril morphology of these variants by employing a comprehensive set of biophysical techniques including solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, AFM, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and XRD. Overall, the findings demonstrate that the introduction of significant local physical perturbations of a crucial early folding contact of Aβ(1-40) only results in minor alterations of the fibrillar morphology. The thermodynamically stable structure of mature Aβ fibrils proves to be relatively robust against the introduction of significantly altered molecular interaction patterns due to point mutations. This underlines that amyloid fibril formation is a highly generic process in protein misfolding that results in the formation of the thermodynamically most stable cross-β structure.

  13. Stepwise organization of the β-structure identifies key regions essential for the propagation and cytotoxicity of insulin amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatani, Eri; Imamura, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Kato, Minoru

    2014-04-11

    Amyloid fibrils are supramolecular assemblies, the deposition of which is associated with many serious diseases including Alzheimer, prion, and Huntington diseases. Several smaller aggregates such as oligomers and protofibrils have been proposed to play a role in early stages of the fibrillation process; however, little is known about how these species contribute to the formation of mature amyloid fibrils with a rigid cross-β structure. Here, we identified a new pathway for the formation of insulin amyloid fibrils at a high concentration of salt in which mature fibrils were formed in a stepwise manner via a prefibrillar intermediate: minute prefibrillar species initially accumulated, followed by the subsequent formation of thicker amyloid fibrils. Fourier transform infrared spectra suggested the sequential formation of two types of β-sheets with different strength hydrogen bonds, one of which was developed concomitantly with the mutual assembly of the prefibrillar intermediate to form mature fibrils. Interestingly, fibril propagation and cellular toxicity appeared only after the later step of structural organization, and a comparison of β-sheet regions between the prefibrillar intermediate and mature fibrils using proteolysis led to the proposal of specific regions essential for manifestation of these properties.

  14. Gallic Acid Is an Antagonist of Semen Amyloid Fibrils That Enhance HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoRicco, Josephine G; Xu, Changmingzi Sherry; Neidleman, Jason; Bergkvist, Magnus; Greene, Warner C; Roan, Nadia R; Makhatadze, George I

    2016-07-01

    Recent in vitro studies have demonstrated that amyloid fibrils found in semen from healthy and HIV-infected men, as well as semen itself, can markedly enhance HIV infection rates. Semen fibrils are made up of multiple naturally occurring peptide fragments derived from semen. The best characterized of these fibrils are SEVI (semen-derived enhancer of viral infection), made up of residues 248-286 of prostatic acidic phosphatase, and the SEM1 fibrils, made up of residues 86-107 of semenogelin 1. A small molecule screen for antagonists of semen fibrils identified four compounds that lowered semen-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 infectivity. One of the four, gallic acid, was previously reported to antagonize other amyloids and to exert anti-inflammatory effects. To better understand the mechanism by which gallic acid modifies the properties of semen amyloids, we performed biophysical measurements (atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, thioflavin T and Congo Red fluorescence assays, zeta potential measurements) and quantitative assays on the effects of gallic acid on semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection and inflammation. Our results demonstrate that gallic acid binds to both SEVI and SEM1 fibrils and modifies their surface electrostatics to render them less cationic. In addition, gallic acid decreased semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection but did not decrease the inflammatory response induced by semen. Together, these observations identify gallic acid as a non-polyanionic compound that inhibits semen-mediated enhancement of HIV infection and suggest the potential utility of incorporating gallic acid into a multicomponent microbicide targeting both the HIV virus and host components that promote viral infection.

  15. [beta subsccript 2]-microglobulin forms three-dimensional domain-swapped amyloid fibrils with disulfide linkages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-08-09

    {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}-m) is the light chain of the type I major histocompatibility complex. It deposits as amyloid fibrils within joints during long-term hemodialysis treatment. Despite the devastating effects of dialysis-related amyloidosis, full understanding of how fibrils form from soluble {beta}{sub 2}-m remains elusive. Here we show that {beta}{sub 2}-m can oligomerize and fibrillize via three-dimensional domain swapping. Isolating a covalently bound, domain-swapped dimer from {beta}{sub 2}-m oligomers on the pathway to fibrils, we were able to determine its crystal structure. The hinge loop that connects the swapped domain to the core domain includes the fibrillizing segment LSFSKD, whose atomic structure we also determined. The LSFSKD structure reveals a class 5 steric zipper, akin to other amyloid spines. The structures of the dimer and the zipper spine fit well into an atomic model for this fibrillar form of {beta}{sub 2}-m, which assembles slowly under physiological conditions.

  16. Universality in the morphology and mechanics of coarsening amyloid fibril networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, L G; Head, D A; Auer, S

    2015-02-20

    Peptide hydrogels have important applications as biomaterials and in nanotechnology, but utilization often depends on their mechanical properties for which we currently have no predictive capability. Here we use a peptide model to simulate the formation of percolating amyloid fibril networks and couple these to the elastic network theory to determine their mechanical properties. We find that the time variation of network length scales can be collapsed onto master curves by using a time scaling function that depends on the peptide interaction anisotropy. The same scaling applies to network mechanics, revealing a nonmonotonic dependence of the shear modulus with time. Our structure-function relationship between the peptide building blocks, network morphology, and network mechanical properties can aid in the design of amyloid fibril networks with tailored mechanical properties.

  17. Universality in the morphology and mechanics of coarsening amyloid fibril networks

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzi, Leandro G; Auer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Above a critical concentration a wide variety of peptides and proteins self-assemble into amyloid fibrils which entangle to form percolating networks called hydrogels. Such hydrogels have important applications as biomaterials and in nanotechnology, but their applicability often depends on their mechanical properties for which we currently have no predictive capability. Here we use a peptide model to simulate the formation of amyloid fibril networks, and couple these to elastic network theory to determine their mechanical properties. The simulations reveal that the time-dependence of morphological quantities characterizing the network length scales can be collapsed onto master curves by using a time scaling function that depends on the interaction parameter between the peptides. The same scaling function is used to unveil a universal, non-monotonic dependence of the shear modulus with time. The obtained insight into the structure-function relationship between the peptide building blocks, network morphology an...

  18. Tabersonine inhibits amyloid fibril formation and cytotoxicity of Aβ(1-42).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Tianhan; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Xiaoying; Jing, Aihua; Zhao, Bingqing; Yu, Xiang; Zheng, Jie; Zhou, Feimeng

    2015-06-17

    The misfolding and aggregation of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides into amyloid fibrils are key events in the amyloid cascade hypothesis for the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using thioflavin-T (ThT) fluorescence assay, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism, size exclusion chromatography, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and cytotoxicity tests, we demonstrate that tabersonine, an ingredient extracted from the bean of Voacanga africana, disrupts Aβ(1-42) aggregation and ameliorates Aβ aggregate-induced cytotoxicity. A small amount of tabersonine (e.g., 10 μM) can effectively inhibit the formation of Aβ(1-42) (e.g., 80 μM) fibrils or convert mature fibrils into largely innocuous amorphous aggregates. SPR results indicate that tabersonine binds to Aβ(1-42) oligomers in a dose-dependent way. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations further confirm that tabersonine can bind to oligomers such as the pentamer of Aβ(1-42). Tabersonine preferentially interact with the β-sheet grooves of Aβ(1-42) containing aromatic and hydrophobic residues. The various binding sites and modes explain the diverse inhibitory effects of tabersonine on Aβ aggregation. Given that tabersonine is a natural product and a precursor for vincristine used in cancer chemotherapy, the biocompatibility and small size essential for permeating the blood-brain barrier make it a potential therapeutic drug candidate for treating AD.

  19. Insight into the stability of cross-beta amyloid fibril from molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; He, Yong-Jie; Wu, Maoying; Yan, Guanwen; Li, Yixue; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2010-06-01

    Amyloid fibrils are considered to play causal roles in the pathogenesis of amyloid-related degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes mellitus, the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, and prion disease. The mechanism of fibril formation is still hotly debated and remains an important open question. In this study, we utilized molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to analyze the stability of hexamer for eight class peptides. The MD results suggest that VEALYL and MVGGVV-1 are the most stable ones, then SNQNNY, followed by LYQLEN, MVGGVV-2, VQIVYK, SSTSAA, and GGVVIA. The statistics result indicates that hydrophobic residues play a key role in stabilizing the zipper interface. Single point and two linkage mutants of MVGGVV-1 confirmed that both Met1 and Val2 are key hydrophobic residues. This is consistent with the statistics analysis. The stability results of oligomer for MVGGVV-1 suggest that the intermediate state should be trimer (3-0) and tetramer (2-2). These methods can be used in stabilization study of other amyloid fibril.

  20. Spatially resolved spectroscopic differentiation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on individual insulin amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Kurouski, Dmitry; Hedegaard, Martin A. B.; Singh, Pushkar; Lednev, Igor K.; Deckert, Volker

    2016-09-01

    The formation of insoluble β-sheet-rich protein structures known as amyloid fibrils is associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. A detailed understanding of the molecular structure of the fibril surface is of interest as the first contact with the physiological environment in vivo and plays a decisive role in biological activity and associated toxicity. Recent studies reveal that the inherent sensitivity and specificity of tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) renders this technique a compelling method for fibril surface analysis at the single-particle level. Here, the reproducibility of TERS is demonstrated, indicating its relevance for detecting molecular variations. Consequently, individual fibrils are systematically investigated at nanometer spatial resolution. Spectral parameters were obtained by band-fitting, particularly focusing on the identification of the secondary structure via the amide III band and the differentiation of hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains on the surface. In addition multivariate data analysis, specifically the N-FINDR procedure, was employed to generate structure-specific maps. The ability of TERS to localize specific structural domains on fibril surfaces shows promise to the development of new fibril dissection strategies and can be generally applied to any (bio)chemical surface when structural variations at the nanometer level are of interest.

  1. Nucleation Process of a Fibril Precursor in the C-Terminal Segment of Amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baftizadeh, Fahimeh; Pietrucci, Fabio; Biarnés, Xevi; Laio, Alessandro

    2013-04-01

    By extended atomistic simulations in explicit solvent and bias-exchange metadynamics, we study the aggregation process of 18 chains of the C-terminal segment of amyloid-β, an intrinsically disordered protein involved in Alzheimer’s disease and prone to form fibrils. Starting from a disordered aggregate, we are able to observe the formation of an ordered nucleus rich in beta sheets. The rate limiting step in the nucleation pathway involves crossing a barrier of approximately 40kcal/mol and is associated with the formation of a very specific interdigitation of the side chains belonging to different sheets. This structural pattern is different from the one observed experimentally in a microcrystal of the same system, indicating that the structure of a “nascent” fibril may differ from the one of an “extended” fibril.

  2. Interruptions between the triple helix peptides can promote the formation of amyloid-like fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Avanish; Hwang, Eileen; Brodsky, Barbara

    2010-03-01

    It has been reported that collagen can initiate or accelerate the formation of amyloid fibrils. Non-fibrillar collagen types have sites where the repeating (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)n sequences are interrupted by non- Gly-Xaa-Yaa sequences, and we are investigating the hypothesis that some of these interruptions can promote amyloid formation. Our experimental data show that model peptides containing an 8 or 9 residue interruption sequence between (Gly-Pro-Hyp)n domains have a strong propensity for self association to form fibrous structures. A peptide containing only the 9-residue interruption sequence forms amyloid like fibrils with anti-parallel β sheet. Computational analysis predicts that 33 out of 374 naturally occurring human non-fibrillar collagen sequences within or between triple-helical sequences have significant cross-β aggregation potential, including the 8 and 9 residue sequences studied in peptides. Further studies are in progress to investigate whether a triple-helix peptide promotes amyloidogenesis and whether amyloid interferes with collagen fibrillogenesis.

  3. End-to-end Structural Restriction of α-Synuclein and Its Influence on Amyloid Fibril Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Chul Suk; Park, Jae Hyung; Choe, Young Jun; Paik, Seung R. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Relationship between molecular freedom of amyloidogenic protein and its self-assembly into amyloid fibrils has been evaluated with α-synuclein, an intrinsically unfolded protein related to Parkinson's disease, by restricting its structural plasticity through an end-to-end disulfide bond formation between two newly introduced cysteine residues on the N- and C-termini. Although the resulting circular form of α-synuclein exhibited an impaired fibrillation propensity, the restriction did not completely block the protein's interactive core since co-incubation with wild-type α-synuclein dramatically facilitated the fibrillation by producing distinctive forms of amyloid fibrils. The suppressed fibrillation propensity was instantly restored as the structural restriction was unleashed with β-mercaptoethanol. Conformational flexibility of the accreting amyloidogenic protein to pre-existing seeds has been demonstrated to be critical for fibrillar extension process by exerting structural adjustment to a complementary structure for the assembly.

  4. Synthesis of Self-assembled Noble Metal Nanoparticle Chains Using Amyloid Fibrils of Lysozyme as Templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziming Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We reported a facile method for preparing self-assembled noble metal nanoparticle chains by using lysozyme amyloid fibrils as a biotemplate in an aqueous environ‐ ment. The nanoparticle chains of gold (AuNPCs, palladi‐ um (PdNPCs, platinum (PtNPCs and rhodium (RhNPCs, which are lysozyme fibrils coated by gold, palladium, platinum and rhodium nanoparticles, can be fabricated by simply reducing the corresponding metal salt precursors using NaBH4. Under the same molar ratio between salt precursors and fibrils, two types of morphologies of high- yield AuNPCs (thin- and thick- AuNPCs were synthesized as a result of adjusting the fibrosis time and temperature in the final stage. Abundant PdNPCs with a length of several micrometres intertwisted with each other to form PdNPC networks. The growth of RhNPCs started from the inner surface of the fibrils and gradually spread to the whole fibre as superabundant rhodium nanoparticles (RhNPs bound to the fibrils. Finally, PtNPCs at different growing periods were presented. The nanostructures were investigated by transmission electron microscope, UV-visible spectrosco‐ py, fluorescence spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscope.

  5. Fibrils from designed non-amyloid-related synthetic peptides induce AA-amyloidosis during inflammation in an animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Westermark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mouse AA-amyloidosis is a transmissible disease by a prion-like mechanism where amyloid fibrils act by seeding. Synthetic peptides with no amyloid relationship can assemble into amyloid-like fibrils and these may have seeding capacity for amyloid proteins. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Several synthetic peptides, designed for nanotechnology, have been examined for their ability to produce fibrils with Congo red affinity and concomitant green birefringence, affinity for thioflavin S and to accelerate AA-amyloidosis in mice. It is shown that some amphiphilic fibril-forming peptides not only produced Congo red birefringence and showed affinity for thioflavin S, but they also shortened the lag phase for systemic AA-amyloidosis in mice when they were given intravenously at the time of inflammatory induction with silver nitride. Peptides, not forming amyloid-like fibrils, did not have such properties. CONCLUSIONS: These observations should caution researchers and those who work with synthetic peptides and their derivatives to be aware of the potential health concerns.

  6. Dewetting transition assisted clearance of (NFGAILS) amyloid fibrils from cell membranes by graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiajia; Yang, Zaixing; Gu, Zonglin [Institute of Quantitative Biology and Medicine, SRMP and RAD-X, Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Li, Haotian [Bio-X Lab, Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Garate, Jose Antonio [IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Zhou, Ruhong, E-mail: ruhongz@us.ibm.com [Institute of Quantitative Biology and Medicine, SRMP and RAD-X, Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    Clearance of partially ordered oligomers and monomers deposited on cell membrane surfaces is believed to be an effective route to alleviate many potential protein conformational diseases (PCDs). With large-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, here we show that graphene nanosheets can easily and quickly win a competitive adsorption of human islet amyloid polypeptides (hIAPP{sub 22-28}) NFGAILS and associated fibrils against cell membrane, due to graphene's unique two-dimensional, highly hydrophobic surface with its all-sp{sup 2} hybrid structure. A nanoscale dewetting transition was observed at the interfacial region between the fibril (originally deposited on the membrane) and the graphene nanosheet, which significantly assisted the adsorption of fibrils onto graphene from the membrane. The π–π stacking interaction between Phe23 and graphene played a crucial role, providing the driving force for the adsorption at the graphene surface. This study renders new insight towards the importance of water during the interactions between amyloid peptides, the phospholipidic membrane, and graphene, which might shed some light on future developments of graphene-based nanomedicine for preventing/curing PCDs like type II diabetes mellitus.

  7. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate rapidly remodels PAP85-120, SEM1(45-107, and SEM2(49-107 seminal amyloid fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Castellano

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Semen harbors amyloid fibrils formed by proteolytic fragments of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP248-286 and PAP85-120 and semenogelins (SEM1 and SEM2 that potently enhance HIV infectivity. Amyloid but not soluble forms of these peptides enhance HIV infection. Thus, agents that remodel these amyloid fibrils could prevent HIV transmission. Here, we confirm that the green tea polyphenol, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, slowly remodels fibrils formed by PAP248-286 termed SEVI (semen derived enhancer of viral infection and also exerts a direct anti-viral effect. We elucidate for the first time that EGCG remodels PAP85-120, SEM1(45-107, and SEM2(49-107 fibrils more rapidly than SEVI fibrils. We establish EGCG as the first small molecule that can remodel all four classes of seminal amyloid. The combined anti-amyloid and anti-viral properties of EGCG could have utility in preventing HIV transmission.

  8. Acetylcholinesterase accelerates assembly of amyloid-beta-peptides into Alzheimer's fibrils: possible role of the peripheral site of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inestrosa, N C; Alvarez, A; Pérez, C A; Moreno, R D; Vicente, M; Linker, C; Casanueva, O I; Soto, C; Garrido, J

    1996-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an important component of cholinergic synapses, colocalizes with amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) deposits of Alzheimer's brain. We report here that bovine brain AChE, as well as the human and mouse recombinant enzyme, accelerates amyloid formation from wild-type A beta and a mutant A beta peptide, which alone produces few amyloid-like fibrils. The action of AChE was independent of the subunit array of the enzyme, was not affected by edrophonium, an active site inhibitor, but it was affected by propidium, a peripheral anionic binding site ligand. Butyrylcholinesterase, an enzyme that lacks the peripheral site, did not affect amyloid formation. Furthermore, AChE is a potent amyloid-promoting factor when compared with other A beta-associated proteins. Thus, in addition to its role in cholinergic synapses, AChE may function by accelerating A beta formation and could play a role during amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's brain.

  9. Amyloid fibril formation of peptides derived from the C-terminus of CETP modulated by lipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-González, Victor [Instituto de Fisiología Celular, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, DF (Mexico); Mas-Oliva, Jaime, E-mail: jmas@ifc.unam.mx [Instituto de Fisiología Celular, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, DF (Mexico); División de Investigación, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, DF (Mexico)

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •The secondary structure of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP was studied. •Lipids modulate secondary structure changes of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP. •Lysophosphatidic acid maintains a functional α-helix and prevents fibril formation. •Transfer of lipids by CETP is related to the presence of an α-helix at its C-end. -- Abstract: Cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) is a plasmatic protein involved in neutral lipid transfer between lipoproteins. Focusing on the last 12 C-terminus residues we have previously shown that mutation D{sub 470}N promotes a conformational change towards a β-secondary structure. In turn, this modification leads to the formation of oligomers and fibrillar structures, which cause cytotoxic effects similar to the ones provoked by amyloid peptides. In this study, we evaluated the role of specific lipid arrangements on the structure of peptide helix-Z (D{sub 470}N) through the use of thioflavin T fluorescence, peptide bond absorbance, circular dichroism and electron microscopy. The results indicate that the use of micelles formed with lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) under neutral pH induce a conformational transition of peptide helix-Z containing a β-sheet conformation to a native α-helix structure, therefore avoiding the formation of amyloid fibrils. In contrast, incubation with phosphatidic acid does not change the profile for the β-sheet conformation. When the electrostatic charge at the surface of micelles or vesicles is regulated through the use of lipids such as phospholipid and LPA, minimal changes and the presence of β-structures were recorded. Mixtures with a positive net charge diminished the percentage of β-structure and the amount of amyloid fibrils. Our results suggest that the degree of solvation determined by the presence of a free hydroxyl group on lipids such as LPA is a key condition that can modulate the secondary structure and the consequent formation of

  10. Computational Potential Energy Minimization Studies on the Prion AGAAAAGA Amyloid Fibril Molecular Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2012-01-01

    X-ray crystallography, NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) spectroscopy, and dual polarization interferometry, etc are indeed very powerful tools to determine the 3D structures of proteins (including the membrane proteins), though they are time-consuming and costly. However, for some proteins, due to their unstable, noncrystalline and insoluble nature, these tools cannot work. Under this condition, mathematical and physical theoretical methods and computational approaches allow us to obtain a description of the protein 3D structure at a submicroscopic level. This Chapter presents some practical and useful mathematical optimization computational approaches to produce 3D structures of the Prion AGAAAAGA Amyloid Fibrils, from a potential energy minimization point of view.

  11. Binding of ACE-inhibitors to in vitro and patient-derived amyloidfibril models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavaraju, Manikanthan; Phillips, Malachi; Bowman, Deborah; Aceves-Hernandez, Juan M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no drugs exist that can prevent or reverse Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disease associated with the presence, in the brain, of plaques that are composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. Recent studies suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, a set of drugs used to treat hypertension, may inhibit amyloid formation in vitro. In the present study, we investigate through computer simulations the binding of ACE inhibitors to patient-derived Aβ fibrils and contrast it with that of ACE inhibitors binding to in vitro generated fibrils. The binding affinities of the ACE inhibitors are compared with that of Congo red, a dye that is used to identify amyloid structures and that is known to be a weak inhibitor of Aβ aggregation. We find that ACE inhibitors have a lower binding affinity to the patient-derived fibrils than to in vitro generated ones. For patient-derived fibrils, their binding affinities are even lower than that of Congo red. Our observations raise doubts on the hypothesis that these drugs inhibit fibril formation in Alzheimer patients by interacting directly with the amyloids.

  12. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langkilde, Annette E., E-mail: annette.langkilde@sund.ku.dk [University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Morris, Kyle L.; Serpell, Louise C. [University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton (United Kingdom); Svergun, Dmitri I. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Hamburg Outstation, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Vestergaard, Bente [University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-04-01

    The aggregation process and the fibril state of an amyloidogenic peptide suggest monomer addition to be the prevailing mechanism of elongation and a model of the peptide packing in the fibrils has been obtained. Structural analysis of protein fibrillation is inherently challenging. Given the crucial role of fibrils in amyloid diseases, method advancement is urgently needed. A hybrid modelling approach is presented enabling detailed analysis of a highly ordered and hierarchically organized fibril of the GNNQQNY peptide fragment of a yeast prion protein. Data from small-angle X-ray solution scattering, fibre diffraction and electron microscopy are combined with existing high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures to investigate the fibrillation process and the hierarchical fibril structure of the peptide fragment. The elongation of these fibrils proceeds without the accumulation of any detectable amount of intermediate oligomeric species, as is otherwise reported for, for example, glucagon, insulin and α-synuclein. Ribbons constituted of linearly arranged protofilaments are formed. An additional hierarchical layer is generated via the pairing of ribbons during fibril maturation. Based on the complementary data, a quasi-atomic resolution model of the protofilament peptide arrangement is suggested. The peptide structure appears in a β-sheet arrangement reminiscent of the β-zipper structures evident from high-resolution crystal structures, with specific differences in the relative peptide orientation. The complexity of protein fibrillation and structure emphasizes the need to use multiple complementary methods.

  13. Engineering Metal Ion Coordination to Regulate Amyloid Fibril Assembly And Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J.; Canfield, J.M.; Mehta, A.K.; Shokes, J.E.; Tian, B.; Childers, W.S.; Simmons, J.A.; Mao, Z.; Scott, R.A.; Warncke, K.; Lynn, D.G.

    2009-06-02

    Protein and peptide assembly into amyloid has been implicated in functions that range from beneficial epigenetic controls to pathological etiologies. However, the exact structures of the assemblies that regulate biological activity remain poorly defined. We have previously used Zn{sup 2+} to modulate the assembly kinetics and morphology of congeners of the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}) associated with Alzheimer's disease. We now reveal a correlation among A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} coordination, peptide self-assembly, and neuronal viability. By using the central segment of A{beta}, HHQKLVFFA or A{beta}(13-21), which contains residues H13 and H14 implicated in A{beta}-metal ion binding, we show that Cu{sup 2+} forms complexes with A{beta}(13-21) and its K16A mutant and that the complexes, which do not self-assemble into fibrils, have structures similar to those found for the human prion protein, PrP. N-terminal acetylation and H14A substitution, Ac-A{beta}(13-21)H14A, alters metal coordination, allowing Cu{sup 2+} to accelerate assembly into neurotoxic fibrils. These results establish that the N-terminal region of A{beta} can access different metal-ion-coordination environments and that different complexes can lead to profound changes in A{beta} self-assembly kinetics, morphology, and toxicity. Related metal-ion coordination may be critical to the etiology of other neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Microscopic factors that control beta-sheet registry in amyloid fibrils formed by fragment 11-25 of amyloid beta peptide: insights from computer simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negureanu, Lacramioara; Baumketner, Andrij

    2009-06-26

    Short fragments of amyloidogenic proteins are widely used as model systems in studies of amyloid formation. Fragment 11-25 of the amyloid beta protein involved in Alzheimer's disease (Abeta11-25) was recently shown to form amyloid fibrils composed of anti-parallel beta-sheets. Interestingly, fibrils grown under neutral and acidic conditions were seen to possess different registries of their inter-beta-strand hydrogen bonds. In an effort to explain the microscopic origin of this pH dependence, we studied Abeta11-25 fibrils using methods of theoretical modeling. Several structural models were built for fibrils at low and neutral pH levels and these were examined in short molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water. The models that displayed the lowest free energy, as estimated using an implicit solvent model, were selected as representative of the true fibrillar structure. It was shown that the registry of these models agrees well with the experimental results. At neutral pH, the main contribution to the free energy difference between the two registries comes from the electrostatic interactions. The charge group of the carboxy terminus makes a large contribution to these interactions and thus appears to have a critical role in determining the registry.

  15. [Histopathological findings of the nerve and muscles in familial primary amyloidosis, with special reference to the mechanism of amyloid fibril production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshimaru, M; Miyakawa, T; Sumiyoshi, S; Murayama, E; Tatetsu, S

    1976-07-01

    T. I., a male aged 38, had a hereditary primary amyloidosis over four generation in his family history. He had peripheral neuropathy with dissociated sensory disturbances in the lower limbs, impotence, gastrointerstial dysfunction and orthostatic hypotention. N. suralis and M. quadriceps femoralis taken from him were examined by light and electron microscopy. N. suralis contained a lot of amyloids reacting with congo-red in the nerve fibres. Amyloid fibrils were remarkably observed around the blood vessels. They were continuous with the basement membrane of the endotherial cells. A few deposites were observed around the Schwann cell and fibroblasts. In M. quadriceps femoralis, amyloid like fibrils were noted in the perivascular spaces. Especially, a great deal of amyloid fibrils were continuous with the basement membranes. From this finding, it might be speculated that the basement membrane may play an important role in the production of amyloid fibrils.

  16. A setup for simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and light scattering signals: Watching amyloid fibrils grow from intact proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang; Maurer, Jürgen; Roth, Andreas; Vogel, Vitali; Winter, Ernst; Mäntele, Werner, E-mail: maentele@biophysik.uni-frankfurt.de [Institut für Biophysik, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Max-von Laue-Straße 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    A setup for the simultaneous measurement of mid-infrared spectra and static light scattering is described that can be used for the analysis of the formation of nanoscale and microscopic aggregates from smaller molecules to biopolymers. It can be easily integrated into sample chambers of infrared spectrometers or combined with laser beams from tunable infrared lasers. Here, its use for the analysis of the formation of amyloid fibrils from intact proteins is demonstrated. The formation of amyloid fibrils or plaques from proteins is a widespread and pathogenetic relevant process, and a number of diseases are caused and correlated with the deposition of amyloid fibrils in cells and tissues. The molecular mechanisms of these transformations, however, are still unclear. We report here the simultaneous measurement of infrared spectra and static light scattering for the analysis of fibril formation from egg-white lysozyme. The transformation of the native form into non-native forms rich in β-sheet structure is measured by analysis of the amide I spectral region in the infrared spectra, which is sensitive for local structures. At the same time, light scattering signals at forward direction as well as the forward/backward ratio, which are sensitive for the number of scattering centers and their approximate sizes, respectively, are collected for the analysis of fibril growth. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters as well as mechanistic information are deduced from the combination of the two complementary techniques.

  17. Solution NMR structure and inhibitory effect against amyloidfibrillation of Humanin containing a d-isomerized serine residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsanousi, Nesreen; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Furuita, Kyoko; So, Masatomo; Lee, Young-Ho; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro

    2016-09-02

    Humanin comprising 24 amino acid residues is a bioactive peptide that has been isolated from the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Humanin reportedly suppressed aging-related death of various cells due to amyloid fibrils and oxidative stress. There are reports that the cytoprotective activity of Humanin was remarkably enhanced by optical isomerization of the Ser14 residue from l to d form, but details of the molecular mechanism remained unclear. Here we demonstrated that Humanin d-Ser14 exhibited potent inhibitory activity against fibrillation of amyloid-β and remarkably higher binding affinity for amyloid-β than that of the Humanin wild-type and S14G mutant. In addition, we determined the solution structure of Humanin d-Ser14 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and showed that d-isomerization of the Ser14 residue enables drastic conformational rearrangement of Humanin. Furthermore, we identified an amyloid-β-binding site on Humanin d-Ser14 at atomic resolution by NMR. These biophysical and high-resolution structural analyses clearly revealed structure-function relationships of Humanin and explained the driving force of the drastic conformational change and molecular basis of the potent anti-amyloidfibrillation activity of Humanin caused by d-isomerization of the Ser14 residue. This is the first study to show correlations between the functional activity, tertiary structure, and partner recognition mode of Humanin and may lead to elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of the cytoprotective activity of Humanin.

  18. Insights on the binding of thioflavin derivative markers to amyloid fibril models and Aβ{sub 1-40} fibrils from computational approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alí-Torres, Jorge; Rimola, Albert; Sodupe, Mariona [Departament de Química, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra 08193 (Spain); Rodriguez-Rodríguez, Cristina [Medicinal Inorganic Chemistry Group, Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, 2036 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2014-10-06

    The present contribution analyzes the binding of ThT and neutral ThT derivatives to a β-sheet model by means of quantum chemical calculations. In addition, we study the properties of four molecules: (2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBX), 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole (HBT) and their respective iodinated compounds, HBXI and HBTI, in binding to amyloid fibril models and Aβ{sub 1-40}fibrils by using a combination of docking, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations.

  19. Acceleration and inhibition of amyloidfibril formation by peptide-conjugated fluorescent-maghemite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaat, Hadas; Shafir, Gilead; Margel, Shlomo

    2011-08-01

    The formation of amyloid aggregates by association of peptides into ordered structures is hallmark of certain neurodegenerative disorders. Exploring the effect of specific nanoparticles on the formation of amyloid fibrils may contribute toward a mechanistic understanding of the aggregation processes, leading to design nanoparticles that modulate the formation of toxic amyloid plaques. Uniform maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) magnetic nanoparticles, containing fluorescein covalently encapsulated within (F-γ-Fe2O3), were prepared. These F-γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles of 14.0 ± 4.0 nm were then coated with human serum albumin (HSA) via a precipitation process. Covalent conjugation of the spacer arm succinimidyl polyethylene glycol succinimidyl ester (NHS-PEG-NHS) to the F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA nanoparticles was then accomplished by interacting the primary amine groups of the HSA coating with excess NHS-PEG-NHS molecules. Covalent conjugation of the peptides amyloid-β 40 (Aβ40) or Leu-Pro-Phe-Phe-Asp (LPFFD) onto the surface of the former fluorescent nanoparticles was then performed, by interacting the terminal activated NHS groups of the PEG derivatized F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA nanoparticles with primary amino groups of the peptides. Kinetics of the Aβ40 fibrillation process in the absence and presence of varying concentrations of the Aβ40 or LPFFD conjugated nanoparticles were also elucidated. The non-peptide conjugated fluorescent nanoparticles do not affect the Aβ40 fibrillation process significantly. However, the Aβ40-conjugated nanoparticles (F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA-PEG-Aβ40) accelerate the fibrillation process while the LPFFD-conjugated nanoparticles (F-γ-Fe2O3 HSA-PEG-LPFFD) inhibit it. By applying MRI and fluorescence imaging techniques simultaneously these bioactive fluorescent magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can be used as an efficient tool to study and control the Aβ40 amyloid fibril formation process.

  20. Deciphering the structure, growth and assembly of amyloid-like fibrils using high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Emmanuel Milhiet

    Full Text Available Formation of fibrillar structures of proteins that deposit into aggregates has been suggested to play a key role in various neurodegenerative diseases. However mechanisms and dynamics of fibrillization remains to be elucidated. We have previously established that lithostathine, a protein overexpressed in the pre-clinical stages of Alzheimer's disease and present in the pathognomonic lesions associated with this disease, form fibrillar aggregates after its N-terminal truncation. In this paper we visualized, using high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM, growth and assembly of lithostathine protofibrils under physiological conditions with a time resolution of one image/s. Real-time imaging highlighted a very high velocity of elongation. Formation of fibrils via protofibril lateral association and stacking was also monitored revealing a zipper-like mechanism of association. We also demonstrate that, like other amyloid ß peptides, two lithostathine protofibrils can associate to form helical fibrils. Another striking finding is the propensity of the end of a growing protofibril or fibril to associate with the edge of a second fibril, forming false branching point. Taken together this study provides new clues about fibrillization mechanism of amyloid proteins.

  1. Intermolecular alignment in Y145Stop human prion protein amyloid fibrils probed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmus, Jonathan J; Surewicz, Krystyna; Apostol, Marcin I; Surewicz, Witold K; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2011-09-07

    The Y145Stop mutant of human prion protein, huPrP23-144, has been linked to PrP cerebral amyloid angiopathy, an inherited amyloid disease, and also serves as a valuable in vitro model for investigating the molecular basis of amyloid strains. Prior studies of huPrP23-144 amyloid by magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy revealed a compact β-rich amyloid core region near the C-terminus and an unstructured N-terminal domain. Here, with the focus on understanding the higher-order architecture of huPrP23-144 fibrils, we probed the intermolecular alignment of β-strands within the amyloid core using MAS NMR techniques and fibrils formed from equimolar mixtures of (15)N-labeled protein and (13)C-huPrP23-144 prepared with [1,3-(13)C(2)] or [2-(13)C]glycerol. Numerous intermolecular correlations involving backbone atoms observed in 2D (15)N-(13)C spectra unequivocally suggest an overall parallel in-register alignment of the β-sheet core. Additional experiments that report on intermolecular (15)N-(13)CO and (15)N-(13)Cα dipolar couplings yielded an estimated strand spacing that is within ∼10% of the distances of 4.7-4.8 Å typical for parallel β-sheets.

  2. An Improved LBFGS Quasi-Newtonian Method for Modeling Prion AGAAAAGA Amyloid Fibril Molecular Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu; Wang, Yiju; Wang, Changyu; Zhang, Xiangsun

    2012-01-01

    Experimental X-ray crystallography, NMR (NuclearMagnetic Resonance) spectroscopy, dual polarization interferometry, etc are indeed very powerful tools to determine the 3-Dimensional structure of a protein (including the membrane protein); theoretical mathematical and physical computational approaches can also allow us to obtain a description of the protein 3D structure at a submicroscopic level for some unstable, noncrystalline and insoluble proteins. X-ray crystallography finds the X-ray final structure of a protein, produce a better structure. This means theoretical methods are also important in determinations of protein structures. This paper presents a theoretical computational method - an improved LBFGS Quasi-Newtonian mathematical optimization method - to produce 3D structures of prion AGAAAAGA amyloid fibrils (which are unstable, noncrystalline and insoluble), from the potential energy minimization point of view.

  3. A comparison of immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry for determining the amyloid fibril protein from formalin-fixed biopsy tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Janet A; Theis, Jason D; Vrana, Julie A; Lachmann, Helen; Wechalekar, Ashutosh; Whelan, Carol; Hawkins, Philip N; Dogan, Ahmet; Gillmore, Julian D

    2015-04-01

    Amyloidosis is caused by deposition in tissues of abnormal protein in a characteristic fibrillar form. There are many types of amyloidosis, classified according to the soluble protein precursor from which the amyloid fibrils are derived. Accurate identification of amyloid type is critical in every case since therapy for systemic amyloidosis is type specific. In ∼20-25% cases, however, immunohistochemistry (IHC) fails to prove the amyloid type and further tests are required. Laser microdissection and mass spectrometry (LDMS) is a powerful tool for identifying proteins from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. We undertook a blinded comparison of IHC, performed at the UK National Amyloidosis Centre, and LDMS, performed at the Mayo Clinic, in 142 consecutive biopsy specimens from 38 different tissue types. There was 100% concordance between positive IHC and LDMS, and the latter increased diagnostic accuracy from 76% to 94%. LDMS in expert hands is a valuable tool for amyloid diagnosis.

  4. Genesis of mammalian prions: from non-infectious amyloid fibrils to a transmissible prion disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natallia Makarava

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The transmissible agent of prion disease consists of a prion protein in its abnormal, β-sheet rich state (PrP(Sc, which is capable of replicating itself according to the template-assisted mechanism. This mechanism postulates that the folding pattern of a newly recruited polypeptide chain accurately reproduces that of a PrP(Sc template. Here we report that authentic PrP(Sc and transmissible prion disease can be generated de novo in wild type animals by recombinant PrP (rPrP amyloid fibrils, which are structurally different from PrP(Sc and lack any detectable PrP(Sc particles. When induced by rPrP fibrils, a long silent stage that involved two serial passages preceded development of the clinical disease. Once emerged, the prion disease was characterized by unique clinical, neuropathological, and biochemical features. The long silent stage to the disease was accompanied by significant transformation in neuropathological properties and biochemical features of the proteinase K-resistant PrP material (PrPres before authentic PrP(Sc evolved. The current work illustrates that transmissible prion diseases can be induced by PrP structures different from that of authentic PrP(Sc and suggests that a new mechanism different from the classical templating exists. This new mechanism designated as "deformed templating" postulates that a change in the PrP folding pattern from the one present in rPrP fibrils to an alternative specific for PrP(Sc can occur. The current work provides important new insight into the mechanisms underlying genesis of the transmissible protein states and has numerous implications for understanding the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Bovine Insulin Filaments Induced by Reducing Disulfide Bonds Show a Different Morphology, Secondary Structure, and Cell Toxicity from Intact Insulin Amyloid Fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Zako, Tamotsu; Sakono, Masafumi; Hashimoto, Naomi; Ihara, Masaki; Maeda, Mizuo

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with more than 20 diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Insulin is a 51-residue polypeptide hormone, with its two polypeptide chains linked by one intrachain and two interchain disulfide bonds, and has long been known to self-assemble in vitro into amyloid fibrils. We demonstrate here that bovine insulin forms flexible filaments in the presence of a reducing agent, Tris (2-carboxyethyl) phosphine. The insulin filaments, possibly formed du...

  6. Conformational stability of mammalian prion protein amyloid fibrils is dictated by a packing polymorphism within the core region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Nathan J; Apostol, Marcin I; Chen, Shugui; Smirnovas, Vytautas; Surewicz, Witold K

    2014-01-31

    Mammalian prion strains are believed to arise from the propagation of distinct conformations of the misfolded prion protein PrP(Sc). One key operational parameter used to define differences between strains has been conformational stability of PrP(Sc) as defined by resistance to thermal and/or chemical denaturation. However, the structural basis of these stability differences is unknown. To bridge this gap, we have generated two strains of recombinant human prion protein amyloid fibrils that show dramatic differences in conformational stability and have characterized them by a number of biophysical methods. Backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments revealed that, in sharp contrast to previously studied strains of infectious amyloid formed from the yeast prion protein Sup35, differences in β-sheet core size do not underlie differences in conformational stability between strains of mammalian prion protein amyloid. Instead, these stability differences appear to be dictated by distinct packing arrangements (i.e. steric zipper interfaces) within the amyloid core, as indicated by distinct x-ray fiber diffraction patterns and large strain-dependent differences in hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics for histidine side chains within the core region. Although this study was limited to synthetic prion protein amyloid fibrils, a similar structural basis for strain-dependent conformational stability may apply to brain-derived PrP(Sc), especially because large strain-specific differences in PrP(Sc) stability are often observed despite a similar size of the PrP(Sc) core region.

  7. Conformational Stability of Mammalian Prion Protein Amyloid Fibrils Is Dictated by a Packing Polymorphism within the Core Region*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Nathan J.; Apostol, Marcin I.; Chen, Shugui; Smirnovas, Vytautas; Surewicz, Witold K.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian prion strains are believed to arise from the propagation of distinct conformations of the misfolded prion protein PrPSc. One key operational parameter used to define differences between strains has been conformational stability of PrPSc as defined by resistance to thermal and/or chemical denaturation. However, the structural basis of these stability differences is unknown. To bridge this gap, we have generated two strains of recombinant human prion protein amyloid fibrils that show dramatic differences in conformational stability and have characterized them by a number of biophysical methods. Backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments revealed that, in sharp contrast to previously studied strains of infectious amyloid formed from the yeast prion protein Sup35, differences in β-sheet core size do not underlie differences in conformational stability between strains of mammalian prion protein amyloid. Instead, these stability differences appear to be dictated by distinct packing arrangements (i.e. steric zipper interfaces) within the amyloid core, as indicated by distinct x-ray fiber diffraction patterns and large strain-dependent differences in hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics for histidine side chains within the core region. Although this study was limited to synthetic prion protein amyloid fibrils, a similar structural basis for strain-dependent conformational stability may apply to brain-derived PrPSc, especially because large strain-specific differences in PrPSc stability are often observed despite a similar size of the PrPSc core region. PMID:24338015

  8. X-Ray Structural Study of Amyloid-Like Fibrils of Tau Peptides Bound to Small-Molecule Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayeb-Fligelman, Einav; Landau, Meytal

    2017-01-01

    Atomic structures of Tau involved in Alzheimer's disease complexed with small molecule binders are the first step to define the Tau pharmacophore, leading the way to a structure-based design of improved diagnostics and therapeutics. Yet the partially disordered and polymorphic nature of Tau hinders structural analyses. Fortunately, short segments from amyloid proteins, which exhibit similar biophysical properties to the full-length proteins, also form fibrils and oligomers, and their atomic structures can be determined using X-ray microcrystallography. Such structures were successfully used to design amyloid inhibitors. This chapter describes experimental procedures used to determine crystal structures of Tau peptide segments in complex with small-molecule binders.

  9. Thioflavin T derivatives for the characterization of insulin and lysozyme amyloid fibrils in vitro: Fluorescence and quantum-chemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vus, Kateryna, E-mail: kateryna_vus@yahoo.com [Department of Nuclear and Medical Physics, V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, 4 Svobody Sq., Kharkiv 61022 (Ukraine); Trusova, Valeriya; Gorbenko, Galyna [Department of Nuclear and Medical Physics, V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, 4 Svobody Sq., Kharkiv 61022 (Ukraine); Sood, Rohit; Kinnunen, Paavo [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, School of Science and Technology, Aalto University, FI-00076 Espoo (Finland)

    2015-03-15

    Two charged Thioflavin T (ThT) derivatives, referred to here as ICT2 and ICT3, showed higher fluorescence response, association constants and the blue-shifted emission maxima in the presence of lysozyme fibrils compared to insulin aggregates. In turn, the other two ThT derivatives, ICT4 and ICT5, possessed much weaker sensitivity to amyloid fibrils. Furthermore, a direct correlation was found between the “light-up” ability of the fibril-bound fluorophores and those observed in concentrated dichlormethane or glycerol solutions. To explain this behavior, the ground and lowest non-relaxed excited state properties of the dyes were evaluated with the 6-31G(d,p) basis set, using DFT and the CIS method. The excited state energy dependences along the torsion angle between the benzothiazole and phenyl moieties of the ICT4, ICT5 turned out to have three directly observed minima, corresponding to the locally excited (LE) and twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) states. Thus, stronger stabilization of the ICT4, ICT5 LE states resulted in significantly greater quantum yield of these dyes in buffer solution and the absence of the “light-up” feature in the presence of insulin amyloid fibrils, compared to ICT2 and ICT3. - Highlights: • The ThT derivatives–ICT{sub 2}, ICT{sub 3} had the sensitivity to lysozyme fibrillar aggregates. • The insulin fibril (InsF)-bound ICT{sub 2}, ICT{sub 3} showed higher fluorescence intensities. • The lysozyme fibril-bound dyes have blue-shifted emission maxima compared to InsF. • Fluorescence of the fibril-bound dyes strongly correlates with that in glycerol. • The propylamine/metoxy moieties → the stabilization of the LE state of ICT4/ICT5. • Such a stabilization → the weak dye sensitivity to the environmental factors.

  10. Assembly of the Fungal SC3 Hydrophobin into Functional Amyloid Fibrils Depends on Its Concentration and Is Promoted by Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtmeijer, Karin; Vocht, Marcel L. de; Rink, Rick; Robillard, George T.; Wösten, Han A.B.

    2009-01-01

    Class I hydrophobins function in fungal growth and development by self-assembling at hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfaces into amyloid-like fibrils. SC3 of the mushroom-forming fungus Schizophyllum commune is the best studied class I hydrophobin. This protein spontaneously adopts the amyloid state at

  11. Purification and Refolding to Amyloid Fibrils of (His)6-tagged Recombinant Shadoo Protein Expressed as Inclusion Bodies in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiaojing; Richard, Charles-Adrien; Moudjou, Mohammed; Vidic, Jasmina

    2015-12-19

    The Escherichia coli expression system is a powerful tool for the production of recombinant eukaryotic proteins. We use it to produce Shadoo, a protein belonging to the prion family. A chromatographic method for the purification of (His)6-tagged recombinant Shadoo expressed as inclusion bodies is described. The inclusion bodies are solubilized in 8 M urea and bound to a Ni(2+)-charged column to perform ion affinity chromatography. Bound proteins are eluted by a gradient of imidazole. Fractions containing Shadoo protein are subjected to size exclusion chromatography to obtain a highly purified protein. In the final step purified Shadoo is desalted to remove salts, urea and imidazole. Recombinant Shadoo protein is an important reagent for biophysical and biochemical studies of protein conformation disorders occurring in prion diseases. Many reports demonstrated that prion neurodegenerative diseases originate from the deposition of stable, ordered amyloid fibrils. Sample protocols describing how to fibrillate Shadoo into amyloid fibrils at acidic and neutral/basic pHs are presented. The methods on how to produce and fibrillate Shadoo can facilitate research in laboratories working on prion diseases, since it allows for production of large amounts of protein in a rapid and low cost manner.

  12. Polymorphism of amyloid fibrils formed by a peptide from the yeast prion protein Sup35: AFM and Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey V., E-mail: akrasnos@unomaha.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 986025 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Nebraska Omaha, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja [IPHT-Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Zhang, Yuliang [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 986025 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Deckert, Volker [IPHT-Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Institute for Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of Photonics, University of Jena, Helmholtzweg 4, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Lyubchenko, Yuri L., E-mail: ylyubchenko@unmc.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 986025 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Aggregation of prion proteins is the cause of various prion related diseases. The infectious form of prions, amyloid aggregates, exist as multiple strains. The strains are thought to represent structurally different prion protein molecules packed into amyloid aggregates, but the knowledge on the structure of different types of aggregates is limited. Here we report on the use of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and TERS (Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering) to study morphological heterogeneity and access underlying conformational features of individual amyloid aggregates. Using AFM we identified the morphology of amyloid fibrils formed by the peptide (CGNNQQNY) from the yeast prion protein Sup35 that is critically involved in the aggregation of the full protein. TERS results demonstrate that morphologically different amyloid fibrils are composed of a distinct set of conformations. Fibrils formed at pH 5.6 are composed of a mixture of peptide conformations (β-sheets, random coil and α-helix) while fibrils formed in pH~2 solution primarily have β-sheets. Additionally, peak positions in the amide III region of the TERS spectra suggested that peptides have parallel arrangement of β-sheets for pH~2 fibrils and antiparallel arrangement for fibrils formed at pH 5.6. We also developed a methodology for detailed analysis of the peptide secondary structure by correlating intensity changes of Raman bands in different regions of TERS spectra. Such correlation established that structural composition of peptides is highly localized with large contribution of unordered secondary structures on a fibrillar surface. - Highlights: • Amyloid polymorphs were characterized by AFM and TERS. • A mixture of peptide secondary structures in fibrils were identified using TERS. • TERS recognizes packing arrangement (parallel versus antiparallel) of peptides. • TERS is a powerful tool for high resolution structural analysis of fibrils.

  13. The Lennard-Jones Potential Minimization Problem for Prion AGAAAAGA Amyloid Fibril Molecular Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2011-01-01

    The simplified Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential minimization problem is minimize f(x)=4\\sum_{i=1}^N \\sum_{j=1,jamyloid fibril molecular model building. The 3nhc.pdb, 3nve.pdb, 3nvf.pdb, 3nvg.pdb and 3nvh.pdb of PDB bank are used for the successful molecular modeling.

  14. Computational studies of the structure, dynamics and native content of amyloid-like fibrils of ribonuclease A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Giorgio; Meli, Massimiliano; De Simone, Alfonso

    2008-02-15

    The characterization at atomic resolution of amyloid-like protein aggregates is one of the fundamental problems of modern biology. In particular, the question whether native-like domains are retained or completely refolded in the amyloid state and the identification of possible mechanisms for macromolecular ordered aggregation represent major unresolved puzzles. To address these issues, in this article we examine the stability, dynamics, and conservation of native-like properties of several models of a previously designed amyloid-like fibril of RNase A (Sambashivan et al., Nature 2005; 437:266-269). Through the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have provided molecular-level insights into the role of different parts of the sequence on the stability of fibrils, the collective properties of supramolecular complexes, and the presence of native-like conformations and dynamics in supramolecular aggregates. We have been able to show that within the fibrils the three-dimensional globular domain-swapped units preserve the conformational, dynamical, and hydration properties typical of the monomeric state, providing a rationalization for the experimentally observed catalytic activity of fibrils. The nativeness of the globular domains is not affected by the amyloidogenic stretches, which determine the molecular recognition process underlying aggregation through the formation of a stable steric zipper motif. Moreover, through the study of the hydration features of a single sheet model, we have been able to show that polyglutamine stretches of the domain-swapped ribonuclease tend to minimize the interaction with water in favor of sidechain-sidechain interactions, shedding light on the factors leading to the supramolecular assembly of beta-sheet layers into dry steric zippers.

  15. Magnetic-responsive hybrids of Fe3O4 nanoparticles with β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils and nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Vallooran, Jijo J; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-07-23

    We report on the synthesis and magnetic-responsive behavior of hybrids formed by dispersing negatively charged iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetic nanoparticles in positively charged β-lactoglobulin protein solutions at acidic pH, followed by heating at high temperatures. Depending on the pH used, different hybrid aggregates can be obtained, such as nanoparticle-modified amyloid fibrils (pH 3) and spherical nanoclusters (pH 4.5). We investigate the effect of magnetic fields of varying strengths (0-5 T) on the alignment of these Fe3O4-modified amyloid fibrils and spherical nanoclusters using a combination of scattering, birefringence and microscopic techniques and we find a strong alignment of the hybrids upon increasing the intensity of the magnetic field, which we quantify via 2D and 3D order parameters. We also demonstrate the possibility of controlling magnetically the sol-gel behavior of these hybrids: addition of salt (NaCl, 150 mM) to a solution containing nanoparticles modified with β-lactoglobulin amyloid fibrils (2 wt % fibrils modified with 0.6 wt % Fe3O4 nanoparticles) induces first the formation of a reversible gel, which can then be converted back to solution upon application of a moderate magnetic field of 1.1 T. These hybrids offer a new appealing functional colloidal system in which the aggregation, orientational order and rheological behavior can be efficiently controlled in a purely noninvasive way by external magnetic fields of weak intensity.

  16. Nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of the bubble cavitation and application to dissociate amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang Viet, Man; Derreumaux, Philippe; Nguyen, Phuong H

    2016-11-07

    The cavitation of gas bubbles in liquids has been applied to different disciplines in life and natural sciences, and in technologies. To obtain an appropriate theoretical description of effects induced by the bubble cavitation, we develop an all-atom nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulation method to simulate bubbles undergoing harmonic oscillation in size. This allows us to understand the mechanism of the bubble cavitation-induced liquid shear stress on surrounding objects. The method is then employed to simulate an Aβ fibril model in the presence of bubbles, and the results show that the bubble expansion and contraction exert water pressure on the fibril. This yields to the deceleration and acceleration of the fibril kinetic energy, facilitating the conformational transition between local free energy minima, and leading to the dissociation of the fibril. Our work, which is a proof-of-concept, may open a new, efficient way to dissociate amyloid fibrils using the bubble cavitation technique, and new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  17. Bacoside-A, an anti-amyloid natural substance, inhibits membrane disruption by the amyloidogenic determinant of prion protein through accelerating fibril formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malishev, Ravit; Nandi, Sukhendu; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Shaham-Niv, Shira; Gazit, Ehud; Jelinek, Raz

    2016-09-01

    Bacosides, class of compounds extracted from the Bacopa monniera plant, exhibit interesting therapeutic properties, particularly enhancing cognitive functions and putative anti-amyloid activity. We show that bacoside-A exerted significant effects upon fibrillation and membrane interactions of the amyloidogenic fragment of the prion protein [PrP(106-126)]. Specifically, when co-incubated with PrP(106-126), bacoside-A accelerated fibril formation in the presence of lipid bilayers and in parallel inhibited bilayer interactions of the peptide aggregates formed in solution. These interesting phenomena were studied by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques, which suggest that bacoside A-promoted fibrillation reduced the concentration of membrane-active pre-fibrillar species of the prion fragment. This study suggests that induction of fibril formation and corresponding inhibition of membrane interactions are likely the underlying factors for ameliorating amyloid protein toxicity by bacoside-A.

