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Sample records for amyloid fibril formation

  1. A catalytic surface for amyloid fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammarstroem, P; Ali, M M; Mishra, R; Tengvall, P; Lundstroem, I [Department of Physics, Biology and Chemistry, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Svensson, S [Astra Zeneca R and D, SE-151 85 Soedertaelje (Sweden)], E-mail: ingemar@ifm.liu.se

    2008-03-15

    A hydrophobic surface incubated in a solution of protein molecules (insulin monomers) was made into a catalytic surface for amyloid fibril formation by repeatedly incubate, rinse and dry the surface. The present contribution describes how this unexpected transformation occurred and its relation to rapid fibrillation of insulin solutions in contact with the surface. A tentative model of the properties of the catalytic surface is given, corroborated by ellipsometric measurements of the thickness of the organic layer on the surface and by atomic force microscopy. The surfaces used were spontaneously oxidized silicon made hydrophobic through treatment in dichlorodimethylsilane.

  2. Looking for a generic inhibitor of amyloid-like fibril formation among flavone derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Šneideris, Tomas; Baranauskienė, Lina; Jonathan G Cannon; Rutkienė, Rasa; Meškys, Rolandas; Smirnovas, Vytautas

    2015-01-01

    A range of diseases is associated with amyloid fibril formation. Despite different proteins being responsible for each disease, all of them share similar features including beta-sheet-rich secondary structure and fibril-like protein aggregates. A number of proteins can form amyloid-like fibrils in vitro, resembling structural features of disease-related amyloids. Given these generic structural properties of amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils, generic inhibitors of fibril formation would be of i...

  3. The contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on amyloid fibril formation.

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    Qian Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyloid fibrils associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be considered biologically relevant failures of cellular quality control mechanisms. It is known that in vivo human Tau protein, human prion protein, and human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 have the tendency to form fibril deposits in a variety of tissues and they are associated with different neurodegenerative diseases, while rabbit prion protein and hen egg white lysozyme do not readily form fibrils and are unlikely to cause neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we have investigated the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation of different proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As revealed by assays based on thioflavin T binding and turbidity, human Tau fragments, when phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β, do not form filaments in the absence of a crowding agent but do form fibrils in the presence of a crowding agent, and the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes amyloid fibril formation of human prion protein and its two pathogenic mutants E196K and D178N. Such an enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation is also observed for a pathological human SOD1 mutant A4V. On the other hand, rabbit prion protein and hen lysozyme do not form amyloid fibrils when a crowding agent at 300 g/l is used but do form fibrils in the absence of a crowding agent. Furthermore, aggregation of these two proteins is remarkably inhibited by Ficoll 70 and dextran 70 at 200 g/l. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases are more likely to form amyloid fibrils under crowded conditions than in dilute solutions. By contrast, some of the proteins that are not neurodegenerative disease-associated are unlikely to misfold in crowded physiological environments. A possible explanation for the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on these two sets of

  4. Formation of soluble amyloid oligomers and amyloid fibrils by the multifunctional protein vitronectin

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    Langen Ralf

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The multifunctional protein vitronectin is present within the deposits associated with Alzheimer disease (AD, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, atherosclerosis, systemic amyloidoses, and glomerulonephritis. The extent to which vitronectin contributes to amyloid formation within these plaques, which contain misfolded, amyloidogenic proteins, and the role of vitronectin in the pathophysiology of the aforementioned diseases is currently unknown. The investigation of vitronectin aggregation is significant since the formation of oligomeric and fibrillar structures are common features of amyloid proteins. Results We observed vitronectin immunoreactivity in senile plaques of AD brain, which exhibited overlap with the amyloid fibril-specific OC antibody, suggesting that vitronectin is deposited at sites of amyloid formation. Of particular interest is the growing body of evidence indicating that soluble nonfibrillar oligomers may be responsible for the development and progression of amyloid diseases. In this study we demonstrate that both plasma-purified and recombinant human vitronectin readily form spherical oligomers and typical amyloid fibrils. Vitronectin oligomers are toxic to cultured neuroblastoma and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells, possibly via a membrane-dependent mechanism, as they cause leakage of synthetic vesicles. Oligomer toxicity was attenuated in RPE cells by the anti-oligomer A11 antibody. Vitronectin fibrils contain a C-terminal protease-resistant fragment, which may approximate the core region of residues essential to amyloid formation. Conclusion These data reveal the propensity of vitronectin to behave as an amyloid protein and put forth the possibilities that accumulation of misfolded vitronectin may contribute to aggregate formation seen in age-related amyloid diseases.

  5. Structure-based design of non-natural amino-acid inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Stuart A.; Karanicolas, John; Chang, Howard W.; Zhao, Anni; Jiang, Lin; Zirafi, Onofrio; Stevens, Jason T.; Münch, Jan; Baker, David; Eisenberg, David (UCLA); (UWASH); (UL); (Kansas); (Ulm)

    2011-09-20

    Many globular and natively disordered proteins can convert into amyloid fibrils. These fibrils are associated with numerous pathologies as well as with normal cellular functions, and frequently form during protein denaturation. Inhibitors of pathological amyloid fibril formation could be useful in the development of therapeutics, provided that the inhibitors were specific enough to avoid interfering with normal processes. Here we show that computer-aided, structure-based design can yield highly specific peptide inhibitors of amyloid formation. Using known atomic structures of segments of amyloid fibrils as templates, we have designed and characterized an all-D-amino-acid inhibitor of the fibril formation of the tau protein associated with Alzheimer's disease, and a non-natural L-amino-acid inhibitor of an amyloid fibril that enhances sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. Our results indicate that peptides from structure-based designs can disrupt the fibril formation of full-length proteins, including those, such as tau protein, that lack fully ordered native structures. Because the inhibiting peptides have been designed on structures of dual-{beta}-sheet 'steric zippers', the successful inhibition of amyloid fibril formation strengthens the hypothesis that amyloid spines contain steric zippers.

  6. Electron microscopic study on amyloid fibril formation in human lymph nodes

    OpenAIRE

    Michio Dobashi; Fumiaki Yuda; Akihiro Masuda; Kazuo Terashima; Yutaka lmai

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to clarify the mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation in human lymph nodes. In our present study, amyloid deposition was observed diffusely in all compartments of the lymph nodes. The deposition form showed extremely characteristic findings in its morphological features. Namely, amyloid deposits mainly consisted of clusters of round or oval nodules. Each amyloid nodule was frequently enclosed with long-stretched cytoplasmic...

  7. Carnosine's effect on amyloid fibril formation and induced cytotoxicity of lysozyme.

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    Josephine W Wu

    Full Text Available Carnosine, a common dipeptide in mammals, has previously been shown to dissemble alpha-crystallin amyloid fibrils. To date, the dipeptide's anti-fibrillogensis effect has not been thoroughly characterized in other proteins. For a more complete understanding of carnosine's mechanism of action in amyloid fibril inhibition, we have investigated the effect of the dipeptide on lysozyme fibril formation and induced cytotoxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Our study demonstrates a positive correlation between the concentration and inhibitory effect of carnosine against lysozyme fibril formation. Molecular docking results show carnosine's mechanism of fibrillogenesis inhibition may be initiated by binding with the aggregation-prone region of the protein. The dipeptide attenuates the amyloid fibril-induced cytotoxicity of human neuronal cells by reducing both apoptotic and necrotic cell deaths. Our study provides solid support for carnosine's amyloid fibril inhibitory property and its effect against fibril-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. The additional insights gained herein may pave way to the discovery of other small molecules that may exert similar effects against amyloid fibril formation and its associated neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. The effects of ginsenosides to amyloid fibril formation by RCMκ-casein.

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    Liu, Jihua; Chen, Fanbo; Yin, Jianyuan; Bu, Fengquan; Zheng, Baohua; Yang, Miao; Wang, Yunhua; Sun, Dandan; Meng, Qin

    2015-08-01

    When not incorporated into the casein micelle, isolated κ-casein spontaneously forms amyloid fibrils under physiological conditions, and is a convenient model for researching generic aspects of fibril formation. Ginsenosides have recently attracted much research interest because of the effects on aging diseases, which are always associated with amyloid fibril formation, for example, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. In addition, the mechanism remains unclear that ginsenosides exert the effects against aging diseases. To address these aspects, we have investigated the ability of ginsenoside Rb1, Rc, Rg1, and Re influencing fibril formation by RCMκ-casein (reduced and carboxymethylated κ-casein), with the methods of Thioflavin T fluorescence assay, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy. The results showed that ginsenoside Rb1 and Rg1 inhibited obviously RCMκ-CN fibrillation in both the initial rate and final level of ThT fluorescence. On the contrary, ginsenoside Re had a few effect on promoting RCMκ-CN fibril formation, proved by thick and larger fibrils observed frequently in TEM. While Rc did not influence RCMκ-CN fibrillation. It is demonstrated that Rg1 prevent RCMκ-CN fibril formation by stabilising RCMκ-CN in its native like state. Additional chemical structure difference of ginsenosides and the effects on fibril formation are also implicated. PMID:25934110

  9. The Effect of Milk Constituents and Crowding Agents on Amyloid Fibril Formation by κ-Casein.

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    Liu, Jihua; Dehle, Francis C; Liu, Yanqin; Bahraminejad, Elmira; Ecroyd, Heath; Thorn, David C; Carver, John A

    2016-02-17

    When not incorporated into the casein micelle, κ-casein, a major milk protein, rapidly forms amyloid fibrils at physiological pH and temperature. In this study, the effects of milk components (calcium, lactose, lipids, and heparan sulfate) and crowding agents on reduced and carboxymethylated (RCM) κ-casein fibril formation was investigated using far-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy, thioflavin T binding assays, and transmission electron microscopy. Longer-chain phosphatidylcholine lipids, which form the lining of milk ducts and milk fat globules, enhanced RCM κ-casein fibril formation irrespective of whether the lipids were in a monomeric or micellar state, whereas shorter-chain phospholipids and triglycerides had little effect. Heparan sulfate, a component of the milk fat globule membrane and catalyst of amyloid deposition in extracellular tissue, had little effect on the kinetics of RCM κ-casein fibril formation. Major nutritional components such as calcium and lactose also had no significant effect. Macromolecular crowding enhances protein-protein interactions, but in contrast to other fibril-forming species, the extent of RCM κ-casein fibril formation was reduced by the presence of a variety of crowding agents. These data are consistent with a mechanism of κ-casein fibril formation in which the rate-determining step is dissociation from the oligomer to give the highly amyloidogenic monomer. We conclude that the interaction of κ-casein with membrane-associated phospholipids along its secretory pathway may contribute to the development of amyloid deposits in mammary tissue. However, the formation of spherical oligomers such as casein micelles is favored over amyloid fibrils in the crowded environment of milk, within which the occurrence of amyloid fibrils is low. PMID:26807595

  10. Influence of dendrimer's structure on its activity against amyloid fibril formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhibition of fibril assembly is a potential therapeutic strategy in neurodegenerative disorders such as prion and Alzheimer's diseases. Highly branched, globular polymers-dendrimers-are novel promising inhibitors of fibril formation. In this study, the effect of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers (generations 3rd, 4th, and 5th) on amyloid aggregation of the prion peptide PrP 185-208 and the Alzheimer's peptide Aβ 1-28 was examined. Amyloid fibrils were produced in vitro and their formation was monitored using the dye thioflavin T (ThT). Fluorescence studies were complemented with electron microscopy. The results show that the higher the dendrimer generation, the larger the degree of inhibition of the amyloid aggregation process and the more effective are dendrimers in disrupting the already existing fibrils. A hypothesis on dendrimer-peptide interaction mechanism is presented based on the dendrimers' molecular structure

  11. Localization microscopy for the study of amyloid fibril formation

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    Pinotsi, Dorothea; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S.; Rees, Eric; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2013-09-01

    Super-resolution microscopy has emerged as a powerful and non-invasive tool for the study of molecular processes both in vitro, but also as they occur in live cells. Here we present the application of direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), a super-resolution technique based on single molecule localization, to determine the morphology of protein aggregates and of small extra- and intracellular structures. The technique reveals details down to 20 nm providing information on scales much smaller than the wavelength of the probing light. We use dSTORM in the study of amyloid fibril self-assembly processes associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. We show that the aggregation process can be followed kinetically and observe the emergence of amyloid structures in time as they occur in vitro. As an all optical technique, there is translation potential from studies in vitro to in vivo applications.

  12. Effect of maghemite nanoparticles on insulin amyloid fibril formation: selective labeling, kinetics, and fibril removal by a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaat, Hadas; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Margel, Shlomo

    2009-11-01

    Maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)) magnetic nanoparticles of 15.0 +/- 2.1 nm were formed by nucleation followed by controlled growth of maghemite thin films on gelatin-iron oxide nuclei. Human insulin amyloid fibrils were formed by incubating the monomeric insulin dissolved in aqueous continuous phase at pH 1.6 and 65 degrees C. Magnetic human insulin amyloid fibrils/gamma-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticle assemblies were prepared by interacting the gamma-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles with the insulin amyloid fibrils during or after their formation. The nanoparticles attached selectively to the insulin fibrils in both cases. The kinetics of the insulin fibrillation process in the absence and the presence of the gamma-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles was elucidated. The insulin amyloid fibrils/gamma-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticle assemblies were easily extracted from the aqueous phase via a magnetic field. We hypothesize that this selective extraction approach may also be applicable for the removal of other amyloidogenic proteins that lead to neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, mad cow, and prion diseases) from their continuous phase, e.g. milk, blood, neurological fluid, etc. PMID:18980178

  13. Amyloid Fibril Solubility.

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    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S

    2015-11-19

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain-side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding, and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove to be a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general. PMID:26496385

  14. Amyloid Fibril Solubility

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzi, L G

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  15. Formation of Toxic Amyloid Fibrils by Amyloid β-Protein on Ganglioside Clusters

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    Katsumi Matsuzaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that the conversion of the soluble, nontoxic amyloid β-protein (Aβ monomer to aggregated toxic Aβ rich in β-sheet structures is central to the development of Alzheimer’s disease. However, the mechanism of the abnormal aggregation of Aβ in vivo is not well understood. Accumulating evidence suggests that lipid rafts (microdomains in membranes mainly composed of sphingolipids (gangliosides and sphingomyelin and cholesterol play a pivotal role in this process. This paper summarizes the molecular mechanisms by which Aβ aggregates on membranes containing ganglioside clusters, forming amyloid fibrils. Notably, the toxicity and physicochemical properties of the fibrils are different from those of Aβ amyloids formed in solution. Furthermore, differences between Aβ-(1–40 and Aβ-(1–42 in membrane interaction and amyloidogenesis are also emphasized.

  16. αB-Crystallin inhibits the cell toxicity associated with amyloid fibril formation by κ-casein and the amyloid-β peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Dehle, Francis C.; Ecroyd, Heath; Musgrave, Ian F.; Carver, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid fibril formation is associated with diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and prion diseases. Inhibition of amyloid fibril formation by molecular chaperone proteins, such as the small heat-shock protein αB-crystallin, may play a protective role in preventing the toxicity associated with this form of protein misfolding. Reduced and carboxymethylated κ-casein (RCMκ-CN), a protein derived from milk, readily and reproducibly forms fibrils at physiological temperature and pH. We inves...

  17. Early stages of amyloid fibril formation studied by liquid-state NMR: the peptide hormone glucagon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Anna Sigrid Pii; Jahn, Kasper; Deva, Taru; Malmendal, Anders; Otzen, Daniel; Dittmer, Jens; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2008-01-01

    the course of the fibril formation process. Kinetic information is extracted from the time course of the residual free glucagon signal decay. This suggests that glucagon amyloids form by a nucleated growth mechanism in which trimers (rather than monomers) of glucagon interact directly with the growing...

  18. Inhibitory effects of β-ionone on amyloid fibril formation of β-lactoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baoliang; You, Xiong; Lu, Fujiao

    2014-03-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (β-LG) is the major constituent of whey food, which has been shown to interact with a wide range of aroma compounds. In the present work, a model aroma compound, β-ionone, is used to investigate the influence of aroma compounds on the urea-induced unfolding of β-LG at pH 7.0. β-Ionone is observed to enhance the stability of β-LG at pH 7.0. Moreover, the amyloid fibrils are observed when β-LG at pH 7.0 is incubated for 12-20 days at 37 °C in the presence of 3-5M urea. However, the formation of amyloid fibrils is inhibited when β-ionone is added into the samples and the inhibitory effects follow a concentration-dependent fashion. There is a clear correlation between Cm and lag time. The correlation demonstrates that protein stability affects the amyloid fibril formation of β-LG. The results highlight the critical role of protein stability and provide an approach to prevent the formation of amyloid fibrils in vitro. PMID:24325860

  19. Methionine oxidation of amyloid peptides by peroxovanadium complexes: inhibition of fibril formation through a distinct mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lei; Wang, Xuesong; Zhu, Dengsen; Zhao, Cong; Du, Weihong

    2015-12-01

    Fibril formation of amyloid peptides is linked to a number of pathological states. The prion protein (PrP) and amyloid-β (Aβ) are two remarkable examples that are correlated with prion disorders and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. Metal complexes, such as those formed by platinum and ruthenium compounds, can act as inhibitors against peptide aggregation primarily through metal coordination. This study revealed the inhibitory effect of two peroxovanadium complexes, (NH4)[VO(O2)2(bipy)]·4H2O (1) and (NH4)[VO(O2)2(phen)]·2H2O (2), on amyloid fibril formation of PrP106-126 and Aβ1-42via site-specific oxidation of methionine residues, besides direct binding of the complexes with the peptides. Complexes 1 and 2 showed higher anti-amyloidogenic activity on PrP106-126 aggregation than on Aβ1-42, though their regulation on the cytotoxicity induced by the two peptides could not be differentiated. The action efficacy may be attributed to the different molecular structures of the vanadium complex and the peptide sequence. Results reflected that methionine oxidation may be a crucial action mode in inhibiting amyloid fibril formation. This study offers a possible application value for peroxovanadium complexes against amyloid proteins. PMID:26444976

  20. Distinguishing crystal-like amyloid fibrils and glass-like amorphous aggregates from their kinetics of formation

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshimura, Yuichi; Lin, Yuxi; Yagi, Hisashi; Lee, Young-Ho; Kitayama, Hiroki; Sakurai, Kazumasa; So, Masatomo; OGI, Hirotsugu; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils and amorphous aggregates are two types of aberrant aggregates associated with protein misfolding diseases. Although they differ in morphology, the two forms are often treated indiscriminately. β2-microglobulin (β2m), a protein responsible for dialysis-related amyloidosis, forms amyloid fibrils or amorphous aggregates depending on the NaCl concentration at pH 2.5. We compared the kinetics of their formation, which was monitored by measuring thioflavin T fluorescence, light scat...

  1. Amyloid fibril formation of peptides derived from the C-terminus of CETP modulated by lipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-González, Victor [Instituto de Fisiología Celular, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, DF (Mexico); Mas-Oliva, Jaime, E-mail: jmas@ifc.unam.mx [Instituto de Fisiología Celular, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, DF (Mexico); División de Investigación, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 México, DF (Mexico)

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •The secondary structure of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP was studied. •Lipids modulate secondary structure changes of a C-terminal peptide derived from CETP. •Lysophosphatidic acid maintains a functional α-helix and prevents fibril formation. •Transfer of lipids by CETP is related to the presence of an α-helix at its C-end. -- Abstract: Cholesteryl-ester transfer protein (CETP) is a plasmatic protein involved in neutral lipid transfer between lipoproteins. Focusing on the last 12 C-terminus residues we have previously shown that mutation D{sub 470}N promotes a conformational change towards a β-secondary structure. In turn, this modification leads to the formation of oligomers and fibrillar structures, which cause cytotoxic effects similar to the ones provoked by amyloid peptides. In this study, we evaluated the role of specific lipid arrangements on the structure of peptide helix-Z (D{sub 470}N) through the use of thioflavin T fluorescence, peptide bond absorbance, circular dichroism and electron microscopy. The results indicate that the use of micelles formed with lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) under neutral pH induce a conformational transition of peptide helix-Z containing a β-sheet conformation to a native α-helix structure, therefore avoiding the formation of amyloid fibrils. In contrast, incubation with phosphatidic acid does not change the profile for the β-sheet conformation. When the electrostatic charge at the surface of micelles or vesicles is regulated through the use of lipids such as phospholipid and LPA, minimal changes and the presence of β-structures were recorded. Mixtures with a positive net charge diminished the percentage of β-structure and the amount of amyloid fibrils. Our results suggest that the degree of solvation determined by the presence of a free hydroxyl group on lipids such as LPA is a key condition that can modulate the secondary structure and the consequent formation of

  2. Population of non-native states of lysozyme variants drives amyloid fibril formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossuto, Maria F.; Cremades, Nunilo; Kumita, Janet R.; Dumoulin, Mireille; Welland, Mark E.; Knowles, Tuomas P.J.; Salvatella, Xavier; Dobson, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    The propensity of protein molecules to self-assemble into highly ordered, fibrillar aggregates lies at the heart of the understanding of many disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease or lysozyme systemic amyloidosis. In this article we use highly accurate kinetic measurements of amyloid fibril growth in combination with spectroscopic tools to quantify the effect of modifications in the solution conditions and the amino acid sequence of human lysozyme on its propensity to form amyloid fibrils under acidic conditions. We elucidate and quantify the correlation between the rate of amyloid growth and the population of non-native states, and show that changes in amyloidogenicity are almost entirely due to alterations in the stability of the native state, while other regions of the global free energy surface remain largely unmodified. These results provide insight into the complex dynamics of a macromolecule on a multidimensional energy landscape, and point the way for a better understanding of misfolding diseases. PMID:21528861

  3. Nanomechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweers, K. K. M.; Bennink, M. L.; Subramaniam, V.

    2012-06-01

    Amyloid fibrils are traditionally associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the ability to form amyloid fibrils appears to be a more generic property of proteins. While disease-related, or pathological, amyloid fibrils are relevant for understanding the pathology and course of the disease, functional amyloids are involved, for example, in the exceptionally strong adhesive properties of natural adhesives. Amyloid fibrils are thus becoming increasingly interesting as versatile nanobiomaterials for applications in biotechnology. In the last decade a number of studies have reported on the intriguing mechanical characteristics of amyloid fibrils. In most of these studies atomic force microscopy (AFM) and atomic force spectroscopy play a central role. AFM techniques make it possible to probe, at nanometer length scales, and with exquisite control over the applied forces, biological samples in different environmental conditions. In this review we describe the different AFM techniques used for probing mechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils on the nanoscale. An overview is given of the existing mechanical studies on amyloid. We discuss the difficulties encountered with respect to the small fibril sizes and polymorphic behavior of amyloid fibrils. In particular, the different conformational packing of monomers within the fibrils leads to a heterogeneity in mechanical properties. We conclude with a brief outlook on how our knowledge of these mechanical properties of the amyloid fibrils can be exploited in the construction of nanomaterials from amyloid fibrils.

  4. Site-directed mutations in the C-terminal extension of human alphaB-crystallin affect chaperone function and block amyloid fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa M Treweek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are associated with inappropriate protein deposition and ordered amyloid fibril assembly. Molecular chaperones, including alphaB-crystallin, play a role in the prevention of protein deposition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A series of site-directed mutants of the human molecular chaperone, alphaB-crystallin, were constructed which focused on the flexible C-terminal extension of the protein. We investigated the structural role of this region as well as its role in the chaperone function of alphaB-crystallin under different types of protein aggregation, i.e. disordered amorphous aggregation and ordered amyloid fibril assembly. It was found that mutation of lysine and glutamic acid residues in the C-terminal extension of alphaB-crystallin resulted in proteins that had improved chaperone activity against amyloid fibril forming target proteins compared to the wild-type protein. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, our results highlight the important role of the C-terminal region of alphaB-crystallin in regulating its secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure and conferring thermostability to the protein. The capacity to genetically modify alphaB-crystallin for improved ability to block amyloid fibril formation provides a platform for the future use of such engineered molecules in treatment of diseases caused by amyloid fibril formation.

  5. Bioactive polyphenol interactions with β amyloid: a comparison of binding modelling, effects on fibril and aggregate formation and neuroprotective capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sukanya; Stark, Lina; Musgrave, Ian F; Pukala, Tara; Smid, Scott D

    2016-02-01

    In this study we compared the effects of a diverse set of natural polyphenolics ligands on in silico interactive modelling, in vitro anti-aggregative properties and neuronal toxicity of β amyloid. The β amyloid-binding characteristics of optimised structural conformations of polyphenols with ascribed neuroprotective actions including punicalagin, myricetin, luteolin and honokiol were determined in silico. Thioflavin T and transmission electron microscopy were used to assess in vitro inhibitory effects of these polyphenols on Aβ1-42 fibril and aggregation formation. Phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells were exposed to Aβ1-42, alone and in combination with test concentrations of each polyphenol (100 μM) and viability measured using MTT assay. Aβ1-42 evoked a concentration-dependent loss of cell viability in PC12 cells, in which all four polyphenols demonstrated significant inhibition of neurotoxicity. While all compounds variably altered the morphology of Aβ aggregation, the flavonoids luteolin and myricetin and the lignan honokiol all bound in a similar hydrophobic region of the amyloid pentamer and exerted the most pronounced inhibition of Aβ1-42 aggregation. Each of the polyphenols demonstrated neuroprotective effects in PC12 cells exposed to Aβ1-42, including punicalagin. These findings highlight some structure-activity insights that can be gleaned into the anti-aggregatory properties of bioactive polyphenols based on modelling of their binding to β-amyloid, but also serve to highlight the more general cellular neuroprotective nature of such compounds. PMID:26815043

  6. Solution Conditions Affect the Ability of the K30D Mutation To Prevent Amyloid Fibril Formation by Apolipoprotein C-II: Insights from Experiments and Theoretical Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yu; Todorova, Nevena; Zlatic, Courtney O; Gooley, Paul R; Griffin, Michael D W; Howlett, Geoffrey J; Yarovsky, Irene

    2016-07-12

    Apolipoproteins form amphipathic helical structures that bind lipid surfaces. Paradoxically, lipid-free apolipoproteins display a strong propensity to form cross-β structure and self-associate into disease-related amyloid fibrils. Studies of apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) amyloid fibrils suggest that a K30-D69 ion pair accounts for the dual abilities to form helix and cross-β structure. Consistent with this is the observation that a K30D mutation prevents fibril formation under standard fibril forming conditions. However, we found that fibril formation by K30D apoC-II proceeded readily at low pH and a higher salt or protein concentration. Structural analysis demonstrated that K30D apoC-II fibrils at pH 7 have a structure similar to that of the wild-type fibrils but are less stable. Molecular dynamics simulations of the wild-type apoC-II fibril model at pH 7 and 3 showed that the loss of charge on D69 at pH 3 leads to greater separation between residues K30 and D69 within the fibril with a corresponding reduction in β-strand content around residue 30. In contrast, in simulations of the K30D mutant model at pH 7 and 3, residues D30 and D69 moved closer at pH 3, accompanied by an increase in β-strand content around residue 30. The simulations also demonstrated a strong dominance of inter- over intramolecular contacts between ionic residues of apoC-II and suggested a cooperative mechanism for forming favorable interactions between the individual strands under different conditions. These observations demonstrate the important role of the buried K30-D69 ion pair in the stability and solution properties of apoC-II amyloid fibrils. PMID:27311794

  7. A Kinetic Study of Amyloid Formation: Fibril Growth and Length Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Schreck, John S

    2013-01-01

    We propose a kinetic model for the self-aggregation by amyloid proteins. By extending several well-known models for protein aggregation, the time evolution of aggregate concentrations containing $r$ proteins, denoted $c_r(t)$, can be written in terms of generalized Smoluchowski kinetics. With this approach we take into account all possible aggregation and fragmentation reactions involving clusters of any size. Correspondingly, an aggregate of size x+y could be formed by or break-up into two smaller constituent aggregates of sizes x and y. The rates of each aggregation or fragmentation reaction, called kernels, are specified in terms of the aggregate size, and we solve $c_r(t)$ for large cluster sizes using numerical techniques. We show that by using Smoluchowski kinetics many pathways to fibrillation are possible and quantities, such as the aggregate length distribution at an arbitrary time, can be calculated. We show that the predicted results of the model are in agreement with the experimental observations.

  8. Amyloid-like fibril elongation follows michaelis-menten kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katazyna Milto

    Full Text Available A number of proteins can aggregate into amyloid-like fibrils. It was noted that fibril elongation has similarities to an enzymatic reaction, where monomers or oligomers would play a role of substrate and nuclei/fibrils would play a role of enzyme. The question is how similar these processes really are. We obtained experimental data on insulin amyloid-like fibril elongation at the conditions where other processes which may impact kinetics of fibril formation are minor and fitted it using Michaelis-Menten equation. The correlation of the fit is very good and repeatable. It speaks in favour of enzyme-like model of fibril elongation. In addition, obtained [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] values at different conditions may help in better understanding influence of environmental factors on the process of fibril elongation.

  9. Amyloid fibril formation requires a chemically discriminating nucleation event: studies of an amyloidogenic sequence from the bacterial protein OsmB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, J T; Lansbury, P T

    1992-12-15

    The sequence of the Escherichia coli OsmB protein was found to resemble that of the C-terminal region of the beta amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease, which seems to be the major determinant of its unusual structural and solubility properties. A peptide corresponding to residues 28-44 of the OsmB protein was synthesized, and its conformational properties and aggregation behavior were analyzed. The peptide OsmB(28-44) was shown to form amyloid fibrils, as did two sequence analogs designed to test the sequence specificity of fibril formation. These fibrils bound Congo red, and two of the peptides showed birefringence. The peptide fibrils were analyzed by electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Subtle differences were observed which were not interpretable at the molecular level. The rate of fibril formation by each peptide was followed by monitoring the turbidity of supersaturated aqueous solutions. The kinetics of aggregation were characterized by a delay period during which the solution remained clear, followed by a nucleation event which led to a growth phase, during which the solution became viscous and turbid due to the presence of insoluble fibrils. The observation of a kinetic barrier to aggregation is typical of a crystallization event. The delay period could be eliminated by seeding the supersaturated solution with previously formed fibrils. Each peptide could be nucleated by fibrils formed from that same peptide, but not by fibrils from closely related sequences, suggesting that fibril growth requires specific hydrophobic interactions. It appears likely that this repeated sequence motif, which comprises most of the OsmB protein sequence, dictates the structure and possibly the function of that protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1463722

  10. Impaired processing of human pro-islet amyloid polypeptide is not a causative factor for fibril formation or membrane damage in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemtémourian, Lucie; Lahoz Casarramona, Gemma; Suylen, Dennis P L; Hackeng, Tilman M; Meeldijk, Johannes D; de Kruijff, Ben; Höppener, Jo W M; Killian, J Antoinette

    2009-11-24

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) forms amyloid fibrils in pancreatic islets of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). hIAPP is synthesized by islet beta-cells initially as a preprohormone, processing of which occurs in several steps. It has been suggested that in DM2 this processing is defective and that aggregation of the processing intermediates prohIAPP and prohIAPP(1-48) may represent the initial step in formation of islet amyloid. Here we investigate this possibility by analyzing the aggregation, the structure, and the membrane interaction of mature hIAPP and its precursors, prohIAPP and prohIAPP(1-48), in vitro. Our data reveal that both precursors form amyloid fibrils in solution but not in the presence of membranes. This inhibition is in contrast to the catalyzing effect of membranes on fibril formation of mature hIAPP. Importantly, in the presence of membranes, both precursors are able to inhibit fibrillogenesis of mature hIAPP. These differences in behavior between mature hIAPP and its precursors are most likely related to differences in their mode of membrane insertion. Both precursors insert efficiently and adopt an alpha-helical structure even with a high lipid/peptide ratio, while mature hIAPP rapidly adopts a beta-sheet conformation. Furthermore, while mature hIAPP affects the barrier properties of lipid vesicles, neither of the precursors is able to induce membrane leakage. Our study suggests that the hIAPP precursors prohIAPP and prohIAPP(1-48) do not serve as amyloid initiators but rather prevent aggregation and membrane damage of mature hIAPP in early stages of its biosynthesis and intracellular transport. PMID:19817482

  11. Designed amyloid beta peptide fibril - a tool for high-throughput screening of fibril inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolphin, Gunnar T; Ouberai, Myriam; Dumy, Pascal; Garcia, Julian

    2007-11-01

    Amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) fibril formation is widely believed to be the causative event of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Therapeutic approaches are therefore in development that target various sites in the production and aggregation of Abeta. Herein we present a high-throughput screening tool to generate novel hit compounds that block Abeta fibril formation. This tool is an application for our fibril model (Abeta(16-37)Y(20)K(22)K(24))(4), which is a covalent assembly of four Abeta fragments. With this tool, screening studies are complete within one hour, as opposed to days with native Abeta(1-40). A Z' factor of 0.84+/-0.03 was determined for fibril formation and inhibition, followed by the reporter molecule thioflavin T. Herein we also describe the analysis of a broad range of reported inhibitors and non-inhibitors of Abeta fibril formation to test the validity of the system. PMID:17876751

  12. Amyloid formation: functional friend or fearful foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, P; Roan, N R; Römling, U; Bevins, C L; Münch, J

    2016-08-01

    Amyloid formation has been most studied in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, as well as in amyloidosis. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that amyloid is also present in the healthy setting; for example nontoxic amyloid formation is important for melanin synthesis and in innate immunity. Furthermore, bacteria have mechanisms to produce functional amyloid structures with important roles in bacterial physiology and interaction with host cells. Here, we will discuss some novel aspects of fibril-forming proteins in humans and bacteria. First, the amyloid-forming properties of the antimicrobial peptide human defensin 6 (HD6) will be considered. Intriguingly, unlike other antimicrobial peptides, HD6 does not kill bacteria. However, recent data show that HD6 can form amyloid structures at the gut mucosa with strong affinity for bacterial surfaces. These so-called nanonets block bacterial invasion by entangling the bacteria in net-like structures. Next, the role of functional amyloid fibrils in human semen will be discussed. These fibrils were discovered through their property to enhance HIV infection but they may also have other yet unknown functions. Finally, the role of amyloid formation in bacteria will be reviewed. The recent finding that bacteria can make amyloid in a controlled fashion without toxic effects is of particular interest and may have implications for human disease. The role of amyloid in health and disease is beginning to be unravelled, and here, we will review some of the most recent findings in this exciting area. PMID:27151743

  13. Benzofuranone derivatives as effective small molecules related to insulin amyloid fibrillation: a structure-function study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabiee, Atefeh; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Navidpour, Latifeh;

    2011-01-01

    amyloid fibrils under slightly destabilizing conditions in vitro and may form amyloid structures when subcutaneously injected into patients with diabetes. There is a great deal of interest in developing novel small molecule inhibitors of amyloidogenic processes, as potential therapeutic compounds. In this...... study, the effects of five new synthetic benzofuranone derivatives were investigated on the insulin amyloid formation process. Protein fibrillation was analyzed by thioflavin-T fluorescence, Congo red binding, circular dichroism, and electron microscopy. Despite high structural similarity, one of the...

  14. Aggregation properties of a short peptide that mediates amyloid fibril formation in model proteins unrelated to disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nitin Chaudhary; Shashi Singh; Ramakrishnan Nagaraj

    2011-09-01

    Short peptides have been identified from amyloidogenic proteins that form amyloid fibrils in isolation. The hexapeptide stretch 21DIDLHL26 has been shown to be important in the self-assembly of the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of p85 subunit of bovine phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3-SH3). The SH3 domain of chicken brain -spectrin, which is otherwise non-amyloidogenic, is rendered amyloidogenic if 22EVTMKK27 is replaced by DIDLHL. In this article, we describe the aggregation behaviour of DIDLHL-COOH and DIDLHL-CONH2. Our results indicate that DIDLHL-COOH and DIDLHL-CONH2 aggregate to form spherical structures at pH 5 and 6. At pH 5, in the presence of mica, DIDLHL-CONH2 forms short fibrous structures. The presence of NaCl along with mica results in fibrillar structures. At pH 6, DIDLHL-CONH2 forms largely spherical aggregates. Both the peptides are unstructured in solution but adopt -conformation on drying. The aggregates formed by DIDLHL-COOH and DIDLHL-CONH2 are formed during drying process and their structures are modulated by the presence of mica and salt. Our study suggests that a peptide need not have intrinsic amyloidogenic propensity to facilitate the selfassembly of the full-length protein. The propensity of peptides to form self-assembled structures that are non-amyloidogenic could be important in potentiating the self-assembly of full-length proteins into amyloid fibrils.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of fluorinated magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for inhibition of insulin amyloid fibril formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaat, Hadas; Belfort, Georges; Margel, Shlomo

    2009-06-01

    Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) magnetic nanoparticles of 15.0 ± 2.1 nm are formed by nucleation followed by controlled growth of maghemite thin films on gelatin-iron oxide nuclei. Uniform magnetic γ-Fe2O3/poly (2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate) (γ-Fe2O3/PHFBA) core-shell nanoparticles are prepared by emulsion polymerization of the fluorinated monomer 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate (HFBA) in the presence of the maghemite nanoparticles. The kinetics of the insulin fibrillation process in the absence and in the presence of the γ-Fe2O3/PHFBA core-shell nanoparticles are elucidated. A significant direct slow transition from α-helix to β-sheets during insulin fibril formation is observed in the presence of the γ-Fe2O3/PHFBA nanoparticles. This is in contradiction to our previous manuscript, which illustrated that the γ-Fe2O3 core nanoparticles do not affect the kinetics of the formation of the insulin fibrils, and to other previous publications that describe acceleration of the fibrillation process by using various types of nanoparticles. These core-shell nanoparticles may therefore be also useful for the inhibition of conformational changes of other amyloidogenic proteins that lead to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, mad cow and prion diseases.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of fluorinated magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for inhibition of insulin amyloid fibril formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) magnetic nanoparticles of 15.0 ± 2.1 nm are formed by nucleation followed by controlled growth of maghemite thin films on gelatin-iron oxide nuclei. Uniform magnetic γ-Fe2O3/poly (2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate) (γ-Fe2O3/PHFBA) core-shell nanoparticles are prepared by emulsion polymerization of the fluorinated monomer 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate (HFBA) in the presence of the maghemite nanoparticles. The kinetics of the insulin fibrillation process in the absence and in the presence of the γ-Fe2O3/PHFBA core-shell nanoparticles are elucidated. A significant direct slow transition from α-helix to β-sheets during insulin fibril formation is observed in the presence of the γ-Fe2O3/PHFBA nanoparticles. This is in contradiction to our previous manuscript, which illustrated that the γ-Fe2O3 core nanoparticles do not affect the kinetics of the formation of the insulin fibrils, and to other previous publications that describe acceleration of the fibrillation process by using various types of nanoparticles. These core-shell nanoparticles may therefore be also useful for the inhibition of conformational changes of other amyloidogenic proteins that lead to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, mad cow and prion diseases.

  17. Simulations of nucleation and elongation of amyloid fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jianing; Muthukumar, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a coarse-grained model for the growth kinetics of amyloid fibrils from solutions of peptides and address the fundamental mechanism of nucleation and elongation by using a lattice Monte Carlo procedure. We reproduce the three main characteristics of nucleation of amyloid fibrils: (1) existence of lag time, (2) occurrence of a critical concentration, and (3) seeding. We find the nucleation of amyloid fibrils to require a quasi-two-dimensional configuration, where a second layer of β ...

  18. Seeded growth of β-amyloid fibrils from Alzheimer's brain-derived fibrils produces a distinct fibril structure

    OpenAIRE

    Paravastu, Anant K.; Qahwash, Isam; Leapman, Richard D.; Meredith, Stephen C.; Tycko, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Studies by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of amyloid fibrils prepared in vitro from synthetic 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1–40) peptides have shown that the molecular structure of Aβ1–40 fibrils is not uniquely determined by amino acid sequence. Instead, the fibril structure depends on the precise details of growth conditions. The molecular structures of β-amyloid fibrils that develop in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are therefore uncertain. We demonstrate through thioflavin T fluorescen...

  19. Stop-and-go kinetics in amyloid fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Fonslet, Jesper; Andersen, Christian Beyschau; Krishna, Sandeep; Pigolotti, Simone; Hisashi, Yagi; Yuji, Goto; Otzen, Daniel; Jensen, Mogens Høgh

    2010-01-01

    Many human diseases are associated with protein aggregation and fibrillation. We present experiments on in vitro glucagon fibrillation using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, providing real-time measurements of single-fibril growth. We find that amyloid fibrils grow in an intermi...

  20. Synthesis and characterization of fluorinated magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for inhibition of insulin amyloid fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaat, Hadas; Margel, Shlomo [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Belfort, Georges [Howard P Isermann Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)], E-mail: ch348@mail.biu.ac.il, E-mail: belfog@rpi.edu, E-mail: Shlomo.margel@mail.biu.ac.il

    2009-06-03

    Maghemite ({gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) magnetic nanoparticles of 15.0 {+-} 2.1 nm are formed by nucleation followed by controlled growth of maghemite thin films on gelatin-iron oxide nuclei. Uniform magnetic {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/poly (2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate) ({gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PHFBA) core-shell nanoparticles are prepared by emulsion polymerization of the fluorinated monomer 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate (HFBA) in the presence of the maghemite nanoparticles. The kinetics of the insulin fibrillation process in the absence and in the presence of the {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PHFBA core-shell nanoparticles are elucidated. A significant direct slow transition from {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheets during insulin fibril formation is observed in the presence of the {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PHFBA nanoparticles. This is in contradiction to our previous manuscript, which illustrated that the {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} core nanoparticles do not affect the kinetics of the formation of the insulin fibrils, and to other previous publications that describe acceleration of the fibrillation process by using various types of nanoparticles. These core-shell nanoparticles may therefore be also useful for the inhibition of conformational changes of other amyloidogenic proteins that lead to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, mad cow and prion diseases.

  1. Universality in the morphology and mechanics of coarsening amyloid fibril networks

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzi, L.; Head, DA; Auer, S.

    2015-01-01

    Above a critical concentration a wide variety of peptides and proteins self-assemble into amyloid fibrils which entangle to form percolating networks called hydrogels. Such hydrogels have important applications as biomaterials and in nanotechnology, but their applicability often depends on their mechanical properties for which we currently have no predictive capability. Here we use a peptide model to simulate the formation of amyloid fibril networks, and couple these to elastic network theory...

  2. Dynamic behavior of small heat shock protein inhibition on amyloid fibrillization of a small peptide (SSTSAA) from RNase A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Mechanism of small heat shock protein inhibition on fibril formation was studied. ► Peptide SSTSAA with modified ends was used for amyloid fibril formation. ► FRET signal was followed during the fibril formation. ► Mj HSP16.5 inhibits fibril formation when introduced in the lag phase. ► Mj HSP16.5 slows down fibril formation when introduced after the lag phase. -- Abstract: Small heat shock proteins, a class of molecular chaperones, are reported to inhibit amyloid fibril formation in vitro, while the mechanism of inhibition remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which Mj HSP16.5 inhibits amyloid fibril formation of a small peptide (SSTSAA) from RNase A. A model peptide (dansyl-SSTSAA-W) was designed by introducing a pair of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes into the peptide, allowing for the monitoring of fibril formation by this experimental model. Mj HSP16.5 completely inhibited fibril formation of the model peptide at a molar ratio of 1:120. The dynamic process of fibril formation, revealed by FRET, circular dichroism, and electron microscopy, showed a lag phase of about 2 h followed by a fast growth period. The effect of Mj HSP16.5 on amyloid fibril formation was investigated by adding it into the incubation solution during different growth phases. Adding Mj HSP16.5 to the incubating peptide before or during the lag phase completely inhibited fibril formation. However, introducing Mj HSP16.5 after the lag phase only slowed down the fibril formation process by adhering to the already formed fibrils. These findings provide insight into the inhibitory roles of small heat shock proteins on amyloid fibril formation at the molecular level.

  3. Aggregate geometry in amyloid fibril nucleation

    CERN Document Server

    Irbäck, A; Linnemann, N; Linse, B; Wallin, S; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.058101

    2013-01-01

    We present and study a minimal structure-based model for the self-assembly of peptides into ordered beta-sheet-rich fibrils. The peptides are represented by unit-length sticks on a cubic lattice and interact by hydrogen bonding and hydrophobicity forces. By Monte Carlo simulations with >100,000 peptides, we show that fibril formation occurs with sigmoidal kinetics in the model. To determine the mechanism of fibril nucleation, we compute the joint distribution in length and width of the aggregates at equilibrium, using an efficient cluster move and flat-histogram techniques. This analysis, based on simulations with 256 peptides in which aggregates form and dissolve reversibly, shows that the main free-energy barriers that a nascent fibril has to overcome are associated with changes in width.

  4. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen P McWilliams-Koeppen

    Full Text Available Light chain (AL amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(PH-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. These data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.

  5. Destroying activity of magnetoferritin on lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopcansky, Peter; Siposova, Katarina [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Melnikova, Lucia, E-mail: melnikova@saske.sk [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Bednarikova, Zuzana [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Institute of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, Safarik University, Kosice (Slovakia); Timko, Milan; Mitroova, Zuzana; Antosova, Andrea [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Garamus, Vasil M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht: Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Max-Planck-Street 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna, 141980 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, Kyiv 01033 (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, Dubna, 141980 Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Gazova, Zuzana [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Kosice (Slovakia); Department of Medical and Clinical Biochemistry and LABMED, Tr. SNP 1, 040 11 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2015-03-01

    Presence of protein amyloid aggregates (oligomers, protofilaments, fibrils) is associated with many diseases as diabetes mellitus or Alzheimer's disease. The interaction between lysozyme amyloid fibrils and magnetoferritin loaded with different amount of iron atoms (168 or 532 atoms) has been investigated by small-angle X-rays scattering and thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. Results suggest that magnetoferritin caused an iron atom-concentration dependent reduction of lysozyme fibril size. - Highlights: • The interaction between lysozyme amyloid fibrils and magnetoferritin loaded with different amount of iron atoms (168 or 532 atoms) has been investigated by small-angle X-rays scattering and thioflavin T fluorescence measurements. • Results suggest that magnetoferritin caused an iron atom-concentration dependent reduction of lysozyme fibril size.

  6. Fibrillation of β amyloid peptides in the presence of phospholipid bilayers and the consequent membrane disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Wei; Yau, Wai-Ming; Schulte, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillation of β amyloid (Aβ) peptides and the accumulation of amyloid plaques are considered as an important clinical hallmark to identify Alzheimer's disease (AD). The physiological connection between Aβ plaques and the disruption of neuronal cells has not been clearly understood. One hypothesis to explain the Aβ neurotoxicity is that the fibrillation process induces disruption to the cellular membrane. We studied the Aβ fibrillation process in two biologically relevant conditions with the peptide either pre-incorporated into or externally added to the synthetic phospholipid bilayers. These two sample preparation conditions mimic the physiological membrane proximities of Aβ peptides before and after the enzymatic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Using thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we were able to monitor the kinetics and morphological evolution of fibril formation, which was highly sensitive to the two sample preparation protocols. While the external addition protocol generates long and mature fibrils through normal fibrillation process, the pre-incubation protocol was found to stabilize the immature protofibrils. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies with doubly-labeled phospholipids indicated that there may be a lipid uptake process associated with the fibril formation. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provided evidence for high resolution structural variations in fibrils formed with different protocols, and in particular the stabilization of long-range contact between N- and C-terminal β strands. In addition, disruption of phospholipid bilayers was supported by measurements with ³¹P chemical shifts and relaxation time constants. PMID:24769158

  7. Picosecond dissociation of amyloid fibrils with infrared laser: A nonequilibrium simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang Viet, Man; Roland, Christopher, E-mail: cmroland@ncsu.edu; Sagui, Celeste, E-mail: sagui@ncsu.edu [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Derreumaux, Philippe; Nguyen, Phuong H., E-mail: phuong.nguyen@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Li, Mai Suan [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute for Computational Science and Technology, SBI Building, Quang Trung Software City, Tan Chanh Hiep Ward, District 12, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2015-10-21

    Recently, mid-infrared free-electron laser technology has been developed to dissociate amyloid fibrils. Here, we present a theoretical framework for this type of experiment based on laser-induced nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the fibril is destroyed due to the strong resonance between its amide I vibrational modes and the laser field. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between fibril formation and dissociation. While the overall rearrangements of the fibril finish over short time scales, the interaction between the peptides and the solvent continues over much longer times indicating that the waters play an important role in the dissociation process. Our results thus provide new insights into amyloid fibril dissociation by laser techniques and open up new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis.

  8. Picosecond dissociation of amyloid fibrils with infrared laser: A nonequilibrium simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, mid-infrared free-electron laser technology has been developed to dissociate amyloid fibrils. Here, we present a theoretical framework for this type of experiment based on laser-induced nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the fibril is destroyed due to the strong resonance between its amide I vibrational modes and the laser field. The effects of laser irradiation are determined by a balance between fibril formation and dissociation. While the overall rearrangements of the fibril finish over short time scales, the interaction between the peptides and the solvent continues over much longer times indicating that the waters play an important role in the dissociation process. Our results thus provide new insights into amyloid fibril dissociation by laser techniques and open up new venues to investigate the complex phenomena associated with amyloidogenesis

  9. Amyloid fibrils composed of hexameric peptides attenuate neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnellas, Michael P; Adams, Chris M; Sobel, Raymond A; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B

    2013-04-01

    The amyloid-forming proteins tau, αB crystallin, and amyloid P protein are all found in lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS). Our previous work established that amyloidogenic peptides from the small heat shock protein αB crystallin (HspB5) and from amyloid β fibrils, characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, were therapeutic in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), reflecting aspects of the pathology of MS. To understand the molecular basis for the therapeutic effect, we showed a set of amyloidogenic peptides composed of six amino acids, including those from tau, amyloid β A4, major prion protein (PrP), HspB5, amylin, serum amyloid P, and insulin B chain, to be anti-inflammatory and capable of reducing serological levels of interleukin-6 and attenuating paralysis in EAE. The chaperone function of the fibrils correlates with the therapeutic outcome. Fibrils composed of tau 623-628 precipitated 49 plasma proteins, including apolipoprotein B-100, clusterin, transthyretin, and complement C3, supporting the hypothesis that the fibrils are active biological agents. Amyloid fibrils thus may provide benefit in MS and other neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:23552370

  10. Binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes for amyloid fibrils recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanczyc, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.hanczyc@chalmers.se

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Interactions of binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes with amyloid fibrils. • Dimer ruthenium(II) compounds are sensitive amyloid fibrils biomarkers. • Recognition of amyloid-chromophore adducts by two-photon excited emission. - Abstract: Metal–organic compounds represent a unique class of biomarkers with promising photophysical properties useful for imaging. Here interactions of insulin fibrils with two binuclear complexes [μ-(11,11′-bidppz)(phen){sub 4}Ru{sub 2}]{sup 4+} (1) and [μ-C4(cpdppz)(phen){sub 4}Ru{sub 2}]{sup 4+} (2) are studied by linear dichroism (LD) and fluorescence. These ruthenium(II) compounds could provide a new generation of amyloid binding chromophores with long lived lifetimes, good luminescence quantum yields for the bound molecules and photo-stability useful in multiphoton luminescence imaging.

  11. Seeded growth of beta-amyloid fibrils from Alzheimer's brain-derived fibrils produces a distinct fibril structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravastu, Anant K; Qahwash, Isam; Leapman, Richard D; Meredith, Stephen C; Tycko, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Studies by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of amyloid fibrils prepared in vitro from synthetic 40-residue beta-amyloid (Abeta(1-40)) peptides have shown that the molecular structure of Abeta(1-40) fibrils is not uniquely determined by amino acid sequence. Instead, the fibril structure depends on the precise details of growth conditions. The molecular structures of beta-amyloid fibrils that develop in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are therefore uncertain. We demonstrate through thioflavin T fluorescence and electron microscopy that fibrils extracted from brain tissue of deceased AD patients can be used to seed the growth of synthetic Abeta(1-40) fibrils, allowing preparation of fibrils with isotopic labeling and in sufficient quantities for solid-state NMR and other measurements. Because amyloid structures propagate themselves in seeded growth, as shown in previous studies, the molecular structures of brain-seeded synthetic Abeta(1-40) fibrils most likely reflect structures that are present in AD brain. Solid-state (13)C NMR spectra of fibril samples seeded with brain material from two AD patients were found to be nearly identical, indicating the same molecular structures. Spectra of an unseeded control sample indicate greater structural heterogeneity. (13)C chemical shifts and other NMR data indicate that the predominant molecular structure in brain-seeded fibrils differs from the structures of purely synthetic Abeta(1-40) fibrils that have been characterized in detail previously. These results demonstrate a new approach to detailed structural characterization of amyloid fibrils that develop in human tissue, and to investigations of possible correlations between fibril structure and the degree of cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration in AD. PMID:19376973

  12. General amyloid inhibitors? A critical examination of the inhibition of IAPP amyloid formation by inositol stereoisomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin forms amyloid deposits in the islets of Langerhans; a process that is believed to contribute to the progression of type 2 diabetes and to the failure of islet transplants. An emerging theme in amyloid research is the hypothesis that the toxic species produced during amyloid formation by different polypeptides share common features and exert their effects by common mechanisms. If correct, this suggests that inhibitors of amyloid formation by one polypeptide might be effective against other amyloidogenic sequences. IAPP and Aβ, the peptide responsible for amyloid formation in Alzheimer's disease, are particularly interesting in this regard as they are both natively unfolded in their monomeric states and share some common characteristics. Comparatively little effort has been expended on the design of IAPP amyloid inhibitors, thus it is natural to inquire if Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP, especially since no IAPP inhibitors have been clinically approved. A range of compounds inhibit Aβ amyloid formation, including various stereoisomers of inositol. Myo-, scyllo-, and epi-inositol have been shown to induce conformational changes in Aβ and prevent Aβ amyloid fibril formation by stabilizing non-fibrillar β-sheet structures. We investigate the ability of inositol stereoisomers to inhibit amyloid formation by IAPP. The compounds do not induce a conformational change in IAPP and are ineffective inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation, although some do lead to modest apparent changes in IAPP amyloid fibril morphology. Thus not all classes of Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP. This work provides a basis of comparison to work on polyphenol based inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation and helps provide clues as to the features which render them effective. The study also helps provide information for further efforts in rational inhibitor design.

  13. On the adsorption of magnetite nanoparticles on lysozyme amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majorosova, Jozefina; Petrenko, Viktor I; Siposova, Katarina; Timko, Milan; Tomasovicova, Natalia; Garamus, Vasil M; Koralewski, Marceli; Avdeev, Mikhail V; Leszczynski, Błażej; Jurga, Stefan; Gazova, Zuzana; Hayryan, Shura; Hu, Chin-Kun; Kopcansky, Peter

    2016-10-01

    An adsorption of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) from electrostatically stabilized aqueous ferrofluids on amyloid fibrils of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) in 2mg/mL acidic dispersions have been detected for the MNP concentration range of 0.01-0.1vol.%. The association of the MNP with amyloid fibrils has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and magneto-optical measurements. It has been observed that the extent of adsorption is determined by the MNP concentration. When increasing the MNP concentration the formed aggregates of magnetic particles repeat the general rod-like structure of the fibrils. The effect is not observed when MNP are mixed with the solution of lysozyme monomers. The adsorption has been investigated with the aim to clarify previously found disaggregation activity of MNP in amyloid fibrils dispersions and to get deeper insight into interaction processes between amyloids and MNP. The observed effect is also discussed with respect to potential applications for ordering lysozyme amyloid fibrils in a liquid crystal phase under external magnetic fields. PMID:27451367

  14. Energy interactions in amyloid-like fibrils from NNQQNY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Inmaculada García; Sánchez de Merás, Alfredo M J

    2014-03-01

    We use large-scale MP2 calculations to analyze the interactions appearing in amyloid fibers, which are difficult to determine experimentally. To this end, dimers and trimers of the hexapeptide NNQQNY from the yeast prion-like protein Sup35 were considered as model systems. We studied the energy interactions present in the three levels of organization in which the formation of amyloid fibrils is structured. The structural changes in the hydrogen bonds were studied too. It was found that the most energetic process is the formation of the β-sheet, which is equally due to both hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. The aromatic rings help stabilize these aggregates through stacking of the aromatic rings of tyrosine, the stability produced by the aromatics residues increasing with their aromaticity. The formation of the basic unit of the assembled proto-fiber, the steric zipper, is less energetic and is associated to both dispersion forces and hydrogen bonds. The interactions between pair of β-sheets across the peptide-to-peptide contact through the tyrosine rings are cooperative and due to dispersion effects. Moreover, the strength of this interaction can rationalize the variation of mobility of the aromatic ring in the tyrosine units found in solid NMR experiments. PMID:24458317

  15. Stop-and-go kinetics in amyloid fibrillation

    CERN Document Server

    Fonslet, Jesper; Krishna, Sandeep; Pigolotti, Simone; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji; Otzen, Daniel; Jensen, Mogens H; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Many human diseases are associated with protein aggregation and fibrillation. We present experiments on in vitro glucagon fibrillation using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, providing real-time measurements of single-fibril growth. We find that amyloid fibrils grow in an intermittent fashion, with periods of growth followed by long pauses. The observed exponential distributions of stop and growth times support a Markovian model, in which fibrils shift between the two states with specific rates. Remarkably, the probability of being in the growing (stopping) state is very close to 1/4 (3/4) in all experiments, even if the rates vary considerably. This finding suggests the presence of 4 independent conformations of the fibril tip; we discuss this possibility in terms of the existing structural knowledge.

  16. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); de Pablo, Juan J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  17. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 - 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 - 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  18. Analysis of the length distribution of amyloid fibrils by centrifugal sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, Paolo; Cedervall, Tommy; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Linse, Sara

    2016-07-01

    The aggregation of normally soluble peptides and proteins into amyloid fibrils is a process associated with a wide range of pathological conditions, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. It has become apparent that aggregates of different sizes possess markedly different biological effects, with aggregates of lower relative molecular weight being associated with stronger neurotoxicity. Yet, although many approaches exist to measure the total mass concentration of aggregates, the ability to probe the length distribution of growing aggregates in solution has remained more elusive. In this work, we applied a differential centrifugation technique to measure the sedimentation coefficients of amyloid fibrils produced during the aggregation process of the amyloid β (M1-42) peptide (Aβ42). The centrifugal method has the advantage of providing structural information on the fibril distribution directly in solution and affording a short analysis time with respect to alternative imaging and analytical centrifugation approaches. We show that under quiescent conditions interactions between Aβ42 fibrils lead to lateral association and to the formation of entangled clusters. By contrast, aggregation under shaking generates a population of filaments characterized by shorter lengths. The results, which have been validated by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) analysis, highlight the important role that fibril-fibril assembly can play in the deposition of aggregation-prone peptides. PMID:27033008

  19. Imaging β-amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer's disease: a critical analysis through simulation of amyloid fibril polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polymerization of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides into fibrillary plaques is implicated, in part, in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ molecular imaging probes (Aβ-MIPs) have been introduced in an effort to quantify amyloid burden or load, in subjects afflicted with AD by invoking the classic PET receptor model for the quantitation of neuronal receptor density. In this communication, we explore conceptual differences between imaging the density of amyloid fibril polymers and neuronal receptors. We formulate a mathematical model for the polymerization of Aβ with parameters that are mapped to biological modulators of fibrillogenesis and introduce a universal measure for amyloid load to accommodate various interactions of Aβ-MIPs with fibrils. Subsequently, we hypothesize four Aβ-MIPs and utilize the fibrillogenesis model to simulate PET tissue time activity curves (TACs). Given the unique nature of polymer growth and resulting PET TAC, the four probes report differing amyloid burdens for a given brain pathology, thus complicating the interpretation of PET images. In addition, we introduce the notion of an MIP's resolution, apparent maximal binding site concentration, optimal kinetic topology and its resolving power in characterizing the pathological progression of AD and the effectiveness of drug therapy. The concepts introduced in this work call for a new paradigm that goes beyond the classic parameters B max and K D to include binding characteristics to polymeric peptide aggregates such as amyloid fibrils, neurofibrillary tangles and prions

  20. Seeding-dependent maturation of beta2-microglobulin amyloid fibrils at neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Miho; Chatani, Eri; Sakai, Miyo; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2005-03-25

    Beta2-microglobulin (beta2-m) is a major component of amyloid fibrils deposited in patients with dialysis-related amyloidosis. Recent studies have focused on the mechanism by which amyloid fibrils are formed under physiological conditions, which had been difficult to reproduce quantitatively. Yamamoto et al. (Yamamoto, S., Hasegawa, K., Yamaguchi, I., Tsutsumi, S., Kardos, J., Goto, Y., Gejyo, F. & Naiki, H. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 11075-11082) showed that a combination of seed fibrils prepared under acidic conditions and a low concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate below its critical micelle concentration enabled extensive fibril formation at pH 7.0. Here, we found that repeated self-seeding at pH 7.0 with fibrils formed at the same pH causes a marked acceleration of growth, indicating the maturation of fibrils. The observed maturation can be simulated by assuming the existence of two types of fibrils with different growth rates. Importantly, some mutations of beta2-m or the addition of a low concentration of urea, both destabilizing the native conformation, were not enough to extend the fibrils at pH 7.0, and a low concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate (i.e. 0.5 mM) was essential. Thus, even though the first stage fibrils in patients are unstable and require stabilizing factors to remain at neutral pH, they can adapt to a neutral pH with repeated self-seeding, implying a mechanism of development of amyloid deposition after a long latent period in patients. PMID:15659393

  1. In vitro fibrillization of Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide (1-42)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiiman, Ann; Krishtal, Jekaterina; Palumaa, Peep; Tõugu, Vello

    2015-09-01

    The amyloid deposition in the form of extracellular fibrillar aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide is a critical pathological event in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effects of environmental factors on the kinetics of Aβ fibrillization in vitro. The effects of Aβ42 peptide concentration, temperature, pH, added solvents and the ratio of Aβ40 and Aβ42 on the peptide fibrillization under agitated conditions was studied. The analysis show that the rate of fibril growth by monomer addition is not limited by diffusion but by rearrangement in the monomer structure, which is enhanced by low concentrations of fluorinated alcohols and characterized by the activation energy of 12 kcal/mol. Fibrillization rate decreases at pH values below 7.0 where simultaneous protonation of His 13 and 14 inhibits fibril formation. The lag period for Aβ42 was only twofold shorter and the fibril growth rate twofold faster than those of Aβ40. Lag period was shortened and the fibrillization rate was increased only at 90% content of Aβ42.

