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Sample records for amyloid beta peptide

  1. Electrochemistry of Alzheimer disease amyloid beta peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiorcea-Paquim, Ana-Maria; Enache, Teodor Adrian; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2018-02-13

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a widespread form of dementia that is estimated to affect 44.4 million people worldwide. AD pathology is closely related to the accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides in fibrils and plagues, the small oligomeric intermediate species formed during the Aβ peptides aggregation presenting the highest neurotoxicity. This review discusses the recent advances on the Aβ peptides electrochemical characterisation. The Aβ peptides oxidation at a glassy carbon electrode occurs in one or two steps, depending on the amino acid sequence, length and content. The first electron transfer reaction corresponds to the tyrosine Tyr10 amino acid residue oxidation, and the second to all three histidine (His6, His13 and His14) and one methionine (Met35) amino acid residues. The Aβ peptides aggregation and amyloid fibril formation is electrochemically detected via the electroactive amino acids oxidation peak currents decrease that occurs in a time dependent manner. The Aβ peptides redox behaviour is correlated with changes in the adsorption morphology from initially random coiled structures, corresponding to the Aβ peptide monomers in random coil or in α-helix conformations, to aggregates and protofibrils and two types of fibrils, corresponding to the Aβ peptides in a β-sheet configuration, observed by atomic force microscopy. Electrochemical studies of Aβ peptides aggregation, mediated by the interaction with metal ions, in particular zinc, copper, and iron, and different methodologies concerning the detection of Aβ peptide biomarkers of AD in biological fluids, using electrochemical biosensors, are also discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Amyloid Beta Peptide Folding in Reverse Micelles.

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    Eskici, Gözde; Axelsen, Paul H

    2017-07-19

    Previously published experimental studies have suggested that when the 40-residue amyloid beta peptide is encapsulated in a reverse micelle, it folds into a structure that may nucleate amyloid fibril formation (Yeung, P. S.-W.; Axelsen, P. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012, 134, 6061 ). The factors that induce the formation of this structure have now been identified in a multi-microsecond simulation of the same reverse micelle system that was studied experimentally. Key features of the polypeptide-micelle interaction include the anchoring of a hydrophobic residue cluster into gaps in the reverse micelle surface, the formation of a beta turn at the anchor point that brings N- and C-terminal segments of the polypeptide into proximity, high ionic strength that promotes intramolecular hydrogen bond formation, and deformation of the reverse micelle surface to facilitate interactions with the surface along the entire length of the polypeptide. Together, these features cause the simulation-derived vibrational spectrum to red shift in a manner that reproduces the red-shift previously reported experimentally. On the basis of these findings, a new mechanism is proposed whereby membranes nucleate fibril formation and facilitate the in-register alignment of polypeptide strands that is characteristic of amyloid fibrils.

  3. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Amyloid Beta Peptides Differentially Affect Hippocampal Theta Rhythms In Vitro

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    Armando I. Gutiérrez-Lerma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble amyloid beta peptide (Aβ is responsible for the early cognitive dysfunction observed in Alzheimer's disease. Both cholinergically and glutamatergically induced hippocampal theta rhythms are related to learning and memory, spatial navigation, and spatial memory. However, these two types of theta rhythms are not identical; they are associated with different behaviors and can be differentially modulated by diverse experimental conditions. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate whether or not application of soluble Aβ alters the two types of theta frequency oscillatory network activity generated in rat hippocampal slices by application of the cholinergic and glutamatergic agonists carbachol or DHPG, respectively. Due to previous evidence that oscillatory activity can be differentially affected by different Aβ peptides, we also compared Aβ25−35 and Aβ1−42 for their effects on theta rhythms in vitro at similar concentrations (0.5 to 1.0 μM. We found that Aβ25−35 reduces, with less potency than Aβ1−42, carbachol-induced population theta oscillatory activity. In contrast, DHPG-induced oscillatory activity was not affected by a high concentration of Aβ25−35 but was reduced by Aβ1−42. Our results support the idea that different amyloid peptides might alter specific cellular mechanisms related to the generation of specific neuronal network activities, instead of exerting a generalized inhibitory effect on neuronal network function.

  5. Interaction of amyloid inhibitor proteins with amyloid beta peptides: insight from molecular dynamics simulations.

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    Payel Das

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the detailed mechanism by which proteins such as human αB- crystallin and human lysozyme inhibit amyloid beta (Aβ peptide aggregation is crucial for designing treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Thus, unconstrained, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent have been performed to characterize the Aβ17-42 assembly in presence of the αB-crystallin core domain and of lysozyme. Simulations reveal that both inhibitor proteins compete with inter-peptide interaction by binding to the peptides during the early stage of aggregation, which is consistent with their inhibitory action reported in experiments. However, the Aβ binding dynamics appear different for each inhibitor. The binding between crystallin and the peptide monomer, dominated by electrostatics, is relatively weak and transient due to the heterogeneous amino acid distribution of the inhibitor surface. The crystallin-bound Aβ oligomers are relatively long-lived, as they form more extensive contact surface with the inhibitor protein. In contrast, a high local density of arginines from lysozyme allows strong binding with Aβ peptide monomers, resulting in stable complexes. Our findings not only illustrate, in atomic detail, how the amyloid inhibitory mechanism of human αB-crystallin, a natural chaperone, is different from that of human lysozyme, but also may aid de novo design of amyloid inhibitors.

  6. Nasal administration of amyloid-beta peptide decreases cerebral amyloid burden in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner, H L; Lemere, C A; Maron, R

    2000-01-01

    Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease-implicated ......Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease...

  7. Influence of hydrophobic Teflon particles on the structure of amyloid beta-peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacomelli, C.E.; Norde, W.

    2003-01-01

    The amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) constitutes the major peptide component of the amyloid plaque deposits of Alzheimer's disease in humans. The Abeta changes from a nonpathogenic to a pathogenic conformation resulting in self-aggregation and deposition of the peptide. It has been established that

  8. Amyloid Beta Peptide Slows Down Sensory-Induced Hippocampal Oscillations

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    Fernando Peña-Ortega

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD progresses with a deterioration of hippocampal function that is likely induced by amyloid beta (Aβ oligomers. Hippocampal function is strongly dependent on theta rhythm, and disruptions in this rhythm have been related to the reduction of cognitive performance in AD. Accordingly, both AD patients and AD-transgenic mice show an increase in theta rhythm at rest but a reduction in cognitive-induced theta rhythm. We have previously found that monomers of the short sequence of Aβ (peptide 25–35 reduce sensory-induced theta oscillations. However, considering on the one hand that different Aβ sequences differentially affect hippocampal oscillations and on the other hand that Aβ oligomers seem to be responsible for the cognitive decline observed in AD, here we aimed to explore the effect of Aβ oligomers on sensory-induced theta rhythm. Our results show that intracisternal injection of Aβ1–42 oligomers, which has no significant effect on spontaneous hippocampal activity, disrupts the induction of theta rhythm upon sensory stimulation. Instead of increasing the power in the theta band, the hippocampus of Aβ-treated animals responds to sensory stimulation (tail pinch with an increase in lower frequencies. These findings demonstrate that Aβ alters induced theta rhythm, providing an in vivo model to test for therapeutic approaches to overcome Aβ-induced hippocampal and cognitive dysfunctions.

  9. Imaging amyloid beta peptide oligomeric particles in solution.

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    Dong, Jijun; Apkarian, Robert P; Lynn, David G

    2005-09-01

    While all protein misfolding diseases are characterized by fibrous amyloid deposits, the favorable free energy and strongly cooperative nature of the self-assembly have complicated the development of therapeutic strategies aimed at preventing their formation. As structural models for the amyloid fibrils approach atomic resolution, increasing evidence suggests that early folding intermediates, rather than the final structure, are more strongly associated with the loss of neuronal function. For that reason we now demonstrate the use of cryo-etch high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (cryo-HRSEM) for the direct observation of pathway intermediates in amyloid assembly. A congener of the Abeta peptide of Alzheimer's disease, Abeta(13-21), samples a variety of time-dependent self-assembles in a manner similar to those seen for larger proteins. A morphological description of these intermediates is the first step towards their structural characterization and the definition of their role in both amyloid assembly and neurotoxicity.

  10. PEGylated nanoparticles bind to and alter amyloid-beta peptide conformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brambilla, Davide; Verpillot, Romain; Le Droumaguet, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the polyethylene glycol (PEG) corona of long-circulating polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) favors interaction with the amyloid-beta (Aß(1-42)) peptide both in solution and in serum. The influence of PEGylation of poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) and poly(lactic acid) NPs on the int......We have demonstrated that the polyethylene glycol (PEG) corona of long-circulating polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) favors interaction with the amyloid-beta (Aß(1-42)) peptide both in solution and in serum. The influence of PEGylation of poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate) and poly(lactic acid) NPs...

  11. Amyloid Beta Mediates Memory Formation

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    Garcia-Osta, Ana; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes sequential cleavages to generate various polypeptides, including the amyloid [beta] (1-42) peptide (A[beta][1-42]), which is believed to play a major role in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide evidence that, in contrast with its pathological role when accumulated,…

  12. Oxidative stress and the amyloid beta peptide in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cheignon

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. In particular, it is linked to the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, an age-related neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Histopathological hallmarks of AD are intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular formation of senile plaques composed of the amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ in aggregated form along with metal-ions such as copper, iron or zinc. Redox active metal ions, as for example copper, can catalyze the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS when bound to the amyloid-β (Aβ. The ROS thus produced, in particular the hydroxyl radical which is the most reactive one, may contribute to oxidative damage on both the Aβ peptide itself and on surrounding molecule (proteins, lipids, …. This review highlights the existing link between oxidative stress and AD, and the consequences towards the Aβ peptide and surrounding molecules in terms of oxidative damage. In addition, the implication of metal ions in AD, their interaction with the Aβ peptide and redox properties leading to ROS production are discussed, along with both in vitro and in vivo oxidation of the Aβ peptide, at the molecular level. Keywords: Oxidative stress, Amyloid beta peptide, Metal-ions, Reactive oxygen species, Oxidative damages

  13. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

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    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  14. The Aggregation Potential of the 1-15-and 1-16-Fragments of the Amyloid beta Peptide and Their Influence on the Aggregation of A beta 40

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shabestari, M.; Plug, T.; Motazacker, M. M.; Meeuwenoord, N. J.; Filippov, D. V.; Meijers, J. C. M.; Huber, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aggregation of amyloid beta (A beta) peptide is important in Alzheimer's disease. Shorter A beta fragments may reduce A beta's cytotoxicity and are used in diagnostics. The aggregation of A beta 16 is controversial; Liu et al. (J. Neurosci. Res. 75:162-171, 2004) and Liao et al. (FEBS Lett.

  15. Sex-dependent actions of amyloid beta peptides on hippocampal choline carriers of postnatal rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištofíková, Z.; Říčný, Jan; Kozmiková, I.; Řípová, D.; Zach, P.; Klaschka, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 3 (2006), s. 351-360 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/03/1547 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : amyloid beta peptide * high affinity choline transport * rat hippocampus Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.139, year: 2006

  16. Nasal administration of amyloid-beta peptide decreases cerebral amyloid burden in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner, H L; Lemere, C A; Maron, R

    2000-01-01

    Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease-implicated ......Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide, an early and essential feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is accompanied by an inflammatory reaction marked by microgliosis, astrocytosis, and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Mucosal administration of disease......-implicated proteins can induce antigen-specific anti-inflammatory immune responses in mucosal lymphoid tissue which then act systemically. We hypothesized that chronic mucosal administration of Abeta peptide might induce an anti-inflammatory process in AD brain tissue that could beneficially affect...... Abeta plaque burden and Abeta42 levels in mice treated intranasally with Abeta peptide versus controls treated with myelin basic protein or left untreated. This lower Abeta burden was associated with decreased local microglial and astrocytic activation, decreased neuritic dystrophy, serum anti...

  17. Beta-amyloid peptide blocks the fast-inactivating K+ current in rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, T A; Smith, D O; Murphy, R M

    1996-01-01

    Deposition of beta-amyloid peptide (A beta) in senile plaques is a hallmark of Alzheimer disease neuropathology. Chronic exposure of neuronal cultures to synthetic A beta is directly toxic, or enhances neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxins. Exposure to A beta may cause a loss of cellular calcium homeostasis, but the mechanism by which this occurs is uncertain. In this work, the acute response of rat hippocampal neurons to applications of synthetic A beta was measured using whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. Pulse application of A beta caused a reversible voltage-dependent decrease in membrane conductance. A beta selectively blocked the voltage-gated fast-inactivating K+ current, with an estimated KI < 10 microM. A beta also blocked the delayed rectifying current, but only at the highest concentration tested. The response was independent of aggregation state or peptide length. The dynamic response of the fast-inactivating current to a voltage jump was consistent with a model whereby A beta binds reversibly to closed channels and prevents their opening. Blockage of fast-inactivating K+ channels by A beta could lead to prolonged cell depolarization, thereby increasing Ca2+ influx. PMID:8770205

  18. Amyloid beta-peptide(25-35) changes [Ca2+] in hippocampal neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Helle Smidt; Beatty, D M; Morris, S J

    1998-01-01

    Insoluble aggregates of the amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) is a major constituent of senile plaques found in brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. The detrimental effects of aggregated A beta is associated with an increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). We examined the effects...... of A beta(25-35) on [Ca2+]i and intracellular H+ concentration ([H+]i) in single hippocampal neurons by real time fluorescence imaging using the Ca(2+)- and H(+)-specific ratio dyes, indo-1 and SNARF-1. Incubation of these cultures with A beta(25-35) for 3-12 days in vitro increased [Ca2+]i and [H+]i...

  19. Complement activation by the amyloid proteins A beta peptide and beta 2-microglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Nielsen, E H; Svehag, S E

    1999-01-01

    Complement activation (CA) has been reported to play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate whether CA may contribute to amyloidogenesis in general, the CA potential of different amyloid fibril proteins was tested. CA induced by A beta preparations containing soluble...... protein, protofilaments and some fibrils or only fibrils in a solid phase system (ELISA) was modest with a slow kinetics compared to the positive delta IgG control. Soluble A beta induced no detectable CA in a liquid phase system (complement consumption assay) while fibrillar A beta caused CA at 200 mg....../ml and higher concentrations. Soluble beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2M) purified from peritoneal dialysates was found to be as potent a complement activator as A beta in both solid and liquid phase systems while beta 2M purified from urine exhibited lower activity, a difference which may be explained...

  20. Structural heterogeneity in familial Alzheimer's disease mutants of amyloid-beta peptides.

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    Chong, Song-Ho; Yim, Janghyun; Ham, Sihyun

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive deposition of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides in brain parenchyma and cerebral blood vessels. Several pathogenic familial mutations of Aβ peptides have been identified that exhibit enhanced neurotoxicity and aggregative ability. However, knowledge of the structural characteristics of those Aβ mutants is still limited. Here, we report multiple all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the wild-type 42-residue Aβ peptide (Aβ42) and its Flemish (A21G), Arctic (E22G), Dutch (E22Q), Italian (E22K), and Iowa (D23N) familial mutants in explicit water. After validating our simulations by comparison with available experimental data, we examined common/different features in the secondary and tertiary structures of the wild-type and five familial mutants of Aβ42. We found that Aβ42 peptides display quite heterogeneous secondary and tertiary structure ensembles. Such structural heterogeneity in the monomeric state would facilitate interconversions between various secondary structures during the formation of a β-sheet-rich amyloid fibril, and may also serve as a structural basis of the amyloid polymorphism.

  1. Measurement of beta-amyloid peptides in specific cells using a photo thin-film transistor

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    Kim, Chang-Beom; Chae, Cheol-Joo; Shin, Hye-Rim; Song, Ki-Bong

    2012-01-01

    The existence of beta-amyloid [Aβ] peptides in the brain has been regarded as the most archetypal biomarker of Alzheimer's disease [AD]. Recently, an early clinical diagnosis has been considered a great importance in identifying people who are at high risk of AD. However, no microscale electronic sensing devices for the detection of Aβ peptides have been developed yet. In this study, we propose an effective method to evaluate a small quantity of Aβ peptides labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate [FITC] using a photosensitive field-effect transistor [p-FET] with an on-chip single-layer optical filter. To accurately evaluate the quantity of Aβ peptides within the cells cultured on the p-FET device, we measured the photocurrents which resulted from the FITC-conjugated Aβ peptides expressed from the cells and measured the number of photons of the fluorochrome in the cells using a photomultiplier tube. Thus, we evaluated the correlation between the generated photocurrents and the number of emitted photons. We also evaluated the correlation between the number of emitted photons and the amount of FITC by measuring the FITC volume using AFM. Finally, we estimated the quantity of Aβ peptides of the cells placed on the p-FET sensing area on the basis of the binding ratio between FITC molecules and Aβ peptides.

  2. Pulsed hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry probes conformational changes in amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Rempel, Don L; Zhang, Jun; Sharma, Anuj K; Mirica, Liviu M; Gross, Michael L

    2013-09-03

    Probing the conformational changes of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide aggregation is challenging owing to the vast heterogeneity of the resulting soluble aggregates. To investigate the formation of these aggregates in solution, we designed an MS-based biophysical approach and applied it to the formation of soluble aggregates of the Aβ42 peptide, the proposed causative agent in Alzheimer's disease. The approach incorporates pulsed hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled with MS analysis. The combined approach provides evidence for a self-catalyzed aggregation with a lag phase, as observed previously by fluorescence methods. Unlike those approaches, pulsed hydrogen-deuterium exchange does not require modified Aβ42 (e.g., labeling with a fluorophore). Furthermore, the approach reveals that the center region of Aβ42 is first to aggregate, followed by the C and N termini. We also found that the lag phase in the aggregation of soluble species is affected by temperature and Cu(2+) ions. This MS approach has sufficient structural resolution to allow interrogation of Aβ aggregation in physiologically relevant environments. This platform should be generally useful for investigating the aggregation of other amyloid-forming proteins and neurotoxic soluble peptide aggregates.

  3. Beta-amyloid peptides undergo regulated co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters.

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    Toneff, Thomas; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Mosier, Charles; Abagyan, Armen; Ziegler, Michael; Hook, Vivian

    2013-08-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are secreted from neurons, resulting in extracellular accumulation of Aβ and neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease. Because neuronal secretion is fundamental for the release of neurotransmitters, this study assessed the hypothesis that Aβ undergoes co-release with neurotransmitters. Model neuronal-like chromaffin cells were investigated, and results illustrate regulated, co-secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with peptide neurotransmitters (galanin, enkephalin, and NPY) and catecholamine neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine). Regulated secretion from chromaffin cells was stimulated by KCl depolarization and nicotine. Forskolin, stimulating cAMP, also induced co-secretion of Aβ peptides with peptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters. These data suggested the co-localization of Aβ with neurotransmitters in dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) that store and secrete such chemical messengers. Indeed, Aβ was demonstrated to be present in DCSV with neuropeptide and catecholamine transmitters. Furthermore, the DCSV organelle contains APP and its processing proteases, β- and γ-secretases, that are necessary for production of Aβ. Thus, Aβ can be generated in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV. Human IMR32 neuroblastoma cells also displayed regulated secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with the galanin neurotransmitter. These findings illustrate that Aβ peptides are present in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV, and undergo co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters that regulate brain functions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A systematic review of amyloid-beta peptides as putative mediators of the association between affective disorders and Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasowa, Leda; Heegaard, N. H. H.

    2014-01-01

    was to explore clinically founded evidence for amyloid-beta peptides in cerebrospinal fluid and blood as putative biomarkers for affective disorders. Method: Systematic searches in Embase and PubMed databases yielded 23 eligible, observational studies. Results: Despite inconsistencies that were partly ascribed...

  5. A disulfide-linked amyloid-beta peptide dimer forms a protofibril-like oligomer through a distinct pathway from amyloid fibril formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji; Matsuzaki, Katsumi; Hoshino, Masaru

    2010-08-24

    The conversion of the soluble, nontoxic amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide into an aggregated, toxic form rich in beta-sheets is considered a key step in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Whereas growing evidence indicates that the Abeta amyloid fibrils consist of in-register parallel beta-sheets, little is known about the structure of soluble oligomeric intermediates because of their transient nature. To understand the mechanism by which amyloid fibrils form, especially the initial development of the "nucleus" oligomeric intermediates, we prepared covalently linked dimeric Abeta peptides and analyzed the kinetics of the fibril-forming process. A covalent bond introduced between two Abeta molecules dramatically facilitated the spontaneous formation of aggregates with a beta-sheet structure and affinity for thioflavin T. Transmission electron microscopy revealed, however, that these aggregates differed in morphology from amyloid fibrils, more closely resembling protofibrils. The protofibril-like aggregates were not the most thermodynamically stable state but were a kinetically trapped state. The results emphasize the importance of the conformational flexibility of the Abeta molecule and a balance in the association and dissociation rate for the formation of rigid amyloid fibrils.

  6. Bloodstream Amyloid-beta (1-40) Peptide, Cognition, and Outcomes in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Barallat, Jaume; de Antonio, Marta; Domingo, Mar; Zamora, Elisabet; Vila, Joan; Subirana, Isaac; Gastelurrutia, Paloma; Pastor, M Cruz; Januzzi, James L; Lupón, Josep

    2017-11-01

    In the brain, amyloid-beta generation participates in the pathophysiology of cognitive disorders; in the bloodstream, the role of amyloid-beta is uncertain but may be linked to sterile inflammation and senescence. We explored the relationship between blood levels of amyloid-beta 1-40 peptide (Aβ40), cognition, and mortality (all-cause, cardiovascular, and heart failure [HF]-related) in ambulatory patients with HF. Bloodstream Aβ40 was measured in 939 consecutive patients with HF. Cognition was evaluated with the Pfeiffer questionnaire (adjusted for educational level) at baseline and during follow-up. Multivariate Cox regression analyses and measurements of performance (discrimination, calibration, and reclassification) were used, with competing risk for specific causes of death. Over 5.1 ± 2.9 years, 471 patients died (all-cause): 250 from cardiovascular causes and 131 HF-related. The median Aβ40 concentration was 519.1 pg/mL [Q1-Q3: 361.8-749.9 pg/mL]. The Aβ40 concentration correlated with age, body mass index, renal dysfunction, and New York Heart Association functional class (all P < .001). There were no differences in Aβ40 in patients with and without cognitive impairment at baseline (P = .97) or during follow-up (P = .20). In multivariable analysis, including relevant clinical predictors and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, Aβ40 remained significantly associated with all-cause death (HR, 1.22; 95%CI, 1.10-1.35; P < .001) and cardiovascular death (HR, 1.18; 95%CI, 1.03-1.36; P = .02), but not with HF-related death (HR, 1.13; 95%CI, 0.93-1.37; P = .22). Circulating Aβ40 improved calibration and patient reclassification. Blood levels of Aβ40 are not associated with cognitive decline in HF. Circulating Aβ40 was predictive of mortality and may indicate systemic aging. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronic exposure of NG108-15 cells to amyloid beta peptide (A beta(1-42)) abolishes calcium influx via N-type calcium channels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašparová, Jana; Lisá, Věra; Tuček, Stanislav; Doležal, Vladimír

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 26, 8-9 (2001), s. 1079-1084 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA MZd NF5183 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : amyloid beta peptide * Alzheimer's disease * calcium Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.638, year: 2001

  8. Aloe arborescens Extract Protects IMR-32 Cells against Alzheimer Amyloid Beta Peptide via Inhibition of Radical Peroxide Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Maria Elisabetta; Tringali, Giuseppe; Triggiani, Doriana; Giardina, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    Aloe arborescens is commonly used as a pharmaceutical ingredient for its effect in burn treatment and ability to increase skin wound healing properties. Besides, it is well known to have beneficial phytotherapeutic, anticancer, and radio-protective properties. In this study, we first provided evidence that A. arborescens extract protects IMR32, a neuroblastoma human cellular line, from toxicity induced by beta amyloid, the peptide responsible for Alzheimer's disease. In particular, pretreatment with A. arborescens maintains an elevated cell viability and exerts a protective effect on mitochondrial functionality, as evidenced by oxygen consumption experiments. The protective mechanism exerted by A. arborescens seems be related to lowering of oxidative potential of the cells, as demonstrated by the ROS measurement compared with the results obtained in the presence of amyloid beta (1-42) peptide alone. Based on these preliminary observations we suggest that use ofA. arborescens extract could be developed as agents for the management of AD.

  9. Alzheimer's disease and amyloid beta-peptide deposition in the brain: a matter of 'aging'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Maria Luisa; Collins, Matthew J; Cappellini, Enrico

    2010-04-01

    Biomolecules can experience aging processes that limit their long-term functionality in organisms. Typical markers of protein aging are spontaneous chemical modifications, such as AAR (amino acid racemization) and AAI (amino acid isomerization), mainly involving aspartate and asparagine residues. Since these modifications may affect folding and turnover, they reduce protein functionality over time and may be linked to pathological conditions. The present mini-review describes evidence of AAR and AAI involvement in the misfolding and brain accumulation of Abeta (amyloid beta-peptide), a central event in AD (Alzheimer's disease) synaptic dysfunctions. Structural alterations introduced by site-specific modifications linked to protein aging may affect Abeta production, polymerization and clearance, and therefore play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of sporadic and genetic forms of AD. Early changes associated with molecular aging also have significant long-term consequences for Abeta folding and turnover. New fast, reproducible and accurate methods for the screening of protein aging markers in biological samples may contribute to improve diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in AD.

  10. Complement activation by the amyloid proteins A beta peptide and beta 2-microglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Nielsen, E H; Svehag, S E

    1999-01-01

    component nor heparan sulfate did significantly alter the A beta-induced CA. The results indicate that not only fibrillar A beta but also oligomers of, in particular, beta 2M from patients with dialysis-associated amyloidosis are capable of inducing CA at supra-physiological concentrations....

  11. Non-fibrillar amyloid-{beta} peptide reduces NMDA-induced neurotoxicity, but not AMPA-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niidome, Tetsuhiro, E-mail: tniidome@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Neuroscience for Drug Discovery, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Goto, Yasuaki; Kato, Masaru; Wang, Pi-Lin [Department of Neuroscience for Drug Discovery, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Goh, Saori; Tanaka, Naoki [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Akaike, Akinori [Department of Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kihara, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hachiro [Department of Neuroscience for Drug Discovery, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2009-09-04

    Amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) is thought to be linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies suggest that A{beta} has important physiological roles in addition to its pathological roles. We recently demonstrated that A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, but the relationship between A{beta}42 assemblies and their neuroprotective effects remains largely unknown. In this study, we prepared non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 based on the results of the thioflavin T assay, Western blot analysis, and atomic force microscopy, and examined the effects of non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Non-fibrillar A{beta}42, but not fibrillar A{beta}42, protected hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, non-fibrillar A{beta}42 decreased both neurotoxicity and increases in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), but not by {alpha}-amino-3-hydrozy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA). Our results suggest that non-fibrillar A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity through regulation of the NMDA receptor.

  12. Specific Triazine Herbicides Induce Amyloid-beta(42) Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portelius, Erik; Durieu, Emilie; Bodin, Marion; Cam, Morgane; Pannee, Josef; Leuxe, Charlotte; Mabondzo, Aloise; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Herve; Lee, Jung Yeol; Chang, Young-Tae; Stuber, Kathrin; Koch, Philipp; Fontaine, Gaelle; Potier, Marie-Claude; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Garbis, Spiros D.; Covaci, Adrian; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter; Karg, Frank; Flajolet, Marc; Omori, Chiori; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Meijer, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid-beta protein precursor (A beta PP) ecretases leads to extracellular release of amyloid-beta (A beta) peptides. Increased production of A beta(42) over A beta(40) and aggregation into oligomers and plaques constitute an Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmark.

  13. Concomitant detection of beta-amyloid peptides with N-terminal truncation and different C-terminal endings in cortical plaques from cases with Alzheimer's disease, senile monkeys and triple transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtig, Wolfgang; Goldhammer, Simone; Bauer, Ute; Wegner, Florian; Wirths, Oliver; Bayer, Thomas A; Grosche, Jens

    2010-09-01

    The disturbed metabolism of beta-amyloid peptides generated from amyloid precursor protein is widely considered as a main factor during the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. A neuropathological hallmark in the brains from cases with Alzheimer's disease are senile plaques mainly composed of hardly soluble beta-amyloid peptides comprising up to 43 amino acids. Age-dependent cortical beta-amyloidosis was also shown in several transgenic mice and old individuals from various mammalian species, e.g., non-human primates. Beta-amyloid(1-42) is believed to be the main component in the core of senile plaques, whereas less hydrophobic beta-amyloid(1-40) predominantly occurs in the outer rim of plaques. Amino-terminally truncated pyroglutamyl-beta-amyloid(pE3-x) was recently found to be a beta-amyloid species of high relevance to the progression of the disease. While a few biochemical studies provided data on the co-occurrence of several beta-amyloid forms, their concomitant histochemical detection is still lacking. Here, we present a novel triple immunofluorescence labelling of amino- and differently carboxy-terminally truncated beta-amyloid peptides in cortical plaques from a case with Alzheimer's disease, senile macaques and baboons, and triple transgenic mice with age-dependent beta-amyloidosis and tau hyperphosphorylation. Additionally, beta-amyloid(pE3-x) and total beta-amyloid were concomitantly detected with beta-amyloid peptides ending with amino acid 40 or 42, respectively. Simultaneous staining of several beta-amyloid species reveals for instance vascular amyloid containing beta-amyloid(pE3-x) in Alzheimer's disease and monkeys, and may contribute to the further elucidation of beta-amyloidosis in neurodegenerative disorders and animal models. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract reverses amyloid beta-peptide-induced isoprostane production in rat brain in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Luigi; Orlando, Giustino; Menghini, Luigi; Ferrante, Claudio; Chiavaroli, Annalisa; Vacca, Michele

    2006-11-01

    Isoprostanes are prostaglandin (PG) isomers generated from oxygen radical peroxidation of arachidonic acid, which are reliable markers of membrane oxidative damage. Aging is characterized by an imbalance between the generation of reactive oxygen species and antioxidant detoxification pathways. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract is reputed as a neuroprotective antioxidant agent. We have tested the effects of a Ginkgo biloba extract {containing 24.1 % flavonoids and 181 % terpene lactones [bilobalide (0.542 %), ginkgolide A (0.570 %), ginkgolide B (0.293 %), ginkgolide C (0.263 %), and ginkgolide J (0.138 %)]} on the production of 8-iso-PGF2alpha from rat brain synaptosomes obtained from young (3 months old) or aged (12 and 24 months old) rats, both in the basal state and after oxidative stress induced by either hydrogen peroxide or amyloid beta-peptide. Our findings show that Ginkgo biloba extract pretreatment is able to completely reverse both basal and hydrogen peroxide-stimulated isoprostane production (IC50 of 81.92 microM and 31.89 microM, respectively). Amyloid beta-peptide-induced isoprostane production was also inhibited, both in young and aged rats, to a level even lower than that in unstimulated synaptosomes. This suggests that the oxygen radical scavenging properties of the Ginkgo biloba extract are fully effective in young, as well as in old rats, showing a greater inhibition of isoprostane production in the latter.

  15. Evaluation of the amyloid beta-GFP fusion protein as a model of amyloid beta peptides-mediated aggregation: A study of DNAJB6 chaperone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Mohamed Hussein

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the accumulation and aggregation of extracellular amyloid β (Aβ peptides and intracellular aggregation of hyper-phosphorylated tau protein. Recent evidence indicates that accumulation and aggregation of intracellular amyloid β peptides may also play a role in disease pathogenesis. This would suggest that intracellular Heat Shock Proteins (HSP that maintain cellular protein homeostasis might be candidates for disease amelioration. We recently found that DNAJB6, a member of DNAJ family of heat shock proteins, effectively prevented the aggregation of short aggregation-prone peptides containing large poly glutamines (associated with CAG repeat diseases both in vitro and in cells. Moreover, recent in vitro data showed that DNAJB6 can delay the aggregation of Aβ42 peptides. In this study, we investigated the ability of DNAJB6 to prevent the aggregation of extracellular and intracellular Aβ peptides using transfection of HEK293 cells with Aβ-GFP fusion construct and performing western blotting and immunofluorescence techniques. We found that DNAJB6 indeed suppresses Aβ-GFP aggregation, but not seeded aggregation initiated by extracellular Aβ peptides. Unexpectedly and unlike what we found for peptide-mediated aggregation, DNAJB6 required interaction with HSP70 to prevent the aggregation of the Aβ-GFP fusion protein and its J-domain was crucial for its anti-aggregation effect. In addition, other DNAJ proteins as well as HSPA1a overexpression also suppressed Aβ-GFP aggregation efficiently. Our findings suggest that Aβ aggregation differs from poly Q peptide induced aggregation in terms of chaperone handling and sheds doubt on the usage of Aβ-GFP fusion construct for studying Aβ peptide aggregation in cells.

  16. Iron and aluminum interaction with amyloid-beta peptides associated with Alzheimer’s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drochioiu, Gabi; Ion, Laura [Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of Iasi, 11 Carol I, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Murariu, Manuela; Habasescu, Laura [Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, 41A Grigore Ghica Voda Alley, Iasi 700487 (Romania)

    2014-10-06

    An elevation in the concentration of heavy metal ions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain has been demonstrated in many studies. Aβ precipitation and toxicity in AD brains seem to be caused by abnormal interactions with neocortical metal ions, especially iron, copper, zinc, and aluminum [1–3]. There is increasing evidence that iron and aluminum ions are involved in the mechanisms that underlie the neurodegenerative diseases [4,5]. However, evidence was brought to demonstrate that some Aβ fragments, at physiological pH, are not able to form binary complexes with Fe(III) ions of sufficient stability to compete with metal hydroxide precipitation [6]. On the contrary, multiple metal ions are known to interact with Aβ peptides [7]. Consequently, we investigated here the interaction of Fe(II/III) and Al(III) ions with some amyloidpeptides and fragments that results in peptide aggregation and fibrillation [8,9]. Infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electrophoresis and mass spectrometry demonstrated conformational changes of peptides in the presence of such metals.

  17. The prion protein as a receptor for amyloid-beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, Helmut W.; Nguyen, Louis N.; Nabavi, Sadegh; Malinow, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Increased levels of brain amyloid-beta, a secreted peptide cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP), is believed to be critical in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease. Increased amyloid-beta can cause synaptic depression, reduce the number of spine protrusions (that is, sites of synaptic

  18. Recombinant amyloid beta-peptide production by coexpression with an affibody ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macao, Bertil; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Sandberg, Anders; Brorsson, Ann-Christin; Dobson, Christopher M; Härd, Torleif

    2008-01-01

    Background Oligomeric and fibrillar aggregates of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The characterization of Aβ assemblies is essential for the elucidation of the mechanisms of Aβ neurotoxicity, but requires large quantities of pure peptide. Here we describe a novel approach to the recombinant production of Aβ. The method is based on the coexpression of the affibody protein ZAβ3, a selected affinity ligand derived from the Z domain three-helix bundle scaffold. ZAβ3 binds to the amyloidogenic central and C-terminal part of Aβ with nanomolar affinity and consequently inhibits aggregation. Results Coexpression of ZAβ3 affords the overexpression of both major Aβ isoforms, Aβ(1–40) and Aβ(1–42), yielding 4 or 3 mg, respectively, of pure 15N-labeled peptide per liter of culture. The method does not rely on a protein-fusion or -tag and thus does not require a cleavage reaction. The purified peptides were characterized by NMR, circular dichroism, SDS-PAGE and size exclusion chromatography, and their aggregation propensities were assessed by thioflavin T fluorescence and electron microscopy. The data coincide with those reported previously for monomeric, largely unstructured Aβ. ZAβ3 coexpression moreover permits the recombinant production of Aβ(1–42) carrying the Arctic (E22G) mutation, which causes early onset familial AD. Aβ(1–42)E22G is obtained in predominantly monomeric form and suitable, e.g., for NMR studies. Conclusion The coexpression of an engineered aggregation-inhibiting binding protein offers a novel route to the recombinant production of amyloidogenic Aβ peptides that can be advantageously employed to study the molecular basis of AD. The presented expression system is the first for which expression and purification of the aggregation-prone Arctic variant (E22G) of Aβ(1–42) is reported. PMID:18973685

  19. Recombinant amyloid beta-peptide production by coexpression with an affibody ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobson Christopher M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oligomeric and fibrillar aggregates of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The characterization of Aβ assemblies is essential for the elucidation of the mechanisms of Aβ neurotoxicity, but requires large quantities of pure peptide. Here we describe a novel approach to the recombinant production of Aβ. The method is based on the coexpression of the affibody protein ZAβ3, a selected affinity ligand derived from the Z domain three-helix bundle scaffold. ZAβ3 binds to the amyloidogenic central and C-terminal part of Aβ with nanomolar affinity and consequently inhibits aggregation. Results Coexpression of ZAβ3 affords the overexpression of both major Aβ isoforms, Aβ(1–40 and Aβ(1–42, yielding 4 or 3 mg, respectively, of pure 15N-labeled peptide per liter of culture. The method does not rely on a protein-fusion or -tag and thus does not require a cleavage reaction. The purified peptides were characterized by NMR, circular dichroism, SDS-PAGE and size exclusion chromatography, and their aggregation propensities were assessed by thioflavin T fluorescence and electron microscopy. The data coincide with those reported previously for monomeric, largely unstructured Aβ. ZAβ3 coexpression moreover permits the recombinant production of Aβ(1–42 carrying the Arctic (E22G mutation, which causes early onset familial AD. Aβ(1–42E22G is obtained in predominantly monomeric form and suitable, e.g., for NMR studies. Conclusion The coexpression of an engineered aggregation-inhibiting binding protein offers a novel route to the recombinant production of amyloidogenic Aβ peptides that can be advantageously employed to study the molecular basis of AD. The presented expression system is the first for which expression and purification of the aggregation-prone Arctic variant (E22G of Aβ(1–42 is reported.

  20. Structure-Based Peptide Design to Modulate Amyloid Beta Aggregation and Reduce Cytotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Kumar

    Full Text Available The deposition of Aβ peptide in the brain is the key event in Alzheimer disease progression. Therefore, the prevention of Aβ self assembly into disease-associated oligomers is a logical strategy for treatment. π stacking is known to provide structural stability to many amyloids; two phenylalanine residues within the Aβ 14-23 self recognition element are in such an arrangement in many solved structures. Therefore, we targeted this structural stacking by substituting these two phenylalanine residues with their D-enantiomers. The resulting peptides were able to modulate Aβ aggregation in vitro and reduce Aβ cytotoxicity in primary neuronal cultures. Using kinetic analysis of fibril formation, electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering characterization of oligomer size distributions, we demonstrate that, in addition to altering fibril structural characteristics, these peptides can induce the formation of larger amorphous aggregates which are protective against toxic oligomers, possibly because they are able to sequester the toxic oligomers during co-incubation. Alternatively, they may alter the surface structure of the oligomers such that they can no longer interact with cells to induce toxic pathways.

  1. Chronic cladribine administration increases amyloid beta peptide generation and plaque burden in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal D Hayes

    Full Text Available The clinical uses of 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (2-CDA or cladribine which was initially prescribed to patients with hematological and lymphoid cancers is now extended to treat patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Previous data has shown that 2-CDA has high affinity to the brain and readily passes through the blood brain barrier reaching CSF concentrations 25% of that found in plasma. However, whether long-term administration of 2-CDA can lead to any adverse effects in patients or animal models is not yet clearly known.Here we show that exposure of 2-CDA to CHO cells stably expressing wild-type APP751 increased generation and secretion of amyloid β peptide (Aβ in to the conditioned medium. Interestingly, increased Aβ levels were noticed even at non-toxic concentrations of 2-CDA. Remarkably, chronic treatment of APdE9 mice, a model of Alzheimer's disease with 2-CDA for 60 days increased amyloid plaque burden by more than 1-fold. Increased Aβ generation appears to result from increased turnover of APP as revealed by cycloheximide-chase experiments. Additionally, surface labeling of APP with biotin and immunoprecipitation of surface labeled proteins with anti-biotin antibody also indicated increased APP at the cell surface in 2-CDA treated cells compared to controls. Increased turnover of APP by 2-CDA in turn might be a consequence of decreased protein levels of PIN 1, which is known to regulate cis-trans isomerization and phosphorylation of APP. Most importantly, like many other oncology drugs, 2-CDA administration led to significant delay in acquiring a reward-based learning task in a T maze paradigm.Taken together, these data provide compelling evidence for the first time that chronic 2-CDA administration can increase amyloidogenic processing of APP leading to robustly increased plaque burden which may be responsible for the observed deficits in learning skills. Thus chronic treatment of mice with 2-CDA can have deleterious effects in vivo.

  2. Rational design of amyloid beta peptide-binding proteins: pseudo-Abeta beta-sheet surface presented in green fluorescent protein binds tightly and preferentially to structured Abeta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Ohta, Kenichi; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2010-02-01

    Some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease are caused by protein misfolding. In AD, amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) is thought to be a toxic agent by self-assembling into a variety of aggregates involving soluble oligomeric intermediates and amyloid fibrils. Here, we have designed several green fluorescent protein (GFP) variants that contain pseudo-Abeta beta-sheet surfaces and evaluated their abilities to bind to Abeta and inhibit Abeta oligomerization. Two GFP variants P13H and AP93Q bound tightly to Abeta, K(d) = 260 nM and K(d) = 420 nM, respectively. Moreover, P13H and AP93Q were capable of efficiently suppressing the generation of toxic Abeta oligomers as shown by a cell viability assay. By combining the P13H and AP93Q mutations, a super variant SFAB4 comprising four strands of Abeta-derived sequences was designed and bound more tightly to Abeta (K(d) = 100 nM) than those having only two pseudo-Abeta strands. The SFAB4 protein preferentially recognized the soluble oligomeric intermediates of Abeta more than both unstructured monomer and mature amyloid fibrils. Thus, the design strategy for embedding pseudo-Abeta beta-sheet structures onto a protein surface arranged in the beta-barrel structure is useful to construct molecules capable of binding tightly to Abeta and inhibiting its aggregation. This strategy may provide implication for the diagnostic and therapeutic development in the treatment of AD. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. The metabolic enhancer piracetam ameliorates the impairment of mitochondrial function and neurite outgrowth induced by beta-amyloid peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, C; Ungerer, I; Lipka, U; Kirr, S; Schütt, T; Eckert, A; Leuner, K; Müller, W E

    2010-05-01

    beta-Amyloid peptide (Abeta) is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease by initiating a cascade of events from mitochondrial dysfunction to neuronal death. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been shown to improve mitochondrial dysfunction following brain aging and experimentally induced oxidative stress. We used cell lines (PC12 and HEK cells) and murine dissociated brain cells. The protective effects of piracetam in vitro and ex vivo on Abeta-induced impairment of mitochondrial function (as mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production), on secretion of soluble Abeta and on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells were investigated. Piracetam improves mitochondrial function of PC12 cells and acutely dissociated brain cells from young NMRI mice following exposure to extracellular Abeta(1-42). Similar protective effects against Abeta(1-42) were observed in dissociated brain cells from aged NMRI mice, or mice transgenic for mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APP) treated with piracetam for 14 days. Soluble Abeta load was markedly diminished in the brain of those animals after treatment with piracetam. Abeta production by HEK cells stably transfected with mutant human APP was elevated by oxidative stress and this was reduced by piracetam. Impairment of neuritogenesis is an important consequence of Abeta-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and Abeta-induced reduction of neurite growth in PC12 cells was substantially improved by piracetam. Our findings strongly support the concept of improving mitochondrial function as an approach to ameliorate the detrimental effects of Abeta on brain function.

  4. Monomeric Amyloid Beta Peptide in Hexafluoroisopropanol Detected by Small Angle Neutron Scattering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang-Haagen

    Full Text Available Small proteins like amyloid beta (Aβ monomers are related to neurodegenerative disorders by aggregation to insoluble fibrils. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS is a nondestructive method to observe the aggregation process in solution. We show that SANS is able to resolve monomers of small molecular weight like Aβ for aggregation studies. We examine Aβ monomers after prolonged storing in d-hexafluoroisopropanol (dHFIP by using SANS and dynamic light scattering (DLS. We determined the radius of gyration from SANS as 1.0±0.1 nm for Aβ1-40 and 1.6±0.1 nm for Aβ1-42 in agreement with 3D NMR structures in similar solvents suggesting a solvent surface layer with 5% increased density. After initial dissolution in dHFIP Aβ aggregates sediment with a major component of pure monomers showing a hydrodynamic radius of 1.8±0.3 nm for Aβ1-40 and 3.2±0.4 nm for Aβ1-42 including a surface layer of dHFIP solvent molecules.

  5. Monomeric Amyloid Beta Peptide in Hexafluoroisopropanol Detected by Small Angle Neutron Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang-Haagen, Bo; Biehl, Ralf; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard; Radulescu, Aurel; Richter, Dieter; Willbold, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Small proteins like amyloid beta (Aβ) monomers are related to neurodegenerative disorders by aggregation to insoluble fibrils. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) is a nondestructive method to observe the aggregation process in solution. We show that SANS is able to resolve monomers of small molecular weight like Aβ for aggregation studies. We examine Aβ monomers after prolonged storing in d-hexafluoroisopropanol (dHFIP) by using SANS and dynamic light scattering (DLS). We determined the radius of gyration from SANS as 1.0±0.1 nm for Aβ1-40 and 1.6±0.1 nm for Aβ1-42 in agreement with 3D NMR structures in similar solvents suggesting a solvent surface layer with 5% increased density. After initial dissolution in dHFIP Aβ aggregates sediment with a major component of pure monomers showing a hydrodynamic radius of 1.8±0.3 nm for Aβ1-40 and 3.2±0.4 nm for Aβ1-42 including a surface layer of dHFIP solvent molecules.

  6. Antagonizing beta-amyloid peptide neurotoxicity of the anti-aging fungus Ganoderma lucidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cora Sau-Wan; Yu, Man-Shan; Yuen, Wai-Hung; So, Kwok-Fai; Zee, Sze-Yong; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2008-01-23

    Ganoderma lucidum (Leyss. ex Fr.) Karst. (Lingzhi) is a medicinal fungus used clinically in many Asian countries to promote health and longevity. Synaptic degeneration is another key mode of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies have shown the loss of synaptic density proteins in each individual neuron during the progression of AD. It was recently reported that beta-amyloid (Abeta) could cause synaptic dysfunction and contribute to AD pathology. In this study, we reported that aqueous extract of G. lucidum significantly attenuated Abeta-induced synaptotoxicity by preserving the synaptic density protein, synaptophysin. In addition, G. lucidum aqueous extract antagonized Abeta-triggered DEVD cleavage activities in a dose-dependent manner. Further studies elucidated that phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, c-Jun, and p38 MAP kinase was attenuated by G. lucidum in Abeta-stressed neurons. Taken together, the results prove a hypothesis that anti-aging G. lucidum can prevent harmful effects of the exterminating toxin Abeta in AD.

  7. Neurine, an acetylcholine autolysis product, elevates secreted amyloid-beta protein precursor and amyloid-beta peptide levels, and lowers neuronal cell viability in culture: a role in Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedie, David; Brossi, Arnold; Chen, DeMoa; Ge, Yuan-Wen; Bailey, Jason; Yu, Qian-Sheng; Kamal, Mohammad A; Sambamurti, Kumar; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Greig, Nigel H

    2006-09-01

    Classical hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are a synaptic loss, cholinergic neuron death, and abnormal protein deposition, particularly of toxic amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) that is derived from amyloid-beta protein precursor (AbetaPP) by the action of beta- and gamma-secretases. The trigger(s) initiating the biochemical cascades that underpin these hallmarks have yet to be fully elucidated. The typical forebrain cholinergic cell demise associated with AD brain results in a loss of presynaptic cholinergic markers and acetylcholine (ACh). Neurine (vinyl-trimethyl-ammonium hydroxide) is a breakdown product of ACh, consequent to autolysis and is an organic poison found in cadavre brain. The time- and concentration-dependent actions of neurine were assessed in human neuroblastoma (NB, SK-N-SH) cells in culture by quantifying cell viability by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and MTS assay, and AbetaPP and Abeta levels by Western blot and ELISA. NB cells displayed evidence of toxicity to neurine at > or = 3 mg/ml, as demonstrated by elevated LDH levels in the culture media and a reduced cell viability shown by the MTS assay. Using subtoxic concentrations of neurine, elevations in AbetaPP and Abeta1-40 peptide levels were detected in conditioned media samples.

  8. alpha-Synuclein enhances secretion and toxicity of amyloid beta peptides in PC12 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazmierczak, Anna; Strosznajder, Joanna B.; Adamczyk, Agata

    2008-01-01

    alpha-Synuclein is the fundamental component of Lewy bodies which occur in the brain of 60% of sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease patients. Moreover, a proteolytic fragment of alpha-synuclein, the so-called non-amyloid component of Alzheimer's disease amyloid, was found to be an integral part

  9. Amyloid-beta (25-35) peptide induces the release of pro-matrix metalloprotease 9 (pro-MMP-9) from human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilli, Cesare; Ciana, Annarita; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a degenerative process of the brain, leading to increasing impairment of cognitive functions, and is associated with accumulation in the brain of several amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides (as amyloid plaques), including Aβ25-35. Neutrophils, the most abundant immune cell type infiltrated in the brain of AD patients, accumulate behind amyloid plaques. Aβ peptides can trigger activation of chemotaxis and oxidative burst in neutrophils, suggesting a role in modulating the neuroinflammation process. We have shown that Aβ25-35 can induce the release from human neutrophils of pro-MMP-9, a metalloprotease involved in the onset of inflammation, corroborating the hypothesis of the involvement of infiltrated neutrophils in the inflammatory processes, which occur in the AD brain.

  10. Antibody responses, amyloid-beta peptide remnants and clinical effects of AN-1792 immunization in patients with AD in an interrupted trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokjohn, Tyler A; Roher, Alex E

    2009-04-01

    Post mortem examinations of AN-1792-vaccinated humans revealed this therapy produced focal senile plaque disruption. Despite the dispersal of substantial plaque material, vaccination did not constitute even a partial eradication of brain amyloid as water soluble amyloid-beta (Abeta) 40/42 increased in the gray matter compared to sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and total brain Abeta levels were not decreased. Significant aspects of AD pathology were unaffected by vaccination with both vascular amyloid and hyper-phosphorylated tau deposits appeared refractory to this therapy. In addition, vaccination resulted in the consequential and drastic expansion of the white matter (WM) amyloid pool to levels without precedent in sporadic AD patients. Although vaccination disrupted amyloid plaques, this therapy did not enhance long-term cognitive function or necessarily halt neurodegeneration. The intricate involvement of vascular pathology in AD evolution and the firm recalcitrance of vessel-associated amyloid to antibody-mediated disruption suggest that immunization therapies might be more effective if administered on a prophylactic basis before vascular impairment and well ahead of any clinically evident cognitive decline. Amyloid-beta is viewed as pathological based on the postmortem correlation of senile plaques with an AD diagnosis. It remains uncertain which of the various forms of this peptide is the most toxic and whether Abeta or senile plaques themselves serve any desirable or protective functions. The long-term cognitive effects of chronic immunotherapy producing a steadily accumulating and effectively permanent pool of disrupted Abeta peptides within the human brain are unknown. In addition, the side effects of such therapy provided on a chronic basis could extend far beyond the brain. Eagerly seeking new therapies, critical knowledge gaps should prompt us to take a more wholistic perspective viewing Abeta and the amyloid cascade as aspects of complex

  11. CD147 is a regulatory subunit of the gamma-secretase complex inAlzheimer's disease amyloid beta-peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shuxia; Zhou, Hua; Walian, Peter J.; Jap, Bing K.

    2005-04-06

    {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex that cleaves the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP) within the transmembrane region, following prior processing by {beta}-secretase, producing amyloid {beta}-peptides (A{beta}{sub 40} and A{beta}{sub 42}). Errant production of A{beta}-peptides that substantially increases A{beta}{sub 42} production has been associated with the formation of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease patients. Biophysical and genetic studies indicate that presenilin-1 (Psn-1), which contains the proteolytic active site, and three other membrane proteins, nicastrin (Nct), APH-1, and PEN-2 are required to form the core of the active {gamma}-secretase complex. Here, we report the purification of the native {gamma}-secretase complexes from HeLa cell membranes and the identification of an additional {gamma}-secretase complex subunit, CD147, a transmembrane glycoprotein with two immunoglobulin-like domains. The presence of this subunit as an integral part of the complex itself was confirmed through co-immunoprecipitation studies of the purified protein from HeLa cells and solubilized complexes from other cell lines such as neural cell HCN-1A and HEK293. Depletion of CD147 by RNA interference was found to increase the production of A{beta} peptides without changing the expression level of the other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates while CD147 overexpression had no statistically significant effect on amyloid {beta}-peptide production, other {gamma}-secretase components or APP substrates, indicating that the presence of the CD147 subunit within the {gamma}-secretase complex directly down-modulates the production of A{beta}-peptides. {gamma}-secretase was first recognized through its role in the production of the A{beta} peptides that are pathogenic in Alzheimer's disease (AD) (1). {gamma}-secretase is a membrane protein complex with unusual aspartyl protease activity that cleaves a variety of type I membrane proteins

  12. The involvement of sigma1 receptors in donepezil-induced rescue of hippocampal LTP impaired by beta-amyloid peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solntseva, E I; Kapai, N A; Popova, O V; Rogozin, P D; Skrebitsky, V G

    2014-07-01

    Donepezil is a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Additional therapeutically relevant target for donepezil is sigma1 receptor (Sig1-R). Beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. In our previous work (Kapai et al., 2012), we have shown that donepezil antagonizes the suppressive action of Aβ(1-42) on long-term potentiation (LTP) in rat hippocampal slices. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether Sig1-R is involved into the mechanisms of donepezil action. For this purpose, we have tested whether agonist of Sig1-R PRE-084 mimics, and antagonist of Sig1-R haloperidol abolishes the effect of donepezil. Population spikes (PSs) were recorded from the pyramidal layer of the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices. Drugs were applied by addition to the perfusate starting 15 min before and ending 5 min after the tetanus. In the control group, the amplitude of PS 30 min post-tetanus reached 153±10%. Aβ (200 nM) markedly suppressed the LTP magnitude or even caused the suppression of baseline PS (82±8%, Pdonepezil was co-administered with Aβ (136±11%, Pdonepezil and 0.5 μM haloperidol and have found that haloperidol antagonized the stimulating effect of donepezil on LTP (92±6%, Pdonepezil-induced rescue of hippocampal LTP impaired by Aβ. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Amyloid Beta Peptides Block New Synapse Assembly by Nogo Receptor-Mediated Inhibition of T-Type Calcium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanjun; Sivaji, Sivaprakash; Chiang, Michael C; Ali, Haadi; Zukowski, Monica; Ali, Sareen; Kennedy, Bryan; Sklyar, Alex; Cheng, Alice; Guo, Zihan; Reed, Alexander K; Kodali, Ravindra; Borowski, Jennifer; Frost, Georgia; Beukema, Patrick; Wills, Zachary P

    2017-10-11

    Compelling evidence links amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide accumulation in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients with the emergence of learning and memory deficits, yet a clear understanding of the events that drive this synaptic pathology are lacking. We present evidence that neurons exposed to Aβ are unable to form new synapses, resulting in learning deficits in vivo. We demonstrate the Nogo receptor family (NgR1-3) acts as Aβ receptors mediating an inhibition of synapse assembly, plasticity, and learning. Live imaging studies reveal Aβ activates NgRs on the dendritic shaft of neurons, triggering an inhibition of calcium signaling. We define T-type calcium channels as a target of Aβ-NgR signaling, mediating Aβ's inhibitory effects on calcium, synapse assembly, plasticity, and learning. These studies highlight deficits in new synapse assembly as a potential initiator of cognitive pathology in AD, and pinpoint calcium dysregulation mediated by NgRs and T-type channels as key components. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of caspase-12 in amyloid beta-peptide-induced toxicity in organotypic hippocampal slices cultured for long periods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishige, K.; Takagi, N.; Imai, T.; Rausch, W.D.; Kosuge, Y.; Kihara, T.; Kusama-Eguchi, K.; Ikeda, H.; Cools, A.R.; Waddington, J.L.; Koshikawa, N.; Ito, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) toxicity has been implicated in cell death in the hippocampus, but its specific mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, Abeta-induced cell death was investigated in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) that were cultured for various periods in vitro. There were

  15. Amyloid formation via supramolecular peptide assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Roger A; Hayes, Stanley F; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Priola, Suzette A

    2007-06-19

    Amyloid fibrils have been classically defined as linear, nonbranched polymeric proteins with a cross beta-sheet structure and the ability to alter the optical properties of the amyloid-specific dye Congo Red. Mounting evidence suggests that soluble oligomeric peptide assemblies approximately 2-20 nm in diameter are critical intermediates in amyloid formation. Using a pathogenic prion protein peptide comprised of residues 23-144, we demonstrate that, under quiescent but not agitated conditions, much larger globular assemblies up to 1 mum in diameter are made. These globules precede fibril formation and directly interact with growing fibril bundles. Fibrils made via these large spherical peptide assemblies displayed a remarkable diversity of ultrastructural features. Fibrillization of the Abeta1-40 peptide under similar conditions yielded similar results, suggesting a mechanism of general amyloid formation that can proceed through intermediates much larger than those previously described. Our data suggest that simply changing the physical microenvironment can profoundly influence the mechanism of amyloid formation and yield fibrils with novel ultrastructural properties.

  16. Analysis of the complex between amyloid beta peptides and mitochondrial enzyme 17beta-HSD in cerebrospinal fluid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištofíková, Z.; Hegnerová, Kateřina; Bocková, Markéta; Vaisocherová, Hana; Bartoš, A.; Říčný, J.; Řípová, D.; Homola, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 275, podzim (2008), s. 249-249 ISSN 1742-464X. [EUROPTRODE /9./. Dublin, 30.03.2008-02.04.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : surface plasmon resonance * alzheimer disease * 17beta-HSD10 Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.139, year: 2008

  17. Generation of the beta-amyloid peptide and the amyloid precursor protein C-terminal fragment gamma are potentiated by FE65L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yang; Tesco, Giuseppina; Jeong, William J; Lindsley, Loren; Eckman, Elizabeth A; Eckman, Christopher B; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Guénette, Suzanne Y

    2003-12-19

    Members of the FE65 family of adaptor proteins, FE65, FE65L1, and FE65L2, bind the C-terminal region of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Overexpression of FE65 and FE65L1 was previously reported to increase the levels of alpha-secretase-derived APP (APPs alpha). Increased beta-amyloid (A beta) generation was also observed in cells showing the FE65-dependent increase in APPs alpha. To understand the mechanism for the observed increase in both A beta and APPs alpha given that alpha-secretase cleavage of a single APP molecule precludes A beta generation, we examined the effects of FE65L1 overexpression on APP C-terminal fragments (APP CTFs). Our data show that FE65L1 potentiates gamma-secretase processing of APP CTFs, including the amyloidogenic CTF C99, accounting for the ability of FE65L1 to increase generation of APP C-terminal domain and A beta 40. The FE65L1 modulation of these processing events requires binding of FE65L1 to APP and APP CTFs and is not because of a direct effect on gamma-secretase activity, because Notch intracellular domain generation is not altered by FE65L1. Furthermore, enhanced APP CTF processing can be detected in early endosome vesicles but not in endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi membranes, suggesting that the effects of FE65L1 occur at or near the plasma membrane. Finally, although FE65L1 increases APP C-terminal domain production, it does not mediate the APP-dependent transcriptional activation observed with FE65.

  18. Effect of ionic strength on the aggregation kinetics of the amidated amyloid beta peptide Aβ (1-40) in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Ramírez, Adriana; Márquez, Maripaz; Quintanar, Liliana; Rojas-Ochoa, Luis F

    2017-09-01

    In this work we study the effect of solution ionic strength on the structural evolution of amidated amyloid beta peptide Aβ (1-40) oligomers at the early stages of fibril formation. By light scattering, we follow the time evolution of the structure and short-time dynamics of peptide structures at low ionic strengths. Our results allow identifying initial oligomer structures as the effective building blocks in the amyloid fibrils formation and indicate that the oligomers growth pathway, from compact structures to flexible chain-like structures, becomes faster as the solution ionic strength is increased. Furthermore, we find no evidence of structural branching what suggests that elongation of amyloid fibrils is dominated by linear association. To describe our results we adapt a phenomenological model based on population balance equations and linear polymer growth, where the parameters required are obtained from the experiments. Model calculations are in good agreement with experimentally-obtained estimates for the radius of gyration of Aβ (1-40) oligomers, thus further supporting our findings. Additionally, we introduce a model for the effective interaction among initial Aβ structures that captures the dependence of the effective association rates on solution ionic strength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Simple detection method of amyloid-beta peptide using p-FET with optical filtering layer and magnetic particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwan-Soo; Kim, Chang-Beom; Song, Ki-Bong

    2013-05-01

    This article describes a novel method for detection of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide that utilizes a photo-sensitive field-effect transistor (p-FET). According to a recent study, Aβ protein is known to play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accordingly, we investigated the variation of photo current of the p-FET generated by the magnetic beads conjugated with Aβ peptides which are placed on the p-FET sensing areas. Additionally, in order to amplify the output signal, we used the lock-in amplifier (LIA) and confirmed the generating the photo current by a small incident light power under 100 μW. It means that it is possible to simply detect a certain protein using magnetic beads conjugated with Aβ peptide and fluorescent label located on the p-FET device. Therefore, in this paper, we suggest that our method could detect tiny amounts of Aβ peptide for early diagnosis of AD using the p-FET devices.

  20. The effect of tachykinin neuropeptides on amyloid {beta} aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flashner, Efrat [The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Edmond J. Safra Campus, Givat Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Raviv, Uri, E-mail: raviv@chem.ch.huji.ac.il [The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Edmond J. Safra Campus, Givat Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Friedler, Assaf, E-mail: assaf@chem.ch.huji.ac.il [The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Edmond J. Safra Campus, Givat Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2011-04-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Mechanistic explanation of how tachykinin neuropeptides reduce A{beta}-induced neurotoxicity. {yields} Biophysical studies suggest that tachykinins do not modulate the distribution of A{beta} oligomeric states, but rather may incorporate into the fibrils. {yields} A possible strategy to inhibit toxicity of amyloid fibrils. -- Abstract: A hallmark of Alzheimer's disease is production of amyloid {beta} peptides resulting from aberrant cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. Amyloid {beta} assembles into fibrils under physiological conditions, through formation of neurotoxic intermediate oligomers. Tachykinin peptides are known to affect amyloid {beta} neurotoxicity in cells. To understand the mechanism of this effect, we studied how tachykinins affect A{beta}(1-40) aggregation in vitro. Fibrils grown in the presence of tachykinins exhibited reduced thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, while their morphology, observed in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), did not alter. Cross linking studies revealed that the distribution of low molecular weight species was not affected by tachykinins. Our results suggest that there may be a specific interaction between tachykinins and A{beta}(1-40) that allows them to co-assemble. This effect may explain the reduction of A{beta}(1-40) neurotoxicity in cells treated with tachykinins.

  1. Differential effect of amyloid beta peptides on mitochondrial axonal trafficking depends on their state of aggregation and binding to the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Trushin, Sergey; Christensen, Trace A; Tripathi, Utkarsh; Hong, Courtney; Geroux, Rachel E; Howell, Kyle G; Poduslo, Joseph F; Trushina, Eugenia

    2018-02-26

    Inhibition of mitochondrial axonal trafficking by amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides has been implicated in early pathophysiology of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Yet, it remains unclear whether the loss of motility inevitably induces the loss of mitochondrial function, and whether restoration of axonal trafficking represents a valid therapeutic target. Moreover, while some investigations identify Aβ oligomers as the culprit of trafficking inhibition, others propose that fibrils play the detrimental role. We have examined the effect of a panel of Aβ peptides with different mutations found in familial AD on mitochondrial motility in primary cortical mouse neurons. Peptides with higher propensity to aggregate inhibit mitochondrial trafficking to a greater extent with fibrils inducing the strongest inhibition. Binding of Aβ peptides to the plasma membrane was sufficient to induce trafficking inhibition where peptides with reduced plasma membrane binding and internalization had lesser effect on mitochondrial motility. We also found that Aβ peptide with Icelandic mutation A673T affects axonal trafficking of mitochondria but has very low rates of plasma membrane binding and internalization in neurons, which could explain its relatively low toxicity. Inhibition of mitochondrial dynamics caused by Aβ peptides or fibrils did not instantly affect mitochondrial bioenergetic and function. Our results support a mechanism where inhibition of axonal trafficking is initiated at the plasma membrane by soluble low molecular weight Aβ species and is exacerbated by fibrils. Since trafficking inhibition does not coincide with the loss of mitochondrial function, restoration of axonal transport could be beneficial at early stages of AD progression. However, strategies designed to block Aβ aggregation or fibril formation alone without ensuring the efficient clearance of soluble Aβ may not be sufficient to alleviate the trafficking phenotype. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by

  2. Interaction of beta-amyloid(1-40) peptide with pairs of metal ions: An electrospray ion trap mass spectrometric model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drochioiu, Gabi; Manea, Marilena; Dragusanu, Mihaela; Murariu, Manuela; Dragan, Ecaterina Stela; Petre, Brandusa Alina; Mezo, Gabor; Przybylski, Michael

    2009-09-01

    The stoichiometries and the affinity toward simple and paired metal ions of synthetic amyloid-beta(1-40) peptide (Abeta1-40) were investigated by electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), circular dichroism (CD), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results lead to the working hypothesis that pH-dependent metal binding to Abeta1-40 may induce conformational changes, which affect the affinity toward other metals. A significant copper and zinc binding to Abeta1-40 peptide at pH 5.5 was found, whereas nickel ions commonly bind to each molecule of beta-amyloid peptide. Some complexes of Abeta1-40 with more than one nickel ion were identified by ESI-MS. In addition, nickel ions proved to enhance Abeta oligomerization. On increasing pH, up to 12 ions of zinc may bind to a single Abeta molecule. Under the same pH and concentration conditions, the binding pattern of the independent copper and silver ions to Abeta1-40 was different from that of the equimolecular mixture of the two metal ions. One might assume that some conformational changes due to water loss altered the capacity of Abeta peptide to bind certain heavy metal ions. As a consequence, copper-silver interaction with the binding process to Abeta1-40 became highly complex. A competition between silver and nickel ions for Abeta1-40 binding sites at high pH was also observed. New strategies were proposed to identify the characteristic signals for some important metal ion-peptide complexes in the spectra recorded at high pH or high concentrations of metal ions. To explain the formation of such a large number of high metal ion-Abeta complexes, we took into consideration the participation of both histidine residues and free amino groups as well as carboxylate ones in the binding process. Finally, CD and AFM studies supported the mass spectrometric data.

  3. Accumulation of Exogenous Amyloid-Beta Peptide in Hippocampal Mitochondria Causes Their Dysfunction: A Protective Role for Melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rosales-Corral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-beta (Aβ pathology is related to mitochondrial dysfunction accompanied by energy reduction and an elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Monomers and oligomers of Aβ have been found inside mitochondria where they accumulate in a time-dependent manner as demonstrated in transgenic mice and in Alzheimer’s disease (AD brain. We hypothesize that the internalization of extracellular Aβ aggregates is the major cause of mitochondrial damage and here we report that following the injection of fibrillar Aβ into the hippocampus, there is severe axonal damage which is accompanied by the entrance of Aβ into the cell. Thereafter, Aβ appears in mitochondria where it is linked to alterations in the ionic gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane. This effect is accompanied by disruption of subcellular structure, oxidative stress, and a significant reduction in both the respiratory control ratio and in the hydrolytic activity of ATPase. Orally administrated melatonin reduced oxidative stress, improved the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio, and ameliorated the energy imbalance.

  4. Proposal for novel curcumin derivatives as potent inhibitors against Alzheimer's disease: Ab initio molecular simulations on the specific interactions between amyloid-beta peptide and curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Shintaro; Fujimori, Mitsuki; Ishimura, Hiromi; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2017-10-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in a brain is closely related with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. To suppress the production of Aβ peptides, we propose novel curcumin derivatives and investigate their binding properties with the amyloid precursor protein (APP), using protein-ligand docking as well as ab initio molecular simulations. Our proposed derivative (curcumin XIV) is found to have a large binding energy with APP and interacts strongly with the cleavage site Ala19 by secretase. It is thus expected that curcumin XIV can protect APP from the secretase attack and be a potent inhibitor against the production of Aβ peptides.

  5. The Na+/K+-ATPase and the amyloid-beta peptide aβ1-40 control the cellular distribution, abundance and activity of TRPC6 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, Sylvain; Boonen, Marielle; Chevallet, Mireille; Jarvis, Louis; Abebe, Addis; Benharouga, Mohamed; Faller, Peter; Jadot, Michel; Bouron, Alexandre

    2015-11-01

    The Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase interacts with the non-selective cation channels TRPC6 but the functional consequences of this association are unknown. Experiments performed with HEK cells over-expressing TRPC6 channels showed that inhibiting the activity of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase with ouabain reduced the amount of TRPC6 proteins and depressed Ca(2+) entry through TRPC6. This effect, not mimicked by membrane depolarization with KCl, was abolished by sucrose and bafilomycin-A, and was partially sensitive to the intracellular Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA/AM. Biotinylation and subcellular fractionation experiments showed that ouabain caused a multifaceted redistribution of TRPC6 to the plasma membrane and to an endo/lysosomal compartment where they were degraded. The amyloid beta peptide Aβ(1-40), another inhibitor of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, but not the shorter peptide Aβ1-16, reduced TRPC6 protein levels and depressed TRPC6-mediated responses. In cortical neurons from embryonic mice, ouabain, veratridine (an opener of voltage-gated Na(+) channel), and Aβ(1-40) reduced TRPC6-mediated Ca(2+) responses whereas Aβ(1-16) was ineffective. Furthermore, when Aβ(1-40) was co-added together with zinc acetate it could no longer control TRPC6 activity. Altogether, this work shows the existence of a functional coupling between the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and TRPC6. It also suggests that the abundance, distribution and activity of TRPC6 can be regulated by cardiotonic steroids like ouabain and the naturally occurring peptide Aβ(1-40) which underlines the pathophysiological significance of these processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Xanthene food dye, as a modulator of Alzheimer's disease amyloid-beta peptide aggregation and the associated impaired neuronal cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Edward Wong

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common form of dementia. AD is a degenerative brain disorder that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. It has been suggested that aggregation of amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ is closely linked to the development of AD pathology. In the search for safe, effective modulators, we evaluated the modulating capabilities of erythrosine B (ER, a Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved red food dye, on Aβ aggregation and Aβ-associated impaired neuronal cell function.In order to evaluate the modulating ability of ER on Aβ aggregation, we employed transmission electron microscopy (TEM, thioflavin T (ThT fluorescence assay, and immunoassays using Aβ-specific antibodies. TEM images and ThT fluorescence of Aβ samples indicate that protofibrils are predominantly generated and persist for at least 3 days. The average length of the ER-induced protofibrils is inversely proportional to the concentration of ER above the stoichiometric concentration of Aβ monomers. Immunoassay results using Aβ-specific antibodies suggest that ER binds to the N-terminus of Aβ and inhibits amyloid fibril formation. In order to evaluate Aβ-associated toxicity we determined the reducing activity of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells treated with Aβ aggregates formed in the absence or in the presence of ER. As the concentration of ER increased above the stoichiometric concentration of Aβ, cellular reducing activity increased and Aβ-associated reducing activity loss was negligible at 500 µM ER.Our findings show that ER is a novel modulator of Aβ aggregation and reduces Aβ-associated impaired cell function. Our findings also suggest that xanthene dye can be a new type of small molecule modulator of Aβ aggregation. With demonstrated safety profiles and blood-brain permeability, ER represents a particularly attractive aggregation modulator for amyloidogenic proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Kinetically controlled thermal response of beta2-microglobulin amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasahara, Kenji; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2005-09-23

    Calorimetric measurements were carried out using a differential scanning calorimeter in the temperature range from 10 to 120 degrees C for characterizing the thermal response of beta2-microglobulin amyloid fibrils. The thermograms of amyloid fibril solution showed a remarkably large decrease in heat capacity that was essentially released upon the thermal unfolding of the fibrils, in which the magnitude of negative heat capacity change was not explicable in terms of the current accessible surface area model of protein structural thermodynamics. The heat capacity-temperature curve of amyloid fibrils prior to the fibril unfolding exhibited an unusual dependence on the fibril concentration and the heating rate. Particularly, the heat needed to induce the thermal response was found to be linearly dependent on the heating rate, indicating that its thermal response is under a kinetic control and precluding the interpretation in terms of equilibrium thermodynamics. Furthermore, amyloid fibrils of amyloid beta peptides also exhibited a heating rate-dependent exothermic process before the fibril unfolding, indicating that the kinetically controlled thermal response may be a common phenomenon to amyloid fibrils. We suggest that the heating rate-dependent negative change in heat capacity is coupled to the association of amyloid fibrils with characteristic hydration pattern.