  18. Steroid hormones block amyloid fibril-induced 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) formazan exocytosis: relationship to neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Schubert, D

    1998-12-01

    Perhaps the most reproducible early event induced by the interaction of amyloid beta peptide (A beta) with the cell is the inhibition of cellular 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction. We recently demonstrated that cytotoxic amyloid peptides such as A beta and human amylin inhibit cellular MTT reduction by dramatically enhancing MTT formazan exocytosis. We now show the following: (a) Insulin and glucagon, when converted to fibrils with beta-pleated sheet structure, induce MTT formazan exocytosis that is indistinguishable from that induced by A beta. NAC35, an amyloidogenic fragment of alpha-synuclein (or NACP), also induces MTT formazan exocytosis. (b) All protein fibrils with the beta-pleated sheet structure examined are toxic to rat hippocampal neurons. (c) Many sterol sex hormones (e.g., estradiol and progesterone) block amyloid fibril-enhanced MTT formazan exocytosis as well as MTT formazan exocytosis in control cells by acting at a common late step in the exocytic pathway. Steroids fail, however, to protect hippocampal neurons from acute amyloid fibril toxicity. These findings suggest that the ability to enhance MTT formazan exocytosis and to induce neurotoxicity are common biological activities of protein fibrils with beta-pleated sheet structure but that enhanced MTT formazan exocytosis is not sufficient for acute A beta neurotoxicity.

  19. Ionic self-complementarity induces amyloid-like fibril formation in an isolated domain of a plant copper metallochaperone protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salom David

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arabidopsis thaliana copper metallochaperone CCH is a functional homologue of yeast antioxidant ATX1, involved in cytosolic copper transport. In higher plants, CCH has to be transported to specialised cells through plasmodesmata, being the only metallochaperone reported to date that leaves the cell where it is synthesised. CCH has two different domains, the N-terminal domain conserved among other copper-metallochaperones and a C-terminal domain absent in all the identified non-plant metallochaperones. The aim of the present study was the biochemical and biophysical characterisation of the C-terminal domain of the copper metallochaperone CCH. Results The conformational behaviour of the isolated C-domain in solution is complex and implies the adoption of mixed conformations in different environments. The ionic self-complementary peptide KTEAETKTEAKVDAKADVE, derived from the C-domain of CCH, adopts and extended conformation in solution with a high content in β-sheet structure that induces a pH-dependent fibril formation. Freeze drying electron microscopy studies revealed the existence of well ordered amyloid-like fibrils in preparations from both the C-domain and its derivative peptide. Conclusion A number of proteins related with copper homeostasis have a high tendency to form fibrils. The determinants for fibril formation, as well as the possible physiological role are not fully understood. Here we show that the plant exclusive C-domain of the copper metallochaperone CCH has conformational plasticity and forms fibrils at defined experimental conditions. The putative influence of these properties with plant copper delivery will be addressed in the future.

  20. The Formation of Fibrils by Intertwining of Filaments: Model and Application to Amyloid Aβ Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gestel, Jeroen; de Leeuw, Simon W.

    2007-01-01

    We outline a model that describes the interaction of rods that form intertwined bundles. In this simple model, we compare the elastic energy penalty that arises due to the deformation of the rods to the gain in binding energy upon intertwining. We find that, for proper values of the bending Young's modulus and the binding energy, a helical pitch may be found for which the energy of intertwining is most favorable. We apply our description to the problem of Alzheimer's Aβ protein fibrillization. If we forbid configurations that exhibit steric overlap between the protofilaments that make up a protein fibril, our model predicts that fibrils consisting of three protofilaments shall form. This agrees well with experimental results. Our model can also provide an estimate for the helical pitch of suitable fibrils. PMID:17114229

  1. Aggregation properties of a short peptide that mediates amyloid fibril formation in model proteins unrelated to disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nitin Chaudhary; Shashi Singh; Ramakrishnan Nagaraj

    2011-09-01

    Short peptides have been identified from amyloidogenic proteins that form amyloid fibrils in isolation. The hexapeptide stretch 21DIDLHL26 has been shown to be important in the self-assembly of the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of p85 subunit of bovine phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3-SH3). The SH3 domain of chicken brain -spectrin, which is otherwise non-amyloidogenic, is rendered amyloidogenic if 22EVTMKK27 is replaced by DIDLHL. In this article, we describe the aggregation behaviour of DIDLHL-COOH and DIDLHL-CONH2. Our results indicate that DIDLHL-COOH and DIDLHL-CONH2 aggregate to form spherical structures at pH 5 and 6. At pH 5, in the presence of mica, DIDLHL-CONH2 forms short fibrous structures. The presence of NaCl along with mica results in fibrillar structures. At pH 6, DIDLHL-CONH2 forms largely spherical aggregates. Both the peptides are unstructured in solution but adopt -conformation on drying. The aggregates formed by DIDLHL-COOH and DIDLHL-CONH2 are formed during drying process and their structures are modulated by the presence of mica and salt. Our study suggests that a peptide need not have intrinsic amyloidogenic propensity to facilitate the selfassembly of the full-length protein. The propensity of peptides to form self-assembled structures that are non-amyloidogenic could be important in potentiating the self-assembly of full-length proteins into amyloid fibrils.

  2. The chaperonin CCT inhibits assembly of α-synuclein amyloid fibrils by a specific, conformation-dependent interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sot, Begoña; Rubio-Muñoz, Alejandra; Leal-Quintero, Ahudrey; Martínez-Sabando, Javier; Marcilla, Miguel; Roodveldt, Cintia; Valpuesta, José M.

    2017-01-01

    The eukaryotic chaperonin CCT (chaperonin containing TCP-1) uses cavities built into its double-ring structure to encapsulate and to assist folding of a large subset of proteins. CCT can inhibit amyloid fibre assembly and toxicity of the polyQ extended mutant of huntingtin, the protein responsible for Huntington’s disease. This raises the possibility that CCT modulates other amyloidopathies, a still-unaddressed question. We show here that CCT inhibits amyloid fibre assembly of α-synuclein A53T, one of the mutants responsible for Parkinson’s disease. We evaluated fibrillation blockade in α-synuclein A53T deletion mutants and CCT interactions of full-length A53T in distinct oligomeric states to define an inhibition mechanism specific for α-synuclein. CCT interferes with fibre assembly by interaction of its CCTζ and CCTγ subunits with the A53T central hydrophobic region (NAC). This interaction is specific to NAC conformation, as it is produced once soluble α-synuclein A53T oligomers form and blocks the reaction before fibres begin to grow. Finally, we show that this association inhibits α-synuclein A53T oligomer toxicity in neuroblastoma cells. In summary, our results and those for huntingtin suggest that CCT is a general modulator of amyloidogenesis via a specific mechanism. PMID:28102321

  3. The mechanism of amyloid-fibril formation by stefin B: temperature and protein concentration dependence of the rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerget, Katja; Vilfan, Andrej; Pompe-Novak, Marusa; Turk, Vito; Waltho, Jonathan P; Turk, Dusan; Zerovnik, Eva

    2009-02-01

    Cystatins, a family of structurally related cysteine proteinase inhibitors, have proved to be useful model system to study amyloidogenesis. We have extended previous studies of the kinetics of amyloid-fibril formation by human stefin B (cystatin B) and some of its mutants, and proposed an improved model for the reaction. Overall, the observed kinetics follow the nucleation and growth behavior observed for many other amyloidogenic proteins. The minimal kinetic scheme that best fits measurements of changes in CD and thioflavin T fluorescence as a function of protein concentration and temperature includes nucleation (modeled as N(I) irreversible transitions with equivalent rates (k(I)), which fitted with N(I) = 64), fibril growth and nonproductive oligomerization, best explained by an off-pathway state with a rate-limiting escape rate. Three energies of activation were derived from global fitting to the minimal kinetic scheme, and independently through the fitting of the individual component rates. Nucleation was found to be a first-order process within an oligomeric species with an enthalpy of activation of 55 +/- 4 kcal mol(-1). Fibril growth was a second-order process with an enthalpy of activation (27 +/- 5 kcal mol(-1)), which is indistinguishable from that of tetramer formation by cystatins, which involves limited conformational changes including proline trans to cis isomerization. The highest enthalpy of activation (95 +/- 5 kcal mol(-1) at 35 degrees C), characteristic of a substantial degree of unfolding as observed prior to domain-swapping reactions, equated with the escape rate of the off-pathway oligomeric state.

  4. PrP aggregation can be seeded by pre-formed recombinant PrP amyloid fibrils without the replication of infectious prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Rona M; King, Declan; Jeffrey, Martin; McGovern, Gillian; Agarwal, Sonya; Gill, Andrew C; Piccardo, Pedro

    2016-10-01

    Mammalian prions are unusual infectious agents, as they are thought to consist solely of aggregates of misfolded prion protein (PrP). Generation of synthetic prions, composed of recombinant PrP (recPrP) refolded into fibrils, has been utilised to address whether PrP aggregates are, indeed, infectious prions. In several reports, neurological disease similar to transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) has been described following inoculation and passage of various forms of fibrils in transgenic mice and hamsters. However, in studies described here, we show that inoculation of recPrP fibrils does not cause TSE disease, but, instead, seeds the formation of PrP amyloid plaques in PrP-P101L knock-in transgenic mice (101LL). Importantly, both WT-recPrP fibrils and 101L-recPrP fibrils can seed plaque formation, indicating that the fibrillar conformation, and not the primary sequence of PrP in the inoculum, is important in initiating seeding. No replication of infectious prions or TSE disease was observed following both primary inoculation and subsequent subpassage. These data, therefore, argue against recPrP fibrils being infectious prions and, instead, indicate that these pre-formed seeds are acting to accelerate the formation of PrP amyloid plaques in 101LL Tg mice. In addition, these data reproduce a phenotype which was previously observed in 101LL mice following inoculation with brain extract containing in vivo-generated PrP amyloid fibrils, which has not been shown for other synthetic prion models. These data are reminiscent of the "prion-like" spread of aggregated forms of the beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ), α-synuclein and tau observed following inoculation of transgenic mice with pre-formed seeds of each misfolded protein. Hence, even when the protein is PrP, misfolding and aggregation do not reproduce the full clinicopathological phenotype of disease. The initiation and spread of protein aggregation in transgenic mouse lines following inoculation with pre

  5. Electrochemical quantification of the Alzheimer’s disease amyloid-β (1–40 using amyloidfibrillization promoting peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Fujii

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-β peptide (Aβ is believed to be an important biomarker for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, practical and reliable methods to assay Aβ levels have been coveted. In this study, a rapid, sensitive, and selective electrochemical method for Aβ(1–40 detection using Cu2+ redox cycling on peptide-modified gold electrodes was developed. A 19-residue peptide that can promote Aβ fibrillization (AFPP was immobilized onto a gold electrode. After incubating an Aβ solution with the modified electrode for 1 h, a Cu2+ solution was added and cyclic voltammetry measurements were conducted. The voltammetric response was found to be proportional to the Aβ(1–40 concentration in the 0.1–5 μM range, and a detection limit of 18 nM was achieved. Washing with sodium hydroxide and ethylenediaminetetraacetate solutions easily reinitialized the modified electrode. Results obtained using the reinitialized electrode showed good reproducibility. Furthermore, when another amyloidogenic and Cu2+-binding protein amylin was used as the target, no voltammetric response was observed. These results indicate that the AFPP-modified electrode provides a promising, label-free, sensitive, selective, cost-effective, and easy method for the quantification of Aβ.

  6. Impact on the replacement of Phe by Trp in a short fragment of Aβ amyloid peptide on the formation of fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nitin; Nagaraj, Ramakrishnan

    2011-02-01

    Aβ(16-22) (Ac-KLVFFAE-NH(2) ) is one of the shortest amyloid fibril-forming sequences identified in β-amyloid peptide. At neutral pH, the peptide forms fibrils in the concentration range of 0.2-2.0 mM after ≥ 10 days of incubation. Structures of the fibrils proposed based on solid-state NMR and MD simulations studies suggest antiparallel arrangement of β-strands and aromatic interactions between the Phe residues. In an effort to examine the role of aromatic interactions between two Phe residues in Aβ(16-22) , we have studied the self-assembly of Aβ(16-22) (AβFF) and two of its variants, Ac-KLVFWAE-NH(2) (AβFW) and Ac-KLVWFAE-NH(2) (AβWF). The peptides were dissolved in methanol (MeOH) at a concentration of 1 mM and in water (AβFW and AβWF, 1 mM; AβFF, 330 µM). Peptide solutions (100 µM) were prepared in 50 mM sodium phosphate buffer at pH 7 by diluting from MeOH and water stock solutions. AβFW forms amyloid-like fibrils immediately from MeOH, as indicated by atomic force microscopy. Dilution of AβFW into phosphate buffer from stock solution prepared in MeOH results in fibrils, but with different morphology and dimensions. The secondary structure potentiated by MeOH seems to be important for the self-assembly of AβFW, as fibrils are not formed from water where the peptide is unordered. On the other hand, AβFF and AβWF do not form amyloid fibrils rapidly from any of the solvents used for dissolution. However, drying of AβWF from MeOH on mica surface gives rod-like and fibrous structures. Our study indicates that positioning of the aromatic residues F and W has an important role to play in promoting self-assembly of the Aβ(16-22) peptides.

  7. Two-dimensional IR spectroscopy and segmental 13C labeling reveals the domain structure of human γD-crystallin amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Sean D; Woys, Ann Marie; Buchanan, Lauren E; Bixby, Eli; Decatur, Sean M; Zanni, Martin T

    2012-02-28

    The structural eye lens protein γD-crystallin is a major component of cataracts, but its conformation when aggregated is unknown. Using expressed protein ligation, we uniformly (13)C labeled one of the two Greek key domains so that they are individually resolved in two-dimensional (2D) IR spectra for structural and kinetic analysis. Upon acid-induced amyloid fibril formation, the 2D IR spectra reveal that the C-terminal domain forms amyloid β-sheets, whereas the N-terminal domain becomes extremely disordered but lies in close proximity to the β-sheets. Two-dimensional IR kinetics experiments show that fibril nucleation and extension occur exclusively in the C-terminal domain. These results are unexpected because the N-terminal domain is less stable in the monomer form. Isotope dilution experiments reveal that each C-terminal domain contributes two or fewer adjacent β-strands to each β-sheet. From these observations, we propose an initial structural model for γD-crystallin amyloid fibrils. Because only 1 μg of protein is required for a 2D IR spectrum, even poorly expressing proteins can be studied under many conditions using this approach. Thus, we believe that 2D IR and protein ligation will be useful for structural and kinetic studies of many protein systems for which IR spectroscopy can be straightforwardly applied, such as membrane and amyloidogenic proteins.

  8. Aβ-40 Y10F Increases βfibrils Formation but Attenuates the Neurotoxicity of Amyloid-β Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaofeng Jiang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is characterized by the abnormal aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ in extracellular deposits known as senile plaques. The tyrosine residue (Tyr-10 is believed to be important in Aβ-induced neurotoxicity due to the formation of tyrosyl radicals. To reduce the likelihood of cross-linking, here we designed an Aβ-40 analogue (Aβ-40 Y10F in which the tyrosine residue was substituted by a structurally similar residue, phenylalanine. The aggregation rate was determined by the Thioflavin T (ThT assay, in which Aβ-40 Y10F populated an ensemble of folded conformations much quicker and stronger than the wild type Aβ. Biophysical tests subsequently confirmed the results of the ThT assay, suggesting the measured increase of β-aggregation may arise predominantly from enhancement of hydrophobicity upon substitution and thus the propensity of intrinsic β-sheet formation. Nevertheless, Aβ-40 Y10F exhibited remarkably decreased neurotoxicity compared to Aβ-40 which could be partly due to the reduced generation of hydrogen peroxide. These findings may lead to further understanding of the structural perturbation of Aβ to its fibrillation.

  9. Influence of divalent copper, manganese and zinc ions on fibril nucleation and elongation of the amyloid-like yeast prion determinant Sup35p-NM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhre, Michael H; Hess, Simone; Golser, Adrian V; Scheibel, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    There is a large body of evidence that divalent metal ions, particularly copper, might play a role in several protein folding pathologies like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or the prion diseases. However, contribution of metal ions on pathogenesis and their molecular influence on the formation of amyloid structures is not clear. Therefore, the general influence of metals on the formation of amyloids is still controversially discussed. We have utilized the well established system of yeast Sup35p-NM to investigate the role of three different metal ions, Cu(2+), Mn(2+) and Zn(2+), on amyloidogenesis. Recently, it has been shown that the prion determining region NM of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae prion protein Sup35p, which is responsible for the yeast prion phenotype [PSI(+)], specifically binds Cu(2+) ions. We further characterized the affinity of NM for Cu(2+), which were found to be comparable to that of other amyloidogenic proteins like the mammalian prion protein PrP. The specific binding sites could be located in the aminoterminal N-region which is known to initiate formation of amyloidogenic nuclei. In the presence of Cu(2+), fibril nucleation was significantly delayed, probably due to influences of copper on the oligomeric ensemble of soluble Sup35p-NM, since Cu(2+) altered the tertiary structure of soluble Sup35p-NM, while no influences on fibril elongation could be detected. The secondary structure of soluble or fibrous protein and the morphology of the fibrils were apparently not altered when assembled in presence of Cu(2+). In contrast, Mn(2+) and Zn(2+) did not bind to Sup35p-NM and did not exhibit significant effects on the formation of NM amyloid fibrils.

  10. β-amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer disease are not inert when bound to copper ions but can degrade hydrogen peroxide and generate reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Jennifer; Tinker-Mill, Claire; Kolosov, Oleg; Zhang, Hao; Tabner, Brian J; Allsop, David

    2014-04-25

    According to the "amyloid cascade" hypothesis of Alzheimer disease, the formation of Aβ fibrils and senile plaques in the brain initiates a cascade of events leading to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, neurodegeneration, and the symptom of dementia. Recently, however, emphasis has shifted away from amyloid fibrils as the predominant toxic form of Aβ toward smaller aggregates, referred to as "soluble oligomers." These oligomers have become one of the prime suspects for involvement in the early oxidative damage that is evident in this disease. This raises the question whether or not Aβ fibrils are actually "inert tombstones" present at the end of the aggregation process. Here we show that, when Aβ(1-42) aggregates, including fibrils, are bound to Cu(II) ions, they retain their redox activity and are able to degrade hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with the formation of hydroxyl radicals and the consequent oxidation of the peptide (detected by formation of carbonyl groups). We find that this ability increases as the Cu(II):peptide ratio increases and is accompanied by changes in aggregate morphology, as determined by atomic force microscopy. When aggregates are prepared in the copresence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions, the ratio of Cu(II):Zn(II) becomes an important factor in the degeneration of H2O2, the formation of carbonyl groups in the peptide, and in aggregate morphology. We believe, therefore, that Aβ fibrils can destroy H2O2 and generate damaging hydroxyl radicals and, so, are not necessarily inert end points.

  11. Binding and Inhibitory Effect of the Dyes Amaranth and Tartrazine on Amyloid Fibrillation in Lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2017-02-16

    Interaction of two food colorant dyes, amaranth and tartrazine, with lysozyme was studied employing multiple biophysical techniques. The dyes exhibited hypochromic changes in the presence of lysozyme. The intrinsic fluorescence of lysozyme was quenched by both dyes; amaranth was a more efficient quencher than tartrazine. The equilibrium constant of amaranth was higher than that of tartarzine. From FRET analysis, the binding distances for amaranth and tartrazine were calculated to be 4.51 and 3.93 nm, respectively. The binding was found to be dominated by non-polyelectrolytic forces. Both dyes induced alterations in the microenvironment surrounding the tryptophan and tyrosine residues of the protein, with the alterations being comparatively higher for the tryptophans than the tyrosines. The interaction caused significant loss in the helicity of lysozyme, the change being higher with amaranth. The binding of both dyes was exothermic. The binding of amaranth was enthalpy driven, while that of tartrazine was predominantly entropy driven. Amaranth delayed lysozyme fibrillation at 25 μM, while tartrazine had no effect even at 100 μM. Nevertheless, both dyes had a significant inhibitory effect on fibrillogenesis. The present study explores the potential antiamyloidogenic property of these azo dyes used as food colorants.

  12. Trimethine cyanine dyes as fluorescent probes for amyloid fibrils: The effect of N,N'-substituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Marina V; Chernii, Svitlana V; Losytskyy, Mykhaylo Yu; Kryvorotenko, Dmytro V; Derevyanko, Nadiya O; Slominskii, Yurii L; Kovalska, Vladyslava B; Yarmoluk, Sergiy M

    2015-09-01

    The effect of various N,N'-substituents in the molecule of benzothiazole trimethine cyanine dye on its ability to sense the amyloid aggregates of protein was studied. The dyes are low fluorescent when free and in the presence of monomeric proteins, but their emission intensity sharply increases in complexes with aggregated insulin and lysozyme, with the fluorescence quantum yield reaching up to 0.42. The dyes carrying butyl, hydroxyalkyl, and phenylalkyl groups as N,N'-substituents possess the increased fluorescent sensitivity to fibrillar lysozyme, whereas the ones carrying quaternary amino groups are preferably sensitive to fibrillar insulin. This fluorescent sensitivity preference provided by the N,N'-functional groups could be explained by the interaction between these groups and protein side chains. The strongest fluorescent response (up to 70times) and the same sensitivity to aggregates of both proteins were exhibited by the dye D-51 carrying N-sulfoalkyl group. The studied cyanines allow the detection of fibrillar aggregates in the wide range up to 0.8 to 300μg/ml and permit monitoring the protein aggregation kinetics with high reproducibility. The modification of trimethine cyanine dyes by functional substituents in N,N'-positions is suggested as a tool for the design of fluorescent molecules with the enhanced fluorescent sensitivity to the fibrillar aggregates of proteins.

  13. Interaction Between Baicalein and AmyloidFibrils Studied by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Sheng-mei; WANG Yong-xiang; XIONG Li-min; QU Ling-bo; XU Mao-tian

    2013-01-01

    The interaction between baicalein and amyloid-β(Aβ) polypeptide was investigated by fluorescence and UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy.The absence of the characteristic peak of tyrosinate(Tyr) in the absorption spectra of Aβ-baicalein complexes provided evidence that the sole Tyr residue in Aβ is not bound to baicalein,but remains close to it.The intrinsic fluorescence of Tyr residues in Aβ1-42 aggregates was quenched strongly by the excited-state ionization of baicalein.In this complex the hydroxyl group was not ionized,but to ionize immediately upon excitation.Absorbance,fluorescence and synchronous spectroscopies show that the formation of Schiff base between the quinone of baicalein and the lysine(Lys) side chains of Aβ1-42 is another major reason in the depolymerization of Aβ1-42 aggregates by baicalein.It is desirable that our research would offer some valuable reference for the application of flavonoid derivants in Alzheimer's disease(AD) treatment.

  14. Steady-state and time-resolved Thioflavin-T fluorescence can report on morphological differences in amyloid fibrils formed by Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, David J. [Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Division of Chemical Biology, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivägen 10, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Wranne, Moa S.; Gilbert Gatty, Mélina [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Division of Physical Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivägen 10, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Westerlund, Fredrik [Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Division of Chemical Biology, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivägen 10, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Esbjörner, Elin K., E-mail: eline@chalmers.se [Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Division of Chemical Biology, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivägen 10, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-03-06

    Thioflavin-T (ThT) is one of the most commonly used dyes for amyloid detection, but the origin of its fluorescence enhancement is not fully understood. Herein we have characterised the ThT fluorescence response upon binding to the Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) variants of the Alzheimer's-related peptide amyloid-β, in order to explore how the photophysical properties of this dye relates to structural and morphological properties of two amyloid fibril types formed by peptides with a high degree of sequence homology. We show that the steady-state ThT fluorescence is 1.7 times more intense with Aβ(1-40) compared to Aβ(1-42) fibrils in concentration matched samples prepared under quiescent conditions. By measuring the excited state lifetime of bound ThT, we also demonstrate a distinct difference between the two fibril isoforms, with Aβ(1-42) fibrils producing a longer ThT fluorescence lifetime compared to Aβ(1-40). The substantial steady-state intensity difference is therefore not explained by differences in fluorescence quantum yield. Further, we find that the ThT fluorescence intensity, but not the fluorescence lifetime, is dependent on the fibril preparation method (quiescent versus agitated conditions). We therefore propose that the fluorescence lifetime is inherent to each isoform and sensitively reports on fibril microstructure in the protofilament whereas the total fluorescence intensity relates to the amount of exposed β-sheet in the mature Aβ fibrils and hence to differences in their morphology. Our results highlight the complexity of ThT fluorescence, and demonstrate its extended use in amyloid fibril characterisation. - Highlights: • ThT emission is more intense with Aβ(1-40) fibrils than with Aβ(1-42) fibrils. • Aβ(1-42) fibrils induce longer ThT fluorescence lifetimes and higher quantum yield. • ThT emission intensity in Aβ fibril samples reports on fibril morphology. • The ThT fluorescence lifetime is a characteristic feature of each A

  15. Amyloid-like fibrils from an 18-residue peptide analogue of a part of the central domain of the B-family of silkmoth chorion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iconomidou, V A; Chryssikos, G D; Gionis, V; Vriend, G; Hoenger, A; Hamodrakas, S J

    2001-06-22

    Chorion is the major component of silkmoth eggshell. More than 95% of its dry mass consists of the A and B families of low molecular weight structural proteins, which have remarkable mechanical and chemical properties, and protect the oocyte and the developing embryo from the environment. We present data from negative staining, Congo red binding, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-Raman, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy and modelling studies of a synthetic peptide analogue of a part of the central domain of the B family of silkmoth chorion proteins, indicating that this peptide folds and self-assembles, forming amyloid-like fibrils. These results support further our proposal, based on experimental data from a synthetic peptide analogue of the central domain of the A family of chorion proteins, that silkmoth chorion is a natural, protective amyloid [Iconomidou et al., FEBS Lett. 479 (2000) 141-145].

  16. In Sup35p filaments (the [PSI+] prion), the globular C-terminal domains are widely offset from the amyloid fibril backbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxa, U.; Wall, J.; Keller, P. W.; Cheng, N.; Steven, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    In yeast cells infected with the [PSI+] prion, Sup35p forms aggregates and its activity in translation termination is downregulated. Transfection experiments have shown that Sup35p filaments assembled in vitro are infectious, suggesting that they reproduce or closely resemble the prion. We have used several EM techniques to study the molecular architecture of filaments, seeking clues as to the mechanism of downregulation. Sup35p has an N-terminal 'prion' domain; a highly charged middle (M-)domain; and a C-terminal domain with the translation termination activity. By negative staining, cryo-EM and scanning transmission EM (STEM), filaments of full-length Sup35p show a thin backbone fibril surrounded by a diffuse 65-nm-wide cloud of globular C-domains. In diameter ({approx}8 nm) and appearance, the backbones resemble amyloid fibrils of N-domains alone. STEM mass-per-unit-length data yield -1 subunit per 0.47 nm for N-fibrils, NM-filaments and Sup35p filaments, further supporting the fibril backbone model. The 30 nm radial span of decorating C-domains indicates that the M-domains assume highly extended conformations, offering an explanation for the residual Sup35p activity in infected cells, whereby the C-domains remain free enough to interact with ribosomes.

  17. Anionic Oligothiophenes Compete for Binding of X‐34 but not PIB to Recombinant Aβ Amyloid Fibrils and Alzheimer's Disease Brain‐Derived Aβ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäck, Marcus; Appelqvist, Hanna; LeVine, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Deposits comprised of amyloid‐β (Aβ) are one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and small hydrophobic ligands targeting these aggregated species are used clinically for the diagnosis of AD. Herein, we observed that anionic oligothiophenes efficiently displaced X‐34, a Congo Red analogue, but not Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) from recombinant Aβ amyloid fibrils and Alzheimer's disease brain‐derived Aβ. Overall, we foresee that the oligothiophene scaffold offers the possibility to develop novel high‐affinity ligands for Aβ pathology only found in human AD brain, targeting a different site than PIB. PMID:27767229

  18. Sensitive {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation spectra of amyloid fibrils at very high spinning frequencies and magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weingarth, Markus [Utrecht University (Netherlands); Masuda, Yuichi; Takegoshi, K. [Kyoto University, Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Tekely, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.tekely@ens.fr [Ecole Normale Superieure, Departement de Chimie (France)

    2011-06-15

    Sensitive 2D solid-state {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation spectra of amyloid {beta} fibrils have been recorded at very fast spinning frequencies and very high magnetic fields. It is demonstrated that PARIS-xy recoupling using moderate rf amplitudes can provide structural information by promoting efficient magnetization transfer even under such challenging experimental conditions. Furthermore, it has been shown both experimentally and by numerical simulations that the method is not very sensitive to dipolar truncation effects and can reveal direct transfer across distances of about 3.5-4A.

  19. Antibody-conjugated, dual-modal, near-infrared fluorescent iron oxide nanoparticles for antiamyloidgenic activity and specific detection of amyloidfibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skaat H

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hadas Skaat,1 Enav Corem-Slakmon,1 Igor Grinberg,1 David Last,2 David Goez,2 Yael Mardor,2,3 Shlomo Margel1 1Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Ramat-Gan, Israel; 2Advanced Technology Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Ramat-Gan, Israel; 3Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel Abstract: Amyloid-β (Aβ peptide is the main fibrillar component of plaque deposits found in brains affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD and is related to the pathogenesis of AD. Passive anti-Aβ immunotherapy has emerged as a promising approach for the therapy of AD, based on the administration of specific anti-Aβ monoclonal antibodies (aAβmAbs to delay Aβ aggregation in the brain. However, the main disadvantage of this approach is the required readministration of the aAβmAbs at frequent intervals. There are only a few reports describing in vitro study for the immobilization of aAβmAbs to nanoparticles as potential targeting agents of Aβ aggregates. In this article, we report the immobilization of the aAβmAb clone BAM10 to near-infrared fluorescent maghemite nanoparticles for the inhibition of Aβ40 fibrillation kinetics and the specific detection of Aβ40 fibrils. The BAM10-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles were well-characterized, including their immunogold labeling and cytotoxic effect on PC-12 (pheochromocytoma cell line. Indeed, these antibody-conjugated nanoparticles significantly inhibit the Aβ40 fibrillation kinetics compared with the same concentration, or even five times higher, of the free BAM10. This inhibitory effect was confirmed by different assays such as the photo-induced crosslinking of unmodified proteins combined with sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A cell viability assay also confirmed that these antibody-conjugated nanoparticles significantly reduced the Aβ40-induced cytotoxicity to PC-12 cells. Furthermore, the selective

  20. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annette Eva; Morris, Kyle L; Serpell, Louise C;

    2015-01-01

    of the GNNQQNY peptide fragment of a yeast prion protein. Data from small-angle X-ray solution scattering, fibre diffraction and electron microscopy are combined with existing high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures to investigate the fibrillation process and the hierarchical fibril structure...

  1. In silico and in vitro studies to elucidate the role of Cu2+ and galanthamine as the limiting step in the amyloid beta (1-42) fibrillation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Rodríguez, Maricarmen; Correa-Basurto, José; Benitez-Cardoza, Claudia G; Resendiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Rosales-Hernández, Martha C

    2013-10-01

    The formation of fibrils and oligomers of amyloid beta (Aβ) with 42 amino acid residues (Aβ 1-42 ) is the most important pathophysiological event associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The formation of Aβ fibrils and oligomers requires a conformational change from an α-helix to a β-sheet conformation, which is encouraged by the formation of a salt bridge between Asp 23 or Glu 22 and Lys 28. Recently, Cu(2+) and various drugs used for AD treatment, such as galanthamine (Reminyl(®) ), have been reported to inhibit the formation of Aβ fibrils. However, the mechanism of this inhibition remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this work was to explore how Cu(2+) and galanthamine prevent the formation of Aβ1-42 fibrils using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (20 ns) and in vitro studies using fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. The MD simulations revealed that Aβ1-42 acquires a characteristic U-shape before the α-helix to β-sheet conformational change. The formation of a salt bridge between Asp 23 and Lys 28 was also observed beginning at 5 ns. However, the MD simulations of Aβ 1-42 in the presence of Cu(2+) or galanthamine demonstrated that both ligands prevent the formation of the salt bridge by either binding to Glu 22 and Asp 23 (Cu(2+) ) or to Lys 28 (galanthamine), which prevents Aβ 1-42 from adopting the U-characteristic conformation that allows the amino acids to transition to a β-sheet conformation. The docking results revealed that the conformation obtained by the MD simulation of a monomer from the 1Z0Q structure can form similar interactions to those obtained from the 2BGE structure in the oligomers. The in vitro studies demonstrated that Aβ remains in an unfolded conformation when Cu(2+) and galanthamine are used. Then, ligands that bind Asp 23 or Glu 22 and Lys 28 could therefore be used to prevent β turn formation and, consequently, the formation of Aβ fibrils.

  2. Midazolam inhibits the formation of amyloid fibrils and GM1 ganglioside-rich microdomains in presynaptic membranes through the gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Arima, Hajime; Sugiura, Takeshi; Hirate, Hiroyuki; Kusama, Nobuyoshi; Suzuki, Kenji; Sobue, Kazuya

    2015-02-20

    Recent studies have suggested that a positive correlation exists between surgical interventions performed under general anesthesia and the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the late postoperative period. It has been reported that amyloid β-protein (Αβ) fibrillogenesis, which is closely related to AD, is accelerated by exposure to anesthetics. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects remain uncertain. This study was designed to investigate whether the anesthetic midazolam affects Αβ fibrillogenesis, and if so, whether it acts through GM1 ganglioside (GM1) on the neuronal surface. Midazolam treatment decreased GM1 expression in the detergent-resistant membrane microdomains of neurons, and these effects were regulated by the gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor. Midazolam inhibited Αβ fibril formation from soluble Αβ on the neuronal surface. In addition, midazolam suppressed GM1-induced fibril formation in a cell-free system. Moreover, midazolam inhibited the formation of Αβ assemblies in synaptosomes isolated from aged mouse brains. These finding suggested that midazolam has direct and indirect inhibitory effects on Αβ fibrillogenesis.

  3. Keampferol-3-O-rhamnoside abrogates amyloid beta toxicity by modulating monomers and remodeling oligomers and fibrils to non-toxic aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharoar Md

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggregation of soluble, monomeric β- amyloid (Aβ to oligomeric and then insoluble fibrillar Aβ is a key pathogenic feature in development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Increasing evidence suggests that toxicity is linked to diffusible Aβ oligomers, rather than to insoluble fibrils. The use of naturally occurring small molecules for inhibition of Aβ aggregation has recently attracted significant interest for development of effective therapeutic strategies against the disease. A natural polyphenolic flavone, Kaempferol-3-O-rhamnoside (K-3-rh, was utilized to investigate its effects on aggregation and cytotoxic effects of Aβ42 peptide. Several biochemical techniques were used to determine the conformational changes and cytotoxic effect of the peptide in the presence and absence of K-3-rh. Results K-3-rh showed a dose-dependent effect against Aβ42 mediated cytotoxicity. Anti-amyloidogenic properties of K-3-rh were found to be efficient in inhibiting fibrilogenesis and secondary structural transformation of the peptide. The consequence of these inhibitions was the accumulation of oligomeric structural species. The accumulated aggregates were smaller, soluble, non-β-sheet and non-toxic aggregates, compared to preformed toxic Aβ oligomers. K-3-rh was also found to have the remodeling properties of preformed soluble oligomers and fibrils. Both of these conformers were found to remodel into non-toxic aggregates. The results showed that K-3-rh interacts with different Aβ conformers, which affects fibril formation, oligomeric maturation and fibrillar stabilization. Conclusion K-3-rh is an efficient molecule to hinder the self assembly and to abrogate the cytotoxic effects of Aβ42 peptide. Hence, K-3-rh and small molecules with similar structure might be considered for therapeutic development against AD.

  4. The repeat domain of the melanosome fibril protein Pmel17 forms the amyloid core promoting melanin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlinchey, Ryan P; Shewmaker, Frank; McPhie, Peter; Monterroso, Begoña; Thurber, Kent; Wickner, Reed B

    2009-08-18

    Pmel17 is a melanocyte protein necessary for eumelanin deposition 1 in mammals and found in melanosomes in a filamentous form. The luminal part of human Pmel17 includes a region (RPT) with 10 copies of a partial repeat sequence, pt.e.gttp.qv., known to be essential in vivo for filament formation. We show that this RPT region readily forms amyloid in vitro, but only under the mildly acidic conditions typical of the lysosome-like melanosome lumen, and the filaments quickly become soluble at neutral pH. Under the same mildly acidic conditions, the Pmel filaments promote eumelanin formation. Electron diffraction, circular dichroism, and solid-state NMR studies of Pmel17 filaments show that the structure is rich in beta sheet. We suggest that RPT is the amyloid core domain of the Pmel17 filaments so critical for melanin formation.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of fluorinated magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for inhibition of insulin amyloid fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaat, Hadas; Margel, Shlomo [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Belfort, Georges [Howard P Isermann Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)], E-mail: ch348@mail.biu.ac.il, E-mail: belfog@rpi.edu, E-mail: Shlomo.margel@mail.biu.ac.il

    2009-06-03

    Maghemite ({gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) magnetic nanoparticles of 15.0 {+-} 2.1 nm are formed by nucleation followed by controlled growth of maghemite thin films on gelatin-iron oxide nuclei. Uniform magnetic {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/poly (2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate) ({gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PHFBA) core-shell nanoparticles are prepared by emulsion polymerization of the fluorinated monomer 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate (HFBA) in the presence of the maghemite nanoparticles. The kinetics of the insulin fibrillation process in the absence and in the presence of the {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PHFBA core-shell nanoparticles are elucidated. A significant direct slow transition from {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheets during insulin fibril formation is observed in the presence of the {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PHFBA nanoparticles. This is in contradiction to our previous manuscript, which illustrated that the {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} core nanoparticles do not affect the kinetics of the formation of the insulin fibrils, and to other previous publications that describe acceleration of the fibrillation process by using various types of nanoparticles. These core-shell nanoparticles may therefore be also useful for the inhibition of conformational changes of other amyloidogenic proteins that lead to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, mad cow and prion diseases.

  6. Rigid Organization of Fluorescence-Active Ligands by Artificial Macrocyclic Receptor to Achieve the Thioflavin T-Amyloid Fibril Level Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Ming; Zhang, Xu-Jie; Xu, Xiufang; Fu, Xiao-Ning; Hou, Hong-Biao; Liu, Yu

    2016-04-28

    The push-pull molecules with an intramolecular charge transfer from donor to acceptor sides upon excitation exhibit a wide variety of biological and electronic activities, as exemplified by the in vivo fluorescence imaging probes for amyloid fibrils in the diagnosis and treatment of amyloid diseases. Interestingly, the structurally much simpler bis(4,8-disulfonato-1,5-naphtho)-32-crown-8 (DNC), in keen contrast to the conventional macrocyclic receptors, was found to dramatically enhance the fluorescence of twisted intramolecular charge-transfer molecules possessing various benzothiazolium and stilbazolium fluorophores upon complexation. Spectroscopic and microcalorimetric titrations jointly demonstrated the complex structures and the interactions that promote the extremely strong complexation, revealing that the binding affinity in these artificial host-guest pairs could reach up to a nearly 10(7) M(-1) order of magnitude in water, and the sandwich-type complexation is driven by electrostatic, hydrophobic, π-stacking, and hydrogen-bonding interactions. Quantum chemical calculations on free molecules and their DNC-bound species in both the ground and excited states elucidated that the encapsulation by DNC could greatly deter the central single and double chemical bonds from free intramolecular rotation in the singlet excited state, thus leading to the unique and unprecedented fluorescence enhancement upon sandwich-type complexation. This complexation-induced structural reorganization mechanism may also apply to the binding of other small-molecule ligands by functional receptors and contribute to the molecular-level understanding of the receptor-ligand interactions in many biology-related systems.

  7. A Metabolic Shift toward Pentose Phosphate Pathway Is Necessary for Amyloid Fibril- and Phorbol 12-Myristate 13-Acetate-induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (NET) Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Estefania P; Rochael, Natalia C; Guimarães-Costa, Anderson B; de Souza-Vieira, Thiago S; Ganilho, Juliana; Saraiva, Elvira M; Palhano, Fernando L; Foguel, Debora

    2015-09-01

    Neutrophils are the main defense cells of the innate immune system. Upon stimulation, neutrophils release their chromosomal DNA to trap and kill microorganisms and inhibit their dissemination. These chromatin traps are termed neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and are decorated with granular and cytoplasm proteins. NET release can be induced by several microorganism membrane components, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate as well as by amyloid fibrils, insoluble proteinaceous molecules associated with more than 40 different pathologies among other stimuli. The intracellular signaling involved in NET formation is complex and remains unclear for most tested stimuli. Herein we demonstrate that a metabolic shift toward the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is necessary for NET release because glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), an important enzyme from PPP, fuels NADPH oxidase with NADPH to produce superoxide and thus induce NETs. In addition, we observed that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, which are NADPH-independent, are not effective in producing NETs. These data shed new light on how the PPP and glucose metabolism contributes to NET formation.

  8. Thioflavin T and its photoirradiative derivatives: exploring their spectroscopic properties in the absence and presence of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jack C-C; Chen, Eric H-L; Snoeberger, Robert C; Luh, Frederick Y; Lim, T-S; Hsu, C-P; Chen, Rita P-Y

    2013-04-04

    In this work, we found that, during storage or after UV irradiation, ThT is demethylated or oxidized, forming three derivatives. These three derivatives were purified by high performance liquid chromatography and characterized by mass and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the spectroscopic properties of pure ThT and the derivatives carefully compared. Our results show that the emission peak at 450 nm results from oxidized ThT and not from the monomeric form of ThT, as previously proposed. The partial conversion of ThT into oxidized and demethylated derivatives has an effect on amyloid detection using ThT assay. Irradiated ThT has the same lag time as pure ThT in the amyloidogenesis of insulin, but the intensity of the emitted fluorescence is significantly decreased.

  9. β-酪蛋白淀粉样纤维沉淀的形成及影响因素%Amyloid Fibril Formation by β-Casein and Its Influence Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘继华; John A.Carver; David C.Thorn

    2014-01-01

    β-Casein is the second abundant among the casein proteins in bovine milk and reported to exhibite biological activities. In this study, the focus was placed on the influence of lipids and heparin sulphate toβ-casein fibril formation. In order to study the time course of fibril formation byβ-casein, the samples were in-cubated and picked up at specific times and tested by ThT assay and transmission electron microscopy. The re-sults showed that amyloid fibrils were not formed byβ-casein incubated in pH=5. 4—9. 0 at 65 ℃ for 252 h, which suggested that β-casein is a good molecular chaperone. The β-casein fibril formation was promoted in the presence of longer-chain phosphatidylcholine lipids(D6PC and D9PC), which indicated that the interac-tion of β-casein with biomembrane of mammary gland abundant with lipids maybe caused β-casein structure changed from native to more β-sheet. Heparin sulphate, a major component of the extracellular matrix and a species which is commonly associated with extracellular amyloid deposits, interacted with β-casein to promote its aggregation. It is supposed that Corpora Amylacea is associated with mastitis because of high expression of heparin sulphate in inflamed mammary. This study explored that it is possible for chaperon proteins to form amyloid fibrils influenced by components in vivo and lose its chaperon effects.%利用硫磺素T( ThT)荧光分析法和透射电子显微镜检测β-酪蛋白形成淀粉样纤维沉淀( Fibril)的动力学过程,研究了磷脂和硫酸肝素对其 Fibril 形成的影响.实验结果表明,β-酪蛋白在65℃下, pH 值为5.4~9.0的范围内,加热252 h以上,并未形成Fibril,说明β-酪蛋白是一种很好的分子伴侣,在高温、弱酸和弱碱条件下均不形成淀粉样纤维沉淀.甘油磷酸胆碱D6PC和D9PC可以显著地促进β-酪蛋白的Fibril的形成,说明一定条件下蛋白质可能与细胞膜之间存在相互作用而导致其二级构象的转变.硫酸

  10. Characterization of amyloid in equine recurrent uveitis as AA amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostevik, L; de Souza, G A; Wien, T N; Gunnes, G; Sørby, R

    2014-01-01

    Two horses with chronic uveitis and histological lesions consistent with equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) were examined. Microscopical findings in the ciliary body included deposits of amyloid lining the non-pigmented epithelium, intracytoplasmic, rod-shaped, eosinophilic inclusions and intraepithelial infiltration of T lymphocytes. Ultrastructural examination of the ciliary body of one horse confirmed the presence of abundant extracellular deposits of non-branching fibrils (9-11 nm in diameter) consistent with amyloid. Immunohistochemistry revealed strong positive labelling for AA amyloid and mass spectrometry showed the amyloid to consist primarily of serum amyloid A1 in both cases. The findings suggest that localized, intraocular AA amyloidosis may occur in horses with ERU.

  11. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosicka, Iga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type II is a metabolic disease affecting millions of people worldwide. The disease is associated with occurence of insoluble, fibrillar, protein aggregates in islets of Langerhans in the pancreas - islet amyloid. The main constituent of these protein fibers is the human islet...... of diabetes type II, while revealing the structure(s) of islet amyloid fibrils is necessary for potential design of therapeutic agents....

  12. Quantitative analysis of the flavonoid glycosides and terpene trilactones in the extract of Ginkgo biloba and evaluation of their inhibitory activity towards fibril formation of β-amyloid peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Haiyan; Wang, Jing-Rong; Yau, Lee-Fong; Liu, Yong; Liu, Liang; Han, Quan-Bin; Zhao, Zhongzhen; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2014-04-10

    The standard extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves (EGb761) is used clinically in Europe for the symptomatic treatment of impaired cerebral function in primary degenerative dementia syndromes, and the results of numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have supported such clinical use. The abnormal production and aggregation of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) and the deposition of fibrils in the brain are regarded as key steps in the onset of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), and the inhibition of Aβ aggregation and destabilization of the preformed fibrils represent viable approaches for the prevention and treatment of AD. Flavonoid glycosides and terpene trilactones (TTLs) are the two main components of EGb761 which represent 24 and 6% of the overall content, respectively. In our research, seven abundant flavonoid glycosides 1-7 were isolated from the extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves and characterized by spectroscopic analysis. Furthermore, an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography method was established for the simultaneous quantification of these seven flavonoids. The inhibitory activities of these flavonoids, as well as four TTLs, i.e., ginkgolides A, B, and C and bilobalide (compounds 8-11), were evaluated towards Aβ42 fibril formation using a thioflavin T fluorescence assay. It was found that three flavonoids 1, 3 and 4 exhibited moderate inhibitory activities, whereas the other four flavonoids 2, 5, 6 and 7, as well as the four terpene trilactones, showed poor activity. This is the first report of the inhibition of Aβ fibril formation of two characteristic acylated flavonoid glycosides 6, 7 in Ginkgo leaves, on the basis of which the structure-activity relationship of these flavonoids 1-7 was discussed.

  13. Effects of Baicalein on the Fibrillation and Cytotoxicity of Amyloid β-Peptide%黄芩素对β-淀粉样蛋白纤维化及其细胞毒性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    艾伟鹏; 谢利霞; 刘宏乐; 刘亚妮

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of baicalein on the fibrillation and cytotoxicity of amyloid p-protein Aβ1-42. Methods The inhibitory effects of baicalein on Aβ1-42 fibril formation were determined by using thioflavin T fluorescence (Th-T). The protective effects against cytotoxicity induced by Aβ1-42 in PC12 cells were evaluated by MTT assay. Results The data from Th-T fluorescence assay showed that baicalein had a dose-dependent effect on inhibition of Aβ1-42 fibril formation and disaggregation of pre-formed Aβ1-42 fibril. It also reduced the neurotoxicity of Aβ1-42 on the cultured PC12 cells in (P< 0. 01) , as determined by the MTT method. Conclusion These findings provide evidence that baicalein can effectively inhibit Aβ1-42 fibril formation and aggregation and significantly lower the neurotoxicity on PC12 cell line, suggesting that baicalein may be a candidate for prevention or treatment of Alzheimer's disease.%目的 探讨黄芩素对致病性β-淀粉样蛋白(Aβ1-42)纤维形成及细胞毒性作用的影响.方法 采用硫黄素-T(Th-T)荧光分析法观察黄芩素对抗Aβ1-42纤维化效应;应用噻唑蓝(MTT)法,观察黄芩素对抗Aβ1-42对PC12细胞毒性的影响.结果 Th-T荧光分析显示:黄芩素对Aβ1-42纤维形成和聚集有浓度依赖性抑制作用,对预聚集的Aβ1-42纤维也有明显解聚作用(P<0.01);MTT法显示:黄芩素能显著降低Aβ1-42对PC12细胞的毒性作用(P<0.01).结论 黄芩素在体外能有效抑制Aβ1-42纤维形成和聚集,并显著降低Aβ1-42对PC12细胞的毒性作用,提示黄芩素有可能成为防治阿尔茨海默病的药物之一.

  14. Effects of Lipids and Heparin Sulphate on Formation of Amyloid Fibril from αs1-Casein%磷脂和硫酸肝素对αs1-酪蛋白淀粉样纤维沉淀形成的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹建元; John A.Carver; David C.Thorn; 刘继华

    2013-01-01

    αs1-Casein is the major protein in milk and has a molecular chaperone action.With the interest in that,whether κ-and αs2-casein can form amyloid fibrils or not,we investigated amyloid fibril formation from αs1-casein by means of ThT assay,transmission electron microscopy and circular dichroism(CD) spectra.The results show that amyloid fibrils formed from αs1-casein at pH =5.0-5.4 and 65 ℃ under heating for 144 h.The CD spectra show that the structure of αs1-casein has changed from α-helical toβ sheet core,which are the special structure characters of fibrils.Lipids of D6PC promoted amyloid fibril formation from αs1-casein in the concentration of 0.3 and 1 mmol/L.Heparin sulphate did not influence the fibril formation from αs1-casein in the test.It is concluded that although αs1-casein has the effects of molecular chaperon,but it could still form fibrils under harsh conditions.Lipids can influence amyloid fibril formation from αs1-casein,depanding on concentration.It suggests that there is relationship between lipid in membrane and amyloid fibril formation.The results are helpful to exploring the mechanism of fibril formation from αs1-casein.%利用ThT荧光分析法、透射电子显微镜和圆二色光谱检测αs1-酪蛋白形成淀粉样纤维沉淀(Fibril)的动力学过程,优化了其形成条件,研究了Fibril形成的影响因素.实验结果表明,αs1-酪蛋白在65℃高温下,pH=5~5.4的范围内,加热144 h以上,可以形成Fibril.在此过程中,αs1-酪蛋白的二级结构由α螺旋构象向β折叠构象转变.甘油磷酸胆碱D6PC可以显著地促进αs1-酪蛋白Fibril的形成,并呈浓度依赖性,说明一定条件下蛋白质可能与细胞膜的磷脂之间存在相互作用,从而导致酪蛋白二级构象的转变.硫酸肝素对αs1-酪蛋白形成Fibril无影响,说明硫酸肝素对蛋白质二级构象的影响作用因蛋白质的不同而不同,与不同蛋白质的Fibril形成机制相关.

  15. Catechins and Procyanidins of Ginkgo biloba Show Potent Activities towards the Inhibition of β-Amyloid Peptide Aggregation and Destabilization of Preformed Fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Xie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Catechins and procyanidins, together with flavonoid glycosides and terpene trilactones, are three important categories of components in the standard extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves (EGb761. In this research, catechins and proanthocyanidins were found to exist in both the extract of Ginkgo leaves and Ginkgo products. By comparing with reference compounds, six of them were identified as (+-catechin, (−-epicatechin, (−-gallocatechin, (−-epigallocatechin and procyanidins B1 and B3. The activities of these polyphenols in the inhibition of Aβ42 aggregation and the destabilization of preformed fibrils were evaluated using biochemical assays, which showed that all six of the polyphenols, as well as a fraction of the extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves (EGb containing catechins and procyanidins, exerted potent inhibitory activities towards Aβ42 aggregation and could also destabilize the performed fibrils. Catechins and procyanidins can therefore be regarded as the potent active constituents of EGb761 in terms of their inhibition of Aβ42 aggregation and destabilization of the fibrils. Although quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis revealed that the catechins and procyanidins are only present in low concentrations in EGb761, these components should be studied in greater detail because of their potent inhibitory effects towards Aβ42 aggregation and their ability to destabilize preformed fibrils, especially during the quality control of Ginkgo leaves and the manufacture of Ginkgo products.