  2. Membrane damage by human islet amyloid polypeptide through fibril growth at the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Maarten F M; Khemtémourian, Lucie; Kleijer, Cécile C; Meeldijk, Hans J D; Jacobs, Jet; Verkleij, Arie J; de Kruijff, Ben; Killian, J Antoinette; Höppener, Jo W M

    2008-04-22

    Fibrillar protein deposits (amyloid) in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans are thought to be involved in death of the insulin-producing islet beta cells in type 2 diabetes mellitus. It has been suggested that the mechanism of this beta cell death involves membrane disruption by human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), the major constituent of islet amyloid. However, the molecular mechanism of hIAPP-induced membrane disruption is not known. Here, we propose a hypothesis that growth of hIAPP fibrils at the membrane causes membrane damage. We studied the kinetics of hIAPP-induced membrane damage in relation to hIAPP fibril growth and found that the kinetic profile of hIAPP-induced membrane damage is characterized by a lag phase and a sigmoidal transition, which matches the kinetic profile of hIAPP fibril growth. The observation that seeding accelerates membrane damage supports the hypothesis. In addition, variables that are well known to affect hIAPP fibril formation, i.e., the presence of a fibril formation inhibitor, hIAPP concentration, and lipid composition, were found to have the same effect on hIAPP-induced membrane damage. Furthermore, electron microscopy analysis showed that hIAPP fibrils line the surface of distorted phospholipid vesicles, in agreement with the notion that hIAPP fibril growth at the membrane and membrane damage are physically connected. Together, these observations point toward a mechanism in which growth of hIAPP fibrils, rather than a particular hIAPP species, is responsible for the observed membrane damage. This hypothesis provides an additional mechanism next to the previously proposed role of oligomers as the main cytotoxic species of amyloidogenic proteins. PMID:18408164

  3. Amyloid Cardiomyopathy in Hereditary Transthyretin V30M Amyloidosis - Impact of Sex and Amyloid Fibril Composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Arvidsson

    Full Text Available Transthyretin V30M (ATTR V30M amyloidosis is a phenotypically diverse disease with symptoms ranging from predominant neuropathy to exclusive cardiac manifestations. The aims of this study were to determine the dispersion of the two types of fibrils found in Swedish ATTR V30M patients -Type A consisting of a mixture of truncated and full length ATTR fibrils and type B fibrils consisting of full length fibrils, and to estimate the severity of cardiac dysfunction in relation to fibril composition and sex.Echocardiographic data were analysed in 107 Swedish ATTR V30M patients with their fibril composition determined as either type A or type B. Measurements of left ventricular (LV dimensions and evaluation of systolic and diastolic function including speckle tracking derived strain were performed. Patients were grouped according to fibril type and sex. Multivariate linear regression was utilised to determine factors of significant impact on LV thickness.There was no significant difference in proportions of the two types of fibrils between men and women. In patients with type A fibrils, women had significantly lower median septal (p = 0.007 and posterior wall thicknesses (p = 0.010, lower median LV mass indexed to height (p = 0.008, and higher septal strain (p = 0.037, as compared to males. These differences were not apparent in patients with type B fibrils. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that fibril type, sex and age all had significant impact on LV septal thickness.This study demonstrates a clear difference between sexes in the severity of amyloid heart disease in ATTR V30M amyloidosis patients. Even though type A fibrils were associated with more advanced amyloid heart disease compared to type B, women with type A fibrils generally developed less cardiac infiltration than men. The differences may explain the better outcome for liver transplanted late-onset female patients compared to males.

  4. Atomic-resolution structures of prion AGAAAAGA amyloid fibrils

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2011-01-01

    To the best of the author's knowledge, there is little structural data available on the AGAAAAGA palindrome in the hydrophobic region (113-120) of prion proteins due to the unstable, noncrystalline and insoluble nature of the amyloid fibril, although many experimental studies have shown that this region has amyloid fibril forming properties and plays an important role in prion diseases. In view of this, the present study is devoted to address this problem from computational approaches such as local optimization steepest descent, conjugate gradient, discrete gradient and Newton methods, global optimization simulated annealing and genetic algorithms, canonical dual optimization theory, and structural bioinformatics. The optimal atomic-resolution structures of prion AGAAAAGA amyloid fibils reported in this Chapter have a value to the scientific community in its drive to find treatments for prion diseases or at least be useful for the goals of medicinal chemistry.

  5. Identification of a Common Binding Mode for Imaging Agents to Amyloid Fibrils from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby; Sørensen, Jesper; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    amyloid fibrils and the disease pathology. Alzheimer’s disease is very difficult to diagnose, and much research is being performed to develop noninvasive diagnostic methods, such as imaging with small-molecule agents. The interactions between amyloid fibrils and imaging agents are challenging to examine...... experimentally due to the insoluble nature of amyloid fibrils. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interactions between 13 aromatic amyloid imaging agents, entailing 4 different organic scaffolds, and a model of an amyloid fibril. Clustering analysis combined with free energy...... binding modes for imaging agents is proposed to originate from subtle differences in amino acid composition of the surface grooves on an amyloid fibril, resulting in fine tuning of the binding affinities for a specific amyloid fibril....

  6. Decoding vibrational states of Concanavalin A amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccirilli, Federica; Schirò, Giorgio; Vetri, Valeria; Lupi, Stefano; Perucchi, Andrea; Militello, Valeria

    2015-04-01

    Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils are a general class of protein aggregates and represent a central topic in life sciences for their involvement in several neurodegenerative disorders and their unique mechanical and supramolecular morphological properties. Both their biological role and their physical properties, including their high mechanical stability and thermodynamic inertia, are related to the structural arrangement of proteins in the aggregates at molecular level. Significant variations may exist in the supramolecular organization of the commonly termed cross-β structure that constitutes the amyloid core. In this context, a fine knowledge of the structural details in fibrils may give significant information on the assembly process and on possible ways of tuning or inhibiting it. Here we propose a simple method based on the combined use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy to accurately reveal structural details in the fibrillar aggregates, side-chain exposure and intermolecular interactions. Interestingly, coupled analysis of mid-infrared spectra reveals antiparallel β-sheet orientation in ConA fibrils. We also report the comparison between THz absorption spectra of Concanavalin A in its native and fibrillar state at different hydration levels, allowing obtaining corroboration of peaks assignation in this range and information on the effect of amyloid supramolecular arrangement on the network dynamics of hydration water. PMID:25776525

  7. Amyloid fibril protein nomenclature: 2012 recommendations from the Nomenclature Committee of the International Society of Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipe, Jean D; Benson, Merrill D; Buxbaum, Joel N; Ikeda, Shu-ichi; Merlini, Giampaolo; Saraiva, Maria J M; Westermark, Per

    2012-12-01

    The Nomenclature Committee of the International Society of Amyloidosis (ISA) met during the XIIIth International Symposium, May 6-10, 2012, Groningen, The Netherlands, to formulate recommendations on amyloid fibril protein nomenclature and to consider newly identified candidate amyloid fibril proteins for inclusion in the ISA Amyloid Fibril Protein Nomenclature List. The need to promote utilization of consistent and up to date terminology for both fibril chemistry and clinical classification of the resultant disease syndrome was emphasized. Amyloid fibril nomenclature is based on the chemical identity of the amyloid fibril forming protein; clinical classification of the amyloidosis should be as well. Although the importance of fibril chemistry to the disease process has been recognized for more than 40 years, to this day the literature contains clinical and histochemical designations that were used when the chemical diversity of amyloid diseases was poorly understood. Thus, the continued use of disease classifications such as familial amyloid neuropathy and familial amyloid cardiomyopathy generates confusion. An amyloid fibril protein is defined as follows: the protein must occur in body tissue deposits and exhibit both affinity for Congo red and green birefringence when Congo red stained deposits are viewed by polarization microscopy. Furthermore, the chemical identity of the protein must have been unambiguously characterized by protein sequence analysis when so is practically possible. Thus, in nearly all cases, it is insufficient to demonstrate mutation in the gene of a candidate amyloid protein; the protein itself must be identified as an amyloid fibril protein. Current ISA Amyloid Fibril Protein Nomenclature Lists of 30 human and 10 animal fibril proteins are provided together with a list of inclusion bodies that, although intracellular, exhibit some or all of the properties of the mainly extracellular amyloid fibrils. PMID:23113696

  8. Quantitative Analysis of the Flavonoid Glycosides and Terpene Trilactones in the Extract of Ginkgo biloba and Evaluation of Their Inhibitory Activity towards Fibril Formation of β-Amyloid Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Xie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The standard extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves (EGb761 is used clinically in Europe for the symptomatic treatment of impaired cerebral function in primary degenerative dementia syndromes, and the results of numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have supported such clinical use. The abnormal production and aggregation of amyloid β peptide (Aβ and the deposition of fibrils in the brain are regarded as key steps in the onset of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD, and the inhibition of Aβ aggregation and destabilization of the preformed fibrils represent viable approaches for the prevention and treatment of AD. Flavonoid glycosides and terpene trilactones (TTLs are the two main components of EGb761 which represent 24 and 6% of the overall content, respectively. In our research, seven abundant flavonoid glycosides 1–7 were isolated from the extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves and characterized by spectroscopic analysis. Furthermore, an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography method was established for the simultaneous quantification of these seven flavonoids. The inhibitory activities of these flavonoids, as well as four TTLs, i.e., ginkgolides A, B, and C and bilobalide (compounds 8–11, were evaluated towards Aβ42 fibril formation using a thioflavin T fluorescence assay. It was found that three flavonoids 1, 3 and 4 exhibited moderate inhibitory activities, whereas the other four flavonoids 2, 5, 6 and 7, as well as the four terpene trilactones, showed poor activity. This is the first report of the inhibition of Aβ fibril formation of two characteristic acylated flavonoid glycosides 6, 7 in Ginkgo leaves, on the basis of which the structure-activity relationship of these flavonoids 1–7 was discussed.

  9. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly

  10. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Hisashi [Research Center for Computational Science, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); Department of Structural Molecular Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly.

  11. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Hisashi

    2015-12-01

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly.

  12. Evidence for Inhibition of Lysozyme Amyloid Fibrillization by Peptide Fragments from Human Lysozyme: A Combined Spectroscopy, Microscopy, and Docking Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Rajiv K; Gazova, Zuzana; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Mroue, Kamal H; Ghosh, Anirban; Zhang, Ruiyan; Ulicna, Katarina; Siebert, Hans-Christian; Nifantiev, Nikolay E; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-06-13

    Degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and prion diseases, as well as type II diabetes, have a pathogenesis associated with protein misfolding, which routes with amyloid formation. Recent strategies for designing small-molecule and polypeptide antiamyloid inhibitors are mainly based on mature fibril structures containing cross β-sheet structures. In the present study, we have tackled the hypothesis that the rational design of antiamyloid agents that can target native proteins might offer advantageous prospect to design effective therapeutics. Lysozyme amyloid fibrillization was treated with three different peptide fragments derived from lysozyme protein sequence R(107)-R(115). Using low-resolution spectroscopic, high-resolution NMR, and STD NMR-restrained docking methods such as HADDOCK, we have found that these peptide fragments have the capability to affect lysozyme fibril formation. The present study implicates the prospect that these peptides can also be tested against other amyloid-prone proteins to develop novel therapeutic agents. PMID:27116396

  13. Glycosaminoglycans in extracts of cardiac amyloid fibrils from familial amyloid cardiomyopathy of Danish origin related to variant transthyretin Met 111.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, J H; Stenstad, T; Kolset, S O; Husby, G

    1991-07-01

    We have previously demonstrated an association between secondary AA type amyloid fibrils and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in human liver. The present study was aimed at investigating whether a similar association could be demonstrated in isolated cardiac amyloid fibrils from a unique Danish family with amyloid cardiomyopathy related to variant transthyretin (TTR) with a single amino acid substitution of a methionin for leucine at position 111 (TTR Met 111). Using gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography, significant amounts of GAGs were detected in close association with purified myocardial amyloid fibrils, whereas only trace amounts of polysaccharides were present in the corresponding normal preparation. The GAGs were identified as 50% chondroitin sulfate, 33% heparin/heparan sulfate, and 17% hyaluronan. With the methods used the amyloid associated GAGs appeared as high molecular weight free polysaccharide chains, and not as part of intact proteoglycans (PGs) in the fibril extracts. We conclude that the association between purified amyloid fibrils and GAGs may be a general feature of amyloid deposits. Also, we suggest that the proportion of different GAGs in the amyloid deposits may depend both on the organ or tissues affected and the type of proteins making up the fibrils. PMID:2068532

  14. Universality in the Morphology and Mechanics of Coarsening Amyloid Fibril Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, L. G.; Head, D. A.; Auer, S.

    2015-02-01

    Peptide hydrogels have important applications as biomaterials and in nanotechnology, but utilization often depends on their mechanical properties for which we currently have no predictive capability. Here we use a peptide model to simulate the formation of percolating amyloid fibril networks and couple these to the elastic network theory to determine their mechanical properties. We find that the time variation of network length scales can be collapsed onto master curves by using a time scaling function that depends on the peptide interaction anisotropy. The same scaling applies to network mechanics, revealing a nonmonotonic dependence of the shear modulus with time. Our structure-function relationship between the peptide building blocks, network morphology, and network mechanical properties can aid in the design of amyloid fibril networks with tailored mechanical properties.

  15. Universality in the morphology and mechanics of coarsening amyloid fibril networks

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzi, Leandro G; Auer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Above a critical concentration a wide variety of peptides and proteins self-assemble into amyloid fibrils which entangle to form percolating networks called hydrogels. Such hydrogels have important applications as biomaterials and in nanotechnology, but their applicability often depends on their mechanical properties for which we currently have no predictive capability. Here we use a peptide model to simulate the formation of amyloid fibril networks, and couple these to elastic network theory to determine their mechanical properties. The simulations reveal that the time-dependence of morphological quantities characterizing the network length scales can be collapsed onto master curves by using a time scaling function that depends on the interaction parameter between the peptides. The same scaling function is used to unveil a universal, non-monotonic dependence of the shear modulus with time. The obtained insight into the structure-function relationship between the peptide building blocks, network morphology an...

  16. Thermal Stability Threshold for Amyloid Formation in Light Chain Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya L. Poshusta

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Light chain (AL amyloidosis is a devastating disease characterized by amyloid deposits formed by immunoglobulin light chains. Current available treatments involve conventional chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. We have recently concluded a phase III trial comparing these two treatments. AL amyloidosis patients who achieve hematological complete response (CR do not necessarily achieve organ response regardless of the treatment they received. In order to investigate the possible correlation between amyloid formation kinetics and organ response, we selected AL amyloidosis patients from the trial with kidney involvement and CR after treatment. Six patients were selected and their monoclonal immunoglobulin light chains were characterized. The proteins showed differences in their stability and their kinetics of amyloid formation. A correlation was detected at pH 7.4, showing that less stable proteins are more likely to form amyloid fibrils. AL-T03 is too unstable to form amyloid fibrils at pH 7.4. This protein was found in the only patient in the study that had organ response, suggesting that partially folded species are required for amyloid formation to occur in AL amyloidosis.

  17. Collagen fibril formation during development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies with embryonic skin and bone suggested that the aminopropeptide (AP) and carboxylpropeptide (CP) of type I pro-callagen (pro-col) play a role in fibril formation. Chick leg metatarsal tendons were studied by electron microscopy. AP and CP of type I pro-col were purified from chick leg tendons; antibodies developed in rabbits and purity tested by radioimmunoassays. Antibodies were used for immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) and immunoblotting (IB). The peritendineum, consisting of thin 20-30 nm fibrils, revealed the AP of type I and type III procol. In the tendon area, collagen fibrils were arranged within small compartments and were of uniform diameter at 10d, 14d and 18d. However, beyond 21d, there was confluency of the compartments and a wide range of fibril diameters. IFM revealed fine streaks of collagen, staining with the AP of type I throughout the tendon. The CP was mainly intracellular with only a small amount present in the extracellular space. IB revealed procollagen, pN-collagen (AP+collagen) and pC-collagen, (CP+collagen) at all stages of development. Ratios of pN/pC collagen, determined by spectrophotometric scanning of autoradiographs, correlated well with the distribution of fibril diameter. This study suggests the hypothesis that AP initiates fibrillogenesis while CP may regulate additional fibril growth

  18. Binding of ACE-inhibitors to in vitro and patient-derived amyloidfibril models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavaraju, Manikanthan; Phillips, Malachi; Bowman, Deborah; Aceves-Hernandez, Juan M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no drugs exist that can prevent or reverse Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disease associated with the presence, in the brain, of plaques that are composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. Recent studies suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, a set of drugs used to treat hypertension, may inhibit amyloid formation in vitro. In the present study, we investigate through computer simulations the binding of ACE inhibitors to patient-derived Aβ fibrils and contrast it with that of ACE inhibitors binding to in vitro generated fibrils. The binding affinities of the ACE inhibitors are compared with that of Congo red, a dye that is used to identify amyloid structures and that is known to be a weak inhibitor of Aβ aggregation. We find that ACE inhibitors have a lower binding affinity to the patient-derived fibrils than to in vitro generated ones. For patient-derived fibrils, their binding affinities are even lower than that of Congo red. Our observations raise doubts on the hypothesis that these drugs inhibit fibril formation in Alzheimer patients by interacting directly with the amyloids.

  19. Fibpredictor: a computational method for rapid prediction of amyloid fibril structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei Ghomi, Hamed; Topp, Elizabeth M; Lill, Markus A

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils are important in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, and are also a common instability in peptide and protein drug products. Despite their importance, experimental structures of amyloid fibrils in atomistic detail are rare. To address this limitation, we have developed a novel, rapid computational method to predict amyloid fibril structures (Fibpredictor). The method combines β-sheet model building, β-sheet replication, and symmetry operations with side-chain prediction and statistical scoring functions. When applied to nine amyloid fibrils with experimentally determined structures, the method predicted the correct structures of amyloid fibrils and enriched those among the top-ranked structures. These models can be used as the initial heuristic structures for more complicated computational studies. Fibpredictor is available at http://nanohub.org/resources/fibpredictor . PMID:27502172

  20. α-Lipoic acid exhibits anti-amyloidogenicity for β-amyloid fibrils in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhibition of the formation of β-amyloid fibrils (fAβ), as well as the destabilization of preformed fAβ in the CNS would be attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies, we examined the effects of α-lipoic acid (LA) and the metabolic product of LA, dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), on the formation, extension, and destabilization of fAβ at pH 7.5 at 37 oC in vitro. LA and DHLA dose-dependently inhibited fAβ formation from amyloid β-protein, as well as their extension. Moreover, they destabilized preformed fAβs. LA and DHLA could be key molecules for the development of therapeutics for AD

  1. Amyloid fibrils containing fragmented ATTR may be the standard fibril composition in ATTR amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihse, Elisabet; Rapezzi, Claudio; Merlini, Giampaolo; Benson, Merrill D; Ando, Yukio; Suhr, Ole B; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Lavatelli, Francesca; Obici, Laura; Quarta, Candida C; Leone, Ornella; Jono, Hirofumi; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Lorenzini, Massimiliano; Liepnieks, Juris; Ohshima, Toshinori; Tasaki, Masayoshi; Yamashita, Taro; Westermark, Per

    2013-09-01

    Abstract The clinical phenotype of familial ATTR amyloidosis depends to some extent on the particular mutation, but differences exist also within mutations. We have previously described that two types of amyloid fibril compositions exist among Swedish ATTRV30M amyloidosis patients, one consisting of a mixture of intact and fragmented ATTR (type A) and one consisting of mainly intact ATTR (type B). The fibril types are correlated to phenotypic differences. Patients with ATTR fragments have a late onset and develop cardiomyopathy, while patients without fragments have an early onset and less myocardial involvement. The present study aimed to determine whether this correlation between fibril type and phenotype is valid for familial ATTR amyloidosis in general. Cardiac or adipose tissues from 63 patients carrying 29 different TTR non-V30M mutations as well as 13 Japanese ATTRV30M patients were examined. Fibril type was determined by western blotting and compared to the patients' age of onset and degree of cardiomyopathy. All ATTR non-V30M patients had a fibril composition with ATTR fragments, except two ATTRY114C patients. No clear conclusions could be drawn about a phenotype to fibril type correlation among ATTR non-V30M patients. In contrast, Japanese ATTRV30M patients showed a similar correlation as previously described for Swedish ATTRV30M patients. This study shows that a fibril composition with fragmented ATTR is very common in ATTR amyloidosis, and suggests that fibrils composed of only full-length ATTR is an exception found only in a subset of patients. PMID:23713495

  2. Role of sequence and structural polymorphism on the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwonchan Yoon

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils playing a critical role in disease expression, have recently been found to exhibit the excellent mechanical properties such as elastic modulus in the order of 10 GPa, which is comparable to that of other mechanical proteins such as microtubule, actin filament, and spider silk. These remarkable mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils are correlated with their functional role in disease expression. This suggests the importance in understanding how these excellent mechanical properties are originated through self-assembly process that may depend on the amino acid sequence. However, the sequence-structure-property relationship of amyloid fibrils has not been fully understood yet. In this work, we characterize the mechanical properties of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP fibrils with respect to their molecular structures as well as their amino acid sequence by using all-atom explicit water molecular dynamics (MD simulation. The simulation result suggests that the remarkable bending rigidity of amyloid fibrils can be achieved through a specific self-aggregation pattern such as antiparallel stacking of β strands (peptide chain. Moreover, we have shown that a single point mutation of hIAPP chain constituting a hIAPP fibril significantly affects the thermodynamic stability of hIAPP fibril formed by parallel stacking of peptide chain, and that a single point mutation results in a significant change in the bending rigidity of hIAPP fibrils formed by antiparallel stacking of β strands. This clearly elucidates the role of amino acid sequence on not only the equilibrium conformations of amyloid fibrils but also their mechanical properties. Our study sheds light on sequence-structure-property relationships of amyloid fibrils, which suggests that the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils are encoded in their sequence-dependent molecular architecture.

  3. Deciphering the structure, growth and assembly of amyloid-like fibrils using high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Emmanuel Milhiet

    Full Text Available Formation of fibrillar structures of proteins that deposit into aggregates has been suggested to play a key role in various neurodegenerative diseases. However mechanisms and dynamics of fibrillization remains to be elucidated. We have previously established that lithostathine, a protein overexpressed in the pre-clinical stages of Alzheimer's disease and present in the pathognomonic lesions associated with this disease, form fibrillar aggregates after its N-terminal truncation. In this paper we visualized, using high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM, growth and assembly of lithostathine protofibrils under physiological conditions with a time resolution of one image/s. Real-time imaging highlighted a very high velocity of elongation. Formation of fibrils via protofibril lateral association and stacking was also monitored revealing a zipper-like mechanism of association. We also demonstrate that, like other amyloid ß peptides, two lithostathine protofibrils can associate to form helical fibrils. Another striking finding is the propensity of the end of a growing protofibril or fibril to associate with the edge of a second fibril, forming false branching point. Taken together this study provides new clues about fibrillization mechanism of amyloid proteins.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of the Flavonoid Glycosides and Terpene Trilactones in the Extract of Ginkgo biloba and Evaluation of Their Inhibitory Activity towards Fibril Formation of β-Amyloid Peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Haiyan Xie; Jing-Rong Wang; Lee-Fong Yau; Yong Liu; Liang Liu; Quan-Bin Han; Zhongzhen Zhao; Zhi-Hong Jiang

    2014-01-01

    The standard extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves (EGb761) is used clinically in Europe for the symptomatic treatment of impaired cerebral function in primary degenerative dementia syndromes, and the results of numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have supported such clinical use. The abnormal production and aggregation of amyloid β peptide (Aβ) and the deposition of fibrils in the brain are regarded as key steps in the onset of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), and the inhibition of Aβ aggregation and d...

  5. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability.

  6. Thermodynamics of amyloid formation and the role of intersheet interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The self-assembly of proteins into β-sheet-rich amyloid fibrils has been observed to occur with sigmoidal kinetics, indicating that the system initially is trapped in a metastable state. Here, we use a minimal lattice-based model to explore the thermodynamic forces driving amyloid formation in a finite canonical (NVT) system. By means of generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo techniques and a semi-analytical method, the thermodynamic properties of this model are investigated for different sets of intersheet interaction parameters. When the interactions support lateral growth into multi-layered fibrillar structures, an evaporation/condensation transition is observed, between a supersaturated solution state and a thermodynamically distinct state where small and large fibril-like species exist in equilibrium. Intermediate-size aggregates are statistically suppressed. These properties do not hold if aggregate growth is one-dimensional

  7. Thermodynamics of amyloid formation and the role of intersheet interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Irbäck, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of proteins into $\\beta$-sheet-rich amyloid fibrils has been observed to occur with sigmoidal kinetics, indicating that the system initially is trapped in a metastable state. Here, we use a minimal lattice-based model to explore the thermodynamic forces driving amyloid formation in a finite canonical ($NVT$) system. By means of generalized-ensemble Monte Carlo techniques and a semi-analytical method, the thermodynamic properties of this model are investigated for different sets of intersheet interaction parameters. When the interactions support lateral growth into multi-layered fibrillar structures, an evaporation/condensation transition is observed, between a supersaturated solution state and a thermodynamically distinct state where small and large fibril-like species exist in equilibrium. Intermediate-size aggregates are statistically suppressed. These properties do not hold if aggregate growth is one-dimensional.

  8. Comparison of the aggregation of homologous β2-microglobulin variants reveals protein solubility as a key determinant of amyloid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashley, Clare L; Hewitt, Eric W; Radford, Sheena E

    2016-02-13

    The mouse and human β2-microglobulin protein orthologs are 70 % identical in sequence and share 88 % sequence similarity. These proteins are predicted by various algorithms to have similar aggregation and amyloid propensities. However, whilst human β2m (hβ2m) forms amyloid-like fibrils in denaturing conditions (e.g. pH2.5) in the absence of NaCl, mouse β2m (mβ2m) requires the addition of 0.3M NaCl to cause fibrillation. Here, the factors which give rise to this difference in amyloid propensity are investigated. We utilise structural and mutational analyses, fibril growth kinetics and solubility measurements under a range of pH and salt conditions, to determine why these two proteins have different amyloid propensities. The results show that, although other factors influence the fibril growth kinetics, a striking difference in the solubility of the proteins is a key determinant of the different amyloidogenicity of hβ2m and mβ2m. The relationship between protein solubility and lag time of amyloid formation is not captured by current aggregation or amyloid prediction algorithms, indicating a need to better understand the role of solubility on the lag time of amyloid formation. The results demonstrate the key contribution of protein solubility in determining amyloid propensity and lag time of amyloid formation, highlighting how small differences in protein sequence can have dramatic effects on amyloid formation. PMID:26780548

  9. Curcumin Reduces Amyloid Fibrillation of Prion Protein and Decreases Reactive Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Raymond Chung; Cheng-I Lee; Chi-Fen Lin; Cheng-Ping Jheng; Kun-Hua Yu

    2013-01-01

    Misfolding and aggregation into amyloids of the prion protein (PrP) is responsible for the development of fatal transmissible neurodegenerative diseases. Various studies on curcumin demonstrate promise for the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease and inhibition of PrPres accumulation. To evaluate the effect of curcumin on amyloid fibrillation of prion protein, we first investigated the effect of curcumin on mouse prion protein (mPrP) in a cell-free system. Curcumin reduced the prion fibril forma...

  10. AFM-based force spectroscopy measurements of mature amyloid fibrils of the peptide glucagon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, M. D.; Hovgaard, M. B.; Mamdouh, W.;

    2008-01-01

    We report on the mechanical characterization of individual mature amyloid fibrils by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). These self-assembling materials, formed from the 29-residue amphiphatic peptide hormone glucagon, were found to display a...... addition, such biological amyloid fibril structures with highly stable mechanical properties can potentially be used to produce nanofibres (nanowires) that may be suitable for nanotechnological applications....

  11. Amyloid Fibril-Induced Structural and Spectral Modifications in the Thioflavin-T Optical Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murugan, N. Arul; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Kongsted, Jacob;

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by future possibilities to design target molecules for fibrils with diagnostic or therapeutic capability related to amyloidosis diseases, we investigate in this work the dielectric nature of amyloid fibril microenvironments in different binding sites using an optical probe, thioflavin......-T (THT), which has been used extensively to stain such fibrils. We study the fibril-environment-induced structural and spectral changes of THT at each binding site and compare the results to the fibril-free situation in aqueous solution. All binding sites are found to show a similar effect with respect...

  12. Proinsulin C-peptide interferes with insulin fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landreh, Michael [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd [Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, Astrid Lindgren Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Endocrinology Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Willander, Hanna [KI-Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, NVS Department, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Soeder, Olle [Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, Astrid Lindgren Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Endocrinology Unit, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, S-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Johansson, Jan [KI-Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, NVS Department, Karolinska Institutet, S-141 86 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, S-751 23 Uppsala (Sweden); Joernvall, Hans, E-mail: Hans.Jornvall@ki.se [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin and C-peptide can interact under insulin fibril forming conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide is incorporated into insulin aggregates and alters aggregation lag time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide changes insulin fibril morphology and affects backbone accessibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C-peptide may be a regulator of fibril formation by {beta}-cell granule proteins. -- Abstract: Insulin aggregation can prevent rapid insulin uptake and cause localized amyloidosis in the treatment of type-1 diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effect of C-peptide, the 31-residue peptide cleaved from proinsulin, on insulin fibrillation at optimal conditions for fibrillation. This is at low pH and high concentration, when the fibrils formed are regular and extended. We report that C-peptide then modulates the insulin aggregation lag time and profoundly changes the fibril appearance, to rounded clumps of short fibrils, which, however, still are Thioflavine T-positive. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry also indicates that C-peptide interacts with aggregating insulin and is incorporated into the aggregates. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry further reveals reduced backbone accessibility in insulin aggregates formed in the presence of C-peptide. Combined, these effects are similar to those of C-peptide on islet amyloid polypeptide fibrillation and suggest that C-peptide has a general ability to interact with amyloidogenic proteins from pancreatic {beta}-cell granules. Considering the concentrations, these peptide interactions should be relevant also during physiological secretion, and even so at special sites post-secretory or under insulin treatment conditions in vivo.

  13. Proinsulin C-peptide interferes with insulin fibril formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Insulin and C-peptide can interact under insulin fibril forming conditions. ► C-peptide is incorporated into insulin aggregates and alters aggregation lag time. ► C-peptide changes insulin fibril morphology and affects backbone accessibility. ► C-peptide may be a regulator of fibril formation by β-cell granule proteins. -- Abstract: Insulin aggregation can prevent rapid insulin uptake and cause localized amyloidosis in the treatment of type-1 diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effect of C-peptide, the 31-residue peptide cleaved from proinsulin, on insulin fibrillation at optimal conditions for fibrillation. This is at low pH and high concentration, when the fibrils formed are regular and extended. We report that C-peptide then modulates the insulin aggregation lag time and profoundly changes the fibril appearance, to rounded clumps of short fibrils, which, however, still are Thioflavine T-positive. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry also indicates that C-peptide interacts with aggregating insulin and is incorporated into the aggregates. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry further reveals reduced backbone accessibility in insulin aggregates formed in the presence of C-peptide. Combined, these effects are similar to those of C-peptide on islet amyloid polypeptide fibrillation and suggest that C-peptide has a general ability to interact with amyloidogenic proteins from pancreatic β-cell granules. Considering the concentrations, these peptide interactions should be relevant also during physiological secretion, and even so at special sites post-secretory or under insulin treatment conditions in vivo.

  14. Experimentally Derived Structural Constraints for Amyloid Fibrils of Wild-Type Transthyretin

    OpenAIRE

    Bateman, David A.; Tycko, Robert; Wickner, Reed B.

    2011-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a largely β-sheet serum protein responsible for transporting thyroxine and vitamin A. TTR is found in amyloid deposits of patients with senile systemic amyloidosis. TTR mutants lead to familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy and familial amyloid cardiomyopathy, with an earlier age of onset. Studies of amyloid fibrils of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy mutant TTR suggest a structure similar to the native state with only a simple opening of a β-strand-loop-strand region e...

  15. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  16. Measurement of intrinsic properties of amyloid fibrils by the peak force QNM method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamcik, Jozef; Lara, Cecile; Usov, Ivan; Jeong, Jae Sun; Ruggeri, Francesco S.; Dietler, Giovanni; Lashuel, Hilal A.; Hamley, Ian W.; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2012-07-01

    We report the investigation of the mechanical properties of different types of amyloid fibrils by the peak force quantitative nanomechanical (PF-QNM) technique. We demonstrate that this technique correctly measures the Young's modulus independent of the polymorphic state and the cross-sectional structural details of the fibrils, and we show that values for amyloid fibrils assembled from heptapeptides, α-synuclein, Aβ(1-42), insulin, β-lactoglobulin, lysozyme, ovalbumin, Tau protein and bovine serum albumin all fall in the range of 2-4 GPa.

  17. Experimentally derived structural constraints for amyloid fibrils of wild-type transthyretin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, David A; Tycko, Robert; Wickner, Reed B

    2011-11-16

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a largely β-sheet serum protein responsible for transporting thyroxine and vitamin A. TTR is found in amyloid deposits of patients with senile systemic amyloidosis. TTR mutants lead to familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy and familial amyloid cardiomyopathy, with an earlier age of onset. Studies of amyloid fibrils of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy mutant TTR suggest a structure similar to the native state with only a simple opening of a β-strand-loop-strand region exposing the two main β-sheets of the protein for fibril elongation. However, we find that the wild-type TTR sequence forms amyloid fibrils that are considerably different from the previously suggested amyloid structure. Using protease digestion with mass spectrometry, we observe the amyloid core to be primarily composed of the C-terminal region, starting around residue 50. Solid-state NMR measurements prove that TTR differs from other pathological amyloids in not having an in-register parallel β-sheet architecture. We also find that the TTR amyloid is incapable of binding thyroxine as monitored by either isothermal calorimetry or 1,8-anilinonaphthalene sulfonate competition. Taken together, our experiments are consistent with a significantly different configuration of the β-sheets compared to the previously suggested structure. PMID:22098747

  18. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-2,5-Bis(4’-hydroxy-3’-carboxystyryl)benzene as a Probe for β-Amyloid Fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Matveev, Sergey V.; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Sviripa, Vitaliy M.; Fazio, Robert C.; Watt, David S.; LeVine, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of Aβ in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients reflects an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance from their brains. Alternative cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by processing proteases generates soluble APP fragments including the neurotoxic amyloid Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides that assemble into fibrils and form plaques. Plaque-buildup occurs over an extended time-frame, and the early detection and modulation of plaque formation are areas of active research....

  19. Cryo-EM reveals the steric zipper structure of a light chain-derived amyloid fibril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Andreas; Annamalai, Karthikeyan; Schmidt, Matthias; Grigorieff, Nikolaus; Fändrich, Marcus

    2016-05-31

    Amyloid fibrils are proteinaceous aggregates associated with diseases in humans and animals. The fibrils are defined by intermolecular interactions between the fibril-forming polypeptide chains, but it has so far remained difficult to reveal the assembly of the peptide subunits in a full-scale fibril. Using electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM), we present a reconstruction of a fibril formed from the pathogenic core of an amyloidogenic immunoglobulin (Ig) light chain. The fibril density shows a lattice-like assembly of face-to-face packed peptide dimers that corresponds to the structure of steric zippers in peptide crystals. Interpretation of the density map with a molecular model enabled us to identify the intermolecular interactions between the peptides and rationalize the hierarchical structure of the fibril based on simple chemical principles. PMID:27185936

  20. A strategy on prion AGAAAAGA amyloid fibril molecular modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2011-01-01

    X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy are two powerful tools to determine the protein 3D structure. However, not all proteins can be successfully crystallized, particularly for membrane proteins. Although NMR spectroscopy is indeed very powerful in determining the 3D structures of membrane proteins, same as X-ray crystallography, it is still very time-consuming and expensive. Under many circumstances, due to the noncrystalline and insoluble nature of some proteins, X-ray and NMR cannot be used at all. Computational approaches, however, allow us to obtain a description of the protein 3D structure at a submicroscopic level. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there is little structural data available to date on the AGAAAAGA palindrome in the hydrophobic region (113-120) of prion proteins, which falls just within the N-terminal unstructured region (1-123) of prion proteins. Many experimental studies have shown that the AGAAAAGA region has amyloid fibril forming properties and...

  1. Chondroitin Sulfate Perlecan Enhances Collagen Fibril Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, A. J.; Johnson, A. E.; Mörgelin, M.;

    2006-01-01

    disaccharides typical for chondroitin sulfate E. Indeed, purified glycosaminoglycans from perlecan-enriched fractions of cartilage extracts contain elevated levels of 4,6-disulfated chondroitin sulfate disaccharides and enhance collagen fibril formation. The effect on collagen assembly is proportional to the...... content of the 4,6-disulfated disaccharide in the different cartilage extracts, with growth plate cartilage glycosaminoglycan being the most efficient enhancer. These findings demonstrate a role for perlecan chondroitin sulfate side chains in cartilage extracellular matrix assembly and provide an...... collagen type II fibril assembly by perlecan-null chondrocytes. Cartilage perlecan is a heparin sulfate or a mixed heparan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The latter form binds collagen and accelerates fibril formation in vitro, with more defined fibril morphology and increased fibril diameters...

  2. Effect of Curcumin on the metal ion induced fibrillization of Amyloid-β peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rona

    2014-01-01

    The effect of Curcumin on Cu(II) and Zn(II) induced oligomerization and protofibrillization of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide has been studied by spectroscopic and microscopic methods. Curcumin could significantly reduce the β-sheet content of the peptide in a time dependent manner. It also plays an antagonistic role in β-sheet formation that is promoted by metal ions like Cu(II) and Zn(II) as observed by Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) images show that spontaneous fibrillization of the peptide occurs in presence of Cu(II) and Zn(II) but is inhibited on incubation of the peptide with Curcumin indicating the beneficial role of Curcumin in preventing the aggregation of Aβ peptide.

  3. Photo-induced inhibition of insulin amyloid fibrillation on online laser measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We compare the structures of insulin upon heating with or without laser irradiation. → Laser irradiation inhibits insulin fibrillation and may be of insert for mechanistic disease studies. → Online laser measurements should be carefully used in the study of amyloid proteins. -- Abstract: Protein aggregation and amyloid fibrillation can lead to several serious diseases and protein drugs ineffectiveness; thus, the detection and inhibition of these processes have been of great interest. In the present study, the inhibition of insulin amyloid fibrillation by laser irradiation was investigated using dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), far-UV circular dichroism (far-UV CD), and thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence. During heat-induced aggregation, the size distribution of two insulin solutions obtained by online and offline dynamic light scattering were different. The laser-on insulin in the presence of 0.1 M NaCl exhibited fewer fibrils than the laser-off insulin, whereas no insulin fibril under laser irradiation was observed in the absence of 0.1 M NaCl for 45 h incubation. Moreover, our CD results showed that the laser-irradiated insulin solution maintained mainly an α-helical conformation, but the laser-off insulin solution formed bulk fibrils followed by a significant increase in β-sheet content for 106 h incubation. These findings provide an inhibition method for insulin amyloid fibrillation using the laser irradiation and demonstrate that the online long-time laser measurements should be carefully used in the study of amyloid proteins because they may change the original results.

  4. Depolymerization of insulin amyloid fibrils by albumin-modified magnetic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siposova, Katarina; Kubovcikova, Martina; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Koneracka, Martina; Zavisova, Vlasta; Antosova, Andrea; Kopcansky, Peter; Daxnerova, Zuzana; Gazova, Zuzana

    2012-02-01

    Pathogenesis of amyloid-related diseases is associated with the presence of protein amyloid deposits. Insulin amyloids have been reported in a patient with diabetes undergoing treatment by injection of insulin and causes problems in the production and storage of this drug and in application of insulin pumps. We have studied the interference of insulin amyloid fibrils with a series of 18 albumin magnetic fluids (MFBSAs) consisting of magnetite nanoparticles modified by different amounts of bovine serum albumin (w/w BSA/Fe3O4 from 0.005 up to 15). We have found that MFBSAs are able to destroy amyloid fibrils in vitro. The extent of fibril depolymerization was affected by nanoparticle physical-chemical properties (hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential and isoelectric point) determined by the BSA amount present in MFBSAs. The most effective were MFBSAs with lower BSA/Fe3O4 ratios (from 0.005 to 0.1) characteristic of about 90% depolymerizing activity. For the most active magnetic fluids (ratios 0.01 and 0.02) the DC50 values were determined in the range of low concentrations, indicating their ability to interfere with insulin fibrils at stoichiometric concentrations. We assume that the present findings represent a starting point for the application of the active MFBSAs as therapeutic agents targeting insulin amyloidosis.

  5. Depolymerization of insulin amyloid fibrils by albumin-modified magnetic fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathogenesis of amyloid-related diseases is associated with the presence of protein amyloid deposits. Insulin amyloids have been reported in a patient with diabetes undergoing treatment by injection of insulin and causes problems in the production and storage of this drug and in application of insulin pumps. We have studied the interference of insulin amyloid fibrils with a series of 18 albumin magnetic fluids (MFBSAs) consisting of magnetite nanoparticles modified by different amounts of bovine serum albumin (w/w BSA/Fe3O4 from 0.005 up to 15). We have found that MFBSAs are able to destroy amyloid fibrils in vitro. The extent of fibril depolymerization was affected by nanoparticle physical–chemical properties (hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential and isoelectric point) determined by the BSA amount present in MFBSAs. The most effective were MFBSAs with lower BSA/Fe3O4 ratios (from 0.005 to 0.1) characteristic of about 90% depolymerizing activity. For the most active magnetic fluids (ratios 0.01 and 0.02) the DC50 values were determined in the range of low concentrations, indicating their ability to interfere with insulin fibrils at stoichiometric concentrations. We assume that the present findings represent a starting point for the application of the active MFBSAs as therapeutic agents targeting insulin amyloidosis. (paper)

  6. Michler’s Hydrol Blue: A Sensitive Probe for Amyloid Fibril Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Kitts, Catherine C.

    2011-05-03

    Michler\\'s hydrol blue (MHB) is investigated with respect to photophysical properties in varied solvent environment and when bound to insulin and lysozyme fibrils. The MHB chromophore is shown to act like a molecular rotor and bind well to amyloid fibrils, where it exhibits a characteristic red-shift in its excitation spectrum and an increase in the emission quantum yield upon binding. MHB is more sensitive to environmental changes than Thioflavin T (ThT) and furthermore, in contrast to the latter amyloid probe, can differentiate between insulin and lysozyme fibrils by a more red-shifted excitation spectrum for insulin fibrils. To support the experimental observations, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations were performed on MHB at several levels of theory. The predicted changes of spectral properties as a function of the environment are in good agreement with the experimental results. Linear dichroism (LD) is used to determine the orientation of the MHB within the fibrils. It was shown through LD and molecular modeling that MHB aligns itself preferentially parallel with the amyloid fiber at an angle of 14°-22° to the fibril axis and along the grooves of the β-sheet. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  7. The effects of chondroitin sulfate and serum albumin on the fibrillation of human islet amyloid polypeptide at phospholipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Wang, Li; Lu, Tong; Wei, Ying; Li, Fei

    2016-04-28

    Glycosaminoglycans and serum albumin are important cellular components that regulate the fibril formation of proteins. Whereas the effects of cellular components on the fibrillation of amyloid proteins in bulk solution are widely studied, less attention has been paid to the effects of cellular components on amyloidogenesis occurring at cellular membranes. In this study, we focus on the impacts of chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the amyloidogenic behaviors of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) at phospholipid membranes consisting of neutral POPC and anionic POPG. Using the thioflavin T fluorescence assay, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, we demonstrate that CSA has an intensive promotion effect on the fibrillation of hIAPP at the POPC membrane, which is larger than the total effect of CSA alone and POPC alone. The further enhanced promotion of the fibrillation of hIAPP by CSA at the neutral membrane is associated with a specific interaction of CSA with POPC. In contrast, the activity of BSA as an inhibitor of hIAPP fibrillation observed in bulk solution decreases dramatically in the presence of POPG vesicles. The dramatic loss of the inhibition efficiency of BSA arises essentially from a specific interaction with the POPG component, but not simply from suppression by an opposite effect of the anionic membrane. The findings in this study suggest that the interactions between membranes and cellular components may have a significant effect on the activity of the cellular components in regulating the fibrillation of hIAPP. PMID:27067251

  8. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Polybasic peptide p5 binds human light chain amyloid extracts. •The binding of p5 with amyloid involves both glycosaminoglycans and fibrils. •Heparinase treatment led to a correlation between p5 binding and fibril content. •p5 binding to AL amyloid requires electrostatic interactions. -- Abstract: In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as

  9. Estrogen has anti-amyloidogenic effects on Alzheimer's β-amyloid fibrils in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhibition of the assembly of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) as well as the destabilization of preformed β-amyloid fibrils (fAβ) in the central nervous system could be valuable therapeutics of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Epidemiological studies have indicated that estrogen therapy reduced the risk of developing AD in women. Here, we examined the effects of estrogen (estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3)) and related sexual steroids (androstenedione (AND) and testosterone (TES)) on the polymerization, extension and destabilization of fAβ(1-42) and fAβ(1-40) at pH 7.5 at 37 oC in vitro, using fluorescence spectroscopic analysis with thioflavin T and electron microscopic studies. E1, E2, and E3 dose-dependently inhibited the formation, as well as destabilization of fAβs. The overall anti-amyloidogenic activity of these molecules was in the order of: E3 > E2 = E1 >>AND = TES. Estrogen could be a potential therapeutic agent to prevent or delay AD progression

  10. How does domain replacement affect fibril formation of the rabbit/human prion proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yan

    Full Text Available It is known that in vivo human prion protein (PrP have the tendency to form fibril deposits and are associated with infectious fatal prion diseases, while the rabbit PrP does not readily form fibrils and is unlikely to cause prion diseases. Although we have previously demonstrated that amyloid fibrils formed by the rabbit PrP and the human PrP have different secondary structures and macromolecular crowding has different effects on fibril formation of the rabbit/human PrPs, we do not know which domains of PrPs cause such differences. In this study, we have constructed two PrP chimeras, rabbit chimera and human chimera, and investigated how domain replacement affects fibril formation of the rabbit/human PrPs.As revealed by thioflavin T binding assays and Sarkosyl-soluble SDS-PAGE, the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes fibril formation of both chimeras. As evidenced by circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and proteinase K digestion assays, amyloid fibrils formed by human chimera have secondary structures and proteinase K-resistant features similar to those formed by the human PrP. However, amyloid fibrils formed by rabbit chimera have proteinase K-resistant features and secondary structures in crowded physiological environments different from those formed by the rabbit PrP, and secondary structures in dilute solutions similar to the rabbit PrP. The results from transmission electron microscopy show that macromolecular crowding caused human chimera but not rabbit chimera to form short fibrils and non-fibrillar particles.We demonstrate for the first time that the domains beyond PrP-H2H3 (β-strand 1, α-helix 1, and β-strand 2 have a remarkable effect on fibrillization of the rabbit PrP but almost no effect on the human PrP. Our findings can help to explain why amyloid fibrils formed by the rabbit PrP and the human PrP have different secondary structures and why macromolecular crowding has different

  11. How curcumin affords effective protection against amyloid fibrillation in insulin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabiee, Atefeh; Ebrahim Habibi, Azadeh; Ghasemi, Atiyeh Ghasemi;

    2013-01-01

    at different time points resulted in reduced amounts of final fibrils. Disaggregation of pre-formed fibrils was also observed upon addition of curcumin, as well as reduction in final fibril amounts after seeding. Overall, this compound appears to be able to interact with native, intermediate and fibrillar...... forms. Docking experiment suggests a potential interacting site with the B-chain of insulin, as well as a possibility for beta-sheet breaker activity....

  12. Amyloid Cardiomyopathy in Hereditary Transthyretin V30M Amyloidosis - Impact of Sex and Amyloid Fibril Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Arvidsson; Björn Pilebro; Per Westermark; Per Lindqvist; Suhr, Ole B.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Transthyretin V30M (ATTR V30M) amyloidosis is a phenotypically diverse disease with symptoms ranging from predominant neuropathy to exclusive cardiac manifestations. The aims of this study were to determine the dispersion of the two types of fibrils found in Swedish ATTR V30M patients -Type A consisting of a mixture of truncated and full length ATTR fibrils and type B fibrils consisting of full length fibrils, and to estimate the severity of cardiac dysfunction in relation to fibril ...

  13. Double-Layer Mediated Electromechanical Response of Amyloid Fibrils in Liquid Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Nikiforov, M.P.; Thompson, G. L.; Reukov, V.V.; Jesse, S; Guo, S.; Rodriguez, B. J.; Seal, K.; Vertegel, A.A.; Kalinin, S. V.

    2010-01-01

    Harnessing electrical bias-induced mechanical motion on the nanometer and molecular scale is a critical step towards understanding the fundamental mechanisms of redox processes and implementation of molecular electromechanical machines. Probing these phenomena in biomolecular systems requires electromechanical measurements be performed in liquid environments. Here we demonstrate the use of band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy for probing electromechanical coupling in amyloid fibrils...

  14. Self-assembly of Amyloid Fibrils in One, Two and Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils are protein aggregates, which occur in-vivo in the case of neurodegenerative diseases and in-vitro in the design of advanced functional materials of relevance in nanotechnology and nanosciences. At length scales above the well-established atomistic fingerprint of amyloid fibrils, these colloidal aggregates exhibit mesoscopic properties comparable to those of natural polyelectrolytes, yet with persistence lengths several orders of magnitude beyond the Debye length. This intrinsic rigidity, together with their chiral, polar and charged nature, provides these systems with some unique physical behavior in one, two and three dimensions. In this talk I will discuss our current understanding on the mesoscopic properties of amyloid fibrils at the single molecule level, the implication of their semiflexible nature on their liquid crystalline properties, and I will illustrate how this information proves useful in understanding their collective behavior in bulk and when adsorbed at liquid interfaces. By the careful exploitation of the physical properties of amyloid fibrils, the design of advanced materials with unprecedented physical properties becomes possible, and I will give a few examples on how these systems can ideally suit the design of biosensors and biomaterials.

  15. The unique Alzheimer's β-amyloid triangular fibril has a cavity along the fibril axis under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Yifat; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    Elucidating the structure of Aβ(1-40) fibrils is of interest in Alzheimer's disease research because it is required for designing therapeutics that target Aβ(1-40) fibril formation at an early stage of the disease. M35 is a crucial residue because of its potential oxidation and its strong interactions across β-strands and across β-sheets in Aβ fibrils. Experimentally, data for the three-fold symmetry structure of the Aβ(9-40) fibril suggest formation of tight hydrophobic core through M35 interactions across the fibril axis and strong I31-V39 interactions between different cross-β units. Herein, on the basis of experimental data, we probe conformers with three-fold symmetry of the full-length Aβ(1-40). Our all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent of conformers based on the ssNMR data reproduced experimental observations of M35-M35 and I31-V39 distances. Our interpretation of the experimental data suggests that the observed ∼5-7 Å M35-M35 distance in the fibril three-fold symmetry structure is likely to relate to M35 interactions along the fibril axis, rather than across the fibril axis, since our measured M35-M35 distances across the fibril axis are consistently above 15 Å. Consequently, we revealed that the unique Aβ(1-40) triangular structure has a large cavity along the fibril axis and that the N-termini can assist in the stabilization of the fibril by interacting with the U-turn domains or with the C-termini domains. Our findings, together with the recent cyroEM characterization of the hollow core in Aβ(1-42) fibrils, point to the relevance of a cavity in Aβ(1-40/1-42) oligomers which should be considered when targeting oligomer toxicity. PMID:21299220

  16. Modeling generic aspects of ideal fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel, D., E-mail: denis.michel@live.fr [Universite de Rennes1-IRSET, Campus de Beaulieu Bat. 13, 35042 Rennes (France)

    2016-01-21

    Many different proteins self-aggregate into insoluble fibrils growing apically by reversible addition of elementary building blocks. But beyond this common principle, the modalities of fibril formation are very disparate, with various intermediate forms which can be reshuffled by minor modifications of physico-chemical conditions or amino-acid sequences. To bypass this complexity, the multifaceted phenomenon of fibril formation is reduced here to its most elementary principles defined for a linear prototype of fibril. Selected generic features, including nucleation, elongation, and conformational recruitment, are modeled using minimalist hypotheses and tools, by separating equilibrium from kinetic aspects and in vitro from in vivo conditions. These reductionist approaches allow to bring out known and new rudiments, including the kinetic and equilibrium effects of nucleation, the dual influence of elongation on nucleation, the kinetic limitations on nucleation and fibril numbers, and the accumulation of complexes in vivo by rescue from degradation. Overlooked aspects of these processes are also pointed: the exponential distribution of fibril lengths can be recovered using various models because it is attributable to randomness only. It is also suggested that the same term “critical concentration” is used for different things, involved in either nucleation or elongation.

  17. Islet amyloid polypeptide and high hydrostatic pressure: towards an understanding of the fibrillization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, D H J; Smirnovas, V; Winter, R [University of Dortmund, Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry I -Biophysical Chemistry, D-44227 Dortmund (Germany)], E-mail: roland.winter@uni-dortmund.de

    2008-07-15

    Type II Diabetes Mellitus is a disease which is characterized by peripheral insulin resistance coupled with a progressive loss of insulin secretion that is associated with a decrease in pancreatic islet {beta}-cell mass and the deposition of amyloid in the extracellular matrix of {beta}-cells, which lead to islet cell death. The principal component of the islet amyloid is a pancreatic hormone called islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). High-pressure coupled with FT-IR, CD, ThT fluorescence spectroscopic and AFM studies were carried out to reveal information on the aggregation pathway as well as the aggregate structure of IAPP. Our data indicate that IAPP pre-formed fibrils exhibit a strong polymorphism with heterogeneous structures very sensitive to high hydrostatic pressure, indicating a high percentage of ionic and hydrophobic interactions being responsible for the stability the IAPP fibrils.

  18. A look into amyloid formation by transthyretin: aggregation pathway and a novel kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Tiago Q; Almeida, Zaida L; Cruz, Pedro F; Jesus, Catarina S H; Castanheira, Pedro; Brito, Rui M M

    2015-03-21

    The aggregation of proteins into insoluble amyloid fibrils is the hallmark of many, highly debilitating, human pathologies such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. Transthyretin (TTR) is a homotetrameric protein implicated in several amyloidoses like Senile Systemic Amyloidosis (SSA), Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy (FAP), Familial Amyloid Cardiomyopathy (FAC), and the rare Central Nervous System selective Amyloidosis (CNSA). In this work, we have investigated the kinetics of TTR aggregation into amyloid fibrils produced by the addition of NaCl to acid-unfolded TTR monomers and we propose a mathematically simple kinetic mechanism to analyse the aggregation kinetics of TTR. We have conducted circular dichroism, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and thioflavin-T emission experiments to follow the conformational changes accompanying amyloid formation at different TTR concentrations. Kinetic traces were adjusted to a two-step model with the first step being second-order and the second being unimolecular. The molecular species present in the pathway of TTR oligomerization were characterized by size exclusion chromatography coupled to multi-angle light scattering and by transmission electron microscopy. The results show the transient accumulation of oligomers composed of 6 to 10 monomers in agreement with reports suggesting that these oligomers may be the causative agent of cell toxicity. The results obtained may prove to be useful in understanding the mode of action of different compounds in preventing fibril formation and, therefore, in designing new drugs against TTR amyloidosis. PMID:25694367

  19. The formation, function and regulation of amyloids: insights from structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landreh, M; Sawaya, M R; Hipp, M S; Eisenberg, D S; Wüthrich, K; Hartl, F U

    2016-08-01

    Amyloid diseases are characterized by the accumulation of insoluble, β-strand-rich aggregates. The underlying structural conversions are closely associated with cellular toxicity, but can also drive the formation of functional protein assemblies. In recent years, studies in the field of structural studies have revealed astonishing insights into the origins, mechanisms and implications of amyloid formation. Notably, high-resolution crystal structures of peptides in amyloid-like fibrils and prefibrillar oligomers have become available despite their challenging chemical nature. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has revealed that dynamic local polymorphisms in the benign form of the prion protein affect the transformation into amyloid fibrils and the transmissibility of prion diseases. Studies of the structures and interactions of chaperone proteins help us to understand how the cellular proteostasis network is able to recognize different stages of aberrant protein folding and prevent aggregation. In this review, we will focus on recent developments that connect the different aspects of amyloid biology and discuss how understanding the process of amyloid formation and the associated defence mechanisms can reveal targets for pharmacological intervention that may become the first steps towards clinically viable treatment strategies. PMID:27237473

  20. Synthetic peptide homologous to β protein from Alzheimer's disease forms amyloid-like fibrils in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progressive amyloid deposition in senile plaques and cortical blood vessels may play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. The authors have used x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy to study the molecular organization and morphology of macromolecular assemblies formed by three synthetic peptides homologous to β protein of brain amyloid: β-(1-28), residues 1-28 of the β protein; [Ala1-β-(1-28), β-(1-28) with alanine substituted for lysine at position 16; and β-(18-28), residues 18-28 of the β protein. β-(1-28) readily formed fibrils in vitro that were similar in ultrastructure to the in vivo amyloid and aggregated into large bundles resembling those of senile plaque cores. X-ray patterns from partially dried, oriented pellets showed a cross-β-conformation. [Ala16]β-(1-28) formed β-pleated sheet assemblies that were dissimilar to in vivo fibrils. The width of the 10-A spacing indicated stacks of about six sheets. Thus, substitution of the uncharged alanine for the positively charged lysine in the β-strand region enhances the packing of the sheets and dramatically alters the type of macromolecular aggregate formed. Β-(18-28) formed assemblies that had even a greater number of stacked sheets. The findings on these homologous synthetic assemblies help to define the specific sequence that is required to form Alzheimer's-type amyloid fibrils, thus providing an in vitro model of age-related cerebral amyloidogenesis

  1. [beta subsccript 2]-microglobulin forms three-dimensional domain-swapped amyloid fibrils with disulfide linkages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-08-09

    {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}-m) is the light chain of the type I major histocompatibility complex. It deposits as amyloid fibrils within joints during long-term hemodialysis treatment. Despite the devastating effects of dialysis-related amyloidosis, full understanding of how fibrils form from soluble {beta}{sub 2}-m remains elusive. Here we show that {beta}{sub 2}-m can oligomerize and fibrillize via three-dimensional domain swapping. Isolating a covalently bound, domain-swapped dimer from {beta}{sub 2}-m oligomers on the pathway to fibrils, we were able to determine its crystal structure. The hinge loop that connects the swapped domain to the core domain includes the fibrillizing segment LSFSKD, whose atomic structure we also determined. The LSFSKD structure reveals a class 5 steric zipper, akin to other amyloid spines. The structures of the dimer and the zipper spine fit well into an atomic model for this fibrillar form of {beta}{sub 2}-m, which assembles slowly under physiological conditions.