  8. Mutation-based structural modification and dynamics study of amyloid beta peptide (1–42: An in-silico-based analysis to cognize the mechanism of aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritam Kumar Panda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is the prevalent cause of premature senility, a progressive mental disorder due to degeneration in brain and deposition of amyloid β peptide (1–42, a misfolded protein in the form of aggregation that prevails for a prolonged time and obstructs every aspect of life. One of the primary hallmarks of the neuropathological disease is the accretion of amyloid β peptide in the brain that leads to Alzheimer's disease, but the mechanism is still a mystery. Several investigations have shown that mutations at specific positions have a significant impact in stability of the peptide as predicted from aggregation profiles. Here in our study, we have analyzed the mutations by substituting residues at position A22G, E22G, E22K, E22Q, D23N, L34V and molecular dynamics have been performed to check the deviation in stability and conformation of the peptide. The results validated that the mutations at specific positions lead to instability and the proline substitution at E22P and L34P stalled the aggregation of the peptide. Keywords: Amyloid β peptide, Alzheimer's disease, Aggregation, Mutational analysis, NAMD, UCSF Chimera, Discovery Studio Visualizer

  9. Monodisperse carboxyl-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-coated magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres: application to the immunocapture of .beta.-amyloid peptides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, Daniel; Hlídková, Helena; Hiraoui, M.; Taverna, M.; Proks, Vladimír; Mázl Chánová, Eliška; Smadja, C.; Kučerová, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 11 (2014), s. 1590-1599 ISSN 1616-5187 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E12053 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 246513 - NADINE Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : β-amyloid peptides * CE-LIF detection * functionalization Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.851, year: 2014

  10. Timing of neurodegeneration and beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide deposition in the brain of aging kokanee salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Tammy A; Jones, Richard E; Norris, David O

    2002-10-01

    Brains of kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) in one of four reproductive stages (sexually immature, maturing, sexually mature, and spawning) were stained with cresyl violet and silver stain to visualize neurodegeneration. These reproductive stages correlate with increasing somatic aging of kokanee salmon, which die after spawning. Twenty-four regions of each brain were examined. Brains of sexually immature fish exhibited low levels of neurodegeneration, whereas neurodegeneration was more marked in maturing fish and greatest in spawning fish. Neurodegeneration was present in specific regions of the telencephalon, diencephalon, mesencephalon, and rhombencephalon. Pyknotic neurons were observed in all regions previously reported to be immunopositive for A beta. Regions that did not exhibit neurodegeneration during aging included the magnocellular vestibular nucleus, the nucleus lateralis tuberis of the hypothalamus, and Purkinje cells of the cerebellum, all of which also lack A beta; perhaps these regions are neuroprotected. In 14 of 16 brain areas for which data were available on both the increase in A beta deposition and pyknosis, neurodegeneration preceded or appeared more or less simultaneously with A beta production, whereas in only two regions did A beta deposition precede neurodegeneration. This information supports the hypothesis that A beta deposition is a downstream product of neurodegeneration in most brain regions. Other conclusions are that the degree of neurodegeneration varies among brain regions, neurodegeneration begins in maturing fish and peaks in spawning fish, the timing of neurodegeneration varies among brain regions, and some regions do not exhibit accelerated neurodegeneration during aging. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Surface Mediated Self-Assembly of Amyloid Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhraai, Zahra

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid fibrils have been considered as causative agents in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, type II diabetes and amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils form when proteins or peptides misfold into one dimensional crystals of stacked beta-sheets. In solution, amyloid fibrils form through a nucleation and growth mechanism. The rate limiting nucleation step requires a critical concentration much larger than those measured in physiological conditions. As such the exact origins of the seeds or oligomers that result in the formation of fully mature fibrils in the body remain topic intense studies. It has been suggested that surfaces and interfaces can enhance the fibrillization rate. However, studies of the mechanism and kinetics of the surface-mediated fibrillization are technologically challenging due to the small size of the oligomer and protofibril species. Using smart sample preparation technique to dry the samples after various incubation times we are able to study the kinetics of fibril formation both in solution and in the vicinity of various surfaces using high-resolution atomic force microscopy. These studies elucidate the role of surfaces in catalyzing amyloid peptide formation through a nucleation-free process. The nucleation free self-assembly is rapid and requires much smaller concentrations of peptides or proteins. We show that this process resembles diffusion limited aggregation and is governed by the peptide adhesion rate, two -dimensional diffusion of the peptides on the surface, and preferential interactions between the peptides. These studies suggest an alternative pathway for amyloid formation may exist, which could lead to new criteria for disease prevention and alternative therapies. Research was partially supported by a seed grant from the National Institute of Aging of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number P30AG010124 (PI: John Trojanowski) and the University of Pennsylvania.

  12. Antimicrobial activity of human islet amyloid polypeptides: an insight into amyloid peptides' connection with antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lan; Liu, Qian; Chen, Jin-Chun; Cui, Yi-Xian; Zhou, Bing; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Li, Yan-Mei

    2012-07-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) shows an antimicrobial activity towards two types of clinically relevant bacteria. The potency of hIAPP varies with its aggregation states. Circular dichroism was employed to determine the interaction between hIAPP and bacteria lipid membrane mimic. The antimicrobial activity of each aggregate species is associated with their ability to induce membrane disruption. Our findings provide new evidence revealing the antimicrobial activity of amyloid peptide, which suggest a possible connection between amyloid peptides and antimicrobial peptides.

  13. Adenosine A2A receptor blockade prevents synaptotoxicity and memory dysfunction caused by beta-amyloid peptides via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canas, Paula M; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Cunha, Geanne M A; Silva, Carla G; Machado, Nuno J; Oliveira, Jorge M A; Oliveira, Catarina R; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2009-11-25

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory impairment, neurochemically by accumulation of beta-amyloid peptide (namely Abeta(1-42)) and morphologically by an initial loss of nerve terminals. Caffeine consumption prevents memory dysfunction in different models, which is mimicked by antagonists of adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs), which are located in synapses. Thus, we now tested whether A(2A)R blockade prevents the early Abeta(1-42)-induced synaptotoxicity and memory dysfunction and what are the underlying signaling pathways. The intracerebral administration of soluble Abeta(1-42) (2 nmol) in rats or mice caused, 2 weeks later, memory impairment (decreased performance in the Y-maze and object recognition tests) and a loss of nerve terminal markers (synaptophysin, SNAP-25) without overt neuronal loss, astrogliosis, or microgliosis. These were prevented by pharmacological blockade [5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine (SCH58261); 0.05 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1), i.p.; for 15 d] in rats, and genetic inactivation of A(2A)Rs in mice. Moreover, these were synaptic events since purified nerve terminals acutely exposed to Abeta(1-42) (500 nm) displayed mitochondrial dysfunction, which was prevented by A(2A)R blockade. SCH58261 (50 nm) also prevented the initial synaptotoxicity (loss of MAP-2, synaptophysin, and SNAP-25 immunoreactivity) and subsequent loss of viability of cultured hippocampal neurons exposed to Abeta(1-42) (500 nm). This A(2A)R-mediated control of neurotoxicity involved the control of Abeta(1-42)-induced p38 phosphorylation and was independent from cAMP/PKA (protein kinase A) pathway. Together, these results show that A(2A)Rs play a crucial role in the development of Abeta-induced synaptotoxicity leading to memory dysfunction through a p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-dependent pathway and provide a molecular basis for the benefits of caffeine consumption in AD.

  14. Halogenation dictates the architecture of amyloid peptide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Andrea; Pigliacelli, Claudia; Gori, Alessandro; Nonappa; Ikkala, Olli; Demitri, Nicola; Terraneo, Giancarlo; Castelletto, Valeria; Hamley, Ian W; Baldelli Bombelli, Francesca; Metrangolo, Pierangelo

    2017-07-20

    Amyloid peptides yield a plethora of interesting nanostructures though difficult to control. Here we report that depending on the number, position, and nature of the halogen atoms introduced into either one or both phenylalanine benzene rings of the amyloid β peptide-derived core-sequence KLVFF, four different architectures were obtained in a controlled manner. Our findings demonstrate that halogenation may develop as a general strategy to engineer amyloidal peptide self-assembly and obtain new amyloidal nanostructures.

  15. The effects of Tabernaemontana divaricata root extract on amyloid beta-peptide 25-35 peptides induced cognitive deficits in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakdook, Walika; Khongsombat, Onrawee; Taepavarapruk, Pornnarin; Taepavarapruk, Niwat; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok

    2010-07-06

    ETHNOPHAMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Tabernaemontana divaricata (TD), a Thai medicinal herb, has been widely used as an analgesic, sedative, or a cough syrup. Moreover, it has been used in traditional rejuvenation remedies as for preventing forgetfulness and improving the memory. The present study aimed to determine the effect of TD on Abeta25-35 peptides induced cognitive deficits and acetylcholinesterase activity in mice. Mice were pretreated with TDE (250, 500 and 1,000 mg/kg body weight) for 28 days and then received i.c.v. injection of Abeta25-35 peptides. Cognitive performance was evaluated using the Morris water maze (MWM) and step-down avoidance test. The Ellman's colorimetric method was used to investigate the levels of cortical and hippocampal AChE activity. Abeta25-35 peptides induced the memory impairment and the increased levels of cortical and hippocampal AChE activity. The consumption of TDE significantly improved the memory impairment and attenuated the brain levels of AChE activity induced by Abeta25-35 peptides. These findings suggest that subchronic administration of TDE might prevent the Abeta25-35 peptides induced memory deficits by decreasing the AChE activity level. Therefore TDE could potentially be one of nootropic supplements for those elderly people suffering from dementia such as the AD patients. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Reducing the Levels of Akt Activation by PDK1 Knock-in Mutation Protects Neuronal Cultures against Synthetic Amyloid-Beta Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobin Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Akt kinase has been widely assumed for years as a key downstream effector of the PI3K signaling pathway in promoting neuronal survival. This notion was however challenged by the finding that neuronal survival responses were still preserved in mice with reduced Akt activity. Moreover, here we show that the Akt signaling is elevated in the aged brain of two different mice models of Alzheimer Disease. We manipulate the rate of Akt stimulation by employing knock-in mice expressing a mutant form of PDK1 (phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 with reduced, but not abolished, ability to activate Akt. We found increased membrane localization and activity of the TACE/ADAM17 α-secretase in the brain of the PDK1 mutant mice with concomitant TNFR1 processing, which provided neurons with resistance against TNFα-induced neurotoxicity. Opposite to the Alzheimer Disease transgenic mice, the PDK1 knock-in mice exhibited an age-dependent attenuation of the unfolding protein response, which protected the mutant neurons against endoplasmic reticulum stressors. Moreover, these two mechanisms cooperatively provide the mutant neurons with resistance against amyloid-beta oligomers, and might singularly also contribute to protect these mice against amyloid-beta pathology.

  17. Beta-amyloid and cholinergic neurons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležal, Vladimír; Kašparová, Jana

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 28, 3-4 (2003), s. 499-506 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/01/0283; GA AV ČR IAA5011206 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cholinergic neurons * AlzheimerŽs disease * beta-amyloid Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.511, year: 2003

  18. Rescue of amyloid-Beta-induced inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by a peptide homologous to the nicotine binding domain of the alpha 7 subtype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur A Nery

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by brain accumulation of the neurotoxic amyloidpeptide (Aβ and by loss of cholinergic neurons and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. Recent evidence indicates that memory loss and cognitive decline in AD correlate better with the amount of soluble Aβ than with the extent of amyloid plaque deposits in affected brains. Inhibition of nAChRs by soluble Aβ40 is suggested to contribute to early cholinergic dysfunction in AD. Using phage display screening, we have previously identified a heptapeptide, termed IQ, homologous to most nAChR subtypes, binding with nanomolar affinity to soluble Aβ40 and blocking Aβ-induced inhibition of carbamylcholine-induced currents in PC12 cells expressing α7 nAChRs. Using alanine scanning mutagenesis and whole-cell current recording, we have now defined the amino acids in IQ essential for reversal of Aβ40 inhibition of carbamylcholine-induced responses in PC12 cells, mediated by α7 subtypes and other endogenously expressed nAChRs. We further investigated the effects of soluble Aβ, IQ and analogues of IQ on α3β4 nAChRs recombinantly expressed in HEK293 cells. Results show that nanomolar concentrations of soluble Aβ40 potently inhibit the function of α3β4 nAChRs, and that subsequent addition of IQ or its analogues does not reverse this effect. However, co-application of IQ makes the inhibition of α3β4 nAChRs by Aβ40 reversible. These findings indicate that Aβ40 inhibits different subtypes of nAChRs by interacting with specific receptor domains homologous to the IQ peptide, suggesting that IQ may be a lead for novel drugs to block the inhibition of cholinergic function in AD.

  19. Involvement of formyl peptide receptors in receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE - and amyloid beta 1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slowik Alexander

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies suggest that the chemotactic G-protein-coupled-receptor (GPCR formyl-peptide-receptor-like-1 (FPRL1 and the receptor-for-advanced-glycation-end-products (RAGE play an important role in the inflammatory response involved in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Therefore, the expression and co-localisation of mouse formyl peptide receptor (mFPR 1 and 2 as well as RAGE in an APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model using immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR were analysed. The involvement of rat or human FPR1/FPRL1 (corresponds to mFPR1/2 and RAGE in amyloid-β 1–42 (Aβ1-42-induced signalling were investigated by extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the cAMP level in primary rat glial cells (microglia and astrocytes and transfected HEK 293 cells was measured. Formyl peptide receptors and RAGE were inhibited by a small synthetic antagonist WRW4 and an inactive receptor variant delta-RAGE, lacking the intracytoplasmatic domains. Results We demonstrated a strong increase of mFPR1/2 and RAGE expression in the cortex and hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice co-localised to the glial cells. In addition, the Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction is dependant on FPRL1, but also on FPR1. For the first time, we have shown a functional interaction between FPRL1/FPR1 and RAGE in RAGE ligands S100B- or AGE-mediated signalling by ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement. In addition a possible physical interaction between FPRL1 as well as FPR1 and RAGE was shown with co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence microscopy. Conclusions The results suggest that both formyl peptide receptors play an essential role in Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells. The interaction with RAGE could explain the broad ligand spectrum of formyl peptide receptors and their important role for inflammation and the host defence against infections.

  20. Disrupting beta-amyloid aggregation for Alzheimer disease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, L D; Soto, C

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a devastating degenerative disorder for which there is no cure or effective treatment. Although the etiology of Alzheimer's disease is not fully understood, compelling evidence indicates that deposition of aggregates composed by a misfolded form of the amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) is the central event in the disease pathogenesis. Therefore, an attractive therapeutic strategy is to prevent or reverse Abeta misfolding and aggregation. Diverse strategies have been described to identify inhibitors of this process, including screening of libraries of small molecules chemical compounds, rational design of synthetic peptides, assessment of natural Abeta-binding proteins and stimulation of the immune system by vaccination. In this article we describe these different approaches, their principles and their potential strengths and weaknesses. Overall the available data suggest that the development of drugs to interfere with Abeta misfolding and aggregation is a feasible target that hold great promise for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Some commonly used brominated flame retardants cause Ca2+-ATPase inhibition, beta-amyloid peptide release and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawaz Al-Mousa

    Full Text Available Brominated flame retardants (BFRs are chemicals commonly used to reduce the flammability of consumer products and are considered pollutants since they have become widely dispersed throughout the environment and have also been shown to bio-accumulate within animals and man. This study investigated the cytotoxicity of some of the most commonly used groups of BFRs on SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The results showed that of the BFRs tested, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD, tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA and decabromodiphenyl ether (DBPE, all are cytotoxic at low micromolar concentrations (LC(50 being 2.7 ± 0.7 µM, 15 ± 4 µM and 28 ± 7 µM, respectively. They induced cell death, at least in part, by apoptosis through activation of caspases. They also increased intracellular [Ca(2+] levels and reactive-oxygen-species within these neuronal cells. Furthermore, these BFRs also caused rapid depolarization of the mitochondria and cytochrome c release in these neuronal cells. Elevated intracellular [Ca(2+] levels appear to occur through a mechanism involving microsomal Ca(2+-ATPase inhibition and this maybe responsible for Ca(2+-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, µM levels of these BFRs caused β-amyloid peptide (Aβ-42 processing and release from these cells with a few hours of exposure. These results therefore shows that these pollutants are both neurotoxic and amyloidogenic in-vitro.

  2. BETASCAN: probable beta-amyloids identified by pairwise probabilistic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen W Bryan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Amyloids and prion proteins are clinically and biologically important beta-structures, whose supersecondary structures are difficult to determine by standard experimental or computational means. In addition, significant conformational heterogeneity is known or suspected to exist in many amyloid fibrils. Recent work has indicated the utility of pairwise probabilistic statistics in beta-structure prediction. We develop here a new strategy for beta-structure prediction, emphasizing the determination of beta-strands and pairs of beta-strands as fundamental units of beta-structure. Our program, BETASCAN, calculates likelihood scores for potential beta-strands and strand-pairs based on correlations observed in parallel beta-sheets. The program then determines the strands and pairs with the greatest local likelihood for all of the sequence's potential beta-structures. BETASCAN suggests multiple alternate folding patterns and assigns relative a priori probabilities based solely on amino acid sequence, probability tables, and pre-chosen parameters. The algorithm compares favorably with the results of previous algorithms (BETAPRO, PASTA, SALSA, TANGO, and Zyggregator in beta-structure prediction and amyloid propensity prediction. Accurate prediction is demonstrated for experimentally determined amyloid beta-structures, for a set of known beta-aggregates, and for the parallel beta-strands of beta-helices, amyloid-like globular proteins. BETASCAN is able both to detect beta-strands with higher sensitivity and to detect the edges of beta-strands in a richly beta-like sequence. For two proteins (Abeta and Het-s, there exist multiple sets of experimental data implying contradictory structures; BETASCAN is able to detect each competing structure as a potential structure variant. The ability to correlate multiple alternate beta-structures to experiment opens the possibility of computational investigation of prion strains and structural heterogeneity of amyloid

  3. Solution structures of {beta}-amyloid{sub 10-35} and {beta}-amyloid{sub 10-35} PEG3000 aggregates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzinger, T. L. S.; Burkoth, T. S.; Gordon, D.; Lynn, D. G.; Meredith, S. C.; Morgan, D. M.; Seifert, S.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Urban, V.

    1999-07-02

    Small angle neutron and x-ray scattering (SANS/SAXS) studies were conducted on the structure of the aggregates formed from both the truncated model peptide {beta}-Amyloid(10-35) (A{beta}{sub 10-35}) and a block copolymer {beta}-Amyloid (10-35)-PEG3000 (A{beta}{sub 10-35}-PEG) in D{sub 2}O at pHs from 3.0 to 7.0. These studies indicate that A{beta}{sub 10-35} aggregates into rod-like particles (fibril) and their radii are strongly dependent on the Pm of the solution. The fibril-fibril association in A{beta}{sub 10-35} solutions is less of pH < 5.6, but becomes larger at higher pH. A{beta}{sub 10-35}-PEG also assembles into rod-like particles whose radius is larger by about 30 {angstrom} than that for A{beta}{sub 10-35} fibril at pH 4.2, while it is about 23 {angstrom} larger at higher pH. Contrast matching SAXS/SANS experiments that eliminate the coherent scattering from PEG reveal that PEG moiety is located at the periphery of the fibril. Also, the mass per unit length of the peptide portion is similar for both A{beta}{sub 10-35} and A{beta}{sub 10-35}-PEG fibrils at pH 5.6. The mass per unit length of the rods from SANS provides key information on the packing of A{beta}{sub 10-35} peptides in the fibril.

  4. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout selectively enhances ethanol-, but not beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, Nancyellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2005-01-03

    The alpha7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated as a potential site of action for two neurotoxins, ethanol and the Alzheimer's disease related peptide, beta-amyloid. Here, we utilized primary neuronal cultures of cerebral cortex from alpha7 nAChR null mutant mice to examine the role of this receptor in modulating the neurotoxic properties of subchronic, "binge" ethanol and beta-amyloid. Knockout of the alpha7 nAChR gene selectively enhanced ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in a gene dosage-related fashion. Susceptibility of cultures to beta-amyloid induced toxicity, however, was unaffected by alpha7 nAChR gene null mutation. Further, beta-amyloid did not inhibit the binding of the highly alpha7-selective radioligand, [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin. On the other hand, in studies in Xenopus oocytes ethanol efficaciously inhibited alpha7 nAChR function. These data suggest that alpha7 nAChRs modulate the neurotoxic effects of binge ethanol, but not the neurotoxicity produced by beta-amyloid. It is hypothesized that inhibition of alpha7 nAChRs by ethanol provides partial protection against the neurotoxic properties of subchronic ethanol.

  5. A Peptide-Fc Opsonin with Pan-Amyloid Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S. Foster

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a continuing need for therapeutic interventions for patients with the protein misfolding disorders that result in systemic amyloidosis. Recently, specific antibodies have been employed to treat AL amyloidosis by opsonizing tissue amyloid deposits thereby inducing cell-mediated dissolution and organ improvement. To develop a pan-amyloid therapeutic agent, we have produced an Fc-fusion product incorporating a peptide, p5, which binds many if not all forms of amyloid. This protein, designated Fcp5, expressed in mammalian cells, forms the desired bivalent dimer structure and retains pan-amyloid reactivity similar to the p5 peptide as measured by immunosorbent assays, immunohistochemistry, surface plasmon resonance, and pulldown assays using radioiodinated Fcp5. Additionally, Fcp5 was capable of opsonizing amyloid fibrils in vitro using a pH-sensitive fluorescence assay of phagocytosis. In mice,125 I-labeled Fcp5 exhibited an extended serum circulation time, relative to the p5 peptide. It specifically bound AA amyloid deposits in diseased mice, as evidenced by biodistribution and microautoradiographic methods, which coincided with an increase in active, Iba-1-positive macrophages in the liver at 48 h postinjection of Fcp5. In healthy mice, no specific tissue accumulation was observed. The data indicate that polybasic, pan-amyloid-targeting peptides, in the context of an Fc fusion, can yield amyloid reactive, opsonizing reagents that may serve as next-generation immunotherapeutics.

  6. Amyloid beta plaque-associated proteins C1q and SAP enhance the Abeta1-42 peptide-induced cytokine secretion by adult human microglia in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerhuis, Robert; van Breemen, Mariëlle J.; Hoozemans, Jeroen M.; Morbin, Michela; Ouladhadj, Jamal; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Eikelenboom, Piet

    2003-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines released by activated microglia could be a driving force in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. We evaluated whether the presence of complement factor C1q and serum amyloid P component (SAP) in Abeta deposits is related to microglial activation. Activated microglia

  7. Perforin Promotes Amyloid Beta Internalisation in Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lana, Erica; Khanbolouki, Mahbod; Degavre, Charline; Samuelsson, Eva-Britt; Åkesson, Elisabet; Winblad, Bengt; Alici, Evren; Lithner, Christina Unger; Behbahani, Homira

    2017-03-01

    Studies on the mechanisms of neuronal amyloid-β (Aβ) internalisation are crucial for understanding the neuropathological progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We here investigated how extracellular Aβ peptides are internalised and focused on three different pathways: (i) via endocytic mechanisms, (ii) via the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and (iii) via the pore-forming protein perforin. Both Aβ 40 and Aβ 42 were internalised in retinoic acid differentiated neuroblastoma (RA-SH-SY5Y) cells. A higher concentration was required for Aβ 40 (250 nM) compared with Aβ 42 (100 nM). The internalised Aβ 40 showed a dot-like pattern of distribution whereas Aβ 42 accumulated in larger and distinct formations. By confocal microscopy, we showed that Aβ 40 and Aβ 42 co-localised with mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and lysosomes. Aβ treatment of human primary cortical neurons (hPCN) confirmed our findings in RA-SH-SY5Y cells, but hPCN were less sensitive to Aβ; therefore, a 20 (Aβ 40 ) and 50 (Aβ 42 ) times higher concentration was needed for inducing uptake. The blocking of endocytosis completely inhibited the internalisation of Aβ peptides in RA-SH-SY5Y cells and hPCN, indicating that this is a major pathway by which Aβ enters the cells. In addition, the internalisation of Aβ 42 , but not Aβ 40 , was reduced by 55 % by blocking RAGE. Finally, for the first time we showed that pore formation in cell membranes by perforin led to Aβ internalisation in hPCN. Understanding how Aβ is internalised sheds light on the pathological role of Aβ and provides further ideas of inhibitory strategies for preventing Aβ internalisation and the spreading of neurodegeneration in AD.

  8. Microbiosensor for Alzheimer's disease diagnostics: detection of amyloid beta biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhulkar, Shradha; Piatyszek, Rudolph; Cirrito, John R; Wu, Ze-Zhi; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) affects about 35.6 million people worldwide, and if current trends continue with no medical advancement, one in 85 people will be affected by 2050. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop a cost-effective, easy to use, sensor platform to diagnose and study AD. The measurement of peptide amyloid beta (Aβ) found in CSF has been assessed as an avenue to diagnose and study the disease. The quantification of the ratio of Aβ1-40/42 (or Aβ ratio) has been established as a reliable test to diagnose AD through human clinical trials. Therefore, we have developed a multiplexed, implantable immunosensor to detect amyloid beta (Aβ) isoforms using triple barrel carbon fiber microelectrodes as the sensor platform. Antibodies act as the biorecognition element of the sensor and selectively capture and bind Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 to the electrode surface. Electrochemistry was used to measure the intrinsic oxidation signal of Aβ at 0.65 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), originating from a single tyrosine residue found at position 10 in its amino acid sequence. Using the proposed immunosensor Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 could be specifically detected in CSF from mice within a detection range of 20-50 nM and 20-140 nM respectively. The immunosensor enables real-time, highly sensitive detection of Aβ and opens up the possibilities for diagnostic ex vivo applications and research-based in vivo studies. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. New Insights in the Amyloid-Beta Interaction with Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Spuch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Particularly, mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of amyloid-beta-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. The recent emphasis on the intracellular biology of amyloid-beta and its precursor protein (APP has led researchers to consider the possibility that mitochondria-associated and mitochondrial amyloid-beta may directly cause neurotoxicity. Both proteins are known to localize to mitochondrial membranes, block the transport of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to mitochondria, interact with mitochondrial proteins, disrupt the electron transport chain, increase reactive oxygen species production, cause mitochondrial damage, and prevent neurons from functioning normally. In this paper, we will outline current knowledge of the intracellular localization of amyloid-beta. Moreover, we summarize evidence from AD postmortem brain as well as animal AD models showing that amyloid-beta triggers mitochondrial dysfunction through a number of pathways such as impairment of oxidative phosphorylation, elevation of reactive oxygen species production, alteration of mitochondrial dynamics, and interaction with mitochondrial proteins. Thus, this paper supports the Alzheimer cascade mitochondrial hypothesis such as the most important early events in this disease, and probably one of the future strategies on the therapy of this neurodegenerative disease.

  10. Stabilization of a β-hairpin in monomeric Alzheimer's amyloidpeptide inhibits amyloid formation

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyer, Wolfgang; Grönwall, Caroline; Jonsson, Andreas; Ståhl, Stefan; Härd, Torleif

    2008-01-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is triggered by the oligomerization and aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into protein plaques. Formation of the potentially toxic oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ assemblies is accompanied by a conformational change toward a high content of β-structure. Here, we report the solution structure of Aβ(1–40) in complex with the phage-display selected affibody protein ZAβ3, a binding protein of nanomolar affinity. Boun...

  11. Effect of four medicinal plants on amyloid-beta induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adewusi, EA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid-beta peptide (Aß) is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder. This study was designed to determine the effect of four medicinal plants used to treat neurodegenerative diseases on Aß...

  12. Cu K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Reveals Differential Copper Coordimation Within Amyloid-beta Oligomers Compared to Amyloid-beta Monomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Shearer; P Callan; T Tran; V Szalai

    2011-12-31

    The fatal neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been linked to the formation of soluble neurotoxic oligomers of amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptides. These peptides have high affinities for copper cations. Despite their potential importance in AD neurodegeneration few studies have focused on probing the Cu{sup 2+/1+} coordination environment within A{beta} oligomers. Herein we present a Cu K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopic study probing the copper-coordination environment within oligomers of A{beta}(42) (sequence: DAEFRHDSGYEVHHQKLVFFAEDVGSNKGAIIGLMVGGVVIA). We find that the Cu{sup 2+} cation is contained within a square planar mixed N/O ligand environment within A{beta}(42) oligomers, which is similar to the copper coordination environment of the monomeric forms of {l_brace}Cu{sup II}A{beta}(40){r_brace} and {l_brace}Cu{sup II}A{beta}(16){r_brace}. Reduction of the Cu{sup 2+} cation within the A{beta}(42) oligomers to Cu{sup 1+} yields a highly dioxygen sensitive copper-species that contains Cu{sup 1+} in a tetrahedral coordination geometry. This can be contrasted with monomers of {l_brace}Cu{sup I}A{beta}(40){r_brace} and {l_brace}Cu{sup I}A{beta}(16){r_brace}, which contain copper in a dioxygen inert linear bis-histidine ligand environment [Shearer and Szalai, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130, 17826]. The biological implications of these findings are discussed.

  13. Beta-amyloid, cholinergní neurony a Alzheimerova choroba

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašparová, Jana; Doležal, Vladimír

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2002), s. 82-94 ISSN 0009-0557 R&D Projects: GA MZd NF5183; GA ČR GA305/01/0283 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Alzheimer 's disease * beta-amyloid * cholinergic neurons Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry

  14. Aggregation properties of a short peptide that mediates amyloid fibril ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Short peptides have been identified from amyloidogenic proteins that form amyloid fibrils in isolation. The hexapeptide stretch 21DIDLHL26 has been shown to be important in the self-assembly of the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of p85 subunit of bovine phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3-SH3). The SH3 domain of ...

  15. Molecular understanding of a potential functional link between antimicrobial and amyloid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingzhen; Zhao, Jun; Zheng, Jie

    2014-10-14

    Antimicrobial and amyloid peptides do not share common sequences, typical secondary structures, or normal biological activity but both the classes of peptides exhibit membrane-disruption ability to induce cell toxicity. Different membrane-disruption mechanisms have been proposed for antimicrobial and amyloid peptides, individually, some of which are not exclusive to either peptide type, implying that certain common principles may govern the folding and functions of different cytolytic peptides and associated membrane disruption mechanisms. Particularly, some antimicrobial and amyloid peptides have been identified to have dual complementary amyloid and antimicrobial properties, suggesting a potential functional link between amyloid and antimicrobial peptides. Given that some similar structural and membrane-disruption characteristics exist between the two classes of peptides, this review summarizes major findings, recent advances, and future challenges related to antimicrobial and amyloid peptides and strives to illustrate the similarities, differences, and relationships in the sequences, structures, and membrane interaction modes between amyloid and antimicrobial peptides, with a special focus on direct interactions of the peptides with the membranes. We hope that this review will stimulate further research at the interface of antimicrobial and amyloid peptides - which has been studied less intensively than either type of peptides - to decipher a possible link between both amyloid pathology and antimicrobial activity, which can guide drug design and peptide engineering to influence peptide-membrane interactions important in human health and diseases.

  16. Exploring the early steps of aggregation of amyloid-forming peptide KFFE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Guanghong [Departement de Physique and Regroupement Quebecois sur les Materiaux de Pointe, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, succursale centre-ville, Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Mousseau, Normand [Departement de Physique and Regroupement Quebecois sur les Materiaux de Pointe, Universite de Montreal, CP 6128, succursale centre-ville, Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Derreumaux, Philippe [Laboratoire de Biochimie, Theorique, UPR 9080 CNRS, IBPC, Universite Paris 7 Denis-Diderot, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2004-11-10

    It has been shown recently that even a tetrapeptide can form amyloid fibrils sharing all the characteristics of amyloid fibrils built from large proteins. Recent experimental studies also suggest that the toxicity observed in several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, is not only related to the mature fibrils themselves, but also to the soluble oligomers formed early in the process of fibrillogenesis. This raises the interest in studying the early steps of the aggregation process. Although fibril formation follows the nucleation-condensation process, characterized by the presence of lag phase, the exact pathways remain to be determined. In this study, we used the activation-relaxation technique and a generic energy model to explore the process of self-assembly and the structures of the resulting aggregates of eight KFFE peptides. Our simulations show, starting from different states with a preformed antiparallel dimer, that eight chains can self-assemble to adopt, with various orientations, four possible distant oligomeric well-aligned structures of similar energy. Two of these structures show a double-layer {beta}-sheet organization, in agreement with the structure of amyloid fibrils as observed by x-ray diffraction; another two are mixtures of dimers and trimers. Our results also suggest that octamers are likely to be below the critical size for nucleation of amyloid fibrils for small peptides.

  17. Docosahexaenoic acid-induced amelioration on impairment of memory learning in amyloid beta-infused rats relates to the decreases of amyloid beta and cholesterol levels in detergent-insoluble membrane fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Michio; Hossain, Shahdat; Agdul, Haqu; Shido, Osamu

    2005-12-30

    We investigated the effects of dietary administration of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6n-3) on the levels of amyloid beta (A beta) peptide (1-40) and cholesterol in the nonionic detergent Triton 100 x-insoluble membrane fractions (DIFs) of the cerebral cortex and, also, on learning-related memory in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) rats infused with A beta peptide (1-40) into the cerebral ventricle. The infusion increased the levels of A beta peptide and cholesterol in the DIFs concurrently with a significant increase in reference memory errors (measured by eight-arm radial-maze tasks) compared with those of vehicle rats. Conversely, the dietary administration of DHA to AD-model rats decreased the levels of A beta peptide and cholesterol in the DIFs, with the decrease being more prominent in the DHA-administered rats. Regression analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between A beta peptide and each of cholesterol, palmitic acid and stearic acid, and between the number of reference memory errors and each of cholesterol, palmitic, stearic and oleic acid; moreover, a significant negative correlation was observed between the number of reference memory errors and the molar ratio of DHA to palmitic plus stearic acid. These results suggest that DHA-induced protection of memory deficits in AD-model rats is related to the interactions of cholesterol, palmitic acid or stearic acid with A beta peptides in DIFs where DHA ameliorates these interactions.

  18. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastus Neus

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  19. The role of mutated amyloid beta 1-42 stimulating dendritic cells in a PDAPP transgenic mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Jia-lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Amyloid plaque is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Anti-beta-amyloid (Aβ immunotherapy is effective in removing brain Aβ, but has shown to be associated with detrimental effects. To avoid severe adverse effects such as meningoencephalitis induced by amyloid beta vaccine with adjuvant, and take advantage of amyloid beta antibody's therapeutic effect on Alzheimer's disease sufficiently, our group has developed a new Alzheimer vaccine with mutated amyloid beta 1-42 peptide stimulating dendritic cells (DC. Our previous work has confirmed that DC vaccine can induce adequate anti-amyloid beta antibody in PDAPP Tg mice safely and efficiently. The DC vaccine can improve impaired learning and memory in the Alzheimer's animal model, and did not cause microvasculitis, microhemorrhage or meningoencephalitis in the animal model. However, the exact mechanism of immunotherapy which reduces Aβ deposition remains unknown. In this report, we studied the mechanism of the vaccine, thinking that this may have implications for better understanding of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Methods A new Alzheimer vaccine with mutated amyloid beta 1-42 peptide stimulating DC which were obtained from C57/B6 mouse bone marrow was developed. Amyloid beta with Freund's adjuvant was inoculated at the same time to act as positive control. After the treatment was done, the samples of brains were collected, fixed, cut. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to observe the expression of the nuclear hormone liver X receptor (LXR, membrane-bound protein tyrosine phosphatase (CD45, the ATP-binding cassette family of active transporters (ABCA1, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, β-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE and Aβ in mouse brain tissue. Semi-quantitative analysis was used to defect CA1, CA2, CA3, DG, Rad in hippocampus region and positive neuron in cortex region. Results Aβ was significantly reduced in the

  20. A comparative analysis of the aggregation behavior of amyloidpeptide variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandersteen, Annelies; Hubin, Ellen; Sarroukh, Rabia; De Baets, Greet; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Subramaniam, Vinod; Raussens, Vincent; Wenschuh, Holger; Wildemann, Dirk; Broersen, Kerensa

    2012-01-01

    Aggregated forms of the amyloidpeptide are hypothesized to act as the prime toxic agents in Alzheimer disease (AD). The in vivo amyloidpeptide pool consists of both C- and N-terminally truncated or mutated peptides, and the composition thereof significantly determines AD risk. Other

  1. Neuroinflammation and Complexes of 17 beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase type 10-Amyloid beta in Alzheimer's Disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištofíková, Z.; Řípová, D.; Bartoš, A.; Bocková, Markéta; Hegnerová, Kateřina; Říčný, J.; Čechová, L.; Vrajová, M.; Homola, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2013), s. 165-173 ISSN 1567-2050 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT11225 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Amyloid beta * mitochondrial enzyme * Alzheimer 's disease Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 3.796, year: 2013

  2. Successful adjuvant-free vaccination of BALB/c mice with mutated amyloid β peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahi Monika M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent human clinical trial of an Alzheimer's disease (AD vaccine using amyloid beta (Aβ 1–42 plus QS-21 adjuvant produced some positive results, but was halted due to meningoencephalitis in some participants. The development of a vaccine with mutant Aβ peptides that avoids the use of an adjuvant may result in an effective and safer human vaccine. Results All peptides tested showed high antibody responses, were long-lasting, and demonstrated good memory response. Epitope mapping indicated that peptide mutation did not lead to epitope switching. Mutant peptides induced different inflammation responses as evidenced by cytokine profiles. Ig isotyping indicated that adjuvant-free vaccination with peptides drove an adequate Th2 response. All anti-sera from vaccinated mice cross-reacted with human Aβ in APP/PS1 transgenic mouse brain tissue. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that an adjuvant-free vaccine with different Aβ peptides can be an effective and safe vaccination approach against AD. This study represents the first report of adjuvant-free vaccines utilizing Aβ peptides carrying diverse mutations in the T-cell epitope. These largely positive results provide encouragement for the future of the development of human vaccinations for AD.

  3. Imaging of dialysis-related amyloid (AB-amyloid) deposits with 131I-beta 2-microglobulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floege, J.; Burchert, W.; Brandis, A.; Gielow, P.; Nonnast-Daniel, B.; Spindler, E.; Hundeshagen, H.; Shaldon, S.; Koch, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of dialysis-related amyloid (AB-amyloid) has been based usually on clinical and radiological criteria. Following the discovery that beta 2-microglobulin was the major protein of this amyloid, we isolated and radiolabelled uremic plasma beta 2-microglobulin. After intravenous injection, gamma-camera images of selected joint areas were obtained from 42 patients who were on regular hemodialysis therapy. Positive scans involving the shoulder, hip, knee and carpal regions were found in 13 of 14 patients treated for more than 10 years and 10 of 16 patients treated for 5 to 10 years. Patients treated for less time had negative scans. Specificity was indicated by negative scans in non-amyloid inflammatory lesions in control hemodialysis patients. Up to 48-fold tracer enrichment was detected in excised AB-amyloid containing tissue as compared to amyloid-free tissue. These findings suggest that circulating radiolabelled beta 2-microglobulin is taken up by the amyloid deposits. This method may non-invasively detect tissue infiltrates of amyloid. It may also permit prospective evaluation of the efficacy of prophylactic dialysis strategies which are designed to prevent or delay the onset of this complication of long-term dialysis

  4. Liquid Crystal Enabled Early Stage Detection of Beta Amyloid Formation on Lipid Monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadati, Monirosadat [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Apik, Aslin Izmitli [Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; Armas-Perez, Julio C. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan P. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Departamento de Materiales y Minerales, Facultad de Minas, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellín, Calle 75 # 79A-51, Bloque M17 Medellín Colombia; Abbott, Nicholas L. [Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; de Pablo, Juan J. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA

    2015-09-09

    Liquid crystals (LCs) can serve as sensitive reporters of interfacial events, and this property has been used for sensing of synthetic or biological toxins. Here it is demonstrated that LCs can distinguish distinct molecular motifs and exhibit a specific response to beta-sheet structures. That property is used to detect the formation of highly toxic protofibrils involved in neurodegenerative diseases, where it is crucial to develop methods that probe the early-stage aggregation of amyloidogenic peptides in the vicinity of biological membranes. In the proposed method, the amyloid fibrils formed at the lipid-decorated LC interface can change the orientation of LCs and form elongated and branched structures that are amplified by the mesogenic medium; however, nonamyloidogenic peptides form ellipsoidal domains of tilted LCs. Moreover, a theoretical and computational analysis is used to reveal the underlying structure of the LC, thereby providing a detailed molecular-level view of the interactions and mechanisms responsible for such motifs. The corresponding signatures can be detected at nanomolar concentrations of peptide by polarized light microscopy and much earlier than the ones that can be identified by fluorescence-based techniques. As such, it offers the potential for early diagnoses of neurodegenerative diseases and for facile testing of inhibitors of amyloid formation.

  5. Curcumin Binding to Beta Amyloid: A Computational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Praveen P N; Mohamed, Tarek; Teckwani, Karan; Tin, Gary

    2015-10-01

    Curcumin, a chemical constituent present in the spice turmeric, is known to prevent the aggregation of amyloid peptide implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. While curcumin is known to bind directly to various amyloid aggregates, no systematic investigations have been carried out to understand its ability to bind to the amyloid aggregates including oligomers and fibrils. In this study, we constructed computational models of (i) Aβ hexapeptide (16) KLVFFA(21) octamer steric-zipper β-sheet assembly and (ii) full-length Aβ fibril β-sheet assembly. Curcumin binding in these models was evaluated by molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies. In both the models, curcumin was oriented in a linear extended conformation parallel to fiber axis and exhibited better stability in the Aβ hexapeptide (16) KLVFFA(21) octamer steric-zipper model (Ebinding  = -10.05 kcal/mol) compared to full-length Aβ fibril model (Ebinding  = -3.47 kcal/mol). Analysis of MD trajectories of curcumin bound to full-length Aβ fibril shows good stability with minimum Cα-atom RMSD shifts. Interestingly, curcumin binding led to marked fluctuations in the (14) HQKLVFFA(21) region that constitute the fibril spine with RMSF values ranging from 1.4 to 3.6 Å. These results show that curcumin binding to Aβ shifts the equilibrium in the aggregation pathway by promoting the formation of non-toxic aggregates. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Unfolding, aggregation, and seeded amyloid formation of lysine-58-cleaved beta(2)-microglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Jørgensen, T.J.D.; Rozlosnik, N.

    2005-01-01

    . Using amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange monitored by mass spectrometry, we show that Delta K58-beta(2)m has increased unfolding rates compared to wt-beta(2)m and that unfolding is highly temperature dependent. The unfolding rate is I order of magnitude faster in Delta K58-beta(2)M than in wt-beta(2)m...... in wt-beta(2)m shows extensive amyloid fibrillation in Delta K58-beta(2)m samples. The results highlight the instability and amyloidogenicity under near physiological conditions of a slightly modified beta(2)m variant generated by limited proteolysis and illustrate stages of amyloid formation from early...

  7. Laminated Morphology of Nontwisting beta-Sheet Fibrilis Constructed via Peptide Self-Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamm,M.; Rajagopal, K.; Schneider, J.; Pochan, D.

    2005-01-01

    A synthetic peptide has been de novo designed that self-assembles into {beta}-sheet fibrils exhibiting a nontwisted, stacked morphology. The stacked morphology is constituted by 2.5 nm wide filaments that laterally associate to form flat fibril laminates exceeding 50 nm in width and micrometers in length. The height of each fibril is limited to the length of exactly one peptide monomer in an extended {beta}-strand conformation, approximately 7 nm. Once assembled, these highly ordered, 2-D structures are stable over a wide range of pH and temperature and exhibit characteristics similar to those of amyloid fibrils. Furthermore, the rate of assembly and degree of fibril lamination can be controlled with kinetic parameters of pH and temperature. Finally, the presence of a diproline peptide between two {beta}-sheet-forming strands in the peptide sequence is demonstrated to be an important factor in promoting the nontwisting, laminated fibril morphology.

  8. A hydrogel biosensor for high selective and sensitive detection of amyloid-beta oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun LP

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Liping Sun,1 Yong Zhong,1 Jie Gui,1 Xianwu Wang,1 Xiaorong Zhuang,2 Jian Weng1 1Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of Fujian Province, Research Center of Biomedical Engineering of Xiamen, Department of Biomaterials, College of Materials, Xiamen University, 2Department of Neurology, The Affiliated Zhongshan Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, People’s Republic of China Background: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive and memory impairment. It is the most common neurological disease that causes dementia. Soluble amyloid-beta oligomers (AβO in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF are the pathogenic biomarker correlated with AD. Methods: A simple electrochemical biosensor using graphene oxide/gold nanoparticles (GNPs hydrogel electrode was developed in this study. Thiolated cellular prion protein (PrPC peptide probe was immobilized on GNPs of the hydrogel electrode to construct an AβO biosensor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was utilized for AβO analysis. Results: The specific binding between AβO and PrPC probes on the hydrogel electrode resulted in an increase in the electron-transfer resistance. The biosensor showed high specificity and sensitivity for AβO detection. It could selectively differentiate AβO from amyloid-beta (Aβ monomers or fibrils. Meanwhile, it was highly sensitive to detect as low as 0.1 pM AβO in artificial CSF or blood plasma. The linear range for AβO detection is from 0.1 pM to 10 nM. Conclusion: This biosensor could be used as a cost-effective tool for early diagnosis of AD due to its high electrochemical performance and bionic structure. Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, amyloid-beta oligomer, graphene, gold nanoparticles, biosensor

  9. Electrochemical sensing of 2D condensation in amyloid peptides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kurzatkowska, K.; Ostatná, Veronika; Hamley, I.W.; Doneux, T.; Paleček, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 106, SEP2013 (2013), s. 43-48 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : QUARTZ-CRYSTAL-MICROBALANCE * SELF -ASSEMBLED MONOLAYERS * BETA-SHEET PEPTIDES Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.086, year: 2013

  10. Two distinct β-sheet structures in Italian-mutant amyloid-beta fibrils : a potential link to different clinical phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubin, Ellen; Deroo, Stéphanie; Schierle, Gabriele Kaminksi; Kaminski, Clemens; Serpell, Louise; Subramaniam, Vinod; van Nuland, Nico; Broersen, Kerensa; Raussens, Vincent; Sarroukh, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    Most Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases are late-onset and characterized by the aggregation and deposition of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide in extracellular plaques in the brain. However, a few rare and hereditary Aβ mutations, such as the Italian Glu22-to-Lys (E22K) mutation, guarantee the development

  11. Inhibition of amyloid-beta-induced cell death in human brain pericytes in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, A.A.M.; Verbeek, M.M.; Otte-Holler, I.; Donkelaar, H.J. ten; Waal, R.M.W. de; Kremer, H.P.H.

    2002-01-01

    Amyloid-beta protein (A beta) deposition in the cerebral vascular walls is one of the key features of Alzheimer's disease and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type (HCHWA-D). A beta(1-40) carrying the 'Dutch' mutation (HCHWA-D A beta(1-40)) induces pronounced degeneration of

  12. Stabilization of a β-hairpin in monomeric Alzheimer's amyloidpeptide inhibits amyloid formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Wolfgang; Grönwall, Caroline; Jonsson, Andreas; Ståhl, Stefan; Härd, Torleif

    2008-01-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is triggered by the oligomerization and aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into protein plaques. Formation of the potentially toxic oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ assemblies is accompanied by a conformational change toward a high content of β-structure. Here, we report the solution structure of Aβ(1–40) in complex with the phage-display selected affibody protein ZAβ3, a binding protein of nanomolar affinity. Bound Aβ(1–40) features a β-hairpin comprising residues 17–36, providing the first high-resolution structure of Aβ in β conformation. The positions of the secondary structure elements strongly resemble those observed for fibrillar Aβ. ZAβ3 stabilizes the β-sheet by extending it intermolecularly and by burying both of the mostly nonpolar faces of the Aβ hairpin within a large hydrophobic tunnel-like cavity. Consequently, ZAβ3 acts as a stoichiometric inhibitor of Aβ fibrillation. The selected Aβ conformation allows us to suggest a structural mechanism for amyloid formation based on soluble oligomeric hairpin intermediates. PMID:18375754

  13. Beta-secretase-cleaved amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer brain: a morphologic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Bogdanovic, N; Volkmann, Inga

    2004-01-01

    beta-amyloid (Abeta) is the main constituent of senile plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease. Abeta is derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via proteolytic cleavage by proteases beta- and gamma-secretase. In this study, we examined content and localization of beta-secretase-cleaved APP...... the beta-sAPP immunostaining to be stronger and more extensive in gray matter in Alzheimer disease (AD) cases than controls. The axonal beta-sAPP staining was patchy and unevenly distributed for the AD cases, indicating impaired axonal transport. beta-sAPP was also found surrounding senile plaques...

  14. Amyloidpeptides time-dependent structural modifications: AFM and voltammetric characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Chiorcea-Paquim, Ana-Maria; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2016-07-05

    The human amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42, structural modifications, from soluble monomers to fully formed fibrils through intermediate structures, were investigated, and the results were compared with those obtained for the inverse Aβ40-1 and Aβ42-1, mutant Aβ1-40Phe(10) and Aβ1-40Nle(35), and rat Aβ1-40Rat peptide sequences. The aggregation was followed at a slow rate, in chloride free media and room temperature, and revealed to be a sequence-structure process, dependent on the physicochemical properties of each Aβ peptide isoforms, and occurring at different rates and by different pathways. The fibrilization process was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), via changes in the adsorption morphology from: (i) initially random coiled structures of ∼0.6 nm height, corresponding to the Aβ peptide monomers in random coil or in α-helix conformations, to (ii) aggregates and protofibrils of 1.5-6.0 nm height and (iii) two types of fibrils, corresponding to the Aβ peptide in a β-sheet configuration. The reactivity of the carbon electrode surface was considered. The hydrophobic surface induced rapid changes of the Aβ peptide conformations, and differences between the adsorbed fibrils, formed at the carbon surface (beaded, thin, 2.0 nm height), were detected. Differential pulse voltammetry showed that, according to their primary structure, the Aβ peptides undergo oxidation in one or two steps, the first step corresponding to the tyrosine amino acids oxidation, and the second one to the histidine and methionine amino acids oxidation. The fibrilization process was electrochemically detected via the decrease of the Aβ peptide oxidation peak currents that occurred in a time dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Microglia, neuroinflammation, and beta-amyloid protein in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhiyou; Hussain, M Delwar; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Compelling evidence from basic molecular biology has demonstrated the dual roles of microglia in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). On one hand, microglia are involved in AD pathogenesis by releasing inflammatory mediators such as inflammatory cytokines, complement components, chemokines, and free radicals that are all known to contribute to beta-amyloid (Aβ) production and accumulation. On the other hand, microglia are also known to play a beneficial role in generating anti-Aβ antibodies and stimulating clearance of amyloid plaques. Aβ itself, an inducer of microglia activation and neuroinflammation, has been considered as an underlying and unifying factor in the development of AD. A vicious cycle of inflammation has been formed between Aβ accumulation, activated microglia, and microglial inflammatory mediators, which enhance Aβ deposition and neuroinflammation. Thus, inhibiting the vicious cycle seems to be a promising treatment to restrain further development of AD. With increasing research efforts on microglia in AD, intervention of microglia activation and neuroinflammation in AD may provide a potential target for AD therapy in spite of the provisional failure of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in clinical trials.

  16. Identification of distinct physiochemical properties of toxic prefibrillar species formed by A{beta} peptide variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeransson, Anna-Lena, E-mail: anngo@ifm.liu.se [Division of Molecular Biotechnology, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping University (Sweden); Nilsson, K. Peter R., E-mail: petni@ifm.liu.se [Division of Organic Chemistry, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping University (Sweden); Kagedal, Katarina, E-mail: katarina.kagedal@liu.se [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linkoeping University (Sweden); Brorsson, Ann-Christin, E-mail: anki@ifm.liu.se [Division of Molecular Biotechnology, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linkoeping University (Sweden)

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of toxic prefibrillar A{beta} species. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence measurements using a combined set of fluorophores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Morphology studies using transmission electron microscopy. -- Abstract: The formation of amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) aggregates at an early stage during the self-assembly process is an important factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease. The toxic effect is believed to be exerted by prefibrillar species of A{beta}. It is therefore important to identify which prefibrillar species are toxic and characterize their distinct properties. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro aggregation behavior of A{beta}-derived peptides possessing different levels of neurotoxic activity, using fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with transmission electron microscopy. The toxicity of various A{beta} aggregates was assessed by using cultures of human neuroblastoma cells. Through combined use of the fluorescence probe 8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonate (ANS) and the novel luminescent probe pentamer formyl thiophene acetic acid (p-FTAA), we were able to identify those A{beta} peptide-derived prefibrillar species which exhibited cellular toxicity. In particular, species, which formed early during the aggregation process and showed strong p-FTAA and ANS fluorescence, were the species that possessed toxic activities. Moreover, by manipulating the aggregation conditions, it was possible to change the capacity of the A{beta} peptide to form nontoxic versus toxic species.

  17. How ionic strength affects the conformational behavior of human and rat beta amyloids--a computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Kříž

    Full Text Available Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid beta occurs in Alzheimers disease and during the aging of certain mammals (human, monkey, dog, bear, cow, cat but not others (rat, mouse. It is possibly due to different amino acid sequences at positions 5, 10 and 13. To address this issue, we performed series of 100 ns long trajectories (each trajectory was run twice with different initial velocity distribution on amyloid beta (1-42 with the human and rat amino acid sequence in three different environments: water with only counter ions, water with NaCl at a concentration of 0.15 M as a model of intracellular Na(+ concentration at steady state, and water with NaCl at a concentration of 0.30 M as a model of intracellular Na(+ concentration under stimulated conditions. We analyzed secondary structure stability, internal hydrogen bonds, and residual fluctuation. It was observed that the change in ionic strength affects the stability of internal hydrogen bonds. Increasing the ionic strength increases atomic fluctuation in the hydrophobic core of the human amyloid, and decreases the atomic fluctuation in the case of rat amyloid. The secondary structure analyses show a stable α-helix part between residues 10 and 20. However, C-terminus of investigated amyloids is much more flexible showing no stable secondary structure elements. Increasing ionic strength of the solvent leads to decreasing stability of the secondary structural elements. The difference in conformational behavior of the three amino acids at position 5, 10 and 13 for human and rat amyloids significantly changes the conformational behavior of the whole peptide.

  18. Amyloid β Peptide-Induced Changes in Prefrontal Cortex Activity and Its Response to Hippocampal Input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Flores-Martínez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in prefrontal cortex (PFC function and abnormalities in its interactions with other brain areas (i.e., the hippocampus have been related to Alzheimer Disease (AD. Considering that these malfunctions correlate with the increase in the brain’s amyloid beta (Aβ peptide production, here we looked for a causal relationship between these pathognomonic signs of AD. Thus, we tested whether or not Aβ affects the activity of the PFC network and the activation of this cortex by hippocampal input stimulation in vitro. We found that Aβ application to brain slices inhibits PFC spontaneous network activity as well as PFC activation, both at the population and at the single-cell level, when the hippocampal input is stimulated. Our data suggest that Aβ can contribute to AD by disrupting PFC activity and its long-range interactions throughout the brain.

  19. Interaction of the amyloid β peptide with sodium dodecyl sulfate as a membrane-mimicking detergent.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hashemi, Shabestari M.; Meeuwenoord, N.J.; Filippov, D.V.; Huber, M.I.

    2016-01-01

    The amyloid β (A β) peptide is important in the context of Alzheimer's disease, since it is one of the major components of the fibrils that constitute amyloid plaques. Agents that can influence fibril formation are important, and of those, membrane mimics are particularly relevant, because the

  20. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition improves synaptic function, memory, and amyloid-beta load in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzzo, Daniela; Staniszewski, Agnieszka; Deng, Shi Xian; Privitera, Lucia; Leznik, Elena; Liu, Shumin; Zhang, Hong; Feng, Yan; Palmeri, Agostino; Landry, Donald W; Arancio, Ottavio

    2009-06-24

    Memory loss, synaptic dysfunction, and accumulation of amyloid beta-peptides (A beta) are major hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Downregulation of the nitric oxide/cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase/c-AMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) cascade has been linked to the synaptic deficits after A beta elevation. Here, we report that the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor (PDE5) sildenafil (Viagra), a molecule that enhances phosphorylation of CREB, a molecule involved in memory, through elevation of cGMP levels, is beneficial against the AD phenotype in a mouse model of amyloid deposition. We demonstrate that the inhibitor produces an immediate and long-lasting amelioration of synaptic function, CREB phosphorylation, and memory. This effect is also associated with a long-lasting reduction of A beta levels. Given that side effects of PDE5 inhibitors are widely known and do not preclude their administration to a senile population, these drugs have potential for the treatment of AD and other diseases associated with elevated A beta levels.

  1. Key aromatic/hydrophobic amino acids controlling a cross-amyloid peptide interaction versus amyloid self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakou, Maria; Hille, Kathleen; Kracklauer, Michael; Spanopoulou, Anna; Frost, Christina V; Malideli, Eleni; Yan, Li-Mei; Caporale, Andrea; Zacharias, Martin; Kapurniotu, Aphrodite

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of the intrinsically disordered polypeptide islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), which is associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), with the Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide modulates their self-assembly into amyloid fibrils and may link the pathogeneses of these two cell-degenerative diseases. However, the molecular determinants of this interaction remain elusive. Using a systematic alanine scan approach, fluorescence spectroscopy, and other biophysical methods, including heterocomplex pulldown assays, far-UV CD spectroscopy, the thioflavin T binding assay, transmission EM, and molecular dynamics simulations, here we identified single aromatic/hydrophobic residues within the amyloid core IAPP region as hot spots or key residues of its cross-interaction with Aβ40(42) peptide. Importantly, we also find that none of these residues in isolation plays a key role in IAPP self-assembly, whereas simultaneous substitution of four aromatic/hydrophobic residues with Ala dramatically impairs both IAPP self-assembly and hetero-assembly with Aβ40(42). Furthermore, our experiments yielded several novel IAPP analogs, whose sequences are highly similar to that of IAPP but have distinct amyloid self- or cross-interaction potentials. The identified similarities and major differences controlling IAPP cross-peptide interaction with Aβ40(42) versus its amyloid self-assembly offer a molecular basis for understanding the underlying mechanisms. We propose that these insights will aid in designing intervention strategies and novel IAPP analogs for the management of type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, or other diseases related to IAPP dysfunction or cross-amyloid interactions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. [Immunization witha synthetic fragment 155-164 of neurotrophin receptor p75 prevents memory loss and decreases beta-amyloid level in mice with experimentally induced Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vol'pina, O M; Medvinskaia, N I; Kamynina, A V; Zaporozhskaia, Ia V; Aleksandrova, I Iu; Koroev, D O; Samokhin, A N; Volkova, T D; Arsen'ev, A S; Bobkova, N V

    2014-01-01

    Neurotoxic beta-amyloid peptide plays an important role in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. In aggregated form it binds to several proteins on the surface of the brain cells leading to their death. p75 receptor in- volved in supporting of cell balance is one of the targets for toxic beta-amyloid. We proposed that induction of antibodies against potential binding sites of p75 with beta-amyloid can be a promising approach towards new drug development for Alzheimer's disease therapy. Four potentially immunoactive fragments of p75 were chosen and chemically synthesized. Investigation of immunoprotective effect of the peptide fragments carried out in mice with experimentally induced form of Alzheimer's disease helped to reveal two fragments effectively preserving murine memory from impairment. Results obtained by ELISA biochemical analysis showed that only immunization with fragment p75 155-164 led to significant decrease in beta-amyloid level in the brain of the experimental mice. Thus, immunization with both fragments of p75 receptor is believed to be an effective tool for the development of new drugs against Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Kinetic modeling and determination of reaction constants of Alzheimer's beta-amyloid fibril extension and dissociation using surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Ono, Kenjiro; Yamada, Masahito; Naiki, Hironobu

    2002-11-19

    To establish the kinetic model of the extension and dissociation of beta-amyloid fibrils (f(A)beta) in vitro, we analyzed these reactions using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. Sonicated f(A)beta were immobilized on the surface of the SPR sensor chip as seeds. The SPR signal increased linearly as a function of time after amyloid beta-peptides (Abeta) were injected into the f(A)beta-immobilized chips. The extension of f(A)beta was confirmed by atomic force microscopy. When flow cells were washed with running buffer, the SPR signal decreased with time after the extension reaction. The curve fitting resolved the dissociation reaction into the fast exponential and slow linear decay phases. Kinetic analysis of the effect of Abeta/f(A)beta concentrations on the reaction rate indicated that both the extension reaction and the slow linear phase of the dissociation were consistent with a first-order kinetic model; i.e., the extension/dissociation reactions proceed via consecutive association/dissociation of Abeta onto/from the end of existing fibrils. On the basis of this model, the critical monomer concentration ([M](e)) and the equilibrium association constant (K) were calculated, for the first time, to be 20 nM and 5 x 10(7) M(-1), respectively. Alternatively, [M](e) was directly measured as 200 nM, which may represent the equilibrium between the extension reaction and the fast phase of the dissociation. The SPR biosensor is a useful quantitative tool for the kinetic and thermodynamic study of the molecular mechanisms of f9A)beta formation in vitro.

  4. Molecular plasticity regulates oligomerization and cytotoxicity of the multipeptide-length amyloidpeptide pool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandersteen, Annelies; Masman, Marcelo F.; Baets, Greet De; Jonckheere, Wim; Werf, Kees van der; Marrink, Siewert J.; Rozenski, Jef; Benilova, Iryna; Strooper, Bart De; Subramaniam, Vinod; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Broersen, Kerensa

    2012-01-01

    Current therapeutic approaches under development for Alzheimer disease, including gamma-secretase modulating therapy, aim at increasing the production of A beta(1-38) and A beta(1-40) at the cost of longer A beta peptides. Here, we consider the aggregation of A beta(1-38) and A beta(1-43) in

  5. Calpain inhibition prevents amyloid-beta-induced neurodegeneration and associated behavioral dysfunction in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granic, Ivica; Nyakas, Csaba; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Eisel, Ulrich L. M.; Halmy, Laszlo G.; Gross, Gerhard; Schoemaker, Hans; Moeller, Achim; Nimmrich, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (A beta) is toxic to neurons and such toxicity is - at least in part - mediated via the NMDA receptor. Calpain, a calcium dependent cystein protease, is part of the NMDA receptor-induced neurodegeneration pathway, and we previously reported that inhibition of calpain prevents

  6. Diagnostic Accuracy of Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-beta Isoforms for Early and Differential Dementia Diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struyfs, Hanne; Van Broeck, Bianca; Timmers, Maarten; Fransen, Erik; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; De Deyn, Peter P.; Streffer, Johannes R.; Mercken, Marc; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Overlapping cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers (CSF) levels between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and non-AD patients decrease differential diagnostic accuracy of the AD core CSF biomarkers. Amyloid-beta (A beta) isoforms might improve the AD versus non-AD differential diagnosis. Objective: To

  7. Absence of beta-amyloid in cortical cataracts of donors with and without Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Ralph; Rosandić, Jurja; Montenegro, Gustavo A; Lobato, Elvira; Tresserra, Francisco; Barraquer, Rafael I; Vrensen, Gijs F J M

    2013-01-01

    Eye lenses from human donors with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD) were studied to evaluate the presence of amyloid in cortical cataract. We obtained 39 lenses from 21 postmortem donors with AD and 15 lenses from age-matched controls provided by the Banco de Ojos para Tratamientos de la Ceguera (Barcelona, Spain). For 17 donors, AD was clinically diagnosed by general physicians and for 4 donors the AD diagnosis was neuropathologically confirmed. Of the 21 donors with AD, 6 had pronounced bilateral cortical lens opacities and 15 only minor or no cortical opacities. As controls, 7 donors with pronounced cortical opacities and 8 donors with almost transparent lenses were selected. All lenses were photographed in a dark field stereomicroscope. Histological sections were analyzed using a standard and a more sensitive Congo red protocol, thioflavin staining and beta-amyloid immunohistochemistry. Brain tissue from two donors, one with cerebral amyloid angiopathy and another with advanced AD-related changes and one cornea with lattice dystrophy were used as positive controls for the staining techniques. Thioflavin, standard and modified Congo red staining were positive in the control brain tissues and in the dystrophic cornea. Beta-amyloid immunohistochemistry was positive in the brain tissues but not in the cornea sample. Lenses from control and AD donors were, without exception, negative after Congo red, thioflavin, and beta-amyloid immunohistochemical staining. The results of the positive control tissues correspond well with known observations in AD, amyloid angiopathy and corneas with lattice dystrophy. The absence of staining in AD and control lenses with the techniques employed lead us to conclude that there is no beta-amyloid in lenses from donors with AD or in control cortical cataracts. The inconsistency with previous studies of Goldstein et al. (2003) and Moncaster et al. (2010), both of which demonstrated positive Congo red, thioflavin, and beta-amyloid

  8. Microglial responses to amyloid β peptide opsonization and indomethacin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Brian

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have suggested that passive or active immunization with anti-amyloid β peptide (Aβ antibodies may enhance microglial clearance of Aβ deposits from the brain. However, in a human clinical trial, several patients developed secondary inflammatory responses in brain that were sufficient to halt the study. Methods We have used an in vitro culture system to model the responses of microglia, derived from rapid autopsies of Alzheimer's disease patients, to Aβ deposits. Results Opsonization of the deposits with anti-Aβ IgG 6E10 enhanced microglial chemotaxis to and phagocytosis of Aβ, as well as exacerbated microglial secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. Indomethacin, a common nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, had no effect on microglial chemotaxis or phagocytosis, but did significantly inhibit the enhanced production of IL-6 after Aβ opsonization. Conclusion These results are consistent with well known, differential NSAID actions on immune cell functions, and suggest that concurrent NSAID administration might serve as a useful adjunct to Aβ immunization, permitting unfettered clearance of Aβ while dampening secondary, inflammation-related adverse events.

  9. Identification of the primary peptide contaminant that inhibits fibrillation and toxicity in synthetic amyloid-β42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Daniel J; Nemkov, Travis G; Mayer, John P; Old, William M; Stowell, Michael H B

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease has relied upon the use of amyloid peptides from a variety of sources, but most predominantly synthetic peptides produced using t-butyloxycarbonyl (Boc) or 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) chemistry. These synthetic methods can lead to minor impurities which can have profound effects on the biological activity of amyloid peptides. Here we used a combination of cytotoxicity assays, fibrillation assays and high resolution mass spectrometry (MS) to identify impurities in synthetic amyloid preparations that inhibit both cytotoxicity and aggregation. We identify the Aβ42Δ39 species as the major peptide contaminant responsible for limiting both cytotoxicity and fibrillation of the amyloid peptide. In addition, we demonstrate that the presence of this minor impurity inhibits the formation of a stable Aβ42 dimer observable by MS in very pure peptide samples. These results highlight the critical importance of purity and provenance of amyloid peptides in Alzheimer's research in particular, and biological research in general.

  10. Intracellular accumulation of amyloid-beta - a predictor for synaptic dysfunction and neuron loss in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Bayer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite of long-standing evidence that beta-amyloid (Aβ peptides have detrimental effects on synaptic function, the relationship between Aβ, synaptic and neuron loss is largely unclear. During the last years there is growing evidence that early intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ peptides is one of the key events leading to synaptic and neuronal dysfunction. Many studies have been carried out using transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD which have been proven to be valuable model system in modern AD research. The present review discusses the impact of intraneuronal Aβ accumulation on synaptic impairment and neuron loss and provides an overview of currently available AD mouse models showing these pathological alterations.

  11. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Emily B.; Williams, Angela [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Heidel, Eric [Department of Surgery, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Macy, Sallie [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Kennel, Stephen J. [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Wall, Jonathan S., E-mail: jwall@utmck.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States)

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Polybasic peptide p5 binds human light chain amyloid extracts. •The binding of p5 with amyloid involves both glycosaminoglycans and fibrils. •Heparinase treatment led to a correlation between p5 binding and fibril content. •p5 binding to AL amyloid requires electrostatic interactions. -- Abstract: In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as

  12. [Development of anti-Alzheimer's disease drug based on beta-amyloid hypothesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2010-04-01

    Currently, there are five anti-Alzheimer's disease drugs approved. These are tacrine, donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine, and memantine. The mechanism of the first four drugs is acetylcholinesterase inhibition, while memantine is an NMDA-receptor antagonist. However, these drugs do not cure Alzheimer's, but are only symptomatic treatments. Therefore, a cure for Alzheimer's disease is truly needed. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by cognitive deficits. The cause of the disease is not well understood, but research indicates that the aggregation of beta-amyloid is the fundamental cause. This theory suggests that beta-amyloid aggregation causes neurotoxicity. Therefore, development of the next anti-Alzheimer's disease drug is based on the beta-amyloid theory. We are now studying natural products, such as mulberry leaf extracts and curcumin derivatives, as potential cure for Alzheimer's disease. In this report, we describe some data about these natural products and derivatives.

  13. Beta-Amyloid Deposition and Alzheimer's Type Changes Induced by Borrelia Spirochetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklossy,J.; Kis, A.; Radenovic, A.; Miller, L.; Forro, L.; Martins, R.; Reiss, K.; Darbinian, N.; Darekar, P.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) consist of {beta}-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in affected brain areas. The processes, which drive this host reaction are unknown. To determine whether an analogous host reaction to that occurring in AD could be induced by infectious agents, we exposed mammalian glial and neuronal cells in vitro to Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes and to the inflammatory bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Morphological changes analogous to the amyloid deposits of AD brain were observed following 2-8 weeks of exposure to the spirochetes. Increased levels of {beta}-amyloid presursor protein (A{beta}PP) and hyperphosphorylated tau were also detected by Western blots of extracts of cultured cells that had been treated with spirochetes or LPS. These observations indicate that, by exposure to bacteria or to their toxic products, host responses similar in nature to those observed in AD may be induced.