  16. Catechins and procyanidins of Ginkgo biloba show potent activities towards the inhibition of β-amyloid peptide aggregation and destabilization of preformed fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Haiyan; Wang, Jing-Rong; Yau, Lee-Fong; Liu, Yong; Liu, Liang; Han, Quan-Bin; Zhao, Zhongzhen; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2014-04-22

    Catechins and procyanidins, together with flavonoid glycosides and terpene trilactones, are three important categories of components in the standard extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves (EGb761). In this research, catechins and proanthocyanidins were found to exist in both the extract of Ginkgo leaves and Ginkgo products. By comparing with reference compounds, six of them were identified as (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, (-)-gallocatechin, (-)-epigallocatechin and procyanidins B1 and B3. The activities of these polyphenols in the inhibition of Aβ42 aggregation and the destabilization of preformed fibrils were evaluated using biochemical assays, which showed that all six of the polyphenols, as well as a fraction of the extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves (EGb) containing catechins and procyanidins, exerted potent inhibitory activities towards Aβ42 aggregation and could also destabilize the performed fibrils. Catechins and procyanidins can therefore be regarded as the potent active constituents of EGb761 in terms of their inhibition of Aβ42 aggregation and destabilization of the fibrils. Although quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis revealed that the catechins and procyanidins are only present in low concentrations in EGb761, these components should be studied in greater detail because of their potent inhibitory effects towards Aβ42 aggregation and their ability to destabilize preformed fibrils, especially during the quality control of Ginkgo leaves and the manufacture of Ginkgo products.

  17. Differential Effects of Structural Modifications on the Competition of Chalcones for the PIB Amyloid Imaging Ligand-Binding Site in Alzheimer's Disease Brain and Synthetic Aβ Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosso, Marina Y; McCarty, Katie; Head, Elizabeth; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; LeVine, Harry

    2016-02-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex brain disorder that still remains ill defined. In order to understand the significance of binding of different clinical in vivo imaging ligands to the polymorphic pathological features of AD brain, the molecular characteristics of the ligand interacting with its specific binding site need to be defined. Herein, we observed that tritiated Pittsburgh Compound B ((3)H-PIB) can be displaced from synthetic Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) fibrils and from the PIB binding complex purified from human AD brain (ADPBC) by molecules containing a chalcone structural scaffold. We evaluated how substitution on the chalcone scaffold alters its ability to displace (3)H-PIB from the synthetic fibrils and ADPBC. By comparing unsubstituted core chalcone scaffolds along with the effects of bromine and methyl substitution at various positions, we found that attaching a hydroxyl group on the ring adjacent to the carbonyl group (ring I) of the parent member of the chalcone family generally improved the binding affinity of chalcones toward ADPBC and synthetic fibrils F40 and F42. Furthermore, any substitution on ring I at the ortho-position of the carbonyl group greatly decreases the binding affinity of the chalcones, potentially as a result of steric hindrance. Together with the finding that neither our chalcones nor PIB interact with the Congo Red/X-34 binding site, these molecules provide new tools to selectively probe the PIB binding site that is found in human AD brain, but not in brains of AD pathology animal models. Our chalcone derivatives also provide important information on the effects of fibril polymorphism on ligand binding.

  18. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane.

  19. The Effect of Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs on Amyloid Aggregation and Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Iannuzzi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a protein folding disorder in which normally soluble proteins are deposited extracellularly as insoluble fibrils, impairing tissue structure and function. Charged polyelectrolytes such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs are frequently found associated with the proteinaceous deposits in tissues of patients affected by amyloid diseases. Experimental evidence indicate that they can play an active role in favoring amyloid fibril formation and stabilization. Binding of GAGs to amyloid fibrils occurs mainly through electrostatic interactions involving the negative polyelectrolyte charges and positively charged side chains residues of aggregating protein. Similarly to catalyst for reactions, GAGs favor aggregation, nucleation and amyloid fibril formation functioning as a structural templates for the self-assembly of highly cytotoxic oligomeric precursors, rich in β-sheets, into harmless amyloid fibrils. Moreover, the GAGs amyloid promoting activity can be facilitated through specific interactions via consensus binding sites between amyloid polypeptide and GAGs molecules. We review the effect of GAGs on amyloid deposition as well as proteins not strictly related to diseases. In addition, we consider the potential of the GAGs therapy in amyloidosis.

  20. Natural polyphenols binding to amyloid: a broad class of compounds to treat different human amyloid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoungoure, Viviane L Ndam; Schluesener, Jan; Moundipa, Paul F; Schluesener, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenols are a large group of phytonutrients found in herbal beverages and foods. They have manifold biological activities, including antioxidative, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties. Interestingly, some polyphenols bind to amyloid and substantially ameliorate amyloid diseases. Misfolding, aggregation, and accumulation of amyloid fibrils in tissues or organs leads to a group of disorders, called amyloidoses. Prominent diseases are Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease, but there are other, less well-known diseases wherein accumulation of misfolded protein is a prominent feature. Amyloidoses are a major burden to public health. In particular, Alzheimer's disease shows a strong increase in patient numbers. Accelerated development of effective therapies for amyloidoses is a necessity. A viable strategy can be the prevention or reduction of protein misfolding, thus reducing amyloid build-up by restoring the cellular aggretome. Amyloid-binding polyphenols affect amyloid formation on various levels, e.g. by inhibiting fibril formation or steering oligomer formation into unstructured, nontoxic pathways. Consequently, preclinical studies demonstrate reduction of amyloid-formation by polyphenols. Amyloid-binding polyphenols might be suitable lead structures for development of imaging agents for early detection of disease and monitoring amyloid deposition. Intake of dietary polyphenols might be relevant to the prevention of amyloidoses. Nutraceutical strategies might be a way to reduce amyloid diseases.

  1. Amyloid deposition in 2 feline thymomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrough, E R; Myers, R K; Hostetter, S J; Fox, L E; Bayer, B J; Felz, C L; Waller, K R; Whitley, E M

    2012-07-01

    Two cases of feline thymoma with amyloid deposition were encountered between 1982 and 2010. Neoplastic cells were separated by abundant, pale eosinophilic, homogeneous material that was congophilic and birefringent. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells were connected by desmosomes, and the extracellular deposits were composed of nonbranching, hollow-cored fibrils, 8-10 nm in diameter. In the case with sufficient archived tissue for additional sections, the amyloid remained congophilic following potassium permanganate incubation, and the neoplastic cells were immunoreactive for pancytokeratin. The histologic, histochemical, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical features of both neoplasms are consistent with epithelial-predominant thymoma with the unusual feature of intratumoral amyloid deposition. The affinity of the amyloid for Congo red following potassium permanganate incubation is consistent with non-AA amyloid. The ultrastructural findings were consistent with amyloid production by the neoplastic epithelial cells.

  2. Dipolar recoupling NMR of biomolecular self-assemblies : determining inter- and intrastrand distances in fibrilized Alzheimer's {betta}-amyloid peptide.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, D. M.; Senzinger, T. L. S.; Burkoth, T. S.; Miller-Auer, H.; Lynn, D. G.; Meredith, S. C.; Botto, R. E.; Chemistry; Univ. of Chicago

    1998-12-01

    We demonstrate a new method for investigating the structure of self-associating biopolymers using dipolar recoupling NMR techniques. This approach was applied to the study of fibrillar {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) peptides (the primary component of the plaques of Alzheimer's disease) containing only a single isotopic spin label ({sup 13}C), by employing the DRAWS (dipolar recoupling with a windowless sequence) technique to measure {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances. The 'single-label' approach simplified analysis of DRAWS data, since only interstrand contacts are present, without the possibility of any intrastrand contacts. As previously reported [T.L.S. Benzinger, D.M. Gregory, T.S. Burkoth, H. Miller-Auer, D.G. Lynn, R.E. Botto, S.C. Meredith, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 95 (1998) 13407.], contacts of approximately 5 {angstrom} were observed at all residues studied, consistent with an extended parallel {beta}-sheet structure with each amino acid in exact register. Here, we propose that our strategy is completely generalizable, and provides a new approach for characterizing any iterative, self-associating biopolymer. Towards the end of generalizing and refining our approach, in this paper we evaluate several issues raised by our previous analyses. First, we consider the effects of double-quantum (DQ) transverse relaxation processes. Next, we discuss the effects of various multiple-spin geometries on modeling of DRAWS data. Several practical issues are also discussed: these include (1) the use of DQ filtering experiments, either to corroborate DRAWS data, or as a rapid screening assessment of the proper placement of isotopic spin labels; and (2) the comparison of solid samples prepared by either lyophilization or freezing. Finally, data obtained from the use of single labels is compared with that obtained in doubly {sup 13}C-labeled model compounds of known crystal structure. It is shown that such data are obtainable in far more complex peptide molecules. These

  3. Structural Organization of Insulin Fibrils Based on Polarized Raman Spectroscopy: Evaluation of Existing Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereda, Valentin; Sawaya, Michael R; Lednev, Igor K

    2015-09-01

    Many different proteins undergo misfolding and self-assemble into amyloid fibrils, resulting in a range of neurodegenerative diseases. The limitations of conventional methods of structural biology for fibril characterization have led to the use of polarized Raman spectroscopy for obtaining quantitative structural information regarding the organization of amyloid fibrils. Herein, we report the orientation of selected chemical groups and secondary structure elements in aligned insulin fibrils, including β-sheets, which possess a high level of orientation in the cross-β core, and α-helices in the disordered portions of the fibrils. Strong orientation of disulfide bonds in amyloid fibrils was also revealed, indicating their association with the fibril core. The determined orientation of chemical groups provides strong constraints for modeling the overall structure of amyloid fibrils, including the core and disordered parts. The developed methodology allows for the validation of structural models proposed in the literature for amyloid fibrils. Specifically, the polarized Raman data obtained herein strongly agreed with two insulin fibril models (Jiménez et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 2002, 99, 9196-9201 and Ivanova et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 2009, 106, 18990-18995) yet revealed significant qualitative and quantitative differences. This work demonstrates the great potential of polarized Raman spectroscopy for structural characterization of anisotropic biological species.

  4. Trifluoroethanol modulates α-synuclein amyloid-like aggregate formation, stability and dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Carlo, Maria Giovanna; Vetri, Valeria; Buscarino, Gianpiero

    2016-01-01

    The conversion of proteins into amyloid fibrils and other amyloid-like aggregates is closely connected to the onset of a series of age-related pathologies. Upon changes in environmental conditions, amyloid-like aggregates may also undergo disassembly into oligomeric aggregates, the latter being r...

  5. Whole body amyloid deposition imaging by 123I-SAP scintigraphy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rheenen, Ronald; Glaudemans, Andor; Hazenberg, Bouke

    2011-01-01

    Amyloidosis is the name of a group of diseases characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils. Deposition of amyloid can be localized or systemic. The 123I-SAP-scan can be used to image extent and distribution of amyloid deposition in patients with systemic AA, AL and ATTR amyloidosis.

  6. Unraveling the mystery of protein-amyloid binding mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beringer, D.

    2013-01-01

    There are several diseases which are caused by amyloid, a deposit of aggregated protein. Examples of these diseases are Alzheimer’s disease, caused by the aggregation of the peptide Aβ, and Diabetes type 2, caused by hIAPP aggregates. A large number of proteins interact with these amyloid fibrils, s

  7. Molecular basis for insulin fibril assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Magdalena I.; Sievers, Stuart A.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Wall, Joseph S.; Eisenberg, David; (HHMI); (BNL)

    2009-12-01

    In the rare medical condition termed injection amyloidosis, extracellular fibrils of insulin are observed. We found that the segment of the insulin B-chain with sequence LVEALYL is the smallest segment that both nucleates and inhibits the fibrillation of full-length insulin in a molar ratio-dependent manner, suggesting that this segment is central to the cross-{beta} spine of the insulin fibril. In isolation from the rest of the protein, LVEALYL forms microcrystalline aggregates with fibrillar morphology, the structure of which we determined to 1 {angstrom} resolution. The LVEALYL segments are stacked into pairs of tightly interdigitated {beta}-sheets, each pair displaying the dry steric zipper interface typical of amyloid-like fibrils. This structure leads to a model for fibrils of human insulin consistent with electron microscopic, x-ray fiber diffraction, and biochemical studies.

  8. General amyloid inhibitors? A critical examination of the inhibition of IAPP amyloid formation by inositol stereoisomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin forms amyloid deposits in the islets of Langerhans; a process that is believed to contribute to the progression of type 2 diabetes and to the failure of islet transplants. An emerging theme in amyloid research is the hypothesis that the toxic species produced during amyloid formation by different polypeptides share common features and exert their effects by common mechanisms. If correct, this suggests that inhibitors of amyloid formation by one polypeptide might be effective against other amyloidogenic sequences. IAPP and Aβ, the peptide responsible for amyloid formation in Alzheimer's disease, are particularly interesting in this regard as they are both natively unfolded in their monomeric states and share some common characteristics. Comparatively little effort has been expended on the design of IAPP amyloid inhibitors, thus it is natural to inquire if Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP, especially since no IAPP inhibitors have been clinically approved. A range of compounds inhibit Aβ amyloid formation, including various stereoisomers of inositol. Myo-, scyllo-, and epi-inositol have been shown to induce conformational changes in Aβ and prevent Aβ amyloid fibril formation by stabilizing non-fibrillar β-sheet structures. We investigate the ability of inositol stereoisomers to inhibit amyloid formation by IAPP. The compounds do not induce a conformational change in IAPP and are ineffective inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation, although some do lead to modest apparent changes in IAPP amyloid fibril morphology. Thus not all classes of Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP. This work provides a basis of comparison to work on polyphenol based inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation and helps provide clues as to the features which render them effective. The study also helps provide information for further efforts in rational inhibitor design.

  9. Aggregation and fibrillation of bovine serum albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, NK; Jespersen, SK; Thomassen, LV;

    2007-01-01

    The all-alpha helix multi-domain protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) aggregates at elevated temperatures. Here we show that these thermal aggregates have amyloid properties. They bind the fibril-specific dyes Thioflavin T and Congo Red, show elongated although somewhat worm-like morphology...

  10. Eumelanin fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueenie, Ross; Sutter, Jens; Karolin, Jan; Birch, David J. S.

    2012-07-01

    We describe the auto-oxidation of 3, 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) in the synthesis of eumelanin to spontaneously produce fibrils upon drying. The self-assembled fibrils are of characteristic diameter ~1 to 2 μm, composed of filaments, and are unidirectional, apart from branches that are formed at typically an angle of 20 to 22 deg. The fibrils are characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence decay times, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The fibrils mimic natural melanin in consisting of core eumelanin with efficient nonradiative properties, but they also display pockets of electronically isolated species with higher radiative rates on the nanosecond timescale. Eumelanin fibrils formed occasionally in solution are tentatively attributed to a scaffold of bacteria or fungus. Fabricating and characterizing novel synthetic eumelanin structures such as fibrils are of interest in helping to reveal a functional structure for eumelanin, in understanding its photophysics, in learning more about L-DOPA as it is used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and in producing novel materials which might embody some of the diverse properties of eumelanin.

  11. The role of stable α-synuclein oligomers in the molecular events underlying amyloid formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Nikolai; Nielsen, Søren Bang; Buell, Alexander K.;

    2014-01-01

    Studies of protein amyloid formation have revealed that potentially cytotoxic oligomers frequently accumulate during fibril formation. An important question in the context of mechanistic studies of this process is whether or not oligomers are intermediates in the process of amyloid fibril formation...... α-synuclein (αSN), whose aggregation is strongly implicated in the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The two types of oligomers are both formed under conditions where amyloid fibril formation is observed but differ in molecular weight by an order of magnitude. Both possess a degree of β...

  12. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian Stougaard; Dueholm, Morten Simonsen

    2015-01-01

    The success of Pseudomonas species as opportunistic pathogens derives in great part from their ability to form stable biofilms that offer protection against chemical and mechanical attack. The extracellular matrix of biofilms contains numerous biomolecules, and it has recently been discovered...... that in Pseudomonas one of the components includes β-sheet rich amyloid fibrils (functional amyloid) produced by the fap operon. However, the role of the functional amyloid within the biofilm has not yet been investigated in detail. Here we investigate how the fap-based amyloid produced by Pseudomonas affects biofilm...

  13. Phosphate and HEPES buffers potently affect the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Alzheimer's Aβ peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Megan; Tepper, Katharina; Haupt, Caroline; Knüpfer, Uwe; Klement, Karolin; Meinhardt, Jessica; Horn, Uwe; Balbach, Jochen; Fändrich, Marcus

    2011-06-10

    The oligomerization of Aβ peptide into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Due to its biological relevance, phosphate is the most commonly used buffer system for studying the formation of Aβ and other amyloid fibrils. Investigation into the characteristics and formation of amyloid fibrils frequently relies upon material formed in vitro, predominantly in phosphate buffers. Herein, we examine the effects on the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Aβ peptide that occur due solely to the influence of phosphate buffer. We reveal that significant differences in amyloid fibrillation are observed due to fibrillation being initiated in phosphate or HEPES buffer (at physiological pH and temperature). Except for the differing buffer ions, all experimental parameters were kept constant. Fibril formation was assessed using fluorescently monitored kinetic studies, microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Based on this set up, we herein reveal profound effects on the mechanism and speed of Aβ fibrillation. The three histidine residues at positions 6, 13 and 14 of Aβ(1-40) are instrumental in these mechanistic changes. We conclude that buffer plays a more significant role in fibril formation than has been generally acknowledged.

  14. The Role of the 14–20 Domain of the Islet Amyloid Polypeptide in Amyloid Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Gilead

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism of amyloid formation by the islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP has been intensively studied since its identification in the late 1980s. The IAPP(20–29 region is considered to be the central amyloidogenic module of the polypeptide. This assumption is mainly based on the amyloidogenic properties of the region and on the large sequence diversity within this region between the human and mouse IAPP, as the mouse IAPP does not form amyloids. A few years ago, another region within IAPP was identified that seems to be at least as important as IAPP(20–29 in facilitation of molecular recognition that leads to amyloid formation. Here, we reinforce our and others' previous findings by analyzing supporting evidence from the recent literature. Moreover, we provide new proofs to our hypothesis by comparing between the amyloidogenic properties of the two regions derived from the IAPP of cats, which is also known to form amyloid fibrils.

  15. Characterization of Amyloid Cores in Prion Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant’Anna, Ricardo; Fernández, Maria Rosario; Batlle, Cristina; Navarro, Susanna; de Groot, Natalia S.; Serpell, Louise; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids consist of repetitions of a specific polypeptide chain in a regular cross-β-sheet conformation. Amyloid propensity is largely determined by the protein sequence, the aggregation process being nucleated by specific and short segments. Prions are special amyloids that become self-perpetuating after aggregation. Prions are responsible for neuropathology in mammals, but they can also be functional, as in yeast prions. The conversion of these last proteins to the prion state is driven by prion forming domains (PFDs), which are generally large, intrinsically disordered, enriched in glutamines/asparagines and depleted in hydrophobic residues. The self-assembly of PFDs has been thought to rely mostly on their particular amino acid composition, rather than on their sequence. Instead, we have recently proposed that specific amyloid-prone sequences within PFDs might be key to their prion behaviour. Here, we demonstrate experimentally the existence of these amyloid stretches inside the PFDs of the canonical Sup35, Swi1, Mot3 and Ure2 prions. These sequences self-assemble efficiently into highly ordered amyloid fibrils, that are functionally competent, being able to promote the PFD amyloid conversion in vitro and in vivo. Computational analyses indicate that these kind of amyloid stretches may act as typical nucleating signals in a number of different prion domains. PMID:27686217

  16. Control the kinetics and pathway of insulin fibril formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhongli; Jing, Benxin; Zhu, Y. Elaine

    2012-02-01

    Protein fibrils have been proposed as possible toxic agents for many amyloid related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, however the reaction pathway toward the amyloid fibrillation remain inadequately understood. In this work, we examine the conformational transition of human insulin as the model amyloid protein by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging. By controlling the pH cycling, insulin monomer and oligomers are indentified at given pH variation condition. Furthermore, low frequency ac-electric fields are employed to control the insulin aggregation from its monomers in a microchannel. It is observed that lag time to induce insulin fibrillation can be significantly shortened, in compassion to the commonly used cooling and seeding methods, and exhibits a strong dependence on applied ac-field strength. Additionally, the structure of insulin aggregates under ac-electric fields is observed to be drastically different from that under the temperature control.

  17. Atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Fauchier, Laurent; Freedman, Saul B;

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disorder, and increases in prevalence with increasing age and the number of cardiovascular comorbidities. AF is characterized by a rapid and irregular heartbeat that can be asymptomatic or lead to symptoms such as palpitations...

  18. Atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten S; Nielsen, Morten W; Haunsø, Stig;

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia affecting 1-2% of the general population. A number of studies have demonstrated that AF, and in particular lone AF, has a substantial genetic component. Monogenic mutations in lone and familial AF, although rare, have been recognized...

  19. The amyloid stretch hypothesis: Recruiting proteins toward the dark side

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra; Serrano, Luis; de la Paz, Manuela López

    2005-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the molecular events underlying the conversion and self-association of normally soluble proteins into amyloid fibrils is fundamental to the identification of therapeutic strategies to prevent or cure amyloid-related disorders. Recent investigations indicate that amyloid fibril formation is not just a general property of the polypeptide backbone depending on external factors, but that it is strongly modulated by amino acid side chains. Here, we propose and address the validation of the premise that the amyloidogenicity of a protein is indeed localized in short protein stretches (amyloid stretch hypothesis). We demonstrate that the conversion of a soluble nonamyloidogenic protein into an amyloidogenic prone molecule can be triggered by a nondestabilizing six-residue amyloidogenic insertion in a particular structural environment. Interestingly enough, although the inserted amyloid sequences clearly cause the process, the protease-resistant core of the fiber also includes short adjacent sequences from the otherwise soluble globular domain. Thus, short amyloid stretches accessible for intermolecular interactions trigger the self-assembly reaction and pull the rest of the protein into the fibrillar aggregate. The reliable identification of such amyloidogenic stretches in proteins opens the possibility of using them as targets for the inhibition of the amyloid fibril formation process. PMID:16263932

  20. HIV Tat protein and amyloid-β peptide form multifibrillar structures that cause neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hategan, Alina; Bianchet, Mario A; Steiner, Joseph; Karnaukhova, Elena; Masliah, Eliezer; Fields, Adam; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Dickens, Alex M; Haughey, Norman; Dimitriadis, Emilios K; Nath, Avindra

    2017-02-20

    Deposition of amyloid-β plaques is increased in the brains of HIV-infected individuals, and the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein affects amyloidogenesis through several indirect mechanisms. Here, we investigated direct interactions between Tat and amyloid-β peptide. Our in vitro studies showed that in the presence of Tat, uniform amyloid fibrils become double twisted fibrils and further form populations of thick unstructured filaments and aggregates. Specifically, Tat binding to the exterior surfaces of the Aβ fibrils increases β-sheet formation and lateral aggregation into thick multifibrillar structures, thus producing fibers with increased rigidity and mechanical resistance. Furthermore, Tat and Aβ aggregates in complex synergistically induced neurotoxicity both in vitro and in animal models. Increased rigidity and mechanical resistance of the amyloid-β-Tat complexes coupled with stronger adhesion due to the presence of Tat in the fibrils may account for increased damage, potentially through pore formation in membranes.

  1. Amyloid-beta(29-42) dimer formations studied by a multicanonical-multioverlap molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Satoru G; Okamoto, Yuko

    2008-03-13

    Amyloid-beta peptides are known to form amyloid fibrils and are considered to play an important role in Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-beta(29-42) is a fragment of the amyloid-beta peptide and also has a tendency to form amyloid fibrils. In order to study the mechanism of amyloidogenesis of this fragment, we applied one of the generalized-ensemble algorithms, the multicanonical-multioverlap algorithm, to amyloid-beta(29-42) dimer in aqueous solution. We obtained a detailed free-energy landscape of the dimer system. From the detailed free-energy landscape, we examined monomer and dimer formations of amyloid-beta(29-42) and deduced dimerization processes, which correspond to seeding processes in the amyloidogenesis of amyloid-beta(29-42).

  2. Atomic View of a Toxic Amyloid Small Oligomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Park, Jiyong; Zhao, Minglei; Pensalfini, Anna; Soriaga, Angela B.; Landau, Meytal; Teng, Poh K.; Cascio, Duilio; Glabe, Charles; Eisenberg, David (UCI); (UCLA)

    2012-04-30

    Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and the prion conditions, are each associated with a particular protein in fibrillar form. These amyloid fibrils were long suspected to be the disease agents, but evidence suggests that smaller, often transient and polymorphic oligomers are the toxic entities. Here, we identify a segment of the amyloid-forming protein {alpha}{beta} crystallin, which forms an oligomeric complex exhibiting properties of other amyloid oligomers: {beta}-sheet-rich structure, cytotoxicity, and recognition by an oligomer-specific antibody. The x-ray-derived atomic structure of the oligomer reveals a cylindrical barrel, formed from six antiparallel protein strands, that we term a cylindrin. The cylindrin structure is compatible with a sequence segment from the {beta}-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease. Cylindrins offer models for the hitherto elusive structures of amyloid oligomers.

  3. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planté-Bordeneuve, Violaine; Said, Gerard

    2011-12-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathies (FAPs) are a group of life-threatening multisystem disorders transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. Nerve lesions are induced by deposits of amyloid fibrils, most commonly due to mutated transthyretin (TTR). Less often the precursor of amyloidosis is mutant apolipoprotein A-1 or gelsolin. The first identified cause of FAP-the TTR Val30Met mutation-is still the most common of more than 100 amyloidogenic point mutations identified worldwide. The penetrance and age at onset of FAP among people carrying the same mutation vary between countries. The symptomatology and clinical course of FAP can be highly variable. TTR FAP typically causes a nerve length-dependent polyneuropathy that starts in the feet with loss of temperature and pain sensations, along with life-threatening autonomic dysfunction leading to cachexia and death within 10 years on average. TTR is synthesised mainly in the liver, and liver transplantation seems to have a favourable effect on the course of neuropathy, but not on cardiac or eye lesions. Oral administration of tafamidis meglumine, which prevents misfolding and deposition of mutated TTR, is under evaluation in patients with TTR FAP. In future, patients with FAP might benefit from gene therapy; however, genetic counselling is recommended for the prevention of all types of FAP.

  4. Nodular goiter with amyloid deposition in an elderly patient: fine-needle cytology diagnosis and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Di Crescenzo, Vincenzo; Garzi, Alfredo; Petruzziello, Fara; Cinelli, Mariapia; Catalano, Lucio; Zeppa, Pio; Vitale, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Background Amyloidosis is a systemic disease characterized by the extracellular deposition of amyloid fibrils in different organs and tissues. The thyroid gland may be affected by diffuse or nodular amyloid deposits, along with multiple myeloma (MM) (Amyloid Light-Chain Amyloidosis, AL amyloidosis) or chronic inflammatory diseases (Amyloid A Amyloidosis, AA amyloidosis), but thyroid gland involvement rarely appears as the first clinical manifestation in both conditions. The present study repo...

  5. Extraskeletal problems and amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drüeke, T B

    1999-12-01

    The major clinical manifestations of dialysis-associated A beta 2M amyloidosis are chronic arthralgias, destructive arthropathy and the carpal tunnel syndrome. For dialysis patients who have been maintained on renal replacement therapy for more than 10-15 years, this complication may become a major physical handicap. It may even be life-threatening in some instances due to cervical cord compression. Amyloid deposits in joint areas precede clinical symptoms and signs by several years. Systemic deposits may also occur but their clinical manifestations are infrequent. The diagnosis of dialysis arthropathy associated with beta 2-microglobulin-associated (A beta 2M) amyloidosis mostly relies on indirect clinical and radiological evidence. Histologic proof is rarely obtained in vivo. The pathogenesis of the disease is complex. It includes reduced elimination of beta 2M and potentially also as impaired degradation of A beta 2M as well as enhanced production of A beta 2M amyloid fibrils. Non enzymatic modifications of beta 2M probably play a role, including beta 2M protein modification with advanced glycation end-products (AGE) and advanced oxidation protein products. Modified beta 2M, collagen and proteoglycans appear actively involved in the induction of a local inflammatory response and beta 2M amyloid formation. There is also evidence in favor of treatment-related factors such as the type of hemodialysis membrane and the purity of dialysis water. Hopefully, the translation of our improving knowledge of all the factors involved will lead to a better treatment and eventually to the prevention of this dramatic complication of dialysis.

  6. Amyloid A amyloidosis secondary to rheumatoid arthritis: pathophysiology and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of biological therapies targeting specific inflammatory mediators revolutionised the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Targeting key components of the immune system allows efficient suppression of the pathological inflammatory cascade that leads to RA symptoms and subsequent joint destruction. Reactive amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, one of the most severe complications of RA, is a serious, potentially life-threatening disorder caused by deposition of AA amyloid fibrils in multiple organs. These AA amyloid fibrils derive from the circulatory acute-phase reactant serum amyloid A protein (SAA), and may be controlled by treatment. New biologics may permit AA amyloidosis secondary to RA to become a treatable, manageable disease. Rheumatologists, when diagnosing and treating patients with AA amyloidosis secondary to RA, must understand the pathophysiology and clinical factors related to development and progression of the disease, including genetic predisposition and biological versatility of SAA.

  7. Amyloid detection using a Peltier-based device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Miguel A; Ferreyra, Martin G; Cortez, Leonardo; Grupalli, Silvina A; Alvarez, L Leguina; Chehin, Rosana

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid aggregation of polypeptides is related to a growing number of pathologic states known as amyloid disorders. At present, it is clear that any proteins submitted to appropriate physicochemical environment can acquire fibrilar conformation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been a widely used technique to study temperature- induced amyloid-fibrils formation in vitro. In this way, strict changes and temperature controls are required to characterize the physicochemical basis of the amyloid-fibrils formation. In this article, the development of a highly efficient and accurate Peltier-based system to improve FTIR measurements is presented (see An Old Physics Phenomenon Applied to a Serious Biomedical Pathology. The accuracy of the thermostatic control was tested with biophysical parameters on biological samples probing its reproducibility. The design of the present device contributes to maintain the FTIR environment stable, which represents a real contribution to improve the spectral quality and thus, the reliability of the results.

  8. Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimetbaum, Peter

    2017-03-07

    This issue provides a clinical overview of atrial fibrillation, focusing on diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  9. A peptide study of the relationship between the collagen triple-helix and amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Avanish S; Nunes, Ana Monica; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Type XXV collagen, or collagen-like amyloidogenic component, is a component of amyloid plaques, and recent studies suggest this collagen affects amyloid fibril elongation and has a genetic association with Alzheimer's disease. The relationship between the collagen triple helix and amyloid fibrils was investigated by studying peptide models, including a very stable triple helical peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)₁₀ , an amyloidogenic peptide GNNQQNY, and a hybrid peptide where the GNNQQNY sequence was incorporated between (GPO)(n) domains. Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy showed the GNNQQNY peptide formed a random coil structure, whereas the hybrid peptide contained a central disordered GNNQQNY region transitioning to triple-helical ends. Light scattering confirmed the GNNQQNY peptide had a high propensity to form amyloid fibrils, whereas amyloidogenesis was delayed in the hybrid peptide. NMR data suggested the triple-helix constraints on the GNNQQNY sequence within the hybrid peptide may disfavor the conformational change necessary for aggregation. Independent addition of a triple-helical peptide to the GNNQQNY peptide under aggregating conditions delayed nucleation and amyloid fibril growth. The inhibition of amyloid nucleation depended on the Gly-Xaa-Yaa sequence and required the triple-helix conformation. The inhibitory effect of the collagen triple-helix on an amyloidogenic sequence, when in the same molecule or when added separately, suggests Type XXV collagen, and possibly other collagens, may play a role in regulating amyloid fibril formation.

  10. Comparison of the aggregation of homologous β2-microglobulin variants reveals protein solubility as a key determinant of amyloid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashley, Clare L; Hewitt, Eric W; Radford, Sheena E

    2016-02-13

    The mouse and human β2-microglobulin protein orthologs are 70% identical in sequence and share 88% sequence similarity. These proteins are predicted by various algorithms to have similar aggregation and amyloid propensities. However, whilst human β2m (hβ2m) forms amyloid-like fibrils in denaturing conditions (e.g. pH2.5) in the absence of NaCl, mouse β2m (mβ2m) requires the addition of 0.3M NaCl to cause fibrillation. Here, the factors which give rise to this difference in amyloid propensity are investigated. We utilise structural and mutational analyses, fibril growth kinetics and solubility measurements under a range of pH and salt conditions, to determine why these two proteins have different amyloid propensities. The results show that, although other factors influence the fibril growth kinetics, a striking difference in the solubility of the proteins is a key determinant of the different amyloidogenicity of hβ2m and mβ2m. The relationship between protein solubility and lag time of amyloid formation is not captured by current aggregation or amyloid prediction algorithms, indicating a need to better understand the role of solubility on the lag time of amyloid formation. The results demonstrate the key contribution of protein solubility in determining amyloid propensity and lag time of amyloid formation, highlighting how small differences in protein sequence can have dramatic effects on amyloid formation.

  11. The effect of exposing a critical hydrophobic patch on amyloidogenicity and fibril structure of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Huang, Lianqi; Yang, Xin; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yue; Gong, Hao; Liu, Yang; Zheng, Ling; Huang, Kun

    2013-10-11

    It is widely accepted that the formation of amyloid fibrils is one of the natural properties of proteins. The amyloid formation process is associated with a variety of factors, among which the hydrophobic residues play a critical role. In this study, insulin was used as a model to investigate the effect of exposing a critical hydrophobic patch on amyloidogenicity and fibril structure of insulin. Porcine insulin was digested with trypsin to obtain desoctapeptide-(B23-B30) insulin (DOI), whose hydrophilic C-terminal of B-chain was removed and hydrophobic core was exposed. The results showed that DOI, of which the ordered structure (predominantly α-helix) was markedly decreased, was more prone to aggregate than intact insulin. As to the secondary structure of amyloid fibrils, DOI fibrils were similar to insulin fibrils formed under acidic condition, whereas under neutral condition, insulin formed less polymerized aggregates by showing decreased β-sheet contents in fibrils. Further investigation on membrane damage and hemolysis showed that DOI fibrils induced significantly less membrane damage and less hemolysis of erythrocytes compared with those of insulin fibrils. In conclusion, exposing the hydrophobic core of insulin can induce the increase of amyloidogenicity and formation of higher-order polymerized fibrils, which is less toxic to membranes.

  12. Structural properties of Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease amyloid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmona, Mario; Morbin, Michela; Massignan, Tania; Colombo, Laura; Mazzoleni, Giulia; Capobianco, Raffaella; Diomede, Luisa; Thaler, Florian; Mollica, Luca; Musco, Giovanna; Kourie, Joseph J; Bugiani, Orso; Sharma, Deepak; Inouye, Hideyo; Kirschner, Daniel A; Forloni, Gianluigi; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2003-11-28

    Prion protein (PrP) amyloid formation is a central feature of genetic and acquired forms of prion disease such as Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The major component of GSS amyloid is a PrP fragment spanning residues approximately 82-146. To investigate the determinants of the physicochemical properties of this fragment, we synthesized PrP-(82-146) and variants thereof, including entirely and partially scrambled peptides. PrP-(82-146) readily formed aggregates that were partially resistant to protease digestion. Peptide assemblies consisted of 9.8-nm-diameter fibrils having a parallel cross-beta-structure. Second derivative of infrared spectra indicated that PrP-(82-146) aggregates are primarily composed of beta-sheet (54%) and turn (24%) which is consistent with their amyloid-like properties. The peptide induced a remarkable increase in plasma membrane microviscosity of primary neurons. Modification of the amino acid sequence 106-126 caused a striking increase in aggregation rate, with formation of large amount of protease-resistant amorphous material and relatively few amyloid fibrils. Alteration of the 127-146 region had even more profound effects, with the inability to generate amyloid fibrils. These data indicate that the intrinsic properties of PrP-(82-146) are dependent upon the integrity of the C-terminal region and account for the massive deposition of PrP amyloid in GSS.

  13. Aluminium, iron, zinc and copper influence the in vitro formation of amyloid fibrils of Abeta42 in a manner which may have consequences for metal chelation therapy in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Emily; Collingwood, Joanna; Khan, Ayesha; Korchazkina, Olga; Berthon, Guy; Exley, Christopher

    2004-06-01

    Metals are found associated with beta-pleated sheets of Abeta42 in vivo and may be involved in their formation. Metal chelation has been proposed as a therapy for Alzheimer's disease on the basis that it may safely dissolve precipitated Abeta peptides. We have followed fibrillisation of Abeta42 in the presence of an additional metal ion (Al(III), Fe(III), Zn(II), Cu(II)) over a period of 32 weeks and we have investigated the dissolution of these aged peptide aggregates in the presence of both desferrioxamine (DFO) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Abeta42 either alone or in the presence of Al(III) or Fe(III) formed beta-pleated sheets of plaque-like amyloids which were dissolved upon incubation with either chelator. Zn(II) inhibited whilst Cu(II) prevented the formation of beta-pleated sheets of Abeta42and neither of these influences were affected by incubation of the aged peptide aggregates with either DFO or EDTA. Freshly prepared solutions of Abeta42 either alone or in the presence of added Al(III) or Fe(III) did not form beta-pleated amyloid in the presence of DFO when incubated for up to 8 weeks. EDTA did not prevent beta-pleated amyloid formation in the same treatments and promoted beta-pleated amyloid formation in the presence of either Zn(II) or Cu(II). The presence of significant concentrations of Al(III) and Fe(III) as contaminants of 'Abeta42 only' preparations suggested that both of these metals were involved in either triggering the formation or stabilising the structure of beta-pleated amyloid. If the formation of such amyloid is critical to the aetiology of AD then the chelation of Al(III) and Fe(III) may prove to be a protective mechanism whilst the chelation of Cu(II) and Zn(II) without also chelating Al(III) and Fe(III) might actually exacerbate the condition.

  14. A role for amyloid in cell aggregation and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa C Garcia

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion molecules in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans contain amyloid-forming sequences that are highly conserved. We have now used site-specific mutagenesis and specific peptide perturbants to explore amyloid-dependent activity in the Candida albicans adhesin Als5p. A V326N substitution in the amyloid-forming region conserved secondary structure and ligand binding, but abrogated formation of amyloid fibrils in soluble Als5p and reduced cell surface thioflavin T fluorescence. When displayed on the cell surface, Als5p with this substitution prevented formation of adhesion nanodomains and formation of large cellular aggregates and model biofilms. In addition, amyloid nanodomains were regulated by exogenous peptides. An amyloid-forming homologous peptide rescued aggregation and biofilm activity of Als5p(V326N cells, and V326N substitution peptide inhibited aggregation and biofilm activity in Als5p(WT cells. Therefore, specific site mutation, inhibition by anti-amyloid peturbants, and sequence-specificity of pro-amyloid and anti-amyloid peptides showed that amyloid formation is essential for nanodomain formation and activation.

  15. Isolating toxic insulin amyloid reactive species that lack β-sheets and have wide pH stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldt, Caryn L; Kurouski, Dmitry; Sorci, Mirco; Grafeld, Elizabeth; Lednev, Igor K; Belfort, Georges

    2011-06-08

    Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, are characterized by aggregation of normally functioning proteins or peptides into ordered, β-sheet rich fibrils. Most of the theories on amyloid toxicity focus on the nuclei or oligomers in the fibril formation process. The nuclei and oligomers are transient species, making their full characterization difficult. We have isolated toxic protein species that act like an oligomer and may provide the first evidence of a stable reactive species created by disaggregation of amyloid fibrils. This reactive species was isolated by dissolving amyloid fibrils at high pH and it has a mass >100 kDa and a diameter of 48 ± 15 nm. It seeds the formation of fibrils in a dose dependent manner, but using circular dichroism and deep ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy, the reactive species was found to not have a β-sheet rich structure. We hypothesize that the reactive species does not decompose at high pH and maintains its structure in solution. The remaining disaggregated insulin, excluding the toxic reactive species that elongated the fibrils, returned to native structured insulin. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that a stable reactive species of an amyloid reaction has been separated and characterized by disaggregation of amyloid fibrils.

  16. Stability and cytotoxicity of crystallin amyloid nanofibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manmeet; Healy, Jackie; Vasudevamurthy, Madhusudan; Lassé, Moritz; Puskar, Ljiljana; Tobin, Mark J.; Valery, Celine; Gerrard, Juliet A.; Sasso, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    Previous work has identified crystallin proteins extracted from fish eye lenses as a cheap and readily available source for the self-assembly of amyloid nanofibrils. However, before exploring potential applications, the biophysical aspects and safety of this bionanomaterial need to be assessed so as to ensure that it can be effectively and safely used. In this study, crude crystallin amyloid fibrils are shown to be stable across a wide pH range, in a number of industrially relevant solvents, at both low and high temperatures, and in the presence of proteases. Crystallin nanofibrils were compared to well characterised insulin and whey protein fibrils using Thioflavin T assays and TEM imaging. Cell cytotoxicity assays suggest no adverse impact of both mature and fragmented crystallin fibrils on cell viability of Hec-1a endometrial cells. An IR microspectroscopy study supports long-term structural integrity of crystallin nanofibrils.Previous work has identified crystallin proteins extracted from fish eye lenses as a cheap and readily available source for the self-assembly of amyloid nanofibrils. However, before exploring potential applications, the biophysical aspects and safety of this bionanomaterial need to be assessed so as to ensure that it can be effectively and safely used. In this study, crude crystallin amyloid fibrils are shown to be stable across a wide pH range, in a number of industrially relevant solvents, at both low and high temperatures, and in the presence of proteases. Crystallin nanofibrils were compared to well characterised insulin and whey protein fibrils using Thioflavin T assays and TEM imaging. Cell cytotoxicity assays suggest no adverse impact of both mature and fragmented crystallin fibrils on cell viability of Hec-1a endometrial cells. An IR microspectroscopy study supports long-term structural integrity of crystallin nanofibrils. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: ThT fluorescence graphs of buffers and solvents used for

  17. Polymorphic structures of Alzheimer's β-amyloid globulomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Misfolding and self-assembly of Amyloid-β (Aβ peptides into amyloid fibrils is pathologically linked to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Polymorphic Aβ structures derived from monomers to intermediate oligomers, protofilaments, and mature fibrils have been often observed in solution. Some aggregates are on-pathway species to amyloid fibrils, while the others are off-pathway species that do not evolve into amyloid fibrils. Both on-pathway and off-pathway species could be biologically relevant species. But, the lack of atomic-level structural information for these Aβ species leads to the difficulty in the understanding of their biological roles in amyloid toxicity and amyloid formation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we model a series of molecular structures of Aβ globulomers assembled by monomer and dimer building blocks using our peptide-packing program and explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Structural and energetic analysis shows that although Aβ globulomers could adopt different energetically favorable but structurally heterogeneous conformations in a rugged energy landscape, they are still preferentially organized by dynamic dimeric subunits with a hydrophobic core formed by the C-terminal residues independence of initial peptide packing and organization. Such structural organizations offer high structural stability by maximizing peptide-peptide association and optimizing peptide-water solvation. Moreover, curved surface, compact size, and less populated β-structure in Aβ globulomers make them difficult to convert into other high-order Aβ aggregates and fibrils with dominant β-structure, suggesting that they are likely to be off-pathway species to amyloid fibrils. These Aβ globulomers are compatible with experimental data in overall size, subunit organization, and molecular weight from AFM images and H/D amide exchange NMR. CONCLUSIONS: Our computationally modeled Aβ globulomers provide useful

  18. Aluminium, beta-amyloid and non-enzymatic glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, C; Schley, L; Murray, S; Hackney, C M; Birchall, J D

    1995-05-08

    The non-enzymatic glycosylation of beta-amyloid is implicated in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease. However, controversy surrounds the nature of any involvement and a potential mechanism has not been fully elucidated. We present evidence of an aluminium-induced aggregation of the A beta P(25-35) peptide and speculate that the mechanism of formation of our ordered beta-amyloid aggregates might involve non-enzymatic glycosylation and/or site-specific crosslinking of beta-amyloid fibrils by atomic aluminium.

  19. Failure of Alzheimer's Aβ(1-40) amyloid nanofibrils under compressive loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparcone, Raffaella; Buehler, Markus J.

    2010-04-01

    Amyloids are associated with severe degenerative diseases and show exceptional mechanical properties, in particular great stiffhess. Amyloid fibrils, forming protein nanotube structures, are elongated fibers with a diameter of ≈8 nm with a characteristic dense hydrogen-bond (H-bond)patterning in the form of beta-sheets (β-sheets). Here we report a series of molecular dynamics simulations to study mechanical failure properties of a twofold symmetric Aβ(l-40) amyloid fibril, a pathogen associated with Alzheimer’s disease. We carry out computational experiments to study the response of the amyloid fibril to compressive loading. Our investigations reveal atomistic details of the failure process, and confirm that the breakdown of H-bonds plays a critical role during the failure process of amyloid fibrils. We obtain a Young’s modulus of ≈12.43 GPa, in dose agreement with earlier experimental results. Our simulations show that failure by buck-ling and subsequent shearing in one of the layers initiates at ≈1% compressive strain, suggesting that amyloid fibrils can be rather brittle mechanical elements.

  20. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); de Pablo, Juan J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  1. Amyloid-like protein inclusions in tobacco transgenic plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Villar-Piqué

    Full Text Available The formation of insoluble protein deposits in human tissues is linked to the onset of more than 40 different disorders, ranging from dementia to diabetes. In these diseases, the proteins usually self-assemble into ordered β-sheet enriched aggregates known as amyloid fibrils. Here we study the structure of the inclusions formed by maize transglutaminase (TGZ in the chloroplasts of tobacco transplastomic plants and demonstrate that they have an amyloid-like nature. Together with the evidence of amyloid structures in bacteria and fungi our data argue that amyloid formation is likely a ubiquitous process occurring across the different kingdoms of life. The discovery of amyloid conformations inside inclusions of genetically modified plants might have implications regarding their use for human applications.

  2. Serum amyloid A and protein AA: molecular mechanisms of a transmissible amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermark, Gunilla T; Westermark, Per

    2009-08-20

    Systemic AA-amyloidosis is a complication of chronic inflammatory diseases and the fibril protein AA derives from the acute phase reactant serum AA. AA-amyloidosis can be induced in mice by an inflammatory challenge. The lag phase before amyloid develops can be dramatically shortened by administration of a small amount of amyloid fibrils. Systemic AA-amyloidosis is transmissible in mice and may be so in humans. Since transmission can cross species barriers it is possible that AA-amyloidosis can be induced by amyloid in food, e.g. foie gras. In mice, development of AA-amyloidosis can also be accelerated by other components with amyloid-like properties. A new possible risk factor may appear with synthetically made fibrils from short peptides, constructed for tissue repair.

  3. Contrasting effects of nanoparticle-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radic, Slaven; Davis, Thomas P; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been experimentally found to either promote or inhibit amyloid aggregation of proteins, but the molecular mechanisms for such complex behaviors remain unknown. Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the effects of varying the strength of nonspecific NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation of a model protein, the amyloid-beta peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, with increasing NP-peptide attraction, amyloid aggregation on the NP surface was initially promoted due to increased local protein concentration on the surface and destabilization of the folded state. However, further increase of NP-peptide attraction decreased the stability of amyloid fibrils and reduced their lateral diffusion on the NP surface necessary for peptide conformational changes and self-association, thus prohibiting amyloid aggregation. Moreover, we found that the relative concentration between protein and NPs also played an important role in amyloid aggregation. With a high NP/protein ratio, NPs that intrinsically promote protein aggregation may display an inhibitive effect by depleting the proteins in solution while having a low concentration of the proteins on each NP's surface. Our coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation study offers a molecular mechanism for delineating the contrasting and seemingly conflicting effects of NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation and highlights the potential of tailoring anti-aggregation nanomedicine against amyloid diseases.

  4. AFM study of glucagon fibrillation via oligomeric structures resulting in interwoven fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Mingdong [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Hovgaard, Mads Bruun [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Xu Sailong [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Otzen, Daniel Erik [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Besenbacher, Flemming [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2006-08-28

    Glucagon is a 29-residue amphiphatic hormone involved in the regulation of blood glucose levels in conjunction with insulin. In concentrated aqueous solutions, glucagon spontaneously aggregates to form amyloid fibrils, destroying its biological activity. In this study we utilize the atomic force microscope (AFM) to elucidate the fibrillation mechanism of glucagon at the nanoscale under acidic conditions (pH 2.0) by visualizing the nanostructures of fibrils formed at different stages of the incubation. Hollow disc-shaped oligomers form at an early stage in the process and subsequently rearrange to more solid oligomers. These oligomers co-exist with, and most likely act as precursors for, protofibrils, which subsequently associate to form at least three different classes of higher-order fibrils of different heights. A repeat unit of around 50 nm along the main fibril axis suggests a helical arrangement of interwoven protofibrils. The diversity of oligomeric and fibrillar arrangements formed at pH 2.0 complements previous spectroscopic analyses that revealed that fibrils formed under different conditions can differ substantially in stability and secondary structure.

  5. D-polyglutamine amyloid recruits L-polyglutamine monomers and kills cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Karunakar; Arduini, Irene; Drombosky, Kenneth W.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; Wetzel, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) amyloid fibrils are observed in disease tissue and have been implicated as toxic agents responsible for neurodegeneration in expanded CAG repeat diseases like Huntington’s disease (HD). Despite intensive efforts, the mechanism of amyloid toxicity remains unknown. As a novel approach to probing polyQ toxicity, we investigate here how some cellular and physical properties of polyQ amyloid vary with the chirality of the glutamine residues in the polyQ. We challenged PC12 cells with small amyloid fibrils composed of either L- or D-polyQ peptides and found that D-fibrils are as cytotoxic as L-fibrils. We also found using fluorescence microscopy that both aggregates effectively seed the aggregation of cell-produced L-polyQ proteins, suggesting a surprising lack of stereochemical restriction in seeded elongation of polyQ amyloid. To investigate this effect further, we studied chemically synthesized D- and L-polyQ in vitro. We found that, as expected, D-polyQ monomers are not recognized by proteins that recognize L-polyQ monomers. However, amyloid fibrils prepared from D-polyQ peptides can efficiently seed the aggregation of L-polyQ monomers in vitro, and vice versa. This result is consistent with our cell results on polyQ recruitment, but is inconsistent with previous literature reports on the chiral specificity of amyloid seeding. This chiral cross-seeding can be rationalized by a model for seeded elongation featuring a “rippled β-sheet” interface between seed fibril and docked monomers of opposite chirality. The lack of chiral discrimination in polyQ amyloid cytotoxicity is consistent with several toxicity mechanisms, including recruitment of cellular polyQ proteins. PMID:24291210

  6. Curcumin Binding to Beta Amyloid: A Computational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Praveen P N; Mohamed, Tarek; Teckwani, Karan; Tin, Gary

    2015-10-01

    Curcumin, a chemical constituent present in the spice turmeric, is known to prevent the aggregation of amyloid peptide implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. While curcumin is known to bind directly to various amyloid aggregates, no systematic investigations have been carried out to understand its ability to bind to the amyloid aggregates including oligomers and fibrils. In this study, we constructed computational models of (i) Aβ hexapeptide (16) KLVFFA(21) octamer steric-zipper β-sheet assembly and (ii) full-length Aβ fibril β-sheet assembly. Curcumin binding in these models was evaluated by molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. In both the models, curcumin was oriented in a linear extended conformation parallel to fiber axis and exhibited better stability in the Aβ hexapeptide (16) KLVFFA(21) octamer steric-zipper model (Ebinding  = -10.05 kcal/mol) compared to full-length Aβ fibril model (Ebinding  = -3.47 kcal/mol). Analysis of MD trajectories of curcumin bound to full-length Aβ fibril shows good stability with minimum Cα-atom RMSD shifts. Interestingly, curcumin binding led to marked fluctuations in the (14) HQKLVFFA(21) region that constitute the fibril spine with RMSF values ranging from 1.4 to 3.6 Å. These results show that curcumin binding to Aβ shifts the equilibrium in the aggregation pathway by promoting the formation of non-toxic aggregates.

  7. Protective effects of Nitraria retusa extract and its constituent isorhamnetin against amyloid β-induced cytotoxicity and amyloid β aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Akihisa; Usui, Takeo; Zar Kalai, Feten; Han, Junkyu; Isoda, Hiroko; Nagumo, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Nitraria retusa is a halophyte species that is distributed in North Africa and used as a traditional medicinal plant. In this study, N. retusa ethanol extract and its constituent isorhamnetin (IRA) protected against amyloid β (Aβ)-induced cytotoxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. An in vitro Aβ aggregation assay suggested that IRA destabilizes Aβ fibrils.

  8. Targeted pharmacological depletion of serum amyloid P component for treatment of human amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepys, M B; Herbert, J; Hutchinson, W L; Tennent, G A; Lachmann, H J; Gallimore, J R; Lovat, L B; Bartfai, T; Alanine, A; Hertel, C; Hoffmann, T; Jakob-Roetne, R; Norcross, R D; Kemp, J A; Yamamura, K; Suzuki, M; Taylor, G W; Murray, S; Thompson, D; Purvis, A; Kolstoe, S; Wood, S P; Hawkins, P N

    2002-05-16

    The normal plasma protein serum amyloid P component (SAP) binds to fibrils in all types of amyloid deposits, and contributes to the pathogenesis of amyloidosis. In order to intervene in this process we have developed a drug, R-1-[6-[R-2-carboxy-pyrrolidin-1-yl]-6-oxo-hexanoyl]pyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid, that is a competitive inhibitor of SAP binding to amyloid fibrils. This palindromic compound also crosslinks and dimerizes SAP molecules, leading to their very rapid clearance by the liver, and thus produces a marked depletion of circulating human SAP. This mechanism of drug action potently removes SAP from human amyloid deposits in the tissues and may provide a new therapeutic approach to both systemic amyloidosis and diseases associated with local amyloid, including Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes.