  2. Amyloid fibrillation in native and chemically-modified forms of carbonic anhydrase II: role of surface hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Es-Haghi, Ali; Shariatizi, Sajad; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Nemat-Gorgani, Mohsen

    2012-03-01

    Chemical modification or mutation of proteins may bring about significant changes in the net charge or surface hydrophobicity of a protein structure. Such events may be of major physiological significance and may provide important insights into the genetics of amyloid diseases. In the present study, fibrillation potential of native and chemically-modified forms of bovine carbonic anhydrase II (BCA II) were investigated. Initially, various denaturing conditions including low pH and high temperatures were tested to induce fibrillation. At a low pH of around 2.4, where the protein is totally dissociated, the apo form was found to take up a pre-molten globular (PMG) conformation with the capacity for fibril formation. Upon increasing the pH to around 3.6, a molten globular (MG) form became abundant, forming amorphous aggregates. Charge neutralization and enhancement of hydrophobicity by methylation, acetylation and propionylation of lysine residues appeared very effective in promoting fibrillation of both the apo and holo forms under native conditions, the rates and extents of which were directly proportional to surface hydrophobicity, and influenced by salt concentration and temperature. These modified structures underwent more pronounced fibrillation under native conditions, than the PMG intermediate form, observed under denaturing conditions. The nature of the fibrillation products obtained from intermediate and modified structures were characterized and compared and their possible cytotoxicity determined. Results are discussed in terms of the importance of surface net charge and hydrophobicity in controlling protein aggregation. A discussion on the physiological significance of the observations is also presented. PMID:22251892

  3. Structural reorganisation and potential toxicity of oligomeric species formed during the assembly of amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mookyung Cheon

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that oligomeric protein assemblies may represent the molecular species responsible for cytotoxicity in a range of neurological disorders including Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. We use all-atom computer simulations to reveal that the process of oligomerization can be divided into two steps. The first is characterised by a hydrophobic coalescence resulting in the formation of molten oligomers in which hydrophobic residues are sequestered away from the solvent. In the second step, the oligomers undergo a process of reorganisation driven by interchain hydrogen bonding interactions that induce the formation of beta sheet rich assemblies in which hydrophobic groups can become exposed. Our results show that the process of aggregation into either ordered or amorphous species is largely determined by a competition between the hydrophobicity of the amino acid sequence and the tendency of polypeptide chains to form arrays of hydrogen bonds. We discuss how the increase in solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface resulting from such a competition offers an explanation for recent observations concerning the cytotoxicity of oligomeric species formed prior to mature amyloid fibrils.

  4. Cu(II) promotes amyloid pore formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hangyu, E-mail: hangyuz@uw.edu [Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Rochet, Jean-Christophe [Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Stanciu, Lia A. [Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    The aggregation of α-synuclein is associated with dopamine neuron death in Parkinson's disease. There is controversy in the field over the question of which species of the aggregates, fibrils or protofibrils, are toxic. Moreover, compelling evidence suggested the exposure to heavy metals to be a risk of PD. Nevertheless, the mechanism of metal ions in promoting PD remains unclear. In this research, we investigated the structural basis of Cu(II) induced aggregation of α-synuclein. Using transmission electron microscopy experiments, Cu(II) was found to promote in vitro aggregation of α-synuclein by facilitating annular protofibril formation rather than fibril formation. Furthermore, neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils accompanied by considerable decrease of β-sheet content. These results strongly support the hypothesis that annular protofibrils are the toxic species, rather than fibrils, thereby inspiring us to search novel therapeutic strategies for the suppression of the toxic annular protofibril formation. - Highlights: • Cu(II) promoted the annular protofibril formation of α-synuclein in vitro. • Cu(II) postponed the in vitro fibrillization of α-synuclein. • Neuroprotective baicalein disaggregated annular protofibrils.

  5. Acidic pH retards the fibrillization of human islet amyloid polypeptide due to electrostatic repulsion of histidines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Xu, Weixin; Mu, Yuguang; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2013-08-01

    The human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP) is the major constituent of amyloid deposits in pancreatic islets of type-II diabetes. IAPP is secreted together with insulin from the acidic secretory granules at a low pH of approximately 5.5 to the extracellular environment at a neutral pH. The increased accumulation of extracellular hIAPP in diabetes indicates that changes in pH may promote amyloid formation. To gain insights and underlying mechanisms of the pH effect on hIAPP fibrillogenesis, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent model were performed to study the structural properties of five hIAPP protofibrillar oligomers, under acidic and neutral pH, respectively. In consistent with experimental findings, simulation results show that acidic pH is not conducive to the structural stability of these oligomers. This provides a direct evidence for a recent experiment [L. Khemtemourian, E. Domenech, J. P. F. Doux, M. C. Koorengevel, and J. A. Killian, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 15598 (2011)], 10.1021/ja205007j, which suggests that acidic pH inhibits the fibril formation of hIAPP. In addition, a complementary coarse-grained simulation shows the repulsive electrostatic interactions among charged His18 residues slow down the dimerization process of hIAPP by twofold. Besides, our all-atom simulations reveal acidic pH mainly affects the local structure around residue His18 by destroying the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, due to the repulsive interactions between protonated interchain His18 residues at acidic pH. It is also disclosed that the local interactions nearby His18 operating between adjacent β-strands trigger the structural transition, which gives hints to the experimental findings that the rate of hIAPP fibril formation and the morphologies of the fibrillar structures are strongly pH-dependent.

  6. Effect of copper (II) ion against elongation behavior of amyloid {beta} fibrils on liposome membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimanouchi, T.; Onishi, R.; Kitaura, N.; Umakoshi, H.; Kuboi, R. [Division of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    The fibril growth behavior of amyloid {beta} protein (A{beta}) on cell membranes is relating to the progression of Alzheimer's disease. This growth behavior of A{beta} fibrils is sensitively affected by the metal ions, neurotransmitters, or bioreactive substrate. The inhibitory effect of those materials was quantitatively estimated from the viewpoints of ''crystal growth''. In a bulk aqueous solution, copper (II) ion showed the strong inhibitory effect on the growth of A{beta} fibrils. Meanwhile, the addition of a closed-phospholipid bilayer membrane (liposome) could reduce the above inhibitory effect of copper (II) ion. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of protease resistance and toxicity of amyloid-like food fibrils from whey, soy, kidney bean, and egg white.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassé, Moritz; Ulluwishewa, Dulantha; Healy, Jackie; Thompson, Dion; Miller, Antonia; Roy, Nicole; Chitcholtan, Kenny; Gerrard, Juliet A

    2016-02-01

    The structural properties of amyloid fibrils combined with their highly functional surface chemistry make them an attractive new food ingredient, for example as highly effective gelling agents. However, the toxic role of amyloid fibrils in disease may cause some concern about their food safety because it has not been established unequivocally if consumption of food fibrils poses a health risk to consumers. Here we present a study of amyloid-like fibrils from whey, kidney bean, soy bean, and egg white to partially address this concern. Fibrils showed varied resistance to proteolytic digestion in vitro by either Proteinase K, pepsin or pancreatin. The toxicity of mature fibrils was measured in vitro and compared to native protein, early-stage-fibrillar protein, and sonicated fibrils in two immortalised human cancer cell lines, Caco-2 and Hec-1a. There was no reduction in the viability of either Caco-2 or Hec-1a cells after treatment with a fibril concentration of up to 0.25 mg/mL. PMID:26304377

  8. Role of mutation on fibril formation in small peptides by REMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudinobar, Farbod; Dias, Cristiano

    Amyloid fibrils are now recognized as a common form of protein structure. They have wide implications for neurological diseases and entities involved in the survival of living organisms, e.g., silkmoth eggshells. Biological functions of these entities are often related to the superior mechanical strength of fibrils that persists over a broad range of chemical and thermal conditions desirable for various biotechnological applications, e.g., to encapsulate drugs. Mechanical properties of fibrils was shown to depend strongly on the amino acid sequence of its constituent peptides whereby bending rigidities can vary by two orders of magnitude. Therefore, the rational design of new fibril-prone peptides with tailored properties depends on our understanding of the relation between amino acid sequence and its propensity to fibrillize. In this presentation I will show results from extensive Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics (REMD) simulations of a 12-residue peptide containing the fibril-prone motif KFFE and its mutants. Simulations are performed on monomers, dimers, and tetramers. I will discuss effects of side chain packing, hydrophobicity, charges and beta-sheet propensity on fibril formation. Physics Department, University Heights, Newark, New Jersey, 07102-1982, USA.

  9. Identification of key amino acid residues modulating intracellular and in vitro microcin E492 amyloid formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina eAguilera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcin E492 (MccE492 is a pore-forming bacteriocin produced and exported by Klebsiella pneumoniae RYC492. Besides its antibacterial activity, excreted MccE492 can form amyloid fibrils in vivo as well as in vitro. It has been proposed that bacterial amyloids can be functional playing a biological role, and in the particular case of MccE492 it would control the antibacterial activity. MccE492 amyloid fibril’s morphology and formation kinetics in vitro have been well characterized, however it is not known which amino acid residues determine its amyloidogenic propensity, nor if it forms intracellular amyloid inclusions as has been reported for other bacterial amyloids. In this work we found the conditions in which MccE492 forms intracellular amyloids in E. coli cells, that were visualized as round-shaped inclusion bodies recognized by two amyloidophillic probes, 2-4´-methylaminophenyl benzothiazole and thioflavin-S. We used this property to perform a flow cytometry-based assay to evaluate the aggregation propensity of MccE492 mutants, that were designed using an in silico prediction of putative aggregation hotspots. We established that the predicted amino acid residues 54-63, effectively act as a pro-amyloidogenic stretch. As in the case of other amyloidogenic proteins, this region presented two gatekeeper residues (P57 and P59, which disfavor both intracellular and in vitro MccE492 amyloid formation, preventing an uncontrolled aggregation. Mutants in each of these gatekeeper residues showed faster in vitro aggregation and bactericidal inactivation kinetics, and the two mutants were accumulated as dense amyloid inclusions in more than 80% of E. coli cells expressing these variants. In contrast, the MccE492 mutant lacking residues 54-63 showed a significantly lower intracellular aggregation propensity and slower in vitro polymerization kinetics. Electron microscopy analysis of the amyloids formed in vitro by these mutants revealed that, although

  10. Fibrils from designed non-amyloid-related synthetic peptides induce AA-amyloidosis during inflammation in an animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Westermark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mouse AA-amyloidosis is a transmissible disease by a prion-like mechanism where amyloid fibrils act by seeding. Synthetic peptides with no amyloid relationship can assemble into amyloid-like fibrils and these may have seeding capacity for amyloid proteins. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Several synthetic peptides, designed for nanotechnology, have been examined for their ability to produce fibrils with Congo red affinity and concomitant green birefringence, affinity for thioflavin S and to accelerate AA-amyloidosis in mice. It is shown that some amphiphilic fibril-forming peptides not only produced Congo red birefringence and showed affinity for thioflavin S, but they also shortened the lag phase for systemic AA-amyloidosis in mice when they were given intravenously at the time of inflammatory induction with silver nitride. Peptides, not forming amyloid-like fibrils, did not have such properties. CONCLUSIONS: These observations should caution researchers and those who work with synthetic peptides and their derivatives to be aware of the potential health concerns.

  11. Dewetting transition assisted clearance of (NFGAILS) amyloid fibrils from cell membranes by graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiajia; Yang, Zaixing; Gu, Zonglin [Institute of Quantitative Biology and Medicine, SRMP and RAD-X, Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Li, Haotian [Bio-X Lab, Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Garate, Jose Antonio [IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Zhou, Ruhong, E-mail: ruhongz@us.ibm.com [Institute of Quantitative Biology and Medicine, SRMP and RAD-X, Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    Clearance of partially ordered oligomers and monomers deposited on cell membrane surfaces is believed to be an effective route to alleviate many potential protein conformational diseases (PCDs). With large-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, here we show that graphene nanosheets can easily and quickly win a competitive adsorption of human islet amyloid polypeptides (hIAPP{sub 22-28}) NFGAILS and associated fibrils against cell membrane, due to graphene's unique two-dimensional, highly hydrophobic surface with its all-sp{sup 2} hybrid structure. A nanoscale dewetting transition was observed at the interfacial region between the fibril (originally deposited on the membrane) and the graphene nanosheet, which significantly assisted the adsorption of fibrils onto graphene from the membrane. The π–π stacking interaction between Phe23 and graphene played a crucial role, providing the driving force for the adsorption at the graphene surface. This study renders new insight towards the importance of water during the interactions between amyloid peptides, the phospholipidic membrane, and graphene, which might shed some light on future developments of graphene-based nanomedicine for preventing/curing PCDs like type II diabetes mellitus.

  12. Dewetting transition assisted clearance of (NFGAILS) amyloid fibrils from cell membranes by graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clearance of partially ordered oligomers and monomers deposited on cell membrane surfaces is believed to be an effective route to alleviate many potential protein conformational diseases (PCDs). With large-scale all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, here we show that graphene nanosheets can easily and quickly win a competitive adsorption of human islet amyloid polypeptides (hIAPP22-28) NFGAILS and associated fibrils against cell membrane, due to graphene's unique two-dimensional, highly hydrophobic surface with its all-sp2 hybrid structure. A nanoscale dewetting transition was observed at the interfacial region between the fibril (originally deposited on the membrane) and the graphene nanosheet, which significantly assisted the adsorption of fibrils onto graphene from the membrane. The π–π stacking interaction between Phe23 and graphene played a crucial role, providing the driving force for the adsorption at the graphene surface. This study renders new insight towards the importance of water during the interactions between amyloid peptides, the phospholipidic membrane, and graphene, which might shed some light on future developments of graphene-based nanomedicine for preventing/curing PCDs like type II diabetes mellitus

  13. MpUL-multi: Software for Calculation of Amyloid Fibril Mass per Unit Length from TB-TEM Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iadanza, Matthew G.; Jackson, Matthew P.; Radford, Sheena E.; Ranson, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Structure determination for amyloid fibrils presents many challenges due to the high variability exhibited by fibrils and heterogeneous morphologies present, even in single samples. Mass per unit length (MPL) estimates can be used to differentiate amyloid fibril morphologies and provide orthogonal evidence for helical symmetry parameters determined by other methods. In addition, MPL data can provide insight on the arrangement of subunits in a fibril, especially for more complex fibrils assembled with multiple parallel copies of the asymmetric unit or multiple twisted protofilaments. By detecting only scattered electrons, which serve as a relative measure of total scattering, and therefore protein mass, dark field imaging gives an approximation of the total mass of protein present in any given length of fibril. When compared with a standard of known MPL, such as Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV), MPL of the fibrils in question can be determined. The program suite MpUL-multi was written for rapid semi-automated processing of TB-TEM dark field data acquired using this method. A graphical user interface allows for simple designation of fibrils and standards. A second program averages intensities from multiple TMV molecules for accurate standard determination, makes multiple measurements along a given fibril, and calculates the MPL. PMID:26867957

  14. The Synthesis of 1,4,7-Triazacyclononane Conjugated Amyloid-phillic Compound and Its Binding Affinity to the β-Amyloid Fibril

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jong Min; Jo, Jee Hye [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    The development of new compounds which have affinity for the β-amyloid fibril would lead to the new compounds that could have therapeutic effects on AD. Previously, we generated new amyloid-phillic amide derivative of Chrysamine G and found that this compound protect human astrocyte cells against Aβ-induced toxicity. As conjugation of amyloid-philic molecules with suitable metal chelating ligands could lead to new diagnostic molecules for in vivo quantification of amyloid deposition and new probes for amyloid structure, we designed the compound, which was conjugate of 1,4,7-triazacyclo-nonane and the amyloid-philic compound 1. Here, we would like to report the synthesis of compound 2 and its binding property of β-amyloid fibril. The synthesis of compound was achieved by combining three fragments the biphenyl amine, isophthalic acid 5 and 1,4,7-triazacyclononane. The synthesis of isophthalic acid part 5 commenced with esterfication of isophthalic acid in methanol with HCl to produce the monoester 4 in 38% yield. Treatment of the monoester 4 with oxalyl chloride afforded the acyl chloride 5 in 95% yield.

  15. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-2,5-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-carboxystyryl)benzene as a probe for β-amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Sergey V; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Sviripa, Vitaliy M; Fazio, Robert C; Watt, David S; LeVine, Harry

    2014-12-01

    Accumulation of Aβ in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients reflects an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance from their brains. Alternative cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by processing proteases generates soluble APP fragments including the neurotoxic amyloid Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides that assemble into fibrils and form plaques. Plaque-buildup occurs over an extended time-frame, and the early detection and modulation of plaque formation are areas of active research. Radiolabeled probes for the detection of amyloid plaques and fibrils in living subjects are important for noninvasive evaluation of AD diagnosis, progression, and differentiation of AD from other neurodegenerative diseases and age-related cognitive decline. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-1-[(3)H]-2,5-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-carbomethoxystyryl)benzene possesses an improved level of chemical stability relative to a previously reported radioiodinated analog for radiometric quantification of Aβ plaque and tau pathology in brain tissue and in vitro studies with synthetic Aβ and tau fibrils. PMID:25452000

  16. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate rapidly remodels PAP85-120, SEM1(45-107, and SEM2(49-107 seminal amyloid fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Castellano

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Semen harbors amyloid fibrils formed by proteolytic fragments of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP248-286 and PAP85-120 and semenogelins (SEM1 and SEM2 that potently enhance HIV infectivity. Amyloid but not soluble forms of these peptides enhance HIV infection. Thus, agents that remodel these amyloid fibrils could prevent HIV transmission. Here, we confirm that the green tea polyphenol, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, slowly remodels fibrils formed by PAP248-286 termed SEVI (semen derived enhancer of viral infection and also exerts a direct anti-viral effect. We elucidate for the first time that EGCG remodels PAP85-120, SEM1(45-107, and SEM2(49-107 fibrils more rapidly than SEVI fibrils. We establish EGCG as the first small molecule that can remodel all four classes of seminal amyloid. The combined anti-amyloid and anti-viral properties of EGCG could have utility in preventing HIV transmission.

  17. Computational Potential Energy Minimization Studies on the Prion AGAAAAGA Amyloid Fibril Molecular Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2012-01-01

    X-ray crystallography, NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) spectroscopy, and dual polarization interferometry, etc are indeed very powerful tools to determine the 3D structures of proteins (including the membrane proteins), though they are time-consuming and costly. However, for some proteins, due to their unstable, noncrystalline and insoluble nature, these tools cannot work. Under this condition, mathematical and physical theoretical methods and computational approaches allow us to obtain a description of the protein 3D structure at a submicroscopic level. This Chapter presents some practical and useful mathematical optimization computational approaches to produce 3D structures of the Prion AGAAAAGA Amyloid Fibrils, from a potential energy minimization point of view.

  18. Polymorphism of amyloid-like fibrils can be defined by the concentration of seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Sneideris, Tomas; Milto, Katažyna; Smirnovas, Vytautas

    2015-01-01

    Prions are infectious proteins where the same protein may express distinct strains. The strains are enciphered by different misfolded conformations. Strain-like phenomena have also been reported in a number of other amyloid-forming proteins. One of the features of amyloid strains is the ability to self-propagate, maintaining a constant set of physical properties despite being propagated under conditions different from those that allowed initial formation of the strain. Here we report a cross-...

  19. Inhibitory Effect of Curcumin-Cu(II) and Curcumin-Zn(II) Complexes on Amyloid-Beta Peptide Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Rona Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    Mononuclear complexes of Curcumin with Cu(II) and Zn(II) have been synthesized and, characterized and their effects on the fibrillization and aggregation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide have been studied. FTIR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations demonstrate that the complexes can inhibit the transition from less structured oligomers to β-sheet rich protofibrils which act as seeding factors for further fibrillization. The metal complexes also impart more improved inhibitor...

  20. Quality control system response to stochastic growth of amyloid fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pigolotti, Simone; Lizana, Ludvig; Otzen, Daniel;

    2013-01-01

    periodically breaks down, allowing for formation of large aggregates. We discuss how these periodic breakdowns may constitute a mechanism for the development of neurodegenerative diseases. © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published...

  1. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langkilde, Annette E., E-mail: annette.langkilde@sund.ku.dk [University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Morris, Kyle L.; Serpell, Louise C. [University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton (United Kingdom); Svergun, Dmitri I. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Hamburg Outstation, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Vestergaard, Bente [University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-04-01

    The aggregation process and the fibril state of an amyloidogenic peptide suggest monomer addition to be the prevailing mechanism of elongation and a model of the peptide packing in the fibrils has been obtained. Structural analysis of protein fibrillation is inherently challenging. Given the crucial role of fibrils in amyloid diseases, method advancement is urgently needed. A hybrid modelling approach is presented enabling detailed analysis of a highly ordered and hierarchically organized fibril of the GNNQQNY peptide fragment of a yeast prion protein. Data from small-angle X-ray solution scattering, fibre diffraction and electron microscopy are combined with existing high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures to investigate the fibrillation process and the hierarchical fibril structure of the peptide fragment. The elongation of these fibrils proceeds without the accumulation of any detectable amount of intermediate oligomeric species, as is otherwise reported for, for example, glucagon, insulin and α-synuclein. Ribbons constituted of linearly arranged protofilaments are formed. An additional hierarchical layer is generated via the pairing of ribbons during fibril maturation. Based on the complementary data, a quasi-atomic resolution model of the protofilament peptide arrangement is suggested. The peptide structure appears in a β-sheet arrangement reminiscent of the β-zipper structures evident from high-resolution crystal structures, with specific differences in the relative peptide orientation. The complexity of protein fibrillation and structure emphasizes the need to use multiple complementary methods.

  2. Engineering Metal Ion Coordination to Regulate Amyloid Fibril Assembly And Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J.; Canfield, J.M.; Mehta, A.K.; Shokes, J.E.; Tian, B.; Childers, W.S.; Simmons, J.A.; Mao, Z.; Scott, R.A.; Warncke, K.; Lynn, D.G.

    2009-06-02

    Protein and peptide assembly into amyloid has been implicated in functions that range from beneficial epigenetic controls to pathological etiologies. However, the exact structures of the assemblies that regulate biological activity remain poorly defined. We have previously used Zn{sup 2+} to modulate the assembly kinetics and morphology of congeners of the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}) associated with Alzheimer's disease. We now reveal a correlation among A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} coordination, peptide self-assembly, and neuronal viability. By using the central segment of A{beta}, HHQKLVFFA or A{beta}(13-21), which contains residues H13 and H14 implicated in A{beta}-metal ion binding, we show that Cu{sup 2+} forms complexes with A{beta}(13-21) and its K16A mutant and that the complexes, which do not self-assemble into fibrils, have structures similar to those found for the human prion protein, PrP. N-terminal acetylation and H14A substitution, Ac-A{beta}(13-21)H14A, alters metal coordination, allowing Cu{sup 2+} to accelerate assembly into neurotoxic fibrils. These results establish that the N-terminal region of A{beta} can access different metal-ion-coordination environments and that different complexes can lead to profound changes in A{beta} self-assembly kinetics, morphology, and toxicity. Related metal-ion coordination may be critical to the etiology of other neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Non-equilibrium nature of two-dimensional isotropic and nematic coexistence in amyloid fibrils at liquid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordens, Sophia; Isa, Lucio; Usov, Ivan; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2013-05-01

    Two-dimensional alignment of shape-anisotropic colloids is ubiquitous in nature, ranging from interfacial virus assembly to amyloid plaque formation. The principles governing two-dimensional self-assembly have therefore long been studied, both theoretically and experimentally, leading, however, to diverging fundamental interpretations on the nature of the two-dimensional isotropic-nematic phase transition. Here we employ single-molecule atomic force microscopy, cryogenic scanning electron microscopy and passive probe particle tracking to study the adsorption and liquid crystalline ordering of semiflexible β-lactoglobulin fibrils at liquid interfaces. Fibrillar rigidity changes on increasing interfacial density, with a maximum caused by alignment and a subsequent decrease stemming from crowding and domain bending. Coexistence of nematic and isotropic regions is resolved and quantified by a length scale-dependent order parameter S2D(d). The nematic surface fraction increases with interfacial fibril density, but depends, for a fixed interfacial density, on the initial bulk concentration, ascribing the observed two-dimensional isotropic-nematic coexistence to non-equilibrium phenomena.

  4. An efficient kinetic model for assemblies of amyloid fibrils and its application to polyglutamine aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Prigent

    Full Text Available Protein polymerization consists in the aggregation of single monomers into polymers that may fragment. Fibrils assembly is a key process in amyloid diseases. Up to now, protein aggregation was commonly mathematically simulated by a polymer size-structured ordinary differential equations (ODE system, which is infinite by definition and therefore leads to high computational costs. Moreover, this Ordinary Differential Equation-based modeling approach implies biological assumptions that may be difficult to justify in the general case. For example, whereas several ordinary differential equation models use the assumption that polymerization would occur at a constant rate independently of polymer size, it cannot be applied to certain protein aggregation mechanisms. Here, we propose a novel and efficient analytical method, capable of modelling and simulating amyloid aggregation processes. This alternative approach consists of an integro-Partial Differential Equation (PDE model of coalescence-fragmentation type that was mathematically derived from the infinite differential system by asymptotic analysis. To illustrate the efficiency of our approach, we applied it to aggregation experiments on polyglutamine polymers that are involved in Huntington's disease. Our model demonstrates the existence of a monomeric structural intermediate [Formula: see text] acting as a nucleus and deriving from a non polymerizing monomer ([Formula: see text]. Furthermore, we compared our model to previously published works carried out in different contexts and proved its accuracy to describe other amyloid aggregation processes.

  5. Quality control system response to stochastic growth of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigolotti, Simone; Lizana, Ludvig; Otzen, Daniel; Sneppen, Kim

    2013-05-01

    We introduce a stochastic model describing aggregation of misfolded proteins and degradation by the protein quality control system in a single cell. Aggregate growth is contrasted by the cell quality control system, that attacks them at different stages of the growth process, with an efficiency that decreases with their size. Model parameters are estimated from experimental data. Two qualitatively different behaviors emerge: a homeostatic state, where the quality control system is stable and aggregates of large sizes are not formed, and an oscillatory state, where the quality control system periodically breaks down, allowing for formation of large aggregates. We discuss how these periodic breakdowns may constitute a mechanism for the development of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23524241

  6. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouza, Maksim, E-mail: mkouza@chem.uw.edu.pl; Kolinski, Andrzej [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, ul. Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warszaw (Poland); Co, Nguyen Truong [Department of Physics, Institute of Technology, National University of HCM City, 268 Ly Thuong Kiet Street, District 10, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Institute for Computational Science and Technology, Quang Trung Software City, Tan Chanh Hiep Ward, District 12, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Nguyen, Phuong H. [Laboratoire de Biochimie Theorique, UPR 9080 CNRS, IBPC, Universite Paris 7, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Li, Mai Suan, E-mail: masli@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  7. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  8. Trifluoroethanol modulates α-synuclein amyloid-like aggregate formation, stability and dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carlo, Maria Giovanna; Vetri, Valeria; Buscarino, Gianpiero; Leone, Maurizio; Vestergaard, Bente; Foderà, Vito

    2016-09-01

    The conversion of proteins into amyloid fibrils and other amyloid-like aggregates is closely connected to the onset of a series of age-related pathologies. Upon changes in environmental conditions, amyloid-like aggregates may also undergo disassembly into oligomeric aggregates, the latter being recognized as key effectors in toxicity. This indicates new possible routes for in vivo accumulation of toxic species. In the light of the recognized implication of α-Synuclein (αSN) in Parkinson's disease, we present an experimental study on supramolecular assembly of αSN with a focus on stability and disassembly paths of such supramolecular aggregate species. Using spectroscopic techniques, two-photon microscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy, we report evidences on how the stability of αSN amyloid-like aggregates can be altered by changing solution conditions. We show that amyloid-like aggregate formation can be induced at high temperature in the presence of trifluoroethanol (TFE). Moreover, sudden disassembly or further structural reorganisation toward higher hierarchical species can be induced by varying TFE concentration. Our results may contribute in deciphering fundamental mechanisms and interactions underlying supramolecular clustering/dissolution of αSN oligomers in cells. PMID:27372900

  9. Kinetic analysis reveals the diversity of microscopic mechanisms through which molecular chaperones suppress amyloid formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, Paolo; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Linse, Sara; Månsson, Cecilia; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; Presto, Jenny; Johansson, Jan; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2016-03-01

    It is increasingly recognized that molecular chaperones play a key role in modulating the formation of amyloid fibrils, a process associated with a wide range of human disorders. Understanding the detailed mechanisms by which they perform this function, however, has been challenging because of the great complexity of the protein aggregation process itself. In this work, we build on a previous kinetic approach and develop a model that considers pairwise interactions between molecular chaperones and different protein species to identify the protein components targeted by the chaperones and the corresponding microscopic reaction steps that are inhibited. We show that these interactions conserve the topology of the unperturbed reaction network but modify the connectivity weights between the different microscopic steps. Moreover, by analysing several protein-molecular chaperone systems, we reveal the striking diversity in the microscopic mechanisms by which molecular chaperones act to suppress amyloid formation.

  10. An Improved LBFGS Quasi-Newtonian Method for Modeling Prion AGAAAAGA Amyloid Fibril Molecular Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu; Wang, Yiju; Wang, Changyu; Zhang, Xiangsun

    2012-01-01

    Experimental X-ray crystallography, NMR (NuclearMagnetic Resonance) spectroscopy, dual polarization interferometry, etc are indeed very powerful tools to determine the 3-Dimensional structure of a protein (including the membrane protein); theoretical mathematical and physical computational approaches can also allow us to obtain a description of the protein 3D structure at a submicroscopic level for some unstable, noncrystalline and insoluble proteins. X-ray crystallography finds the X-ray final structure of a protein, produce a better structure. This means theoretical methods are also important in determinations of protein structures. This paper presents a theoretical computational method - an improved LBFGS Quasi-Newtonian mathematical optimization method - to produce 3D structures of prion AGAAAAGA amyloid fibrils (which are unstable, noncrystalline and insoluble), from the potential energy minimization point of view.

  11. Genesis of mammalian prions: from non-infectious amyloid fibrils to a transmissible prion disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natallia Makarava

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The transmissible agent of prion disease consists of a prion protein in its abnormal, β-sheet rich state (PrP(Sc, which is capable of replicating itself according to the template-assisted mechanism. This mechanism postulates that the folding pattern of a newly recruited polypeptide chain accurately reproduces that of a PrP(Sc template. Here we report that authentic PrP(Sc and transmissible prion disease can be generated de novo in wild type animals by recombinant PrP (rPrP amyloid fibrils, which are structurally different from PrP(Sc and lack any detectable PrP(Sc particles. When induced by rPrP fibrils, a long silent stage that involved two serial passages preceded development of the clinical disease. Once emerged, the prion disease was characterized by unique clinical, neuropathological, and biochemical features. The long silent stage to the disease was accompanied by significant transformation in neuropathological properties and biochemical features of the proteinase K-resistant PrP material (PrPres before authentic PrP(Sc evolved. The current work illustrates that transmissible prion diseases can be induced by PrP structures different from that of authentic PrP(Sc and suggests that a new mechanism different from the classical templating exists. This new mechanism designated as "deformed templating" postulates that a change in the PrP folding pattern from the one present in rPrP fibrils to an alternative specific for PrP(Sc can occur. The current work provides important new insight into the mechanisms underlying genesis of the transmissible protein states and has numerous implications for understanding the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Thioflavin T derivatives for the characterization of insulin and lysozyme amyloid fibrils in vitro: Fluorescence and quantum-chemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vus, Kateryna, E-mail: kateryna_vus@yahoo.com [Department of Nuclear and Medical Physics, V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, 4 Svobody Sq., Kharkiv 61022 (Ukraine); Trusova, Valeriya; Gorbenko, Galyna [Department of Nuclear and Medical Physics, V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, 4 Svobody Sq., Kharkiv 61022 (Ukraine); Sood, Rohit; Kinnunen, Paavo [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, School of Science and Technology, Aalto University, FI-00076 Espoo (Finland)

    2015-03-15

    Two charged Thioflavin T (ThT) derivatives, referred to here as ICT2 and ICT3, showed higher fluorescence response, association constants and the blue-shifted emission maxima in the presence of lysozyme fibrils compared to insulin aggregates. In turn, the other two ThT derivatives, ICT4 and ICT5, possessed much weaker sensitivity to amyloid fibrils. Furthermore, a direct correlation was found between the “light-up” ability of the fibril-bound fluorophores and those observed in concentrated dichlormethane or glycerol solutions. To explain this behavior, the ground and lowest non-relaxed excited state properties of the dyes were evaluated with the 6-31G(d,p) basis set, using DFT and the CIS method. The excited state energy dependences along the torsion angle between the benzothiazole and phenyl moieties of the ICT4, ICT5 turned out to have three directly observed minima, corresponding to the locally excited (LE) and twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) states. Thus, stronger stabilization of the ICT4, ICT5 LE states resulted in significantly greater quantum yield of these dyes in buffer solution and the absence of the “light-up” feature in the presence of insulin amyloid fibrils, compared to ICT2 and ICT3. - Highlights: • The ThT derivatives–ICT{sub 2}, ICT{sub 3} had the sensitivity to lysozyme fibrillar aggregates. • The insulin fibril (InsF)-bound ICT{sub 2}, ICT{sub 3} showed higher fluorescence intensities. • The lysozyme fibril-bound dyes have blue-shifted emission maxima compared to InsF. • Fluorescence of the fibril-bound dyes strongly correlates with that in glycerol. • The propylamine/metoxy moieties → the stabilization of the LE state of ICT4/ICT5. • Such a stabilization → the weak dye sensitivity to the environmental factors.

  13. In Silico and in Vitro Study of Binding Affinity of Tripeptides to Amyloid β Fibrils: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viet, Man Hoang; Siposova, Katarina; Bednarikova, Zuzana; Antosova, Andrea; Nguyen, Truc Trang; Gazova, Zuzana; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-23

    Self-assembly of Aβ peptides into amyloid aggregates has been suggested as the major cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Nowadays, there is no medication for AD, but experimental data indicate that reversion of the process of amyloid aggregation reduces the symptoms of disease. In this paper, all 8000 tripeptides were studied for their ability to destroy Aβ fibrils. The docking method and the more sophisticated MM-PBSA (molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area) method were employed to calculate the binding affinity and mode of tripeptides to Aβ fibrils. The ability of these peptides to depolymerize Aβ fibrils was also investigated experimentally using atomic force microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy (Thioflavin T assay). It was shown that tripeptides prefer to bind to hydrophobic regions of 6Aβ9-40 fibrils. Tripeptides WWW, WWP, WPW and PWW were found to be the most potent binders. In vitro experiments showed that tight-binding tripeptides have significant depolymerizing activities and their DC50 values determined from dose-response curves were in micromolar range. The ability of nonbinding (GAM, AAM) and weak-binding (IVL and VLA) tripeptides to destroy Aβ fibrils was negligible. In vitro data of tripeptide depolymerizing activities support the predictions obtained by molecular docking and all-atom simulation methods. Our results suggest that presence of multiple complexes of heterocycles forming by tryptophan and proline residues in tripeptides is crucial for their tight binding to Aβ fibrils as well as for extensive fibril depolymerization. We recommend PWW for further studies as it has the lowest experimental binding constant. PMID:25815792

  14. Solution NMR structure and inhibitory effect against amyloidfibrillation of Humanin containing a d-isomerized serine residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsanousi, Nesreen; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Furuita, Kyoko; So, Masatomo; Lee, Young-Ho; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Kojima, Chojiro

    2016-09-01

    Humanin comprising 24 amino acid residues is a bioactive peptide that has been isolated from the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Humanin reportedly suppressed aging-related death of various cells due to amyloid fibrils and oxidative stress. There are reports that the cytoprotective activity of Humanin was remarkably enhanced by optical isomerization of the Ser14 residue from l to d form, but details of the molecular mechanism remained unclear. Here we demonstrated that Humanin d-Ser14 exhibited potent inhibitory activity against fibrillation of amyloid-β and remarkably higher binding affinity for amyloid-β than that of the Humanin wild-type and S14G mutant. In addition, we determined the solution structure of Humanin d-Ser14 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and showed that d-isomerization of the Ser14 residue enables drastic conformational rearrangement of Humanin. Furthermore, we identified an amyloid-β-binding site on Humanin d-Ser14 at atomic resolution by NMR. These biophysical and high-resolution structural analyses clearly revealed structure-function relationships of Humanin and explained the driving force of the drastic conformational change and molecular basis of the potent anti-amyloidfibrillation activity of Humanin caused by d-isomerization of the Ser14 residue. This is the first study to show correlations between the functional activity, tertiary structure, and partner recognition mode of Humanin and may lead to elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of the cytoprotective activity of Humanin. PMID:27349871

  15. Conformational stability of fibrillar amyloid-beta oligomers via protofilament pair formation - a systematic computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kahler

    Full Text Available Amyloid-[Formula: see text] (A[Formula: see text] oligomers play a crucial role in Alzheimer's disease due to their neurotoxic aggregation properties. Fibrillar A[Formula: see text] oligomerization can lead to protofilaments and protofilament pairs via oligomer elongation and oligomer association, respectively. Small fibrillar oligomers adopt the protofilament topology, whereas fibrils contain at least protofilament pairs. To date, the underlying growth mechanism from oligomers to the mature fibril still remains to be elucidated. Here, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent on single layer-like protofilaments and fibril-like protofilament pairs of different size ranging from the tetramer to the 48-mer. We found that the initial U-shaped topology per monomer is maintained over time in all oligomers. The observed deviations of protofilaments from the starting structure increase significantly with size due to the twisting of the in-register parallel [Formula: see text]-sheets. This twist causes long protofilaments to be unstable and leads to a breakage. Protofilament pairs, which are stabilized by a hydrophobic interface, exhibit more fibril-like properties such as the overall structure and the twist angle. Thus, they can act as stable conformational templates for further fibril growth. Key properties like the twist angle, shape complementarity, and energetics show a size-dependent behavior so that small oligomers favor the protofilament topology, whereas large oligomers favor the protofilament pair topology. The region for this conformational transition is at the size of approximately twelve A[Formula: see text] monomers. From that, we propose the following growth mechanism from A[Formula: see text] oligomers to fibrils: (1 elongation of short protofilaments; (2 breakage of large protofilaments; (3 formation of short protofilament pairs; and (4 elongation of protofilament pairs.

  16. Influence of the stability of a fused protein and its distance to the amyloidogenic segment on fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Buttstedt

    Full Text Available Conversion of native proteins into amyloid fibrils is irreversible and therefore it is difficult to study the interdependence of conformational stability and fibrillation by thermodynamic analyses. Here we approached this problem by fusing amyloidogenic poly-alanine segments derived from the N-terminal domain of the nuclear poly (A binding protein PABPN1 with a well studied, reversibly unfolding protein, CspB from Bacillus subtilis. Earlier studies had indicated that CspB could maintain its folded structure in fibrils, when it was separated from the amyloidogenic segment by a long linker. When CspB is directly fused with the amyloidogenic segment, it unfolds because its N-terminal chain region becomes integrated into the fibrillar core, as shown by protease mapping experiments. Spacers of either 3 or 16 residues between CspB and the amyloidogenic segment were not sufficient to prevent this loss of CspB structure. Since the low thermodynamic stability of CspB (ΔG(D = 12.4 kJ/mol might be responsible for unfolding and integration of CspB into fibrils, fusions with a CspB mutant with enhanced thermodynamic stability (ΔG(D = 26.9 kJ/mol were studied. This strongly stabilized CspB remained folded and prevented fibril formation in all fusions. Our data show that the conformational stability of a linked, independently structured protein domain can control fibril formation.

  17. The interplay of intrinsic disorder and macromolecular crowding on α-synuclein fibril formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Nobu C.; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2016-02-01

    α-synuclein (α-syn) is an intrinsically disordered protein which is considered to be one of the causes of Parkinson's disease. This protein forms amyloid fibrils when in a highly concentrated solution. The fibril formation of α-syn is induced not only by increases in α-syn concentration but also by macromolecular crowding. In order to investigate the coupled effect of the intrinsic disorder of α-syn and macromolecular crowding, we construct a lattice gas model of α-syn in contact with a crowding agent reservoir based on statistical mechanics. The main assumption is that α-syn can be expressed as coarse-grained particles with internal states coupled with effective volume; and disordered states are modeled by larger particles with larger internal entropy than other states. Thanks to the simplicity of the model, we can exactly calculate the number of conformations of crowding agents, and this enables us to prove that the original grand canonical ensemble with a crowding agent reservoir is mathematically equivalent to a canonical ensemble without crowding agents. In this expression, the effect of macromolecular crowding is absorbed in the internal entropy of disordered states; it is clearly shown that the crowding effect reduces the internal entropy. Based on Monte Carlo simulation, we provide scenarios of crowding-induced fibril formation. We also discuss the recent controversy over the existence of helically folded tetramers of α-syn, and suggest that macromolecular crowding is the key to resolving the controversy.

  18. Formation of non-toxic Aβ fibrils by small heat shock protein under heat-stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakono, Masafumi [Bioengineering Laboratory, RIKEN Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); PRESTO, JST, Saitama (Japan); Utsumi, Arata [Bioengineering Laboratory, RIKEN Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei-shi, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Zako, Tamotsu, E-mail: zako@riken.jp [Bioengineering Laboratory, RIKEN Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Abe, Tetsuya; Yohda, Masafumi [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Naka-cho, Koganei-shi, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Maeda, Mizuo [Bioengineering Laboratory, RIKEN Institute, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► We examined effect of the quaternary structure of yeast sHsp on Aβ aggregation. ► Aβ aggregation was inhibited by the oligomeric form of sHsp, but not by dimeric sHsp. ► The fibrillar amyloids consisted of both Aβ and dimeric sHsp. ► They exhibited different inner structure and cytotoxicity from authentic Aβ amyloids. ► These results suggest the formation of new type fibrillar Aβ amyloid by sHsp. -- Abstract: Small heat shock protein (sHsp) is a molecular chaperone with a conserved alpha-crystallin domain that can prevent protein aggregation. It has been shown that sHsps exist as oligomers (12–40 mer) and their dissociation into small dimers or oligomers is functionally important. Since several sHsps are upregulated and co-localized with amyloid-β (Aβ) in senile plaques of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), sHsps are thought to be involved in AD. Previous studies have also shown that sHsp can prevent Aβ aggregation in vitro. However, it remains unclear how the quaternary structure of sHsp influences Aβ aggregation. In this study, we report for the first time the effect of the quaternary structure of sHsp on Aβ aggregation using sHsp from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (SpHsp16.0) showing a clear temperature-dependent structural transition between an oligomer (30 °C) and dimer (50 °C) state. Aβ aggregation was inhibited by the oligomeric form of SpHsp16.0. In contrast, amyloid fibrils were formed in the presence of dimeric SpHsp16.0. Interestingly, these amyloid fibrils consisted of both Aβ and SpHsp16.0 and showed a low ThT intensity and low cytotoxicity due to their low binding affinity to the cell surface. These results suggest the formation of novel fibrillar Aβ amyloid with different characteristics from that of the authentic Aβ amyloid fibrils formed in the absence of sHsp. Our results also suggest the potential protective role of sHsp in AD under stress conditions.

  19. The Lennard-Jones Potential Minimization Problem for Prion AGAAAAGA Amyloid Fibril Molecular Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2011-01-01

    The simplified Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential minimization problem is minimize f(x)=4\\sum_{i=1}^N \\sum_{j=1,jamyloid fibril molecular model building. The 3nhc.pdb, 3nve.pdb, 3nvf.pdb, 3nvg.pdb and 3nvh.pdb of PDB bank are used for the successful molecular modeling.

  20. A Synchrotron-Based Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting Analysis of Amyloid Fibrils and Prefibrillar Intermediates with Residue-Specific Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinger, Alexandra L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kiselar, Janna [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Ilchenko, Serguei [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Komatsu, Hiroaki [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chance, Mark R. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Axelsen, Paul H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-11-09

    The structural models of the fibrils formed by the 40-residue amyloid-β (Aβ40) peptide in Alzheimer’s disease typically consist of linear polypeptide segments, oriented approximately perpendicular to the long axis of the fibril, and joined together as parallel in-register β-sheets to form filaments. However, various models differ in the number of filaments that run the length of a fibril, and in the topological arrangement of these filaments. In addition to questions about the structure of Aβ40 monomers in fibrils, there are important unanswered questions about their structure in prefibrillar intermediates, which are of interest because they may represent the most neurotoxic form of Aβ40. To assess different models of fibril structure and to gain insight into the structure of prefibrillar intermediates, the relative solvent accessibility of amino acid residue side chains in fibrillar and prefibrillar Aβ40 preparations was characterized in solution by hydroxyl radical footprinting and structural mass spectrometry. A key to the application of this technology was the development of hydroxyl radical reactivity measures for individual side chains of Aβ40. When we combined mass-per-length measurements performed by dark-field electron microscopy, we determined that the results of our study were consistent with the core filament structure represented by two- and three-filament solid state nuclear magnetic resonance-based models of the Aβ40 fibril (such as 2LMN, 2LMO, 2LMP, and 2LMQ), with minor refinements, but they are inconsistent with the more recently proposed 2M4J model. Our results also demonstrate that individual Aβ40 fibrils exhibit structural heterogeneity or polymorphism, where regions of two-filament structure alternate with regions of three-filament structure. The footprinting approach utilized in this study will be valuable for characterizing various fibrillar and nonfibrillar forms of the Aβ peptide.

  1. Expression of Fap amyloids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. fluorescens, and P. putida results in aggregation and increased biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueholm, Morten S.; Søndergaard, Mads T; Nilsson, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    The fap operon, encoding functional amyloids in Pseudomonas (Fap), is present in most pseudomonads, but so far the expression and importance for biofilm formation has only been investigated for P. fluorescens strain UK4. In this study, we demonstrate the capacity of P. aeruginosa PAO1, P. fluorescens...... Pf-5, and P. putida F1 to express Fap fibrils, and investigated the effect of Fap expression on aggregation and biofilm formation. The fap operon in all three Pseudomonas species conferred the ability to express Fap fibrils as shown using a recombinant approach. This Fap overexpression consistently...

  2. Cryogenic solid state NMR studies of fibrils of the Alzheimer’s disease amyloid-β peptide: perspectives for DNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization solid-state NMR holds the potential to enable a dramatic increase in sensitivity by exploiting the large magnetic moment of the electron. However, applications to biological solids are hampered in uniformly isotopically enriched biomacromolecules due to line broadening which yields a limited spectral resolution at cryogenic temperatures. We show here that high magnetic fields allow to overcome the broadening of resonance lines often experienced at liquid nitrogen temperatures. For a fibril sample of the Alzheimer’s disease β-amyloid peptide, we find similar line widths at low temperature and at room temperature. The presented results open new perspectives for structural investigations in the solid-state

  3. Oligomer Formation of Toxic and Functional Amyloid Peptides Studied with Atomistic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Pacheco, Martín; Ismail, Ahmed E; Strodel, Birgit

    2015-07-30

    Amyloids are associated with diseases, including Alzheimer's, as well as functional roles such as storage of peptide hormones. It is still unclear what differences exist between aberrant and functional amyloids. However, it is known that soluble oligomers formed during amyloid aggregation are more toxic than the final fibrils. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to study the aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide Aβ25-35, associated with Alzheimer's disease, and two functional amyloid-forming tachykinin peptides: kassinin and neuromedin K. Although the three peptides have similar primary sequences, tachykinin peptides, in contrast to Aβ25-35, form nontoxic amyloids. Our simulations reveal that the charge of the C-terminus is essential to controlling the aggregation process. In particular, when the kassinin C-terminus is not amidated, the aggregation kinetics decreases considerably. In addition, we observe that the monomeric peptides in extended conformations aggregate faster than those in collapsed hairpin-like conformations. PMID:26130191

  4. Palmitoylation and amyloid fibril formation of lung surfactant protein C

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Magnus

    2000-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a mixture of lipids and a few proteins, of which surfactant proteins (SP)-B and SP-C are lipophilic. Surfactant is essential for the reduction of surface tension at the alveolar air/liquid interface. The extremely hydrophobic SP-C is a 35-residue transmembraneous [alpha]-helical peptide containing a poly-Val stretch and two palmitoylated Cys residues. In this thesis the structural and functional importance of the SP-C palmitoyl groups and the poly-Val heli...

  5. Polymorphism of amyloid fibrils formed by a peptide from the yeast prion protein Sup35: AFM and Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey V; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Zhang, Yuliang; Deckert, Volker; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2016-06-01

    Aggregation of prion proteins is the cause of various prion related diseases. The infectious form of prions, amyloid aggregates, exist as multiple strains. The strains are thought to represent structurally different prion protein molecules packed into amyloid aggregates, but the knowledge on the structure of different types of aggregates is limited. Here we report on the use of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and TERS (Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering) to study morphological heterogeneity and access underlying conformational features of individual amyloid aggregates. Using AFM we identified the morphology of amyloid fibrils formed by the peptide (CGNNQQNY) from the yeast prion protein Sup35 that is critically involved in the aggregation of the full protein. TERS results demonstrate that morphologically different amyloid fibrils are composed of a distinct set of conformations. Fibrils formed at pH 5.6 are composed of a mixture of peptide conformations (β-sheets, random coil and α-helix) while fibrils formed in pH~2 solution primarily have β-sheets. Additionally, peak positions in the amide III region of the TERS spectra suggested that peptides have parallel arrangement of β-sheets for pH~2 fibrils and antiparallel arrangement for fibrils formed at pH 5.6. We also developed a methodology for detailed analysis of the peptide secondary structure by correlating intensity changes of Raman bands in different regions of TERS spectra. Such correlation established that structural composition of peptides is highly localized with large contribution of unordered secondary structures on a fibrillar surface. PMID:27060278

  6. Inhibitory effect of epigallocatechin on amyloid fibrillation of lysozyme%表没食子儿茶素(EGC)对溶菌酶淀粉样纤维化的抑制作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李改涛; 李圆圆; 曾成鸣

    2014-01-01

    Natural polyphenols had been recognized as medicinal candidates for treating amyloid diseases. In the present study,the inhibitory effect of epigallocatechin( EGC) on amyloid formation was investigated in vitro by using lysozyme as a model protein. The results demonstrated that EGC inhibited efficiently lysozyme fibril formation and transformed the mature fibrils into non-amyloid as-semblies. Thiol compound dithiothreitol( DTT) abolished partly the fibril-destabilizing role of EGC,indicating that EGC probably a-lerted amyloid fibrillar structure through covalently binding to the peptide chains. It was suggested that formation of quinone interme-diates and subsequently modification of free thiol groups in peptide chains were the main events in the inhibition of lysozyme amy-loid fibrillation by polyphenols.%天然多酚化合物是蛋白质淀粉样纤维化相关疾病的潜在治疗药物。本文采用溶菌酶和表没食子儿茶素( EGC)研究了多酚化合物对蛋白质淀粉样纤维的作用。结果表明,EGC能够抑制溶菌酶的淀粉样纤维化,并能够破坏成熟的纤维结构,使纤维的淀粉样特性降低。巯基化合物二巯基苏糖醇( DTT)能够部分抑制EGC破坏纤维的作用,表明EGC可能通过与巯基结合而对多肽链进行共价修饰,从而改变了淀粉样纤维的自组装结构。根据上述结果,我们认为,多酚化合物形成醌类中间体并对多肽链的自由巯基进行修饰,是其抑制蛋白质淀粉样纤维化的主要途径。

  7. Amyloid at the nanoscale: AFM and single-molecule investigations of early steps of aggregation and mature fibril growth, structure, and mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Vinod

    2013-03-01

    Misfolding and aggregation of proteins into nanometer-scale fibrillar assemblies is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases. We have investigated the self-assembly of the human intrinsically disordered protein alpha-synuclein, involved in Parkinson's disease, into amyloid fibrils. A particularly relevant question is the role of early oligomeric aggregates in modulating the dynamics of protein nucleation and aggregation. We have used single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize conformational transitions of alpha-synuclein, and to gain insights into the structure and composition of oligomeric aggregates of alpha-synuclein. Quantitative atomic force microscopy and nanomechanical investigations provide information on amyloid fibril polymorphism and on nanoscale mechanical properties of mature fibrillar species, while conventional optical and super-resolution imaging have yielded insights into the growth of fibrils and into the assembly of suprafibrillar structures. We thank the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO), and the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology for support.

  8. Rational design of potent human transthyretin amyloid disease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabunde, T; Petrassi, H M; Oza, V B; Raman, P; Kelly, J W; Sacchettini, J C

    2000-04-01

    The human amyloid disorders, familial amyloid polyneuropathy, familial amyloid cardiomyopathy and senile systemic amyloidosis, are caused by insoluble transthyretin (TTR) fibrils, which deposit in the peripheral nerves and heart tissue. Several nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and structurally similar compounds have been found to strongly inhibit the formation of TTR amyloid fibrils in vitro. These include flufenamic acid, diclofenac, flurbiprofen, and resveratrol. Crystal structures of the protein-drug complexes have been determined to allow detailed analyses of the protein-drug interactions that stabilize the native tetrameric conformation of TTR and inhibit the formation of amyloidogenic TTR. Using a structure-based drug design approach ortho-trifluormethylphenyl anthranilic acid and N-(meta-trifluoromethylphenyl) phenoxazine 4, 6-dicarboxylic acid have been discovered to be very potent and specific TTR fibril formation inhibitors. This research provides a rationale for a chemotherapeutic approach for the treatment of TTR-associated amyloid diseases. PMID:10742177

  9. Inhibition of Alzheimer amyloid β aggregation by polyvalent trehalose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A glycopolymer carrying trehalose was found to suppress the formation of amyloid fibrils from the amyloid β peptide (1-42) (Aβ), as evaluated by thioflavin T assay and atomic force microscopy. Glycopolymers carrying sugar alcohols also changed the aggregation properties of Aβ, and the inhibitory effect depended on the type of sugar and alkyl side chain. Neutralization activity was confirmed by in vitro assay using HeLa cells. The glycopolymer carrying trehalose strongly inhibited amyloid formation and neutralized cytotoxicity.

  10. The Effect of Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs on Amyloid Aggregation and Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Iannuzzi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is a protein folding disorder in which normally soluble proteins are deposited extracellularly as insoluble fibrils, impairing tissue structure and function. Charged polyelectrolytes such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs are frequently found associated with the proteinaceous deposits in tissues of patients affected by amyloid diseases. Experimental evidence indicate that they can play an active role in favoring amyloid fibril formation and stabilization. Binding of GAGs to amyloid fibrils occurs mainly through electrostatic interactions involving the negative polyelectrolyte charges and positively charged side chains residues of aggregating protein. Similarly to catalyst for reactions, GAGs favor aggregation, nucleation and amyloid fibril formation functioning as a structural templates for the self-assembly of highly cytotoxic oligomeric precursors, rich in β-sheets, into harmless amyloid fibrils. Moreover, the GAGs amyloid promoting activity can be facilitated through specific interactions via consensus binding sites between amyloid polypeptide and GAGs molecules. We review the effect of GAGs on amyloid deposition as well as proteins not strictly related to diseases. In addition, we consider the potential of the GAGs therapy in amyloidosis.

  11. Common molecular mechanism of amyloid pore formation by Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide and α-synuclein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Boutemeur, Sonia; Flores, Alessandra; Rodriguez, Léa; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-permeable pores formed by small oligomers of amyloid proteins are the primary pathologic species in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of these toxic oligomers in the plasma membrane of brain cells remain unclear. Here we have analyzed and compared the pore-forming capability of a large panel of amyloid proteins including wild-type, variant and truncated forms, as well as synthetic peptides derived from specific domains of Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. We show that amyloid pore formation involves two membrane lipids, ganglioside and cholesterol, that physically interact with amyloid proteins through specific structural motifs. Mutation or deletion of these motifs abolished pore formation. Moreover, α-synuclein (Parkinson) and Aβ peptide (Alzheimer) did no longer form Ca2+-permeable pores in presence of drugs that target either cholesterol or ganglioside or both membrane lipids. These results indicate that gangliosides and cholesterol cooperate to favor the formation of amyloid pores through a common molecular mechanism that can be jammed at two different steps, suggesting the possibility of a universal therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases. Finally we present the first successful evaluation of such a new therapeutic approach (coined “membrane therapy”) targeting amyloid pores formed by Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. PMID:27352802

  12. Common molecular mechanism of amyloid pore formation by Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide and α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Boutemeur, Sonia; Flores, Alessandra; Rodriguez, Léa; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-permeable pores formed by small oligomers of amyloid proteins are the primary pathologic species in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of these toxic oligomers in the plasma membrane of brain cells remain unclear. Here we have analyzed and compared the pore-forming capability of a large panel of amyloid proteins including wild-type, variant and truncated forms, as well as synthetic peptides derived from specific domains of Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. We show that amyloid pore formation involves two membrane lipids, ganglioside and cholesterol, that physically interact with amyloid proteins through specific structural motifs. Mutation or deletion of these motifs abolished pore formation. Moreover, α-synuclein (Parkinson) and Aβ peptide (Alzheimer) did no longer form Ca(2+)-permeable pores in presence of drugs that target either cholesterol or ganglioside or both membrane lipids. These results indicate that gangliosides and cholesterol cooperate to favor the formation of amyloid pores through a common molecular mechanism that can be jammed at two different steps, suggesting the possibility of a universal therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases. Finally we present the first successful evaluation of such a new therapeutic approach (coined "membrane therapy") targeting amyloid pores formed by Aβ1-42 and α-synuclein. PMID:27352802

  13. Comparison of the aggregation of homologous β2-microglobulin variants reveals protein solubility as a key determinant of amyloid formation

    OpenAIRE

    Pashley, Clare L.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Sheena E. Radford

    2016-01-01

    The mouse and human β2-microglobulin protein orthologs are 70 % identical in sequence and share 88 % sequence similarity. These proteins are predicted by various algorithms to have similar aggregation and amyloid propensities. However, whilst human β2m (hβ2m) forms amyloid-like fibrils in denaturing conditions (e.g. pH 2.5) in the absence of NaCl, mouse β2m (mβ2m) requires the addition of 0.3 M NaCl to cause fibrillation. Here, the factors which give rise to this difference in amyloid propens...

  14. Surface-bound basement membrane components accelerate amyloid-β peptide nucleation in air-free wells: an in vitro model of cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Ozawa, Daisaku; Ookoshi, Tadakazu; Naiki, Hironobu

    2013-08-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy is caused by deposition of the amyloid β-peptide which consists of mainly 39-40 residues to the cortical and leptomeningeal vessel walls. There are no definite in vitro systems to support the hypothesis that the vascular basement membrane may act as a scaffold of amyloid β-peptide carried by perivascular drainage flow and accelerate its amyloid fibril formation in vivo. We previously reported the critical roles of interfaces and agitation on the nucleation of amyloid fibrils at low concentrations of amyloid β-peptide monomers. Here, we reproduced the perivascular drainage flow in vitro by using N-hydroxysuccinimide-Sepharose 4 Fast flow beads as an inert stirrer in air-free wells rotated at 1rpm. We then reproduced the basement membranes in the media of cerebral arteries in vitro by conjugating Matrigel and other proteins on the surface of Sepharose beads. These beads were incubated with 5μM amyloid β(1-40) at 37°C without air, where amyloid β(1-40) alone does not form amyloid fibrils. Using the initiation time of fibril growth kinetics (i.e., the lag time of fibril growth during which nuclei, on-pathway oligomers and protofibrils are successively formed) as a parameter of the efficiency of biological molecules to induce amyloid fibril formation, we found that basement membrane components including Matrigel, laminin, fibronectin, collagen type IV and fibrinogen accelerate the initiation of amyloid β-peptide fibril growth in vitro. These data support the essential role of vascular basement membranes in the development of cerebral amyloid angiopathy. PMID:23608949

  15. Molecular mechanisms of amyloid self-regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Landreh, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid is associated with both pathological protein deposits and the formation of functional protein structures. Therefore, several strategies have evolved to control the formation or inhibition of amyloid in vivo. In this thesis, three separate systems were investigated in which amyloidogenic protein segments are coupled to regulatory elements that prevent or promote fibrillation. We describe the molecular mechanism for how (a) a propeptide segment prevents the uncontrolled a...