  14. Interaction of the molecular chaperone DNAJB6 with growing amyloid-beta 42 (Aβ42) aggregates leads to sub-stoichiometric inhibition of amyloid formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Månsson, Cecilia; Arosio, Paolo; Hussein, Rasha; Kampinga, Harm H; Hashem, Reem M; Boelens, Wilbert C; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Linse, Sara; Emanuelsson, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The human molecular chaperone protein DNAJB6 was recently found to inhibit the formation of amyloid fibrils from polyglutamine peptides associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease. We show in the present study that DNAJB6 also inhibits amyloid formation by an even more

  15. The proton-pump inhibitor lansoprazole enhances amyloid beta production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiola, Nahuai; Alcalde, Victor; Pujol, Albert; Münter, Lisa-Marie; Multhaup, Gerd; Lleó, Alberto; Coma, Mireia; Soler-López, Montserrat; Aloy, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    A key event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) species in the brain, derived from the sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. Based on a systems biology study to repurpose drugs for AD, we explore the effect of lansoprazole, and other proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), on Aβ production in AD cellular and animal models. We found that lansoprazole enhances Aβ37, Aβ40 and Aβ42 production and lowers Aβ38 levels on amyloid cell models. Interestingly, acute lansoprazole treatment in wild type and AD transgenic mice promoted higher Aβ40 levels in brain, indicating that lansoprazole may also exacerbate Aβ production in vivo. Overall, our data presents for the first time that PPIs can affect amyloid metabolism, both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. A Humanin Derivative Reduces Amyloid Beta Accumulation and Ameliorates Memory Deficit in Triple Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Takako; Sidahmed, Elkhansa; Hirata-Fukae, Chiho; Aisen, Paul S.; Matsuoka, Yasuji

    2011-01-01

    Humanin (HN), a 24-residue peptide, was identified as a novel neuroprotective factor and shows anti-cell death activity against a wide spectrum of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related cytotoxicities, including exposure to amyloid beta (Abeta), in vitro. We previously demonstrated that the injection of S14G-HN, a highly potent HN derivative, into brain ameliorated memory loss in an Abeta-injection mouse model. To fully understand HN's functions under AD-associated pathological conditions, we examined the effect of S14G-HN on triple transgenic mice harboring APPswe, tauP310L, and PS-1M146V that show the age-dependent development of multiple pathologies relating to AD. After 3 months of intranasal treatment, behavioral analyses showed that S14G-HN ameliorated cognitive impairment in male mice. Moreover, ELISA and immunohistochemical analyses showed that Abeta levels in brains were markedly lower in S14G-HN-treated male and female mice than in vehicle control mice. We also found the expression level of neprilysin, an Abeta degrading enzyme, in the outer molecular layer of hippocampal formation was increased in S14G-HN-treated mouse brains. NEP activity was also elevated by S14G-HN treatment in vitro. These findings suggest that decreased Abeta level in these mice is at least partly attributed to S14G-HN-induced increase of neprilysin level. Although HN was identified as an anti-neuronal death factor, these results indicate that HN may also have a therapeutic effect on amyloid accumulation in AD. PMID:21264226

  17. A humanin derivative reduces amyloid beta accumulation and ameliorates memory deficit in triple transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Niikura

    Full Text Available Humanin (HN, a 24-residue peptide, was identified as a novel neuroprotective factor and shows anti-cell death activity against a wide spectrum of Alzheimer's disease (AD-related cytotoxicities, including exposure to amyloid beta (Abeta, in vitro. We previously demonstrated that the injection of S14G-HN, a highly potent HN derivative, into brain ameliorated memory loss in an Abeta-injection mouse model. To fully understand HN's functions under AD-associated pathological conditions, we examined the effect of S14G-HN on triple transgenic mice harboring APP(swe, tau(P310L, and PS-1(M146V that show the age-dependent development of multiple pathologies relating to AD. After 3 months of intranasal treatment, behavioral analyses showed that S14G-HN ameliorated cognitive impairment in male mice. Moreover, ELISA and immunohistochemical analyses showed that Abeta levels in brains were markedly lower in S14G-HN-treated male and female mice than in vehicle control mice. We also found the expression level of neprilysin, an Abeta degrading enzyme, in the outer molecular layer of hippocampal formation was increased in S14G-HN-treated mouse brains. NEP activity was also elevated by S14G-HN treatment in vitro. These findings suggest that decreased Abeta level in these mice is at least partly attributed to S14G-HN-induced increase of neprilysin level. Although HN was identified as an anti-neuronal death factor, these results indicate that HN may also have a therapeutic effect on amyloid accumulation in AD.

  18. Amyloid-beta transporter expression at the blood-CSF barrier is age-dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Crissey L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age is the major risk factor for many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD. There is an accumulation of amyloid-beta peptides (Aβ in both the AD brain and the normal aging brain. Clearance of Aβ from the brain occurs via active transport at the blood-brain barrier (BBB and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB. With increasing age, the expression of the Aβ efflux transporters is decreased and the Aβ influx transporter expression is increased at the BBB, adding to the amyloid burden in the brain. Expression of the Aβ transporters at the choroid plexus (CP epithelium as a function of aging was the subject of this study. Methods This project investigated the changes in expression of the Aβ transporters, the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, LRP-2 (megalin and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE at the BCSFB in Brown-Norway/Fischer rats at ages 3, 6, 9, 12, 20, 30 and 36 months, using real time RT-PCR to measure transporter mRNA expression, and immunohistochemistry (IHC to measure transporter protein in isolated rat CP. Results There was an increase in the transcription of the Aβ efflux transporters, LRP-1 and P-gp, no change in RAGE expression and a decrease in LRP-2, the CP epithelium influx transporter, at the BCSFB with aging. Decreased Aβ42 concentration in the CP, as measured by quantitative IHC, was associated with these Aβ transporter alterations. Conclusions Age-dependent alterations in the CP Aβ transporters are associated with a decrease in Aβ42 accumulation in the CP, and are reciprocal to the changes seen in these transporters at the BBB, suggesting a possible compensatory role for the BCSFB in Aβ clearance in aging.

  19. Adaptor protein sorting nexin 17 regulates amyloid precursor protein trafficking and processing in the early endosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Jiyeon; Retamal, Claudio; Cuitino, Loreto; Caruano-Yzermans, Amy; Shin, Jung-Eun; van Kerkhof, Peter; Marzolo, Maria-Paz; Bu, Guojun

    2008-01-01

    Accumulation of extracellular amyloid beta peptide (A beta), generated from amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing by beta- and gamma-secretases, is toxic to neurons and is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Production of A beta from APP is greatly affected by the subcellular

  20. Red mold rice ameliorates impairment of memory and learning ability in intracerebroventricular amyloid beta-infused rat by repressing amyloid beta accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun-Lin; Kuo, Tzong-Fu; Wang, Jyh-Jye; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2007-11-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide related to the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) damaged neurons and further resulted in dementia. Monascus-fermented red mold rice (RMR), a traditional Chinese medicine as well as health food, includes monacolins (with the same function as statins) and multifunctional metabolites. In this study, ethanol extract of RMR (RE) was used to evaluate neuroprotection against Abeta40 neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. Furthermore, the effects of dietary administration of RMR on memory and learning abilities are confirmed in an animal model of AD rats infused with Abeta40 into the cerebral ventricle. During continuous Abeta40 infusion for 28 days, the rats of test groups were administered RMR or lovastatin. Memory and learning abilities were evaluated in the water maze and passive avoidance tasks. After sacrifice, cerebral cortex and hippocampus were collected for the examination of AD risk factors. The in vitro results clearly indicate that RE provides stronger neuroprotection in rescuing cell viability as well as repressing inflammatory response and oxidative stress. RMR administration potently reverses the memory deficit in the memory task. Abeta40 infusion increases acetylcholinesterase activity, reactive oxygen species, and lipid peroxidation and decreases total antioxidant status and superoxide dismutase activity in brain, but these damages were potently reversed by RMR administration, and the protection was more significant than that with lovastatin administration. The protection provided by RMR is able to prevent Abeta fibrils from being formed and deposited in hippocampus and further decrease Abeta40 accumulation, even though Abeta40 solution was infused into brain continuously. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Detection of Alzheimer’s disease amyloid-beta plaque deposition by deep brain impedance profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béduer, Amélie; Joris, Pierre; Mosser, Sébastien; Fraering, Patrick C.; Renaud, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease in elderly people. Toxic brain amyloid-beta (Aß) aggregates and ensuing cell death are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, we investigated if we could monitor the presence of these aggregates by performing in situ electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements in AD model mice brains. Approach. In this study, electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed post-mortem in APPPS1 transgenic mice brains. This transgenic model is commonly used to study amyloidogenesis, a pathological hallmark of AD. We used flexible probes with embedded micrometric electrodes array to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting senile plaques composed of Aß peptides by localized impedance measurements. Main results. We particularly focused on deep brain structures, such as the hippocampus. Ex vivo experiments using brains from young and old APPPS1 mice lead us to show that impedance measurements clearly correlate with the percentage of Aβ plaque load in the brain tissues. We could monitor the effects of aging in the AD APPPS1 mice model. Significance. We demonstrated that a localized electrical impedance measurement constitutes a valuable technique to monitor the presence of Aβ-plaques, which is complementary with existing imaging techniques. This method does not require prior Aβ staining, precluding the risk of variations in tissue uptake of dyes or tracers, and consequently ensuring reproducible data collection.

  2. Synthèse de peptidomimétiques contenant un scaffold dicetopiperazinique bifonctionnel et leur evaluation comme modulateurs de l'agrégation des peptides amyloides beta

    OpenAIRE

    Vahdati, Leïla

    2015-01-01

    The formation of peptide and protein aggregates through the interaction of β-sheets has increasingly drawn attention since it occurs in many widespread human diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), prion diseases, and Huntington's disease (HD). Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia that causes memory loss in the elderly. In 2013, 35 million people were afflicted with AD worldwide, a number expected to double ...

  3. Antibody-based PET imaging of amyloid beta in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sehlin, Dag; Fang, Xiaotian T.; Cato, Linda; Antoni, Gunnar; Lannfelt, Lars; Syvänen, Stina

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their specificity and high-affinity binding, monoclonal antibodies have potential as positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands and are currently used to image various targets in peripheral organs. However, in the central nervous system, antibody uptake is limited by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here we present a PET ligand to be used for diagnosis and evaluation of treatment effects in Alzheimer's disease. The amyloid beta (A beta) antibody mAb158 is radiolabelled and conjuga...

  4. Homocysteine metabolism is associated with cerebrospinal fluid levels of soluble amyloid precursor protein and amyloid beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomidi, Aikaterini; Lewczuk, Piotr; Kornhuber, Johannes; Smulders, Yvo; Linnebank, Michael; Semmler, Alexander; Popp, Julius

    2016-10-01

    Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may contribute to amyloidogenesis by modulating the amyloid precursor protein (APP) production and processing. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationships between cerebral amyloid production and both blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of the homocysteine metabolism. We assessed CSF concentrations of soluble APPα, soluble APPβ, and amyloid β1-42 (Aβ1-42), as well as plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcys), total vitamin B12, and folate, and CSF concentrations of homocysteine (Hcys-CSF), 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF), S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) in 59 subjects with normal cognition. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess associations between homocysteine metabolism parameters and amyloid production. The study was approved by the Ethical Committee of the University of Bonn. After controlling for age, gender, APOEe4 status, and albumin ratio (Qalb), higher Aβ1-42 CSF levels were associated with high Hcys and low vitamin B12 plasma levels as well as with high Hcys, high SAH, and low 5-MTHF CSF levels. Higher CSF concentrations of sAPPα and sAPPβ were associated with high SAH levels. The results suggest that disturbed homocysteine metabolism is related to increased CSF levels of sAPP forms and Aβ1-42, and may contribute to the accumulation of amyloid pathology in the brain. Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may contribute to amyloidogenesis by modulating the amyloid precursor protein (APP) production and processing. We found associations between CSF levels of soluble APP forms and Aβ1-42, and markers of the homocysteine metabolism in both plasma and CSF in adults with normal cognition. Disturbed homocysteine metabolism may represent a target for preventive and early disease-modifying interventions in Alzheimer's disease. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Insulin inhibits amyloid beta-induced cell death in cultured human brain pericytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Annemieke A M; Otte-Höller, Irene; de Boer, Roelie; Bosch, Remko R; ten Donkelaar, Hans J; de Waal, Robert M W; Verbeek, Marcel M; Kremer, Berry

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) deposition in the cerebral arterial and capillary walls is one of the characteristics of Alzheimer's disease and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type. In vitro, Abeta1-40, carrying the "Dutch" mutation (DAbeta1-40), induced reproducible degeneration of

  6. NAP and D-SAL: neuroprotection against the β amyloid peptide (1–42

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piltzer Inbar

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction NAP (Asn-Ala-Pro-Val-Ser-Ile-Pro-Gln, single amino acid letter code, NAPVSIPQ, an eight amino acid neuroprotective peptide derived from activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP, exhibits some structural similarity to activity-dependent neurotropic factor-9 (ADNF-9; Ser-Alal-Leu-Leu-Arg-Ser-Ile-Pro-Ala, SALLRSIPA. Both peptides are also active in the all D-amino acid conformation, termed D-NAP and D-SAL. Original results utilizing affinity chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry identified tubulin, the subunit protein of microtubules, as the major NAP-associating protein in brain. The NAP-tubulin association was found to be diminished in the presence of ADNF-9, D-NAP, and D-SAL, suggesting a common target of neuroprotection. The β amyloid peptide interacts with microtubules, and previous studies have demonstrated protection against β amyloid (25–35 toxicity by NAP and ADNF-9. NAP also inhibits β amyloid (25–35 and 1–40 aggregation. Methods Cerebral cortical cultures derived from newborn rats were used in neuronal survival assays to test the activity of both NAP and D-SAL against the major Alzheimer's disease toxic peptide β amyloid (1–42. Results NAP and D-SAL protected cerebral cortical neurons against the major Alzheimer's disease toxic peptide β amyloid (1–42. Maximal protection of both peptides was observed at concentrations of 10-15 to 10-10 mol/l. Conclusion These findings, together with those of previous in vivo studies conducted in relevant Alzheimer's disease models, pave the path to drug development. Bioavailability studies indicated that NAP penetrates cells and crosses the blood-brain barrier after nasal or systemic administration. Phase II clinical trials of NAP are currently in progress by Allon Therapeutics Inc.

  7. Synchrotron-based Infrared and X-ray Imaging Shows Focalized Accumulation of Cu and Zn Co-localized With Beta-amyloid Deposits in Alzheimer's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.; Wang, Q.; Telivala, T.; Smith, R.; Lanzirotti, A.; Miklossy, J.

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the misfolding and plaque-like accumulation of a naturally occurring peptide in the brain called amyloid beta (Abeta). Recently, this process has been associated with the binding of metal ions such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn). It is thought that metal dyshomeostasis is involved in protein misfolding and may lead to oxidative stress and neuronal damage. However, the exact role of the misfolded proteins and metal ions in the degenerative process of AD is not yet clear. In this study, we used synchrotron Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (FTIRM) to image the in situ secondary structure of the amyloid plaques in brain tissue of AD patients. These results were spatially correlated with metal ion accumulation in the same tissue sample using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microprobe. For both techniques, a spatial resolution of 5-10 microm was achieved. FTIRM results showed that the amyloid plaques have elevated beta-sheet content, as demonstrated by a strong amide I absorbance at 1625cm(-1). Using SXRF microprobe, we find that AD tissue also contains 'hot spots' of accumulated metal ions, specifically Cu and Zn, with a strong spatial correlation between these two ions. The 'hot spots' of accumulated Zn and Cu were co-localized with beta-amyloid plaques. Thus for the first time, a strong spatial correlation has been observed between elevated beta-sheet content in Abeta plaques and accumulated Cu and Zn ions, emphasizing an association of metal ions with amyloid formation in AD

  8. Insulin Promotes Survival of Amyloid-Beta Oligomers Neuroblastoma Damaged Cells via Caspase 9 Inhibition and Hsp70 Upregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Di Carlo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD and type 2 diabetes are connected in a way that is still not completely understood, but insulin resistance has been implicated as a risk factor for developing AD. Here we show an evidence that insulin is capable of reducing cytotoxicity induced by Amyloid-beta peptides (A-beta in its oligomeric form in a dose-dependent manner. By TUNEL and biochemical assays we demonstrate that the recovery of the cell viability is obtained by inhibition of intrinsic apoptotic program, triggered by A-beta and involving caspase 9 and 3 activation. A protective role of insulin on mitochondrial damage is also shown by using Mito-red vital dye. Furthermore, A-beta activates the stress inducible Hsp70 protein in LAN5 cells and an overexpression is detectable after the addition of insulin, suggesting that this major induction is the necessary condition to activate a cell survival program. Together, these results may provide opportunities for the design of preventive and therapeutic strategies against AD.

  9. Halogenation dictates the architecture of amyloid peptide nanostructures† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7nr03263c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Andrea; Pigliacelli, Claudia; Gori, Alessandro; Nonappa; Ikkala, Olli; Demitri, Nicola; Terraneo, Giancarlo; Castelletto, Valeria; Hamley, Ian W.; Baldelli Bombelli, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid peptides yield a plethora of interesting nanostructures though difficult to control. Here we report that depending on the number, position, and nature of the halogen atoms introduced into either one or both phenylalanine benzene rings of the amyloid β peptide-derived core-sequence KLVFF, four different architectures were obtained in a controlled manner. Our findings demonstrate that halogenation may develop as a general strategy to engineer amyloidal peptide self-assembly and obtain new amyloidal nanostructures. PMID:28696473

  10. Molecular simulations of beta-amyloid protein near hydrated lipids (PECASE).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Han, Kunwoo (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Ford, David M. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX)

    2005-12-01

    We performed molecular dynamics simulations of beta-amyloid (A{beta}) protein and A{beta} fragment(31-42) in bulk water and near hydrated lipids to study the mechanism of neurotoxicity associated with the aggregation of the protein. We constructed full atomistic models using Cerius2 and ran simulations using LAMMPS. MD simulations with different conformations and positions of the protein fragment were performed. Thermodynamic properties were compared with previous literature and the results were analyzed. Longer simulations and data analyses based on the free energy profiles along the distance between the protein and the interface are ongoing.

  11. A binding-site barrier affects imaging efficiency of high affinity amyloid-reactive peptide radiotracers in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Wall

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a complex pathology associated with a growing number of diseases including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and myeloma. The distribution and extent of amyloid deposition in body organs establishes the prognosis and can define treatment options; therefore, determining the amyloid load by using non-invasive molecular imaging is clinically important. We have identified a heparin-binding peptide designated p5 that, when radioiodinated, was capable of selectively imaging systemic visceral AA amyloidosis in a murine model of the disease. The p5 peptide was posited to bind effectively to amyloid deposits, relative to similarly charged polybasic heparin-reactive peptides, because it adopted a polar α helix secondary structure. We have now synthesized a variant, p5R, in which the 8 lysine amino acids of p5 have been replaced with arginine residues predisposing the peptide toward the α helical conformation in an effort to enhance the reactivity of the peptide with the amyloid substrate. The p5R peptide had higher affinity for amyloid and visualized AA amyloid in mice by using SPECT/CT imaging; however, the microdistribution, as evidenced in micro-autoradiographs, was dramatically altered relative to the p5 peptide due to its increased affinity and a resultant "binding site barrier" effect. These data suggest that radioiodinated peptide p5R may be optimal for the in vivo detection of discreet, perivascular amyloid, as found in the brain and pancreatic vasculature, by using molecular imaging techniques; however, peptide p5, due to its increased penetration, may yield more quantitative imaging of expansive tissue amyloid deposits.

  12. First demonstration of cerebrospinal fluid and plasma A beta lowering with oral administration of a beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 inhibitor in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Holahan, Marie A; Colussi, Dennis; Crouthamel, Ming-Chih; Devanarayan, Viswanath; Ellis, Joan; Espeseth, Amy; Gates, Adam T; Graham, Samuel L; Gregro, Allison R; Hazuda, Daria; Hochman, Jerome H; Holloway, Katharine; Jin, Lixia; Kahana, Jason; Lai, Ming-tain; Lineberger, Janet; McGaughey, Georgia; Moore, Keith P; Nantermet, Philippe; Pietrak, Beth; Price, Eric A; Rajapakse, Hemaka; Stauffer, Shaun; Steinbeiser, Melissa A; Seabrook, Guy; Selnick, Harold G; Shi, Xiao-Ping; Stanton, Matthew G; Swestock, John; Tugusheva, Katherine; Tyler, Keala X; Vacca, Joseph P; Wong, Jacky; Wu, Guoxin; Xu, Min; Cook, Jacquelynn J; Simon, Adam J

    2009-01-01

    beta-Site amyloid precursor protein (APP)-cleaving enzyme (BACE) 1 cleavage of amyloid precursor protein is an essential step in the generation of the potentially neurotoxic and amyloidogenic A beta 42 peptides in Alzheimer's disease. Although previous mouse studies have shown brain A beta lowering after BACE1 inhibition, extension of such studies to nonhuman primates or man was precluded by poor potency, brain penetration, and pharmacokinetics of available inhibitors. In this study, a novel tertiary carbinamine BACE1 inhibitor, tertiary carbinamine (TC)-1, was assessed in a unique cisterna magna ported rhesus monkey model, where the temporal dynamics of A beta in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma could be evaluated. TC-1, a potent inhibitor (IC(50) approximately 0.4 nM), has excellent passive membrane permeability, low susceptibility to P-glycoprotein transport, and lowered brain A beta levels in a mouse model. Intravenous infusion of TC-1 led to a significant but transient lowering of CSF and plasma A beta levels in conscious rhesus monkeys because it underwent CYP3A4-mediated metabolism. Oral codosing of TC-1 with ritonavir, a potent CYP3A4 inhibitor, twice daily over 3.5 days in rhesus monkeys led to sustained plasma TC-1 exposure and a significant and sustained reduction in CSF sAPP beta, A beta 40, A beta 42, and plasma A beta 40 levels. CSF A beta 42 lowering showed an EC(50) of approximately 20 nM with respect to the CSF [TC-1] levels, demonstrating excellent concordance with its potency in a cell-based assay. These results demonstrate the first in vivo proof of concept of CSF A beta lowering after oral administration of a BACE1 inhibitor in a nonhuman primate.

  13. DNA polymerase-beta is expressed early in neurons of Alzheimer's disease brain and is loaded into DNA replication forks in neurons challenged with beta-amyloid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copani, Agata; Hoozemans, Jeroen J. M.; Caraci, Filippo; Calafiore, Marco; van Haastert, Elise S.; Veerhuis, Robert; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.; Aronica, Eleonora; Sortino, Maria Angela; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2006-01-01

    Cultured neurons exposed to synthetic beta-amyloid (Abeta) fragments reenter the cell cycle and initiate a pathway of DNA replication that involves the repair enzyme DNA polymerase-beta (DNA pol-beta) before undergoing apoptotic death. In this study, by performing coimmunoprecipitation experiments

  14. Interactions of laminin with the amyloid ß peptide: Implications for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive neuronal cell loss is observed in Alzheimer's disease. Laminin immunoreactivity colocalizes with senile plaques, the characteristic extracellular histopathological lesions of Alzheimer brain, which consist of the amyloid ß (Aß peptide polymerized into amyloid fibrils. These lesions have neurotoxic effects and have been proposed to be a main cause of neurodegeneration. In order to understand the pathological significance of the interaction between laminin and amyloid, we investigated the effect of laminin on amyloid structure and toxicity. We found that laminin interacts with the Aß1-40 peptide, blocking fibril formation and even inducing depolymerization of preformed fibrils. Protofilaments known to be intermediate species of Aß fibril formation were also detected as intermediate species of laminin-induced Aß fibril depolymerization. Moreover, laminin-amyloid interactions inhibited the toxic effects on rat primary hippocampal neurons. As a whole, our results indicate a putative anti-amyloidogenic role of laminin which may be of biological and therapeutic interest for controlling amyloidosis, such as those observed in cerebral angiopathy and Alzheimer's disease.

  15. The Peptide Vaccine Combined with Prior Immunization of a Conventional Diphtheria-Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Induced Amyloid β Binding Antibodies on Cynomolgus Monkeys and Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of brain amyloid beta (Aβ peptides by anti-Aβ antibodies is one of the possible therapies for Alzheimer’s disease. We previously reported that the Aβ peptide vaccine including the T-cell epitope of diphtheria-tetanus combined toxoid (DT induced anti-Aβ antibodies, and the prior immunization with conventional DT vaccine enhanced the immunogenicity of the peptide. Cynomolgus monkeys were given the peptide vaccine subcutaneously in combination with the prior DT vaccination. Vaccination with a similar regimen was also performed on guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine induced anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs without chemical adjuvants, and excessive immune responses were not observed. Those antibodies could preferentially recognize Aβ40, and Aβ42 compared to Aβ fibrils. The levels of serum anti-Aβ antibodies and plasma Aβ peptides increased in both animals and decreased the brain Aβ40 level of guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine could induce a similar binding profile of anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs. The peptide vaccination could be expected to reduce the brain Aβ peptides and their toxic effects via clearance of Aβ peptides by generated antibodies.

  16. A bifunctional curcumin analogue for two-photon imaging and inhibiting crosslinking of amyloid beta in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueli; Tian, Yanli; Yuan, Peng; Li, Yuyan; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Grutzendler, Jaime; Moore, Anna; Ran, Chongzhao

    2014-10-09

    In this report, we designed a highly bright bifunctional curcumin analogue CRANAD-28. In vivo two-photon imaging suggested that CRANAD-28 could penetrate the blood brain barrier (BBB) and label plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathies (CAAs). We also demonstrated that this imaging probe could inhibit the crosslinking of amyloid beta induced either by copper or by natural conditions.

  17. Structural and Thermodynamic Properties of AmyloidPeptides: Impact of Fragment Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, T.; Wise-Scira, O.; Coskuner, O.

    2010-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease whose physiological characteristics include the accumulation of amyloid-containing deposits in the brain and consequent synapse and neuron loss. Unfortunately, most widely used drugs for the treatment can palliate the outer symptoms but cannot cure the disease itself. Hence, developing a new drug that can cure it. Most recently, the ``early aggregation and monomer'' hypothesis has become popular and a few drugs have been developed based on this hypothesis. Detailed understanding of the amyloidpeptide structure can better help us to determine more effective treatment strategies; indeed, the structure of Amyloid has been studied extensively employing experimental and theoretical tools. Nevertheless, those studies have employed different fragment sizes of Amyloid and characterized its conformational nature in different media. Thus, the structural properties might be different from each other and provide a reason for the existing debates in the literature. Here, we performed all-atom MD simulations and present the structural and thermodynamic properties of Aβ1-16, Aβ1-28, and Aβ1-42 in the gas phase and in aqueous solution. Our studies show that the overall structures, secondary structures, and the calculated thermodynamic properties change with increasing peptide size. In addition, we find that the structural properties of those peptides are different from each other in the gas phase and in aqueous solution.

  18. [beta subsccript 2]-microglobulin forms three-dimensional domain-swapped amyloid fibrils with disulfide linkages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cong; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-08-09

    {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}-m) is the light chain of the type I major histocompatibility complex. It deposits as amyloid fibrils within joints during long-term hemodialysis treatment. Despite the devastating effects of dialysis-related amyloidosis, full understanding of how fibrils form from soluble {beta}{sub 2}-m remains elusive. Here we show that {beta}{sub 2}-m can oligomerize and fibrillize via three-dimensional domain swapping. Isolating a covalently bound, domain-swapped dimer from {beta}{sub 2}-m oligomers on the pathway to fibrils, we were able to determine its crystal structure. The hinge loop that connects the swapped domain to the core domain includes the fibrillizing segment LSFSKD, whose atomic structure we also determined. The LSFSKD structure reveals a class 5 steric zipper, akin to other amyloid spines. The structures of the dimer and the zipper spine fit well into an atomic model for this fibrillar form of {beta}{sub 2}-m, which assembles slowly under physiological conditions.

  19. Tuning the stereo-hindrance of a curcumin scaffold for the selective imaging of the soluble forms of amyloid beta species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuyan; Yang, Jian; Liu, Hongwu; Yang, Jing; Du, Lei; Feng, Haiwei; Tian, Yanli; Cao, Jianqin; Ran, Chongzhao

    2017-11-01

    Amyloid peptides and proteins are associated with the pathologies of numerous diseases. In the progression of a disease, amyloids exist in soluble and insoluble forms, which are the dominant species at different stages of the disease and they have different degrees of toxicity. However, differentiating between the soluble and insoluble forms is very challenging with small molecule probes due to multiple obstacles that need to be overcome. Inspired by the recognition principle of antibodies for sAβ, we hypothesized that the accessibility/tightness of soluble and insoluble amyloids could be utilized to design imaging probes to recognize different amyloid forms and the stereo-hindrance tuning strategy could be used to design imaging probes for selectively detecting the soluble amyloid beta (sAβ) species in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Herein, we demonstrated that tuning the stereo-hindrance of the phenoxy-alkyl chains at the 4-position of a curcumin scaffold could lead to certain selectivity for sAβ over insoluble Aβs (insAβ). Among the designed compounds, CRANAD-102 showed a 68-fold higher affinity for sAβ than for insAβ (7.5 ± 10 nM vs. 505.9 ± 275.9 nM). Moreover, our imaging data indicated that CRANAD-102 was indeed capable of detecting sAβ in vivo using 4 month old APP/PS1 mice, in which sAβ is the predominant species in the brain. In addition, we also demonstrated that CRANAD-102 could be used to monitor the increase in sAβ loading from the ages of 4 months old to 12 months old. We believe that CRANAD-102 can be a useful probe for selectively detecting sAβ species in AD and that our probe designing strategy can be applied to other amyloids and will have tremendous impact on AD drug development and other amyloid research.

  20. Oral Administration of Thioflavin T Prevents Beta Amyloid Plaque Formation in Double Transgenic AD Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Paule, Merle G; Schmued, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and most common cause of adult-onset dementia. The major hallmarks of AD are the formation of senile amyloid plaques made of beta amyloid and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) which are primarily composed of phosphorylated tau protein. Although numerous agents have been considered as providing protection against AD, identification of potential agents with neuroprotective ability is limited. Thioflavin T has been used in the past to stain amyloid beta plaques in brain. In this study, Thioflavin T (ThT) and vehicle (infant formula) were administered orally by gavage to transgenic (B6C3 APP PS1; AD-Tg) mice beginning at 4 months age and continuing until sacrifice at 9 months of age at 40 mg/kg dose. The number of amyloid plaques was reduced dramatically by ThT treatment in both male and female transgenic mice compared to those in control mice. Additionally, GFAP and Amylo-Glo labeling suggest that astrocytic hypertrophy is minimized in ThT-treated animals. Similarly, CD68 labeling, which detects activated microglia, along with Amylo-Glo labeling, suggests that microglial activation is significantly less in ThT-treated mice. Both Aβ-40 and Aβ-42 concentrations in blood rose significantly in the ThT-treated animals suggesting that ThT may inhibit the deposition, degradation, and/or clearance of Aβ plaques in brain.

  1. S14G-humanin restored cellular homeostasis disturbed by amyloid-beta protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Zhao, Wencong; Yang, Hongqi; Zhang, Junhong; Ma, Jianjun

    2013-09-25

    Humanin is a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease, and its derivative, S14G-humanin, is 1 000-fold stronger in its neuroprotective effect against Alzheimer's disease-relevant insults. Al-though effective, the detailed molecular mechanism through which S14G-humanin exerts its effects remains unclear. Data from this study showed that fibrillar amyloid-beta 40 disturbed cellular ho-meostasis through the cell membrane, increasing intracellular calcium, generating reactive oxygen species, and decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential. S14G-humanin restored these responses. The results suggested that S14G-humanin blocked the effects of amyloid-beta 40 on the neuronal cell membrane, and restored the disturbed cellular homeostasis, thereby exerting a neu-roprotective effect on hippocampal neurons.

  2. Amyloid-beta binds catalase with high affinity and inhibits hydrogen peroxide breakdown.

    OpenAIRE

    Milton, N G

    1999-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) specifically bound purified catalase with high affinity and inhibited catalase breakdown of H(2)O(2). The Abeta-induced catalase inhibition involved formation of the inactive catalase Compound II and was reversible. CatalaseAbeta interactions provide rapid functional assays for the cytotoxic domain of Abeta and suggest a mechanism for some of the observed actions of Abeta plus catalase in vitro.

  3. Oxidative stress induces macroautophagy of amyloid beta-protein and ensuing apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Lin; Kågedal, Katarina; Dehvari, Nodi

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the toxicity of intracellular amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) to neurons and the involvement of lysosomes in this process in Alzheimer disease (AD). We have recently shown that oxidative stress, a recognized determinant of AD, enhances macroautophagy and leads to int...... to normoxic conditions. The rate of apoptosis in all three cell lines demonstrated dependence on intralysosomal Abeta content (Vector...

  4. S14G-humanin restored cellular homeostasis disturbed by amyloid-beta protein

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xue; Zhao, Wencong; Yang, Hongqi; Zhang, Junhong; Ma, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    Humanin is a potential therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease, and its derivative, S14G-humanin, is 1 000-fold stronger in its neuroprotective effect against Alzheimer's disease-relevant insults. Al-though effective, the detailed molecular mechanism through which S14G-humanin exerts its effects remains unclear. Data from this study showed that fibrillar amyloid-beta 40 disturbed cellular ho-meostasis through the cell membrane, increasing intracellular calcium, generating reactive oxygen sp...

  5. What is the role of amyloid precursor protein dimerization?

    OpenAIRE

    Khalifa, Naouel Ben; Van Hees, Joanne; Tasiaux, Bernadette; Huysseune, Sandra; Smith, Steven O.; Constantinescu, Stefan N.; Octave, Jean-Noël; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Extensive research efforts have been conducted over the past decades to understand the processing of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP). APP cleavage leads to the production of the beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta), which is the major constituent of the amyloid core of senile plaques found in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Abeta is produced by the sequential cleavage of APP by beta- and gamma-secretases. Cleavage of APP by gamma-secretase also generates the APP Intracellula...

  6. Brain-predicted age in Down syndrome is associated with beta amyloid deposition and cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, James H; Annus, Tiina; Wilson, Liam R; Remtulla, Ridhaa; Hong, Young T; Fryer, Tim D; Acosta-Cabronero, Julio; Cardenas-Blanco, Arturo; Smith, Robert; Menon, David K; Zaman, Shahid H; Nestor, Peter J; Holland, Anthony J

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) are more likely to experience earlier onset of multiple facets of physiological aging. This includes brain atrophy, beta amyloid deposition, cognitive decline, and Alzheimer's disease-factors indicative of brain aging. Here, we employed a machine learning approach, using structural neuroimaging data to predict age (i.e., brain-predicted age) in people with DS (N = 46) and typically developing controls (N = 30). Chronological age was then subtracted from brain-predicted age to generate a brain-predicted age difference (brain-PAD) score. DS participants also underwent [ 11 C]-PiB positron emission tomography (PET) scans to index the levels of cerebral beta amyloid deposition, and cognitive assessment. Mean brain-PAD in DS participants' was +2.49 years, significantly greater than controls (p brain-PAD was associated with the presence and the magnitude of PiB-binding and levels of cognitive performance. Our study indicates that DS is associated with premature structural brain aging, and that age-related alterations in brain structure are associated with individual differences in the rate of beta amyloid deposition and cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cationization increases brain distribution of an amyloid-beta protofibril selective F(ab')2 fragment

    OpenAIRE

    Syvänen, Stina; Edén, Desireé; Sehlin, Dag

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies and fragments thereof are, because of high selectivity for their targets, considered as potential therapeutics and biomarkers for several neurological disorders. However, due to their large molecular size, antibodies/fragments do not easily penetrate into the brain. The aim of the present study was to improve the brain distribution via adsorptive-mediated transcytosis of an amyloid-beta (A beta) protofibril selective F(ab')2 fragment (F(ab')2-h158). F(ab')2-h158 was cationized to d...

  8. Amyloid beta1–42 and the phoshorylated tau threonine 231 in brains of aged cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darusman, Huda Shalahudin; Gjedde, Albert; Sajuthi, Dondin

    2014-01-01

    Pathological hallmarks indicative of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which are the plaques of amyloid beta1-42 and neurofibrillary tangles, were found in brain of aged cynomolgus monkey. The aim of this study was to investigate if aged monkeys exhibiting spatial memory impairment and levels of biomarkers...... angiopathy, and the tauopathy, to possible neurofibrillary tangles. Six aged monkeys were selected based on their spatial memory performance and profile of biomarkers of AD, divided equally to affected aged subject - with Memory-affected and low amyloid level, and aged with higher performance in memory...... and amyloid, as the age-matched subjects. Using immunohistochemistry, plaques of amyloid beta1-42 were observed in two out of three brains of aged subjects with memory impairment and biomarkers indicative of AD. The cerebral amyloid angiopathy was observed in both aged monkey groups, and unlike in the human...

  9. Detecting beta-amyloid aggregation from time-resolved emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, A.; Vyshemirsky, V.; Birch, D. J. S.; Rolinski, O. J.

    2018-04-01

    The aggregation of beta-amyloids is one of the key processes responsible for the development of Alzheimer’s disease. Early molecular-level detection of beta-amyloid oligomers may help in early diagnosis and in the development of new intervention therapies. Our previous studies on the changes in beta-amyloid’s single tyrosine intrinsic fluorescence response during aggregation demonstrated a four-exponential fluorescence intensity decay, and the ratio of the pre-exponential factors indicated the extent of the aggregation in the early stages of the process before the beta-sheets were formed. Here we present a complementary approach based on the time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) of amyloid’s tyrosine excited at 279 nm and fluorescence in the window 240-450 nm. TRES have been used to demonstrate sturctural changes occuring on the nanosecond time scale after excitation which has significant advantages over using steady-state spectra. We demonstrate this by resolving the fluorescent species and revealing that beta-amyloid’s monomers show very fast dielectric relaxation, and its oligomers display a substantial spectral shift due to dielectric relaxation, which gradually decreases when the oligomers become larger.

  10. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II does not process amyloid-beta peptide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, František; Šácha, Pavel; Blechová, Miroslava; Březinová, Anna; Šafařík, Martin; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Konvalinka, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 7 (2013), s. 2626-2632 ISSN 0892-6638 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/12/0847 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : PSMA * Alzheimer's disease * disaggregation * exopeptidase * substrate specificity * depsipeptide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.480, year: 2013

  11. Exploring the early steps of aggregation of amyloid-forming peptide KFFE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Guanghong; Mousseau, Normand; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    It has been shown recently that even a tetrapeptide can form amyloid fibrils sharing all the characteristics of amyloid fibrils built from large proteins. Recent experimental studies also suggest that the toxicity observed in several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, is not only related to the mature fibrils themselves, but also to the soluble oligomers formed early in the process of fibrillogenesis. This raises the interest in studying the early steps of the aggregation process. Although fibril formation follows the nucleation-condensation process, characterized by the presence of lag phase, the exact pathways remain to be determined. In this study, we used the activation-relaxation technique and a generic energy model to explore the process of self-assembly and the structures of the resulting aggregates of eight KFFE peptides. Our simulations show, starting from different states with a preformed antiparallel dimer, that eight chains can self-assemble to adopt, with various orientations, four possible distant oligomeric well-aligned structures of similar energy. Two of these structures show a double-layer β-sheet organization, in agreement with the structure of amyloid fibrils as observed by x-ray diffraction; another two are mixtures of dimers and trimers. Our results also suggest that octamers are likely to be below the critical size for nucleation of amyloid fibrils for small peptides

  12. Effect of copper (II) ion against elongation behavior of amyloid {beta} fibrils on liposome membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimanouchi, T.; Onishi, R.; Kitaura, N.; Umakoshi, H.; Kuboi, R. [Division of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    The fibril growth behavior of amyloid {beta} protein (A{beta}) on cell membranes is relating to the progression of Alzheimer's disease. This growth behavior of A{beta} fibrils is sensitively affected by the metal ions, neurotransmitters, or bioreactive substrate. The inhibitory effect of those materials was quantitatively estimated from the viewpoints of ''crystal growth''. In a bulk aqueous solution, copper (II) ion showed the strong inhibitory effect on the growth of A{beta} fibrils. Meanwhile, the addition of a closed-phospholipid bilayer membrane (liposome) could reduce the above inhibitory effect of copper (II) ion. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha}, suppress amyloid {beta}-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raman, Dayanidhi; Milatovic, Snjezana-Zaja [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Milatovic, Dejan [Department of Pediatrics/Pediatric Toxicology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Splittgerber, Ryan [Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Fan, Guo-Huang [Department of Neurobiology and Neurotoxicology, Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN 37221 (United States); Richmond, Ann, E-mail: ann.richmond@vanderbilt.edu [VA Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and accumulation of neurotoxic oligomeric peptides amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}). Although the molecular events are not entirely known, it has become evident that inflammation, environmental and other risk factors may play a causal, disruptive and/or protective role in the development of AD. The present study investigated the ability of the chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) and stromal cell-derived factor-1{alpha} (SDF-1{alpha}), the respective ligands for chemokine receptors CXCR2 and CXCR4, to suppress A{beta}-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment with MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha} significantly protected neurons from A{beta}-induced dendritic regression and apoptosis in vitro through activation of Akt, ERK1/2 and maintenance of metalloproteinase ADAM17 especially with SDF-1{alpha}. Intra-cerebroventricular (ICV) injection of A{beta} led to reduction in dendritic length and spine density of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and increased oxidative damage 24 h following the exposure. The A{beta}-induced morphometric changes of neurons and increase in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes, were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with the chemokines MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha}. Additionally, MIP-2 or SDF-1{alpha} was able to suppress the aberrant mislocalization of p21-activated kinase (PAK), one of the proteins involved in the maintenance of dendritic spines. Furthermore, MIP-2 also protected neurons against A{beta} neurotoxicity in CXCR2-/- mice, potentially through observed up regulation of CXCR1 mRNA. Understanding the neuroprotective potential of chemokines is crucial in defining the role for their employment during the early stages of neurodegeneration. -- Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neuroprotective ability of the chemokines MIP2 and CXCL12 against A{beta} toxicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MIP

  14. Anti-amyloid treatments in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, Mamta; Kim, Kye Y

    2009-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most challenging threats to the healthcare system in society. One of the main characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology is formation of amyloid plaques from accumulation of amyloid beta peptide. The therapeutic agents that are currently available for AD including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AchEIs) and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist are focused on improving the symptoms and do not revert the progression of the disease. This limitation coupled with the burgeoning increase in the prevalence of AD and resultant impact on healthcare economics calls for more substantial treatments for AD. According to the leading amyloid hypothesis, cleavage of amyloid precursor protein to release amyloid beta peptide is the critical event in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recently treatment strategies have been focused on modifying the formation, clearance and accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid beta peptide. This article reviews different therapeutic approaches that have been investigated to target amyloid beta ranging from secretase modulators, antiaggregation agents to amyloid immunotherapy. Authors review the different novel drugs which are in clinical trials.

  15. Memory Impairment in Estrogen Receptor ? Knockout Mice Through Accumulation of Amyloid-? Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Chul Ju; Yun, Hyung-Mun; Park, Kyung-Ran; Song, Ju Kyung; Seo, Hyun Ok; Hyun, Byung Kook; Choi, Dong Young; Yoo, Hwan-Soo; Oh, Ki-Wan; Hwang, Dae Yeun; Han, Sang-Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen has been known to reduce the development of Alzheimer?s disease (AD). However, exact mechanisms are not clear. We investigated whether estrogen can increase amyloid-beta (A?) degradation and affects A?-induced memory impairment in an estrogen deficiency model. Estrogen receptor alpha (ER?) knockout mice and wild-type mice were intracerebroventricular (ICV) infused with A? (300?pmol) for 2?weeks. Cognitive function was then assessed by the Morris water maze test and passive avoidance ...

  16. Role of amyloid peptides in vascular dysfunction and platelet dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria eCanobbio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common neurodegenerative cause of dementia in the elderly. AD is accompanied by the accumulation of amyloid peptides in the brain parenchyma and in the cerebral vessels. The sporadic form of the AD accounts for about 95% of all cases. It is characterized by a late onset, typically after the age of 65, with a complex and still poorly understood aetiology. Several observations point towards a central role of cerebrovascular dysfunction in the onset of sporadic AD. According to the vascular hypothesis, AD may be initiated by vascular dysfunctions that precede and promote the neurodegenerative process. In accordance to this, AD patients show increased hemorragic or ischemic stroke risks. It is now clear that multiple bidirectional connections exist between AD and cerebrovascular disease, and in this new scenario, the effect of amyloid peptides on vascular cells and blood platelets appear to be central to AD. In this review we analyse the effect of amyloid peptides on vascular function and platelet activation and its contribution to the cerebrovascular pathology associated with AD and the progression of this disease.

  17. Characterization of Mn(II) ion binding to the amyloidpeptide in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Cecilia; Kulkarni, Yashraj S; Abelein, Axel; Jarvet, Jüri; Liao, Qinghua; Strodel, Birgit; Olsson, Lisa; Luo, Jinghui; Abrahams, Jan Pieter; Sholts, Sabrina B; Roos, Per M; Kamerlin, Shina C L; Gräslund, Astrid; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S

    2016-12-01

    Growing evidence links neurodegenerative diseases to metal exposure. Aberrant metal ion concentrations have been noted in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains, yet the role of metals in AD pathogenesis remains unresolved. A major factor in AD pathogenesis is considered to be aggregation of and amyloid formation by amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. Previous studies have shown that Aβ displays specific binding to Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions, and such binding has been shown to modulate Aβ aggregation. Here, we use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to show that Mn(II) ions also bind to the N-terminal part of the Aβ(1-40) peptide, with a weak binding affinity in the milli- to micromolar range. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, solid state atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence spectroscopy, and molecular modeling suggest that the weak binding of Mn(II) to Aβ may not have a large effect on the peptide's aggregation into amyloid fibrils. However, identification of an additional metal ion displaying Aβ binding reveals more complex AD metal chemistry than has been previously considered in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Aggregation properties of a short peptide that mediates amyloid fibril ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mandelkow E 2005 Tau aggregation is driven by a transition from random coil to beta sheet structure. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1739 158–166 von Bergen M, Barghorn S, Li L, Marx A, Biernat J, Mandelkow. EM and Mandelkow E 2001 Mutations of tau protein in frontotemporal dementia promote aggregation of paired helical.

  19. Peptides derived from nucleoside beta-amino acids form an unusual 8-helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threlfall, Richard; Davies, Andrew; Howarth, Nicola M; Fisher, Julie; Cosstick, Richard

    2008-02-07

    Peptides of varying length (dimers to octamers) were prepared from nucleoside beta-amino acids and conformational studies, based on NOE observations, show that the beta-peptides form an unusual 8-helix.

  20. Caspase activation increases beta-amyloid generation independently of caspase cleavage of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesco, Giuseppina; Koh, Young Ho; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2003-11-14

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes "alternative" proteolysis mediated by caspases. Three major caspase recognition sites have been identified in the APP, i.e. one at the C terminus (Asp720) and two at the N terminus (Asp197 and Asp219). Caspase cleavage at Asp720 has been suggested as leading to increased production of Abeta. Thus, we set out to determine which putative caspase sites in APP, if any, are cleaved in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines concurrently with the increased Abeta production that occurs during apoptosis. We found that cleavage at Asp720 occurred concurrently with caspase 3 activation and the increased production of total secreted Abeta and Abeta1-42 in association with staurosporine- and etoposide-induced apoptosis. To investigate the contribution of caspase cleavage of APP to Abeta generation, we expressed an APP mutant truncated at Asp720 that mimics APP caspase cleavage at the C-terminal site. This did not increase Abeta generation but, in contrast, dramatically decreased Abeta production in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Furthermore, the ablation of caspase-dependent cleavage at Asp720, Asp197, and Asp219 (by site-directed mutagenesis) did not prevent enhanced Abeta production following etoposide-induced apoptosis. These findings indicate that the enhanced Abeta generation associated with apoptosis does not require cleavage of APP at its C-terminal (Asp720) and/or N-terminal caspase sites.

  1. Coassembly of Peptides Derived from β-Sheet Regions of β-Amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truex, Nicholas L; Nowick, James S

    2016-10-26

    In this paper, we investigate the coassembly of peptides derived from the central and C-terminal regions of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). In the preceding paper, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, DOI: 10.1021/jacs.6b06000 , we established that peptides containing residues 17-23 (LVFFAED) from the central region of Aβ and residues 30-36 (AIIGLMV) from the C-terminal region of Aβ assemble to form homotetramers consisting of two hydrogen-bonded dimers. Here, we mix these tetramer-forming peptides and determine how they coassemble. Incorporation of a single 15 N isotopic label into each peptide provides a spectroscopic probe with which to elucidate the coassembly of the peptides by 1 H, 15 N HSQC. Job's method of continuous variation and nonlinear least-squares fitting reveal that the peptides form a mixture of heterotetramers in 3:1, 2:2, and 1:3 stoichiometries, in addition to the homotetramers. These studies also establish the relative stability of each tetramer and show that the 2:2 heterotetramer predominates. 15 N-Edited NOESY shows the 2:2 heterotetramer comprises two different homodimers, rather than two heterodimers. The peptides within the heterotetramer segregate in forming the homodimer subunits, but the two homodimers coassemble in forming the heterotetramer. These studies show that the central and C-terminal regions of Aβ can preferentially segregate within β-sheets and that the resulting segregated β-sheets can further coassemble.

  2. Acute gamma-secretase inhibition of nonhuman primate CNS shifts amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism from amyloid-beta production to alternative APP fragments without amyloid-beta rebound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jacquelynn J; Wildsmith, Kristin R; Gilberto, David B; Holahan, Marie A; Kinney, Gene G; Mathers, Parker D; Michener, Maria S; Price, Eric A; Shearman, Mark S; Simon, Adam J; Wang, Jennifer X; Wu, Guoxin; Yarasheski, Kevin E; Bateman, Randall J

    2010-05-12

    The accumulation of amyloid beta (Abeta) in Alzheimer's disease is caused by an imbalance of production and clearance, which leads to increased soluble Abeta species and extracellular plaque formation in the brain. Multiple Abeta-lowering therapies are currently in development: an important goal is to characterize the molecular mechanisms of action and effects on physiological processing of Abeta, as well as other amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolites, in models which approximate human Abeta physiology. To this end, we report the translation of the human in vivo stable-isotope-labeling kinetics (SILK) method to a rhesus monkey cisterna magna ported (CMP) nonhuman primate model, and use the model to test the mechanisms of action of a gamma-secretase inhibitor (GSI). A major concern of inhibiting the enzymes which produce Abeta (beta- and gamma-secretase) is that precursors of Abeta may accumulate and cause a rapid increase in Abeta production when enzyme inhibition discontinues. In this study, the GSI MK-0752 was administered to conscious CMP rhesus monkeys in conjunction with in vivo stable-isotope-labeling, and dose-dependently reduced newly generated CNS Abeta. In contrast to systemic Abeta metabolism, CNS Abeta production was not increased after the GSI was cleared. These results indicate that most of the CNS APP was metabolized to products other than Abeta, including C-terminal truncated forms of Abeta: 1-14, 1-15 and 1-16; this demonstrates an alternative degradation pathway for CNS amyloid precursor protein during gamma-secretase inhibition.

  3. Amyloid-beta immunotherapy: the hope for Alzheimer disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Lopera, Francisco

    2016-12-30

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia of adult-onset, characterized by progressive impairment in cognition and memory. There is no cure for the disease and the current treatments are only symptomatic. Drug discovery is an expensive and time-consuming process; in the last decade no new drugs have been found for AD despite the efforts of the scientific community and pharmaceutical companies. The Aβ immunotherapy is one of the most promising approaches to modify the course of AD. This therapeutic strategy uses synthetic peptides or monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to decrease the Aβ load in the brain and slow the progression of the disease. Therefore, this article will discuss the main aspects of AD neuropathogenesis, the classical pharmacologic treatment, as well as the active and passive immunization describing drug prototypes evaluated in different clinical trials.

  4. Levels of alpha- and beta-secretase cleaved amyloid precursor protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of Alzheimer's disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, K; Fastbom, J; Blomberg, M

    2000-01-01

    Alternative cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) results in generation and secretion of both soluble APP (sAPP) and beta-amyloid (Abeta). Abeta is the main component of the amyloid depositions in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Using Western blotting, we compared...... the levels of alpha-secretase cleaved sAPP, beta-secretase cleaved sAPP and total sAPP, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 13 sporadic AD patients and 13 healthy controls. Our findings show significant amounts of beta-secretase cleaved sAPP in CSF. There was no statistically significant difference...... in the levels of beta-secretase cleaved sAPP between AD patients and controls. The levels of alpha-secretase cleaved sAPP and total sAPP were, however, found to be significantly lower in the AD patients than in the controls....

  5. Interleukin-3 prevents neuronal death induced by amyloid peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otth Carola

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-3 (IL-3 is an important glycoprotein involved in regulating biological responses such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Its effects are mediated via interaction with cell surface receptors. Several studies have demonstrated the expression of IL-3 in neurons and astrocytes of the hippocampus and cortices in normal mouse brain, suggesting a physiological role of IL-3 in the central nervous system. Although there is evidence indicating that IL-3 is expressed in some neuronal populations, its physiological role in these cells is poorly known. Results In this study, we demonstrated the expression of IL-3 receptor in cortical neurons, and analyzed its influence on amyloid β (Aβ-treated cells. In these cells, IL-3 can activate at least three classical signalling pathways, Jak/STAT, Ras/MAP kinase and the PI 3-kinase. Viability assays indicated that IL-3 might play a neuroprotective role in cells treated with Aβ fibrils. It is of interest to note that our results suggest that cell survival induced by IL-3 required PI 3-kinase and Jak/STAT pathway activation, but not MAP kinase. In addition, IL-3 induced an increase of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Conclusion Altogether these data strongly suggest that IL-3 neuroprotects neuronal cells against neurodegenerative agents like Aβ.

  6. Development of magnetic resonance imaging based detection methods for beta amyloids via sialic acid-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouyoumdjian, Hovig

    The development of a non-invasive method for the detection of Alzheimer's disease is of high current interest, which can be critical in early diagnosis and in guiding preventive treatment of the disease. The aggregates of beta amyloids are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Carbohydrates such as sialic acid terminated gangliosides have been shown to play significant roles in initiation of amyloid aggregation. Herein, we report a biomimetic approach using sialic acid coated iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles for in vitro detection in addition to the assessment of the in vivo mouse-BBB (Blood brain barrier) crossing of the BSA (bovine serum albumin)-modified ones. The sialic acid functionalized dextran nanoparticles were shown to bind with beta amyloids through several techniques including ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), TEM (transmission electron microscopy), gel electrophoresis and tyrosine fluorescence assay. The superparamagnetic nature of the nanoparticles allowed easy detection of the beta amyloids in mouse brains in both in vitro and ex vivo model by magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, the sialic acid nanoparticles greatly reduced beta amyloid induced cytotoxicity to SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, highlighting the potential of the glyconanoparticles for detection and imaging of beta amyloids. Sialic acid functionalized BSA (bovine serum albumin) nanoparticles also showed significant binding to beta amyloids, through ELISA and ex vivo mouse brain MRI experiments. Alternatively, the BBB crossing was demonstrated by several techniques such as confocal microscopy, endocytosis, exocytosis assays and were affirmed by nanoparticles transcytosis assays through bEnd.3 endothelial cells. Finally, the BBB crossing was confirmed by analyzing the MRI signal of nanoparticle-injected CD-1 mice.

  7. "Clicked" sugar-curcumin conjugate: modulator of amyloid-β and tau peptide aggregation at ultralow concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolai, Sukanta; Shi, Wei; Corbo, Christopher; Sun, Chong; Averick, Saadyah; Obeysekera, Dinali; Farid, Mina; Alonso, Alejandra; Banerjee, Probal; Raja, Krishnaswami

    2011-12-21

    The synthesis of a water/plasma soluble, noncytotoxic, "clicked" sugar-derivative of curcumin with amplified bioefficacy in modulating amyloid-β and tau peptide aggregation is presented. Curcumin inhibits amyloid-β and tau peptide aggregation at micromolar concentrations; the sugar-curcumin conjugate inhibits Aβ and tau peptide aggregation at concentrations as low as 8 nM and 0.1 nM, respectively. In comparison to curcumin, this conveniently synthesized Alzheimer's drug candidate is a more powerful antioxidant.

  8. Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet Is not Related to Beta-Amyloid Deposition: Data from the Women's Healthy Ageing Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, E; Szoeke, C; Dennerstein, L; Campbell, S; Clifton, P

    2018-01-01

    Research has indicated the neuroprotective potential of the Mediterranean diet. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet has shown preventative potential for Alzheimer's disease incidence and prevalence, yet few studies have investigated the impact of Mediterranean diet adherence on the hallmark protein; beta-amyloid. To investigate the association between Mediterranean diet adherence and beta-amyloid deposition in a cohort of healthy older Australian women. This study was a cross-sectional investigation of participants from the longitudinal, epidemiologically sourced Women's Healthy Ageing Project which is a follow-up of the Melbourne Women's Midlife Health Project. Assessments were conducted at the Centre for Medical Research, Royal Melbourne Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. F-18 Florbetaben positron emission tomography scanning was conducted at the Austin Centre for PET in Victoria, Australia. One hundred and eleven Women's Healthy Ageing Project participants were included in the study. Mediterranean diet adherence scores for all participants were calculated from the administration of a validated food frequency questionnaire constructed by the Cancer Council of Victoria. Beta-amyloid deposition was measured using positron emission tomography standardised uptake value ratios. Gamma regression analysis displayed no association between Mediterranean diet adherence and beta-amyloid deposition. This result was consistent across APOE-ε4 +/- cohorts and with the inclusion of covariates such as age, education, body mass index and cognition. This study found no association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and beta-amyloid deposition in a cohort of healthy Australian women.

  9. [German Society of Nuclear Medicine procedure guideline on beta-amyloid brain PET imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Henryk; Meyer, Philipp T; Drzezga, Alexander; Bartenstein, Peter; Boecker, Henning; Brust, Peter; Buchert, Ralph; Coenen, Heinz H; la Fougère, Christian; Gründer, Gerhard; Grünwald, Frank; Krause, Bernd J; Kuwert, Torsten; Schreckenberger, Matthias; Tatsch, Klaus; Langen, Karl-Josef; Sabri, Osama

    2016-08-05

    Recently, a number of positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers have been approved for clinical use. These tracers target cerebral beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Increasing use of this method implies the need for respective standards. This German Society of Nuclear Medicine guideline describes adequate procedures for Aβ plaque PET imaging. It not only discusses the tracers used for that purpose, but also lists measures for correct patient preparation, image data generation, processing, analysis and interpretation. With that, this "S1" category (according to the German Association of the Scientific Medical Societies standard) guideline aims at contributing to quality assurance of nuclear imaging in Germany.

  10. Fibrils from designed non-amyloid-related synthetic peptides induce AA-amyloidosis during inflammation in an animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Westermark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mouse AA-amyloidosis is a transmissible disease by a prion-like mechanism where amyloid fibrils act by seeding. Synthetic peptides with no amyloid relationship can assemble into amyloid-like fibrils and these may have seeding capacity for amyloid proteins. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Several synthetic peptides, designed for nanotechnology, have been examined for their ability to produce fibrils with Congo red affinity and concomitant green birefringence, affinity for thioflavin S and to accelerate AA-amyloidosis in mice. It is shown that some amphiphilic fibril-forming peptides not only produced Congo red birefringence and showed affinity for thioflavin S, but they also shortened the lag phase for systemic AA-amyloidosis in mice when they were given intravenously at the time of inflammatory induction with silver nitride. Peptides, not forming amyloid-like fibrils, did not have such properties. CONCLUSIONS: These observations should caution researchers and those who work with synthetic peptides and their derivatives to be aware of the potential health concerns.

  11. Assembly of Peptides Derived from β-Sheet Regions of β-Amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truex, Nicholas L; Wang, Yilin; Nowick, James S

    2016-10-26

    In Alzheimer's disease, aggregation of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) results in the formation of oligomers and fibrils that are associated with neurodegeneration. Aggregation of Aβ occurs through interactions between different regions of the peptide. This paper and the accompanying paper constitute a two-part investigation of two key regions of Aβ: the central region and the C-terminal region. These two regions promote aggregation and adopt β-sheet structure in the fibrils, and may also do so in the oligomers. In this paper, we study the assembly of macrocyclic β-sheet peptides that contain residues 17-23 (LVFFAED) from the central region and residues 30-36 (AIIGLMV) from the C-terminal region. These peptides assemble to form tetramers. Each tetramer consists of two hydrogen-bonded dimers that pack through hydrophobic interactions in a sandwich-like fashion. Incorporation of a single 15 N isotopic label into each peptide provides a spectroscopic probe with which to elucidate the β-sheet assembly and interaction: 1 H, 15 N HSQC studies facilitate the identification of the monomers and tetramers; 15 N-edited NOESY studies corroborate the pairing of the dimers within the tetramers. In the following paper, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, DOI: 10.1021/jacs.6b06001 , we will extend these studies to elucidate the coassembly of the peptides to form heterotetramers.

  12. Indexing amyloid peptide diffraction from serial femtosecond crystallography: new algorithms for sparse patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewster, Aaron S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sawaya, Michael R. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Rodriguez, Jose [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McFarlane, Heather T. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Cascio, Duilio [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Eisenberg, David S. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570 (United States); Sauter, Nicholas K., E-mail: nksauter@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Special methods are required to interpret sparse diffraction patterns collected from peptide crystals at X-ray free-electron lasers. Bragg spots can be indexed from composite-image powder rings, with crystal orientations then deduced from a very limited number of spot positions. Still diffraction patterns from peptide nanocrystals with small unit cells are challenging to index using conventional methods owing to the limited number of spots and the lack of crystal orientation information for individual images. New indexing algorithms have been developed as part of the Computational Crystallography Toolbox (cctbx) to overcome these challenges. Accurate unit-cell information derived from an aggregate data set from thousands of diffraction patterns can be used to determine a crystal orientation matrix for individual images with as few as five reflections. These algorithms are potentially applicable not only to amyloid peptides but also to any set of diffraction patterns with sparse properties, such as low-resolution virus structures or high-throughput screening of still images captured by raster-scanning at synchrotron sources. As a proof of concept for this technique, successful integration of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to 2.5 Å resolution for the amyloid segment GNNQQNY from the Sup35 yeast prion is presented.

  13. Effects of Amyloid Precursor Protein 17 Peptide on the Protection of Diabetic Encephalopathy and Improvement of Glycol Metabolism in the Diabetic Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Heng; Zhang, Duo; Yang, Haishan

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have proposed that amyloid precursor protein 17 peptide (APP17 peptide), an active fragment of amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the nervous system, has therapeutic effects on neurodegeneration. Diabetic encephalopathy (DE) is a neurological disease caused by diabetes. Here we use multiple experimental approaches to investigate the effect of APP17 peptide on changes in learning behavior and glycol metabolism in rats. It was found that rats with DE treated by APP17 peptide showed ...

  14. Impairment of context memory by β-amyloid peptide in terrestrial snail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We examined influence of the β-amyloid peptide (25-35 neurotoxic fragment (βAP on Helix lucorum food-aversion learning. Testing with aversively conditioned carrot showed that 2, 5, and 14 days after training the βAP-injected group responded in a significantly larger number of cases and with a significantly smaller latency than the sham-injected control group. The results demonstrate that the amyloid peptide partially impairs the learning process. In an attempt to specify what component of memory is impaired we compared responses in a context in which the snails were aversively trained, and in a neutral context. It was found that the sham-injected learned snails significantly less frequently took the aversively conditioned food in the context in which the snails were shocked, while the βAP-injected snails remembered the aversive context 2 days after associative training, but were not able to distinguish two contexts 5, and 14 days after training. In a separate series of experiments a specific context was associated with electric shock, and changes in general responsiveness were tested in two contexts several days later. It was found that the βAP-injected snails significantly increased withdrawal responses in all tested contexts, while the sham-injected control animals selectively increased responsiveness only in the context in which they were reinforced with electric shocks. These results demonstrate that the β-amyloid peptide (25-35 interferes with the learning process, and may play a significant role in behavioral plasticity and memory by selectively impairing only one

  15. The influence of pathological mutations and proline substitutions in TDP-43 glycine-rich peptides on its amyloid properties and cellular toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Sui Sun

    Full Text Available TAR DNA-binding protein (TDP-43 was identified as the major ubiquitinated component deposited in the inclusion bodies in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U in 2006. Later on, numerous ALS-related mutations were found in either the glycine or glutamine/asparagine-rich region on the TDP-43 C-terminus, which hinted on the importance of mutations on the disease pathogenesis. However, how the structural conversion was influenced by the mutations and the biological significance of these peptides remains unclear. In this work, various peptides bearing pathogenic or de novo designed mutations were synthesized and displayed their ability to form twisted amyloid fibers, cause liposome leakage, and mediate cellular toxicity as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, circular dichroism (CD, Thioflavin T (ThT assay, Raman spectroscopy, calcein leakage assay, and cell viability assay. We have also shown that replacing glycines with prolines, known to obstruct β-sheet formation, at the different positions in these peptides may influence the amyloidogenesis process and neurotoxicity. In these cases, GGG308PPP mutant was not able to form beta-amyloid, cause liposome leakage, nor jeopardized cell survival, which hinted on the importance of the glycines (308-310 during amyloidogenesis.

  16. Amyloid beta 1-42 and phoshorylated tau threonin 231 in brains of aged cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Shalahudin Darusman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Pathological hallmarks indicative of Alzheimer’s disease, which are the plaques of Amyloid Beta 1-42 and neurofibrillary tangles, were found in brain of aged cynomolgus monkey. The aim of the study was to investigate if aged monkeys exhibiting spatial memory impairment and levels of biomarkers indicative of Alzheimer’s disease, had brain lesions similar to human patients suffering from senile dementia. Generating immunohistochemistry technique to biomarkers of Amyloid beta 1-42 and the phosphorylated tau 231, our study assessed the amyloidopathy, such as indicative to the senile plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and the tauopathy, to possible neurofibrillary tangles. Six aged monkeys were selected based on their spatial memory performance and profile of biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease, divided equally to affected aged subject - with Memory-affected and low amyloid level, and aged with higher performance in memory and amyloid, as the age-matched subjects. Using immunohistochemistry, plaques of Amyloid Beta 1-42 were observed in two out of three brains of aged subjects with memory impairment and biomarkers indicative of Alzheimer’s disease. The cerebral amyloid angiopathy was observed in both aged monkey groups, and unlike in the human, the amyloids were found to deposit in the small veins and capillaries. In one of the affected individuals, phosphorylated tau was positively stained intracellularly of the neurons, indicating a possibility of an early stage of the formation of tangles. These findings add to the body of evidence of the utility of the aged cynomolgus monkeys as a spontaneous model for Alzheimer-related disease.

  17. Effect of the surface charge of artificial model membranes on the aggregation of amyloid β-peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaté, Raimon; Espargaró, Alba; Barbosa-Barros, Lucyanna; Ventura, Salvador; Estelrich, Joan

    2012-08-01

    The neurotoxicity effect of the β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide, the primary constituent of senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease, occurs through interactions with neuronal membranes. Here, we attempt to clarify the mechanisms and consequences of the interaction of Aβ with lipid membranes. We have used liposomes as a model of biological membrane, and have devoted particular attention to the bilayer charge effect. Our results show that insertion and surface association of peptide with membrane, increased in a membrane charge-dependent manner, lead to a reduction of Aβ soluble species, lag time elongation and an increase in the inter-molecular β-sheet ratio of amyloid fibrils. In addition, our findings suggest that the fine balance between peptide insertion and surface association modulates Aβ aggregation, influencing the amyloid fibrils concentration as well as their morphology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Multiscale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Beta-Amyloid Interactions with Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, Kelvin

    2012-10-01

    Early events of human beta-amyloid protein interactions with cholesterol-containing membranes are critical to understanding the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to exploring new therapeutic interventions of AD. Atomistic molecular dynamics (AMD) simulations have been extensively used to study the protein-lipid interaction at high atomic resolutions. However, traditional MD simulations are not efficient in sampling the phase space of complex lipid/protein systems with rugged free energy landscapes. Meanwhile, coarse-grained MD (CGD) simulations are efficient in the phase space sampling but suffered from low spatial resolutions and from the fact that the energy landscapes are not identical to those of the AMD. Here, a multiscale approach was employed to simulate the protein-lipid interactions of beta-amyloid upon its release from proteolysis residing in the neuronal membranes. We utilized a forward (AMD to CGD) and reverse (CGD-AMD) strategy to explore new transmembrane and surface protein configuration and evaluate the stabilization mechanisms by measuring the residue-specific protein-lipid or protein conformations. The detailed molecular interactions revealed in this multiscale MD approach will provide new insights into understanding the early molecular events leading to the pathogenesis of AD.

  19. Viscoelastic properties of oil-water interfaces covered by bovine beta-casein tryptic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardet, J M; Debomy, L; Courthaudon, J L; Miclo, T L; Humbert, G; Gaillard, J L

    2000-11-01

    A combination of proteolysis and dilational rheology has been used to study the behavior of films of beta-casein (beta-CN) and of peptides spread at the oil-water interface. Identification of the peptides produced by trypsin hydrolysis of beta-CN in emulsion at 37 degrees C provided information on the structure of beta-CN adsorbed at the oil-water interface. Good interface properties were observed for beta-CN or its peptides, probably because of the amphipathic nature of beta-CN or a synergistic effect between hydrophilic and hydrophobic peptides. Remarkable surface activity was found for the amphipathic peptide beta-CN (f114-169). Rheological studies had shown that interface films made with peptide fractions or with beta-CN were elastic rather than viscous. Film made with the purified peptide beta-CN (f114-169) was merely elastic at the triolein-water interface. A decrease of the viscoelastic modulus was observed for aging beta-CN film but not for aging peptide films; The beta-CN decrease was related to the flexibility of its structure. When the interface is increased by the dilation of an aqueous droplet plunged into oil, beta-CN may expose new polypeptide trains to cover the increased interface, unlike peptides with simpler structures.