  9. Nanoscale structure and spectroscopic probing of Aβ1-40 fibril bundle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psonka-Antonczyk, Katarzyna; Hammarström, Per; Johansson, Leif; Lindgren, Mikael; Stokke, Bjørn Torger; Nilsson, Peter; Nyström, Sofie

    2016-11-01

    Amyloid plaques composed of fibrillar Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. However, Aβ fibrils are morphologically heterogeneous. Conformation sensitive luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs) are versatile tools for monitoring such fibril polymorphism in vivo and in vitro. Biophysical methods applied on in vitro generated Aβ fibrils, stained with LCOs with different binding and fluorescence properties, can be used to characterize the Aβ fibrillation in depth, far beyond that possible for in vivo generated amyloid plaques. In this study, in vitro fibrillation of the Aβ1-40 peptide was monitored by time-lapse transmission electron microscopy, LCO fluorescence and atomic force microscopy. Differences in the LCO binding in combination with nanoscale imaging revealed that spectral variation correlated with fibrils transforming from solitary filaments (Ø 2.5 nm) into higher order bundled structures (Ø 5 nm). These detailed in vitro experiments can be used to derive data that reflects the heterogeneity of in vivo generated Aβ plaques observed by LCO fluorescence. Our work provides new structural basis for targeted drug design and molecular probe development for amyloid imaging.

  10. Porcine prion protein amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions.

  11. Copper(II) ions and the Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide: Affinity and stoichiometry of binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tõugu, Vello; Friedemann, Merlin; Tiiman, Ann; Palumaa, Peep

    2014-10-01

    Deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides into amyloid plaques is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis this deposition is an early event and primary cause of the disease, however, the mechanisms that cause this deposition remain elusive. An increasing amount of evidence shows that the interactions of biometals can contribute to the fibrillization and amyloid formation by amyloidogenic peptides. From different anions the copper ions deserve the most attention since it can contribute not only toamyloid formation but also to its toxicity due to the generation of ROS. In this thesis we focus on the affinity and stoichiometry of copper(II) binding to the Aβ molecule.

  12. Force generation by the growth of amyloid aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herling, Therese W; Garcia, Gonzalo A; Michaels, Thomas C T; Grentz, Wolfgang; Dean, James; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Gang, Hongze; Müller, Thomas; Kav, Batuhan; Terentjev, Eugene M; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2015-08-01

    The generation of mechanical forces are central to a wide range of vital biological processes, including the function of the cytoskeleton. Although the forces emerging from the polymerization of native proteins have been studied in detail, the potential for force generation by aberrant protein polymerization has not yet been explored. Here, we show that the growth of amyloid fibrils, archetypical aberrant protein polymers, is capable of unleashing mechanical forces on the piconewton scale for individual filaments. We apply microfluidic techniques to measure the forces released by amyloid growth for two systems: insulin and lysozyme. The level of force measured for amyloid growth in both systems is comparable to that observed for actin and tubulin, systems that have evolved to generate force during their native functions and, unlike amyloid growth, rely on the input of external energy in the form of nucleotide hydrolysis for maximum force generation. Furthermore, we find that the power density released from growing amyloid fibrils is comparable to that of high-performance synthetic polymer actuators. These findings highlight the potential of amyloid structures as active materials and shed light on the criteria for regulation and reversibility that guide molecular evolution of functional polymers.

  13. High resolution spectroscopy reveals fibrillation inhibition pathways of insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Deckert, Volker

    2016-12-01

    Fibril formation implies the conversion of a protein’s native secondary structure and is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. A better understanding of fibrillation inhibition and fibril dissection requires nanoscale molecular characterization of amyloid structures involved. Tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) has already been used to chemically analyze amyloid fibrils on a sub-protein unit basis. Here, TERS in combination with atomic force microscopy (AFM), and conventional Raman spectroscopy characterizes insulin assemblies generated during inhibition and dissection experiments in the presence of benzonitrile, dimethylsulfoxide, quercetin, and β-carotene. The AFM topography indicates formation of filamentous or bead-like insulin self-assemblies. Information on the secondary structure of bulk samples and of single aggregates is obtained from standard Raman and TERS measurements. In particular the high spatial resolution of TERS reveals the surface conformations associated with the specific agents. The insulin aggregates formed under different inhibition and dissection conditions can show a similar morphology but differ in their β-sheet structure content. This suggests different aggregation pathways where the prevention of the β-sheet stacking of the peptide chains plays a major role. The presented approach is not limited to amyloid-related reasearch but can be readily applied to systems requiring extremely surface-sensitive characterization without the need of labels.

  14. Interactions of laminin with the amyloid ß peptide: Implications for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive neuronal cell loss is observed in Alzheimer's disease. Laminin immunoreactivity colocalizes with senile plaques, the characteristic extracellular histopathological lesions of Alzheimer brain, which consist of the amyloid ß (Aß peptide polymerized into amyloid fibrils. These lesions have neurotoxic effects and have been proposed to be a main cause of neurodegeneration. In order to understand the pathological significance of the interaction between laminin and amyloid, we investigated the effect of laminin on amyloid structure and toxicity. We found that laminin interacts with the Aß1-40 peptide, blocking fibril formation and even inducing depolymerization of preformed fibrils. Protofilaments known to be intermediate species of Aß fibril formation were also detected as intermediate species of laminin-induced Aß fibril depolymerization. Moreover, laminin-amyloid interactions inhibited the toxic effects on rat primary hippocampal neurons. As a whole, our results indicate a putative anti-amyloidogenic role of laminin which may be of biological and therapeutic interest for controlling amyloidosis, such as those observed in cerebral angiopathy and Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Exploring the early steps of aggregation of amyloid-forming peptide KFFE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Guanghong [Departement de Physique and Regroupement Quebecois sur les Materiaux de Pointe, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, succursale centre-ville, Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Mousseau, Normand [Departement de Physique and Regroupement Quebecois sur les Materiaux de Pointe, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, succursale centre-ville, Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Derreumaux, Philippe [Laboratoire de Biochimie, Theorique, UPR 9080 CNRS, IBPC, Universite Paris 7 Denis-Diderot, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2004-11-10

    It has been shown recently that even a tetrapeptide can form amyloid fibrils sharing all the characteristics of amyloid fibrils built from large proteins. Recent experimental studies also suggest that the toxicity observed in several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, is not only related to the mature fibrils themselves, but also to the soluble oligomers formed early in the process of fibrillogenesis. This raises the interest in studying the early steps of the aggregation process. Although fibril formation follows the nucleation-condensation process, characterized by the presence of lag phase, the exact pathways remain to be determined. In this study, we used the activation-relaxation technique and a generic energy model to explore the process of self-assembly and the structures of the resulting aggregates of eight KFFE peptides. Our simulations show, starting from different states with a preformed antiparallel dimer, that eight chains can self-assemble to adopt, with various orientations, four possible distant oligomeric well-aligned structures of similar energy. Two of these structures show a double-layer {beta}-sheet organization, in agreement with the structure of amyloid fibrils as observed by x-ray diffraction; another two are mixtures of dimers and trimers. Our results also suggest that octamers are likely to be below the critical size for nucleation of amyloid fibrils for small peptides.

  16. High-speed atomic force microscopy reveals structural dynamics of amyloid β1-42 aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Ono, Kenjiro; Itami, Masahiro; Takahashi, Ryoichi; Teplow, David B; Yamada, Masahito

    2016-05-24

    Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins into insoluble amyloid fibrils is implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases. This process involves protein assembly into oligomeric intermediates and fibrils with highly polymorphic molecular structures. These structural differences may be responsible for different disease presentations. For this reason, elucidation of the structural features and assembly kinetics of amyloidogenic proteins has been an area of intense study. We report here the results of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) studies of fibril formation and elongation by the 42-residue form of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ1-42), a key pathogenetic agent of Alzheimer's disease. Our data demonstrate two different growth modes of Aβ1-42, one producing straight fibrils and the other producing spiral fibrils. Each mode depends on initial fibril nucleus structure, but switching from one growth mode to another was occasionally observed, suggesting that fibril end structure fluctuated between the two growth modes. This switching phenomenon was affected by buffer salt composition. Our findings indicate that polymorphism in fibril structure can occur after fibril nucleation and is affected by relatively modest changes in environmental conditions.

  17. Atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Casper N

    2013-10-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common complication after myocardial infarction (MI) and new-onset AF has been demonstrated to be associated with adverse outcome and a large excess risk of death in both MI and aortic stenosis (AS) patients. Prevention of new-onset AF is therefore a potential therapeutic target in AS and MI patients. Lipid-lowering drugs, particularly statins, have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that may prevent AF. Accordingly, statins are recommended as a class IIa recommendation for prevention of new-onset AF after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, this preventive effect has not been investigated on new-onset AF in asymptomatic patients with AS or a large scale first-time MI patient sample and data in patients not undergoing invasive cardiac interventions are limited. This PhD thesis was conducted at the Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, Denmark, with the aim to investigate the three aforementioned questions and to add to the existing evidence of AF prevention with statins. This was done using three different settings: 1) a randomized patients sample of 1,873 from the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS) study, 2) a register patient sample of 97,499 with first-time MI, and 3) all published studies until beginning of June 2011 examining statin treatment on new-onset and recurrent AF in patients not undergoing cardiac surgery. This thesis revealed that statins did not lower the incidence or the time to new-onset AF in patients with asymptomatic AS. However, statin treatment showed an independently preventive effect on new-onset AF, including type-dependent effect and a trend to dosage-dependent effect. In addition, this thesis showed that good compliance to statin treatment was important to prevent new-onset AF. Finally, the meta-analysis in this PhD thesis showed a preventive effect in the observational studies although this effect was absent in the randomized controlled trials. Based on this PhD thesis

  18. Isolated Atrial Amyloidosis in Patients with Various Types of Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhacheva, T V; Eremeeva, M V; Ibragimova, A G; Vaskovskii, V A; Serov, R A; Revishvili, A Sh

    2016-04-01

    The myocardium of the right and left atrial appendages (auricles) in patients with paroxysmal, persistent, and permanent forms of atrial fibrillation was examined by histological methods and electron microscopy. Isolated atrial amyloidosis was detected in the left (50.0-56.3% patients) and in the right (45.0-55.6% patients) atrial appendages. In all cases, immunohistochemistry revealed atrial natriuretic peptide in fibrillary amyloid deposits. Ultrastructurally, amyloid masses formed clusters of myofibrils 8-10 nm in diameter. They were chaotically located in the extracellular space along the sarcolemma as well as in membrane invaginations, dilated tubules of cardiomyocyte T-tubular system, and vascular walls. Amyloidosis was predominantly observed in women; its degree positively correlated with age of patients and duration of atrial fibrillation but negatively correlated with atrial fibrosis. The study revealed positive (in permanent atrial fibrillation) and negative (in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation) correlation of amyloidosis with myofibril content in atrial cardiomyocytes.

  19. Crowding alone cannot account for cosolute effect on amyloid aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahar Sukenik

    Full Text Available Amyloid fiber formation is a specific form of protein aggregation, often resulting from the misfolding of native proteins. Aimed at modeling the crowded environment of the cell, recent experiments showed a reduction in fibrillation halftimes for amyloid-forming peptides in the presence of cosolutes that are preferentially excluded from proteins and peptides. The effect of excluded cosolutes has previously been attributed to the large volume excluded by such inert cellular solutes, sometimes termed "macromolecular crowding". Here, we studied a model peptide that can fold to a stable monomeric β-hairpin conformation, but under certain solution conditions aggregates in the form of amyloid fibrils. Using Circular Dichroism spectroscopy (CD, we found that, in the presence of polyols and polyethylene glycols acting as excluded cosolutes, the monomeric β-hairpin conformation was stabilized with respect to the unfolded state. Stabilization free energy was linear with cosolute concentration, and grew with molecular volume, as would also be predicted by crowding models. After initiating the aggregation process with a pH jump, fibrillation in the presence and absence of cosolutes was followed by ThT fluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, and CD spectroscopy. Polyols (glycerol and sorbitol increased the lag time for fibril formation and elevated the amount of aggregated peptide at equilibrium, in a cosolute size and concentration dependent manner. However, fibrillation rates remained almost unaffected by a wide range of molecular weights of soluble polyethylene glycols. Our results highlight the importance of other forces beyond the excluded volume interactions responsible for crowding that may contribute to the cosolute effects acting on amyloid formation.

  20. Effect of Metals on Kinetic Pathways of Amyloid-β Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Hane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal ions, including copper and zinc, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease through a variety of mechanisms including increased amyloid-β affinity and redox effects. Recent reports have demonstrated that the amyloid-β monomer does not necessarily travel through a definitive intermediary en-route to a stable amyloid fibril structure. Rather, amyloid-β misfolding may follow a variety of pathways resulting in a fibrillar end-product or a variety of oligomeric end-products with a diversity of structures and sizes. The presence of metal ions has been demonstrated to alter the kinetic pathway of the amyloid-β peptide which may lead to more toxic oligomeric end-products. In this work, we review the contemporary literature supporting the hypothesis that metal ions alter the reaction pathway of amyloid-β misfolding leading to more neurotoxic species.

  1. Phosphate and HEPES buffers potently affect the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Alzheimer's A{beta} peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garvey, Megan; Tepper, Katharina [Max-Planck-Forschungsstelle fuer Enzymologie der Proteinfaltung, Weinbergweg 22, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Haupt, Caroline [Institute fuer Physik, Biophysik, Martin-Luther Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Betty-Heimann-Str. 7, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Knuepfer, Uwe [Leibniz-Institute for Infection Biology and Natural Product Research, Beutenbergstr. 11a, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Klement, Karolin; Meinhardt, Jessica [Leibniz-Institute for Age Research (FLI), Beutenbergstr. 11, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Horn, Uwe [Leibniz-Institute for Infection Biology and Natural Product Research, Beutenbergstr. 11a, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Balbach, Jochen [Institute fuer Physik, Biophysik, Martin-Luther Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Betty-Heimann-Str. 7, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Faendrich, Marcus, E-mail: fandrich@enzyme-halle.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Forschungsstelle fuer Enzymologie der Proteinfaltung, Weinbergweg 22, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Bio zentrum, Martin-Luther Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Weinbergweg 22, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Sodium phosphate buffer accelerated A{beta}(1-40) nucleation relative to HEPES. {yields} A{beta}(1-40) fibrils formed in the two buffers show only minor structural differences. {yields} NMR revealed that A{beta}(1-40) histidine residues mediate buffer dependent changes. -- Abstract: The oligomerization of A{beta} peptide into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Due to its biological relevance, phosphate is the most commonly used buffer system for studying the formation of A{beta} and other amyloid fibrils. Investigation into the characteristics and formation of amyloid fibrils frequently relies upon material formed in vitro, predominantly in phosphate buffers. Herein, we examine the effects on the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of A{beta} peptide that occur due solely to the influence of phosphate buffer. We reveal that significant differences in amyloid fibrillation are observed due to fibrillation being initiated in phosphate or HEPES buffer (at physiological pH and temperature). Except for the differing buffer ions, all experimental parameters were kept constant. Fibril formation was assessed using fluorescently monitored kinetic studies, microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Based on this set up, we herein reveal profound effects on the mechanism and speed of A{beta} fibrillation. The three histidine residues at positions 6, 13 and 14 of A{beta}(1-40) are instrumental in these mechanistic changes. We conclude that buffer plays a more significant role in fibril formation than has been generally acknowledged.

  2. Prediction of Peptide and Protein Propensity for Amyloid Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Família

    Full Text Available Understanding which peptides and proteins have the potential to undergo amyloid formation and what driving forces are responsible for amyloid-like fiber formation and stabilization remains limited. This is mainly because proteins that can undergo structural changes, which lead to amyloid formation, are quite diverse and share no obvious sequence or structural homology, despite the structural similarity found in the fibrils. To address these issues, a novel approach based on recursive feature selection and feed-forward neural networks was undertaken to identify key features highly correlated with the self-assembly problem. This approach allowed the identification of seven physicochemical and biochemical properties of the amino acids highly associated with the self-assembly of peptides and proteins into amyloid-like fibrils (normalized frequency of β-sheet, normalized frequency of β-sheet from LG, weights for β-sheet at the window position of 1, isoelectric point, atom-based hydrophobic moment, helix termination parameter at position j+1 and ΔG° values for peptides extrapolated in 0 M urea. Moreover, these features enabled the development of a new predictor (available at http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/appnn/index.html capable of accurately and reliably predicting the amyloidogenic propensity from the polypeptide sequence alone with a prediction accuracy of 84.9 % against an external validation dataset of sequences with experimental in vitro, evidence of amyloid formation.

  3. Proinsulin C-peptide interferes with insulin fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landreh, Michael [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd [Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, Astrid Lindgren Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Endocrinology Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Willander, Hanna [KI-Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, NVS Department, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Soeder, Olle [Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, Astrid Lindgren Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Endocrinology Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, Jan [KI-Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, NVS Department, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Joernvall, Hans, E-mail: Hans.Jornvall@ki.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin and C-peptide can interact under insulin fibril forming conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide is incorporated into insulin aggregates and alters aggregation lag time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide changes insulin fibril morphology and affects backbone accessibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide may be a regulator of fibril formation by {beta}-cell granule proteins. -- Abstract: Insulin aggregation can prevent rapid insulin uptake and cause localized amyloidosis in the treatment of type-1 diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effect of C-peptide, the 31-residue peptide cleaved from proinsulin, on insulin fibrillation at optimal conditions for fibrillation. This is at low pH and high concentration, when the fibrils formed are regular and extended. We report that C-peptide then modulates the insulin aggregation lag time and profoundly changes the fibril appearance, to rounded clumps of short fibrils, which, however, still are Thioflavine T-positive. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry also indicates that C-peptide interacts with aggregating insulin and is incorporated into the aggregates. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry further reveals reduced backbone accessibility in insulin aggregates formed in the presence of C-peptide. Combined, these effects are similar to those of C-peptide on islet amyloid polypeptide fibrillation and suggest that C-peptide has a general ability to interact with amyloidogenic proteins from pancreatic {beta}-cell granules. Considering the concentrations, these peptide interactions should be relevant also during physiological secretion, and even so at special sites post-secretory or under insulin treatment conditions in vivo.

  4. Study of β-amyloid adsorption and aggregation on graphite by STM and AFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been applied to the direct study of the adsorption and aggregation of β-amyloid(1-42)(Aβ42) on the hydrophobic graphite surface. It was found that Aβ42 were preferentially adsorbed on graphite defects such as the edges. Aβ42 peptides self-assembled into intermediate protofibrils, which in turn self-associated to form fibrils. Usually, two or more fibrils intertwined to form the helical structure. These results will provide an important clue to studying the aggregation process of β-amyloid.

  5. Atrial Ectopics Precipitating Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Francis

    2015-01-01

    Holter monitor tracing showing blocked atrial ectopics and atrial ectopic precipitating atrial fibrillation is being demonstrated. Initially it was coarse atrial fibrillation, which rapidly degenerated into fine atrial fibrillation.

  6. How does domain replacement affect fibril formation of the rabbit/human prion proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yan

    Full Text Available It is known that in vivo human prion protein (PrP have the tendency to form fibril deposits and are associated with infectious fatal prion diseases, while the rabbit PrP does not readily form fibrils and is unlikely to cause prion diseases. Although we have previously demonstrated that amyloid fibrils formed by the rabbit PrP and the human PrP have different secondary structures and macromolecular crowding has different effects on fibril formation of the rabbit/human PrPs, we do not know which domains of PrPs cause such differences. In this study, we have constructed two PrP chimeras, rabbit chimera and human chimera, and investigated how domain replacement affects fibril formation of the rabbit/human PrPs.As revealed by thioflavin T binding assays and Sarkosyl-soluble SDS-PAGE, the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes fibril formation of both chimeras. As evidenced by circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and proteinase K digestion assays, amyloid fibrils formed by human chimera have secondary structures and proteinase K-resistant features similar to those formed by the human PrP. However, amyloid fibrils formed by rabbit chimera have proteinase K-resistant features and secondary structures in crowded physiological environments different from those formed by the rabbit PrP, and secondary structures in dilute solutions similar to the rabbit PrP. The results from transmission electron microscopy show that macromolecular crowding caused human chimera but not rabbit chimera to form short fibrils and non-fibrillar particles.We demonstrate for the first time that the domains beyond PrP-H2H3 (β-strand 1, α-helix 1, and β-strand 2 have a remarkable effect on fibrillization of the rabbit PrP but almost no effect on the human PrP. Our findings can help to explain why amyloid fibrils formed by the rabbit PrP and the human PrP have different secondary structures and why macromolecular crowding has different

  7. Thermodynamics of amyloid formation and the role of intersheet interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irbäck, Anders; Wessén, Jonas

    2015-09-14

    The self-assembly of proteins into β-sheet-rich amyloid fibrils has been observed to occur with sigmoidal kinetics, indicating that the system initially is trapped in a metastable state. Here, we use a minimal lattice-based model to explore the thermodynamic forces driving amyloid formation in a finite canonical (NVT) system. By means of generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo techniques and a semi-analytical method, the thermodynamic properties of this model are investigated for different sets of intersheet interaction parameters. When the interactions support lateral growth into multi-layered fibrillar structures, an evaporation/condensation transition is observed, between a supersaturated solution state and a thermodynamically distinct state where small and large fibril-like species exist in equilibrium. Intermediate-size aggregates are statistically suppressed. These properties do not hold if aggregate growth is one-dimensional.

  8. Thermodynamics of amyloid formation and the role of intersheet interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Irbäck, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of proteins into $\\beta$-sheet-rich amyloid fibrils has been observed to occur with sigmoidal kinetics, indicating that the system initially is trapped in a metastable state. Here, we use a minimal lattice-based model to explore the thermodynamic forces driving amyloid formation in a finite canonical ($NVT$) system. By means of generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo techniques and a semi-analytical method, the thermodynamic properties of this model are investigated for different sets of intersheet interaction parameters. When the interactions support lateral growth into multi-layered fibrillar structures, an evaporation/condensation transition is observed, between a supersaturated solution state and a thermodynamically distinct state where small and large fibril-like species exist in equilibrium. Intermediate-size aggregates are statistically suppressed. These properties do not hold if aggregate growth is one-dimensional.

  9. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastus Neus

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  10. Picosecond pulsed infrared laser tuned to amide I band dissociates polyglutamine fibrils in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takayasu; Ohori, Gaku; Chiba, Tomoyuki; Tsukiyama, Koichi; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils are causal substances for serious neurodegenerative disorders and amyloidosis. Among them, polyglutamine fibrils seen in multiple polyglutamine diseases are toxic to neurons. Although much efforts have been made to explore the treatments of polyglutamine diseases, there are no effective drugs to block progression of the diseases. We recently found that a free electron laser (FEL), which has an oscillation wavelength at the amide I band (C = O stretch vibration mode) and picosecond pulse width, was effective for conversion of the fibril forms of insulin, lysozyme, and calcitonin peptide into their monomer forms. However, it is not known if that is also the case in polyglutamine fibrils in cells. We found in this study that the fibril-specific β-sheet conformation of polyglutamine peptide was converted into nonfibril form, as evidenced by the infrared microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy after the irradiation tuned to 6.08 μm. Furthermore, irradiation at this wavelength also changed polyglutamine fibrils to their nonfibril state in cultured cells, as shown by infrared mapping image of protein secondary structure. Notably, infrared thermography analysis showed that temperature increase of the cells during the irradiation was within 1 K, excluding thermal damage of cells. These results indicate that the picosecond pulsed infrared laser can safely reduce amyloid fibril structure to the nonfibril form even in cells.

  11. Depletion of spleen macrophages delays AA amyloid development: a study performed in the rapid mouse model of AA amyloidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Lundmark

    Full Text Available AA amyloidosis is a systemic disease that develops secondary to chronic inflammatory diseases Macrophages are often found in the vicinity of amyloid deposits and considered to play a role in both formation and degradation of amyloid fibrils. In spleen reside at least three types of macrophages, red pulp macrophages (RPM, marginal zone macrophages (MZM, metallophilic marginal zone macrophages (MMZM. MMZM and MZM are located in the marginal zone and express a unique collection of scavenger receptors that are involved in the uptake of blood-born particles. The murine AA amyloid model that resembles the human form of the disease has been used to study amyloid effects on different macrophage populations. Amyloid was induced by intravenous injection of amyloid enhancing factor and subcutaneous injections of silver nitrate and macrophages were identified with specific antibodies. We show that MZMs are highly sensitive to amyloid and decrease in number progressively with increasing amyloid load. Total area of MMZMs is unaffected by amyloid but cells are activated and migrate into the white pulp. In a group of mice spleen macrophages were depleted by an intravenous injection of clodronate filled liposomes. Subsequent injections of AEF and silver nitrate showed a sustained amyloid development. RPMs that constitute the majority of macrophages in spleen, appear insensitive to amyloid and do not participate in amyloid formation.

  12. β-hairpin-mediated nucleation of polyglutamine amyloid formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Karunakar; Hoop, Cody L.; Drombosky, Kenneth W.; Baker, Matthew A.; Kodali, Ravindra; Arduini, Irene; van der Wel, Patrick C.A.; Horne, W. Seth; Wetzel, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    The conformational preferences of polyglutamine (polyQ) sequences are of major interest because of their central importance in the expanded CAG repeat diseases that include Huntington’s disease (HD). Here we explore the response of various biophysical parameters to the introduction of β-hairpin motifs within polyQ sequences. These motifs (trpzip, disulfide, D-Pro-Gly, Coulombic attraction, L-Pro-Gly) enhance formation rates and stabilities of amyloid fibrils with degrees of effectiveness well...

  13. Study of neurotoxic intracellular calcium signalling triggered by amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Carlos; Caballero, Erica; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Núñez, Lucía

    2012-01-01

    Neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated to dishomeostasis of intracellular Ca(2+) induced by amyloid β peptide (Aβ) species. Understanding of the effects of Aβ on intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis requires preparation of the different Aβ assemblies including oligomers and fibrils and the testing of their effects on cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) in neurons. Procedures for cerebellar granule cell culture, preparation of Aβ species as well as fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging of cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) in neurons are described.

  14. Vulnerability to ventricular fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janse, Michiel J.

    1998-03-01

    One of the factors that favors the development of ventricular fibrillation is an increase in the dispersion of refractoriness. Experiments will be described in which an increase in dispersion in the recovery of excitability was determined during brief episodes of enhanced sympathetic nerve activity, known to increase the risk of fibrillation. Whereas in the normal heart ventricular fibrillation can be induced by a strong electrical shock, a premature stimulus of moderate intensity only induces fibrillation in the presence of regional ischemia, which greatly increases the dispersion of refractoriness. One factor that is of importance for the transition of reentrant ventricular tachycardia to ventricular fibrillation during acute regional ischemia is the subendocardial Purkinje system. After selective destruction of the Purkinje network by lugol, reentrant tachycardias still develop in the ischemic region, but they do not degenerate into fibrillation. Finally, attempts were made to determine the minimal mass of thin ventricular myocardium required to sustain fibrillation induced by burst pacing. This was done by freezing of subendocardial and midmural layers. The rim of surviving epicardial muscle had to be larger than 20 g. Extracellular electrograms during fibrillation in both the intact and the "frozen" left ventricle were indistinguishable, but activation patterns were markedly different. In the intact ventricle epicardial activation was compatible with multiple wavelet reentry, in the "frozen" heart a single, or at most two wandering reentrant waves were seen.

  15. Amyloid Beta Aggregation in the Presence of Temperature-Sensitive Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Funtan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The formation of amyloid fibrils is considered to be one of the main causes for many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s or Huntington’s disease. Current knowledge suggests that amyloid-aggregation represents a nucleation-dependent aggregation process in vitro, where a sigmoidal growth phase follows an induction period. Here, we studied the fibrillation of amyloid β 1-40 (Aβ40 in the presence of thermoresponsive polymers, expected to alter the Aβ40 fibrillation kinetics due to their lower critical solution behavior. To probe the influence of molecular weight and the end groups of the polymer on its lower critical solution temperature (LCST, also considering its concentration dependence in the presence of buffer-salts needed for the aggregation studies of the amyloids, poly(oxazolines (POx with LCSTs ranging from 14.2–49.8 °C and poly(methoxy di(ethylene glycolacrylates with LCSTs ranging from 34.4–52.7 °C were synthesized. The two different polymers allowed the comparison of the influence of different molecular structures onto the fibrillation process. Mixtures of Aβ40 with these polymers in varying concentrations were studied via time-dependent measurements of the thioflavin T (ThT fluorescence. The studies revealed that amyloid fibrillation was accelerated in, accompanied by an extension of the lag phase of Aβ40 fibrillation from 18.3 h in the absence to 19.3 h in the presence of the poly(methoxy di(ethylene glycolacrylate (3600 g/mol.

  16. Dynamics of Focal Fibrillation Waves during Persistent Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanters, Eva A H; Allessie, Maurits A; DE Groot, Natasja M S

    2016-04-01

    The incidence and appearance of focal fibrillation waves on the right and left atrial epicardial surface were visualized during 10 seconds of persistent atrial fibrillation in a 71-year-old woman with valvular heart disease. The frequent, nonrepetitive, widespread, and capricious distribution of focal waves suggests that transmural conduction of fibrillation waves is most likely the mechanism underlying focal fibrillation waves.

  17. D-polyglutamine amyloid recruits L-polyglutamine monomers and kills cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Karunakar; Arduini, Irene; Drombosky, Kenneth W.; van der Wel, Patrick C.A.; Wetzel, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) amyloid fibrils are observed in disease tissue and have been implicated as toxic agents responsible for neurodegeneration in expanded CAG repeat diseases like Huntington’s disease (HD). Despite intensive efforts, the mechanism of amyloid toxicity remains unknown. As a novel approach to probing polyQ toxicity, we investigate here how some cellular and physical properties of polyQ amyloid vary with the chirality of the glutamine residues in the polyQ. We challenged PC12 ce...

  18. Eugenol prevents amyloid formation of proteins and inhibits amyloid-induced hemolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Kriti; Anand, Bibin G.; Shekhawat, Dolat Singh; Kar, Karunakar

    2017-02-01

    Eugenol has attracted considerable attention because of its potential for many pharmaceutical applications including anti-inflammatory, anti-tumorigenic and anti-oxidant properties. Here, we have investigated the effect of eugenol on amyloid formation of selected globular proteins. We find that both spontaneous and seed-induced aggregation processes of insulin and serum albumin (BSA) are significantly suppressed in the presence of eugenol. Isothermal titration calorimetric data predict a single binding site for eugenol-insulin complex confirming the affinity of eugenol for native soluble insulin species. We also find that eugenol suppresses amyloid-induced hemolysis. Our findings reveal the inherent ability of eugenol to stabilize native proteins and to delay the conversion of protein species of native conformation into β-sheet assembled mature fibrils, which seems to be crucial for its inhibitory effect.

  19. A beta2-microglobulin cleavage variant fibrillates at near-physiological pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corlin, Dorthe B; Johnsen, Christina K; Nissen, Mogens H

    2009-01-01

    Beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) deposits as amyloid in dialysis-related amyloidosis (DRA), predominantly in joints. The molecular mechanisms underlying the amyloidogenicity of beta2m are still largely unknown. In vitro, acidic conditions, pH ... several days. Here, we show that amyloid fibrils are generated in less than an hour when a cleavage variant of beta2m--found in the circulation of many dialysis patients--is exposed to pH levels (pH 6.6) occurring in joints during inflammation. Aggregation and fibrillation, including seeding effects...... with intact, native beta2m were studied by Thioflavin T fluorescence spectroscopy, turbidimetry, capillary electrophoresis, and electron microscopy. We conclude that a biologically relevant variant of beta2m is amyloidogenic at slightly acidic pH. Also, only a very small amount of preformed fibrils...

  20. Concentration dependence of alpha-synuclein fibril length assessed by quantitative atomic force microscopy and statistical-mechanical theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Raaij, Martijn E; van Gestel, Jeroen; Segers-Nolten, Ine M J; de Leeuw, Simon W; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2008-11-15

    The initial concentration of monomeric amyloidogenic proteins is a crucial factor in the in vitro formation of amyloid fibrils. We use quantitative atomic force microscopy to study the effect of the initial concentration of human alpha-synuclein on the mean length of mature alpha-synuclein fibrils, which are associated with Parkinson's disease. We determine that the critical initial concentration, below which low-molecular-weight species dominate and above which fibrils are the dominant species, lies at approximately 15 muM, in good agreement with earlier measurements using biochemical methods. In the concentration regime where fibrils dominate, we find that their mean length increases with initial concentration. These results correspond well to the qualitative predictions of a recent statistical-mechanical model of amyloid fibril formation. In addition, good quantitative agreement of the statistical-mechanical model with the measured mean fibril length as a function of initial protein concentration, as well as with the fibril length distributions for several protein concentrations, is found for reasonable values of the relevant model parameters. The comparison between theory and experiment yields, for the first time to our knowledge, an estimate of the magnitude of the free energies associated with the intermolecular interactions that govern alpha-synuclein fibril formation.

  1. Surgery for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrance, Christopher P; Henn, Matthew C; Damiano, Ralph J

    2014-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, and its treatment options include drug therapy or catheter-based or surgical interventions. The surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation has undergone multiple evolutions over the last several decades. The Cox-Maze procedure went on to become the gold standard for the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation and is currently in its fourth iteration (Cox-Maze IV). This article reviews the indications and preoperative planning for performing a Cox-Maze IV procedure. This article also reviews the literature describing the surgical results for both approaches including comparisons of the Cox-Maze IV to the previous cut-and-sew method.

  2. Epigallocatechin Gallate Remodels overexpressed Functional Amyloids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Increases Biofilm Susceptibility to Antibiotic Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Marcel; Dueholm, Morten S; Vad, Brian S;

    2016-01-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the major polyphenol in green tea. It has anti-microbial properties and disrupts the ordered structure of amyloid fibrils involved in human disease. The anti-microbial effect of EGCG against the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been shown...

  3. Constant region of a kappa III immunoglobulin light chain as a major AL-amyloid protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvig, J P; Olsen, K E; Gislefoss, R E

    1998-01-01

    and the corresponding AL protein as a kappa III immunoglobulin light chain from material of a patient with systemic AL-amyloidosis presenting as a local inguinal tumour. The two proteins showed some unique features. The major part of the AL amyloid fibril protein consisted of C-terminal fragments of the Bence...

  4. [Amyloid typing from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues using LMD-LC-MS/MS system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasaki, Masayoshi; Obayashi, Konen; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Ando, Yukio

    2014-03-01

    Amyloidosis is one of the protein conformational disorders in which normally soluble proteins accumulate insoluble amyloid fibrils, leading to severe organ dysfunction. To date, 30 different amyloidogenic proteins have been reported. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is usually used to identify the amyloid precursor protein, but the results may be inconclusive owing to a loss of epitopes or small amounts of amyloid deposits, comprising unknown amyloidogenic protein. Recently, laser microdissection (LMD)-liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been used in a novel method to identify amyloid precursor protein from amyloid-laden formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues. We describe the usefulness of the system for amyloid typing in this report.

  5. Trifluoroethanol modulates amyloid formation by the all α-helical URN1 FF domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Patrizia; Castillo, Virginia; Ventura, Salvador

    2013-08-30

    Amyloid fibril formation is implicated in different human diseases. The transition between native α-helices and nonnative intermolecular β-sheets has been suggested to be a trigger of fibrillation in different conformational diseases. The FF domain of the URN1 splicing factor (URN1-FF) is a small all-α protein that populates a molten globule (MG) at low pH. Despite the fact that this conformation maintains most of the domain native secondary structure, it progressively converts into β-sheet enriched and highly ordered amyloid fibrils. In this study, we investigated if 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) induced conformational changes that affect URN1-FF amyloid formation. Despite TFE having been shown to induce or increase the aggregation of both globular and disordered proteins at moderate concentrations, we demonstrate here that in the case of URN1-FF it reinforces its intrinsic α-helical structure, which competes the formation of aggregated assemblies. In addition, we show that TFE induces conformational diversity in URN1-FF fibrils, in such a way that the fibrils formed in the presence and absence of the cosolvent represent different polymorphs. It is suggested that the effect of TFE on both the soluble and aggregated states of URN1-FF depends on its ability to facilitate hydrogen bonding.

  6. Characterization of the spherical intermediates and fibril formation of hCT in HEPES solution using solid-state 13C-NMR and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh-Watanabe, Hikari; Kamihira-Ishijima, Miya; Kawamura, Izuru; Kondoh, Masashi; Nakakoshi, Masamichi; Sato, Michio; Naito, Akira

    2013-10-21

    Human calcitonin (hCT) is a 32-amino acid peptide hormone that contains an intrachain disulfide bridge between Cys1 and Cys7 and a proline amide at the C-terminus. hCT tends to associate to form a fibril precipitate of the same type as amyloid fibrils, and hence has been studied as a model of amyloid fibril formation. The fibrillation process in N-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) solution was examined using transmission electron microscopy. The rate of hCT fibrillation in HEPES solution was much lower than in phosphate buffer and acetic acid solution. Spherical intermediate aggregates (nuclei) were observed during the early stage of fibril formation. Short proto-fibrils appeared on the surface of the spherical intermediates. Subsequently, the spherical intermediates transformed directly into long proto-fibrils, which then elongated into mature hCT fibrils. The fibrillation process was also examined using solid-state (13)C-NMR spectroscopy, which indicated that the fibril structure was a β-sheet in the central region and a mixture of random coils and β-sheets at the C-terminus. The kinetics of fibril formation was examined in terms of a two-step autocatalytic reaction mechanism. The first-step nucleation rate (k1) was lower in HEPES solution than in phosphate buffer and acetic acid solution because the half-life of the intermediates is significantly longer in HEPES solution. In contrast, the second-step fibril elongation rate (k2) was similar in HEPES solution and acidic solutions. Specific interaction of HEPES molecules with hCT may stabilize the spherical intermediates and consequently inhibit the fibril elongation process of hCT.

  7. What Is Atrial Fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regular beat. Certain cells in your heart make electric signals that cause the heart to contract and pump ... read your ECG to find out if the electric signals are normal. In atrial fibrillation (AFib), the heart’s ...

  8. Heterogeneous Seeding of a Prion Structure by a Generic Amyloid Form of the Fungal Prion-forming Domain HET-s(218-289)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, William; Bian, Wen; McDonald, Michele; Kijac, Aleksandra; Wemmer, David E.; Stubbs, Gerald [UCB; (Vanderbilt); (LBNL)

    2013-11-13

    The fungal prion-forming domain HET-s(218–289) forms infectious amyloid fibrils at physiological pH that were shown by solid-state NMR to be assemblies of a two-rung β-solenoid structure. Under acidic conditions, HET-s(218–289) has been shown to form amyloid fibrils that have very low infectivity in vivo, but structural information about these fibrils has been very limited. We show by x-ray fiber diffraction that the HET-s(218–289) fibrils formed under acidic conditions have a stacked β-sheet architecture commonly found in short amyloidogenic peptides and denatured protein aggregates. At physiological pH, stacked β-sheet fibrils nucleate the formation of the infectious β-solenoid prions in a process of heterogeneous seeding, but do so with kinetic profiles distinct from those of spontaneous or homogeneous (seeded with infectious β-solenoid fibrils) fibrillization. Several serial passages of stacked β-sheet-seeded solutions lead to fibrillization kinetics similar to homogeneously seeded solutions. Our results directly show that structural mutation can occur between substantially different amyloid architectures, lending credence to the suggestion that the processes of strain adaptation and crossing species barriers are facilitated by structural mutation.

  9. Computational Design of New Peptide Inhibitors for Amyloid Beta (Aβ) Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease: Application of a Novel Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Gözde Eskici; Mert Gur

    2013-01-01

    Computational Design of New Peptide Inhibitors for Amyloid Beta (Ab) Aggregation in Alzheimer’s Disease: Application of a Novel Methodology Go¨ zde Eskici¤a , Mert Gur¤b* Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey Abstract Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. It is a neurodegenerative and incurable disease that is associated with the tight packing of amyloid fibrils. This packing is facilitated by the compatib...

  10. β-hairpin-mediated nucleation of polyglutamine amyloid formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Karunakar; Hoop, Cody L.; Drombosky, Kenneth W.; Baker, Matthew A.; Kodali, Ravindra; Arduini, Irene; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; Horne, W. Seth; Wetzel, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    The conformational preferences of polyglutamine (polyQ) sequences are of major interest because of their central importance in the expanded CAG repeat diseases that include Huntington’s disease (HD). Here we explore the response of various biophysical parameters to the introduction of β-hairpin motifs within polyQ sequences. These motifs (trpzip, disulfide, D-Pro-Gly, Coulombic attraction, L-Pro-Gly) enhance formation rates and stabilities of amyloid fibrils with degrees of effectiveness well-correlated with their known abilities to enhance β-hairpin formation in other peptides. These changes led to decreases in the critical nucleus for amyloid formation from a value of n* = 4 for a simple, unbroken Q23 sequence to approximate unitary n* values for similar length polyQs containing β-hairpin motifs. At the same time, the morphologies, secondary structures, and bioactivities of the resulting fibrils were essentially unchanged from simple polyQ aggregates. In particular, the signature pattern of SSNMR 13C Gln resonances that appears to be unique to polyQ amyloid is replicated exactly in fibrils from a β-hairpin polyQ. Importantly, while β-hairpin motifs do produce enhancements in the equilibrium constant for nucleation in aggregation reactions, these Kn* values remain quite low (~ 10−10) and there is no evidence for significant embellishment of β-structure within the monomer ensemble. The results indicate an important role for β-turns in the nucleation mechanism and structure of polyQ amyloid and have implications for the nature of the toxic species in expanded CAG repeat diseases. PMID:23353826

  11. Thermodynamics and dynamics of amyloid peptide oligomerization are sequence dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Derreumaux, Philippe; Guo, Zhi; Mousseau, Normand; Wei, Guanghong

    2009-06-01

    Aggregation of the full-length amyloid-beta (Abeta) and beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) proteins is associated with Alzheimer's disease and dialysis-related amyloidosis, respectively. This assembly process is not restricted to full-length proteins, however, many short peptides also assemble into amyloid fibrils in vitro. Remarkably, the kinetics of amyloid-fibril formation of all these molecules is generally described by a nucleation-polymerization process characterized by a lag phase associated with the formation of a nucleus, after which fibril elongation occurs rapidly. In this study, we report using long molecular dynamics simulations with the OPEP coarse-grained force field, the thermodynamics and dynamics of the octamerization for two amyloid 7-residue peptides: the beta2m83-89 NHVTLSQ and Abeta16-22 KLVFFAE fragments. Based on multiple trajectories run at 310 K, totaling 2.2 mus (beta2m83-89) and 4.8 mus (Abeta16-22) and starting from random configurations and orientations of the chains, we find that the two peptides not only share common but also very different aggregation properties. Notably, an increase in the hydrophobic character of the peptide, as observed in Abeta16-22 with respect to beta2m83-89 impacts the thermodynamics by reducing the population of bilayer beta-sheet assemblies. Higher hydrophobicity is also found to slow down the dynamics of beta-sheet formation by enhancing the averaged lifetime of all configuration types (CT) and by reducing the complexity of the CT transition probability matrix. Proteins 2009. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Quality control system response to stochastic growth of amyloid fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pigolotti, Simone; Lizana, Ludvig; Otzen, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a stochastic model describing aggregation of misfolded proteins and degradation by the protein quality control system in a single cell. Aggregate growth is contrasted by the cell quality control system, that attacks them at different stages of the growth process, with an efficiency t...

  13. Evaluation of membrane models and their composition for islet amyloid polypeptide-membrane aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillon, Lucie; Lequin, Olivier; Khemtémourian, Lucie

    2013-09-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) forms amyloid fibrils in the pancreatic islets of patients suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The formation of IAPP fibrils has been shown to cause membrane damage which most likely is responsible for the death of pancreatic islet β-cells during the pathogenesis of T2DM. Several studies have demonstrated a clear interaction between IAPP and lipid membranes. However the effect of different lipid compositions and of various membrane mimetics (including micelles, bicelles, SUV and LUV) on fibril formation kinetics and fibril morphology has not yet systematically been analysed. Here we report that the interaction of IAPP with various membrane models promoted different processes of fibril formation. Our data reveal that in SDS and DPC micelles, IAPP adopts a stable α-helical structure for several days, suggesting that the micelle models may stabilize monomeric or small oligomeric species of IAPP. In contrast, zwitterionic DMPC/DHPC bicelles and DOPC SUV accelerate the fibril formation compared to zwitterionic DOPC LUV, indicating that the size of the membrane model and its curvature influence the fibrillation process. Negatively charged membranes decrease the lag-time of the fibril formation kinetics while phosphatidylethanolamine and cholesterol have an opposite effect, probably due to the modulation of the physical properties of the membrane and/or due to direct interactions with IAPP within the membrane core. Finally, our results show that the modulation of lipid composition influences not only the growth of fibrils at the membrane surface but also the interactions of β-sheet oligomers with membranes.

  14. Molecular-level secondary structure, polymorphism, and dynamics of full-length -synuclein fibrils studied by solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Henrike; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Becker, Stefan; Andronesi, Ovidiu C.; Riedel, Dietmar; Baldus, Marc

    2005-11-01

    The 140-residue protein -synuclein (AS) is able to form amyloid fibrils and as such is the main component of protein inclusions involved in Parkinson's disease. We have investigated the structure and dynamics of full-length AS fibrils by high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Homonuclear and heteronuclear 2D and 3D spectra of fibrils grown from uniformly 13C/15N-labeled AS and AS reverse-labeled for two of the most abundant amino acids, K and V, were analyzed. 13C and 15N signals exhibited linewidths of HR ALIGN=LEFT WIDTH=50% NOSHADE SIZE=1>

  15. Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayliss, D L; Walsh, J L; Iza, F; Kong, M G [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Shama, G [Department of Chemical Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.g.kong@lboro.ac.uk

    2009-11-15

    Surface-borne amyloid aggregates with mature fibrils are used as a non-infectious prion model to evaluate cold atmospheric plasmas (CAPs) as a prion inactivation strategy. Using a helium-oxygen CAP jet with pulsed radio-frequency (RF) excitation, amyloid aggregates deposited on freshly cleaved mica discs are reduced substantially leaving only a few spherical fragments of sub-micrometer sizes in areas directly treated by the CAP jet. Outside the light-emitting part of the CAP jet, plasma treatment results in a 'skeleton' of much reduced amyloid stacks with clear evidence of fibril fragmentation. Analysis of possible plasma species and the physical configuration of the jet-sample interaction suggests that the skeleton structures observed are unlikely to have arisen as a result of physical forces of detachment, but instead by progressive diffusion of oxidizing plasma species into porous amyloid aggregates. Composition of chemical bonds of this reduced amyloid sample is very different from that of intact amyloid aggregates. These suggest the possibility of on-site degradation by CAP treatment with little possibility of spreading contamination elsewhere , thus offering a new reaction chemistry route to protein infectivity control with desirable implications for the practical implementation of CAP-based sterilization systems.

  16. Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, D. L.; Walsh, J. L.; Shama, G.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G.

    2009-11-01

    Surface-borne amyloid aggregates with mature fibrils are used as a non-infectious prion model to evaluate cold atmospheric plasmas (CAPs) as a prion inactivation strategy. Using a helium-oxygen CAP jet with pulsed radio-frequency (RF) excitation, amyloid aggregates deposited on freshly cleaved mica discs are reduced substantially leaving only a few spherical fragments of sub-micrometer sizes in areas directly treated by the CAP jet. Outside the light-emitting part of the CAP jet, plasma treatment results in a 'skeleton' of much reduced amyloid stacks with clear evidence of fibril fragmentation. Analysis of possible plasma species and the physical configuration of the jet-sample interaction suggests that the skeleton structures observed are unlikely to have arisen as a result of physical forces of detachment, but instead by progressive diffusion of oxidizing plasma species into porous amyloid aggregates. Composition of chemical bonds of this reduced amyloid sample is very different from that of intact amyloid aggregates. These suggest the possibility of on-site degradation by CAP treatment with little possibility of spreading contamination elsewhere , thus offering a new reaction chemistry route to protein infectivity control with desirable implications for the practical implementation of CAP-based sterilization systems.

  17. Dimerization process of amyloid-β(29-42) studied by the Hamiltonian replica-permutation molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Satoru G; Okumura, Hisashi

    2014-10-02

    The amyloid-β peptides form amyloid fibrils which are associated with Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-β(29-42) is its C-terminal fragment and a critical determinant of the amyloid formation rate. This fragment forms the amyloid fibril by itself. However, the fragment conformation in the fibril has yet to be determined. The oligomerization process including the dimerization process is also still unknown. The dimerization process corresponds to an early process of the amyloidogenesis. In order to investigate the dimerization process and conformations, we applied the Hamiltonian replica-permutation method, which is a better alternative to the Hamiltonian replica-exchange method, to two amyloid-β(29-42) molecules in explicit water solvent. At the first step of the dimerization process, two amyloid-β(29-42) molecules came close to each other and had intermolecular side chain contacts. When two molecules had the intermolecular side chain contacts, the amyloid-β(29-42) tended to have intramolecular secondary structures, especially β-hairpin structures. The two molecules had intermolecular β-bridge structures by coming much closer at the second step of the dimerization process. Formation of these intermolecular β-bridge structures was induced by the β-hairpin structures. The intermolecular β-sheet structures elongated at the final step. Structures of the amyloid-β(29-42) in the monomer and dimer states are also shown with the free-energy landscapes, which were obtained by performing efficient sampling in the conformational space in our simulations.

  18. Modeling amyloids in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villar-Piqué Anna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An increasing number of proteins are being shown to assemble into amyloid structures, self-seeding fibrillar aggregates that may lead to pathological states or play essential biological functions in organisms. Bacterial cell factories have raised as privileged model systems to understand the mechanisms behind amyloid assembly and the cellular fitness cost associated to the formation of these aggregates. In the near future, these bacterial systems will allow implementing high-throughput screening approaches to identify effective modulators of amyloid aggregation.

  19. Local interactions influence the fibrillation kinetics, structure and dynamics of Aβ(1-40) but leave the general fibril structure unchanged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Juliane; Scheidt, Holger A; Krüger, Martin; Thomas, Lars; Huster, Daniel

    2014-04-28

    A series of peptide mutants was studied to understand the influence of local physical interactions on the fibril formation mechanism of amyloid β (Aβ)(1-40). In the peptide variants, the well-known hydrophobic contact between residues phenylalanine 19 and leucine 34 was rationally modified. In single site mutations, residue phenylalanine 19 was replaced by amino acids that introduce higher structural flexibility by a glycine mutation or restrict the backbone flexibility by introduction of proline. Next, the aromatic phenylalanine was replaced by tyrosine or tryptophan, respectively, to probe the influence of additional hydrogen bond forming capacity in the fibril interior. Furthermore, negatively charged glutamate or positively charged lysine was introduced to probe the influence of electrostatics. In double mutants, the hydrophobic contact was replaced by a putative salt bridge (glutamate and lysine) or two electrostatically repelling lysine residues. The influence of these mutations on the fibrillation kinetics and morphology, cross-β structure as well as the local structure and dynamics was probed using fluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. While the fibrillation kinetics and the local structure and dynamics of the peptide variants were influenced by the introduction of these local fields, the overall morphology and cross-β structure of the fibrils remained very robust against all the probed interactions. Overall, 7 out of the 8 mutated peptides formed fibrils of very similar morphology compared to the wildtype. However, characteristic local structural and dynamical changes indicate that amyloid fibrils show an astonishing ability to respond to local perturbations but overall show a very homogenous mesoscopic organization.

  20. Limited Proteolysis Reveals That Amyloids from the 3D Domain-Swapping Cystatin B Have a Non-Native β-Sheet Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Peter J; Holmes, David; Waltho, Jonathan P; Staniforth, Rosemary A

    2015-07-31

    3D domain-swapping proteins form multimers by unfolding and then sharing of secondary structure elements, often with native-like interactions. Runaway domain swapping is proposed as a mechanism for folded proteins to form amyloid fibres, with examples including serpins and cystatins. Cystatin C amyloids cause a hereditary form of cerebral amyloid angiopathy whilst cystatin B aggregates are found in cases of Unverricht-Lundborg Syndrome, a progressive form of myoclonic epilepsy. Under conditions that favour fibrillisation, cystatins populate stable 3D domain-swapped dimers both in vitro and in vivo that represent intermediates on route to the formation of fibrils. Previous work on cystatin B amyloid fibrils revealed that the α-helical region of the protein becomes disordered and identified the conservation of a continuous 20-residue elongated β-strand (residues 39-58), the latter being a salient feature of the dimeric 3D domain-swapped structure. Here we apply limited proteolysis to cystatin B amyloid fibrils and show that not only the α-helical N-terminal of the protein (residues 1-35) but also the C-terminal of the protein (residues 80-98) can be removed without disturbing the underlying fibril structure. This observation is incompatible with previous models of cystatin amyloid fibrils where the β-sheet is assumed to retain its native antiparallel arrangement. We conclude that our data favour a more generic, at least partially parallel, arrangement for cystatin β-sheet structure in mature amyloids and propose a model that remains consistent with available data for amyloids from either cystatin B or cystatin C.