  16. Islet amyloid polypeptide-induced membrane leakage involves uptake of lipids by forming amyloid fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparr, Emma; Engel, Maarten F M; Sakharov, Dmitri V; Sprong, Mariette; Jacobs, Jet; de Kruijff, Ben; Höppener, Jo W M; Killian, J Antoinette

    2004-11-01

    Fibril formation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is associated with cell death of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells in patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. A likely cause for the cytotoxicity of human IAPP is that it destroys the barrier properties of the cell membrane. Here, we show by fluorescence confocal microscopy on lipid vesicles that the process of hIAPP amyloid formation is accompanied by a loss of barrier function, whereby lipids are extracted from the membrane and taken up in the forming amyloid deposits. No membrane interaction was observed when preformed fibrils were used. It is proposed that lipid uptake from the cell membrane is responsible for amyloid-induced membrane damage and that this represents a general mechanism underlying the cytotoxicity of amyloid forming proteins. PMID:15527771

  17. Electrochemical quantification of the Alzheimer’s disease amyloid-β (1–40 using amyloidfibrillization promoting peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Fujii

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-β peptide (Aβ is believed to be an important biomarker for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, practical and reliable methods to assay Aβ levels have been coveted. In this study, a rapid, sensitive, and selective electrochemical method for Aβ(1–40 detection using Cu2+ redox cycling on peptide-modified gold electrodes was developed. A 19-residue peptide that can promote Aβ fibrillization (AFPP was immobilized onto a gold electrode. After incubating an Aβ solution with the modified electrode for 1 h, a Cu2+ solution was added and cyclic voltammetry measurements were conducted. The voltammetric response was found to be proportional to the Aβ(1–40 concentration in the 0.1–5 μM range, and a detection limit of 18 nM was achieved. Washing with sodium hydroxide and ethylenediaminetetraacetate solutions easily reinitialized the modified electrode. Results obtained using the reinitialized electrode showed good reproducibility. Furthermore, when another amyloidogenic and Cu2+-binding protein amylin was used as the target, no voltammetric response was observed. These results indicate that the AFPP-modified electrode provides a promising, label-free, sensitive, selective, cost-effective, and easy method for the quantification of Aβ.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Amyloid Beta Dimer Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Urbanc, B; Ding, F; Sammond, D; Khare, S; Buldyrev, S V; Stanley, H E; Dokholyan, N V

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments with amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide suggest that formation of toxic oligomers may be an important contribution to the onset of Alzheimer's disease. The toxicity of Abeta oligomers depends on their structure, which is governed by assembly dynamics. Due to limitations of current experimental techniques, a detailed knowledge of oligomer structure at the atomic level is missing. We introduce a molecular dynamics approach to study Abeta dimer formation: (1) we use discrete molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model to identify a variety of dimer conformations, and (2) we employ all-atom molecular mechanics simulations to estimate the thermodynamic stability of all dimer conformations. Our simulations of a coarse-grained Abeta peptide model predicts ten different planar beta-strand dimer conformations. We then estimate the free energies of all dimer conformations in all-atom molecular mechanics simulations with explicit water. We compare the free energies of Abeta(1-42) and Abeta(1-40...

  19. Surface Binding of TOTAPOL Assists Structural Investigations of Amyloid Fibrils by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Madhu; Franks, Trent W; Saeidpour, Siavash; Schubeis, Tobias; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Ritter, Christiane; van Rossum, Barth-Jan

    2016-07-15

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR can enhance sensitivity but often comes at the price of a substantial loss of resolution. Two major factors affect spectral quality: low-temperature heterogeneous line broadening and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) effects. Investigations by NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and EPR revealed a new substantial affinity of TOTAPOL to amyloid surfaces, very similar to that shown by the fluorescent dye thioflavin-T (ThT). As a consequence, DNP spectra with remarkably good resolution and still reasonable enhancement could be obtained at very low TOTAPOL concentrations, typically 400 times lower than commonly employed. These spectra yielded several long-range constraints that were difficult to obtain without DNP. Our findings open up new strategies for structural studies with DNP NMR spectroscopy on amyloids that can bind the biradical with affinity similar to that shown towards ThT. PMID:27147408

  20. Curcumin Protects β-Lactoglobulin Fibril Formation and Fibril-Induced Neurotoxicity in PC12 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansooreh Mazaheri

    Full Text Available In this study the β-lactoglobulin fibrillation, in the presence or absence of lead ions, aflatoxin M1 and curcumin, was evaluated using ThT fluorescence, Circular dichroism spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. To investigate the toxicity of the different form of β-Lg fibrils, in the presence or absence of above toxins and curcumin, we monitored changes in the level of reactive oxygen species and morphology of the differentiated neuron-like PC12 cells. The cell viability, cell body area, average neurite length, neurite width, number of primary neurites, percent of bipolar cells and node/primary neurite ratios were used to assess the growth and complexity of PC12 cells exposed to different form of β-Lg fibrils. Incubation of β-Lg with curcumin resulted in a significant decrease in ROS levels even in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1. The β-Lg fibrils formed in the presence of lead ions and aflatoxin M1 attenuated the growth and complexity of PC12 cells compared with other form of β-Lg fibrils. However, the adverse effects of these toxins and protein fibrils were negated in the presence of curcumin. Furthermore, the antioxidant and inhibitory effects of curcumin protected PC12 cells against fibril neurotoxicity and enhanced their survival. Thus, curcumin may provide a protective effect toward β-Lg, and perhaps other protein, fibrils mediated neurotoxicity.

  1. Extracellular DNA facilitates the formation of functional amyloids in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Kelly; Ganesan, Mahesh; Payne, David E; Solomon, Michael J; Boles, Blaise R

    2016-01-01

    Persistent staphylococcal infections often involve surface-associated communities called biofilms. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm development is mediated by the co-ordinated production of the biofilm matrix, which can be composed of polysaccharides, extracellular DNA (eDNA) and proteins including amyloid fibers. The nature of the interactions between matrix components, and how these interactions contribute to the formation of matrix, remain unclear. Here we show that the presence of eDNA in S. aureus biofilms promotes the formation of amyloid fibers. Conditions or mutants that do not generate eDNA result in lack of amyloids during biofilm growth despite the amyloidogeneic subunits, phenol soluble modulin peptides, being produced. In vitro studies revealed that the presence of DNA promotes amyloid formation by PSM peptides. Thus, this work exposes a previously unacknowledged interaction between biofilm matrix components that furthers our understanding of functional amyloid formation and S. aureus biofilm biology. PMID:26365835

  2. The SAXS and Rheological Studies of HEWL Amyloid Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed small angle X-ray scattering and rheological experiments in order to analyze the aggregation and denaturation processes of hen egg white lysozyme initiated by the presence of ethanol molecule. At low ethanol concentrations (below 60% (v/v)) we did not observe any change of the radius of gyration of lysozyme and no drastic changes in viscosity of the protein solution. With the increase in ethanol concentration up to the final concentration of 85% (v/v) the viscosity of protein solution dramatically increased. For high ethanol concentration a pseudoplastic behavior of lysozyme solution was observed, indicating a process of aggregation and reorientation of the protein molecules. Similar effects were observed in small angle X-ray scattering experiments. We assume that the analysis of the aggregation processes of the hen egg white lysozyme could contribute to our understanding of the mechanism of lysozyme amyloid formation. (authors)

  3. Heat-induced whey protein isolate fibrils: Conversion, hydrolysis, and disulphide bond formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.G.; Vasbinder, A.; Sagis, L.M.C.; Linden, van der E.

    2007-01-01

    Fibril formation of individual pure whey proteins and whey protein isolate (WPI) was studied. The heat-induced conversion of WPI monomers into fibrils at pH 2 and low ionic strength increased with heating time and protein concentration. Previous studies, using a precipitation method, size-exclusion

  4. Synthesis of fluorescent-maghemite nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents for amyloid-beta fibrils detection and removal by a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaat, Hadas; Margel, Shlomo

    2009-09-01

    Early diagnosis in Alzheimer's disease (AD), before the onset of marked clinical symptoms, is critical in preventing the irreversible neuronal damage that eventually leads to dementia and ultimately death. Therefore, there is an urgent need for in vivo imaging agents, which are valuable as specific biomarkers to demonstrate the location and density of amyloid plaques in the living human brain. The present manuscript describes a novel method for selective marking of Abeta(40) fibrils by non-fluorescent gamma-Fe(2)O(3) and fluorescent-magnetic gamma-Fe(2)O(3)-rhodamine or gamma-Fe(2)O(3)-Congo red nanoparticles, and the complete removal of the magnetized fibrils from the aqueous continuous phase by a magnetic field. These fluorescent-maghemite nanoparticles as multimodal imaging agents have a great advantage due to the combination of the magnetic and fluorescence imaging into one nanostructured system. This hybrid system, which selectively marks Abeta(40) fibrils, might enable the early detection of plaques using both MRI and fluorescence microscopy, and therefore may be applied in in vivo AD diagnosis studies. These fluorescent-magnetic nanoparticles may also be useful as selective biomarkers to detect the location and the removal of other amyloid plaques derived from different amyloidogenic proteins that lead to neurodegenerative diseases, e.g., Parkinson's, Huntington's, mad cow, and prion diseases. PMID:19559008

  5. Deconstructing glucagon fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghodke, Shirin

    Aggregation of misfolded proteins into ordered amyloid fibrils has deep implications in disease pathology as well as in pharmaceutical production of therapeutic proteins. This thesis elucidates the fibrillation pathway of the therapeutic peptide hormone, glucagon and explores the biophysical basis...... of its inherent fibril polymorphism by varying physicochemical factors like temperature, pressure and co-solvents. This work demonstrates the important role of hydration in the fibrillation process as well as in fibril polymorphism....

  6. Multifunctional cholinesterase and amyloid Beta fibrillization modulators. Synthesis and biological investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butini, Stefania; Brindisi, Margherita; Brogi, Simone; Maramai, Samuele; Guarino, Egeria; Panico, Alessandro; Saxena, Ashima; Chauhan, Ved; Colombo, Raffaella; Verga, Laura; De Lorenzi, Ersilia; Bartolini, Manuela; Andrisano, Vincenza; Novellino, Ettore; Campiani, Giuseppe; Gemma, Sandra

    2013-12-12

    In order to identify novel Alzheimer's modifying pharmacological tools, we developed bis-tacrines bearing a peptide moiety for specific interference with surface sites of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) binding amyloid-beta (Aβ). Accordingly, compounds 2a-c proved to be inhibitors of hAChE catalytic and noncatalytic functions, binding the catalytic and peripheral sites, interfering with Aβ aggregation and with the Aβ self-oligomerization process (2a). Compounds 2a-c in complex with TcAChE span the gorge with the bis-tacrine system, and the peptide moieties bulge outside the gorge in proximity of the peripheral site. These moieties are likely responsible for the observed reduction of hAChE-induced Aβ aggregation since they physically hamper Aβ binding to the enzyme surface. Moreover, 2a was able to significantly interfere with Aβ self-oligomerization, while 2b,c showed improved inhibition of hAChE-induced Aβ aggregation. PMID:24900626

  7. Steady-state and time-resolved Thioflavin-T fluorescence can report on morphological differences in amyloid fibrils formed by Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, David J. [Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Division of Chemical Biology, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivägen 10, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Wranne, Moa S.; Gilbert Gatty, Mélina [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Division of Physical Chemistry, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivägen 10, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Westerlund, Fredrik [Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Division of Chemical Biology, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivägen 10, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Esbjörner, Elin K., E-mail: eline@chalmers.se [Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Division of Chemical Biology, Chalmers University of Technology, Kemivägen 10, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-03-06

    Thioflavin-T (ThT) is one of the most commonly used dyes for amyloid detection, but the origin of its fluorescence enhancement is not fully understood. Herein we have characterised the ThT fluorescence response upon binding to the Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) variants of the Alzheimer's-related peptide amyloid-β, in order to explore how the photophysical properties of this dye relates to structural and morphological properties of two amyloid fibril types formed by peptides with a high degree of sequence homology. We show that the steady-state ThT fluorescence is 1.7 times more intense with Aβ(1-40) compared to Aβ(1-42) fibrils in concentration matched samples prepared under quiescent conditions. By measuring the excited state lifetime of bound ThT, we also demonstrate a distinct difference between the two fibril isoforms, with Aβ(1-42) fibrils producing a longer ThT fluorescence lifetime compared to Aβ(1-40). The substantial steady-state intensity difference is therefore not explained by differences in fluorescence quantum yield. Further, we find that the ThT fluorescence intensity, but not the fluorescence lifetime, is dependent on the fibril preparation method (quiescent versus agitated conditions). We therefore propose that the fluorescence lifetime is inherent to each isoform and sensitively reports on fibril microstructure in the protofilament whereas the total fluorescence intensity relates to the amount of exposed β-sheet in the mature Aβ fibrils and hence to differences in their morphology. Our results highlight the complexity of ThT fluorescence, and demonstrate its extended use in amyloid fibril characterisation. - Highlights: • ThT emission is more intense with Aβ(1-40) fibrils than with Aβ(1-42) fibrils. • Aβ(1-42) fibrils induce longer ThT fluorescence lifetimes and higher quantum yield. • ThT emission intensity in Aβ fibril samples reports on fibril morphology. • The ThT fluorescence lifetime is a characteristic feature of each A

  8. Steady-state and time-resolved Thioflavin-T fluorescence can report on morphological differences in amyloid fibrils formed by Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thioflavin-T (ThT) is one of the most commonly used dyes for amyloid detection, but the origin of its fluorescence enhancement is not fully understood. Herein we have characterised the ThT fluorescence response upon binding to the Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) variants of the Alzheimer's-related peptide amyloid-β, in order to explore how the photophysical properties of this dye relates to structural and morphological properties of two amyloid fibril types formed by peptides with a high degree of sequence homology. We show that the steady-state ThT fluorescence is 1.7 times more intense with Aβ(1-40) compared to Aβ(1-42) fibrils in concentration matched samples prepared under quiescent conditions. By measuring the excited state lifetime of bound ThT, we also demonstrate a distinct difference between the two fibril isoforms, with Aβ(1-42) fibrils producing a longer ThT fluorescence lifetime compared to Aβ(1-40). The substantial steady-state intensity difference is therefore not explained by differences in fluorescence quantum yield. Further, we find that the ThT fluorescence intensity, but not the fluorescence lifetime, is dependent on the fibril preparation method (quiescent versus agitated conditions). We therefore propose that the fluorescence lifetime is inherent to each isoform and sensitively reports on fibril microstructure in the protofilament whereas the total fluorescence intensity relates to the amount of exposed β-sheet in the mature Aβ fibrils and hence to differences in their morphology. Our results highlight the complexity of ThT fluorescence, and demonstrate its extended use in amyloid fibril characterisation. - Highlights: • ThT emission is more intense with Aβ(1-40) fibrils than with Aβ(1-42) fibrils. • Aβ(1-42) fibrils induce longer ThT fluorescence lifetimes and higher quantum yield. • ThT emission intensity in Aβ fibril samples reports on fibril morphology. • The ThT fluorescence lifetime is a characteristic feature of each A

  9. Amyloid fibrils in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of Icelandic type is a variant of gamma-trace basic protein (cystatin C).

    OpenAIRE

    Ghiso, J.; Jensson, O; Frangione, B

    1986-01-01

    A gamma-trace variant protein is the major constituent of the amyloid fibrils in patients from Iceland with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis. The protein consists of 110 residues and is similar to human urinary gamma-trace basic protein (or cystatin C) beginning at its 11th amino-terminal residue. It has an amino acid substitution (glutamine for leucine) at position 58 (position 68 in gamma-trace numbering), which is near the proposed active site of related proteins--namely, cy...

  10. In Sup35p filaments (the [PSI+] prion), the globular C-terminal domains are widely offset from the amyloid fibril backbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxa, U.; Wall, J.; Keller, P. W.; Cheng, N.; Steven, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    In yeast cells infected with the [PSI+] prion, Sup35p forms aggregates and its activity in translation termination is downregulated. Transfection experiments have shown that Sup35p filaments assembled in vitro are infectious, suggesting that they reproduce or closely resemble the prion. We have used several EM techniques to study the molecular architecture of filaments, seeking clues as to the mechanism of downregulation. Sup35p has an N-terminal 'prion' domain; a highly charged middle (M-)domain; and a C-terminal domain with the translation termination activity. By negative staining, cryo-EM and scanning transmission EM (STEM), filaments of full-length Sup35p show a thin backbone fibril surrounded by a diffuse 65-nm-wide cloud of globular C-domains. In diameter ({approx}8 nm) and appearance, the backbones resemble amyloid fibrils of N-domains alone. STEM mass-per-unit-length data yield -1 subunit per 0.47 nm for N-fibrils, NM-filaments and Sup35p filaments, further supporting the fibril backbone model. The 30 nm radial span of decorating C-domains indicates that the M-domains assume highly extended conformations, offering an explanation for the residual Sup35p activity in infected cells, whereby the C-domains remain free enough to interact with ribosomes.

  11. α-Casein Inhibits Insulin Amyloid Formation by Preventing the Onset of Secondary Nucleation Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Librizzi, Fabio; Carrotta, Rita; Spigolon, Dario; Bulone, Donatella; San Biagio, Pier Luigi

    2014-09-01

    α-Casein is known to inhibit the aggregation of several proteins, including the amyloid β-peptide, by mechanisms that are not yet completely clear. We studied its effects on insulin, a system extensively used to investigate the properties of amyloids, many of which are common to all proteins and peptides. In particular, as for other proteins, insulin aggregation is affected by secondary nucleation pathways. We found that α-casein strongly delays insulin amyloid formation, even at extremely low doses, when the aggregation process is characterized by secondary nucleation. At difference, it has a vanishing inhibitory effect on the initial oligomer formation, which is observed at high concentration and does not involve any secondary nucleation pathway. These results indicate that an efficient inhibition of amyloid formation can be achieved by chaperone-like systems, by sequestering the early aggregates, before they can trigger the exponential proliferation brought about by secondary nucleation mechanisms. PMID:26278257

  12. Solution NMR structure of CsgE: Structural insights into a chaperone and regulator protein important for functional amyloid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Qin; Krezel, Andrzej M; Cusumano, Zachary T; Pinkner, Jerome S; Klein, Roger; Hultgren, Scott J; Frieden, Carl

    2016-06-28

    Curli, consisting primarily of major structural subunit CsgA, are functional amyloids produced on the surface of Escherichia coli, as well as many other enteric bacteria, and are involved in cell colonization and biofilm formation. CsgE is a periplasmic accessory protein that plays a crucial role in curli biogenesis. CsgE binds to both CsgA and the nonameric pore protein CsgG. The CsgG-CsgE complex is the curli secretion channel and is essential for the formation of the curli fibril in vivo. To better understand the role of CsgE in curli formation, we have determined the solution NMR structure of a double mutant of CsgE (W48A/F79A) that appears to be similar to the wild-type (WT) protein in overall structure and function but does not form mixed oligomers at NMR concentrations similar to the WT. The well-converged structure of this mutant has a core scaffold composed of a layer of two α-helices and a layer of three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet with flexible N and C termini. The structure of CsgE fits well into the cryoelectron microscopy density map of the CsgG-CsgE complex. We highlight a striking feature of the electrostatic potential surface in CsgE structure and present an assembly model of the CsgG-CsgE complex. We suggest a structural mechanism of the interaction between CsgE and CsgA. Understanding curli formation can provide the information necessary to develop treatments and therapeutic agents for biofilm-related infections and may benefit the prevention and treatment of amyloid diseases. CsgE could establish a paradigm for the regulation of amyloidogenesis because of its unique role in curli formation. PMID:27298344

  13. Structure and formation of the twisted plywood pattern of collagen fibrils in rat lamellar bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Sasaki, Muneteru; Hongo, Hiromi; Tabata, Chihiro; Liu, Zhusheng; Li, Minqi; Amizuka, Norio

    2012-04-01

    This study was designed to elucidate details of the structure and formation process of the alternate lamellar pattern known to exist in lamellar bone. For this purpose, we examined basic internal lamellae in femurs of young rats by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the latter employing two different macerations with NaOH at concentrations of 10 and 24%. Observations after the maceration with 10% NaOH showed that the regular and periodic rotation of collagen fibrils caused an alternation between two types of lamellae: one consisting of transversely and nearly transversely cut fibrils, and the other consisting of longitudinally and nearly longitudinally cut fibrils. This finding confirms the consistency of the twisted plywood model. The maceration method with 24% NaOH removed bone components other than cells, thus allowing for three-dimensional observations of osteoblast morphology. Osteoblasts extended finger-like processes paralleling the inner bone surface, and grouped in such a way that, within a group, the processes arranged in a similar direction. Transmission electron microscopy showed that newly deposited fibrils were arranged alongside these processes. For the formation of the alternating pattern, our findings suggest that: (1) osteoblasts control the collagen fibril arrangement through their finger-like process position; (2) osteoblasts behave similarly within a group; (3) osteoblasts move their processes synchronously and periodically to promote alternating different fibril orientation; and (4) this dynamic sequential deposition of fibrils results in the alternate lamellar (or twisted plywood) pattern. PMID:22362877

  14. Antibody-conjugated, dual-modal, near-infrared fluorescent iron oxide nanoparticles for antiamyloidgenic activity and specific detection of amyloidfibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skaat H

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hadas Skaat,1 Enav Corem-Slakmon,1 Igor Grinberg,1 David Last,2 David Goez,2 Yael Mardor,2,3 Shlomo Margel1 1Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Ramat-Gan, Israel; 2Advanced Technology Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Ramat-Gan, Israel; 3Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel Abstract: Amyloid-β (Aβ peptide is the main fibrillar component of plaque deposits found in brains affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD and is related to the pathogenesis of AD. Passive anti-Aβ immunotherapy has emerged as a promising approach for the therapy of AD, based on the administration of specific anti-Aβ monoclonal antibodies (aAβmAbs to delay Aβ aggregation in the brain. However, the main disadvantage of this approach is the required readministration of the aAβmAbs at frequent intervals. There are only a few reports describing in vitro study for the immobilization of aAβmAbs to nanoparticles as potential targeting agents of Aβ aggregates. In this article, we report the immobilization of the aAβmAb clone BAM10 to near-infrared fluorescent maghemite nanoparticles for the inhibition of Aβ40 fibrillation kinetics and the specific detection of Aβ40 fibrils. The BAM10-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles were well-characterized, including their immunogold labeling and cytotoxic effect on PC-12 (pheochromocytoma cell line. Indeed, these antibody-conjugated nanoparticles significantly inhibit the Aβ40 fibrillation kinetics compared with the same concentration, or even five times higher, of the free BAM10. This inhibitory effect was confirmed by different assays such as the photo-induced crosslinking of unmodified proteins combined with sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A cell viability assay also confirmed that these antibody-conjugated nanoparticles significantly reduced the Aβ40-induced cytotoxicity to PC-12 cells. Furthermore, the selective

  15. Surface Mediated Self-Assembly of Amyloid Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraai, Zahra

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils have been considered as causative agents in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type II diabetes and amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils form when proteins or peptides misfold into one dimensional crystals of stacked beta-sheets. In solution, amyloid fibrils form through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The rate limiting nucleation step requires a critical concentration much larger than those measured in physiological conditions. As such the exact origins of the seeds or oligomers that result in the formation of fully mature fibrils in the body remain topic intense studies. It has been suggested that surfaces and interfaces can enhance the fibrillization rate. However, studies of the mechanism and kinetics of the surface-mediated fibrillization are technologically challenging due to the small size of the oligomer and protofibril species. Using smart sample preparation technique to dry the samples after various incubation times we are able to study the kinetics of fibril formation both in solution and in the vicinity of various surfaces using high-resolution atomic force microscopy. These studies elucidate the role of surfaces in catalyzing amyloid peptide formation through a nucleation-free process. The nucleation free self-assembly is rapid and requires much smaller concentrations of peptides or proteins. We show that this process resembles diffusion limited aggregation and is governed by the peptide adhesion rate, two -dimensional diffusion of the peptides on the surface, and preferential interactions between the peptides. These studies suggest an alternative pathway for amyloid formation may exist, which could lead to new criteria for disease prevention and alternative therapies. Research was partially supported by a seed grant from the National Institute of Aging of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number P30AG010124 (PI: John Trojanowski) and the University of Pennsylvania.

  16. Designed Trpzip-3 β-Hairpin Inhibits Amyloid Formation in Two Different Amyloid Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopping, Gene; Kellock, Jackson; Caughey, Byron; Daggett, Valerie

    2013-09-12

    The trpzip peptides are small, monomeric, and extremely stable β-hairpins that have become valuable tools for studying protein folding. Here, we show that trpzip-3 inhibits aggregation in two very different amyloid systems: transthyretin and Aβ(1-42). Interestingly, Trp → Leu mutations renders the peptide ineffective against transthyretin, but Aβ inhibition remains. Computational docking was used to predict the interactions between trpzip-3 and transthyretin, suggesting that inhibition occurs via binding to the outer region of the thyroxine-binding site, which is supported by dye displacement experiments. PMID:24900756

  17. Sulindac Sulfide Induces the Formation of Large Oligomeric Aggregates of the Alzheimer's Disease Amyloid-β Peptide Which Exhibit Reduced Neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prade, Elke; Barucker, Christian; Sarkar, Riddhiman; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Lopez del Amo, Juan Miguel; Hossain, Shireen; Zhong, Yifei; Multhaup, Gerd; Reif, Bernd

    2016-03-29

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by deposition of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in brain tissue of affected individuals. In recent years, many potential lead structures have been suggested that can potentially be used for diagnosis and therapy. However, the mode of action of these compounds is so far not understood. Among these small molecules, the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) sulindac sulfide received a lot of attention. In this manuscript, we characterize the interaction between the monomeric Aβ peptide and the NSAID sulindac sulfide. We find that sulindac sulfide efficiently depletes the pool of toxic oligomers by enhancing the rate of fibril formation. In vitro, sulindac sulfide forms colloidal particles which catalyze the formation of fibrils. Aggregation is immediate, presumably by perturbing the supersaturated Aβ solution. We find that sulindac sulfide induced Aβ aggregates are structurally homogeneous. The C-terminal part of the peptide adopts a β-sheet structure, whereas the N-terminus is disordered. The salt bridge between D23 and K28 is present, similar as in wild type fibril structures. (13)C-(19)F transferred echo double resonance experiments suggest that sulindac sulfide colocalizes with the Aβ peptide in the aggregate. PMID:26900939

  18. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annette Eva; Morris, Kyle L; Serpell, Louise C;

    2015-01-01

    GNNQQNY peptide fragment of a yeast prion protein. Data from small-angle X-ray solution scattering, fibre diffraction and electron microscopy are combined with existing high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures to investigate the fibrillation process and the hierarchical fibril structure of the...

  19. Prions, amyloids, and RNA: Pieces of a puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizhnikov, Anton A; Antonets, Kirill S; Bondarev, Stanislav A; Inge-Vechtomov, Sergey G; Derkatch, Irina L

    2016-05-01

    Amyloids are protein aggregates consisting of fibrils rich in β-sheets. Growth of amyloid fibrils occurs by the addition of protein molecules to the tip of an aggregate with a concurrent change of a conformation. Thus, amyloids are self-propagating protein conformations. In certain cases these conformations are transmissible / infectious; they are known as prions. Initially, amyloids were discovered as pathological extracellular deposits occurring in different tissues and organs. To date, amyloids and prions have been associated with over 30 incurable diseases in humans and animals. However, a number of recent studies demonstrate that amyloids are also functionally involved in a variety of biological processes, from biofilm formation by bacteria, to long-term memory in animals. Interestingly, amyloid-forming proteins are highly overrepresented among cellular factors engaged in all stages of mRNA life cycle: from transcription and translation, to storage and degradation. Here we review rapidly accumulating data on functional and pathogenic amyloids associated with mRNA processing, and discuss possible significance of prion and amyloid networks in the modulation of key cellular functions. PMID:27248002

  20. Magnetite-Amyloid-β deteriorates activity and functional organization in an in vitro model for Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Teller; Islam Bogachan Tahirbegi; Mònica Mir; Josep Samitier; Jordi Soriano

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the key mechanisms behind human brain deterioration in Alzheimer’ disease (AD) is a highly active field of research. The most widespread hypothesis considers a cascade of events initiated by amyloid-β peptide fibrils that ultimately lead to the formation of the lethal amyloid plaques. Recent studies have shown that other agents, in particular magnetite, can also play a pivotal role. To shed light on the action of magnetite and amyloid-β in the deterioration of neuronal ci...

  1. A micellar on-pathway intermediate step explains the kinetics of prion amyloid formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwan Hingant

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In a previous work by Alvarez-Martinez et al. (2011, the authors pointed out some fallacies in the mainstream interpretation of the prion amyloid formation. It appeared necessary to propose an original hypothesis able to reconcile the in vitro data with the predictions of a mathematical model describing the problem. Here, a model is developed accordingly with the hypothesis that an intermediate on-pathway leads to the conformation of the prion protein into an amyloid competent isoform thanks to a structure, called micelles, formed from hydrodynamic interaction. The authors also compare data to the prediction of their model and propose a new hypothesis for the formation of infectious prion amyloids.

  2. A Micellar On-Pathway Intermediate Step Explains the Kinetics of Prion Amyloid Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingant, Erwan; Fontes, Pascaline; Alvarez-Martinez, Maria Teresa; Arnaud, Jacques-Damien; Liautard, Jean-Pierre; Pujo-Menjouet, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    In a previous work by Alvarez-Martinez et al. (2011), the authors pointed out some fallacies in the mainstream interpretation of the prion amyloid formation. It appeared necessary to propose an original hypothesis able to reconcile the in vitro data with the predictions of a mathematical model describing the problem. Here, a model is developed accordingly with the hypothesis that an intermediate on-pathway leads to the conformation of the prion protein into an amyloid competent isoform thanks to a structure, called micelles, formed from hydrodynamic interaction. The authors also compare data to the prediction of their model and propose a new hypothesis for the formation of infectious prion amyloids. PMID:25101755

  3. Unfolding, aggregation, and seeded amyloid formation of lysine-58-cleaved beta(2)-microglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Jørgensen, T.J.D.; Rozlosnik, N.;

    2005-01-01

    . Using amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry, we show that Delta K58-beta(2)m has increased unfolding rates compared to wt-beta(2)m and that unfolding is highly temperature dependent. The unfolding rate is I order of magnitude faster in Delta K58-beta(2)M than in wt-beta(2)m...... fluorescence. After a few days at 37 degrees C, in contrast to wt-beta(2)M, Delta K-58-beta(2)M forms well-defined high molecular weight aggregates that are detected by size-exclusion chromatography. Atomic force microscopy after seeding with amyloid-beta(2)m fibrils under conditions that induce minimal...

  4. Difference in aggregation between functional and toxic amyloids studied by atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo Pacheco, Martin; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloids are highly structured protein aggregates, normally associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. In recent years, a number of nontoxic amyloids with physiologically normal functions, called functional amyloids, have been found. It is known that soluble small oligomers are more toxic than large fibrils. Thus, we study with atomistic explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations the oligomer formation of the amyloid- β peptide Aβ25 - 35, associated with Alzheimer's disease, and two functional amyloid-forming tachykinin peptides: kassinin and neuromedin K. Our simulations show that monomeric peptides in extended conformations aggregate faster than those in collapsed hairpin-like conformations. In addition, we observe faster aggregation by functional amyloids than toxic amyloids, which could explain their lack of toxicity.

  5. Structure Activity Relationship of Phenolic Acid inhibitors of α-Synuclein Fibril Formation and Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa eArdah

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aggregation of α-synuclein (α-syn is considered the key pathogenic event in many neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD, dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy, giving rise to a whole category of neurodegenerative diseases known as synucleinopathies. Although the molecular basis of α-syn toxicity has not been precisely elucidated, a great deal of effort has been put into identifying compounds that could inhibit or even reverse the aggregation process. Previous reports indicated that many phenolic compounds are potent inhibitors of α-syn aggregation. The aim of the present study was to assess the anti-aggregating effect of gallic acid (GA (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, a benzoic acid derivative that belongs to a group of phenolic compounds known as phenolic acids. By employing an array of biophysical and biochemical techniques and a cell-viability assay, GA was shown not only to inhibit α-syn fibrillation and toxicity but also to disaggregate preformed α-syn amyloid fibrils. Interestingly, GA was found to bind to soluble, non-toxic oligomers with no β-sheet content, and to stabilize their structure. The binding of GA to the oligomers may represent a potential mechanism of action. Additionally, by using structure activity relationship data obtained from fourteen structurally similar benzoic acid derivatives, it was determined that the inhibition of α-syn fibrillation by GA is related to the number of hydroxyl moieties and their position on the phenyl ring. GA may represent the starting point for designing new molecules that could be used for the treatment of PD and related disorders.

  6. Membrane Incorporation, Channel Formation, and Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis by Alzheimer's β-Amyloid Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oligomerization, conformational changes, and the consequent neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's β-amyloid protein (AβP play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Mounting evidence suggests that oligomeric AβPs cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis, eventually leading to neuronal death. We have demonstrated that oligomeric AβPs directly incorporate into neuronal membranes, form cation-sensitive ion channels (“amyloid channels”, and cause the disruption of calcium homeostasis via the amyloid channels. Other disease-related amyloidogenic proteins, such as prion protein in prion diseases or α-synuclein in dementia with Lewy bodies, exhibit similarities in the incorporation into membranes and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. Here, based on our experimental results and those of numerous other studies, we review the current understanding of the direct binding of AβP into membrane surfaces and the formation of calcium-permeable channels. The implication of composition of membrane lipids and the possible development of new drugs by influencing membrane properties and attenuating amyloid channels for the treatment and prevention of AD is also discussed.

  7. Interactions of laminin with the amyloid ß peptide: Implications for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive neuronal cell loss is observed in Alzheimer's disease. Laminin immunoreactivity colocalizes with senile plaques, the characteristic extracellular histopathological lesions of Alzheimer brain, which consist of the amyloid ß (Aß peptide polymerized into amyloid fibrils. These lesions have neurotoxic effects and have been proposed to be a main cause of neurodegeneration. In order to understand the pathological significance of the interaction between laminin and amyloid, we investigated the effect of laminin on amyloid structure and toxicity. We found that laminin interacts with the Aß1-40 peptide, blocking fibril formation and even inducing depolymerization of preformed fibrils. Protofilaments known to be intermediate species of Aß fibril formation were also detected as intermediate species of laminin-induced Aß fibril depolymerization. Moreover, laminin-amyloid interactions inhibited the toxic effects on rat primary hippocampal neurons. As a whole, our results indicate a putative anti-amyloidogenic role of laminin which may be of biological and therapeutic interest for controlling amyloidosis, such as those observed in cerebral angiopathy and Alzheimer's disease.

  8. The Luminescent Oligothiophene p-FTAA Converts Toxic Aβ1-42 Species into Nontoxic Amyloid Fibers with Altered Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitelli, Livia; Sandin, Linnea; Nelson, Erin; Khattak, Sikander Iqbal; Brorsson, Ann-Christin; Kågedal, Katarina

    2016-04-22

    Aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the brain leads to the formation of extracellular amyloid plaques, which is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD). It is a general hypothesis that soluble prefibrillar assemblies of the Aβ peptide, rather than mature amyloid fibrils, cause neuronal dysfunction and memory impairment in AD. Thus, reducing the level of these prefibrillar species by using molecules that can interfere with the Aβ fibrillation pathway may be a valid approach to reduce Aβ cytotoxicity. Luminescent-conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs) have amyloid binding properties and spectral properties that differ when they bind to protein aggregates with different morphologies and can therefore be used to visualize protein aggregates. In this study, cell toxicity experiments and biophysical studies demonstrated that the LCO p-FTAA was able to reduce the pool of soluble toxic Aβ species in favor of the formation of larger insoluble nontoxic amyloid fibrils, there by counteracting Aβ-mediated cytotoxicity. Moreover, p-FTAA bound to early formed Aβ species and induced a rapid formation of β-sheet structures. These p-FTAA generated amyloid fibrils were less hydrophobic and more resistant to proteolysis by proteinase K. In summary, our data show that p-FTAA promoted the formation of insoluble and stable Aβ species that were nontoxic which indicates that p-FTAA might have therapeutic potential. PMID:26907684

  9. The Luminescent Oligothiophene p-FTAA Converts Toxic Aβ1–42 Species into Nontoxic Amyloid Fibers with Altered Properties*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitelli, Livia; Sandin, Linnea; Nelson, Erin; Khattak, Sikander Iqbal; Kågedal, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the brain leads to the formation of extracellular amyloid plaques, which is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD). It is a general hypothesis that soluble prefibrillar assemblies of the Aβ peptide, rather than mature amyloid fibrils, cause neuronal dysfunction and memory impairment in AD. Thus, reducing the level of these prefibrillar species by using molecules that can interfere with the Aβ fibrillation pathway may be a valid approach to reduce Aβ cytotoxicity. Luminescent-conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs) have amyloid binding properties and spectral properties that differ when they bind to protein aggregates with different morphologies and can therefore be used to visualize protein aggregates. In this study, cell toxicity experiments and biophysical studies demonstrated that the LCO p-FTAA was able to reduce the pool of soluble toxic Aβ species in favor of the formation of larger insoluble nontoxic amyloid fibrils, there by counteracting Aβ-mediated cytotoxicity. Moreover, p-FTAA bound to early formed Aβ species and induced a rapid formation of β-sheet structures. These p-FTAA generated amyloid fibrils were less hydrophobic and more resistant to proteolysis by proteinase K. In summary, our data show that p-FTAA promoted the formation of insoluble and stable Aβ species that were nontoxic which indicates that p-FTAA might have therapeutic potential. PMID:26907684

  10. Extrahepatic production of acute phase serum amyloid A

    OpenAIRE

    Upragarin, N.; Landman, W.J.M.; Gaastra, W; Gruys, E.

    2005-01-01

    Amyloidosis is a group of diseases characterized by the extracellular deposition of protein that contains non-branching, straight fibrils on electron microscopy (amyloid fibrils) that have a high content of ß-pleated sheet conformation. Various biochemically distinct proteins can undergo transformation into amyloid fibrils. The precursor protein of amyloid protein A (AA) is the acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA). The concentration of SAA in plasma increa...

  11. 探讨小鼠肌肉组织中老化淀粉样变纤维的传播性%Transmission of mouse senile amyloid fibrils in skeletal muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍佳; 钱俊乔; 李陈莉; 樋口京一; 郭浅妤; 钱金泽

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT:Recently ,prion‐like transmission has been found in various amyloidosis .AApoAII amyloid fibrils in mouse senile amyloidosis have exhibited transmissibility .AApoAII amyloid fibrils ,which were excreted from mice and contained in fe‐ces or milk ,cause mouse senile amyloidosis .However ,transmissibility of AApoAII amyloid fibrils through other pathways has not yet been established .In this study ,we injected AApoAII amyloid fibrils into R1 .P1‐A poa2c mice to induce AApoAII sys‐temic amyloidosis .Two months later ,AApoAII amyloid fibrils ,which deposited in the skeletal muscles of amyloid‐affected mice ,were used to induce AApoAII systemic amyloidosis .Mouse senile amyloidosis which deposited in skeletal muscles could induce secondary transmission of AApoAII amyloidosis .The evidence of transmission through skeletal muscles in non‐prion systemic amyloidosis is found in our study .This pathway of transmission provides new insight into the potential for food‐borne pathogenesis and etiology of systemic amyloidosis .%目的:探讨淀粉样变纤维AApoAII在小鼠肌肉组织中的传播性。方法本研究采用R1.P1‐A poa2c小鼠进行系统性淀粉样变诱导实验,诱导实验进行2个月后,判断从骨骼肌组织中提取淀粉样变纤维的沉积程度,并进行2次传播实验。结果从骨骼肌组织中提取淀粉样变纤维可诱发小鼠系统性淀粉样变。结论与prion蛋白质具有相似的特点,小鼠老化淀粉样变纤维可通过骨骼肌传播淀粉样变,而此结果为淀粉样变疾病的预防及发生机制的解析提供了新的理论依据。

  12. Rapid oriented fibril formation of fish scale collagen facilitates early osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Rena; Uemura, Toshimasa; Xu, Zhefeng; Yamaguchi, Isamu; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junzo

    2015-08-01

    We studied the effect of fibril formation of fish scale collagen on the osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). We found that hMSCs adhered easily to tilapia scale collagen, which remarkably accelerated the early stage of osteoblastic differentiation in hMSCs during in vitro cell culture. Osteoblastic markers such as ALP activity, osteopontin, and bone morphogenetic protein 2 were markedly upregulated when the hMSCs were cultured on a tilapia collagen surface, especially in the early osteoblastic differentiation stage. We hypothesized that this phenomenon occurs due to specific fibril formation of tilapia collagen. Thus, we examined the time course of collagen fibril formation using high-speed atomic force microscopy. Moreover, to elucidate the effect of the orientation of fibril formation on the differentiation of hMSCs, we measured ALP activity of hMSCs cultured on two types of tilapia scale collagen membranes with different degrees of fibril formation. The ALP activity in hMSCs cultured on a fibrous collagen membrane was significantly higher than on a non-fibrous collagen membrane even before adding osteoblastic differentiation medium. These results showed that the degree of the fibril formation of tilapia collagen was essential for the osteoblastic differentiation of hMSCs. PMID:25546439

  13. Polymorphic structures of Alzheimer's β-amyloid globulomers.

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    Xiang Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Misfolding and self-assembly of Amyloid-β (Aβ peptides into amyloid fibrils is pathologically linked to the development of Alzheimer's disease. Polymorphic Aβ structures derived from monomers to intermediate oligomers, protofilaments, and mature fibrils have been often observed in solution. Some aggregates are on-pathway species to amyloid fibrils, while the others are off-pathway species that do not evolve into amyloid fibrils. Both on-pathway and off-pathway species could be biologically relevant species. But, the lack of atomic-level structural information for these Aβ species leads to the difficulty in the understanding of their biological roles in amyloid toxicity and amyloid formation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we model a series of molecular structures of Aβ globulomers assembled by monomer and dimer building blocks using our peptide-packing program and explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Structural and energetic analysis shows that although Aβ globulomers could adopt different energetically favorable but structurally heterogeneous conformations in a rugged energy landscape, they are still preferentially organized by dynamic dimeric subunits with a hydrophobic core formed by the C-terminal residues independence of initial peptide packing and organization. Such structural organizations offer high structural stability by maximizing peptide-peptide association and optimizing peptide-water solvation. Moreover, curved surface, compact size, and less populated β-structure in Aβ globulomers make them difficult to convert into other high-order Aβ aggregates and fibrils with dominant β-structure, suggesting that they are likely to be off-pathway species to amyloid fibrils. These Aβ globulomers are compatible with experimental data in overall size, subunit organization, and molecular weight from AFM images and H/D amide exchange NMR. CONCLUSIONS: Our computationally modeled Aβ globulomers provide useful

  14. Depletion of spleen macrophages delays AA amyloid development: a study performed in the rapid mouse model of AA amyloidosis.

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    Katarzyna Lundmark

    Full Text Available AA amyloidosis is a systemic disease that develops secondary to chronic inflammatory diseases Macrophages are often found in the vicinity of amyloid deposits and considered to play a role in both formation and degradation of amyloid fibrils. In spleen reside at least three types of macrophages, red pulp macrophages (RPM, marginal zone macrophages (MZM, metallophilic marginal zone macrophages (MMZM. MMZM and MZM are located in the marginal zone and express a unique collection of scavenger receptors that are involved in the uptake of blood-born particles. The murine AA amyloid model that resembles the human form of the disease has been used to study amyloid effects on different macrophage populations. Amyloid was induced by intravenous injection of amyloid enhancing factor and subcutaneous injections of silver nitrate and macrophages were identified with specific antibodies. We show that MZMs are highly sensitive to amyloid and decrease in number progressively with increasing amyloid load. Total area of MMZMs is unaffected by amyloid but cells are activated and migrate into the white pulp. In a group of mice spleen macrophages were depleted by an intravenous injection of clodronate filled liposomes. Subsequent injections of AEF and silver nitrate showed a sustained amyloid development. RPMs that constitute the majority of macrophages in spleen, appear insensitive to amyloid and do not participate in amyloid formation.

  15. The effects of amino acid composition of glutamine-rich domains on amyloid formation and fragmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I Alexandrov

    Full Text Available Fragmentation of amyloid polymers by the chaperone Hsp104 allows them to propagate as prions in yeast. The factors which determine the frequency of fragmentation are unclear, though it is often presumed to depend on the physical strength of prion polymers. Proteins with long polyglutamine stretches represent a tractable model for revealing sequence elements required for polymer fragmentation in yeast, since they form poorly fragmented amyloids. Here we show that interspersion of polyglutamine stretches with various amino acid residues differentially affects the in vivo formation and fragmentation of the respective amyloids. Aromatic residues tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine strongly stimulated polymer fragmentation, leading to the appearance of oligomers as small as dimers. Alanine, methionine, cysteine, serine, threonine and histidine also enhanced fragmentation, while charged residues, proline, glycine and leucine inhibited polymerization. Our data indicate that fragmentation frequency primarily depends on the recognition of fragmentation-promoting residues by Hsp104 and/or its co-chaperones, rather than on the physical stability of polymers. This suggests that differential exposure of such residues to chaperones defines prion variant-specific differences in polymer fragmentation efficiency.

  16. Quantitative Analyses of Force-Induced Amyloid Formation in Candida albicans Als5p: Activation by Standard Laboratory Procedures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho X J Chan

    Full Text Available Candida albicans adhesins have amyloid-forming sequences. In Als5p, these amyloid sequences cluster cell surface adhesins to create high avidity surface adhesion nanodomains. Such nanodomains form after force is applied to the cell surface by atomic force microscopy or laminar flow. Here we report centrifuging and resuspending S. cerevisiae cells expressing Als5p led to 1.7-fold increase in initial rate of adhesion to ligand coated beads. Furthermore, mechanical stress from vortex-mixing of Als5p cells or C. albicans cells also induced additional formation of amyloid nanodomains and consequent activation of adhesion. Vortex-mixing for 60 seconds increased the initial rate of adhesion 1.6-fold. The effects of vortex-mixing were replicated in heat-killed cells as well. Activation was accompanied by increases in thioflavin T cell surface fluorescence measured by flow cytometry or by confocal microscopy. There was no adhesion activation in cells expressing amyloid-impaired Als5pV326N or in cells incubated with inhibitory concentrations of anti-amyloid dyes. Together these results demonstrated the activation of cell surface amyloid nanodomains in yeast expressing Als adhesins, and further delineate the forces that can activate adhesion in vivo. Consequently there is quantitative support for the hypothesis that amyloid forming adhesins act as both force sensors and effectors.

  17. Inhibition of amyloid-β plaque formation by α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachhuber, Teresa; Katzmarski, Natalie; McCarter, Joanna F; Loreth, Desiree; Tahirovic, Sabina; Kamp, Frits; Abou-Ajram, Claudia; Nuscher, Brigitte; Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Müller, Alexandra; Prinz, Marco; Steiner, Harald; Hyman, Bradley T; Haass, Christian; Meyer-Luehmann, Melanie

    2015-07-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and α-synuclein (α-syn)-rich Lewy bodies are the major neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease, respectively. An overlap of pathologies is found in most individuals with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and in more than 50% of AD cases. Their brains display substantial α-syn accumulation not only in Lewy bodies, but also in dystrophic neurites decorating Aβ plaques. Several studies report binding and coaggregation of Aβ and α-syn, yet the precise role of α-syn in amyloid plaque formation remains elusive. Here we performed intracerebral injections of α-syn-containing preparations into amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice (expressing APP695(KM670/671NL) and PSEN1(L166P) under the control of the neuron-specific Thy-1 promoter; referred to here as 'APPPS1'). Unexpectedly, α-syn failed to cross-seed Aβ plaques in vivo, but rather it inhibited plaque formation in APPPS1 mice coexpressing SNCA(A30P) (referred to here as 'APPPS1 × [A30P]aSYN' double-transgenic mice). This was accompanied by increased Aβ levels in cerebrospinal fluid despite unchanged overall Aβ levels. Notably, the seeding activity of Aβ-containing brain homogenates was considerably reduced by α-syn, and Aβ deposition was suppressed in grafted tissue from [A30P]aSYN transgenic mice. Thus, we conclude that an interaction between Aβ and α-syn leads to inhibition of Aβ deposition and to reduced plaque formation. PMID:26099047

  18. Inhibitory effect of minocycline on amyloid beta fibril formation and human microglial activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Familian; R.S. Boshuizen; P. Eikelenboom; R. Veerhuis

    2006-01-01

    Minocycline, a derivative of the antibiotic tetracycline, displays neuroprotective properties in various models of neurodegenerative diseases and is now used in clinical trials, because of its relative safety and tolerability. Minocycline passes the blood-brain barrier and is presumed to inhibit mic

  19. Formation of DNA-copolymer fibrils through an amyloid-like nucleation polymerization mechanism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kedracki, D.; Filippov, Sergey K.; Gour, N.; Schlaad, H.; Nardin, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 8 (2015), s. 768-773. ISSN 1022-1336 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/0640 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : DNA copolymer s * fibers * hydrogen bonding Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.941, year: 2014

  20. Quasielastic light scattering study of amyloid β-protein fibril formation

    OpenAIRE

    Lomakin, A; Teplow, DB

    2006-01-01

    Quasielastic light scattering spectroscopy (QLS) is an optical method for the determination of diffusion coefficients of particles in solution. Here we discuss the principles of QLS and explain how the distribution of particle sizes can be reconstructed from the measured correlation function of scattered light. Non-invasive observation of the temporal evolution of particle sizes provides a powerful tool for studying protein assembly. We illustrate practical applications of QLS with examples f...

  1. Current and future treatment of amyloid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankarcrona, M; Winblad, B; Monteiro, C; Fearns, C; Powers, E T; Johansson, J; Westermark, G T; Presto, J; Ericzon, B-G; Kelly, J W

    2016-08-01

    There are more than 30 human proteins whose aggregation appears to cause degenerative maladies referred to as amyloid diseases or amyloidoses. These disorders are named after the characteristic cross-β-sheet amyloid fibrils that accumulate systemically or are localized to specific organs. In most cases, current treatment is limited to symptomatic approaches and thus disease-modifying therapies are needed. Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder with extracellular amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) fibrils and intracellular tau neurofibrillary tangles as pathological hallmarks. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted with passive and active immunotherapy, and small molecules to inhibit Aβ formation and aggregation or to enhance Aβ clearance; so far such clinical trials have been unsuccessful. Novel strategies are therefore required and here we will discuss the possibility of utilizing the chaperone BRICHOS to prevent Aβ aggregation and toxicity. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is symptomatically treated with insulin. However, the underlying pathology is linked to the aggregation and progressive accumulation of islet amyloid polypeptide as fibrils and oligomers, which are cytotoxic. Several compounds have been shown to inhibit islet amyloid aggregation and cytotoxicity in vitro. Future animal studies and clinical trials have to be conducted to determine their efficacy in vivo. The transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses are a group of systemic degenerative diseases compromising multiple organ systems, caused by TTR aggregation. Liver transplantation decreases the generation of misfolded TTR and improves the quality of life for a subgroup of this patient population. Compounds that stabilize the natively folded, nonamyloidogenic, tetrameric conformation of TTR have been developed and the drug tafamidis is available as a promising treatment. PMID:27165517

  2. Depletion of Spleen Macrophages Delays AA Amyloid Development: A Study Performed in the Rapid Mouse Model of AA Amyloidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Lundmark; Aida Vahdat Shariatpanahi; Westermark, Gunilla T.

    2013-01-01

    AA amyloidosis is a systemic disease that develops secondary to chronic inflammatory diseases Macrophages are often found in the vicinity of amyloid deposits and considered to play a role in both formation and degradation of amyloid fibrils. In spleen reside at least three types of macrophages, red pulp macrophages (RPM), marginal zone macrophages (MZM), metallophilic marginal zone macrophages (MMZM). MMZM and MZM are located in the marginal zone and express a unique collection of scavenger r...

  3. Amyloid cascade in Alzheimer's disease: Recent advances in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Tarek; Shakeri, Arash; Rao, Praveen P N

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is of major concern all over the world due to a number of factors including (i) an aging population (ii) increasing life span and (iii) lack of effective pharmacotherapy options. The past decade has seen intense research in discovering disease-modifying multitargeting small molecules as therapeutic options. The pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease is attributed to a number of factors such as the cholinergic dysfunction, amyloid/tau toxicity and oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction. In recent years, targeting the amyloid cascade has emerged as an attractive strategy to discover novel neurotherapeutics. Formation of beta-amyloid species, with different degrees of solubility and neurotoxicity is associated with the gradual decline in cognition leading to dementia. The two commonly used approaches to prevent beta-amyloid accumulation in the brain include (i) development of beta-secretase inhibitors and (ii) designing direct inhibitors of beta-amyloid (self-induced) aggregation. This review highlights the amyloid cascade hypothesis and the key chemical features required to design small molecules that inhibit lower and higher order beta-amyloid aggregates. Several recent examples of small synthetic molecules with disease-modifying properties were considered and their molecular docking studies were conducted using either a dimer or steric-zipper assembly of beta-amyloid. These investigations provide a mechanistic understanding on the structural requirements needed to design novel small molecules with anti-amyloid aggregation properties. Significantly, this work also demonstrates that the structural requirements to prevent aggregation of various amyloid species differs considerably, which explains the fact that many small molecules do not exhibit similar inhibition profile toward diverse amyloid species such as dimers, trimers, tetramers, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils. PMID:26945113

  4. Heterogeneous Seeding of a Prion Structure by a Generic Amyloid Form of the Fungal Prion-forming Domain HET-s(218-289)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, William; Bian, Wen; McDonald, Michele; Kijac, Aleksandra; Wemmer, David E.; Stubbs, Gerald [UCB; (Vanderbilt); (LBNL)

    2013-11-13

    The fungal prion-forming domain HET-s(218–289) forms infectious amyloid fibrils at physiological pH that were shown by solid-state NMR to be assemblies of a two-rung β-solenoid structure. Under acidic conditions, HET-s(218–289) has been shown to form amyloid fibrils that have very low infectivity in vivo, but structural information about these fibrils has been very limited. We show by x-ray fiber diffraction that the HET-s(218–289) fibrils formed under acidic conditions have a stacked β-sheet architecture commonly found in short amyloidogenic peptides and denatured protein aggregates. At physiological pH, stacked β-sheet fibrils nucleate the formation of the infectious β-solenoid prions in a process of heterogeneous seeding, but do so with kinetic profiles distinct from those of spontaneous or homogeneous (seeded with infectious β-solenoid fibrils) fibrillization. Several serial passages of stacked β-sheet-seeded solutions lead to fibrillization kinetics similar to homogeneously seeded solutions. Our results directly show that structural mutation can occur between substantially different amyloid architectures, lending credence to the suggestion that the processes of strain adaptation and crossing species barriers are facilitated by structural mutation.

  5. Epigallocatechin gallate remodels fibrils of Lattice Corneal Dystrophy protein, facilitating proteolytic degradation and preventing formation of membrane-permeabilizing species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Marcel; Christiansen, Gunna; Otzen, Daniel Erik

    2016-01-01

    with destabilizing mutations in the fourth fasciclin 1 (Fas1-4) domain of TGFBIp. The green tea compound Epigallo-catechin gallate (EGCG) has been found to inhibit fibril formation of various amyloidogenic proteins in vitro. In this study we investigated the effect of EGCG as a potential treatment in...

  6. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of fluorescently labelled amyloid β 1-40 and α-synuclein aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Valerie L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescent tags, including small organic molecules and fluorescent proteins, enable the localization of protein molecules in biomedical research experiments. However, the use of these labels may interfere with the formation of larger-scale protein structures such as amyloid aggregates. Therefore, we investigate the effects of some commonly used fluorescent tags on the morphologies of fibrils grown from the Alzheimer's disease-associated peptide Amyloid β 1-40 (Aβ40 and the Parkinson's disease-associated protein α-synuclein (αS. Results Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, we verify that N-terminal labeling of Aβ40 with AMCA, TAMRA, and Hilyte-Fluor 488 tags does not prevent the formation of protofibrils and amyloid fibrils of various widths. We also measure the two-photon action cross-section of Aβ40 labelled with Hilyte Fluor 488 and demonstrate that this tag is suitable for use with two-photon fluorescence techniques. Similarly, we find that Alexa Fluor 488 labelling of αS variant proteins near either the N or C terminus (position 9 or 130 does not interfere with the formation of amyloid and other types of αS fibrils. We also present TEM images of fibrils grown from αS C-terminally labelled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. Near neutral pH, two types of αS-EGFP fibrils are observed via TEM, while denaturation of the EGFP tag leads to the formation of additional species. Conclusions We demonstrate that several small extrinsic fluorescent tags are compatible with studies of amyloid protein aggregation. However, although fibrils can be grown from αS labelled with EGFP, the conformation of the fluorescent protein tag affects the observed aggregate morphologies. Thus, our results should assist researchers with label selection and optimization of solution conditions for aggregation studies involving fluorescence techniques.

  7. Ile-phe dipeptide self-assembly: clues to amyloid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Natalia Sánchez; Parella, Teodor; Aviles, Francesc X; Vendrell, Josep; Ventura, Salvador

    2007-03-01

    Peptidic self-assembled nanostructures are said to have a wide range of applications in nanotechnology, yet the mechanistic details of hierarchical self-assembly are still poorly understood. The Phe-Phe recognition motif of the Alzheimer's Abeta peptide is the smallest peptide able to assemble into higher-order structures. Here, we show that the Ile-Phe dipeptide analog is also able to self-associate in aqueous solution as a transparent, thermoreversible gel formed by a network of fibrillar nanostructures that exhibit strong birefringence upon Congo red binding. Besides, a second dipeptide Val-Phe, differing only in a methyl group from the former, is unable to self-assemble. The detailed analysis of the differential polymeric behavior of these closely related molecules provides insight into the forces triggering the first steps in self-assembly processes such as amyloid formation. PMID:17172307

  8. Thermodynamic description of Beta amyloid formation using physicochemical scales and fractal bioinformatic scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J C

    2015-05-20

    Protein function depends on both protein structure and amino acid (aa) sequence. Here we show that modular features of both structure and function can be quantified economically from the aa sequences alone for the small (40,42 aa) plaque-forming (aggregative) amyloid beta fragments. Some edge and center features of the fragments are predicted. Bioinformatic scales based on β strand formation propensities and the thermodynamically second order fractal hydropathicity scale based on evolutionary optimization (self-organized criticality) are contrasted with the standard first order physicochemical scale based on complete protein (water-air) unfolding. The results are consistent with previous studies of these physicochemical factors that show that aggregative properties, even of beta fragments, are driven primarily by near-equilibrium hydropathic forces. PMID:25702750

  9. Bifurcated hydrogen bonds stabilize fibrils of poly(L-glutamic) acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulara, Aleksandra; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2010-06-24

    Model fibrillating homopolypeptides have been providing many insightful analogies to the clinically important phenomena of protein misfolding and amyloidogenesis. Here we show that the beta(2) structural variant of poly(l-glutamic) acid forms fibrils with an amyloid-like morphology, ability to enhance fluorescence of thioflavin T, and seeding properties. The beta(2) fibrils are formed upon heating of aqueous solutions of alpha-helical poly(l-glutamic) acid, which leads to a significant increase of pD (pH) of unbuffered samples and a concomitant precipitation of fibrils with unusual infrared traits: amide I' band being dramatically red-shifted to 1596 cm(-1), and the -COOD stretching band split into two peaks around 1730 and 1719 cm(-1). We are proposing that formation of three-center hydrogen bonds involving bifurcated peptide carbonyl acceptors (>C=O) and main chains' NH, as well as side chains' -COOH proton donors is likely to underlie the observed infrared characteristics of beta(2) fibrils. Such bonds provide additional conformational constraints in a tightly packed environment around glutamate side chains resulting in the decreased overall acidity of the polypeptide. The presence of bifurcated hydrogen bonds in amyloid fibrils may be an overlooked factor in fibrils' robustness, thermodynamic stability and the ability to propagate their own growth. PMID:20509699

  10. Natural amyloid-β oligomers acutely impair the formation of a contextual fear memory in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara A Kittelberger

    Full Text Available Memory loss is one of the hallmark symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD. It has been proposed that soluble amyloid-beta (Abeta oligomers acutely impair neuronal function and thereby memory. We here report that natural Abeta oligomers acutely impair contextual fear memory in mice. A natural Abeta oligomer solution containing Abeta monomers, dimers, trimers, and tetramers was derived from the conditioned medium of 7PA2 cells, a cell line that expresses human amyloid precursor protein containing the Val717Phe familial AD mutation. As a control we used 7PA2 conditioned medium from which Abeta oligomers were removed through immunodepletion. Separate groups of mice were injected with Abeta and control solutions through a cannula into the lateral brain ventricle, and subjected to fear conditioning using two tone-shock pairings. One day after fear conditioning, mice were tested for contextual fear memory and tone fear memory in separate retrieval trials. Three experiments were performed. For experiment 1, mice were injected three times: 1 hour before and 3 hours after fear conditioning, and 1 hour before context retrieval. For experiments 2 and 3, mice were injected a single time at 1 hour and 2 hours before fear conditioning respectively. In all three experiments there was no effect on tone fear memory. Injection of Abeta 1 hour before fear conditioning, but not 2 hours before fear conditioning, impaired the formation of a contextual fear memory. In future studies, the acute effect of natural Abeta oligomers on contextual fear memory can be used to identify potential mechanisms and treatments of AD associated memory loss.