  20. Benzothiazole Aniline Tetra(ethylene glycol) and 3-Amino-1,2,4-triazole Inhibit Neuroprotection against Amyloid Peptides by Catalase Overexpression in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease, Familial British dementia, Familial Danish dementia, Type 2 diabetes mellitus, plus Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are associated with amyloid fibril deposition and oxidative stress. The antioxidant enzyme catalase is a neuroprotective amyloid binding protein. Herein the effects of catalase overexpression in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells on the toxicity of amyloid-β (Aβ), amyloid-Bri (ABri), amyloid-Dan (ADan), amylin (IAPP), and prion protein (PrP) peptides were determined. Results showed catalase overexpression was neuroprotective against Aβ, ABri, ADan, IAPP, and PrP peptides. The catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT) and catalase-amyloid interaction inhibitor benzothiazole aniline tetra(ethylene glycol) (BTA-EG4) significantly enhanced neurotoxicity of amyloid peptides in catalase overexpressing neuronal cells. This suggests catalase neuroprotection involves breakdown of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plus a direct binding interaction between catalase and the Aβ, ABri, ADan, IAPP, and PrP peptides. Kisspeptin 45–50 had additive neuroprotective actions against the Aβ peptide in catalase overexpressing cells. The effects of 3-AT had an intracellular site of action, while catalase-amyloid interactions had an extracellular component. These results suggest that the 3-AT and BTA-EG4 compounds may be able to inhibit endogenous catalase mediated neuroprotection. Use of BTA-EG4, or compounds that inhibit catalase binding to amyloid peptides, as potential therapeutics for Neurodegenerative diseases may therefore result in unwanted effects. PMID:23968537

  1. Benzothiazole aniline tetra(ethylene glycol) and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole inhibit neuroprotection against amyloid peptides by catalase overexpression in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilumuri, Amrutha; Odell, Mark; Milton, Nathaniel G N

    2013-11-20

    Alzheimer's disease, Familial British dementia, Familial Danish dementia, Type 2 diabetes mellitus, plus Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease are associated with amyloid fibril deposition and oxidative stress. The antioxidant enzyme catalase is a neuroprotective amyloid binding protein. Herein the effects of catalase overexpression in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells on the toxicity of amyloid-β (Aβ), amyloid-Bri (ABri), amyloid-Dan (ADan), amylin (IAPP), and prion protein (PrP) peptides were determined. Results showed catalase overexpression was neuroprotective against Aβ, ABri, ADan, IAPP, and PrP peptides. The catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (3-AT) and catalase-amyloid interaction inhibitor benzothiazole aniline tetra(ethylene glycol) (BTA-EG4) significantly enhanced neurotoxicity of amyloid peptides in catalase overexpressing neuronal cells. This suggests catalase neuroprotection involves breakdown of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plus a direct binding interaction between catalase and the Aβ, ABri, ADan, IAPP, and PrP peptides. Kisspeptin 45-50 had additive neuroprotective actions against the Aβ peptide in catalase overexpressing cells. The effects of 3-AT had an intracellular site of action, while catalase-amyloid interactions had an extracellular component. These results suggest that the 3-AT and BTA-EG4 compounds may be able to inhibit endogenous catalase mediated neuroprotection. Use of BTA-EG4, or compounds that inhibit catalase binding to amyloid peptides, as potential therapeutics for Neurodegenerative diseases may therefore result in unwanted effects.

  2. Computational identification of potential multitarget treatments for ameliorating the adverse effects of amyloid-beta on synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Anastasio

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The leading hypothesis on Alzheimer Disease (AD is that it is caused by buildup of the peptide amyloid-beta (Abeta, which initially causes dysregulation of synaptic plasticity and eventually causes destruction of synapses and neurons. Pharmacological efforts to limit Abeta buildup have proven ineffective, and this raises the twin challenges of understanding the adverse effects of Abeta on synapses and of suggesting pharmacological means to prevent it. The purpose of this paper is to initiate a computational approach to understanding the dysregulation by Abeta of synaptic plasticity and to offer suggestions whereby combinations of various chemical compounds could be arrayed against it. This data-driven approach confronts the complexity of synaptic plasticity by representing findings from the literature in a course-grained manner, and focuses on understanding the aggregate behavior of many molecular interactions. The same set of interactions is modeled by two different computer programs, each written using a different programming modality: one imperative, the other declarative. Both programs compute the same results over an extensive test battery, providing an essential crosscheck. Then the imperative program is used for the computationally intensive purpose of determining the effects on the model of every combination of ten different compounds, while the declarative program is used to analyze model behavior using temporal logic. Together these two model implementations offer new insights into the mechanisms by which Abeta dysregulates synaptic plasticity and suggest many drug combinations that potentially may reduce or prevent it.

  3. Effect of osmolytes on the conformation and aggregation of some amyloid peptides: CD spectroscopic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Inayathullah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein misfolding and aggregation are responsible for a large number of diseases called protein conformational diseases or disorders that include Alzheimer׳s disease, Huntington׳s diseases, Prion related encephalopathies and type-II diabetes (http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/35041139 (Kopito and Ron, 2000 [1]. A variety of studies have shown that some small organic molecules, known as osmolytes have the ability to stabilize native conformation of proteins and prevent misfolding and aggregation (http://www.la-press.com/article.php?article_id=447 (Zhao et al., 2008 [2]. It has been shown that certain short segment or fragment of respective proteins can also form amyloids, and the segments also promote the aggregation in the full-length protein (http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/0929867023369187 (Gazit, 2002 [3]. This article presents circular dichroism spectroscopic data on conformational analysis and effect of osmolytes on Aβ peptide fragments, different lengths of polyglutamine peptide and the amyloidogenic segment of islet amyloid polypeptide.

  4. Neuroprotective Effects of Pomegranate Peel Extract after Chronic Infusion with AmyloidPeptide in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morzelle, Maressa Caldeira; Salgado, Jocelem Mastrodi; Telles, Milena; Mourelle, Danilo; Bachiega, Patricia; Buck, Hudson Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a chronic and degenerative condition that had no treatment until recently. The current therapeutic strategies reduce progression of the disease but are expensive and commonly cause side effects that are uncomfortable for treated patients. Functional foods to prevent and/or treat many conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases, represent a promising field of study currently gaining attention. To this end, here we demonstrate the effects of pomegranate (Punica granatum) peel extract (PPE) regarding spatial memory, biomarkers of neuroplasticity, oxidative stress and inflammation in a mouse model of neurodegeneration. Male C57Bl/6 mice were chronically infused for 35 days with amyloidpeptide 1–42 (Aβ) or vehicle (control) using mini-osmotic pumps. Another group, also infused with Aβ, was treated with PPE (p.o.– βA+PPE, 800 mg/kg/day). Spatial memory was evaluated in the Barnes maze. Animals treated with PPE and in the control group exhibited a reduction in failure to find the escape box, a finding that was not observed in the Aβ group. The consumption of PPE reduced amyloid plaque density, increased the expression of neurotrophin BDNF and reduced the activity of acetylcholinesterase enzyme. A reduction in lipid peroxidation and in the concentration of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α was also observed in the PPE group. No hepatic lesions were observed in animals treated with PPE. In conclusion, administration of pomegranate peel extract has neuroprotective effects involving multiple mechanisms to prevent establishment and progression of the neurodegenerative process induced by infusion with amyloidpeptide in mice. PMID:27829013

  5. Chaperones ameliorate beta cell dysfunction associated with human islet amyloid polypeptide overexpression.

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    Lisa Cadavez

    Full Text Available In type 2 diabetes, beta-cell dysfunction is thought to be due to several causes, one being the formation of toxic protein aggregates called islet amyloid, formed by accumulations of misfolded human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP. The process of hIAPP misfolding and aggregation is one of the factors that may activate the unfolded protein response (UPR, perturbing endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis. Molecular chaperones have been described to be important in regulating ER response to ER stress. In the present work, we evaluate the role of chaperones in a stressed cellular model of hIAPP overexpression. A rat pancreatic beta-cell line expressing hIAPP exposed to thapsigargin or treated with high glucose and palmitic acid, both of which are known ER stress inducers, showed an increase in ER stress genes when compared to INS1E cells expressing rat IAPP or INS1E control cells. Treatment with molecular chaperone glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78, also known as BiP or protein disulfite isomerase (PDI, and chemical chaperones taurine-conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA or 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA, alleviated ER stress and increased insulin secretion in hIAPP-expressing cells. Our results suggest that the overexpression of hIAPP induces a stronger response of ER stress markers. Moreover, endogenous and chemical chaperones are able to ameliorate induced ER stress and increase insulin secretion, suggesting that improving chaperone capacity can play an important role in improving beta-cell function in type 2 diabetes.

  6. Beta-amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice that harbor diffuse A beta deposits but do not form plaques show increased ischemic vulnerability: role of inflammation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koistinaho, M.; Kettunen, M. I.; Goldsteins, G.; Keinänen, R.; Salminen, A.; Ort, Michael; Bureš, Jan; Liu, D.; Kauppinen, R. A.; Higgins, L. S.; Koistinaho, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 3 (2002), s. 1610-1615 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/00/1656 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Beta-amyloid * Alzheimer disease * brain ischemia Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 10.701, year: 2002

  7. Triptolide Inhibited Cytotoxicity of Differentiated PC12 Cells Induced by Amyloid-Beta25–35 via the Autophagy Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pengjuan; Li, Zhigui; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Xiaochen; Yang, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Evidence shows that an abnormal deposition of amyloid beta-peptide25–35 (Aβ25–35) was the primary cause of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). And the elimination of Aβ25–35 is considered an important target for the treatment of AD. Triptolide (TP), isolated from Tripterygium wilfordii Hook.f. (TWHF), has been shown to possess a broad spectrum of biological profiles, including neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects. In our study investigating the effect and potential mechanism of triptolide on cytotoxicity of differentiated rat pheochromocytoma cell line (the PC12 cell line is often used as a neuronal developmental model) induced by Amyloid-Beta25–35 (Aβ25–35), we used 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, flow cytometry, Western blot, and acridine orange staining to detect whether triptolide could inhibit Aβ25–35–induced cell apoptosis. We focused on the potential role of the autophagy pathway in Aβ25–35-treated differentiated PC12 cells. Our experiments show that cell viability is significantly decreased, and the apoptosis increased in Aβ25–35-treated differentiated PC12 cells. Meanwhile, Aβ25–35 treatment increased the expression of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 II (LC3 II), which indicates an activation of autophagy. However, triptolide could protect differentiated PC12 cells against Aβ25–35-induced cytotoxicity and attenuate Aβ25–35-induced differentiated PC12 cell apoptosis. Triptolide could also suppress the level of autophagy. In order to assess the effect of autophagy on the protective effects of triptolide in differentiated PC12 cells treated with Aβ25–35, we used 3-Methyladenine (3-MA, an autophagy inhibitor) and rapamycin (an autophagy activator). MTT assay showed that 3-MA elevated cell viability compared with the Aβ25–35-treated group and rapamycin inhibits the protection of triptolide. These results suggest that triptolide will repair the

  8. The coding sequence of amyloid-beta precursor protein APP contains a neural-specific promoter element.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collin, R.W.J.; Martens, G.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The amyloid-beta precursor protein APP is generally accepted to be involved in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Since its physiological role is still unclear, we decided to study the function of APP via stable transgenesis in the amphibian Xenopus laevis. However, the application of constructs

  9. Association between amylin and amyloidpeptides in plasma in the context of apolipoprotein E4 allele.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qiao Qiu

    Full Text Available Amylin, a pancreatic peptide that readily crosses the blood brain barrier (BBB, and amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ, the main component of amyloid plaques and a major component of Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology in the brain, share several features. These include having similar β-sheet secondary structures, binding to the same receptor, and being degraded by the same protease. Thus, amylin may be associated with Aβ, but the nature of their relationship remains unclear. In this study, we used human samples to study the relationship between plasma amylin and Aβ in the context of the apolipoprotein E alleles (ApoE. We found that concentrations of Aβ1-42 (P<0.0001 and Aβ1-40 (P<0.0001 increased with each quartile increase of amylin. Using multivariate regression analysis, the study sample showed that plasma amylin was associated with Aβ1-42 (β = +0.149, SE = 0.025, P<0.0001 and Aβ1-40 (β = +0.034, SE = 0.016, P = 0.04 as an outcome after adjusting for age, gender, ethnicity, ApoE4, BMI, diabetes, stroke, kidney function and lipid profile. This positive association between amylin and Aβ1-42 in plasma was found regardless of the ApoE genotype. In contrast, the relationship between amylin and Aβ1-40 in plasma seen in ApoE4 non-carriers disappeared in the presence of ApoE4. Using AD mouse models, our recent study demonstrates that intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of synthetic amylin enhances the removal of Aβ from the brain into blood, thus resulting in increased blood levels of both amylin and Aβ. The positive association between amylin and Aβ, especially Aβ1-42, in human blood samples is probably relevant to the findings in the AD mouse models. The presence of ApoE4 may attenuate amylin's capacity to remove Aβ, especially Aβ1-40, from the AD brain.

  10. In vitro screening on amyloid beta modulation of aqueous extracts from plant seeds

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    Yoshinori Okada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glycation process might contribute to both extensive protein cross-linking and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease (AD. The amyloid-like aggregation of glycated bovine serum albumin induces apoptosis in the neuronal cell. Dietary supplementation of antioxidants, vitamins, and polyphenols are beneficial to AD, and consumption of fruits and vegetables reduce the risk of AD. We conducted a screening of 14 aqueous extracts from plant seeds (PSAE for inhibitory activity on amyloid beta (Aβ. Materials and Methods: To examine the effects of PSAE on the Aβ (1–42 concentration, PSAE were analyzed by Aβ (1–42 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Furthermore, we carried out an antiglycation experiment of PSAE and an antiaggregation experiment of PSAE to confirm the modification mechanism of PSAE. PSAE were added to buffer containing D-ribose and albumins. The solutions were incubated at 37 °C for 10 days. After incubation, the products were assayed on a fluorophotometer. Results: PSAE associated differential reduction in the levels of Aβ (1–42 (lettuce; 98.7% ± 2.4%, bitter melon; 95.9% ± 2.6%, and corn; 93.9% ± 2.1%, demonstrating that treatment with lettuce seeds extracts (LSE effectively decreases Aβ (1–42 concentration. Among the 14 PSAE, LSE exhibited the second greatest potential for antiglycation. Inhibition of aggregates was not recognized in LSE. Conclusion: These results suggest that LSE reduces the toxicity of Aβ by modifying Aβ.

  11. The Role of Choroid Plexus In IVIG-induced Beta-Amyloid Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wendy; Du, Eileen; Dodel, Richard; Farlow, Martin R.; Zheng, Wei; Du, Yansheng

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) contains anti-Aβ autoantibodies and IVIG could induce beta amyloid (Aβ) efflux from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to blood in both Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. However, the molecular mechanism underlying IVIG-induced Aβ efflux remains unclear. In this study, we used amyloid precursor protein (AβPP) transgenic mice to investigate if the IVIG could induce efflux of Aβ from the brain and whether low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1), a hypothetic Aβ transporter in blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCB); could mediate this clearance process. We currently provide strong evidence to demonstrate that IVIG could reduce brain Aβ levels by pulling Aβ into the blood system in AβPP transgenic mice. In the mechanistic study, IVIG could induce Aβ efflux through the in-vitro BCB membrane formed by cultured BCB epithelial cells. Both RAP (receptor-associated protein; a functional inhibitor of LRP1), and LRP1 siRNA were able to significantly inhibit the Aβ efflux. Should Aβ prove to be the underlying cause of AD, our results strongly suggest that IVIG could be beneficial in the therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) by inducing efflux of Aβ from the brain through the LRP1 in the BCB. PMID:24747018

  12. Spectroscopic investigation of Ginkgo biloba terpene trilactones and their interaction with amyloid peptide Aβ(25-35)

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiangtao; Petrovic, Ana G.; Dzyuba, Sergei V.; Berova, Nina; Nakanishi, Koji; Polavarapu, Prasad L.

    2008-04-01

    The beneficial effects of Ginkgo biloba extract in the "treatment" of dementia are attributed to its terpene trilactone (TTL) constituents. The interactions between TTLs and amyloid peptide are believed to be responsible in preventing the aggregation of peptide. These interactions have been investigated using infrared vibrational absorption (VA) and circular dichroism (VCD) spectra. Four TTLs, namely ginkgolide A (GA), ginkgolide B (GB), ginkgolide C (GC) and bilobalide (BB) and amyloid Aβ(25-35) peptide, as a model for the full length peptide, are used in this study. GA-monoether and GA-diether have also been synthesized and investigated to help understand the role of individual carbonyl groups in these interactions. The precipitation and solubility issues encountered with the mixture of ginkgolide + Aβ peptide for VA and VCD studies were overcome using binary ethanol-D 2O solvent mixture. The experimental VA and VCD spectra of GA, GB, GC and BB, GA-monoether and GA-diether have been analyzed using the corresponding spectra predicted with density functional theory. The time-dependent experimental VA and VCD spectra of Aβ(25-35) peptide and the corresponding experimental spectra in the presence of TTLs indicated that the effect of the TTLs in modulating the aggregation of Aβ(25-35) peptide is relatively small. Such small effects might indicate the absence of a specific interaction between the TTLs and Aβ(25-35) peptide as a major force leading to the reduced aggregation of amyloid peptides. It is possible that the therapeutic effect of G. biloba extract does not originate from direct interactions between TTLs and the Aβ(25-35) peptide and is more complex.

  13. The interaction with gold suppresses fiber-like conformations of the amyloid β (16-22) peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Luca; Ardèvol, Albert; Parrinello, Michele; Lutz, Helmut; Lu, Hao; Weidner, Tobias; Corni, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Inorganic surfaces and nanoparticles can accelerate or inhibit the fibrillation process of proteins and peptides, including the biomedically relevant amyloid β peptide. However, the microscopic mechanisms that determine such an effect are still poorly understood. By means of large-scale, state-of-the-art enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations, here we identify an interaction mechanism between the segments 16-22 of the amyloid β peptide, known to be fibrillogenic by itself, and the Au(111) surface in water that leads to the suppression of fiber-like conformations from the peptide conformational ensemble. Moreover, thanks to advanced simulation analysis techniques, we characterize the conformational selection vs. induced fit nature of the gold effect. Our results disclose an inhibition mechanism that is rooted in the details of the microscopic peptide-surface interaction rather than in general phenomena such as peptide sequestration from the solution.Inorganic surfaces and nanoparticles can accelerate or inhibit the fibrillation process of proteins and peptides, including the biomedically relevant amyloid β peptide. However, the microscopic mechanisms that determine such an effect are still poorly understood. By means of large-scale, state-of-the-art enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations, here we identify an interaction mechanism between the segments 16-22 of the amyloid β peptide, known to be fibrillogenic by itself, and the Au(111) surface in water that leads to the suppression of fiber-like conformations from the peptide conformational ensemble. Moreover, thanks to advanced simulation analysis techniques, we characterize the conformational selection vs. induced fit nature of the gold effect. Our results disclose an inhibition mechanism that is rooted in the details of the microscopic peptide-surface interaction rather than in general phenomena such as peptide sequestration from the solution. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  14. Ipomoea batatas attenuates amyloid β peptide-induced neurotoxicity in ICR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Kyeom; Choi, Soo Jung; Cho, Hong Yon; Kim, Young Jun; Lim, Seung-Taik; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Eun Ki; Kim, Hye Kyung; Peterson, Sabrina; Shin, Dong-Hoon

    2011-03-01

    In this study, the protective effects of 17 Korean native plants against amyloid β peptide (Aβ)-induced oxidative stress were screened using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate assay and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Ipomoea batatas exerted the highest protective effects against oxidative stress and was selected for further investigation. To confirm the protective activity of this extract, the I. batatas extract was fed to ICR mice that had been injected with Aβ to induce neuronal deficits. In these experiments, the extract of I. batatas significantly reversed Aβ-induced neurotoxicity as assessed by the passive avoidance test, a behavioral experiment. Moreover, I. batatas administration reduced the level of lipid peroxidation and increased catalase activities in biochemical studies using the brain tissue of mice. These results indicate that I. batatas might be beneficial against Alzheimer's disease, especially by limiting oxidative stress in the brain.

  15. beta-amyloid((1-42))-induced cholinergic lesions in rat nucleus basalis bidirectionally modulate serotonergic innervation of the basal forebrain and cerebral cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T; O'Mahony, S; Kelly, JP; Konya, C; Borostyankoi, ZA; Gorcs, TJ; Zarandi, M; Penke, B; Leonard, BE; Luiten, PGM; Keijser, Jan N.

    Ample experimental evidence suggests that beta -amyloid (A beta), when injected into the rat magnocellular nucleus basalis (MBN), impels excitotoxic injury of cholinergic projection neurons. Whereas learning and memory dysfunction is a hallmark of A beta -induced cholinergic deficits, anxiety, or

  16. MMP-7 cleaves amyloid β fragment peptides and copper ion inhibits the degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Masanari; Matsuura, Kazuki; Nakamura, Rina; Kojima, Aya; Konishi, Motomi; Akizawa, Toshifumi

    2017-10-01

    The extracellular deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) is known to be the fundamental cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ1-42, generated by β-secretases from the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is the main component of neuritic plaque, and the aggregation of this protein is shown to be dependent to an extent on metal ions such as copper and zinc. However, the mechanism by which Cu 2+ affects the physicochemical properties of Aβ1-42 or the central nervous system is still under debate. A recent series of studies have demonstrated that both the soluble-type matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) and the membrane-type matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) are capable of degrading Aβ peptides. MMP-7, one of the soluble-type matrix metalloproteinases, is expressed in hippocampal tissue; however, less information is available concerning the pathophysiological roles of this enzyme in the process and/or progress of Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we examined the degradation activity of MMP-7 against various Aβ1-42's fragment peptides and the effect of Cu 2+ . Although Aβ22-40 was degraded by MMP-7 regardless of Cu 2+ , Cu 2+ inhibited the degradation of Aβ1-19, Aβ11-20, and Aβ11-29 by MMP-7. These results indicate that MMP-7 is capable of degrading Aβ1-42, and that Aβ1-42 acquired resistance against MMP-7 cleavage through Cu 2+ -binding and structure changes. Our results demonstrate that MMP-7 may play an important role in the defensive mechanism against the aggregation of Aβ1-42, which gives rise to the pathology of AD.

  17. Lattice model for amyloid peptides: OPEP force field parametrization and applications to the nucleus size of Alzheimer’s peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Thanh Thuy; Nguyen, Phuong H., E-mail: phuong.nguyen@ibpc.fr; Derreumaux, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.derreumaux@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS, Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France)

    2016-05-28

    Coarse-grained protein lattice models approximate atomistic details and keep the essential interactions. They are, therefore, suitable for capturing generic features of protein folding and amyloid formation at low computational cost. As our aim is to study the critical nucleus sizes of two experimentally well-characterized peptide fragments Aβ{sub 16−22} and Aβ{sub 37−42} of the full length Aβ{sub 1−42} Alzheimer’s peptide, it is important that simulations with the lattice model reproduce all-atom simulations. In this study, we present a comprehensive force field parameterization based on the OPEP (Optimized Potential for Efficient protein structure Prediction) force field for an on-lattice protein model, which incorporates explicitly the formation of hydrogen bonds and directions of side-chains. Our bottom-up approach starts with the determination of the best lattice force parameters for the Aβ{sub 16−22} dimer by fitting its equilibrium parallel and anti-parallel β-sheet populations to all-atom simulation results. Surprisingly, the calibrated force field is transferable to the trimer of Aβ{sub 16−22} and the dimer and trimer of Aβ{sub 37−42}. Encouraged by this finding, we characterized the free energy landscapes of the two decamers. The dominant structure of the Aβ{sub 16−22} decamer matches the microcrystal structure. Pushing the simulations for aggregates between 4-mer and 12-mer suggests a nucleus size for fibril formation of 10 chains. In contrast, the Aβ{sub 37−42} decamer is largely disordered with mixed by parallel and antiparallel chains, suggesting that the nucleus size is >10 peptides. Our refined force field coupled to this on-lattice model should provide useful insights into the critical nucleation number associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. A role for 12/15 lipoxygenase in the amyloid beta precursor protein metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succol, Francesca; Praticò, Domenico

    2007-10-01

    12/15 Lipoxygenase (12/15LO) protein levels and activity are increased in pathologically affected regions of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains, compared with controls. Its metabolic products are elevated in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with AD and individuals with mild cognitive impairment, suggesting that this enzyme may be involved early in AD pathogenesis. Herein, we investigate the effect of pharmacologic inhibition of 12/15LO on the amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) metabolism. To this end, we used CHO and N2A cells stably expressing human APP with the Swedish mutant, and two structurally distinct and selective 12/15LO inhibitors, PD146176 and CDC. Our results demonstrated that both drugs dose-dependently reduced Abeta formation without affecting total APP levels. Interestingly, in the same cells we observed a significant reduction in secreted (s)APPbeta and beta-secretase (BACE), but not sAPPalpha and ADAM10 protein levels. Together, these data show for the first time that this enzymatic pathway influences Abeta formation whereby modulating the BACE proteolytic cascade. We conclude that specific pharmacologic inhibition of 12/15LO could represent a novel therapeutic target for treating or preventing AD pathology in humans.

  19. Biological markers of amyloid beta-related mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2012-02-01

    Recent research progress has given detailed knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD), which has been translated into an intense, ongoing development of disease-modifying treatments. Most new drug candidates are targeted on inhibiting amyloid beta (Abeta) production and aggregation. In drug development, it is important to co-develop biomarkers for Abeta-related mechanisms to enable early diagnosis and patient stratification in clinical trials, and to serve as tools to identify and monitor the biochemical effect of the drug directly in patients. Biomarkers are also requested by regulatory authorities to serve as safety measurements. Molecular aberrations in the AD brain are reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Core CSF biomarkers include Abeta isoforms (Abeta40\\/Abeta42), soluble APP isoforms, Abeta oligomers and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). This article reviews recent research advances on core candidate CSF and plasma Abeta-related biomarkers, and gives a conceptual review on how to implement biomarkers in clinical trials in AD.

  20. Biological markers of amyloid beta-related mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hampel, Harald

    2010-06-01

    Recent research progress has given detailed knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD), which has been translated into an intense, ongoing development of disease-modifying treatments. Most new drug candidates are targeted on inhibiting amyloid beta (Abeta) production and aggregation. In drug development, it is important to co-develop biomarkers for Abeta-related mechanisms to enable early diagnosis and patient stratification in clinical trials, and to serve as tools to identify and monitor the biochemical effect of the drug directly in patients. Biomarkers are also requested by regulatory authorities to serve as safety measurements. Molecular aberrations in the AD brain are reflected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Core CSF biomarkers include Abeta isoforms (Abeta40\\/Abeta42), soluble APP isoforms, Abeta oligomers and beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). This article reviews recent research advances on core candidate CSF and plasma Abeta-related biomarkers, and gives a conceptual review on how to implement biomarkers in clinical trials in AD.

  1. The effect of resveratrol on beta amyloid-induced memory impairment involves inhibition of phosphodiesterase-4 related signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Chen, Ling; Pan, Xiaoyu; Chen, Jiechun; Wang, Liqun; Wang, Weijie; Cheng, Ruochuan; Wu, Fan; Feng, Xiaoqing; Yu, Yingcong; Zhang, Han-Ting; O'Donnell, James M; Xu, Ying

    2016-04-05

    Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol found in red wine, has wide spectrum of pharmacological properties including antioxidative and antiaging activities. Beta amyloid peptides (Aβ) are known to involve cognitive impairment, neuroinflammatory and apoptotic processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Activation of cAMP and/or cGMP activities can improve memory performance and decrease the neuroinflammation and apoptosis. However, it remains unknown whether the memory enhancing effect of resveratrol on AD associated cognitive disorders is related to the inhibition of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) subtypes and subsequent increases in intracellular cAMP and/or cGMP activities. This study investigated the effect of resveratrol on Aβ1-42-induced cognitive impairment and the participation of PDE4 subtypes related cAMP or cGMP signaling. Mice microinfused with Aβ1-42 into bilateral CA1 subregions displayed learning and memory impairment, as evidenced by reduced memory acquisition and retrieval in the water maze and retention in the passive avoidance tasks; it was also significant that neuroinflammatory and pro-apoptotic factors were increased in Aβ1-42-treated mice. Aβ1-42-treated mice also increased in PDE4A, 4B and 4D expression, and decreased in PKA level. However, PKA inhibitor H89, but not PKG inhibitor KT5823, prevented resveratrol's effects on these parameters. Resveratrol also reversed Aβ1-42-induced decreases in phosphorylated cAMP response-element binding protein (pCREB), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and anti-apoptotic factor BCl-2 expression, which were reversed by H89. These findings suggest that resveratrol reversing Aβ-induced learning and memory disorder may involve the regulation of neuronal inflammation and apoptosis via PDE4 subtypes related cAMP-CREB-BDNF signaling.

  2. Repair of amyloid beta(25-35)-induced memory impairment and synaptic loss by a Kampo formula, Zokumei-to.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohda, Chihiro; Tamura, Takayuki; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2003-11-14

    Although Zokumei-to (ZMT), a Kampo formula, has been used for postapopletic sequelae such as paralysis and logopathy, only few studies of this drug have been carried out. We hypothesized that ZMT may affect neuronal plasticity and investigated whether or not this drug is capable of improving learning impairment and synaptic loss observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid beta(25-35) [Abeta(25-35)] (4.7 nmol) was intracerebroventricularly injected into ddY mice (male, 6 weeks old). Fourteen days after the injection, mice were given ZMT extract (500 mg/kg/day) per os for 15 days. In a memory acquisition test, the Abeta(25-35)-injected mice required more time to master this task than did mice in the saline- or reverse peptide Abeta(35-25)-treated groups. ZMT-treated mice shortened escape latencies during trial days 3-5, but not significantly. Three days after the last drug treatment, a retention test was performed. Following ZMT, the number of crossings over a platform was significantly decreased in Abeta(25-35)-injected mice compared with those in the control groups. However, ZMT-treated mice showed complete recovery of this number. Although Abeta(25-35) injection decreased synaptophysin expression in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus, ZMT treatment significantly increased the level of expression of synaptophysin up to the control level. Donepezil hydrochloride (DNP, 0.5 mg/kg/day, p.o.) clinically used for AD had no effect on memory retention and synaptophysin levels. Abeta(25-35)-induced neuronal loss was not observed in any region of the brain. The present results suggest that memory impairment and synaptic loss in AD patients may be improved by treatment with ZMT, even after such impairment has already progressed.

  3. Satureja bachtiarica ameliorate beta-amyloid induced memory impairment, oxidative stress and cholinergic deficit in animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soodi, Maliheh; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Hajimehdipoor, Homa; Dashti, Abolfazl; Sepand, Mohammad Reza; Moradi, Shahla

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular deposition of Beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is the main finding in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which damages cholinergic neurons through oxidative stress and reduces the cholinergic neurotransmission. Satureja bachtiarica is a medicinal plant from the Lamiaceae family which was widely used in Iranian traditional medicine. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible protective effects of S. bachtiarica methanolic extract on Aβ induced spatial memory impairment in Morris Water Maze (MWM), oxidative stress and cholinergic neuron degeneration. Pre- aggregated Aβ was injected into the hippocampus of each rat bilaterally (10 μg/rat) and MWM task was performed 14 days later to evaluate learning and memory function. Methanolic extract of S.bachtiarica (10, 50 and 100 mg/Kg) was injected intraperitoneally for 19 consecutive days, after Aβ injection. After the probe test the brain tissue were collected and lipid peroxidation, Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and Cholin Acetyl Transferees (ChAT) immunorectivity were measured in the hippocampus. Intrahipocampal injection of Aβ impaired learning and memory in MWM in training days and probe trail. Methanolic extract of S. bachtiarica (50 and 100 mg/Kg) could attenuate Aβ-induced memory deficit. ChAT immunostaining revealed that cholinergic neurons were loss in Aβ- injected group and S. bachtiarica (100 mg/Kg) could ameliorate Aβ- induced ChAT reduction in the hippocampus. Also S. bachtiarica could ameliorate Aβ-induced lipid peroxidation and AChE activity increase in the hippocampus. In conclusion our study represent that S.bachtiarica methanolic extract can improve Aβ-induced memory impairment and cholinergic loss then we recommended this extract as a candidate for further investigation in treatment of AD.

  4. Vascular remodeling versus amyloid beta-induced oxidative stress in the cerebrovascular dysfunctions associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xin-Kang; Nicolakakis, Nektaria; Kocharyan, Ara; Hamel, Edith

    2005-11-30

    The roles of oxidative stress and structural alterations in the cerebrovascular dysfunctions associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) were investigated in transgenic mice overexpressing amyloid precusor protein (APP+) or transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF+). Age-related impairments and their in vitro reversibility were evaluated, and underlying pathogenic mechanisms were assessed and compared with those seen in AD brains. Vasoconstrictions to 5-HT and endothelin-1 were preserved, except in the oldest (18-21 months of age) TGF+ mice. Despite unaltered relaxations to sodium nitroprusside, acetylcholine (ACh) and calcitonin gene-related peptide-mediated dilatations were impaired, and there was an age-related deficit in the basal availability of nitric oxide (NO) that progressed more gradually in TGF+ mice. The expression and progression of these deficits were unrelated to the onset or extent of thioflavin-S-positive vessels. Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) was upregulated in pial vessels and around brain microvessels of APP+ mice, pointing to a role of superoxide in the dysfunctions elicited by amyloidosis. In contrast, vascular wall remodeling associated with decreased levels of endothelial NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 and increased contents of vascular endothelial growth factor and collagen-I and -IV characterized TGF+ mice. Exogenous SOD or catalase normalized ACh dilatations and NO availability in vessels from aged APP+ mice but had no effect in those of TGF+ mice. Increased perivascular oxidative stress was not evidenced in AD brains, but vascular wall alterations compared well with those seen in TGF+ mice. We conclude that brain vessel remodeling and associated alterations in levels of vasoactive signaling molecules are key contributors to AD cerebrovascular dysfunctions.

  5. Natural Amyloid-Beta Oligomers Acutely Impair the Formation of a Contextual Fear Memory in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittelberger, Kara A.; Piazza, Fabrizio; Tesco, Giuseppina; Reijmers, Leon G.

    2012-01-01

    Memory loss is one of the hallmark symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been proposed that soluble amyloid-beta (Abeta) oligomers acutely impair neuronal function and thereby memory. We here report that natural Abeta oligomers acutely impair contextual fear memory in mice. A natural Abeta oligomer solution containing Abeta monomers, dimers, trimers, and tetramers was derived from the conditioned medium of 7PA2 cells, a cell line that expresses human amyloid precursor protein containing the Val717Phe familial AD mutation. As a control we used 7PA2 conditioned medium from which Abeta oligomers were removed through immunodepletion. Separate groups of mice were injected with Abeta and control solutions through a cannula into the lateral brain ventricle, and subjected to fear conditioning using two tone-shock pairings. One day after fear conditioning, mice were tested for contextual fear memory and tone fear memory in separate retrieval trials. Three experiments were performed. For experiment 1, mice were injected three times: 1 hour before and 3 hours after fear conditioning, and 1 hour before context retrieval. For experiments 2 and 3, mice were injected a single time at 1 hour and 2 hours before fear conditioning respectively. In all three experiments there was no effect on tone fear memory. Injection of Abeta 1 hour before fear conditioning, but not 2 hours before fear conditioning, impaired the formation of a contextual fear memory. In future studies, the acute effect of natural Abeta oligomers on contextual fear memory can be used to identify potential mechanisms and treatments of AD associated memory loss. PMID:22238679

  6. HIV-1 stimulates nuclear entry of amyloid beta via dynamin dependent EEA1 and TGF-β/Smad signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Clinical evidence indicates increased amyloid deposition in HIV-1-infected brains, which contributes to neurocognitive dysfunction in infected patients. Here we show that HIV-1 exposure stimulates amyloid beta (Aβ) nuclear entry in human brain endothelial cells (HBMEC), the main component of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Treatment with HIV-1 and/or Aβ resulted in concurrent increase in early endosomal antigen-1 (EEA1), Smad, and phosphorylated Smad (pSmad) in nuclear fraction of HBMEC. A series of inhibition and silencing studies indicated that Smad and EEA1 closely interact by influencing their own nuclear entry; the effect that was attenuated by dynasore, a blocker of GTP-ase activity of dynamin. Importantly, inhibition of dynamin, EEA1, or TGF-β/Smad effectively attenuated HIV-1-induced Aβ accumulation in the nuclei of HBMEC. The present study indicates that nuclear uptake of Aβ involves the dynamin-dependent EEA1 and TGF-β/Smad signaling pathways. These results identify potential novel targets to protect against HIV-1-associated dysregulation of amyloid processes at the BBB level. - Highlights: • HIV-1 induces nuclear accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) in brain endothelial cells. • EEA-1 and TGF-Β/Smad act in concert to regulate nuclear entry of Aβ. • Dynamin appropriates the EEA-1 and TGF-Β/Smad signaling. • Dynamin serves as a master regulator of HIV-1-induced nuclear accumulation of Aβ

  7. Antimicrobial peptide (Cn-AMP2) from liquid endosperm of Cocos nucifera forms amyloid-like fibrillar structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gour, Shalini; Kaushik, Vibha; Kumar, Vijay; Bhat, Priyanka; Yadav, Subhash C; Yadav, Jay K

    2016-04-01

    Cn-AMP2 is an antimicrobial peptide derived from liquid endosperm of coconut (Cocos nucifera). It consists of 11 amino acid residues and predicted to have high propensity for β-sheet formation that disposes this peptide to be amyloidogenic. In the present study, we have examined the amyloidogenic propensities of Cn-AMP2 in silico and then tested the predictions under in vitro conditions. The in silico study revealed that the peptide possesses high amyloidogenic propensity comparable with Aβ. Upon solubilisation and agitation in aqueous buffer, Cn-AMP2 forms visible aggregates that display bathochromic shift in the Congo red absorbance spectra, strong increase in thioflavin T fluorescence and fibrillar morphology under transmission electron microscopy. All these properties are typical of an amyloid fibril derived from various proteins/peptides including Aβ. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Peptides of presenilin-1 bind the amyloid precursor protein ectodomain and offer a novel and specific therapeutic approach to reduce ß-amyloid in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewji, Nazneen N; Singer, S Jonathan; Masliah, Eliezer; Rockenstein, Edward; Kim, Mihyun; Harber, Martha; Horwood, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    β-Amyloid (Aβ) accumulation in the brain is widely accepted to be critical to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Current efforts at reducing toxic Aβ40 or 42 have largely focused on modulating γ-secretase activity to produce shorter, less toxic Aβ, while attempting to spare other secretase functions. In this paper we provide data that offer the potential for a new approach for the treatment of AD. The method is based on our previous findings that the production of Aβ from the interaction between the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Presenilin (PS), as part of the γ-secretase complex, in cell culture is largely inhibited if the entire water-soluble NH2-terminal domain of PS is first added to the culture. Here we demonstrate that two small, non-overlapping water-soluble peptides from the PS-1 NH2-terminal domain can substantially and specifically inhibit the production of total Aβ as well as Aβ40 and 42 in vitro and in vivo in the brains of APP transgenic mice. These results suggest that the inhibitory activity of the entire amino terminal domain of PS-1 on Aβ production is largely focused in a few smaller sequences within that domain. Using biolayer interferometry and confocal microscopy we provide evidence that peptides effective in reducing Aβ give a strong, specific and biologically relevant binding with the purified ectodomain of APP 695. Finally, we demonstrate that the reduction of Aβ by the peptides does not affect the catalytic activities of β- or γ-secretase, or the level of APP. P4 and P8 are the first reported protein site-specific small peptides to reduce Aβ production in model systems of AD. These peptides and their derivatives offer new potential drug candidates for the treatment of AD.

  9. Oil Palm Phenolics Inhibit the In Vitro Aggregation of β-Amyloid Peptide into Oligomeric Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Weinberg

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease is a severe neurodegenerative disease characterized by the aggregation of amyloidpeptide (Aβ into toxic oligomers which activate microglia and astrocytes causing acute neuroinflammation. Multiple studies show that the soluble oligomers of Aβ42 are neurotoxic and proinflammatory, whereas the monomers and insoluble fibrils are relatively nontoxic. We show that Aβ42 aggregation is inhibited in vitro by oil palm phenolics (OPP, an aqueous extract from the oil palm tree (Elaeis guineensis. The data shows that OPP inhibits stacking of β-pleated sheets, which is essential for oligomerization. We demonstrate the inhibition of Aβ42 aggregation by (1 mass spectrometry; (2 Congo Red dye binding; (3 2D-IR spectroscopy; (4 dynamic light scattering; (5 transmission electron microscopy; and (6 transgenic yeast rescue assay. In the yeast rescue assay, OPP significantly reduces the cytotoxicity of aggregating neuropeptides in yeast genetically engineered to overexpress these peptides. The data shows that OPP inhibits (1 the aggregation of Aβ into oligomers; (2 stacking of β-pleated sheets; and (3 fibrillar growth and coalescence. These inhibitory effects prevent the formation of neurotoxic oligomers and hold potential as a means to reduce neuroinflammation and neuronal death and thereby may play some role in the prevention or treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

  10. Modeling clustered activity increase in amyloid-beta positron emission tomographic images with statistical descriptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhi S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sepideh Shokouhi,1 Baxter P Rogers,1 Hakmook Kang,2 Zhaohua Ding,1 Daniel O Claassen,3 John W Mckay,1 William R Riddle1On behalf of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative1Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science, 2Department of Biostatistics, 3Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USABackground: Amyloid-beta (Aβ imaging with positron emission tomography (PET holds promise for detecting the presence of Aβ plaques in the cortical gray matter. Many image analyses focus on regional average measurements of tracer activity distribution; however, considerable additional information is available in the images. Metrics that describe the statistical properties of images, such as the two-point correlation function (S2, have found wide applications in astronomy and materials science. S2 provides a detailed characterization of spatial patterns in images typically referred to as clustering or flocculence. The objective of this study was to translate the two-point correlation method into Aβ-PET of the human brain using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB to characterize longitudinal changes in the tracer distribution that may reflect changes in Aβ plaque accumulation.Methods: We modified the conventional S2 metric, which is primarily used for binary images and formulated a weighted two-point correlation function (wS2 to describe nonbinary, real-valued PET images with a single statistical function. Using serial 11C-PiB scans, we calculated wS2 functions from two-dimensional PET images of different cortical regions as well as three-dimensional data from the whole brain. The area under the wS2 functions was calculated and compared with the mean/median of the standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR. For three-dimensional data, we compared the area under the wS2 curves with the subjects’ cerebrospinal fluid measures.Results: Overall, the longitudinal changes in wS2

  11. Nicotine and methyl vinyl ketone, major components of cigarette smoke extracts, increase protective amyloidpeptides in cells harboring amyloid-β precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Yoichi; Iwata, Kazumi; Ibi, Masakazu; Matsumoto, Misaki; Katsuyama, Masato; Yabe-Nishimura, Chihiro

    2018-01-01

    The increased ratio of longer amyloid-β (Aβ1-42)/shorter amyloid-β (Aβ1-40) peptides, generated from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is known to promote the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate the role of smoking in Aβ production, we determined the production of Aβ species in the presence of nicotine or methyl vinyl ketone (MVK), major components of cigarette smoke extracts, in Flp-In ™ T-REx ™ -293 (T-REx293) cells harboring a single copy of human APP. While treatment with nicotine or MVK did not affect the amount of APP, the levels of Aβ1-40 in the culture media were significantly increased. On the other hand, the levels of Aβ1-42 were unaltered by nicotine or MVK treatment. The Aβ1-42/Aβ1-40 ratio was therefore attenuated by cigarette smoke extracts. Similar results were obtained in T-REx293 cells harboring APP of Swedish- or London-type mutation linked to familial AD. T-REx293 cells expressed the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAchR) and tubocurarine, an nAChR antagonist, completely blocked the effects of nicotine. Treatment with nicotine significantly elevated cellular levels of β-secretase that cleaves APP prior to Aβ generation. Taken together, a protective role of nicotine against AD pathology was suggested by enhanced extracellular Aβ1-40 production, which may suppress Aβ fibrillogenesis.

  12. Expression and purification of 15N- and 13C-isotope labeled 40-residue human Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide for NMR-based structural analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Fei; Cho, Wonhwa; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) are a primary component of amyloid plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Enormous attention has been given to the structural features and functions of Aβ in amyloid fibrils and other type of aggregates in associated with development of AD. This report describes an efficient protocol to express and purify high-quality 40-residue Aβ(1–40), the most abundant Aβ in brains, for structural studies by NMR spectroscopy. Over-expression ...

  13. Aluminum complexing enhances amyloid beta protein penetration of blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, William A; Niehoff, Michael L; Drago, Denise; Zatta, Paolo

    2006-10-20

    A significant co-morbidity of Alzheimer's disease and cerebrovascular impairment suggests that cerebrovascular dysregulation is an important feature of dementia. Amyloid beta protein (Abeta), a relevant risk factor in Alzheimer's disease, has neurotoxic properties and is thought to play a critical role in the cognitive impairments. Previously, we demonstrated that the 42mer of Abeta (Abeta42) complexed with aluminum (Al-Abeta42) is much more cytotoxic than non-complexed Abeta42. The level of Abeta in the brain is a balance between synthesis, degradation, and fluxes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the present paper, we determined whether complexing with aluminum affected the ability of radioactively iodinated Abeta to cross the in vivo BBB. We found that the rates of uptake of Al-Abeta42 and Abeta42 were similar, but that Al-Abeta42 was sequestered by brain endothelial cells much less than Abeta42 and so more readily entered the parenchymal space of the brain. Al-Abeta42 also had a longer half-life in blood and had increased permeation at the striatum and thalamus. Brain-to-blood transport was similar for Al-Abeta42 and Abeta42. In conclusion, complexing with aluminum affects some aspects of blood-to-brain permeability so that Al-Abeta42 would have more ready access to brain cells than Abeta42.

  14. Amyloid-Beta Induced Changes in Vesicular Transport of BDNF in Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Seifert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurotrophin brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is an important growth factor in the CNS. Deficits in transport of this secretory protein could underlie neurodegenerative diseases. Investigation of disease-related changes in BDNF transport might provide insights into the cellular mechanism underlying, for example, Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To analyze the role of BDNF transport in AD, live cell imaging of fluorescently labeled BDNF was performed in hippocampal neurons of different AD model systems. BDNF and APP colocalized with low incidence in vesicular structures. Anterograde as well as retrograde transport of BDNF vesicles was reduced and these effects were mediated by factors released from hippocampal neurons into the extracellular medium. Transport of BDNF was altered at a very early time point after onset of human APP expression or after acute amyloid-beta(1-42 treatment, while the activity-dependent release of BDNF remained unaffected. Taken together, extracellular cleavage products of APP induced rapid changes in anterograde and retrograde transport of BDNF-containing vesicles while release of BDNF was unaffected by transgenic expression of mutated APP. These early transport deficits might lead to permanently impaired brain functions in the adult brain.

  15. Kinetic analysis of IgG antibodies to beta-amyloid oligomers with surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisostomo, Amanda C; Dang, Loan; Digambaranath, Jyothi L; Klaver, Andrea C; Loeffler, David A; Payne, Jeremiah J; Smith, Lynnae M; Yokom, Adam L; Finke, John M

    2015-07-15

    Surface plasmon resonance was used to investigate the kinetics, affinity, and specificity of binding between anti-Aβ (beta-amyloid) IgG antibodies and oligomeric Aβ. Two factors were needed to accurately characterize the IgG binding kinetics. First, a bivalent model was necessary to properly fit the kinetic association and dissociation sensograms. Second, a high concentration of IgG was necessary to overcome a significant mass transport limitation that existed regardless of oligomer density on the sensor surface. Using high IgG concentrations and bivalent fits, consistent kinetic parameters were found at varying sensor surface ligand densities. A comparison of binding specificity, affinity, and kinetic flux between monoclonal and natural human anti-Aβ IgG antibodies revealed the following findings. First, monoclonal antibodies 6E10 and 4G8 single-site binding affinity is similar between Aβ oligomers and monomers. Second, natural human anti-Aβ IgG binding readily binds Aβ oligomers but does not bind monomers. Third, natural human anti-Aβ IgG binds Aβ oligomers with a higher affinity and kinetic flux than 6E10 and 4G8. Both the current analytical methodology and antibody binding profiles are important for advances in antibody drug development and kinetic biomarker applications for Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rationally Designed Peptides and Peptidomimetics as Inhibitors of Amyloid-β (Aβ) Aggregation: Potential Therapeutics of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Deepti; Shuaib, Suniba; Mann, Sukhmani; Goyal, Bhupesh

    2017-02-13

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with no clinically accepted treatment to cure or halt its progression. The worldwide effort to develop peptide-based inhibitors of amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation can be considered an unplanned combinatorial experiment. An understanding of what has been done and achieved may advance our understanding of AD pathology and the discovery of effective therapeutic agents. We review here the history of such peptide-based inhibitors, including those based on the Aβ sequence and those not derived from that sequence, containing both natural and unnatural amino acid building blocks. Peptide-based aggregation inhibitors hold significant promise for future AD therapy owing to their high selectivity, effectiveness, low toxicity, good tolerance, low accumulation in tissues, high chemical and biological diversity, possibility of rational design, and highly developed methods for analyzing their mode of action, proteolytic stability (modified peptides), and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability.

  17. Neurotrophic and Neurotoxic Effects of Amyloid |beta Protein: Reversal by Tachykinin Neuropeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankner, Bruce A.; Duffy, Lawrence K.; Kirschner, Daniel A.

    1990-10-01

    The amyloid β protein is deposited in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease but its pathogenic role is unknown. In culture, the amyloid β protein was neurotrophic to undifferentiated hippocampal neurons at low concentrations and neurotoxic to mature neurons at higher concentrations. In differentiated neurons, amyloid β protein caused dendritic and axonal retraction followed by neuronal death. A portion of the amyloid β protein (amino acids 25 to 35) mediated both the trophic and toxic effects and was homologous to the tachykinin neuropeptide family. The effects of the amyloid β protein were mimicked by tachykinin antagonists and completely reversed by specific tachykinin agonists. Thus, the amyloid β protein could function as a neurotrophic factor for differentiating neurons, but at high concentrations in mature neurons, as in Alzheimer's disease, could cause neuronal degeneration.

  18. A carrier for non-covalent delivery of functional beta-galactosidase and antibodies against amyloid plaques and IgM to the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobinda Sarkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapeutic intervention of numerous brain-associated disorders currently remains unrealized due to serious limitations imposed by the blood-brain-barrier (BBB. The BBB generally allows transport of small molecules, typically <600 daltons with high octanol/water partition coefficients, but denies passage to most larger molecules. However, some receptors present on the BBB allow passage of cognate proteins to the brain. Utilizing such receptor-ligand systems, several investigators have developed methods for delivering proteins to the brain, a critical requirement of which involves covalent linking of the target protein to a carrier entity. Such covalent modifications involve extensive preparative and post-preparative chemistry that poses daunting limitations in the context of delivery to any organ. Here, we report creation of a 36-amino acid peptide transporter, which can transport a protein to the brain after routine intravenous injection of the transporter-protein mixture. No covalent linkage of the protein with the transporter is necessary. APPROACH: A peptide transporter comprising sixteen lysine residues and 20 amino acids corresponding to the LDLR-binding domain of apolipoprotein E (ApoE was synthesized. Transport of beta-galactosidase, IgG, IgM, and antibodies against amyloid plques to the brain upon iv injection of the protein-transporter mixture was evaluated through staining for enzyme activity or micro single photon emission tomography (micro-SPECT or immunostaining. Effect of the transporter on the integrity of the BBB was also investigated. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The transporter enabled delivery to the mouse brain of functional beta-galactosidase, human IgG and IgM, and two antibodies that labeled brain-associated amyloid beta plaques in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest the transporter is able to transport most or all proteins to the brain without the need for chemically linking the

  19. Cartilage acidic protein 1, a new member of the beta-propeller protein family with amyloid propensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Liliana; Morgado, Isabel; Guerreiro, Marta; Cardoso, João C R; Melo, Eduardo P; Power, Deborah M

    2017-02-01

    Cartilage acidic protein1 (CRTAC1) is an extracellular matrix protein of chondrogenic tissue in humans and its presence in bacteria indicate it is of ancient origin. Structural modeling of piscine CRTAC1 reveals it belongs to the large family of beta-propeller proteins that in mammals have been associated with diseases, including amyloid diseases such as Alzheimer's. In order to characterize the structure/function evolution of this new member of the beta-propeller family we exploited the unique characteristics of piscine duplicate genes Crtac1a and Crtac1b and compared their structural and biochemical modifications with human recombinant CRTAC1. We demonstrate that CRTAC1 has a beta-propeller structure that has been conserved during evolution and easily forms high molecular weight thermo-stable aggregates. We reveal for the first time the propensity of CRTAC1 to form amyloid-like structures, and hypothesize that the aggregating property of CRTAC1 may be related to its disease-association. We further contribute to the general understating of CRTAC1's and beta-propeller family evolution and function. Proteins 2017; 85:242-255. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Stimulation of autophagy prevents amyloidpeptide-induced neuritic degeneration in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Chen, Sicong; Zhang, Jiafeng; Li, Chentan; Sun, Yonghong; Zhang, Lihui; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative process essential for neuronal homeostasis, whereas autophagic failure has been linked to accumulating neurodegenerative disorders. However, the precise role of autophagy in axonal and dendritic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains unclear. In this study, we aim to investigate the precise effect of autophagy in amyloidpeptide (Aβ)25-35-mediated neurite degeneration. Aβ35-25, the non-neurotoxic reverse sequence analogue of Aβ25-35, was used as a negative control. Our results showed that Aβ25-35 dose-dependently suppressed PC12 proliferation and induced autophagy induction in neurites (axons and dendrites). A high proportion of autophagic structures in PC12 neurites were autolysosomes after 24 h of Aβ25-35 treatment. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3MA), LY294002, and chloroquine (CQ) could not relieve the Aβ25-35-induced neurite degeneration, while administration of autophagy stimulator rapamycin or AR-12 efficiently suppressed neurite degeneration. Autophagosomes colocalized with fragmented mitochondria after Aβ25-35 treatment. Similar results were obtained using in vitro cultured superior cervical ganglion neurons. These findings demonstrate that autophagy stimulation may prevent neuritic degeneration following Aβ25-35 treatment. Upregulation of autophagic activity may provide a valuable approach for the treatment of axonal and dendritic dystrophy in AD patients.

  1. Metabolic Characterization of Intact Cells Reveals Intracellular Amyloid Beta but Not Its Precursor Protein to Reduce Mitochondrial Respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick M Schaefer

    Full Text Available One hallmark of Alzheimer´s disease are senile plaques consisting of amyloid beta (Aβ, which derives from the processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer´s disease and both Aβ and APP have been reported to affect mitochondrial function in isolated systems. However, in intact cells, considering a physiological localization of APP and Aβ, it is pending what triggers the mitochondrial defect. Thus, the aim of this study was to dissect the impact of APP versus Aβ in inducing mitochondrial alterations with respect to their subcellular localization. We performed an overexpression of APP or beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1, increasing APP and Aβ levels or Aβ alone, respectively. Conducting a comprehensive metabolic characterization we demonstrate that only APP overexpression reduced mitochondrial respiration, despite lower extracellular Aβ levels compared to BACE overexpression. Surprisingly, this could be rescued by a gamma secretase inhibitor, oppositionally indicating an Aβ-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. Analyzing Aβ localization revealed that intracellular levels of Aβ and an increased spatial association of APP/Aβ with mitochondria are associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration. Thus, our data provide marked evidence for a prominent role of intracellular Aβ accumulation in Alzheimer´s disease associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Thereby it highlights the importance of the localization of APP processing and intracellular transport as a decisive factor for mitochondrial function, linking two prominent hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Spatial patterns of brain amyloid-beta burden and atrophy rate associations in mild cognitive impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tosun, Duygu; Schuff, Norbert; Mathis, Chester A.; Jagust, William; Weiner, Michael W.; Saradha, A.; Abdi, Herve; Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Abeliovich, Asa; Abellan van Kan, Gabor; Abner, Erin; Acharya, Deepa; Agrusti, Antonella; Agyemang, Alex; Ahdidan, Jamila; Ahmed, Shiek; Ahn, Jae Eun; Aisen, Paul; Aksu, Yaman; Al-Akhras, Mousa; Alarcon, Marcelo; Alberca, Roman; Alexander, Gene; Alexander, Daniel; Alin, Aylin; Almeida, Fabio; Amlien, Inge; Anand, Shyam; Anderson, Dallas; Andrew, Marilee; Angersbach, Steve; Anjum, Ayesha; Aoyama, Eiji; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Armor, Tom; Arnold, Steven; Arunagiri, Vidhya; Asatryan, Albert; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Ashiga, Hirokazu; Assareh, Arezoo; Le Page, Aurelie; Avants, Brian; Avinash, Gopal; Aviv, Richard; Awasthi, Sukrati; Ayan-Oshodi, Mosun; Babic, Tomislav; Baek, Young; Bagci, Ulas; Bai, Shuyang; Baird, Geoffrey; Baker, John; Banks, Sarah; Bard, Jonathan; Barnes, Josephine; Bartlett, Jonathan; Bartzokis, George; Barua, Neil; Bauer, Corinna; Bayley, Peter; Beck, Irene; Becker, James; Becker, J. Alex; Beckett, Laurel; Bednar, Martin; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Bek, Stephan; Belaroussi, Boubakeur; Belmokhtar, Nabil; Bernard, Charlotte; Bertram, Lars; Bhaskar, Uday; Biffi, Alessandro; Bigler, Erin; Bilgic, Basar; Bishop, Courtney; Bittner, Daniel; Black, Ronald; Bogorodzki, Piotr; Bokde, Arun; Bonner-Jackson, Aaron; Boppana, Madhu; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Bowes, Mike; Bowman, DuBois; Bowman, Gene; Braskie, Meredith; Braunewell, Karl; Breitner, Joihn; Bresell, Anders; Brewer, James; Brickman, Adam; Britschgi, Markus; Broadbent, Steve; Brogren, Jacob; Brooks, David; Browndyke, Jeffrey; Brunton, Simon; Buchert, Ralph; Buchsbaum, Monte; Buckley, Chris; Buerger, Katharina; Burger, Cyrill; Burnham, Samantha; Burns, Jeffrey; Burton, David; Butman, John; Cabeza, Rafael; Cairns, Nigel; Callhoff, Johanna; Calvini, Piero; Cantillon, Marc; Capella, Heraldo; Carbotti, Angela; Cardona-Sanclemente, Luis Eduardo; Carle, Adam; Carmasin, Jeremy; Carranza-Ath, Fredy; Casabianca, Jodi; Casanova, Ramon; Cash, David; Cedarbaum, Jesse; Cella, Massimo; Celsis, Pierre; Chanu, Pascal; Chao, Linda; Charil, Arnaud; Chemali, Zeina; Chen, Rong; Chen, Jake; Chen, Gennan; Chen, Wei; Chen, Kewei; Chen, Shuzhong; Chen, Minhua; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Cherkas, Yauheniya; Chertkow, Howard; Cheung, Charlton; Cheung, Vinci; Chiang, Gloria; Chiba, Koji; Chin, Simon; Chisholm, Jane; Cho, Youngsang; Choe, John; Choubey, Suresh; Chowbina, Sudhir; Christensen, Anette Luther; Clark, David; Clark, Chris; Clarkson, Matt; Clayton, David; Clunie, David; Coen, Michael; Coimbra, Alexandre; Compton, David; Coppola, Giovanni; Coulin, Samuel; Cover, Keith S.; Crane, Paul; Crans, Gerald; Croop, Robert; Crowther, Daniel; Crum, William; Cui, Yue; Curry, Charles; Curtis, Steven; Cutter, Gary; Daiello, Lori; Dake, Michael; Dale, Anders; Daliri, Mohammad Reza; Damato, Vito Domenico; Darby, Eveleen; Darkner, Sune; Davatzikos, Christos; Dave, Jay; David, Renaud; DavidPrakash, Bhaskaran; Davidson, Julie; de Bruijne, Marleen; de Meyer, Geert; de Nunzio, Giorgio; Decarli, Charles; Dechairo, Bryan; DeDuck, Kristina; Dehghan, Hossein; Dejkam, Arsalan; Delfino, Manuel; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Dellavedova, Luca; Delpassand, Ebrahim; Delrieu, Julien; DeOrchis, Vincent; Depy Carron, Delphine; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Devanand, Davangere; Devanarayan, Viswanath; DeVous, Michael; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Bradford, Dickerson; Ding, Xiaobo; Dinov, Ivo; Dobson, Howard; Dodge, Hiroko; Donohue, Michael; Dore, Vincent; Dorflinger, Ernest; Dowling, Maritza; Duan, Xujun; Dubal, Dena; Duchesne, Simon; Duff, Kevin; Dukart, Jrgen; Durazzo, Timothy; Dykstra, Kevin; Earl, Nancy; Edula, Goutham; Ekin, Ahmet; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; Emahazion, Tesfai; Engelman, Corinne; Epstein, Noam; Erten-Lyons, Deniz; Eskildsen, Simon; Falcone, Guido; Fan, Lingzhong; Fan, Yong; Farahibozorg, Seyedehrezvan; Farb, Norman; Farnum, Michael; Farrer, Lindsay; Farzan, Ali; Faux, Noel; Feldman, Betsy; Feldman, Howard; Feldman, Susan; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Fernandes, Michel; Fernandez, Elsa; Ferrarini, Luca; Ferreira, Manuel Joao; Ferrer, Eugene; Figurski, Michal; Filipovych, Roman; Fillit, Howard; Finch, Stephen; Finlay, Daniel; Fiot, Jean-Baptiste; Flenniken, Derek; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Fletcher, Evan; Flynn Longmire, Crystal; Focke, Niels; Forman, Mark; Forsythe, Alan; Fox, Steven; Fox-Bosetti, Sabrina; Francis, Alexander L.; Franco-Villalobos, Conrado; Franko, Edit; Freeman, Stefanie; Friedrich, Christoph M.; Friesenhahn, Michel; Frings, Lars; Frisoni, Giovanni; Fritzsche, Klaus; Fujimoto, Yoko; Fujiwara, Ken; Fullerton, Terence; Furney, Simon; Gallins, Paul; Galvin, Ben; Gamst, Anthony; Gan, Ke; Garcia, Maria Teresa; Garg, Gaurav; Gaser, Christian; Gastineau, Edward; Gauthier, Serge; Gavett, Brandon; Gavidia, Giovana; Gazdzinski, Stefan; Ge, Qi; Ge, Tian; Gemme, Gianluca; Geraci, Joseph; Ghassabi, Zeinab; Gieschke, Ronald; Gil, Juan E.; Gill, Ryan; Gitelman, Darren; Gleason, Carey; Glymour, M. Maria; Godbey, Michael; Goghari, Vina; Gold, Michael; Goldberg, Terry; Goldman, Jennifer; Gomeni, Roberto; Gong, Shangwenyan; Gonzales, Celedon; Goodro, Robert; Gordon, Brian; Gore, Chris; Gorriz, Juan Manuel; Grachev, Igor; Grandey, Emily; Grasela, Thaddeus; Gratt, Jeremy; Gray, Katherine; Greenberg, Barry; Gregg, Keith; Gregory, Erik; Greicius, Michael; Greve, Douglas; Grill, Joshua; Gross, Alden; Gross, Alan; Guignot, Isabelle; Guo, Jeffrey; Guo, Qimiao; Guo, Hongbin; Guo, Lianghao; Habeck, Christian; Hai, Yizhen; Haight, Thaddeus; Hammarstrom, Per; Hampel, Harald; Han, Duke; Han, Jian; Han, Tony; Hanif, Muhammad; Hanna, Yousef; Hardy, Peter; Harvey, Danielle; Hasan, Md Kamrul; Hayashi, Toshihiro; Hazart, Aurelien; He, Huiguang; He, Yong; Head, Denise; Heckemann, Rolf; Heidebrink, Judith; Henderson, David; Henrard, Sebastien; Herholz, Karl; Hernandez, Monica; Herskovits, A. Zara; Hess, Christopher; Hildenbrand, Maike; Hobart, Jeremy; Hoffman, John; Holder, Daniel; Hollingworth, Paul; Holmes, Robin; Honigberg, Lee; Hoppin, Jack; Hou, Yangyang; Hsu, Ailing; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Hu, Xiaolan; Hu, Zhiwei; Hu, William; Huang, Juebin; Huang, Chien-Chih; Huang, Chingwen; Huang, Shuai; Huang, Yifan; Huang, Fude; Huang, Chun-Jung; Huang, Shu-Pang; Hubbard, Rebecca; Huentelman, Matthew; Hui, Shen; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Hurko, Orest; Hurt, Stephen; Huyck, Susan; Hwang, Scott; Hyun, JungMoon; Ifeachor, Emmanuel; Iglesias, Martina; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki; Imani, Farzin; Immermann, Fred; Inlow, Mark; Inoue, Lurdes; Insel, Philip; Irizarry, Michael; Irungu, Benson mwangi; Ishibashi, Taro; Ishii, Kenji; Ismail, Sara; Ismail, Shahina; Ito, Kaori; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Jacobson, Mark; Jacqmin, Philippe; Jafari, Aria; Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Jaffe, Carl; Jara, Hernan; Jasperse, Bas; Jedynak, Bruno; Jefferson, Angela; Jennings, J. Richard; Jessen, Walter; Jia, Fucang; Jiang, Tianzi; Jing, Huang; Johnson, Julene; Johnson, Sterling; Johnson, David K.; Jones, Richard; Juengling, Freimut; Juh, Rahyeong; Julin, Per; Kadish, Bill; Kahle-Wrobleski, Kristin; Kallam, Hanimi Reddy; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Kaneko, Tomoki; Kaneta, Tomohiro; Kang, Ju Hee; Karageorgiou, Elissaios; Karantzoulis, Stella; Karlawish, Jason; Katz, Elyse; Kaushik, Sandeep S.; Kauwe, John; Kawakami, Hirofumi; Kazimipoor, Borhan; Kelleher, Thomas; Kennedy, Richard; Kerchner, Geoffrey; Kerrouche, Nacer; Khalil, Iya; Khalil, Andre; Killeen, Neil; Killiany, Ron; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Heeyoung; Kim, Ana; Kim, Yeonhee; Kim, Hyoungkyu; Kim, Seongkyun; Kim, Hyewon; Kimberg, Daniel; Kimura, Tokunori; King, Richard; Kirby, Justin; Kirsch, Wolff; Klimas, Michael; Kline, Richard; Kling, Mitchel; Klopfenstein, Erin; Koikkalainen, Juha; Kokomoor, Anders; Kolasny, Anthony; Koppel, Jeremy; Korolev, Igor; Kotran, Nickolas; Kouassi, Alex; Kowalczyk, Adam; Kozma, Lynn; Krams, Michael; Kratzer, Martina; Kuceyeski, Amy; Kuhn, Felix Pierre; Kumar, Sreedhar; Kuo, Hsun Ting; Kuo, Julie; Kurosawa, Ken; Kwon, Oh Hun; Labrish, Catherine; Laforet, Genevieve; Lai, Song; Lakatos, Anita; Lam, On Ki; Lampron, Antoine; Landau, Susan; Landen, Jaren; Lane, Richard; Langbaum, Jessica; Langford, Dianne; Lanius, Vivian; Laxamana, Joel; Le, Trung; Leahy, Richard; Lee, Jong-Min; Lee, Vita; Lee, Joseph H.; Lee, Grace; Lee, Dongsoo; Lee, Noah; Lefkimmiatis, Stamatis; Lemaitre, Herve; Lenfant, Pierre; Lenz, Robert; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie; Lester, Gayle; Levey, Allan; Li, Shi-jiang; Li, Shanshan; Li, Wenjun; Li, Chin-Shang; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Rui; Li, Ming; Li, Lexin; Li, Jinhe; Li, Yi; Li, Quanzheng; Li, Gang; Liang, Kuchang; Liang, Peipeng; Liang, Lichen; Liao, Yuan-Lin; Lin, Ling-chih; Lin, Lan; Lin, Mingkuan; Lin, Ai-Ling; Liu, Songling; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Tianming; Liu, Meijie; Liu, Xiuwen; Liu, Li; Liu, Honggang; Liu, Pu; Liu, Tao; Liu, Sophia; Liu, Dazhong; Lo, Raymond; Lobanov, Victor; Loewenstein, David; Logovinsky, Veronika; Long, Xiaojing; Long, Ziyi; Looi, Jeffrey; Lu, Po-Haong; Lukic, Ana; Lull, Juan J.; Luo, Xiongjian; Lynch, John; Ma, Lei; Mackin, Scott; Mada, Marius; Magda, Sebastian; Maglio, Silvio; Maikusa, Norihide; Mak, Henry Ka-Fung; Malave, Vicente; Maldjian, Joseph; Mandal, Pravat; Mangin, Jean-Francois; Manjon, Jose; Mantri, Ninad; Manzour, Amir; Marambaud, Philippe; Marchewka, Artur; Marek, Kenneth; Markind, Samuel; Marshall, Gad; Martinez Torteya, Antonio; Mather, Mara; Mathis, Chester; Matoug, Sofia; Matsuo, Yoshiyuki; Mattei, Peter; Matthews, Dawn; McArdle, John; McCarroll, Steven; McEvoy, Linda; McGeown, William; McGonigle, John; McIntyre, John; McLaren, Donald; McQuail, Joseph; Meadowcroft, Mark; Meda, Shashwath; Mehta, Nirav; Melie-Garcia, Lester; Melrose, Rebecca; Mendonca, Brian; Menendez, Manuel; Meredith, Jere; Merrill, David; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Metti, Andrea; Meyer, Carsten; Mez, Jesse; Mickael, Guedj; Miftahof, Roustem; Mikhno, Arthur; Miller, David; Millikin, Colleen; Min, Ye; Mirza, Mubeena; Mistridis, Panagiota; Mitchell, Meghan; Mitsis, Effie; Mohan, Ananth; Moore, Dana; Moradi Birgani, Parmida; Moratal, David; Morimoto, Bruce; Mormino, Elizabeth; Mortamet, Benedicte; Moscato, Pablo; Mueller, Kathyrne; Mueller, Susanne; Mueller, Notger; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Mulder, Emma; Murayama, Shigeo; Murphy, Michael; Murray, Brian; Musiek, Erik; Myers, Amanda; Najafi, Shahla; Nazarparvar, Babak; Nazeri, Arash; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Neu, Scott; Ng, Yen-Bee; Nguyen, Nghi; Nguyen Xuan, Tuong; Nichols, Thomas; Nicodemus, Kristin; Niecko, Timothy; Nielsen, Casper; Notomi, Keiji; Nutakki, Gopi Chand; O'Bryant, Sid; O'Neil, Alison; Obisesan, Thomas; Oh, Dong Hoon; Oh, Joonmi; Okonkwo, Ozioma; Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Olmos, Salvador; Ortner, Marion; Ostrowitzki, Susanne; Oswald, Annahita; Ott, Brian; Ourselin, Sebastien; Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Paiva, Renata; Pan, Zhifang; Pande, Yogesh; Pardo, Jose; Pardoe, Heath; Park, Hyunjin; Park, Lovingly; Park, Moon Ho; Park, Sang hyun; Park, Kee Hyung; Park, Sujin; Parsey, Ramin; Parveen, Riswana; Paskavitz, James; Patel, Yogen; Patil, Manasi; Pawlak, Mikolaj; Payoux, Pierre; Pearson, Jim; Peavy, Guerry; Pell, Gaby; Peng, Yahong; Pennec, Xavier; Pepin, Jean louis; Perea, Rodrigo; Perneczky, Robert; Petitti, Diana; Petrella, Jeffrey; Peyrat, Jean-Marc; Pezoa, Jorge; Pham, Chi-Tuan; Phillips, Justin; Phillips, Nicole; Pierson, Ronald; Piovezan, Mauro; Podhorski, Adam; Pollari, Mika; Pontecorvo, Michael; Poppenk, Jordan; Posner, Holly; Potkin, Steven; Potter, Guy; Potter, Elizabeth; Poulin, Stephane; Prasad, Gautam; Prenger, Kurt; Prince, Jerry; Priya, Anandh; Puchakayala, Shashidhar Reddy; Qiu, Ruolun; Qiu, Anqi; Qiu, Wendy; Qualls, Constance Dean; Rabie, Huwaida; Rajeesh, Rajeesh; Rallabandi, V. P. Subramanyam; Ramage, Amy; Randolph, Christopher; Rao, Anil; Rao, Divya; Raubertas, Richard; Ray, Debashis; Razak, Hana; Redolfi, Alberto; Reed, Bruce; Reid, Andrew; Reilhac, Anthonin; Reinsberger, Claus; Restrepo, Lucas; Retico, Alessandra; Richards, John; Riddle, William; Ries, Michele; Rincon, Mariano; Rischall, Matt; Rizk-Jackson, Angela; Robieson, Weining; Rocha-Rego, Vanessa; Rogalski, Emily; Rogers, Elizabeth; Rojas, Ignacio; Rojas Balderrama, Javier; Romero, Klaus; Rorden, Chris; Rosand, Jonathan; Rosen, Allyson; Rosen, Ori; Rosenberg, Paul; Ross, David; Roubini, Eli; Rousseau, François; Rowe, Christopher; Rubin, Daniel; Rubright, Jonathan; Ruiz, Agustin; Rusinek, Henry; Ryan, Laurie; Saad, Ahmed; Sabbagh, Marway; Sabuncu, Mert; Sachs, Michael; Sadeghi, Ali; Said, Yasmine; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Sakata, Muneyuki; Salat, David; Salmon, David; Salter, Hugh; Samwald, Matthias; Sanchez, Luciano; Sanders, Elizabeth; Sanjo, Nobuo; Sarnel, Haldun; Sato, Hajime; Sato, Shinji; Saumier, Daniel; Savio, Alexandre; Sawada, Ikuhisa; Saykin, Andrew; Schaffer, J. David; Scharre, Douglas; Schegerin, Marc; Schlosser, Gretchen; Schmand, Ben; Schmansky, Nick; Schmidt, Mark; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Schneider, Lon; Schramm, Hauke; Schuerch, Markus; Schwartz, Eben; Schwartz, Craig; Schwarz, Adam; Seethamraju, Ravi; Seixas, Flavio; Selnes, Per; Senjem, Matthew; Senlin, Wang; Seo, Sang Won; Sethuraman, Gopalan; Sevigny, Jeffrey; Sfikas, Giorgos; Sghedoni, Roberto; Shah, Said Khalid; Shahbaba, Babak; Shams, Soheil; Shattuck, David; Shaw, Leslie; Sheela, Jaba; Shen, Weijia; Shen, Qian; Shera, David; Sherman, John; Sherva, Richard; Shi, Feng; Shukla, Vinay; Shuler, Catherine; Shulman, Joshua; Siegel, Rene; Siemers, Eric; Silveira, Margarida; Silver, Michael; Silverman, Daniel; Sim, Ida; Simmons, Andy; Simoes, Rita; Simon, Melvin; Simpson, Ivor; Singh, Simer Preet; Singh, Nikhil; Siuciak, Judy; Sjogren, Niclas; Skinner, Jeannine; Skup, Martha; Small, Gary; Smith, Michael; Smith, Benjamin; Smith, Charles; Smyth, Timothy; Snow, Sarah; Soares, Holly; Soldea, Octavian; Solomon, Paul; Solomon, Alan; Som, Subhojit; Song, Changhong; Song, Mingli; Sosova, Iveta; Soudah, Eduardo; Soydemir, Melih; Spampinato, Maria Vittoria; Spenger, Christian; Sperling, Reisa; Spiegel, Rene; Spies, Lothar; Squarcia, Sandro; Squire, Larry; Staff, Roger; Stern, Yaakov; Straw, Jack; Stricker, Nikki; Strittmatter, Stephen; Stühler, Elisabeth; Styren, Scot; Subramanian, Vijayalakshmi; Sugishita, Morihiro; Sukkar, Rafid; Sun, Jia; Sun, Ying; Sun, Yu; Sundell, Karen; Suri, Muhammad; Suzuki, Akiyuki; Svetnik, Vladimir; Swan, Melanie; Takahasi, Tetsuhiko; Takeuchi, Tomoko; Tanaka, Shoji; Tanchi, Chaturaphat; Tancredi, Daniel; Tao, Wenwen; Tao, Dacheng; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Teng, Edmond; Terlizzi, Rita; Thames, April; Thiele, Frank; Thomas, Benjamin; Thomas, Ronald; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Wesley; Thornton-Wells, Tricia; Thorvaldsson, Valgeir; Thurfjell, Lennart; Titeux, Laurence; Tokuda, Takahiko; Toledo, Juan B.; Tolli, Tuomas; Toma, Ahmed; Tomita, Naoki; Toro, Roberto; Torrealdea, Patxi; Tousian, Mona; Toussaint, Paule; Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Tractenberg, Rochelle E.; Trittschuh, Emily; Trojanowski, John; Truran, Diana; Tsechpenakis, Gavriil; Tucker-Drob, Elliot; Tufail, Ahsan; Tung, Joyce; Turken, And; Ueda, Yoji; Ullrich, Lauren; Umadevi Venkataraju, Kannan; Umar, Nisser; Uzunbas, Gokhan; van de Nes, Joseph; van der Brug, Marcel; van Horn, John; van Leemput, Koen; van Train, Kenneth; van Zeeland, Ashley; Vasanawala, Minal; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Verwaerde, Philippe; Videbaek, Charlotte; Vidoni, Eric; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Vitolo, Ottavio; Vounou, Maria; Wade, Sara; Walhovd, Kristine B.; Wan, Hong; Wang, Huanli; Wang, Yongmei Michelle; Wang, Yalin; Wang, Angela; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yue; Wang, Xu; Wang, Ze; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Tiger; Wang, Alex; Wang, Huali; Wang, Li-San; Wang, Wei; Wang, Li; Ward, Michael; Warfield, Simon; Waring, Stephen; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Webb, David; Wei, Lili; Weiner, Michael; Wen, Shu-Hui; Wenjing, Li; Wenzel, Fabian; Westlye, Lars T.; Whitcher, Brandon; Whitlow, Christopher; Whitwell, Jennifer; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Williams, David; Wilmot, Beth; Wimsatt, Matt; Wingo, Thomas; Wiste, Heather; Wolfson, Tanya; Wolke, Ira; Wolz, Robin; Woo, Jongwook; Woo, Ellen; Woods, Lynn; Worth, Andrew; Worth, Eric; Wouters, Hans; Wu, Teresa; Wu, Yi-Gen; Wu, Liang; Wu, Xiaoling; Wyman, Bradley; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Xiao, Guanghua; Xiao, Liu; Xie, Sharon; Xu, Shunbin; Xu, Ye; Xu, Yi-Zheng; Xu, Guofan; Xu, Jun; Yamane, Tomohiko; Yamashita, Fumio; Yan, Yunyi; Yan, Pingkun; Yang, Eric; Yang, Jinzhong; Yang, Qing X.; Yang, Zijiang; Yang, Guang; Yang, Zhitong; Yang, Wenlu; Ye, Liang; Ye, Byoung Seok; Ye, Jieping; Ye, Jong; Yee, Laura; Yesavage, Jerome; Ying, Song; Yoo, Bongin; Young, Jonathan; Yu, Shiwei; Yu, Dongchuan; Yuan, Guihong; Yuan, Kai; Yushkevich, Paul; Zaborszky, Laszlo; Zagorodnov, Vitali; Zagorski, Michael; Zawadzki, Rezi; Zeitzer, Jamie; Zelinski, Elizabeth; Zhang, Kurt; Zhang, Huixiong; Zhang, Tianhao; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Linda; Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Zhiguo; Zhao, Qinying; Zhao, Jim; Zhao, Peng; Zhen, Xiantong; Zheng, Yuanjie; Zhijun, Yao; Zhou, Bin; Zhou, Sheng; Zhu, Wen; Zhu, Hongtu; Zhu, Wanlin; Zilka, Samantha; Zito, Giancarlo; Zou, Heng

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid-β accumulation in the brain is thought to be one of the earliest events in Alzheimer's disease, possibly leading to synaptic dysfunction, neurodegeneration and cognitive/functional decline. The earliest detectable changes seen with neuroimaging appear to be amyloid-β accumulation detected by

  3. Expression of human FE65 in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice is associated with a reduction in beta-amyloid load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiard-Baron, Dominique; Langui, Dominique; Delehedde, Maryse; Delatour, Benoît; Schombert, Brigitte; Touchet, Nathalie; Tremp, Günter; Paul, Marie-Françoise; Blanchard, Véronique; Sergeant, Nicolas; Delacourte, André; Duyckaerts, Charles; Pradier, Laurent; Mercken, Luc

    2005-04-01

    FE65 is an adaptor protein that interacts with the cytoplasmic tail of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). In cultured non-neuronal cells, the formation of the FE65-APP complex is a key element for the modulation of APP processing, signalling and beta-amyloid (Abeta) production. The functions of FE65 in vivo, including its role in the metabolism of neuronal APP, remain to be investigated. In this study, transgenic mice expressing human FE65 were generated and crossbred with APP transgenic mice, known to develop Abeta deposits at 6 months of age. Compared with APP mice, APP/FE65 double transgenic mice exhibited a lower Abeta accumulation in the cerebral cortex as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and immunoassay, and a lower level of APP-CTFs. The reduced accumulation of Abeta in APP/FE65 double transgenics, compared with APP mice, could be linked to the low Abeta42 level observed at 4 months of age and to the lower APP-CTFs levels. The present work provides evidence that FE65 plays a role in the regulation of APP processing in an in vivo model.