  1. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of fluorescently labelled amyloid β 1-40 and α-synuclein aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Valerie L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescent tags, including small organic molecules and fluorescent proteins, enable the localization of protein molecules in biomedical research experiments. However, the use of these labels may interfere with the formation of larger-scale protein structures such as amyloid aggregates. Therefore, we investigate the effects of some commonly used fluorescent tags on the morphologies of fibrils grown from the Alzheimer's disease-associated peptide Amyloid β 1-40 (Aβ40 and the Parkinson's disease-associated protein α-synuclein (αS. Results Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, we verify that N-terminal labeling of Aβ40 with AMCA, TAMRA, and Hilyte-Fluor 488 tags does not prevent the formation of protofibrils and amyloid fibrils of various widths. We also measure the two-photon action cross-section of Aβ40 labelled with Hilyte Fluor 488 and demonstrate that this tag is suitable for use with two-photon fluorescence techniques. Similarly, we find that Alexa Fluor 488 labelling of αS variant proteins near either the N or C terminus (position 9 or 130 does not interfere with the formation of amyloid and other types of αS fibrils. We also present TEM images of fibrils grown from αS C-terminally labelled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. Near neutral pH, two types of αS-EGFP fibrils are observed via TEM, while denaturation of the EGFP tag leads to the formation of additional species. Conclusions We demonstrate that several small extrinsic fluorescent tags are compatible with studies of amyloid protein aggregation. However, although fibrils can be grown from αS labelled with EGFP, the conformation of the fluorescent protein tag affects the observed aggregate morphologies. Thus, our results should assist researchers with label selection and optimization of solution conditions for aggregation studies involving fluorescence techniques.

  2. Interaction between amyloid beta peptide and an aggregation blocker peptide mimicking islet amyloid polypeptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrollah Rezaei-Ghaleh

    Full Text Available Assembly of amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ into cytotoxic oligomeric and fibrillar aggregates is believed to be a major pathologic event in Alzheimer's disease (AD and interfering with Aβ aggregation is an important strategy in the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Prior studies have shown that the double N-methylated analogue of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP IAPP-GI, which is a conformationally constrained IAPP analogue mimicking a non-amyloidogenic IAPP conformation, is capable of blocking cytotoxic self-assembly of Aβ. Here we investigate the interaction of IAPP-GI with Aβ40 and Aβ42 using NMR spectroscopy. The most pronounced NMR chemical shift changes were observed for residues 13-20, while residues 7-9, 15-16 as well as the C-terminal half of Aβ--that is both regions of the Aβ sequence that are converted into β-strands in amyloid fibrils--were less accessible to solvent in the presence of IAPP-GI. At the same time, interaction of IAPP-GI with Aβ resulted in a concentration-dependent co-aggregation of Aβ and IAPP-GI that was enhanced for the more aggregation prone Aβ42 peptide. On the basis of the reduced toxicity of the Aβ peptide in the presence of IAPP-GI, our data are consistent with the suggestion that IAPP-GI redirects Aβ into nontoxic "off-pathway" aggregates.

  3. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... needed for weakness or clumsiness. This can include physical, occupational, or speech therapy. Sometimes, medicines that help improve memory, such as those for Alzheimer disease, are used. Seizures, also called amyloid spells, may ...

  4. Effects of pH on aggregation kinetics of the repeat domain of a functional amyloid, Pmel17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferkorn, Candace M.; McGlinchey, Ryan P.; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2010-01-01

    Pmel17 is a functional amyloidogenic protein whose fibrils act as scaffolds for pigment deposition in human skin and eyes. We have used the repeat domain (RPT, residues 315–444), an essential luminal polypeptide region of Pmel17, as a model system to study conformational changes from soluble unstructured monomers to β-sheet-containing fibrils. Specifically, we report on the effects of solution pH (4 → 7) mimicking pH conditions of melanosomes, acidic organelles where Pmel17 fibrils are formed. Local, secondary, and fibril structure were monitored via intrinsic Trp fluorescence, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. We find that W423 is a highly sensitive probe of amyloid assembly with spectral features reflecting local conformational and fibril morphological changes. A critical pH regime (5 ± 0.5) was identified for fibril formation suggesting the involvement of at least three carboxylic acids in the structural rearrangement necessary for aggregation. Moreover, we demonstrate that RPT fibril morphology can be transformed directly by changing solution pH. Based on these results, we propose that intramelanosomal pH regulates Pmel17 amyloid formation and its subsequent dissolution in vivo. PMID:21106765

  5. Affinity of (nat/68)Ga-Labelled Curcumin and Curcuminoid Complexes for β-Amyloid Plaques: Towards the Development of New Metal-Curcumin Based Radiotracers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubagotti, Sara; Croci, Stefania; Ferrari, Erika; Iori, Michele; Capponi, Pier C; Lorenzini, Luca; Calzà, Laura; Versari, Annibale; Asti, Mattia

    2016-09-06

    Curcumin derivatives labelled with fluorine-18 or technetium-99m have recently shown their potential as diagnostic tools for Alzheimer's disease. Nevertheless, no study by exploiting the labelling with gallium-68 has been performed so far, in spite of its suitable properties (positron emitter, generator produced radionuclide). Herein, an evaluation of the affinity for synthetic β-amyloid fibrils and for amyloid plaques of three (nat/68)Ga-labelled curcumin analogues, namely curcumin curcumin (CUR), bis-dehydroxy-curcumin (bDHC) and diacetyl-curcumin (DAC), was performed. Affinity and specificity were tested in vitro on amyloid synthetic fibrils by using gallium-68 labelled compounds. Post-mortem brain cryosections from Tg2576 mice were used for the ex vivo visualization of amyloid plaques. The affinity of (68)Ga(CUR)₂⁺, (68)Ga(DAC)₂⁺, and (68)Ga(bDHC)₂⁺ for synthetic β-amyloid fibrils was moderate and their uptake could be observed in vitro. On the other hand, amyloid plaques could not be visualized on brain sections of Tg2576 mice after injection, probably due to the low stability of the complexes in vivo and of a hampered passage through the blood-brain barrier. Like curcumin, all (nat/68)Ga-curcuminoid complexes maintain a high affinity for β-amyloid plaques. However, structural modifications are still needed to improve their applicability as radiotracers in vivo.

  6. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  7. Role of mutation on fibril formation in small peptides by REMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudinobar, Farbod; Dias, Cristiano

    Amyloid fibrils are now recognized as a common form of protein structure. They have wide implications for neurological diseases and entities involved in the survival of living organisms, e.g., silkmoth eggshells. Biological functions of these entities are often related to the superior mechanical strength of fibrils that persists over a broad range of chemical and thermal conditions desirable for various biotechnological applications, e.g., to encapsulate drugs. Mechanical properties of fibrils was shown to depend strongly on the amino acid sequence of its constituent peptides whereby bending rigidities can vary by two orders of magnitude. Therefore, the rational design of new fibril-prone peptides with tailored properties depends on our understanding of the relation between amino acid sequence and its propensity to fibrillize. In this presentation I will show results from extensive Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics (REMD) simulations of a 12-residue peptide containing the fibril-prone motif KFFE and its mutants. Simulations are performed on monomers, dimers, and tetramers. I will discuss effects of side chain packing, hydrophobicity, charges and beta-sheet propensity on fibril formation. Physics Department, University Heights, Newark, New Jersey, 07102-1982, USA.

  8. Dissecting the contribution of Staphylococcus aureus α-phenol-soluble modulins to biofilm amyloid structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Patrizia; Pallares, Irantzu; Navarro, Susanna; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is recognized as one of the most frequent causes of biofilm-associated infections. The recently discovered phenol soluble modulins (PSMs) are small α-helical amphipathic peptides that act as the main molecular effectors of staphylococcal biofilm maturation, promoting the formation of an extracellular fibril structure with amyloid-like properties. Here, we combine computational, biophysical and in cell analysis to address the specific contribution of individual PSMs to biofilm structure. We demonstrate that despite their highly similar sequence and structure, contrary to what it was previously thought, not all PSMs participate in amyloid fibril formation. A balance of hydrophobic/hydrophilic forces and helical propensity seems to define the aggregation propensity of PSMs and control their assembly and function. This knowledge would allow to target specifically the amyloid properties of these peptides. In this way, we show that Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the principal polyphenol in green tea, prevents the assembly of amyloidogenic PSMs and disentangles their preformed amyloid fibrils. PMID:27708403

  9. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freedman, Ben; Potpara, Tatjana S; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is found in a third of all ischaemic strokes, even more after post-stroke atrial fibrillation monitoring. Data from stroke registries show that both unknown and untreated or under treated atrial fibrillation is responsible for most of these strokes, which are often fatal...... or debilitating. Most could be prevented if efforts were directed towards detection of atrial fibrillation before stroke occurs, through screening or case finding, and treatment of all patients with atrial fibrillation at increased risk of stroke with well-controlled vitamin K antagonists or non-vitamin K...

  10. Solution structures of {beta}-amyloid{sub 10-35} and {beta}-amyloid{sub 10-35} PEG3000 aggregates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzinger, T. L. S.; Burkoth, T. S.; Gordon, D.; Lynn, D. G.; Meredith, S. C.; Morgan, D. M.; Seifert, S.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Urban, V.

    1999-07-02

    Small angle neutron and x-ray scattering (SANS/SAXS) studies were conducted on the structure of the aggregates formed from both the truncated model peptide {beta}-Amyloid(10-35) (A{beta}{sub 10-35}) and a block copolymer {beta}-Amyloid (10-35)-PEG3000 (A{beta}{sub 10-35}-PEG) in D{sub 2}O at pHs from 3.0 to 7.0. These studies indicate that A{beta}{sub 10-35} aggregates into rod-like particles (fibril) and their radii are strongly dependent on the Pm of the solution. The fibril-fibril association in A{beta}{sub 10-35} solutions is less of pH < 5.6, but becomes larger at higher pH. A{beta}{sub 10-35}-PEG also assembles into rod-like particles whose radius is larger by about 30 {angstrom} than that for A{beta}{sub 10-35} fibril at pH 4.2, while it is about 23 {angstrom} larger at higher pH. Contrast matching SAXS/SANS experiments that eliminate the coherent scattering from PEG reveal that PEG moiety is located at the periphery of the fibril. Also, the mass per unit length of the peptide portion is similar for both A{beta}{sub 10-35} and A{beta}{sub 10-35}-PEG fibrils at pH 5.6. The mass per unit length of the rods from SANS provides key information on the packing of A{beta}{sub 10-35} peptides in the fibril.

  11. Lesson Five Atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁端; 吴文烈

    2003-01-01

    @@ Atrial fibrillation(AF) may occur in paroxysmaland persistent forms. It may be seen in normal subjects,particularly during emotional stress or follow-ing surgery,exercise, or acute alcoholic intoxication.It also may occur in patients with heart or lungdisease who develop acute hypoxia, hypercapnia,ormetabolic or hemodynamic derangements.

  12. Modulation of atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuzebroek, G.S.C.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the results of various surgical procedures for atrial fibrillation which have been performed in the last 2 decades in the Sint Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands. In the 1990s the classical Maze III procedure was the main surgical technique for drug-refracto

  13. Rivaroxaban in atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgi MA

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mariano A Giorgi,1,2 Lucas San Miguel31Cardiology Service, Centro de Educación Médica e Investigaciones Clínicas “Norberto Quirno”, 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Universidad Austral, 3Department of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery, FLENI, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaAbstract: Warfarin is the traditional therapeutic option available to manage thromboembolic risk in atrial fibrillation. The hemorrhagic risk with warfarin depends mainly on the international normalized ratio (INR. Data from randomized controlled trials show that patients have a therapeutic INR (2.00–3.00 only 61%–68% of the time while taking warfarin, and this target is sometimes hard to establish. Many compounds have been developed in order to optimize the profile of oral anticoagulants. We focus on one of them, rivaroxaban, comparing it with novel alternatives, ie, dabigatran and apixaban. The indication for rivaroxaban in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation was evaluated in ROCKET-AF (Rivaroxaban-once daily, Oral, direct factor Xa inhibition Compared with vitamin K antagonism for prevention of stroke and Embolism Trial in Atrial Fibrillation. In this trial, rivaroxaban was associated with a 12% reduction in the incidence of the primary endpoint compared with warfarin (hazard ratio 0.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74–1.03; P < 0.001 for noninferiority and P = 0.12 for superiority. However, patients remained in the therapeutic range for INR only 55% of the time, which is less than that in RE-LY (the Randomized Evaluation of Long-Term Anticoagulation Therapy, 64% and in the ARISTOTLE trial (Apixaban for Reduction in Stroke and Other Thromboembolic Events in Atrial Fibrillation, 66%. This shorter time spent in the therapeutic range has been one of the main criticisms of the ROCKET-AF trial, but could actually reflect what happens in real life. In addition, rivaroxaban exhibits good pharmacokinetic and pharmacoeconomic properties. Novel anticoagulants

  14. Measuring the Length Distribution of a Fibril System: a Flow Birefringence Technique applied to Amyloid Fibrils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, S.S.; Venema, P.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Linden, van der E.; Donald, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Relaxation of flow birefringence can give a direct measure of the rotational diffusion of rodlike objects in solution. With a suitable model of the rotational diffusivity, a length distribution can be sought by fitting the decay curve. We have measured the flow birefringence decay from solutions of

  15. Attachment of Streptomyces coelicolor is mediated by amyloidal fimbriae that are anchored to the cell surface via cellulose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Wouter; Wosten, Han A. B.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Claessen, Dennis; Wösten, Han A.B.

    2009-01-01

    P>The chaplin proteins ChpA-H enable the filamentous bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor to form reproductive aerial structures by assembling into surface-active amyloid-like fibrils. We here demonstrate that chaplins also mediate attachment of S. coelicolor to surfaces. Attachment coincides with the

  16. Patterning nanofibrils through the templated growth of multiple modified amyloid peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Ken; Kudoh, Fuki; Kamada, Rui; Chuman, Yoshiro; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2016-08-01

    There has been considerable interest in the patterning of functionalized nanowires because of the potential applications of these materials to the construction of nanodevices. A variety of biomolecular building blocks containing amyloid peptides have been used to functionalize nanowires. However, the patterning of self-assembled nanowires can be challenging because of the difficulties associated with controlling the self-assembly of these functionalized building blocks. Herein, we present a versatile approach for the patterning of nanowires based on the combination of templated fibril growth with a versatile functionalization method using our structure-controllable amyloid peptides (SCAPs). Using this approach, we have succeeded in the formation of multi-type nanowires with tandem domain structures in high yields. Given that the mixing-SCAP method can lead to the formation of tandem fibrils, it is noteworthy that our method allowed us to control the initiation of fibril formation from the gold nanoparticles, which were attached to a short fibril as initiation points. This approach could be used to prepare a wide variety of fibril patterns, and therefore holds great potential for the development of novel self-assembled nanodevices.

  17. Identifying structural features of fibrillar islet amyloid polypeptide using site-directed spin labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Sajith A; Langen, Ralf

    2004-11-12

    Pancreatic amyloid deposits, composed primarily of the 37-residue islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), are a characteristic feature found in more than 90% of patients with type II diabetes. Although IAPP amyloid deposits are associated with areas of pancreatic islet beta-cell dysfunction and depletion and are thought to play a role in disease, their structure is unknown. We used electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to analyze eight spin-labeled derivatives of IAPP in an effort to determine structural features of the peptide. In solution, all eight derivatives gave rise to electron paramagnetic resonance spectra with sharp lines indicative of rapid motion on the sub-nanosecond time scale. These spectra are consistent with a rapidly tumbling and highly dynamic peptide. In contrast, spectra for the fibrillar form exhibit reduced mobility and the presence of strong intermolecular spin-spin interactions. The latter implies that the peptide subunits are ordered and that the same residues from neighboring peptides are in close proximity to one another. Our data are consistent with a parallel arrangement of IAPP peptides within the amyloid fibril. Analysis of spin label mobility indicates a high degree of order throughout the peptide, although the N-terminal region is slightly less ordered. Possible similarities with respect to the domain organization and parallelism of Alzheimer's amyloid beta peptide fibrils are discussed.

  18. Management of asymptomatic gene carriers of transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hartmut H-J; Barroso, Fabio; González-Duarte, Alejandra; Conceição, Isabel; Obici, Laura; Keohane, Denis; Amass, Leslie

    2016-09-01

    Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) is a rare, severe, and irreversible, adult-onset, hereditary disorder caused by autosomal-dominant mutations in the TTR gene that increase the intrinsic propensity of transthyretin protein to misfold and deposit systemically as insoluble amyloid fibrils in nerve tissues, the heart, and other organs. TTR-FAP is characterized by relentless, progressively debilitating polyneuropathy, and leads to death, on average, within 10 years of symptom onset without treatment. With increased availability of disease-modifying treatment options for a wider spectrum of patients with TTR-FAP, timely detection of the disease may offer substantial clinical benefits. This review discusses mutation-specific predictive genetic testing in first-degree relatives of index patients diagnosed with TTR-FAP and the structured clinical follow-up of asymptomatic gene carriers for prompt diagnosis and early therapeutic intervention before accumulation of substantial damage. Muscle Nerve 54: 353-360, 2016.

  19. BETASCAN: probable beta-amyloids identified by pairwise probabilistic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen W Bryan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Amyloids and prion proteins are clinically and biologically important beta-structures, whose supersecondary structures are difficult to determine by standard experimental or computational means. In addition, significant conformational heterogeneity is known or suspected to exist in many amyloid fibrils. Recent work has indicated the utility of pairwise probabilistic statistics in beta-structure prediction. We develop here a new strategy for beta-structure prediction, emphasizing the determination of beta-strands and pairs of beta-strands as fundamental units of beta-structure. Our program, BETASCAN, calculates likelihood scores for potential beta-strands and strand-pairs based on correlations observed in parallel beta-sheets. The program then determines the strands and pairs with the greatest local likelihood for all of the sequence's potential beta-structures. BETASCAN suggests multiple alternate folding patterns and assigns relative a priori probabilities based solely on amino acid sequence, probability tables, and pre-chosen parameters. The algorithm compares favorably with the results of previous algorithms (BETAPRO, PASTA, SALSA, TANGO, and Zyggregator in beta-structure prediction and amyloid propensity prediction. Accurate prediction is demonstrated for experimentally determined amyloid beta-structures, for a set of known beta-aggregates, and for the parallel beta-strands of beta-helices, amyloid-like globular proteins. BETASCAN is able both to detect beta-strands with higher sensitivity and to detect the edges of beta-strands in a richly beta-like sequence. For two proteins (Abeta and Het-s, there exist multiple sets of experimental data implying contradictory structures; BETASCAN is able to detect each competing structure as a potential structure variant. The ability to correlate multiple alternate beta-structures to experiment opens the possibility of computational investigation of prion strains and structural heterogeneity of amyloid

  20. Amyloid beta-peptide worsens cognitive impairment following cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury*****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Song; Qiang Ao; Ying Niu; Qin Shen; Huancong Zuo; Xiufang Zhang; Yandao Gong

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β-peptide, a major component of senile plaques in Alzheimer’s disease, has been impli-cated in neuronal cel death and cognitive impairment. Recently, studies have shown that the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia is closely linked with Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, a rat model of global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was established via occlusion of four arteries;meanwhile, fibril ar amyloid β-peptide was injected into the rat lateral ventricle. The Morris water maze test and histological staining revealed that administration of amyloid β-peptide could further aggravate impairments to learning and memory and neuronal cel death in the hippocampus of rats subjected to cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Western blot showed that phosphorylation of tau protein and the activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3β were significantly stronger in cerebral is-chemia-reperfusion injury rats subjected to amyloidβ-peptide administration than those undergoing cerebral ischemia-reperfusion or amyloidβ-peptide administration alone. Conversely, the activity of protein phosphatase 2A was remarkably reduced in rats with cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury fol owing amyloidβ-peptide administration. These findings suggest that amyloidβ-peptide can po-tentiate tau phosphorylation induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion and thereby aggravate cog-nitive impairment.

  1. Protection of the blood-brain barrier by pentosan against amyloid-β-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deli, Mária A; Veszelka, Szilvia; Csiszár, Boglárka; Tóth, Andrea; Kittel, Agnes; Csete, Mária; Sipos, Aron; Szalai, Anikó; Fülöp, Lívia; Penke, Botond; Abrahám, Csongor S; Niwa, Masami

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cells of brain capillaries forming the blood-brain barrier play an important role in the pathogenesis and therapy of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are key pathological elements in the development of the disease. A blood-brain barrier model, based on primary rat brain endothelial cells was used in which the barrier properties were induced by glial cells. The effects of amyloid peptides have been tested on cell viability and barrier functions. Aβ showed toxic effects on primary rat brain endothelial cells measured by MTT dye conversion and the lactate dehydrogenase release. Morphologically cytoplasmic vacuolization, disruption of the structure of cytoplasmic organelles and tight junctions could be observed in brain endothelial cells. Treatment with Aβ1-42 decreased the electrical resistance, and increased the permeability of brain endothelial cell monolayers for both fluorescein and albumin. Serum amyloid P component which stabilizes Aβ fibrils in cortical amyloid plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits significantly potentiated the barrier-weakening effect of Aβ1-42. Sulfated polysaccharide pentosan could decrease the toxic effects of Aβ peptides in brain endothelial cells. It could also significantly protect the barrier integrity of monolayers from damaging actions of peptides. Pentosan modified the size, and significantly decreased the number of amyloid aggregates demonstrated by atomic force microscopy. The present data further support the toxic effects of amyloid peptides on brain endothelial cells, and can contribute to the development of molecules protecting the blood-brain barrier in Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Insights into the variability of nucleated amyloid polymerization by a minimalistic model of stochastic protein assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugène, Sarah; Xue, Wei-Feng; Robert, Philippe; Doumic, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid aggregates is an important biological phenomenon associated with human diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid fibrils also have potential applications in nano-engineering of biomaterials. The kinetics of amyloid assembly show an exponential growth phase preceded by a lag phase, variable in duration as seen in bulk experiments and experiments that mimic the small volumes of cells. Here, to investigate the origins and the properties of the observed variability in the lag phase of amyloid assembly currently not accounted for by deterministic nucleation dependent mechanisms, we formulate a new stochastic minimal model that is capable of describing the characteristics of amyloid growth curves despite its simplicity. We then solve the stochastic differential equations of our model and give mathematical proof of a central limit theorem for the sample growth trajectories of the nucleated aggregation process. These results give an asymptotic description for our simple model, from which closed form analytical results capable of describing and predicting the variability of nucleated amyloid assembly were derived. We also demonstrate the application of our results to inform experiments in a conceptually friendly and clear fashion. Our model offers a new perspective and paves the way for a new and efficient approach on extracting vital information regarding the key initial events of amyloid formation.

  3. Anti-amyloid Aggregation Activity of Natural Compounds: Implications for Alzheimer's Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Xian-Le; Rao, Praveen P N; Wang, Yan-Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Several plant-derived natural compounds are known to exhibit anti-amyloid aggregation activity which makes them attractive as potential therapies to treat Alzheimer's disease. The mechanisms of their anti-amyloid activity are not well known. In this regard, many natural compounds are known to exhibit direct binding to various amyloid species including oligomers and fibrils, which in turn can lead to conformational change in the beta-sheet assembly to form nontoxic aggregates. This review discusses the mechanism of anti-amyloid activity of 16 natural compounds and gives structural details on their direct binding interactions with amyloid aggregates. Our computational investigations show that the physicochemical properties of natural products do fit Lipinski's criteria and that catechol and catechol-type moieties present in natural compounds act as lysine site-specific inhibitors of amyloid aggregation. Based on these observations, we propose a structural template to design novel small molecules containing site-specific ring scaffolds, planar aromatic and nonaromatic linkers with suitably substituted hydrogen bond acceptors and donors. These studies will have significant implications in the design and development of novel amyloid aggregation inhibitors with superior metabolic stability and blood-brain barrier penetration as potential agents to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Computational Modelling of the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby

    2014-01-01

    . Using MD simulations we have investigated the binding of 13 different imaging agents to a fibril segment. Using clustering analysis and binding energy calculations we have identified a common binding mode for the 13 agents in the surface grooves of the fibril, which are present on all amyloid fibrils...... between the N-terminal part of hIAPP and the lipid head-groups. This is due to positive charges present in the N-terminal part of hIAPP interacting with the anionic lipids. The C-terminal part of hIAPP is unfolded in the solution phase, making this part of hIAPP ready for interaction with other peptides...... in flat ribbons which are due to the compatible peptide terminals. Capping only the N-terminal abolishes the fibrillation, which is caused by incompatibility of the hydrophobic N-terminal with the anionic C terminal as well as a lower number of interpeptide hydrogen bonds to overcome the repulsion...

  5. Two-Step Amyloid Aggregation: Sequential Lag Phase Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castello, Fabio; Paredes, Jose M.; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Martin, Miguel; Roldan, Mar; Casares, Salvador; Orte, Angel

    2017-01-01

    The self-assembly of proteins into fibrillar structures called amyloid fibrils underlies the onset and symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. However, the molecular basis and mechanism of amyloid aggregation are not completely understood. For many amyloidogenic proteins, certain oligomeric intermediates that form in the early aggregation phase appear to be the principal cause of cellular toxicity. Recent computational studies have suggested the importance of nonspecific interactions for the initiation of the oligomerization process prior to the structural conversion steps and template seeding, particularly at low protein concentrations. Here, using advanced single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging of a model SH3 domain, we obtained direct evidence that nonspecific aggregates are required in a two-step nucleation mechanism of amyloid aggregation. We identified three different oligomeric types according to their sizes and compactness and performed a full mechanistic study that revealed a mandatory rate-limiting conformational conversion step. We also identified the most cytotoxic species, which may be possible targets for inhibiting and preventing amyloid aggregation.

  6. Nanomaterials for reducing amyloid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Mao, Xiaobo; Yu, Yue; Wang, Chen-Xuan; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2013-07-26

    This review is intended to reflect the recent progress on therapeutic applications of nanomaterials in amyloid diseases. The progress on anti-amyloid functions of various nanomaterials including inorganic nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials and biomolecular aggregates, is reviewed and discussed. The main functionalization strategies for general nanoparticle modifications are reviewed for potential applications of targeted therapeutics. The interaction mechanisms between amyloid peptides and nanomaterials are discussed from the perspectives of dominant interactions and kinetics. The encapsulation of anti-amyloid drugs, targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release and drug delivery crossing blood brain barrier by application of nanomaterials would also improve the therapeutics of amyloid diseases.

  7. Deposition of kappa and lambda light chains in amyloid filaments of dialysis-related amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancaccio, D; Ghiggeri, G M; Braidotti, P; Garberi, A; Gallieni, M; Bellotti, V; Zoni, U; Gusmano, R; Coggi, G

    1995-10-01

    beta 2-Microglobulin (beta 2m) is considered to be the amyloidogenic precursor in dialysis-related amyloidosis, although the implication of other relevant cofactors in the pathogenesis of this disease has also been hypothesized. It is conceivable that substances found in amyloid deposits might represent something more than simple codeposition, possibly playing a pathogenic role in amyloidogenesis. Along these lines, a detailed analysis of the protein composition of amyloid fibrils purified from synovial material surgically obtained from nine patients on long-term dialysis was carried out. By the use of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, several other protein components, in addition to beta 2m, were found. These were characterized by NH2 amino-terminal sequencing and immunoblotting. In fibrils obtained by water extraction, which fulfill the electron microscopy criteria of highly pure amyloid material, polyclonal kappa and lambda light chains were detected with a concentration of 15 micrograms/mL in the water extraction material; the beta 2m concentration was 200 micrograms/mL. Light microscopy immunohistochemistry was performed on samples from five patients. Amyloid deposits reacted with anti-beta 2m, and anti-light (kappa, lambda), chain antibodies. The immunoreaction of amyloid filaments to anti-beta 2m, anti-lambda, and anti-kappa light chain antibodies was also tested by electron microscopy by use of the immunogold staining procedure. Amyloid filaments were labeled by the three antibodies and showed a different intensity of immunostaining apparently related to their different aggregation pattern. These observations demonstrate that polyclonal immunoglobulin light chains (kappa and lambda) are not contaminants but, together with beta 2m, represent a major constituent of amyloid deposits in dialysis-related osteoarticular amyloidosis, thus indicating their possible role in amyloidogenesis.

  8. Mapping local structural perturbations in the native state of stefin B (cystatin B under amyloid forming conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eParamore

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Unlike a number of amyloid-forming proteins, stefins, in particular stefin B (cystatin B form amyloids under conditions where the native state predominates. In order to trigger oligomerization processes, the stability of the protein needs to be compromised, favoring structural re-arrangement however, accelerating fibril formation is not a simple function of protein stability. We report here on how optimal conditions for amyloid formation lead to the destabilization of dimeric and tetrameric states of the protein in favor of the monomer. Small, highly localized structural changes can be mapped out that allow us to visualize directly areas of the protein which eventually become responsible for triggering amyloid formation. These regions of the protein overlap with the Cu (II-binding sites which we identify here for the first time. We hypothesize that in vivo modulators of amyloid formation may act similarly to painstakingly optimized solvent conditions developed in vitro. We discuss these data in the light of current structural models of stefin B amyloid fibrils based on H-exchange data, where the detachment of the helical part and the extension of loops were observed.

  9. Identification of key amino acid residues modulating intracellular and in vitro microcin E492 amyloid formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina eAguilera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcin E492 (MccE492 is a pore-forming bacteriocin produced and exported by Klebsiella pneumoniae RYC492. Besides its antibacterial activity, excreted MccE492 can form amyloid fibrils in vivo as well as in vitro. It has been proposed that bacterial amyloids can be functional playing a biological role, and in the particular case of MccE492 it would control the antibacterial activity. MccE492 amyloid fibril’s morphology and formation kinetics in vitro have been well characterized, however it is not known which amino acid residues determine its amyloidogenic propensity, nor if it forms intracellular amyloid inclusions as has been reported for other bacterial amyloids. In this work we found the conditions in which MccE492 forms intracellular amyloids in E. coli cells, that were visualized as round-shaped inclusion bodies recognized by two amyloidophillic probes, 2-4´-methylaminophenyl benzothiazole and thioflavin-S. We used this property to perform a flow cytometry-based assay to evaluate the aggregation propensity of MccE492 mutants, that were designed using an in silico prediction of putative aggregation hotspots. We established that the predicted amino acid residues 54-63, effectively act as a pro-amyloidogenic stretch. As in the case of other amyloidogenic proteins, this region presented two gatekeeper residues (P57 and P59, which disfavor both intracellular and in vitro MccE492 amyloid formation, preventing an uncontrolled aggregation. Mutants in each of these gatekeeper residues showed faster in vitro aggregation and bactericidal inactivation kinetics, and the two mutants were accumulated as dense amyloid inclusions in more than 80% of E. coli cells expressing these variants. In contrast, the MccE492 mutant lacking residues 54-63 showed a significantly lower intracellular aggregation propensity and slower in vitro polymerization kinetics. Electron microscopy analysis of the amyloids formed in vitro by these mutants revealed that, although

  10. Contribution of Electrostatics in the Fibril Stability of a Model Ionic-Complementary Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarz, Marta; Casalini, Tommaso; Motta, Anna C; Morbidelli, Massimo; Arosio, Paolo

    2015-12-14

    In this work we quantified the role of electrostatic interactions in the self-assembly of a model amphiphilic peptide (RADA 16-I) into fibrillar structures by a combination of size exclusion chromatography and molecular simulations. For the peptide under investigation, it is found that a net charge of +0.75 represents the ideal condition to promote the formation of regular amyloid fibrils. Lower net charges favor the formation of amorphous precipitates, while larger net charges destabilize the fibrillar aggregates and promote a reversible dissociation of monomers from the ends of the fibrils. By quantifying the dependence of the equilibrium constant of this reversible reaction on the pH value and the peptide net charge, we show that electrostatic interactions contribute largely to the free energy of fibril formation. The addition of both salt and a charged destabilizer (guanidinium hydrochloride) at moderate concentration (0.3-1 M) shifts the monomer-fibril equilibrium toward the fibrillar state. Whereas the first effect can be explained by charge screening of electrostatic repulsion only, the promotion of fibril formation in the presence of guanidinium hydrochloride is also attributed to modifications of the peptide conformation. The results of this work indicate that the global peptide net charge is a key property that correlates well with the fibril stability, although the peptide conformation and the surface charge distribution also contribute to the aggregation propensity.

  11. Sucrose prevents protein fibrillation through compaction of the tertiary structure but hardly affects the secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Nídia; Franquelim, Henri G; Lopes, Carlos; Tavares, Evandro; Macedo, Joana A; Christiansen, Gunna; Otzen, Daniel E; Melo, Eduardo P

    2015-11-01

    Amyloid fibers, implicated in a wide range of diseases, are formed when proteins misfold and stick together in long rope-like structures. As a natural mechanism, osmolytes can be used to modulate protein aggregation pathways with no interference with other cellular functions. The osmolyte sucrose delays fibrillation of the ribosomal protein S6 leading to softer and less shaped-defined fibrils. The molecular mechanism used by sucrose to delay S6 fibrillation was studied based on the two-state unfolding kinetics of the secondary and tertiary structures. It was concluded that the delay in S6 fibrillation results from stabilization and compaction of the slightly expanded tertiary native structure formed under fibrillation conditions. Interestingly, this compaction extends to almost all S6 tertiary structure but hardly affects its secondary structure. The part of the S6 tertiary structure that suffered more compaction by sucrose is known to be the first part to unfold, indicating that the native S6 has entered the unfolding pathway under fibrillation conditions.

  12. Transient formation of nano-crystalline structures during fibrillation of an Abeta-like peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otzen, Daniel E; Oliveberg, Mikael

    2004-05-01

    During the first few minutes of fibrillation of a 14-residue peptide homologous to the hydrophobic C-terminal part of the Abeta-peptide, EM micrographs reveal small crystalline areas (100 to 150 nm, repeating unit 47 A) scattered in more amorphous material. On a longer time scale, these crystalline areas disappear and are replaced by tangled clusters resembling protofilaments (hours), and eventually by more regular amyloid fibrils of 60 A to 120 A diameter (days). The transient population of the crystalline areas indicates the presence of ordered substructures in the early fibrillation process, the diameter of which matches the length of the 14-mer peptide in an extended beta-strand conformation.

  13. Quartz Crystal Microbalance Studies of Multilayer Glucagon Fibrillation at the Solid-Liquid Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovgaard, Mads Bruun; Dong, Mingdong; Otzen, Daniel Erik; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2007-01-01

    We have used a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) to monitor the changes in layer thickness and viscoelastic properties accompanying multilayer amyloid deposition in situ for the first time. By means of atomic force microscope imaging, an unequivocal correlation is established between the interfacial nucleation and growth of glucagon fibrils and the QCM-D response. The combination of the two techniques allows us to study the temporal evolution of the interfacial fibrillation process. We have modeled the QCM-D data using an extension to the Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic model. Three phases were observed in the fibrillation process: 1), a rigid multilayer of glucagon monomers forms and slowly rearranges; 2), this multilayer subsequently evolves into a dramatically more viscoelastic layer, containing a polymorphic network of micrometer-long fibrils growing from multiple nucleation sites; and 3), the fibrillar formation effectively stops as a result of the depletion of bulk-phase monomers, although the process can be continued without a lag phase by subsequent addition of fresh monomers. The robustness of the QCM-D technique, consolidated by complementary atomic force microscope studies, should make it possible to combine different components thought to be involved in the plaque formation process and thus build up realistic models of amyloid plaque formation in vitro. PMID:17513349

  14. Quartz crystal microbalance studies of multilayer glucagon fibrillation at the solid-liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovgaard, Mads Bruun; Dong, Mingdong; Otzen, Daniel Erik; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2007-09-15

    We have used a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) to monitor the changes in layer thickness and viscoelastic properties accompanying multilayer amyloid deposition in situ for the first time. By means of atomic force microscope imaging, an unequivocal correlation is established between the interfacial nucleation and growth of glucagon fibrils and the QCM-D response. The combination of the two techniques allows us to study the temporal evolution of the interfacial fibrillation process. We have modeled the QCM-D data using an extension to the Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic model. Three phases were observed in the fibrillation process: 1), a rigid multilayer of glucagon monomers forms and slowly rearranges; 2), this multilayer subsequently evolves into a dramatically more viscoelastic layer, containing a polymorphic network of micrometer-long fibrils growing from multiple nucleation sites; and 3), the fibrillar formation effectively stops as a result of the depletion of bulk-phase monomers, although the process can be continued without a lag phase by subsequent addition of fresh monomers. The robustness of the QCM-D technique, consolidated by complementary atomic force microscope studies, should make it possible to combine different components thought to be involved in the plaque formation process and thus build up realistic models of amyloid plaque formation in vitro.

  15. Role of PAMAM-OH dendrimers against the fibrillation pathway of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Gajalakshmi; Florance, Ida; Sivakumar, A; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2016-12-01

    The binding behavior of nanoparticle with proteins determines its biocompatibility. This study reports the interaction of ten different biomolecules (proteins-BSA, HSA, haemoglobin, gamma globulin, transferrin and enzymes-hog and bacillus amylase, lysozyme from chicken and human and laccases from Tramates versicolor) with a surface group hydroxylated Poly AMido AMide dendrimer (PAMAM) of generation 5. The study has utilized various spectroscopic methods like UV-vis spectroscopy, Fluorescence emission, Synchronous, 3-D spectroscopy and Circular Dichroism to detect the binding induced structural changes in biomolecules that occur upon interaction with mounting concentration of the dendrimers. Aggregation of proteins results in the formation of amyloid fibrils causing several human diseases. In this study, fibrillar samples of all ten biomolecules formed in the absence and the presence of dendrimers were investigated with Congo Red absorbance and ThT Assay to detect fibril formation, Trp Emission and 3-D scan to evaluate the effect of fibrillation on aromatic environment of biomolecules, and CD spectroscopy to measure the conformational changes in a quantitative manner. These assays have generated useful information on the role of dendrimers in amyloid fibril formation of biomolecules. The outcomes of the study remain valuable in evaluating the biological safety of PAMAM-OH dendrimers for their biomedical application in vivo.

  16. Superoxide dismutase 1 and tgSOD1 mouse spinal cord seed fibrils, suggesting a propagative cell death mechanism in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Chia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a neurodegenerative disease that specifically affects motor neurons and leads to a progressive and ultimately fatal loss of function, resulting in death typically within 3 to 5 years of diagnosis. The disease starts with a focal centre of weakness, such as one limb, and appears to spread to other parts of the body. Mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 are known to cause disease and it is generally accepted they lead to pathology not by loss of enzymatic activity but by gain of some unknown toxic function(s. Although different mutations lead to varying tendencies of SOD1 to aggregate, we suggest abnormal proteins share a common misfolding pathway that leads to the formation of amyloid fibrils. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that misfolding of superoxide dismutase 1 leads to the formation of amyloid fibrils associated with seeding activity, which can accelerate the formation of new fibrils in an autocatalytic cascade. The time limiting event is nucleation to form a stable protein "seed" before a rapid linear polymerisation results in amyloid fibrils analogous to other protein misfolding disorders. This phenomenon was not confined to fibrils of recombinant protein as here we show, for the first time, that spinal cord homogenates obtained from a transgenic mouse model that overexpresses mutant human superoxide dismutase 1 (the TgSOD1(G93A mouse also contain amyloid seeds that accelerate the formation of new fibrils in both wildtype and mutant SOD1 protein in vitro. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings provide new insights into ALS disease mechanism and in particular a mechanism that could account for the spread of pathology throughout the nervous system. This model of disease spread, which has analogies to other protein misfolding disorders such as prion disease, also suggests it may be possible to design assays for therapeutics that can inhibit fibril propagation and

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of protein amyloid formation reveal origin of sigmoidal aggregation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linse, Björn; Linse, Sara

    2011-07-01

    Severe conditions and lack of cure for many amyloid diseases make it highly desired to understand the underlying principles of formation of fibrillar aggregates (amyloid). Here, amyloid formation from peptides was studied using Monte Carlo simulations. Systems of 20, 50, 100, 200 or 500 hexapeptides were simulated. Association kinetics were modeled equal for fibrillar and other (inter- and intra-peptide) contacts and assumed to be faster the lower the effective contact order, which represents the distance in space. Attempts to form contacts were thus accepted with higher probability the lower the effective contact order, whereby formation of new contacts next to preexisting ones is favored by shorter physical separation. Kinetic discrimination was invoked by using two different life-times for formed contacts. Contacts within amyloid fibrils were assumed to have on average longer life-time than other contacts. We find that the model produces fibrillation kinetics with a distinct lag phase, and that the fibrillar contacts need to dissociate on average 5-20 times slower than all other contacts for the fibrillar structure to dominate at equilibrium. Analysis of the species distribution along the aggregation process shows that no other intermediate is ever more populated than the dimer. Instead of a single nucleation event there is a concomitant increase in average aggregate size over the whole system, and the occurrence of multiple parallel processes makes the process more reproducible the larger the simulated system. The sigmoidal shape of the aggregation curves arises from cooperativity among multiple interactions within each pair of peptides in a fibril. A governing factor is the increasing probability as the aggregation process proceeds of neighboring reinforcing contacts. The results explain the very strong bias towards cross β-sheet fibrils in which the possibilities for cooperativity among interactions involving neighboring residues and the repetitive use of

  18. Tafamidis, a potent and selective transthyretin kinetic stabilizer that inhibits the amyloid cascade

    OpenAIRE

    Bulawa, Christine E.; Connelly, Stephen; DeVit, Michael; Wang, Lan; Weigel, Charlotte; Fleming, James A.; Packman, Jeff; Powers, Evan T.; Wiseman, R Luke; Foss, Theodore R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Labaudinière, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The transthyretin amyloidoses (ATTR) are invariably fatal diseases characterized by progressive neuropathy and/or cardiomyopathy. ATTR are caused by aggregation of transthyretin (TTR), a natively tetrameric protein involved in the transport of thyroxine and the vitamin A–retinol-binding protein complex. Mutations within TTR that cause autosomal dominant forms of disease facilitate tetramer dissociation, monomer misfolding, and aggregation, although wild-type TTR can also form amyloid fibrils ...

  19. Cholesterol modulates the interaction of the islet amyloid polypeptide with membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillon, Lucie; Duma, Luminita; Lequin, Olivier; Khemtemourian, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    The deposition of insoluble amyloid fibrils resulting from the aggregation of the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) within the islet of Langerhans is a pathological feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Increasing evidence indicates that biological membranes play a key role in amyloid aggregation, modulating among others the kinetics of amyloid formation, and being the target of toxic species generated during amyloid formation. In T2DM patients, elevated levels of cholesterol, an important determinant of the physical state of biological membranes, are observed in β-cells and are thought to directly impair β-cell function and insulin secretion. However, it is not known whether cholesterol enhances membrane-interaction or membrane-insertion of hIAPP. In this study, we investigated the effect of cholesterol incorporated in zwitterionic and anionic membranes. Our circular dichroism and liquid state NMR data reveal that 10-30% of cholesterol slightly affects the aggregational and conformational behaviour of hIAPP. Additional fluorescence results indicate that 10 and 20% of cholesterol slightly slow down the kinetics of oligomer and fibril formation while anionic lipids accelerate this kinetics. This behavior might be caused by differences in membrane insertion and therefore in membrane binding of hIAPP. The membrane binding affinity was evaluated using (1)H NMR experiments and our results show that the affinity of hIAPP for membranes containing cholesterol is significantly smaller than that for membranes containing anionic lipids. Furthermore, we found that hIAPP-induced membrane damage is synchronized to fibril formation in the absence and in the presence of cholesterol.

  20. An infrared spectroscopy approach to follow β-sheet formation in peptide amyloid assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jongcheol; Hoffmann, Waldemar; Warnke, Stephan; Huang, Xing; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Bowers, Michael T.; von Helden, Gert; Pagel, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Amyloidogenic peptides and proteins play a crucial role in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These proteins undergo a spontaneous transition from a soluble, often partially folded form, into insoluble amyloid fibrils that are rich in β-sheets. Increasing evidence suggests that highly dynamic, polydisperse folding intermediates, which occur during fibril formation, are the toxic species in the amyloid-related diseases. Traditional condensed-phase methods are of limited use for characterizing these states because they typically only provide ensemble averages rather than information about individual oligomers. Here we report the first direct secondary-structure analysis of individual amyloid intermediates using a combination of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and gas-phase infrared spectroscopy. Our data reveal that oligomers of the fibril-forming peptide segments VEALYL and YVEALL, which consist of 4-9 peptide strands, can contain a significant amount of β-sheet. In addition, our data show that the more-extended variants of each oligomer generally exhibit increased β-sheet content.

  1. Evidence for Intramolecular Antiparallel Beta-Sheet Structure in Alpha-Synuclein Fibrils from a Combination of Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeters, Steven J.; Iyer, Aditya; Pletikapic, Galja; Kogan, Vladimir; Subramaniam, Vinod; Woutersen, Sander

    2017-01-01

    The aggregation of the intrinsically disordered protein alpha-synuclein (αS) into amyloid fibrils is thought to play a central role in the pathology of Parkinson’s disease. Using a combination of techniques (AFM, UV-CD, XRD, and amide-I 1D- and 2D-IR spectroscopy) we show that the structure of αS fi

  2. Reduced aggregation and cytotoxicity of amyloid peptides by graphene oxide/gold nanocomposites prepared by pulsed laser ablation in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingying; Han, Qiusen; Wang, Xinhuan; Yu, Ning; Yang, Lin; Yang, Rong; Wang, Chen

    2014-11-12

    A novel and convenient method to synthesize the nanocomposites combining graphene oxides (GO) with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is reported and their applications to modulate amyloid peptide aggregation are demonstrated. The nanocomposites produced by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in water show good biocompatibility and solubility. The reduced aggregation of amyloid peptides by the nanocomposites is confirmed by Thioflavin T fluorescence and atomic force microscopy. The cell viability experiments reveals that the presence of the nanocomposites can significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of the amyloid peptides. Furthermore, the depolymerization of peptide fibrils and inhibition of their cellular cytotoxicity by GO/AuNPs is also observed. These observations suggest that the nanocomposites combining GO and AuNPs have a great potential for designing new therapeutic agents and are promising for future treatment of amyloid-related diseases.

  3. Complement activation by the amyloid proteins A beta peptide and beta 2-microglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Nielsen, E H; Svehag, S E

    1999-01-01

    Complement activation (CA) has been reported to play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate whether CA may contribute to amyloidogenesis in general, the CA potential of different amyloid fibril proteins was tested. CA induced by A beta preparations containing soluble...... protein, protofilaments and some fibrils or only fibrils in a solid phase system (ELISA) was modest with a slow kinetics compared to the positive delta IgG control. Soluble A beta induced no detectable CA in a liquid phase system (complement consumption assay) while fibrillar A beta caused CA at 200 mg....../ml and higher concentrations. Soluble beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2M) purified from peritoneal dialysates was found to be as potent a complement activator as A beta in both solid and liquid phase systems while beta 2M purified from urine exhibited lower activity, a difference which may be explained...

  4. Structure, orientation, and surface interaction of Alzheimer amyloid-β peptides on the graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiang; Wang, Qiuming; Lin, Yinan; Zhao, Jun; Zhao, Chao; Zheng, Jie

    2012-04-24

    The misfolding and aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides into amyloid fibrils in solution and on the cell membrane has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Although it is well-known that the presence of different surfaces can accelerate the aggregation of Aβ peptides into fibrils, surface-induced conformation, orientation, aggregation, and adsorption of Aβ peptides have not been well understood at the atomic level. Here, we perform all-atom explicit-water molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the orientation change, conformational dynamics, surface interaction of small Aβ aggregates with different sizes (monomer to tetramer), and conformations (α-helix and β-hairpin) upon adsorption on the graphite surface, in comparison with Aβ structures in bulk solution. Simulation results show that hydrophobic graphite induces the quick adsorption of Aβ peptides regardless of their initial conformations and sizes. Upon the adsorption, Aβ prefers to adopt random structure for monomers and to remain β-rich-structure for small oligomers, but not helical structures. More importantly, due to the amphiphilic sequence of Aβ and the hydrophobic nature of graphite, hydrophobic C-terminal residues of higher-order Aβ oligomers appear to have preferential interactions with the graphite surface for facilitating Aβ fibril formation and fibril growth. In combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) images and MD simulation results, a postulated mechanism is proposed to describe the structure and kinetics of Aβ aggregation from aqueous solution to the graphite surface, providing parallel insights into Aβ aggregation on biological cell membranes.

  5. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Induced Destabilization and Disassembly of Various Structural Variants of Insulin Fibrils Monitored by Vibrational Circular Dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ge; Babenko, Viktoria; Dzwolak, Wojciech; Keiderling, Timothy A

    2015-12-15

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) induced destabilization of insulin fibrils has been previously studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and interpreted in terms of secondary structural changes. The variation of this process for fibrils with different types of higher-order morphological structures remained unclear. Here, we utilize vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), which has been reported to provide a useful biophysical probe of the supramolecular chirality of amyloid fibrils, to characterize changes in the macroscopic chirality following DMSO-induced disassembly for two types of insulin fibrils formed under different conditions, at different reduced pH values with and without added salt and agitation. We confirm that very high concentrations of DMSO can disaggregate both types of insulin fibrils, which initially maintained a β-sheet conformation and eventually changed their secondary structure to a disordered form. The two types responded to varying concentrations of DMSO, and disaggregation followed different mechanisms. Interconversion of specific insulin fibril morphological types also occurred during the destabilization process as monitored by VCD. With transmission electron microscopy, we were able to correlate the changes in VCD sign patterns to alteration of morphology of the insulin fibrils.

  6. Toward the discovery of functional transthyretin amyloid inhibitors: application of virtual screening methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Carlos J V; Mukherjee, Trishna; Brito, Rui M M; Jackson, Richard M

    2010-10-25

    Inhibition of amyloid fibril formation by stabilization of the native form of the protein transthyretin (TTR) is a viable approach for the treatment of familial amyloid polyneuropathy that has been gaining momentum in the field of amyloid research. The TTR stabilizer molecules discovered to date have shown efficacy at inhibiting fibrilization in vitro but display impairing issues of solubility, affinity for TTR in the blood plasma and/or adverse effects. In this study we present a benchmark of four protein- and ligand-based virtual screening (VS) methods for identifying novel TTR stabilizers: (i) two-dimensional (2D) similarity searches with chemical hashed, pharmacophore, and UNITY fingerprints, (ii) 3D searches based on shape, chemical, and electrostatic similarity, (iii) LigMatch, a new ligand-based method which uses multiple templates and combines 3D geometric hashing with a 2D preselection process, and (iv) molecular docking to consensus X-ray crystal structures of TTR. We illustrate the potential of the best-performing VS protocols to retrieve promising new leads by ranking a tailored library of 2.3 million commercially available compounds. Our predictions show that the top-scoring molecules possess distinctive features from the known TTR binders, holding better solubility, fraction of halogen atoms, and binding affinity profiles. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to rationalize the utilization of a large battery of in silico screening techniques toward the identification of a new generation of TTR amyloid inhibitors.

  7. Sugar microarray via click chemistry: molecular recognition with lectins and amyloid {beta} (1-42)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Erino; Fukuda, Tomohiro; Miura, Yoshiko [School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Yamauchi, Takahiro, E-mail: miuray@jaist.ac.j [Department of Molecular Design and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Sugar microarrays were fabricated on various substrates via click chemistry. Acetylene-terminated substrates were prepared by forming self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on a gold substrate with alkyl-disulfide and on silicon, quartz and glass substrates with a silane-coupling reagent. The gold substrates were subjected to surface plasmon resonance measurements, and the quartz and glass substrates were subjected to spectroscopy measurements and optical microscopy observation. The saccharide-immobilized substrate on the gold substrate showed specific interaction with the corresponding lectin, and the saccharides showed inert surface properties to other proteins with a high signal-to-noise ratio. We also focused on the saccharide-protein interaction on protein amyloidosis of Alzheimer amyloid {beta}. Amyloid {beta} peptide showed conformation transition on the saccharide-immobilization substrate into a {beta}-sheet, and fibril formation and amyloid aggregates were found on the specific saccharides.

  8. Sugar microarray via click chemistry: molecular recognition with lectins and amyloid β (1–42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erino Matsumoto, Takahiro Yamauchi, Tomohiro Fukuda and Yoshiko Miura

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sugar microarrays were fabricated on various substrates via click chemistry. Acetylene-terminated substrates were prepared by forming self-assembled monolayers (SAMs on a gold substrate with alkyl-disulfide and on silicon, quartz and glass substrates with a silane-coupling reagent. The gold substrates were subjected to surface plasmon resonance measurements, and the quartz and glass substrates were subjected to spectroscopy measurements and optical microscopy observation. The saccharide-immobilized substrate on the gold substrate showed specific interaction with the corresponding lectin, and the saccharides showed inert surface properties to other proteins with a high signal-to-noise ratio. We also focused on the saccharide–protein interaction on protein amyloidosis of Alzheimer amyloid β. Amyloid β peptide showed conformation transition on the saccharide-immobilization substrate into a β-sheet, and fibril formation and amyloid aggregates were found on the specific saccharides.