  11. Amyloid domains in the cell nucleus controlled by nucleoskeletal protein lamin B1 reveal a new pathway of mercury neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Arnhold

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mercury (Hg is a bioaccumulating trace metal that globally circulates the atmosphere and waters in its elemental, inorganic and organic chemical forms. While Hg represents a notorious neurotoxicant, the underlying cellular pathways are insufficiently understood. We identify amyloid protein aggregation in the cell nucleus as a novel pathway of Hg-bio-interactions. By mass spectrometry of purified protein aggregates, a subset of spliceosomal components and nucleoskeletal protein lamin B1 were detected as constituent parts of an Hg-induced nuclear aggregome network. The aggregome network was located by confocal imaging of amyloid-specific antibodies and dyes to amyloid cores within splicing-speckles that additionally recruit components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Hg significantly enhances global proteasomal activity in the nucleus, suggesting that formation of amyloid speckles plays a role in maintenance of protein homeostasis. RNAi knock down showed that lamin B1 for its part regulates amyloid speckle formation and thus likewise participates in nuclear protein homeostasis. As the Hg-induced cascade of interactions between the nucleoskeleton and protein homeostasis reduces neuronal signalling, amyloid fibrillation in the cell nucleus is introduced as a feature of Hg-neurotoxicity that opens new avenues of future research. Similar to protein aggregation events in the cytoplasm that are controlled by the cytoskeleton, amyloid fibrillation of nuclear proteins may be driven by the nucleoskeleton.

  12. Interactions driving the collapse of islet amyloid polypeptide: Implications for amyloid aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Stephanie M.

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), also known as amylin, is a 37-residue intrinsically disordered hormone involved in glucose regulation and gastric emptying. The aggregation of hIAPP into amyloid fibrils is believed to play a causal role in type 2 diabetes. To date, not much is known about the monomeric state of hIAPP or how it undergoes an irreversible transformation from disordered peptide to insoluble aggregate. IAPP contains a highly conserved disulfide bond that restricts hIAPP(1-8) into a short ring-like structure: N_loop. Removal or chemical reduction of N_loop not only prevents cell response upon binding to the CGRP receptor, but also alters the mass per length distribution of hIAPP fibers and the kinetics of fibril formation. The mechanism by which N_loop affects hIAPP aggregation is not yet understood, but is important for rationalizing kinetics and developing potential inhibitors. By measuring end-to-end contact formation rates, Vaiana et al. showed that N_loop induces collapsed states in IAPP monomers, implying attractive interactions between N_loop and other regions of the disordered polypeptide chain . We show that in addition to being involved in intra-protein interactions, the N_loop is involved in inter-protein interactions, which lead to the formation of extremely long and stable beta-turn fibers. These non-amyloid fibers are present in the 10 muM concentration range, under the same solution conditions in which hIAPP forms amyloid fibers. We discuss the effect of peptide cyclization on both intra- and inter-protein interactions, and its possible implications for aggregation. Our findings indicate a potential role of N_loop-N_loop interactions in hIAPP aggregation, which has not previously been explored. Though our findings suggest that N_loop plays an important role in the pathway of amyloid formation, other naturally occurring IAPP variants that contain this structural feature are incapable of forming amyloids. For example, hIAPP readily

  13. Essential Oils May Lead α-Synuclein towards Toxic Fibrils Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Morshedi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available α-Synuclein (α-Syn fibrillation links with Parkinson’s disease (PD and several related syndromes. It is believed that exposure to the factors which promote fibrillation may induce and progress such neurodegenerative diseases (NDs. Herein, the effects of some wildly used essential oils including Myrtus communis (M. communis on α-Syn fibrillation were examined. M. communis particularly increased α-Syn fibrillation in a concentration dependent manner. Given that applications of M. communis are very extensive in Asian societies, especially Zoroastrians, this study was extended towards its role on α-Syn fibrillation/cytotoxicity. By using a unilamellar vesicle, it was shown that the aggregated species with tendency to perturb membrane were increased in the presence of M. communis. In this regard, the cytotoxicity of α-Syn on SH-SH5Y cells was also increased significantly. Inappropriately, the effects of fibrillation inhibitors, baicalein and cuminaldehyde, were modulated in the presence of M. communis. However, major components of M. communis did not induce fibrillation and also the effect of M. communis was limited on other fibrinogenic proteins. Assuming that essential oils have the ability to pass through the blood brain barrier (BBB along with the popular attention on aromatherapy for the incurable ND, these findings suggest an implementation of fibrillation tests for essential oils.

  14. Essential Oils May Lead α-Synuclein towards Toxic Fibrils Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshedi, Dina; Nasouti, Mahour

    2016-01-01

    α-Synuclein (α-Syn) fibrillation links with Parkinson's disease (PD) and several related syndromes. It is believed that exposure to the factors which promote fibrillation may induce and progress such neurodegenerative diseases (NDs). Herein, the effects of some wildly used essential oils including Myrtus communis (M. communis) on α-Syn fibrillation were examined. M. communis particularly increased α-Syn fibrillation in a concentration dependent manner. Given that applications of M. communis are very extensive in Asian societies, especially Zoroastrians, this study was extended towards its role on α-Syn fibrillation/cytotoxicity. By using a unilamellar vesicle, it was shown that the aggregated species with tendency to perturb membrane were increased in the presence of M. communis. In this regard, the cytotoxicity of α-Syn on SH-SH5Y cells was also increased significantly. Inappropriately, the effects of fibrillation inhibitors, baicalein and cuminaldehyde, were modulated in the presence of M. communis. However, major components of M. communis did not induce fibrillation and also the effect of M. communis was limited on other fibrinogenic proteins. Assuming that essential oils have the ability to pass through the blood brain barrier (BBB) along with the popular attention on aromatherapy for the incurable ND, these findings suggest an implementation of fibrillation tests for essential oils. PMID:27313947

  15. The mechanism of lesion formation by focused ultrasound ablation catheter for treatment of atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinelnikov, Y. D.; Fjield, T.; Sapozhnikov, O. A.

    2009-10-01

    The application of therapeutic ultrasound for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) is investigated. The results of theoretical and experimental investigation of ultrasound ablation catheter are presented. The major components of the catheter are the high power cylindrical piezoelectric element and parabolic balloon reflector. Thermal elevation in the ostia of pulmonary veins is achieved by focusing the ultrasound beam in shape of a torus that transverses the myocardial tissue. High intensity ultrasound heating in the focal zone results in a lesion surrounding the pulmonary veins that creates an electrical conduction blocks and relief from AF symptoms. The success of the ablation procedure largely depends on the correct choice of reflector geometry and ultrasonic power. We present a theoretical model of the catheter’s acoustic field and bioheat transfer modeling of cardiac lesions. The application of an empirically derived relation between lesion formation and acoustic power is shown to correlate with the experimental data. Developed control methods combine the knowledge of theoretical acoustics and the thermal lesion formation simulations with experiment and thereby establish dosimetry that contributes to a safe and effective ultrasound ablation procedure.

  16. Supramolecular amplification of amyloid self-assembly by iodination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolani, Arianna; Pirrie, Lisa; Stefan, Loic; Houbenov, Nikolay; Haataja, Johannes S; Catalano, Luca; Terraneo, Giancarlo; Giancane, Gabriele; Valli, Ludovico; Milani, Roberto; Ikkala, Olli; Resnati, Giuseppe; Metrangolo, Pierangelo

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid supramolecular assemblies have found widespread exploitation as ordered nanomaterials in a range of applications from materials science to biotechnology. New strategies are, however, required for understanding and promoting mature fibril formation from simple monomer motifs through easy and scalable processes. Noncovalent interactions are key to forming and holding the amyloid structure together. On the other hand, the halogen bond has never been used purposefully to achieve control over amyloid self-assembly. Here we show that single atom replacement of hydrogen with iodine, a halogen-bond donor, in the human calcitonin-derived amyloidogenic fragment DFNKF results in a super-gelator peptide, which forms a strong and shape-persistent hydrogel at 30-fold lower concentration than the wild-type pentapeptide. This is remarkable for such a modest perturbation in structure. Iodination of aromatic amino acids may thus develop as a general strategy for the design of new hydrogels from unprotected peptides and without using organic solvents. PMID:26123690

  17. An Intein-based Strategy for the Production of Tag-free Huntingtin Exon 1 Proteins Enables New Insights into the Polyglutamine Dependence of Httex1 Aggregation and Fibril Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieweg, Sophie; Ansaloni, Annalisa; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Warner, John B; Lashuel, Hilal A

    2016-06-01

    The first exon of the Huntingtin protein (Httex1) is one of the most actively studied Htt fragments because its overexpression in R6/2 transgenic mice has been shown to recapitulate several key features of Huntington disease. However, the majority of biophysical studies of Httex1 are based on assessing the structure and aggregation of fusion constructs where Httex1 is fused to large proteins, such as glutathione S-transferase, maltose-binding protein, or thioredoxin, or released in solution upon in situ cleavage of these proteins. Herein, we report an intein-based strategy that allows, for the first time, the rapid and efficient production of native tag-free Httex1 with polyQ repeats ranging from 7Q to 49Q. Aggregation studies on these proteins enabled us to identify interesting polyQ-length-dependent effects on Httex1 oligomer and fibril formation that were previously not observed using Httex1 fusion proteins or Httex1 proteins produced by in situ cleavage of fusion proteins. Our studies revealed the inability of Httex1-7Q/15Q to undergo amyloid fibril formation and an inverse correlation between fibril length and polyQ repeat length, suggesting possible polyQ length-dependent differences in the structural properties of the Httex1 aggregates. Altogether, our findings underscore the importance of working with tag-free Httex1 proteins and indicate that model systems based on non-native Httex1 sequences may not accurately reproduce the effect of polyQ repeat length and solution conditions on Httex1 aggregation kinetics and structural properties. PMID:27002149

  18. MetAmyl: a METa-predictor for AMYLoid proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Emily

    Full Text Available The aggregation of proteins or peptides in amyloid fibrils is associated with a number of clinical disorders, including Alzheimer's, Huntington's and prion diseases, medullary thyroid cancer, renal and cardiac amyloidosis. Despite extensive studies, the molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation of fibril formation remain largely unknown. Several lines of evidence revealed that short amino-acid segments (hot spots, located in amyloid precursor proteins act as seeds for fibril elongation. Therefore, hot spots are potential targets for diagnostic/therapeutic applications, and a current challenge in bioinformatics is the development of methods to accurately predict hot spots from protein sequences. In this paper, we combined existing methods into a meta-predictor for hot spots prediction, called MetAmyl for METapredictor for AMYLoid proteins. MetAmyl is based on a logistic regression model that aims at weighting predictions from a set of popular algorithms, statistically selected as being the most informative and complementary predictors. We evaluated the performances of MetAmyl through a large scale comparative study based on three independent datasets and thus demonstrated its ability to differentiate between amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic polypeptides. Compared to 9 other methods, MetAmyl provides significant improvement in prediction on studied datasets. We further show that MetAmyl is efficient to highlight the effect of point mutations involved in human amyloidosis, so we suggest this program should be a useful complementary tool for the diagnosis of these diseases.

  19. Automated Ex Situ Assays of Amyloid Formation on a Microfluidic Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saar, Kadi-Liis; Yates, Emma V; Müller, Thomas; Saunier, Séverine; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2016-02-01

    Increasingly prevalent neurodegenerative diseases are associated with the formation of nanoscale amyloid aggregates from normally soluble peptides and proteins. A widely used strategy for following the aggregation process and defining its kinetics involves the use of extrinsic dyes that undergo a spectral shift when bound to β-sheet-rich aggregates. An attractive route to carry out such studies is to perform ex situ assays, where the dye molecules are not present in the reaction mixture, but instead are only introduced into aliquots taken from the reaction at regular time intervals to avoid the possibility that the dye molecules interfere with the aggregation process. However, such ex situ measurements are time-consuming to perform, require large sample volumes, and do not provide for real-time observation of aggregation phenomena. To overcome these limitations, here we have designed and fabricated microfluidic devices that offer continuous and automated real-time ex situ tracking of the protein aggregation process. This device allows us to improve the time resolution of ex situ aggregation assays relative to conventional assays by more than one order of magnitude. The availability of an automated system for tracking the progress of protein aggregation reactions without the presence of marker molecules in the reaction mixtures opens up the possibility of routine noninvasive study of protein aggregation phenomena. PMID:26840721

  20. C1q binding and complement activation by prions and amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Robert B; Kishore, Uday; Villiers, Christian L; Marche, Patrice N; Mitchell, Daniel A

    2007-01-01

    C1q binds to many non-self and altered-self-materials. These include microorganisms, immune complexes, apoptotic and necrotic cells and their breakdown products, and amyloids. C1q binding to amyloid fibrils found as extracellular deposits in tissues, and subsequent complement activation are involved in the pathology of several amyloid diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. Prion diseases, such as scrapie also involve formation of amyloid by polymerization of the host prion protein (PrP). Complement activation is likely to contribute to neuronal damage in the end stages of prion diseases, but is also thought to participate in the initial infection, dissemination and replication stages. Infectious prion particles are likely to bind C1q and activate the complement system. Bound complement proteins may then influence the uptake and transport of prion particles by dendritic cells (DCs) and their subsequent proliferation at sites such as follicular DCs. PMID:17544820

  1. Vitamin k3 inhibits protein aggregation: Implication in the treatment of amyloid diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Parvez; Chaturvedi, Sumit Kumar; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Rajpoot, Ravi Kant; Ajmal, Mohd Rehan; Zaman, Masihuz; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation have been associated with several human diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and familial amyloid polyneuropathy etc. In this study, anti-fibrillation activity of vitamin k3 and its effect on the kinetics of amyloid formation of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and Aβ-42 peptide were investigated. Here, in combination with Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay, circular dichroism (CD), transmission electron microscopy and cell cytotoxicity assay, we demonstrated that vitamin k3 significantly inhibits fibril formation as well as the inhibitory effect is dose dependent manner. Our experimental studies inferred that vitamin k3 exert its neuro protective effect against amyloid induced cytotoxicity through concerted pathway, modifying the aggregation formation towards formation of nontoxic aggregates. Molecular docking demonstrated that vitamin k3 mediated inhibition of HEWL and Aβ-42 fibrillogenesis may be initiated by interacting with proteolytic resistant and aggregation prone regions respectively. This work would provide an insight into the mechanism of protein aggregation inhibition by vitamin k3; pave the way for discovery of other small molecules that may exert similar effect against amyloid formation and its associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27230476

  2. Pathways of tau fibrillization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuret, Jeff; Chirita, Carmen N; Congdon, Erin E; Kannanayakal, Theresa; Li, Guibin; Necula, Mihaela; Yin, Haishan; Zhong, Qi

    2005-01-01

    New methods for analyzing tau fibrillization have yielded insights into the biochemical transitions involved in the process. Here we review the parallels between the sequential progression of tau fibrillization observed macroscopically in Alzheimer's disease (AD) lesions and the pathway of tau aggregation observed in vitro with purified tau preparations. In addition, pharmacological agents for further dissection of fibrillization mechanism and lesion formation are discussed. PMID:15615636

  3. Catechins and Procyanidins of Ginkgo biloba Show Potent Activities towards the Inhibition of β-Amyloid Peptide Aggregation and Destabilization of Preformed Fibrils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Xie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Catechins and procyanidins, together with flavonoid glycosides and terpene trilactones, are three important categories of components in the standard extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves (EGb761. In this research, catechins and proanthocyanidins were found to exist in both the extract of Ginkgo leaves and Ginkgo products. By comparing with reference compounds, six of them were identified as (+-catechin, (−-epicatechin, (−-gallocatechin, (−-epigallocatechin and procyanidins B1 and B3. The activities of these polyphenols in the inhibition of Aβ42 aggregation and the destabilization of preformed fibrils were evaluated using biochemical assays, which showed that all six of the polyphenols, as well as a fraction of the extract of Ginkgo biloba leaves (EGb containing catechins and procyanidins, exerted potent inhibitory activities towards Aβ42 aggregation and could also destabilize the performed fibrils. Catechins and procyanidins can therefore be regarded as the potent active constituents of EGb761 in terms of their inhibition of Aβ42 aggregation and destabilization of the fibrils. Although quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis revealed that the catechins and procyanidins are only present in low concentrations in EGb761, these components should be studied in greater detail because of their potent inhibitory effects towards Aβ42 aggregation and their ability to destabilize preformed fibrils, especially during the quality control of Ginkgo leaves and the manufacture of Ginkgo products.

  4. Amyloid fibrillogenesis of lysozyme is suppressed by a food additive brilliant blue FCF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Han; Tseng, Chia-Ping; How, Su-Chun; Lo, Chun-Hsien; Chou, Wei-Lung; Wang, Steven S-S

    2016-06-01

    At least 30 different human proteins can fold abnormally to form the amyloid deposits that are associated with a number of degenerative diseases. The research presented here aimed at understanding the inhibitory potency of a food additive, brilliant blue FCF (BBF), on the amyloid fibril formation of lysozyme. Our results demonstrated that BBF was able to suppress the formation of lysozyme fibrils in a dose-dependent fashion. In addition, the structural features and conformational changes in the lysozyme samples upon the addition of BBF were further characterized using circular dichroism spectroscopy, nile red fluorescence spectroscopy, turbidity assay, and sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoresis. Through molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations, BBF's mechanism of action in lysozyme fibrillogenesis inhibition was found to be initiated by binding with the aggregation-prone region of the lysozyme. We believe the results from this research may contribute to the development of effective therapeutics for amyloidoses. PMID:26970823

  5. DNA aptamers detecting generic amyloid epitopes

    OpenAIRE

    Mitkevich, Olga V.; Kochneva-Pervukhova, Natalia V; Surina, Elizaveta R.; Benevolensky, Sergei V.; Kushnirov, Vitaly V.; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloids are fibrillar protein aggregates resulting from non-covalent autocatalytic polymerization of various structurally and functionally unrelated proteins. Previously we have selected DNA aptamers, which bind specifically to the in vitro assembled amyloid fibrils of the yeast prionogenic protein Sup35. Here we show that such DNA aptamers can be used to detect SDS-insoluble amyloid aggregates of the Sup35 protein, and of some other amyloidogenic proteins, including mouse PrP, formed in yea...

  6. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane. PMID:26673736

  7. Fibril stability in solutions of twisted -sheet peptides: a new kind of micellization in chiral systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyrkova, I. A.; Semenov, A. N.; Aggeli, A.; Boden, N.

    2000-10-01

    The problem of fibril (fibre) formation in chiral systems is explored theoretically being supported by experiments on synthetic de novo 11-mer peptide forming self-assembled -sheet tapes. Experimental data unambiguously indicate that the tapes form fibrils of nearly monodisperse thickness ca. 8-10 nm. Fibril formation and stabilisation are attributed to inter-tape face-to-face attraction and their intrinsic twist, correspondingly. The proposed theory is capable of predicting the fibril aggregation number and its equilibrium twist in terms of molecular parameters of the primary tapes. The suggested novel mechanism of twist stabilisation of finite aggregates (fibrils) is different to the well-known stabilisation of micelles in amphiphilic systems, and it is likely to explain the formation and stability of fibrils in a wide variety of systems including proteinaceous amyloid fibres, sickle-cell hemoglobin fibres responsible for HbS anemia, corkscrew threads found in chromonics in the presence of chiral additives and native cellulose microfibrillar crystallites. The theory also makes it possible to extract the basic molecular parameters of primary tapes (inter-tape attraction energy, helical twist step, elastic moduli) from the experimental data.

  8. Apolipoprotein C-II Adopts Distinct Structures in Complex with Micellar and Submicellar Forms of the Amyloid-Inhibiting Lipid-Mimetic Dodecylphosphocholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Timothy M; Griffin, Michael D W; McGillivray, Duncan J; Knott, Robert B; Wood, Kathleen; Masters, Colin L; Kirby, Nigel; Curtain, Cyril C

    2016-01-01

    The formation of amyloid deposits is a common feature of a broad range of diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. The basis and role of amyloid deposition in the pathogenesis of these diseases is still being defined, however an interesting feature of amyloidogenic proteins is that the majority of the pathologically associated proteins are involved in lipid homeostasis, be it in lipid transport, incorporation into membranes, or the regulation of lipid pathways. Thus, amyloid-forming proteins commonly bind lipids, and lipids are generally involved in the proper folding of these proteins. However, understanding of the basis for these lipid-related aspects of amyloidogenesis is lacking. Thus, we have used the apolipoprotein C-II amyloid model system in conjunction with x-ray and neutron scattering analyses to address this problem. Apolipoprotein C-II is a well-studied model system of systemic amyloid fibril formation, with a clear and well-defined pathway for fibril formation, where the effects of lipid interaction are characterized, particularly for the lipid mimetic dodecylphosphocholine. We show that the micellar state of an inhibitory lipid can have a very significant effect on protein conformation, with micelles stabilizing a particular α-helical structure, whereas submicellar lipids stabilize a very different dimeric, α-helical structure. These results indicate that lipids may have an important role in the development and progression of amyloid-related diseases. PMID:26745412

  9. Insights into the variability of nucleated amyloid polymerization by a minimalistic model of stochastic protein assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugène, Sarah; Xue, Wei-Feng; Robert, Philippe; Doumic, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid aggregates is an important biological phenomenon associated with human diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid fibrils also have potential applications in nano-engineering of biomaterials. The kinetics of amyloid assembly show an exponential growth phase preceded by a lag phase, variable in duration as seen in bulk experiments and experiments that mimic the small volumes of cells. Here, to investigate the origins and the properties of the observed variability in the lag phase of amyloid assembly currently not accounted for by deterministic nucleation dependent mechanisms, we formulate a new stochastic minimal model that is capable of describing the characteristics of amyloid growth curves despite its simplicity. We then solve the stochastic differential equations of our model and give mathematical proof of a central limit theorem for the sample growth trajectories of the nucleated aggregation process. These results give an asymptotic description for our simple model, from which closed form analytical results capable of describing and predicting the variability of nucleated amyloid assembly were derived. We also demonstrate the application of our results to inform experiments in a conceptually friendly and clear fashion. Our model offers a new perspective and paves the way for a new and efficient approach on extracting vital information regarding the key initial events of amyloid formation.

  10. Insights into the variability of nucleated amyloid polymerization by a minimalistic model of stochastic protein assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugène, Sarah; Xue, Wei-Feng; Robert, Philippe; Doumic, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid aggregates is an important biological phenomenon associated with human diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid fibrils also have potential applications in nano-engineering of biomaterials. The kinetics of amyloid assembly show an exponential growth phase preceded by a lag phase, variable in duration as seen in bulk experiments and experiments that mimic the small volumes of cells. Here, to investigate the origins and the properties of the observed variability in the lag phase of amyloid assembly currently not accounted for by deterministic nucleation dependent mechanisms, we formulate a new stochastic minimal model that is capable of describing the characteristics of amyloid growth curves despite its simplicity. We then solve the stochastic differential equations of our model and give mathematical proof of a central limit theorem for the sample growth trajectories of the nucleated aggregation process. These results give an asymptotic description for our simple model, from which closed form analytical results capable of describing and predicting the variability of nucleated amyloid assembly were derived. We also demonstrate the application of our results to inform experiments in a conceptually friendly and clear fashion. Our model offers a new perspective and paves the way for a new and efficient approach on extracting vital information regarding the key initial events of amyloid formation. PMID:27155653

  11. Dissecting the role of disulfide bonds on the amyloid formation of insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We dissect how individual disulfide bond affects the amyloidogenicity of insulin. ► A controlled reduction system for insulin is established in this study. ► Disulfide breakage is associated with unfolding and increased amyloidogenicity. ► Breakage of A6-A11 is associated with significantly increased cytotoxicity. ► Analogs without A6-A11 have a higher potency to form high order toxic oligomers. -- Abstract: Disulfide bonds play a critical role in the stability and folding of proteins. Here, we used insulin as a model system, to investigate the role of its individual disulfide bond during the amyloid formation of insulin. Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) was applied to reduce two of the three disulfide bonds in porcine insulin and the reduced disulfide bonds were then alkylated by iodoacetamide. Three disulfide bond-modified insulin analogs, INS-2 (lack of A6-A11), INS-3 (lack of A7-B7) and INS-6 (lack of both A6-A11 and A7-B7), were obtained. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy results indicated that the secondary structure of INS-2 was the closest to insulin under neutral conditions, followed by INS-3 and INS-6, whereas in an acidic solution all analogs were essentially unfolded. To test how these modifications affect the amyloidogenicity of insulin, thioflavin-T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) were performed. Our results showed that all analogs were more prone to aggregation than insulin, with the order of aggregation rates being INS-6 > INS-3 > INS-2. Cross-linking of unmodified proteins (PICUP) assay results showed that analogs without A6-A11 (INS-2 and INS-6) have a higher potential for oligomerization than insulin and INS-3, which is accompanied with a higher cytotoxicity as the hemolytic assays of human erythrocytes suggested. The results indicated that breakage of A7-B7 induced more unfolding of the insulin structure and a higher amyloidogenicity than breakage of A6-A11, but breakage of A6

  12. Dissecting the role of disulfide bonds on the amyloid formation of insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang; Gong, Hao [Tongji School of Pharmacy, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Sun, Yue [College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yan, Juan; Cheng, Biao; Zhang, Xin [Tongji School of Pharmacy, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Huang, Jing [College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yu, Mengying; Guo, Yu [Tongji School of Pharmacy, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Zheng, Ling, E-mail: lzheng217@hotmail.com [College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Huang, Kun, E-mail: kunhuang2008@hotmail.com [Tongji School of Pharmacy, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030 (China); Centre for Biomedicine Research, Wuhan Institutes of Biotechnology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We dissect how individual disulfide bond affects the amyloidogenicity of insulin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A controlled reduction system for insulin is established in this study. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disulfide breakage is associated with unfolding and increased amyloidogenicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Breakage of A6-A11 is associated with significantly increased cytotoxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analogs without A6-A11 have a higher potency to form high order toxic oligomers. -- Abstract: Disulfide bonds play a critical role in the stability and folding of proteins. Here, we used insulin as a model system, to investigate the role of its individual disulfide bond during the amyloid formation of insulin. Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) was applied to reduce two of the three disulfide bonds in porcine insulin and the reduced disulfide bonds were then alkylated by iodoacetamide. Three disulfide bond-modified insulin analogs, INS-2 (lack of A6-A11), INS-3 (lack of A7-B7) and INS-6 (lack of both A6-A11 and A7-B7), were obtained. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy results indicated that the secondary structure of INS-2 was the closest to insulin under neutral conditions, followed by INS-3 and INS-6, whereas in an acidic solution all analogs were essentially unfolded. To test how these modifications affect the amyloidogenicity of insulin, thioflavin-T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) were performed. Our results showed that all analogs were more prone to aggregation than insulin, with the order of aggregation rates being INS-6 > INS-3 > INS-2. Cross-linking of unmodified proteins (PICUP) assay results showed that analogs without A6-A11 (INS-2 and INS-6) have a higher potential for oligomerization than insulin and INS-3, which is accompanied with a higher cytotoxicity as the hemolytic assays of human erythrocytes suggested. The results indicated that breakage of A7

  13. Anti-aggregating effect of the naturally occurring dipeptide carnosine on aβ1-42 fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Aloisi

    Full Text Available Carnosine is an endogenous dipeptide abundant in the central nervous system, where by acting as intracellular pH buffering molecule, Zn/Cu ion chelator, antioxidant and anti-crosslinking agent, it exerts a well-recognized multi-protective homeostatic function for neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Carnosine seems to counteract proteotoxicity and protein accumulation in neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer's Disease (AD. However, its direct impact on the dynamics of AD-related fibril formation remains uninvestigated. We considered the effects of carnosine on the formation of fibrils/aggregates of the amyloidogenic peptide fragment Aβ1-42, a major hallmark of AD injury. Atomic force microscopy and thioflavin T assays showed inhibition of Aβ1-42 fibrillogenesis in vitro and differences in the aggregation state of Aβ1-42 small pre-fibrillar structures (monomers and small oligomers in the presence of carnosine. in silico molecular docking supported the experimental data, calculating possible conformational carnosine/Aβ1-42 interactions. Overall, our results suggest an effective role of carnosine against Aβ1-42 aggregation.

  14. A Micellar On-Pathway Intermediate Step Explains the Kinetics of Prion Amyloid Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Erwan Hingant; Pascaline Fontes; Maria Teresa Alvarez-Martinez; Jacques-Damien Arnaud; Jean-Pierre Liautard; Laurent Pujo-Menjouet

    2014-01-01

    Author Summary Understanding the mechanism of prions is an important issue. Indeed, it involves a mechanism modifying the structure of the proteins that are of high interest in theoretical biology. Knowing the underlying mechanism that leads to prion disease could help further investigations in the world of amyloid disease and for example the so-called Alzheimer's disease. The theory of prion, also known as Protein-Only, has been widely studied. Nevertheless no mathematical models are able to...

  15. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ha Young, E-mail: hayoung@skku.edu [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Dong-A University, Busan 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Doo [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Suk-Hwan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Joon Hyuk [Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Hyun [School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Zabel, Brian A. [Palo Alto Institute for Research and Education, Veterans Affairs Hospital, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Bae, Yoe-Sik, E-mail: yoesik@skku.edu [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Mitochondria Hub Regulation Center, Dong-A University, Busan 602-714 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. ► SAA stimulated upregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1). ► SAA-induced LOX1 expression and foam cell formation is mediated by JNK/NF-κB signaling. ► HDL-conjugated SAA also stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 upregulation. ► The finding reveals a novel mechanism of action of SAA in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis.

  16. Designing peptidic inhibitors of serum amyloid A aggregation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnowska, Marta; Skibiszewska, Sandra; Kamińska, Emilia; Wieczerzak, Ewa; Jankowska, Elżbieta

    2016-04-01

    Amyloid A amyloidosis is a life-threatening complication of a wide range of chronic inflammatory, infectious and neoplastic diseases, and the most common form of systemic amyloidosis worldwide. It is characterized by extracellular tissue deposition of fibrils that are composed of fragments of serum amyloid A protein (SAA), a major acute-phase reactant protein, produced predominantly by hepatocytes. Currently, there are no approved therapeutic agents directed against the formation of fibrillar SAA assemblies. We attempted to develop peptidic inhibitors based on their similarity and complementarity to the regions critical for SAA self-association, which they should interact with and block their assembly into amyloid fibrils. Inh1 and inh4 which are comprised of the residues from the amyloidogenic region of SAA1.1 protein and Aβ peptide, respectively, were found by us as capable to significantly suppress aggregation of the SAA1-12 peptide. It was chosen as an aggregation model that mimicks the amyloidogenic nucleus of SAA protein. We suppose that aromatic interactions may be responsible for inhibitory activity of both compounds. We also recognized that aromatic residues are involved in self-association of SAA1-12. PMID:26759015

  17. Oxidation reduces the fibrillation but not the neurotoxicity of the prion peptide PrP106-126

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm, Linda Alice; Chabry, J.; Bastholm, L.;

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that soluble oligomers of misfolded protein may play a role in the pathogenesis of protein misfolding diseases including the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) where the protein involved is the prion protein, PrP. The effect of oxidation on fibrillation...... tendency and neurotoxicity of different molecular variants of the prion peptide PrP106-126 was investigated. It was found that methionine oxidation significantly reduced amyloid fibril formation and proteinase K resistance, but it did not reduce (but rather increase slightly) the neurotoxicity of the...

  18. Role of dietary antioxidant (-)-epicatechin in the development of β-lactoglobulin fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonaro, M; Di Venere, A; Filabozzi, A; Maselli, P; Minicozzi, V; Morante, S; Nicolai, E; Nucara, A; Placidi, E; Stellato, F

    2016-07-01

    Under specific physico-chemical conditions β-lactoglobulin is seen to form fibrils structurally highly similar to those that are formed by the amyloid-like proteins associated with neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. In the present study we provide insights on the possible role that the dietary flavonoid (-)-epicatechin plays on β-lactoglobulin fibril formation. Fibril formation is induced by keeping β-lactoglobulin solutions at pH2.0 and at a temperature of 80°C for 24h. Atomic Force Microscopy measurements suggest that, by adding (-)-epicatechin in the solution, fibrils density is visibly lowered. This last observation is confirmed by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy experiments. With the use of Fourier Transform IR spectroscopy we monitored the relative abundances of the secondary structures components during the heating process. We observed that in the presence of (-)-epicatechin the spectral-weight exchange between different secondary structures is partially inhibited. Molecular Dynamics simulations have been able to provide an atomistic explanation of this experimental observation, showing that (-)-epicatechin interacts with β-lactoglobulin mainly via the residues that, normally in the absence of (-)-epicatechin, are involved in β-sheet formation. Unveiling this molecular mechanism is an important step in the process of identifying suitable molecules apt at finely tuning fibril formation like it is desirable to do in food industry applications. PMID:27049464

  19. Amyloids here, amyloids there…What’s wrong with them?

    OpenAIRE

    Gharibyan, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid formation is inherent property of proteins which under certain circumstances can become a pathologic feature of a group of diseases called amyloidosis. There are about 30 known human amyloidosis and more than 27 identified proteins involved in these pathologies.  Besides these proteins, there are a growing number of proteins non-related to diseases shown to form amyloid-like structures in vitro, which make them excellent tools for studying amyloid formation mechanisms, physicochemical...

  20. A Novel liposomal nanoparticle for the imaging of amyloid plaque by MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Tanifum, Eric A; Ghaghada, Ketan; Vollert, Craig; Head, Elizabeth; Eriksen, Jason L.; Annapragada, Ananth

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid binding molecules with greater hydrophilicity than existing ligands were synthesized. The lead candidate ET6-21 bound amyloid fibrils, and amyloid deposits in dog brain and human brain tissue ex vivo. The ligand was used to prepare novel amyloid-targeted liposomal nanoparticles. The preparation was tested in the Tg2576 and TetO/APP mouse models of amyloid deposition. Gd chelates and Indocyanine green were included in the particles for visualization by MRI and near-infrared microscopy....

  1. Aliphatic peptides show similar self-assembly to amyloid core sequences, challenging the importance of aromatic interactions in amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Anupama; Cheong, Daniel W; Accardo, Angelo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Riekel, Christian; Hauser, Charlotte A E

    2013-01-01

    The self-assembly of abnormally folded proteins into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of many debilitating diseases, from Alzheimer's and Parkinson diseases to prion-related disorders and diabetes type II. However, the fundamental mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains poorly understood. Core sequences of four to seven amino acids within natural amyloid proteins that form toxic fibrils have been used to study amyloidogenesis. We recently reported a class of systematically designed ultrasmall peptides that self-assemble in water into cross-β-type fibers. Here we compare the self-assembly of these peptides with natural core sequences. These include core segments from Alzheimer's amyloid-β, human amylin, and calcitonin. We analyzed the self-assembly process using circular dichroism, electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, rheology, and molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the designed aliphatic peptides exhibited a similar self-assembly mechanism to several natural sequences, with formation of α-helical intermediates being a common feature. Interestingly, the self-assembly of a second core sequence from amyloid-β, containing the diphenylalanine motif, was distinctly different from all other examined sequences. The diphenylalanine-containing sequence formed β-sheet aggregates without going through the α-helical intermediate step, giving a unique fiber-diffraction pattern and simulation structure. Based on these results, we propose a simplified aliphatic model system to study amyloidosis. Our results provide vital insight into the nature of early intermediates formed and suggest that aromatic interactions are not as important in amyloid formation as previously postulated. This information is necessary for developing therapeutic drugs that inhibit and control amyloid formation. PMID:23267112

  2. Sugar microarray via click chemistry: molecular recognition with lectins and amyloid β (1–42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erino Matsumoto, Takahiro Yamauchi, Tomohiro Fukuda and Yoshiko Miura

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sugar microarrays were fabricated on various substrates via click chemistry. Acetylene-terminated substrates were prepared by forming self-assembled monolayers (SAMs on a gold substrate with alkyl-disulfide and on silicon, quartz and glass substrates with a silane-coupling reagent. The gold substrates were subjected to surface plasmon resonance measurements, and the quartz and glass substrates were subjected to spectroscopy measurements and optical microscopy observation. The saccharide-immobilized substrate on the gold substrate showed specific interaction with the corresponding lectin, and the saccharides showed inert surface properties to other proteins with a high signal-to-noise ratio. We also focused on the saccharide–protein interaction on protein amyloidosis of Alzheimer amyloid β. Amyloid β peptide showed conformation transition on the saccharide-immobilization substrate into a β-sheet, and fibril formation and amyloid aggregates were found on the specific saccharides.

  3. Sugar microarray via click chemistry: molecular recognition with lectins and amyloid β (1-42)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Erino; Yamauchi, Takahiro; Fukuda, Tomohiro; Miura, Yoshiko

    2009-06-01

    Sugar microarrays were fabricated on various substrates via click chemistry. Acetylene-terminated substrates were prepared by forming self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on a gold substrate with alkyl-disulfide and on silicon, quartz and glass substrates with a silane-coupling reagent. The gold substrates were subjected to surface plasmon resonance measurements, and the quartz and glass substrates were subjected to spectroscopy measurements and optical microscopy observation. The saccharide-immobilized substrate on the gold substrate showed specific interaction with the corresponding lectin, and the saccharides showed inert surface properties to other proteins with a high signal-to-noise ratio. We also focused on the saccharide-protein interaction on protein amyloidosis of Alzheimer amyloid β. Amyloid β peptide showed conformation transition on the saccharide-immobilization substrate into a β-sheet, and fibril formation and amyloid aggregates were found on the specific saccharides.

  4. The amyloid in familial amyloid cardiomyopathy of Danish origin is related to pre-albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husby, G; Ranløv, P J; Sletten, K; Marhaug, G

    1985-04-01

    Amyloid obtained from the myocardium of a patient (Han) with familial amyloid cardiomyopathy of Danish origin was studied. Gel filtration and electrophoresis of purified and denatured amyloid fibrils Han revealed various fractions ranging in mol. wt from 40,000 to 8,000 daltons. Amyloid Han and fractions reacted with an antiserum against amyloid Han showing a reaction of identity with each other; partial identity between Han and human pre-albumin was observed, while no reaction was seen with AA or AL proteins. Cardiac tissue sections from Han showed reactivity with antisera to amyloid Han, pre-albumin and protein AP, but not with anti-AA or anti-AL in indirect immunofluorescence. Amino acid composition and sequence studies of a protein fraction of amyloid Han with mol. wt 15,000 daltons confirmed the structural relationship with pre-albumin. PMID:3924450

  5. Magnetite-Amyloid-β deteriorates activity and functional organization in an in vitro model for Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Sara; Tahirbegi, Islam Bogachan; Mir, Mònica; Samitier, Josep; Soriano, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    The understanding of the key mechanisms behind human brain deterioration in Alzheimer’ disease (AD) is a highly active field of research. The most widespread hypothesis considers a cascade of events initiated by amyloid-β peptide fibrils that ultimately lead to the formation of the lethal amyloid plaques. Recent studies have shown that other agents, in particular magnetite, can also play a pivotal role. To shed light on the action of magnetite and amyloid-β in the deterioration of neuronal circuits, we investigated their capacity to alter spontaneous activity patterns in cultured neuronal networks. Using a versatile experimental platform that allows the parallel monitoring of several cultures, the activity in controls was compared with the one in cultures dosed with magnetite, amyloid-β and magnetite-amyloid-β complex. A prominent degradation in spontaneous activity was observed solely when amyloid-β and magnetite acted together. Our work suggests that magnetite nanoparticles have a more prominent role in AD than previously thought, and may bring new insights in the understanding of the damaging action of magnetite-amyloid-β complex. Our experimental system also offers new interesting perspectives to explore key biochemical players in neurological disorders through a controlled, model system manner.

  6. Normal and Reversed Supramolecular Chirality of Insulin Fibrils Probed by Vibrational Circular Dichroism at the Protofilament Level of Fibril Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Kurouski, Dmitry; Dukor, Rina K.; Lu, Xuefang; Nafie, Laurence A.; Lednev, Igor K.

    2012-01-01

    Fibrils are β-sheet-rich aggregates that are generally composed of several protofibrils and may adopt variable morphologies, such as twisted ribbons or flat-like sheets. This polymorphism is observed for many different amyloid associated proteins and polypeptides. In a previous study we proposed the existence of another level of amyloid polymorphism, namely, that associated with fibril supramolecular chirality. Two chiral polymorphs of insulin, which can be controllably grown by means of smal...

  7. Formation of low-dimensional crystalline nucleus region during insulin amyloidogenesis process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We observe lag-phase crystallization process in insulin. ► The crystallization is a result of the formation of higher order oligomers. ► The crystallization also changes the secondary structure of the protein. ► The spectroscopic signature can be used for amyloid inhibitors assay. -- Abstract: Insulin, as other amyloid proteins, can form amyloid fibrils at certain conditions. The self-assembled aggregation process of insulin can result in a variety of conformations, starting from small oligomers, going through various types of protofibrils, and finishing with bundles of fibrils. One of the most common consensuses among the various self-assembly processes that are suggested in the literature is the formation of an early stage nucleus conformation. Here we present an additional insight for the self-assembly process of insulin. We show that at the early lag phase of the process (prior to fibril formation) the insulin monomers self-assemble into ordered nanostructures. The most notable feature of this early self-assembly process is the formation of nanocrystalline nucleus regions with a strongly bound electron–hole confinement, which also change the secondary structure of the protein. Each step in the self-assembly process is characterized by an optical spectroscopic signature, and possesses a narrow size distribution. By following the spectroscopic signature we can measure the potency of amyloid fibrils inhibitors already at the lag phase. We further demonstrate it by the use of epigallocatechin gallate, a known inhibitor for insulin fibrils. The findings can result in a spectroscopic-based application for the analysis of amyloid fibrils inhibitors.

  8. Ablation of MMP9 gene ameliorates paracellular permeability and fibrinogen-amyloid beta complex formation during hyperhomocysteinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradashvili, Nino; Tyagi, Reeta; Metreveli, Naira; Tyagi, Suresh C; Lominadze, David

    2014-09-01

    Increased blood level of homocysteine (Hcy), called hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) accompanies many cognitive disorders including Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that HHcy-enhanced cerebrovascular permeability occurs via activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) and leads to an increased formation of fibrinogen-β-amyloid (Fg-Aβ) complex. Cerebrovascular permeability changes were assessed in C57BL/6J (wild type, WT), cystathionine-β-synthase heterozygote (Cbs+/-, a genetic model of HHcy), MMP9 gene knockout (Mmp9-/-), and Cbs and Mmp9 double knockout (Cbs+/-/Mmp9-/-) mice using a dual-tracer probing method. Expression of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) and Fg-Aβ complex formation was assessed in mouse brain cryosections by immunohistochemistry. Short-term memory of mice was assessed with a novel object recognition test. The cerebrovascular permeability in Cbs+/- mice was increased via mainly the paracellular transport pathway. VE-cadherin expression was the lowest and Fg-Aβ complex formation was the highest along with the diminished short-term memory in Cbs+/- mice. These effects of HHcy were ameliorated in Cbs+/-/Mmp9-/- mice. Thus, HHcy causes activation of MMP9 increasing cerebrovascular permeability by downregulation of VE-cadherin resulting in an enhanced formation of Fg-Aβ complex that can be associated with loss of memory. These data may lead to the identification of new targets for therapeutic intervention that can modulate HHcy-induced cerebrovascular permeability and resultant pathologies. PMID:24865997

  9. Heterologous amyloid seeding: revisiting the role of acetylcholinesterase in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Létitia Jean

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases associated with abnormal protein folding and ordered aggregation require an initial trigger which may be infectious, inherited, post-inflammatory or idiopathic. Proteolytic cleavage to generate vulnerable precursors, such as amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta production via beta and gamma secretases in Alzheimer's Disease (AD, is one such trigger, but the proteolytic removal of these fragments is also aetiologically important. The levels of Abeta in the central nervous system are regulated by several catabolic proteases, including insulysin (IDE and neprilysin (NEP. The known association of human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE with pathological aggregates in AD together with its ability to increase Abeta fibrilization prompted us to search for proteolytic triggers that could enhance this process. The hAChE C-terminal domain (T40, AChE(575-614 is an exposed amphiphilic alpha-helix involved in enzyme oligomerisation, but it also contains a conformational switch region (CSR with high propensity for conversion to non-native (hidden beta-strand, a property associated with amyloidogenicity. A synthetic peptide (AChE(586-599 encompassing the CSR region shares homology with Abeta and forms beta-sheet amyloid fibrils. We investigated the influence of IDE and NEP proteolysis on the formation and degradation of relevant hAChE beta-sheet species. By combining reverse-phase HPLC and mass spectrometry, we established that the enzyme digestion profiles on T40 versus AChE(586-599, or versus Abeta, differed. Moreover, IDE digestion of T40 triggered the conformational switch from alpha- to beta-structures, resulting in surfactant CSR species that self-assembled into amyloid fibril precursors (oligomers. Crucially, these CSR species significantly increased Abeta fibril formation both by seeding the energetically unfavorable formation of amyloid nuclei and by enhancing the rate of amyloid elongation. Hence, these results may offer an explanation

  10. Toward the discovery of functional transthyretin amyloid inhibitors: application of virtual screening methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Carlos J V; Mukherjee, Trishna; Brito, Rui M M; Jackson, Richard M

    2010-10-25

    Inhibition of amyloid fibril formation by stabilization of the native form of the protein transthyretin (TTR) is a viable approach for the treatment of familial amyloid polyneuropathy that has been gaining momentum in the field of amyloid research. The TTR stabilizer molecules discovered to date have shown efficacy at inhibiting fibrilization in vitro but display impairing issues of solubility, affinity for TTR in the blood plasma and/or adverse effects. In this study we present a benchmark of four protein- and ligand-based virtual screening (VS) methods for identifying novel TTR stabilizers: (i) two-dimensional (2D) similarity searches with chemical hashed, pharmacophore, and UNITY fingerprints, (ii) 3D searches based on shape, chemical, and electrostatic similarity, (iii) LigMatch, a new ligand-based method which uses multiple templates and combines 3D geometric hashing with a 2D preselection process, and (iv) molecular docking to consensus X-ray crystal structures of TTR. We illustrate the potential of the best-performing VS protocols to retrieve promising new leads by ranking a tailored library of 2.3 million commercially available compounds. Our predictions show that the top-scoring molecules possess distinctive features from the known TTR binders, holding better solubility, fraction of halogen atoms, and binding affinity profiles. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to rationalize the utilization of a large battery of in silico screening techniques toward the identification of a new generation of TTR amyloid inhibitors. PMID:20883031

  11. Aggregation and fibrillation of bovine serum albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, NK; Jespersen, SK; Thomassen, LV;

    2007-01-01

    The all-alpha helix multi-domain protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) aggregates at elevated temperatures. Here we show that these thermal aggregates have amyloid properties. They bind the fibril-specific dyes Thioflavin T and Congo Red, show elongated although somewhat worm-like morphology and...... characteristic amyloid X-ray fiber diffraction peaks. Fibrillation occurs over minutes to hours without a lag phase, is independent of seeding and shows only moderate concentration dependence, suggesting intramolecular aggregation nuclei. Nevertheless, multi-exponential increases in dye-binding signal and...

  12. A peptide study of the relationship between the collagen triple-helix and amyloid

    OpenAIRE

    Parmar, Avanish S.; Nunes, Ana Monica; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Type XXV collagen, or Collagen-Like Amyloidogenic Component (CLAC), is a component of amyloid plaques, and recent studies suggest this collagen affects amyloid fibril elongation and has a genetic association with Alzheimer’s disease. The relationship between the collagen triple helix and amyloid fibrils was investigated by studying peptide models, including a very stable triple helical peptide (Pro-Hyp-Gly)10; an amyloidogenic peptide GNNQQNY; and a hybrid peptide where the GNNQQNY sequence w...

  13. Functional Hydrogel Materials Inspired by Amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Joel

    2012-02-01

    Protein assembly resulting in the formation of amyloid fibrils, assemblies rich in cross beta-sheet structure, is normally thought of as a deleterious event associated with disease. However, amyloid formation is also involved in a diverse array of normal biological functions such as cell adhesion, melanin synthesis, insect defense mechanism and modulation of water surface tension by fungi and bacteria. These findings indicate that Nature has evolved to take advantage of large, proteinaceous fibrillar assemblies to elicit function. We are designing functional materials, namely hydrogels, from peptides that self-assembled into fibrillar networks, rich in cross beta-sheet structure. These gels can be used for the direct encapsulation and delivery of small molecule-, protein- and cell-based therapeutics. Loaded gels exhibit shear-thinning/self-healing mechanical properties enabling their delivery via syringe. In addition to their use for delivery, we have found that some of these gels display antibacterial activity. Although cytocompatible towards mammalian cells, the hydrogels can kill a broad spectrum of bacteria on contact.

  14. Visualization of particle complexes in the plasma membrane of Micrasterias denticulata associated with the formation of cellulose fibrils in primary and secondary cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddings, T H; Brower, D L; Staehelin, L A

    1980-02-01

    Highly ordered arrays of intramembrane particles are observed in freeze-fractured plasma membranes of the green alga Micrasterias denticulata during the synthesis of the secondary cell wall. The observable architecture of the complex consists primarily of a precise hexagonal array of from 3 to 175 rosettes, consisting of 6 particles each, which fracture with the P-face. The complexes are observed at the ends of impressions of cellulose fibrils. The distance between rows of rosettes is equal to the center-to-center distance between parallel cellulose fibrils of the secondary wall. Correlation of the structure of the complex with the pattern of deposition indicates that the size of a given fibril is proportional to the number of rosettes engaged in its formation. Vesicles containing hexagonal arrays of rosettes are found in the cytoplasm and can be observed in the process of fusing with the plasma membrane, suggesting that the complexes are first assembled in the cytoplasm and then incorporated into the plasma membrane, where they become active in fibril formation. Single rosettes appear to be responsible for the synthesis of microfibrils during primary wall growth. Similar rosettes have now been detected in a green alga, in fern protonemata, and in higher plant cells. This structure, therefore, probably represents a significant component of the cellulose synthesizing mechanism in a large variety of plant cells. PMID:7189756

  15. High plasma levels of islet amyloid polypeptide in young with new-onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan F Paulsson

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP is a beta cell hormone secreted together with insulin upon glucose stimulation. IAPP participates in normal glucose regulation, but IAPP is also known for its ability to misfold and form islet amyloid. Amyloid fibrils form through smaller cell toxic intermediates and deposited amyloid disrupts normal islet architecture. Even though IAPP and amyloid formation are much discussed in type 2 diabetes, our aim was to study the significance of IAPP in type 1 diabetes. RESULTS: Plasma IAPP levels in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes (n = 224 were analysed and concentrations exceeding 100 pmol/L (127.2-888.7 pmol/L were found in 11% (25/224. The IAPP increase did not correlate with C-peptide levels. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Plasma levels of IAPP and insulin deviate in a subpopulation of young with newly-diagnosed type 1 diabetes. The determined elevated levels of IAPP might increase the risk for IAPP misfolding and formation of cell toxic amyloid in beta cells. This finding add IAPP-aggregation to the list over putative pathological factors causing type 1 diabetes.

  16. SPECT imaging of peripheral amyloid in mice by targeting hyper-sulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans with specific scFv antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wall, J.S.; Richey, T.; Stuckey, A.; Donnell, R.; Oosterhof, A.; Kuppevelt, T. van; Smits, N.C.; Kennel, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Amyloid deposits are associated with a broad spectrum of disorders including monoclonal gammopathies, chronic inflammation, and Alzheimer's disease. In all cases, the amyloid pathology contains, in addition to protein fibrils, a plethora of associated molecules, including high concentr

  17. Early oligomerization stages for the non-amyloid component of α-synuclein amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugene, Cindie; Laghaei, Rozita; Mousseau, Normand

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, much effort has focused on the early stages of aggregation and the formation of amyloid oligomers. Aggregation processes for these proteins are complex and their non-equilibrium nature makes any experimental study very difficult. Under these conditions, simulations provide a useful alternative for understanding the dynamics of the early stages of oligomerization. Here, we focus on the non-Aβ amyloid component (NAC) of the monomer, dimer, and trimer of α-synuclein, an important 35-residue sequence involved in the aggregation and fibrillation of this protein associated with Parkinson's disease. Using Hamiltonian and temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations combined with the coarse grained Optimized Potential for Efficient peptide structure Prediction potential, we identify the role of the various regions and the secondary structures for the onset of oligomerization. For this sequence, we clearly observe the passage from α-helix to β-sheet, a characteristic transition of amyloid proteins. More precisely, we find that the NAC monomer is highly structured with two α-helical regions, between residues 2-13 and 19-25. As the dimer and trimer form, β-sheet structures between residues 2-14 and 26-34 appear and rapidly structure the system. The resulting conformations are much more structured than similar dimers and trimers of β-amyloid and amylin proteins and yet display a strong polymorphism at these early stages of aggregation. In addition to its inherent experimental interest, comparison with other sequences shows that NAC could be a very useful numerical model for understanding the onset of aggregation.

  18. Vitamin E but not 17B-estradiol protect against vascular toxicity induced by B-amyloid wild type and the Dutch amyploid variant

    OpenAIRE

    Mu??oz L??pez, Francisco Jos??, 1964-; Opazo, Carlos; Gil G??mez, Gabriel; Tapia, Gladys; Fern??ndez, Virginia; Valverde, M A; Nibaldo C Inestrosa

    2002-01-01

    Amyloid ??-peptide (A??) fibril deposition on cerebral vessels produces cerebral amyloid angiopathy that appears in the majority of Alzheimer's disease patients. An early onset of a cerebral amyloid angiopathy variant called hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of the Dutch type is caused by a point mutation in A?? yielding A??Glu22???Gln. The present study addresses the effect of amyloid fibrils from both wild-type and mutated A?? on vascular cells, as well as the putative protect...

  19. Assessment of the Inhibitory Effect of Rifampicin on Amyloid Formation of Hen Egg White Lysozyme: Thioflavin T Fluorescence Assay versus FTIR Difference Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Gang Ma; Hong Zhang; Jianhua Guo; Xiaodan Zeng; Xiaoqian Hu; Wenying Hao

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of rifampicin on the amyloid formation of hen egg white lysozyme was assessed with both Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy. We reveal that ThT fluorescence assay gives a false positive result due to rifampicin interference, while FTIR difference spectroscopy provides a reliable assessment. With FTIR, we show that rifampicin only has marginally inhibitory effect. We then propose that FTIR difference spectros...

  20. YuaB Functions Synergistically with the Exopolysaccharide and TasA Amyloid Fibers To Allow Biofilm Formation by Bacillus subtilis ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrowski, Adam; Mehert, Angela; Prescott, Alan; Taryn B. Kiley; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R.

    2011-01-01

    During biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis, two extracellular matrix components are synthesized, namely, the TasA amyloid fibers and an exopolysaccharide. In addition, a small protein called YuaB has been shown to allow the biofilm to form. The regulatory protein DegU is known to initiate biofilm formation. In this report we show that the main role of DegU during biofilm formation is to indirectly drive the activation of transcription from the yuaB promoter. The N terminus of YuaB constitu...

  1. Amyloid-β peptide aggregation and the influence of carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-Hui, Xi; Guang-Hong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Soluble peptides or proteins can self-aggregate into insoluble, ordered amyloid fibrils under appropriate conditions. These amyloid aggregates are the hallmarks of several human diseases ranging from neurodegenerative disorders to systemic amyloidoses. In this review, we first introduce the common structural features of amyloid fibrils and the amyloid fibrillation kinetics determined from experimental studies. Then, we discuss the structural models of Alzheimer’s amyloid-β (Aβ) fibrils derived from solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. On the computational side, molecular dynamics simulations can provide atomic details of structures and the underlying oligomerization mechanisms. We finally summarize recent progress in atomistic simulation studies on the oligomerization of Aβ (including full-length Aβ and its fragments) and the influence of carbon nanoparticles. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274075 and 91227102).

  2. Opportunities for Conformation-Selective Antibodies in Amyloid-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Westwood

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Assembly of misfolded proteins into fibrillar deposits is a common feature of many neurodegenerative diseases. Developing effective therapies to these complex, and not yet fully understood diseases is currently one of the greatest medical challenges facing society. Slow and initially asymptomatic onset of neurodegenerative disorders requires profound understanding of the processes occurring at early stages of the disease including identification and structural characterisation of initial toxic species underlying neurodegeneration. In this review, we chart the latest progress made towards understanding the multifactorial process leading to amyloid formation and highlight efforts made in the development of therapeutic antibodies for the treatment of amyloid-based disorders. The specificity and selectivity of conformational antibodies make them attractive research probes to differentiate between transient states preceding formation of mature fibrils and enable strategies for potential therapeutic intervention to be considered.

  3. Investigation of the inhibitory effects of TiO{sub 2} on the β-amyloid peptide aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Mukhtar H., E-mail: ahmed-m@email.ulster.ac.uk [School of Chemical Science, National Centre for Sensor Research, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Nanotechnology Integrated Bioengineering Centre, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, BT37 0QB Belfast (United Kingdom); Byrne, John A. [Nanotechnology Integrated Bioengineering Centre, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, BT37 0QB Belfast (United Kingdom); Keyes, Tia E. [School of Chemical Science, National Centre for Sensor Research, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2014-06-01

    TiO{sub 2} thin films are of great interest as biocompatible coatings and also as photocatalytic self-cleaning and antimicrobial coatings. In this work we used β-amyloid as a model for infectious protein to investigate the attachment and photocatalytic degradation. TiO{sub 2} films were prepared on stainless steel substrates using magnetron sputtering. The films were characterised before and after exposure to β-amyloid (1–42), using XRD, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and AFM. The TiO{sub 2} film was mostly composed of the anatase phase with a relatively high surface roughness. The presence of Raman peaks at 1668 cm{sup −1} and 1263 cm{sup −1}, with the XPS spectral feature for nitrogen at 400 eV, confirmed the adsorption of amyloid on surface. Following exposure of the β-amyloid contaminated TiO{sub 2} to UV-B irradiation a slight shift of amide modes was observed. Furthermore, the amide I spectra show an overall decrease in α-helix content with presence of a minor peak around 1591 cm{sup −1}, which is related to tryptophanyl and tyrosinyl radicals, which can lead to conformational change of β-amyloid. The C1s band at 292.2 eV suggests the formation of free carboxylic acid. The loss in the crucial structure of β-amyloid leads to reduce the fibril formation, thought to be induced through a photocatalytic process. - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} thin films synthesised and characterised • Absorption study using β-amyloid (1–42) • Investigation of peptide configuration via Raman, AFM and XPS spectroscopies • β-Amyloid was subsequently degraded by photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2}.

  4. Aliphatic peptides show similar self-assembly to amyloid core sequences, challenging the importance of aromatic interactions in amyloidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmanan, Anupama; Cheong, Daniel W.; Accardo, Angelo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Riekel, Christian; Hauser, Charlotte A. E.

    2012-01-01

    The self-assembly of abnormally folded proteins into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of many debilitating diseases, from Alzheimer’s and Parkinson diseases to prion-related disorders and diabetes type II. However, the fundamental mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains poorly understood. Core sequences of four to seven amino acids within natural amyloid proteins that form toxic fibrils have been used to study amyloidogenesis. We recently reported a class of systematically designed ultrasmall p...