  4. Soluble beta-amyloid precursor protein is related to disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Steinacker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biomarkers of disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS could support the identification of beneficial drugs in clinical trials. We aimed to test whether soluble fragments of beta-amyloid precursor protein (sAPPα and sAPPß correlated with clinical subtypes of ALS and were of prognostic value. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a cross-sectional study including patients with ALS (N = 68 with clinical follow-up data over 6 months, Parkinson's disease (PD, N = 20, and age-matched controls (N = 40, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF levels of sAPPα a, sAPPß and neurofilaments (NfH(SMI35 were measured by multiplex assay, Progranulin by ELISA. CSF sAPPα and sAPPß levels were lower in ALS with a rapidly-progressive disease course (p = 0.03, and p = 0.02 and with longer disease duration (p = 0.01 and p = 0.01, respectively. CSF NfH(SMI35 was elevated in ALS compared to PD and controls, with highest concentrations found in patients with rapid disease progression (p<0.01. High CSF NfH(SMI3 was linked to low CSF sAPPα and sAPPß (p = 0.001, and p = 0.007, respectively. The ratios CSF NfH(SMI35/CSF sAPPα,-ß were elevated in patients with fast progression of disease (p = 0.002 each. CSF Progranulin decreased with ongoing disease (p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides new CSF candidate markers associated with progression of disease in ALS. The data suggest that a deficiency of cellular neuroprotective mechanisms (decrease of sAPP is linked to progressive neuro-axonal damage (increase of NfH(SMI35 and to progression of disease.

  5. Intravenous immunglobulin binds beta amyloid and modifies its aggregation, neurotoxicity and microglial phagocytosis in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Cattepoel

    Full Text Available Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG has been proposed as a potential therapeutic for Alzheimer's disease (AD and its efficacy is currently being tested in mild-to-moderate AD. Earlier studies reported the presence of anti-amyloid beta (Aβ antibodies in IVIG. These observations led to clinical studies investigating the potential role of IVIG as a therapeutic agent in AD. Also, IVIG is known to mediate beneficial effects in chronic inflammatory and autoimmune conditions by interfering with various pathological processes. Therefore, we investigated the effects of IVIG and purified polyclonal Aβ-specific antibodies (pAbs-Aβ on aggregation, toxicity and phagocytosis of Aβ in vitro, thus elucidating some of the potential mechanisms of action of IVIG in AD patients. We report that both IVIG and pAbs-Aβ specifically bound to Aβ and inhibited its aggregation in a dose-dependent manner as measured by Thioflavin T assay. Additionally, IVIG and the purified pAbs-Aβ inhibited Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line and prevented Aβ binding to rat primary cortical neurons. Interestingly, IVIG and pAbs-Aβ also increased the number of phagocytosing cells as well as the amount of phagocytosed fibrillar Aβ by BV-2 microglia. Phagocytosis of Aβ depended on receptor-mediated endocytosis and was accompanied by upregulation of CD11b expression. Importantly, we could also show that Privigen dose-dependently reversed Aβ-mediated LTP inhibition in mouse hippocampal slices. Therefore, our in vitro results suggest that IVIG may have an impact on different processes involved in AD pathogenesis, thereby promoting further understanding of the effects of IVIG observed in clinical studies.

  6. Amyloid beta inhibits olfactory bulb activity and the ability to smell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Alvarado-Martínez

    Full Text Available Early olfactory dysfunction has been consistently reported in both Alzheimer's disease (AD and in transgenic mice that reproduce some features of this disease. In AD transgenic mice, alteration in olfaction has been associated with increased levels of soluble amyloid beta protein (Aβ as well as with alterations in the oscillatory network activity recorded in the olfactory bulb (OB and in the piriform cortex. However, since AD is a multifactorial disease and transgenic mice suffer a variety of adaptive changes, it is still unknown if soluble Aβ, by itself, is responsible for OB dysfunction both at electrophysiological and behavioral levels. Thus, here we tested whether or not Aβ directly affects OB network activity in vitro in slices obtained from mice and rats and if it affects olfactory ability in these rodents. Our results show that Aβ decreases, in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, the network activity of OB slices at clinically relevant concentrations (low nM and in a reversible manner. Moreover, we found that intrabulbar injection of Aβ decreases the olfactory ability of rodents two weeks after application, an effect that is not related to alterations in motor performance or motivation to seek food and that correlates with the presence of Aβ deposits. Our results indicate that Aβ disrupts, at clinically relevant concentrations, the network activity of the OB in vitro and can trigger a disruption in olfaction. These findings open the possibility of exploring the cellular mechanisms involved in early pathological AD as an approach to reduce or halt its progress.

  7. Tau, Amyloid Beta and Deep Brain Stimulation: Aiming to Restore Cognitive Deficit in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón-Rodríguez, Siddhartha; Perry, George; Pena-Ortega, Fernando; Williams, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a great advance in the data that supports the two current hypotheses in Alzheimer`s disease field, the amyloid beta hypothesis and the tau hypothesis. Not surprisingly, Aβ and tau proteins are currently the major therapeutic research targets for AD treatment. Unfortunately, nothing but moderate success has emerged from such therapeutic approaches. With this in mind, we will discuss deep brain stimulation as a promising therapeutic strategy that aims to restore brain activity. Lastly, in the scope of cognitive deficit restoration, we will discuss the relevance of the limbic formation as a promising neuroanatomical target for deep brain stimulation. Immunohistochemistry for modified tau (phosphorylated at Ser199-202-Thr205 labelled by the antibody AT8) was performed on paraffin-embedded human brain sections providing a detailed characterization of NFT pathology. Abnormally phosphorylated tau protein is the key common marker in several brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson`s disease, Pick Disease, Down syndrome and frontotemporal dementia and is capable of affecting synaptic events that are critical for memory formation. With this in mind, therapeutic strategies aiming to restore synaptic events could offer better outcomes. The humble success of current therapeutic strategies along with the lack of basic knowledge of the brain disease mechanisms calls for alternatives that benefit patients in the present moment. One of particular interest is the neurostimulation strategy that is already a well-established treatment for several movement disorders and when compared to current Alzheimer`s therapeutic strategies, deep brain stimulation does not directly interfere with the normal protein function, therefore increasing the probability of success.

  8. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langkilde, Annette E., E-mail: annette.langkilde@sund.ku.dk [University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Morris, Kyle L.; Serpell, Louise C. [University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton (United Kingdom); Svergun, Dmitri I. [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Hamburg Outstation, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Vestergaard, Bente [University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 2, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-04-01

    The aggregation process and the fibril state of an amyloidogenic peptide suggest monomer addition to be the prevailing mechanism of elongation and a model of the peptide packing in the fibrils has been obtained. Structural analysis of protein fibrillation is inherently challenging. Given the crucial role of fibrils in amyloid diseases, method advancement is urgently needed. A hybrid modelling approach is presented enabling detailed analysis of a highly ordered and hierarchically organized fibril of the GNNQQNY peptide fragment of a yeast prion protein. Data from small-angle X-ray solution scattering, fibre diffraction and electron microscopy are combined with existing high-resolution X-ray crystallographic structures to investigate the fibrillation process and the hierarchical fibril structure of the peptide fragment. The elongation of these fibrils proceeds without the accumulation of any detectable amount of intermediate oligomeric species, as is otherwise reported for, for example, glucagon, insulin and α-synuclein. Ribbons constituted of linearly arranged protofilaments are formed. An additional hierarchical layer is generated via the pairing of ribbons during fibril maturation. Based on the complementary data, a quasi-atomic resolution model of the protofilament peptide arrangement is suggested. The peptide structure appears in a β-sheet arrangement reminiscent of the β-zipper structures evident from high-resolution crystal structures, with specific differences in the relative peptide orientation. The complexity of protein fibrillation and structure emphasizes the need to use multiple complementary methods.

  9. The effect of a beta-lactamase inhibitor peptide on bacterial membrane structure and integrity: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaybeyoglu, Begum; Uluocak, Bilge Gedik; Akbulut, Berna Sariyar; Ozkirimli, Elif

    2017-05-01

    Co-administration of beta-lactam antibiotics and beta-lactamase inhibitors has been a favored treatment strategy against beta-lactamase-mediated bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the emergence of beta-lactamases resistant to current inhibitors necessitates the discovery of novel non-beta-lactam inhibitors. Peptides derived from the Ala46-Tyr51 region of the beta-lactamase inhibitor protein are considered as potent inhibitors of beta-lactamase; unfortunately, peptide delivery into the cell limits their potential. The properties of cell-penetrating peptides could guide the design of beta-lactamase inhibitory peptides. Here, our goal is to modify the peptide with the sequence RRGHYY that possesses beta-lactamase inhibitory activity under in vitro conditions. Inspired by the work on the cell-penetrating peptide pVEC, our approach involved the addition of the N-terminal hydrophobic residues, LLIIL, from pVEC to the inhibitor peptide to build a chimera. These residues have been reported to be critical in the uptake of pVEC. We tested the potential of RRGHYY and its chimeric derivative as a beta-lactamase inhibitory peptide on Escherichia coli cells and compared the results with the action of the antimicrobial peptide melittin, the beta-lactam antibiotic ampicillin, and the beta-lactamase inhibitor potassium clavulanate to get mechanistic details on their action. Our results show that the addition of LLIIL to the N-terminus of the beta-lactamase inhibitory peptide RRGHYY increases its membrane permeabilizing potential. Interestingly, the addition of this short stretch of hydrophobic residues also modified the inhibitory peptide such that it acquired antimicrobial property. We propose that addition of the hydrophobic LLIIL residues to the peptide N-terminus offers a promising strategy to design novel antimicrobial peptides in the battle against antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European

  10. Donepezil inhibits the amyloid-beta oligomer-induced microglial activation in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Moon, Minho; Choi, Jin Gyu; Park, Gunhyuk; Kim, Ae-Jung; Hur, Jinyoung; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Oh, Myung Sook

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies on Alzheimer's disease (AD) have focused on soluble oligomeric forms of amyloid-beta (Aβ oligomer, AβO) that are directly associated with AD-related pathologies, such as cognitive decline, neurodegeneration, and neuroinflammation. Donepezil is a well-known anti-dementia agent that increases acetylcholine levels through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. However, a growing body of experimental and clinical studies indicates that donepezil may also provide neuroprotective and disease-modifying effects in AD. Additionally, donepezil has recently been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects against lipopolysaccharides and tau pathology. However, it remains unknown whether donepezil has anti-inflammatory effects against AβO in cultured microglial cells and the brain in animals. Further, the effects of donepezil against AβO-mediated neuronal death, astrogliosis, and memory impairment have also not yet been investigated. Thus, in the present study, we examined the anti-inflammatory effect of donepezil against AβO and its neuroinflammatory mechanisms. Donepezil significantly attenuated the release of inflammatory mediators (prostaglandin E2, interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-α, and nitric oxide) from microglia. Donepezil also decreased AβO-induced up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 protein and phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase as well as translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B. We next showed that donepezil suppresses activated microglia-mediated toxicity in primary hippocampal cells using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. In intrahippocampal AβO-injected mice, donepezil significantly inhibited microgliosis and astrogliosis. Furthermore, behavioral tests revealed that donepezil (2 mg/kg/day, 5 days, p.o.) significantly ameliorated AβO-induced memory impairment. These results suggest that donepezil directly inhibits microglial activation

  11. Nanoscale size dependence in the conjugation of amyloid beta and ovalbumin proteins on the surface of gold colloidal particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, K; Briglio, N M; Hartati, D Sri; Tsang, S M W; MacCormac, J E; Welchons, D R [Department of Chemistry, State University of New York College at Geneseo, One College Circle, Geneseo, NY 14454 (United States)], E-mail: yokoyama@geneseo.edu

    2008-09-17

    Absorption spectroscopy was utilized to investigate the conjugation of amyloid {beta} protein solution (A{beta}{sub 1-40}) and chicken egg albumin (ovalbumin) with various sizes of gold colloidal nanoparticles for various pHs, ranging from pH 2 to pH 10. The pH value that indicates the colour change, pH{sub o}, exhibited colloidal size dependence for both A{beta}{sub 1-40} and ovalbumin coated particles. In particular, A{beta}{sub 1-40} coated gold colloidal particles exhibited non-continuous size dependence peaking at 40 and 80 nm, implying that their corresponding cage-like structures provide efficient net charge cancellation at these core sizes. Remarkably, only the pH{sub o} value for ovalbumin coated 80 nm gold colloid was pH>7, and a specific cage-like structure is speculated to have a positive net charge facing outward when ovalbumin self-assembles over this particular gold colloid. The previously reported reversible colour change between pH 4 and 10 took place only with A{beta}{sub 1-40} coated 20 nm gold colloids; this was also explored with ovalbumin coated gold colloids. Interestingly, gold colloidal nanoparticles showed a quasi-reversible colour change when they were coated with ovalbumin for all test sizes. The ovalbumin coated gold colloid was found to maintain reversible properties longer than A{beta}{sub 1-40} coated gold colloid.

  12. Immunosensor for diagnosis of Alzheimer disease using amyloid-β 1-40 peptide and silk fibroin thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, J M; Lima, L R; Moraes, M L; Ribeiro, S J L

    2016-11-01

    Layer-by-Layer (LbL) films containing silk fibroin (SF) and the 40 aminoacid-long amyloidpeptide (Aβ1-40) were prepared with the purpose of developing a new prototype of an electrochemical immunosensor. The film showed a satisfactory growth in quartz substrate and screen-printed carbon electrodes, as observed by UV-vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetric, respectively. The peptide immobilized in LbL films in junction with SF shows secondary structure induced, as shown by circular dichroism measurements, favoring the interaction SF/peptide LbL film with the specific antibody. Immunosensor showed a linear response in the presence of the antibody with concentrations from 0 to 10ngmL(-1) both analyzed by current changes in 0.3V and voltammogram area. This system can be applied as a new prototype for preliminary diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cholesterol enhances amyloid {beta} deposition in mouse retina by modulating the activities of A{beta}-regulating enzymes in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiying [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko, E-mail: k.ohno.oph@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Morita, Ikuo [Section of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-treated RPE produces more A{beta} than non-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neprilysin expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}-Secretase expression and activity decreased in cholesterol-treated RPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol-enriched diet induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A{beta} were present in cholesterol-enriched-diet-induced subRPE deposits in aged mice. -- Abstract: Subretinally-deposited amyloid {beta} (A{beta}) is a main contributor of developing age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, the mechanism causing A{beta} deposition in AMD eyes is unknown. Hypercholesterolemia is a significant risk for developing AMD. Thus, we investigated the effects of cholesterol on A{beta} production in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro and in the mouse retina in vivo. RPE cells isolated from senescent (12-month-old) C57BL/6 mice were treated with 10 {mu}g/ml cholesterol for 48 h. A{beta} amounts in culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. Activity and expression of enzymes and proteins that regulate A{beta} production were examined by activity assay and real time PCR. The retina of mice fed cholesterol-enriched diet was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Cholesterol significantly increased A{beta} production in cultured RPE cells. Activities of A{beta} degradation enzyme; neprilysin (NEP) and anti-amyloidogenic secretase; {alpha}-secretase were significantly decreased in cell lysates of cholesterol-treated RPE cells compared to non-treated cells, but there was no change in the activities of {beta}- or {gamma}-secretase. mRNA levels of NEP and {alpha}-secretase (ADAM10 and ADAM17) were significantly lower in cholesterol-treated RPE cells than non-treated cells. Senescent (12-month-old) mice fed cholesterol-enriched chow developed subRPE deposits containing A{beta}, whereas

  14. Evaluation of beta-cell secretory capacity using glucagon-like peptide 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina; Nielsen, Mette Toft; Krarup, T

    2000-01-01

    Beta-cell secretory capacity is often evaluated with a glucagon test or a meal test. However, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is the most insulinotropic hormone known, and the effect is preserved in type 2 diabetic patients.......Beta-cell secretory capacity is often evaluated with a glucagon test or a meal test. However, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is the most insulinotropic hormone known, and the effect is preserved in type 2 diabetic patients....

  15. Evidence that a synthetic amyloid-ß oligomer-binding peptide (ABP) targets amyloid-ß deposits in transgenic mouse brain and human Alzheimer's disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Balu; Ito, Shingo; Atkinson, Trevor; Gaudet, Chantal; Ménard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Whitfield, James

    2014-03-14

    The synthetic ~5 kDa ABP (amyloid-ß binding peptide) consists of a region of the 228 kDa human pericentrioloar material-1 (PCM-1) protein that selectively and avidly binds in vitro Aβ1-42 oligomers, believed to be key co-drivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but not monomers (Chakravarthy et al., (2013) [3]). ABP also prevents Aß1-42 from triggering the apoptotic death of cultured human SHSY5Y neuroblasts, likely by sequestering Aß oligomers, suggesting that it might be a potential AD therapeutic. Here we support this possibility by showing that ABP also recognizes and binds Aβ1-42 aggregates in sections of cortices and hippocampi from brains of AD transgenic mice and human AD patients. More importantly, ABP targets Aβ1-42 aggregates when microinjected into the hippocampi of the brains of live AD transgenic mice. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Predominant loss of glutamatergic terminal markers in a β-amyloid peptide model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canas, Paula M; Simões, Ana Patrícia; Rodrigues, Ricardo J; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized phenotypically by memory impairment, neurochemically by accumulation of β-amyloid peptide (such as Aβ1-42) and morphologically by an initial loss of nerve terminals in cortical and hippocampal regions. However, it is not known what nerve terminals are mostly affected in early AD. We now used a mouse model of AD, based on the intra-cerebral administration of soluble Aβ1-42, that leads to memory impairment and loss of nerve terminal markers within 2 weeks, to investigate which type of hippocampal nerve terminals was mostly affected in the hippocampus. Western blot analysis revealed a decrease of the density of vesicular glutamate transporters type 1 (vGluT1, a marker of glutamatergic terminals; -20.1 ± 3.6%) and of vesicular acetylcholine transporters (vAChT, a marker of cholinergic terminals; -27.2 ± 0.9%) but not of vesicular GABA transporters (vGAT, a marker of GABAergic terminals) in the hippocampus of Aβ-injected mice. Immunocytochemical analysis of single hippocampal nerve terminals revealed that the decrease of the density of vGluT1 reflects a reduction of the number of vGluT1-immunopositive nerve terminals (-10.6 ± 3.6%), while no significant changes in the number of vAChT- or vGAT-immunopositive nerve terminals were observed. This pilot study shows that, in this Aβ-based model of AD, there is an asymmetric loss of different synaptic markers with a predominant susceptibility of glutamatergic synapses. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Synaptic Basis of Neurodegenerative Disorders'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Combined determination of copper ions and β-amyloid peptide by a single ratiometric electrochemical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanyan; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Xiaodan; Peng, Qiwen; Zhou, Yi; Yin, Tianxiao; Liang, Yixin; Yin, Xiaoxing

    2017-12-18

    Copper ions (Cu 2+ ) play a critical role in biological processes and are directly involved in β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) aggregation, which is responsible for the occurrence and development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, combined determination of Cu 2+ and Aβ in one analytical system is of great significance to understand the exact nature of the AD event. This work presents a novel ratiometric electrochemical biosensor for the dual determination of Cu 2+ and Aβ 1-42 . This unique sensor is based on a 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonate) (ABTS) and poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA)-bi functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (ABTS-PDDA/CNTs) composite. The inclusion of ABTS not only enhanced the sensitivity, but it also acted as an inner reference molecule to improve detection accuracy. The specific recognition of Cu 2+ was realized by neurokinin B (NKB) coatings on the ABTS-PDDA/CNTs surface to form a [Cu II (NKB) 2 ] complex with Cu 2+ . The ABTS-PDDA/CNTs-NKB modified electrode also displayed an excellent electrochemical response toward the Aβ 1-42 monomer, when a certain amount of the Aβ 1-42 monomer was added to Cu 2+ -contained PBS buffer, which was due to the release of Cu 2+ from the [Cu II (NKB) 2 ] complex through Aβ binding to Cu 2+ . Meanwhile, our work showed that Cu 2+ bound Aβ 1-42 was concentration-dependent. Consequently, the presented electrochemical approach was capable of quantifying two important biological species associated with AD by one single biosensor, with the detection limits of 0.04 μM for Cu 2+ and 0.5 ng mL -1 for Aβ 1-42 , respectively. Finally, the ratiometric electrode was successfully applied for monitoring Cu 2+ and Aβ 1-42 variations in plasma and hippocampus of normal and AD rats.

  18. Polymorphism of amyloid fibrils formed by a peptide from the yeast prion protein Sup35: AFM and Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey V., E-mail: akrasnos@unomaha.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 986025 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Nebraska Omaha, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States); Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja [IPHT-Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Zhang, Yuliang [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 986025 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Deckert, Volker [IPHT-Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Institute for Physical Chemistry and Abbe Center of Photonics, University of Jena, Helmholtzweg 4, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Lyubchenko, Yuri L., E-mail: ylyubchenko@unmc.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 986025 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Aggregation of prion proteins is the cause of various prion related diseases. The infectious form of prions, amyloid aggregates, exist as multiple strains. The strains are thought to represent structurally different prion protein molecules packed into amyloid aggregates, but the knowledge on the structure of different types of aggregates is limited. Here we report on the use of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and TERS (Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering) to study morphological heterogeneity and access underlying conformational features of individual amyloid aggregates. Using AFM we identified the morphology of amyloid fibrils formed by the peptide (CGNNQQNY) from the yeast prion protein Sup35 that is critically involved in the aggregation of the full protein. TERS results demonstrate that morphologically different amyloid fibrils are composed of a distinct set of conformations. Fibrils formed at pH 5.6 are composed of a mixture of peptide conformations (β-sheets, random coil and α-helix) while fibrils formed in pH~2 solution primarily have β-sheets. Additionally, peak positions in the amide III region of the TERS spectra suggested that peptides have parallel arrangement of β-sheets for pH~2 fibrils and antiparallel arrangement for fibrils formed at pH 5.6. We also developed a methodology for detailed analysis of the peptide secondary structure by correlating intensity changes of Raman bands in different regions of TERS spectra. Such correlation established that structural composition of peptides is highly localized with large contribution of unordered secondary structures on a fibrillar surface. - Highlights: • Amyloid polymorphs were characterized by AFM and TERS. • A mixture of peptide secondary structures in fibrils were identified using TERS. • TERS recognizes packing arrangement (parallel versus antiparallel) of peptides. • TERS is a powerful tool for high resolution structural analysis of fibrils.

  19. 9,10-Anthraquinone hinders β-aggregation: How does a small molecule interfere with Aβ-peptide amyloid fibrillation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Marino; Pellarin, Riccardo; Catto, Marco; Carotti, Angelo; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid aggregation is linked to a number of neurodegenerative syndromes, the most prevalent one being Alzheimer's disease. In this pathology, the β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) aggregate into oligomers, protofibrils, and fibrils and eventually into plaques, which constitute the characteristic hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Several low-molecular-weight compounds able to impair the Aβ aggregation process have been recently discovered; yet, a detailed description of their interactions with oligomers and fibrils is hitherto missing. Here, molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the influence of two relatively similar tricyclic, planar compounds, that is, 9, 10-anthraquinone (AQ) and anthracene (AC), on the early phase of the aggregation of the Aβ heptapeptide segment H14QKLVFF20, the hydrophobic stretch that promotes the Aβ self-assembly. The simulations show that AQ interferes with β-sheet formation more than AC. In particular, AQ intercalates into the β-sheet because polar interactions between the compound and the peptide backbone destabilize the interstrand hydrogen bonds, thereby favoring disorder. The thioflavin T-binding assay indicates that AQ, but not AC, sensibly reduces the amount of aggregated Aβ1–40 peptide. Taken together, the in silico and in vitro results provide evidence that structural perturbations by AQ can remarkably affect ordered oligomerization. Moreover, the simulations shed light at the atomic level on the interactions between AQ and Aβ oligomers, providing useful insights for the design of small-molecule inhibitors of aggregation with therapeutic potential in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19309732

  20. Roles of Amyloid β-Peptide-Associated Oxidative Stress and Brain Protein Modifications in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Butterfield, D. Allan; Reed, Tanea; Newman, Shelley F.; Sultana, Rukhsana

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and ischemia just to name a few. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that is recognized as the most common form of dementia. AD is histopathologically characterized by the presence of extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, the presence of oligomers of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), and ...

  1. A Peptide Derived from the HIV-1 gp120 Coreceptor-Binding Region Promotes Formation of PAP248-286 Amyloid Fibrils to Enhance HIV-1 Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinquan Chen

    Full Text Available Semen is a major vehicle for HIV transmission. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP fragments, such as PAP248-286, in human semen can form amyloid fibrils to enhance HIV infection. Other endogenous or exogenous factors present during sexual intercourse have also been reported to promote the formation of seminal amyloid fibrils.Here, we demonstrated that a synthetic 15-residue peptide derived from the HIV-1 gp120 coreceptor-binding region, designated enhancing peptide 2 (EP2, can rapidly self-assemble into nanofibers. These EP2-derivated nanofibers promptly accelerated the formation of semen amyloid fibrils by PAP248-286, as shown by Thioflavin T (ThT and Congo red assays. The amyloid fibrils presented similar morphology, assessed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM, in the presence or absence of EP2. Circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy revealed that EP2 accelerates PAP248-286 amyloid fibril formation by promoting the structural transition of PAP248-286 from a random coil into a cross-β-sheet. Newly formed semen amyloid fibrils effectively enhanced HIV-1 infection in TZM-bl cells and U87 cells by promoting the binding of HIV-1 virions to target cells.Nanofibers composed of EP2 promote the formation of PAP248-286 amyloid fibrils and enhance HIV-1 infection.

  2. Gelsolin bound β-amyloid peptides(1-40/1-42): electrochemical evaluation of levels of soluble peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanyan; Sun, Xiaoyu; Tang, Daoquan; Li, Chenglin; Zhang, Lin; Nie, Dongxia; Yin, Xiaoxing; Shi, Guoyue

    2015-06-15

    A method for the highly sensitive determination of soluable β-amyloid peptides (Aβ(1-40/1-42)) that employs a detection bioconjugate of HRP-Au-gelsolin as the electrochemical nanoprobe is presented. Contrary to previous detection notions that utilized antibodies, which could specifically recognize the N- or C-terminus of peptides, we demonstrate herein that the reported specific binding between gelsolin and Aβ might provide an alternative way to evaluate the peptides sensitively and selectively. The HRP-Au-gelsolin nanohybrid was designed by one-pot functionalization of Au nanaoparticles (NPs) with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and gelsolin. Through a sandwich-type sensor array, soluble Aβ(1-40/1-42) were captured onto the array due to the interactions between targeted peptides and surface-confined gelsolin and electrochemical signals were amplified by abundant attachments of HRP labeled on AuNPs, which could specifically catalyse its substrate, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H2O2 to give rise to measurable signals. The proposed gelsolin-bound Aβ methodology displayed satisfactory sensitivity and wide linear range towards Aβ(1-40/1-42) with a detection limit down to 28 pM, which are verified to be sensitive-enough for the assessment of Aβ levels both in normal and Alzheimer's disease (AD) rat brains. Experimental results indicated that compared with normal group, soluble β-amyloid peptide levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and targeted brain tissues of AD rats all declined with differentiable degrees. In short, the newly unfolding strategy presents valuable information related to pathological events in brain and will exhibit a braw perspective for the early diagnosis of AD process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Key Aging-Associated Alterations in Primary Microglia Response to Beta-Amyloid Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Caldeira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline and believed to be driven by the self-aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ peptide into oligomers and fibrils that accumulate as senile plaques. It is widely accepted that microglia-mediated inflammation is a significant contributor to disease pathogenesis; however, different microglia phenotypes were identified along AD progression and excessive Aβ production was shown to dysregulate cell function. As so, the contribution of microglia to AD pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. In this study, we wondered if isolated microglia cultured for 16 days in vitro (DIV would react differentially from the 2 DIV cells upon treatment with 1000 nM Aβ1–42 for 24 h. No changes in cell viability were observed and morphometric alterations associated to microglia activation, such as volume increase and process shortening, were obvious in 2 DIV microglia, but less evident in 16 DIV cells. These cells showed lower phagocytic, migration and autophagic properties after Aβ treatment than the 2 DIV cultured microglia. Reduced phagocytosis may derive from increased CD33 expression, reduced triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2 and milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 protein (MFG-E8 levels, which were mainly observed in 16 DIV cells. Activation of inflammatory mediators, such as high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as increased expression of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2, TLR4 and fractalkine/CX3C chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1 cell surface receptors were prominent in 2 DIV microglia, while elevation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9 was marked in 16 DIV cells. Increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal and upregulated miR-146a expression that were observed in 16 DIV cells showed to increase by Aβ in 2 DIV microglia. Additionally, Aβ downregulated miR-155 and miR-124, and reduced the CD11b+ subpopulation in 2 DIV microglia, while

  4. The Role of Neutrophil Proteins on the Amyloid Beta-RAGE Axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Amanda J.; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne; Wren, Jonathan D.; Sjoelund, Virginie H.; Prestwich, Glenn D.

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed an elevated expression of the neutrophil protein, cationic antimicrobial protein of 37kDa (CAP37), in brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), suggesting that CAP37 could be involved in AD pathogenesis. The first step in determining how CAP37 might contribute to AD pathogenesis was to identify the receptor through which it induces cell responses. To identify a putative receptor, we performed GAMMA analysis to determine genes that positively correlated with CAP37 in terms of expression. Positive correlations with ligands for the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) were observed. Additionally, CAP37 expression positively correlated with two other neutrophil proteins, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) demonstrated an interaction between CAP37, neutrophil elastase, and cathepsin G with RAGE. Amyloid beta 1–42 (Aβ1–42), a known RAGE ligand, accumulates in AD brains and interacts with RAGE, contributing to Aβ1–42 neurotoxicity. We questioned whether the binding of CAP37, neutrophil elastase and/or cathepsin G to RAGE could interfere with Aβ1–42 binding to RAGE. Using ELISAs, we determined that CAP37 and neutrophil elastase inhibited binding of Aβ1–42 to RAGE, and this effect was reversed by protease inhibitors in the case of neutrophil elastase. Since neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G have enzymatic activity, mass spectrometry was performed to determine the proteolytic activity of all three neutrophil proteins on Aβ1–42. All three neutrophil proteins bound to Aβ1–42 with different affinities and cleaved Aβ1–42 with different kinetics and substrate specificities. We posit that these neutrophil proteins could modulate neurotoxicity in AD by cleaving Aβ1–42 and influencing the Aβ1–42 –RAGE interaction. Further studies will be required to determine the biological significance of these effects and their relevance in neurodegenerative diseases such as

  5. Beta-Amyloid Downregulates MDR1-P-Glycoprotein (Abcb1 Expression at the Blood-Brain Barrier in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Brenn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurovascular dysfunction is an important component of Alzheimer's disease, leading to reduced clearance across the blood-brain barrier and accumulation of neurotoxic β-amyloid (Aβ peptides in the brain. It has been shown that the ABC transport protein P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1 is involved in the export of Aβ from the brain into the blood. To determine whether Aβ influences the expression of key Aβ transporters, we studied the effects of 1-day subcutaneous Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 administration via Alzet mini-osmotic pumps on P-gp, BCRP, LRP1, and RAGE expression in the brain of 90-day-old male FVB mice. Our results demonstrate significantly reduced P-gp, LRP1, and RAGE mRNA expression in mice treated with Aβ1-42 compared to controls, while BCRP expression was not affected. The expression of the four proteins was unchanged in mice treated with Aβ1-40 or reverse-sequence peptides. These findings indicate that, in addition to the age-related decrease of P-gp expression, Aβ1-42 itself downregulates the expression of P-gp and other Aβ-transporters, which could exacerbate the intracerebral accumulation of Aβ and thereby accelerate neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease and cerebral β-amyloid angiopathy.

  6. Synthetic Curcumin Analogs as Inhibitors of β -Amyloid Peptide Aggregation: Potential Therapeutic and Diagnostic Agents for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    There is a crucial need to develop new effective drugs for Alzheimer's disease (AD) as the currently available AD treatments provide only momentary and incomplete symptomatic relief. Amongst natural products, curcumin, a major constituent of turmeric, has been intensively investigated for its neuroprotective effect against β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced toxicity in cultured neuronal cells. The ability of curcumin to attach to Aβ peptide and prevent its accumulation is attributed to its three structural characteristics such as the presence of two aromatic end groups and their co-planarity, the length and rigidity of the linker region and the substitution conformation of these aromatics. However, curcumin failed to reach adequate brain levels after oral absorption in AD clinical trials due to its low water solubility and poor oral bioavailability. A number of new curcumin analogs that mimic the active site of the compound along with analogs that mimic the curcumin anti-amyloid effect combined with anticholinesterase effect have been developed to enhance the bioavailability, pharmacokinetics, water solubility, stability at physiological conditions and delivery of curcumin. In this article, we have summarized all reported synthetic analogs of curcumin showing effects on β-amyloid and discussed their potential as therapeutic and diagnostic agents for AD.

  7. Reversion of prion protein conformational changes by synthetic beta-sheet breaker peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, C; Kascsak, R J; Saborío, G P; Aucouturier, P; Wisniewski, T; Prelli, F; Kascsak, R; Mendez, E; Harris, D A; Ironside, J; Tagliavini, F; Carp, R I; Frangione, B

    2000-01-15

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are associated with a structural transition in the prion protein that results in the conversion of the physiological PrPc to pathological PrP(Sc). We investigated whether this conformational transition can be inhibited and reversed by peptides homologous to the PrP fragments implicated in the abnormal folding, which contain specific residues acting as beta-sheet blockers (beta-sheet breaker peptides). We studied the effect of a 13-residue beta-sheet breaker peptide (iPrP13) on the reversion of the abnormal structure and properties of PrP(Sc) purified from the brains of mice with experimental scrapie and from human beings affected by sporadic and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. In a cellular model of familial prion disease, we studied the effect of the peptide in the production of the abnormal form of PrP in intact cells. The influence of the peptide on prion infectivity was studied in vivo by incubation time assays in mice with experimental scrapie. The beta-sheet breaker peptide partly reversed in-vitro PrP(Sc) to a biochemical and structural state similar to that of PrPc. The effect of the peptide was also detected in intact cells. Treatment of prion infectious material with iPrP13 delayed the appearance of clinical symptoms and decreased infectivity by 90-95% in mice with experimental scrapie. Beta-sheet breaker peptides reverse PrP conformational changes implicated in the pathogenesis of spongiform encephalopathies. These peptides or their derivatives provide a useful tool to study the role of PrP conformation and might represent a novel therapeutic approach for prion-related disorders.

  8. Amyloid-beta 1-40 is associated with alterations in NG2+ pericyte population ex vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Nina; Brännström, Kristoffer; Byman, Elin; Moussaud, Simon; Nielsen, Henrietta M; Olofsson, Anders; Wennström, Malin

    2018-02-17

    The population of brain pericytes, a cell type important for vessel stability and blood brain barrier function, has recently been shown altered in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The underlying reason for this alteration is not fully understood, but progressive accumulation of the AD characteristic peptide amyloid-beta (Aβ) has been suggested as a potential culprit. In the current study, we show reduced number of hippocampal NG2+ pericytes and an association between NG2+ pericyte numbers and Aβ1-40 levels in AD patients. We further demonstrate, using in vitro studies, an aggregation-dependent impact of Aβ1-40 on human NG2+ pericytes. Fibril-EP Aβ1-40 exposure reduced pericyte viability and proliferation and increased caspase 3/7 activity. Monomer Aβ1-40 had quite the opposite effect: increased pericyte viability and proliferation and reduced caspase 3/7 activity. Oligomer-EP Aβ1-40 had no impact on either of the cellular events. Our findings add to the growing number of studies suggesting a significant impact on pericytes in the brains of AD patients and suggest different aggregation forms of Aβ1-40 as potential key regulators of the brain pericyte population size. © 2018 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Amyloid beta and the longest-lived rodent: the naked mole-rat as a model for natural protection from Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edrey, Yael H; Medina, David X; Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel A; Oddo, Salvatore; Caccamo, Antonella; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2013-10-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) is implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) as an integral component of both neural toxicity and plaque formation. Brains of the longest-lived rodents, naked mole-rats (NMRs) approximately 32 years of age, had levels of Aβ similar to those of the 3xTg-AD mouse model of AD. Interestingly, there was no evidence of extracellular plaques, nor was there an age-related increase in Aβ levels in the individuals examined (2-20+ years). The NMR Aβ peptide showed greater homology to the human sequence than to the mouse sequence, differing by only 1 amino acid from the former. This subtle difference led to interspecies differences in aggregation propensity but not neurotoxicity; NMR Aβ was less prone to aggregation than human Aβ. Nevertheless, both NMR and human Aβ were equally toxic to mouse hippocampal neurons, suggesting that Aβ neurotoxicity and aggregation properties were not coupled. Understanding how NMRs acquire and tolerate high levels of Aβ with no plaque formation could provide useful insights into AD, and may elucidate protective mechanisms that delay AD progression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Beta-Sheet-Forming, Self-Assembled Peptide Nanomaterials towards Optical, Energy, and Healthcare Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungjin; Kim, Jae Hong; Lee, Joon Seok; Park, Chan Beum

    2015-08-12

    Peptide self-assembly is an attractive route for the synthesis of intricate organic nanostructures that possess remarkable structural variety and biocompatibility. Recent studies on peptide-based, self-assembled materials have expanded beyond the construction of high-order architectures; they are now reporting new functional materials that have application in the emerging fields such as artificial photosynthesis and rechargeable batteries. Nevertheless, there have been few reviews particularly concentrating on such versatile, emerging applications. Herein, recent advances in the synthesis of self-assembled peptide nanomaterials (e.g., cross β-sheet-based amyloid nanostructures, peptide amphiphiles) are selectively reviewed and their new applications in diverse, interdisciplinary fields are described, ranging from optics and energy storage/conversion to healthcare. The applications of peptide-based self-assembled materials in unconventional fields are also highlighted, such as photoluminescent peptide nanostructures, artificial photosynthetic peptide nanomaterials, and lithium-ion battery components. The relation of such functional materials to the rapidly progressing biomedical applications of peptide self-assembly, which include biosensors/chips and regenerative medicine, are discussed. The combination of strategies shown in these applications would further promote the discovery of novel, functional, small materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Redox Reactions of Copper Complexes Formed with Different β-amyloid Peptides and Their Neuropathalogical Relevance†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dianlu; Men, Lijie; Wang, Jianxiu; Zhang, Yi; Chickenyen, Sara; Wang, Yinsheng; Zhou, Feimeng

    2011-01-01

    The binding stoichiometry between Cu(II) and the full-length β-amyloid Aβ(1–42) and the oxidation state of copper in the resultant complex were determined by electrospray ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR-MS) and cyclic voltammetry. The same approach was extended to the copper complexes of Aβ(1–16) and Aβ(1–28). A stoichiometric ratio of 1:1 was directly observed and the oxidation state of copper was deduced to be 2+ for all the complexes and residues tyrosine-10 and methionine-35 are not oxidized in the Aβ(1–42)-Cu(II) complex. The stoichiometric ratio remains the same in the presence of more than 10 fold excess of Cu(II). Redox potentials of the sole tyrosine residue and the Cu(II) center were determined to be ca. 0.75 V and 0.08 V vs. Ag/AgCl (or 0.95 V and 0.28 V vs. normal hydrogen electrode (NHE)), respectively. More importantly, for the first time, Aβ-Cu(I) complex has been generated electrochemically and was found to catalyze the reduction of oxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. The voltammetric behaviors of the three Aβ segments suggest that diffusion of oxygen to the metal center can be affected by the length and hydrophobicity of the Aβ peptide. The determination and assignment of the redox potentials clarify some misconceptions in the redox reactions involving Aβ and provide new insight into the possible roles of redox metal ions in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. In cellular environments, the reduction potential of the Aβ-Cu(II) complex is sufficiently low to react with antioxidants (e.g., ascorbic acid) and cellular redox buffers (e.g., glutathione), and the Aβ-Cu(I) complex produced could subsequently reduce oxygen to form hydrogen peroxide via a catalytic cycle. Using voltammetry, the Aβ-Cu(II) complex formed in solution was found to be readily reduced by ascorbic acid. Hydrogen peroxide produced, in addition to its role in damaging DNA, protein, and lipid molecules

  12. Protective Effects Induced by Microwave-Assisted Aqueous Harpagophytum Extract on Rat Cortex Synaptosomes Challenged with Amyloid β-Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Claudio; Recinella, Lucia; Locatelli, Marcello; Guglielmi, Paolo; Secci, Daniela; Leporini, Lidia; Chiavaroli, Annalisa; Leone, Sheila; Martinotti, Sara; Brunetti, Luigi; Vacca, Michele; Menghini, Luigi; Orlando, Giustino

    2017-08-01

    Harpagophytum procumbens is a plant species that displays anti-inflammatory properties in multiple tissues. The iridoid glycosides arpagoside, harpagide, and procumbide appear to be the most therapeutically important constituents. In addition, harpagoside treatment exerted neuroprotective effects both in vitro and in vivo. Considering these findings, the aim of the present work is to explore the possible protective role of the previously described microwave-assisted aqueous extract of H. procumbens on rat hypothalamic (Hypo-E22) cells, and in rat cortex challenged with amyloid β-peptide (1-40). In this context, we assayed the protective effects induced by H. procumbens by measuring the levels of malondialdehyde, 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK), brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and tumor necrosis factor-α, 3-HK. Finally, we evaluated the effects of H. procumbens treatment on cortex levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. H. procumbens extract was well tolerated by Hypo-E22 cells and upregulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression but down-regulated tumor necrosis factor-α gene expression. In addition, the extract reduced amyloid β-peptide stimulation of malondialdehyde and 3-HK and blunted the decrease of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, in the cortex. In this context, our work supports further studies for the evaluation and confirmation of Harpagophytum in the management of the clinical symptoms related to Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Small Amphipathic Molecules Modulate Secondary Structure and Amyloid Fibril-forming Kinetics of Alzheimer Disease Peptide Aβ1–42

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Timothy M.; Friedhuber, Anna; Lind, Monica; Howlett, Geoffrey J.; Masters, Colin; Roberts, Blaine R.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid fibril formation is associated with a number of debilitating systemic and neurodegenerative diseases. One of the most prominent is Alzheimer disease in which aggregation and deposition of the Aβ peptide occur. Aβ is widely considered to mediate the extensive neuronal loss observed in this disease through the formation of soluble oligomeric species, with the final fibrillar end product of the aggregation process being relatively inert. Factors that influence the aggregation of these amyloid-forming proteins are therefore very important. We have screened a library of 96 amphipathic molecules for effects on Aβ1–42 aggregation and self-association. We find, using thioflavin T fluorescence and electron microscopy assays, that 30 of the molecules inhibit the aggregation process, whereas 36 activate fibril formation. Several activators and inhibitors were subjected to further analysis using analytical ultracentrifugation and circular dichroism. Activators typically display a 1:10 peptide:detergent stoichiometry for maximal activation, whereas the inhibitors are effective at a 1:1 stoichiometry. Analytical ultracentrifugation and circular dichroism experiments show that activators promote a mixture of unfolded and β-sheet structures and rapidly form large aggregates, whereas inhibitors induce α-helical structures that form stable dimeric/trimeric oligomers. The results suggest that Aβ1–42 contains at least one small molecule binding site, which modulates the secondary structure and aggregation processes. Further studies of the binding of these compounds to Aβ may provide insight for developing therapeutic strategies aimed at stabilizing Aβ in a favorable conformation. PMID:22461629

  14. Small amphipathic molecules modulate secondary structure and amyloid fibril-forming kinetics of Alzheimer disease peptide Aβ(1-42).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Timothy M; Friedhuber, Anna; Lind, Monica; Howlett, Geoffrey J; Masters, Colin; Roberts, Blaine R

    2012-05-11

    Amyloid fibril formation is associated with a number of debilitating systemic and neurodegenerative diseases. One of the most prominent is Alzheimer disease in which aggregation and deposition of the Aβ peptide occur. Aβ is widely considered to mediate the extensive neuronal loss observed in this disease through the formation of soluble oligomeric species, with the final fibrillar end product of the aggregation process being relatively inert. Factors that influence the aggregation of these amyloid-forming proteins are therefore very important. We have screened a library of 96 amphipathic molecules for effects on Aβ(1-42) aggregation and self-association. We find, using thioflavin T fluorescence and electron microscopy assays, that 30 of the molecules inhibit the aggregation process, whereas 36 activate fibril formation. Several activators and inhibitors were subjected to further analysis using analytical ultracentrifugation and circular dichroism. Activators typically display a 1:10 peptide:detergent stoichiometry for maximal activation, whereas the inhibitors are effective at a 1:1 stoichiometry. Analytical ultracentrifugation and circular dichroism experiments show that activators promote a mixture of unfolded and β-sheet structures and rapidly form large aggregates, whereas inhibitors induce α-helical structures that form stable dimeric/trimeric oligomers. The results suggest that Aβ(1-42) contains at least one small molecule binding site, which modulates the secondary structure and aggregation processes. Further studies of the binding of these compounds to Aβ may provide insight for developing therapeutic strategies aimed at stabilizing Aβ in a favorable conformation.

  15. AmyloidPeptide Is Needed for cGMP-Induced Long-Term Potentiation and Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeri, Agostino; Ricciarelli, Roberta; Gulisano, Walter; Rivera, Daniela; Rebosio, Claudia; Calcagno, Elisa; Tropea, Maria Rosaria; Conti, Silvia; Das, Utpal; Roy, Subhojit; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Arancio, Ottavio; Fedele, Ernesto; Puzzo, Daniela

    2017-07-19

    High levels of amyloidpeptide (Aβ) have been related to Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. However, in the healthy brain, low physiologically relevant concentrations of Aβ are necessary for long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory. Because cGMP plays a key role in these processes, here we investigated whether the cyclic nucleotide cGMP influences Aβ levels and function during LTP and memory. We demonstrate that the increase of cGMP levels by the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors sildenafil and vardenafil induces a parallel release of Aβ due to a change in the approximation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1. Moreover, electrophysiological and behavioral studies performed on animals of both sexes showed that blocking Aβ function, by using anti-murine Aβ antibodies or APP knock-out mice, prevents the cGMP-dependent enhancement of LTP and memory. Our data suggest that cGMP positively regulates Aβ levels in the healthy brain which, in turn, boosts synaptic plasticity and memory. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a key pathogenetic factor in Alzheimer's disease. However, low concentrations of endogenous Aβ, mimicking levels of the peptide in the healthy brain, enhance hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory. Because the second messenger cGMP exerts a central role in LTP mechanisms, here we studied whether cGMP affects Aβ levels and function during LTP. We show that cGMP enhances Aβ production by increasing the APP/BACE-1 convergence in endolysosomal compartments. Moreover, the cGMP-induced enhancement of LTP and memory was disrupted by blockade of Aβ, suggesting that the physiological effect of the cyclic nucleotide on LTP and memory is dependent upon Aβ. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/376926-12$15.00/0.

  16. Effects of Amyloid Precursor Protein 17 Peptide on the Protection of Diabetic Encephalopathy and Improvement of Glycol Metabolism in the Diabetic Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have proposed that amyloid precursor protein 17 peptide (APP17 peptide, an active fragment of amyloid precursor protein (APP in the nervous system, has therapeutic effects on neurodegeneration. Diabetic encephalopathy (DE is a neurological disease caused by diabetes. Here we use multiple experimental approaches to investigate the effect of APP17 peptide on changes in learning behavior and glycol metabolism in rats. It was found that rats with DE treated by APP17 peptide showed reversed behavioral alternation. The [18F]-FDG-PET images and other results all showed that the APP17 peptide could promote glucose metabolism in the brain of the DE rat model. Meanwhile, the insulin signaling was markedly increased as shown by increased phosphorylation of Akt and enhanced GLUT4 activation. Compared with the DE group, the activities of SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT in the rat hippocampal gyrus were increased, while MDA decreased markedly in the DE + APP17 peptide group. No amyloid plaques in the cortex and the hippocampus were detected in either group, indicating that the experimental animals in the current study were not suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. These results indicate that APP17 peptide could be used to treat DE effectively.

  17. Direct interaction of beta-amyloid with Na,K-ATPase as a putative regulator of the enzyme function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrushanko, Irina Yu.; Mitkevich, Vladimir A.; Anashkina, Anastasia A.; Adzhubei, Alexei A.; Burnysheva, Ksenia M.; Lakunina, Valentina A.; Kamanina, Yulia V.; Dergousova, Elena A.; Lopina, Olga D.; Ogunshola, Omolara O.; Bogdanova, Anna Yu.; Makarov, Alexander A.

    2016-06-01

    By maintaining the Na+ and K+ transmembrane gradient mammalian Na,K-ATPase acts as a key regulator of neuronal electrotonic properties. Na,K-ATPase has an important role in synaptic transmission and memory formation. Accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) at the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease is accompanied by reduction of Na,K-ATPase functional activity. The molecular mechanism behind this phenomenon is not known. Here we show that the monomeric Aβ(1-42) forms a tight (Kd of 3 μM), enthalpy-driven equimolar complex with α1β1 Na,K-ATPase. The complex formation results in dose-dependent inhibition of the enzyme hydrolytic activity. The binding site of Aβ(1-42) is localized in the “gap” between the alpha- and beta-subunits of Na,K-ATPase, disrupting the enzyme functionality by preventing the subunits from shifting towards each other. Interaction of Na,K-ATPase with exogenous Aβ(1-42) leads to a pronounced decrease of the enzyme transport and hydrolytic activity and Src-kinase activation in neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y. This interaction allows regulation of Na,K-ATPase activity by short-term increase of the Aβ(1-42) level. However prolonged increase of Aβ(1-42) level under pathological conditions could lead to chronical inhibition of Na,K-ATPase and disruption of neuronal function. Taken together, our data suggest the role of beta-amyloid as a novel physiological regulator of Na,K-ATPase.

  18. Protective effect of systemic L-kynurenine and probenecid administration on behavioural and morphological alterations induced by toxic soluble amyloid beta (25-35) in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Mora, Paul; Méndez-Cuesta, Luis A; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Fortoul-van Der Goes, Teresa I; Santamaría, Abel

    2010-07-11

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide exerts different toxic effects at a cellular level, including over-activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) and excitotoxicity, synaptic dysfunction and neuronal death. Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is an endogenous antagonist of NMDAr and alpha7 nicotinic receptors. Systemic administrations of both the immediate metabolic precursor of KYNA, L-kynurenine (L-KYN), and a proved inhibitor of KYNA's brain transport, probenecid (PROB), have shown to produce neuroprotective effects in a considerable number of experimental toxic conditions; however, this strategy has not been tested in the toxic model Abeta peptide so far. In this study we evaluated the effects of systemic administration of PROB (50 mg/kg/day for 7 days), L-KYN (75 mg/kg/day for 7 days) and their combination, on behavioural (locomotor activity and spatial memory) and morphological alterations induced by an intrahippocampal infusion of Abeta 25-35 to rats. An additional group was administered with the potent NMDAr antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801, 0.8 mg/kg/day for 7 days) for comparative purposes. A significant improvement of spatial memory was evident in Abeta-lesioned rats since post-lesion day 21 with all treatments tested and this effect was correlated with a reduction of cell damage and a decrease in reactive gliosis in hippocampal CA1 area. Neither L-KYN, nor PROB, or their combination, produced major alterations in motor function when given alone to rats. These results suggest that modulation of NMDAr activity by mean of therapeutic strategies designed to enhance KYNA in the brain may help to counteract neurodegenerative events coursing with Abeta toxicity and excitotoxic patterns. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Design and synthesis of curcumin analogues for in vivo fluorescence imaging and inhibiting copper-induced cross-linking of amyloid beta species in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueli; Tian, Yanli; Li, Zeng; Tian, Xiaoyu; Sun, Hongbin; Liu, Hong; Moore, Anna; Ran, Chongzhao

    2013-11-06

    In this article, we first designed and synthesized curcumin-based near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging probes for detecting both soluble and insoluble amyloid beta (Aβ) species and then an inhibitor that could attenuate cross-linking of Aβ induced by copper. According to our previous results and the possible structural stereohindrance compatibility of the Aβ peptide and the hydrophobic/hydrophilic property of the Aβ13-20 (HHQKLVFF) fragment, NIR imaging probe CRANAD-58 was designed and synthesized. As expected CRANAD-58 showed significant fluorescence property changes upon mixing with both soluble and insoluble Aβ species in vitro. In vivo NIR imaging revealed that CRANAD-58 was capable of differentiating transgenic and wild-type mice as young as 4 months old, the age that lacks apparently visible Aβ plaques and Aβ is likely in its soluble forms. According to our limited studies on the interaction mechanism between CRANAD-58 and Aβ, we also designed CRANAD-17 to attenuate the cross-linking of Aβ42 induced by copper. It is well-known that the coordination of copper with imidazoles on Histidine-13 and 14 (H13, H14) of Aβ peptides could initialize covalent cross-linking of Aβ. In CRANAD-17, a curcumin scaffold was used as an anchoring moiety to usher the designed compound to the vicinity of H13 and H14 of Aβ, and imidazole rings were incorporated to compete with H13/H14 for copper binding. The results of SDS-PAGE gel and Western blot indicated that CRANAD-17 was capable of inhibiting Aβ42 cross-linking induced by copper. This raises a potential for CRANAD-17 to be considered for AD therapy.

  20. Nuclear localisation of the G-actin sequestering peptide thymosin beta4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Thomas; Rosorius, Olaf; Otto, Angela M; Müller, Christian S G; Ballweber, Edda; Hannappel, Ewald; Mannherz, Hans Georg

    2004-10-15

    Thymosin beta4 is regarded as the main G-actin sequestering peptide in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells. It is also thought to be involved in cellular events like cancerogenesis, apoptosis, angiogenesis, blood coagulation and wound healing. Thymosin beta4 has been previously reported to localise intracellularly to the cytoplasm as detected by immunofluorescence. It can be selectively labelled at two of its glutamine-residues with fluorescent Oregon Green cadaverine using transglutaminase; however, this labelling does not interfere with its interaction with G-actin. Here we show that after microinjection into intact cells, fluorescently labelled thymosin beta4 has a diffuse cytoplasmic and a pronounced nuclear staining. Enzymatic cleavage of fluorescently labelled thymosin beta4 with AsnC-endoproteinase yielded two mono-labelled fragments of the peptide. After microinjection of these fragments, only the larger N-terminal fragment, containing the proposed actin-binding sequence exhibited nuclear localisation, whereas the smaller C-terminal fragment remained confined to the cytoplasm. We further showed that in digitonin permeabilised and extracted cells, fluorescent thymosin beta4 was solely localised within the cytoplasm, whereas it was found concentrated within the cell nuclei after an additional Triton X100 extraction. Therefore, we conclude that thymosin beta4 is specifically translocated into the cell nucleus by an active transport mechanism, requiring an unidentified soluble cytoplasmic factor. Our data furthermore suggest that this peptide may also serve as a G-actin sequestering peptide in the nucleus, although additional nuclear functions cannot be excluded.

  1. Characterization of the fine specificity of peptide antibodies to HLA-DQ beta-chain molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, J S; Atar, D; Karlsen, Alan E

    1990-01-01

    In an attempt to produce epitope specific antisera which could distinguish two closely associated HLA-DQ beta-chain alleles, we immunized 20 rabbits with synthetic peptides representing sequences from the first domain of the HLA-DQw8 and -DQw7 beta-chain molecules, differing only by one amino acid...... in position 57. Several of the antisera in immunoblotting specifically recognized either the HLA-DQw7 or the HLA-DQw8 beta-chain allele as previously reported. The fine specificity of the antisera was tested in ELISA using synthetic peptides of varying length as solid phase antigen. Two out of the 20 antisera...... specifically recognized DQw7 beta peptides and two antisera bound only to DQw8 beta peptides from the region containing the amino acid in position 57. To analyze whether the antisera bound to native HLA-DQ beta-chain molecules, FACS analysis was carried out. Seven of the 20 antisera bound to intact EBV...

  2. Amyloid-beta oligomer detection by ELISA in cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, K.A.; Jongbloed, W.; Biemans, E.A.L.M.; Veerhuis, R.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Kuiperij, H.B.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits are important pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ aggregates into fibrils; however, the intermediate oligomers are believed to be the most neurotoxic species and, therefore, are of great interest as potential biomarkers. Here, we have developed an

  3. Protective Effects of Indian Spice Curcumin Against Amyloid Beta in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Grady, Mary Catherine; Mitchell, Andrew; Tonk, Sahil; Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar; Bhatti, Jasvinder Singh; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Vijayan, Murali; Kumar, Subodh; Wang, Rui; Adi Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli; Ogunmokun, Gilbert; Thamarai, Kavya; Quesada, Kandi; Boles, Annette; Reddy, Arubala P

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to assess the current understanding of Indian spice ‘Curcumin’ against amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Natural products, such as ginger, curcumin and gingko biloba have been used as diets and dietary supplements to treat human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular, respiratory, infectious, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndromes and neurological disorders. Products derived from plants are known to have protective effects, including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-arthritis, pro-healing and boosting memory cognitive functions. In the last decade, several groups have designed and synthesized curcumin and its derivatives and extensively tested using cell and mouse models of AD. Recent research on amyloid-β and curcumin has revealed that curcumin prevents amyloid-β aggregation and crosses the blood brain barrier (BBB), reach brain cells and protect neurons from various toxic insults of aging and amyloid-β in humans. Recent research has also reported that curcumin ameliorates cognitive decline and improves synaptic functions in mouse models of AD. Further, recent groups have initiated studies on elderly individuals and patients with AD and the outcome of these studies is currently being assessed. This article highlights the beneficial effects of curcumin on AD. This article also critically assesses the current limitations of curcumin’s bioavailability and urgent need for new formulation to increase its brain levels to treat patients with AD. PMID:29332042

  4. Correlations between serum levels of beta amyloid, cerebrospinal levels of tau and phospho tau, and delayed response tasks in young and aged cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darusman, Huda Shalahudin; Sajuthi, D; Kalliokoski, O

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to explore cynomolgus monkeys as an animal model for Alzheimer's disease, the present study focused on the Alzheimer's biomarkers beta amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42 ) in serum, and total tau (t-tau) and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) levels in cerebrospinal fluid....

  5. Beta-amyloid-induced cholinergic denervation correlates with enhanced nitric oxide synthase activity in rat cerebral cortex: Reversal by NMDA receptor blockade : Reversal by NMDA receptor blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O’Mahony, S.; Harkany, T.; Ábrahám, I.; Jong, G.I. de; Varga, J.L.; Zarándi, M.; Penke, B.; Nyakas, C.; Luiten, P.G.M.; Leonard, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    Ample experimental evidence indicates that acute beta-amyloid infusion into the nucleus basalis of rats elicits abrupt degeneration of the magnocellular cholinergic neurons projecting to the cerebral cortex, In fact, involvement of a permanent Ca2+ overload, partially via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)

  6. Frameshifted beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP(+1)) is a secretory protein, and the level of APP(+1) in cerebrospinal fluid is linked to Alzheimer pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, Elly M.; van Dijk, Renske; Gerez, Lisya; Sluijs, Jacqueline A.; Hobo, Barbara; Tonk, Martijn T.; de Haan, Annett; Kamphorst, Wouter; Fischer, David F.; Benne, Rob; van Leeuwen, Fred W.

    2003-01-01

    Molecular misreading of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene generates mRNA with dinucleotide deletions in GAGAG motifs. The resulting truncated and partly frameshifted APP protein ( APP(+1)) accumulates in the dystrophic neurites and the neurofibrillary tangles in the cortex and

  7. Immunization with the SDPM1 peptide lowers amyloid plaque burden and improves cognitive function in the APPswePSEN1(A246E) transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiou-Miin; Devries, Sarah; Camboni, Marybeth; Glass, Matthew; Martin, Paul T

    2010-09-01

    Vaccination has become an important therapeutic approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, immunization with Abeta amyloid can have unwanted, potentially lethal, side effects. Here we demonstrate an alternative peptide-mimotope vaccine strategy using the SDPM1 peptide. SDPM1 is a 20 amino acid peptide bounded by cysteines that binds tetramer forms of Abeta(1-40)- and Abeta(1-42)-amyloids and blocks subsequent Abeta amyloid aggregation. Immunization of mice with SDPM1 induced peptide-mimotope antibodies with the same biological activity as the SDPM1 peptide. When done prior to the onset of amyloid plaque formation, SDPM1 vaccination of APPswePSEN1(A246E) transgenic mice reduced amyloid plaque burden and Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) levels in the brain, improved cognitive performance in Morris water maze tests, and resulted in no increased T cell responses to immunogenic or Abeta peptides or brain inflammation. When done after plaque burden was already significant, SDPM1 immunization still significantly reduced amyloid plaque burden and Abeta(1-40/1-42) peptide levels in APPswePSEN1(A246E) brain without inducing encephalitogenic T cell responses or brain inflammation, but treatment at this stage did not improve cognitive function. These experiments demonstrate the efficacy of a novel vaccine approach for Alzheimer's disease where immunization with an Abeta(1-40/1-42) amyloid-specific binding and blocking peptide is used to inhibit the development of neuropathology and cognitive dysfunction.

  8. Astrocytic expression of the Alzheimer's disease beta-secretase (BACE1) is stimulus-dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartlage-Rübsamen, Maike; Zeitschel, Ulrike; Apelt, Jenny

    2003-01-01

    The beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is a prerequisite for the generation of beta-amyloid peptides, which give rise to cerebrovascular and parenchymal beta-amyloid deposits in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. BACE1 is neuronally expressed in the brains of humans and experimental...... paradigms studied. In contrast, BACE1 expression by reactive astrocytes was evident in chronic but not in acute models of gliosis. Additionally, we observed BACE1-immunoreactive astrocytes in proximity to beta-amyloid plaques in the brains of aged Tg2576 mice and Alzheimer's disease patients....