  9. Orientation of aromatic residues in amyloid cores: Structural insights into prion fiber diversity

    KAUST Repository

    Reymer, Anna

    2014-11-17

    Structural conversion of one given protein sequence into different amyloid states, resulting in distinct phenotypes, is one of the most intriguing phenomena of protein biology. Despite great efforts the structural origin of prion diversity remains elusive, mainly because amyloids are insoluble yet noncrystalline and therefore not easily amenable to traditional structural-biology methods. We investigate two different phenotypic prion strains, weak and strong, of yeast translation termination factor Sup35 with respect to angular orientation of tyrosines using polarized light spectroscopy. By applying a combination of alignment methods the degree of fiber orientation can be assessed, which allows a relatively accurate determination of the aromatic ring angles. Surprisingly, the strains show identical average orientations of the tyrosines, which are evenly spread through the amyloid core. Small variations between the two strains are related to the local environment of a fraction of tyrosines outside the core, potentially reflecting differences in fibril packing.

  10. Identification of a Novel Parallel beta-Strand Conformation within Molecular Monolayer of Amyloid Peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lei; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Shuai;

    2016-01-01

    technique with force controlled in pico-Newton range, combining with molecular dynamic simulation. The identified parallel beta-strand-like structure of molecular monolayer is distinct from the antiparallel beta-strand structure of A beta(33-42) amyloid fibril. This finding enriches the molecular structures....... In this work, the early A beta(33-42) aggregates forming the molecular monolayer at hydrophobic interface are investigated. The molecular monolayer of amyloid peptide A beta(33-42) consisting of novel parallel beta-strand-like structure is further revealed by means of a quantitative nanomechanical spectroscopy......The differentiation of protein properties and biological functions arises from the variation in the primary and secondary structure. Specifically, in abnormal assemblies of protein, such as amyloid peptide, the secondary structure is closely correlated with the stable ensemble and the cytotoxicity...

  11. Acetylcholinesterase, a senile plaque component, affects the fibrillogenesis of amyloid-beta-peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, A; Bronfman, F; Pérez, C A; Vicente, M; Garrido, J; Inestrosa, N C

    1995-12-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) colocalizes with amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) deposits present in the brain of Alzheimer's patients. Recent studies showed that A beta 1-40 can adopt two different conformational states in solution (an amyloidogenic conformer, A beta ac, and a non-amyloidogenic conformer, A beta nac) which have distinct abilities to form amyloid fibrils. We report here that AChE binds A beta nac and accelerates amyloid formation by the same peptide. No such effect was observed with A beta ac, the amyloidogenic conformer, suggesting that AChE acts as a 'pathological chaperone' inducing a conformational transition from A beta nac into A beta ac in vitro.

  12. Expression and sequence analyses of serum amyloid A in the Syrian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, C F; Tucker, P W; Dowton, S B

    1989-05-30

    Reactive amyloidosis occurs during chronic inflammation and involves deposition of amyloid A (AA) fibrils in many organs. Amyloid A is derived by proteolysis from serum amyloid A component (SAA), a major acute-phase reactant in many species. Since spontaneous amyloidosis occurs commonly in Syrian hamsters, we have studied the structure and expression of SAA genes during inflammation in these animals. Two cDNA clones and one genomic clone were sequenced, suggesting that Syrian hamster SAA is encoded by at least two genes. Hepatic mRNA analyses showed that SAA was inducible in many hamster organs during acute inflammation. These studies also demonstrated that SAA mRNA for one isotype is maximally expressed at a site of local tissue damage.

  13. Cross-beta spine architecture of fibrils formed by the amyloidogenic segment NFGSVQFV of medin from solid-state NMR and X-ray fiber diffraction measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madine, Jillian; Copland, Alastair; Serpell, Louise C; Middleton, David A

    2009-04-14

    Over 30 polypeptides are known to assemble into highly ordered fibrils associated with pathological disorders known collectively as amyloidoses. Structural studies of short model peptides are beginning to reveal trends in the types of molecular interactions that drive aggregation and stabilize the packing of beta-sheet layers within fibrillar assemblies. This work investigates the molecular architecture of fibrils formed by the peptide AMed42-49 representing residues 42-49 of the 50 amino acid polypeptide medin associated with aortic medial amyloid, the most common form of senile localized amyloid. The peptide aggregates within 2 days to form bundles of microcrystalline-like needles displaying a high degree of order. Fibrils were prepared from peptides containing up to 23 13C labels, and the solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) method rotational resonance (RR) was used to determine constraints on the distances between selective atomic sites within fibrils. The constraints are consistent with unbroken beta-strands hydrogen bonded in a parallel in-register arrangement within beta-sheets. Further RR measurements identify close (>6.5 A) contacts between residues F43 and V46 and between S45 and V46, which can only occur between beta-sheet layers and which are consistent with two principal models of beta-sheet arrangements. X-ray fiber diffraction from partially aligned fibrils revealed the classical amyloid diffraction pattern, and comparison of patterns calculated from model coordinates with experimental data allowed determination of a consistent molecular model.

  14. Atrial fibrillation in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto A.Franken; Ronaldo F.Rosa; Silvio CM Santos

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses atrial fibrillation according to the guidelines of Brazilian Society of Cardiac Arrhythmias and the Brazilian Cardiogeriatrics Guidelines. We stress the thromboembolic burden of atrial fibrillation and discuss how to prevent it as well as the best way to conduct cases of atrial fibrillatios in the elderly, reverting the arrhythmia to sinus rhythm, or the option of heart rate control. The new methods to treat atrial fibrillation, such as radiofrequency ablation, new oral direct thrombin inhibitors and Xa factor inhibitors, as well as new antiarrhythmic drugs, are depicted.

  15. Electrostatic effects in collagen fibrillization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Svetlana; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2014-03-01

    Using light scattering and AFM techniques, we have measured the kinetics of fibrillization of collagen (pertinent to the vitreous of human eye) as a function of pH and ionic strength. At higher and lower pH, collagen triple-peptides remain stable in solution without fibrillization. At neutral pH, the fibrillization occurs and its growth kinetics is slowed upon either an increase in ionic strength or a decrease in temperature. We present a model, based on polymer crystallization theory, to describe the observed electrostatic nature of collagen assembly.

  16. Heterologous amyloid seeding: revisiting the role of acetylcholinesterase in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Létitia Jean

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases associated with abnormal protein folding and ordered aggregation require an initial trigger which may be infectious, inherited, post-inflammatory or idiopathic. Proteolytic cleavage to generate vulnerable precursors, such as amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta production via beta and gamma secretases in Alzheimer's Disease (AD, is one such trigger, but the proteolytic removal of these fragments is also aetiologically important. The levels of Abeta in the central nervous system are regulated by several catabolic proteases, including insulysin (IDE and neprilysin (NEP. The known association of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE with pathological aggregates in AD together with its ability to increase Abeta fibrilization prompted us to search for proteolytic triggers that could enhance this process. The hAChE C-terminal domain (T40, AChE(575-614 is an exposed amphiphilic alpha-helix involved in enzyme oligomerisation, but it also contains a conformational switch region (CSR with high propensity for conversion to non-native (hidden beta-strand, a property associated with amyloidogenicity. A synthetic peptide (AChE(586-599 encompassing the CSR region shares homology with Abeta and forms beta-sheet amyloid fibrils. We investigated the influence of IDE and NEP proteolysis on the formation and degradation of relevant hAChE beta-sheet species. By combining reverse-phase HPLC and mass spectrometry, we established that the enzyme digestion profiles on T40 versus AChE(586-599, or versus Abeta, differed. Moreover, IDE digestion of T40 triggered the conformational switch from alpha- to beta-structures, resulting in surfactant CSR species that self-assembled into amyloid fibril precursors (oligomers. Crucially, these CSR species significantly increased Abeta fibril formation both by seeding the energetically unfavorable formation of amyloid nuclei and by enhancing the rate of amyloid elongation. Hence, these results may offer an explanation

  17. Self-assembly of polypeptides into left-handedly twisted fibril-like structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yan; Gao, Yi Qin

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we investigated the spontaneous formation of aggregation structures of amyloid-forming peptide (GGVVIA) using a coarse-grained model and Monte Carlo simulations. The effects of concentration and temperature on the formation of different aggregation structures were studied. Three types of aggregation structures, single-layer β sheet, amorphous β -sheet aggregate, and fibril-like structures, were observed in our simulations. The fibril-like structures obtained in simulations have a common cross- β spine structure in which β sheets twist in a left-handed fashion. The averaged twisting angle of the β sheet in the fibril-like structures is 12°±2° . Moreover, it was found that the peptides in the same β sheets prefer to arrange in a parallel way, which is consistent with the corresponding GGVVIA crystalline structure. On the other hand, it was found that there is a rich family of β -sheet stacking patterns in the fibril-like structures suggesting that the fibril structures are more complex than the corresponding crystalline structure and there exist many local free-energy minima rather than a distinct global minimum.

  18. Dissecting the structural determinants for the difference in mechanical stability of silk and amyloid beta-sheet stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Senbo; Xiao, Shijun; Gräter, Frauke

    2013-06-14

    Stacking of β-sheets results in a protein super secondary structure with remarkable mechanical properties. β-Stacks are the determinants of a silk fiber's resilience and are also the building blocks of amyloid fibrils. While both silk and amyloid-type crystals are known to feature a high resistance against rupture, their structural and mechanical similarities and particularities are yet to be fully understood. Here, we systematically compare the rupture force and stiffness of amyloid and spider silk poly-alanine β-stacks of comparable sizes using Molecular Dynamics simulations. We identify the direction of force application as the primary determinant of the rupture strength; β-sheets in silk are orientated along the fiber axis, i.e. the pulling direction, and consequently require high forces in the several nanoNewton range for shearing β-strands apart, while β-sheets in amyloid are oriented vertically to the fiber, allowing a zipper-like rupture at sub-nanoNewton forces. A secondary factor rendering amyloid β-stacks softer and weaker than their spider silk counterparts is the sub-optimal side-chain packing between β-sheets due to the sequence variations of amyloid-forming proteins as opposed to the perfectly packed poly-alanine β-sheets of silk. Taken together, amyloid fibers can reach the stiffness of silk fibers in spite of their softer and weaker β-sheet arrangement as they are missing a softening amorphous matrix.

  19. Hypertension and Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dzeshka, Mikhail S.; Shahid, Farhan; Shantsila, Alena

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent sustained arrhythmia found in clinical practice. AF rarely exists as a single entity but rather as part of a diverse clinical spectrum of cardiovascular diseases, related to structural and electrical remodeling within the left atrium, leading to AF o...... of complications as the first clinical manifestation of the disease. Antithrombotic prevention in AF combined with strict blood pressure control is of primary importance, since stroke risk and bleeding risk are both greater with underlying hypertension....... onset, perpetuation, and progression. Due to the high overall prevalence within the AF population arterial hypertension plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of AF and its complications. Fibroblast proliferation, apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, gap junction remodeling, accumulation of collagen both...... in atrial and ventricular myocardium all accompany ageing-related structural remodeling with impact on electrical activity. The presence of hypertension also stimulates oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic activation, which further drives the remodeling...

  20. Pathogenesis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, A.A.M.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Kremer, H.P.H.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is the result of the deposition of an amyloidogenic protein in cortical and leptomeningeal vessels. The most common type of CAA is caused by amyloid beta-protein (Abeta), which is particularly associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Excessive Abeta-CAA formation c

  1. Fracture mechanics of collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene B; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko;

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within...... fibrils is limited. The presence of covalent enzymatic cross-links between collagen molecules is an important factor that has been shown to influence mechanical behavior of the tendons. To improve our understanding of how molecular bonds translate into tendon mechanics, we used an atomic force microscopy...... technique to measure the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils loaded to failure. Fibrils from human patellar tendons, rat-tail tendons (RTTs), NaBH₄ reduced RTTs, and tail tendons of Zucker diabetic fat rats were tested. We found a characteristic three-phase stress-strain behavior in the human...

  2. Mechanical properties of collagen fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Wenger, M. P. E.; Bozec, L.; Horton, M. A.; Mesquida, P

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collagen fibers from staggered subfibrils still lacks a universally accepted model. Determining the mechanical properties of single collagen fibrils ( diameter 50 - 200 nm) provides new insights into collagen structure. In this work, the reduced modulus of collagen was measured by nanoindentation using atomic force microscopy. For individual type 1 collagen fibrils from rat tail, the modulus was found to be in the range from 5 GPa to 11.5 GPa ( in air and at room temperature)...

  3. Architecture of polyglutamine-containing fibrils from time-resolved fluorescence decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röthlein, Christoph; Miettinen, Markus S; Borwankar, Tejas; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Kumke, Michael U; Ignatova, Zoya

    2014-09-26

    The disease risk and age of onset of Huntington disease (HD) and nine other repeat disorders strongly depend on the expansion of CAG repeats encoding consecutive polyglutamines (polyQ) in the corresponding disease protein. PolyQ length-dependent misfolding and aggregation are the hallmarks of CAG pathologies. Despite intense effort, the overall structure of these aggregates remains poorly understood. Here, we used sensitive time-dependent fluorescent decay measurements to assess the architecture of mature fibrils of huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 implicated in HD pathology. Varying the position of the fluorescent labels in the Htt monomer with expanded 51Q (Htt51Q) and using structural models of putative fibril structures, we generated distance distributions between donors and acceptors covering all possible distances between the monomers or monomer dimensions within the polyQ amyloid fibril. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we systematically scanned all possible monomer conformations that fit the experimentally measured decay times. Monomers with four-stranded 51Q stretches organized into five-layered β-sheets with alternating N termini of the monomers perpendicular to the fibril axis gave the best fit to our data. Alternatively, the core structure of the polyQ fibrils might also be a zipper layer with antiparallel four-stranded stretches as this structure showed the next best fit. All other remaining arrangements are clearly excluded by the data. Furthermore, the assessed dimensions of the polyQ stretch of each monomer provide structural evidence for the observed polyQ length threshold in HD pathology. Our approach can be used to validate the effect of pharmacological substances that inhibit or alter amyloid growth and structure.

  4. Folding and fibril formation of the cell cycle protein Cks1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Reto; Seeliger, Markus A; Kelly, Sadie E; Ilag, Leopold L; Meersman, Filip; Limones, Alejandra; Luisi, Ben F; Dobson, Christopher M; Itzhaki, Laura S

    2006-07-07

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cks protein Cks1 has a COOH-terminal glutamine-rich sequence not present in other homologues. Cks proteins domain swap to form dimers but unique to Cks1 is the anti-parallel arrangement of protomers within the dimer. Despite the differences in Cks1 compared with other Cks proteins, we find the domain swapping properties are very similar. However, aggregation of Cks1 occurs by a route distinct from the other Cks proteins studied to date. Cks1 formed fibrillar aggregates at room temperature and neutral pH. During this process, Cks1 underwent proteolytic cleavage at a trypsin-like site into two fragments, the globular Cks domain and the glutamine-rich COOH terminus. At high protein concentrations, the rate of fibril formation was the same as the rate of proteolysis. The dominant species present within the fibrils was the glutamine-rich sequence. Consistent with this result, fibril formation was enhanced by addition of trypsin. Moreover, a truncated variant lacking the glutamine-rich sequence did not form fibrils under the same conditions. A lag phase at low protein concentrations indicates that fibril formation occurs through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The aggregates appear to resemble amyloid fibrils, in that they show the typical cross-beta x-ray diffraction pattern. Moreover, infrared spectroscopy data indicate that the glutamine side chains are hydrogen-bonded along the axis of the fibril. Our results indicate that the proteolytic reaction is the crucial step initiating aggregation and demonstrate that Cks1 is a simple, tunable model system for exploring aggregation mechanisms associated with polyglutamine deposition diseases.

  5. Odontogenic fibroma, including amyloid and ossifying variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eversole, Lewis R

    2011-12-01

    Sixty-five cases of odontogenic fibroma (OdonF) are herein presented having been segregated into peripheral, extra bony tumors (n = 40) and tumors arising in bone or centrally (n = 25). All cases were characterized microscopically by a fibrous proliferation that varied within and between cases in cellularity and collagen fibril diameter, with intermixed odontogenic epithelial islands and cords. All central lesions presented as well demarcated radiolucencies and resorption of contiguous tooth roots was a common finding. These intraosseous lesions were of the WHO type; the so-called nonWHO type was excluded as all lesions with this diagnosis were devoid of an epithelial component and could be reclassified as other soft tissue fibrogenic tumors. Neither the central tumors nor the peripheral lesions recurred following enucleation/curettage, with a mean follow-up of 4 and 3.4 years respectively. Three distinct microscopic variations were encountered in this series: (1) two cases of OdonF with giant cell reaction, (2) two instances of OdonF with ossifying fibroma; and (3) four instances of OdonF with odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM), an amyloid-like protein found deposited adjacent to epithelial cords plus CD1a+/S-100+ Langerhans dendritic cells entwined around the epithelial element. A single instance of the odontogenic fibroma-like hamartoma/enamel hypoplasia syndrome has been included in this series.

  6. Hacking the code of amyloid formation: the amyloid stretch hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, M Teresa; Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra; Serrano, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Many research efforts in the last years have been directed towards understanding the factors determining protein misfolding and amyloid formation. Protein stability and amino acid composition have been identified as the two major factors in vitro. The research of our group has been focused on understanding the relationship between amino acid sequence and amyloid formation. Our approach has been the design of simple model systems that reproduce the biophysical properties of natural amyloids. An amyloid sequence pattern was extracted that can be used to detect amyloidogenic hexapeptide stretches in proteins. We have added evidence supporting that these amyloidogenic stretches can trigger amyloid formation by nonamyloidogenic proteins. Some experimental results in other amyloid proteins will be analyzed under the conclusions obtained in these studies. Our conclusions together with evidences from other groups suggest that amyloid formation is the result of the interplay between a decrease of protein stability, and the presence of highly amyloidogenic regions in proteins. As many of these results have been obtained in vitro, the challenge for the next years will be to demonstrate their validity in in vivo systems.

  7. Advanced glycation end products induce differential structural modifications and fibrillation of albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Saurabh; Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Saraswathi, N. T.

    2016-06-01

    Glycation induced amyloid fibrillation is fundamental to the development of many neurodegenerative and cardiovascular complications. Excessive non-enzymatic glycation in conditions such as hyperglycaemia results in the increased accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs are highly reactive pro-oxidants, which can lead to the activation of inflammatory pathways and development of oxidative stress. Recently, the effect of non-enzymatic glycation on protein structure has been the major research area, but the role of specific AGEs in such structural alteration and induction of fibrillation remains undefined. In this study, we determined the specific AGEs mediated structural modifications in albumin mainly considering carboxymethyllysine (CML), carboxyethyllysine (CEL), and argpyrimidine (Arg-P) which are the major AGEs formed in the body. We studied the secondary structural changes based on circular dichroism (CD) and spectroscopic analysis. The AGEs induced fibrillation was determined by Congo red binding and examination of scanning and transmission electron micrographs. The amyloidogenic regions in the sequence of BSA were determined using FoldAmyloid. It was observed that CEL modification of BSA leads to the development of fibrillar structures, which was evident from both secondary structure changes and TEM analysis.

  8. Fluorescence monitoring of the effect of oxidized lipids on the process of protein fibrillization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vus, Kateryna; Sood, Rohit; Gorbenko, Galyna; Kinnunen, Paavo

    2016-09-01

    The kinetics of lysozyme and insulin amyloid formation in the presence of the oxidized phospholipids (oxPLs) was investigated using Thioflavin T fluorescence assay. The kinetic parameters of fibrillization process (lag time and apparent rate constant) have been determined upon varying the following experimental parameters: the type of lipid assemblies (premicellar aggregates and lipid bilayer vesicles), pH, temperature and lipid-to-protein molar ratio. It was found that oxPLs premicellar aggregates induced the more pronounced increase of the maximum Thioflavin T fluorescence, which is proportional to the extent of fibril formation, compared to the vesicles composed of the oxidized and unoxidized lipids. In contrast, the oxPLs, used as dispersions or included into vesicles, inhibited fibril nucleation and elongation under near-physiological conditions in vitro compared to liposomes containing unoxidized lipids. The results obtained provide deeper insight into the molecular mechanisms of the oxidative stress-modulated conformational diseases, and could be employed for the anti-amyloid drug development.

  9. Role of gut microbiota and nutrients in amyloid formation and pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistollato, Francesca; Sumalla Cano, Sandra; Elio, Iñaki; Masias Vergara, Manuel; Giampieri, Francesca; Battino, Maurizio

    2016-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that alterations in the composition of the gut microbiota might be associated with the onset of certain human pathologies, such as Alzheimer disease, a neurodegenerative syndrome associated with cerebral accumulation of amyloidfibrils. It has been shown that bacteria populating the gut microbiota can release significant amounts of amyloids and lipopolysaccharides, which might play a role in the modulation of signaling pathways and the production of proinflammatory cytokines related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Additionally, nutrients have been shown to affect the composition of the gut microbiota as well as the formation and aggregation of cerebral amyloid-β. This suggests that modulating the gut microbiome and amyloidogenesis through specific nutritional interventions might prove to be an effective strategy to prevent or reduce the risk of Alzheimer disease. This review examines the possible role of the gut in the dissemination of amyloids, the role of the gut microbiota in the regulation of the gut-brain axis, the potential amyloidogenic properties of gut bacteria, and the possible impact of nutrients on modulation of microbiota composition and amyloid formation in relation to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

  10. Serum amyloid P component scintigraphy in familial amyloid polyneuropathy: regression of visceral amyloid following liver transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydh, A.; Hietala, S.O.; Aahlstroem, K.R. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Suhr, O. [Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Northern Sweden, Umeaa (Sweden); Pepys, M.B.; Hawkins, P.N. [Immunological Medicine Unit, Department of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-07-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) associated with transthyretin (TTR) mutations is the commonest type of hereditary amyloidosis. Plasma TTR is produced almost exclusively in the liver and orthotopic liver transplantation is the only available treatment, although the clinical outcome varies. Serum amyloid P component (SAP) scintigraphy is a method for identifying and quantitatively monitoring amyloid deposits in vivo, but it has not previously been used to study the outcome of visceral amyloid deposits in FAP following liver transplantation. Whole body scintigraphy following injection of iodine-123 labelled SAP was performed in 17 patients with FAP associated with TTR Met30 and in five asymptomatic gene carriers. Follow-up studies were performed in ten patients, eight of whom had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation 1-5 years beforehand. There was abnormal uptake of {sup 123}I-SAP in all FAP patients, including the kidneys in each case, the spleen in five cases and the adrenal glands in three cases. Renal amyloid deposits were also present in three of the asymptomatic carriers. Follow-up studies 1-5 years after liver transplantation showed that there had been substantial regression of the visceral amyloid deposits in two patients and modest improvement in three cases. The amyloid deposits were unchanged in two patients. In conclusion, {sup 123}I-SAP scintigraphy identified unsuspected visceral amyloid in each patient with FAP due to TTR Met30. The universal presence of renal amyloid probably underlies the high frequency of renal failure that occurs in FAP following liver transplantation. The variable capacity of patients to mobilise amyloid deposits following liver transplantation may contribute to their long-term clinical outcome. (orig.) With 2 figs., 2 tabs., 22 refs.

  11. Influence of the stability of a fused protein and its distance to the amyloidogenic segment on fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Buttstedt

    Full Text Available Conversion of native proteins into amyloid fibrils is irreversible and therefore it is difficult to study the interdependence of conformational stability and fibrillation by thermodynamic analyses. Here we approached this problem by fusing amyloidogenic poly-alanine segments derived from the N-terminal domain of the nuclear poly (A binding protein PABPN1 with a well studied, reversibly unfolding protein, CspB from Bacillus subtilis. Earlier studies had indicated that CspB could maintain its folded structure in fibrils, when it was separated from the amyloidogenic segment by a long linker. When CspB is directly fused with the amyloidogenic segment, it unfolds because its N-terminal chain region becomes integrated into the fibrillar core, as shown by protease mapping experiments. Spacers of either 3 or 16 residues between CspB and the amyloidogenic segment were not sufficient to prevent this loss of CspB structure. Since the low thermodynamic stability of CspB (ΔG(D = 12.4 kJ/mol might be responsible for unfolding and integration of CspB into fibrils, fusions with a CspB mutant with enhanced thermodynamic stability (ΔG(D = 26.9 kJ/mol were studied. This strongly stabilized CspB remained folded and prevented fibril formation in all fusions. Our data show that the conformational stability of a linked, independently structured protein domain can control fibril formation.

  12. Atrial fibrillation and heart failure: is atrial fibrillation a disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilman, V

    2014-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation in heart failure often occur together. The relationship between atrial fibrillation and heart failure has remained a subject of research. The main manifestation of the violation of hydrodynamics in heart failure is the increased end-diastolic pressure, which is transmitted through the intercommunicated system (left ventricle-left atrium-pulmonary veins-alveolar capillaries) causing increased pulmonary wedge pressure with the danger for pulmonary edema. End-diastolic pressure is the sum of left ventricle diastolic pressure and left atrial systolic pressure. Stopping the mechanical systole of the left atrium can reduce the pressure in the system in heart failure. Atrial fibrillation stops the mechanical systole of the left atrium and decreases the intercommunicating pressure and pulmonary wedge pressure. It is possible that atrial fibrillation is a mechanism for protection from increasing end-diastolic pressure and pulmonary wedge pressure, and prevents the danger of pulmonary edema. This hypothesis may explain the relationship between heart failure and atrial fibrillation and their frequent association.

  13. Diversity, biogenesis and function of microbial amyloids

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid is a distinct β-sheet-rich fold that many proteins can acquire. Frequently associated with neurodegenerative diseases in humans, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s, amyloids are traditionally considered the product of protein misfolding. However, the amyloid fold is now recognized as a ubiquitous part of normal cellular biology. ‘Functional’ amyloids have been identified in nearly all facets of cellular life, with microbial functional amyloids leading the way. Unlike ...

  14. Parallel in-register intermolecular β-sheet architectures for prion-seeded prion protein (PrP) amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groveman, Bradley R; Dolan, Michael A; Taubner, Lara M; Kraus, Allison; Wickner, Reed B; Caughey, Byron

    2014-08-29

    Structures of the infectious form of prion protein (e.g. PrP(Sc) or PrP-Scrapie) remain poorly defined. The prevalent structural models of PrP(Sc) retain most of the native α-helices of the normal, noninfectious prion protein, cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), but evidence is accumulating that these helices are absent in PrP(Sc) amyloid. Moreover, recombinant PrP(C) can form amyloid fibrils in vitro that have parallel in-register intermolecular β-sheet architectures in the domains originally occupied by helices 2 and 3. Here, we provide solid-state NMR evidence that the latter is also true of initially prion-seeded recombinant PrP amyloids formed in the absence of denaturants. These results, in the context of a primarily β-sheet structure, led us to build detailed models of PrP amyloid based on parallel in-register architectures, fibrillar shapes and dimensions, and other available experimentally derived conformational constraints. Molecular dynamics simulations of PrP(90-231) octameric segments suggested that such linear fibrils, which are consistent with many features of PrP(Sc) fibrils, can have stable parallel in-register β-sheet cores. These simulations revealed that the C-terminal residues ∼124-227 more readily adopt stable tightly packed structures than the N-terminal residues ∼90-123 in the absence of cofactors. Variations in the placement of turns and loops that link the β-sheets could give rise to distinct prion strains capable of faithful template-driven propagation. Moreover, our modeling suggests that single PrP monomers can comprise the entire cross-section of fibrils that have previously been assumed to be pairs of laterally associated protofilaments. Together, these insights provide a new basis for deciphering mammalian prion structures.

  15. Oxidation reduces the fibrillation but not the neurotoxicity of the prion peptide PrP106-126

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm, Linda Alice; Chabry, J.; Bastholm, L.;

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that soluble oligomers of misfolded protein may play a role in the pathogenesis of protein misfolding diseases including the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) where the protein involved is the prion protein, PrP. The effect of oxidation on fibrillation...... tendency and neurotoxicity of different molecular variants of the prion peptide PrP106-126 was investigated. It was found that methionine oxidation significantly reduced amyloid fibril formation and proteinase K resistance, but it did not reduce (but rather increase slightly) the neurotoxicity...... of the peptides in vivo (electroretinography after intraocular injections in mice) and in vitro (in primary neuronal cultures). We furthermore found that the bovine variant of PrP106-126, containing only one methionine residue, showed both reduced fibril forming capacity and in vivo and in vitro neurotoxicity...

  16. Self-assembly of a nine-residue amyloid-forming peptide fragment of SARS corona virus E-protein: mechanism of self aggregation and amyloid-inhibition of hIAPP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anirban; Pithadia, Amit S; Bhat, Jyotsna; Bera, Supriyo; Midya, Anupam; Fierke, Carol A; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Bhunia, Anirban

    2015-04-01

    Molecular self-assembly, a phenomenon widely observed in nature, has been exploited through organic molecules, proteins, DNA, and peptides to study complex biological systems. These self-assembly systems may also be used in understanding the molecular and structural biology which can inspire the design and synthesis of increasingly complex biomaterials. Specifically, use of these building blocks to investigate protein folding and misfolding has been of particular value since it can provide tremendous insights into peptide aggregation related to a variety of protein misfolding diseases, or amyloid diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type-II diabetes). Herein, the self-assembly of TK9, a nine-residue peptide of the extra membrane C-terminal tail of the SARS corona virus envelope, and its variants were characterized through biophysical, spectroscopic, and simulated studies, and it was confirmed that the structure of these peptides influences their aggregation propensity, hence, mimicking amyloid proteins. TK9, which forms a beta-sheet rich fibril, contains a key sequence motif that may be critical for beta-sheet formation, thus making it an interesting system to study amyloid fibrillation. TK9 aggregates were further examined through simulations to evaluate the possible intra- and interpeptide interactions at the molecular level. These self-assembly peptides can also serve as amyloid inhibitors through hydrophobic and electrophilic recognition interactions. Our results show that TK9 inhibits the fibrillation of hIAPP, a 37 amino acid peptide implicated in the pathology of type-II diabetes. Thus, biophysical and NMR experimental results have revealed a molecular level understanding of peptide folding events, as well as the inhibition of amyloid-protein aggregation are reported.

  17. Templated Aggregation of TAR DNA-binding Protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) by Seeding with TDP-43 Peptide Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimonaka, Shotaro; Nonaka, Takashi; Suzuki, Genjiro; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Hasegawa, Masato

    2016-04-22

    TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been identified as the major component of ubiquitin-positive neuronal and glial inclusions in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Aggregation of TDP-43 to amyloid-like fibrils and spreading of the aggregates are suggested to account for the pathogenesis and progression of these diseases. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of TDP-43 aggregation, we attempted to identify the amino acid sequence required for the aggregation. By expressing a series of deletion mutants lacking 20 amino acid residues in the C-terminal region in SH-SY5Y cells, we established that residues 274-313 in the glycine-rich region are essential for aggregation. In vitro aggregation experiments using synthetic peptides of 40 amino acids from this sequence and adjacent regions showed that peptides 274-313 and 314-353 formed amyloid-like fibrils. Transduction of these fibrils induced seed-dependent aggregation of TDP-43 in cells expressing wild-type TDP-43 or TDP-43 lacking nuclear localization signal. These cells showed different phosphorylated C-terminal fragments of TDP-43 and different trypsin-resistant bands. These results suggest that residues 274-353 are responsible for the conversion of TDP-43 to amyloid-like fibrils and that templated aggregation of TDP-43 by seeding with different peptides induces various types of TDP-43 pathologies, i.e. the peptides appear to act like prion strains.

  18. An extract of the marine alga Alaria esculenta modulates α-synuclein folding and amyloid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffin, James C; Richards, Robert C; Craft, Cheryl; Jahan, Nusrat; Leggiadro, Cindy; Chopin, Thierry; Szemerda, Michael; MacKinnon, Shawna L; Ewart, K Vanya

    2017-02-23

    The conversion of α-synuclein from its natively unfolded and α-helical tetrameric forms to an amyloid conformation is central to the emergence of Parkinson's disease. Therefore, prevention of this conversion may offer an effective way of avoiding the onset of this disease or delaying its progress. At different concentrations, an aqueous extract from the edible winged kelp (Alaria esculenta), was shown to lower and to raise the melting point of α-synuclein. Size fractionation of the extract resulted in the separation of these distinct activities. The fraction below 5kDa decreased the melting point of α-synuclein, whereas the fraction above 10kDa raised the melting point. Both of these fractions were found to inhibit the formation of amyloid aggregates by α-synuclein, measured by thioflavin T dye-binding assays; this effect was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy showing the inhibition of fibril formation. Circular dichroism analysis suggested that the incubation of α-synuclein under fibrillation conditions resulted in the loss of substantial native helical structure in the presence and absence of the fractions. It is therefore likely that the fractions inhibit fibrillation by interacting with the unfolded form of α-synuclein.

  19. Garlic extract exhibits antiamyloidogenic activity on amyloid-beta fibrillogenesis: relevance to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Veer Bala; Indi, S S; Rao, K S J

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized pathologically by the deposition of amyloid plaques. Fibrillar Abeta is the principal component of amyloid plaques in the brain of AD patients. The prevention of Abeta aggregation or dissolution of fibrillar Abeta has clinical significance. The present communication examined in vitro the antiamyloidogenic properties of garlic extract. The effects of aqueous garlic extract (both fresh and boiled) on Abeta aggregation and defibrillation were studied by thioflavin-T based fluorescence assay, transmission electron microscopy and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The aqueous fresh garlic extract not only inhibited Abeta fibril formation in a concentration and time dependent manner but was also able to defibrillate Abeta preformed fibrils. The maximum defibrillization was observed after 2-3 days of incubation. The boiled aqueous garlic extract also retained its antiamyloidogenic activity. This indicated that antiamyloidogenic activity of garlic extract is non-enzymatic, i.e. proteases present in garlic did not degrade Abeta in solution. However, the fibril degrading ability of boiled garlic extract was significantly lost. The findings suggest that consumption of garlic may lead to inhibition of Abeta aggregation in human brain.

  20. Tafamidis, a potent and selective transthyretin kinetic stabilizer that inhibits the amyloid cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulawa, Christine E; Connelly, Stephen; Devit, Michael; Wang, Lan; Weigel, Charlotte; Fleming, James A; Packman, Jeff; Powers, Evan T; Wiseman, R Luke; Foss, Theodore R; Wilson, Ian A; Kelly, Jeffery W; Labaudinière, Richard

    2012-06-12

    The transthyretin amyloidoses (ATTR) are invariably fatal diseases characterized by progressive neuropathy and/or cardiomyopathy. ATTR are caused by aggregation of transthyretin (TTR), a natively tetrameric protein involved in the transport of thyroxine and the vitamin A-retinol-binding protein complex. Mutations within TTR that cause autosomal dominant forms of disease facilitate tetramer dissociation, monomer misfolding, and aggregation, although wild-type TTR can also form amyloid fibrils in elderly patients. Because tetramer dissociation is the rate-limiting step in TTR amyloidogenesis, targeted therapies have focused on small molecules that kinetically stabilize the tetramer, inhibiting TTR amyloid fibril formation. One such compound, tafamidis meglumine (Fx-1006A), has recently completed Phase II/III trials for the treatment of Transthyretin Type Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) and demonstrated a slowing of disease progression in patients heterozygous for the V30M TTR mutation. Herein we describe the molecular and structural basis of TTR tetramer stabilization by tafamidis. Tafamidis binds selectively and with negative cooperativity (K(d)s ~2 nM and ~200 nM) to the two normally unoccupied thyroxine-binding sites of the tetramer, and kinetically stabilizes TTR. Patient-derived amyloidogenic variants of TTR, including kinetically and thermodynamically less stable mutants, are also stabilized by tafamidis binding. The crystal structure of tafamidis-bound TTR suggests that binding stabilizes the weaker dimer-dimer interface against dissociation, the rate-limiting step of amyloidogenesis.

  1. Loss of metal ions, disulfide reduction and mutations related to familial ALS promote formation of amyloid-like aggregates from superoxide dismutase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep A Oztug Durer

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene encoding Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1 are one of the causes of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS. Fibrillar inclusions containing SOD1 and SOD1 inclusions that bind the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin S have been found in neurons of transgenic mice expressing mutant SOD1. Therefore, the formation of amyloid fibrils from human SOD1 was investigated. When agitated at acidic pH in the presence of low concentrations of guanidine or acetonitrile, metalated SOD1 formed fibrillar material which bound both thioflavin T and Congo red and had circular dichroism and infrared spectra characteristic of amyloid. While metalated SOD1 did not form amyloid-like aggregates at neutral pH, either removing metals from SOD1 with its intramolecular disulfide bond intact or reducing the intramolecular disulfide bond of metalated SOD1 was sufficient to promote formation of these aggregates. SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates both with and without intermolecular disulfide bonds, depending on the incubation conditions, and a mutant SOD1 lacking free sulfhydryl groups (AS-SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates at neutral pH under reducing conditions. ALS mutations enhanced the ability of disulfide-reduced SOD1 to form amyloid-like aggregates, and apo-AS-SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates at pH 7 only when an ALS mutation was also present. These results indicate that some mutations related to ALS promote formation of amyloid-like aggregates by facilitating the loss of metals and/or by making the intramolecular disulfide bond more susceptible to reduction, thus allowing the conversion of SOD1 to a form that aggregates to form resembling amyloid. Furthermore, the occurrence of amyloid-like aggregates per se does not depend on forming intermolecular disulfide bonds, and multiple forms of such aggregates can be produced from SOD1.

  2. High plasma levels of islet amyloid polypeptide in young with new-onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan F Paulsson

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP is a beta cell hormone secreted together with insulin upon glucose stimulation. IAPP participates in normal glucose regulation, but IAPP is also known for its ability to misfold and form islet amyloid. Amyloid fibrils form through smaller cell toxic intermediates and deposited amyloid disrupts normal islet architecture. Even though IAPP and amyloid formation are much discussed in type 2 diabetes, our aim was to study the significance of IAPP in type 1 diabetes. RESULTS: Plasma IAPP levels in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes (n = 224 were analysed and concentrations exceeding 100 pmol/L (127.2-888.7 pmol/L were found in 11% (25/224. The IAPP increase did not correlate with C-peptide levels. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Plasma levels of IAPP and insulin deviate in a subpopulation of young with newly-diagnosed type 1 diabetes. The determined elevated levels of IAPP might increase the risk for IAPP misfolding and formation of cell toxic amyloid in beta cells. This finding add IAPP-aggregation to the list over putative pathological factors causing type 1 diabetes.

  3. Expression of Fap amyloids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. fluorescens, and P. putida results in aggregation and increased biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueholm, Morten S; Søndergaard, Mads; Nilsson, Martin

    2013-01-01

    resulted in highly aggregative phenotypes and in increased biofilm formation. Detailed biophysical investigations of purified fibrils confirmed FapC as the main fibril monomer and supported the role of FapB as a minor, nucleating constituent as also indicated by bioinformatic analysis. Bioinformatics......The fap operon, encoding functional amyloids in Pseudomonas (Fap), is present in most pseudomonads, but so far the expression and importance for biofilm formation has only been investigated for P. fluorescens strain UK4. In this study, we demonstrate the capacity of P. aeruginosa PAO1, P....... fluorescens Pf-5, and P. putida F1 to express Fap fibrils, and investigated the effect of Fap expression on aggregation and biofilm formation. The fap operon in all three Pseudomonas species conferred the ability to express Fap fibrils as shown using a recombinant approach. This Fap overexpression consistently...

  4. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouza, Maksim, E-mail: mkouza@chem.uw.edu.pl; Kolinski, Andrzej [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warszaw (Poland); Co, Nguyen Truong [Department of Physics, Institute of Technology, National University of HCM City, 268 Ly Thuong Kiet Street, District 10, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Institute for Computational Science and Technology, Quang Trung Software City, Tan Chanh Hiep Ward, District 12, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Nguyen, Phuong H. [Laboratoire de Biochimie Theorique, UPR 9080 CNRS, IBPC, Universite Paris 7, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Li, Mai Suan, E-mail: masli@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  5. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: insights from lattice and all-atom models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouza, Maksim; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H; Kolinski, Andrzej; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  6. A triple-emission fluorescent probe reveals distinctive amyloid fibrillar polymorphism of wild-type alpha-synuclein and its familial Parkinson's disease mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celej, M Soledad; Caarls, Wouter; Demchenko, Alexander P; Jovin, Thomas M

    2009-08-11

    Intracytoplasmic neuronal deposits containing amyloid fibrils of the 140-amino acid presynaptic protein alpha-synuclein (AS) are the hallmark of Parkinson's (PD) disease and related neurodegenerative disorders. Three point mutations (A53T, A30P, and E46K) are linked to early onset PD. Compared to the wild-type (WT) protein, the mutants aggregate faster in vitro, but their fibrillar products are quite similar. Using the extrinsic multiple-emission probe 4'-(diethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone (FE), we demonstrate unique and distinct spectroscopic signatures for the amyloid fibrils formed by the WT and mutant AS, presumably indicative of subtle differences in supramolecular structure. The two well-separated emission bands of the FE probe originate from a proton transfer reaction in the excited state. The ratiometric response constitutes a sensitive, tunable reporter of microenvironmental properties such as polarity and hydrogen bonding. The very distinctive fluorescence spectra of the FE probe bound to the four AS variants reflect different tautomeric equilibria in the excited state and the existence of at least two different binding sites in the fibrils for the dye. Deconvolution of the two-dimensional excitation-emission spectra leads to estimations of different local dielectric constants and extents of hydration characteristic of the proteins. The sensitivity of such a simple external probe to conformational alterations induced by point mutations is unprecedented and provides new insight into key phenomena related to amyloid fibrils: plasticity, polymorphism, propagation of structural features, and structure-function relationships underlying toxicity.

  7. Using optical profilometry to characterize cell membrane roughness influenced by amyloid-beta 42 aggregates and electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huei-Jyuan; Wang, Ruei-Lin; Xiao, Jian-Long; Chang, Yu-Jen; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Chen, Yun-Ru; Lee, Chau-Hwang

    2014-01-01

    The membrane roughness of Neuro-2a neroblastoma cells is measured by using noninterferometric wide-field optical profilometry. The cells are treated with the fibril and oligomer conformers of amyloid-beta (Aβ) 42, which is a peptide of 42 amino acids related to the development of Alzheimer's disease. We find that both the Aβ42 fibrils and Aβ42 oligomers reduced the cell membrane roughness, but the effect of Aβ42 oligomers was faster and stronger than that of the fibrils. We also apply direct-current electric field (dcEF) stimulations on the cells. A dcEF of 300 mV/mm can increase the membrane roughness under the treatment of Aβ42. These results suggest that Aβ42 can decrease the membrane compliance of live neuroblastoma cells, and dcEFs may counteract this effect.

  8. Apigenin modulates the expression levels of pro-inflammatory mediators to reduce the human insulin amyloid-induced oxidant damages in SK-N-MC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, R; Yazdanparast, R; Ghaffari, S H

    2015-06-01

    Amyloid depositions of proteins play crucial roles in a wide variety of degenerative disorders called amyloidosis. Although the exact mechanisms involved in amyloid-mediated cytotoxicity remain unknown, increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species and overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines are believed to play key roles in the process. In that regard, we investigated the effect of apigenin, a common dietary flavonoid with high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties on potential factors involved in cytotoxicity of human insulin amyloids. Pretreatment of SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells with apigenin increased cell viability and reduced the apoptosis induced by insulin fibrils. In addition, apigenin attenuated insulin fibril-induced ROS production and lipid peroxidation. Our result also demonstrated that pretreatment of the fibril-affected cells with apigenin caused an increase in catalase activity and the intracellular glutathione content along with reduction in nitric oxide production and nuclear factor κB, tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6 gene expression based on real-time polymerase chain reaction evaluation. In accordance with these results, apigenin could be a promising candidate in the design of natural-based drugs for treatment or prevention of amyloid-related disorders.

  9. Huntingtin exon 1 fibrils feature an interdigitated β-hairpin-based polyglutamine core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoop, Cody L; Lin, Hsiang-Kai; Kar, Karunakar; Magyarfalvi, Gábor; Lamley, Jonathan M; Boatz, Jennifer C; Mandal, Abhishek; Lewandowski, Józef R; Wetzel, Ronald; van der Wel, Patrick C A

    2016-02-09

    Polyglutamine expansion within the exon1 of huntingtin leads to protein misfolding, aggregation, and cytotoxicity in Huntington's disease. This incurable neurodegenerative disease is the most prevalent member of a family of CAG repeat expansion disorders. Although mature exon1 fibrils are viable candidates for the toxic species, their molecular structure and how they form have remained poorly understood. Using advanced magic angle spinning solid-state NMR, we directly probe the structure of the rigid core that is at the heart of huntingtin exon1 fibrils and other polyglutamine aggregates, via measurements of long-range intramolecular and intermolecular contacts, backbone and side-chain torsion angles, relaxation measurements, and calculations of chemical shifts. These experiments reveal the presence of β-hairpin-containing β-sheets that are connected through interdigitating extended side chains. Despite dramatic differences in aggregation behavior, huntingtin exon1 fibrils and other polyglutamine-based aggregates contain identical β-strand-based cores. Prior structural models, derived from X-ray fiber diffraction and computational analyses, are shown to be inconsistent with the solid-state NMR results. Internally, the polyglutamine amyloid fibrils are coassembled from differently structured monomers, which we describe as a type of "intrinsic" polymorphism. A stochastic polyglutamine-specific aggregation mechanism is introduced to explain this phenomenon. We show that the aggregation of mutant huntingtin exon1 proceeds via an intramolecular collapse of the expanded polyglutamine domain and discuss the implications of this observation for our understanding of its misfolding and aggregation mechanisms.

  10. Cu(II) coordination structure determinants of the fibrillization switch in Abeta peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Guzman, Jessica; Sun, Li; Mehta, Anil; Lynn, David; Warncke, Kurt

    2010-03-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is associated with the aggregation and fibrillization of the beta-amyloid protein (Abeta). The coordination of Cu(II) by peptide histidine imidazole sidechains is proposed to play an important role in determining the fibrillization ``switch'' [1]. We have developed techniques of powder X-band electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy to determine the 3D molecular structure of the Cu(II)-histidine imidazole coordination in cryotrapped soluble and fibrillar forms of Abeta peptides, in order to gain insight into the factors that govern fibrillization. We use hybrid optimization-based OPTESIM [2] simulation of the double quantum harmonic feature to determine the mutual orientation of the imidazole rings in Cu(II)--bis-imidazole complexes and in Abeta(13-21) peptides. The Cu(II) coordination mode and assembly constraints in fibrils are revealed. [1] Dong , J., et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 2007, 104, 13313. [2] Sun, L., et al., J. Magn. Reson. 2009, 200, 21.

  11. Insulin-degrading enzyme prevents α-synuclein fibril formation in a nonproteolytical manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sandeep K; Chorell, Erik; Steneberg, Pär; Vernersson-Lindahl, Emma; Edlund, Helena; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2015-07-31

    The insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) degrades amyloidogenic proteins such as Amyloid β (Αβ) and Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (IAPP), i.e. peptides associated with Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes, respectively. In addition to the protease activity normally associated with IDE function an additional activity involving the formation of stable, irreversible complexes with both Αβ and α-synuclein, an amyloidogenic protein involved in Parkinson's disease, was recently proposed. Here, we have investigated the functional consequences of IDE-α-synuclein interactions in vitro. We demonstrate that IDE in a nonproteolytic manner and at sub-stoichiometric ratios efficiently inhibits α-synuclein fibril formation by binding to α-synuclein oligomers making them inert to amyloid formation. Moreover, we show that, within a defined range of α-synuclein concentrations, interaction with α-synuclein oligomers increases IDE's proteolytic activity on a fluorogenic substrate. We propose that the outcomes of IDE-α-synuclein interactions, i.e. protection against α-synuclein amyloid formation and stimulated IDE protease activity, may be protective in vivo.

  12. Amyloid β oligomers induce interleukin-1β production in primary microglia in a cathepsin B- and reactive oxygen species-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneo, Jun; Adachi, Takumi [Department of Animal Development and Physiology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Yoshida, Aiko; Takayasu, Kunio [Responses to Environmental Signals and Stresses, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Takahara, Kazuhiko, E-mail: ktakahar@zoo.zool.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Animal Development and Physiology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Tokyo 102-0081 (Japan); Inaba, Kayo [Department of Animal Development and Physiology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Tokyo 102-0081 (Japan)

    2015-03-13

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide, a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease, forms two types of aggregates: oligomers and fibrils. These aggregates induce inflammatory responses, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production by microglia, which are macrophage-like cells located in the brain. In this study, we examined the effect of the two forms of Aβ aggregates on IL-1β production in mouse primary microglia. We prepared Aβ oligomer and fibril from Aβ (1–42) peptide in vitro. We analyzed the characteristics of these oligomers and fibrils by electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy. Interestingly, Aβ oligomers but not Aβ monomers or fibrils induced robust IL-1β production in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, Aβ oligomers induced endo/phagolysosome rupture, which released cathepsin B into the cytoplasm. Aβ oligomer-induced IL-1β production was inhibited not only by the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074-Me but also by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor N-acetylcysteine. Random chemical crosslinking abolished the ability of the oligomers to induce IL-1β. Thus, multimerization and fibrillization causes Aβ oligomers to lose the ability to induce IL-1β. These results indicate that Aβ oligomers, but not fibrils, induce IL-1β production in primary microglia in a cathepsin B- and ROS-dependent manner. - Highlights: • We prepared amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils with minimum contamination of Aβ oligomers. • Primary microglia (MG) produced IL-1β in response to Aβ oligomers, but not fibrils. • Only Aβ oligomers induced leakage of cathepsin B from endo/phagolysosomes. • IL-1β production in response to Aβ oligomers depended on both cathepsin B and ROS. • Crosslinking reduced the ability of the Aβ oligomers to induce IL-1β from MG.

  13. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a

  14. Atrial fibrillation and delayed gastric emptying.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora C Botwinick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation and delayed gastric emptying (DGE are common after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Our aim was to investigate a potential relationship between atrial fibrillation and DGE, which we defined as failure to tolerate a regular diet by the 7(th postoperative day. METHODS: We performed a retrospective chart review of 249 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy at our institution between 2000 and 2009. Data was analyzed with Fisher exact test for categorical variables and Mann-Whitney U or unpaired T-test for continuous variables. RESULTS: Approximately 5% of the 249 patients included in the analysis experienced at least one episode of postoperative atrial fibrillation. Median age of patients with atrial fibrillation was 74 years, compared with 66 years in patients without atrial fibrillation (p = 0.0005. Patients with atrial fibrillation were more likely to have a history of atrial fibrillation (p = 0.03. 92% of the patients with atrial fibrillation suffered from DGE, compared to 46% of patients without atrial fibrillation (p = 0.0007. This association held true when controlling for age. CONCLUSION: Patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation are more likely to experience delayed gastric emptying. Interventions to manage delayed gastric function might be prudent in patients at high risk for postoperative atrial fibrillation.

  15. Nonlinear Dynamical Analysis of Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerin, John A.; Sporrer, Justin M.; Egolf, David A.

    2013-03-01

    The development of spatiotemporal chaotic behavior in heart tissue, termed fibrillation, is a devastating, life-threatening condition. The chaotic behavior of electrochemical signals, in the form of spiral waves, causes the muscles of the heart to contract in an incoherent manner, hindering the heart's ability to pump blood. We have applied the mathematical tools of nonlinear dynamics to large-scale simulations of a model of fibrillating heart tissue to uncover the dynamical modes driving this chaos. By studying the evolution of Lyapunov vectors and exponents over short times, we have found that the fibrillating tissue is sensitive to electrical perturbations only in narrow regions immediately in front of the leading edges of spiral waves, especially when these waves collide, break apart, or hit the edges of the tissue sample. Using this knowledge, we have applied small stimuli to areas of varying sensitivity. By studying the evolution of the effects of these perturbations, we have made progress toward controlling the electrochemical patterns associated with heart fibrillation. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation (DMR-0094178) and Research Corporation.

  16. Genetic basis of atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Campuzano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia and remains as one of main challenges in current clinical practice. The disease may be induced secondary to other diseases such as hypertension, valvular heart disease, and heart failure, conferring an increased risk of stroke and sudden death. Epidemiological studies have provided evidence that genetic factors play an important role and up to 30% of clinically diagnosed patients may have a family history of atrial fibrillation. To date, several rare variants have been identified in a wide range of genes associated with ionic channels, calcium handling protein, fibrosis, conduction and inflammation. Important advances in clinical, genetic and molecular basis have been performed over the last decade, improving diagnosis and treatment. However, the genetics of atrial fibrillation is complex and pathophysiological data remains still unraveling. A better understanding of the genetic basis will induce accurate risk stratification and personalized clinical treatment. In this review, we have focused on current genetics basis of atrial fibrillation.