  5. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  6. A new molecular model for Congo Red-β amyloid interaction: implications for diagnosis and inhibition of brain plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kristine A.; Li, Yat

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), an age-related neurodegenerative disorder, is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. One strong pathological indicator of AD is senile plaques, which are aggregates of fibrils formed from amyloid β (Aβ) peptides. Thus, detection and inhibition of Aβ aggregation are critical for the prevention and treatment of AD. Congo red (CR) is one of the most widely used dye molecules for probing as well as inhabiting Aβ aggregation. However, the nature of interaction between CR and Aβ is not well understood. In this research, we systematically studied the interaction between CR and Aβ using a combination of optical techniques, including electronic absorption, fluorescence, Raman scattering, and circular dichroism, to provide detailed information with molecular specificity and high sensitivity. Compared to CR alone, interaction of the dye with Aβ results in a new absorption peak near 540 nm and significantly enhanced photoluminescence as well as Raman signal. Our results led us to propose a new model suggesting that CR exists primarily in a micellar form, resembling H-aggregates, in water and dissociates into monomers upon interaction with Aβ. This model has significant implications for the development of new strategies to detect and inhibit brain plaques for treatment of neurological diseases like AD.

  7. Eumelanin fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueenie, Ross; Sutter, Jens; Karolin, Jan; Birch, David J. S.

    2012-07-01

    We describe the auto-oxidation of 3, 4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) in the synthesis of eumelanin to spontaneously produce fibrils upon drying. The self-assembled fibrils are of characteristic diameter ~1 to 2 μm, composed of filaments, and are unidirectional, apart from branches that are formed at typically an angle of 20 to 22 deg. The fibrils are characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence decay times, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The fibrils mimic natural melanin in consisting of core eumelanin with efficient nonradiative properties, but they also display pockets of electronically isolated species with higher radiative rates on the nanosecond timescale. Eumelanin fibrils formed occasionally in solution are tentatively attributed to a scaffold of bacteria or fungus. Fabricating and characterizing novel synthetic eumelanin structures such as fibrils are of interest in helping to reveal a functional structure for eumelanin, in understanding its photophysics, in learning more about L-DOPA as it is used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and in producing novel materials which might embody some of the diverse properties of eumelanin.

  8. Atrial Fibrillation: Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Diagnosis Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... of your body's cells and organs. Read More "Atrial Fibrillation" Articles Atrial Fibrillation / Who Is at Risk for ...

  9. Nuclear imaging of amyloid deposits based upon thioflavins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presence of amyloid deposits and neurofibrillar tangles in the brain. Direct assessment of local changes of amyloid deposits in vivo would greatly facilitate the diagnosis and therapeutic treatments of AD. The goal of this study is to develop small-molecule probes that can be used to follow amyloid deposition in vivo in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Over the past years, we set out to develop a series of small molecules based on thioflavins as radiotracers for use in nuclear imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. The potential of these amyloid-imaging agents for in vivo studies of amyloid deposition has been evaluated based on the following methods: 1) spectrophotometric binding assays with synthetic amyloid-β (Aβ) fibrils and AD brain homogenates; 2) fluorescent staining of brain tissue sections to evaluate specificity of binding to amyloid deposits; 3) fluorescent microscopy in mouse models to determine the brain permeability and characterize the binding specificity in vivo, and 4) PET studies in human subjects diagnosed with AD and age-matched control subjects. To date, we have identified some lead compounds as molecular probes with specificity towards amyloid deposits. The in vitro and in vivo binding properties of these compounds have been demonstrated in the following ways: 1) they selectively binds to Aβ fibrils; 2) they selectively stains amyloid deposits in AD brain tissue sections; 3) they readily penetrates the blood-brain barrier, selectively detects amyloid deposits in vivo in living mice; and 4) one of these compounds has been successfully used in PET studies in human subjects. In conclusion, amyloid-imaging probes have been developed that could be used to monitor amyloid load in vivo. Applications of the probes are under investigation for potential pathophysiology studies and

  10. Nuclear imaging of amyloid deposits based upon thioflavins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the presence of amyloid deposits and neurofibrillar tangles in the brain. Direct assessment of local changes of amyloid deposits in vivo would greatly facilitate the diagnosis and therapeutic treatments of AD. The goal of this study is to develop small-molecule probes that can be used to follow amyloid deposition in vivo in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Over the past years, we set out to develop a series of small molecules based on thioflavins as radiotracers for use in nuclear imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. The potential of these amyloid-imaging agents for in vivo studies of amyloid deposition has been evaluated based on the following methods: 1) spectrophotometric binding. assays with synthetic amyloid-β (Aβ) fibrils and AD brain homogenates; 2) fluorescent staining of brain tissue sections to evaluate specificity of binding to amyloid deposits; 3) fluorescent microscopy in mouse models to determine the brain permeability and characterize the binding specificity in vivo, and 4) PET studies in human subjects diagnosed with AD and age-matched control subjects. To date, we have identified some lead compounds as molecular probes with specificity towards amyloid deposits. The in vitro and in vivo binding properties of these compounds have been demonstrated in the following ways: 1) they selectively binds to Aβ fibrils; 2) they selectively stains amyloid deposits in AD brain tissue sections; 3) they readily penetrates the blood-brain barrier, selectively detects amyloid deposits in vivo iri living mice; and 4) One of these compounds, termed PIB, has been successfully used in PET studies in human subjects. In conclusion, amyloid-imaging probes have been developed that could be used to monitor amyloid load in vivo. Applications of the probes are under investigation for potential pathophysiology studies

  11. Effect of cholesterol and amyloid-β peptide on structure and function of mixed-lipid films and pulmonary surfactant BLES: an atomic force microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hane, Francis; Drolle, Elizabeth; Leonenko, Zoya

    2010-12-01

    Pulmonary surfactant forms a thin molecular film inside mammalian lung alveoli and lowers the surface tension of the air/fluid interface to reduce the work of breathing. Upon compression functional surfactant forms characteristic multilayer structures, which indicate surfactant surface activity. We showed that cholesterol adversely affects both structural and surface-active properties of BLES surfactant and DPPC/DOPG lipid films. Incorporation of small concentrations of fibril-forming peptide amyloid-β 1-40 helps to counteract the distractive effect of cholesterol by improving characteristic multilayer formation that occurs upon compression. In contrast to many negative effects of amyloid-forming peptides reported earlier, we report a positive effect of amyloid-β peptide on surfactant function, which may aid in the designing of novel surfactant formulations. PMID:20493966

  12. Two Types of Fibrils in ATTR Amyloidosis : Implications for Clinical Phenotype and Treatment Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Ihse, Elisabet

    2011-01-01

    Systemic amyloidoses are a group of lethal diseases where proteins aggregate into fibrillar structures, called amyloid fibrils, that deposits throughout the body. Transthyretin (TTR) causes one type of amyloidosis, in which the aggregates mainly infiltrate nervous and cardiac tissue. Almost a hundred different mutations in the TTR gene are known to trigger the disease, but wild-type (wt) TTR is also incorporated into the fibrils, and may alone form amyloid. Patients with the TTRV30M mutation ...

  13. Atomic View of a Toxic Amyloid Small Oligomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laganowsky, Arthur; Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Park, Jiyong; Zhao, Minglei; Pensalfini, Anna; Soriaga, Angela B.; Landau, Meytal; Teng, Poh K.; Cascio, Duilio; Glabe, Charles; Eisenberg, David (UCI); (UCLA)

    2012-04-30

    Amyloid diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and the prion conditions, are each associated with a particular protein in fibrillar form. These amyloid fibrils were long suspected to be the disease agents, but evidence suggests that smaller, often transient and polymorphic oligomers are the toxic entities. Here, we identify a segment of the amyloid-forming protein {alpha}{beta} crystallin, which forms an oligomeric complex exhibiting properties of other amyloid oligomers: {beta}-sheet-rich structure, cytotoxicity, and recognition by an oligomer-specific antibody. The x-ray-derived atomic structure of the oligomer reveals a cylindrical barrel, formed from six antiparallel protein strands, that we term a cylindrin. The cylindrin structure is compatible with a sequence segment from the {beta}-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease. Cylindrins offer models for the hitherto elusive structures of amyloid oligomers.

  14. Neuroprotective and nootropic drug noopept rescues α-synuclein amyloid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xueen; Gharibyan, Anna L; Öhman, Anders; Liu, Yonggang; Olofsson, Anders; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A

    2011-12-16

    Parkinson's disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by α-synuclein (α-Syn)-containing Lewy body formation and selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. We have demonstrated the modulating effect of noopept, a novel proline-containing dipeptide drug with nootropic and neuroprotective properties, on α-Syn oligomerization and fibrillation by using thioflavin T fluorescence, far-UV CD, and atomic force microscopy techniques. Noopept does not bind to a sterically specific site in the α-Syn molecule as revealed by heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR analysis, but due to hydrophobic interactions with toxic amyloid oligomers, it prompts their rapid sequestration into larger fibrillar amyloid aggregates. Consequently, this process rescues the cytotoxic effect of amyloid oligomers on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells as demonstrated by using cell viability assays and fluorescent staining of apoptotic and necrotic cells and by assessing the level of intracellular oxidative stress. The mitigating effect of noopept against amyloid oligomeric cytotoxicity may offer additional benefits to the already well-established therapeutic functions of this new pharmaceutical. PMID:21986202

  15. Anti-Aggregating Effect of the Naturally Occurring Dipeptide Carnosine on Aβ1-42 Fibril Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandra Aloisi; Amilcare Barca; Alessandro Romano; Sara Guerrieri; Carlo Storelli; Rosaria Rinaldi; Tiziano Verri

    2013-01-01

    Carnosine is an endogenous dipeptide abundant in the central nervous system, where by acting as intracellular pH buffering molecule, Zn/Cu ion chelator, antioxidant and anti-crosslinking agent, it exerts a well-recognized multi-protective homeostatic function for neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Carnosine seems to counteract proteotoxicity and protein accumulation in neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer's Disease (AD). However, its direct impact on the dynamics of AD-related fibril...

  16. Mechanical properties of collagen fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Wenger, M. P. E.; Bozec, L.; Horton, M.A.; Mesquida, P

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collagen fibers from staggered subfibrils still lacks a universally accepted model. Determining the mechanical properties of single collagen fibrils ( diameter 50 - 200 nm) provides new insights into collagen structure. In this work, the reduced modulus of collagen was measured by nanoindentation using atomic force microscopy. For individual type 1 collagen fibrils from rat tail, the modulus was found to be in the range from 5 GPa to 11.5 GPa ( in air and at room temperature)...

  17. A simple method of labeling amyloid β with quantum dots and ingestion of the labeled amyloid β by astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Jia, Xing; Qing, Hong; Xie, Hai-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Steady labeling of amyloid beta (Aβ) is crucial for studying the ingestion and degradation of Aβ by astrocytes and unraveling a relevant regulation mechanism. Quantum dots (QDs) are an optimum labeling reagent for this because of their strong and steady fluorescence properties. In this paper, Aβ was labeled with QDs by a simple mixed incubation strategy, with a QD labeled Aβ complex (QDs-Aβ) being obtained. In the complex, QDs efficiently restrained the formation of β-folding and fibrils of Aβ, while the graininess, dispersivity and fluorescence properties of the QDs hardly changed. The fluorescence microscopy imaging results showed that the astrocytes could ingest the QDs-Aβ. The QDs and Aβ did not separate from each other during the ingestion process, and the Aβ could be degraded subsequently.

  18. A simple method of labeling amyloid β with quantum dots and ingestion of the labeled amyloid β by astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steady labeling of amyloid beta (Aβ) is crucial for studying the ingestion and degradation of Aβ by astrocytes and unraveling a relevant regulation mechanism. Quantum dots (QDs) are an optimum labeling reagent for this because of their strong and steady fluorescence properties. In this paper, Aβ was labeled with QDs by a simple mixed incubation strategy, with a QD labeled Aβ complex (QDs-Aβ) being obtained. In the complex, QDs efficiently restrained the formation of β-folding and fibrils of Aβ, while the graininess, dispersivity and fluorescence properties of the QDs hardly changed. The fluorescence microscopy imaging results showed that the astrocytes could ingest the QDs-Aβ. The QDs and Aβ did not separate from each other during the ingestion process, and the Aβ could be degraded subsequently. (paper)

  19. Amyloid/Melanin distinctive mark in invertebrate immunity

    OpenAIRE

    A Grimaldi; R Girardello; D Malagoli; P Falabella; Tettamanti, G.; R Valvassori; E Ottaviani; M de Eguileor

    2012-01-01

    Protostomes and Deuterostomes show the same nexus between melanin production, and amyloid fibril production, i.e., the presence of melanin is indissolubly linked to amyloid scaffold that, in turn, is conditioned by the redox status/cytoplasmic pH modification, pro-protein cleavage presence, adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), and neutral endopeptidase (NEP) overexpressions. These events represent the crucial component of immune response in invertebrates...

  20. Characterization of dry globular proteins and protein fibrils by synchrotron radiation vacuum UV circular dichroism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesgaard, Lise W.; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Andersen, Christian Beyschau;

    2008-01-01

    between two different types of protein fibrils, highlighting that bona fide fibrils formed by lysozyme are structurally more similar to the nonclassical fibrillar aggregates formed by the SerADan peptide than with the amyloid formed by alpha-synuclein. Thus, despite the lack of direct structural...

  1. Polymorphism, metastable species and interconversion: the many states of glucagon fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghodke, Shirin D; Jensen, Grethe Vestergaard; Svane, Anna Sigrid P.;

    2014-01-01

    The natively unfolded peptide hormone glucagon forms fibrillar structures with amyloid properties. Here, we summarize past advances in glucagon fibrillation and combine them with recent new unpublished data to provide some more general conclusions on how glucagon fibrillation adapts to different ...

  2. Protein Folding and Aggregation into Amyloid: The Interference by Natural Phenolic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Stefani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid aggregation is a hallmark of several degenerative diseases affecting the brain or peripheral tissues, whose intermediates (oligomers, protofibrils and final mature fibrils display different toxicity. Consequently, compounds counteracting amyloid aggregation have been investigated for their ability (i to stabilize toxic amyloid precursors; (ii to prevent the growth of toxic oligomers or speed that of fibrils; (iii to inhibit fibril growth and deposition; (iv to disassemble preformed fibrils; and (v to favor amyloid clearance. Natural phenols, a wide panel of plant molecules, are one of the most actively investigated categories of potential amyloid inhibitors. They are considered responsible for the beneficial effects of several traditional diets being present in green tea, extra virgin olive oil, red wine, spices, berries and aromatic herbs. Accordingly, it has been proposed that some natural phenols could be exploited to prevent and to treat amyloid diseases, and recent studies have provided significant information on their ability to inhibit peptide/protein aggregation in various ways and to stimulate cell defenses, leading to identify shared or specific mechanisms. In the first part of this review, we will overview the significance and mechanisms of amyloid aggregation and aggregate toxicity; then, we will summarize the recent achievements on protection against amyloid diseases by many natural phenols.

  3. Atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Fauchier, Laurent; Freedman, Saul B; Van Gelder, Isabelle; Natale, Andrea; Gianni, Carola; Nattel, Stanley; Potpara, Tatjana; Rienstra, Michiel; Tse, Hung-Fat; Lane, Deirdre A

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disorder, and increases in prevalence with increasing age and the number of cardiovascular comorbidities. AF is characterized by a rapid and irregular heartbeat that can be asymptomatic or lead to symptoms such as palpitations, dys

  4. Atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Morten S; Nielsen, Morten W; Haunsø, Stig;

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia affecting 1-2% of the general population. A number of studies have demonstrated that AF, and in particular lone AF, has a substantial genetic component. Monogenic mutations in lone and familial AF, although rare, have been recognized...

  5. Amyloids in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance: potential causes of the usually low resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espargaró A

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Alba Espargaró, Maria Antònia Busquets, Joan Estelrich, Raimon Sabate Department of Physical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (IN2UB, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Amyloids are non-crystalline and insoluble, which imply that the classical structural biology tools, ie, X-ray crystallography and solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, are not suitable for their analysis. In the last years, solid-state NMR (ssNMR has emerged as an alternative tool to decrypt the structural signatures of amyloid fibrils, providing major contributions to our understanding of molecular structures of amyloids such as β-amyloid peptide associated with Alzheimer’s disease or fungal prions, among others. Despite this, the wide majority of amyloid fibrils display low resolution by ssNMR. Usually, this low resolution has been attributed to a high disorder or polymorphism of the fibrils, suggesting the existence of diverse elementary β-sheet structures. Here, we propose that a single β-sheet structure could be responsible for the broadening of the line widths in the ssNMR spectra. Although the fibrils and fibers consist of a single elementary structure, the angle of twist of each individual fibril in the mature fiber depends on the number of individual fibrils as well as the fibril arrangement in the final mature fiber. Thus, a wide range of angles of twist could be observed in the same amyloid sample. These twist variations involve changes in amino acid alignments that could be enough to limit the ssNMR resolution. Keywords: amyloid, fibril, misfolding, β-structure, ssNMR, NMR, β-sheet

  6. Effect of curcumin and Cu 2+/Zn 2+ ions on the fibrillar aggregates formed by the amyloid peptide and other peptides at the organic-aqueous interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghamitra, Nusrat J. M.; Varghese, Neenu; Rao, C. N. R.

    2010-08-01

    Characteristic features of a perilous neuro-degenerative disease such as the Alzhiemer's disease is fibrillar plaque formation by the amyloid (Aβ) peptide. We have modelled the formation and disintegration of fibrils by studying the aggregate structures formed by Aβ structural motif diphenylalanine as well as insulin and bovine serum albumin at the organic-aqueous interface. Even small concentrations of curcumin in the organic medium or Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ ions in the aqueous medium are found to break down the fibrillar structures.

  7. Stability and cytotoxicity of crystallin amyloid nanofibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manmeet; Healy, Jackie; Vasudevamurthy, Madhusudan; Lassé, Moritz; Puskar, Ljiljana; Tobin, Mark J.; Valery, Celine; Gerrard, Juliet A.; Sasso, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    Previous work has identified crystallin proteins extracted from fish eye lenses as a cheap and readily available source for the self-assembly of amyloid nanofibrils. However, before exploring potential applications, the biophysical aspects and safety of this bionanomaterial need to be assessed so as to ensure that it can be effectively and safely used. In this study, crude crystallin amyloid fibrils are shown to be stable across a wide pH range, in a number of industrially relevant solvents, at both low and high temperatures, and in the presence of proteases. Crystallin nanofibrils were compared to well characterised insulin and whey protein fibrils using Thioflavin T assays and TEM imaging. Cell cytotoxicity assays suggest no adverse impact of both mature and fragmented crystallin fibrils on cell viability of Hec-1a endometrial cells. An IR microspectroscopy study supports long-term structural integrity of crystallin nanofibrils.Previous work has identified crystallin proteins extracted from fish eye lenses as a cheap and readily available source for the self-assembly of amyloid nanofibrils. However, before exploring potential applications, the biophysical aspects and safety of this bionanomaterial need to be assessed so as to ensure that it can be effectively and safely used. In this study, crude crystallin amyloid fibrils are shown to be stable across a wide pH range, in a number of industrially relevant solvents, at both low and high temperatures, and in the presence of proteases. Crystallin nanofibrils were compared to well characterised insulin and whey protein fibrils using Thioflavin T assays and TEM imaging. Cell cytotoxicity assays suggest no adverse impact of both mature and fragmented crystallin fibrils on cell viability of Hec-1a endometrial cells. An IR microspectroscopy study supports long-term structural integrity of crystallin nanofibrils. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: ThT fluorescence graphs of buffers and solvents used for

  8. Distinguishing Closely Related Amyloid Precursors Using anRNA Aptamer*

    OpenAIRE

    Sarell, C. J.; Karamanos, T. K.; White, S J; Bunka, D. H. J.; Kalverda, A. P.; Thompson, G. S.; Barker, A. M.; Stockley, P. G.; Radford, S.E.

    2014-01-01

    Although amyloid fibrils assembled in vitro commonly involve a single protein, fibrils formed in vivo can contain multiple protein sequences. The amyloidogenic protein human β2-microglobulin (hβ2m) can co-polymerize with its N-terminally truncated variant (ΔN6) in vitro to form hetero-polymeric fibrils that differ from their homo-polymeric counterparts. Discrimination between the different assembly precursors, for example by binding of a biomolecule to one species in a mixture of conformers, ...

  9. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials What is Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke? Atrial fibrillation (AF) describes the rapid, irregular beating ...

  10. Atrial Fibrillation: Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents Treatment for atrial fibrillation depends on how often you have symptoms, how ...

  11. Living with Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics » Atrial Fibrillation » Living With Atrial Fibrillation Explore Atrial Fibrillation What Is... Types Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia ...

  12. Oligomer Formation of Amyloid-β(29-42) from Its Monomers Using the Hamiltonian Replica-Permutation Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Satoru G; Okumura, Hisashi

    2016-07-14

    Oligomers of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) are formed during the early stage of the amyloidogenesis process and exhibit neurotoxicity. The oligomer formation process of Aβ and even that of Aβ fragments are still poorly understood, though understanding of these processes is essential for remedying Alzheimer's disease. In order to better understand the oligomerization process of the C-terminal Aβ fragment Aβ(29-42) at the atomic level, we performed the Hamiltonian replica-permutation molecular dynamics simulation with Aβ(29-42) molecules using the explicit water solvent model. We observed that oligomers increased in size through the sequential addition of monomers to the oligomer, rather than through the assembly of small oligomers. Moreover, solvent effects played an important role in this oligomerization process. PMID:27281682

  13. Defining and Assessing Analytical Performance Criteria for Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy-Detecting Amyloid Seeding Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John G; Graham, Catherine; Dudas, Sandor; Paxman, Eric; Vuong, Ben; Czub, Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are infectious, fatal neurodegenerative diseases that affect production animal health, and thus human food safety. Enhanced TSE detection methods mimic the conjectured basis for prion replication, in vitro; biological matrices can be tested for prion activity via their ability to convert recombinant cellular prion protein (PrP) into amyloid fibrils; fluorescent spectra changes of amyloid-binding fluorophores in the reaction vessel detect fibril formation. In vitro PrP conversion techniques have high analytical sensitivity for prions, comparable with that of bioassays, yet no such protocol has gained regulatory approval for use in animal TSE surveillance programs. This study describes a timed in vitro PrP conversion protocol with accurate, well-defined analytical criteria based on probability density and mass functions of TSE(+) and TSE(-) associated thioflavin T signal times, a new approach within this field. The prion detection model used is elk chronic wasting disease (CWD) in brain tissues. The protocol and analytical criteria proved as sensitive for elk CWD as two bioassay models, and upward of approximately 1.2 log10 more sensitive than the most sensitive TSE rapid test we assessed. Furthermore, we substantiate that timing in vitro PrP conversion may be used to titrate TSE infectivity, and, as a result, provide a comprehensive extrapolation of analytical sensitivity differences between bioassay, TSE rapid tests, and in vitro PrP conversion for elk CWD. PMID:27068712

  14. STIMULATED PLATELETS RELEASE AMYLOID β–PROTEIN PRECURSOR

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Gregory M.; Galasko, Douglas; Shapiro, I. Paul; Saitoh, Tsunao

    1990-01-01

    Human platelets can be stimulated by thrombin or ionomycin to secrete soluble truncated amyloid β–protein precursor and particulate membrane fragments which contain C-terminal and N-terminal immunoreactive amyloid β–protein precursor. This suggests a possible circulating source of β–protein in serum which may play a role in the formation of amyloid deposits. The release of soluble amyloid β-protein precursor could be involved in normal platelet physiology.

  15. Plasma amyloid beta peptides and oligomers antibodies in Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, L.; Chu, LW; Kwan, JSC; Ho, JWM; Lam, KSL; Ho, PWL; Chan, KH

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Various forms of amyloid beta (Aβ) including Aβ peptides, oligomers, protofibrils and fibrils are thought to be pathogenic in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The exact pathophysiological role of endogenous Aβ autoantibodies (Ab) in healthy subjects and AD patients are uncertain. Potential protective role ...

  16. In vitro formation and thermal transition of novel hybrid fibrils from type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Song Chen, Toshiyuki Ikoma, Nobuhiro Ogawa, Satoshi Migita, Hisatoshi Kobayashi and Nobutaka Hanagata

    2010-01-01

    Novel type I collagen hybrid fibrils were fabricated by neutralizing a mixture of type I fish scale collagen solution and type I porcine collagen solution with a phosphate buffer saline at 28 °C. Their structure was discussed in terms of the volume ratio of fish/porcine collagen solution. Scanning electron and atomic force micrographs showed that the diameter of collagen fibrils derived from the collagen mixture was larger than those derived from each collagen, and all resultant fibrils exhib...

  17. Intracellular fibril formation, calcification, and enrichment of chaperones, cytoskeletal, and intermediate filament proteins in the adult hippocampus CA1 following neonatal exposure to the nonprotein amino acid BMAA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Oskar; Berg, Anna-Lena; Hanrieder, Jörg; Arnerup, Gunnel; Lindström, Anna-Karin; Brittebo, Eva B

    2015-03-01

    The environmental neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) has been implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative disease, and recent studies indicate that BMAA can be misincorporated into proteins. BMAA is a developmental neurotoxicant that can induce long-term learning and memory deficits, as well as regionally restricted neuronal degeneration and mineralization in the hippocampal CA1. The aim of the study was to characterize long-term changes (2 weeks to 6 months) further in the brain of adult rats treated neonatally (postnatal days 9-10) with BMAA (460 mg/kg) using immunohistochemistry (IHC), transmission electron microscopy, and laser capture microdissection followed by LC-MS/MS for proteomic analysis. The histological examination demonstrated progressive neurodegenerative changes, astrogliosis, microglial activation, and calcification in the hippocampal CA1 3-6 months after exposure. The IHC showed an increased staining for α-synuclein and ubiquitin in the area. The ultrastructural examination revealed intracellular deposition of abundant bundles of closely packed parallel fibrils in neurons, axons, and astrocytes of the CA1. Proteomic analysis of the affected site demonstrated an enrichment of chaperones (e.g., clusterin, GRP-78), cytoskeletal and intermediate filament proteins, and proteins involved in the antioxidant defense system. Several of the most enriched proteins (plectin, glial fibrillar acidic protein, vimentin, Hsp 27, and ubiquitin) are known to form complex astrocytic inclusions, so-called Rosenthal fibers, in the neurodegenerative disorder Alexander disease. In addition, TDP-43 and the negative regulator of autophagy, GLIPR-2, were exclusively detected. The present study demonstrates that neonatal exposure to BMAA may offer a novel model for the study of hippocampal fibril formation in vivo. PMID:24798087

  18. Amyloid arthropathy in patients on regular dialysis: A newly discovered disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amyloid arthropathy is a newly discovered complication observed in patients on regular dialysis treatment. It is due to an abnormal deposition of β/sub 2/-micro-amyloid fibrils in synovia and bone structure. The authors present the radiographic evaluation of 286 patients treated in three different dialysis units. The most relevant radiologic aspects are cystic radiolucencies of bone, which result from local amyloid deposition, involving carpal bones and humeral and femoral heads as the main targets. The frequency of these findings was as follows: carpal bones, 16%; humeral heads, 29%; femoral heads, 28%. In three patients amyloid deposition was also found in the synovia of the carpal tunnels; in two additional patients articular synovial biopsy tissue examined with immunocytochemical analysis and optical and electron microscopy showed β/sub 2/ deposition in the amyloid fibrils. In conclusion, amyloidosis is a frequent and new complication of regular dialysis, and β/sub 2/-microglobulin appears to be a new uremic toxin

  19. The 8 and 5 kDa Fragments of Plasma Gelsolin Form Amyloid Fibrils by a Nucleated Polymerization Mechanism, while the 68 kDa Fragment is Not Amyloidogenic†

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, James P.; Isaac T. Yonemoto; Murray, Amber N; Price, Joshua L.; Powers, Evan T.; Balch, William E.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2009-01-01

    Familial amyloidosis of Finnish type (FAF), or gelsolin amyloidosis, is a systemic amyloid disease caused by a mutation (D187N/Y) in domain 2 of human plasma gelsolin, resulting in domain 2 misfolding within the secretory pathway. Upon passage through the Golgi, furin endoproteolysis within domain 2 occurs as a consequence of the abnormal conformations that enable furin to bind and cleave, resulting in the secretion of a 68-kDa C-terminal plasma gelsolin fragment (amino acids173–755, C68). Th...

  20. Clues for divergent, polymorphic amyloidogenesis through dissection of amyloid forming steps of bovine carbonic anhydrase and its critical amyloid forming stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Dushyant Kumar; Kundu, Bishwajit

    2016-07-01

    Certain amino acid stretches are considered 'critical' to trigger amyloidogenesis in a protein. Synthetic peptides corresponding to these stretches are often used as experimental mimics for studying the amyloidogenesis of their parent protein. Here we provide evidence that such simple extrapolation is misleading. We scrutinized each step of amyloid progression of full length bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) and compared it with the amyloidogenic process of its critical peptide stretch 201-227 (PepB). We found that under similar solution conditions amyloidogenesis of BCA followed surface-catalyzed secondary nucleation, whereas, that of PepB followed classical nucleation-dependent pathway. AFM images showed that while BCA formed short, thick and branched fibrils, PepB formed thin, long and unbranched fibrils. Structural information obtained by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy suggested parallel arrangement of intermolecular β-sheet in BCA amyloids in contrast to PepB amyloids which arranged into antiparallel β sheets. Amyloids formed by BCA were unable to seed the fibrillation of PepB and vice versa. Even the intermediates formed during lag phase revealed contrasting FTIR and far UV CD signature, hydrophobicity, morphology and cell cytotoxicity. Thus, we propose that sequences other than critical amyloidogenic stretches may significantly influence the initiation, polymerization and final fibrillar morphology of amyloid forming protein. The results have been discussed in light of primary sequence mediated amyloid polymorphism and its importance in the rational design of amyloid nanomaterials possessing desired physico-chemical properties. PMID:27045222

  1. Amyloid-PET predicts inhibition of de novo plaque formation upon chronic γ-secretase modulator treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendel, M; Jaworska, A; Herms, J; Trambauer, J; Rötzer, C; Gildehaus, F-J; Carlsen, J; Cumming, P; Bylund, J; Luebbers, T; Bartenstein, P; Steiner, H; Haass, C; Baumann, K; Rominger, A

    2015-10-01

    In a positron-emission tomography (PET) study with the β-amyloid (Aβ) tracer [(18)F]-florbetaben, we previously showed that Aβ deposition in transgenic mice expressing Swedish mutant APP (APP-Swe) mice can be tracked in vivo. γ-Secretase modulators (GSMs) are promising therapeutic agents by reducing generation of the aggregation prone Aβ42 species without blocking general γ-secretase activity. We now aimed to investigate the effects of a novel GSM [8-(4-Fluoro-phenyl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridin-2-yl]-[1-(3-methyl-[1,2,4]thiadiazol-5-yl)-piperidin-4-yl]-amine (RO5506284) displaying high potency in vitro and in vivo on amyloid plaque burden and used longitudinal Aβ-microPET to trace individual animals. Female transgenic (TG) APP-Swe mice aged 12 months (m) were assigned to vehicle (TG-VEH, n=12) and treatment groups (TG-GSM, n=12), which received daily RO5506284 (30 mg kg(-1)) treatment for 6 months. A total of 131 Aβ-PET recordings were acquired at baseline (12 months), follow-up 1 (16 months) and follow-up 2 (18 months, termination scan), whereupon histological and biochemical analyses of Aβ were performed. We analyzed the PET data as VOI-based cortical standard-uptake-value ratios (SUVR), using cerebellum as reference region. Individual plaque load assessed by PET remained nearly constant in the TG-GSM group during 6 months of RO5506284 treatment, whereas it increased progressively in the TG-VEH group. Baseline SUVR in TG-GSM mice correlated with Δ%-SUVR, indicating individual response prediction. Insoluble Aβ42 was reduced by 56% in the TG-GSM versus the TG-VEH group relative to the individual baseline plaque load estimates. Furthermore, plaque size histograms showed differing distribution between groups of TG mice, with fewer small plaques in TG-GSM animals. Taken together, in the first Aβ-PET study monitoring prolonged treatment with a potent GSM in an AD mouse model, we found clear attenuation of de novo amyloidogenesis. Moreover

  2. A novel class of secreted hydrophobic proteins is involved in aerial hyphae formation in Streptomyces coelicolor by forming amyloid-like fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Claessen, D.; Rink, R; Jong, W. de; Siebring, J.; de Vreugd, P.; Boersma, FGH; Dijkhuizen, L.; Wosten, HAB; Wösten, Han A. B.

    2003-01-01

    Streptomycetes exhibit a complex morphological differentiation. After a submerged mycelium has been formed, filaments grow into the air to septate into spores. A class of eight hydrophobic secreted proteins, ChpA-H, was shown to be instrumental in the development of Streptomyces coelicolor. Mature forms of ChpD-H are up to 63 amino acids in length, and those of ChpA-C are larger (+/-225 amino acids). ChpA-C contain two domains similar to ChpD-H, as well as a cell-wall sorting signal. The chp ...

  3. A novel class of secreted hydrophobic proteins is involved in aerial hyphae formation in Streptomyces coelicolor by forming amyloid-like fibrils

    OpenAIRE

    Claessen, Dennis; Rink, Rick; Jong, Wouter ,; Siebring, Jeroen; de Vreugd, Peter; Boersma, F. G. Hidde; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Wösten, Han A. B.

    2003-01-01

    Streptomycetes exhibit a complex morphological differentiation. After a submerged mycelium has been formed, filaments grow into the air to septate into spores. A class of eight hydrophobic secreted proteins, ChpA–H, was shown to be instrumental in the development of Streptomyces coelicolor. Mature forms of ChpD–H are up to 63 amino acids in length, and those of ChpA–C are larger (±225 amino acids). ChpA–C contain two domains similar to ChpD–H, as well as a cell-wal...

  4. Rheological and hemostasiological aspects of thrombus formation in the left atrial appendage in atrial fibrillation? A new strategy for prevention of cardioembolic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leithäuser, Boris; Jung, Friedrich; Park, Jai-Wun

    2010-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF), as the most common cardiac rhythm disturbance, gains in importance not only for the persons affected, but also for health care and social economy due to thromboembolic events, of which stroke is the most serious, disabling, and life threatening one. Cardiac embolism is due to thrombus formation mainly in the left atrial appendage (LAA). The pathophysiology leading to increased thrombogenicity is complex and requires a remodelling of the LAA structure, decreased LAA blood flow, activation of inflammatory processes, deviations of the hemostatic/fibrinolytic system, and activation/dysfunction of endothelial/endocardial cells. Altogether, a prothrombotic state proposed by Virchow more than 150 years ago. The presence of a LAA thrombus, therefore, is a result of a dynamic process of clot formation and lysis. A comprehensive understanding of this pathophysiology is helpful to optimize the management of patients at high risk of cardioembolic stroke. Especially those with contraindications for oral anticoagulation are in a need of an alternative approach that is not associated with a long-term risk of hemorrhage and other attendant circumstances. The reasonable alternative may be the exclusion of the LAA cavity from circulation by either surgical or percutaneous catheter-based procedures. PMID:20675914

  5. In vitro formation and thermal transition of novel hybrid fibrils from type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Song; Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Migita, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Ikoma, Toshiyuki [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama 2-12-1, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Hanagata, Nobutaka, E-mail: HANAGATA.Nobutaka@nims.go.j [Nanotechnology Innovation Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Novel type I collagen hybrid fibrils were fabricated by neutralizing a mixture of type I fish scale collagen solution and type I porcine collagen solution with a phosphate buffer saline at 28 {sup 0}C. Their structure was discussed in terms of the volume ratio of fish/porcine collagen solution. Scanning electron and atomic force micrographs showed that the diameter of collagen fibrils derived from the collagen mixture was larger than those derived from each collagen, and all resultant fibrils exhibited a typical D-periodic unit of {approx}67 nm, irrespective of volume ratio of both collagens. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed only one endothermic peak for the fibrils derived from collagen mixture or from each collagen solution, indicating that the resultant collagen fibrils were hybrids of type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen.

  6. In vitro formation and thermal transition of novel hybrid fibrils from type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chen, Toshiyuki Ikoma, Nobuhiro Ogawa, Satoshi Migita, Hisatoshi Kobayashi and Nobutaka Hanagata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel type I collagen hybrid fibrils were fabricated by neutralizing a mixture of type I fish scale collagen solution and type I porcine collagen solution with a phosphate buffer saline at 28 °C. Their structure was discussed in terms of the volume ratio of fish/porcine collagen solution. Scanning electron and atomic force micrographs showed that the diameter of collagen fibrils derived from the collagen mixture was larger than those derived from each collagen, and all resultant fibrils exhibited a typical D-periodic unit of ~67 nm, irrespective of volume ratio of both collagens. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed only one endothermic peak for the fibrils derived from collagen mixture or from each collagen solution, indicating that the resultant collagen fibrils were hybrids of type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen.

  7. In vitro formation and thermal transition of novel hybrid fibrils from type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Migita, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Hisatoshi; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2010-06-01

    Novel type I collagen hybrid fibrils were fabricated by neutralizing a mixture of type I fish scale collagen solution and type I porcine collagen solution with a phosphate buffer saline at 28 °C. Their structure was discussed in terms of the volume ratio of fish/porcine collagen solution. Scanning electron and atomic force micrographs showed that the diameter of collagen fibrils derived from the collagen mixture was larger than those derived from each collagen, and all resultant fibrils exhibited a typical D-periodic unit of ~67 nm, irrespective of volume ratio of both collagens. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed only one endothermic peak for the fibrils derived from collagen mixture or from each collagen solution, indicating that the resultant collagen fibrils were hybrids of type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen.

  8. In vitro formation and thermal transition of novel hybrid fibrils from type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel type I collagen hybrid fibrils were fabricated by neutralizing a mixture of type I fish scale collagen solution and type I porcine collagen solution with a phosphate buffer saline at 28 0C. Their structure was discussed in terms of the volume ratio of fish/porcine collagen solution. Scanning electron and atomic force micrographs showed that the diameter of collagen fibrils derived from the collagen mixture was larger than those derived from each collagen, and all resultant fibrils exhibited a typical D-periodic unit of ∼67 nm, irrespective of volume ratio of both collagens. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed only one endothermic peak for the fibrils derived from collagen mixture or from each collagen solution, indicating that the resultant collagen fibrils were hybrids of type I fish scale collagen and type I porcine collagen.

  9. Contemporary treatment of amyloid heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palecek, Tomas; Fikrle, Michal; Nemecek, Eduard; Bauerova, Lenka; Kuchynka, Petr; Louch, William E; Spicka, Ivan; Rysava, Romana

    2015-01-01

    The amyloidoses represent a group of diseases characterized by extracellular deposition of abnormal protein, amyloid, which is formed by insoluble extracellular fibrils in β-pleated sheets. Although cardiac involvement may occur in all types of amyloidoses, clinically relevant amyloid cardiomyopathy is a typical feature of AL amyloidosis and transthyretin-related amyloidoses. Congestive heart failure represents the commonest manifestation of amyloid heart disease. Noninvasive imaging techniques, especially echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance, play a major role in the diagnosis of amyloid cardiomyopathy; however, histological confirmation and exact typing of amyloid deposits is necessary whether in extracardiac location or directly in the myocardium. Early diagnosis of amyloid heart disease is of utmost importance as the presence and especially the severity of cardiac involvement generally drives the prognosis of affected subjects and plays a major role in determining the intensity of specific treatment, namely in AL amyloidosis. The management of patients with amyloid heart disease is complex. Loop diuretics together with aldosterone antagonists represent the basis for influencing signs of congestion. In AL amyloidosis, high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation is generally considered to be a front-line treatment option, if the disease is diagnosed at its early stage. The combination of mephalan with dexamethasone has been the standard therapy for severely affected individuals; however, the combinations with several novel agents including immunomodulatory drugs and bortezomibe have been tested in clinical trials with promising results. New therapeutic substances with the potential to slow or even stop the progression of transthyretin-related amyloidosis are also extensively studied. PMID:25483951

  10. Atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Fauchier, Laurent; Freedman, Saul B; Van Gelder, Isabelle; Natale, Andrea; Gianni, Carola; Nattel, Stanley; Potpara, Tatjana; Rienstra, Michiel; Tse, Hung-Fat; Lane, Deirdre A

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac rhythm disorder, and increases in prevalence with increasing age and the number of cardiovascular comorbidities. AF is characterized by a rapid and irregular heartbeat that can be asymptomatic or lead to symptoms such as palpitations, dyspnoea and dizziness. The condition can also be associated with serious complications, including an increased risk of stroke. Important recent developments in the clinical epidemiology and management of AF have informed our approach to this arrhythmia. This Primer provides a comprehensive overview of AF, including its epidemiology, mechanisms and pathophysiology, diagnosis, screening, prevention and management. Management strategies, including stroke prevention, rate control and rhythm control, are considered. We also address quality of life issues and provide an outlook on future developments and ongoing clinical trials in managing this common arrhythmia. PMID:27159789

  11. Collagen fibril biosynthesis in tendon: a review and recent insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canty, E G; Kadler, K E

    2002-12-01

    The development and evolution of multicellular animals relies on the ability of certain cell types to synthesise an extracellular matrix (ECM) comprising very long collagen fibrils that are arranged in very ordered 3-dimensional scaffolds. Tendon is a good example of a highly ordered ECM, in which tens of millions of collagen fibrils, each hundreds of microns long, are synthesised parallel to the tendon long axis. This review highlights recent discoveries showing that the assembly of collagen fibrils in tendon is hierarchical, and involves the formation of fairly short "collagen early fibrils" that are the fusion precursors of the very long fibrils that occur in mature tendon. PMID:12485687

  12. Computational Modelling of the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby

    2014-01-01

    specific protein into amyloid fibrils. During this process, a cytotoxic event occurs which can be a serious actor in the evolvement of the disease. This thesis is concerned with elucidating the biological processes concerning amyloid proteins, more specifically, the peptide hormone human islet amyloid...... methods to interpret results correctly. Computational studies and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in particular have become important tools in the effort to understand biological mechanisms. The strength of these methods is the high resolution in time and space, and the ability to specifically design...... atoms are grouped into a single particle, reducing the number of particles in the system. Coarse grained MD simulations are necessary to study amyloid aggregation computationally, as the time scale and the system size needed for the process are not currently accessible with atomistic MD simulations...

  13. Ellagic acid promotes A{beta}42 fibrillization and inhibits A{beta}42-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Ying [Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Yang, Shi-gao; Du, Xue-ting; Zhang, Xi; Sun, Xiao-xia; Zhao, Min [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Sun, Gui-yuan, E-mail: sungy2004@sohu.com [Department of Histology and Embryology, College of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Liu, Rui-tian, E-mail: rtliu@tsinghua.edu.cn [Tsinghua University School of Medicine, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-12-25

    Smaller, soluble oligomers of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Selective inhibition of A{beta} oligomer formation provides an optimum target for AD therapy. Some polyphenols have potent anti-amyloidogenic activities and protect against A{beta} neurotoxicity. Here, we tested the effects of ellagic acid (EA), a polyphenolic compound, on A{beta}42 aggregation and neurotoxicity in vitro. EA promoted A{beta} fibril formation and significant oligomer loss, contrary to previous results that polyphenols inhibited A{beta} aggregation. The results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Western blot displayed more fibrils in A{beta}42 samples co-incubated with EA in earlier phases of aggregation. Consistent with the hypothesis that plaque formation may represent a protective mechanism in which the body sequesters toxic A{beta} aggregates to render them harmless, our MTT results showed that EA could significantly reduce A{beta}42-induced neurotoxicity toward SH-SY5Y cells. Taken together, our results suggest that EA, an active ingredient in many fruits and nuts, may have therapeutic potential in AD.

  14. Ellagic acid promotes Aβ42 fibrillization and inhibits Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smaller, soluble oligomers of β-amyloid (Aβ) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Selective inhibition of Aβ oligomer formation provides an optimum target for AD therapy. Some polyphenols have potent anti-amyloidogenic activities and protect against Aβ neurotoxicity. Here, we tested the effects of ellagic acid (EA), a polyphenolic compound, on Aβ42 aggregation and neurotoxicity in vitro. EA promoted Aβ fibril formation and significant oligomer loss, contrary to previous results that polyphenols inhibited Aβ aggregation. The results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Western blot displayed more fibrils in Aβ42 samples co-incubated with EA in earlier phases of aggregation. Consistent with the hypothesis that plaque formation may represent a protective mechanism in which the body sequesters toxic Aβ aggregates to render them harmless, our MTT results showed that EA could significantly reduce Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity toward SH-SY5Y cells. Taken together, our results suggest that EA, an active ingredient in many fruits and nuts, may have therapeutic potential in AD.

  15. Atrial fibrillation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000237.htm Atrial fibrillation - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... have been in the hospital because you have atrial fibrillation . This condition occurs when your heart beats faster ...

  16. Atrial fibrillation or flutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000184.htm Atrial fibrillation or flutter To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Atrial fibrillation or flutter is a common type of abnormal ...

  17. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide: Structure, Function, and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehana Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hormone islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, or amylin plays a role in glucose homeostasis but aggregates to form islet amyloid in type-2 diabetes. Islet amyloid formation contributes to β-cell dysfunction and death in the disease and to the failure of islet transplants. Recent work suggests a role for IAPP aggregation in cardiovascular complications of type-2 diabetes and hints at a possible role in type-1 diabetes. The mechanisms of IAPP amyloid formation in vivo or in vitro are not understood and the mechanisms of IAPP induced β-cell death are not fully defined. Activation of the inflammasome, defects in autophagy, ER stress, generation of reactive oxygen species, membrane disruption, and receptor mediated mechanisms have all been proposed to play a role. Open questions in the field include the relative importance of the various mechanisms of β-cell death, the relevance of reductionist biophysical studies to the situation in vivo, the molecular mechanism of amyloid formation in vitro and in vivo, the factors which trigger amyloid formation in type-2 diabetes, the potential role of IAPP in type-1 diabetes, the development of clinically relevant inhibitors of islet amyloidosis toxicity, and the design of soluble, bioactive variants of IAPP for use as adjuncts to insulin therapy.

  18. Atrial Fibrillation: Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Atrial Fibrillation Atrial Fibrillation: Complications Past Issues / Winter 2015 Table of Contents ... has two major complications—stroke and heart failure. Atrial Fibrillation and Stroke Click to enlarge image This illustration ...

  19. Atrial Fibrillation in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Atrial Fibrillation in Children Updated:Jul 18,2016 Does your ... content was last reviewed on 04/16/14. Atrial Fibrillation • Introduction • What is Atrial Fibrillation? • Why AFib Matters • ...

  20. Atrial Fibrillation Factsheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrial Fibrillation Atrial fibrillation, often called AFib or AF, is the most common type of heart arrhythmia. An arrhythmia is when the ... Atrium Sinoatrial Node (pacemaker) Atrioventricular Node Left Atrium Atrial Fibrillation AFib Facts 1 • An estimated 2.7–6. ...

  1. Oligomer stability of Amyloid- β (A β) 25-35: A Dissipative Particle Dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivkin, Igor; Peter, Emanuel

    Alzheimer's disease is strongly associated with an accumulation of Amyloid- β (A β) peptide plaques in the human brain. A β is a 43 residues long intrinsically disordered peptide and has a strong tendency to form aggregates. Evidence accumulates that A β acts toxic to the neurons in the brain through the formation of small soluble oligomers. A β 25-35 is the smallest fragment of A β which still retains its toxicity and its ability to form extended fibrils. In this talk we will present the results from simulations of aggregation of up to 100 A β 25-35 peptides using a novel polarizable coarse-grained protein model in combination with Dissipative Particle Dynamics.

  2. Uniform spatial distribution of collagen fibril radii within tendon implies local activation of pC-collagen at individual fibrils

    CERN Document Server

    Rutenberg, Andrew D; Kreplak, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Collagen fibril cross-sectional radii show no systematic variation between the interior and the periphery of fibril bundles, indicating an effectively constant rate of collagen incorporation into fibrils throughout the bundle. Such spatially homogeneous incorporation constrains the extracellular diffusion of collagen precursors from sources at the bundle boundary to sinks at the growing fibrils. With a coarse-grained diffusion equation we determine stringent bounds, using parameters extracted from published experimental measurements of tendon development. From the lack of new fibril formation after birth, we further require that the concentration of diffusing precursors stays below the critical concentration for fibril nucleation. We find that the combination of the diffusive bound, which requires larger concentrations to ensure homogeneous fibril radii, and lack of nucleation, which requires lower concentrations, is only marginally consistent with fully-processed collagen using conservative bounds. More real...

  3. Epigenetic regulations of immediate early genes expression involved in memory formation by the amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrickx, Aurélie; Pierrot, Nathalie; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Schakman, Olivier; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; De Smet, Charles; Octave, Jean-Noël

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that APP epigenetically regulates Egr1 expression both in cultured neurons and in vivo. Since Egr1 is an immediate early gene involved in memory formation, we wondered whether other early genes involved in memory were regulated by APP and we studied molecular mechanisms involved. By comparing prefrontal (PF) cortex from wild type (APP+/+) and APP knockout mice (APP-/-), we observed that APP down regulates expression of four immediate early genes, Egr1, c-Fos, Bdnf a...

  4. Epigenetic Regulations of Immediate Early Genes Expression Involved in Memory Formation by the Amyloid Precursor Protein of Alzheimer Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrickx, Aurélie; Pierrot, Nathalie; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Schakman, Olivier; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; De Smet, Charles; Octave, Jean-Noël

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that APP epigenetically regulates Egr1 expression both in cultured neurons and in vivo. Since Egr1 is an immediate early gene involved in memory formation, we wondered whether other early genes involved in memory were regulated by APP and we studied molecular mechanisms involved. By comparing prefrontal (PF) cortex from wild type (APP+/+) and APP knockout mice (APP−/−), we observed that APP down regulates expression of four immediate early genes, Egr1, c-Fos, Bdnf a...

  5. Dynamic assessment of Amyloid oligomers - cell membrane interaction by advanced impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheorghiu, M.; David, S.; Polonschii, C.; Bratu, D.; Gheorghiu, E.

    2013-04-01

    The amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are believed to be pivotal in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis and onset of vascular dysfunction. Recent studies indicate that Aβ1-42 treatment influences the expression of tight junction protein complexes, stress fibre formation, disruption and aggregation of actin filaments and cellular gap formation. Aiming for functional characterization of model cells upon Aβ1-42 treatment, we deployed an advanced Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing for monitoring cell evolution. A precision Impedance Analyzer with a multiplexing module developed in house was used for recording individual electrode sets in the 40 Hz - 100 KHz frequency range. In a step forward from the classical ECIS assays, we report on a novel data analysis algorithm that enables access to cellular and paracellular electrical parameters and cell surface interaction with fully developed cell monolayers. The evolution of the impedance at selected frequencies provides evidence for a dual effect of Aβ42 exposure, at both paracellular permeability and cell adherence level, with intricate dynamics that open up new perspectives on Aβ1-42 oligomers - cell membrane interaction. Validation of electrical impedance assays of the amyloid fibrils effect on cell membrane structure is achieved by both AFM analysis and Surface Plasmon Resonance studies. The capabilities of this noninvasive, real time platform for cell analysis in a wider applicative context are outlined.

  6. The effect of zinc on amyloid β-protein assembly and toxicity: A mechanistic investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomonov, Inna; Sagi, Irit

    2014-10-01

    Neurotoxic assemblies of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) are widely believed to be the cause for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, understanding the factors and mechanisms that control, modulate, and inhibit formation of these assemblies is crucial for the development of therapeutic intervention of AD. This information also can contribute significantly to our understanding of the mechanisms of other amyloidosis diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, type 2 diabetes, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease) and prion diseases (e.g. Mad Cow disease). We have developed a multidisciplinary experimental strategy to study structural and dynamic mechanistic aspects that underlie the Aβ assembly process. Utilizing this strategy, we explored the molecular basis leading to the perturbation of the Aβ assembly process by divalent metal ions, mainly Zn2+ ions. Using Zn2+ as reaction physiological relevant probes, it was demonstrated that Zn2+ rapidly (milliseconds) induce self-assembly of Aβ aggregates and stabilize them in a manner that prevents formation of Aβ fibrils. Importantly, the early-formed intermediates are substantially more neurotoxic than fibrils. Our results suggest that relevant Aβ modulators should be targeted against the rapidly evolved intermediate states of Aβ assembly. The design of such modulators is challenging, as they have to compete with different natural mediators (such as Zn2+) of Aβ aggregation, which diverse Aβ assemblies in both specific and nonspecific manners.

  7. Multiple splice variants within the bovine silver homologue (SILV gene affecting coat color in cattle indicate a function additional to fibril formation in melanophores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weikard Rosemarie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The silver homologue(SILV gene plays a major role in melanosome development. SILV is a target for studies concerning melanoma diagnostics and therapy in humans as well as on skin and coat color pigmentation in many species ranging from zebra fish to mammals. However, the precise functional cellular mechanisms, in which SILV is involved, are still not completely understood. While there are many studies addressing SILV function upon a eumelaneic pigment background, there is a substantial lack of information regarding the further relevance of SILV, e.g. for phaeomelanosome development. Results In contrast to previous results in other species reporting SILV expression exclusively in pigmented tissues, our experiments provide evidence that the bovine SILV gene is expressed in a variety of tissues independent of pigmentation. Our data show that the bovine SILV gene generates an unexpectedly large number of different transcripts occurring in skin as well as in non-pigmented tissues, e.g. liver or mammary gland. The alternative splice sites are generated by internal splicing and primarily remove complete exons. Alternative splicing predominantly affects the repeat domain of the protein, which has a functional key role in fibril formation during eumelanosome development. Conclusion The expression of the bovine SILV gene independent of pigmentation suggests SILV functions exceeding melanosome development in cattle. This hypothesis is further supported by transcript variants lacking functional key elements of the SILV protein relevant for eumelanosome development. Thus, the bovine SILV gene can serve as a model for the investigation of the putative additional functions of SILV. Furthermore, the splice variants of the bovine SILV gene represent a comprehensive natural model to refine the knowledge about functional domains in the SILV protein. Our study exemplifies that the extent of alternative splicing is presumably much higher than

  8. Bis(propyl)-cognitin Prevents β-amyloid-induced Memory Deficits as Well as Synaptic Formation and Plasticity Impairments via the Activation of PI3-K Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liting; Huang, Meng; Xu, Shujun; Wang, Yu; An, Pengyuan; Feng, Chenxi; Chen, Xiaowei; Wei, Xiaofei; Han, Yifan; Wang, Qinwen

    2016-08-01

    Bis(propyl)-cognitin (B3C), derived from tacrine linked with three methylene (-CH2-) groups, is a dimerized molecule interacting multiple targets. During the past several years, it has been reported as a promising therapeutic drug for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. However, the therapeutic mechanism of B3C for AD needs further demonstration. Based on a combination of behavioral tests, electrophysiological technique, immunocytochemistry, and live cell imaging, we studied the effects and the underlying mechanism of B3C on the impairments of cognitive function, synapse formation, and synaptic plasticity induced by soluble amyloid-β protein (Aβ) oligomers. Our study showed that spatial learning and memory in a Morris water maze task and recognition memory in a novel object recognition task were significantly decreased in the AD model mice created by hippocampal injection of Aβ. Chronic administration of B3C for 21 days prevented the memory impairments of the AD model mice in a dose-dependent manner. Live cell imaging study showed that 2-h pretreatment of B3C prevented the decrease in the number of filopodia and synapses induced by Aβ (0.5 μM) in a dose-dependent manner. Besides, electrophysiological recording data showed that the inhibition of long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by Aβ1-42 oligomers in the dentate gyrus (DG) of hippocampus was prevented by B3C in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that the neuroprotective effect of B3C against Aβ-oligomer-induced impairments of synaptic formation and plasticity could be partially blocked by a specific phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) inhibitor LY294002 (50 μM). Therefore, these results indicate that B3C can prevent Aβ-oligomer-induced cognitive deficits, synaptic formation impairments, and synaptic plasticity impairments in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects of B3C are partially mediated via the PI3-K pathway. This study provides novel insights

  9. Using bacterial inclusion bodies to screen for amyloid aggregation inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Villar-Piqué Anna; Espargaró Alba; Sabaté Raimon; de Groot Natalia S; Ventura Salvador

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42) is the main component of the inter-neuronal amyloid plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The mechanism by which Aβ42 and other amyloid peptides assemble into insoluble neurotoxic deposits is still not completely understood and multiple factors have been reported to trigger their formation. In particular, the presence of endogenous metal ions has been linked to the pathogenesis of AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. Results ...

  10. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastus Neus

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  11. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Eyleen; Olmedo, Ivonne; Bastus, Neus G.; Guerrero, Simón; Puntes, Víctor F.; Giralt, Ernest; Kogan, Marcelo J.

    2008-11-01

    Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ) amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  12. NNanomechanical characteristics of proteins and peptides in amyloid

    OpenAIRE

    Boayue, Nya Mehnwolo

    2012-01-01

    ......The understanding of the aggregation of amyloid fibrils is essential as they are linked to a number of diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkston’s disease. Amy- loids from different proteins or peptides have common characteristics such as core β-sheet structure, green birefringence upon binding to Congo red, and fibrillar mor- phology. In this thesis, I report single molecule analysis of TTR105−115 a fragment of transthyretin, a serum and cerebrospinal fluid carrier of ...

  13. Rapid Filament Supramolecular Chirality Reversal of HET-s (218-289) Prion Fibrils Driven by pH Elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Maruda; Kurouski, Dmitry; Wan, William; Stubbs, Gerald; Dukor, Rina K; Nafie, Laurence A; Lednev, Igor K

    2015-07-01

    Amyloid fibril polymorphism is not well understood despite its potential importance for biological activity and associated toxicity. Controlling the polymorphism of mature fibrils including their morphology and supramolecular chirality by postfibrillation changes in the local environment is the subject of this study. Specifically, the effect of pH on the stability and dynamics of HET-s (218-289) prion fibrils has been determined through the use of vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), deep UV resonance Raman, and fluorescence spectroscopies. It was found that a change in solution pH causes deprotonation of Asp and Glu amino acid residues on the surface of HET-s (218-289) prion fibrils and triggers rapid transformation of one supramolecular chiral polymorph into another. This process involves changes in higher order arrangements like lateral filament and fibril association and their supramolecular chirality, while the fibril cross-β core remains intact. This work suggests a hypothetical mechanism for HET-s (218-289) prion fibril refolding and proposes that the interconversion between fibril polymorphs driven by the solution environment change is a general property of amyloid fibrils. PMID:26023710

  14. Atrial Ectopics Precipitating Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Francis

    2015-01-01

    Holter monitor tracing showing blocked atrial ectopics and atrial ectopic precipitating atrial fibrillation is being demonstrated. Initially it was coarse atrial fibrillation, which rapidly degenerated into fine atrial fibrillation.

  15. How Is Atrial Fibrillation Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Atrial Fibrillation Treated? Treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF) depends on ... too much thyroid hormone). Who Needs Treatment for Atrial Fibrillation? People who have AF but don't have ...

  16. How Is Atrial Fibrillation Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Atrial Fibrillation » How Is Atrial Fibrillation Diagnosed? Explore Atrial Fibrillation What Is... Types Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia ...

  17. Picosecond pulsed infrared laser tuned to amide I band dissociates polyglutamine fibrils in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takayasu; Ohori, Gaku; Chiba, Tomoyuki; Tsukiyama, Koichi; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils are causal substances for serious neurodegenerative disorders and amyloidosis. Among them, polyglutamine fibrils seen in multiple polyglutamine diseases are toxic to neurons. Although much efforts have been made to explore the treatments of polyglutamine diseases, there are no effective drugs to block progression of the diseases. We recently found that a free electron laser (FEL), which has an oscillation wavelength at the amide I band (C = O stretch vibration mode) and picosecond pulse width, was effective for conversion of the fibril forms of insulin, lysozyme, and calcitonin peptide into their monomer forms. However, it is not known if that is also the case in polyglutamine fibrils in cells. We found in this study that the fibril-specific β-sheet conformation of polyglutamine peptide was converted into nonfibril form, as evidenced by the infrared microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy after the irradiation tuned to 6.08 μm. Furthermore, irradiation at this wavelength also changed polyglutamine fibrils to their nonfibril state in cultured cells, as shown by infrared mapping image of protein secondary structure. Notably, infrared thermography analysis showed that temperature increase of the cells during the irradiation was within 1 K, excluding thermal damage of cells. These results indicate that the picosecond pulsed infrared laser can safely reduce amyloid fibril structure to the nonfibril form even in cells. PMID:27342599

  18. Atrial fibrillation (acute onset)

    OpenAIRE

    Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Watson, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Acute atrial fibrillation is rapid, irregular, and chaotic atrial activity of less than 48 hours' duration. It resolves spontaneously within 24 to 48 hours in over 50% of people. In this review we have included studies on patients with onset up to 7 days previously. Risk factors for acute atrial fibrillation include increasing age, CVD, alcohol abuse, diabetes, and lung disease.Acute atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke and heart failure.