  9. Disaggregation of amyloid plaque in brain of Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice with daily subcutaneous administration of a tetravalent bispecific antibody that targets the transferrin receptor and the Abeta amyloid peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbria, Rachita K; Hui, Eric Ka-Wai; Lu, Jeff Zhiqiang; Boado, Ruben J; Pardridge, William M

    2013-09-03

    Anti-amyloid antibodies (AAA) are under development as new therapeutics that disaggregate the amyloid plaque in brain in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the AAAs are large molecule drugs that do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in the absence of BBB disruption. In the present study, an AAA was re-engineered for receptor-mediated transport across the BBB via the endogenous BBB transferrin receptor (TfR). A single chain Fv (ScFv) antibody form of an AAA was fused to the carboxyl terminus of each heavy chain of a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the mouse TfR, and this produced a tetravalent bispecific antibody designated the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein. Unlike a conventional AAA, which has a plasma half-time of weeks, the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein is cleared from plasma in mice with a mean residence time of about 3 h. Therefore, a novel protocol was developed for the treatment of one year old presenilin (PS)-1/amyloid precursor protein (APP) AD double transgenic PSAPP mice, which were administered daily subcutaneous (sc) injections of 5 mg/kg of the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein for 12 consecutive weeks. At the end of the treatment, brain amyloid plaques were quantified with confocal microscopy using both Thioflavin-S staining and immunostaining with the 6E10 antibody against Abeta amyloid fibrils. Fusion protein treatment caused a 57% and 61% reduction in amyloid plaque in the cortex and hippocampus, respectively. No increase in plasma immunoreactive Abeta amyloid peptide, and no cerebral microhemorrhage, was observed. Chronic daily sc treatment of the mice with the fusion protein caused no immune reactions and only a low titer antidrug antibody response. In conclusion, re-engineering AAAs for receptor-mediated BBB transport allows for reduction in brain amyloid plaque without cerebral microhemorrhage following daily sc treatment for 12 weeks.

  10. New Method Based on Capillary Electrophoresis with Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection (CE-LIF) to Monitor Interaction between Nanoparticles and the AmyloidPeptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brambilla, Davide; Verpillot, Romain; Taverna, Myriam; de Kimpe, Line; Le Droumaguet, Benjamin; Nicolas, Julien; Canovi, Mara; Gobbi, Marco; Mantegazza, Francesco; Salmona, Mario; Nicolas, Valérie; Scheper, Wiep; Couvreur, Patrick; Andrieux, Karine

    2010-01-01

    A novel application of capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) was proposed to efficiently detect and monitor the interaction between polymeric nanoparticles and the β-Amyloid peptide (Aβ(1-42)), a biomarker for Alzheimer's Disease (AD), at concentrations close

  11. Amyloidpeptide increases cell surface localization of α7 ACh receptor to protect neurons from amyloid β-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yu; Tsuchiya, Ayako; Kanno, Takeshi; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    Amyloidpeptide 1-42 (Aβ1-42) reduced PC-12 cell viability in a concentration (1-10 μM)- and treatment time (48-72 h)-dependent manner. Nicotine prevented Aβ1-42-induced PC-12 cell death, but conversely, the α7 ACh receptor antagonist α-bungarotoxin enhanced Aβ1-42-induced cell toxicity. Extracellularly applied Aβ1-42 significantly increased cell surface localization of α7 ACh receptor in PC-12 cells as compared with that for non-treated control cells. Cell surface localization of α7 ACh receptor in the brain of 5xFAD mouse, an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD), apparently increased in an age (1-12 months)-dependent manner in association with increased accumulation of Aβ1-42 in the plasma membrane component. Taken together, these results indicate that Aβ1-42 promotes translocation of α7 ACh receptor towards the cell surface and that α7 ACh receptor rescues neuronal cells from Aβ1-42-induced damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Amyloid Beta and Tau Proteins as Therapeutic Targets for Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment: Rethinking the Current Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Mondragón-Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is defined by the concurrence of accumulation of abnormal aggregates composed of two proteins: Amyloid beta (Aβ and tau, and of cellular changes including neurite degeneration and loss of neurons and cognitive functions. Based on their strong association with disease, genetically and pathologically, it is not surprising that there has been a focus towards developing therapies against the aggregated structures. Unfortunately, current therapies have but mild benefit. With this in mind we will focus on the relationship of synaptic plasticity with Aβ and tau protein and their role as potential targets for the development of therapeutic drugs. Finally, we will provide perspectives in developing a multifactorial strategy for AD treatment.

  13. Effects of pre-germinated brown rice on beta-amyloid protein-induced learning and memory deficits in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamiya, Takayoshi; Asanuma, Takamasa; Kise, Mitsuo; Ito, Yukihiko; Mizukuchi, Aya; Aoto, Hiromichi; Ukai, Makoto

    2004-07-01

    We evaluated the effects of pre-germinated brown rice (hatsuga genmai, PGR) on learning and memory and compared them with those of polished rice or cornstarch. In mice that were fed pellets of polished rice or PGR for two weeks, the learning ability in the Morris water maze test was significantly enhanced compared with mice that were fed cornstarch pellets. In the Y-maze test, the intake of food pellets for two weeks failed to affect spontaneous alternation behavior. Beta-amyloid(25-35) (Abeta(25-35): 3 nmol/mouse, i.c.v.) protein impaired spontaneous alternation behavior in mice that were fed pellets of cornstarch or polished rice. In contrast, PGR pellets prevented the Abeta(25-35)-induced impairment of spontaneous alternation behavior. These results suggest that polished rice and PGR have facilitating effects on spatial learning. In particular, it is surmised that PGR may prevent Alzheimer's disease associated with Abeta.

  14. Decreased rhythmic GABAergic septal activity and memory-associated theta oscillations after hippocampal amyloid-beta pathology in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villette, Vincent; Poindessous-Jazat, Frédérique; Simon, Axelle; Léna, Clément; Roullot, Elodie; Bellessort, Brice; Epelbaum, Jacques; Dutar, Patrick; Stéphan, Aline

    2010-08-18

    The memory deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease result to a great extent from hippocampal network dysfunction. The coordination of this network relies on theta (symbol) oscillations generated in the medial septum. Here, we investigated in rats the impact of hippocampal amyloid beta (Abeta) injections on the physiological and cognitive functions that depend on the septohippocampal system. Hippocampal Abeta injections progressively impaired behavioral performances, the associated hippocampal theta power, and theta frequency response in a visuospatial recognition test. These alterations were associated with a specific reduction in the firing of the identified rhythmic bursting GABAergic neurons responsible for the propagation of the theta rhythm to the hippocampus, but without loss of medial septal neurons. Such results indicate that hippocampal Abeta treatment leads to a specific functional depression of inhibitory projection neurons of the medial septum, resulting in the functional impairment of the temporal network.

  15. Ultrafast Unzipping of a Beta-Hairpin Peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zinth, W.; Schrader, T.E.; Schreier, W.J.; Koller, F.O.; Cordes, T.; Babitzki, G.; Denschlag, R.; Tavan, P.; Löweneck, M.; Dong, Shou-Liang; Moroder, L.; Renner, C.; Corkum, Paul; Jonas, David M.; Miller, R.J. Dwayne; Weiner, Andrew M.

    2007-01-01

    Light induced switching of a beta-hairpin structure is investigated by femtosecond IR spectroscopy. While the unzipping process comprises ultrafast kinetics and is finished within 1 ns, the folding into the hairpin structure is a much slower process.

  16. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists: Beta-Cell Protection or Exhaustion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Raalte, Daniël H; Verchere, C Bruce

    2016-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonists enhance insulin secretion and may improve pancreatic islet cell function. However, GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist treatment may have more complex, and sometimes deleterious, effects on beta cells. We discuss the concepts of beta cell protection versus exhaustion for different GLP-1R agonists based on recent data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Reduction of Alzheimer's disease beta-amyloid pathology in the absence of gut microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Harach, T.; Marungruang, N.; Dutilleul, N.; Cheatham, V.; Coy, K. D. Mc; Neher, J. J.; Jucker, M.; Fåk, F.; T.; Lasser; Bolmont, T.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia in the western world, however there is no cure available for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder. Despite clinical and experimental evidence implicating the intestinal microbiota in a number of brain disorders, its impact on Alzheimer's disease is not known. We generated a germ-free mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and discovered a drastic reduction of cerebral Ab amyloid pathology when compared to control Alzheimer's disease a...

  18. Protective Effects of Indian Spice Curcumin Against Amyloid Beta in Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, P. Hemachandra; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Grady, Mary Catherine; Mitchell, Andrew; Tonk, Sahil; Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar; Bhatti, Jasvinder Singh; Kandimalla, Ramesh; Vijayan, Murali; Kumar, Subodh; Wang, Rui; Adi Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli; Ogunmokun, Gilbert; Thamarai, Kavya

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to assess the current understanding of Indian spice ‘Curcumin’ against amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Natural products, such as ginger, curcumin and gingko biloba have been used as diets and dietary supplements to treat human diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular, respiratory, infectious, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndromes and neurological disorders. Products derived from plants are known to have protective effe...

  19. [18F] AV-1451 uptake in corticobasal syndrome: the influence of beta-amyloid and clinical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, F; Whitwell, J L; Martin, P R; Senjem, M L; Knopman, D S; Jack, C R; Lowe, V J; Petersen, R C; Boeve, B F; Josephs, K A

    2018-03-01

    Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is a phenotypic manifestation of diverse pathologies, including Alzheimer's disease and 4-repeat tauopathies. Predicting pathology in CBS is unreliable and, hence, molecular neuroimaging may prove to be useful. The aim of this study was to assess regional patterns of uptake on [ 18 F] AV-1451 PET in CBS and determine whether patterns of uptake differ according to beta-amyloid deposition or differing clinical presentations. Fourteen patients meeting criteria for CBS underwent Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) and [ 18 F] AV-1451 PET. Seven patients presented as CBS and seven presented with apraxia of speech (AOS) and later evolved into CBS. A global PiB summary was calculated and used to classify patients as PiB (-) or PiB (+). AV-1451 uptake was calculated in fourteen regions-of-interest, with values divided by uptake in cerebellar crus grey matter to generate standard uptake value ratios. AV-1451 uptake was considered elevated if it fell above the 95th percentile from a group of 476 cognitively unimpaired normal controls. Six of the 14 CBS patients (43%) were PiB (+), with three of these patients showing strikingly elevated AV-1451 uptake across many cortical regions. Of the eight PiB (-) patients, only those with AOS showed elevated AV-1451 uptake in supplementary motor area and precentral cortex compared to controls. No region of elevated AV-1451 uptake were observed in PiB (-) typical CBS patients without AOS. These results suggest that regional [ 18 F] AV-1451 is variable in CBS and depends on the presence of beta-amyloid as well as clinical presentation such as AOS. PiB (+) CBS does not necessarily reflect underlying Alzheimer's disease; however, the possibility some of these patients will evolve into Alzheimer's disease over time cannot be excluded.

  20. Oligomeric AmyloidPeptide on Sialylic Lewisx–Selectin Bonding at Cerebral Endothelial Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sholpan Askarova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder, which affects approximately 10% of the population aged 65 and 40% of people over the age 80. Currently, AD is on the list of diseases with no effective treatment. Thus, the study of molecular and cellular mechanisms of AD progression is of high scientific and practical importance. In fact, dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB plays an important role in the onset and progression of the disease. Increased deposition of amyloid b peptide (Aβ in cerebral vasculature and enhanced transmigration of monocytes across the BBB are frequently observed in AD brains and are some of the pathological hallmarks of the diseases. Since the transmigration of monocytes across the BBB is both a mechanical and a biochemical process, the expression of adhesion molecules and mechanical properties of endothelial cells are the critical factors that require investigation.Methods: Because of recent advances in the biological applications of atomic force microscopy (AFM, we applied AFM with cantilever tips bio-functionalized by sLex in combination with the advanced immunofluorescent microscopy (QIM to study the direct effects of Aβ42 oligomers on the selectins expression, actin polymerization, and cellular mechanical and adhesion properties in cerebral endothelial cells (mouse bEnd3 line and primary human CECs and find a possible way to attenuate these effects. Results: QIM results showed that Aβ42 increased the expressions of P-selectin on the cell surface and enhanced actin polymerization. Consistent with our QIM results, AFM data showed that Aβ42 increased the probability of cell adhesion with sLex-coated cantilever and cell stiffness. These effects were counteracted by lovstatin, a cholesterol-lowering drug.  Surprisingly, the apparent rupture force of sLex-selectin bonding was significantly lower after treatment with Aβ42, as compared with the control (i.e. no treatment

  1. The alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-selective antagonist, methyllycaconitine, partially protects against beta-amyloid1-42 toxicity in primary neuron-enriched cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Shelley E; de Fiebre, Nancy Ellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2004-10-01

    Studies have suggested that the neuroprotective actions of alpha7 nicotinic agonists arise from activation of receptors and not from the extensive desensitization which rapidly follows activation. Here, we report that the alpha7-selective nicotinic antagonist, methyllycaconitine (MLA), protects against beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity; whereas the alpha4beta2-selective antagonist, dihydro-beta-erythroidine, does not. These findings suggest that neuroprotective actions of alpha7-acting agents arise from receptor inhibition/desensitization and that alpha7 antagonists may be useful neuroprotective agents.

  2. Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid Beta and Tau Concentrations Are Not Modulated by 16 Weeks of Moderate- to High-Intensity Physical Exercise in Patients with Alzheimer Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla Steen; Portelius, Erik; Siersma, Volkert

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical exercise may have some effect on cognition in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). However, the underlying biochemical effects are unclear. Animal studies have shown that amyloid beta (Aβ), one of the pathological hallmarks of AD, can be altered with high levels of physical...... of Life, Physical Health and Functional Ability in Alzheimer's Disease: The Effect of Physical Exercise (ADEX) study we analyzed cerebrospinal fluid samples for Aβ species, total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and soluble amyloid precursor protein (sAPP) species. We also assessed the patients...

  3. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Regulates Production of AmyloidPeptides and Tau Phosphorylation in Diabetic Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Sen Qu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of diabetic neurological complications is not fully understood. Diabetes mellitus (DM and Alzheimer’s disease (AD are characterized by amyloid deposits. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of AD and DM. Here we tried to investigate the production of amyloidpeptides (Aβ and phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau in DM rats and elucidate the role of GSK-3 and Akt (protein kinase B, PKB in these processes. Streptozotocin injection-induced DM rats displayed an increased GSK-3 activity, decreased activity and expression of Akt. And Aβ40 and Aβ42 were found overproduced and the microtubule-associated protein tau was hyperphosphorylated in the hippocampus. Furthermore, selective inhibition of GSK-3 by lithium could attenuate the conditions of Aβ overproduction and tau hyperphosphorylation. Taken together, our studies suggest that GSK-3 regulates both the production of Aβ and the phosphorylation of tau in rat brain and may therefore contribute to DM caused AD-like neurological defects.

  4. Surface Plasmon Resonance Based Biosensors for Exploring the Influence of Alkaloids on Aggregation of AmyloidPeptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Radecka

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the presented study was the development of a simple analytical tool for exploring the influence of naturally occurring compounds on the aggregation of amyloidpeptide (Aβ40 in order to find potential anti-neurodegenerative drugs. The gold discs used for surface plasmon resonance (SPR measurements were modified with thioaliphatic acid. The surface functionalized with carboxylic groups was used for covalent attaching of Aβ40 probe by creation of amide bonds in the presence of EDC/NHS. The modified SPR gold discs were used for exploring the Aβ40 aggregation process in the presence of selected alkaloids: arecoline hydrobromide, pseudopelletierine hydrochloride, trigonelline hydrochloride and α-lobeline hydrochloride. The obtained results were discussed with other parameters which govern the phenomenon studied such as lipophilicity/ hydrophilicy and Aβ40-alkaloid association constants.

  5. Responsiveness of beta-escin-permeabilized rabbit gastric gland model: effects of functional peptide fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, K; Nagao, T; Urushidani, T

    1999-09-01

    We established a beta-escin-permeabilized gland model with the use of rabbit isolated gastric glands. The glands retained an ability to secrete acid, monitored by [14C]aminopyrine accumulation, in response to cAMP, forskolin, and histamine. These responses were all inhibited by cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitory peptide. Myosin light-chain kinase inhibitory peptide also suppressed aminopyrine accumulation, whereas the inhibitory peptide of protein kinase C or that of calmodulin kinase II was without effect. Guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPgammaS) abolished cAMP-stimulated acid secretion concomitantly, interfering with the redistribution of H+-K+-ATPase from tubulovesicles to the apical membrane. To identify the targets of GTPgammaS, effects of peptide fragments of certain GTP-binding proteins were examined. Although none of the peptides related to Rab proteins showed any effect, the inhibitory peptide of Arf protein inhibited cAMP-stimulated secretion. These results demonstrate that our new model, the beta-escin-permeabilized gland, allows the introduction of relatively large molecules, e.g., peptides, into the cell, and will be quite useful for analyzing signal transduction of parietal cell function.

  6. Dynamic membrane interactions of antibacterial and antifungal biomolecules, and amyloid peptides, revealed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Akira; Matsumori, Nobuaki; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2018-02-01

    A variety of biomolecules acting on the cell membrane folds into a biologically active structure in the membrane environment. It is, therefore, important to determine the structures and dynamics of such biomolecules in a membrane environment. While several biophysical techniques are used to obtain low-resolution information, solid-state NMR spectroscopy is one of the most powerful means for determining the structure and dynamics of membrane bound biomolecules such as antibacterial biomolecules and amyloidogenic proteins; unlike X-ray crystallography and solution NMR spectroscopy, applications of solid-state NMR spectroscopy are not limited by non-crystalline, non-soluble nature or molecular size of membrane-associated biomolecules. This review article focuses on the applications of solid-state NMR techniques to study a few selected antibacterial and amyloid peptides. Solid-state NMR studies revealing the membrane inserted bent α-helical structure associated with the hemolytic activity of bee venom melittin and the chemical shift oscillation analysis used to determine the transmembrane structure (with α-helix and 3 10 -helix in the N- and C-termini, respectively) of antibiotic peptide alamethicin are discussed in detail. Oligomerization of an amyloidogenic islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, or also known as amylin) resulting from its aggregation in a membrane environment, molecular interactions of the antifungal natural product amphotericin B with ergosterol in lipid bilayers, and the mechanism of lipid raft formation by sphingomyelin studied using solid state NMR methods are also discussed in this review article. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Biophysical Exploration of Dynamical Ordering of Biomolecular Systems" edited by Dr. Koichi Kato. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The structure of the TGF-beta latency associated peptide region determines the ability of the proprotein convertase furin to cleave TGF-betas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakabe, Makoto; Cheong, Pak-Leng; Nikfar, Reza; McLennan, Ian S; Koishi, Kyoko

    2008-01-01

    The TGF-beta family members are generated as latent pre-pro-polypeptides. The active mature peptides are cleaved from the latent forms by cellular proteases. TGF-beta 1, for instance, is predominantly processed by a substilisin-like proprotein convertase, furin. TGF-beta 2 has a consensus cleavage site for furin and therefore has been presumed to be cleaved by furin. However, TGF-beta 2 is often secreted as the latent form, which appears to be inconsistent with its postulated sensitivity to furin. We report here that both the regular (short) form of TGF-beta2 and its spliced variant with an additional exon (long form) are insensitive to furin. NIH 3T3 and CHO cells were transfected with expression vectors containing the short or long form of TGF-beta 2 or a chimeric TGF-beta consisting of the TGF-beta1 LAP region, the TGF-beta 2 cleavage site and the TGF-beta 2 mature peptide. The constructs included a c-myc epitope tag in the N-terminal region of the mature peptide. The TGF-betas produced by the transfected cells were analyzed with Western blots and immunocytochemistry. The intracellular proteins harvested from these cells were incubated with furin. Furin only inefficiently cleaved both the long and short forms of TGF-beta 2, but efficiently processed the chimeric TGF-beta. This indicates that the insensitivity of both forms of TGF-beta 2 to furin is a consequence of the tertiary structure of their LAP regions rather than their cleavage site. This differential processing of TGF-beta1 and -beta 2 may be part of the mechanism that generates isoform-specific functions of the TGF-betas.

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist treatment reduces beta cell mass in normoglycaemic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellenbroek, J.H.; Tons, H.A.; Westerouen van Meeteren, M.J.; de Graaf, N.; Hanegraaf, M.A.; Rabelink, T.J.; Carlotti, F.; de Koning, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Incretin-based therapies improve glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. In animal models of diabetes, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) increase beta cell mass. GLP-1RAs are also evaluated in non-diabetic individuals with obesity and cardiovascular

  9. Structure of the antimicrobial beta-hairpin peptide protegrin-1 in a DLPC lipid bilayer investigated by molecular dynamics simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2007-01-01

    -18 to extend perpendicular to the beta-hairpin plane. This bend was driven by a highly persistent hydrogen-bond between the polar peptide side-chain of TYR7 and the unshielded backbone carbonyl oxygen atom of GLY17. The H-bond formation relieves the unfavorable free energy of insertion of polar groups......All atom molecular dynamics simulations of the 18-residue beta-hairpin antimicrobial peptide protegrin-1 (PG-1, RGGRLCYCRRRFCVCVGR-NH(2)) in a fully hydrated dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) lipid bilayer have been implemented. The goal of the reported work is to investigate the structure......-550]), and to delineate specific peptide-membrane interactions which are responsible for the peptide's membrane binding properties. A novel, previously unknown, "kick" shaped conformation of the peptide was detected, where a bend at the C-terminal beta-strand of the peptide caused the peptide backbone at residues 16...

  10. Involvement of insulin-degrading enzyme in insulin- and atrial natriuretic peptide-sensitive internalization of amyloidpeptide in mouse brain capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shingo; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Murata, Sho; Katsukura, Yuki; Suzuki, Hiroya; Funaki, Miho; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral clearance of amyloidpeptide (Aβ), which is implicated in Alzheimer's disease, involves elimination across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and we previously showed that an insulin-sensitive process is involved in the case of Aβ1-40. The purpose of this study was to clarify the molecular mechanism of the insulin-sensitive Aβ1-40 elimination across mouse BBB. An in vivo cerebral microinjection study demonstrated that [125I]hAβ1-40 elimination from mouse brain was inhibited by human natriuretic peptide (hANP), and [125I]hANP elimination was inhibited by hAβ1-40, suggesting that hAβ1-40 and hANP share a common elimination process. Internalization of [125I]hAβ1-40 into cultured mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (TM-BBB4) was significantly inhibited by either insulin, hANP, other natriuretic peptides or insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) inhibitors, but was not inhibited by phosphoramidon or thiorphan. Although we have reported the involvement of natriuretic peptide receptor C (Npr-C) in hANP internalization, cells stably expressing Npr-C internalized [125I]hANP but not [125I]hAβ1-40, suggesting that there is no direct interaction between Npr-C and hAβ1-40. IDE was detected in plasma membrane of TM-BBB4 cells, and internalization of [125I]hAβ1-40 by TM-BBB4 cells was reduced by IDE-targeted siRNAs. We conclude that elimination of hAβ1-40 from mouse brain across the BBB involves an insulin- and ANP-sensitive process, mediated by IDE expressed in brain capillary endothelial cells.

  11. Protective role of rosmarinic acid on amyloid beta 42-induced echoic memory decline: Implication of oxidative stress and cholinergic impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantar Gok, Deniz; Hidisoglu, Enis; Ocak, Guzide Ayse; Er, Hakan; Acun, Alev Duygu; Yargıcoglu, Piraye

    2018-04-13

    In the present study, we examined whether rosmarinic acid (RA) reverses amyloid β (Aβ) induced reductions in antioxidant defense, lipid peroxidation, cholinergic damage as well as the central auditory deficits. For this purpose, Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups; Sham(S), Sham + RA (SR), Aβ42 peptide (Aβ) and Aβ42 peptide + RA (AβR) groups. Rat model of Alzheimer was established by bilateral injection of Aβ42 peptide (2,2 nmol/10 μl) into the lateral ventricles. RA (50 mg/kg, daily) was administered orally by gavage for 14 days after intracerebroventricular injection. At the end of the experimental period, we recorded the auditory event related potentials (AERPs) and mismatch negativity (MMN) response to assess auditory functions followed by histological and biochemical analysis. Aβ42 injection led to a significant increase in the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) but decreased the activity of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, GSH-Px) and glutathione levels. Moreover, Aβ42 injection resulted in a reduction in the acetylcholine content and acetylcholine esterase activity. RA treatment prevented the observed alterations in the AβR group. Furthermore, RA attenuated the increased Aβ staining and astrocyte activation. We also found that Aβ42 injection decreased the MMN response and theta power/coherence of AERPs, suggesting an impairing effect on auditory discrimination and echoic memory processes. RA treatment reversed the Aβ42 related alterations in AERP parameters. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that RA prevented Aβ-induced antioxidant-oxidant imbalance and cholinergic damage, which may contribute to the improvement of neural network dynamics of auditory processes in this rat model. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Effect of creatine supplementation on cognitive performance and apoptosis in a rat model of amyloid-beta-induced Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malek Alimohammadi-Kamalabadi

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: Cr supplementation before and after β-amyloid injection into the CA1 area of hippocampus deteriorates the learning and memory impairment of rats and it does not protect neuronal apoptosis caused by β-amyloid.

  13. Voluntary Exercise Promotes Glymphatic Clearance of Amyloid Beta and Reduces the Activation of Astrocytes and Microglia in Aged Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Dong-Xu; Zhang, Qun; Liang, Feng-Ying; Dai, Guang-Yan; Zeng, Jin-Sheng; Pei, Zhong; Xu, Guang-Qing; Lan, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Age is characterized by chronic inflammation, leading to synaptic dysfunction and dementia because the clearance of protein waste is reduced. The clearance of proteins depends partly on the permeation of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) or on the exchange of water and soluble contents between the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the interstitial fluid (ISF). A wealth of evidence indicates that physical exercise improves memory and cognition in neurodegenerative diseases during aging, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the influence of physical training on glymphatic clearance, BBB permeability and neuroinflammation remains unclear. In this study, glymphatic clearance and BBB permeability were evaluated in aged mice using in vivo two-photon imaging. The mice performed voluntary wheel running exercise and their water-maze cognition was assessed; the expression of the astrocytic water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4), astrocyte and microglial activation, and the accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) were evaluated with immunofluorescence or an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); synaptic function was investigated with Thy1 -green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice and immunofluorescent staining. Voluntary wheel running significantly improved water-maze cognition in the aged mice, accelerated the efficiency of glymphatic clearance, but which did not affect BBB permeability. The numbers of activated astrocytes and microglia decreased, AQP4 expression increased, and the distribution of astrocytic AQP4 was rearranged. Aβ accumulation decreased, whereas dendrites, dendritic spines and postsynaptic density protein (PSD95) increased. Our study suggests that voluntary wheel running accelerated glymphatic clearance but not BBB permeation, improved astrocytic AQP4 expression and polarization, attenuated the accumulation of amyloid plaques and neuroinflammation, and ultimately protected mice against synaptic dysfunction and a decline in spatial cognition. These data suggest

  14. Voluntary Exercise Promotes Glymphatic Clearance of Amyloid Beta and Reduces the Activation of Astrocytes and Microglia in Aged Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-fei He

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Age is characterized by chronic inflammation, leading to synaptic dysfunction and dementia because the clearance of protein waste is reduced. The clearance of proteins depends partly on the permeation of the blood–brain barrier (BBB or on the exchange of water and soluble contents between the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and the interstitial fluid (ISF. A wealth of evidence indicates that physical exercise improves memory and cognition in neurodegenerative diseases during aging, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, but the influence of physical training on glymphatic clearance, BBB permeability and neuroinflammation remains unclear. In this study, glymphatic clearance and BBB permeability were evaluated in aged mice using in vivo two-photon imaging. The mice performed voluntary wheel running exercise and their water-maze cognition was assessed; the expression of the astrocytic water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4, astrocyte and microglial activation, and the accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ were evaluated with immunofluorescence or an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA; synaptic function was investigated with Thy1–green fluorescent protein (GFP transgenic mice and immunofluorescent staining. Voluntary wheel running significantly improved water-maze cognition in the aged mice, accelerated the efficiency of glymphatic clearance, but which did not affect BBB permeability. The numbers of activated astrocytes and microglia decreased, AQP4 expression increased, and the distribution of astrocytic AQP4 was rearranged. Aβ accumulation decreased, whereas dendrites, dendritic spines and postsynaptic density protein (PSD95 increased. Our study suggests that voluntary wheel running accelerated glymphatic clearance but not BBB permeation, improved astrocytic AQP4 expression and polarization, attenuated the accumulation of amyloid plaques and neuroinflammation, and ultimately protected mice against synaptic dysfunction and a decline in spatial cognition

  15. Humanin attenuates Alzheimer-like cognitive deficits and pathological changes induced by amyloid β-peptide in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Gao-Shang; Duan, Dong-Xiao; Ma, Rong-Hong; Shen, Jian-Ying; Li, Hong-Lian; Ma, Zhi-Wei; Luo, Yu; Wang, Lu; Qi, Xin-Hua; Wang, Qun; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Wei, Zelan; Mousseau, Darrell D; Wang, Li; Liu, Gongping

    2014-12-01

    Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) has been implicated as a key molecule in the neurodegenerative cascades of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Humanin (HN) is a secretory peptide that inhibits the neurotoxicity of Aβ. However, the mechanism(s) by which HN exerts its neuroprotection against Aβ-induced AD-like pathological changes and memory deficits are yet to be completely defined. In the present study, we provided evidence that treatment of rats with HN increases the number of dendritic branches and the density of dendritic spines, and upregulates pre- and post-synaptic protein levels; these effects lead to enhanced long-term potentiation and amelioration of the memory deficits induced by Aβ(1-42). HN also attenuated Aβ(1-42)-induced tau hyperphosphorylation, apparently by inhibiting the phosphorylation of Tyr307 on the inhibitory protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit and thereby activating PP2A. HN also inhibited apoptosis and reduced the oxidative stress induced by Aβ(1-42). These findings provide novel mechanisms of action for the ability of HN to protect against Aβ(1-42)-induced AD-like pathological changes and memory deficits.

  16. Differentiation of three pairs of Boc-beta,gamma- and gamma,beta-hybrid peptides by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, V; Srinivas, R; Sharma, G V M; Jayaprakash, P; Kunwar, A C

    2008-09-01

    A new series of Boc-N-beta(3), gamma(4)-/gamma(4), beta(3)-isomeric hybrid peptides (containing repeats of beta(3)-Caa and gamma(4)-Caa's, Caa = C-linked carbo beta(3)-/gamma(4)-amino acids derived from D-xylose) have been differentiated by both positive and negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) ion-trap and high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight/tandem mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS/MS). MS(n) of protonated isomeric peptides and [M+H-Boc+H](+) produce characteristic fragmentation involving the peptide backbone, the Boc-group, and the side chain. The positional isomers are differentiated from one another by the presence of y(n)(+), b(n)(+), and other fragment ions of different m/z values. It is observed that the peptides with beta-Caa at the N-terminus produce extensive fragmentation, whereas gamma-Caa gave rise to much less fragmentation. Peptides with gamma-Caa at the N-terminus lose NH(3), whereas this process is absent for the carbopeptides with beta-Caa at the N-terminus. Two pairs of dipeptide diastereomers are clearly differentiated by the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of their protonated molecules. The loss of 2-methylprop-1-ene is more pronounced for Boc-NH-(R)-beta-Caa-(R)-gamma-Caa-OCH(3) (6) and Boc-NH-(R)-gamma-Caa-(R)-beta-Caa-OCH(3) (12), whereas it is insignificant or totally absent for its protonated diastereomeric pair Boc-NH-(S)-beta-Caa-(S)-gamma-Caa-OCH(3) (1) and Boc-NH-(S)-gamma-Caa-(S)-beta-Caa-OCH(3) (7). Further, ESI negative ion tandem mass spectrometry has also been found to be useful for differentiating these isomeric peptide acids.

  17. Amylin under examination. Fibrillogenic polypeptide of pancreatic amyloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Marszałek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In patients or animals affected by 2 type diabetes mellitus (diabetes mellitus type 2, DM2, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, NIDDM or pancreatic tumor disease e.g., insulinoma, some pathological deposits, called amyloid, are observed among cells of islets of Langerhans. Among other constituents, pancreatic deposits consist of an insoluble, fibrillar form of peptide neurohormone termed amylin, produced by pancreatic beta cells. It is thought that formation of fibrillar deposits of misfolded and aggregated peptide is highly toxic to beta cells and leads to cell dysfunction, cell loss, pancreas destruction and progress of the disease. This relatively small, 37-amino acid peptide constitutes a serious scientific, research and to some extent a medical problem. This article presents amylin as a fibrillating molecule which participates in formation of amyloid deposits in human and animal pancreas, Langerhans islets as a microenvironment of pancreatic amyloid formation, occurrence of amylin and amyloid in animals and humans, and physico-chemical requirements to meet to name amylin deposit as amyloid.

  18. Antibody-based PET imaging of amyloid beta in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehlin, Dag; Fang, Xiaotian T; Cato, Linda; Antoni, Gunnar; Lannfelt, Lars; Syvänen, Stina

    2016-02-19

    Owing to their specificity and high-affinity binding, monoclonal antibodies have potential as positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands and are currently used to image various targets in peripheral organs. However, in the central nervous system, antibody uptake is limited by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here we present a PET ligand to be used for diagnosis and evaluation of treatment effects in Alzheimer's disease. The amyloid β (Aβ) antibody mAb158 is radiolabelled and conjugated to a transferrin receptor antibody to enable receptor-mediated transcytosis across the BBB. PET imaging of two different mouse models with Aβ pathology clearly visualize Aβ in the brain. The PET signal increases with age and correlates closely with brain Aβ levels. Thus, we demonstrate that antibody-based PET ligands can be successfully used for brain imaging.

  19. Cholinergic Neurons - Keeping Check on Amyloid beta in the Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saak V. Ovsepian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The physiological relevance of the uptake of ligands with no apparent trophic functions via the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR remains unclear. Herein, we propose a homeostatic role for this in clearance of amyloid β (Aβ in the brain. We hypothesize that uptake of Aβ in conjunction with p75NTR followed by its degradation in lysosomes endows cholinergic basalo-cortical projections enriched in this receptor a facility for maintaining physiological levels of Aβ in target areas. Thus, in addition to the diffuse modulator influence and channeling of extra-thalamic signals, cholinergic innervations could supply the cerebral cortex with an elaborate system for Aβ drainage. Interpreting the emerging relationship of new molecular data with established role of cholinergic modulator system in regulating cortical network dynamics should provide new insights into the brain physiology and mechanisms of neuro-degenerative diseases.

  20. The interaction of beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) with mouse class I major histocompatibility antigens and its ability to support peptide binding. A comparison of human and mouse beta 2m

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L O; Stryhn, A; Holter, T L

    1995-01-01

    The function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is to sample peptides derived from intracellular proteins and to present these peptides to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this paper, biochemical assays addressing MHC class I binding of both peptide and beta 2-microglobul...

  1. Sphingolipid metabolism correlates with cerebrospinal fluid Beta amyloid levels in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred N Fonteh

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are important in many brain functions but their role in Alzheimer's disease (AD is not completely defined. A major limit is availability of fresh brain tissue with defined AD pathology. The discovery that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF contains abundant nanoparticles that include synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles offer an accessible sample to study these organelles, while the supernatant fluid allows study of brain interstitial metabolism. Our objective was to characterize sphingolipids in nanoparticles representative of membrane vesicle metabolism, and in supernatant fluid representative of interstitial metabolism from study participants with varying levels of cognitive dysfunction. We recently described the recruitment, diagnosis, and CSF collection from cognitively normal or impaired study participants. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we report that cognitively normal participants had measureable levels of sphingomyelin, ceramide, and dihydroceramide species, but that their distribution differed between nanoparticles and supernatant fluid, and further differed in those with cognitive impairment. In CSF from AD compared with cognitively normal participants: a total sphingomyelin levels were lower in nanoparticles and supernatant fluid; b levels of ceramide species were lower in nanoparticles and higher in supernatant fluid; c three sphingomyelin species were reduced in the nanoparticle fraction. Moreover, three sphingomyelin species in the nanoparticle fraction were lower in mild cognitive impairment compared with cognitively normal participants. The activity of acid, but not neutral sphingomyelinase was significantly reduced in the CSF from AD participants. The reduction in acid sphingomylinase in CSF from AD participants was independent of depression and psychotropic medications. Acid sphingomyelinase activity positively correlated with amyloid β42 concentration in CSF from cognitively normal but

  2. Behavior of beta-Amyloid 1-16 at the Air-Water Interface at Varying pH by Nonlinear Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miller, A. E.; Petersen, P. B.; Hollars, C. H.; Saykally, R. J.; Heyda, Jan; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 23 (2011), s. 5873-5880 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/08/0114 Grant - others:NSF(US) 0650950 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : beta-amyloid * air/water interface * SHG spectroscopy * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.946, year: 2011

  3. Age-related toxicity of amyloid-beta associated with increased pERK and pCREB in primary hippocampal neurons: reversal by blueberry extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Gregory J.; Torricelli, John R.; Lindsey, Amanda L.; Kunz, Elizabeth Z.; Neuman, A.; Fisher, Derek R.; Joseph, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Further clarification is needed to address the paradox that memory formation, aging and neurodegeneration all involve calcium influx, oxyradical production (ROS) and activation of certain signaling pathways. In aged rats and in APP/PS-1 mice, cognitive and hippocampal Ca2+ dysregulation were reversed by food supplementation with a high antioxidant blueberry extract. Here, we studied whether neurons were an important target of blueberry extract and whether the mechanism involved altered ROS signaling through MAPK and CREB, pathways known to be activated in response to amyloid-beta. Primary hippocampal neurons were isolated and cultured from embryonic, middle-age or old-age (24 months) rats. Blueberry extract was found to be equally neuroprotective against amyloid-beta neurotoxicity at all ages. Increases in amyloid-beta toxicity with age were associated with age-related increases in immunoreactivity of neurons to pERK and an age-independent increase in pCREB. Treatment with blueberry extract strongly inhibited these increases in parallel with neuroprotection. Simultaneous labeling for ROS and for glutathione with dichlorofluorescein and monocholorobimane showed a mechanism of action of blueberry extract to involve transient ROS generation with an increase in the redox buffer, glutathione. We conclude that the increased age-related susceptibility of old-age neurons to amyloid-beta toxicity may be due to higher levels of activation of pERK and pCREB pathways that can be protected by blueberry extract through inhibition of both these pathways through an ROS stress response. These results suggest that the beneficial effects of blueberry extract may involve transient stress signaling and ROS protection that may translate into improved cognition in aging rats and APP/PS1 mice given blueberry extract. PMID:19954954

  4. Chronic treatment with amyloid beta(1-42) inhibits non-cholinergic high-affinity choline transport in NG108-15 cells through protein kinase C signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Jana; Mikasová, Lenka; Machová, Eva; Lisá, Věra; Doležal, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 1062, č. 1-2 (2005), s. 101-110 ISSN 0006-8993 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011206; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:Lipidiet(XE) QLK1-CT-2002-00172 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : choline transporter * beta-amyloid * protein kinase C Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.296, year: 2005

  5. The effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on the beta cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilsbøll, Tina

    2009-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease characterized by insulin resistance and impaired beta-cell function. Treatments that prevent further beta-cell decline are therefore essential for the management of type 2 diabetes. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone that is known...... to stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion. Furthermore, GLP-1 appears to have multiple positive effects on beta cells. However, GLP-1 is rapidly degraded by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4), which limits the clinical relevance of GLP-1 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Two main classes of GLP-1-based...... with type 2 diabetes, as assessed by homoeostasis model assessment-B analysis and proinsulin : insulin ratio. Additionally, liraglutide and exenatide are able to enhance first- and second-phase insulin secretion and are able to restore beta-cell sensitivity to glucose. Preclinical studies have shown...

  6. Amyloid beta Fibril Elongation by Monomers Involves Disorder at the Tip

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bacci, M.; Vymětal, Jiří; Mihajlovic, M.; Caflisch, A.; Vitalis, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 10 (2017), s. 5117-5130 ISSN 1549-9618 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular dynamics simulations * atomic resolution structure * A beta Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 5.245, year: 2016

  7. Combining conformational sampling and selection to identify the binding mode of zinc-bound amyloid peptides with bifunctional molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Gao, Ke; Bao, Chunyu; Wang, Xicheng

    2012-08-01

    The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been suggested to be related with the aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides. Metal ions (e.g. Cu, Fe, and Zn) are supposed to induce the aggregation of Aβ. Recent development of bifunctional molecules that are capable of interacting with Aβ and chelating biometal ions provides promising therapeutics to AD. However, the molecular mechanism for how Aβ, metal ions, and bifunctional molecules interact with each other is still elusive. In this study, the binding mode of Zn2+-bound Aβ with bifunctional molecules was investigated by the combination of conformational sampling of full-length Aβ peptides using replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations (REMD) and conformational selection using molecular docking and classical MD simulations. We demonstrate that Zn2+-bound Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) exhibit different conformational ensemble. Both Aβ peptides can adopt various conformations to recognize typical bifunctional molecules with different binding affinities. The bifunctional molecules exhibit their dual functions by first preferentially interfering with hydrophobic residues 17-21 and/or 30-35 of Zn2+-bound Aβ. Additional interactions with residues surrounding Zn2+ could possibly disrupt interactions between Zn2+ and Aβ, which then facilitate these small molecules to chelate Zn2+. The binding free energy calculations further demonstrate that the association of Aβ with bifunctional molecules is driven by enthalpy. Our results provide a feasible approach to understand the recognition mechanism of disordered proteins with small molecules, which could be helpful to the design of novel AD drugs.

  8. Beta-emitting radionuclides for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parus, J L; Mikolajczak, R

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on the β-emitting radionuclides which might be useful for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, PRRT. For the effective design of the radiopharmaceutical, the choice of radionuclide will depend on the purpose for which the radioligand is being used and on the physicochemical properties of the radionuclide. The important factor is also the availability and the cost of production. The physical characteristics of several radionuclides which are currently used or can be considered as potential candidates for PRRT is provided, followed by short description of production methods and chemical aspects of their use in preparation of peptide-based radiopharmaceuticals. Somatostatin analogues labeled with radionuclides have been a successful example of PRRT. For treatment of patients with inoperable or metastasized neuroendocrine tumors, somatostatin analogues labeled with the radioisotopes (111)In, (90)Y and (177)Lu have been used so far. Labeling with (111)In, mainly an Auger electron emitter, resulted in no reduction of tumor size while somatostatin analogues labeled with (90)Y and (177)Lu gave overall positive response and improved the patients' quality of life. These promising results together with the increasing availability of other β-emitting radionuclides are a good basis for further studies.

  9. Methanolic extract of Piper nigrum fruits improves memory impairment by decreasing brain oxidative stress in amyloid beta(1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritcu, Lucian; Noumedem, Jaurès A; Cioanca, Oana; Hancianu, Monica; Kuete, Victor; Mihasan, Marius

    2014-04-01

    The present study analyzed the possible memory-enhancing and antioxidant proprieties of the methanolic extract of Piper nigrum L. fruits (50 and 100 mg/kg, orally, for 21 days) in amyloid beta(1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease. The memory-enhancing effects of the plant extract were studied by means of in vivo (Y-maze and radial arm-maze tasks) approaches. Also, the antioxidant activity in the hippocampus was assessed using superoxide dismutase-, catalase-, glutathione peroxidase-specific activities and the total content of reduced glutathione, malondialdehyde, and protein carbonyl levels. The amyloid beta(1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of spontaneous alternations percentage within Y-maze task and increase of working memory and reference memory errors within radial arm-maze task. Administration of the plant extract significantly improved memory performance and exhibited antioxidant potential. Our results suggest that the plant extract ameliorates amyloid beta(1-42)-induced spatial memory impairment by attenuation of the oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus.

  10. Large quantities of Abeta peptide are constitutively released during amyloid precursor protein metabolism in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghekar, Abhay; Rao, Sneha; Li, Ming; Ruben, Dawn; Mammen, Andrew; Tang, Xiaopei; O'Brien, Richard J

    2011-05-06

    The metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been extensively investigated because its processing generates the amyloid-β-peptide (Aβ), which is a likely cause of Alzheimer disease. Much prior research has focused on APP processing using transgenic constructs and heterologous cell lines. Work to date in native neuronal cultures suggests that Aβ is produced in very large amounts. We sought to investigate APP metabolism and Aβ production simultaneously under more physiological conditions in vivo and in vitro using cultured rat cortical neurons and live pigs. We found in cultured neurons that both APP and Aβ are secreted rapidly and at extremely high rates into the extracellular space (2-4 molecules/neuron/s for Aβ). Little APP is degraded outside of the pathway that leads to extracellular release. Two metabolic pools of APP are identified, one that is metabolized extremely rapidly (t1/2;) = 2.2 h), and another, surface pool, composed of both synaptic and extrasynaptic elements, that turns over very slowly. Aβ release and accumulation in the extracellular medium can be accounted for stoichiometrically by the extracellular release of β-cleaved forms of the APP ectodomain. Two α-cleavages of APP occur for every β-cleavage. Consistent with the results seen in cultured neurons, an extremely high rate of Aβ production and secretion from the brain was seen in juvenile pigs. In summary, our experiments show an enormous and rapid production and extracellular release of Aβ and the soluble APP ectodomain. A small, slowly metabolized, surface pool of full-length APP is also identified.

  11. Binding of peptides to HLA-DQ molecules: peptide binding properties of the disease-associated HLA-DQ(alpha 1*0501, beta 1*0201) molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, B H; Buus, S; Vartdal, F

    1994-01-01

    Peptide binding to DQ molecules has not previously been described. Here we report a biochemical peptide-binding assay specific for the DQ2 [i.e. DQ(alpha 1*0501, beta 1*0201)] molecule. This molecule was chosen since it shows a strong association to diseases such as celiac disease and insulin...

  12. Dodecylphosphocholine Micelles Induce Amyloid Formation of the PrP(110-136 Peptide via an α-Helical Metastable Conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Sauvé

    Full Text Available A peptide encompassing the conserved hydrophobic region and the first β-strand of the prion protein (PrP(110-136 shown to interact with the surface of dodecylphosphocholine micelles adopts an α-helical conformation that is localized below the head-group layer. This surface-bound peptide has a half-life of one day, and readily initiates the formation of amyloid fibrils. The presence of the latter was confirmed using birefringence microscopy upon Congo red binding and thioflavin T-binding induced fluorescence. The observation of this metastable α-helical conformer provides a unique snapshot of the early steps of the inter-conversion pathway. These findings together with the body of evidence from the prion literature allowed us to propose a mechanism for the conversion of PrPC to amyloid material.

  13. Dual Targeting of Amyloid-beta Clearance and Neuroinflammation as a Novel Therapeutic Approach against Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batarseh, Yazan S.

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) cascade hypothesis suggests that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is related to an imbalance between the production and clearance of Abeta peptide. Sporadic AD has been related to faulty clearance of Abeta. Accumulation of Abeta oligomers (Abetao) has been linked to several downstream toxic effects including neuroinflammation, synaptic loss, and cellular death. Abeta transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the primary pathways for reducing Abeta load in the brain, which work hand in hand with other parenchymal mechanisms to reduce Abeta levels including intra and extracellular degradation by a family of Abeta degrading enzymes. Established AD drugs, such as the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil, have been reported to have several additional non-cholinergic effects that alter Abeta pathology; reduce Abeta load, anti-inflammatory response, and attenuate synaptic loss. However, their limited effect only lead to minor improvements in AD symptoms without improving the prognosis of the disease. The lack of effective medical treatment for AD led to several studies focusing on establishing new therapeutic approaches to reduce Abeta pathology. We aimed to identify and characterize natural products that are capable of enhancing the BBB clearance of Abeta in addition to reducing neuroinflammation. Our first project was to investigate the role of oleocanthal (one of the active ingredients in extra-virgin olive oil; EVOO) on attenuating Abeta toxic effects on neurons and astrocytes. We developed Abeta oligomers (Abetao) induced inflammatory environment by exposing neurons and astrocytes to accumulative doses of Abetao to investigate oleocanthal effect on modulating Abetao pathological changes in neurons and astrocytes. Our findings demonstrated oleocanthal prevented Abetao-induced synaptic proteins, SNAP-25 and PSD-95, down-regulation in neurons, attenuated Abetao-induced inflammation, and restored glutamine transporter (GLT1) and glucose

  14. Allosteric modulation of PS1/gamma-secretase conformation correlates with amyloid beta(42/40 ratio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Uemura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Presenilin 1(PS1 is the catalytic subunit of gamma-secretase, the enzyme responsible for the Abeta C-terminal cleavage site, which results in the production of Abeta peptides of various lengths. Production of longer forms of the Abeta peptide occur in patients with autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease (AD due to mutations in presenilin. Many modulators of gamma-secretase function have been described. We hypothesize that these modulators act by a common mechanism by allosterically modifying the structure of presenilin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis we generated a genetically encoded GFP-PS1-RFP (G-PS1-R FRET probe that allows monitoring of the conformation of the PS1 molecule in its native environment in live cells. We show that G-PS1-R can be incorporated into the gamma-secretase complex, reconstituting its activity in PS1/2 deficient cells. Using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based approaches we show that various pharmacological and genetic manipulations that target either gamma-secretase components (PS1, Pen2, Aph1 or gamma-secretase substrate (amyloid precursor protein, APP and are known to change Abeta(42 production are associated with a consistent conformational change in PS1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results strongly support the hypothesis that allosteric changes in PS1 conformation underlie changes in the Abeta(42/40 ratio. Direct measurement of physiological and pathological changes in the conformation of PS1/gamma-secretase may provide insight into molecular mechanism of Abeta(42 generation, which could be exploited therapeutically.

  15. Deficiency in either COX-1 or COX-2 genes does not affect amyloid beta protein burden in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Ah; Chevallier, Nathalie; Tejwani, Karishma; Hung, Mary M; Maruyama, Hiroko; Golde, Todd E; Koo, Edward H

    2016-09-09

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that chronic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with a lower risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because the primary mode of action of NSAIDs is to inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX) activity, it has been proposed that perturbed activity of COX-1 or COX-2 contributes to AD pathogenesis. To test the role of COX-1 or COX-2 in amyloid deposition and amyloid-associated inflammatory changes, we examined amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice in the context of either COX-1 or COX-2 deficiency. Our studies showed that loss of either COX-1 or COX-2 gene did not alter amyloid burden in brains of the APP transgenic mice. However, one marker of microglial activation (CD45) was decreased in brains of COX-1 deficient/APP animals and showed a strong trend in reduction in COX-2 deficient/APP animals. These results suggest that COX activity and amyloid deposition in brain are likely independent processes. Further, if NSAIDs do causally reduce the risks of AD, then our findings indicate that the mechanisms are likely not due primarily to their inhibition on COX or γ-secretase modulation activity, the latter reported recently after acute dosing of ibuprofen in humans and nonhuman primates. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Lipidated alpha-Peptide/beta-Peptoid Hybrids with Potent Antiinflammatory Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbakke, Sarah L.; Larsen, Camilla J.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2015-01-01

    is dependent on the length and position of the lipid element(s). The resulting lead compound, Pam-(Lys-beta NSpe)(6)-NH2, blocks LPS-induced cytokine secretion with a potency comparable to that of polymyxin B. The mode of action of this HDP mimic appears not to involve direct LPS interaction since it......, in contrast to polymyxin B, displayed only minor activity in the Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Flow cytometry data showed specific interaction of a fluorophore-labeled lipidated a-peptide/beta-peptoid hybrid with monocytes and granulocytes indicating a cellular target expressed by these leukocyte subsets....

  17. Glutamine acts as a neuroprotectant against DNA damage, beta-amyloid and H2O2-induced stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Chen

    Full Text Available Glutamine is the most abundant free amino acid in the human blood stream and is 'conditionally essential' to cells. Its intracellular levels are regulated both by the uptake of extracellular glutamine via specific transport systems and by its intracellular synthesis by glutamine synthetase (GS. Adding to the regulatory complexity, when extracellular glutamine is reduced GS protein levels rise. Unfortunately, this excess GS can be maladaptive. GS overexpression is neurotoxic especially if the cells are in a low-glutamine medium. Similarly, in low glutamine, the levels of multiple stress response proteins are reduced rendering cells hypersensitive to H(2O(2, zinc salts and DNA damage. These altered responses may have particular relevance to neurodegenerative diseases of aging. GS activity and glutamine levels are lower in the Alzheimer's disease (AD brain, and a fraction of AD hippocampal neurons have dramatically increased GS levels compared with control subjects. We validated the importance of these observations by showing that raising glutamine levels in the medium protects cultured neuronal cells against the amyloid peptide, Aβ. Further, a 10-day course of dietary glutamine supplementation reduced inflammation-induced neuronal cell cycle activation, tau phosphorylation and ATM-activation in two different mouse models of familial AD while raising the levels of two synaptic proteins, VAMP2 and synaptophysin. Together, our observations suggest that healthy neuronal cells require both intracellular and extracellular glutamine, and that the neuroprotective effects of glutamine supplementation may prove beneficial in the treatment of AD.

  18. Acceleration of Amyloidosis by Inflammation in the Amyloid-Beta Marmoset Monkey Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippens, Ingrid H.; Ormel, Paul R.; Baarends, Guus; Johansson, Maja; Remarque, Ed J.; Doverskog, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Background: The immune system is increasingly mentioned as a potential target for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) treatment. Objective: In the present pilot study, the effect of (neuro)inflammation on amyloidopathy was investigated in the marmoset monkey, which has potential as an AD animal model due to its natural cerebral amyloidosis similar to humans. Methods: Six adult/aged marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were intracranial injected with amyloid-beta (Aβ) fibrils at three cortical locations in the right hemisphere. Additionally, in half of the monkeys, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was co-injected with the Aβ fibrils and injected in the other hemisphere without Aβ fibrils. The other three monkeys received phosphate buffered saline instead of LPS, as a control for the inflammatory state. The effect of inflammation on amyloidopathy was also investigated in an additional monkey that suffered from chronic inflammatory wasting syndrome. Mirror histology sections were analyzed to assess amyloidopathy and immune reaction, and peripheral blood for AD biomarker expression. Results: All LPS-injected monkeys showed an early AD immune blood cell expression profile on CD95 and CD45RA. Two out of three monkeys injected with Aβ and LPS and the additional monkey, suffering from chronic inflammation, developed plaques. None of the controls, injected with Aβ only, developed any plaques. Conclusion: This study shows the importance of immune modulation on the susceptibility for amyloidosis, a hallmark of AD, which offers new perspectives for disease modifying approaches in AD. PMID:27662314

  19. Acceleration of Amyloidosis by Inflammation in the Amyloid-Beta Marmoset Monkey Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippens, Ingrid H; Ormel, Paul R; Baarends, Guus; Johansson, Maja; Remarque, Ed J; Doverskog, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    The immune system is increasingly mentioned as a potential target for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment. In the present pilot study, the effect of (neuro)inflammation on amyloidopathy was investigated in the marmoset monkey, which has potential as an AD animal model due to its natural cerebral amyloidosis similar to humans. Six adult/aged marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were intracranial injected with amyloid-beta (Aβ) fibrils at three cortical locations in the right hemisphere. Additionally, in half of the monkeys, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was co-injected with the Aβ fibrils and injected in the other hemisphere without Aβ fibrils. The other three monkeys received phosphate buffered saline instead of LPS, as a control for the inflammatory state. The effect of inflammation on amyloidopathy was also investigated in an additional monkey that suffered from chronic inflammatory wasting syndrome. Mirror histology sections were analyzed to assess amyloidopathy and immune reaction, and peripheral blood for AD biomarker expression. All LPS-injected monkeys showed an early AD immune blood cell expression profile on CD95 and CD45RA. Two out of three monkeys injected with Aβ and LPS and the additional monkey, suffering from chronic inflammation, developed plaques. None of the controls, injected with Aβ only, developed any plaques. This study shows the importance of immune modulation on the susceptibility for amyloidosis, a hallmark of AD, which offers new perspectives for disease modifying approaches in AD.

  20. Novel neuroprotective function of apical-basal polarity gene crumbs in amyloid beta 42 (aβ42 mediated neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Steffensmeier

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, OMIM: 104300, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder with no cure to date, is caused by the generation of amyloid-beta-42 (Aβ42 aggregates that trigger neuronal cell death by unknown mechanism(s. We have developed a transgenic Drosophila eye model where misexpression of human Aβ42 results in AD-like neuropathology in the neural retina. We have identified an apical-basal polarity gene crumbs (crb as a genetic modifier of Aβ42-mediated-neuropathology. Misexpression of Aβ42 caused upregulation of Crb expression, whereas downregulation of Crb either by RNAi or null allele approach rescued the Aβ42-mediated-neurodegeneration. Co-expression of full length Crb with Aβ42 increased severity of Aβ42-mediated-neurodegeneration, due to three fold induction of cell death in comparison to the wild type. Higher Crb levels affect axonal targeting from the retina to the brain. The structure function analysis identified intracellular domain of Crb to be required for Aβ42-mediated-neurodegeneration. We demonstrate a novel neuroprotective role of Crb in Aβ42-mediated-neurodegeneration.

  1. The Aqueous Extract of Rhizome of Gastrodia elata Protected Drosophila and PC12 Cells against Beta-Amyloid-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Fai Ng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the neuroprotective effect of the rhizome of Gastrodia elata (GE aqueous extract on beta-amyloid(Aβ-induced toxicity in vivo and in vitro. Transgenic Drosophila mutants with Aβ-induced neurodegeneration in pan-neuron and ommatidia were used to determine the efficacy of GE. The antiapoptotic and antioxidative mechanisms of GE were also studied in Aβ-treated pheochromocytoma (PC12 cells. In vivo studies demonstrated that GE (5 mg/g Drosophila media-treated Drosophila possessed a longer lifespan, better locomotor function, and less-degenerated ommatidia when compared with the Aβ-expressing control (all P<0.05. In vitro studies illustrated that GE increased the cell viability of Aβ-treated PC12 cells in dose-dependent manner, probably through attenuation of Aβ-induced oxidative and apoptotic stress. GE also significantly upregulated the enzymatic activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase, leading to the decrease of reactive oxidation species production and apoptotic marker caspase-3 activity. In conclusion, our current data presented the first evidence that the aqueous extract of GE was capable of reducing the Aβ-induced neurodegeneration in Drosophila, possibly through inhibition of apoptosis and reduction of oxidative stress. GE aqueous extract could be developed as a promising herbal agent for neuroprotection and novel adjuvant therapies for Alzheimer’s disease.

  2. IMPY, a potential {beta}-amyloid imaging probe for detection of prion deposits in scrapie-infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, P.-J. [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Bernard, Serge [IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France)], E-mail: bernard@tours.inra.fr; Sarradin, Pierre [INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France); Vergote, Jackie [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Barc, Celine [INRA, UR1282, IASP, 37380 Nouzilly (France); Chalon, Sylvie [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France); Kung, M.-P.; Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Guilloteau, Denis [INSERM, U619, F-37000 Tours (France); Universite Francois-Rabelais, F-37000 Tours (France); IFR135, F-37000 Tours (France)

    2008-02-15

    Introduction: A potential single-photon emission computed tomography imaging agent for labeling of A{beta} plaques of Alzheimer's disease, IMPY (2-(4'-dimethylaminophenyl)-6-iodo-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine), would be effective in detection of prion amyloid deposits in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Methods: In vitro autoradiographic studies were carried out with [{sup 125}I]IMPY on brain sections from scrapie-infected mice and age-matched controls. Competition study was performed to evaluate the prion deposit binding specificity with nonradioactive IMPY. Results: Binding of [{sup 125}I]IMPY was observed in infected brain sections, while on age-matched control brain sections, there was no or very low labeling. Prion deposit binding was confirmed by histoblots with prion protein-specific monoclonal antibody 2D6. In the presence of nonradioactive IMPY, the binding of [{sup 125}I]IMPY was significantly inhibited in all regions studied. Conclusions: These findings indicate that IMPY can detect the prion deposits in vitro in scrapie-infected mice. Labeled with {sup 123}I, this ligand may be useful to quantitate prion deposit burdens in TSEs by in vivo imaging.

  3. Protective effects of [Gly14]-Humanin on beta-amyloid-induced PC12 cell death by preventing mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hui; Liu, Tao; Wang, Wei-Xi; Xu, Jie-Hua; Yang, Peng-Bo; Lu, Hai-Xia; Sun, Qin-Ru; Hu, Hai-Tao

    2010-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of beta-amyloid (Abeta)-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and is considered as an early event in AD pathology. Humanin (HN) and its derivative, [Gly14]-Humanin (HNG), are known for their ability to suppress neuronal death induced by AD-related insults in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of HNG on Abeta(25-35)-induced toxicity and its potential mechanisms in PC12 cells. Exposure of PC12 cells to 25 microM Abeta(25-35) caused significant viability loss and cell apoptosis. In addition, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased cytochrome c releases from mitochondria were also observed after Abeta(25-35) exposure. All these effects induced by Abeta(25-35) were markedly reversed by HNG. Pretreatment with 100 nM HNG 6h prior to Abeta(25-35) exposure significantly elevated cell viability, reduced Abeta(25-35)-induced cell apoptosis, stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential, and blocked cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Furthermore, HNG also ameliorated the Abeta(25-35)-induced Bcl-2/Bax ratio reduction and decreased caspase-3 activity in PC12 cells. These results demonstrate that HNG could attenuate Abeta(25-35)-induced PC12 cell injury and apoptosis by preventing mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, these data suggest that mitochondria are involved in the protective effect of HNG against Abeta(25-35). Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Increased tau phosphorylation and beta amyloid in the hipocampus of mouse pups by early life lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, N; Yu, Z L; Wang, L; Zheng, Y T; Jia, J X; Wang, Q; Zhu, M J; Liu, X L; Xia, X; Li, W J

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of maternal lead exposure on the learning and memory ability and expression of tau protein phosphorylation (P-tau) and beta amyloid protein (Abeta) in hippocampus of mice offspring. Pb exposure initiated from beginning of gestation to weaning. Pb acetate administered in drinking solutions was dissolved in distilled deionized water at the concentrations of 0.1%, 0.5% and 1% groups. On the 21 th of postnatal day, the learning and memory ability of the mouse pups was tested by Water Maze test and the Pb levels in blood and hippocampus of the offspring were also determined. The expression of P-tau and Abeta in hippocampus was measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The Pb levels in blood and hippocampus of all exposure groups were significantly higher than that of the control group ( P < 0.05). In Water Maze test, the performances of 0.5% and 1% groups were worse than that of the control group ( P < 0.05). The expression of P-tau and Abeta was increased in Pb exposed groups than that of the control group ( P < 0.05). Tau hyper-phosphorylation and Abeta increase in the hippocampus of pups may contribute to the impairment of learning and memory associated with maternal Pb exposure.

  5. Icariin Prevents Amyloid Beta-Induced Apoptosis via the PI3K/Akt Pathway in PC-12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Icariin is a prenylated flavonol glycoside derived from the Chinese herb Epimedium sagittatum that exerts a variety of pharmacological activities and shows promise in the treatment and prevention of Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of icariin against amyloid beta protein fragment 25–35 (Aβ25–35 induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and explored potential underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that icariin dose-dependently increased cell viability and decreased Aβ25–35-induced apoptosis, as assessed by MTT assay and Annexin V/propidium iodide staining, respectively. Results of western blot analysis revealed that the selective phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K inhibitor LY294002 suppressed icariin-induced Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that the protective effects of icariin are associated with activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. LY294002 also blocked the icariin-induced downregulation of proapoptotic factors Bax and caspase-3 and upregulation of antiapoptotic factor Bcl-2 in Aβ25–35-treated PC12 cells. These findings provide further evidence for the clinical efficacy of icariin in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

  6. Hypocretin and brain β-amyloid peptide interactions in cognitive disorders and narcolepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves A Dauvilliers

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF Alzheimer’ disease (AD biomarkers and hypocretin-1 levels in patients with cognitive abnormalities and hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy-cataplexy (NC, estimate diagnostic accuracy, and determine correlations with sleep disturbances. Background: Sleep disturbances are frequent in AD. Interactions between brain β-amyloid (Aβ aggregation and a wake-related neurotransmitter hypocretin have been reported in a mouse model of AD. Methods: Ninety-one cognitive patients (37 AD, 16 mild cognitive impairment – MCI that converts to AD, 38 other dementias and 15 elderly patients with NC were recruited. Patients were diagnosed blind to CSF results. CSF A42, total tau, ptau181, and hypocretin-1 were measured. Sleep disturbances were assessed with questionnaires in 32 cognitive patients. Results: Lower CSF Aβ42 but higher tau and P-tau levels were found in AD and MCI compared to other dementias. CSF hypocretin-1 levels were higher in patients with MCI due to AD compared to other dementias, with a similar tendency for patients with advanced AD. CSF hypocretin-1 was significantly and independently associated with AD/MCI due to AD, with an OR of 2.70 after full adjustment, exceeding that for Aβ42. Aβ42 correlated positively with hypocretin-1 levels in advanced stage AD. No association was found between sleep disturbances and CSF biomarkers. No patients with NC achieved pathological cutoffs for Aβ42, with respectively one and four patients with NC above tau and P-tau cutoffs and no correlations between hypocretin-1 and other biomarkers. Conclusions: Our results suggest a pathophysiological relationship between Aβ42 and hypocretin-1 in the AD process, with higher CSF hypocretin-1 levels in early disease stages. Further longitudinal studies are needed to validate these biomarker interactions and to determine the cause-effect relationship and the role of wake/sleep behavior in amyloid

  7. beta-Scission of C-3 (beta-carbon) alkoxyl radicals on peptides and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, H A; Mortimer, A; Easton, C J

    2000-01-01

    radicals, confirming that this is a major process. Methanal causes cell toxicity and DNA damage and is an animal carcinogen and a genotoxic agent in human cells. Thus, the formation and subsequent reaction of alkoxyl radicals formed at the C-3 position on aliphatic amino acid side chains on peptides...

  8. Cu(II) mediates kinetically distinct, non-amyloidogenic aggregation of amyloidpeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jeppe T.; Østergaard, Jesper; Rozlosnik, Noemi

    2011-01-01

    on (i) the aggregation kinetics/mechanism of Aβ, because three different kinetic scenarios were observed depending on the Cu(II):Aβ ratio, (ii) the metal:peptide stoichiometry in the aggregates, which increased to 1.4 at supra-equimolar Cu(II):Aβ ratio; and (iii) the morphology of the aggregates, which...

  9. PB1-F2 influenza A virus protein adopts a beta-sheet conformation and forms amyloid fibers in membrane environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Christophe; Al Bazzal, Ali; Vidic, Jasmina; Février, Vincent; Bourdieu, Christiane; Bouguyon, Edwige; Le Goffic, Ronan; Vautherot, Jean-François; Bernard, Julie; Moudjou, Mohammed; Noinville, Sylvie; Chich, Jean-François; Da Costa, Bruno; Rezaei, Human; Delmas, Bernard

    2010-04-23

    The influenza A virus PB1-F2 protein, encoded by an alternative reading frame in the PB1 polymerase gene, displays a high sequence polymorphism and is reported to contribute to viral pathogenesis in a sequence-specific manner. To gain insights into the functions of PB1-F2, the molecular structure of several PB1-F2 variants produced in Escherichia coli was investigated in different environments. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that all variants have a random coil secondary structure in aqueous solution. When incubated in trifluoroethanol polar solvent, all PB1-F2 variants adopt an alpha-helix-rich structure, whereas incubated in acetonitrile, a solvent of medium polarity mimicking the membrane environment, they display beta-sheet secondary structures. Incubated with asolectin liposomes and SDS micelles, PB1-F2 variants also acquire a beta-sheet structure. Dynamic light scattering revealed that the presence of beta-sheets is correlated with an oligomerization/aggregation of PB1-F2. Electron microscopy showed that PB1-F2 forms amorphous aggregates in acetonitrile. In contrast, at low concentrations of SDS, PB1-F2 variants exhibited various abilities to form fibers that were evidenced as amyloid fibers in a thioflavin T assay. Using a recombinant virus and its PB1-F2 knock-out mutant, we show that PB1-F2 also forms amyloid structures in infected cells. Functional membrane permeabilization assays revealed that the PB1-F2 variants can perforate membranes at nanomolar concentrations but with activities found to be sequence-dependent and not obviously correlated with their differential ability to form amyloid fibers. All of these observations suggest that PB1-F2 could be involved in physiological processes through different pathways, permeabilization of cellular membranes, and amyloid fiber formation.

  10. Amyloidpeptides and tau protein as biomarkers in cerebrospinal and interstitial fluid following traumatic brain injury: A review of experimental and clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmenion P. Tsitsopoulos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI survivors frequently suffer from life-long deficits in cognitive functions and a reduced quality of life. Axonal injury, observed in most severe TBI patients, results in accumulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP. Post-injury enzymatic cleavage of APP can generate amyloid-β (Aβ peptides, a hallmark finding in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. At autopsy, brains of AD and a subset of TBI victims display some similarities including accumulation of Aβ peptides and neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Most epidemiological evidence suggests a link between TBI and AD, implying that TBI has neurodegenerative sequelae. Aβ peptides and tau may be used as biomarkers in interstitial fluid (ISF using cerebral microdialysis and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF following clinical TBI. In the present review, the available clinical and experimental literature on Aβ peptides and tau as potential biomarkers following TBI is comprehensively analyzed. Elevated CSF and ISF tau protein levels have been observed following severe TBI and suggested to correlate with clinical outcome. Although Aβ peptides are produced by normal neuronal metabolism, high levels of long and/or fibrillary Aβ peptides may be neurotoxic. Increased CSF and/or ISF Aβ levels post-injury may be related to neuronal activity and/or the presence of axonal injury. The heterogeneity of animal models, clinical cohorts, analytical techniques and the complexity of TBI in available studies make the clinical value of tau and Aβ as biomarkers uncertain at present. Additionally, the link between early post-injury changes in tau and Aβ peptides and the future risk of developing AD remains unclear. Future studies using e.g. rapid biomarker sampling combined with enhanced analytical techniques and/or novel pharmacological tools could provide additional information on the importance of Aβ peptides and tau protein in both the acute pathophysiology and long

  11. Conformational stability of fibrillar amyloid-beta oligomers via protofilament pair formation - a systematic computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kahler

    Full Text Available Amyloid-[Formula: see text] (A[Formula: see text] oligomers play a crucial role in Alzheimer's disease due to their neurotoxic aggregation properties. Fibrillar A[Formula: see text] oligomerization can lead to protofilaments and protofilament pairs via oligomer elongation and oligomer association, respectively. Small fibrillar oligomers adopt the protofilament topology, whereas fibrils contain at least protofilament pairs. To date, the underlying growth mechanism from oligomers to the mature fibril still remains to be elucidated. Here, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent on single layer-like protofilaments and fibril-like protofilament pairs of different size ranging from the tetramer to the 48-mer. We found that the initial U-shaped topology per monomer is maintained over time in all oligomers. The observed deviations of protofilaments from the starting structure increase significantly with size due to the twisting of the in-register parallel [Formula: see text]-sheets. This twist causes long protofilaments to be unstable and leads to a breakage. Protofilament pairs, which are stabilized by a hydrophobic interface, exhibit more fibril-like properties such as the overall structure and the twist angle. Thus, they can act as stable conformational templates for further fibril growth. Key properties like the twist angle, shape complementarity, and energetics show a size-dependent behavior so that small oligomers favor the protofilament topology, whereas large oligomers favor the protofilament pair topology. The region for this conformational transition is at the size of approximately twelve A[Formula: see text] monomers. From that, we propose the following growth mechanism from A[Formula: see text] oligomers to fibrils: (1 elongation of short protofilaments; (2 breakage of large protofilaments; (3 formation of short protofilament pairs; and (4 elongation of protofilament pairs.