  17. Radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiesfeld, ACP; Tan, ES; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Crijns, HJGM; Van Gelder, IC

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-five patients (16 males, mean age 46 years.) underwent radiofrequency ablation because of either paroxysmal (13 patients) or persistent atrial fibrillation (12 patients). Ablation aimed at earliest activation of spontaneous and catheter-induced repetitive ectopy in left and right atria and ap

  18. [New antithrombotics for atrial fibrillation].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral infarction is the most serious complication of atrial fibrillation. Coumarin derivatives (vitamin K antagonists) counteract systemic thromboembolism and reduce the risk of stroke by more than 60%, but carry a risk of serious bleeding. Antiplatelet therapy and subcutaneous low-molecular-weig

  19. TANGO-Inspired Design of Anti-Amyloid Cyclic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaomeng; Brickson, Claire R; Murphy, Regina M

    2016-09-21

    β-Amyloid peptide (Aβ) self-associates into oligomers and fibrils, in a process that is believed to directly lead to neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease. Compounds that bind to Aβ, and inhibit fibrillogenesis and neurotoxicity, are of interest as an anti-Alzheimer therapeutic strategy. Peptides are particularly attractive for this purpose, because they have advantages over small molecules in their ability to disrupt protein-protein interactions, yet they are amenable to tuning of their properties through chemical means, unlike antibodies. Self-complementation and peptide library screening are two strategies that have been employed in the search for peptides that bind to Aβ. We have taken a different approach, by designing Aβ-binding peptides using transthyretin (TTR) as a template. Previously, we demonstrated that a cyclic peptide, with sequence derived from the known Aβ-binding site on TTR, suppressed Aβ aggregation into fibrils and protected neurons against Aβ toxicity. Here, we searched for cyclic peptides with improved efficacy, by employing the algorithm TANGO, designed originally to identify amyloidogenic sequences in proteins. By using TANGO as a guide to predict the effect of sequence modifications on conformation and aggregation, we synthesized a significantly improved cyclic peptide. We demonstrate that the peptide, in binding to Aβ, redirects Aβ toward protease-sensitive, nonfibrillar aggregates. Cyclic peptides designed using this strategy have attractive solubility, specificity, and stability characteristics.

  20. Amyloid-carbon hybrid membranes for universal water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    Industrial development, energy production and mining have led to dramatically increased levels of environmental pollutants such as heavy metal ions, metal cyanides and nuclear waste. Current technologies for purifying contaminated waters are typically expensive and ion specific, and there is therefore a significant need for new approaches. Here, we report inexpensive hybrid membranes made from protein amyloid fibrils and activated porous carbon that can be used to remove heavy metal ions and radioactive waste from water. During filtration, the concentration of heavy metal ions drops by three to five orders of magnitude per passage and the process can be repeated numerous times. Notably, their efficiency remains unaltered when filtering several ions simultaneously. The performance of the membrane is enabled by the ability of the amyloids to selectively absorb heavy metal pollutants from solutions. We also show that our membranes can be used to recycle valuable heavy metal contaminants by thermally reducing ions trapped in saturated membranes, leading to the creation of elemental metal nanoparticles and films.

  1. Amyloid-carbon hybrid membranes for universal water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    Industrial development, energy production and mining have led to dramatically increased levels of environmental pollutants such as heavy metal ions, metal cyanides and nuclear waste. Current technologies for purifying contaminated waters are typically expensive and ion specific, and there is therefore a significant need for new approaches. Here, we report inexpensive hybrid membranes made from protein amyloid fibrils and activated porous carbon that can be used to remove heavy metal ions and radioactive waste from water. During filtration, the concentration of heavy metal ions drops by three to five orders of magnitude per passage and the process can be repeated numerous times. Notably, their efficiency remains unaltered when filtering several ions simultaneously. The performance of the membrane is enabled by the ability of the amyloids to selectively absorb heavy metal pollutants from solutions. We also show that our membranes can be used to recycle valuable heavy metal contaminants by thermally reducing ions trapped in saturated membranes, leading to the creation of elemental metal nanoparticles and films.

  2. Investigation of the inhibitory effects of TiO{sub 2} on the β-amyloid peptide aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Mukhtar H., E-mail: ahmed-m@email.ulster.ac.uk [School of Chemical Science, National Centre for Sensor Research, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Nanotechnology Integrated Bioengineering Centre, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, BT37 0QB Belfast (United Kingdom); Byrne, John A. [Nanotechnology Integrated Bioengineering Centre, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, BT37 0QB Belfast (United Kingdom); Keyes, Tia E. [School of Chemical Science, National Centre for Sensor Research, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2014-06-01

    TiO{sub 2} thin films are of great interest as biocompatible coatings and also as photocatalytic self-cleaning and antimicrobial coatings. In this work we used β-amyloid as a model for infectious protein to investigate the attachment and photocatalytic degradation. TiO{sub 2} films were prepared on stainless steel substrates using magnetron sputtering. The films were characterised before and after exposure to β-amyloid (1–42), using XRD, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and AFM. The TiO{sub 2} film was mostly composed of the anatase phase with a relatively high surface roughness. The presence of Raman peaks at 1668 cm{sup −1} and 1263 cm{sup −1}, with the XPS spectral feature for nitrogen at 400 eV, confirmed the adsorption of amyloid on surface. Following exposure of the β-amyloid contaminated TiO{sub 2} to UV-B irradiation a slight shift of amide modes was observed. Furthermore, the amide I spectra show an overall decrease in α-helix content with presence of a minor peak around 1591 cm{sup −1}, which is related to tryptophanyl and tyrosinyl radicals, which can lead to conformational change of β-amyloid. The C1s band at 292.2 eV suggests the formation of free carboxylic acid. The loss in the crucial structure of β-amyloid leads to reduce the fibril formation, thought to be induced through a photocatalytic process. - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} thin films synthesised and characterised • Absorption study using β-amyloid (1–42) • Investigation of peptide configuration via Raman, AFM and XPS spectroscopies • β-Amyloid was subsequently degraded by photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2}.

  3. [Atrial fibrillation and cognitive function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duron, Emmanuelle; Hanon, Olivier

    2010-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), which prevalence increases with age, is a growing public health problem and a well known risk factor for stroke. On the other hand, dementia is one of the most important neurological disorders in the elderly, and with aging of the population in developed countries, the number of demented patients will increase in absence of prevention. In the past decade, several vascular risk factors (hypertension, obesity and metabolic syndrome, hypercholesterolemia) have been found, with various degree of evidence, to be associated with vascular dementia but also, surprisingly, with Alzheimer's disease. This review is devoted to the links between atrial fibrillation, cognitive decline and dementia. Globally, transversal studies showed a significant association between atrial fibrillation, cognitive decline and dementia. However, these studies are particularly sensitive to various biases. In this context, recent longitudinal studies of higher level of evidence have been conducted to assess the link between AF and dementia. One study disclosed a high incidence of dementia among patients suffering from atrial fibrillation during a 4.6 years follow-up. Similarly another study showed that atrial fibrillation was significantly associated with conversion from mild cognitive impairment to dementia during a 3 years follow-up. Nevertheless two other longitudinal studies did not find any significant association between AF and dementia, but this discrepancy should be interpreted taking into account that the comparability of all these studies is moderate because they were using different methodologies (population, cognitive testing, and mean follow-up). Possible explanatory mechanisms for the association between AF and the risk of dementia are proposed, such as thrombo-embolic ischemic damage and cerebral hypo perfusion due to fluctuations in the cardiac output. Thus, there is some evidence that FA could be associated with cognitive decline and dementia but this

  4. Conformational stability of fibrillar amyloid-beta oligomers via protofilament pair formation - a systematic computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kahler

    Full Text Available Amyloid-[Formula: see text] (A[Formula: see text] oligomers play a crucial role in Alzheimer's disease due to their neurotoxic aggregation properties. Fibrillar A[Formula: see text] oligomerization can lead to protofilaments and protofilament pairs via oligomer elongation and oligomer association, respectively. Small fibrillar oligomers adopt the protofilament topology, whereas fibrils contain at least protofilament pairs. To date, the underlying growth mechanism from oligomers to the mature fibril still remains to be elucidated. Here, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent on single layer-like protofilaments and fibril-like protofilament pairs of different size ranging from the tetramer to the 48-mer. We found that the initial U-shaped topology per monomer is maintained over time in all oligomers. The observed deviations of protofilaments from the starting structure increase significantly with size due to the twisting of the in-register parallel [Formula: see text]-sheets. This twist causes long protofilaments to be unstable and leads to a breakage. Protofilament pairs, which are stabilized by a hydrophobic interface, exhibit more fibril-like properties such as the overall structure and the twist angle. Thus, they can act as stable conformational templates for further fibril growth. Key properties like the twist angle, shape complementarity, and energetics show a size-dependent behavior so that small oligomers favor the protofilament topology, whereas large oligomers favor the protofilament pair topology. The region for this conformational transition is at the size of approximately twelve A[Formula: see text] monomers. From that, we propose the following growth mechanism from A[Formula: see text] oligomers to fibrils: (1 elongation of short protofilaments; (2 breakage of large protofilaments; (3 formation of short protofilament pairs; and (4 elongation of protofilament pairs.

  5. Conformational stability of fibrillar amyloid-beta oligomers via protofilament pair formation - a systematic computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Anna; Sticht, Heinrich; Horn, Anselm H C

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-[Formula: see text] (A[Formula: see text]) oligomers play a crucial role in Alzheimer's disease due to their neurotoxic aggregation properties. Fibrillar A[Formula: see text] oligomerization can lead to protofilaments and protofilament pairs via oligomer elongation and oligomer association, respectively. Small fibrillar oligomers adopt the protofilament topology, whereas fibrils contain at least protofilament pairs. To date, the underlying growth mechanism from oligomers to the mature fibril still remains to be elucidated. Here, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent on single layer-like protofilaments and fibril-like protofilament pairs of different size ranging from the tetramer to the 48-mer. We found that the initial U-shaped topology per monomer is maintained over time in all oligomers. The observed deviations of protofilaments from the starting structure increase significantly with size due to the twisting of the in-register parallel [Formula: see text]-sheets. This twist causes long protofilaments to be unstable and leads to a breakage. Protofilament pairs, which are stabilized by a hydrophobic interface, exhibit more fibril-like properties such as the overall structure and the twist angle. Thus, they can act as stable conformational templates for further fibril growth. Key properties like the twist angle, shape complementarity, and energetics show a size-dependent behavior so that small oligomers favor the protofilament topology, whereas large oligomers favor the protofilament pair topology. The region for this conformational transition is at the size of approximately twelve A[Formula: see text] monomers. From that, we propose the following growth mechanism from A[Formula: see text] oligomers to fibrils: (1) elongation of short protofilaments; (2) breakage of large protofilaments; (3) formation of short protofilament pairs; and (4) elongation of protofilament pairs.

  6. Tyrosine- and tryptophan-coated gold nanoparticles inhibit amyloid aggregation of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Kriti; Anand, Bibin G; Badhwar, Rahul; Bagler, Ganesh; Navya, P N; Daima, Hemant Kumar; Kar, Karunakar

    2015-12-01

    Here, we have strategically synthesized stable gold (AuNPs(Tyr), AuNPs(Trp)) and silver (AgNPs(Tyr)) nanoparticles which are surface functionalized with either tyrosine or tryptophan residues and have examined their potential to inhibit amyloid aggregation of insulin. Inhibition of both spontaneous and seed-induced aggregation of insulin was observed in the presence of AuNPs(Tyr), AgNPs(Tyr), and AuNPs(Trp) nanoparticles. These nanoparticles also triggered the disassembly of insulin amyloid fibrils. Surface functionalization of amino acids appears to be important for the inhibition effect since isolated tryptophan and tyrosine molecules did not prevent insulin aggregation. Bioinformatics analysis predicts involvement of tyrosine in H-bonding interactions mediated by its C=O, -NH2, and aromatic moiety. These results offer significant opportunities for developing nanoparticle-based therapeutics against diseases related to protein aggregation.

  7. Regulation of serum amyloid A gene expression in Syrian hamsters by cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowton, S B; Peters, C N; Jestus, J J

    1991-10-01

    Amyloid A (AA) protein is derived from serum amyloid A (SAA) and deposited as beta-pleated sheet fibrils in reactive amyloidosis, a disease that occurs spontaneously in golden Syrian hamsters. The precursor SAA is an acute-phase reactant in many species including hamsters, and in this report we have defined the in vivo kinetic and dosage responses for SAA mRNA accumulation in hamsters following administration of various cytokines. Elevations in levels of hepatic SAA mRNA were documented when the doses of interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor were increased. The increase in dosages applied ranged from 2 1/2-fold for interleukin-6 to 10-fold for interleukin-1. SAA transcript levels were highest 8 h following administration of interleukin-6 or tumor necrosis factor, whereas maximal amounts of SAA-specific mRNA were found 24 h after administration of interleukin-1.

  8. A High Affinity Red Fluorescence and Colorimetric Probe for Amyloid β Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekhar, K.; Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Murugan, N. Arul; Kuang, Guanglin; Ågren, Hans; Govindaraju, T.

    2016-04-01

    A major challenge in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is its timely diagnosis. Amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates have been proposed as the most viable biomarker for the diagnosis of AD. Here, we demonstrate hemicyanine-based benzothiazole-coumarin (TC) as a potential probe for the detection of highly toxic Aβ42 aggregates through switch-on, enhanced (~30 fold) red fluorescence (Emax = 654 nm) and characteristic colorimetric (light red to purple) optical outputs. Interestingly, TC exhibits selectivity towards Aβ42 fibrils compared to other abnormal protein aggregates. TC probe show nanomolar binding affinity (Ka = 1.72 × 107 M‑1) towards Aβ42 aggregates and also displace ThT bound to Aβ42 fibrils due to its high binding affinity. The Aβ42 fibril-specific red-shift in the absorption spectra of TC responsible for the observed colorimetric optical output has been attributed to micro-environment change around the probe from hydrophilic-like to hydrophobic-like nature. The binding site, binding energy and changes in optical properties observed for TC upon interaction with Aβ42 fibrils have been further validated by molecular docking and time dependent density functional theory studies.

  9. Distinct annular oligomers captured along the assembly and disassembly pathways of transthyretin amyloid protofibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo H Pires

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Defects in protein folding may lead to severe degenerative diseases characterized by the appearance of amyloid fibril deposits. Cytotoxicity in amyloidoses has been linked to poration of the cell membrane that may involve interactions with amyloid intermediates of annular shape. Although annular oligomers have been detected in many amyloidogenic systems, their universality, function and molecular mechanisms of appearance are debated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated with high-resolution in situ atomic force microscopy the assembly and disassembly of transthyretin (TTR amyloid protofibrils formed of the native protein by pH shift. Annular oligomers were the first morphologically distinct intermediates observed in the TTR aggregation pathway. Morphological analysis suggests that they can assemble into a double-stack of octameric rings with a 16 ± 2 nm diameter, and displaying the tendency to form linear structures. According to light scattering data coupled to AFM imaging, annular oligomers appeared to undergo a collapse type of structural transition into spheroid oligomers containing 8-16 monomers. Disassembly of TTR amyloid protofibrils also resulted in the rapid appearance of annular oligomers but with a morphology quite distinct from that observed in the assembly pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our observations indicate that annular oligomers are key dynamic intermediates not only in the assembly but also in the disassembly of TTR protofibrils. The balance between annular and more compact forms of aggregation could be relevant for cytotoxicity in amyloidogenic disorders.

  10. Rapid α-oligomer formation mediated by the Aβ C terminus initiates an amyloid assembly pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Pinaki; Kodali, Ravindra; Chemuru, Saketh; Kar, Karunakar; Wetzel, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Since early oligomeric intermediates in amyloid assembly are often transient and difficult to distinguish, characterize and quantify, the mechanistic basis of the initiation of spontaneous amyloid growth is often opaque. We describe here an approach to the analysis of the Aβ aggregation mechanism that uses Aβ-polyglutamine hybrid peptides designed to retard amyloid maturation and an adjusted thioflavin intensity scale that reveals structural features of aggregation intermediates. The results support an aggregation initiation mechanism for Aβ-polyQ hybrids, and by extension for full-length Aβ peptides, in which a modular Aβ C-terminal segment mediates rapid, non-nucleated formation of α-helical oligomers. The resulting high local concentration of tethered amyloidogenic segments within these α-oligomers facilitates transition to a β-oligomer population that, via further remodelling and/or elongation steps, ultimately generates mature amyloid. Consistent with this mechanism, an engineered Aβ C-terminal fragment delays aggregation onset by Aβ-polyglutamine peptides and redirects assembly of Aβ42 fibrils. PMID:27546208

  11. Neuroprotective and nootropic drug noopept rescues α-synuclein amyloid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xueen; Gharibyan, Anna L; Öhman, Anders; Liu, Yonggang; Olofsson, Anders; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A

    2011-12-16

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by α-synuclein (α-Syn)-containing Lewy body formation and selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. We have demonstrated the modulating effect of noopept, a novel proline-containing dipeptide drug with nootropic and neuroprotective properties, on α-Syn oligomerization and fibrillation by using thioflavin T fluorescence, far-UV CD, and atomic force microscopy techniques. Noopept does not bind to a sterically specific site in the α-Syn molecule as revealed by heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR analysis, but due to hydrophobic interactions with toxic amyloid oligomers, it prompts their rapid sequestration into larger fibrillar amyloid aggregates. Consequently, this process rescues the cytotoxic effect of amyloid oligomers on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells as demonstrated by using cell viability assays and fluorescent staining of apoptotic and necrotic cells and by assessing the level of intracellular oxidative stress. The mitigating effect of noopept against amyloid oligomeric cytotoxicity may offer additional benefits to the already well-established therapeutic functions of this new pharmaceutical.

  12. Use of a small peptide fragment as an inhibitor of insulin fibrillation process: a study by high and low resolution spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Banerjee

    Full Text Available A non-toxic, nine residue peptide, NIVNVSLVK is shown to interfere with insulin fibrillation by various biophysical methods. Insulin undergoes conformational changes under certain stress conditions leading to amyloid fibrils. Fibrillation of insulin poses a problem in its long-term storage, reducing its efficacy in treating type II diabetes. The dissociation of insulin oligomer to monomer is the key step for the onset of fibrillation. The time course of insulin fibrillation at 62°C using Thioflavin T fluorescence shows an increase in the lag time from 120 min without peptide to 236 min with peptide. Transmission electron micrographs show branched insulin fibrils in its absence and less inter-fibril association in its presence. Upon incubation at 62°C and pH 2.6, insulin lost some α-helical structure as seen by Fourier transformed infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR, but if the peptide is added, secondary structure is almost fully maintained for 3 h, though lost partially at 4 h. FT-IR spectroscopy also shows that insulin forms the cross beta structure indicative of fibrils beyond 2 h, but in the presence of the peptide, α-helix retention is seen till 4 h. Both size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering show that insulin primarily exists as trimer, whose conversion to a monomer is resisted by the peptide. Saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance confirms that the hydrophobic residues in the peptide are in close contact with an insulin hydrophobic groove. Molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with principal component analyses reveal how the peptide interrupts insulin fibrillation. In vitro hemolytic activity of the peptide showed insignificant cytotoxicity against HT1080 cells. The insulin aggregation is probed due to the inter play of two key residues, Phe(B24 and Tyr(B26 monitored from molecular dynamics simulations studies. Further new peptide based leads may be developed from this nine residue peptide.

  13. Risk of atrial fibrillation in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Jannik L.; Schjerning, Anne-Marie; Lindhardt, Tommi B.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Diabetes has been associated with atrial fibrillation but the current evidence is conflicting. In particular knowledge regarding young diabetes patients and the risk of developing atrial fibrillation is sparse. The aim of our study was to investigate the risk of atrial fibrillation in patients...... with diabetes compared to the background population in Denmark. METHODS AND RESULTS: Through Danish nationwide registries we included persons above 18 years of age and without prior atrial fibrillation and/or diabetes from 1996 to 2012. The study cohort was divided into a background population without diabetes...... and a diabetes group. The absolute risk of developing atrial fibrillation was calculated and Poisson regression models adjusted for sex, age and comorbidities were used to calculate incidence rate ratios of atrial fibrillation. The total study cohort included 5,081,087 persons, 4,827,713 (95%) in the background...

  14. Atrial fibrillation in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roger Kerzner; Michael W. Rich

    2005-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an extremely common condition in the elderly, with increasing prevalence around the world as the population ages. AF may be associated with serious health consequences, including stroke, heart failure, and decreased quality of life, so that careful management of AF by geriatric health care providers is required. With careful attention to anticoagulation therapy, and prudent use of medications and invasive procedures to minimize symptoms, many of the adverse health consequences of AF can be prevented.

  15. John H. Dillon Medal Talk: Protein Fibrils, Polymer Physics: Encounter at the Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2011-03-01

    Aggregation of proteins is central to many aspects of daily life, ranging from blood coagulation, to eye cataract formation disease, food processing, or neurodegenerative infections. In particular, the physical mechanisms responsible for amyloidosis, the irreversible fibril formation of various proteins implicated in protein misfolding disorders such as Alzheimer, Creutzfeldt-Jakob or Huntington's diseases, have not yet been fully elucidated. In this talk I will discuss how polymer physics and colloidal science concepts can be used to reveal very useful information on the formation, structure and properties of amyloid protein fibrils. I will discuss their physical properties at various length scales, from their collective liquid crystalline behavior in solution to their structural features at the single molecule length scale and show how polymer science notions can shed a new light on these interesting systems. 1) ``Understanding amyloid aggregation by statistical analysis of atomic force microscopy images'' J. Adamcik, J.-M. Jung, J. Flakowski, P. De Los Rios, G. Dietler and R. Mezzenga, Nature nanotechnology, 5, 423 (2010)

  16. Alginate-Collagen Fibril Composite Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Baniasadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis and the mechanical characterization of an alginate-collagen fibril composite hydrogel. Native type I collagen fibrils were used to synthesize the fibrous composite hydrogel. We characterized the mechanical properties of the fabricated fibrous hydrogel using tensile testing; rheometry and atomic force microscope (AFM-based nanoindentation experiments. The results show that addition of type I collagen fibrils improves the rheological and indentation properties of the hydrogel.

  17. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  18. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Fowler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  19. Collagen fibril diameter and leather strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Hannah C; Edmonds, Richard L; Kirby, Nigel; Hawley, Adrian; Mudie, Stephen T; Haverkamp, Richard G

    2013-11-27

    The main structural component of leather and skin is type I collagen in the form of strong fibrils. Strength is an important property of leather, and the way in which collagen contributes to the strength is not fully understood. Synchrotron-based small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is used to measure the collagen fibril diameter of leather from a range of animals, including sheep and cattle, that had a range of tear strengths. SAXS data were fit to a cylinder model. The collagen fibril diameter and tear strength were found to be correlated in bovine leather (r(2) = 0.59; P = 0.009), with stronger leather having thicker fibrils. There was no correlation between orientation index, i.e., fibril alignment, and fibril diameter for this data set. Ovine leather showed no correlation between tear strength and fibril diameter, nor was there a correlation across a selection of other animal leathers. The findings presented here suggest that there may be a different structural motif in skin compared with tendon, particularly ovine skin or leather, in which the diameter of the individual fibrils contributes less to strength than fibril alignment does.

  20. A cyclic undecamer peptide mimics a turn in folded Alzheimer amyloid β and elicits antibodies against oligomeric and fibrillar amyloid and plaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hoogerhout

    Full Text Available The 39- to 42-residue amyloid β (Aβ peptide is deposited in extracellular fibrillar plaques in the brain of patients suffering from Alzheimer's Disease (AD. Vaccination with these peptides seems to be a promising approach to reduce the plaque load but results in a dominant antibody response directed against the N-terminus. Antibodies against the N-terminus will capture Aβ immediately after normal physiological processing of the amyloid precursor protein and therefore will also reduce the levels of non-misfolded Aβ, which might have a physiologically relevant function. Therefore, we have targeted an immune response on a conformational neo-epitope in misfolded amyloid that is formed in advance of Aβ-aggregation. A tetanus toxoid-conjugate of the 11-meric cyclic peptide Aβ(22-28-YNGK' elicited specific antibodies in Balb/c mice. These antibodies bound strongly to the homologous cyclic peptide-bovine serum albumin conjugate, but not to the homologous linear peptide-conjugate, as detected in vitro by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The antibodies also bound--although more weakly--to Aβ(1-42 oligomers as well as fibrils in this assay. Finally, the antibodies recognized Aβ deposits in AD mouse and human brain tissue as established by immunohistological staining. We propose that the cyclic peptide conjugate might provide a lead towards a vaccine that could be administered before the onset of AD symptoms. Further investigation of this hypothesis requires immunization of transgenic AD model mice.

  1. Causative factors for formation of toxic islet amyloid polypeptide oligomer in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong HR

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hye Rin Jeong, Seong Soo A AnDepartment of Bionano Technology, Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of KoreaAbstract: Human islet amyloid polypeptide (h-IAPP is a peptide hormone that is synthesized and cosecreted with insulin from insulin-secreting pancreatic β-cells. Recently, h-IAPP was proposed to be the main component responsible for the cytotoxic pancreatic amyloid deposits in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Since the causative factors of IAPP (or amylin oligomer aggregation are not fully understood, this review will discuss the various forms of h-IAPP aggregation. Not all forms of IAPP aggregates trigger the destruction of β-cell function and loss of β-cell mass; however, toxic oligomers do trigger these events. Once these toxic oligomers form under abnormal metabolic conditions in T2DM, they can lead to cell disruption by inducing cell membrane destabilization. In this review, the various factors that have been shown to induce toxic IAPP oligomer formation will be presented, as well as the potential mechanism of oligomer and fibril formation from pro-IAPPs. Initially, pro-IAPPs undergo enzymatic reactions to produce the IAPP monomers, which can then develop into oligomers and fibrils. By this mechanism, toxic oligomers could be generated by diverse pathway components. Thus, the interconnections between factors that influence amyloid aggregation (eg, absence of PC2 enzyme, deamidation, reduction of disulfide bonds, environmental factors in the cell, genetic mutations, copper metal ions, and heparin will be presented. Hence, this review will aid in understanding the fundamental causative factors contributing to IAPP oligomer formation and support studies for investigating novel T2DM therapeutic approaches, such as the development of inhibitory agents for preventing oligomerization at the early stages of diabetic pathology.Keywords: amyloid aggregation, causative factor, IAPP, islet

  2. THE OPEP COARSE-GRAINED PROTEIN MODEL: FROM SINGLE MOLECULES, AMYLOID FORMATION, ROLE OF MACROMOLECULAR CROWDING AND HYDRODYNAMICS TO RNA/DNA COMPLEXES

    OpenAIRE

    Sterpone, Fabio; Melchionna, Simone; Tuffery, Pierre; Pasquali, Samuela; Mousseau, Normand; Cragnolini, Tristan; Chebaro, Yassmine; Saint-Pierre, Jean-Francois; Kalimeri, Maria; Barducci, Alessandro; Laurin, Yohan; Tek, Alex; Baaden, Marc; Nguyen, Phuong Hoang; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The OPEP coarse-grained protein model has been applied to a wide range of applications since its first release 15 years ago. The model, which combines energetic and structural accuracy and chemical specificity, allows studying single protein properties, DNA/RNA complexes, amyloid fibril formation and protein suspensions in a crowded environment. Here we first review the current state of the model and the most exciting applications using advanced conformational sampling methods. We then presen...

  3. Aggregation process of Aβ1-40 with non-Aβ amyloid component of α-synuclein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugene, Cindie; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-09-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, are characterized by the presence of amyloid fibers. Recently, attention has turned from the fibers to the early stages of oligomerization where toxicity could be highest. Here, we focus on the interactions between non-Aβ amyloid component of a-synuclein (NAC) and Aβ1-40, two proteins found in amyloid fibrils associated with Alzheimer's disease. We combine the coarse-grained OPEP potential with a Hamiltonian and temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation (HT-REMD) to identify mechanisms leading to the formation of secondary structures promoting fibrillation. We observe that the propensity to form beta-sheet remains the same for Aβ1-40 whereas is decreases significantly for NAC. In particular, the 25-35 region of Aβ1-40 is a significant area of secondary structure stabilization with NAC. The ionic interactions between salt-bridge D23 and K28 in Aβ1-40 and K20 and E23 in NAC of the heterogeneous dimer are consistent with the salt-bridges found in NAC and Aβ1-40 homogenous dimers and allow us to see that these interactions don't necessarily dominate the interchain stabilizations. Our numerical simulation also show the formation of interaction between the early oligomer of NAC and Aβ1-40.

  4. E. coli chaperones DnaK, Hsp33 and Spy inhibit bacterial functional amyloid assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Margery L; Schmidt, Jens C; Ilbert, Marianne; Doyle, Shannon M; Quan, Shu; Bardwell, James C A; Jakob, Ursula; Wickner, Sue; Chapman, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid formation is an ordered aggregation process, where β-sheet rich polymers are assembled from unstructured or partially folded monomers. We examined how two Escherichia coli cytosolic chaperones, DnaK and Hsp33, and a more recently characterized periplasmic chaperone, Spy, modulate the aggregation of a functional amyloid protein, CsgA. We found that DnaK, the Hsp70 homologue in E. coli, and Hsp33, a redox-regulated holdase, potently inhibited CsgA amyloidogenesis. The Hsp33 anti-amyloidogenesis activity was oxidation dependent, as oxidized Hsp33 was significantly more efficient than reduced Hsp33 at preventing CsgA aggregation. When soluble CsgA was seeded with preformed amyloid fibers, neither Hsp33 nor DnaK were able to efficiently prevent soluble CsgA from adopting the amyloid conformation. Moreover, both DnaK and Hsp33 increased the time that CsgA was reactive with the amyloid oligomer conformation-specific A11 antibody. Since CsgA must also pass through the periplasm during secretion, we assessed the ability of the periplasmic chaperone Spy to inhibit CsgA polymerization. Like DnaK and Hsp33, Spy also inhibited CsgA polymerization in vitro. Overexpression of Spy resulted in increased chaperone activity in periplasmic extracts and in reduced curli biogenesis in vivo. We propose that DnaK, Hsp33 and Spy exert their effects during the nucleation stages of CsgA fibrillation. Thus, both housekeeping and stress induced cytosolic and periplasmic chaperones may be involved in discouraging premature CsgA interactions during curli biogenesis.

  5. Mink serum amyloid A protein. Expression and primary structure based on cDNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhaug, G; Husby, G; Dowton, S B

    1990-06-15

    The nucleotide sequences of two mink serum amyloid A (SAA) cDNA clones have been analyzed, one (SAA1) 776 base pairs long and the other (SAA2) 552 base pairs long. Significant differences were discovered when derived amino acid sequences were compared with data for apoSAA isolated from high density lipoprotein. Previous studies of mink protein SAA and amyloid protein A (AA) suggest that only one SAA isotype is amyloidogenic. The cDNA clone for SAA2 defines the "amyloid prone" isotype while SAA1 is found only in serum. Mink SAA1 has alanine in position 10, isoleucine in positions 24, 67, and 71, lysine in position 27, and proline in position 105. Residue 10 in mink SAA2 is valine while arginine and asparagine are at positions 24 and 27, respectively, all characteristics of protein AA isolated from mink amyloid fibrils. Mink SAA2 also has valine in position 67, phenylalanine in position 71, and amino acid 105 is serine. It remains unknown why these six amino acid substitutions render SAA2 more amyloidogenic than SAA1. Eighteen hours after lipopolysaccharide stimulation, mink SAA mRNA is abundant in liver with relatively minor accumulations in brain and lung. Genes encoding both SAA isotypes are expressed in all three organs while no SAA mRNA was detectable in amyloid prone organs, including spleen and intestine, indicating that deposition of AA from locally synthesized SAA is unlikely. A third mRNA species (2.2 kilobases) was identified and hybridizes with cDNA probes for mink SAA1 and SAA2. In addition to a major primary translation product (molecular mass 14,400 Da) an additional product with molecular mass 28,000 Da was immunoprecipitable.

  6. Functional amyloid formation in LPS activated cells from invertebrates to vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Grimaldi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available LPS stimulation provokes serious cellular stress with an increase of cytoplasmic reactive oxygen species (ROS. We have investigated, among the different cellular defenses, amyloidogenesis as common physiological response to attenuate oxidative stress. Optical and electron microscopic observations of the following LPS activated cell lines [insect (larval hemocytes, IPLB-LdFB and Drosophila Schneider’s S2 cells; mouse (NIH3T3 embryonic fibroblasts; Human (Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC, neutrophils, and mesenchymal stem cells] reveal that, all are characterized by irregular profiles, cytoplasmic empty vacuoles or by cisternae containing fibrillar material. The compartmentalized fibrillar material shows staining properties typical of amyloid fibrils. LPS activation leads to ROS generation, resulting in pH acidification. Stimulated cells show pink cytoplasm in May-Grünwald Giemsa differential staining, giving a gross indication of a lower intracellular pH. Moreover the activation of amyloidogenesis is also linked with an extensive production of ACTH and α-MSH in all cultured cell types. We suggest that amyloidogenesis is a common, physiological cellular response to weak ROS, starting when other anti-stress cellular systems failed to restore homeostasis. The morphological evidence and/or functional characterization of synthesized amyloid fibrils could be an early indicator of oxidative stress that may lead to a general inflammatory process.

  7. Conformational Effects of the A21G Flemish Mutation on the Aggregation of Amyloid β Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Dobson, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Among the various hereditary mutants of amyloid β (Aβ) in familial Alzheimer's disease (AD), the A21G Flemish-type mutant has unique properties showing a low aggregation propensity but progressive deposition in vascular walls. Moreover, in contrast to other familial AD cases that show extensive Aβ1-42 deposition in the brain, patients with Flemish AD predominantly exhibit the deposition of the Aβ1-40 isoform. Here we report the structural characterization of the Flemish-type mutant (A21G) in comparison with the wild-type Aβ1-40 peptide to examine the possible effects of the A21G mutation on the conformation of the Aβ1-40 isoform. The kinetic analysis of the aggregation of the peptides monitored by thioflavin T fluorescence measurement indicates that the mutation precludes the initial nucleation process of amyloid fibril formation by Aβ1-40. Spectroscopic data indicate that the Flemish-type mutant bound to aqueous micelles composed of lyso-GM1, in which the mobile N-terminal segment is tethered through the C-terminal helical segment, has reduced α-helical structure compared to the wild-type peptide. Our findings suggest that the mutational perturbation to the membrane binding properties is coupled with the changes in nucleation behavior of Aβ during its fibril formation.

  8. Oxidized epigallocatechin gallate inhibited lysozyme fibrillation more strongly than the native form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting An

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, the most abundant flavanoid in green tea, is currently being evaluated in the clinic due to its benefits in the treatment of amyloid disorders. Its anti-amyloidogenic effect has been attributed to direct interaction of the intact molecule with misfolded polypeptides. In addition, antioxidant activity is also involved in the anti-amyloidogenic role. The detailed molecular mechanism is still unclear and requires further investigation. In the present study, the kinetics of EGCG oxidation and the anti-amyloidogenic effect of the resultant oxidation substances have been examined. The results indicate that EGCG degrades in a medium at pH 8.0 with a half-life less than 2 h. By utilizing lysozyme as an in vitro model, the oxidized EGCG demonstrates a more potent anti-amyloidogenic capacity than the intact molecule, as shown by ThT and ANS fluorescence, TEM determination, and hemolytic assay. The oxidized EGCG also has a stronger disruptive effect on preformed fibrils than the native form. Ascorbic acid eliminates the disruptive role of native EGCG on the fibrils, suggesting that oxidation is a prerequisite in fibril disruption. The results of this work demonstrate that oxidized EGCG plays a more important role than the intact molecule in anti-amyloidogenic activity. These insights into the action of EGCG may provide a novel route to understand the anti-amyloidogenic activity of natural polyphenols.

  9. Annular structures as intermediates in fibril formation of Alzheimer Abeta17-42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Jang, Hyunbum; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth

    2008-06-05

    We report all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of annular beta-amyloid (17-42) structures, single- and double-layered, in solution. We assess the structural stability and association force of Abeta annular oligomers associated through different interfaces, with a mutated sequence (M35A), and with the oxidation state (M35O). Simulation results show that single-layered annular models display inherent structural instability: one is broken down into linear-like oligomers, and the other collapses. On the other hand, a double-layered annular structure where the two layers interact through their C-termini to form an NC-CN interface (where N and C are the N and C termini, respectively) exhibits high structural stability over the simulation time due to strong hydrophobic interactions and geometrical constraints induced by the closed circular shape. The observed dimensions and molecular weight of the oligomers from atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments are found to correspond well to our stable double-layered model with the NC-CN interface. Comparison with K3 annular structures derived from the beta 2-microglobulin suggests that the driving force for amyloid formation is sequence specific, strongly dependent on side-chain packing arrangements, structural morphologies, sequence composition, and residue positions. Combined with our previous simulations of linear-like Abeta, K3 peptide, and sup35-derived GNNQQNY peptide, the annular structures provide useful insight into oligomeric structures and driving forces that are critical in amyloid fibril formation.

  10. Structural characterization of toxic oligomers that are kinetically trapped during α-synuclein fibril formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Serene W; Drakulic, Srdja; Deas, Emma; Ouberai, Myriam; Aprile, Francesco A; Arranz, Rocío; Ness, Samuel; Roodveldt, Cintia; Guilliams, Tim; De-Genst, Erwin J; Klenerman, David; Wood, Nicholas W; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Alfonso, Carlos; Rivas, Germán; Abramov, Andrey Y; Valpuesta, José María; Dobson, Christopher M; Cremades, Nunilo

    2015-04-21

    We describe the isolation and detailed structural characterization of stable toxic oligomers of α-synuclein that have accumulated during the process of amyloid formation. Our approach has allowed us to identify distinct subgroups of oligomers and to probe their molecular architectures by using cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) image reconstruction techniques. Although the oligomers exist in a range of sizes, with different extents and nature of β-sheet content and exposed hydrophobicity, they all possess a hollow cylindrical architecture with similarities to certain types of amyloid fibril, suggesting that the accumulation of at least some forms of amyloid oligomers is likely to be a consequence of very slow rates of rearrangement of their β-sheet structures. Our findings reveal the inherent multiplicity of the process of protein misfolding and the key role the β-sheet geometry acquired in the early stages of the self-assembly process plays in dictating the kinetic stability and the pathological nature of individual oligomeric species.

  11. Amyloid-β peptides act as allosteric modulators of cholinergic signalling through formation of soluble BAβACs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajnish; Nordberg, Agneta; Darreh-Shori, Taher

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β peptides, through highly sophisticated enzymatic machinery, are universally produced and released in an action potential synchronized manner into the interstitial fluids in the brain. Yet no native functions are attributed to amyloid-β. The amyloid-β hypothesis ascribes just neurotoxicity properties through build-up of soluble homomeric amyloid-β oligomers or fibrillar deposits. Apolipoprotein-ε4 (APOE4) allele is the only confirmed genetic risk factor of sporadic Alzheimer's disease; once more it is unclear how it increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Similarly, central cholinergic signalling is affected selectively and early in the Alzheimer's disease brain, again why cholinergic neurons show this sensitivity is still unclear. However, the three main known Alzheimer's disease risk factors, advancing age, female gender and APOE4, have been linked to a high apolipoprotein-E and accumulation of the acetylcholine degrading enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase in cerebrospinal fluids of patients. Furthermore, numerous reports indicate that amyloid-β interacts with butyrylcholinesterase and apolipoprotein-E. We have proposed that this interaction leads to formation of soluble ultrareactive acetylcholine-hydrolyzing complexes termed BAβACs, to adjust at demand both synaptic and extracellular acetylcholine signalling. This hypothesis predicted presence of acetylcholine-synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase in extracellular fluids to allow maintenance of equilibrium between breakdown and synthesis of acetylcholine through continuous in situ syntheses. A recent proof-of-concept study led to the discovery of this enzyme in the human extracellular fluids. We report here that apolipoprotein-E, in particular ε4 isoprotein acts as one of the strongest endogenous anti-amyloidfibrillization agents reported in the literature. At biological concentrations, apolipoprotein-E prevented amyloidfibrillization for at least 65 h. We show that amyloid

  12. Fibril assembly in whey protein mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to study fibril assembly in mixtures of whey proteins. The effect of the composition of the protein mixture on the structures and the resulting phase behaviour was investigated. The current work has shown that beta-lactoglobulin is responsible for the fibril assembly

  13. Viscoelastic behavior of discrete human collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, René; Hassenkam, Tue; Hansen, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Whole tendon and fibril bundles display viscoelastic behavior, but to the best of our knowledge this property has not been directly measured in single human tendon fibrils. In the present work an atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach was used for tensile testing of two human patellar tendon fibr...

  14. Formation and properties of whey protein fibrils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes-Nijboer, A.

    2011-01-01

    Protein fibrils are threadlike aggregates that are about one molecule thick and more than thousand molecules long. Due to their threadlike structure they could potentially be used to form meat-like structures. Protein fibrils can be produced from milk protein and plant protein, opening opportunities

  15. PAROXYSMAL ATRIAL FIBRILLATION: CHOICE OF CARDIOVERSION THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Tatarskii

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics and classification of different patterns of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation are presented. Main indications to restoration of sinus rhythm are discussed. The features of main medications used to terminate of atrial fibrillation are given. The choice of antiarrhythmic drug is considerate. Necessity of individual approach to therapy tactics is proved.

  16. Modeling generic aspects of ideal fibril formation

    CERN Document Server

    Michel, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Many different proteins self-aggregate into insoluble fibrils growing apically by reversible addition of elementary building blocks. But beyond this common principle, the modalities of fibril formation are very disparate, with various intermediate forms which can be reshuffled by minor modifications of physico-chemical conditions or amino-acid sequences. To bypass this complexity, the multifaceted phenomenon of fibril formation is reduced here to its most elementary principles defined for a linear prototype of fibril. Selected generic features, including nucleation, elongation and conformational recruitment, are modeled using minimalist hypotheses and tools, by separating equilibrium from kinetic aspects and in vitro from in vivo conditions. These reductionist approaches allow to bring out known and new rudiments, including the kinetic and equilibrium effects of nucleation, the dual influence of elongation on nucleation, the kinetic limitations on nucleation and fibril numbers and the accumulation of complexe...

  17. Nanoscale scraping and dissection of collagen fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, M P E; Horton, M A; Mesquida, P

    2008-09-24

    The main function of collagen is mechanical, hence there is a fundamental scientific interest in experimentally investigating the mechanical and structural properties of collagen fibrils on the nanometre scale. Here, we present a novel atomic force microscopy (AFM) based scraping technique that can dissect the outer layer of a biological specimen. Applied to individual collagen fibrils, the technique was successfully used to expose the fibril core and reveal the presence of a D-banding-like structure. AFM nanoindentation measurements of fibril shell and core indicated no significant differences in mechanical properties such as stiffness (reduced modulus), hardness, adhesion and adhesion work. This suggests that collagen fibrils are mechanically homogeneous structures. The scraping technique can be applied to other biological specimens, as demonstrated on the example of bacteria.

  18. Atrial fibrillation in patients with ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Sandra Kruchov; Frost, Lars; Eagle, Kim A;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation is a major risk factor for ischemic stroke. However, the prognostic impact of atrial fibrillation among patients with stroke is not fully clarified. We compared patient characteristics, including severity of stroke and comorbidity, quality of in-hospital care...... and outcomes in a cohort of first-time ischemic stroke patients with and without atrial fibrillation. METHODS: Based on linkage of public medical databases, we did a population-based follow-up study among 3,849 stroke patients from the County of Aarhus, Denmark admitted in the period of 2003......-2007 and prospectively registered in the Danish National Indicator Project. RESULTS: Atrial fibrillation was associated with an adverse prognostic profile but not with an overall poorer quality of in-hospital care. Patients with atrial fibrillation had a longer total length of stay (median: 15 vs 9 days), and were...

  19. Chondroitin Sulfate Perlecan Enhances Collagen Fibril Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, A. J.; Johnson, A. E.; Mörgelin, M.

    2006-01-01

    produced in the presence of perlecan. Interestingly, the enhancement of collagen fibril formation is independent on the core protein and is mimicked by chondroitin sulfate E but neither by chondroitin sulfate D nor dextran sulfate. Furthermore, perlecan chondroitin sulfate contains the 4,6-disulfated......Inactivation of the perlecan gene leads to perinatal lethal chondrodysplasia. The similarity to the phenotypes of the Col2A1 knock-out and the disproportionate micromelia mutation suggests perlecan involvement in cartilage collagen matrix assembly. We now present a mechanism for the defect...... in collagen type II fibril assembly by perlecan-null chondrocytes. Cartilage perlecan is a heparin sulfate or a mixed heparan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The latter form binds collagen and accelerates fibril formation in vitro, with more defined fibril morphology and increased fibril diameters...

  20. Evidence for Intramolecular Antiparallel Beta-Sheet Structure in Alpha-Synuclein Fibrils from a Combination of Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeters, Steven J.; Iyer, Aditya; Pletikapić, Galja; Kogan, Vladimir; Subramaniam, Vinod; Woutersen, Sander

    2017-01-01

    The aggregation of the intrinsically disordered protein alpha-synuclein (αS) into amyloid fibrils is thought to play a central role in the pathology of Parkinson’s disease. Using a combination of techniques (AFM, UV-CD, XRD, and amide-I 1D- and 2D-IR spectroscopy) we show that the structure of αS fibrils varies as a function of ionic strength: fibrils aggregated in low ionic-strength buffers ([NaCl] ≤ 25 mM) have a significantly different structure than fibrils grown in higher ionic-strength buffers. The observations for fibrils aggregated in low-salt buffers are consistent with an extended conformation of αS molecules, forming hydrogen-bonded intermolecular β-sheets that are loosely packed in a parallel fashion. For fibrils aggregated in high-salt buffers (including those prepared in buffers with a physiological salt concentration) the measurements are consistent with αS molecules in a more tightly-packed, antiparallel intramolecular conformation, and suggest a structure characterized by two twisting stacks of approximately five hydrogen-bonded intermolecular β-sheets each. We find evidence that the high-frequency peak in the amide-I spectrum of αS fibrils involves a normal mode that differs fundamentally from the canonical high-frequency antiparallel β-sheet mode. The high sensitivity of the fibril structure to the ionic strength might form the basis of differences in αS-related pathologies.

  1. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunyamin Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn’s disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide is generated during the very early stages of aggregation of the amyloid peptides implicated in Alzheimer disease and familial British dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabner, Brian J; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Turnbull, Stuart; German, Matthew J; Paleologou, Katerina E; Hayashi, Yoshihito; Cooper, Leanne J; Fullwood, Nigel J; Allsop, David

    2005-10-28

    Alzheimer disease and familial British dementia are neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by the presence of numerous amyloid plaques in the brain. These lesions contain fibrillar deposits of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta) and the British dementia peptide (ABri), respectively. Both peptides are toxic to cells in culture, and there is increasing evidence that early "soluble oligomers" are the toxic entity rather than mature amyloid fibrils. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this toxicity are not clear, but in the case of Abeta, one prominent hypothesis is that the peptide can induce oxidative damage via the formation of hydrogen peroxide. We have developed a reliable method, employing electron spin resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with the spin-trapping technique, to detect any hydrogen peroxide generated during the incubation of Abeta and other amyloidogenic peptides. Here, we monitored levels of hydrogen peroxide accumulation during different stages of aggregation of Abeta-(1-40) and ABri and found that in both cases it was generated as a short "burst" early on in the aggregation process. Ultrastructural studies with both peptides revealed that structures resembling "soluble oligomers" or "protofibrils" were present during this early phase of hydrogen peroxide formation. Mature amyloid fibrils derived from Abeta-(1-40) did not generate hydrogen peroxide. We conclude that hydrogen peroxide formation during the early stages of protein aggregation may be a common mechanism of cell death in these (and possibly other) neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Amyloid myopathy: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Tuomaala

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid myopathy (AM is a rare manifestation of primary systemic amyloidosis (AL. Like inflammatory myopathies, it presents with proximal muscle weakness and an increased creatine kinase level. We describe a case of AL with severe, rapidly progressive myopathy as the initial symptom. The clinical manifestation and muscle biopsy were suggestive of inclusion body myositis. AM was not suspected until amyloidosis was seen in the gastric mucosal biopsy. The muscle biopsy was then re-examined more specifically, and Congo red staining eventually showed vascular and interstitial amyloid accumulation, which led to a diagnosis of AM. The present case illustrates the fact that the clinical picture of AM can mimic that of inclusion body myositis.

  4. Surgical considerations about amyloid goiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Villanueva, Augusto; García Villanueva, María Jesús; García Villanueva, Mercedes; Rojo Blanco, Roberto; Collado Guirao, María Vicenta; Cabañas Montero, Jacobo; Beni Pérez, Rafael; Moreno Montes, Irene

    2013-05-01

    Amyloidosis is an uncommon syndrome consisting of a number of disorders having in common an extracellular deposit of fibrillary proteins. This results in functional and structural changes in the affected organs, depending on deposit location and severity. Amyloid infiltration of the thyroid gland may occur in 50% and up to 80% of patients with primary and secondary amyloidosis respectively. Amyloid goiter (AG) is a true rarity, usually found associated to secondary amyloidosis. AG may require surgical excision, usually because of compressive symptoms. We report the case of a patient with a big AG occurring in the course of a secondary amyloidosis associated to polyarticular onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis who underwent total thyroidectomy. Current literature is reviewed, an attempt is made to provide action guidelines, and some surgical considerations on this rare condition are given.

  5. Atypical presentation of atypical amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, Danniele G; Acharya, Veena K; Dogan, Ahmet; Racusen, Lorraine C; Atta, Mohamed G

    2011-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a group of diseases categorized by precipitation of a group of protein aggregates (amyloid) in tissues, including the kidney, and proteinuria is usually the commonest, though not exclusive, hallmark of clinical presentation. AL and AA are the most commonly recognized forms of amyloidosis involving the kidney, but other forms have been described. We present a case of renal amyloidosis due to a novel amyloidogenic protein, leucocyte cell-derived chemotaxin 2, without proteinuria at presentation or on subsequent follow-up.

  6. Janus faces of amyloid proteins in neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B; Kurnellas, Michael P

    2014-07-01

    Amyloid forming molecules are generally considered harmful. In Alzheimer's Disease two amyloid molecules Aβ A4 and tau vie for consideration as the main pathogenic culprit. But molecules obey the laws of chemistry and defy the way we categorize them as humans with our well-known proclivities to bias in our reasoning. We have been exploring the brains of multiple sclerosis patients to identify molecules that are associated with protection from inflammation and degeneration. In 2001 we noted that aB crystallin (cryab) was the most abundant transcript found in MS lesions, but not in healthy brains. Cryab can reverse paralysis and attenuate inflammation in several models of inflammation including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and various models of ischemia. Cryab is an amyloid forming molecule. We have identified a core structure common to many amyloids including amyloid protein Aβ A4, tau, amylin, prion protein, serum amyloid protein P, and cryab. The core hexapeptide structure is highly immune suppressive and can reverse paralysis in EAE when administered systemically. Administration of this amyloid forming hexapeptide quickly lowers inflammatory cytokines in plasma like IL-6 and IL-2. The hexapeptide bind a set of proinflammatory mediators in plasma, including acute phase reactants and complement components. The beneficial properties of amyloid forming hexapeptides provide a potential new therapeutic direction. These experiments indicate that amyloid forming molecules have Janus faces, providing unexpected benefit for neuroinflammatory conditions.

  7. Neuronal Classification of Atria Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed BEN MESSAOUD

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Motivation. In medical field, particularly the cardiology, the diagnosis systems constitute the essential domain of research. In some applications, the traditional methods of classification present some limitations. The neuronal technique is considered as one of the promising algorithms to resolve such problem.Method. In this paper, two approaches of the Artificial Neuronal Network (ANN technique are investigated to classify the heart beats which are Multi Layer Perception (MLP and Radial Basis Function (RBF. A calculation algorithm of the RBF centers is proposed. For the Atria Fibrillation anomalies, an artificial neural network was used as a pattern classifier to distinguish three classes of the cardiac arrhythmias. The different classes consist of the normal beats (N, the Arrhythmia (AFA and Tachycardia (TFA Atria Fibrillation cases. The global and the partition classifier are performed. The arrhythmias of MIT-BIH database are analyzed. The ANN inputs are the temporal and morphological parameters deduced from the electrocardiograph.Results. The simulation results illustrate the performances of the studied versions of the neural network and give the fault detection rate of the tested data, a rate of classification reaching the 3.7%.Conclusion. This system can constitute a mesh in a chain of automated diagnosis and can be a tool for assistance for the classification of the cardiac anomalies in the services of urgencies before the arrival of a qualified personal person.

  8. Anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylek, Elaine M

    2013-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common significant cardiac rhythm disorder, and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. Atrial fibrillation confers a fivefold increased risk of stroke, and these strokes are associated with significant mortality and disability. The vitamin K antagonist, warfarin, has been the mainstay of anticoagulant therapy for patients with AF, reducing the risk of stroke by 65%. Despite its efficacy, warfarin remains underused in clinical practice because of its variable dose response, diet and medication interactions, and need for frequent monitoring. Stroke prevention in AF has entered an exciting therapeutic era with new classes of targeted anticoagulants that avoid the many pitfalls of the vitamin K antagonists. Dabigatran, an oral thrombin inhibitor, and the factor Xa inhibitors, rivaroxaban and apixaban, have demonstrated efficacy for stroke prevention and a reduced risk of intracranial hemorrhage relative to warfarin. Translating the efficacy of clinical trials into effective use of these novel agents in clinical practice will require an understanding of their pharmacokinetic profiles, dose selection, and management in select clinical situations.