  19. Amyloid/Melanin distinctive mark in invertebrate immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Grimaldi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Protostomes and Deuterostomes show the same nexus between melanin production, and amyloid fibril production, i.e., the presence of melanin is indissolubly linked to amyloid scaffold that, in turn, is conditioned by the redox status/cytoplasmic pH modification, pro-protein cleavage presence, adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH, melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH, and neutral endopeptidase (NEP overexpressions. These events represent the crucial component of immune response in invertebrates, while in vertebrates these series of occurrences could be interpreted as a modest and very restricted innate immune response. On the whole, it emerges that the mechanisms involving amyloid fibrils/pigment synthesis in phylogenetically distant metazoan (viz, cnidaria, molluscs, annelids, insects, ascidians and vertebrates are evolutionary conserved. Furthermore, our data show the relationship between immune and neuroendocrine systems in amyloid/melanin synthesis. Indeed the process is closely associated to ACTH-α-MSH production, and their role in stress responses leading to pigment production reflects and confirms again their ancient phylogeny.

  20. Effective screen for amyloid β aggregation inhibitor using amyloid β-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Sun-Ho; Chang, Yu Jin; Jung, Eun Sun; Kim, Jong-Won; Na, Duk Lyul; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2010-01-01

    The abnormal aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) and its subsequent intra- and extracellular accumulation constitute the disease-causing cascade of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The detection of Aβ aggregates and senile plaque formation, however, is nearly impossible during early pathogenesis, and the absence of a convenient screen to validate the activity of Aβ aggregation regulators impedes the development of promising drug targets and diagnostic biomarkers for AD. Here, we conjugated amyloid β42 (Aβ...

  1. Studies of amyloid toxicity in Drosophila models and effects of the BRICHOS domain

    OpenAIRE

    Hermansson Wik, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid diseases involve specific protein misfolding events and formation of fibrillar deposits. The symptoms of these diseases are broad and dependent on site of accumulation, with different amyloid proteins depositing in specific tissues or systematically. One such protein is transthyretin (TTR) associated with senile systemic amyloidosis, familial amyloid polyneuropathy and familial amyloid cardiomyopathy. We show that the glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate (HS) can be co-loc...

  2. Antimicrobial peptide (Cn-AMP2) from liquid endosperm of Cocos nucifera forms amyloid-like fibrillar structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gour, Shalini; Kaushik, Vibha; Kumar, Vijay; Bhat, Priyanka; Yadav, Subhash C; Yadav, Jay K

    2016-04-01

    Cn-AMP2 is an antimicrobial peptide derived from liquid endosperm of coconut (Cocos nucifera). It consists of 11 amino acid residues and predicted to have high propensity for β-sheet formation that disposes this peptide to be amyloidogenic. In the present study, we have examined the amyloidogenic propensities of Cn-AMP2 in silico and then tested the predictions under in vitro conditions. The in silico study revealed that the peptide possesses high amyloidogenic propensity comparable with Aβ. Upon solubilisation and agitation in aqueous buffer, Cn-AMP2 forms visible aggregates that display bathochromic shift in the Congo red absorbance spectra, strong increase in thioflavin T fluorescence and fibrillar morphology under transmission electron microscopy. All these properties are typical of an amyloid fibril derived from various proteins/peptides including Aβ. PMID:27028204

  3. Atrial Fibrillation and Hyperthyroidism*

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation occurs in 10 – 15% of patients with hyperthyroidism. Low serum thyrotropin concentration is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation. Thyroid hormone contributes to arrythmogenic activity by altering the electrophysiological characteristics of atrial myocytes by shortening the action potential duration, enhancing automaticity and triggered activity in the pulmonary vein cardio myocytes. Hyperthyroidism results in excess mortality from increased incidence of circu...

  4. Visualization of particle complexes in the plasma membrane of Micrasterias denticulata associated with the formation of cellulose fibrils in primary and secondary cell walls

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Highly ordered arrays of intramembrane particles are observed in freeze- fractured plasma membranes of the green alga Micrasterias denticulata during the synthesis of the secondary cell wall. The observable architecture of the complex consists primarily of a precise hexagonal array of from 3 to 175 rosettes, consisting of 6 particles each, which fracture with the P-face. The complexes are observed at the ends of impressions of cellulose fibrils. The distance between rows of rosettes is equal ...

  5. Molecular Structure of Aggregated Amyloid-β: Insights from Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycko, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides aggregate to form polymorphic amyloid fibrils and a variety of intermediate assemblies, including oligomers and protofibrils, both in vitro and in human brain tissue. Since the beginning of the 21st century, considerable progress has been made to characterize the molecular structures of Aβ aggregates. Full molecular structural models based primarily on data from measurements using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) have been developed for several in vitro Aβ fibrils and one metastable protofibril. Partial structural characterization of other aggregation intermediates has been achieved. One full structural model for fibrils derived from brain tissue has also been reported. Future work is likely to focus on additional structures from brain tissue and on further clarification of nonfibrillar Aβ aggregates. PMID:27481836

  6. Sustained peripheral depletion of amyloid-β with a novel form of neprilysin does not affect central levels of amyloid-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Simon J; Andersson, Christin; Narwal, Rajesh; Janson, Juliette; Goldschmidt, Tom J; Appelkvist, Paulina; Bogstedt, Anna; Steffen, Ann-Charlott; Haupts, Ulrich; Tebbe, Jan; Freskgård, Per Ola; Jermutus, Lutz; Burrell, Matthew; Fowler, Susan B; Webster, Carl I

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid deposits in the brain and the progressive loss of cognitive functions. Although the precise role of amyloid-β in disease progression remains somewhat controversial, many efforts to halt or reverse disease progression have focussed on reducing its synthesis or enhancing its removal. It is believed that brain and peripheral soluble amyloid-β are in equilibrium and it has previously been hypothesized that a reduction in peripheral amyloid-β can lower brain amyloid-β, thereby reducing formation of plaques predominantly composed of insoluble amyloid-β; the so-called peripheral sink hypothesis. Here we describe the use of an amyloid-β degrading enzyme, the endogenous metallopeptidase neprilysin, which is fused to albumin to extend plasma half-life and has been engineered to confer increased amyloid-β degradation activity. We used this molecule to investigate the effect of degradation of peripheral amyloid-β on amyloid-β levels in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid after repeated intravenous dosing for up to 4 months in Tg2576 transgenic mice, and 1 month in rats and monkeys. This molecule proved highly effective at degradation of amyloid-β in the periphery but did not alter brain or cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β levels, suggesting that the peripheral sink hypothesis is not valid and is the first time that this has been demonstrated in non-human primates. PMID:24259408

  7. Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy Type IV (FINNISH) with Rapid Clinical Progression in an Iranian Woman: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Babaei-Ghazani, Arash; Eftekharsadat, Bina

    2016-01-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) type IV (FINNISH) is a rare clinical entity with challenging neuropathy and cosmetic deficits. Amyloidosis can affect peripheral sensory, motor, or autonomic nerves. Nerve lesions are induced by deposits of amyloid fibrils and treatment approaches for neuropathy are challenging. Involvement of cranial nerves and atrophy in facial muscles is a real concern in daily life of such patients. Currently, diagnosis of neuropathy can be made by electrodiagnostic s...

  8. Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy Type IV (FINNISH) with Rapid Clinical Progression in an Iranian Woman: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Arash Babaei-Ghazani; Bina Eftekharsadat

    2016-01-01

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) type IV (FINNISH) is a rare clinical entity with challenging neuropathy and cosmetic deficits. Amyloidosis can affect peripheral sensory, motor, or autonomic nerves. Nerve lesions are induced by deposits of amyloid fibrils and treatment approaches for neuropathy are challenging. Involvement of cranial nerves and atrophy in facial muscles is a real concern in daily life of such patients. Currently, diagnosis of neuropathy can be made by electrodiagnostic s...

  9. AG10 inhibits amyloidogenesis and cellular toxicity of the familial amyloid cardiomyopathy-associated V122I transthyretin

    OpenAIRE

    Penchala, Sravan C; Connelly, Stephen; Wang, Yu; Park, Miki S; Zhao, Lei; Baranczak, Aleksandra; Rappley, Irit; Vogel, Hannes; Liedtke, Michaela; Witteles, Ronald M.; Powers, Evan T.; Reixach, Natàlia; Chan, William K.; Wilson, Ian A.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    The misassembly of soluble proteins into toxic aggregates, including amyloid fibrils, underlies a large number of human degenerative diseases. Cardiac amyloidoses, which are most commonly caused by aggregation of Ig light chains or transthyretin (TTR) in the cardiac interstitium and conducting system, represent an important and often underdiagnosed cause of heart failure. Two types of TTR-associated amyloid cardiomyopathies are clinically important. The Val122Ile (V122I) mutation, which alter...

  10. 左心耳封堵术:预防心房颤动左心耳血栓的利刃%Left atrial appendage transcatheter occlusion:theb ladef or prevention thrombus formation in atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张澍

    2015-01-01

    血栓栓塞性并发症是心房颤动致死、致残的主要原因,左心耳是心房颤动患者血栓形成的主要部位。抗凝及外科手术切除左心耳副作用及创伤大,患者难以接受。经皮导管介入行左心耳封堵术是近年来进展快速的预防心房颤动血栓栓塞的方法,具有创伤小、操作简单、耗时较少等优点。作者对国内外左心耳封堵术的相关研究进展作一介绍。%Thromboembolic complication is the main cause of death and disability during atrial fibrillation .Left atrial appendage in patients with atrial fibrillation is the position of the thrombus for-mation.Patients are not tolerated with side effects or trauma by treatment with anticoagulant or resec-tion of the left atrial appendage .The methods with percutaneous left atrial appendage transcatheter occlusion become popular and developed rapidly in recent years for prevention of thrombus formation in atrial fibrillation for advantage with little trauma , easy operated and less time-consuming .The re-search progress on left atrial appendage occlusion at home and abroad was reviewed .

  11. Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface-borne amyloid aggregates with mature fibrils are used as a non-infectious prion model to evaluate cold atmospheric plasmas (CAPs) as a prion inactivation strategy. Using a helium-oxygen CAP jet with pulsed radio-frequency (RF) excitation, amyloid aggregates deposited on freshly cleaved mica discs are reduced substantially leaving only a few spherical fragments of sub-micrometer sizes in areas directly treated by the CAP jet. Outside the light-emitting part of the CAP jet, plasma treatment results in a 'skeleton' of much reduced amyloid stacks with clear evidence of fibril fragmentation. Analysis of possible plasma species and the physical configuration of the jet-sample interaction suggests that the skeleton structures observed are unlikely to have arisen as a result of physical forces of detachment, but instead by progressive diffusion of oxidizing plasma species into porous amyloid aggregates. Composition of chemical bonds of this reduced amyloid sample is very different from that of intact amyloid aggregates. These suggest the possibility of on-site degradation by CAP treatment with little possibility of spreading contamination elsewhere , thus offering a new reaction chemistry route to protein infectivity control with desirable implications for the practical implementation of CAP-based sterilization systems.

  12. Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayliss, D L; Walsh, J L; Iza, F; Kong, M G [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Shama, G [Department of Chemical Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.g.kong@lboro.ac.uk

    2009-11-15

    Surface-borne amyloid aggregates with mature fibrils are used as a non-infectious prion model to evaluate cold atmospheric plasmas (CAPs) as a prion inactivation strategy. Using a helium-oxygen CAP jet with pulsed radio-frequency (RF) excitation, amyloid aggregates deposited on freshly cleaved mica discs are reduced substantially leaving only a few spherical fragments of sub-micrometer sizes in areas directly treated by the CAP jet. Outside the light-emitting part of the CAP jet, plasma treatment results in a 'skeleton' of much reduced amyloid stacks with clear evidence of fibril fragmentation. Analysis of possible plasma species and the physical configuration of the jet-sample interaction suggests that the skeleton structures observed are unlikely to have arisen as a result of physical forces of detachment, but instead by progressive diffusion of oxidizing plasma species into porous amyloid aggregates. Composition of chemical bonds of this reduced amyloid sample is very different from that of intact amyloid aggregates. These suggest the possibility of on-site degradation by CAP treatment with little possibility of spreading contamination elsewhere , thus offering a new reaction chemistry route to protein infectivity control with desirable implications for the practical implementation of CAP-based sterilization systems.

  13. Reduction and degradation of amyloid aggregates by a pulsed radio-frequency cold atmospheric plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, D. L.; Walsh, J. L.; Shama, G.; Iza, F.; Kong, M. G.

    2009-11-01

    Surface-borne amyloid aggregates with mature fibrils are used as a non-infectious prion model to evaluate cold atmospheric plasmas (CAPs) as a prion inactivation strategy. Using a helium-oxygen CAP jet with pulsed radio-frequency (RF) excitation, amyloid aggregates deposited on freshly cleaved mica discs are reduced substantially leaving only a few spherical fragments of sub-micrometer sizes in areas directly treated by the CAP jet. Outside the light-emitting part of the CAP jet, plasma treatment results in a 'skeleton' of much reduced amyloid stacks with clear evidence of fibril fragmentation. Analysis of possible plasma species and the physical configuration of the jet-sample interaction suggests that the skeleton structures observed are unlikely to have arisen as a result of physical forces of detachment, but instead by progressive diffusion of oxidizing plasma species into porous amyloid aggregates. Composition of chemical bonds of this reduced amyloid sample is very different from that of intact amyloid aggregates. These suggest the possibility of on-site degradation by CAP treatment with little possibility of spreading contamination elsewhere , thus offering a new reaction chemistry route to protein infectivity control with desirable implications for the practical implementation of CAP-based sterilization systems.

  14. Serum amyloid P inhibits dermal wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The repair of open wounds depends on granulation tissue formation and contraction, which is primarily mediated by myofibroblasts. A subset of myofibroblasts originates from bone-marrow-derived monocytes which differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes. Serum amyloid P (SAP) inhibits ...

  15. Methods for structural characterization of prefibrillar intermediates and amyloid fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annette Eva; Vestergaard, Bente

    2009-01-01

    equilibrium between a large number of structural species. These are furthermore of highly diverging sizes and present in very uneven amounts and timeframes. Different structural methods have different strengths and limitations. These, and in particular recent advances within solution analysis of the...

  16. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Steinberg, Benjamin A; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also availabl...

  17. New insights into side effect of solvents on the aggregation of human islet amyloid polypeptide 11-20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yexuan; Yu, Lanlan; Yang, Ran; Ma, Chuanguo; Qu, Ling-bo; Harrington, Peter de B

    2016-02-01

    The formation of highly ordered fibrils for the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is considered as one of the precipitating factors of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this study, an emerging new approach microscale thermophoresis and conventional ThT fluorescence assay were utilized to investigate the aggregation behavior of hIAPP(11-20), giving a new insight of the solvent effect on the aggregation of hIAPP(11-20). hIAPP(11-20) displayed different aggregation behaviors in various buffers, revealing that hIAPP(11-20) not only self-aggregates but also binds to solvent components. hIAPP(11-20) had a higher binding affinity for Tris than other selected buffers because multiple hydrogen bonds form, resulting in weaker self-aggregation of hIAPP(11-20) at the early stage of aggregation and prolonging the fibril formation process. hIAPP(11-20) displayed similar self-aggregation in both HEPES and pure water. Negatively charged phosphate ions in the PBS solution 'neutralize' the charges carried by hIAPP(11-20) itself to some extent, causing rapid aggregation of hIAPP(11-20), and leading to a shorter fibrillation process of hIAPP(11-20). These results revealed that solvents contribute to the aggregation of hIAPP(11-20) and demonstrated the affect of solvents on the activity of biomolecules. Additionally, as a new technique, microscale thermophoresis offers a powerful and promising approach to study the early stages of aggregation of peptides or proteins. PMID:26653463

  18. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fenichel GM, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... al. Course of cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation. Neurology. 2007;68:1411-1416. PMID: 17452586 www.ncbi. ...

  19. The Tubular Sheaths Encasing Methanosaeta thermophila Filaments Are Functional Amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueholm, Morten S; Larsen, Poul; Finster, Kai; Stenvang, Marcel R; Christiansen, Gunna; Vad, Brian S; Bøggild, Andreas; Otzen, Daniel E; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-08-14

    Archaea are renowned for their ability to thrive in extreme environments, although they can be found in virtually all habitats. Their adaptive success is linked to their unique cell envelopes that are extremely resistant to chemical and thermal denaturation and that resist proteolysis by common proteases. Here we employ amyloid-specific conformation antibodies and biophysical techniques to show that the extracellular cell wall sheaths encasing the methanogenic archaea Methanosaeta thermophila PT are functional amyloids. Depolymerization of sheaths and subsequent MS/MS analyses revealed that the sheaths are composed of a single major sheath protein (MspA). The amyloidogenic nature of MspA was confirmed by in vitro amyloid formation of recombinant MspA under a wide range of environmental conditions. This is the first report of a functional amyloid from the archaeal domain of life. The amyloid nature explains the extreme resistance of the sheath, the elastic properties that allow diffusible substrates to penetrate through expandable hoop boundaries, and how the sheaths are able to split and elongate outside the cell. The archaeal sheath amyloids do not share homology with any of the currently known functional amyloids and clearly represent a new function of the amyloid protein fold. PMID:26109065

  20. Can Atrial Fibrillation Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Atrial Fibrillation Be Prevented? Following a healthy lifestyle and taking ... risk for heart disease may help you prevent atrial fibrillation (AF). These steps include: Following a heart healthy ...

  1. Anticoagulation in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Benjamin A; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation increases the risk of stroke, which is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The use of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation at moderate or high risk of stroke, estimated by established criteria, improves outcomes. However, to ensure that the benefits exceed the risks of bleeding, appropriate patient selection is essential. Vitamin K antagonism has been the mainstay of treatment; however, newer drugs with novel mechanisms are also available. These novel oral anticoagulants (direct thrombin inhibitors and factor Xa inhibitors) obviate many of warfarin's shortcomings, and they have demonstrated safety and efficacy in large randomized trials of patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. However, the management of patients taking warfarin or novel agents remains a clinical challenge. There are several important considerations when selecting anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation. This review will discuss the rationale for anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation; risk stratification for treatment; available agents; the appropriate implementation of these agents; and additional, specific clinical considerations for treatment. PMID:24733535

  2. BETASCAN: probable beta-amyloids identified by pairwise probabilistic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen W Bryan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Amyloids and prion proteins are clinically and biologically important beta-structures, whose supersecondary structures are difficult to determine by standard experimental or computational means. In addition, significant conformational heterogeneity is known or suspected to exist in many amyloid fibrils. Recent work has indicated the utility of pairwise probabilistic statistics in beta-structure prediction. We develop here a new strategy for beta-structure prediction, emphasizing the determination of beta-strands and pairs of beta-strands as fundamental units of beta-structure. Our program, BETASCAN, calculates likelihood scores for potential beta-strands and strand-pairs based on correlations observed in parallel beta-sheets. The program then determines the strands and pairs with the greatest local likelihood for all of the sequence's potential beta-structures. BETASCAN suggests multiple alternate folding patterns and assigns relative a priori probabilities based solely on amino acid sequence, probability tables, and pre-chosen parameters. The algorithm compares favorably with the results of previous algorithms (BETAPRO, PASTA, SALSA, TANGO, and Zyggregator in beta-structure prediction and amyloid propensity prediction. Accurate prediction is demonstrated for experimentally determined amyloid beta-structures, for a set of known beta-aggregates, and for the parallel beta-strands of beta-helices, amyloid-like globular proteins. BETASCAN is able both to detect beta-strands with higher sensitivity and to detect the edges of beta-strands in a richly beta-like sequence. For two proteins (Abeta and Het-s, there exist multiple sets of experimental data implying contradictory structures; BETASCAN is able to detect each competing structure as a potential structure variant. The ability to correlate multiple alternate beta-structures to experiment opens the possibility of computational investigation of prion strains and structural heterogeneity of amyloid

  3. Characteristics of Amyloid-Related Oligomers Revealed by Crystal Structures of Macrocyclic [beta]-Sheet Mimics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Zheng, Jing; Nowick, James S.; Eisenberg, David (UCI); (UCLA)

    2011-09-20

    Protein amyloid oligomers have been strongly linked to amyloid diseases and can be intermediates to amyloid fibers. {beta}-Sheets have been identified in amyloid oligomers. However, because of their transient and highly polymorphic properties, the details of their self-association remain elusive. Here we explore oligomer structure using a model system: macrocyclic peptides. Key amyloidogenic sequences from A{beta} and tau were incorporated into macrocycles, thereby restraining them to {beta}-strands, but limiting the growth of the oligomers so they may crystallize and cannot fibrillate. We determined the atomic structures for four such oligomers, and all four reveal tetrameric interfaces in which {beta}-sheet dimers pair together by highly complementary, dry interfaces, analogous to steric zippers found in fibers, suggesting a common structure for amyloid oligomers and fibers. In amyloid fibers, the axes of the paired sheets are either parallel or antiparallel, whereas the oligomeric interfaces display a variety of sheet-to-sheet pairing angles, offering a structural explanation for the heterogeneity of amyloid oligomers.

  4. Beta-protein deposition: a pathogenetic link between Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coria, F; Prelli, F; Castaño, E M; Larrondo-Lillo, M; Fernandez-Gonzalez, J; van Duinen, S G; Bots, G T; Luyendijk, W; Shelanski, M L; Frangione, B

    1988-10-25

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) refers to a group of hereditary (hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, HCHWA and sporadic (SCAA) disorders characterized by amyloid fibril deposition restricted to the leptomeningeal and cortical vasculature leading to recurrent hemorrhagic and/or ischemic accidents. On clinical and biochemical grounds, two forms of HCHWA can be distinguished. The amyloid subunit of the HCHWA of Icelandic origin is related to Cystatin C, while amyloid from patients of Dutch origin (HCHWA-D) is related to the beta-protein (or A4), the main component of vascular and plaque core amyloid in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome (DS) [corrected]. SCAA is an increasingly recognized cause of stroke in normotensive individual amounting to 5-10% of all cerebrovascular accidents. We now report the isolation and partial amino acid sequence of the amyloid subunit from a case of SCAA and a new case of HCHWA-D. The recognition that a heterogeneous group of diseases are linked by similar pathological and chemical features suggests that diversity of etiological factors may promote a common pathogenetic mechanism leading to amyloid-beta (A beta) deposition, and open new ways of research in AD and CAA as they are related to dementia and stroke. PMID:3058268

  5. The polyphenol Oleuropein aglycone hinders the growth of toxic transthyretin amyloid assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leri, Manuela; Nosi, Daniele; Natalello, Antonino; Porcari, Riccardo; Ramazzotti, Matteo; Chiti, Fabrizio; Bellotti, Vittorio; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Stefani, Massimo; Bucciantini, Monica

    2016-04-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is involved in a subset of familial or sporadic amyloid diseases including senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA), familial amyloid polyneuropathy and cardiomyopathy (FAP/FAC) for which no effective therapy has been found yet. These conditions are characterized by extracellular deposits primarily found in the heart parenchyma and in peripheral nerves whose main component are amyloid fibrils, presently considered the main culprits of cell sufferance. The latter are polymeric assemblies grown from misfolded TTR, either wt or carrying one out of many identified mutations. The recent introduction in the clinical practice of synthetic TTR-stabilizing molecules that reduce protein aggregation provides the rationale to search natural effective molecules able to interfere with TTR amyloid aggregation by hindering the appearance of toxic species or by favoring the growth of harmless aggregates. Here we carried out an in depth biophysical and morphological study on the molecular features of the aggregation of wt- and L55P-TTR involved in SSA or FAP/FAC, respectively, and on the interference with fibril aggregation, stability and toxicity to cardiac HL-1 cells to demonstrate the ability of Oleuropein aglycone (OleA), the main phenolic component of the extra virgin olive oil. We describe the molecular basis of such interference and the resulting reduction of TTR amyloid aggregate cytotoxicity. Our data offer the possibility to validate and optimize the use of OleA or its molecular scaffold to rationally design promising drugs against TTR-related pathologies that could enter a clinical experimental phase. PMID:27012632

  6. Protein Fibrils Induce Emulsion Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinfeng; Simon, Joana Ralfas; Venema, Paul; van der Linden, Erik

    2016-03-01

    The behavior of an oil-in-water emulsion was studied in the presence of protein fibrils for a wide range of fibril concentrations by using rheology, diffusing wave spectroscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results showed that above a minimum fibril concentration depletion flocculation occurred, leading to oil droplet aggregation and enhanced creaming of the emulsion. Upon further increasing the concentration of the protein fibrils, the emulsions were stabilized. In this stable regime both aggregates of droplets and single droplets are present, and these aggregates are smaller than the aggregates in the flocculated emulsion samples at the lower fibril concentrations. The size of the droplet aggregates in the stabilized emulsions is independent of fibril concentration. In addition, the droplet aggregation was reversible upon dilution both by a pH 2 HCl solution and by a fibril solution at the same concentration. The viscosity of the emulsions containing fibrils was comparable to that of the pure fibril solution. Neither fibril networks nor droplet gel networks were observed in our study. The stabilization mechanism of emulsions containing long protein fibrils at high protein fibril concentrations points toward the mechanism of a kinetic stabilization. PMID:26882086

  7. Atrial Fibrillation (AF or AFib)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Atrial Fibrillation (AF or AFib) Updated:Feb 10,2016 What ... to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Atrial Fibrillation • Introduction • What is Atrial Fibrillation? • Why AFib Matters • ...

  8. Atomic structure of the cross-[beta] spine of islet amyloid polypeptide (amylin)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltzius, J.J.; Sievers, S.A.; Sawaya, M.R.; Cascio, D.; Popov, D.; Riekel, C.; Eisenberg, D. (UCLA); (ESRF)

    2009-03-27

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin) is a 37-residue hormone found as fibrillar deposits in pancreatic extracts of nearly all type II diabetics. Although the cellular toxicity of IAPP has been established, the structure of the fibrillar form found in these deposits is unknown. Here we have crystallized two segments from IAPP, which themselves form amyloid-like fibrils. The atomic structures of these two segments, NNFGAIL and SSTNVG, were determined, and form the basis of a model for the most commonly observed, full-length IAPP polymorph.

  9. Identification of a Novel Parallel beta-Strand Conformation within Molecular Monolayer of Amyloid Peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lei; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Shuai;

    2016-01-01

    . In this work, the early A beta(33-42) aggregates forming the molecular monolayer at hydrophobic interface are investigated. The molecular monolayer of amyloid peptide A beta(33-42) consisting of novel parallel beta-strand-like structure is further revealed by means of a quantitative nanomechanical...... spectroscopy technique with force controlled in pico-Newton range, combining with molecular dynamic simulation. The identified parallel beta-strand-like structure of molecular monolayer is distinct from the antiparallel beta-strand structure of A beta(33-42) amyloid fibril. This finding enriches the molecular...

  10. Effects of cholesterol on pore formation in lipid bilayers induced by human islet amyloid polypeptide fragments: A coarse-grained molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weixin; Wei, Guanghong; Su, Haibin; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Mu, Yuguang

    2011-11-01

    Disruption of the cellular membrane by the amyloidogenic peptide, islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), has been considered as one of the mechanisms of β-cell death during type 2 diabetes. The N-terminal region (residues 1-19) of the human version of IAPP is suggested to be primarily responsible for the membrane-disrupting effect of the full-length hIAPP peptide. However, the detailed assembly mode of hIAPP1-19 with membrane remains unclear. To gain insight into the interactions of hIAPP1-19 oligomer with the model membrane, we have employed coarse-grained molecular dynamics self-assembly simulations to study the aggregation of hIAPP1-19 fragments in the binary lipid made of zwitterionic dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and anionic dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine (DPPS) in the presence and absence of different levels of cholesterol content. The membrane-destabilizing effect of hIAPP1-19 is found to be modulated by the presence of cholesterol. In the absence of cholesterol, hIAPP1-19 aggregates prefer to locate inside the bilayer, forming pore-like assemblies. While in the presence of cholesterol molecules, the lipid bilayer becomes more ordered and stiff, and the hIAPP1-19 aggregates are dominantly positioned at the bilayer-water interface. The action of cholesterol may suggest a possible way to maintain the membrane integrity by small molecule interference.

  11. What Is Atrial Fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regular beat. Certain cells in your heart make electric signals that cause the heart to contract and pump blood. These electrical signals show up on an elec- trocardiogram (ECG) recording. Your doctor can read your ECG to find out if the electric signals are normal. In atrial fibrillation (AFib), the ...

  12. Lesson Five Atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁端; 吴文烈

    2003-01-01

    @@ Atrial fibrillation(AF) may occur in paroxysmaland persistent forms. It may be seen in normal subjects,particularly during emotional stress or follow-ing surgery,exercise, or acute alcoholic intoxication.It also may occur in patients with heart or lungdisease who develop acute hypoxia, hypercapnia,ormetabolic or hemodynamic derangements.

  13. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosicka, Iga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type II is a metabolic disease affecting millions of people worldwide. The disease is associated with occurence of insoluble, fibrillar, protein aggregates in islets of Langerhans in the pancreas - islet amyloid. The main constituent of these protein fibers is the human islet...

  14. Tafamidis, a potent and selective transthyretin kinetic stabilizer that inhibits the amyloid cascade

    OpenAIRE

    Bulawa, Christine E.; Connelly, Stephen; DeVit, Michael; Wang, Lan; Weigel, Charlotte; Fleming, James A; Packman, Jeff; Powers, Evan T.; Wiseman, R. Luke; Foss, Theodore R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Kelly, Jeffery W.; Labaudinière, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The transthyretin amyloidoses (ATTR) are invariably fatal diseases characterized by progressive neuropathy and/or cardiomyopathy. ATTR are caused by aggregation of transthyretin (TTR), a natively tetrameric protein involved in the transport of thyroxine and the vitamin A–retinol-binding protein complex. Mutations within TTR that cause autosomal dominant forms of disease facilitate tetramer dissociation, monomer misfolding, and aggregation, although wild-type TTR can also form amyloid fibrils ...

  15. 4′-Iodo-4′-Deoxydoxorubicin Disrupts the Fibrillar Structure of Transthyretin Amyloid

    OpenAIRE

    Palha, Joana Almeida; Ballinari, Dario; Amboldi, Nadia; Cardoso, Isabel; Fernandes, Rui; Bellotti, Vittorio; Merlini, Giampaolo; Saraiva, Maria João

    2000-01-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a tetrameric protein synthesized mainly by the liver and the choroid plexus, from where it is secreted into the plasma and the cerebrospinal fluid, respectively. Some forms of polyneuropathy, vitreopathy, and cardiomyopathy are caused by the deposition of normal and/or mutant TTR molecules in the form of amyloid fibrils. Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy is the most common form of TTR amyloidosis related to the V30M variant. It is still unclear the process by which so...

  16. Amyloid-linked cellular toxicity triggered by bacterial inclusion bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aggregation of proteins in the form of amyloid fibrils and plaques is the characteristic feature of some pathological conditions ranging from neurodegenerative disorders to systemic amyloidoses. The mechanisms by which the aggregation processes result in cell damage are under intense investigation but recent data indicate that prefibrillar aggregates are the most proximate mediators of toxicity rather than mature fibrils. Since it has been shown that prefibrillar forms of the nondisease-related misfolded proteins are highly toxic to cultured mammalian cells we have studied the cytoxicity associated to bacterial inclusion bodies that have been recently described as protein deposits presenting amyloid-like structures. We have proved that bacterial inclusion bodies composed by a misfolding-prone β-galactosidase fusion protein are clearly toxic for mammalian cells but the β-galactosidase wild type enzyme forming more structured thermal aggregates does not impair cell viability, despite it also binds and enter into the cells. These results are in the line that the most cytotoxic aggregates are early prefibrilar assemblies but discard the hypothesis that the membrane destabilization is Key event to subsequent disruption of cellular processes, such as ion balance, oxidative state and the eventually cell death

  17. Dynamic fibrils in Ly alpha

    CERN Document Server

    Koza, J; Vourlidas, A

    2008-01-01

    The solar chromosphere and transition region are highly structured regimes of large complexity. A recent breakthrough concerns the identification of dynamic fibrils seen in Halpha. An aim is to find out whether dynamic fibrils are also observable in Ly alpha. We use a brief sequence of four high-resolution Ly alpha filtergrams of the solar limb taken by the Very high Angular resolution ULtraviolet Telescope (VAULT) to identify 50 dynamic fibrils, measure their top trajectories, and fit these with parabolas. Most fibril tops move supersonically. Their decelerations vary from sub- to superballistic. About half show outward acceleration, which may be an artifact from the poor sampling. The similarity between these dynamic fibrils observed in Ly alpha and the ones observed in Halpha suggests that the magnetoacoustic shock excitation proposed for the Halpha dynamic fibrils is also valid for the Ly alpha ones.

  18. Management of atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Vergara, Pasquale; Della Bella, Paolo

    1997-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with increases in the risk of mortality, congestive heart failure, and stroke. Medical treatment is aimed at preventing thrombo-embolic complications and reducing symptoms and consequences related to the arrhythmia. In the first section of this review, we discuss the principles of mainstream oral anticoagulant therapy and the possible advantages of the new oral anticoagulants. In the second section, we review the catheter ablation approaches to paroxysma...

  19. Anticoagulation in Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Yousif; YH Lip, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) are at increased thromboembolic risk, and they suffer more severe strokes with worse outcomes. Most thromboembolic complications of AF are eminently preventable with oral anticoagulation, and the increasing numbers of AF patients mean antithrombotic therapy is the most crucial management aspect of this common arrhythmia. Despite the proven efficacy of warfarin, a string of limitations have meant that it is underused by physicians and patients alike. This...

  20. Rivaroxaban in atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgi MA; Miguel LS

    2012-01-01

    Mariano A Giorgi,1,2 Lucas San Miguel31Cardiology Service, Centro de Educación Médica e Investigaciones Clínicas “Norberto Quirno”, 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Universidad Austral, 3Department of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery, FLENI, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaAbstract: Warfarin is the traditional therapeutic option available to manage thromboembolic risk in atrial fibrillation. The hemorrhagic risk with warfarin de...

  1. Histochemical Differential Diagnosis and Polarization Optical Analysis of Amyloid and Amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bély

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidosis is characterized by extracellular deposition of protein fibrils of chemically heterogeneous composition. Early recognition and identification of amyloid deposits allows an early start of therapy, which may entail a better prognosis. Congo red staining according to Romhányi (1971 is a highly specific and sensitive method for early microscopic recognition of amyloidosis. The main and most important types of amyloidosis may be distinguished by classic histochemical methods of performate pretreatment according to Romhányi (1979, or by KMnO4 oxidation according to Wright (1977 followed by Congo red staining and viewed under polarized light. Differences in the speed of breakdown (disintegration of amyloid deposits according to Bély and Apáthy allow a more precise distinction of various types of amyloid.

  2. Orientation of aromatic residues in amyloid cores: Structural insights into prion fiber diversity

    KAUST Repository

    Reymer, Anna

    2014-11-17

    Structural conversion of one given protein sequence into different amyloid states, resulting in distinct phenotypes, is one of the most intriguing phenomena of protein biology. Despite great efforts the structural origin of prion diversity remains elusive, mainly because amyloids are insoluble yet noncrystalline and therefore not easily amenable to traditional structural-biology methods. We investigate two different phenotypic prion strains, weak and strong, of yeast translation termination factor Sup35 with respect to angular orientation of tyrosines using polarized light spectroscopy. By applying a combination of alignment methods the degree of fiber orientation can be assessed, which allows a relatively accurate determination of the aromatic ring angles. Surprisingly, the strains show identical average orientations of the tyrosines, which are evenly spread through the amyloid core. Small variations between the two strains are related to the local environment of a fraction of tyrosines outside the core, potentially reflecting differences in fibril packing.

  3. Neuroprotective approaches in experimental models of beta-amyloid neurotoxicity : Relevance to Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T; Hortobagyi, T; Sasvari, M; Konya, C; Penke, B; Luiten, PGM; Nyakas, C

    1999-01-01

    1. beta-Amyloid peptides (A beta s) accumulate abundantly in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain in areas subserving information acquisition arid processing, and memory formation. A beta fragments are producedin a process of abnormal proteolytic cleavage of their precursor, the amyloid precursor prot

  4. Neuroprotective Approaches in Experimental Models of β-Amyloid Neurotoxicity : Relevance to Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, Tibor; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Sasvári, Maria; Kónya, Csaba; Penke, Botond; Luiten, Paul G.M.; Nyakas, Csaba

    1999-01-01

    1. β-Amyloid peptides (Aβs) accumulate abundantly in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain in areas subserving information acquisition and processing, and memory formation. Aβ fragments are produced in a process of abnormal proteolytic cleavage of their precursor, the amyloid precursor protein (APP). W

  5. Reverse engineering an amyloid aggregation pathway with dimensional analysis and scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is a cytotoxic protein that aggregates into oligomers and fibrils that kill pancreatic β-cells. Here we analyze hIAPP aggregation in vitro, measured via thioflavin-T fluorescence. We use mass-action kinetics and scaling analysis to reconstruct the aggregation pathway, and find that the initiation step requires four hIAPP monomers. After this step, monomers join the nucleus in pairs, until the first stable nucleus (of size approximately 20 monomers) is formed. This nucleus then elongates by successive addition of single monomers. We find that the best-fit of our data is achieved when we include a secondary fibril-dependent nucleation pathway in the reaction scheme. We predict how interventions that change rates of fibril elongation or nucleation rates affect the accumulation of potentially cytotoxic oligomer species. Our results demonstrate the power of scaling analysis in reverse engineering biochemical aggregation pathways

  6. Type I collagen fibrils and discoidin domain receptor 1 set invadosomes straight

    OpenAIRE

    Moreau, Violaine; Saltel, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of type I collagen fibrils in tumors is associated with an increased risk of metastasis. We recently demonstrated that the collagen sensor discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) interacts with type I collagen fibrils to allow proteolysis-based cancer cell invasion through the formation of a new class of invadosomes, termed linear invadosomes.

  7. The inhibitory mechanism of a fullerene derivative against amyloid-β peptide aggregation: an atomistic simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yunxiang; Qian, Zhenyu; Wei, Guanghong

    2016-05-14

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with the pathological self-assembly of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides into β-sheet enriched fibrillar aggregates. Aβ dimers formed in the initial step of Aβ aggregation were reported to be the smallest toxic species. Inhibiting the formation of β-sheet-rich oligomers and fibrils is considered as the primary therapeutic strategy for AD. Previous studies reported that fullerene derivatives strongly inhibit Aβ fibrillation. However, the underlying inhibitory mechanism remains elusive. As a first step to understand fullerene-modulated full-length Aβ aggregation, we investigated the conformational ensemble of the Aβ1-42 dimer with and without 1,2-(dimethoxymethano)fullerene (DMF) - a more water-soluble fullerene derivative - by performing a 340 ns explicit-solvent replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation. Our simulations show that although disordered states are the most abundant conformations of the Aβ1-42 dimer, conformations containing diverse extended β-hairpins are also populated. The first most-populated β-hairpins involving residues L17-D23 and A30-V36 strongly resemble the engineered β-hairpin which is a building block of toxic Aβ oligomers. We find that the interaction of DMFs with Aβ peptides greatly impedes the formation of such β-hairpins and inter-peptide β-sheets. Binding energy analyses demonstrate that DMF preferentially binds not only to the central hydrophobic motif LVFFA of the Aβ peptide as suggested experimentally, but also to the aromatic residues including F4 and Y10 and the C-terminal hydrophobic region I31-V40. This study reveals a complete picture of the inhibitory mechanism of full-length Aβ1-42 aggregation by fullerenes, providing theoretical insights into the development of drug candidates against AD. PMID:27091578

  8. "Red-flag" symptom clusters in transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Isabel; González-Duarte, Alejandra; Obici, Laura; Schmidt, Hartmut H-J; Simoneau, Damien; Ong, Moh-Lim; Amass, Leslie

    2016-03-01

    Transthyretin familial amyloid polyneuropathy (TTR-FAP) is a rare, progressive, life-threatening, hereditary disorder caused by mutations in the transthyretin gene and characterized by extracellular deposition of transthyretin-derived amyloid fibrils in peripheral and autonomic nerves, heart, and other organs. TTR-FAP is frequently diagnosed late because the disease is difficult to recognize due to phenotypic heterogeneity. Based on published literature and expert opinion, symptom clusters suggesting TTR-FAP are reviewed, and practical guidance to facilitate earlier diagnosis is provided. TTR-FAP should be suspected if progressive peripheral sensory-motor neuropathy is observed in combination with one or more of the following: family history of a neuropathy, autonomic dysfunction, cardiac hypertrophy, gastrointestinal problems, inexplicable weight loss, carpal tunnel syndrome, renal impairment, or ocular involvement. If TTR-FAP is suspected, transthyretin genotyping, confirmation of amyloid in tissue biopsy, large- and small-fiber assessment by nerve conduction studies and autonomic system evaluations, and cardiac testing should be performed. PMID:26663427

  9. Collagen IX is required for the integrity of collagen II fibrils and the regulation of vascular plexus formation in Zebrafish caudal fins

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Cheng-chen; Wang, Tai-Chuan; Lin, Bo-Hung; Wang, Yi-Wen; Johnson, Stephen L.; Yu, John

    2009-01-01

    Capillary plexuses form during both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and are remodeled into mature vessel types and patterns which are delicately orchestrated with the sizes and shapes of other tissues and organs. We isolated a zebrafish mutation named prp (for persistent plexus) that causes persistent formation of vascular plexuses in the caudal fins and consequent mispatterning of bony fin rays and the fin shape. Detailed analyses revealed that the prp mutation causes a significant reduction...

  10. Dynamics of Asp23-Lys28 salt-bridge formation in Abeta10-35 monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarus, Bogdan; Straub, John E; Thirumalai, D

    2006-12-20

    In the amyloid fibrils formed from long fragments of the amyloid beta-protein (Abeta-protein), the monomers are arranged in parallel and lie perpendicular to the fibril axis. The structure of the monomers satisfies the amyloid self-organization principle; namely, the low free energy state of the monomer maximizes the number of intra- and interpeptide contacts and salt bridges. The formation of the intramolecular salt bridge between Asp(D)23 and Lys(K)28 ensures that unpaired charges are not buried in the low-dielectric interior. We have investigated, using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water, whether the D23-K28 interaction forms spontaneously in the isolated Abeta10-35 monomer. To validate the simulation protocol, we show, using five independent trajectories spanning a total of 100 ns, that the pKa values of the titratable groups are in good agreement with experimental measurements. The computed free energy disconnectvity graph shows that broadly the ensemble of compact random coil conformations can be clustered into four basins that are separated by free energy barriers ranging from 0.3 to 2.7 kcal/mol. There is significant residual structure in the conformation of the peptide in each of the basins. Due to the desolvation penalty, the structural motif with a stable turn involving the residues VGSN and a preformed D23-K28 contact is a minor component of the simulated structures. The extent of solvation of the peptides in the four basins varies greatly, which underscores the dynamical fluctuations in the monomer. Our results suggest that the early event in the oligomerization process must be the expulsion of discrete water molecules that facilitates the formation of interpeptide-interaction-driven stable structures with an intramolecular D23-K28 salt bridge and an intact VGSN turn. PMID:17165769

  11. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Induced Destabilization and Disassembly of Various Structural Variants of Insulin Fibrils Monitored by Vibrational Circular Dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ge; Babenko, Viktoria; Dzwolak, Wojciech; Keiderling, Timothy A

    2015-12-15

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) induced destabilization of insulin fibrils has been previously studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and interpreted in terms of secondary structural changes. The variation of this process for fibrils with different types of higher-order morphological structures remained unclear. Here, we utilize vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), which has been reported to provide a useful biophysical probe of the supramolecular chirality of amyloid fibrils, to characterize changes in the macroscopic chirality following DMSO-induced disassembly for two types of insulin fibrils formed under different conditions, at different reduced pH values with and without added salt and agitation. We confirm that very high concentrations of DMSO can disaggregate both types of insulin fibrils, which initially maintained a β-sheet conformation and eventually changed their secondary structure to a disordered form. The two types responded to varying concentrations of DMSO, and disaggregation followed different mechanisms. Interconversion of specific insulin fibril morphological types also occurred during the destabilization process as monitored by VCD. With transmission electron microscopy, we were able to correlate the changes in VCD sign patterns to alteration of morphology of the insulin fibrils. PMID:26582046

  12. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2006-01-01

    The only major and potentially fatal risk for patients with atrial fibrillation is the development of systemic thromboembolism. Stroke occurs five times more frequently in patients with atrial fibrillation than in comparable patients in sinus rhythm. The yearly incidence of stroke in atrial fibrilla

  13. Musculoskeletal amyloid disease: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of arthropathy and soft tissue masses due to amyloid deposition in a patient with myeloma is reported. The radiologic and magnetic resonance findings of musculoskeletal amyloidosis are described. The amyloid masses show heterogeneous signal intensity, with a signal lower than muscle and intermingled areas of marked hyperintensity on T 2-weighted images. (authors). 7 refs., 2 figs

  14. Musculoskeletal amyloid disease: MRI features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Castillo, M.; Guerra, J.L. [Hospital Arquitecto Marcide, Ferrol (Spain); Comesana, L.; Martin, R. [Hospital Arquitecto Marcide, Ferrol (Spain)]|[Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain); Rodriguez, E.; Soler, R. [Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    A case of arthropathy and soft tissue masses due to amyloid deposition in a patient with myeloma is reported. The radiologic and magnetic resonance findings of musculoskeletal amyloidosis are described. The amyloid masses show heterogeneous signal intensity, with a signal lower than muscle and intermingled areas of marked hyperintensity on T 2-weighted images. (authors). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Viscoelastic behavior of discrete human collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, René; Hassenkam, Tue; Hansen, Philip;

    2010-01-01

    fibrils. Fibrils were obtained from intact human fascicles, without any pre-treatment besides frozen storage. In the dry state a single isolated fibril was anchored to a substrate using epoxy glue, and the end of the fibril was glued on to an AFM cantilever for tensile testing. In phosphate buffered...

  16. Hyperuricemia and Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharani, Nani; Kuwabara, Masanari; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2016-07-27

    The importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) as a cause of mortality and morbidity has prompted research on its pathogenesis and treatment. Recognition of AF risk factors is essential to prevent it and reduce the risk of death. Hyperuricemia has been widely accepted to be associated with the incidence of paroxysmal or persistent AF, as well as to the risk of AF in post cardiovascular surgery patients. The possible explanations for this association have been based on their relation with either oxidative stress or inflammation. To investigate the link between hyperuricemia and AF, it is necessary to refer to hyperuricemia-induced atrial remodeling. So far, both ionic channel and structural remodeling caused by hyperuricemia might be plausible explanations for the occurrence of AF. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase, or the use of antioxidants, along with serum uric acid (SUA) level reduction to prevent inflammation, might be useful. Uric acid transporters (UATs) play a key role in the regulation of intracellular uric acid concentration. Intracellular rather than serum uric acid level is considered more important for the pathogenesis of AF. Identification of UATs expressed in cells is thus important, and targeting UATs might become a potential strategy to reduce the risk of hyperuricemia-induced atrial fibrillation. PMID:27396561

  17. Serum amyloid P component scintigraphy in familial amyloid polyneuropathy: regression of visceral amyloid following liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) associated with transthyretin (TTR) mutations is the commonest type of hereditary amyloidosis. Plasma TTR is produced almost exclusively in the liver and orthotopic liver transplantation is the only available treatment, although the clinical outcome varies. Serum amyloid P component (SAP) scintigraphy is a method for identifying and quantitatively monitoring amyloid deposits in vivo, but it has not previously been used to study the outcome of visceral amyloid deposits in FAP following liver transplantation. Whole body scintigraphy following injection of iodine-123 labelled SAP was performed in 17 patients with FAP associated with TTR Met30 and in five asymptomatic gene carriers. Follow-up studies were performed in ten patients, eight of whom had undergone orthotopic liver transplantation 1-5 years beforehand. There was abnormal uptake of 123I-SAP in all FAP patients, including the kidneys in each case, the spleen in five cases and the adrenal glands in three cases. Renal amyloid deposits were also present in three of the asymptomatic carriers. Follow-up studies 1-5 years after liver transplantation showed that there had been substantial regression of the visceral amyloid deposits in two patients and modest improvement in three cases. The amyloid deposits were unchanged in two patients. In conclusion, 123I-SAP scintigraphy identified unsuspected visceral amyloid in each patient with FAP due to TTR Met30. The universal presence of renal amyloid probably underlies the high frequency of renal failure that occurs in FAP following liver transplantation. The variable capacity of patients to mobilise amyloid deposits following liver transplantation may contribute to their long-term clinical outcome. (orig.)

  18. Pro-C5, a marker of true type V collagen formation and fibrillation, correlates with portal hypertension in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeming, Diana J; Veidal, Sanne S; Karsdal, Morten A;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) is an important but invasive diagnostic and prognostic marker in cirrhotic patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate a novel biochemical plasma marker of true type V collagen formation (Pro-C5) for describing HVPG. METHODS...... combined in a linear regression model. RESULTS: Plasma Pro-C5 correlated to HVPG, indocyanine green clearance, sustained vascular resistance and mean arterial pressure (r = -0.68-0.33, p < 0.0001). A multiple regression analysis including Pro-C5, alanine aminotransferase, bilirubin and model for end......-stage liver disease (MELD) improved the correlation to HVPG (r = 0.74, p < 0.0001). Plasma Pro-C5 was positively or negatively correlated to a number of routine liver function markers and MELD score (r = 0.27-0.68; p < 0.05-0.0001). Furthermore, plasma Pro-C5 could clearly separate patients with a HVPG <10 mm...

  19. Atrial fibrillation in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto A.Franken; Ronaldo F.Rosa; Silvio CM Santos

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses atrial fibrillation according to the guidelines of Brazilian Society of Cardiac Arrhythmias and the Brazilian Cardiogeriatrics Guidelines. We stress the thromboembolic burden of atrial fibrillation and discuss how to prevent it as well as the best way to conduct cases of atrial fibrillatios in the elderly, reverting the arrhythmia to sinus rhythm, or the option of heart rate control. The new methods to treat atrial fibrillation, such as radiofrequency ablation, new oral direct thrombin inhibitors and Xa factor inhibitors, as well as new antiarrhythmic drugs, are depicted.

  20. SPECT imaging of peripheral amyloid in mice by targeting hyper-sulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans with specific scFv antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Amyloid deposits are associated with a broad spectrum of disorders including monoclonal gammopathies, chronic inflammation, and Alzheimer's disease. In all cases, the amyloid pathology contains, in addition to protein fibrils, a plethora of associated molecules, including high concentrations of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). Methods: We have evaluated radioiodinated scFvs that bind HS for their ability to image amyloid deposits in vivo. scFv's with different binding characteristics were isolated by phage display using HS extracted from bovine kidney or mouse and human skeletal muscle glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Following purification and radioiodination, the biodistribution of 125I-scFv's was assessed in mice with inflammation-associated AA amyloidosis or in amyloid-free mice by using SPECT imaging, biodistribution measurements and tissue autoradiography. Results: Four different scFv's all showed binding in vivo to amyloid in the spleen, liver and kidney of diseased mice; however, three of the scFv's also bound to sites within these organs in disease free mice. One scFv specific for hypersulfated HSPGs preferentially bound amyloid and did not accumulate in healthy tissues. Conclusions: These data indicate that HS expressed in amyloid deposits has unique qualities that can be distinguished from HS in normal tissues. A scFv specific for rare hypersulfated HS was used to selectively image AA amyloid in mice with minimal retention in normal tissue.

  1. Variation in amount of wild-type transthyretin in different fibril and tissue types in ATTR amyloidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ihse, Elisabet; Suhr, Ole B.; Hellman, Ulf; Westermark, Per

    2010-01-01

    Familial transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis is caused by a mutation in the TTR gene, although wild-type (wt) TTR is also incorporated into the amyloid fibrils. Liver transplantation (LT) is the prevailing treatment of the disease and is performed in order to eliminate the mutant TTR from plasma. The outcome of the procedure is varied; especially problematic is a progressive cardiomyopathy seen in some patients, presumably caused by continued incorporation of wtTTR. What determines the discrepanc...

  2. Beware of Cocktails: Chain-Length Bidispersity Triggers Explosive Self-Assembly of Poly-l-Glutamic Acid β2-Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernik-Magoń, Agnieszka; Puławski, Wojciech; Fedorczyk, Bartłomiej; Tymecka, Dagmara; Misicka, Aleksandra; Szymczak, Piotr; Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2016-04-11

    Chain-length polydispersity is among the least understood factors governing the fibrillation propensity of homopolypeptides. For monodisperse poly-l-glutamic acid (PLGA), the tendency to form fibrils depends of the main-chain length. Long-chained PLGA, so-called (Glu)200, fibrillates more readily than short (Glu)5 fragments. Here we show that conversion of α-helical (Glu)200 into amyloid-like β-fibrils is dramatically accelerated in the presence of intrinsically disordered (Glu)5. While separately self-assembled fibrils of (Glu)200 and (Glu)5 reveal distinct morphological and infrared characteristics, accelerated fibrillation in mixed (Glu)200 and (Glu)5 leads to aggregates similar to neat (Glu)200 fibrils, even in excess of (Glu)5. According to molecular dynamics simulations and circular dichroism measurements, local events of "misfolding transfer" from (Glu)5 to (Glu)200 may play a key role in the initial stages of conformational dynamics underlying the observed phenomenon. Our results highlight chain-length polydispersity as a potent, although so-far unrecognized factor profoundly affecting the fibrillation propensity of homopolypeptides. PMID:26909651

  3. Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Stevenson, M.D

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is common in heart failure patients and is associated with increased mortality. Pharmacologic trials have not shown any survival benefit for a rhythm control over a rate control strategy. It has been suggested that sinus rhythm is associated with a survival benefit, but that the risks of anti-arrhythmic drug treatment and poor efficacy offset the beneficial effect. Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation can establish sinus rhythm without the risks of anti-arrhythmic drug therapy. Data from randomized trials demonstrating a survival benefit for patients undergoing an ablation procedure for atrial fibrillation are still lacking. Ablation of the AV junction and permanent pacing remain a treatment alternative in otherwise refractory cases. Placement of a biventricular system may prevent or reduce negative consequences of chronic right ventricular pacing. Current objectives and options for treatment of atrial fibrillation in heart failure patients are reviewed.

  4. Fracture mechanics of collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene B; Mulder, Hindrik; Kovanen, Vuokko;

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are important load-bearing structures, which are frequently injured in both sports and work. Type I collagen fibrils are the primary components of tendons and carry most of the mechanical loads experienced by the tissue, however, knowledge of how load is transmitted between and within...... fibrils is limited. The presence of covalent enzymatic cross-links between collagen molecules is an important factor that has been shown to influence mechanical behavior of the tendons. To improve our understanding of how molecular bonds translate into tendon mechanics, we used an atomic force microscopy...... technique to measure the mechanical behavior of individual collagen fibrils loaded to failure. Fibrils from human patellar tendons, rat-tail tendons (RTTs), NaBH₄ reduced RTTs, and tail tendons of Zucker diabetic fat rats were tested. We found a characteristic three-phase stress-strain behavior in the human...

  5. Smooth muscle titin forms in vitro amyloid aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobylev, Alexandr G; Galzitskaya, Oxana V; Fadeev, Roman S; Bobyleva, Liya G; Yurshenas, Darya A; Molochkov, Nikolay V; Dovidchenko, Nikita V; Selivanova, Olga M; Penkov, Nikita V; Podlubnaya, Zoya A; Vikhlyantsev, Ivan M

    2016-07-01

    Amyloids are insoluble fibrous protein aggregates, and their accumulation is associated with amyloidosis and many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, we report that smooth muscle titin (SMT; 500 kDa) from chicken gizzard forms amyloid aggregates in vitro This conclusion is supported by EM data, fluorescence analysis using thioflavin T (ThT), Congo red (CR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Our dynamic light scattering (DLS) data show that titin forms in vitro amyloid aggregates with a hydrodynamic radius (Rh) of approximately 700-4500 nm. The initial titin aggregates with Rh approximately 700 nm were observed beyond first 20 min its aggregation that shows a high rate of amyloid formation by this protein. We also showed using confocal microscopy the cytotoxic effect of SMT amyloid aggregates on smooth muscle cells from bovine aorta. This effect involves the disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and result is cell damage. Cumulatively, our results indicate that titin may be involved in generation of amyloidosis in smooth muscles. PMID:27129292

  6. Advanced glycation end products induce differential structural modifications and fibrillation of albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Saurabh; Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Saraswathi, N T

    2016-06-15

    Glycation induced amyloid fibrillation is fundamental to the development of many neurodegenerative and cardiovascular complications. Excessive non-enzymatic glycation in conditions such as hyperglycaemia results in the increased accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs are highly reactive pro-oxidants, which can lead to the activation of inflammatory pathways and development of oxidative stress. Recently, the effect of non-enzymatic glycation on protein structure has been the major research area, but the role of specific AGEs in such structural alteration and induction of fibrillation remains undefined. In this study, we determined the specific AGEs mediated structural modifications in albumin mainly considering carboxymethyllysine (CML), carboxyethyllysine (CEL), and argpyrimidine (Arg-P) which are the major AGEs formed in the body. We studied the secondary structural changes based on circular dichroism (CD) and spectroscopic analysis. The AGEs induced fibrillation was determined by Congo red binding and examination of scanning and transmission electron micrographs. The amyloidogenic regions in the sequence of BSA were determined using FoldAmyloid. It was observed that CEL modification of BSA leads to the development of fibrillar structures, which was evident from both secondary structure changes and TEM analysis. PMID:27037764

  7. Advanced glycation end products induce differential structural modifications and fibrillation of albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Saurabh; Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Saraswathi, N. T.

    2016-06-01

    Glycation induced amyloid fibrillation is fundamental to the development of many neurodegenerative and cardiovascular complications. Excessive non-enzymatic glycation in conditions such as hyperglycaemia results in the increased accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs are highly reactive pro-oxidants, which can lead to the activation of inflammatory pathways and development of oxidative stress. Recently, the effect of non-enzymatic glycation on protein structure has been the major research area, but the role of specific AGEs in such structural alteration and induction of fibrillation remains undefined. In this study, we determined the specific AGEs mediated structural modifications in albumin mainly considering carboxymethyllysine (CML), carboxyethyllysine (CEL), and argpyrimidine (Arg-P) which are the major AGEs formed in the body. We studied the secondary structural changes based on circular dichroism (CD) and spectroscopic analysis. The AGEs induced fibrillation was determined by Congo red binding and examination of scanning and transmission electron micrographs. The amyloidogenic regions in the sequence of BSA were determined using FoldAmyloid. It was observed that CEL modification of BSA leads to the development of fibrillar structures, which was evident from both secondary structure changes and TEM analysis.

  8. Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Jens Seiler; Tedrow, Usha B.; Stevenson, William G

    2008-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is common in heart failure patients and is associated with increased mortality.  Pharmacologic trials have not shown any survival benefit for a rhythm control over a rate control strategy.  It has been suggested that sinus rhythm is associated with a survival benefit, but that the risks of anti-arrhythmic drug treatment and poor efficacy offset the beneficial effect.  Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation can establish sinus rhythm without the risks of a...

  9. Risk Factors for Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Krijthe, Bouwe

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAtrial fibrillation is a common cardiac arrhythmia that is characterized by rapid disorganized atrial electrical activity resulting in absence of atrial contractions. It is diagnosed on the basis of typical findings on an electrocardiogram (ECG). The characteristic ECG findings are absence of P-waves, and an irregular heart rate. Symptoms of atrial fibrillation include palpitations, dyspnea, reduced exercise capacity, chest pain and dizziness, but it often goes without symptoms. A...

  10. Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    William G. Stevenson, M.D; Usha B. Tedrow, M.D; Jens Seiler, M.D

    2008-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is common in heart failure patients and is associated with increased mortality. Pharmacologic trials have not shown any survival benefit for a rhythm control over a rate control strategy. It has been suggested that sinus rhythm is associated with a survival benefit, but that the risks of anti-arrhythmic drug treatment and poor efficacy offset the beneficial effect. Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation can establish sinus rhythm without the risks of anti-arrhythmic dru...