  12. A ketogenic diet reduces amyloid beta 40 and 42 in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Leuven Fred

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that primarily strikes the elderly. Studies in both humans and animal models have linked the consumption of cholesterol and saturated fats with amyloid-β (Aβ deposition and development of AD. Yet, these studies did not examine high fat diets in combination with reduced carbohydrate intake. Here we tested the effect of a high saturated fat/low carbohydrate diet on a transgenic mouse model of AD. Results Starting at three months of age, two groups of female transgenic mice carrying the "London" APP mutation (APP/V717I were fed either, a standard diet (SD composed of high carbohydrate/low fat chow, or a ketogenic diet (KD composed of very low carbohydrate/high saturated fat chow for 43 days. Animals fed the KD exhibited greatly elevated serum ketone body levels, as measured by β-hydroxybutyrate (3.85 ± 2.6 mM, compared to SD fed animals (0.29 ± 0.06 mM. In addition, animals fed the KD lost body weight (SD 22.2 ± 0.6 g vs. KD 17.5 ± 1.4 g, p = 0.0067. In contrast to earlier studies, the brief KD feeding regime significantly reduced total brain Aβ levels by approximately 25%. Despite changes in ketone levels, body weight, and Aβ levels, the KD diet did not alter behavioral measures. Conclusion Previous studies have suggested that diets rich in cholesterol and saturated fats increased the deposition of Aβ and the risk of developing AD. Here we demonstrate that a diet rich in saturated fats and low in carbohydrates can actually reduce levels of Aβ. Therefore, dietary strategies aimed at reducing Aβ levels should take into account interactions of dietary components and the metabolic outcomes, in particular, levels of carbohydrates, total calories, and presence of ketone bodies should be considered.

  13. Complex of amyloid beta peptides with 24-hydroxycholesterol and its effect on hemicholinium-3 sensitive carriers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištofíková, Z.; Kopecký, V. Jr.; Hofbauerová, Kateřina; Hovorková, P.; Řípová, D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2008), s. 412-421 ISSN 0364-3190 Grant - others:GA Mšk(CZ) MZOPCP2005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : aging * hippocampus * choline carriers Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.260, year: 2008

  14. A Synthetic Peptide with the Putative Iron Binding Motif of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Does Not Catalytically Oxidize Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Kourosh Honarmand; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2012-01-01

    The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), which is a key player in Alzheimer's disease, was recently reported to possess an Fe(II) binding site within its E2 domain which exhibits ferroxidase activity [Duce et al. 2010, Cell 142: 857]. The putative ligands of this site were compared to those in the ferroxidase site of ferritin. The activity was indirectly measured using transferrin, which scavenges the Fe(III) product of the reaction. A 22-residue synthetic peptide, named FD1, with the putative ferroxidase site of APP, and the E2 domain of APP were each reported to exhibit 40% of the ferroxidase activity of APP and of ceruloplasmin. It was also claimed that the ferroxidase activity of APP is inhibited by Zn(II) just as in ferritin. We measured the ferroxidase activity indirectly (i) by the incorporation of the Fe(III) product of the ferroxidase reaction into transferrin and directly (ii) by monitoring consumption of the substrate molecular oxygen. The results with the FD1 peptide were compared to the established ferroxidase activities of human H-chain ferritin and of ceruloplasmin. For FD1 we observed no activity above the background of non-enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation by molecular oxygen. Zn(II) binds to transferrin and diminishes its Fe(III) incorporation capacity and rate but it does not specifically bind to a putative ferroxidase site of FD1. Based on these results, and on comparison of the putative ligands of the ferroxidase site of APP with those of ferritin, we conclude that the previously reported results for ferroxidase activity of FD1 and – by implication – of APP should be re-evaluated. PMID:22916096

  15. A synthetic peptide with the putative iron binding motif of amyloid precursor protein (APP does not catalytically oxidize iron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Honarmand Ebrahimi

    Full Text Available The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP, which is a key player in Alzheimer's disease, was recently reported to possess an Fe(II binding site within its E2 domain which exhibits ferroxidase activity [Duce et al. 2010, Cell 142: 857]. The putative ligands of this site were compared to those in the ferroxidase site of ferritin. The activity was indirectly measured using transferrin, which scavenges the Fe(III product of the reaction. A 22-residue synthetic peptide, named FD1, with the putative ferroxidase site of APP, and the E2 domain of APP were each reported to exhibit 40% of the ferroxidase activity of APP and of ceruloplasmin. It was also claimed that the ferroxidase activity of APP is inhibited by Zn(II just as in ferritin. We measured the ferroxidase activity indirectly (i by the incorporation of the Fe(III product of the ferroxidase reaction into transferrin and directly (ii by monitoring consumption of the substrate molecular oxygen. The results with the FD1 peptide were compared to the established ferroxidase activities of human H-chain ferritin and of ceruloplasmin. For FD1 we observed no activity above the background of non-enzymatic Fe(II oxidation by molecular oxygen. Zn(II binds to transferrin and diminishes its Fe(III incorporation capacity and rate but it does not specifically bind to a putative ferroxidase site of FD1. Based on these results, and on comparison of the putative ligands of the ferroxidase site of APP with those of ferritin, we conclude that the previously reported results for ferroxidase activity of FD1 and - by implication - of APP should be re-evaluated.

  16. Low background and high contrast PET imaging of amyloid-{beta} with [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 in Alzheimer's disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Anton; Andersson, Jan; Varnaes, Katarina; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Jureus, Anders; Swahn, Britt-Marie; Sandell, Johan; Julin, Per; Svensson, Samuel [AstraZeneca Research and Development, Neuroscience Research and Therapy Area, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Cselenyi, Zsolt; Schou, Magnus; Johnstroem, Peter; Farde, Lars [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Hospital, AstraZeneca Translational Sciences Centre, PET CoE, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksdotter, Maria; Freund-Levi, Yvonne [Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Jeppsson, Fredrik [AstraZeneca Research and Development, Neuroscience Research and Therapy Area, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate AZD2995 side by side with AZD2184 as novel PET radioligands for imaging of amyloid-{beta} in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In vitro binding of tritium-labelled AZD2995 and AZD2184 was studied and compared with that of the established amyloid-{beta} PET radioligand PIB. Subsequently, a first-in-human in vivo PET study was performed using [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 and [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 in three healthy control subjects and seven AD patients. AZD2995, AZD2184 and PIB were found to share the same binding site to amyloid-{beta}. [{sup 3}H]AZD2995 had the highest signal-to-background ratio in brain tissue from patients with AD as well as in transgenic mice. However, [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 had superior imaging properties in PET, as shown by larger effect sizes comparing binding potential values in cortical regions of AD patients and healthy controls. Nevertheless, probably due to a lower amount of nonspecific binding, the group separation of the distribution volume ratio values of [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 was greater in areas with lower amyloid-{beta} load, e.g. the hippocampus. Both AZD2995 and AZD2184 detect amyloid-{beta} with high affinity and specificity and also display a lower degree of nonspecific binding than that reported for PIB. Overall [{sup 11}C]AZD2184 seems to be an amyloid-{beta} radioligand with higher uptake and better group separation when compared to [{sup 11}C]AZD2995. However, the very low nonspecific binding of [{sup 11}C]AZD2995 makes this radioligand potentially interesting as a tool to study minute levels of amyloid-{beta}. This sensitivity may be important in investigating, for example, early prodromal stages of AD or in the longitudinal study of a disease modifying therapy. (orig.)

  17. beta-Scission of C-3 (beta-carbon) alkoxyl radicals on peptides and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, H A; Mortimer, A; Easton, C J

    2000-01-01

    of methanal (formaldehyde). This product has been quantified with a number of oxidized peptides and proteins, and can account for up to 64% of the initial attacking radicals with some Ala peptides. When quantified together with the hydroperoxide precursors, these species account for up to 80% of the initial......Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O(2) brings about multiple changes in the target molecules. These alterations include oxidation of side chains, fragmentation, cross-linking, changes in hydrophobicity and conformation, altered susceptibility to proteolytic enzymes, and formation...... and proteins can give rise to both backbone fragmentation and the release of further reactive species which can cause cell toxicity and mutagenicity....

  18. Effects of ligands on unfolding of the amyloid β-peptide central helix: mechanistic insights from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Ito

    Full Text Available Polymerization of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ, a process which requires that the helical structure of Aβ unfolds beforehand, is suspected to cause neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease. According to recent experimental studies, stabilization of the Aβ central helix counteracts Aβ polymerization into toxic assemblies. The effects of two ligands (Dec-DETA and Pep1b, which were designed to bind to and stabilize the Aβ central helix, on unfolding of the Aβ central helix were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. It was quantitatively demonstrated that the stability of the Aβ central helix is increased by both ligands, and more effectively by Pep1b than by Dec-DETA. In addition, it was shown that Dec-DETA forms parallel conformations with β-strand-like Aβ, whereas Pep1b does not and instead tends to bend unwound Aβ. The molecular dynamics results correlate well with previous experiments for these ligands, which suggest that the simulation method should be useful in predicting the effectiveness of novel ligands in stabilizing the Aβ central helix. Detailed Aβ structural changes upon loss of helicity in the presence of the ligands are also revealed, which gives further insight into which ligand may lead to which path subsequent to unwinding of the Aβ central helix.

  19. Sildenafil protects neuronal cells from mitochondrial toxicity induced by β-amyloid peptide via ATP-sensitive K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Yonghae; Kim, Koanhoi; Cho, Hyok-Rae

    2018-06-02

    To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of sildenafil in animal models of neurological disorders, we investigated the effects of sildenafil on the mitochondrial toxicity induced by β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide. Treatment of HT-22 hippocampal neuronal cells with Aβ 25∼35 results in increased mitochondrial Ca 2+ load, which is subsequently suppressed by sildenafil as well as by diazoxide, a selective opener of the ATP-sensitive K + channels (K ATP ). However, the suppressive effects of sildenafil and diazoxide are significantly attenuated by 5-hydroxydecanoic acid (5-HD), a K ATP inhibitor. The increased mitochondrial Ca 2+ overload is accompanied by decrease in the intracellular ATP concentration, increase in intracellular ROS generation, occurrence of mitochondrial permeability transition, and activation of caspase-9 and cell death. Exposure to sildenafil inhibited the mitochondria-associated changes and cell death induced by Aβ. However, the inhibitory effects of sildenafil are abolished or weakened in the presence of 5-HD, suggesting that opening of the mitochondrial K ATP is required for sildenafil to exert these effects. Taken together, these results indicate that at the mitochondrial levels, sildenafil plays a protective role towards neuronal cell in an environment rich in Aβ, and exerts its effects via the mitochondrial K ATP channels-dependent mechanisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Amyloidpeptide-specific DARPins as a novel class of potential therapeutics for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanenberg, Michael; McAfoose, Jordan; Kulic, Luka; Welt, Tobias; Wirth, Fabian; Parizek, Petra; Strobel, Lisa; Cattepoel, Susann; Späni, Claudia; Derungs, Rebecca; Maier, Marcel; Plückthun, Andreas; Nitsch, Roger M

    2014-09-26

    Passive immunization with anti-amyloidpeptide (Aβ) antibodies is effective in animal models of Alzheimer disease. With the advent of efficient in vitro selection technologies, the novel class of designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) presents an attractive alternative to the immunoglobulin scaffold. DARPins are small and highly stable proteins with a compact modular architecture ideal for high affinity protein-protein interactions. In this report, we describe the selection, binding profile, and epitope analysis of Aβ-specific DARPins. We further showed their ability to delay Aβ aggregation and prevent Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity in vitro. To demonstrate their therapeutic potential in vivo, mono- and trivalent Aβ-specific DARPins (D23 and 3×D23) were infused intracerebroventricularly into the brains of 11-month-old Tg2576 mice over 4 weeks. Both D23 and 3×D23 treatments were shown to result in improved cognitive performance and reduced soluble Aβ levels. These findings demonstrate the therapeutic potential of Aβ-specific DARPins for the treatment of Alzheimer disease. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. The chalcone derivative Chana 1 protects against amyloid β peptide-induced oxidative stress and cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Jieun; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Choi, Hyo-Kyung; Jun, Woojin; Park, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Yoo-Hyun; Yoon, Ho-Geun

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease to cause dementia in the elderly. Amyloid β (Aβ)-peptide induced oxidative stress causes the initiation and progression of AD. Recently, new chalcone derivatives termed the Chana series were synthesized. Among them, Chana 1 showed high free radical scavenging activity (72.5%), as measured by a DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) assay. In this study, we investigated the effect of Chana 1 against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity and cognitive deficits. Additionally, we sought to estimate the lethal dose, 50% (LD50) of Chana 1 in mice using an acute oral toxicity test. We found that Chana 1 significantly protected against Aβ-induced neuronal cell death in PC12 cells. Oral administration of Chana 1 at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight/day significantly improved Aβ-induced learning and memory impairment in mice, as measured in Y-maze and passive avoidance tests. In acute toxicity tests, the LD50 in mice was determined to be 520.44 mg/kg body weight. The data are valuable for future studies and suggest that Chana 1 has therapeutic potential for the management of neurodegenerative disease.

  2. Effect of four medicinal plants on Amyloid-β induced neurotoxicity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amyloid-beta peptide (Aâ) is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), a neurodegenerative disorder. This study was designed to determine the effect of four medicinal plants used to treat neurodegenerative diseases on Aâ-induced cell death. Cytotoxicity of the ethanol extracts of the plants was ...

  3. Multiple factors contribute to the peripheral induction of cerebral beta-amyloidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisele, Y.S.; Fritschi, S.K.; Hamaguchi, T.; Obermuller, U.; Fuger, P.; Skodras, A.; Schafer, C.; Odenthal, J.; Heikenwalder, M.; Staufenbiel, M.; Jucker, M.

    2014-01-01

    Deposition of aggregated amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide in brain is an early event and hallmark pathology of Alzheimer's disease and cerebral Abeta angiopathy. Experimental evidence supports the concept that Abeta multimers can act as seeds and structurally corrupt other Abeta peptides by a

  4. Coconut oil protects cortical neurons from amyloid beta toxicity by enhancing signaling of cell survival pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafar, F; Clarke, J P; Mearow, K M

    2017-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that has links with other conditions that can often be modified by dietary and life-style interventions. In particular, coconut oil has received attention as having potentially having benefits in lessening the cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease. In a recent report, we showed that neuron survival in cultures co-treated with coconut oil and Aβ was rescued compared to cultures exposed only to Aβ. Here we investigated treatment with Aβ for 1, 6 or 24 h followed by addition of coconut oil for a further 24 h, or treatment with coconut oil for 24 h followed by Aβ exposure for various periods. Neuronal survival and several cellular parameters (cleaved caspase 3, synaptophysin labeling and ROS) were assessed. In addition, the influence of these treatments on relevant signaling pathways was investigated with Western blotting. In terms of the treatment timing, our data indicated that coconut oil rescues cells pre-exposed to Aβ for 1 or 6 h, but is less effective when the pre-exposure has been 24 h. However, pretreatment with coconut oil prior to Aβ exposure showed the best outcomes. Treatment with octanoic or lauric acid also provided protection against Aβ, but was not as effective as the complete oil. The coconut oil treatment reduced the number of cells with cleaved caspase and ROS labeling, as well as rescuing the loss of synaptophysin labeling observed with Aβ treatment. Treatment with coconut oil, as well as octanoic, decanoic and lauric acids, resulted in a modest increase in ketone bodies compared to controls. The biochemical data suggest that Akt and ERK activation may contribute to the survival promoting influence of coconut oil. This was supported by observations that a PI3-Kinase inhibitor blocked the rescue effect of CoOil on Aβ amyloid toxicity. Further studies into the mechanisms of action of coconut oil and its constituent medium chain fatty acids are warranted

  5. Amyloid Beta-Mediated Hypomethylation of Heme Oxygenase 1 Correlates with Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Youn Sung

    Full Text Available To identify epigenetically regulated genes involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD we analyzed global mRNA expression and methylation profiles in amyloid precursor protein (APP-Swedish mutant-expressing AD model cells, H4-sw and selected heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1, which is associated with pathological features of AD such as neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. We examined the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of HMOX1 and its application as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for AD. Our results show that HMOX1 mRNA and protein expression was approximately 12.2-fold and 7.9-fold increased in H4-sw cells, respectively. Increased HMOX1 expression was also detected in the brain, particularly the hippocampus, of AD model transgenic mice. However, the methylation of specific CpG sites within its promoter, particularly at CpG located -374 was significantly decreased in H4-sw cells. Treatment of neuroglioma cells with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine resulted in reduced methylation of HMOX1 promoter accompanied by enhanced HMOX1 expression strongly supporting DNA methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation of HMOX1. Toxic Aβ-induced aberrant hypomethylation of HMOX1 at -374 promoter CpG site was correlated with increased HMOX1 expression. In addition to neuroglioma cells, we also found Aβ-induced epigenetic regulation of HMOX1 in human T lymphocyte Jurkat cells. We evaluated DNA methylation status of HMOX1 at -374 promoter CpG site in blood samples from AD patients, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI, and control individuals using quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. We observed lower methylation of HMOX1 at the -374 promoter CpG site in AD patients compared to MCI and control individuals, and a correlation between Mini-Mental State Examination score and demethylation level. Receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed good discrimination of AD patients from MCI

  6. {sup 18}F-Florbetaben PET beta-amyloid binding expressed in Centiloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, Christopher C. [Austin Health, Department of Molecular Imaging and Therapy, Centre for PET, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Dore, Vincent [Austin Health, Department of Molecular Imaging and Therapy, Centre for PET, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); eHealth, CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Jones, Gareth; Baxendale, David; Mulligan, Rachel S. [Austin Health, Department of Molecular Imaging and Therapy, Centre for PET, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Bullich, Santiago; Stephens, Andrew W.; Dinkelborg, Ludger [Piramal Imaging GmbH, Berlin (Germany); De Santi, Susan [Piramal Pharma, Inc, Boston, MA (United States); Masters, Colin L. [The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Villemagne, Victor L. [Austin Health, Department of Molecular Imaging and Therapy, Centre for PET, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2017-11-15

    The Centiloid (CL) method enables quantitative values from Aβ-amyloid (Aβ) imaging to be expressed in a universal unit providing pathological, diagnostic and prognostic thresholds in clinical practice and research and allowing integration of multiple tracers and methods. The method was developed for {sup 11}C-PiB scans with zero CL set as the average in young normal subjects and 100 CL the average in subjects with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). The method allows derivation of equations to convert the uptake value of any tracer into the same standard CL units but first requires head-to-head comparison with {sup 11}C-PiB results. We derived the equation to express {sup 18}F-florbetaben (FBB) binding in CL units. Paired PiB and FBB PET scans were obtained in 35 subjects. including ten young normal subjects aged under 45 years (33 ± 8 years). FBB images were acquired from 90 to 110 min after injection. Spatially normalized images were analysed using the standard CL method (SPM8 coregistration of PET data to MRI data and the MNI-152 atlas) and standard CL regions (cortex and whole cerebellum downloaded from http://www.gaain.org). FBB binding was strongly correlated with PiB binding (R{sup 2} = 0.96, SUVR{sub FBB} = 0.61 x SUVR{sub PiB} + 0.39). The equation to derive CL values from FBB SUVR was CL units = 153.4 x SUVR{sub FBB} - 154.9. The CL value in the young normal subjects was -1.08 ± 6.81 for FBB scans compared to -0.32 ± 3.48 for PiB scans, giving a variance ratio of 1.96 (SD{sub FBB} {sub CL}/SD{sub PiB} {sub CL}). {sup 18}F-FBB binding is strongly correlated with PiB binding and FBB results can now be expressed in CL units. (orig.)

  7. Characterization of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor beta-arrestin 2 interaction: a high-affinity receptor phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Rasmus; Martini, Lene; Schwartz, Thue W

    2005-01-01

    for the fusion constructs was observed. We conclude that the glucagon-like peptide 1 fusion construct mimics the natural interaction of the receptor with (beta)arr2 with respect to binding peptide ligands, G protein-mediated signaling and internalization, and that this distinct molecular phenotype is reminiscent...

  8. Melting of a beta-hairpin peptide using isotope-edited 2D IR spectroscopy and simulations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, A.W.; Lessing, J.; Ganim, Z.; Peng, C.S.; Tokmakoff, A.; Roy, S.; Jansen, T.L.Th.A.; Knoester, J.

    2010-01-01

    Isotope-edited two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy has been used to characterize the conformational heterogeneity of the beta-hairpin peptide TrpZip2 (TZ2) across its thermal unfolding transition. Four isotopologues were synthesized to probe hydrogen bonding and solvent exposure of the beta-turn

  9. Melting of a beta-Hairpin Peptide Using Isotope-Edited 2D IR Spectroscopy and Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Adam W.; Lessing, Joshua; Ganim, Ziad; Peng, Chunte Sam; Tokmakoff, Andrei; Roy, Santanu; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Knoester, Jasper

    2010-01-01

    Isotope-edited two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy has been used! to characterize the conformational heterogeneity of the beta-hairpin peptide TrpZip2 (17.2) across its thermal unfolding transition Four isotopologues were synthesized to probe hydrogen bonding and solvent exposure of the beta-turn

  10. Tumor targeting with radiolabeled alpha(v)beta(3) integrin binding peptides in a nude mouse model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.L.H.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Dijkgraaf, I.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Frielink, C.; Edwards, D.S.; Rajopadhye, M.; Boonstra, H.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Boerman, O.C.

    2002-01-01

    The alpha(v)beta(3) integrin is expressed on proliferating endothelial cells such as those present in growing tumors, as well as on tumor cells of various origin. Tumor-induced angiogenesis can be blocked in vivo by antagonizing the alpha(v)beta(3) integrin with small peptides containing the

  11. HUBUNGAN KADAR BETA.SITE APP.CLEAVING ENZYME 1, BETA-AMYLOID DAN 4 HYDROXINONENAL PLASMA DENGAN GANGGUAN FUNGSI KOGNITIF PADA PENDERITA PASCASTROKE ISKEMIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliarni Syafrita

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The levet of beta-amyloid (Ap in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSS can beused asa marker to detect cognitive impairment, but fhe CSS retrieval technique is invasive. so if r'snecessa4z fo find biomarkers that are relatively easy, cheap and reliable. Therefore, biomarkersthat can be measured in blood is needed.Aims: To determine fhe association of the blood levels of BACE-I, AB and 4HNE with ischemiccognitive functisn after stroke event.Methads: This study was an observational study with cross sectional design using cases andcontrols. A number af 84 patients with ischemic stroke and 42 normal subjecfs as controls wereenrolled. Cognitive function u/as assessed 3 months aftdr stroke event using MoCA-lna testand measurement of blood levels of BACE1-1, 4p40, AP42 and 4HNE was conducted within72 hours of onset of stroke. Regression statistical analysis was used to determine the mostdaminant factars related to the occurrence of impaired cognitive function after stroke event.Resuffs; ln bivariate analysis, we found a significant assocrafion between cognitive impairmentafter stroke with high blood levels of BACE1 (p = 0.004, OR = 1.714, low levels of AB40 (p =A.0001, AR = 14.80 and low /eve/s of AB42 @ = A.U7, OR = 3.44. There was no significantassociation between the blood levels of 4HNE with impaired cognitive function after strokeevent. ln multivariate analysis, we found low low plasma level of 4840, high level of BACE-1,and low level of AB42 were variables strongly related with cognitive impairment after ischemicstroke subsequently based on the strength of correlation.Canclusians: Low levels of 4840, ttigh levels of BACE-I and low ievels of Ap42 are associatedwith the incidence of impaired cagnitive functian after ischemic stroke.M}(A, Volume 37, Nomor.Supl. 2, November 2014MKA, Volume 37, Nomor.Supl. 2, November 2014 http:/imka.fk. u nand.ac. id/ABSTRAKLatar Belakang : Kecacatan pascastroke diperberat oleh terganggunya fungsi kognitif

  12. Serum β-amyloid peptide levels spike in the early stage of Alzheimer-like plaque pathology in an APP/PS1 double transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jue; Qiao, Jin-Ping; Zhu, Shenghua; Xue, Mengzhou; Chen, Wenwu; Wang, Xinchun; Tempier, Adrien; Huang, Qingjun; Kong, Jiming; Li, Xin-Min

    2013-11-01

    Serum levels of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides may represent an early biomarker in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we investigated the temporal kinetic changes in the levels of serum Aβ 1-42 and 40 in an amyloid precursor protein (APP)/presenilin (PS)1 double transgenic mouse model of AD. Serum Aβ peptide levels in 2-, 3-, 6-, 9- and 18-month old, and liver Aβ 1-40 level in 6-month old mice were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Results revealed that serum Aβ levels peaked in 3-month old transgenic mice, and the Aβ level in non-transgenic and transgenic mice is comparable in liver. Compared to the 6-month old transgenic mice, Congo red staining showed that the 3-month old transgenic mice had minimum brain Aβ plaques, corresponding to the early stage of Alzheimer-like plaque pathology, and confocal microscope images showed that the deposition of Aβ in their cerebral vessels was minimal. Furthermore, results of the water maze test, showed that memory was normal for the 3- month old transgenic mice when compared to age-matched non-transgenic mice. These results suggest that serum Aβ peptide levels may be peaked during the early stage of AD. Monitoring serum Aβ peptide levels in the potential AD population may provide an early diagnosis of AD prior to the appearance of clinical symptoms.

  13. Ideally amphipathic beta-sheeted peptides at interfaces: structure, orientation, affinities for lipids and hemolytic activity of (KL)(m)K peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, S; Desbat, B; Dufourcq, J

    2000-01-15

    Designed to model ideally amphipathic beta-sheets, the minimalist linear (KL)(m)K peptides (m=4-7) were synthesized and proved to form stable films at the air/water interface, they insert into compressed dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine monolayers and interact with egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles. Whatever the interface or the lateral pressure applied to the films, FT-IR and polarization-modulated IRRAS spectroscopy developed in situ on the films indicated that all the peptides totally fold into intermolecular antiparallel beta-sheets. Calculated spectra of the amide region allowed us to define the orientation of the beta-strands compared to the interface. It is concluded that such beta-sheets remain flat-oriented without deep perturbation of zwitterionic phospholipids. Dansyl labelling at the N-terminus indicates that all the peptides are monomeric at a low concentration in aqueous buffer and bind to lipids with similar Dns burying. The affinities for zwitterionic lecithin mono- and bilayers, quantitatively estimated from buffer to lipid partition constants, monotonically increased with peptide length, indicating that hydrophobicity is a limiting parameter for lipid and membrane affinities. Peptides induced permeability increases on zwitterionic liposomes, they are strongly hemolytic towards human erythrocytes and their activity increases concurrently with length. Taking into account the lipid affinity, a hemolytic efficiency can be defined: at the same amount of peptide bound, this efficiency strongly increases with the peptide length. It is proposed that the first determinant step of membrane disturbance is the invasion of the outer membrane leaflet by these ideally amphipathic beta-sheeted structures lying flat at the interface, like large rafts depending on the number of beta-strands.

  14. In silico studies of the early stages of aggregation of A peptides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prabir Khatua

    Abstract. Accumulation of amyloid beta peptide in the brain is responsible for debilitating neurodegenerative disease, namely, Alzheimer's disease. We have carried out atomistic molecular dynamics simulation to study the early stages of the aggregation process of five full-length Aβ42 peptide monomers with varying ...

  15. Additional Value of CSF Amyloid-beta(40) Levels in the Differentiation between FTLD and Control Subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwey, N.A.; Kester, M.I.; van der Flier, W.M.; Veerhuis, R.; Berkhof, J.; Twaalfhoven, H.A.M.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Scheltens, P.; Pijnenburg, Y.A.L.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the additional value of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid-β {1-40} (Aβ {40}) next to amyloid-β {1-42} (β {42}), total tau (Tau), and tau phosphorylated at threonine-181 (pTau) to distinguish patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and controls,

  16. The metabolic enhancer piracetam ameliorates the impairment of mitochondrial function and neurite outgrowth induced by ß-amyloid peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, C; Ungerer, I; Lipka, U; Kirr, S; Schütt, T; Eckert, A; Leuner, K; Müller, WE

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: β-Amyloid peptide (Aβ) is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease by initiating a cascade of events from mitochondrial dysfunction to neuronal death. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been shown to improve mitochondrial dysfunction following brain aging and experimentally induced oxidative stress. Experimental approach: We used cell lines (PC12 and HEK cells) and murine dissociated brain cells. The protective effects of piracetam in vitro and ex vivo on Aβ-induced impairment of mitochondrial function (as mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production), on secretion of soluble Aβ and on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells were investigated. Key results: Piracetam improves mitochondrial function of PC12 cells and acutely dissociated brain cells from young NMRI mice following exposure to extracellular Aβ1-42. Similar protective effects against Aβ1-42 were observed in dissociated brain cells from aged NMRI mice, or mice transgenic for mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APP) treated with piracetam for 14 days. Soluble Aβ load was markedly diminished in the brain of those animals after treatment with piracetam. Aβ production by HEK cells stably transfected with mutant human APP was elevated by oxidative stress and this was reduced by piracetam. Impairment of neuritogenesis is an important consequence of Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and Aβ-induced reduction of neurite growth in PC12 cells was substantially improved by piracetam. Conclusion and implications: Our findings strongly support the concept of improving mitochondrial function as an approach to ameliorate the detrimental effects of Aβ on brain function. This article is commented on by Moncada, pp. 217–219 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00706.x and to view related papers by Pravdic et al. and Puerta et al. visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00698.x and http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j

  17. A new brain metalloendopeptidase which degrades the Alzheimer ß-amyloid 1-40 peptide producing soluble fragments without neurotoxic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.M. Carvalho

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available A new metalloendopeptidase was purified to apparent homogeneity from a homogenate of normal human brain using successive steps of chromatography on DEAE-Trisacryl, hydroxylapatite and Sephacryl S-200. The purified enzyme cleaved the Gly33-Leu34 bond of the 25-35 neurotoxic sequence of the Alzheimer ß-amyloid 1-40 peptide producing soluble fragments without neurotoxic effects. This enzyme activity was only inhibited by divalent cation chelators such as EDTA, EGTA and o-phenanthroline (1 mM and was insensitive to phosphoramidon and captopril (1 µM concentration, specific inhibitors of neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11 and angiotensin-converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1, respectively. The high affinity of this human brain endopeptidase for ß-amyloid 1-40 peptide (Km = 5 µM suggests that it may play a physiological role in the degradation of this substance produced by normal cellular metabolism. It may also be hypothesized that the abnormal accumulation of the amyloid ß-protein in Alzheimer's disease may be initiated by a defect or an inactivation of this enzyme.

  18. Synaptotoxicity of Alzheimer beta amyloid can be explained by its membrane perforating property.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando J Sepulveda

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that induce Alzheimer's disease (AD are largely unknown thereby deterring the development of disease-modifying therapies. One working hypothesis of AD is that Abeta excess disrupts membranes causing pore formation leading to alterations in ionic homeostasis. However, it is largely unknown if this also occurs in native brain neuronal membranes. Here we show that similar to other pore forming toxins, Abeta induces perforation of neuronal membranes causing an increase in membrane conductance, intracellular calcium and ethidium bromide influx. These data reveal that the target of Abeta is not another membrane protein, but that Abeta itself is the cellular target thereby explaining the failure of current therapies to interfere with the course of AD. We propose that this novel effect of Abeta could be useful for the discovery of anti AD drugs capable of blocking these "Abeta perforates". In addition, we demonstrate that peptides that block Abeta neurotoxicity also slow or prevent the membrane-perforating action of Abeta.

  19. Reduced amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid beta-protein precursor by the small-molecule Differentiation Inducing Factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, Michael A; Washicosky, Kevin; Moir, Robert D; Tesco, Giuseppina; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Wasco, Wilma

    2009-04-01

    The detection of cell cycle proteins in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains may represent an early event leading to neurodegeneration. To identify cell cycle modifiers with anti-Abeta properties, we assessed the effect of Differentiation-Inducing Factor-1 (DIF-1), a unique, small-molecule from Dictyostelium discoideum, on the proteolysis of the amyloid beta-protein precursor (APP) in a variety of different cell types. We show that DIF-1 slows cell cycle progression through G0/G1 that correlates with a reduction in cyclin D1 protein levels. Western blot analysis of DIF-treated cells and conditioned medium revealed decreases in the levels of secreted APP, mature APP, and C-terminal fragments. Assessment of conditioned media by sandwich ELISA showed reduced levels of Abeta40 and Abeta42, also demonstrating that treatment with DIF-1 effectively decreases the ratio of Abeta42 to Abeta40. In addition, DIF-1 significantly diminished APP phosphorylation at residue T668. Interestingly, site-directed mutagenesis of APP residue Thr668 to alanine or glutamic acid abolished the effect of DIF-1 on APP proteolysis and restored secreted levels of Abeta. Finally, DIF-1 prevented the accumulation of APP C-terminal fragments induced by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin, and calpain inhibitor N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (ALLN). Our findings suggest that DIF-1 affects G0/G1-associated amyloidogenic processing of APP by a gamma-secretase-, proteasome- and calpain-insensitive pathway, and that this effect requires the presence of residue Thr668.

  20. Iterative Image Processing for Early Diagnostic of Beta-Amyloid Plaque Deposition in Pre-Clinical Alzheimer's Disease Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavine, Nikolai V; Kulkarni, Padmakar V; McColl, Roderick W

    2017-08-01

    To test and evaluate an efficient iterative image processing strategy to improve the quality of sub-optimal pre-clinical PET images. A novel iterative resolution subsets-based method to reduce noise and enhance resolution (RSEMD) has been demonstrated on examples of PET imaging studies of Alzheimer's disease (AD) plaques deposition in mice brains. The RSEMD method was applied to imaging studies of non-invasive detection of beta-amyloid plaque in transgenic mouse models of AD. Data acquisition utilized a Siemens Inveon® micro PET/CT device. Quantitative uptake of the tracer in control and AD mice brains was determined by counting the extent of plaque deposition by histological staining. The pre-clinical imaging software inviCRO ® was used for fitting the recovery PET images to the mouse brain atlas and obtaining the time activity curves (TAC) from different brain areas. In all of the AD studies the post-processed images proved to have higher resolution and lower noise as compared with images reconstructed by conventional OSEM method. In general, the values of SNR reached a plateau at around 10 iterations with an improvement factor of about 2 over sub-optimal PET brain images. A rapidly converging, iterative deconvolution image processing algorithm with a resolution subsets-based approach RSEMD has been used for quantitative studies of changes in Alzheimer's pathology over time. The RSEMD method can be applied to sub-optimal clinical PET brain images to improve image quality to diagnostically acceptable levels and will be crucial in order to facilitate diagnosis of AD progression at the earliest stages.

  1. Phase 2 safety trial targeting amyloid beta production with a gamma-secretase inhibitor in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, Adam S; Raman, Rema; Siemers, Eric R; Becerra, Lida; Clark, Christopher M; Dean, Robert A; Farlow, Martin R; Galvin, James E; Peskind, Elaine R; Quinn, Joseph F; Sherzai, Abdullah; Sowell, B Brooke; Aisen, Paul S; Thal, Leon J

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate the safety, tolerability, and amyloid beta (Abeta) response to the gamma-secretase inhibitor LY450139 in Alzheimer disease. Multicenter, randomized, double-blind, dose-escalation, placebo-controlled trial. Community-based clinical research centers. Patients Fifty-one individuals with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease were randomized to receive placebo (n=15) or LY450139 (100 mg [n=22] or 140 mg [n=14]), with 43 completing the treatment phase. Intervention The LY450139 groups received 60 mg/d for 2 weeks, then 100 mg/d for 6 weeks, and then either 100 or 140 mg/d for 6 additional weeks. Primary outcome measures were adverse events, plasma and cerebrospinal fluid Abeta levels, vital signs, electrocardiographic data, and laboratory safety test results. Secondary outcome measures included the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale cognitive subscale and the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study Activities of Daily Living Scale. Group differences were seen in skin and subcutaneous tissue concerns (P=.05), including 3 possible drug rashes and 3 reports of hair color change in the treatment groups. There were 3 adverse event-related discontinuations, including 1 transient bowel obstruction. The plasma Abeta(40) concentration was reduced by 58.2% for the 100-mg group and 64.6% for the 140-mg group (P<.001). No significant reduction was seen in cerebrospinal fluid Abeta levels. No group differences were seen in cognitive or functional measures. LY450139 was generally well tolerated at doses of up to 140 mg/d for 14 weeks, with several findings indicating the need for close clinical monitoring in future studies. Decreases in plasma Abeta concentrations were consistent with inhibition of gamma-secretase. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00244322.

  2. Phase II safety trial targeting amyloid beta production with a gamma-secretase inhibitor in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, Adam S.; Raman, Rema; Siemers, Eric R.; Becerra, Lida; Clark, Christopher M.; Dean, Robert A; Farlow, Martin R.; Galvin, James E.; Peskind, Elaine R.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Sherzai, Abdullah; Sowell, B. Brooke; Aisen, Paul S.; Thal, Leon J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Evaluate the safety, tolerability and amyloid beta (Aβ) response to a γ-secretase inhibitor (LY450139) in Alzheimer's disease. Design Multi-center, randomized, double-blind, dose-escalation, placebo-controlled trial. Setting Community based clinical research centers. Participants 51 participants with mild to moderate AD were randomized (placebo=15, 100mg=22, 140mg=14), with 43 completing the treatment phase. Intervention Subjects randomized to LY450139 received 60mg daily for 2 weeks followed by 100mg for 6 weeks, then re-randomized to 100mg or 140mg for 6 additional weeks. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcome measures consisted of adverse events, plasma and cerebrospinal fluid Aβ levels, vital signs, electrocardiogram data, and laboratory safety tests. Secondary outcome measures included the ADAS-cognitive subscale and the ADCS-Activities of Daily Living scale. Results Group differences were seen in “skin and subcutaneous tissue” complaints (p=0.052). These included 3 possible drug rashes and 3 reports of hair color change in the treatment groups. There were 3 adverse-event-related discontinuations, including one report of transient bowel obstruction. Plasma Aβ40 was reduced by 58.2% for the 100mg group and 64.6% for the 140mg group (P<0.001). No significant reduction was seen in CSF Aβ. No group differences were seen in cognitive or functional measures. Conclusions LY450139 was generally well tolerated at doses of up to 140mg taken daily for 14 weeks with several findings indicating the need for close clinical monitoring in future studies. Decreases in plasma Aβ concentrations were consistent with inhibition of γ-secretase. PMID:18695053

  3. Alzheimer's Toxic Amyloid Beta Oligomers: Unwelcome Visitors to the Na/K ATPase alpha3 Docking Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiChiara, Thomas; DiNunno, Nadia; Clark, Jeffrey; Bu, Riana Lo; Cline, Erika N; Rollins, Madeline G; Gong, Yuesong; Brody, David L; Sligar, Stephen G; Velasco, Pauline T; Viola, Kirsten L; Klein, William L

    2017-03-01

    Toxic amyloid beta oligomers (AβOs) are known to accumulate in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in animal models of AD. Their structure is heterogeneous, and they are found in both intracellular and extracellular milieu. When given to CNS cultures or injected ICV into non-human primates and other non-transgenic animals, AβOs have been found to cause impaired synaptic plasticity, loss of memory function, tau hyperphosphorylation and tangle formation, synapse elimination, oxidative and ER stress, inflammatory microglial activation, and selective nerve cell death. Memory loss and pathology in transgenic models are prevented by AβO antibodies, while Aducanumab, an antibody that targets AβOs as well as fibrillar Aβ, has provided cognitive benefit to humans in early clinical trials. AβOs have now been investigated in more than 3000 studies and are widely thought to be the major toxic form of Aβ. Although much has been learned about the downstream mechanisms of AβO action, a major gap concerns the earliest steps: How do AβOs initially interact with surface membranes to generate neuron-damaging transmembrane events? Findings from Ohnishi et al (PNAS 2005) combined with new results presented here are consistent with the hypothesis that AβOs act as neurotoxins because they attach to particular membrane protein docks containing Na/K ATPase-α3, where they inhibit ATPase activity and pathologically restructure dock composition and topology in a manner leading to excessive Ca++ build-up. Better understanding of the mechanism that makes attachment of AβOs to vulnerable neurons a neurotoxic phenomenon should open the door to therapeutics and diagnostics targeting the first step of a complex pathway that leads to neural damage and dementia.

  4. Nanoformulated alpha-mangostin ameliorates Alzheimer's disease neuropathology by elevating LDLR expression and accelerating amyloid-beta clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lei; Gu, Xiao; Song, Qingxiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Huang, Meng; Hu, Meng; Hou, Lina; Kang, Ting; Chen, Jun; Chen, Hongzhuan; Gao, Xiaoling

    2016-03-28

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is now representing one of the largest global healthcare challenges. However, an effective therapy is still lacking. Accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) in the brain is supposed to trigger pathogenic cascades that eventually lead to AD. Therefore, Aβ clearance strategy is being actively pursued as a promising disease modifying therapy. Here, we found that α-mangostin (α-M), a polyphenolic xanthone derivative from mangosteen, up-regulated low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) expression in microglia and liver cells, and efficiently facilitated Aβ clearance. However, the in vivo application of α-M is limited due to its hydrophobic nature, poor aqueous solubility and stability, and thus low bioavailability and accumulation in the target organs. To overcome this limitation, α-M was encapsulated into the core of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(l-lactide) (PEG-PLA) nanoparticles [NP(α-M)]. Such nanoencapsulation improved the biodistribution of α-M in both the brain and liver, enhanced the brain clearance of (125)I-radiolabeled Aβ1-42 in an LDLR-dependent manner, reduced Aβ deposition, attenuated neuroinflammatory responses, ameliorated neurologic changes and reversed behavioral deficits in AD model mice. These findings justified the concept that polyphenol-mediated modulation of LDLR expression might serve as a safe and efficient disease-modifying therapy for AD by accelerating Aβ clearance. It also demonstrated the powerful capacity of nanotechnology in modulating the biodistribution behavior of drug to improve its therapeutic efficacy in AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cortical Amyloid Beta in Cognitively Normal Elderly Adults is Associated with Decreased Network Efficiency within the Cerebro-Cerebellar System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steininger, Stefanie C; Liu, Xinyang; Gietl, Anton; Wyss, Michael; Schreiner, Simon; Gruber, Esmeralda; Treyer, Valerie; Kälin, Andrea; Leh, Sandra; Buck, Alfred; Nitsch, Roger M; Prüssmann, Klaas P; Hock, Christoph; Unschuld, Paul G

    2014-01-01

    Deposition of cortical amyloid beta (Aβ) is a correlate of aging and a risk factor for Alzheimer disease (AD). While several higher order cognitive processes involve functional interactions between cortex and cerebellum, this study aims to investigate effects of cortical Aβ deposition on coupling within the cerebro-cerebellar system. We included 15 healthy elderly subjects with normal cognitive performance as assessed by neuropsychological testing. Cortical Aβ was quantified using (11)carbon-labeled Pittsburgh compound B positron-emission-tomography late frame signals. Volumes of brain structures were assessed by applying an automated parcelation algorithm to three dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo T1-weighted images. Basal functional network activity within the cerebro-cerebellar system was assessed using blood-oxygen-level dependent resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging at the high field strength of 7 T for measuring coupling between cerebellar seeds and cerebral gray matter. A bivariate regression approach was applied for identification of brain regions with significant effects of individual cortical Aβ load on coupling. Consistent with earlier reports, a significant degree of positive and negative coupling could be observed between cerebellar seeds and cerebral voxels. Significant positive effects of cortical Aβ load on cerebro-cerebellar coupling resulted for cerebral brain regions located in inferior temporal lobe, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, and thalamus. Our findings indicate that brain amyloidosis in cognitively normal elderly subjects is associated with decreased network efficiency within the cerebro-cerebellar system. While the identified cerebral regions are consistent with established patterns of increased sensitivity for Aβ-associated neurodegeneration, additional studies are needed to elucidate the relationship between dysfunction of the cerebro-cerebellar system and risk for AD.

  6. Engineering Metal Ion Coordination to Regulate Amyloid Fibril Assembly And Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J.; Canfield, J.M.; Mehta, A.K.; Shokes, J.E.; Tian, B.; Childers, W.S.; Simmons, J.A.; Mao, Z.; Scott, R.A.; Warncke, K.; Lynn, D.G.

    2009-06-02

    Protein and peptide assembly into amyloid has been implicated in functions that range from beneficial epigenetic controls to pathological etiologies. However, the exact structures of the assemblies that regulate biological activity remain poorly defined. We have previously used Zn{sup 2+} to modulate the assembly kinetics and morphology of congeners of the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}) associated with Alzheimer's disease. We now reveal a correlation among A{beta}-Cu{sup 2+} coordination, peptide self-assembly, and neuronal viability. By using the central segment of A{beta}, HHQKLVFFA or A{beta}(13-21), which contains residues H13 and H14 implicated in A{beta}-metal ion binding, we show that Cu{sup 2+} forms complexes with A{beta}(13-21) and its K16A mutant and that the complexes, which do not self-assemble into fibrils, have structures similar to those found for the human prion protein, PrP. N-terminal acetylation and H14A substitution, Ac-A{beta}(13-21)H14A, alters metal coordination, allowing Cu{sup 2+} to accelerate assembly into neurotoxic fibrils. These results establish that the N-terminal region of A{beta} can access different metal-ion-coordination environments and that different complexes can lead to profound changes in A{beta} self-assembly kinetics, morphology, and toxicity. Related metal-ion coordination may be critical to the etiology of other neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Long-term basal forebrain cholinergic-rich grafts derived from trisomy 16 mice do not develop beta-amyloid pathology and neurodegeneration but demonstrate neuroinflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, T; Goldammer, A; Luschekina, E; Beck, M; Schliebs, R; Bigl, V

    1998-01-01

    Patients with Down syndrome (human trisomy 21) develop neuropathological and cholinergic functional defects characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, which has been attributed to the location of the Alzheimer beta-amyloid precursor protein on chromosome 21. Due to the partial genetic homology between mouse chromosome 16 and human chromosome 21, murine trisomy 16 was used as a model to study functional links between increased expression of the amyloid precursor protein, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammatory responses. Basal forebrain cholinergic-rich tissue derived from trisomy 16 mice at embryonic age of day 16 was transplanted into the lateral ventricle of adult normal mice. At 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after transplantation, the grafts were characterized by immunocytochemistry, molecular biological analysis, and stereological methods. Grafts survived up to one year and still demonstrated immunoreactivity for cholinergic, GABAergic and astroglial cells. Though a 1.5-fold neuronal over-expression of amyloid precursor protein was detected in brains from trisomy 16 embryos by Northern analysis, beta-amyloid deposits were found neither in control nor trisomic grafts. Detailed stereological analysis of trisomic grafts did not reveal any neurodegeneration or morphological changes of cholinergic and GABAergic neurons during the course of graft maturation up to one year, as compared to grafts derived from euploid tissue. However, both euploid and trisomic grafts demonstrated a strong infiltration with T- and B-lymphocytes and a significant micro- and astroglial activation (hypertrophic astrocytes) within and around the grafts. These observations further suggest that the trisomy 16-induced neurodegeneration is seemingly due to a lack of neuron supporting factors which are provided by either the metabolic interaction of trisomic graft with surrounding healthy host tissue or by cells of the immune system infiltrating the graft.

  8. The influence of exogenous peptide on beta2-microglobulin exchange in the HLA complex: analysis in real-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, C L; Ruprai, A K; Solache, A; Lowdell, M; Price, C P; Cohen, S B; Parham, P; Madrigal, J A; Newman, D J

    1998-07-01

    We used an optical biosensor to determine the relative binding affinity of peptides to purified HLA class I molecules. In this assay we monitor beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) exchange within the HLA-A2 molecule, whereby native beta2m in the complex is replaced by beta2m immobilized at the surface of the biosensor. Quantitative kinetic measurements permit us to obtain association rate (kass), dissociation rate (kdiss) and affinity constants (KA) for the beta2m exchange reaction, alone, (control) and in the presence of exogenous peptide. We tested a panel of six peptides which had been designed and synthesized with an HLA-A2 binding motif, and had also been tested by the T2-cell binding assay, along with control peptides. The biosensor results demonstrate that exogenous peptide influences the dynamics of beta2m exchange in a sequence-specific manner. Five of six peptides increased the association rate, decreased the dissociation rate, and significantly increased the affinity (KA=1. 55-1.88x10(9) M-1) of HLA-A2 for immobilized beta2m compared with the control (KA =1.14+/-0.04x10(9)M-1), demonstrating stabilization of the complex. One peptide was unable to stabilize the complex, as also shown in the T2 binding assay. However, analysis of peptide sequences demonstrated that the HLA-A2 secondary motif as well as primary motif residues are required for HLA-A2 stabilization. Further experiments demonstrated that beta2m exchange alone cannot stabilize the HLA class I complex at the cell surface until a peptide of sufficient binding affinity is bound. Hence kinetics equal to or below the control values in our biosensor assay probably represent an unstable complex in vivo. Unlike other methods described for the analysis of peptide stabilization, this approach is significantly faster, provides full kinetic analysis, and is simpler, since it requires no labeling of peptides. Furthermore, this may have important implications in the assessment of peptide vaccines.

  9. Dual effect of beta-amyloid on α7 and α4β2 nicotinic receptors controlling the release of glutamate, aspartate and GABA in rat hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Mura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously showed that beta-amyloid (Aβ, a peptide considered as relevant to Alzheimer's Disease, is able to act as a neuromodulator affecting neurotransmitter release in absence of evident sign of neurotoxicity in two different rat brain areas. In this paper we focused on the hippocampus, a brain area which is sensitive to Alzheimer's Disease pathology, evaluating the effect of Aβ (at different concentrations on the neurotransmitter release stimulated by the activation of pre-synaptic cholinergic nicotinic receptors (nAChRs, α4β2 and α7 subtypes. Particularly, we focused on some neurotransmitters that are usually involved in learning and memory: glutamate, aspartate and GABA. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: WE USED A DUAL APPROACH: in vivo experiments (microdialysis technique on freely moving rats in parallel to in vitro experiments (isolated nerve endings derived from rat hippocampus. Both in vivo and in vitro the administration of nicotine stimulated an overflow of aspartate, glutamate and GABA. This effect was greatly inhibited by the highest concentrations of Aβ considered (10 µM in vivo and 100 nM in vitro. In vivo administration of 100 nM Aβ (the lowest concentration considered potentiated the GABA overflow evoked by nicotine. All these effects were specific for Aβ and for nicotinic secretory stimuli. The in vitro administration of either choline or 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride (α7 and α4β2 nAChRs selective agonists, respectively elicited the hippocampal release of aspartate, glutamate, and GABA. High Aβ concentrations (100 nM inhibited the overflow of all three neurotransmitters evoked by both choline and 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride. On the contrary, low Aβ concentrations (1 nM and 100 pM selectively acted on α7 subtypes potentiating the choline-induced release of both aspartate and glutamate, but not the one of GABA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results reinforce the concept that Aβ has relevant

  10. Involvement of insulin-degrading enzyme in the clearance of beta-amyloid at the blood-CSF barrier: Consequences of lead exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yanshu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by the deposition of beta-amyloid (Aβ peptides in the brain extracellular matrix, resulting in pathological changes and neurobehavioral deficits. Previous work from this laboratory demonstrated that the choroid plexus (CP possesses the capacity to remove Aβ from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, and exposure to lead (Pb compromises this function. Since metalloendopeptidase insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE, has been implicated in the metabolism of Aβ, we sought to investigate whether accumulation of Aβ following Pb exposure was due to the effect of Pb on IDE. Methods Rats were injected with a single dose of Pb acetate or an equivalent concentration of Na-acetate; CP tissues were processed to detect the location of IDE by immunohistochemistry. For in vitro studies, choroidal epithelial Z310 cells were treated with Pb for 24 h in the presence or absence of a known IDE inhibitor, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM to assess IDE enzymatic activity and subsequent metabolic clearance of Aβ. Additionally, the expression of IDE mRNA and protein were determined using real time PCR and western blots respectively. Results Immunohistochemistry and confocal imaging revealed the presence of IDE towards the apical surface of the CP tissue with no visible alteration in either its intensity or location following Pb exposure. There was no significant difference in the expressions of either IDE mRNA or protein following Pb exposure compared to controls either in CP tissues or in Z310 cells. However, our findings revealed a significant decrease in the IDE activity following Pb exposure; this inhibition was similar to that seen in the cells treated with NEM alone. Interestingly, treatment with Pb or NEM alone significantly increased the levels of intracellular Aβ, and a greater accumulation of Aβ was seen when the cells were exposed to a combination of both. Conclusion These data suggest that Pb exposure inhibits IDE

  11. Reactive oxygen species released from astrocytes treated with amyloid beta oligomers elicit neuronal calcium signals that decrease phospho-Ser727-STAT3 nuclear content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Yorka; Paula-Lima, Andrea C; Núñez, Marco T

    2018-03-01

    The transcription factor STAT3 has a crucial role in the development and maintenance of the nervous system. In this work, we treated astrocytes with oligomers of the amyloid beta peptide (AβOs), which display potent synaptotoxic activity, and studied the effects of mediators released by AβOs-treated astrocytes on the nuclear location of neuronal serine-727-phosphorylated STAT3 (pSerSTAT3). Treatment of mixed neuron-astrocyte cultures with 0.5µMAβOs induced in neurons a significant decrease of nuclear pSerSTAT3, but not of phosphotyrosine-705 STAT3, the other form of STAT3 phosphorylation. This decrease did not occur in astrocyte-poor neuronal cultures revealing a pivotal role for astrocytes in this response. To test if mediators released by astrocytes in response to AβOs induce pSerSTAT3 nuclear depletion, we used conditioned medium derived from AβOs-treated astrocyte cultures. Treatment of astrocyte-poor neuronal cultures with this medium caused pSerSTAT3 nuclear depletion but did not modify overall STAT3 levels. Extracellular catalase prevented the pSerSTAT3 nuclear depletion caused by astrocyte-conditioned medium, indicating that reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate this response. This conditioned medium also increased neuronal oxidative tone, leading to a ryanodine-sensitive intracellular calcium signal that proved to be essential for pSerSTAT3 nuclear depletion. In addition, this depletion decreased BCL2 and Survivin transcription and significantly increased BAX/BCL2 ratio. This is the first description that ROS generated by AβOs-treated astrocytes and neuronal calcium signals jointly regulate pSerSTAT3 nuclear distribution in neurons. We propose that astrocytes release ROS in response to AβOs, which by increasing neuronal oxidative tone, generate calcium signals that cause pSerSTAT3 nuclear depletion and loss of STAT3 protective transcriptional activity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Molecular cloning of activin betaA subunit mature peptide from peafowl and its application in taxonomy and phylogeny].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Fang-Dong; Tong, Xin-Xin; Yue, Bi-Song

    2005-03-01

    The sequences of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptide have been amplified from white peafowl, blue peafowl (pavo cristatus) and green peafowl (pavo muticus) genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a pair of degenerate primers. The target fragments were cloned into the vector pMD18-T and sequenced. The length of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptide is 345bp, which encoded a peptide of 115 amino acid residues. Sequence analysis of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptide demonstrated that the identity of nucleotide is 98.0% between blue peaflowl and green peafowl, and the identity of that is 98.8% between blue peaflowl and white peafow. Sequences comparison in NCBI revealed that the sequences of activin gene betaA subunit mature peptides of different species are highly conserved during evolution process. In addition, the restriction enzyme map of activins is high similar between white peafowl and blue peafowl. Phylogenetic tree was constructed with Mega 2 and Clustalxldx software. The result showed that white peafowl has a closer relationship to blue peafowl than to green peafowl. Considered the nucleotide differences of peafowls' activin gene betaA subunit mature peptides, a highly conserved region, we supported that white peafowl was derived from blue peafowl, and it is more possible the hybrid but just the product of color mutation, or maybe as a subspecies of Pavo genus.

  13. Beta-methyl substitution of cyclohexylalanine in Dmt-Tic-Cha-Phe peptides results in highly potent delta opioid antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Géza; Ioja, Eniko; Tömböly, Csaba; Ballet, Steven; Tourwé, Dirk; Péter, Antal; Martinek, Tamás; Chung, Nga N; Schiller, Peter W; Benyhe, Sándor; Borsodi, Anna

    2007-01-25

    The opioid peptide TIPP (H-Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe-OH, Tic:1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) was substituted with Dmt (2',6'-dimethyltyrosine) and a new unnatural amino acid, beta-MeCha (beta-methyl-cyclohexylalanine). This double substitution led to a new series of opioid peptides displaying subnanomolar delta antagonist activity and mu agonist or antagonist properties depending on the configuration of the beta-MeCha residue. The most promising analog, H-Dmt-Tic-(2S,3S)-beta-MeCha-Phe-OH was a very selective delta antagonist both in the mouse vas deferens (MVD) assay (Ke = 0.241 +/- 0.05 nM) and in radioligand binding assay (K i delta = 0.48 +/- 0.05 nM, K i mu/K i delta = 2800). The epimeric peptide H-Dmt-Tic-(2S,3R)-beta-MeCha-Phe-OH and the corresponding peptide amide turned out to be mixed partial mu agonist/delta antagonists in the guinea pig ileum and MVD assays. Our results constitute further examples of the influence of Dmt and beta-methyl substitution as well as C-terminal amidation on the potency, selectivity, and signal transduction properties of TIPP related peptides. Some of these compounds represent valuable pharmacological tools for opioid research.

  14. Inhibition of amyloid fiber assembly by both BiP and its target peptide.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, D. P.; Raffen, R.; Vogen, S.; Williamson, E.; Stevens, F. J.; Argon, Y.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2000-10-01

    Immunoglobulin light chain (LC) normally is a soluble, secreted protein, but some LC assemble into ordered fibrils whose deposition in tissues results in amyloidosis and organ failure. Here we reconstitute fibril formation in vitro and show that preformed fibrils can nucleate polymerization of soluble LC. This prion-like behavior has important physiological implications, since somatic mutations generate multiple related LC sequences. Furthermore, we demonstrate that fibril formation in vitro and aggregation of whole LC within cells are inhibited by BiP and by a synthetic peptide that is identical to a major LC binding site for BiP. We propose that LC form fibrils via an interprotein loop swap and that the underlying conformational change should be amenable to drug therapy.

  15. Interaction structure of the complex between neuroprotective factor humanin and Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide revealed by affinity mass spectrometry and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maftei, Madalina; Tian, Xiaodan; Manea, Marilena; Exner, Thomas E; Schwanzar, Daniel; von Arnim, Christine A F; Przybylski, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Humanin (HN) is a linear 24-aa peptide recently detected in human Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. HN specifically inhibits neuronal cell death in vitro induced by ß-amyloid (Aß) peptides and by amyloid precursor protein and its gene mutations in familial AD, thereby representing a potential therapeutic lead structure for AD; however, its molecular mechanism of action is not well understood. We report here the identification of the binding epitopes between HN and Aß(1-40) and characterization of the interaction structure through a molecular modeling study. Wild-type HN and HN-sequence mutations were synthesized by SPPS and the HPLC-purified peptides characterized by MALDI-MS. The interaction epitopes between HN and Aß(1-40) were identified by affinity-MS using proteolytic epitope excision and extraction, followed by elution and mass spectrometric characterization of the affinity-bound peptides. The affinity-MS analyses revealed HN(5-15) as the epitope sequence of HN, whereas Aß(17-28) was identified as the Aß interaction epitope. The epitopes and binding sites were ascertained by ELISA of the complex of HN peptides with immobilized Aß(1-40) and by ELISA with Aß(1-40) and Aß-partial sequences as ligands to immobilized HN. The specificity and affinity of the HN-Aß interaction were characterized by direct ESI-MS of the HN-Aß(1-40) complex and by bioaffinity analysis using a surface acoustic wave biosensor, providing a K(D) of the complex of 610 nm. A molecular dynamics simulation of the HN-Aß(1-40) complex was consistent with the binding specificity and shielding effects of the HN and Aß interaction epitopes. These results indicate a specific strong association of HN and Aß(1-40) polypeptide and provide a molecular basis for understanding the neuroprotective function of HN. Copyright © 2012 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Structure-based design of non-natural amino-acid inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Stuart A.; Karanicolas, John; Chang, Howard W.; Zhao, Anni; Jiang, Lin; Zirafi, Onofrio; Stevens, Jason T.; Münch, Jan; Baker, David; Eisenberg, David (UCLA); (UWASH); (UL); (Kansas); (Ulm)

    2011-09-20

    Many globular and natively disordered proteins can convert into amyloid fibrils. These fibrils are associated with numerous pathologies as well as with normal cellular functions, and frequently form during protein denaturation. Inhibitors of pathological amyloid fibril formation could be useful in the development of therapeutics, provided that the inhibitors were specific enough to avoid interfering with normal processes. Here we show that computer-aided, structure-based design can yield highly specific peptide inhibitors of amyloid formation. Using known atomic structures of segments of amyloid fibrils as templates, we have designed and characterized an all-D-amino-acid inhibitor of the fibril formation of the tau protein associated with Alzheimer's disease, and a non-natural L-amino-acid inhibitor of an amyloid fibril that enhances sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. Our results indicate that peptides from structure-based designs can disrupt the fibril formation of full-length proteins, including those, such as tau protein, that lack fully ordered native structures. Because the inhibiting peptides have been designed on structures of dual-{beta}-sheet 'steric zippers', the successful inhibition of amyloid fibril formation strengthens the hypothesis that amyloid spines contain steric zippers.

  17. Effect of Four Weeks Exercise Prior Preparation before Alzheimer's Induction on the Levels of Nerve Growth Factor and Beta Amyloid in the Hippocampus of Wistar Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atabak Shahed

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of four weeks exercise prior preparation before Alzheimer's induction on the levels of nerve growth factor and beta amyloid in the hippocampus of Wistar male rats Materials and Methods: 84 male Wistar rats (8 weeks old with a weighing average of 20 ± 195 grams from Pasteur Institute of Iran were prepared, and rats were randomly divided to two exercise (4 weeks aerobic training on a treadmill with a gradient of 0 degrees, 5 days a week for 4 weeks and rest groups. Then, the rats of each group were randomly assigned to 3 sub groups of 14 numbers, injection Aβ1-42, control, and non-injected. 48 hours after the last exercise session, injections into the hippocampus amyloid beta or Dimethyl sulfoxide were performed. Seven days after surgery, the rats of each group were randomly sacrificed or subjected to behavioral testing. To determine the levels of of nerve growth factor and beta amyloid Sampling was performed from the hippocampus and plasma of animals, a Morris water maze test was used for spatial memory test. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (KS and analysis of variance were used to analyze the data. Results: The results of one-way analysis of variance showed that there was a significant difference between the levels of amylohyd of hippocampus and NGF in different groups. Also, the results of the probe test for spatial memory showed that the time spent on the target circle in the Aβ1-42 injection group was significantly lower than the other groups (p≤ 0.01. Also, the exercise and exercise + sham groups had a significantly better performance than control group. Conclusion: It seems that performing physical activity before induction of Alzheimer's in rats is a kind of countermeasures and preeclampsia with physiological disorders and progression of the disease.

  18. Anxiolytic and antidepressant profile of the methanolic extract of Piper nigrum fruits in beta-amyloid (1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritcu, Lucian; Noumedem, Jaurès A; Cioanca, Oana; Hancianu, Monica; Postu, Paula; Mihasan, Marius

    2015-03-29

    Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae) is employed in traditional medicine of many countries as analgesic, antiinflammatory, anticonvulsant, antioxidant, antidepressant and cognitive-enhancing agent. This study was undertaken in order to evaluate the possible anxiolytic, antidepressant and antioxidant properties of the methanolic extract of Piper nigrum fruits in beta-amyloid (1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease. The anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of the methanolic extract were studied by means of in vivo (elevated plus-maze and forced swimming tests) approaches. Also, the antioxidant activity in the amygdala was assessed using superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase specific activities, the total content of the reduced glutathione, protein carbonyl and malondialdehyde levels. Statistical analyses were performed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Significant differences were determined by Tukey's post hoc test. F values for which p < 0.05 were regarded as statistically significant. Pearson's correlation coefficient and regression analysis were used in order to evaluate the connection between behavioral measures, the antioxidant defence and lipid peroxidation. The beta-amyloid (1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of the exploratory activity, the percentage of the time spent and the number of entries in the open arm within elevated plus-maze test and decrease of swimming time and increase of immobility time within forced swimming test. Administration of the methanolic extract significantly exhibited anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects and also antioxidant potential. Taken together, our results suggest that the methanolic extract ameliorates beta-amyloid (1-42)-induced anxiety and depression by attenuation of the oxidative stress in the rat amygdala.

  19. Exendin-4, a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist, protects against amyloidpeptide-induced impairment of spatial learning and memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiao-Tao; Ye-Tian; Yuan-Li; Zhang, Ge-Juan; Liu, Zhi-Qin; Di, Zheng-Li; Ying, Xiao-Ping; Fang, Yan; Song, Er-Fei; Qi, Jin-Shun; Pan, Yan-Fang

    2016-05-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) share specific molecular mechanisms, and agents with proven efficacy in one may be useful against the other. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist exendin-4 has similar properties to GLP-1 and is currently in clinical use for T2DM treatment. Thus, this study was designed to characterize the effects of exendin-4 on the impairment of learning and memory induced by amyloid protein (Aβ) and its probable molecular underlying mechanisms. The results showed that (1) intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of Aβ1-42 resulted in a significant decline of spatial learning and memory of rats in water maze tests; (2) pretreatment with exendin-4 effectively and dose-dependently protected against the Aβ1-42-induced impairment of spatial learning and memory; (3) exendin-4 treatment significantly decreased the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 and increased the expression of Bcl2 in Aβ1-42-induced Alzheimer's rats. The vision and swimming speed of the rats among all groups in the visible platform tests did not show any difference. These findings indicate that systemic pretreatment with exendin-4 can effectively prevent the behavioral impairment induced by neurotoxic Aβ1-42, and the underlying protective mechanism of exendin-4 may be involved in the Bcl2, Bax and caspase-3 pathways. Thus, the application of exendin-4 or the activation of its signaling pathways may be a promising strategy to ameliorate the degenerative processes observed in AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Induction of serine racemase expression and D-serine release from microglia by amyloid β-peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffin W Sue T

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Roles for excitotoxicity and inflammation in Alzheimer's disease have been hypothesized. Proinflammatory stimuli, including amyloid β-peptide (Aβ, elicit a release of glutamate from microglia. We tested the possibility that a coagonist at the NMDA class of glutamate receptors, D-serine, could respond similarly. Methods Cultured microglial cells were exposed to Aβ. The culture medium was assayed for levels of D-serine by HPLC and for effects on calcium and survival on primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons. Microglial cell lysates were examined for the levels of mRNA and protein for serine racemase, the enzyme that forms D-serine from L-serine. The racemase mRNA was also assayed in Alzheimer hippocampus and age-matched controls. A microglial cell line was transfected with a luciferase reporter construct driven by the putative regulatory region of human serine racemase. Results Conditioned medium from Aβ-treated microglia contained elevated levels of D-serine. Bioassays of hippocampal neurons with the microglia-conditioned medium indicated that Aβ elevated a NMDA receptor agonist that was sensitive to an antagonist of the D-serine/glycine site (5,7-dicholorokynurenic acid; DCKA and to enzymatic degradation of D-amino acids by D-amino acid oxidase (DAAOx. In the microglia, Aβ elevated steady-state levels of dimeric serine racemase, the apparent active form of the enzyme. Promoter-reporter and mRNA analyses suggest that serine racemase is transcriptionally induced by Aβ. Finally, the levels of serine racemase mRNA were elevated in Alzheimer's disease hippocampus, relative to age-matched controls. Conclusions These data suggest that Aβ could contribute to neurodegeneration through stimulating microglia to release cooperative excitatory amino acids, including D-serine.

  1. Amyloidpeptide on sialyl-Lewis(X-selectin-mediated membrane tether mechanics at the cerebral endothelial cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sholpan Askarova

    Full Text Available Increased deposition of amyloidpeptide (Aβ at the cerebral endothelial cell (CEC surface has been implicated in enhancement of transmigration of monocytes across the brain blood barrier (BBB in Alzheimer's disease (AD. In this study, quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy (QIM and atomic force microscopy (AFM with cantilevers biofunctionalized by sialyl-Lewis(x (sLe(x were employed to investigate Aβ-altered mechanics of membrane tethers formed by bonding between sLe(x and p-selectin at the CEC surface, the initial mechanical step governing the transmigration of monocytes. QIM results indicated the ability for Aβ to increase p-selectin expression at the cell surface and promote actin polymerization in both bEND3 cells (immortalized mouse CECs and human primary CECs. AFM data also showed the ability for Aβ to increase cell stiffness and adhesion probability in bEND3 cells. On the contrary, Aβ lowered the overall force of membrane tether formation (Fmtf , and produced a bimodal population of Fmtf , suggesting subcellular mechanical alterations in membrane tethering. The lower Fmtf population was similar to the results obtained from cells treated with an F-actin-disrupting drug, latrunculin A. Indeed, AFM results also showed that both Aβ and latrunculin A decreased membrane stiffness, suggesting a lower membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion, a factor resulting in lower Fmtf . In addition, these cerebral endothelial alterations induced by Aβ were abrogated by lovastatin, consistent with its anti-inflammatory effects. In sum, these results demonstrated the ability for Aβ to enhance p-selectin expression at the CEC surface and induce cytoskeleton reorganization, which in turn, resulted in changes in membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion and membrane tethering, mechanical factors important in transmigration of monocytes through the BBB.

  2. Atomistic mechanism of polyphenol amyloid aggregation inhibitors: molecular dynamics study of Curcumin, Exifone, and Myricetin interaction with the segment of tau peptide oligomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhanu, Workalemahu M; Masunov, Artëm E

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are highly ordered protein aggregates associated with many diseases affecting millions of people worldwide. Polyphenols such as Curcumin, Exifone, and Myricetin exhibit modest inhibition toward fibril formation of tau peptide which is associated with Alzheimer's disease. However, the molecular mechanisms of this inhibition remain elusive. We investigated the binding of three polyphenol molecules to the protofibrils of an amyloidogenic fragment VQIVYK of tau peptide by molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent. We find that polyphenols induce conformational changes in the oligomer aggregate. These changes disrupt the amyloid H bonding, perturbing the aggregate. While the structural evolution of the control oligomer with no ligand is limited to the twisting of the β-sheets without their disassembly, the presence of polyphenol molecule pushes the β-sheets apart, and leads to a loosely packed structure where two of four β-sheets dissociate in each of the three cases considered here. The H-bonding capacity of polyphenols is responsible for the observed behavior. The calculated binding free energies and its individual components enabled better understanding of the binding. Results indicated that the contribution from Van der Waals interactions is more significant than electrostatic contribution to the binding. The findings from this study are expected to assist in the development of aggregation inhibitors. Significant binding between polyphenols and aggregate oligomer identified in our simulations confirms the previous experimental observations in which polyphenols refold the tau peptide without forming covalent bonds.

  3. Affinity peptides protect transforming growth factor beta during encapsulation in poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Joshua D; Lin, Chien-Chi; Anseth, Kristi S

    2011-04-11

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ(1)) influences a host of cellular fates, including proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Due to its short half-life and cross reactivity with a variety of cells, clinical application of TGFβ(1) may benefit from a localized delivery strategy. Photoencapsulation of proteins in polymeric matrices offers such an opportunity; however, the reactions forming polymer networks often result in lowered protein bioactivity. Here, PEG-based gels formed from the chain polymerization of acrylated monomers were studied as a model system for TGFβ(1) delivery. Concentrations of acrylate group ranging from 0 to 50 mM and photopolymerization conditions were systematically altered to study their effects on TGFβ(1) bioactivity. In addition, two peptide sequences, WSHW (K(D) = 8.20 nM) and KRIWFIPRSSWY (K(D) = 10.41 nM), that exhibit binding affinity for TGFβ(1) were introduced into the monomer solution prior to encapsulation to determine if affinity binders would increase the activity and release of the encapsulated growth factor. The addition of affinity peptides enhanced the bioactivity of TGFβ(1) in vitro from 1.3- to 2.9-fold, compared to hydrogels with no peptide. Further, increasing the concentration of affinity peptides by a factor of 100-10000 relative to the TGFβ(1) concentration increased fractional recovery of the protein from PEG hydrogels.