  9. Inferring Mechanistic Parameters from Amyloid Formation Kinetics by Approximate Bayesian Computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani-Webster, Eri; Nath, Abhinav

    2017-03-14

    Amyloid formation is implicated in a number of human diseases, and is thought to proceed via a nucleation-dependent polymerization mechanism. Experimenters often wish to relate changes in amyloid formation kinetics, for example, in response to small molecules to specific mechanistic steps along this pathway. However, fitting kinetic fibril formation data to a complex model including explicit rate constants results in an ill-posed problem with a vast number of potential solutions. The levels of uncertainty remaining in parameters calculated from these models, arising both from experimental noise and high levels of degeneracy or codependency in parameters, is often unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a combination of explicit mathematical models with an approximate Bayesian computation approach can be used to assign the mechanistic effects of modulators on amyloid fibril formation. We show that even when exact rate constants cannot be extracted, parameters derived from these rate constants can be recovered and used to assign mechanistic effects and their relative magnitudes with a great deal of confidence. Furthermore, approximate Bayesian computation provides a robust method for visualizing uncertainty remaining in the model parameters, regardless of its origin. We apply these methods to the problem of heparin-mediated tau polymerization, which displays complex kinetic behavior not amenable to analysis by more traditional methods. Our analysis indicates that the role of heparin cannot be explained by enhancement of nucleation alone, as has been previously proposed. The methods described here are applicable to a wide range of systems, as models can be easily adapted to account for new reactions and reversibility.

  10. Amyloid β oligomers in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, treatment, and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Kirsten L; Klein, William L

    2015-02-01

    Protein aggregation is common to dozens of diseases including prionoses, diabetes, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Over the past 15 years, there has been a paradigm shift in understanding the structural basis for these proteinopathies. Precedent for this shift has come from investigation of soluble Aβ oligomers (AβOs), toxins now widely regarded as instigating neuron damage leading to Alzheimer's dementia. Toxic AβOs accumulate in AD brain and constitute long-lived alternatives to the disease-defining Aβ fibrils deposited in amyloid plaques. Key experiments using fibril-free AβO solutions demonstrated that while Aβ is essential for memory loss, the fibrillar Aβ in amyloid deposits is not the agent. The AD-like cellular pathologies induced by AβOs suggest their impact provides a unifying mechanism for AD pathogenesis, explaining why early stage disease is specific for memory and accounting for major facets of AD neuropathology. Alternative ideas for triggering mechanisms are being actively investigated. Some research favors insertion of AβOs into membrane, while other evidence supports ligand-like accumulation at particular synapses. Over a dozen candidate toxin receptors have been proposed. AβO binding triggers a redistribution of critical synaptic proteins and induces hyperactivity in metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors. This leads to Ca(2+) overload and instigates major facets of AD neuropathology, including tau hyperphosphorylation, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and synapse loss. Because different species of AβOs have been identified, a remaining question is which oligomer is the major pathogenic culprit. The possibility has been raised that more than one species plays a role. Despite some key unknowns, the clinical relevance of AβOs has been established, and new studies are beginning to point to co-morbidities such as diabetes and hypercholesterolemia as etiological factors. Because pathogenic AβOs appear early in the disease, they

  11. Environmental impact of multi-wall carbon nanotubes in a novel model of exposure: systemic distribution, macrophage accumulation, and amyloid deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, Adriana; Pagani, Arianna; Pulze, Laura; Bruno, Antonino; Principi, Elisa; Congiu, Terenzio; Gini, Elisabetta; Grimaldi, Annalisa; Bassani, Barbara; De Flora, Silvio; de Eguileor, Magda; Noonan, Douglas M

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been extensively investigated and employed for industrial use because of their peculiar physical properties, which make them ideal for many industrial applications. However, rapid growth of CNT employment raises concerns about the potential risks and toxicities for public health, environment, and workers associated with the manufacture and use of these new materials. Here we investigate the main routes of entry following environmental exposure to multi-wall CNTs (MWCNTs; currently the most widely used in industry). We developed a novel murine model that could represent a surrogate of a workplace exposure to MWCNTs. We traced the localization of MWCNTs and their possible role in inducing an innate immune response, inflammation, macrophage recruitment, and inflammatory conditions. Following environmental exposure of CD1 mice, we observed that MWCNTs rapidly enter and disseminate in the organism, initially accumulating in lungs and brain and later reaching the liver and kidney via the bloodstream. Since recent experimental studies show that CNTs are associated with the aggregation process of proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases, we investigated whether MWCNTs are able to induce amyloid fibril production and accumulation. Amyloid deposits in spatial association with macrophages and MWCNT aggregates were found in the brain, liver, lungs, and kidneys of exposed animals. Our data suggest that accumulation of MWCNTs in different organs is associated with inflammation and amyloid accumulation. In the brain, where we observed rapid accumulation and amyloid fibril deposition, exposure to MWCNTs might enhance progression of neurodegenerative and other amyloid-related diseases. Our data highlight the conclusion that, in a novel rodent model of exposure, MWCNTs may induce macrophage recruitment, activation, and amyloid deposition, causing potential damage to several organs.

  12. Medicinal Chemistry Focusing on Aggregation of Amyloid-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohma, Youhei

    2016-01-01

    The aggregation of peptides/proteins is intimately related to a number of human diseases. More than 20 have been identified which aggregate into fibrils containing extensive β-sheet structures, and species generated in the aggregation processes (i.e., oligomers and fibrils) contribute to disease development. Amyloid-β peptide (designated Aβ), related to Alzheimer's disease (AD), is the representative example. The intensive aggregation property of Aβ also leads to difficulty in its synthesis. To improve the synthetic problem, we developed an O-acyl isopeptide of Aβ1-42, in which the N-acyl linkage (amide bond) of Ser(26) was replaced with an O-acyl linkage (ester bond) at the side chain. The O-acyl isopeptide demonstrated markedly higher water-solubility than that of Aβ1-42, while it quickly converted to intact monomer Aβ1-42 via an O-to-N acyl rearrangement under physiological conditions. Inhibition of the pathogenic aggregation of Aβ1-42 might be a therapeutic strategy for curing AD. We succeeded in the rational design and identification of a small molecule aggregation inhibitor based on a pharmacophore motif obtained from cyclo[-Lys-Leu-Val-Phe-Phe-]. Moreover, the inhibition of Aβ aggregation was achieved via oxygenation (i.e., incorporation of oxygen atoms to Aβ) using an artificial catalyst. We identified a selective, cell-compatible photo-oxygenation catalyst of Aβ, a flavin catalyst attached to an Aβ-binding peptide, which markedly decreased the aggregation potency and neurotoxicity of Aβ.

  13. Amyloid peptide Aβ40 inhibits aggregation of Aβ42: Evidence from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viet, Man Hoang; Li, Mai Suan

    2012-06-01

    Effects of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide Aβ40 on secondary structures of Aβ42 are studied by all-atom simulations using the GROMOS96 43a1 force field with explicit water. It is shown that in the presence of Aβ40 the beta-content of monomer Aβ42 is reduced. Since the fibril-prone conformation N* of full-length Aβ peptides has the shape of beta strand-loop-beta strand this result suggests that Aβ40 decreases the probability of observing N* of Aβ42 in monomer state. Based on this and the hypothesis that the higher is the population of N* the higher fibril formation rates, one can expect that, in agreement with the recent experiment, Aβ40 inhibit fibril formation of Aβ42. It is shown that the presence of Aβ40 makes the salt bridge D23-K28 and fragment 18-33 of Aβ42 more flexible providing additional support for this experimental fact. Our estimation of the binding free energy by the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area method reveals the inhibition mechanism that Aβ40 binds to Aβ42 modifying its morphology.

  14. Toxic β-Amyloid (Aβ) Alzheimer's Ion Channels: From Structure to Function and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth

    2012-02-01

    interacting α-helices that robustly prevent ion leakage, rather than hydrogen-bonded β-strands. Moreover, in comparison with β-rich antimicrobial peptide (AMP) such as a protegrin-1 (PG-1), both Aβ and PG-1 are cytotoxic, and capable of forming fibrils and dynamic channels which consist of subunits with similar dimensions. These combined properties support a functional relationship between amyloidogenic peptides and β-sheet-rich cytolytic AMPs, suggesting that PG-1 is amyloidogenic and amyloids may have an antimicrobial function.

  15. Urea-induced denaturation of apolipoprotein serum amyloid A reveals marginal stability of hexamer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limin; Colón, Wilfredo

    2005-01-01

    Serum Amyloid A (SAA) is an acute phase reactant protein that is predominantly found bound to high-density lipoprotein in plasma. Upon inflammation, the plasma concentration of SAA can increase dramatically, occasionally leading to the development of amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, which involves the deposition of SAA amyloid fibrils in major organs. We previously found that the murine isoform SAA2.2 exists in aqueous solution as a hexamer containing a central channel. Here we show using various biophysical and biochemical techniques that the SAA2.2 hexamer can be totally dissociated into monomer by ~2 M urea, with the concerted loss of its α-helical structure. However, limited trypsin proteolysis experiments in urea showed a conserved digestion profile, suggesting the preservation of major backbone topological features in the urea-denatured state of SAA2.2. The marginal stability of hexameric SAA2.2 and the presence of residual structure in the denatured monomeric protein suggest that both forms may interconvert in vivo to exert different functions to meet the various needs during normal physiological conditions and in response to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:15937280

  16. Topo-optical reactions for the identification of O-acyl sugars in amyloid deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Susann; Makovitzky, Josef

    2009-01-01

    The aldehyde bisulfite toluidine blue (ABT) reaction with former saponification (KOH-ABT) and periodic acid-borohydride reduction-saponification (PB-KOH-ABT) were applied to sections of human amyloid deposits in the respiratory tract. The saponification-induced increase in ABT-reactivity was confined to the presence of O-acyl sugars associated with the amyloid fibrils. The anisotropic and metachromatic effect in the ABT and KOH-ABT reaction was reduced in the corresponding PB-KOH-ABT reaction, a difference attributed to the removal of staining due to neutral carbohydrate residues. Since the periodic acid-borohydride reduction abolishes all pre-existing ABT-reactivity of neutral sugar vicinal diols, the isolated KOH-effect could be shown using the PB-KOH-ABT reaction. By application of this sequence, the problem identifying small quantities of O-acyl sugars was solved. It is suggested that the KOH-effect depends upon the removal of O-acyl substituents located on the polyhydroxy side chain (C7, C8, C9) of sialic acid residues. An advantage of such topo-optical reactions over biochemical techniques is the exact localization of O-acyl sugars in tissue sites. By means of the KOH-ABT and PB-KOH-ABT reactions we have demonstrated, for the first time, that O-acyl sugars occur within amyloid deposits.

  17. Effect of stirring and seeding on whey protein fibril formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolder, Suzanne G; Sagis, Leonard M C; Venema, Paul; van der Linden, Erik

    2007-07-11

    The effect of stirring and seeding on the formation of fibrils in whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions was studied. More fibrils of a similar length are formed when WPI is stirred during heating at pH 2 and 80 degrees C compared to samples that were heated at rest. Addition of seeds did not show an additional effect compared to samples that were stirred. We propose a model for fibril formation, including an activation, nucleation, growth, and termination step. The activation and nucleation steps are the rate-determining steps. Fibril growth is relatively fast but terminates after prolonged heating. Two processes that possibly induce termination of fibril growth are hydrolysis of nonassembled monomers and inactivation of the growth ends of the fibrils. Stirring may break up immature fibrils, thus producing more active fibrils. Stirring also seems to accelerate the kinetics of fibril formation, resulting in an increase of the number of fibrils formed.

  18. Atrial fibrillation and survival in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Timothy A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survival in colorectal cancer may correlate with the degree of systemic inflammatory response to the tumour. Atrial fibrillation may be regarded as an inflammatory complication. We aimed to determine if atrial fibrillation is a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. Patients and methods A prospective colorectal cancer patient database was cross-referenced with the hospital clinical-coding database to identify patients who had underwent colorectal cancer surgery and were in atrial fibrillation pre- or postoperatively. Results A total of 175 patients underwent surgery for colorectal cancer over a two-year period. Of these, 13 patients had atrial fibrillation pre- or postoperatively. Atrial fibrillation correlated with worse two-year survival (p = 0.04; log-rank test. However, in a Cox regression analysis, atrial fibrillation was not significantly associated with survival. Conclusion The presence or development of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer is associated with worse overall survival, however it was not found to be an independent factor in multivariate analysis.

  19. Huntingtin exon 1 fibrils feature an interdigitated β-hairpin–based polyglutamine core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoop, Cody L.; Lin, Hsiang-Kai; Kar, Karunakar; Magyarfalvi, Gábor; Lamley, Jonathan M.; Boatz, Jennifer C.; Mandal, Abhishek; Lewandowski, Józef R.; Wetzel, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Polyglutamine expansion within the exon1 of huntingtin leads to protein misfolding, aggregation, and cytotoxicity in Huntington’s disease. This incurable neurodegenerative disease is the most prevalent member of a family of CAG repeat expansion disorders. Although mature exon1 fibrils are viable candidates for the toxic species, their molecular structure and how they form have remained poorly understood. Using advanced magic angle spinning solid-state NMR, we directly probe the structure of the rigid core that is at the heart of huntingtin exon1 fibrils and other polyglutamine aggregates, via measurements of long-range intramolecular and intermolecular contacts, backbone and side-chain torsion angles, relaxation measurements, and calculations of chemical shifts. These experiments reveal the presence of β-hairpin–containing β-sheets that are connected through interdigitating extended side chains. Despite dramatic differences in aggregation behavior, huntingtin exon1 fibrils and other polyglutamine-based aggregates contain identical β-strand–based cores. Prior structural models, derived from X-ray fiber diffraction and computational analyses, are shown to be inconsistent with the solid-state NMR results. Internally, the polyglutamine amyloid fibrils are coassembled from differently structured monomers, which we describe as a type of “intrinsic” polymorphism. A stochastic polyglutamine-specific aggregation mechanism is introduced to explain this phenomenon. We show that the aggregation of mutant huntingtin exon1 proceeds via an intramolecular collapse of the expanded polyglutamine domain and discuss the implications of this observation for our understanding of its misfolding and aggregation mechanisms. PMID:26831073

  20. Arginine metabolising enzymes as therapeutic tools for Alzheimer's disease: peptidyl arginine deiminase catalyses fibrillogenesis of beta-amyloid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohlake, Peter; Whiteley, Chris G

    2010-06-01

    The accumulation of arginine in the cerebrospinal fluid and brains of patients suffering from acute neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease, point to defects in the metabolic pathways involving this amino acids. The deposits of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques perhaps as a consequence of fibrillogenesis of beta-amyloid peptides has also been shown to be a hallmark in the aetiology of certain neurodegenerative diseases. Peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD II) is an enzyme that uses arginine as a substrate and we now show that PAD II not only binds with the peptides Abeta(1-40), Abeta(22-35), Abeta(17-28), Abeta(25-35) and Abeta(32-35) but assists in the proteolytic degradation of these peptides with the concomitant formation of insoluble fibrils. PAD was purified in 12.5% yield and 137 fold with a specific activity of 59 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) from bovine brain by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Sephacel. Characterisation of the enzyme gave a pH and temperature optima of 7.5 degrees C and 68 degrees C, respectively, and the enzyme lost 50% activity within 38 min at this temperature. Michaelis-Menten kinetics established a V(max) and K(m) of 1.57 micromol min(-1) ml(-1) and 1.35 mM, respectively, with N-benzoyl arginine ethyl ester as substrate. Kinetic analysis was used to measure the affinity (K(i)) of the amyloid peptides to PAD with values between 1.4 and 4.6 microM. The formation of Abeta fibrils was rate limiting involving an initial lag time of about 24 h that was dependent on the concentration of the amyloid peptides. Turbidity measurements at 400 nm, Congo Red assay and Thioflavin-T staining fluorescence were used to establish the aggregation kinetics of PAD-induced fibril formation.

  1. Vaccination with a non-human random sequence amyloid oligomer mimic results in improved cognitive function and reduced plaque deposition and micro hemorrhage in Tg2576 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool Suhail

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well established that vaccination of humans and transgenic animals against fibrillar Aβ prevents amyloid accumulation in plaques and preserves cognitive function in transgenic mouse models. However, autoimmune side effects have halted the development of vaccines based on full length human Aβ. Further development of an effective vaccine depends on overcoming these side effects while maintaining an effective immune response. Results We have previously reported that the immune response to amyloid oligomers is largely directed against generic epitopes that are common to amyloid oligomers of many different proteins and independent of a specific amino acid sequence. Here we have examined whether we can exploit this generic immune response to develop a vaccine that targets amyloid oligomers using a non-human random sequence amyloid oligomer. In order to study the effect of vaccination against generic oligomer epitopes, a random sequence oligomer (3A was selected as it forms oligomers that react with the oligomer specific A11 antibody. Oligomer mimics from 3A peptide, Aβ, islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, and Aβ fibrils were used to vaccinate Tg2576 mice, which develop a progressive accumulation of plaques and cognitive impairment. Vaccination with the 3A random sequence antigen was just as effective as vaccination with the other antigens in improving cognitive function and reducing total plaque load (Aβ burden in the Tg2576 mouse brains, but was associated with a much lower incidence of micro hemorrhage than Aβ antigens. Conclusion These results shows that the amyloid Aβ sequence is not necessary to produce a protective immune response that specifically targets generic amyloid oligomers. Using a non-human, random sequence antigen may facilitate the development of a vaccine that avoids autoimmune side effects.

  2. Self-assembly of aromatic α-amino acids into amyloid inspired nano/micro scaled architects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhjot; Brar, Surinder K; Bajaj, Manish; Narang, Nikesh; Mithu, Venus S; Katare, Om P; Wangoo, Nishima; Sharma, Rohit K

    2017-03-01

    In the pursuit for design of novel bio inspired materials, aromatic α-amino acids (phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan and histidine) have been investigated for the generation of well-ordered self-assembled architects such as fibrils, rods, ribbons and twisted nanosheets in varying solvent systems. These nano/micro scaled architects were thoroughly characterized using FE-SEM, confocal microscopy, optical microscopy, (1)H NMR, FTIR, XRD and TGA. These self-assembled architects were histologically stained with Congo red and thioflavin T dyes for investigation of amyloid morphology which revealed that the deposited state of ordered assemblies exhibit specific characteristic of amyloid deposits. The self-assembly of aromatic amino acids was observed to be driven by non-covalent forces such as π-π stacking, van der Waals and electrostatic interaction.

  3. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy data for amyloid formation of Aβ40 and Aβ42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga M. Selivanova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “One of the possible mechanisms of amyloid fibrils formation based on the sizes of primary and secondary folding nuclei of Aβ40 and Aβ42” (Dovidchenko et al., 2016 [1]. Aβ peptide is one of the most intensively studied amyloidogenic peptides. Despite the huge number of articles devoted to studying different fragments of Aβ peptide there are only several papers with correct kinetics data, also there are a few papers with X-ray data, especially for Aβ42. Our data present X-ray diffraction patterns both for Aβ40 and Aβ42 as well for Tris–HCl and wax. Moreover, our data provide kinetics of amyloid formation by recombinant Аβ40 and synthetic Аβ42 peptides by using electron microscopy.

  4. Molecular dynamics studies of the inhibitory mechanism of copper(Ⅱ) on aggregation of amyloid β-peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Jiao; Pin Yang

    2007-01-01

    The inhibitory mechanism of copper(Ⅱ) on the aggregation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The binding mode of copper(Ⅱ) with Aβ is characterized by the imidazole nitrogen atom, Nπ, of the histidine residue H13,acting as the anchoring site, and the backbone's deprotoned amide nitrogen atoms as the main binding sites. Drove by the coordination bonds and their induced hydrogen bond net, the conformations of Aβ converted from β-sheet non-β-sheet conformations, which destabilized the aggregation of Aβ into fibrils.

  5. The OPEP protein model: from single molecules, amyloid formation, crowding and hydrodynamics to DNA/RNA systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpone, Fabio; Melchionna, Simone; Tuffery, Pierre; Pasquali, Samuela; Mousseau, Normand; Cragnolini, Tristan; Chebaro, Yassmine; St-Pierre, Jean-Francois; Kalimeri, Maria; Barducci, Alessandro; Laurin, Yoann; Tek, Alex; Baaden, Marc; Nguyen, Phuong Hoang; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2014-07-07

    The OPEP coarse-grained protein model has been applied to a wide range of applications since its first release 15 years ago. The model, which combines energetic and structural accuracy and chemical specificity, allows the study of single protein properties, DNA-RNA complexes, amyloid fibril formation and protein suspensions in a crowded environment. Here we first review the current state of the model and the most exciting applications using advanced conformational sampling methods. We then present the current limitations and a perspective on the ongoing developments.

  6. The slowly aggregating salmon Calcitonin: a useful tool for the study of the amyloid oligomers structure and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diociaiuti, Marco; Gaudiano, Maria Cristina; Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid proteins of different aminoacidic composition share the tendency to misfold and aggregate in a similar way, following common aggregation steps. The process includes the formation of dimers, trimers, and low molecular weight prefibrillar oligomers, characterized by the typical morphology of globules less than 10 nm diameter. The globules spontaneously form linear or annular structures and, eventually, mature fibers. The rate of this process depends on characteristics intrinsic to the different proteins and to environmental conditions (i.e., pH, ionic strength, solvent composition, temperature). In the case of neurodegenerative diseases, it is now generally agreed that the pathogenic aggregates are not the mature fibrils, but the intermediate, soluble oligomers. However, the molecular mechanism by which these oligomers trigger neuronal damage is still unclear. In particular, it is not clear if there is a peculiar structure at the basis of the neurotoxic effect and how this structure interacts with neurons. This review will focus on the results we obtained using salmon Calcitonin, an amyloid protein characterized by a very slow aggregation rate, which allowed us to closely monitor the aggregation process. We used it as a tool to investigate the characteristics of amyloid oligomers formation and their interactions with neuronal cells. Our results indicate that small globules of about 6 nm could be the responsible for the neurotoxic effects. Moreover, our data suggest that the rich content in lipid rafts of neuronal cell plasma membrane may render neurons particularly vulnerable to the amyloid protein toxic effect.

  7. The Slowly Aggregating Salmon Calcitonin: A Useful Tool for the Study of the Amyloid Oligomers Structure and Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Diociaiuti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid proteins of different aminoacidic composition share the tendency to misfold and aggregate in a similar way, following common aggregation steps. The process includes the formation of dimers, trimers, and low molecular weight prefibrillar oligomers, characterized by the typical morphology of globules less than 10 nm diameter. The globules spontaneously form linear or annular structures and, eventually, mature fibers. The rate of this process depends on characteristics intrinsic to the different proteins and to environmental conditions (i.e., pH, ionic strength, solvent composition, temperature. In the case of neurodegenerative diseases, it is now generally agreed that the pathogenic aggregates are not the mature fibrils, but the intermediate, soluble oligomers. However, the molecular mechanism by which these oligomers trigger neuronal damage is still unclear. Inparticular, it is not clear if there is a peculiar structure at the basis of the neurotoxic effect and how this structure interacts with neurons. This review will focus on the results we obtained using salmon Calcitonin, an amyloid protein characterized by a very slow aggregation rate, which allowed us to closely monitor the aggregation process. We used it as a tool to investigate the characteristics of amyloid oligomers formation and their interactions with neuronal cells. Our results indicate that small globules of about 6 nm could be the responsible for the neurotoxic effects. Moreover, our data suggest that the rich content in lipid rafts of neuronal cell plasma membrane may render neurons particularly vulnerable to the amyloid protein toxic effect.

  8. Demonstration of aluminum in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, Sakae; Kakimi, Shigeo; Ohsaki, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Akira

    2009-11-01

    Aluminum (Al) exposure has been reported to be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia of Alzheimer type), although the role of Al in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease remains controversial. We examined the presence of Al in the Alzheimer's brain using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM-EDX). TEM-EDX analysis allows simultaneous imaging of subcellular structures with high spatial resolution and analysis of small quantities of elements contained in the same subcellular structures. We identified senile plaques by observation using TEM and detected Al in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques located in the hippocampus and the temporal lobe by EDX. Phosphorus and calcium were also present in the amyloid fibers. No Al could be detected in the extracellular space in senile plaques or in the cytoplasm of nerve cells. In this study, we demonstrated colocalization of Al and beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques. The results support the following possibilities in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease: Al could be involved in the aggregation of Abeta peptides to form toxic fibrils; Al might induce Abeta peptides into the beta-sheet structure; and Al might facilitate iron-mediated oxidative reactions, which cause severe damage to brain tissues.

  9. On fibrils and field lines: The nature of H$\\alpha$ fibrils in the solar chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Leenaarts, Jorrit; van der Voort, Luc Rouppe

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the solar chromosphere in the line-core of the \\Halpha\\ line show dark elongated structures called fibrils that show swaying motion. We performed a 3D radiation-MHD simulation of a network region, and computed synthetic \\Halpha\\ images from this simulation to investigate the relation between fibrils and the magnetic field lines in the chromosphere. The periods, amplitudes and phase-speeds of the synthetic fibrils are consistent with those observed. We analyse the relation between the synthetic fibrils and the field lines threading through them, and find that some fibrils trace out the same field line along the fibril's length, but there are also fibrils that sample different field lines at different locations along their length. Fibrils sample the same field lines on a time scale of $\\sim200$~s. This is shorter than their own lifetime. We analysed the evolution of the atmosphere along a number of field lines that thread through fibrils and find that they carry slow-mode waves that load mass in...

  10. Personalized management of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Aliot, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    to detect AF. Most clinical management decisions in AF patients can be based on validated parameters that encompass type of presentation, clinical factors, electrocardiogram analysis, and cardiac imaging. Despite these advances, patients with AF are still at increased risk for death, stroke, heart failure......, and hospitalizations. During the fourth Atrial Fibrillation competence NETwork/European Heart Rhythm Association (AFNET/EHRA) consensus conference, we identified the following opportunities to personalize management of AF in a better manner with a view to improve outcomes by integrating atrial morphology and damage......, brain imaging, information on genetic predisposition, systemic or local inflammation, and markers for cardiac strain. Each of these promising avenues requires validation in the context of existing risk factors in patients. More importantly, a new taxonomy of AF may be needed based...

  11. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke in Elderly Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali Dang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of stroke, with an estimated annual cost of $71.5 billion, has made it a major health problem that increases disability and death, particularly in patients with atrial fibrillation. Although advanced age and atrial fibrillation are recognized as strong risk factors for stroke, the basis for this susceptibility are not well defined. Aging or associated diseases are accompanied by changes in rheostatic, humoral, metabolic and hemodynamic factors that may contribute more to stroke predisposition than rhythm abnormality alone. Several thromboembolism-predisposing clinical characteristics and serum biomarkers with prognostic significance have been identified in patients with atrial fibrillation. Although anticoagulation decreases the risk of thromboembolism, management in the elderly remains complex due to major concerns about bleeding. New anticoagulants and nonpharmacologic strategies are helpful to reduce the risk of bleeding, particularly in older-elderly patients. Herein, we review the pathogenesis and management of select issues of thromboembolism in the elderly with atrial fibrillation.

  12. Atrial Fibrillation During an Exploration Class Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsett, Mark; Hamilton, Douglas; Lemery, Jay; Polk, James

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a possible scenario of an astronaut having Atrial Fibrillation during a Mars Mission. In the case review the presentation asks several questions about the alternatives for treatment, medications and the ramifications of the decisions.

  13. Alcohol consumption and risk of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Ørsted, David Dynnes

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that alcohol consumption, both observational (self-reported) and estimated by genetic instruments, is associated with a risk of atrial fibrillation and to determine whether people with high cardiovascular risk are more sensitive towards...... register. As a measure of alcohol exposure, both self-reported consumption and genetic variations in alcohol metabolizing genes (ADH1B/ADH1C) were used as instrumental variables. The endpoint was admission to hospital for atrial fibrillation as recorded in a validated hospital register. RESULTS: A total...... of 3493 cases of atrial fibrillation occurred during follow-up. High alcohol consumption was associated with a risk of atrial fibrillation among men, but not among women. Among the men who drank 28-35 and 35+ drinks/week, the hazards ratios were 1.40 (95% confidence interval 1.09-1.80) and 1.62 (95...

  14. [Cardiac rehabilitation in patients with atrial fibrillation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlitt, Axel; Kamke, Wolfram; Guha, Manju; Haberecht, Olaf; Völler, Heinz

    2015-06-01

    The course of cardiac rehabilitation is often altered due to episodes of paroxysmal, predominantly postoperative atrial fibrillation. In symptomatic patients, a TEE-guided cardioversion - preferential DC shock - is indicated. In patients with persistent / permanent atrial fibrillation, a heart rate up to 110 / min and 170 / min at rest and during physical activity should, respectively, be tolerated. Therefore, training should not be quitted by heart rate but rather by load. The antithrombotic management is in addition a great task in treating patients with atrial fibrillation. With the exception of patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc-Score < 1, oral anticoagulation is indicated. Atrial fibrillation has little impact on social aspects, whereas the underlying heart disease and drug treatment (oral anticoagulation) has an important impact.

  15. [Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation - an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antz, Matthias; Hullmann, Bettina; Neufert, Christian; Vocke, Wolfgang

    2008-12-01

    The correct anticoagulation regimen for prevention of thromboembolic events is essential in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, only a minority of patients receives anticoagulation according to the guidelines. The current guidelines are intended to make the indication for anticoagulation more simple and are summarized in the present article. This includes recommendations for chronic anticoagulation, prevention of thromboembolic events after cardioversion and in ablation of atrial fibrillation.

  16. Interleukin-3 prevents neuronal death induced by amyloid peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otth Carola

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-3 (IL-3 is an important glycoprotein involved in regulating biological responses such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Its effects are mediated via interaction with cell surface receptors. Several studies have demonstrated the expression of IL-3 in neurons and astrocytes of the hippocampus and cortices in normal mouse brain, suggesting a physiological role of IL-3 in the central nervous system. Although there is evidence indicating that IL-3 is expressed in some neuronal populations, its physiological role in these cells is poorly known. Results In this study, we demonstrated the expression of IL-3 receptor in cortical neurons, and analyzed its influence on amyloid β (Aβ-treated cells. In these cells, IL-3 can activate at least three classical signalling pathways, Jak/STAT, Ras/MAP kinase and the PI 3-kinase. Viability assays indicated that IL-3 might play a neuroprotective role in cells treated with Aβ fibrils. It is of interest to note that our results suggest that cell survival induced by IL-3 required PI 3-kinase and Jak/STAT pathway activation, but not MAP kinase. In addition, IL-3 induced an increase of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Conclusion Altogether these data strongly suggest that IL-3 neuroprotects neuronal cells against neurodegenerative agents like Aβ.

  17. Size-dependent neurotoxicity of β-amyloid oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizas, Paulius; Budvytyte, Rima; Morkuniene, Ramune; Moldovan, Radu; Broccio, Matteo; Lösche, Mathias; Niaura, Gediminas; Valincius, Gintaras; Borutaite, Vilmante

    2010-01-01

    The link between the size of soluble amyloid β (Aβ) oligomers and their toxicity to rat cerebellar granule cells (CGC) was investigated. Variation in conditions during in vitro oligomerization of Aβ1-42 resulted in peptide assemblies with different particle size as measured by atomic force microscopy and confirmed by the dynamic light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Small oligomers of Aβ1-42 with a mean particle z-height of 1-2 nm exhibited propensity to bind to the phospholipid vesicles and they were the most toxic species that induced rapid neuronal necrosis at submicromolar concentrations whereas the bigger aggregates (z-height above 4-5 nm) did not bind vesicles and did not cause detectable neuronal death. Similar neurotoxic pattern was also observed in primary cultures of cortex neurons whereas Aβ1–42 oligomers, monomers and fibrils were non-toxic to glial cells in CGC cultures or macrophage J774 cells. However, both oligomeric forms of Aβ1-42 induced reduction of neuronal cell densities in the CGC cultures. PMID:20153288

  18. Size-dependent neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizas, Paulius; Budvytyte, Rima; Morkuniene, Ramune; Moldovan, Radu; Broccio, Matteo; Lösche, Mathias; Niaura, Gediminas; Valincius, Gintaras; Borutaite, Vilmante

    2010-04-15

    The link between the size of soluble amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers and their toxicity to rat cerebellar granule cells (CGC) was investigated. Variation in conditions during in vitro oligomerization of Abeta(1-42) resulted in peptide assemblies with different particle size as measured by atomic force microscopy and confirmed by dynamic light scattering and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Small oligomers of Abeta(1-42) with a mean particle z-height of 1-2 nm exhibited propensity to bind to phospholipid vesicles and they were the most toxic species that induced rapid neuronal necrosis at submicromolar concentrations whereas the bigger aggregates (z-height above 4-5 nm) did not bind vesicles and did not cause detectable neuronal death. A similar neurotoxic pattern was also observed in primary cultures of cortex neurons whereas Abeta(1-42) oligomers, monomers and fibrils were non-toxic to glial cells in CGC cultures or macrophage J774 cells. However, both oligomeric forms of Abeta(1-42) induced reduction of neuronal cell densities in the CGC cultures.

  19. Shear-Induced Amyloid Formation in the Brain: I. Potential Vascular and Parenchymal Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbore, Conrad N

    2016-09-06

    Shear distortion of amyloid-beta (Aβ) solutions accelerates amyloid cascade reactions that may yield different toxic oligomers than those formed in quiescent solutions. Recent experiments indicate that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) containing Aβ flow through narrow brain perivascular pathways and brain parenchyma. This paper suggests that such flow causes shear distortion of Aβ molecules involving conformation changes that may be one of the initiating events in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ shearing can occur in or around brain arteries and arterioles and is suggested as the origin of cerebral amyloid angiopathy deposits in cerebrovascular walls. Comparatively low flow rates of ISF within the narrow extracellular spaces (ECS) of the brain parenchyma are suggested as a possible initiating factor in both the formation of neurotoxic Aβ42 oligomers and amyloid fibrils. Aβ42 in slow-flowing ISF can gain significant shear energy at or near the walls of tortuous brain ECS flow paths, promoting the formation of a shear-distorted, excited state hydrophobic Aβ42* conformation. This Aβ42* molecule could possibly be involved in one of two paths, one involving rapid adsorption to a brain membrane surface, ultimately forming neurotoxic oligomers on membranes, and the other ultimately forming plaque within the ECS flow pathways. Rising Aβ concentrations combined with shear at or near critical brain membranes are proposed as contributing factors to Alzheimer's disease neurotoxicity. These hypotheses may be applicable in other neurodegenerative diseases, including tauopathies and alpha-synucleinopathies, in which shear-distorted proteins also may form in the brain ECS.

  20. Modeling generic aspects of ideal fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, D., E-mail: denis.michel@live.fr [Universite de Rennes1-IRSET, Campus de Beaulieu Bat. 13, 35042 Rennes (France)

    2016-01-21

    Many different proteins self-aggregate into insoluble fibrils growing apically by reversible addition of elementary building blocks. But beyond this common principle, the modalities of fibril formation are very disparate, with various intermediate forms which can be reshuffled by minor modifications of physico-chemical conditions or amino-acid sequences. To bypass this complexity, the multifaceted phenomenon of fibril formation is reduced here to its most elementary principles defined for a linear prototype of fibril. Selected generic features, including nucleation, elongation, and conformational recruitment, are modeled using minimalist hypotheses and tools, by separating equilibrium from kinetic aspects and in vitro from in vivo conditions. These reductionist approaches allow to bring out known and new rudiments, including the kinetic and equilibrium effects of nucleation, the dual influence of elongation on nucleation, the kinetic limitations on nucleation and fibril numbers, and the accumulation of complexes in vivo by rescue from degradation. Overlooked aspects of these processes are also pointed: the exponential distribution of fibril lengths can be recovered using various models because it is attributable to randomness only. It is also suggested that the same term “critical concentration” is used for different things, involved in either nucleation or elongation.

  1. SDS-Induced Fibrillation of α-Synuclein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giehm, L.; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto De; Pedersen, J.S.;

    2010-01-01

    -stabilized micelles. Thus, fibrillation in this case occurs by a process of continuous accretion rather than by the rate-limiting accumulation of a distinct nucleus. The morphology of the SDS-induced fibrils does not exhibit the classical rod-like structures formed by αSN when aggregated by agitation in the absence......, and transmission electron microscopy to elucidate a fibrillation pathway that is remarkably different from the fibrillation pathway in the absence of SDS. Fibrillation occurs most extensively and most rapidly (starting within 45 min) under conditions where 12 SDS molecules are bound per αSN molecule, which is also...... of SDS. The SDS-induced fibrils have a flexible worm-like appearance, which can be converted into classical straight fibrils by continuous agitation. SDS-induced fibrillation represents an alternative and highly reproducible mechanism for fibrillation where protein association is driven by the formation...

  2. A Proposed Atomic Structure of the Self-Assembly of the Non-Amyloid-β Component of Human α-Synuclein As Derived by Computational Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsmon-Raz, Yoav; Miller, Yifat

    2015-08-06

    α-Synuclein (AS) fibrils are the major hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD). It is known that the central domain of the 140-residue AS protein, known as the non-amyloid-β component (NAC), plays a crucial role in aggregation. The secondary structure of AS fibrils (including the NAC domain) has been proposed on the basis of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance studies, but the atomic structure of the self-assembly of NAC (or AS itself) is still elusive. This is the first study that presents a detailed three-dimensional structure of NAC at atomic resolution. The proposed self-assembled structure of NAC consists of three β-strands connected by two turn regions. Our study shows that calculated structural parameter values of the simulated fibril-like cross-β structure of NAC are in excellent agreement with the experimental values. Moreover, the diameter dimensions of the proposed fibril-like structure are also in agreement with experimental measurements. The proposed fibril-like structure of NAC may assist in future work aimed at understanding the formation of aggregates in PD and developing compounds to modulate aggregation.

  3. Rimmed vacuoles with beta-amyloid and ubiquitinated filamentous deposits in the muscles of patients with long-standing denervation (postpoliomyelitis muscular atrophy): similarities with inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semino-Mora, C; Dalakas, M C

    1998-10-01

    In the chronically denervated muscles of patients with prior paralytic poliomyelitis, there are secondary myopathic features, including endomysial inflammation and rare vacuolated fibers. To assess the frequency and characteristics of the vacuoles and their similarities with those seen in inclusion body myositis (IBM), we examined 58 muscle biopsy specimens from patients with prior paralytic poliomyelitis for (1) the presence of rimmed vacuoles; (2) acid-phosphatase reactivity; (3) Congo-red-positive amyloid deposits; (4) electron microscopy, searching for tubulofilaments; and (5) immunoelectron microscopy, using antibodies against beta-amyloid and ubiquitin. We found vacuolated muscle fibers in 18 of 58 (31%) biopsies, with a mean frequency of 2.06 +/- 0.42 fibers per specimen. The vacuoles contained acid phosphatase-positive material in 6 of the 18 (33.30%) specimens and stained positive for Congo red in five (27.80%). By immunoelectron microscopy, the vacuoles contained 5.17 +/- 0.13 nm fibrils and 14.9 +/- 0.31 nm filaments that immunoreacted with antibodies to beta-amyloid and ubiquitin in a pattern identical to the one seen in IBM. We conclude that vacuolated muscle fibers containing filamentous inclusions positive for amyloid and ubiquitin are not unique to IBM and the other vacuolar myopathies but can also occur in a chronic neurogenic condition, such as postpoliomyelitis. The chronicity of the underlying disease, rather than the cause, may lead to vacuolar formation, amyloid deposition, and accumulation of ubiquitinated filaments.

  4. Effective hybrid evolutionary computational algorithms for global optimization and applied to construct prion AGAAAAGA fibril models

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary algorithms are parallel computing algorithms and simulated annealing algorithm is a sequential computing algorithm. This paper inserts simulated annealing into evolutionary computations and successful developed a hybrid Self-Adaptive Evolutionary Strategy $\\mu+\\lambda$ method and a hybrid Self-Adaptive Classical Evolutionary Programming method. Numerical results on more than 40 benchmark test problems of global optimization show that the hybrid methods presented in this paper are very effective. Lennard-Jones potential energy minimization is another benchmark for testing new global optimization algorithms. It is studied through the amyloid fibril constructions by this paper. To date, there is little molecular structural data available on the AGAAAAGA palindrome in the hydrophobic region (113-120) of prion proteins.This region belongs to the N-terminal unstructured region (1-123) of prion proteins, the structure of which has proved hard to determine using NMR spectroscopy or X-ray crystallography ...

  5. Curcumin Protects β-Lactoglobulin Fibril Formation and Fibril-Induced Neurotoxicity in PC12 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansooreh Mazaheri

    Full Text Available In this study the β-lactoglobulin fibrillation, in the presence or absence of lead ions, aflatoxin M1 and curcumin, was evaluated using ThT fluorescence, Circular dichroism spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. To investigate the toxicity of the different form of β-Lg fibrils, in the presence or absence of above toxins and curcumin, we monitored changes in the level of reactive oxygen species and morphology of the differentiated neuron-like PC12 cells. The cell viability, cell body area, average neurite length, neurite width, number of primary neurites, percent of bipolar cells and node/primary neurite ratios were used to assess the growth and complexity of PC12 cells exposed to different form of β-Lg fibrils. Incubation of β-Lg with curcumin resulted in a significant decrease in ROS levels even in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1. The β-Lg fibrils formed in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1 attenuated the growth and complexity of PC12 cells compared with other form of β-Lg fibrils. However, the adverse effects of these toxins and protein fibrils were negated in the presence of curcumin. Furthermore, the antioxidant and inhibitory effects of curcumin protected PC12 cells against fibril neurotoxicity and enhanced their survival. Thus, curcumin may provide a protective effect toward β-Lg, and perhaps other protein, fibrils mediated neurotoxicity.

  6. Effect of age on stroke prevention therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation: the atrial fibrillation investigators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Walraven, Carl; Hart, Robert G; Connolly, Stuart

    2009-01-01

    on the relative efficacy of oral anticoagulants (OAC) and antiplatelet (AP) therapy (including acetylsalicylic acid and triflusal) on ischemic stroke, serious bleeding, and vascular events in patients with atrial fibrillation. METHODS: This is an analysis of the Atrial Fibrillation Investigators database, which...

  7. RR-Interval variance of electrocardiogram for atrial fibrillation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuryani, N.; Solikhah, M.; Nugoho, A. S.; Afdala, A.; Anzihory, E.

    2016-11-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a serious heart problem originated from the upper chamber of the heart. The common indication of atrial fibrillation is irregularity of R peak-to-R-peak time interval, which is shortly called RR interval. The irregularity could be represented using variance or spread of RR interval. This article presents a system to detect atrial fibrillation using variances. Using clinical data of patients with atrial fibrillation attack, it is shown that the variance of electrocardiographic RR interval are higher during atrial fibrillation, compared to the normal one. Utilizing a simple detection technique and variances of RR intervals, we find a good performance of atrial fibrillation detection.

  8. Structural Mechanism of the Interaction of Alzheimer Disease Aβ Fibrils with the Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug (NSAID) Sulindac Sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prade, Elke; Bittner, Heiko J; Sarkar, Riddhiman; Lopez Del Amo, Juan Miguel; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Multhaup, Gerd; Hildebrand, Peter W; Reif, Bernd

    2015-11-27

    Alzheimer disease is the most severe neurodegenerative disease worldwide. In the past years, a plethora of small molecules interfering with amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation has been reported. However, their mode of interaction with amyloid fibers is not understood. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known γ-secretase modulators; they influence Aβ populations. It has been suggested that NSAIDs are pleiotrophic and can interact with more than one pathomechanism. Here we present a magic angle spinning solid-state NMR study demonstrating that the NSAID sulindac sulfide interacts specifically with Alzheimer disease Aβ fibrils. We find that sulindac sulfide does not induce drastic architectural changes in the fibrillar structure but intercalates between the two β-strands of the amyloid fibril and binds to hydrophobic cavities, which are found consistently in all analyzed structures. The characteristic Asp(23)-Lys(28) salt bridge is not affected upon interacting with sulindac sulfide. The primary binding site is located in the vicinity of residue Gly(33), a residue involved in Met(35) oxidation. The results presented here will assist the search for pharmacologically active molecules that can potentially be employed as lead structures to guide the design of small molecules for the treatment of Alzheimer disease.

  9. Amyloid Beta as a Modulator of Synaptic Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Parihar, Mordhwaj S.; Gregory J. Brewer

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is associated with synapse loss, memory dysfunction and pathological accumulation of amyloid beta in plaques. However, an exclusively pathological role for amyloid beta is being challenged by new evidence for an essential function of amyloid beta at the synapse. Amyloid beta protein exists in different assembly states in the central nervous system and plays distinct roles ranging from synapse and memory formation to memory loss and neuronal cell death. Amyloid beta is pres...

  10. Hacking the Code of Amyloid Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, M Teresa; Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Many research efforts in the last years have been directed towards understanding the factors determining protein misfolding and amyloid formation. Protein stability and amino acid composition have been identified as the two major factors in vitro. The research of our group has been focused on understanding the relationship between amino acid sequence and amyloid formation. Our approach has been the design of simple model systems that reproduce the biophysical properties of natural amyloids. An amyloid sequence pattern was extracted that can be used to detect amyloidogenic hexapeptide stretches in proteins. We have added evidence supporting that these amyloidogenic stretches can trigger amyloid formation by nonamyloidogenic proteins. Some experimental results in other amyloid proteins will be analyzed under the conclusions obtained in these studies. Our conclusions together with evidences from other groups suggest that amyloid formation is the result of the interplay between a decrease of protein stability, and the presence of highly amyloidogenic regions in proteins. As many of these results have been obtained in vitro, the challenge for the next years will be to demonstrate their validity in in vivo systems. PMID:19164912

  11. Neuroinflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis affects amyloid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anckarsäter Henrik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP and β-amyloid (Aβ is widely studied in Alzheimer's disease, where Aβ deposition and plaque development are essential components of the pathogenesis. However, the physiological role of amyloid in the adult nervous system remains largely unknown. We have previously found altered cerebral amyloid metabolism in other neuroinflammatory conditions. To further elucidate this, we investigated amyloid metabolism in patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB. Methods The first part of the study was a cross-sectional cohort study in 61 patients with acute facial palsy (19 with LNB and 42 with idiopathic facial paresis, Bell's palsy and 22 healthy controls. CSF was analysed for the β-amyloid peptides Aβ38, Aβ40 and Aβ42, and the amyloid precursor protein (APP isoforms α-sAPP and β-sAPP. CSF total-tau (T-tau, phosphorylated tau (P-tau and neurofilament protein (NFL were measured to monitor neural cell damage. The second part of the study was a prospective cohort-study in 26 LNB patients undergoing consecutive lumbar punctures before and after antibiotic treatment to study time-dependent dynamics of the biomarkers. Results In the cross-sectional study, LNB patients had lower levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau, and higher levels of CSF NFL than healthy controls and patients with Bell's palsy. In the prospective study, LNB patients had low levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau at baseline, which all increased towards normal at follow-up. Conclusions Amyloid metabolism is altered in LNB. CSF levels of α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau are decreased in acute infection and increase after treatment. In combination with earlier findings in multiple sclerosis, cerebral SLE and HIV with cerebral engagement, this points to an influence of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism.

  12. Characterization of the heterogeneity and specificity of interpolypeptide interactions in amyloid protofibrils by measurement of site-specific fluorescence anisotropy decay kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Anjali; Udgaonkar, Jayant B; Krishnamoorthy, G

    2009-10-30

    The aggregation of proteins often results in highly ordered fibrillar structures. While significant insights have been obtained on structural aspects of amyloid fibrils, little is known about the structures of protofibrils, which are presumed to be the precursors of fibrils. An understanding of the molecular mechanism of the formation of protofibrils and fibrils requires information on the landscape of interpeptide interactions. This work addresses this question by using, as a model protein, barstar, which forms protofibrils and fibrils at low (environment-sensitive fluorophore, 5-((((2-iodoacetyl)amino)ethyl)amino)naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (1,5-IAEDANS), attached to specific locations in the protein. Firstly, it was observed that barstar, when labeled at certain locations with 1,5-IAEDANS, did not form mixed protofibrils with the corresponding unlabeled protein. Labeled and unlabeled proteins formed protofibrils as separate populations. A two-population model of fluorescence anisotropy decay kinetics exhibiting a 'dip-and-rise' behavior was the main readout in arriving at this conclusion. Additional support for this conclusion came from the fluorescence lifetime of the probe 1,5-IAEDANS. Subsequently, the location of the fluorophore was moved along the length of the protein in nine mutant proteins, and the capability to form mixed fibrils was assessed. The results revealed that about two-thirds of the protein sequence at the C-terminal end of the protein was intimately involved in the formation of ordered protofibrils, probably forming the core, while the remaining one-third of the protein (i.e., the N-terminal region) remained largely noninteractive and flexible. This methodology can be used as a general strategy to identify regions of a given protein sequence involved in interprotein interactions in amyloid protofibrils.

  13. Comparison of the binding characteristics of [{sup 18}F]THK-523 and other amyloid imaging tracers to Alzheimer's disease pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Ryuichi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Yanai, Kazuhiko [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Furumoto, Shozo [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Tago, Tetsuro; Iwata, Ren [Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Maruyama, Masahiro; Higuchi, Makoto [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Arai, Hiroyuki [Tohoku University, Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Sendai (Japan); Kudo, Yukitsuka [Tohoku University, Innovation of New Biomedical Engineering Center, Sendai (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Extensive deposition of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although several PET imaging agents have been developed for in vivo detection of senile plaques, no PET probe is currently available for selective detection of neurofibrillary tangles in the living human brain. Recently, [{sup 18}F]THK-523 was developed as a potential in vivo imaging probe for tau pathology. The purpose of this study was to compare the binding properties of [{sup 18}F]THK-523 and other amyloid imaging agents, including PiB, BF-227 and FDDNP, to synthetic protein fibrils and human brain tissue. In vitro radioligand binding assays were conducted using synthetic amyloid {beta}{sub 42} and K18{Delta}K280-tau fibrils. Nonspecific binding was determined by the addition of unlabelled compounds at a concentration of 2 {mu}M. To examine radioligand binding to neuropathological lesions, in vitro autoradiography was conducted using sections of AD brain. [{sup 18}F]THK-523 showed higher affinity for tau fibrils than for A{beta} fibrils, whereas the other probes showed a higher affinity for A{beta} fibrils. The autoradiographic analysis indicated that [{sup 18}F]THK-523 accumulated in the regions containing a high density of tau protein deposits. Conversely, PiB and BF-227 accumulated in the regions containing a high density of A{beta} plaques. These findings suggest that the unique binding profile of [{sup 18}F]THK-523 can be used to identify tau deposits in AD brain. (orig.)

  14. Amyloid Imaging in Aging and Dementia: Testing the Amyloid Hypothesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Rabinovici

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging represents a major advance in neuroscience, enabling the detection and quantification of pathologic protein aggregations in the brain. In this review we survey current amyloid imaging techniques, focusing on positron emission tomography (PET with ^{11}carbon-labelled Pittsburgh Compound-B (11C-PIB, the most extensively studied and best validated tracer. PIB binds specifically to fibrillar beta-amyloid (Aβ deposits, and is a sensitive marker for Aβ pathology in cognitively normal older individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. PIB-PET provides us with a powerful tool to examine in vivo the relationship between amyloid deposition, clinical symptoms, and structural and functional brain changes in the continuum between normal aging and AD. Amyloid imaging studies support a model in which amyloid deposition is an early event on the path to dementia, beginning insidiously in cognitively normal individuals, and accompanied by subtle cognitive decline and functional and structural brain changes suggestive of incipient AD. As patients progress to dementia, clinical decline and neurodegeneration accelerate and proceed independently of amyloid accumulation. In the future, amyloid imaging is likely to supplement clinical evaluation in selecting patients for anti-amyloid therapies, while MRI and FDG-PET may be more appropriate markers of clinical progression.

  15. Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation of cross-fibrillation of IAPP and PrP106-126.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Khi Pin; Chew, Lock Yue; Mu, Yuguang

    2016-08-01

    Aggregation of proteins into amyloid is the central hallmark of a number of protein diseases. Most studies were carried out on the aggregation between proteins of similar species. However, it was observed that some patients with certain protein disease can easily acquire another unrelated protein disease. As such, it is also important to examine aggregation between proteins of different species. Usually aggregation between proteins of the same species can be attributed to the similarity between their respective amino acid sequences. In this article, we were motivated by an experimental study of aggregation between amylin (Islet Amyloid Polypeptide, IAPP) and prion106-126 (PrP106-126) fragment (JACS, 2013, 135, 13582-9). It was found that the two non-homologous peptides can aggregate quickly to form fibrils in the presence of negatively charged lipid bilayer. We attempted to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the early stage of dimerization of these two peptides through extensive replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. Conformations consisting of various degrees of β-sheets structures, both intra-chain and inter-chain, were found in the simulations. The conformations of the aggregated complex are very diverse, which suggests that the cross-species fibrils formed between the two proteins are highly polymorphic. The driving forces are mainly hydrophobic interactions, including aromatic-aliphatic interactions. The palindromic region of PrP106-126 and SNNFGAIL region of IAPP were found to play important roles in the interaction. Our study sheds insight into the exciting research of protein cross-fibrillation. Proteins 2016; 84:1134-1146. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.