  11. Antithrombotic therapy in atrial fibrillation.

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, B.; Lip, G. Y.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence for antithrombotic therapy in patients with nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Five primary prevention trials and one secondary prevention trial compare antithrombotic therapy with placebo or no treatment. Two trials also determine the efficacy and safety of acetylsalicylic acid. MAIN FINDINGS: Warfarin reduces the risk of stroke by 68%. The effect is consistent in all identifiable groups of patients with nonrheumatic atrial fibrillation, ...

  12. Stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Katsnelson,; Sebastian Koch; Tatjana Rundek

    1997-01-01

    Non-valvular atrial fibrillation is a common and from a neurological perspective the most significant cardiac arrhythmia with a growing world-wide incidence. It also carries a significant associated morbidity and mortality, with cardioembolic strokes arguably being the most disabling sequelae. This brief review will highlight the important studies and the latest treatment modalities available for stroke prevention in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.

  13. Atrial Fibrillation and Pacing Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Terranova, Paolo; Severgnini, Barbara; Valli, Paolo; Dell'Orto, Simonetta; Greco, Enrico Maria

    2006-01-01

    Pacing prevention algorithms have been introduced in order to maximize the benefits of atrial pacing in atrial fibrillation prevention. It has been demonstrated that algorithms actually keep overdrive atrial pacing, reduce atrial premature contractions, and prevent short-long atrial cycle phenomenon, with good patient tolerance. However, clinical studies showed inconsistent benefits on clinical endpoints such as atrial fibrillation burden. Factors which may be responsible for neutral results ...

  14. Lipid rafts participate in aberrant degradative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta peptide in Alzheimer’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhou; Chun Yang; Yufeng Liu; Peng Li; Huiying Yang; Jingxing Dai; Rongmei Qu; Lin Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide is the main component of amyloid plaques, which are found in Alzhei-mer’s disease. The generation and deposition of amyloid-beta is one of the crucial factors for the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Lipid rafts are glycolipid-rich liquid domains of the plasma membrane, where certain types of protein tend to aggregate and intercalate. Lipid rafts are involved in the generation of amyloid-beta oligomers and the formation of amyloid-beta peptides. In this paper, we review the mechanism by which lipid rafts disturb the aberrant deg-radative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta, which plays an important role in the pathological process of Alzheimer’s disease. Moreover, we describe this mechanism from the view of the Two-system Theory of fasciology and thus, suggest that lipid rafts may be a new target of Alzheimer’s disease treatment.

  15. In vivo detection of amyloid plaques by gadolinium-stained MRI can be used to demonstrate the efficacy of an anti-amyloid immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu D. Santin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular deposition of β amyloid plaques is an early event associated to Alzheimer's disease. Here we have used in vivo gadolinium-stained high resolution (29*29*117µm3 MRI to follow-up in a longitudinal way individual amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 mice and evaluate the efficacy of a new immunotherapy (SAR255952 directed against protofibrillar and fibrillary forms of Aβ. APP/PS1 mice were treated for 5 months between the age of 3.5 and 8.5 months. SAR255952 reduced amyloid load in 8.5-month-old animals, but not in 5.5-month animals compared to mice treated with a control antibody (DM4. Histological evaluation confirmed the reduction of amyloid load and revealed a lower density of amyloid plaques in 8.5-month SAR255952-treated animals. The longitudinal follow-up of individual amyloid plaques by MRI revealed that plaques that were visible at 5.5 months were still visible at 8.5 months in both SAR255952 and DM4-treated mice. This suggests that the amyloid load reduction induced by SAR255952 is related to a slowing down in the formation of new plaques rather than to the clearance of already formed plaques.

  16. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a

  17. Amyloid β oligomers induce interleukin-1β production in primary microglia in a cathepsin B- and reactive oxygen species-dependent manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide, a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease, forms two types of aggregates: oligomers and fibrils. These aggregates induce inflammatory responses, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production by microglia, which are macrophage-like cells located in the brain. In this study, we examined the effect of the two forms of Aβ aggregates on IL-1β production in mouse primary microglia. We prepared Aβ oligomer and fibril from Aβ (1–42) peptide in vitro. We analyzed the characteristics of these oligomers and fibrils by electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy. Interestingly, Aβ oligomers but not Aβ monomers or fibrils induced robust IL-1β production in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, Aβ oligomers induced endo/phagolysosome rupture, which released cathepsin B into the cytoplasm. Aβ oligomer-induced IL-1β production was inhibited not only by the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074-Me but also by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor N-acetylcysteine. Random chemical crosslinking abolished the ability of the oligomers to induce IL-1β. Thus, multimerization and fibrillization causes Aβ oligomers to lose the ability to induce IL-1β. These results indicate that Aβ oligomers, but not fibrils, induce IL-1β production in primary microglia in a cathepsin B- and ROS-dependent manner. - Highlights: • We prepared amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils with minimum contamination of Aβ oligomers. • Primary microglia (MG) produced IL-1β in response to Aβ oligomers, but not fibrils. • Only Aβ oligomers induced leakage of cathepsin B from endo/phagolysosomes. • IL-1β production in response to Aβ oligomers depended on both cathepsin B and ROS. • Crosslinking reduced the ability of the Aβ oligomers to induce IL-1β from MG

  18. Amyloid β oligomers induce interleukin-1β production in primary microglia in a cathepsin B- and reactive oxygen species-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneo, Jun; Adachi, Takumi [Department of Animal Development and Physiology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Yoshida, Aiko; Takayasu, Kunio [Responses to Environmental Signals and Stresses, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Takahara, Kazuhiko, E-mail: ktakahar@zoo.zool.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Animal Development and Physiology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Tokyo 102-0081 (Japan); Inaba, Kayo [Department of Animal Development and Physiology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Tokyo 102-0081 (Japan)

    2015-03-13

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide, a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease, forms two types of aggregates: oligomers and fibrils. These aggregates induce inflammatory responses, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production by microglia, which are macrophage-like cells located in the brain. In this study, we examined the effect of the two forms of Aβ aggregates on IL-1β production in mouse primary microglia. We prepared Aβ oligomer and fibril from Aβ (1–42) peptide in vitro. We analyzed the characteristics of these oligomers and fibrils by electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy. Interestingly, Aβ oligomers but not Aβ monomers or fibrils induced robust IL-1β production in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, Aβ oligomers induced endo/phagolysosome rupture, which released cathepsin B into the cytoplasm. Aβ oligomer-induced IL-1β production was inhibited not only by the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074-Me but also by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor N-acetylcysteine. Random chemical crosslinking abolished the ability of the oligomers to induce IL-1β. Thus, multimerization and fibrillization causes Aβ oligomers to lose the ability to induce IL-1β. These results indicate that Aβ oligomers, but not fibrils, induce IL-1β production in primary microglia in a cathepsin B- and ROS-dependent manner. - Highlights: • We prepared amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils with minimum contamination of Aβ oligomers. • Primary microglia (MG) produced IL-1β in response to Aβ oligomers, but not fibrils. • Only Aβ oligomers induced leakage of cathepsin B from endo/phagolysosomes. • IL-1β production in response to Aβ oligomers depended on both cathepsin B and ROS. • Crosslinking reduced the ability of the Aβ oligomers to induce IL-1β from MG.

  19. Antiaggregation Potential of Padina gymnospora against the Toxic Alzheimer's Beta-Amyloid Peptide 25-35 and Cholinesterase Inhibitory Property of Its Bioactive Compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishnan Shanmuganathan

    Full Text Available Inhibition of β-amyloid (Aβ aggregation in the cerebral cortex of the brain is a promising therapeutic and defensive strategy in identification of disease modifying agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD. Since natural products are considered as the current alternative trend for the discovery of AD drugs, the present study aims at the evaluation of anti-amyloidogenic potential of the marine seaweed Padina gymnospora. Prevention of aggregation and disaggregation of the mature fibril formation of Aβ 25-35 by acetone extracts of P. gymnospora (ACTPG was evaluated in two phases by Thioflavin T assay. The results were further confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM analysis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic analysis. The results of antiaggregation and disaggregation assay showed that the increase in fluorescence intensity of aggregated Aβ and the co-treatment of ACTPG (250 μg/ml with Aβ 25-35, an extensive decrease in the fluorescence intensity was observed in both phases, which suggests that ACTPG prevents the oligomers formation and disaggregation of mature fibrils. In addition, ACTPG was subjected to column chromatography and the bioactivity was screened based on the cholinesterase inhibitory activity. Finally, the active fraction was subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis for the identification of bioactive compounds. Overall, the results suggest that the bioactive compound alpha bisabolol present in the alga might be responsible for the observed cholinesterase inhibition with the IC50 value < 10 μg/ml for both AChE and BuChE when compared to standard drug donepezil (IC50 value < 6 μg/ml and support its use for the treatment of neurological disorders.

  20. Evaluation of Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis E. Marchlinski

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is a supraventricular tachyarrhythmia characterized by uncoordinated atrial activation. On the ECG fibrillatory (f waves (rapid oscillations with variable amplitude, shape and timing replace normal P waves. Ventricular response becomes irregular and rapid depending of the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of the AV node1 and the balance between vagal and sympathetic tone1. The presence of an irregularly pulse is a clinical sign that can be quickly and reliably identified in any healthcare situation and, indicates AF with a high sensitivity and specificity (95% and 75%, respectively. If the irregularity last for more than 20 seconds the specificity reaches 98% 2-4. Identification of AF can be done by using manual pulse palpation in those presenting with a variety of symptoms. It is desirable to check the blood pressure and pulse in all patients who present with breathlessness, dyspnea, palpitations, syncope, dizziness or chest discomfort. Furthermore, many patients presenting with an acute stroke are found to be in AF albeit asymptomatic with respect to non-neurologic complaints. The finding of a sustained irregular wide QRS complex tachycardia may be suspicious of AF conducted with bundle brunch aberrancy or over an accessory pathway, and in patients with A-V sequential pacemakers can reflect an inadequate configuration with ventricular tracking of sensed atrial activity.

  1. Gelsolin amyloid angiopathy causes severe disruption of the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskelainen, Susanna; Pihlamaa, Tiia; Suominen, Sinikka; Zhao, Fang; Salo, Tuula; Risteli, Juha; Baumann, Marc; Kalimo, Hannu; Kiuru-Enari, Sari

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary gelsolin amyloidosis (HGA) is a dominantly inherited systemic disease reported worldwide. HGA is characterized by ophthalmological, neurological, and dermatological manifestations. AGel amyloid accumulates at basal lamina of epithelial and muscle cells, thus amyloid angiopathy is encountered in nearly every organ. HGA patients have cardiovascular, hemorrhagic, and potentially vascularly induced neurological problems. To clarify pathomechanisms of AGel angiopathy, we performed histological, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic analyses on facial temporal artery branches from 8 HGA patients and 13 control subjects. We demonstrate major pathological changes in arteries: disruption of the tunica media, disorganization of vascular smooth muscle cells, and accumulation of AGel fibrils in arterial walls, where they associate with the lamina elastica interna, which becomes fragmented and diminished. We also provide evidence of abnormal accumulation and localization of collagen types I and III and an increase of collagen type I degradation product in the tunica media. Vascular smooth muscle cells appear to be morphologically and semi-quantitatively normal, only their basal lamina is often thickened. In conclusion, angiopathy in HGA results in severe disruption of arterial walls, characterized by prominent AGel deposition, collagen derangement and severe elastolysis, and it may be responsible for several, particularly hemorrhagic, disease manifestations in HGA. PMID:27198069

  2. Amyloid-carbon hybrid membranes for universal water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    Industrial development, energy production and mining have led to dramatically increased levels of environmental pollutants such as heavy metal ions, metal cyanides and nuclear waste. Current technologies for purifying contaminated waters are typically expensive and ion specific, and there is therefore a significant need for new approaches. Here, we report inexpensive hybrid membranes made from protein amyloid fibrils and activated porous carbon that can be used to remove heavy metal ions and radioactive waste from water. During filtration, the concentration of heavy metal ions drops by three to five orders of magnitude per passage and the process can be repeated numerous times. Notably, their efficiency remains unaltered when filtering several ions simultaneously. The performance of the membrane is enabled by the ability of the amyloids to selectively absorb heavy metal pollutants from solutions. We also show that our membranes can be used to recycle valuable heavy metal contaminants by thermally reducing ions trapped in saturated membranes, leading to the creation of elemental metal nanoparticles and films. PMID:26809058

  3. Who Is at Risk for Atrial Fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Who Is at Risk for Atrial Fibrillation? Explore Atrial Fibrillation What Is... Types Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia ...

  4. S14G-humanin restored cellular homeostasis disturbed by amyloid-beta protein***

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Li; Wencong Zhao; Hongqi Yang; Junhong Zhang; Jianjun Ma

    2013-01-01

    Humanin is a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer’s disease, and its derivative, S14G-humanin, is 1 000-fold stronger in its neuroprotective effect against Alzheimer’s disease-relevant insults. Alt-hough effective, the detailed molecular mechanism through which S14G-humanin exerts its effects remains unclear. Data from this study showed that fibril ar amyloid-beta 40 disturbed cel ular ho-meostasis through the cel membrane, increasing intracel ular calcium, generating reactive oxygen species, and decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential. S14G-humanin restored these re-sponses. The results suggested that S14G-humanin blocked the effects of amyloid-beta 40 on the neuronal cel membrane, and restored the disturbed cel ular homeostasis, thereby exerting a neuroprotective effect on hippocampal neurons.

  5. Obstructive sleep apnea in atrial fibrillation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Miguel A; Alonso-Fernández, Alberto; García-Río, Francisco; Sánchez, Ana; López, Juana M; Pagola, Carlos

    2006-06-28

    A high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea has been demonstrated in patients with atrial fibrillation. Our comments want to emphasize the importance of identifying and treating a large proportion of patients with atrial fibrillation who have undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea as an additional preventive strategy for atrial fibrillation patients. PMID:16309764

  6. Connexin Remodeling Contributes to Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Michelle M Jennings; J Kevin Donahue

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation significantly contributes to mortality and morbidity through increased risk of stroke, heart failure and myocardial infarcts. Investigations of mechanisms responsible for the development and maintenance of atrial fibrillation have highlighted the importance of gap junctional remodeling. Connexins 40 and 43, the major atrial gap junctional proteins, undergo considerable alterations in expression and localization in atrial fibrillation, creating an environment conducive to s...

  7. Atrial fibrillation post cardiac bypass surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa, Ashraf; EL-Haddad, Mohamed A.; Shenoy, Maithili; Tuliani, Tushar

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation occurs in 5-40% patients after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Atrial fibrillation increases mortality and morbidity in the post-operative period. We sought to conduct a comprehensive review of literature focusing on pathophysiology, risk factors, prevention and treatment of post coronary artery bypass graft atrial fibrillation.

  8. The green tea polyphenol EGCG inhibits E. coli biofilm formation by impairing amyloid curli fibre assembly and downregulating the biofilm regulator CsgD via the σ(E) -dependent sRNA RybB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Diego O; Mika, Franziska; Richter, Anja M; Hengge, Regine

    2016-07-01

    In bacterial biofilms, which are often involved in chronic infections, cells are surrounded by a self-produced extracellular matrix that contains amyloid fibres, exopolysaccharides and other biopolymers. The matrix contributes to the pronounced resistance of biofilms against antibiotics and host immune systems. Being highly inflammatory, matrix amyloids such as curli fibres of Escherichia coli can also play a role in pathogenicity. Using macrocolony biofilms of commensal and pathogenic E. coli as a model system, we demonstrate here that the green tea polyphenol epigallocatachin gallate (EGCG) is a potent antibiofilm agent. EGCG virtually eliminates the biofilm matrix by directly interfering with the assembly of curli subunits into amyloid fibres, and by triggering the σ(E) cell envelope stress response and thereby reducing the expression of CsgD - a crucial activator of curli and cellulose biosynthesis - due to csgD mRNA targeting by the σ(E) -dependent sRNA RybB. These findings highlight EGCG as a potential adjuvant for antibiotic therapy of biofilm-associated infections. Moreover, EGCG may support therapies against pathogenic E. coli that produce inflammatory curli fibres along with Shigatoxin. PMID:26992034

  9. Synthesis of graphene nanoribbons from amyloid templates by gallium vapor-assisted solid-phase graphitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Katsuhisa, E-mail: k.murakami@bk.tsukuba.ac.jp; Dong, Tianchen; Kajiwara, Yuya; Takahashi, Teppei; Fujita, Jun-ichi [Institute of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Hiyama, Takaki; Takai, Eisuke; Ohashi, Gai; Shiraki, Kentaro [Institute of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)

    2014-06-16

    Single- and double-layer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with widths of around 10 nm were synthesized directly onto an insulating substrate by solid-phase graphitization using a gallium vapor catalyst and carbon templates made of amyloid fibrils. Subsequent investigation revealed that the crystallinity, conductivity, and carrier mobility were all improved by increasing the temperature of synthesis. The carrier mobility of the GNR synthesized at 1050 °C was 0.83 cm{sup 2}/V s, which is lower than that of mechanically exfoliated graphene. This is considered to be most likely due to electron scattering by the defects and edges of the GNRs.

  10. Synthesis of graphene nanoribbons from amyloid templates by gallium vapor-assisted solid-phase graphitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single- and double-layer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with widths of around 10 nm were synthesized directly onto an insulating substrate by solid-phase graphitization using a gallium vapor catalyst and carbon templates made of amyloid fibrils. Subsequent investigation revealed that the crystallinity, conductivity, and carrier mobility were all improved by increasing the temperature of synthesis. The carrier mobility of the GNR synthesized at 1050 °C was 0.83 cm2/V s, which is lower than that of mechanically exfoliated graphene. This is considered to be most likely due to electron scattering by the defects and edges of the GNRs.

  11. The amyloid-β isoform pattern in cerebrospinal fluid in familial PSEN1 M139T- and L286P-associated Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Portelius, Erik; Fortea, Juan; Molinuevo, Jose Luis; Gustavsson, Mikael K; Andreasson, Ulf; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    There are several familial forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) most of which are caused by mutations in the genes that encode the presenilin enzymes involved in the production of amyloid-β (Aβ) from the amyloid precursor protein (APP). In AD, Aβ forms fibrils that are deposited in the brain as plaques. Much of the fibrillar Aβ found in the plaques consists of the 42 amino acid form of Aβ (Aβ1-–2) and it is now widely accepted that Aβ is related to the pathogenesis of AD and that Aβ may both imp...

  12. A High Affinity Red Fluorescence and Colorimetric Probe for Amyloid β Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekhar, K.; Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Murugan, N. Arul; Kuang, Guanglin; Ågren, Hans; Govindaraju, T.

    2016-04-01

    A major challenge in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is its timely diagnosis. Amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates have been proposed as the most viable biomarker for the diagnosis of AD. Here, we demonstrate hemicyanine-based benzothiazole-coumarin (TC) as a potential probe for the detection of highly toxic Aβ42 aggregates through switch-on, enhanced (~30 fold) red fluorescence (Emax = 654 nm) and characteristic colorimetric (light red to purple) optical outputs. Interestingly, TC exhibits selectivity towards Aβ42 fibrils compared to other abnormal protein aggregates. TC probe show nanomolar binding affinity (Ka = 1.72 × 107 M‑1) towards Aβ42 aggregates and also displace ThT bound to Aβ42 fibrils due to its high binding affinity. The Aβ42 fibril-specific red-shift in the absorption spectra of TC responsible for the observed colorimetric optical output has been attributed to micro-environment change around the probe from hydrophilic-like to hydrophobic-like nature. The binding site, binding energy and changes in optical properties observed for TC upon interaction with Aβ42 fibrils have been further validated by molecular docking and time dependent density functional theory studies.

  13. Extracellular fibrils of pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus gattii are important for ecological niche, murine virulence and human neutrophil interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah J Springer

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus gattii, an emerging fungal pathogen of humans and animals, is found on a variety of trees in tropical and temperate regions. The ecological niche and virulence of this yeast remain poorly defined. We used Arabidopsis thaliana plants and plant-derived substrates to model C. gattii in its natural habitat. Yeast cells readily colonized scratch-wounded plant leaves and formed distinctive extracellular fibrils (40-100 nm diameter x500-3000 nm length. Extracellular fibrils were observed on live plants and plant-derived substrates by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and by high voltage- EM (HVEM. Only encapsulated yeast cells formed extracellular fibrils as a capsule-deficient C. gattii mutant completely lacked fibrils. Cells deficient in environmental sensing only formed disorganized extracellular fibrils as apparent from experiments with a C. gattii STE12alpha mutant. C. gattii cells with extracellular fibrils were more virulent in murine model of pulmonary and systemic cryptococcosis than cells lacking fibrils. C. gattii cells with extracellular fibrils were also significantly more resistant to killing by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN in vitro even though these PMN produced elaborate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs. These observations suggest that extracellular fibril formation could be a structural adaptation of C. gattii for cell-to-cell, cell-to-substrate and/or cell-to- phagocyte communications. Such ecological adaptation of C. gattii could play roles in enhanced virulence in mammalian hosts at least initially via inhibition of host PMN- mediated killing.

  14. [Treatment of familial amyloid polyneuropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David; Samuel, Didier; Slama, Michel

    2012-09-01

    The treatment of familial amyloid polyneuropathies (FAP) is complex and requires a neurological and cardiological multidisciplinary coverage. It includes specific treatments to control the progression of the systemic amyloidogenesis, the symptomatic treatment of the peripheral and autonomic neuropathy (digestive, urinary, sexual, postural hypotension) and the treatment of organs severely involved by amyloidosis (heart, eyes, kidneys). First line specific treatment of met30 TTR-FAP is liver transplantation (LT) which allows to suppress the main source of mutant TTR, to stop the progression of the neuropathy in 70 % of cases at long-term (with an experience of 18 years) and to double the median survival. In case of severe renal or cardiac insufficiency, a double transplant kidney-liver or heart-liver can be discussed. The tafamidis (in temporary authorization of use in France) is a stabilizing medicine of the tetrameric TTR which showed in very early stages of met30 TTR-FAP short-term capacities to stop the progress of the peripheral neuropathy in 60 % of the cases versus 38 % with placebo. It should be proposed in case of contraindication of TH (age>70 years [20 % of the cases]), of very early stages (very low NIS-LL score), or for the period of wait of LT. Other innovative medicines issued from biopharmaceutical companies have been developed to block the hepatic production of both mutant and wild TTR which are noxious in the late forms NAH (>50 years old) (RNAi [RNA interference] therapeutics, AntiSens oligonucleotids), for removing the amyloid deposits (monoclonal antibody anti-SAP), or to slow down the formation of deposits of TTR and amyloidosis (combination of doxycycline-TUDCA). Clinical trials should be first addressed to the patients with a late onset of FAP or non-met30 TTR-FAP who are less responding to LT and patients with contraindications in the LT. Initial cardiac assessment and periodic cardiac investigations are important for the FAP according to the

  15. Drug Development in Conformational Diseases: A Novel Family of Chemical Chaperones that Bind and Stabilise Several Polymorphic Amyloid Structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquiza Sablón-Carrazana

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of conformational diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer, poses a global challenge at many different levels. It has devastating effects on the sufferers as well as a tremendous economic impact on families and the health system. In this work, we apply a cross-functional approach that combines ideas, concepts and technologies from several disciplines in order to study, in silico and in vitro, the role of a novel chemical chaperones family (NCHCHF in processes of protein aggregation in conformational diseases. Given that Serum Albumin (SA is the most abundant protein in the blood of mammals, and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA is an off-the-shelf protein available in most labs around the world, we compared the ligandability of BSA:NCHCHF with the interaction sites in the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP:NCHCHF, and in the amyloid pharmacophore fragments (Aβ17-42 and Aβ16-21:NCHCHF. We posit that the merging of this interaction sites is a meta-structure of pharmacophore which allows the development of chaperones that can prevent protein aggregation at various states from: stabilizing the native state to destabilizing oligomeric state and protofilament. Furthermore to stabilize fibrillar structures, thus decreasing the amount of toxic oligomers in solution, as is the case with the NCHCHF. The paper demonstrates how a set of NCHCHF can be used for studying and potentially treating the various physiopathological stages of a conformational disease. For instance, when dealing with an acute phase of cytotoxicity, what is needed is the recruitment of cytotoxic oligomers, thus chaperone F, which accelerates fiber formation, would be very useful; whereas in a chronic stage it is better to have chaperones A, B, C, and D, which stabilize the native and fibril structures halting self-catalysis and the creation of cytotoxic oligomers as a consequence of fiber formation. Furthermore, all the

  16. Purification and preliminary characterization of Spiroplasma fibrils.

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend, R; Archer, D. B.; Plaskitt, K A

    1980-01-01

    Fibrils 3.5 nm in diameter were released from the honeybee spiroplasma (BC3) by treatment with detergents and then purified by isopycnic centrifugation. Purified fibrils were flexuous, of indeterminate length, and had an axial repeat of 8.5 nm. The fibrils were associated in pairs, but in 1 M salt formed aggregates with a marked striated appearance. Pronase completely degraded the fibrils, but trypsin had little effect. The fibrils were composed of a single protein of molecular weight 55,000 ...

  17. Lattice model for amyloid peptides: OPEP force field parametrization and applications to the nucleus size of Alzheimer's peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thanh Thuy; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    Coarse-grained protein lattice models approximate atomistic details and keep the essential interactions. They are, therefore, suitable for capturing generic features of protein folding and amyloid formation at low computational cost. As our aim is to study the critical nucleus sizes of two experimentally well-characterized peptide fragments Aβ16-22 and Aβ37-42 of the full length Aβ1-42 Alzheimer's peptide, it is important that simulations with the lattice model reproduce all-atom simulations. In this study, we present a comprehensive force field parameterization based on the OPEP (Optimized Potential for Efficient protein structure Prediction) force field for an on-lattice protein model, which incorporates explicitly the formation of hydrogen bonds and directions of side-chains. Our bottom-up approach starts with the determination of the best lattice force parameters for the Aβ16-22 dimer by fitting its equilibrium parallel and anti-parallel β-sheet populations to all-atom simulation results. Surprisingly, the calibrated force field is transferable to the trimer of Aβ16-22 and the dimer and trimer of Aβ37-42. Encouraged by this finding, we characterized the free energy landscapes of the two decamers. The dominant structure of the Aβ16-22 decamer matches the microcrystal structure. Pushing the simulations for aggregates between 4-mer and 12-mer suggests a nucleus size for fibril formation of 10 chains. In contrast, the Aβ37-42 decamer is largely disordered with mixed by parallel and antiparallel chains, suggesting that the nucleus size is >10 peptides. Our refined force field coupled to this on-lattice model should provide useful insights into the critical nucleation number associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Atrial fibrillation and delayed gastric emptying.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isadora C Botwinick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation and delayed gastric emptying (DGE are common after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Our aim was to investigate a potential relationship between atrial fibrillation and DGE, which we defined as failure to tolerate a regular diet by the 7(th postoperative day. METHODS: We performed a retrospective chart review of 249 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy at our institution between 2000 and 2009. Data was analyzed with Fisher exact test for categorical variables and Mann-Whitney U or unpaired T-test for continuous variables. RESULTS: Approximately 5% of the 249 patients included in the analysis experienced at least one episode of postoperative atrial fibrillation. Median age of patients with atrial fibrillation was 74 years, compared with 66 years in patients without atrial fibrillation (p = 0.0005. Patients with atrial fibrillation were more likely to have a history of atrial fibrillation (p = 0.03. 92% of the patients with atrial fibrillation suffered from DGE, compared to 46% of patients without atrial fibrillation (p = 0.0007. This association held true when controlling for age. CONCLUSION: Patients with postoperative atrial fibrillation are more likely to experience delayed gastric emptying. Interventions to manage delayed gastric function might be prudent in patients at high risk for postoperative atrial fibrillation.

  19. Canine model of contrast medium induced fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The injection of radiocontrast media into coronary arteries will produce a low incidence of ventricular fibrillation. This study establishes the injection duration (or contact time) required to produce fibrillation during right coronary angiography in dogs using a 370 mg I/ml, meglumine/sodium diatrizoate formulation (Renografin 76, Squibb). The mean contact time required to induce fibrillation was 18.8+-5.8 seconds for 66 injections in 47 dogs. Prolonged ischemia of greater than 170 s did not produce either fibrillation or arrhythmias, therefore fibrillation is caused by properties of the media. The contact time was not significantly influenced by test injections and was not significantly different in repeated experiments. The canine contact time model of contrast media induced ventricular fibrillation is reproducible and will facilitate the study of risk factors that increase the possibility of fibrillation. (orig.)

  20. Factors modifying contrast media induced fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factors effecting contrast media induced ventricular fibrillation were studied in anesthetized dogs using contact time as the measured parameter. Injections of meglumine/sodium diatrizoate (370 mg I/ml) were made into the right coronary artery at 0.4 ml/s until fibrillation occurred. A contrast medium containing calcium chelators was found to produce fibrillation in a significantly shorter contact time than a similar medium without calcium chelators. Pre-treatment by the cardiac glycoside, ouabain, increased the contact time of fibrillation as did the production of a sub-acute infarction in the left coronary artery and a previous fibrillation and resuscitation. The data suggest that calcium binding additives increase the risk of fibrillation while pre-treatment with cardiac glycosides, the presence of stable infarcts in the non-injected areas, or a previous fibrillation and resuscitation do not increase risk. (orig.)

  1. Surgical Treatment of Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Moshtaghi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is the most prevalent permanent arrhythmia. It may be associated with other cardiac pathologies which need surgical treatment. Various types of surgery including the traditional cut-sew operations and operations using different energy sources are currently in use. In comparison with medical treatment, surgery is safe, effective, and has reliable results.

  2. Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Seiler

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation is common in heart failure patients and is associated with increased mortality.  Pharmacologic trials have not shown any survival benefit for a rhythm control over a rate control strategy.  It has been suggested that sinus rhythm is associated with a survival benefit, but that the risks of anti-arrhythmic drug treatment and poor efficacy offset the beneficial effect.  Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation can establish sinus rhythm without the risks of anti-arrhythmic drug therapy.  Data from randomized trials demonstrating a survival benefit for patients undergoing an ablation procedure for atrial fibrillation are still lacking.  Ablation of the AV junction and permanent pacing remain a treatment alternative in otherwise refractory cases.  Placement of a biventricular system may prevent or reduce negative consequences of chronic right ventricular pacing.  Current objectives and options for treatment of atrial fibrillation in heart failure patients are reviewed. 

  3. Personalized management of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Aliot, Etienne;

    2013-01-01

    The management of atrial fibrillation (AF) has seen marked changes in past years, with the introduction of new oral anticoagulants, new antiarrhythmic drugs, and the emergence of catheter ablation as a common intervention for rhythm control. Furthermore, new technologies enhance our ability to de...

  4. Utility of an improved model of amyloid-beta (Aβ1-42 toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans for drug screening for Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McColl Gawain

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The definitive indicator of Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathology is the profuse accumulation of amyloid-ß (Aß within the brain. Various in vitro and cell-based models have been proposed for high throughput drug screening for potential therapeutic benefit in diseases of protein misfolding. Caenorhabditis elegans offers a convenient in vivo system for examination of Aß accumulation and toxicity in a complex multicellular organism. Ease of culturing and a short life cycle make this animal model well suited to rapid screening of candidate compounds. Results We have generated a new transgenic strain of C. elegans that expresses full length Aß1-42. This strain differs from existing Aß models that predominantly express amino-truncated Aß3-42. The Aß1-42 is expressed in body wall muscle cells, where it oligomerizes, aggregates and results in severe, and fully penetrant, age progressive-paralysis. The in vivo accumulation of Aß1-42 also stains positive for amyloid dyes, consistent with in vivo fibril formation. The utility of this model for identification of potential protective compounds was examined using the investigational Alzheimer’s therapeutic PBT2, shown to be neuroprotective in mouse models of AD and significantly improve cognition in AD patients. We observed that treatment with PBT2 provided rapid and significant protection against the Aß-induced toxicity in C. elegans. Conclusion This C. elegans model of full length Aß1-42 expression can now be adopted for use in screens to rapidly identify and assist in development of potential therapeutics and to study underlying toxic mechanism(s of Aß.

  5. Acid-responsive properties of fibrils from heat-induced whey protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong-Hua; Wang, Jing; Dong, Shi-Rong; Cheng, Wen; Kong, Bao-Hua; Tan, Jun-Yan

    2016-08-01

    The heat-induced fibrils of whey protein concentrate (WPC) have demonstrated an acid-responsive property; that is, the fibrils went through formation-depolymerization-reformation as pH was adjusted to 1.8, 6.5, and back to 1.8. We investigated the microstructure, driving force, and thermal stability of 3.0% (wt) WPC nanofibrils adjusted between pH 6.5 and 1.8 twice. The results showed that the nanofibrils had acid-responsive properties and good thermal stability after reheating for 10h at 90°C and adjusting pH from 1.8 to 6.5 to 1.8. The content of WPC fibril aggregates was not much different with the prolongation of heating times during pH variation. Although the nanofibrils' structure could be destroyed only by changing the pH, the essence of this destruction might only form fiber fragments, polymers that would restore a fibrous structure upon returning to pH 1.8. A described model for the acid-responsive assembly of fibrils of WPC was proposed. The fibrils went through formation-depolymerization-reformation by weaker noncovalent interactions (surface hydrophobicity) as pH changed from 1.8 to 6.5 back to 1.8. However, the fibrils lost the acid-responsive properties because much more S-S (disulfide) formation occurred when the solution was adjusted to pH 6.5 and reheated. Meanwhile, fibrils still possessed acid-responsive properties when reheated at pH 1.8, and the content of fibrils slightly increased with a further reduction of α-helix structure. PMID:27265171

  6. Modeling Fibril Fragmentation in Real-Time

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Pengzhen

    2012-01-01

    During the application of mass-action equation models to the study of amyloid fiber formation, time-consuming numerical calculations constitute a major bottleneck when no analytical solution is available. To conquer this difficulty, here an alternative efficient method is introduced for the fragmentation-only model. It includes two basic steps: (1) simulate close-formed time-evolution equations for the number concentration P(t) derived from the moment-closure method; (2) reconstruct the detailed fiber length distribution based on the knowledge of moments obtained in the first step. Compared to direct solution, current method speeds up the calculation by at least ten thousand times. The accuracy is also quite satastifactory if suitable forms of approximate distribution fucntion is taken. Further application to PI264-b-PFS48 micelles study performed by Guerin et al. confirms our method is very promising for the real-time analysis of the experimental data on fiber fragmentation.

  7. Advances in Imaging for Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last fifteen years, our understanding of the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation (AF) has paved the way for ablation to be utilized as an effective treatment option. With the aim of gaining more detailed anatomical representation, advances have been made using various imaging modalities, both before and during the ablation procedure, in planning and execution. Options have flourished from procedural fluoroscopy, electro anatomic mapping systems, pre procedural computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and combinations of these technologies. Exciting work is underway in an effort to allow the electro physiologist to assess scar formation in real time. One advantage would be to lessen the learning curve for what are very complex procedures. The hope of these developments is to improve the likelihood of a successful ablation procedure and to allow more patients access to this treatment

  8. 670 nm laser light and EGCG complementarily reduce amyloid-{beta} aggregates in human neuroblastoma cells: basis for treatment of Alzheimer's disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Sommer, A.P.; Bieschke, J.; Friedrich, R.P.; Zhu, D.; Wanker, E. E.; Fecht, H.J.; Mereles, D; Hunstein, W

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study is to present the results of in vitro experiments with possible relevance in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Background Data: Despite intensive research efforts, there is no treatment for AD. One root cause of AD is the extra- and intracellular deposition of amyloid-beta (A{beta}) fibrils in the brain. Recently, it was shown that extracellular A{beta} can enter brain cells, resulting in neurotoxicity. Methods: After internalization of A{beta}...

  9. Disruption of human serum albumin fibrils by a static electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein self-association leads to toxic filamentous plaques believed to be the key reason behind several neurodegenerative diseases. Stabilization of the fibrillar architecture is guided by several forces; primarily electrostatic, hydrophobic, and the extent of hydrogen bonding. In this study, we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, the effect of varying static electric fields on preformed fibrils of human serum albumin (HSA) in an electrowetting on dielectric type setup using spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. We have found appreciable and continuous reduction in the β-sheet content of HSA fibrils up to an applied field of ∼8 × 106 V m−1. The observed disruption of the fibrils has been attributed to the combined effects of electrostatic interactions and electrowetting phenomena. Kinetic studies indicate a prior intermediate formation followed by disruption of HSA fibrils after application of the electric field. (paper)

  10. Solid-state NMR structure of a pathogenic fibril of full-length human α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Marcus D; Comellas, Gemma; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J; Covell, Dustin J; Berthold, Deborah A; Kloepper, Kathryn D; Courtney, Joseph M; Kim, Jae K; Barclay, Alexander M; Kendall, Amy; Wan, William; Stubbs, Gerald; Schwieters, Charles D; Lee, Virginia M Y; George, Julia M; Rienstra, Chad M

    2016-05-01

    Misfolded α-synuclein amyloid fibrils are the principal components of Lewy bodies and neurites, hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD). We present a high-resolution structure of an α-synuclein fibril, in a form that induces robust pathology in primary neuronal culture, determined by solid-state NMR spectroscopy and validated by EM and X-ray fiber diffraction. Over 200 unique long-range distance restraints define a consensus structure with common amyloid features including parallel, in-register β-sheets and hydrophobic-core residues, and with substantial complexity arising from diverse structural features including an intermolecular salt bridge, a glutamine ladder, close backbone interactions involving small residues, and several steric zippers stabilizing a new orthogonal Greek-key topology. These characteristics contribute to the robust propagation of this fibril form, as supported by the structural similarity of early-onset-PD mutants. The structure provides a framework for understanding the interactions of α-synuclein with other proteins and small molecules, to aid in PD diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27018801

  11. Progression of cardiac amyloid deposition in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis patients after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepnieks, Juris J; Benson, Merrill D

    2007-12-01

    It has been hypothesized that transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis may progress after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) as a result of continued amyloid fibril synthesis and deposition from normal TTR. To test this hypothesis amyloid fibrils were isolated from cardiac tissues of three patients who died 1(1/2) to 5(1/2) years after OLT: two with Val30Met and one with Thr60Ala TTR. The ratio of variant to normal TTR in each case was determined and compared with the ratio of variant to normal in cardiac tissues from seven patients who died with TTR amyloidosis but who had not had liver transplantation. Tissues from patients with TTR amyloidosis without OLT included three with Val30Met, two with Thr60Ala, one with deltaVal122, and one with Val122Ile. All tissues from patients without OLT had greater amounts of variant TTR than normal TTR except for the Val122Ile in which the ratio was 50:50. The overall median variant to normal ratio was 60:40 with a range of 50-70% variant. In contrast, the mean percentage of variant TTR in the three tissues from patients after OLT was 25% (range 20-35). These data are consistent with the continued deposition of normal TTR in cardiac tissue after liver transplantation. PMID:17968687

  12. Amyloid-β peptides time-dependent structural modifications: AFM and voltammetric characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Chiorcea-Paquim, Ana-Maria; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2016-07-01

    The human amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, structural modifications, from soluble monomers to fully formed fibrils through intermediate structures, were investigated, and the results were compared with those obtained for the inverse Aβ40-1 and Aβ42-1, mutant Aβ1-40Phe(10) and Aβ1-40Nle(35), and rat Aβ1-40Rat peptide sequences. The aggregation was followed at a slow rate, in chloride free media and room temperature, and revealed to be a sequence-structure process, dependent on the physicochemical properties of each Aβ peptide isoforms, and occurring at different rates and by different pathways. The fibrilization process was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), via changes in the adsorption morphology from: (i) initially random coiled structures of ∼0.6 nm height, corresponding to the Aβ peptide monomers in random coil or in α-helix conformations, to (ii) aggregates and protofibrils of 1.5-6.0 nm height and (iii) two types of fibrils, corresponding to the Aβ peptide in a β-sheet configuration. The reactivity of the carbon electrode surface was considered. The hydrophobic surface induced rapid changes of the Aβ peptide conformations, and differences between the adsorbed fibrils, formed at the carbon surface (beaded, thin, 2.0 nm height), were detected. Differential pulse voltammetry showed that, according to their primary structure, the Aβ peptides undergo oxidation in one or two steps, the first step corresponding to the tyrosine amino acids oxidation, and the second one to the histidine and methionine amino acids oxidation. The fibrilization process was electrochemically detected via the decrease of the Aβ peptide oxidation peak currents that occurred in a time dependent manner. PMID:27216391

  13. Risk of atrial fibrillation in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Jannik L.; Schjerning, Anne-Marie; Lindhardt, Tommi B.;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Diabetes has been associated with atrial fibrillation but the current evidence is conflicting. In particular knowledge regarding young diabetes patients and the risk of developing atrial fibrillation is sparse. The aim of our study was to investigate the risk of atrial fibrillation in patients...... with diabetes compared to the background population in Denmark. METHODS AND RESULTS: Through Danish nationwide registries we included persons above 18 years of age and without prior atrial fibrillation and/or diabetes from 1996 to 2012. The study cohort was divided into a background population without...... diabetes and a diabetes group. The absolute risk of developing atrial fibrillation was calculated and Poisson regression models adjusted for sex, age and comorbidities were used to calculate incidence rate ratios of atrial fibrillation. The total study cohort included 5,081,087 persons, 4,827,713 (95%) in...

  14. Induction of atrial fibrillation with rapid high voltage ventricular pacing for ventricular fibrillation conversion testing

    OpenAIRE

    Schuchert, A; Kuhl, M; Ruppel, R; Meinertz, T

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess whether rapid high voltage ventricular pacing can also induce atrial fibrillation, and whether the induction of atrial fibrillation during ventricular fibrillation conversion testing is related to the patient's heart disease.
DESIGN—Prospective study of 50 patients who received the dual chamber implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) Ventak AV II DR (Guidant) as a first implant. This device can record atrial activity even during a ventricular fibrillation episode and ...

  15. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation? Atrial fibrillation (AF) usually causes the heart's lower ... Chest pain Dizziness or fainting Fatigue (tiredness) Confusion Atrial Fibrillation Complications AF has two major complications— stroke and ...

  16. Atrial fibrillation: inflammation in disguise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappegård, K T; Hovland, A; Pop, G A M; Mollnes, T E

    2013-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation is highly prevalent, and affected patients are at an increased risk of a number of complications, including heart failure and thrombo-embolism. Over the past years, there has been increasing interest in the role of inflammatory processes in atrial fibrillation, from the first occurrence of the arrhythmia to dreaded complications such as strokes or peripheral emboli. As the standard drug combination which aims at rate control and anticoagulation only offers partial protection against complications, newer agents are needed to optimize treatment. In this paper, we review recent knowledge regarding the impact of inflammation on the occurrence, recurrence, perpetuation and complications of the arrhythmia, as well as the role of anti-inflammatory therapies in the treatment for the disease. PMID:23672430

  17. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunyamin Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn’s disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis.

  18. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Bunyamin; Koca, Yavuz Savas; Koca, Tugba; Yildiz, Ihsan; Gerek Celikden, Sevda; Ciris, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG) is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn's disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis. PMID:27051538

  19. Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adwait BHADBHADE

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Bhadbhade A, Cheng DW. Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Alzheimer’s Disease. Iranian Journal of Child Neurology2012;6(1:1-5.Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and a leading cause of dementia. The AD is characterized by presence of intraneuronal tangles and extracellular plaques in the brain. The plaques are composed of dense and mostly insoluble deposits of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ, formed by sequential cleavage of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP, by two pathways amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic. Tangles are composed of paired helical fragments, which aggregate to form, microtubular protein tau. Although Aβ plaques are established to be the cause of the disease, there exist genetic factors and other pathological identifications in addition to these which are an integral part of the disease. This article gives an overview into the mechanism of APP action, genetic factors and other pathological identifications contributing to Alzheimer’s disease formation.References Brookmeyer R, Gray S, Kawas C. Projections of Alzheimer’s disease in the United States and the public health impact of delaying disease onset. American Journal of Public Health 1998;88(9:1337. Hebert LE, Scherr PA, Bienias JL, Bennett DA, Evans DA. Alzheimer disease in the US population. Arch Neurol 2003;60(8:1119-22. Möller HJ, Graeber M. The case described by Alois Alzheimer in 1911. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience 1998:248(3:111-122. Selkoe D J. (2002. Deciphering the genesis and fate of amyloid beta-protein yields novel therapies for Alzheimer disease. J Clinic Investigat 2002;110(10: 1375-82. Wolfe MS. Tau mutations in neurodegenerative diseases. J Biolog Chem 2009;284(10:6021. Selkoe DJ. Alzheimer’s disease: genes, proteins, and therapy. Physiological reviews 2001;81(2:741. Selkoe DJ. The cell biology of [beta]-amyloid precursor protein and presenilin in Alzheimer

  20. Almanac 2015: atrial fibrillation research in Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad-Ul-Qamar, Muhammad; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2016-04-15

    Atrial fibrillation continues to attract interest in the cardiovascular community and inHeart Over 60 original research and review papers published inHeartin 2014-2015 cover various aspects of atrial fibrillation, from associated conditions and precipitating factors to new approaches to management. Here, we provide an overview of articles on atrial fibrillation published inHeartin 2014-2015, highlighting new developments, emerging concepts and novel approaches to treatment. PMID:26791994

  1. Minimally Invasive Surgical Therapies for Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Michael W.A.; Yoshitsugu Nakamura; Bob Kiaii

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most common sustained arrhythmia and is associated with significant risks of thromboembolism, stroke, congestive heart failure, and death. There have been major advances in the management of atrial fibrillation including pharmacologic therapies, antithrombotic therapies, and ablation techniques. Surgery for atrial fibrillation, including both concomitant and stand-alone interventions, is an effective therapy to restore sinus rhythm. Minimally invasive surgical ablat...

  2. Postoperative atrial fibrillation, oxidative stress, and inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZAYDIN, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Postoperative atrial fibrillation is the most common complication of cardiac surgery. It is associated with increased complication rates. Recent trials have suggested that inflammation and oxidative stress have key roles in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation. Current evidence evaluating the use of antiinflammatory and antioxidant agents, including statins, corticosteroids, N-acetylcysteine, vitamin C, and fish oil, to prevent postoperative atrial fibrillation is promising. However, la...

  3. Alginate-Collagen Fibril Composite Hydrogel

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Baniasadi; Majid Minary-Jolandan

    2015-01-01

    We report on the synthesis and the mechanical characterization of an alginate-collagen fibril composite hydrogel. Native type I collagen fibrils were used to synthesize the fibrous composite hydrogel. We characterized the mechanical properties of the fabricated fibrous hydrogel using tensile testing; rheometry and atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindentation experiments. The results show that addition of type I collagen fibrils improves the rheological and indentation properties of th...

  4. Alginate-Collagen Fibril Composite Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Baniasadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the synthesis and the mechanical characterization of an alginate-collagen fibril composite hydrogel. Native type I collagen fibrils were used to synthesize the fibrous composite hydrogel. We characterized the mechanical properties of the fabricated fibrous hydrogel using tensile testing; rheometry and atomic force microscope (AFM-based nanoindentation experiments. The results show that addition of type I collagen fibrils improves the rheological and indentation properties of the hydrogel.

  5. Mapping Atrial Fibrillation: 2015 Update

    OpenAIRE

    Chirag R. Barbhayia; Saurabh Kumar; Gregory F. Michaud

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation requires a trigger that initiates the arrhythmia and substrate that favors perpetuation. Cardiac mapping is necessary to locate triggers and substrate so that an ablation strategy can be optimized. The most commonly used cardiac mapping approach is isochronal or activation mapping, which aims to create a spatial model of electrical wavefront propagation. Historically, activation mapping has been successful for mapping point source and single or double wave reentrant arr...

  6. Atrial fibrillation care improvement collaborative

    OpenAIRE

    Robelia, Paul; Kopecky, Stephen; Thacher, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly common cardiac arrhythmia. Many patients with new onset or recurrent AF present to the emergency department and are subsequently admitted to the hospital and seen by cardiology specialists for follow up. In an attempt to address this high utilization of acute health care resources, reduce costs, and improve patient care, our institution instituted a collaborative project between the departments of emergency medicine, cardiology, family medicine, and...

  7. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions were performed using a surgical cut-and-sew approach that ensured transmurality. The Cox-Maze IV is the most currently accepted iteration. It achieves the same lesion set of the Cox- maze III but uses alternative energy sources to create the transmural lesions, potentially in a minimally invasive approach on the beating heart. High-frequency ultrasound, microwave, and laser energy have all been used with varying success in the past. Today, bipolar radiofrequency heat or cryotherapy cooling are the most accepted sources for creating linear lesions with consistent safety and transmurality. The robust and reliable nature of these energy delivery methods has yielded a success rate reaching 90% freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12 months. Such approaches offer a significant long-term advantage over catheter-based ablation, especially in patients having longstanding, persistent atrial fibrillation with characteristics such as dilated left atrial dimensions, poor ejection fraction, and failed catheter ablation. Based on these improved results, there currently is significant interest in developing a hybrid ablation strategy that incorporates the superior transmural robust lesions of surgical ablation, the reliable stroke prevention potential of epicardial left atrial appendage exclusion, and sophisticated mapping and confirmatory catheter-based ablation technology. Such a minimally invasive hybrid strategy for ablation may lead to the development of multidisciplinary "Afib teams" to

  8. Surgical Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Ramlawi, Basel; Abu Saleh, Walid K.

    2015-01-01

    The Cox-maze procedure for the restoration of normal sinus rhythm, initially developed by Dr. James Cox, underwent several iterations over the years. The main concept consists of creating a series of transmural lesions in the right and left atria that disrupt re-entrant circuits responsible for propagating the abnormal atrial fibrillation rhythm. The left atrial appendage is excluded as a component of the Maze procedure. For the first three iterations of the Cox- maze procedure, these lesions...

  9. Atrial fibrillation in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roger Kerzner; Michael W. Rich

    2005-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an extremely common condition in the elderly, with increasing prevalence around the world as the population ages. AF may be associated with serious health consequences, including stroke, heart failure, and decreased quality of life, so that careful management of AF by geriatric health care providers is required. With careful attention to anticoagulation therapy, and prudent use of medications and invasive procedures to minimize symptoms, many of the adverse health consequences of AF can be prevented.

  10. Amyloid myopathy: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Tuomaala

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid myopathy (AM is a rare manifestation of primary systemic amyloidosis (AL. Like inflammatory myopathies, it presents with proximal muscle weakness and an increased creatine kinase level. We describe a case of AL with severe, rapidly progressive myopathy as the initial symptom. The clinical manifestation and muscle biopsy were suggestive of inclusion body myositis. AM was not suspected until amyloidosis was seen in the gastric mucosal biopsy. The muscle biopsy was then re-examined more specifically, and Congo red staining eventually showed vascular and interstitial amyloid accumulation, which led to a diagnosis of AM. The present case illustrates the fact that the clinical picture of AM can mimic that of inclusion body myositis.

  11. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David

    2011-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of β-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. PMID:21695112

  12. Aspirin Often Wrongly Prescribed for Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159459.html Aspirin Often Wrongly Prescribed for Atrial Fibrillation Blood thinners -- not aspirin -- dramatically cut the risk of stroke, researchers say ...

  13. Present treatment options for atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Lairikyengbam, S; Anderson, M.,; Davies, A

    2003-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the commonest sustained cardiac arrhythmia. It accounts for >35% of all hospital admissions for cardiac arrhythmias in the United States. The presence of atrial fibrillation increases the mortality of a population by up to twofold. The risk of stroke increases from 1.5% in patients with atrial fibrillation from 50–59 years of age to up to 23.5% for such patients aged 80–89 years. Although the diagnosis of atrial fibrillation is usually straightforward, effective treatme...

  14. Inhibition of aggregation of amyloid peptides by beta-sheet breaker peptides and their binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viet, Man Hoang; Ngo, Son Tung; Lam, Nguyen Sy; Li, Mai Suan

    2011-06-01

    The effects of beta-sheet breaker peptides KLVFF and LPFFD on the oligomerization of amyloid peptides were studied by all-atom simulations. It was found that LPFFD interferes the aggregation of Aβ(16-22) peptides to a greater extent than does KLVFF. Using the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we found that the former binds more strongly to Aβ(16-22). Therefore, by simulations, we have clarified the relationship between aggregation rates and binding affinity: the stronger the ligand binding, the slower the oligomerization process. The binding affinity of pentapeptides to full-length peptide Aβ(1-40) and its mature fibrils has been considered using the Autodock and MM-PBSA methods. The hydrophobic interaction between ligands and receptors plays a more important role for association than does hydrogen bonding. The influence of beta-sheet breaker peptides on the secondary structures of monomer Aβ(1-40) was studied in detail, and it turns out that, in their presence, the total beta-sheet content can be enhanced. However, the aggregation can be slowed because the beta-content is reduced in fibril-prone regions. Both pentapeptides strongly bind to monomer Aβ(1-40), as well as to mature fibrils, but KLVFF displays a lower binding affinity than LPFFD. Our findings are in accord with earlier experiments that both of these peptides can serve as prominent inhibitors. In addition, we predict that LPFFD inhibits/degrades the fibrillogenesis of full-length amyloid peptides better than KLVFF. This is probably related to a difference in their total hydrophobicities in that the higher the hydrophobicity, the lower the inhibitory capacity. The GROMOS96 43a1 force field with explicit water and the force field proposed by Morris et al. (Morris et al. J. Comput. Chem. 1998, 19, 1639 ) were employed for all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and Autodock experiments, respectively. PMID:21563780

  15. Exploring new biological functions of amyloids: bacteria cell agglutination mediated by host protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Torrent

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs are important effectors of the innate immune system that play a vital role in the prevention of infections. Recent advances have highlighted the similarity between AMPs and amyloid proteins. Using the Eosinophil Cationic Protein as a model, we have rationalized the structure-activity relationships between amyloid aggregation and antimicrobial activity. Our results show how protein aggregation can induce bacteria agglutination and cell death. Using confocal and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy we have tracked the formation in situ of protein amyloid-like aggregates at the bacteria surface and on membrane models. In both cases, fibrillar aggregates able to bind to amyloid diagnostic dyes were detected. Additionally, a single point mutation (Ile13 to Ala can suppress the protein amyloid behavior, abolishing the agglutinating activity and impairing the antimicrobial action. The mutant is also defective in triggering both leakage and lipid vesicle aggregation. We conclude that ECP aggregation at the bacterial surface is essential for its cytotoxicity. Hence, we propose here a new prospective biological function for amyloid-like aggregates with potential biological relevance.

  16. Toxic β-Amyloid (Aβ) Alzheimer's Ion Channels: From Structure to Function and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth

    2012-02-01

    interacting α-helices that robustly prevent ion leakage, rather than hydrogen-bonded β-strands. Moreover, in comparison with β-rich antimicrobial peptide (AMP) such as a protegrin-1 (PG-1), both Aβ and PG-1 are cytotoxic, and capable of forming fibrils and dynamic channels which consist of subunits with similar dimensions. These combined properties support a functional relationship between amyloidogenic peptides and β-sheet-rich cytolytic AMPs, suggesting that PG-1 is amyloidogenic and amyloids may have an antimicrobial function.

  17. Medicinal Chemistry Focusing on Aggregation of Amyloid-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohma, Youhei

    2016-01-01

    The aggregation of peptides/proteins is intimately related to a number of human diseases. More than 20 have been identified which aggregate into fibrils containing extensive β-sheet structures, and species generated in the aggregation processes (i.e., oligomers and fibrils) contribute to disease development. Amyloid-β peptide (designated Aβ), related to Alzheimer's disease (AD), is the representative example. The intensive aggregation property of Aβ also leads to difficulty in its synthesis. To improve the synthetic problem, we developed an O-acyl isopeptide of Aβ1-42, in which the N-acyl linkage (amide bond) of Ser(26) was replaced with an O-acyl linkage (ester bond) at the side chain. The O-acyl isopeptide demonstrated markedly higher water-solubility than that of Aβ1-42, while it quickly converted to intact monomer Aβ1-42 via an O-to-N acyl rearrangement under physiological conditions. Inhibition of the pathogenic aggregation of Aβ1-42 might be a therapeutic strategy for curing AD. We succeeded in the rational design and identification of a small molecule aggregation inhibitor based on a pharmacophore motif obtained from cyclo[-Lys-Leu-Val-Phe-Phe-]. Moreover, the inhibition of Aβ aggregation was achieved via oxygenation (i.e., incorporation of oxygen atoms to Aβ) using an artificial catalyst. We identified a selective, cell-compatible photo-oxygenation catalyst of Aβ, a flavin catalyst attached to an Aβ-binding peptide, which markedly decreased the aggregation potency and neurotoxicity of Aβ. PMID:26726739

  18. AG10 inhibits amyloidogenesis and cellular toxicity of the familial amyloid cardiomyopathy-associated V122I transthyretin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penchala, Sravan C; Connelly, Stephen; Wang, Yu; Park, Miki S; Zhao, Lei; Baranczak, Aleksandra; Rappley, Irit; Vogel, Hannes; Liedtke, Michaela; Witteles, Ronald M; Powers, Evan T; Reixach, Natàlia; Chan, William K; Wilson, Ian A; Kelly, Jeffery W; Graef, Isabella A; Alhamadsheh, Mamoun M

    2013-06-11

    The misassembly of soluble proteins into toxic aggregates, including amyloid fibrils, underlies a large number of human degenerative diseases. Cardiac amyloidoses, which are most commonly caused by aggregation of Ig light chains or transthyretin (TTR) in the cardiac interstitium and conducting system, represent an important and often underdiagnosed cause of heart failure. Two types of TTR-associated amyloid cardiomyopathies are clinically important. The Val122Ile (V122I) mutation, which alters the kinetic stability of TTR and affects 3% to 4% of African American subjects, can lead to development of familial amyloid cardiomyopathy. In addition, aggregation of WT TTR in individuals older than age 65 y causes senile systemic amyloidosis. TTR-mediated amyloid cardiomyopathies are chronic and progressive conditions that lead to arrhythmias, biventricular heart failure, and death. As no Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs are currently available for treatment of these diseases, the development of therapeutic agents that prevent TTR-mediated cardiotoxicity is desired. Here, we report the development of AG10, a potent and selective kinetic stabilizer of TTR. AG10 prevents dissociation of V122I-TTR in serum samples obtained from patients with familial amyloid cardiomyopathy. In contrast to other TTR stabilizers currently in clinical trials, AG10 stabilizes V122I- and WT-TTR equally well and also exceeds their efficacy to stabilize WT and mutant TTR in whole serum. Crystallographic studies of AG10 bound to V122I-TTR give valuable insights into how AG10 achieves such effective kinetic stabilization of TTR, which will also aid in designing better TTR stabilizers. The oral bioavailability of AG10, combined with additional desirable drug-like features, makes it a very promising candidate to treat TTR amyloid cardiomyopathy. PMID:23716704

  19. Amyloid properties of the leader peptide of variant B cystatin C: implications for Alzheimer and macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Anna, Ricardo; Navarro, Susanna; Ventura, Salvador; Paraoan, Luminita; Foguel, Debora

    2016-03-01

    Variant B (VB) of cystatin C has a mutation in its signal peptide (A25T), which interferes with its processing leading to reduced secretion and partial retention in the vicinity of the mitochondria. There are genetic evidences of the association of VB with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Here, we investigated aggregation and amyloid propensities of unprocessed VB combining computational and in vitro studies. Aggregation predictors revealed the presence of four aggregation-prone regions, with a strong one at the level of the signal peptide, which indeed formed toxic aggregates and mature amyloid fibrils in solution. In light of these results, we propose for the first time the role of the signal peptide in pathogenesis of AD and AMD. PMID:26865059

  20. Differential regulation of amyloid-β-protein mRNA expression within hippocampal neuronal subpopulations in Alzheimer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have mapped the neuroanatomical distribution of amyloid-β-protein mRNA within neuronal subpopulations of the hippocampal formation in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), normal aged human, and patients with Alzheimer disease. Amyloid-β-protein mRNA appears to be expressed in all hippocampal neurons, but at different levels of abundance. In the central nervous system of monkey and normal aged human, image analysis shows that neurons of the dentate gyrus and cornu Ammonis fields contain a 2.5-times-greater hybridization signal than is present in neurons of the subiculum and entorhinal cortex. In contrast, in the Alzheimer disease hippocampal formation, the levels of amyloid-β-protein mRNA in the cornu Ammonis field 3 and parasubiculum are equivalent. These findings suggest that within certain neuronal subpopulations cell type-specific regulation of amyloid-β-protein gene expression may be altered in Alzheimer disease