  4. GMP-compliant automated synthesis of [{sup 18}F]AV-45 (Florbetapir F 18) for imaging {beta}-amyloid plaques in human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, C.-H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Lin, K.-J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Weng, C.-C. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, I.-T. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Ting, Y.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Yen, T.-C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Jan, T.-R. [Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Skovronsky, Daniel [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, M.-P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Wey, S.-P., E-mail: spwey@mail.cgu.edu.t [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2010-12-15

    We report herein the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant automated synthesis of {sup 18}F-labeled styrylpyridine, AV-45 (Florbetapir), a novel tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. [{sup 18}F]AV-45 was prepared in 105 min using a tosylate precursor with Sumitomo modules for radiosynthesis under GMP-compliant conditions. The overall yield was 25.4{+-}7.7% with a final radiochemical purity of 95.3{+-}2.2% (n=19). The specific activity of [{sup 18}F]AV-45 reached as high as 470{+-}135 TBq/mmol (n=19). The present studies show that [{sup 18}F]AV-45 can be manufactured under GMP-compliant conditions and could be widely available for routine clinical use.

  5. Amyloid beta dimers/trimers potently induce cofilin-actin rods that are inhibited by maintaining cofilin-phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podlisny Marcia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we reported 1 μM synthetic human amyloid beta1-42 oligomers induced cofilin dephosphorylation (activation and formation of cofilin-actin rods within rat hippocampal neurons primarily localized to the dentate gyrus. Results Here we demonstrate that a gel filtration fraction of 7PA2 cell-secreted SDS-stable human Aβ dimers and trimers (Aβd/t induces maximal neuronal rod response at ~250 pM. This is 4,000-fold more active than traditionally prepared human Aβ oligomers, which contain SDS-stable trimers and tetramers, but are devoid of dimers. When incubated under tyrosine oxidizing conditions, synthetic human but not rodent Aβ1-42, the latter lacking tyrosine, acquires a marked increase (620 fold for EC50 in rod-inducing activity. Gel filtration of this preparation yielded two fractions containing SDS-stable dimers, trimers and tetramers. One, eluting at a similar volume to 7PA2 Aβd/t, had maximum activity at ~5 nM, whereas the other, eluting at the void volume (high-n state, lacked rod inducing activity at the same concentration. Fractions from 7PA2 medium containing Aβ monomers are not active, suggesting oxidized SDS-stable Aβ1-42 dimers in a low-n state are the most active rod-inducing species. Aβd/t-induced rods are predominantly localized to the dentate gyrus and mossy fiber tract, reach significance over controls within 2 h of treatment, and are reversible, disappearing by 24 h after Aβd/t washout. Overexpression of cofilin phosphatases increase rod formation when expressed alone and exacerbate rod formation when coupled with Aβd/t, whereas overexpression of a cofilin kinase inhibits Aβd/t-induced rod formation. Conclusions Together these data support a mechanism by which Aβd/t alters the actin cytoskeleton via effects on cofilin in neurons critical to learning and memory.

  6. Multielement analysis of swiss mice brains with Alzheimer's disease induced by beta amyloid oligomers using a portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Danielle S.; Brigido, Matheus M.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Ferreira, Sergio S.; Souza, Amanda S.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive dementia that, in early stages, manifests as a profound inability to form new memories. The pathological features of AD include β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, loss of neurons and synapses, and activation of glia cells. Recently, several groups have raised the 'metal hypothesis' of AD. Metal ions, such as Cu and Zn, have been demonstrated to modulate amyloid aggregation along different pathways. Extensive research has been conducted on the effects of metals on Aβ aggregation and all of them have shown that both Cu and Zn accelerate the aggregation by shortening, or eliminating, the lag phase associated with the amyloid fibrillation process. The metal ions mentioned previously may have an important impact on the protein misfolding and the progression of the neurodegenerative process. The TXRF technique is very important, because can be used to identify and quantify trace elements present in the sample at very low concentrations (μg.g -1 ). In this work, three groups of females were studied: control, AD10 and AD100. The groups AD10 and AD100 were given a single intracerebroventricular injection of 10 pmol and 100 pmol of oligomers of β-amyloid peptide respectively to be induced AD. The TXRF measurements were performed using a portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence system developed in the Laboratory of Nuclear Instrumentation (LIN/UFRJ) that uses an X-ray tube with a molybdenum anode operating at 40 kV and 500 mA used for the excitation and a detector Si-PIN with energy resolution of 145 eV at 200 eV. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rubidium. Results showed differences in the elemental concentration in some brain regions between the AD groups and the control group. (author)

  7. Multielement analysis of swiss mice brains with Alzheimer's disease induced by beta amyloid oligomers using a portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Danielle S.; Brigido, Matheus M.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Ferreira, Sergio S.; Souza, Amanda S.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br, E-mail: marcelin@uerj.br, E-mail: amandass@bioqmed.ufrj.br, E-mail: ferreira@bioqmed.ufrj.br, E-mail: amandass@bioqmed.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica Armando Dias Tavares (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive dementia that, in early stages, manifests as a profound inability to form new memories. The pathological features of AD include β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, loss of neurons and synapses, and activation of glia cells. Recently, several groups have raised the 'metal hypothesis' of AD. Metal ions, such as Cu and Zn, have been demonstrated to modulate amyloid aggregation along different pathways. Extensive research has been conducted on the effects of metals on Aβ aggregation and all of them have shown that both Cu and Zn accelerate the aggregation by shortening, or eliminating, the lag phase associated with the amyloid fibrillation process. The metal ions mentioned previously may have an important impact on the protein misfolding and the progression of the neurodegenerative process. The TXRF technique is very important, because can be used to identify and quantify trace elements present in the sample at very low concentrations (μg.g{sup -1}). In this work, three groups of females were studied: control, AD10 and AD100. The groups AD10 and AD100 were given a single intracerebroventricular injection of 10 pmol and 100 pmol of oligomers of β-amyloid peptide respectively to be induced AD. The TXRF measurements were performed using a portable total reflection X-ray fluorescence system developed in the Laboratory of Nuclear Instrumentation (LIN/UFRJ) that uses an X-ray tube with a molybdenum anode operating at 40 kV and 500 mA used for the excitation and a detector Si-PIN with energy resolution of 145 eV at 200 eV. It was possible to determine the concentrations of the following elements: P, S, K, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rubidium. Results showed differences in the elemental concentration in some brain regions between the AD groups and the control group. (author)

  8. Binding of peptides to HLA-DQ molecules: peptide binding properties of the disease-associated HLA-DQ(alpha 1*0501, beta 1*0201) molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, B H; Buus, S; Vartdal, F

    1994-01-01

    Peptide binding to DQ molecules has not previously been described. Here we report a biochemical peptide-binding assay specific for the DQ2 [i.e. DQ(alpha 1*0501, beta 1*0201)] molecule. This molecule was chosen since it shows a strong association to diseases such as celiac disease and insulin......-dependent diabetes mellitus. Initially we radiolabelled some selected peptides and tested them for binding to affinity-purified DQ2 molecules. One of the peptides, a Mycobacterium bovis (MB) 65 kDa 243-255Y peptide, displayed a good signal-to-noise ratio and was thus chosen as an indicator peptide in the DQ2 binding...... to DQ2 was specific, as shown in inhibition experiments with a panel of 47 peptides, differing in length, sequence, and origin. The binding of peptides to DR3 was tested in a similar assay with a Mycobacterium tuberculosis 65 kDa 3-13 peptide as the binding indicator. DQ2 and DR3 molecules bound...

  9. Protein aggregation containing beta-amyloid, alpha-synuclein and hyperphosphorylated tau in cultured cells of hippocampus, substantia nigra and locus coeruleus after rotenone exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Stephanie A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein aggregates containing alpha-synuclein, beta-amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau are commonly found during neurodegenerative processes which is often accompanied by the impairment of mitochondrial complex I respiratory chain and dysfunction of cellular systems of protein degradation. In view of this, we aimed to develop an in vitro model to study protein aggregation associated to neurodegenerative diseases using cultured cells from hippocampus, locus coeruleus and substantia nigra of newborn Lewis rats exposed to 0.5, 1, 10 and 25 nM of rotenone, which is an agricultural pesticide, for 48 hours. Results We demonstrated that the proportion of cells in culture is approximately the same as found in the brain nuclei they were extracted from. Rotenone at 0.5 nM was able to induce alpha-synuclein and beta amyloid aggregation, as well as increased hyperphosphorylation of tau, although high concentrations of this pesticide (over 1 nM lead cells to death before protein aggregation. We also demonstrated that the 14kDa isoform of alpha-synuclein is not present in newborn Lewis rats. Conclusion Rotenone exposure may lead to constitutive protein aggregation in vitro, which may be of relevance to study the mechanisms involved in idiopathic neurodegeneration.

  10. Inhalation of coriander volatile oil increased anxiolytic-antidepressant-like behaviors and decreased oxidative status in beta-amyloid (1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioanca, Oana; Hritcu, Lucian; Mihasan, Marius; Trifan, Adriana; Hancianu, Monica

    2014-05-28

    The present study analyzed the possible anxiolytic, antidepressant and antioxidant proprieties of inhaled coriander volatile oil extracted from Coriandrum sativum var. microcarpum in beta-amyloid (1-42) rat model of Alzheimer's disease. The anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of inhaled coriander volatile oil were studied by means of in vivo (elevated plus-maze and forced swimming tests) approaches. Also, the antioxidant activity in the hippocampus was assessed using catalase specific activity and the total content of the reduced glutathione. The beta-amyloid (1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: decrease of the locomotor activity, the percentage of the time spent and the number of entries in the open arm within elevated plus-maze test and decrease of swimming and immobility times within forced swimming test. Exposure to coriander volatile oil significantly improved these parameters, suggesting anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects. Moreover, coriander volatile oil decreased catalase activity and increased glutathione level in the hippocampus. Our results suggest that multiple exposures to coriander volatile oil can be useful as a mean to counteract anxiety, depression and oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Correlations between structure, material properties and bioproperties in self-assembled beta-hairpin peptide hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hule, Rohan A; Nagarkar, Radhika P; Altunbas, Aysegul; Ramay, Hassna R; Branco, Monica C; Schneider, Joel P; Pochan, Darrin J

    2008-01-01

    A de novo designed beta-hairpin peptide (MAX8), capable of undergoing intramolecular folding and consequent intermolecular self-assembly into a cytocompatible hydrogel, has been studied. A combination of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) have been used to quantitatively investigate the MAX8 nanofibrillar hydrogel network morphology. A change in the peptide concentration from 0.5 to 2 wt% resulted in a denser fibrillar network as revealed via SANS by a change in the high q (q = (4 pi/lambda) x sin (theta/2), where lambda = wavelength of incident neutrons and theta = scattering angle) mass fractal exponent from 2.5 to 3 and by a decrease in the measured correlation length from 23 to 16 A. A slope of -4 in the USANS regime indicates well-defined gel microporosity, an important characteristic for cellular substrate applications. These changes, both at the network as well as the individual fibril lengthscales, can be directly visualized in situ by cryo-TEM. Fibrillar nanostructures and network properties are directly related to bulk hydrogel stiffness via oscillatory rheology. Preliminary cell viability and anchorage studies at varying hydrogel stiffness confirm cell adhesion at early stages of cell culture within the window of stiffness investigated. Knowledge of the precise structure spanning length scales from the nanoscale up to the microscale can help in the formation of future, specific structure-bioproperty relationships when studying in vitro and in vivo behavior of these new peptide scaffolds.

  12. Effect of nanoparticles binding ß-amyloid peptide on nitric oxide production by cultured endothelial cells and macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando A

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Antonina Orlando,1 Francesca Re,1 Silvia Sesana,1 Ilaria Rivolta,1 Alice Panariti,1 Davide Brambilla,2 Julien Nicolas,2 Patrick Couvreur,2 Karine Andrieux,2 Massimo Masserini,1 Emanuela Cazzaniga1 1Department of Health Sciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Monza, Italy; 2Institut Galien Paris Sud, University Paris-Sud, Châtenay-Malabry, France Background: As part of a project designing nanoparticles for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, we have synthesized and characterized a small library of nanoparticles binding with high affinity to the β-amyloid peptide and showing features of biocompatibility in vitro, which are important properties for administration in vivo. In this study, we focused on biocompatibility issues, evaluating production of nitric oxide by cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells and macrophages, used as models of cells which would be exposed to nanoparticles after systemic administration. Methods: The nanoparticles tested were liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles carrying phosphatidic acid or cardiolipin, and PEGylated poly(alkyl cyanoacrylate nanoparticles (PEG-PACA. We measured nitric oxide production using the Griess method as well as phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and intracellular free calcium, which are biochemically related to nitric oxide production. MTT viability tests and caspase-3 detection were also undertaken. Results: Exposure to liposomes did not affect the viability of endothelial cells at any concentration tested. Increased production of nitric oxide was detected only with liposomes carrying phosphatidic acid or cardiolipin at the highest concentration (120 µg/mL, together with increased synthase phosphorylation and intracellular calcium levels. Macrophages exposed to liposomes showed a slightly dose-dependent decrease in viability, with no increase in production of nitric oxide. Exposure to solid lipid nanoparticles carrying phosphatidic acid decreased viability in

  13. beta. -Endorphin and related peptides suppress phorbol myristate acetate-induced respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamant, M.; Henricks, P.A.J.; Nijkamp, F.P.; de Wied, D. (Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1989-01-01

    In the present study, the immunomodulatory effect of {beta}-endorphin ({beta}-E) and shorter pro-opiomelancortin (POMC) fragments was evaluated by assessing their influence on respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). The effect of the peptides on phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated production of reactive oxygen metabolites was measured in a lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) assay. Both POMC peptides with opiate-like activity and their non-opioid derivatives were tested. With the exception of {alpha}-E, PMA-stimulated respiratory burst was suppressed by all POMC fragments tested. A U-shaped dose-response relation was observed. Doses lower than 10{sup {minus}17}M and higher than 10{sup {minus}8}M were without effect. {beta}-E and dT{beta}E both suppressed PMA-induced oxidative burst in human PMN at physiological concentrations. {gamma}-E and dT{gamma}E proved to be less potent inhibitors, reaching maximal effect at higher concentrations. DE{gamma}E exerted an even less pronounced but still significant suppressive effect at the concentration of 10{sup {minus}10}M. None of the endorphins tested was shown to affect resting oxidative metabolism in the PMN. The modulatory effects of the opioid peptides could not be blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone.

  14. The antibacterial activity of peptides derived from human beta-2 glycoprotein I is inhibited by protein H and M1 protein from Streptococcus pyogenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nilsson, Maria; Wasylik, Sylwia; Mörgelin, Matthias; Olin, Anders I.; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Derksen, Ronald H. W. M.; de Groot, Philip G.; Herwald, Heiko

    2008-01-01

    During the last years, the importance of antibacterial peptides has attracted considerable attention. We report here that peptides derived from the fifth domain of beta-2 glycoprotein I (beta(2)GPI), a human heparin binding plasma protein, have antibacterial activities against Gram-positive and

  15. Monosodium glutamate neurotoxicity increases beta amyloid in the rat hippocampus: a potential role for cyclic AMP protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dief, Abeer E; Kamha, Eman S; Baraka, Azza M; Elshorbagy, Amany K

    2014-05-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity and cyclic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) are both recognized as important mediators in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate whether oral or subcutaneous monosodium glutamate (MSG) neurotoxicity mimics some features of AD and whether these can be reversed by the AMPK activator Pioglitazone. Male Wistar rats aged 5 weeks were administered oral or subcutaneous MSG for 10 days with or without daily oral Pioglitazone. Two additional groups given only saline orally or subcutaneously acted as controls. At age 10 weeks the rats were subjected to neurobehavioral testing, then sacrificed for measurement of AMPK, β-amyloid and Fas ligand in the hippocampus. Oral and subcutaneous MSG both induced a lowering of hippocampal AMPK by 43% and 31% respectively (P2-fold increase in hippocampal Fas ligand, a mediator of apoptosis (P4-fold and >5-fold in the oral and subcutaneous groups. This was associated with increased latency before crossing to the white half in the black-white alley and before the first rear in the holeboard test, suggesting increased anxiety. Pioglitazone decreased hippocampal β-amyloid accumulation and Fas ligand, but did not ameliorate the neurobehavioural deficits induced by MSG. MSG treatment enhances β-amyloid accumulation in the rat hippocampus. Our results suggest a role for AMPK reduction in mediating the neurotoxic effects of glutamate, including β-amyloid accumulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Differentiation of Boc-protected alpha,delta-/delta,alpha- and beta,delta-/delta,beta-hybrid peptide positional isomers by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, G; Ramesh, V; Srinivas, R; Sharma, G V M; Shoban Babu, B

    2010-06-01

    Two new series of Boc-N-alpha,delta-/delta,alpha- and beta,delta-/delta,beta-hybrid peptides containing repeats of L-Ala-delta(5)-Caa/delta(5)-Caa-L-Ala and beta(3)-Caa-delta(5)-Caa/delta(5)-Caa-beta(3)-Caa (L-Ala = L-alanine, Caa = C-linked carbo amino acid derived from D-xylose) have been differentiated by both positive and negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS(n) spectra of protonated isomeric peptides produce characteristic fragmentation involving the peptide backbone, the Boc-group, and the side chain. The dipeptide positional isomers are differentiated by the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the protonated peptides. The loss of 2-methylprop-1-ene is more pronounced for Boc-NH-L-Ala-delta-Caa-OCH(3) (1), whereas it is totally absent for its positional isomer Boc-NH-delta-Caa-L-Ala-OCH(3) (7), instead it shows significant loss of t-butanol. On the other hand, second isomeric pair shows significant loss of t-butanol and loss of acetone for Boc-NH-delta-Caa-beta-Caa-OCH(3) (18), whereas these are insignificant for its positional isomer Boc-NH-beta-Caa-delta-Caa-OCH(3) (13). The tetra- and hexapeptide positional isomers also show significant differences in MS(2) and MS(3) CID spectra. It is observed that 'b' ions are abundant when oxazolone structures are formed through five-membered cyclic transition state and cyclization process for larger 'b' ions led to its insignificant abundance. However, b(1)(+) ion is formed in case of delta,alpha-dipeptide that may have a six-membered substituted piperidone ion structure. Furthermore, ESI negative ion MS/MS has also been found to be useful for differentiating these isomeric peptide acids. Thus, the results of MS/MS of pairs of di-, tetra-, and hexapeptide positional isomers provide peptide sequencing information and distinguish the positional isomers. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Influence of scan duration on the accuracy of {beta}-amyloid PET with florbetaben in patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiepolt, Solveig; Barthel, Henryk; Butzke, Daniel; Hesse, Swen; Patt, Marianne; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Reininger, Cornelia [Bayer Pharma AG, Global Clinical Development, Berlin (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Florbetaben is a {beta}-amyloid-targeted PET tracer with significant potential for augmenting the toolbox in the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In dementia imaging, shortening of scan duration may simplify future clinical use. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the effect of scan duration on diagnostic accuracy. PET scans obtained from 25 AD patients and 25 healthy volunteers (HVs) were analysed. In each subject, scans of three different durations (5, 10 and 20 min; all starting 90 min after injection) were obtained, randomized, and visually assessed by three experts blinded to the subject's identity and group affiliation. Presence/absence of {beta}-amyloid and diagnostic confidence (0-100 %) were scored, and 10 % of the scans were re-read. Further, randomly selected datasets of ten AD patients and ten HVs were quantified using an established VOI-based approach and using a voxel-based approach. The sensitivity and specificity of the blinded read were 80 % and 96 %, respectively, for all scan durations. Diagnostic confidence was high (97 {+-} 6 %, 97 {+-} 6 % and 95 {+-} 8 % for the 20-min, 10-min and 5-min scans, respectively; n.s.), as was interreader agreement (kappa{sub 20} {sub min} = 0.94, kappa{sub 10} {sub min} = 0.94, kappa{sub 5} {sub min} = 0.89; n.s.). Intrareader agreement was highest for the 20-min scan (kappa = 1.00) and lower for the 10-min scan (kappa = 0.71) and 5-min scan (kappa = 0.80; p = 0.002 and 0.003 vs. the 20-min scan). For all scan durations, composite SUVRs (Cohen's d effect size 4.5, 3.9 and 4.8 for the 5-min, 10-min and 20-min scans; p < 0.0001 each) and individual brain volumes affected by {beta}-amyloid (Cohen's d effect size 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 for the 5-min, 10-min and 20-min scans; p < 0.005 each) were significantly higher in AD patients than in HVs. Reduction in scan duration did not relevantly affect the accuracy of florbetaben PET scans in discriminating between AD patients

  18. Individualized quantification of brain {beta}-amyloid burden: results of a proof of mechanism phase 0 florbetaben PET trial in patients with Alzheimer's disease and healthy controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, Henryk; Luthardt, Julia; Becker, Georg; Patt, Marianne; Sattler, Bernhard; Schildan, Andreas; Hesse, Swen; Meyer, Philipp M.; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Hammerstein, Eva; Hartwig, Kristin; Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Eggers, Birk [Arzneimittelforschung Leipzig GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Wolf, Henrike [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); University of Zurich, Department of Psychiatry, Zurich (Switzerland); Zimmermann, Torsten; Reischl, Joachim; Rohde, Beate; Reininger, Cornelia [Bayer Healthcare, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Complementing clinical findings with those generated by biomarkers - such as {beta}-amyloid-targeted positron emission tomography (PET) imaging - has been proposed as a means of increasing overall accuracy in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Florbetaben ([{sup 18}F]BAY 94-9172) is a novel {beta}-amyloid PET tracer currently in global clinical development. We present the results of a proof of mechanism study in which the diagnostic efficacy, pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of florbetaben were assessed. The value of various quantitative parameters derived from the PET scans as potential surrogate markers of cognitive decline was also investigated. Ten patients with mild-moderate probable AD (DSM-IV and NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) and ten age-matched ({>=} 55 years) healthy controls (HCs) were administered a single dose of 300 MBq florbetaben, which contained a tracer mass dose of < 5 {mu}g. The 70-90 min post-injection brain PET data were visually analysed by three blinded experts. Quantitative assessment was also performed via MRI-based, anatomical sampling of predefined volumes of interest (VOI) and subsequent calculation of standardized uptake value (SUV) ratios (SUVRs, cerebellar cortex as reference region). Furthermore, single-case, voxelwise analysis was used to calculate individual ''whole brain {beta}-amyloid load''. Visual analysis of the PET data revealed nine of the ten AD, but only one of the ten HC brains to be {beta}-amyloid positive (p = 0.001), with high inter-reader agreement (weighted kappa {>=} 0.88). When compared to HCs, the neocortical SUVRs were significantly higher in the ADs (with descending order of effect size) in frontal cortex, lateral temporal cortex, occipital cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, and parietal cortex (p = 0.003-0.010). Voxel-based group comparison confirmed these differences. Amongst the PET-derived parameters, the Statistical Parametric Mapping-based whole brain

  19. Similar Intracellular Peptide Profile of TAP1/beta 2 Microglobulin Double-Knockout Mice and C57BL/6 Wild-Type Mice as Revealed by Peptidomic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Leandro Mantovani de [UNIFESP; Berti, Denise A.; Russo, Lilian C.; Coelho, Veronica; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Oliveira, Vitor [UNIFESP; Ferro, Emer Suavinho [UNIFESP

    2010-01-01

    Cells produce and use peptides in distinctive ways. in the present report, using isotope labeling plus semi-quantitative mass spectrometry, we evaluated the intracellular peptide profile of TAP1/beta 2m(-/-) (transporter associated with antigen-processing 1/beta 2 microglobulin) double-knockout mice and compared it with that of C57BL/6 wild-type animals. Overall, 92 distinctive peptides were identified, and most were shown to have a similar concentration in both mouse strains. However, some p...

  20. THYMUS PEPTIDES (THYMULIN, THYMOSIN ALPHA 1 AND THYMOSIN BETA 4 INHIBITING EFFECTS ON THE INTRINSIC BLOOD COAGULATION PATHWAY IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negrin Negrev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thymus peptides (thymulin, thymosin alpha 1 and thymosin beta 4 inhibiting effects on the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway in rats Background and purpose: Hemostasis is a basic homeostatic mechanism protecting the body from thrombosis or haemorrhage. A number of pathological conditions, including multiple endocrine disorders modulate the balance between pro- and anticoagulation factors and establish conditions of hyper- or hypocoagulability. Endocrine effects of thymus gland on blood coagulation are not completely elucidated, and data existing on the theme are relatively scarce and partially controversial. The present study was designed to investigate thymus peptides (thymulin, thymosin alpha 1 and thymosin beta 4 effects on key intrinsic pathway plasma clotting factors XII, XI, IX, X and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT – a principal marker of blood coagulation via intrinsic pathway of hemocoagulation, in rats. Materials and methods: Plasma clotting factor activities and aPTT were studied on 52 male Wistar intact rats after 3 day s.c. application of the thymic peptides envisaged using routine kinetic coagulometry. Results of the study indicate a significant reduction of FXII activity by thymulin and thymosin alpha 1, and FXI and FIX activity by thymulin and thymosin beta 4. Conclusion: Upper results support the conclusion that thymus peptides thymulin, thymosin alpha 1 and thymosin beta 4 application in rats imposes a distinct tendency of hypocoagulability.

  1. Characterization of the beta amyloid precursor protein-like gene in the central nervous system of the crab Chasmagnathus. Expression during memory consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fustiñana Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human β-amyloid, the main component in the neuritic plaques found in patients with Alzheimer's disease, is generated by cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein. Beyond the role in pathology, members of this protein family are synaptic proteins and have been associated with synaptogenesis, neuronal plasticity and memory, both in vertebrates and in invertebrates. Consolidation is necessary to convert a short-term labile memory to a long-term and stable form. During consolidation, gene expression and de novo protein synthesis are regulated in order to produce key proteins for the maintenance of plastic changes produced during the acquisition of new information. Results Here we partially cloned and sequenced the beta-amyloid precursor protein like gene homologue in the crab Chasmagnathus (cappl, showing a 37% of identity with the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster homologue and 23% with Homo sapiens but with much higher degree of sequence similarity in certain regions. We observed a wide distribution of cappl mRNA in the nervous system as well as in muscle and gills. The protein localized in all tissues analyzed with the exception of muscle. Immunofluorescence revealed localization of cAPPL in associative and sensory brain areas. We studied gene and protein expression during long-term memory consolidation using a well characterized memory model: the context-signal associative memory in this crab species. mRNA levels varied at different time points during long-term memory consolidation and correlated with cAPPL protein levels Conclusions cAPPL mRNA and protein is widely distributed in the central nervous system of the crab and the time course of expression suggests a role of cAPPL during long-term memory formation.

  2. Characterization of the beta amyloid precursor protein-like gene in the central nervous system of the crab Chasmagnathus. Expression during memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustiñana, Maria Sol; Ariel, Pablo; Federman, Noel; Freudenthal, Ramiro; Romano, Arturo

    2010-09-01

    Human β-amyloid, the main component in the neuritic plaques found in patients with Alzheimer's disease, is generated by cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein. Beyond the role in pathology, members of this protein family are synaptic proteins and have been associated with synaptogenesis, neuronal plasticity and memory, both in vertebrates and in invertebrates. Consolidation is necessary to convert a short-term labile memory to a long-term and stable form. During consolidation, gene expression and de novo protein synthesis are regulated in order to produce key proteins for the maintenance of plastic changes produced during the acquisition of new information. Here we partially cloned and sequenced the beta-amyloid precursor protein like gene homologue in the crab Chasmagnathus (cappl), showing a 37% of identity with the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster homologue and 23% with Homo sapiens but with much higher degree of sequence similarity in certain regions. We observed a wide distribution of cappl mRNA in the nervous system as well as in muscle and gills. The protein localized in all tissues analyzed with the exception of muscle. Immunofluorescence revealed localization of cAPPL in associative and sensory brain areas. We studied gene and protein expression during long-term memory consolidation using a well characterized memory model: the context-signal associative memory in this crab species. mRNA levels varied at different time points during long-term memory consolidation and correlated with cAPPL protein levels cAPPL mRNA and protein is widely distributed in the central nervous system of the crab and the time course of expression suggests a role of cAPPL during long-term memory formation.

  3. PET imaging of alpha(v)beta(3) integrin expression in tumours with Ga-68-labelled mono-, di- and tetrameric RGD peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, Ingrid; Yim, Cheng-Bin; Franssen, Gerben M.; Schuit, Robert C.; Luurtsema, Gert; Liu, Shuang; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Boerman, Otto C.

    Due to the restricted expression of alpha(v)beta(3) in tumours, alpha(v)beta(3) is considered a suitable receptor for tumour targeting. In this study the alpha(v)beta(3)-binding characteristics of Ga-68-labelled monomeric, dimeric and tetrameric RGD peptides were determined and compared with their

  4. Protective effect of Nelumbo nucifera extracts on beta amyloid protein induced apoptosis in PC12 cells, in vitro model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaganandam Kumaran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. β-Amyloid (Aβ has been proposed to play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. Deposits of insoluble Aβ are found in the brains of patients with AD and are one of the pathological hallmarks of the disease, but the underlying signaling pathways are poorly understood. In order to develop antidementia agents with potential therapeutic value, we examined the inhibitory effect of the Nelumbo nucifera seed embryo extracts on to the aggregated amyloid β peptide (agg Aβ1–40-induced damage of differentiated PC-12 cells (dPC-12, a well-known cell model for AD. In the present study, seed embryos of N. nucifera were extracted with 70% methanol in water and then separated into hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, and water layers. Among them, only the n-butanol layer showed strong activity and was therefore subjected to separation on Sephadex LH-20 chromatography. Two fractions showing potent activity were found to significantly inhibit Aβ1–40 toxicity on dPC-12 cells in increasing order of concentration (10–50 μg/mL. Further purification and characterization of these active fractions identified them to be flavonoids such as rutin, orientin, isoorientin, isoquercetrin, and hyperoside. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate scavenging activity of the extracts was also carried out to ascertain the possible mechanism of the activity.

  5. Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid Beta and Tau Concentrations Are Not Modulated by 16 Weeks of Moderate- to High-Intensity Physical Exercise in Patients with Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen Jensen, Camilla; Portelius, Erik; Siersma, Volkert; Høgh, Peter; Wermuth, Lene; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Waldemar, Gunhild; Gregers Hasselbalch, Steen; Hviid Simonsen, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise may have some effect on cognition in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). However, the underlying biochemical effects are unclear. Animal studies have shown that amyloid beta (Aβ), one of the pathological hallmarks of AD, can be altered with high levels of physical activity. The objective of this study was to elucidate the effect of 16 weeks of moderate- to high-intensity physical exercise on the biomarkers of AD, with special emphasis on the amyloidogenic pathway. From a total of 53 patients with AD participating in the Preserving Cognition, Quality of Life, Physical Health and Functional Ability in Alzheimer's Disease: The Effect of Physical Exercise (ADEX) study we analyzed cerebrospinal fluid samples for Aβ species, total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and soluble amyloid precursor protein (sAPP) species. We also assessed the patients for apolipoprotein E ε4 (ApoE ε4) genotype. We found no effect of 16 weeks of physical exercise on the selected biomarkers, and no effect of ApoE ε4 genotype. Our findings suggest that the possible effect of physical exercise on cognition in patients with AD is not due to modulation of Aβ, t-tau, p-tau and sAPP species. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. The soluble transcobalamin receptor (sCD320) is present in cerebrospinal fluid and correlates to dementia-related biomarkers tau proteins and amyloid-beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abuyaman, Omar; Nexo, Ebba

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cellular uptake of vitamin B12 (B12) demands binding of the vitamin to transcobalamin (TC) and recognition of TC-B12 (holoTC) by the receptor CD320. Recently, we identified a soluble form of CD320 (sCD320) in human plasma. Here we present data on the occurrence of this soluble receptor...... phospho-tau (181P) (p-tau), total tau (t-tau) and amyloid-beta 1-42 (Aβ) (n = 177) employing commercial ELISA kits (Innogenetics Company). Size exclusion chromatography was performed on a Superdex 200 column. RESULTS: The median sCD320 concentration in CSF (14 pmol/L) is around five times lower than...

  7. Poor Memory Performance in Aged Cynomolgus Monkeys with Hippocampal Atrophy, Depletion of Amyloid Beta 1-42 and Accumulation of Tau Proteins in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darusman, Huda S; Pandelaki, Jacub; Mulyadi, Rahmad

    2014-01-01

    , aged cynomolgus monkeys were divided into two groups to compare high-performing (n=6) and low-performing (n=6) subjects. Both groups were tested for biomarkers related to Alzheimer's disease and their brains were scanned using structural magnetic resonance imaging. RESULTS: The subjects with poor DRT......BACKGROUND: Due to their similarities in behavior and disease pathology to humans, non-human primate models are desirable to complement small animals as models for the study of age-related dementia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Based on their performance on delayed response task (DRT) tests of memory...... performance had evidence of atrophy in the hippocampus and cortical areas, significantly lower cerebrospinal fluid levels of amyloid beta amino acid 1-42 (pmemory...

  8. Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis by detecting exogenous fluorescent signal of ligand bound to beta amyloid in the lens of human eye: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eKerbage

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We report results of a clinical exploratory human trial involving 10 participants using a combination of a fluorescent ligand and a laser scanning device, SAPPHIRE System, as an aid in the diagnosis of Probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such a technique has been used in vivo of a human lens. The primary goal of the clinical trial, in addition to safety assessment, was to evaluate efficacy of the system. By detecting specific fluorescent signature of ligand bound beta amyloid in the supranucleus region of the human lens, a two-fold differentiation factor between AD patients and Control groups is achieved. Data from our studies indicates that deeper regions of the supranucleus provide the highest measures of ligand bound fluorescence signal from both controls and AD patients. Further studies are underway involving a larger population for statistical evaluation of the method.

  9. A Synthetic Peptide with the Putative Iron Binding Motif of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Does Not Catalytically Oxidize Iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honarmand Ebrahimi, K.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    The ?-amyloid precursor protein (APP), which is a key player in Alzheimer's disease, was recently reported to possess an Fe(II) binding site within its E2 domain which exhibits ferroxidase activity [Duce et al. 2010, Cell 142: 857]. The putative ligands of this site were compared to those in the

  10. Expression of active secreted forms of human amyloid beta-protein precursor by recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Bhasin, R; Van Nostrand, W E; Saitoh, T; Donets, M A; Barnes, E A; Quitschke, W W; Goldgaber, D

    1991-01-01

    Three alternatively spliced forms of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), APP-695, APP-751, and APP-770, were expressed in the baculovirus expression vector system. The recombinant proteins were secreted into the culture medium by infected insect cells, and APP molecules were detected in insect cells and medium 2 days after infection with the recombinant APP-baculoviruses. A partial sequence of the NH2 terminus of the secreted protein revealed identity with the native secreted protein and sho...

  11. Acetylcholineestarase-Inhibiting Alkaloids from Lycoris radiata Delay Paralysis of Amyloid Beta-Expressing Transgenic C. elegans CL4176

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Lijuan; Yamujala, Ritupriya; Wang, Yuehu; Wang, Huan; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Lawton, Michael A.; Long, Chunlin; Di, Rong

    2013-01-01

    The limited symptom relief and side effects of current Alzheimer's disease (AD) medications warrant urgent discovery and study of new anti-AD agents. The "cholinergic hypothesis" of AD prompts us to search for plant-derived acetylcholineesterase (AChE) inhibitors such as galanthamine that has been licensed in Europe for AD treatment. We used the unique amyloid β-expressing transgenic C. elegans CL4176, which exhibits paralysis when human Aβ1-42 is induced, to study two natural benzylphenethyl...

  12. Near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging of amyloid beta species and monitoring therapy in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueli; Tian, Yanli; Zhang, Can; Tian, Xiaoyu; Ross, Alana W.; Moir, Robert D.; Sun, Hongbin; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Moore, Anna; Ran, Chongzhao

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) molecular imaging has been widely applied to monitoring therapy of cancer and other diseases in preclinical studies; however, this technology has not been applied successfully to monitoring therapy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although several NIRF probes for detecting amyloid beta (Aβ) species of AD have been reported, none of these probes has been used to monitor changes of Aβs during therapy. In this article, we demonstrated that CRANAD-3, a curcumin analog, is capable of detecting both soluble and insoluble Aβ species. In vivo imaging showed that the NIRF signal of CRANAD-3 from 4-mo-old transgenic AD (APP/PS1) mice was 2.29-fold higher than that from age-matched wild-type mice, indicating that CRANAD-3 is capable of detecting early molecular pathology. To verify the feasibility of CRANAD-3 for monitoring therapy, we first used the fast Aβ-lowering drug LY2811376, a well-characterized beta-amyloid cleaving enzyme-1 inhibitor, to treat APP/PS1 mice. Imaging data suggested that CRANAD-3 could monitor the decrease in Aβs after drug treatment. To validate the imaging capacity of CRANAD-3 further, we used it to monitor the therapeutic effect of CRANAD-17, a curcumin analog for inhibition of Aβ cross-linking. The imaging data indicated that the fluorescence signal in the CRANAD-17–treated group was significantly lower than that in the control group, and the result correlated with ELISA analysis of brain extraction and Aβ plaque counting. It was the first time, to our knowledge, that NIRF was used to monitor AD therapy, and we believe that our imaging technology has the potential to have a high impact on AD drug development. PMID:26199414

  13. Keampferol-3-O-rhamnoside abrogates amyloid beta toxicity by modulating monomers and remodeling oligomers and fibrils to non-toxic aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharoar Md

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggregation of soluble, monomeric β- amyloid (Aβ to oligomeric and then insoluble fibrillar Aβ is a key pathogenic feature in development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Increasing evidence suggests that toxicity is linked to diffusible Aβ oligomers, rather than to insoluble fibrils. The use of naturally occurring small molecules for inhibition of Aβ aggregation has recently attracted significant interest for development of effective therapeutic strategies against the disease. A natural polyphenolic flavone, Kaempferol-3-O-rhamnoside (K-3-rh, was utilized to investigate its effects on aggregation and cytotoxic effects of Aβ42 peptide. Several biochemical techniques were used to determine the conformational changes and cytotoxic effect of the peptide in the presence and absence of K-3-rh. Results K-3-rh showed a dose-dependent effect against Aβ42 mediated cytotoxicity. Anti-amyloidogenic properties of K-3-rh were found to be efficient in inhibiting fibrilogenesis and secondary structural transformation of the peptide. The consequence of these inhibitions was the accumulation of oligomeric structural species. The accumulated aggregates were smaller, soluble, non-β-sheet and non-toxic aggregates, compared to preformed toxic Aβ oligomers. K-3-rh was also found to have the remodeling properties of preformed soluble oligomers and fibrils. Both of these conformers were found to remodel into non-toxic aggregates. The results showed that K-3-rh interacts with different Aβ conformers, which affects fibril formation, oligomeric maturation and fibrillar stabilization. Conclusion K-3-rh is an efficient molecule to hinder the self assembly and to abrogate the cytotoxic effects of Aβ42 peptide. Hence, K-3-rh and small molecules with similar structure might be considered for therapeutic development against AD.

  14. Link Between Affinity and Cu(II) Binding Sites to AmyloidPeptides Evaluated by a New Water-Soluble UV-Visible Ratiometric Dye with a Moderate Cu(II) Affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayen, Stéphanie; Guillon, Emmanuel; Journaux, Yves; Gontard, Geoffrey; Lisnard, Laurent; Hureau, Christelle

    2017-01-01

    Being able to easily determine the Cu(II) affinity for biomolecules of moderate affinity is important. Such biomolecules include amyloidogenic peptides, such as the well-known amyloidpeptide involved in Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we report the synthesis of a new water soluble ratiometric Cu(II) dye with a moderate affinity (109 M-1 at pH 7.1) and the characterizations of the Cu(II) corresponding complex by X-ray crystallography, EPR and XAS spectroscopic methods. UV-Vis competition were performed on the Aβ peptide as well as on a wide series of modified peptides, leading to an affinity value of 1.6 109 M-1 at pH 7.1 for the Aβ peptide and to a coordination model for the Cu(II) site within the Aβ peptide that agrees with the one mostly accepted currently. PMID:28208266

  15. Oligomerization and toxicity of A{beta} fusion proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caine, Joanne M., E-mail: Jo.Caine@csiro.au [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Bharadwaj, Prashant R. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Centre for Excellence for Alzheimer' s Disease Research and Care, School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia (Australia); Sankovich, Sonia E. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D. [The Department of Pathology and Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Streltsov, Victor A.; Varghese, Jose [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering and the Preventive Health Flagship, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} We expressed amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide as a soluble maltose binding protein fusion (MBP-A{beta}42 and MBP-A{beta}16). {yields} The full length A{beta} peptide fusion, MBP-A{beta}42, forms oligomeric species as determined by SDS-PAGE gels, gel filtration and DLS. {yields} The MBP-A{beta}42, but not MBP-A{beta}16 or MBP alone, is toxic to both yeast and mammalian cells as determined by toxicity assays. -- Abstract: This study has found that the Maltose binding protein A{beta}42 fusion protein (MBP-A{beta}42) forms soluble oligomers while the shorter MBP-A{beta}16 fusion and control MBP did not. MBP-A{beta}42, but neither MBP-A{beta}16 nor control MBP, was toxic in a dose-dependent manner in both yeast and primary cortical neuronal cells. This study demonstrates the potential utility of MBP-A{beta}42 as a reagent for drug screening assays in yeast and neuronal cell cultures and as a candidate for further A{beta}42 characterization.

  16. Targeted correction of a thalassemia-associated beta-globin mutation induced by pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonkar, Pallavi; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kuan, Jean Y

    2009-01-01

    Beta-thalassemia is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the beta-globin gene. Triplex-forming oligonucleotides and triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in mammalian cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures...... hindrance, pcPNAs are unable to form pcPNA-pcPNA duplexes but can bind to complementary DNA sequences via double duplex-invasion complexes. We demonstrate here that pcPNAs, when co-transfected with donor DNA fragments, can promote single base pair modification at the start of the second intron of the beta......-globin gene. This was detected by the restoration of proper splicing of transcripts produced from a green fluorescent protein-beta globin fusion gene. We also demonstrate that pcPNAs are effective in stimulating recombination in human fibroblast cells in a manner dependent on the nucleotide excision repair...

  17. Why are Functional Amyloids Non-Toxic in Humans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P. Jackson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Amyloids were first identified in association with amyloidoses, human diseases in which proteins and peptides misfold into amyloid fibrils. Subsequent studies have identified an array of functional amyloid fibrils that perform physiological roles in humans. Given the potential for the production of toxic species in amyloid assembly reactions, it is remarkable that cells can produce these functional amyloids without suffering any obvious ill effect. Although the precise mechanisms are unclear, there are a number of ways in which amyloid toxicity may be prevented. These include regulating the level of the amyloidogenic peptides and proteins, minimising the production of prefibrillar oligomers in amyloid assembly reactions, sequestrating amyloids within membrane bound organelles, controlling amyloid assembly by other molecules, and disassembling the fibrils under physiological conditions. Crucially, a better understanding of how toxicity is avoided in the production of functional amyloids may provide insights into the prevention of amyloid toxicity in amyloidoses.

  18. Negatively charged food additive dye "Allura Red" rapidly induces SDS-soluble amyloid fibril in beta-lactoglobulin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shabib, Nasser Abdulatif; Khan, Javed Masood; Malik, Ajamaluddin; Alsenaidy, Abdulrahman M; Alsenaidy, Mohammad A; Husain, Fohad Mabood; Shamsi, Monis Bilal; Hidayathulla, Syed; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2018-02-01

    Recent studies have led to an increased interest to categorize small molecular inhibitors of protein fibrillation. In this study, we used spectroscopy, microscopy and gel electrophoresis techniques that provides an elaborated description of the Allura Red-induced amyloid fibrillation in the β-LG protein at two pHs (7.4 and 3.5). The spectroscopy results show that β-LG protein form aggregates in the presence of Allura Red (0.04-15.0mM) at pH 3.5 due to electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. However, at pH 7.4, the β-LG does not interact electrostatically with Allura Red and therefore no aggregation occurred. The Allura Red-induced aggregates have an amyloid-like structure that was confirmed by far-UV CD, Congo Red and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The CD spectrum of β-LG contains single minima at ∼218nm, which shifts towards higher wavelength minima at ∼225nm in the presence of Allura Red, characteristics of the cross β-sheet structure. The TEM results suggest that β-LG form long straight fibril when exposed to Allura Red at pH 3.5. The Allura Red-induced amyloid fibril is SDS-soluble confirmed by SDS-PAGE techniques. A far UV CD result shows the conversion of Allura Red induced cross β-sheet structure into alpha-helical structure in the presence of increasing concentration of SDS. The results of this study suggest that the electrostatic, as well as hydrophobic interactions play an important role during Allura Red-induced β-LG fibrillation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. peptide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    The effects on memory formation and cognitive abilities due to injection of amyloid fragments into the brain have been very inconsistent until now. It has been ... determining the molecular basis of the recognition and assembly processes fostering amyloid-fibril formation is a very complicated task. Moreover, the synthesis of ...

  20. Transfer of Copper from an Amyloid to a Natural Copper-Carrier Peptide with a Specific Mediating Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michel; Bijani, Christian; Martins, Nathalie; Meunier, Bernard; Robert, Anne

    2015-11-16

    The oxidative stress that arises from the catalytic reduction of dioxygen by Cu(II/I)-loaded amyloids is the major pathway for neuron death that occurs in Alzheimer's disease. In this work, we show that bis-8(aminoquinoline) ligands, copper(II) specific chelators, are able to catalytically extract Cu(II) from Cu-Aβ1-16 and then completely release Cu(I) in the presence of glutathione to provide a Cu(I)-glutathione complex, a biological intermediate that is able to deliver copper to apo forms of copper-protein complexes. These data demonstrate that bis-8(aminoquinolines) can perform the transfer of copper ions from the pathological Cu-amyloid complexes to regular copper-protein complexes. These copper-specific ligands assist GSH to recycle Cu(I) in an AD brain and consequently slow down oxidative damage that is due to copper dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease. Under the same conditions, we have shown that the copper complex of PBT2, a mono(8-hydroxyquinoline) previously used as a drug candidate, does not efficiently release copper in the presence of GSH. In addition, we report that GSH itself was unable to fully abstract copper ions from Cu-β-amyloid complexes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. The architecture of amyloid-like peptide fibrils revealed by X-ray scattering, diffraction and electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annette Eva; Morris, Kyle L; Serpell, Louise C

    2015-01-01

    hierarchical layer is generated via the pairing of ribbons during fibril maturation. Based on the complementary data, a quasi-atomic resolution model of the protofilament peptide arrangement is suggested. The peptide structure appears in a β-sheet arrangement reminiscent of the β-zipper structures evident from...

  2. Evaluation of the Expression of Amyloid Precursor Protein and the Ratio of Secreted Amyloid Beta 42 to Amyloid Beta 40 in SH-SY5Y Cells Stably Transfected with Wild-Type, Single-Mutant and Double-Mutant Forms of the APP Gene for the Study of Alzheimer's Disease Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahrudin Arrozi, Aslina; Shukri, Siti Nur Syazwani; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Ahmad Damanhuri, Mohd Hanafi; Makpol, Suzana

    2017-11-01

    Neuroblastoma cell lines such as SH-SY5Y are the most frequently utilized models in neurodegenerative research, and their use has advanced the understanding of the pathology of neurodegeneration over the past few decades. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), several pathogenic mutations have been described, all of which cause elevated levels of pathological hallmarks such as amyloid-beta (Aβ). Although the genetics of Alzheimer's disease is well known, familial AD only accounts for a small number of cases in the population, with the rest being sporadic AD, which contains no known mutations. Currently, most of the in vitro models used to study AD pathogenesis only examine the level of Aβ42 as a confirmation of successful model generation and only perform comparisons between wild-type APP and single mutants of the APP gene. Recent findings have shown that the Aβ42/40 ratio in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a better diagnostic indicator for AD patients than is Aβ42 alone and that more extensive Aβ formation, such as accumulation of intraneuronal Aβ, Aβ plaques, soluble oligomeric Aβ (oAβ), and insoluble fibrillar Aβ (fAβ) occurs in TgCRND8 mice expressing a double-mutant form (Swedish and Indiana) of APP, later leading to greater progressive impairment of the brain. In this study, we generated SH-SY5Y cells stably transfected separately with wild-type APP, the Swedish mutation of APP, and the Swedish and Indiana mutations of APP and evaluated the APP expression as well as the Aβ42/40 ratio in those cells. The double-mutant form of APP (Swedish/Indiana) expressed markedly high levels of APP protein and showed a high Aβ2/40 ratio compared to wild-type and single-mutant cells.

  3. Yeast red pigment modifies Amyloid beta growth in Alzheimer disease models in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevzglyadova, Olga V; Mikhailova, Ekaterina V; Amen, Triana R; Zenin, Valeriy V; Artemov, Alexey V; Kostyleva, Elena I; Mezhenskaya, Daria A; Rodin, Dmitry I; Saifitdinova, Alsu F; Khodorkovskii, Mikhail A; Sarantseva, Svetlana V; Soidla, Tonu R

    2015-01-01

    The effect of yeast red pigment on amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation and fibril growth was studied in yeasts, fruit flies and in vitro. Yeast strains accumulating red pigment (red strains) contained less amyloid and had better survival rates compared to isogenic strains without red pigment accumulation (white strains). Confocal and fluorescent microscopy was used to visualise fluorescent Aβ-GFP aggregates. Yeast cells containing less red pigment had more Aβ-GFP aggregates despite the lower level of overall GFP fluorescence. Western blot analysis with anti-GFP, anti-Aβ and A11 antibodies also revealed that red cells contained a considerably lower amount of Aβ GFP aggregates as compared to white cells. Similar results were obtained with exogenous red pigment that was able to penetrate yeast cells. In vitro experiments with thioflavine and TEM showed that red pigment effectively decreased Aβ fibril growth. Transgenic flies expressing Aβ were cultivated on medium containing red and white isogenic yeast strains. Flies cultivated on red strains had a significant decrease in Aβ accumulation levels and brain neurodegeneration. They also demonstrated better memory and learning indexes and higher locomotor ability.

  4. GM1 Ganglioside Inhibits β-Amyloid Oligomerization Induced by Sphingomyelin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Amaro, Mariana; Šachl, Radek; Aydogan, Gokcan; Mikhalyov, I.; Vácha, R.; Hof, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 32 (2016), s. 9411-9415 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : amyloid beta-peptides * Alzheimer's disease * diffusion coefficients Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 11.994, year: 2016

  5. GM1 Ganglioside Inhibits β-Amyloid Oligomerization Induced by Sphingomyelin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Amaro, Mariana; Šachl, Radek; Aydogan, Gokcan; Mikhalyov, I.; Vácha, R.; Hof, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 32 (2016), s. 9411-9415 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : amyloid beta-peptides * Alzheimer's disease * diffusion coefficients Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; The oretical Chemistry Impact factor: 11.994, year: 2016

  6. Label-free detection of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ40 and Aβ42): a colorimetric sensor array for plasma monitoring of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Forough; Hormozi-Nezhad, M Reza; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2018-04-05

    Monitoring the ratio of 40- and 42-residue amyloid β peptides (i.e., Aβ40 and Aβ42) in human plasma is considered one of the hallmarks of detection of the early stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, development of a specific, yet non-antibody-based method for simultaneous detection of Aβ40 and Aβ42 may have considerable clinical applications. Here, we developed a 'nanoparticle-based colorimetric sensor array' utilizing label-free gold and silver nanoparticles for visual detection of Aβ42 and Aβ40. Different aggregation behaviors of nanoparticles through their conjugation with Aβ42 and Aβ40 followed by the coordination of Aβ42 and Aβ40 with Cu(ii) led to diverse spectral and color changes. The spectral changes were quantitatively differentiated by a supervised pattern recognition approach, linear discriminant analysis (LDA). The proposed sensor array was able to discriminate among Aβ42, Aβ40, and HSA in different concentrations (50 nmol L-1 to 500 nmol L-1) and their mixtures. Moreover, the sensor array had the capability to identify structurally similar Aβ peptides in human plasma samples. The developed sensor array technology might pave the way for a cheap and rapid, yet robust, platform for high-throughput screening of human plasma for defining the at-risk population for AD.

  7. 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR attenuates the expression of LPS- and Aβ peptide-induced inflammatory mediators in astroglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giri Shailendra

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology shows characteristic 'plaques' rich in amyloid beta (Aβ peptide deposits. Inflammatory process-related proteins such as pro-inflammatory cytokines have been detected in AD brain suggesting that an inflammatory immune reaction also plays a role in the pathogenesis of AD. Glial cells in culture respond to LPS and Aβ stimuli by upregulating the expression of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, and also the expression of proinflammatory genes iNOS and COX-2. We have earlier reported that LPS/Aβ stimulation-induced ceramide and ROS generation leads to iNOS expression and nitric oxide production in glial cells. The present study was undertaken to investigate the neuroprotective function of AICAR (a potent activator of AMP-activated protein kinase in blocking the pro-oxidant/proinflammatory responses induced in primary glial cultures treated with LPS and Aβ peptide. Methods To test the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidant functions of AICAR, we tested its inhibitory potential in blocking the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and iNOS, expression of COX-2, generation of ROS, and associated signaling following treatment of glial cells with LPS and Aβ peptide. We also investigated the neuroprotective effects of AICAR against the effects of cytokines and inflammatory mediators (released by the glia, in blocking neurite outgrowth inhibition, and in nerve growth factor-(NGF induced neurite extension by PC-12 cells. Results AICAR blocked LPS/Aβ-induced inflammatory processes by blocking the expression of proinflammatory cytokine, iNOS, COX-2 and MnSOD genes, and by inhibition of ROS generation and depletion of glutathione in astroglial cells. AICAR also inhibited down-stream signaling leading to the regulation of transcriptional factors such as NFκB and C/EBP which are critical for the expression of iNOS, COX-2, MnSOD and cytokines (TNF-α/IL-1β and IL-6. AICAR promoted NGF-induced neurite growth

  8. Improved targeting of the alpha(v)beta (3) integrin by multimerisation of RGD peptides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, I.; Kruijtzer, J.A.; Liu, S.; Soede, A.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Liskamp, R.M.; Boerman, O.C.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: The integrin alpha(v)beta(3) is expressed on sprouting endothelial cells and on various tumour cell types. Due to the restricted expression of alpha(v)beta(3) in tumours, alpha(v)beta(3) is considered a suitable receptor for tumour targeting. In this study the alpha(v)beta(3) binding

  9. Curcumin Improves Amyloid β-Peptide (1-42) Induced Spatial Memory Deficits through BDNF-ERK Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Fang, Yu; Xu, Yuming; Lian, Yajun; Xie, Nanchang; Wu, Tianwen; Zhang, Haifeng; Sun, Limin; Zhang, Ruifang; Wang, Zhenhua

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin, the most active component of turmeric, has various beneficial properties, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor effects. Previous studies have suggested that curcumin reduces the levels of amyloid and oxidized proteins and prevents memory deficits and thus is beneficial to patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying curcumin's effect on cognitive functions are not well-understood. In the present study, we examined the working memory and spatial reference memory in rats that received a ventricular injection of amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ1-42), representing a rodent model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The rats treated with Aβ1-42 exhibited obvious cognitive deficits in behavioral tasks. Chronic (seven consecutive days, once per day) but not acute (once a day) curcumin treatments (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) improved the cognitive functions in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the beneficial effect of curcumin is accompanied by increased BDNF levels and elevated levels of phosphorylated ERK in the hippocampus. Furthermore, the cognition enhancement effect of curcumin could be mimicked by the overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus and blocked by either bilateral hippocampal injections with lentiviruses that express BDNF shRNA or a microinjection of ERK inhibitor. These findings suggest that chronic curcumin ameliorates AD-related cognitive deficits and that upregulated BDNF-ERK signaling in the hippocampus may underlie the cognitive improvement produced by curcumin.

  10. Imaging characteristic of dual-phase 18F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET for the concomitant detection of perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Kun-Ju; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Hsu, Jung-Lung; Huang, Chin-Chang; Huang, Kuo-Lun

    2016-01-01

    We investigated dual-phase 18 F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET imaging for the concomitant detection of brain perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and in cognitively healthy controls (HCs). A total of 82 subjects (24 AD patients, 44 MCI patients and 14 HCs) underwent both dual-phase 18 F-AV-45 PET and MRI imaging. Dual-phase dynamic PET imaging consisted of (1) five 1-min scans obtained 1 - 6 min after tracer injection (perfusion 18 F-AV-45 imaging, pAV-45), and (2) ten 1-min scans obtained 50 - 60 min after tracer injection (amyloid 18 F-AV-45 imaging). Amyloid-negative MCI/AD patients were excluded. Volume of interest analysis and statistical parametric mapping of pAV-45 and 18 F-AV-45 images were performed to investigate the perfusion deficits and the beta-amyloid burden in the three study groups. The associations between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and global perfusion deficits and amyloid deposition were investigated with linear and segmental linear correlation analyses. HCs generally had normal pAV-45 findings, whereas perfusion deficits were evident in the hippocampus, and temporal, parietal and middle frontal cortices in both MCI and AD patients. The motor-sensory cortex was relatively preserved. MMSE scores in the entire study cohort were significantly associated with the degree of perfusion impairment as assessed by pAV-45 imaging (r = 0.5156, P < 0.0001). 18 F-AV-45 uptake was significantly higher in AD patients than in the two other study groups. However, the correlation between MMSE scores and 18 F-AV-45 uptake in MCI patients was more of a binary phenomenon and began in MCI patients with MMSE score 23.14 when 18 F-AV-45 uptake was higher and MMSE score lower than in patients with early MCI. Amyloid deposition started in the precuneus and the frontal and temporal regions in early MCI, ultimately reaching the maximum burden in advanced

  11. Imaging characteristic of dual-phase (18)F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET for the concomitant detection of perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun-Ju; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Hsu, Jung-Lung; Huang, Chin-Chang; Huang, Kuo-Lun; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-07-01

    We investigated dual-phase (18)F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET imaging for the concomitant detection of brain perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and in cognitively healthy controls (HCs). A total of 82 subjects (24 AD patients, 44 MCI patients and 14 HCs) underwent both dual-phase (18)F-AV-45 PET and MRI imaging. Dual-phase dynamic PET imaging consisted of (1) five 1-min scans obtained 1 - 6 min after tracer injection (perfusion (18)F-AV-45 imaging, pAV-45), and (2) ten 1-min scans obtained 50 - 60 min after tracer injection (amyloid (18)F-AV-45 imaging). Amyloid-negative MCI/AD patients were excluded. Volume of interest analysis and statistical parametric mapping of pAV-45 and (18)F-AV-45 images were performed to investigate the perfusion deficits and the beta-amyloid burden in the three study groups. The associations between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and global perfusion deficits and amyloid deposition were investigated with linear and segmental linear correlation analyses. HCs generally had normal pAV-45 findings, whereas perfusion deficits were evident in the hippocampus, and temporal, parietal and middle frontal cortices in both MCI and AD patients. The motor-sensory cortex was relatively preserved. MMSE scores in the entire study cohort were significantly associated with the degree of perfusion impairment as assessed by pAV-45 imaging (r = 0.5156, P AV-45 uptake was significantly higher in AD patients than in the two other study groups. However, the correlation between MMSE scores and (18)F-AV-45 uptake in MCI patients was more of a binary phenomenon and began in MCI patients with MMSE score 23.14 when (18)F-AV-45 uptake was higher and MMSE score lower than in patients with early MCI. Amyloid deposition started in the precuneus and the frontal and temporal regions in early MCI, ultimately reaching the maximum burden in

  12. Imaging characteristic of dual-phase {sup 18}F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET for the concomitant detection of perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Kun-Ju; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung; Hsieh, Chia-Ju; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences and Healthy Aging Research Center, Taoyuan (China); Hsu, Jung-Lung [Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Section of Dementia and Cognitive Impairment, Department of Neurology, Taoyuan (China); Taipei Medical University, Graduate Institute of Humanities in Medicine, Taipei (China); Huang, Chin-Chang; Huang, Kuo-Lun [Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and University, Department of Neurology, Taoyuan (China)

    2016-07-15

    We investigated dual-phase {sup 18}F-florbetapir (AV-45/Amyvid) PET imaging for the concomitant detection of brain perfusion deficits and beta-amyloid deposition in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and in cognitively healthy controls (HCs). A total of 82 subjects (24 AD patients, 44 MCI patients and 14 HCs) underwent both dual-phase {sup 18}F-AV-45 PET and MRI imaging. Dual-phase dynamic PET imaging consisted of (1) five 1-min scans obtained 1 - 6 min after tracer injection (perfusion {sup 18}F-AV-45 imaging, pAV-45), and (2) ten 1-min scans obtained 50 - 60 min after tracer injection (amyloid {sup 18}F-AV-45 imaging). Amyloid-negative MCI/AD patients were excluded. Volume of interest analysis and statistical parametric mapping of pAV-45 and {sup 18}F-AV-45 images were performed to investigate the perfusion deficits and the beta-amyloid burden in the three study groups. The associations between Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores and global perfusion deficits and amyloid deposition were investigated with linear and segmental linear correlation analyses. HCs generally had normal pAV-45 findings, whereas perfusion deficits were evident in the hippocampus, and temporal, parietal and middle frontal cortices in both MCI and AD patients. The motor-sensory cortex was relatively preserved. MMSE scores in the entire study cohort were significantly associated with the degree of perfusion impairment as assessed by pAV-45 imaging (r = 0.5156, P < 0.0001). {sup 18}F-AV-45 uptake was significantly higher in AD patients than in the two other study groups. However, the correlation between MMSE scores and {sup 18}F-AV-45 uptake in MCI patients was more of a binary phenomenon and began in MCI patients with MMSE score 23.14 when {sup 18}F-AV-45 uptake was higher and MMSE score lower than in patients with early MCI. Amyloid deposition started in the precuneus and the frontal and temporal regions in early MCI, ultimately

  13. How can a beta-sheet peptide be both a potent antimicrobial and harmfully toxic? Molecular dynamics simulations of protegrin-1 in micelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langham, Allison A; Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the naturally occurring beta-hairpin antimicrobial peptide protegrin-1 (PG-1) is studied by molecular dynamics simulation in all-atom sodium dodecylsulfate and dodecylphosphocholine micelles. These simulations provide a high-resolution picture of the interactions between the peptide...

  14. The effect of cognitive-motor dual-task training on cognitive function and plasma amyloid ? peptide 42/40 ratio in healthy elderly persons: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Hisayo; Okazaki, Kazunobu; Imai, Daiki; Yamashina, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Ryosuke; Naghavi, Nooshin; Ota, Akemi; Hirasawa, Yoshikazu; Miyagawa, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical activity reduces the incidence and progression of cognitive impairment. Cognitive-motor dual-task training, which requires dividing attention between cognitive tasks and exercise, may improve various cognitive domains; therefore, we examined the effect of dual-task training on the executive functions and on plasma amyloid ? peptide (A?) 42/40 ratio, a potent biomarker of Alzheimer?s disease, in healthy elderly people. Methods Twenty-seven sedentary elderly people participa...

  15. Beta-endorphin chimeric peptides: Transport through the blood-brain barrier in vivo and cleavage of disulfide linkage by brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardridge, W.M.; Triguero, D.; Buciak, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Water soluble peptides are normally not transported through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Chimeric peptides may be transportable through the BBB and are formed by the covalent coupling of a nontransportable peptide to a transportable peptide vector, e.g. cationized albumin, using disulfide-based coupling reagents such as N-succinimidyl 3-[2-pyridyldithio(propionate)] (SPDP). The transcytosis of peptide into brain parenchyma, as opposed to vascular sequestration of blood-borne peptide, was quantified using an internal carotid artery perfusion/capillary depletion method. It is shown that [125I]beta-endorphin is not transported through the BBB, but is rapidly cleaved to free [125I] tyrosine via capillary peptidase. Therefore, chimeric peptide was prepared using [125I] [D-Ala2]beta-endorphin (DABE), owing to the resistance of this analogue to peptidase degradation. The [125I] DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide is shown to enter brain parenchyma at a rate comparable to that reported previously for unconjugated cationized albumin. When the [125I] DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide was incubated with rat brain homogenate at 37 C, the free [125I] DABE was liberated from the cationized albumin conjugate prior to its subsequent degradation into free [125I] tyrosine. Approximately 50% of the chimeric peptide was cleaved within 60 sec of incubation at 37 C. These studies demonstrate that (1) [125I]beta-endorphin is not transported through the BBB in its unconjugated form, (2) a [125I] DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide is transported through the BBB into brain parenchyma at a rate comparable to the unconjugated cationized albumin, and (3) brain contains the necessary disulfide reductases for rapid cleavage of the chimeric peptide into free beta-endorphin and this cleavage occurs before degradation of the [125I] DABE into [125I] tyrosine

  16. Beta-endorphin chimeric peptides: Transport through the blood-brain barrier in vivo and cleavage of disulfide linkage by brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardridge, W.M.; Triguero, D.; Buciak, J.L. (UCLA School of Medicine (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Water soluble peptides are normally not transported through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Chimeric peptides may be transportable through the BBB and are formed by the covalent coupling of a nontransportable peptide to a transportable peptide vector, e.g. cationized albumin, using disulfide-based coupling reagents such as N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio(propionate)) (SPDP). The transcytosis of peptide into brain parenchyma, as opposed to vascular sequestration of blood-borne peptide, was quantified using an internal carotid artery perfusion/capillary depletion method. It is shown that (125I)beta-endorphin is not transported through the BBB, but is rapidly cleaved to free (125I) tyrosine via capillary peptidase. Therefore, chimeric peptide was prepared using (125I) (D-Ala2)beta-endorphin (DABE), owing to the resistance of this analogue to peptidase degradation. The (125I) DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide is shown to enter brain parenchyma at a rate comparable to that reported previously for unconjugated cationized albumin. When the (125I) DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide was incubated with rat brain homogenate at 37 C, the free (125I) DABE was liberated from the cationized albumin conjugate prior to its subsequent degradation into free (125I) tyrosine. Approximately 50% of the chimeric peptide was cleaved within 60 sec of incubation at 37 C. These studies demonstrate that (1) (125I)beta-endorphin is not transported through the BBB in its unconjugated form, (2) a (125I) DABE-cationized albumin chimeric peptide is transported through the BBB into brain parenchyma at a rate comparable to the unconjugated cationized albumin, and (3) brain contains the necessary disulfide reductases for rapid cleavage of the chimeric peptide into free beta-endorphin and this cleavage occurs before degradation of the (125I) DABE into (125I) tyrosine.

  17. Acetylcholineestarase-inhibiting alkaloids from Lycoris radiata delay paralysis of amyloid beta-expressing transgenic C. elegans CL4176.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Xin

    Full Text Available The limited symptom relief and side effects of current Alzheimer's disease (AD medications warrant urgent discovery and study of new anti-AD agents. The "cholinergic hypothesis" of AD prompts us to search for plant-derived acetylcholineesterase (AChE inhibitors such as galanthamine that has been licensed in Europe for AD treatment. We used the unique amyloid β-expressing transgenic C. elegans CL4176, which exhibits paralysis when human Aβ1-42 is induced, to study two natural benzylphenethylamine alkaloids isolated from Lycoris radiata (L' Her. Herb, galanthamine and haemanthidine, and their synthetic derivatives 1,2-Di-O-acetyllycorine and 1-O-acetyllycorine for their anti-paralysis effects. Our data indicate that these Lycoris compounds effectively delay the paralysis of CL4176 worms upon temperature up-shift, and prolong the lives of these transgenic worms. Lycoris compounds were shown to significantly inhibit the gene expression of ace-1 and ace-2. Additionally, the Lycoris compounds may modulate inflammatory and stress-related gene expressions to combat the Aβ-toxicity in C. elegans.

  18. Acetylcholineestarase-inhibiting alkaloids from Lycoris radiata delay paralysis of amyloid beta-expressing transgenic C. elegans CL4176.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Lijuan; Yamujala, Ritupriya; Wang, Yuehu; Wang, Huan; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Lawton, Michael A; Long, Chunlin; Di, Rong

    2013-01-01

    The limited symptom relief and side effects of current Alzheimer's disease (AD) medications warrant urgent discovery and study of new anti-AD agents. The "cholinergic hypothesis" of AD prompts us to search for plant-derived acetylcholineesterase (AChE) inhibitors such as galanthamine that has been licensed in Europe for AD treatment. We used the unique amyloid β-expressing transgenic C. elegans CL4176, which exhibits paralysis when human Aβ1-42 is induced, to study two natural benzylphenethylamine alkaloids isolated from Lycoris radiata (L' Her.) Herb, galanthamine and haemanthidine, and their synthetic derivatives 1,2-Di-O-acetyllycorine and 1-O-acetyllycorine for their anti-paralysis effects. Our data indicate that these Lycoris compounds effectively delay the paralysis of CL4176 worms upon temperature up-shift, and prolong the lives of these transgenic worms. Lycoris compounds were shown to significantly inhibit the gene expression of ace-1 and ace-2. Additionally, the Lycoris compounds may modulate inflammatory and stress-related gene expressions to combat the Aβ-toxicity in C. elegans.

  19. Treadmill exercise improves short-term memory by enhancing neurogenesis in amyloid beta-induced Alzheimer disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo-Kyun; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Baek, Sang-Bin; Ko, Yeong-Chan; Kim, Young-Pyo

    2014-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most devastating neurodegenerative disorders, and this disease is characterized by severe memory impairment and decline of cognition. Hippocampal neurons are vulnerable to injury induced by Alzheimer's disease. Physical exercise is known to promote cell survival and functional recovery after brain injuries. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on short-term memory in relation with neurogenesis in the rats with amyloid β25-35 (Aβ25-35)-induced Alzheimer's disease. The rat model of Alzheimer's disease was induced by the intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of Aβ25-35, using a stereotaxic instrument. The rats in the exercise group were forced to run on a treadmill for 30 min once daily for 4 consecutive weeks, starting 2 days after Aβ25-35 injection. Presently, short-term memory was deteriorated and apical dendritic length in the hippocampus was shortened in the hippocampus by Aβ25-35 injection. In contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated memory impairment and increased apical dendritic length in the Aβ25-35-injected rats. Neurogenesis and brain-derived neurotorphic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (trkB) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by Aβ25-35 injection. Treadmill exercise increased neurogenesis and expressions of BDNF and trkB expressions. The present study shows that treadmill exercise may provide therapeutic value for the alleviating symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Amyloid-beta (Aβ₁₋₄₂)-induced paralysis in Caenorhabditis elegans is inhibited by the polyphenol quercetin through activation of protein degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regitz, Charlotte; Dußling, Lisa Marie; Wenzel, Uwe

    2014-10-01

    Dietary polyphenols are suggested to play a role in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease, of which accumulation of aggregated beta amyloid (Aβ) is a key histopathological hallmark. We used the transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strain CL2006, which expresses human Aβ₁₋₄₂ under control of a muscle-specific promoter and responds to Aβ₁₋₄₂ aggregation with paralysis, to test effects of the polyphenol quercetin on the phenotype. Quercetin dose-dependently decreased the amount of aggregated proteins in solution and also paralysis in CL2006. The knockdown of key components of unfolded protein response in mitochondria or the endoplasmic reticulum by RN